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Sample records for nursing assistant licensed

  1. Feelings about Nursing Assistants that Enhance the Work Motivation of Japanese Registered Nurses and Licensed Practical Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Yasushi; Kono, Keiko; Kume, Ryuko; Matsuhashi, Ayako; Tsutsumi, Akizumi

    Registered nurses and licensed practical nurses have received professional education, but to enhance their work motivation it is necessary to create work environments in which they can concentrate on their jobs as specialists. One of the methods to develop such work environments is to use nursing assistants effectively. We investigated professional nurses' feelings toward nursing assistants and then examined the associations between those feelings and their work motivation. The analyzed subjects were 2,170 female nurses working in 25 hospitals with from 55 to 458 beds. The average age of the respondents was 38.0 (standard deviation, 10.6 years). Factor analyses extracted four factors of professional nurses' feelings toward nursing assistants: 1. knowledge related to healthcare, 2. nursing assistants' attitudes toward work, 3. human relations, and 4. distinguishing between professional nurses' work and nursing assistants' work. Using multiple linear regression analysis, our results revealed that scores of maintaining a high motivation to work thanks to nursing assistants became lower as the ages of the respondents increased. Scores of maintaining a high motivation to work thanks to nursing assistants became higher as professional nurses gained satisfaction from: knowledge related to healthcare, nursing assistants' attitudes toward work, and human relations. Hospital managers should consider these findings to improve working environments in which professional nurses can feel motivated to work.

  2. International assistance. Licensing assistance project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleev, A.

    1999-01-01

    Description of licensing assistance project for VATESI is presented. In licensing of unit No.1 of INPP VATESI is supported by many western countries. Experts from regulatory bodies or scientific organizations of those countries assist VATESI staff in reviewing documentation presented by INPP. Among bilateral cooperation support is provided by European Commission through Phare programme

  3. How registered nurses, licensed practical nurses and resident aides spend time in nursing homes: An observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCloskey, Rose; Donovan, Cindy; Stewart, Connie; Donovan, Alicia

    2015-09-01

    Calls for improved conditions in nursing homes have pointed to the importance of optimizing the levels and skills of care providers. Understanding the work of care providers will help to determine if staff are being used to their full potential and if opportunities exist for improved efficiencies. To explore the activities of care providers in different nursing homes and to identify if variations exist within and across homes and shifts. A multi-centre cross-sectional observational work flow study was conducted in seven different nursing homes sites in one Canadian province. Data were collected by a research assistant who conducted 368 h of observation. The research assistant collected data by following an identical route in each site and recording observations on staff activities. Findings indicate staff activities vary across roles, sites and shifts. Licensed practical nurses (nursing assistants) have the greatest variation in their role while registered nurses have the least amount of variability. In some sites both registered nurses and licensed practical nurses perform activities that may be safely delegated to others. Care providers spend as much as 53.7% of their time engaged in non-value added activities. There may be opportunities for registered nurses and licensed practical nurses to delegate some of their activities to non-regulated workers. The time care providers spend in non-value activities suggest there may be opportunities to improve efficiencies within the nursing home setting. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Generational differences among newly licensed registered nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keepnews, David M; Brewer, Carol S; Kovner, Christine T; Shin, Juh Hyun

    2010-01-01

    Responses of 2369 newly licensed registered nurses from 3 generational cohorts-Baby Boomers, Generation X, and Generation Y-were studied to identify differences in their characteristics, work-related experiences, and attitudes. These responses revealed significant differences among generations in: job satisfaction, organizational commitment, work motivation, work-to-family conflict, family-to-work conflict, distributive justice, promotional opportunities, supervisory support, mentor support, procedural justice, and perceptions of local job opportunities. Health organizations and their leaders need to anticipate intergenerational differences among newly licensed nurses and should provide for supportive working environments that recognize those differences. Orientation and residency programs for newly licensed nurses should be tailored to the varying needs of different generations. Future research should focus on evaluating the effectiveness of orientation and residency programs with regard to different generations so that these programs can be tailored to meet the varying needs of newly licensed nurses at the start of their careers. Copyright 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [Burnout syndrome in licensed nurses. Approaches for a debate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de los Ríos-Castillo, José Lauro; Barrios-Santiago, Pedro; Ocampo-Mancilla, Mariano; Avila-Rojas, Teresa Luzeldy

    2007-01-01

    The burnout syndrome (BS) is characterized by emotional fatigue, loss of personal identity and loss of personal realization feelings. BS is frequent among professionals that assist people (health care workers) and among those that have interpersonal contact; the occupational characteristics are among BS contributing factors. The objective was to ascertain BS prevalence among nurses affiliated to the San Luis Potosí General Hospital. A cross-sectional survey was carried out with a groups of nurses who gave their informed consent to participate. The Brief Questionnaire of Burnout version standardized for Mexico was used to collect the information. This version explores the following areas: emotional fatigue, loss of personal identity and personal realization. Also, participants answered three questionnaires about their socio-demographic characteristics, occupational satisfaction, family variables and emotional dysfunction. 70 licensed nurses participated. The BS was common among participants. Some variables related to BS were: age older than 30 years, being female, being married, housekeeping work, absenteeism due to illness, serious depression and occupational dissatisfaction. Nurses working at the emergency room and in critical care services had BS more often. The burnout syndrome has a high prevalence among licensed nurses. Interventions to decrease and to avert BS are needed.

  6. Workplace Violence and Job Outcomes of Newly Licensed Nurses

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Hyoung Eun; Cho, Sung-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence of workplace violence toward newly licensed nurses and the relationship between workplace violence and job outcomes. Methods: An online survey was conducted of newly licensed registered nurses who had obtained their license in 2012 or 2013 in South Korea and had been working for 5–12 months after first being employed. The sample consisted of 312 nurses working in hospitals or clinics. The Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire...

  7. Yucca Mountain licensing support network archive assistant.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunlavy, Daniel M.; Bauer, Travis L.; Verzi, Stephen J.; Basilico, Justin Derrick; Shaneyfelt, Wendy

    2008-03-01

    This report describes the Licensing Support Network (LSN) Assistant--a set of tools for categorizing e-mail messages and documents, and investigating and correcting existing archives of categorized e-mail messages and documents. The two main tools in the LSN Assistant are the LSN Archive Assistant (LSNAA) tool for recategorizing manually labeled e-mail messages and documents and the LSN Realtime Assistant (LSNRA) tool for categorizing new e-mail messages and documents. This report focuses on the LSNAA tool. There are two main components of the LSNAA tool. The first is the Sandia Categorization Framework, which is responsible for providing categorizations for documents in an archive and storing them in an appropriate Categorization Database. The second is the actual user interface, which primarily interacts with the Categorization Database, providing a way for finding and correcting categorizations errors in the database. A procedure for applying the LSNAA tool and an example use case of the LSNAA tool applied to a set of e-mail messages are provided. Performance results of the categorization model designed for this example use case are presented.

  8. Job and industry turnover for registered and licensed vocational nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spetz, Joanne; Rickles, Jordan; Chapman, Susan; Ong, Paul M

    2008-09-01

    Most studies of nurse turnover focus on job turnover, which could reflect nurse advancement and thus not be detrimental to the workforce. The authors discuss findings from a study that involved 2 cohorts of graduates from registered nursing and licensed vocational nursing community college programs in California. The duration of employment in the healthcare industry, as well as with specific employers, is tracked, lending a more thorough analysis of nursing job and industry turnover than found in other studies.

  9. Experiences of rural and remote nurses assisting with disasters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulig, Judith C; Penz, Kelly; Karunanayake, Chandima; MacLeod, Martha L P; Jahner, Sharleen; Andrews, Mary Ellen

    2017-05-01

    Globally, disasters are on the rise. Nurses play a significant role in responding to such events but little is known about rural and remote nurses' experiences. A national cross-sectional survey of regulated nurses (registered nurses, registered psychiatric nurses, licensed practical nurses and nurse practitioners) in rural and remote Canada provided the data (n=2465) for the logistic regression of predictors of assisting with a disaster event within the last five years. The types of disaster events were also examined and open-ended responses were explored to reveal nurses' perspectives. Nurse type, age, region of employment, employment status, number of rural communities worked, distance to advanced referral centre, remote community, personal-professional boundaries, burnout and work engagement were significant factors related to assisting with a disaster event. Open-ended data alluded to the importance of pre-disaster preparation, and the difficulties experienced when personal-professional relationships are impacted during a disaster. Nursing education curricula needs to include information about disasters and the nurse's role. Continuing education opportunities and preparation for nurses should be offered in the workplace. Psychosocial supports to assist rural nurses who attend to disasters in their workplace will help them deal with issues such as the blurring of personal-professional relationships. Copyright © 2017 College of Emergency Nursing Australasia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Assisted suicide: implications for nurses and nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, B J; Berry, D; Fitzpatrick, J J; Drew, B; Montgomery, K

    1997-01-01

    Assisted suicide is an issue of great importance to nurses. This issue reflects our values and beliefs as a society, calls for a clear and precise response as a profession, and challenges individual nurses to think about their own moral views. The history of the debate and the compelling moral arguments on both sides attest to the complexity of the issue and also suggest that it will not soon be resolved. The current position of the profession, as expressed in the ANA Code for Nurses and a specific position statement, were reviewed. The dilemma faced by the individual nurse who perceives an obligation to adhere to the guidelines specified by his or her profession's code and yet whose conscience dictates an act in violation of this code has been discussed as an instance of conscientious objection. While this analysis has been necessarily brief, it was intended to illustrate the importance of being clear about one's personal moral views and equally clear about one's duty to fulfil the obligations stemming from the profession's public statements. It is essential that the profession continue to explore the moral issues involved in requests for assistance in dying and provide additional guidelines for practicing nurses, with sound rationale for the profession's position.

  11. Job satisfaction of nursing assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Nancy; Resnick, Barbara; Galik, Elizabeth; Flynn, Linda

    2011-11-01

    This secondary data analysis explored factors influencing job satisfaction in a sample of nursing assistants employed in Maryland skilled nursing facilities. Multiple factors have been shown to affect job satisfaction and turnover in nursing assistants (NAs), but the problem of turnover persists in skilled nursing facility environments affecting quality of care. An existing data set of 556 nursing assistants from 12 Maryland skilled nursing facilities was used. To explore factors found to influence job satisfaction from other studies, a multiple regression analysis was performed. Nine dependent variables previously shown to affect job satisfaction were used. Of these variables, only years of experience (β = .230) and performance of restorative care (β = .095) were found to be positively associated with job satisfaction. Self-esteem (β = -.094) was found to be negatively associated with job satisfaction. Only length of experience and exemplary care as evidenced by the performance of restorative care were associated with job satisfaction. These results mirror results found in other studies. Self-esteem was negatively associated with job satisfaction in this population, a finding needing further study. Copyright © 2011 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

  12. Nursing home work practices and nursing assistants' job satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Christine E; Squillace, Marie R; Meagher, Jennifer; Anderson, Wayne L; Wiener, Joshua M

    2009-10-01

    To estimate the impact of nursing home work practices, specifically compensation and working conditions, on job satisfaction of nursing assistants employed in nursing homes. Data are from the 2004 National Nursing Assistant Survey, responses by the nursing assistants' employers to the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey, and county-level data from the Area Resource File. Multinomial logistic regression was used to estimate effects of compensation and working conditions on nursing assistants' overall job satisfaction, controlling for personal characteristics and local labor market characteristics. Wages, benefits, and job demands, measured by the ratio of nursing assistant hours per resident day, were associated with job satisfaction. Consistent with previous studies, job satisfaction was greater when nursing assistants felt respected and valued by their employers and had good relationships with supervisors. Nursing assistants were more satisfied when they had enough time to complete their work, when their work was challenging, when they were not subject to mandatory overtime, and where food was not delivered to residents on trays. This is the first investigation of nursing assistant job satisfaction using a nationally representative sample of nursing assistants matched to information about their employing nursing homes. The findings corroborate results of previous studies in showing that compensation and working conditions that provide respect, good relationships with supervisors, and better staffing levels are important to nursing assistant job satisfaction.

  13. [Impact of Increased Supply of Newly Licensed Nurses on Hospital Nurse Staffing and Policy Implications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yunmi; You, Sunju; Kim, Jinhyun

    2017-12-01

    This study aimed to analyze the impact of increasing the supply of newly licensed nurses on improving the hospital nurse staffing grades for the period of 2009~2014. Using public administrative data, we analyzed the effect of newly licensed nurses on staffing in 1,594 hospitals using Generalized Estimating Equation (GEE) ordered logistic regression, and of supply variation on improving staffing grades in 1,042 hospitals using GEE logistic regression. An increase of one newly licensed nurse per 100 beds in general units had significantly lower odds of improving staffing grades (grades 6~0 vs. 7) (odds ratio=0.95, p=.005). The supply of newly licensed nurses increased by 32% from 2009 to 2014, and proportion of hospitals whose staffing grade had improved, not changed, and worsened was 19.1%, 70.1%, and 10.8% respectively. Compared to 2009, the supply variation of newly licensed nurses in 2014 was not significantly related to the increased odds of improving staffing grades in the region (OR=1.02, p=.870). To achieve a balance in the regional supply and demand for hospital nurses, compliance with nurse staffing legislation and revisions in the nursing fee differentiation policy are needed. Rather than relying on increasing nurse supply, retention policies for new graduate nurses are required to build and sustain competent nurse workforce in the future. © 2017 Korean Society of Nursing Science

  14. Upgrading Licensed Practical Nurse to Registered Nurse Program, September 1971 - June 1973. Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Sally

    Twenty Licensed Practical Nurses (LPN) became Registered Nurses (RN) in a pilot program giving partial academic credit for their LPN training and building on their existing skills. The program revolved around three needs: (1) trained nurses; (2) eliminating the notion that jobs were dead-end; and (3) achieving upward mobility for hospital staff.…

  15. Nursing Manpower Licensed in Kentucky, 1979-1981. Kentucky Nursing Education Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kentucky State Council on Higher Education, Frankfort.

    Data on nurses licensed in Kentucky for 1979-1981 are presented, as part of the Kentucky Nursing Education Project. Information is provided on: licensure status, home state/district/county, employment status, employment state/district/county, field of employment in nursing, position, highest educational level attained, age, sex, marital status,…

  16. Workplace Violence and Job Outcomes of Newly Licensed Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hyoung Eun; Cho, Sung-Hyun

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence of workplace violence toward newly licensed nurses and the relationship between workplace violence and job outcomes. An online survey was conducted of newly licensed registered nurses who had obtained their license in 2012 or 2013 in South Korea and had been working for 5-12 months after first being employed. The sample consisted of 312 nurses working in hospitals or clinics. The Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire II was used to measure violence and nurse job outcomes. Multiple linear and logistic regression analyses were conducted to examine the relationship between violence and job outcomes. Verbal abuse was most prevalent (59.6%), followed by threats of violence (36.9%), physical violence (27.6%), bullying (25.6%), and sexual harassment (22.4%). Approximately three quarters of the nurses had experienced at least one type of violence. The main perpetrators were patients and nurse colleagues, although the distribution of perpetrators varied depending on the type of violence. Bullying had a significant relationship with all four job outcomes (job satisfaction, burnout, commitment to the workplace, and intent to leave), while verbal abuse was associated with all job outcomes except for intent to leave. Violence perpetrated by nurse colleagues had a significant relationship with all four job outcomes, while violence by physicians had a significant inverse relationship with job satisfaction. Workplace violence is experienced by a high percentage of newly licensed nurses, and is associated with their job outcomes. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Licensed Practical Nurses' Sex Role Stereotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallston, Barbara Strudler; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Examined whether sex-role stereotypes would affect nurses' (N=32) attitudes toward simulations of male and female patients. Emotional style and patients' diagnosis were manipulated. Results showed significant sex-role differences and stereotypical attitudes. Male patients were rated more positively, and were more likely to possess traditional male…

  18. Work motivation for Japanese nursing assistants in small- to medium-sized hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Yasushi; Kido, Shigeri; Shahzad, Machiko Taruzuka; Yoshimura, Emiko; Shibuya, Akitaka; Aizawa, Yoshiharu

    2011-12-01

    Nursing assistants can work without a professional certification to help registered nurses and licensed practical nurses. Nursing assistants engage in various tasks, e.g., washing laundry, cleaning up, and clerk tasks regarding nursing. Enhancing work motivation among nursing assistants is essential for every hospital, because when nursing assistants do their jobs well, it allows registered nurses and licensed practical nurses to complete their own specialized jobs. We examined the predictors significantly associated with nursing assistants' work motivation. For those predictors, we produced items to examine job satisfaction. Those items are classified into intrinsic and extrinsic facets. The subjects for this study were Japanese nursing assistants working in 26 hospitals with 62-376 beds (4 public and 22 private hospitals). A total of 516 nursing assistants were analyzed, with the average age and standard deviation of 42.7 ± 12.9 years; the age of 456 female subjects was 43.8 ± 12.7 years and that of 60 male subjects was 34.3 ± 11.0 years. Our results show that "work motivation" is significantly associated with "free time to do one's own things," "nursing assistants as important partners on the job," "feeling helpful to patients," "participating in decision making," and "job-skill improvement." Free time to do one's own things is an extrinsic item. Hospital administrators must monitor the workload and their quality of life among nursing assistants. All the other significant items are intrinsic. Nursing assistants are not only motivated by money. They highly value the intrinsic nature and experience of their jobs.

  19. Career Motivation in Newly Licensed Registered Nurses: What Makes Them Remain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Zarata Mann; Bailey, Jessica H.

    2010-01-01

    Despite vast research on newly licensed registered nurses (RNs), we don't know why some newly licensed registered nurses remain in their current jobs and others leave the nursing profession early in their career. Job satisfaction, the most significant factor emerging from the literature, plays a significant role in nurses' decisions to remain in…

  20. Nurses' attitudes to assisted suicide: sociodemographic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Luke

    This literature review seeks to explore the factors that influence nurses' attitudes towards assisted suicide. A poll conducted by the Royal College of Nursing (RCN) showed that 49% of nurses supported assisted suicide while 40% were opposed to it. A literature review resulted in 16 articles being identified for data synthesis using a recognised critiquing framework. The articles revealed four key themes: nursing specialty, level of education, geographical location and religion. It was concluded that these four themes are key to understanding a nurse's attitude towards assisted suicide. Nursing staff need to be aware of their own influences on this topic, since they will inevitably be involved in the process in some way or another, in countries where assisted suicide has been legalised.

  1. Development of radioactive waste management licensing review assistant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei-Whua Loa; Suan Chen; Wei-Chu Yu

    1992-01-01

    Regulations on radioactive waste disposal are now in urgent need due to our increasing consumption of electric power from nuclear origin. It is set forth that actually applying the regulations to evaluate the license application of new repositories for interim storage and final disposal of High-Level Waste and Low-Level Waste before the year of 2000. In the mean time, it is expected to establish the basis for the decision on issuing the license. The license review procedure can be very complicated, because too many factors must be taken into consideration. For the time being, licensing review is as much an art as it is a science. The authority usually faces three major problems; (1) the availability of domain expert, (2) maintaining of high quality and consistent reviews, and (3) the documentation of the review process. However, to maintain a more efficient, accurate, and systematic review procedure, and at the same time to reduce costs, the Artificial Intelligence (AI) techniques may be used. An expert system is designed as a radioactive waste management licensing review aid for the staff those are in charge of the license application. Tasks such as completeness checking, functional areas of review distribution, participation confirmation, knowledge acquisition, review comment collection, weighting calculation, and degree of satisfaction are considered. In this paper we will discuss the development of the radioactive waste management licensing review assistant

  2. Utilizing Computer Integration to Assist Nursing

    OpenAIRE

    Hujcs, Marianne

    1990-01-01

    As the use of computers in health care continues to increase, methods of using these computers to assist nursing practice are also increasing. This paper describes how integration within a hospital information system (HIS) contributed to the development of a report format and computer generated alerts used by nurses. Discussion also includes how the report and alerts impact those nurses providing bedside care as well as how integration of an HIS creates challenges for nursing.

  3. Articulation Matrix for Home Health Aide, Nursing Assistant, Patient Care Assistant, Practical Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. Center for Instructional Development and Services.

    This document demonstrates the relationships among four Florida nursing education programs (home health aide, nursing assistant, patient care assistant, and practical nursing) by listing student performance standards and indicating which ones are required in each program. The 268 student performance standards are arranged in 23 areas of…

  4. Development of radioactive waste management licensing review assistant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loa, W.W.; Chen, S.; Yu, W.C.; Peng, C.M.; Huang, C.L.; Lin, C.

    1992-01-01

    Regulations on radioactive waste disposal are now in urgent need due to our increasing consumption of electric power from nuclear origin. It is set forth that actually applying the regulations to evaluate the license application of new repositories for interim storage and final disposal fo High-Level Waste and Low-Level Waste before the year of 2000. In the mean time, it is expected to establish the basis for the decision on issuing the license. The license review procedure can be very complicated because too many factors must be taken into consideration. However, to maintain a more efficient, accurate, and systematic review procedure, and at the same time to reduce costs, the Artificial Intelligence (AI) techniques may be used. An expert system is designed as a radioactive waste management licensing review aid for the staff those are in charge of the license application. Tasks such as completeness checking, functional areas of review distribution, participation confirmation, knowledge acquisition, review comment collection, weighting calculation, and degree of satisfaction are considered. In this paper the authors will discuss the development of the radioactive waste management licensing review assistant

  5. Interpersonal Conflict and Organizational Commitment Among Licensed Practical Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loes, Chad N; Tobin, Mary B

    The shortage of nursing professionals in the United States is unquestionable. This shortage, which is predicted to continue into the foreseeable future, is a particularly salient problem within the nursing profession. This is especially true for long-term care facility administrators who not only are faced with the challenge of increasing numbers of aging residents but also regularly struggle with turnover among more cost-effective nursing staff, such as licensed practical nurses (LPNs). The primary purpose of this study was to examine whether perceived interpersonal conflict influences organizational commitment among LPNs. To accomplish this, we analyzed responses from 1165 LPNs throughout a Midwestern state who were queried on their perceptions of interpersonal conflict and organizational commitment in their work settings. Considering a wide range of potential confounding influences such as age and years working as an LPN, for example, we found that higher perceived interpersonal conflict was associated with significantly lower levels of organizational commitment. The implications of these findings, along with recommendations for nurse administrators to reduce LPN turnover, are discussed in the article.

  6. From healthcare assistant to student nurse

    OpenAIRE

    Adair, Fiona

    2017-01-01

    This article discusses research undertaken to investigate the journey that student nurses make who have previously worked as healthcare assistants (HCAs). It briefly identifies the research process, followed by in-depth discussion of one of the themes that emerged from the study: the difference between a student nurse and a healthcare assistant.\\ud \\ud The author chose to explore this theme in depth because more and more HCAs are undertaking the undergraduate degree programme to become a regi...

  7. Nursing delegation and medication administration in assisted living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitty, Ethel; Resnick, Barbara; Allen, Josh; Bakerjian, Debra; Hertz, Judith; Gardner, Wendi; Rapp, Mary Pat; Reinhard, Susan; Young, Heather; Mezey, Mathy

    2010-01-01

    Assisted living (AL) residences are residential long-term care settings that provide housing, 24-hour oversight, personal care services, health-related services, or a combination of these on an as-needed basis. Most residents require some assistance with activities of daily living and instrumental activities of daily living, such as medication management. A resident plan of care (ie, service agreement) is developed to address the health and psychosocial needs of the resident. The amount and type of care provided, and the individual who provides that care, vary on the basis of state regulations and what services are provided within the facility. Some states require that an RN hold a leadership position to oversee medication management and other aspects of care within the facility. A licensed practical nurse/licensed vocational nurse can supervise the day-to-day direct care within the facility. The majority of direct care in AL settings is provided by direct care workers (DCWs), including certified nursing assistants or unlicensed providers. The scope of practice of a DCW varies by state and the legal structure within that state. In some states, the DCW is exempt from the nurse practice act, and in some states, the DCW may practice within a specific scope such as being a medication aide. In most states, however, the DCW scope of practice is conscribed, in part, by the delegation of responsibilities (such as medication administration) by a supervising RN. The issue of RN delegation has become the subject of ongoing discussion for AL residents, facilities, and regulators and for the nursing profession. The purpose of this article is to review delegation in AL and to provide recommendations for future practice and research in this area.

  8. An untapped resource in the nursing workforce: Licensed practical nurses who transition to become registered nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Cheryl B; Toles, Mark; Knafl, George J; Beeber, Anna S

    A more diverse registered nurse (RN) workforce is needed to provide health care in North Carolina (NC) and nationally. Studies describing licensed practical nurse (LPN) career transitions to RNs are lacking. To characterize the occurrence of LPN-to-RN professional transitions; compare key characteristics of LPNs who do and do not make such a transition; and compare key characteristics of LPNs who do transition in the years prior to and following their transition. A retrospective design was conducted using licensure data on LPNs from 2001 to 2013. Cohorts were constructed based on year of graduation. Of 39,398 LPNs in NC between 2001 and 2013, there were 3,161 LPNs (8.0%) who had a LPN-to-RN career transition between 2001 and 2013. LPNs were more likely to transition to RN if they were male; from Asian, American Indian, or other racial groups; held an associate or baccalaureate degree in their last year as an LPN (or their last year in the study if they did not transition); worked in a hospital inpatient setting; worked in the medical-surgical nursing specialty; and were from a rural area. Our findings indicate that the odds of an LPN-to-RN transition were greater if LPNs were: male; from all other racial groups except white; of a younger age at their first LPN licensure; working in a hospital setting; working in the specialty of medical-surgical nursing; employed part-time; or working in a rural setting during the last year as an LPN. This study fills an important gap in our knowledge of LPN-to-RN transitions. Policy efforts are needed to incentivize: LPNs to make a LPN-to-RN transition; educational entities to create and communicate curricular pathways; and employers to support LPNs in making the transition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Engagement, resilience and empathy in nursing assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Abal, Yolanda; López-López, M José; Climent-Rodríguez, José A

    To analyse the levels of engagement, resilience and empathy, and the relationship between them, in a sample of nursing assistants working in different private institutions in Huelva. A transversal, descriptive study. The sample comprised 128 nursing assistants working in private health centres of Huelva. They were given the following instruments: resilience scale Wagnild and Young, Interpersonal Reactivity Index and Utrech Work Engagement Scale. There is a relationship between the cognitive and emotional components of engagement and empathy. Certain sociodemographic variables associated with the organisation of work and working conditions are associated with level of engagement. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Pressure ulcers: knowledge and attitude of nurses and nursing assistants in Belgian nursing homes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demarre, L.; Vanderwee, K.; Defloor, T.; Verhaeghe, S.; Schoonhoven, L.; Beeckman, D.

    2012-01-01

    AIMS: To gain insight into the knowledge and attitudes of nurses and nursing assistants and to study the correlation between knowledge, attitudes and the compliance with the pressure ulcer prevention guidelines provided to residents at risk of pressure ulcers in nursing homes. BACKGROUND: There is a

  11. Factors predicting dropout in student nursing assistants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Annemarie Lyng; Strøyer, Jesper; Ebbehøj, Niels Erik

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The dropout rate among student nursing assistants (NAs) in Danish health and social care education is high at >20%. AIMS: To explore if recent low back pain (LBP) history is a predictor of dropout among NA students, taking into account conventional risk factors for LBP, general health...

  12. Ignalina plant licensing process, international co-operation and assistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bystedt, P.

    1999-01-01

    The challenge for Lithuania as a country with regained independence was to perform a licensing review in a way never done before in the country and in a time schedule that was extremely short. The work included establishing of the licensing base, strengthening the regulatory authority and organising the technical support, establish and implement a safety improvement program, production of the safety case and review of the safety case, and to derive a conclusion regarding whether to issue a licence or not. This was to be done together with other tasks, such as implementation of modifications included in the safety improvement programme at Ignalina, implementation of a new storage for spent fuel and, most important of all, to manage the operational safety at the plant. The achievements are impressive seen in view of the point of start and in view of the time and resources that have been available. Lithuania has put forward a unique safety documentation of an RBMK reactor and presented an in-depth safety evaluation in full openness to Western experts, giving the unique possibility to compare the safety of the Ignalina reactors to Western standards. The co-operation that has been established between Lithuania and Western experts through different assistance programmes is of outmost value, for all involved parties. Co-operation should continue as one element of the challenges for the future

  13. Staffing and job satisfaction: nurses and nursing assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalisch, Beatrice; Lee, Kyung Hee

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between staffing and job satisfaction of registered nurses (RNs) and nursing assistants (NAs). Although a number of previous studies have demonstrated the link between the numbers of patients cared for on the last shift and/or perceptions of staffing adequacy, we could find only one study that utilized a measure of actual staffing (opposed to perceptions of staffing adequacy) and correlated it with job satisfaction of registered nurses. This cross-sectional study included 3523 RNs and 1012 NAs in 131 patient care units. Staff were surveyed to determine job satisfaction and demographic variables. In addition, actual staffing data were collected from each of the study units. Hours per patient day was a significant positive predictor for registered nurse job satisfaction after controlling for covariates. For NAs, a lower skill mix was marginally significant with higher job satisfaction. In addition, the more work experience the NAs reported, the lower their job satisfaction. Adequate staffing levels are essential for RN job satisfaction whereas NA job satisfaction depends on the number of assistive personnel in the mix of nursing staff. Two implications are (1) providing adequate staffing is critical to maintain RN job satisfaction and (2) the NA job needs to be re-engineered to make it a more attractive and satisfying career. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Development and Field Test of Competency Based Instructional Material for a Career Mobility Program for Licensed Practical Nurses. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergen Community Coll., Paramus, NJ.

    The Associate Degree Nursing Program at Bergen Community College developed and field tested competency-based instructional modules in a program designed to allow licensed practical nurses to qualify to take the certification examination for registered nurses after a year of study. Thirteen licensed practical nurses were enrolled in the first class…

  15. Delegation practices between registered nurses and nursing assistive personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Patricia; Deshields, Teresa; Kuhrik, Marilee

    2010-03-01

    To understand registered nurses' (RNs) and nursing assistive personnel's (NAP) perceptions of delegation practices in delivery of oncology patient care. No research to date describes how RNs and NAP communicate and interact during the delegation process. An understanding of the nature of communication during delegation offers direction for how RNs and NAP can improve collaboration. Qualitative descriptive study. Participants described conflict as a central theme during delegation. Sources of conflict varied between RNs and NAP. Successful delegation is characterised by effective communication, teamwork and initiative. Successful delegation depends on the quality of RN and NAP working relationships, timely ongoing communication, initiative and a willingness to collaborate. Nurse managers play a key role in the facilitation of delegation practices. Developing clear guidelines for RN and NAP patient reporting and providing opportunities to discuss conflict-related issues is essential. RNs would benefit from acquiring competency in how to conduct reports, resolve conflicts, and how to convey their role in patient care management. Nursing assistive personnel would benefit from developing competency in using effective communication skills for giving feedback, clarifying tasks and patient status and resolving conflict.

  16. Determinants of the nurses' and nursing assistants' request for antipsychotics for people with dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janus, Sarah I M; van Manen, Jeannette G; IJzerman, Maarten J; Bisseling, Marloes; Drossaert, Constance H C; Zuidema, Sytse U

    Background: Although physicians are responsible for writing the antipsychotic prescriptions for patients with dementia, the initiative is often taken by nurses or nursing assistants. To reduce antipsychotics uses, one needs to understand the reasons for nurses and nursing assistants to request them.

  17. Exploring the activity profile of health care assistants and nurses in home nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vliegher, Kristel; Aertgeerts, Bert; Declercq, Anja; Moons, Philip

    2015-12-01

    Are home nurses (also known as community nurses) ready for their changing role in primary care? A quantitative study was performed in home nursing in Flanders, Belgium, to explore the activity profile of home nurses and health care assistants, using the 24-hour recall instrument for home nursing. Seven dates were determined, covering each day of the week and the weekend, on which data collection would take place. All the home nurses and health care assistants from the participating organisations across Flanders were invited to participate in the study. All data were measured at nominal level. A total of 2478 home nurses and 277 health care assistants registered 336 128 (47 977 patients) and 36 905 (4558 patients) activities, respectively. Home nurses and health care assistants mainly perform 'self-care facilitation' activities in combination with 'psychosocial care' activities. Health care assistants also support home nurses in the 'selfcare facilitation' of patients who do not have a specific nursing indication.

  18. Reflections on International Certified Nursing Assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Penelope Ann

    2017-01-01

    The author, a former university faculty member who taught English to speakers of other languages and now a nursing home resident, shares her observations about how English language proficiency, culture, and religious differences affect her care. She provides examples of communication challenges that can be annoying or cause harm, her coping strategies, and reasons many certified nursing assistants might never be fully fluent in English. She explains how international certified nursing assistants can benefit residents because of skills developed by family-centered care in their countries of origin. She also discusses related issues-the importance of being culturally competent about U.S. culture. She points out how religiousness not only affects residents but is a buffer for staff against the stress of physically and emotionally demanding low-wage work. Overall, the author likes receiving care from individuals from other countries, finding reward in comparing how her personal struggle with illness and paralysis resonates with the trauma of migration and how learning firsthand about varying beliefs and attitudes clarifies her identity and place in world history.

  19. Nurse Assistant Communication Strategies About Pressure Ulcers in Nursing Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Gregory L

    2015-07-01

    There is growing recognition of benefits of sophisticated information technology (IT) in nursing homes (NHs). In this research, we explore strategies nursing assistants (NAs) use to communicate pressure ulcer prevention practices in NHs with variable IT sophistication measures. Primary qualitative data were collected during focus groups with NAs in 16 NHs located across Missouri. NAs (n = 213) participated in 31 focus groups. Three major themes referencing communication strategies for pressure ulcer prevention were identified, including Passing on Information, Keeping Track of Needs and Information Access. NAs use a variety of strategies to prioritize care, and strategies are different based on IT sophistication level. NA work is an important part of patient care. However, little information about their work is included in communication, leaving patient records incomplete. NAs' communication is becoming increasingly important in the care of the millions of chronically ill elders in NHs. © The Author(s) 2014.

  20. Effects of the medication nursing assistant role on nurse job satisfaction and stress in long-term care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Margaret J

    2008-01-01

    Long-term care nurses continue to struggle with increasing workloads, fulfilling regulatory requirements and limited staffing resources. One method of impacting the workload is the introduction of the new medication nursing assistant (MNA) role to alleviate the nurse from prolonged time intervals spent administering medications. An early step in MNA role implementation is to evaluate its impact by comparing agencies using the MNA and those not using the role. This article presents findings from a mixed method study examining the efficacy of the MNA role in relationship to job satisfaction and the degree of perceived stress experienced by long-term care nurses. Ninety-one nurses employed at 2 large New Hampshire facilities responded. Findings offer empirical evidence supporting the use of the MNA to reduce job stress and increase satisfaction for licensed nurses. The MNA role is accepted by nurse leaders and viewed as a benefit. Findings also support a correlation between empowerment and decision making in the nursing environment with levels of nurse satisfaction.

  1. Report of survey results for newly licensed registered nurses in Washington state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Anne M

    2011-10-01

    Current projections for the need for nurses in Washington state are based on an increase in the need for health care, the aging of the population, and the inability of the nursing educational institutions to supply adequate numbers of graduates. Yet many new graduates are providing anecdotal evidence that they cannot find a job in nursing. This study gathered information regarding the employment of newly licensed registered nurses in Washington between May 2009 and August 2010. Questionnaires were administered to a randomly selected sample of 2,200 newly licensed nurses; 532 responses were returned. Nearly 81% reported current employment as a registered nurse and 69.5% reported that they were very or somewhat satisfied with their employment situation. The job search strategies, type of job sought, and factors contributing to their success are reported. Factors contributing to the success of their job search and to job dissatisfaction are explored. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  2. Predictors of actual turnover in a national sample of newly licensed registered nurses employed in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Carol S; Kovner, Christine T; Greene, William; Tukov-Shuser, Magdalene; Djukic, Maja

    2012-03-01

    This paper is a report of a study of factors that affect turnover of newly licensed registered nurses in United States hospitals. There is a large body of research related to nursing retention; however, there is little information specific to newly licensed registered nurse turnover. Incidence rates of turnover among new nurses are unknown because most turnover data are not from nationally representative samples of nurses. This study used a longitudinal panel design to obtain data from 1653 registered nurses who were recently licensed by examination for the first time. We mailed surveys to a nationally representative sample of hospital registered nurses 1 year apart. The analytic sample consisted of 1653 nurses who responded to both survey mailings in January of 2006 and 2007. Full-time employment and more sprains and strains (including back injuries) result in more turnover. Higher intent to stay and hours of voluntary overtime and more than one job for pay reduces turnover. When we omitted intent to stay from the probit model, less job satisfaction and organizational commitment led to more turnover, confirming their importance to turnover. Magnet Recognition Award(®) hospitals and several other work attributes had no effect on turnover.   Turnover problems are complex, which means that there is no one solution to decreasing turnover. Multiple points of intervention exist. One specific approach that may improve turnover rates is hospital policies that reduce strains and sprains. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Advanced Nursing © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. American Nurses Association. position statement on assisted suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Nurses, individually and collectively, have an obligation to provide comprehensive and compassionate end-of-life care which includes the promotion of comfort and the relief of pain and, at times, forgoing life-sustaining treatments. The American Nurses Association (ANA) believes that the nurse should not participate in assisted suicide. Such an act is in violation of the Code for Nurses with Interpretive Statements (Code for Nurses) and the ethical traditions of the profession.

  4. Evaluating the American Nurses Association's arguments against nurse participation in assisted suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelstein, Eric

    2017-01-01

    This discussion paper critically assesses the American Nurses Association's stated arguments against nurse participation in assisted suicide, as found in its current (2013) position statement. Seven distinct arguments can be gleaned from the American Nurses Association's statement, based on (1) the American Nurses Association's Code of Ethics with Interpretive Statements and its injunction against nurses acting with the sole intent to end life, (2) the risks of abuse and misuse of assisted suicide, (3) nursing's social contract or covenant with society, (4) the contention that nurses must not harm their patients, (5) the sanctity of life, (6) the traditions of nursing, and (7) the fundamental goals of nursing. Each of these arguments is evaluated, and none are found to be convincing. This is crucial because the American Nurses Association's official stance on nurse participation in assisted suicide can have significant consequences for the well-being of nurses who care for patients in jurisdictions in which assisted suicide is legally available. The American Nurses Association should therefore have a strong and convincing justification for opposing the practice, if it is to take such a position. That it fails to evince such a justification in its official statement on the matter places a burden on the American Nurses Association to more strongly justify its position, or else abandon its stance against nurse participation in assisted suicide.

  5. Voices That Care: Licensed Practical Nurses and the Emotional Labour Underpinning Their Collaborative Interactions with Registered Nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Truc Huynh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recognizing the emotional labour underlying interprofessional collaborations (IPCs could be considered a crucial step towards building a cohesive nursing team. Although IPCs between registered nurses (RNs and licensed practical nurses (LPNs have been linked to quality nursing care, little is known about the emotions experienced by LPNs during their interactions with RNs or those factors that influence IPCs. A questionnaire administered to 309 LPNs found that (1 the professional identity of LPNs has evolved into a that of a unique social group; (2 LPNs define IPC as an interpersonal process of exploring similar or dissimilar assessments of a patient's status with RNs and, together, establishing a course of nursing actions; (3 the primary organizational factor facilitating IPCs is inclusive nursing leadership; (4 the interpersonal factor promoting IPCs is the level of trust RNs extend to LPNs; and (5 an LPN's emotional labour (i.e., internal emotional regulation is most tangible during uncollaborative interactions with RNs.

  6. Pain in Alzheimer's disease : nursing assistants' and patients' evaluations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scherder, E; van Manen, F

    2005-01-01

    Aim. This paper reports on a study examining the level of agreement between the pain perceptions of nursing assistants, older people without dementia and patients with Alzheimer's dementia. It was hypothesized that nursing assistants would overestimate the pain experience of patients with

  7. HUMANIZATION OF THE NURSING ASSISTANCE IN THE SURGICAL UNIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana Bedin

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: This study consisted in a bibliographic review, which goal was a survey of the main national literature that approaches the humanization in the surgical unit, identifying and demonstrating the needs and the importance of the nursing staff daily activities. The search was made selecting the key words and the period between 1985 and 2002, where 31 articles were selected. Analyzing them we discussed about the theme, classifying it in four stages that made sense to the humanization for the nursing assistance in the surgical unit, describing aspects of the nursing graduation releasing for humanization, making ethics considerations to the assistance and demonstrating the needs of the humanized care in the presence of the technological development. We concluded that the humanization of the nursing assistance in the surgical units is a challenge, however, the humanized care is possible and essential to the nursing practice, mainly in a technological environment like the surgical unit. KEYWORDS: Operating Room Nursing; Assistance; Ethics.

  8. Pre-Licensed Nursing Students Rate Professional Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garee, Denise L.

    2016-01-01

    Ethical decision making of new nurses relies on professional values and moral development obtained during training. This descriptive, comparative study demonstrated the importance values attributed to the items of the Nurses' Professional Values Scale-Revised (Weis & Schank, 2009), by a sample of senior ADN and BSN students from across the…

  9. Substance use and mental illness among nurses: workplace warning signs and barriers to seeking assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cares, Alexa; Pace, Elizabeth; Denious, Jean; Crane, Lori A

    2015-01-01

    Although some studies have examined the prevalence of substance use among nurses, few have assessed substance use in the workplace or early cues for identifying these health conditions. Primary data collected as part of a larger program evaluation were examined with the purpose of better understanding (a) the context and perceived consequences of substance use and mental illness among nurses and (b) barriers and opportunities for earlier identification and treatment of these issues among nurses, their colleagues, and employers. Anonymous surveys were mailed to 441 active and recent participants of a peer health assistance program in the summer of 2010. The survey examined drug-related behaviors in the workplace; behavioral cues that may permit earlier identification of substance use and mental illness; perceptions of barriers to seeking assistance; and strategies for preventing problems and overcoming barriers to seeking assistance. Responses were received from 302 nurses (69%). Nearly half (48%) reported drug or alcohol use at work, and two fifths (40%) felt that their competency level was affected by their use. More than two thirds of respondents thought their problem could have been recognized earlier. The most highly rated barriers to seeking assistance for substance use and mental illness included fear and embarrassment and concerns about losing one's nursing license. Respondents recommended greater attention be paid to early identification of risk factors during nurses' professional training as a prevention strategy. Findings from this study provide preliminary data that can be used by schools of nursing and health care employers to improve early identification of nurses' substance use and mental illness treatment needs. These data also suggest a need for more research to explore the prevention and early identification of co-occurring disorders in health care settings where nurses practice.

  10. Pedagogy and Culture: An Educational Initiative in Supporting UAE Nursing Graduates Prepare for a High-Stakes Nurse Licensing Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownie, Sharon M.; Williams, Ged; Barnewall, Kate; Bishaw, Suzanne; Cooper, Jennifer L.; Robb, Walter; Younis, Neima; Kuzemski, Dawn

    2015-01-01

    Graduates of an Abu Dhabi transnational nursing degree struggled with the mandatory national licensing examination. Poor pass rates undermine graduate career futures and impact on the workforce capacity building contributions of the partnering transnational educational providers. This paper describes how the design and delivery of an intensive…

  11. Preventing home health nursing assistant back and shoulder injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leff, E W; Hagenbach, G L; Marn, K K

    2000-10-01

    Franklin County Home Health Agency (St Albans, Vermont) undertook a performance improvement project in 1996 to reduce employee injuries. A review of recent injuries led to the prevention of licensed nursing assistants' (LNAs') back and shoulder injuries as the first priority. Root causes of injuries were agency communication, employee training, patient home environment, nursing assistant body mechanics, and failure to use safety measures. Given that injury causality is complex and multifactorial, a variety of improvement strategies were implemented over the following two to three years. IMPLEMENTATION OF POTENTIAL SOLUTIONS: Short-term (a few months), mid-term (six months), and long-term (one year) potential solutions to the LNA back and shoulder injury problem were charted. Safety and health training was the major focus of the team's short-term plan. Risk management forms were to be used to identify and follow up on hazardous situations. Project plans that were successfully implemented included revision of LNA plans of care, standardization of the return-to-work process after injury, development of guidelines for identifying unsafe patient lifts and transfers, improved follow-up of employee reports of injury-risk situations in patient homes, improved body mechanics screening of new employees, and a stronger injury-prevention training program for current employees. A less successful initiative was aimed at collecting more data about injuries and causal factors. Employee injuries were gradually reduced from 4-10 per quarter to 0-3 per quarter. Injury prevention requires commitment, persistence, and patience--but not expensive improvements. Multiple interventions increase the chances of success when there are many root causes and lack of evidence regarding the effectiveness of various approaches.

  12. The National Nursing Assistant Survey: Improving the Evidence Base for Policy Initiatives to Strengthen the Certified Nursing Assistant Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squillace, Marie R.; Remsburg, Robin E.; Harris-Kojetin, Lauren D.; Bercovitz, Anita; Rosenoff, Emily; Han, Beth

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This study introduces the first National Nursing Assistant Survey (NNAS), a major advance in the data available about certified nursing assistants (CNAs) and a rich resource for evidence-based policy, practice, and applied research initiatives. We highlight potential uses of this new survey using select population estimates as examples of…

  13. Introduction of assistive devices: home nurses' practices and beliefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelands, Marc; Van Oost, Paulette; Depoorter, Anne Marie; Buysse, Ann; Stevens, Veerle

    2006-04-01

    This paper reports a study describing home nurses' intention and current practices regarding introducing assistive devices, and investigating whether their practice is related to social cognitive factors (attitudes, subjective norms and self-efficacy). Home nurses not only care for patients in particular medical domains, but also educate and guide them towards more independence. Patients with age-related disabilities in mobility and self-care might benefit from the use of assistive devices. A home nurse might be the first and only person to discuss the disability and use of an assistive device. Therefore, home nurses' beliefs about the introduction of assistive devices could affect their daily practices. A cross-sectional study was conducted with a convenience sample of 64 home nurses chosen from a random sample of home nursing departments. The home nurses completed a self-administered questionnaire. The Theory of Planned Behaviour framework was used to develop the social cognitive measures regarding each of the six steps distinguished in the introduction of assistive devices. Home nurses had positive attitudes and high levels of intention, subjective norm and self-efficacy towards most steps of the decision process to introduce assistive devices. In a multiple linear regression analysis, attitude and self-efficacy predicted intention to introduce assistive devices to older clients with disabilities. Intention was correlated to home nurses' current practices. The findings suggest that conditions are present to involve home nurses more explicitly in the introduction of assistive devices to their patients. Social cognitive factors should be taken into account when developing interventions that aim to support home nurses to do this.

  14. Critical Cases Faced by Mental Health Nurses and Assistant Nurses in Psychiatric Hospitals in Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evmorfia Koukia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Psychiatric Nurses and nurses’ assistants working in an inpatient unit experience a significant number of critical cases. A small number of studies have explored which patients’ problems nurses perceive as ‘critical case or incident’ and particularly which interventions they choose. Aim: The aim of the research was 1. To identify the clinical problems that mental health nurses and assistant nurses characterize as critical 2. To report the main nursing interventions 3. To investigate the main person involved in the critical incident. Material-Method: Critical incident technique was used as a method of data collection. Content analysis was carried out in order nurses’ information to be categorized into subcategories. The sample consisted of 35 mental health nurses and nurses’ assistants who work in psychiatric acute inpatient wards.Results: Nurses identified ten types of critical incidents. They noted violence (verbal, physical by patients and psychotic symptoms to be the most critical situations. Nurses were the main person involved in these incidents. The study also described eight nursing interventions used by nurses when faced with critical events. Conclusions: The findings indicated that mental health nurses and assistant nurses working in acute inpatient wards are called to confront a variety of critical incidents in their every day practice. Further research is necessary to identify in-depth nursing interventions and decision-making used in these situations.

  15. Intravenous Fluid Therapy Course for the Licensed Practical Nurse. Instructor Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This curriculum guide provides materials for a 10-unit intravenous (IV) therapy course for licensed practical nurses. Units contain from one to nine lessons. The first unit provides an introduction and orientation to the course. Subsequent units concern documentation, anatomy and physiology as applied to IV therapy, fundamental aspects of fluid…

  16. Occupational factors contributing to low self-esteem in registered nurses and licensed practical nurses: a multivariate analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, K

    2001-03-01

    The present study examines job-related factors leading to low self-esteem in nurses. The lowering of self-esteem suggests that such nurses had difficulty in fully accepting themselves and their circumstances. Subjects were registered nurses (RN) and licensed practical nurses (LPN) at hospitals, and unemployed registered nurses (UEN) seeking employment. Questionnaires were provided at 53 hospitals and a Nurse Bank in Kanagawa Prefecture. The responses of 552 RN, 146 LPN and 433 UEN were analyzed. Questions were asked about personal life, past or present nursing experience, working conditions, nursing skills, satisfaction with work performance and self-esteem. Factors giving rise to low self-esteem were determined using logistic regression analysis and logistic discriminant analysis. Employment status and qualifications were determined to be the most important factors determining the self-esteem of nurses. The next most important factors were 'a limited number of years of experience (less than five years)' and 'dissatisfaction with discretion and responsibility as a nurse' (P self-esteem for LPN was 4.07 times higher than for UEN, and 2.2 times higher than for RN by logistic regression analysis. LPN are treated as unskilled workers, and thus significant differences were apparent in their performance of certain job tasks. These differences were analyzed using discriminant analysis, and were referred to as follows, 1: Advanced assessment skills, 2: Advanced technical skills, 3: Advanced communication skills, and 4: Nursing plan and documentation (positive discrimination rate was 70.8%). Job dissatisfaction is closely associated with the level of professional training. Continuous education and a feedback system for various levels of nurses are needed.

  17. Back to the future: A practice led transition program from Assistant in Nursing to Enrolled Nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faithfull-Byrne, Annette; Thompson, Lorraine; Welch, Tony; Williamson, Moira; Schafer, Keppel; Hallinan, Claire

    2017-01-01

    Continuing professional development is an essential element in professional nursing practice. In our Hospital and Health service, a gap in existing nursing pathways was identified for Assistants in Nursing (AINs), who wished to further their career in nursing and progress to Enrolled Nurse (EN). There is also little in the literature that addresses Assistants in Nursing wishing to progress their career to Enrolled Nurses. This article describes a quality improvement project designed to address this gap. The project was a collaborative venture between a Queensland Hospital and Health Service and an Institute of Tertiary and Further Education (TAFE). The focus was on creating a flexible career path for Assistants in Nursing, wishing to become Enrolled Nurses. The project resulted in the Diploma of Nursing program (theory and practice) being delivered within the hospital setting by nurse educators and clinical nurse consultants. This is unusual in that the program is normally delivered in the tertiary setting, by academic staff from the Institute of Further Education. Program implementation is described along with the challenges encountered. Outcomes from the project were: 78% completion rate; 100% employment on completion of their course of study; and 18% progressing to further their education such as Advance Enrolled Nurse or Registered Nurse. Student satisfaction regarding the program was also positive. The initiative established a local career path for Assistants in Nursing wishing to progress to Enrolled Nurse. This quality project demonstrates that collaborative ventures between the tertiary sector and hospital and health services, can create innovative flexible solutions for staff wishing to further their career in nursing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Assisted Living Facilities - MDC_NursingHome

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Label (point) feature class of Miami-Dade County Nursing Homes Facilities. As of May 2004 the Office of Emergency Management (OEM) will provide updates for Nursing...

  19. The Trajectory of Professional Education of the Nursing Assistant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Regina Ulian Manzato

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Among the technical courses offered in Brazil, the field of nursing corresponds to 49.6% of the healthcare sector. From this total, 57% are Nursing Assistant courses. The formation of mid-level human resources has been discussed by nursing teachers and by the institutions that offer nursing-professional training, with special emphasis on the issues related to the quality of technical courses. In this context, a brief historical review of Brazilian legislation on the education and practice of these professionals, including regulations related to this education and to professional nursing practice, is presented chronologically in this paper, examining the laws and the political factors that contributed to guide the trajectory and evolution of professional Nursing Assistant Education. A comparison of the offer of mid-level courses in the field of healthcare and the quantitative of workers reveals the dimensions of Education Institutions' challenge for health sector.

  20. Factors predicting dropout in student nursing assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Annemarie Lyng; Strøyer, Jesper; Ebbehøj, Niels Erik; Mortensen, Ole Steen

    2008-12-01

    The dropout rate among student nursing assistants (NAs) in Danish health and social care education is high at >20%. To explore if recent low back pain (LBP) history is a predictor of dropout among NA students, taking into account conventional risk factors for LBP, general health and physical fitness. Prospective study with 14-month follow-up (the duration of the education) in two schools of health and social care in the Region of Copenhagen, Denmark. Participants completed a comprehensive questionnaire, and their physical fitness (balance, back extension endurance, back flexion endurance and sagittal flexibility) was assessed at baseline. Dropout was defined as failure to complete NA education. A total of 790 subjects, 87% of those invited, completed the questionnaire; 612 subjects also completed the physical tests and were included in the present study and 500 (83%) were women. Recent LBP was not an independent predictor of school dropout. However, only among women who had LBP were other factors (a history of previous exposure to heavy physical workload, a low mental health score and failure to pass the back extension endurance test) associated with risk of dropout, OR (95% CI)=2.5 (1.2-5.3). Among men, only low height was significantly associated with dropout risk. A recent LBP history was not an independent single predictor of dropout from NA education but was a risk factor in combination with other factors.

  1. Substituting physicians with nurse practitioners, physician assistants or nurses in nursing homes: protocol for a realist evaluation case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lovink, M.H.; Persoon, A.; Vught, A.J. van; Schoonhoven, L.; Koopmans, R.T.C.M.; Laurant, M.G.H.

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In developed countries, substituting physicians with nurse practitioners, physician assistants and nurses (physician substitution) occurs in nursing homes as an answer to the challenges related to the ageing population and the shortage of staff, as well as to guarantee the quality of

  2. Dutch nurses' attitudes towards euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bruchem-van de Scheur, Ada; van der Arend, Arie; van Wijmen, Frans; Abu-Saad, Huda Huijer; ter Meulen, Ruud

    2008-03-01

    This article presents the attitudes of nurses towards three issues concerning their role in euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide. A questionnaire survey was conducted with 1509 nurses who were employed in hospitals, home care organizations and nursing homes. The study was conducted in the Netherlands between January 2001 and August 2004. The results show that less than half (45%) of nurses would be willing to serve on committees reviewing cases of euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide. More than half of the nurses (58.2%) found it too far-reaching to oblige physicians to consult a nurse in the decision-making process. The majority of the nurses stated that preparing euthanatics (62.9%) and inserting an infusion needle to administer the euthanatics (54.1%) should not be accepted as nursing tasks. The findings are discussed in the context of common practices and policies in the Netherlands, and a recommendation is made not to include these three issues in new regulations on the role of nurses in euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide.

  3. The introduction of a nursing guideline on depression at psychogeriatric nursing home wards: effects on Certified Nurse Assistants.

    OpenAIRE

    Verkaik, R.; Francke, A.L.; Meijel, B. van; Spreeuwenberg, P.M.M.; Ribbe, M.W.; Bensing, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: To improve care for residents with depression in dementia, an evidence based nursing guideline was developed. Using the guideline has already shown positive effects on depression in psychogeriatric nursing home residents. Objective: To study the effects of the introduction of the nursing guideline ‘depression in dementia’ on perceived professional autonomy, workload and feelings of powerlessness and confidence in Certified Nurse Assistants. Design: A multi-center controlled interv...

  4. Animal-Assisted Interventions in Dutch Nursing Homes: A Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuurmans, Lonneke; Enders-Slegers, Marie-Jose; Verheggen, Theo; Schols, Jos

    2016-07-01

    Animal-assisted interventions (AAI) have become more and more popular in nursing homes in the past decade. Various initiatives for using animals in nursing homes have been developed over the years (eg, animal visiting programs, residential companion animals, petting zoos) and, on the whole, the number of nursing homes that refuse animals on their premises has declined. In this survey, we aimed to determine how many Dutch nursing homes offer AAIs, what type of interventions are used, and with what aim. We also focus on the use of underlying health, hygiene, and (animal) safety protocols. Using an online Dutch nursing home database, we invited all listed (457) nursing home organizations in the Netherlands (encompassing a total of 804 nursing home locations) to participate in our digital survey, powered by SurveyMonkey. The survey consisted of a total of 45 questions, divided into general questions about the use of animals in interventions; the targeted client population(s); and specific questions about goals, guidelines, and protocols. The results were analyzed with SPSS Statistics. In the end, 244 surveys, representing 165 organizations, were returned: 125 nursing homes used AAI in one way or another, 40 did not. Nursing homes that did not offer AAI cited allergy and hygiene concerns as the most important reasons. Most nursing homes offering AAI used visiting animals, mostly dogs (108) or rabbits (76). A smaller number of nursing homes had resident animals, either living on the ward or in a meadow outside. Almost all programs involved animal-assisted activities with a recreational purpose; none of the participating nursing homes provided animal assisted therapy with therapeutic goals. Psychogeriatric patients were most frequently invited to participate. A total of 88 nursing homes used alternatives when animals were not an option or not available. The most popular alternative was the use of stuffed animals (83) followed by FurReal Friends robotic toys (14). The

  5. 42 CFR Appendix G to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography G Appendix G to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE...—Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography The following section...

  6. Obesity Prevention Practices of Elementary School Nurses in Minnesota: Findings from Interviews with Licensed School Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison-Sandberg, Leslie F.; Kubik, Martha Y.; Johnson, Karen E.

    2011-01-01

    Elementary schools are an optimal setting to provide obesity prevention interventions, yet little is known about the obesity prevention practices of elementary school nurses. The purpose of this study was to gain insight into current obesity-related school nursing practice in elementary schools in Minnesota, opinions regarding school nurse-led…

  7. Do personality traits predict work outcomes of certified nursing assistants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovach, Christine R; Simpson, Michelle R; Reitmaier, Amy B; Johnson, Addie; Kelber, Sheryl T

    2010-10-01

    The purposes of this study were to describe personality traits of certified nursing assistants (CNAs) employed at nursing homes and explore relationships between personality traits, job satisfaction, and job performance. The sample included 177 CNAs providing direct care to residents in three nursing homes. CNAs with high and low job performance skills were distinguished by the cluster of traits associated with teamwork skills. Overall, 21.3% of the variance in job satisfaction was explained by the personality traits of Adjustment, Prudence, Likeability, Excitable, and Dutiful, F(8, 145) = 4.899, p personality, job satisfaction, and job performance provide important information about the personality traits of nursing staff who are most likely to enjoy and perform well in the nursing home setting. Knowledge of these links may be useful for hiring the appropriate person for direct care nursing home positions. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. Goals and potential career advancement of licensed practical nurses in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Mari; Inoue, Katsuya; Kamibeppu, Kiyoko

    2008-10-01

    To investigate the effects of personal and professional variables on career advancement intentions of working Licensed Practical Nurses (LPNs). In Japan, two levels of professional nursing licensures, the LPN and the registered nurse (RN), are likely to be integrated in the future. Therefore, it is important to know the career advancement intentions of LPNs. Questionnaires were sent to a sample of 356 LPNs. Analysis of variance (anova) and discriminative analysis were used. We found that those who had a positive image of LPNs along with a positive image of RNs were identified as showing interest in career advancement. The results of anova showed that age had a negative effect; however, discriminative analysis suggested that age is not as significant compared with other variables. Our results indicate that the 'image of RNs', and 'role-acceptance factors' have an effect on career advancement intentions of LPNs. Our results suggest that Nursing Managers should create a supportive working environment where the LPN would feel encouraged to carry out the nursing role, thereby creating a positive image of nursing in general which would lead to career motivation and pursuing RN status.

  9. Religion and nurses' attitudes to euthanasia and physician assisted suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gielen, Joris; van den Branden, Stef; Broeckaert, Bert

    2009-05-01

    In this review of empirical studies we aimed to assess the influence of religion and world view on nurses' attitudes towards euthanasia and physician assisted suicide. We searched PubMed for articles published before August 2008 using combinations of search terms. Most identified studies showed a clear relationship between religion or world view and nurses' attitudes towards euthanasia or physician assisted suicide. Differences in attitude were found to be influenced by religious or ideological affiliation, observance of religious practices, religious doctrines, and personal importance attributed to religion or world view. Nevertheless, a coherent comparative interpretation of the results of the identified studies was difficult. We concluded that no study has so far exhaustively investigated the relationship between religion or world view and nurses' attitudes towards euthanasia or physician assisted suicide and that further research is required.

  10. Death Concern and Attitudes toward the Elderly in Nursing Home Personnel as a Function of Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePaola, Stephen J.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Investigated the relationship between death fear, attitudes toward the elderly, and personal anxiety about aging in nursing home employees. Nursing professionals (registered nurses or licensed practical nurses) had lower levels of death concern than nursing assistants, and results also indicated that nursing assistants displayed significantly…

  11. Scheduling and shift work characteristics associated with risk for occupational injury in newly licensed registered nurses: An observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stimpfel, Amy Witkoski; Brewer, Carol S; Kovner, Christine T

    2015-11-01

    Registered nurses across the globe bear a heavy injury burden. Every shift, nurses are exposed to a variety of hazards that can jeopardize their health, which negatively impacts their ability to provide high-quality patient care. Previous research suggests that inexperienced, or newly licensed nurses, may have an increased risk for certain occupational injuries. However, the current knowledge base is insufficient to fully understand how work hours influence newly licensed nurses' occupational injury, given the significant variation in hospital organization and work characteristics. To describe newly licensed nurses' shift work characteristics and determine the association between shift type and scheduling characteristics and nurse injury, before and after adjusting for individual and combined effects of demographics, external context, organizational context, and work context, following the Organization of Work model. This study is a secondary analysis of a nationally representative survey of newly licensed registered nurses using a cross-sectional design. The analytic sample includes 1744 newly licensed registered nurses from 34 states and the District of Columbia who reported working in a hospital and were within 6-18 months of passing their state licensure exam at the time of survey administration. Descriptive statistics were calculated, followed by bivariate and multivariate Poisson regression models to assess the relationship between shift type and scheduling characteristics and nurse injury. Lastly, full models with the addition of demographics, external context, organizational context, and work context variables were calculated. The majority (79%) of newly licensed nurses worked 12-h shifts, a near majority worked night shift (44%), and over half (61%) worked overtime (mandatory or voluntary) weekly. Nurses working weekly overtime were associated with a 32% [incidence rate ratio (IRR) 1.32, CI 1.07-1.62] increase in the risk of a needle stick and nurses

  12. Nursing Assistant Burnout and the Cognitively Impaired Elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Mark; Chappell, Neena L.

    1994-01-01

    Examined burnout among nursing assistants (n=245). Found that both stressor and appraisal variables influenced feelings of burnout. Stressor variable, frequency of disturbing patient behaviors, best explained feelings of reduced Personal Accomplishment. Appraisal variable, reaction to patient behaviors, best explained Emotional Exhaustion. Found…

  13. The Role of Support in Alleviating Stress among Nursing Assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Neena L.; Novak, Mark

    1992-01-01

    Tested the buffering hypothesis that negative effects of stressors (measured as burden, burnout, and perceived job pressure) on nursing assistants (n=245) in long-term care institutions are moderated by social support (at work and external to work). Buffering hypothesis was not confirmed, though some support for a main effects view was found.…

  14. The effect of preceptor role effectiveness on newly licensed registered nurses' perceived psychological empowerment and professional autonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Chanell; Hart, Patricia L; Mareno, Nicole

    2016-03-01

    The first year turnover rate for newly licensed registered nurses is roughly 30% and increases to about 57% in the second year (Twibell et al., 2012). An effective preceptorship has been shown to better facilitate the first year transition (Hodges et al., 2008) and increase retention rates (Pine and Tart, 2007). The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between newly licensed registered nurses' perceived preceptor role effectiveness, psychological empowerment and professional autonomy. A prospective, cross-sectional, descriptive research design was used. Sixty-nine newly licensed registered nurses were recruited and surveyed. Newly licensed registered nurses were found to have moderately high levels of perceived preceptor role effectiveness, psychological empowerment, and professional autonomy. Preceptor role effectiveness had significant, moderately, positive relationships with professional autonomy and psychological empowerment. There was also a significant relationship found between professional autonomy and psychological empowerment. Results show that preceptor role effectiveness is linked to increased professional autonomy and psychological empowerment. Therefore, effective preceptorships are necessary in easing the newly licensed registered nurse's transition to practice. Strategies to ensure effective preceptorships and enhance the NRLN's transition to practice are proposed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Work Life Stress and Career Resilience of Licensed Nursing Facility Administrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Dennis R; Rogers, Rob; LeCrone, Harold H; Kelley, Katherine; Scott, Joel H

    2018-04-01

    Career resilience provided a frame for understanding how Licensed Nursing Facility Administrators (LNFAs) sustain role performance and even thrive in stressful skilled nursing facility work environments. Quantitative and qualitative analyses of in-depth interviews with18 LNFAs, averaging 24 years of experience were conducted by a five-member research team. Analysis was informed by evidence-based frameworks for career resilience in the health professions as well as the National Association of Long-Term Care Administrator Boards' (NAB) five domains of competent administrative practice. Findings included six sources of work stressors and six sources of professional satisfaction. Also, participants identified seven strategic principles and 10 administrative practices for addressing major sources of stress. Recommendations are provided for research and evidence-based application of the career resilience perspective to LNFA practice aimed at reducing role abandonment and energizing the delivery of the quality of care that each resident deserves.

  16. Perception survey on the introduction of clinical performance examination as part of the national nursing licensing examination in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Jin Shin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose The purpose of this study was to analyze opinions about the action plan for implementation of clinical performance exam as part of the national nursing licensing examination and presents the expected effects of the performance exam and aspects to consider regarding its implementation. Methods This study used a mixed-methods design. Quantitative data were collected by a questionnaire survey, while qualitative data were collected by focus group interviews with experts. The survey targeted 200 nursing professors and clinical nurses with more than 5 years of work experience, and the focus group interviews were conducted with 28 of professors, clinical instructors, and nurses at hospitals. Results First, nursing professors and clinical specialists agreed that the current written tests have limitations in evaluating examinees’ ability, and that the introduction of a clinical performance exam will yield positive results. Clinical performance exam is necessary to evaluate and improve nurses’ work ability, which means that the implementation of a performance exam is advisable if its credibility and validity can be verified. Second, most respondents chose direct performance exams using simulators or standardized patients as the most suitable format of the test. Conclusion In conclusion, the current national nursing licensing exam is somewhat limited in its ability to identify competent nurses. Thus, the time has come for us to seriously consider the introduction of a performance exam. The prerequisites for successfully implementing clinical performance exam as part of the national nursing licensing exam are a professional training process and forming a consortium to standardize practical training.

  17. The importance of social exchange to nurses and nurse assistants: impact on retention factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trybou, Jeroen; De Pourcq, Kaat; Paeshuyse, Michel; Gemmel, Paul

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the norm of reciprocity by examining relationships between perceived organisational support (POS), the quality of leader-member exchange (LMX) and psychological contract breach (PCB) and important nurse retention factors identified in the literature. A major cause of turnover among nurses is related to unsatisfying workplaces. Previous research, mainly outside the nursing setting, found that social exchange affects employees' work-related attitudes. A cross-sectional survey was conducted on 217 nurses and nursing assistants to test and refine a model linking POS, LMX, PCB with job satisfaction, trust and turnover intentions. Hierarchical multiple linear regression revealed that POS, PCB and LMX explained significant variance in all three retention factors: job satisfaction (adjusted R² = 0.502), trust (adjusted R² = 0.462) and turnover intentions (adjusted R² = 0.196). POS and PCB predicted most strongly job satisfaction (P < 0.001) and trust (P < 0.001 and P < 0.01, respectively). LMX predicted most strongly intention to leave (P < 0.01). In our study, POS, the quality of LMX and PCB were strongly related to job satisfaction, trust and turnover intentions. Nursing managers and leaders should recognize the importance of social exchange within their organisation to build trust, satisfy and retain scarce nurses and nursing assistants. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Application requirements for Robotic Nursing Assistants in hospital environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremer, Sven; Doelling, Kris; Lundberg, Cody L.; McNair, Mike; Shin, Jeongsik; Popa, Dan

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we report on analysis toward identifying design requirements for an Adaptive Robotic Nursing Assistant (ARNA). Specifically, the paper focuses on application requirements for ARNA, envisioned as a mobile assistive robot that can navigate hospital environments to perform chores in roles such as patient sitter and patient walker. The role of a sitter is primarily related to patient observation from a distance, and fetching objects at the patient's request, while a walker provides physical assistance for ambulation and rehabilitation. The robot will be expected to not only understand nurse and patient intent but also close the decision loop by automating several routine tasks. As a result, the robot will be equipped with sensors such as distributed pressure sensitive skins, 3D range sensors, and so on. Modular sensor and actuator hardware configured in the form of several multi-degree-of-freedom manipulators, and a mobile base are expected to be deployed in reconfigurable platforms for physical assistance tasks. Furthermore, adaptive human-machine interfaces are expected to play a key role, as they directly impact the ability of robots to assist nurses in a dynamic and unstructured environment. This paper discusses required tasks for the ARNA robot, as well as sensors and software infrastructure to carry out those tasks in the aspects of technical resource availability, gaps, and needed experimental studies.

  19. Nurses and nurse assistants' experiences with using a design thinking approach to innovation in a nursing home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eines, Trude Fløystad; Vatne, Solfrid

    2018-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate nurses' and nurse assistants' experiences with a design thinking approach to innovation used in a nursing home in Norway. A design thinking approach to innovation that focuses on users' needs can be employed to address many of the challenges facing health care providers in a field facing a growing ageing population, complex diseases and financial shortfalls. This study is based on a thematic analysis of four focus group interviews with nurses and nurse assistants (n = 23). In the initial phase of developing the new service model, which included defining staff roles and responsibilities, participating nurses and nurse assistants felt engaged and motivated by the designers' inclusive and creative methods. However, during the new model's testing phase, they were critical of management's lack of involvement in the model`s implementation and therefore became less motivated about the project. The findings of the study highlight the importance of the designers cooperating with management and staff for the duration of the innovation process. Challenging innovation processes require strong managers who engage with designers, patients, staff and volunteers throughout all phases of an innovation process using a design thinking approach. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Complications of the natural childbirth: assistance of nurses obstetras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulmerinda Meira Oliveira

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The moment of the natural childbirth is a complex and dynamic event that demands assistance from the health professional that joins the humanized execution of procedures and actions respecting the singularity of the woman. In this way, the objectives of this study were: to know the main occurred complications at the moment of the natural childbirth and the assistance given by the nurse. It’s an exploratory research, in which the scene was a public hospital in the city of Jequié-Ba. The sampling consisted of five persons with specialization in obstetric nursing, and the used instrument for the data collection was the half-structuralized interview. After the data collection, the gotten information were submitted to the content analysis Bardin. Therefore, it’s possible to infer that the obstetric nurse faces in a positive way the complications lived deeply during the natural childbirth, through the exercise of a humanized and distinguished assistance as techniques/procedures endorsed by the literature. Thus, this can make us reflect the importance of this professional in the childbirth room as an executor and promoter of a worthy and welcoming assistance

  1. Nurses' satisfaction with use of a personal digital assistants with a mobile nursing information system in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Li-Qiong; Zang, Xiao-Ying; Cong, Ji-Yan

    2018-04-01

    Personal digital assistants, technology with various functions, have been applied in international clinical practice. Great benefits in reducing medical errors and enhancing the efficiency of clinical work have been achieved, but little research has investigated nurses' satisfaction with the use of personal digital assistants. To investigate nurses' satisfaction with use of personal digital assistants, and to explore the predictors of this. This is a cross-sectional descriptive study. We conducted a cross-sectional survey targeting nurses who used personal digital assistants in a comprehensive tertiary hospital in Beijing. A total of 383 nurses were recruited in this survey in 2015. The total score of nurses' satisfaction with use of personal digital assistants was 238.91 (SD 39.25). Nurses were less satisfied with the function of documentation, compared with the function of administering medical orders. The time length of using personal digital assistants, academic degree, and different departments predicted nurses' satisfaction towards personal digital assistant use (all P < 0.05). Nurses were satisfied with the accuracy of administering medical orders and the safety of recording data. The stability of the wireless network and efficiency related to nursing work were less promising. To some extent, nurses with higher education and longer working time with personal digital assistants were more satisfied with them. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  2. “The balancing act”— Licensed practical nurse experiences of falls and fall prevention: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Häggqvist Beatrice

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Falls are common in old age and may have serious consequences. There are many strategies to predict and prevent falls from occurring in long-term care and hospitals. The aim of this study was to describe licensed practical nurse experiences of predicting and preventing further falls when working with patients who had experienced a fall-related fracture. Licensed practical nurses are the main caretakers that work most closely with the patients. Methods A qualitative study of focus groups interviews and field observations was done. 15 licensed practical nurses from a rehabilitation ward and an acute ward in a hospital in northern Sweden were interviewed. Content was analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Results The result of the licensed practical nurse thoughts and experiences about risk of falling and fall prevention work is represented in one theme, “the balancing act”. The theme includes three categories: “the right to decide”, “the constant watch”, and “the ongoing negotiation” as well as nine subcategories. The analysis showed similarities and differences between rehabilitation and acute wards. At both wards it was a core strategy in the licensed practical nurse work to always be ready and to pay attention to patients’ appearance and behavior. At the rehabilitation ward, it was an explicit working task to judge the patients’ risk of falling and to be active to prevent falls. At the acute ward, the words “risk of falling” were not used and fall prevention were not discussed; instead the licensed practical nurses used for example “dizzy and pale”. The results also indicated differences in components that facilitate workplace learning and knowledge transfer. Conclusions Differences between the wards are most probably rooted in organizational differences. When it is expected by the leadership, licensed practical nurses can express patient risk of falling, share their observations with others

  3. LIRA - License Renewal Assistant an expert system advisor for system and component screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, R.M.; DeLuke, R.J.; Lu, Yi; Catron, S.R.

    1992-01-01

    In developing a license renewal application for a nuclear power plant, it is necessary to identify those systems and components for which age-related degradation must be evaluated and addressed in detail. One approach, used in the Monticello Lead Plant project, is to screen all plant systems and components, based on criteria developed by the Nuclear Utility Management and Resources Council (NUMARC). This paper describes an expert system developed as an assistant in the application of the screening methodology. 4 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  4. Information literacy skills and training of licensed practical nurses in Alberta, Canada: results of a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadson, Kelley; Phillips, Leah Adeline

    2018-06-01

    Although information literacy skills are recognized as important to the curriculum and professional outcomes of two-year nursing programs, there is a lack of research on the information literacy skills and support needed by graduates. To identify the information literacy skills and consequent training and support required of Licensed Practical Nurses (LPNs) in Alberta, Canada. An online survey using a random sample of new graduates (graduated within 5 years) from the registration database of the College of Practical Nurses of Alberta (CLPNA). There was a 43% response rate. Approximately 25-38% of LPNs felt they were only moderately or to a small extent prepared to use evidence effectively in their professional practice. LPNs use the internet and websites most frequently, in contrast to library resources that are used least frequently. Developing lifelong learning skills, using information collaboratively, and locating and retrieving information are areas where LPNs desire more effective or increased training. The results suggest there are significant gaps in the preparedness and ability of LPNs to access and apply research evidence effectively in the workplace. There are several areas in which the training provided by Librarians appears either misaligned or ineffective. © 2018 Health Libraries Group.

  5. The waste of assistance material perceived by nursing students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magaly Cecília Franchini Reichert

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to identify the opinion of nursing students about the waste of assistance materials in practical learning activities. We conducted an exploratory, descriptive study with a quantitative approach. One hundred and eighty-six students composed the sample and they answered to an instrument with affirmatives measured by a Likert-type scale. More than half of students believed that institutions where they are interns waste materials; 76% of fourth grade students (p<0.001 acknowledged to waste materials during their internships and, 89% of the same year (p<0.001 attributed waste to conducting a procedure for the first time. The study allowed the discussion about waste materials during nursing training, alerting about the importance of adequate management of these resources besides the nursing responsibility with the environment and sustainable practices.

  6. Teaching nursing assistant students about aphasia and communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, Jessica Dionne; Szabo, Gretchen Beideman

    2011-08-01

    Research indicates that communication between patients with communication disorders and their health care providers may be compromised, which leads to adverse outcomes and reduced participation in patients' own health care. Emerging studies demonstrate that effective communication education programs may decrease communication difficulties. This feasibility study of an education program that includes people with aphasia as educators aims to improve nursing assistant students' knowledge of aphasia and awareness of supported communication strategies while also examining the experiences of participants with aphasia. This preliminary study suggests that explicit aphasia and communication training delivered in this format has positive learning outcomes for nursing assistant students and potential psychosocial benefits to participants with aphasia. The format can be modified for a variety of health care audiences and lends itself to implementation by community aphasia groups and centers. © Thieme Medical Publishers.

  7. Work-Family Conflict, Sleep, and Mental Health of Nursing Assistants Working in Nursing Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuan; Punnett, Laura; Nannini, Angela

    2017-07-01

    Work-family conflict is challenging for workers and may lead to depression, anxiety, and overall poor health. Sleep plays an important role in the maintenance of mental health; however, the role of sleep in the association between work-family conflict and mental health is not well-studied. Questionnaires were collected from 650 nursing assistants in 15 nursing homes. Multivariate linear regression modeling demonstrated that increased work-family conflict was associated with lower mental health scores (β = -2.56, p work-family conflict was correlated with more job demands, less job control, less social support, and longer work hours. Poor sleep quality, but not short sleep duration, mediated the association between work-family conflict and mental health. Workplace interventions to improve nursing assistants' mental health should increase their control over work schedules and responsibilities, provide support to meet their work and family needs, and address healthy sleep practices.

  8. Individual and contextual antecedents of workplace aggression in aged care nurses and certified nursing assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodwell, John; Demir, Defne; Gulyas, Andre

    2015-08-01

    Employees in aged care are at high risk of workplace aggression. Research rarely examines the individual and contextual antecedents of aggression for specific types of workers within these settings, such as nurses and certified nursing assistants (CNAs). The study aimed to explore characteristics of the job demands-resources model (JD-R), negative affectivity (NA) and demographics related to workplace aggression for aged care workers. The survey study was based on 208 nurses and 83 CNAs working within aged care. Data from each group were analysed separately using ordinal regressions. Both aged care nurses and CNAs reported high rates of bullying, external emotional abuse, threat of assault and physical assault. Elements of the JD-R model and individual characteristics were related to aggression types for both groups. Characteristics of the JD-R model, NA and demographics are important in understanding the antecedents of aggression observed among aged care workers. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  9. Psychiatric wards with locked doors--advantages and disadvantages according to nurses and mental health nurse assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haglund, K; von Knorring, L; von Essen, L

    2006-04-01

    To describe nurses' and mental health nurse assistants' perceptions of advantages and disadvantages about working on a psychiatric ward with a locked entrance door. Psychiatric staff sometimes needs to protect patients from harming themselves or others. To keep the entrance door locked may help staff to achieve this goal. How locked entrance doors at psychiatric wards are experienced by staff, working on these wards, has been investigated to a very limited extent. The study was explorative and descriptive. Audio taped, semi-structured interviews with open-ended questions about advantages and disadvantages about working on a psychiatric ward with a locked entrance door, were conducted with 20 nurses and 20 mental health nurse assistants. Data were analyzed with content analysis. A content analysis revealed eight categories of advantages and 18 categories of disadvantages. Most advantages mentioned by nurses and mental health nurse assistants were categorized as providing staff with control over patients, providing patients with a secure and efficient care and protecting patients and staff against 'the outside'. Most disadvantages mentioned by nurses were categorized as causing extra work for staff, making patients feel confined, making patients feel dependent and creating a non-caring environment. Most disadvantages mentioned by mental health nurse assistants were categorized as causing extra work for staff, making patients feel confined, causing emotional problems for patients, making staff's power obvious and forcing patients to adapt to other patients' needs. Nurses and mental health nurse assistants mentioned more disadvantages than advantages and nurses mentioned more disadvantages than mental health nurse assistants. Nurses and mental health nurse assistants perceive a number of advantages and disadvantages for themselves, patients and significant others with a locked door at a psychiatric ward. Most of these concern patients' experiences. It is important for

  10. A National Overview of the Training Received by Certified Nursing Assistants Working in U.S. Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Manisha; Harris-Kojetin, Lauren D.; Ejaz, Farida K.

    2010-01-01

    A few geographically limited studies have indicated that training of direct care workers may be insufficient. Using the first-ever nationally representative sample of certified nursing assistants (CNAs) from the 2004 National Nursing Assistant Survey (NNAS), this descriptive article provides an overview of the type of initial training and…

  11. Work-related musculoskeletal risks associated with nurses and nursing assistants handling overweight and obese patients: A literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sang D; Brings, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    Nurses and nursing assistants are susceptible to work-related musculoskeletal disorders and injuries (WMSDs) due to the increase in overweight and obese patients they are handling on a daily basis. This study aimed to review work-related musculoskeletal hazards and risks associated with handling overweight and obese patients, and summarize the recommended interventions to mitigate musculoskeletal concerns among nurses and nursing assistants. Approximately 350 publications were initially screened and 22 refereed articles were used to synthesize for this study on the bases of inclusion/exclusion relevance and strength of evidence on overweight or obese patient handling. Evidence suggested that the work-related musculoskeletal risks among nurses and nursing assistants included sprains/strains, low back pain, wrist, knee and shoulder injuries. The findings indicated that the WMSD risks increased when nurses and nursing assistants were manually moving or lifting patients, especially when the patients were overweight or obese. The recommended solutions included the lifting/transfer equipment and devices, ergonomic assessments and controls, no-lift policies, and training and education. To alleviate the risk of musculoskeletal disorders and injuries among nurses and nursing assistants handling overweight or obese patients, additional research and development into what safe patient handling interventions suit this growing population needs to be addressed.

  12. Nursing Assistants for Long-Term Care. Performance-Based Instructional Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indiana Univ., Bloomington. Vocational Education Services.

    This guide is intended to assist students enrolled in programs to train nursing assistants for employment in an Indiana long-term health care facility. The first part discusses human development (growth, aging, and dying); communication with residents; sexuality; legal, ethical, and professional responsibilities of nursing assistants in long-term…

  13. Experiences of reduced work hours for nurses and assistant nurses at a surgical department: a qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Gyllensten, Kristina; Andersson, Gunnar; Muller, Helena

    2017-01-01

    Background There is a shortage of registered nurses in the European Union (EU), and job dissatisfaction and perceived high work?family conflict have been identified as causes of nursing staff turnover. Reducing work hours is an organisational intervention that could have a positive effect on nurses? and assistant nurses? job satisfaction, work?life balance, and willingness to stay in the job. An orthopaedic surgery department at a large hospital in Sweden introduced reduced work hours for nur...

  14. Making tradeoffs between the reasons to leave and reasons to stay employed in long-term care homes: perspectives of licensed nursing staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGilton, Katherine S; Boscart, Veronique M; Brown, Maryanne; Bowers, Barbara

    2014-06-01

    Turnover of licensed nursing staff in long-term care (LTC) settings (e.g., nursing homes) is a mounting concern and is associated with poor quality of care and low staff morale. Retention and turnover research in LTC have focused primarily on direct care workers (i.e., nurse aides) leaving the issues largely unexplored for licensed nursing staff (i.e., registered nurses and licensed practical nurses). The main objective of this study was to understand factors that influence nurses' intentions to remain employed at their current job. Qualitative descriptive study. Seven nursing homes in Ontario, Canada. A convenience sample of forty-one licensed LTC nurses. Data were collected through focus groups conducted at each of the participating nursing homes. Focus group discussions were transcribed verbatim. Directed content analysis was used to identify and develop themes. Work conditions were a salient element affecting nurses' intention to stay and included impact of regulations on nurse role flexibility and professional judgment, an underfunded system contributing to insufficient resources and staffing, and a lack of supportive leadership. Factors promoting nurses' willingness to stay included the development of meaningful relationships with residents and staff and opportunities for learning and professional development. Nurses also considered personal and life circumstances (e.g., marital status and seniority) when discussing intention to stay. Nurses in this study weighed positive and negative work-related factors as well as personal circumstances to determine their intent to stay. Developing a more individualized approach to address attrition of licensed nurses in LTC may be the most successful strategy for improving retention of highly skilled staff in this sector. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The assisted presentations of self in nursing home life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Næss, Anders; Fjær, Eivind Grip; Vabø, Mia

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, based on ethnographic data from five nursing homes, we introduce the concept of assisted self-presentation as an analytical tool for exploring how different care practices affect nursing home residents' dignity and sense of self. Practices of assisted self-presentation are geared at recognizing and preserving the individuality and autonomy of residents in situations where it may otherwise come under threat or be misrecognized. Sufficient or appropriate forms of attentiveness to residents' selves and sense of dignity is thus a matter of finding the right balance between intervening too much or too little in residents' production of their physical or social appearance. Here, staff-members' knowledge and recognition of the individuality of residents is essential. Whereas intervening too much in residents' appearance or performance of self might be perceived and experienced as pacifying, infantilizing, or as paternalistic overbearingness, intervening too little might be seen as neglectfulness or inhumane. Since practices of assisted self-presentation refer to a kind of social action, which will always be contingent upon the specific capacities and conditions of performing actors, it allows for the simultaneous recognition of failed or perverted work practices as well as promising practices through which residents' selves are successfully recognized. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Multidimensional intervention and sickness absence in assistant nursing students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Annemarie Lyng; Strøyer, Jesper; Ebbehøj, Niels Erik

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: When handling patients, nursing assistant (NA) students and nurse students are frequently exposed to risk factors for low back pain (LBP) including sudden loads and twisting and bending of the spine. Furthermore, LBP is a major cause of sickness absence. AIMS: To ascertain...... if a multidimensional prevention programme combining physical training, patient transfer technique and stress management prevents sickness absence and LBP in NA students. METHODS: The study was a 14-month cluster randomized controlled study. The participants were NA students from 37 randomly selected classes located...... at two schools of health and social care in Copenhagen, Denmark. The participants completed a comprehensive questionnaire regarding sickness absence, LBP and psychosocial factors on commencement and after completion of the study. RESULTS: Of 766 female NA students, 668 (87%) completed the baseline...

  17. Capillary refill time: a study of interobserver reliability among nurses and nurse assistants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brabrand, Mikkel; Hosbond, Susanne; Folkestad, Lars

    2011-01-01

    assistants would grade CRT. METHODS: We recorded a video of the index finger of six medical patients and these were shown to nurses and nurse assistants. They were asked to record the CRT and whether they found this value to be normal. The data were analyzed using the Fleiss Kappa Coefficient Analysis...... 130 mmHg. All had arterial blood oxygen saturation above 92% and all but one had normal body temperature. The kappa value for normality was 0.56. The interclass correlation of measurement of CRT was 0.62. CONCLUSION: This is the largest interobserver study of CRT when looking at the number...... of observers. We found an only moderate agreement for the exact value of CRT and a moderate agreement for normality. We believe that CRT should be used with caution in clinical practice....

  18. Exploring correlates of turnover among nursing assistants in the National Nursing Home Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temple, April; Dobbs, Debra; Andel, Ross

    2011-01-01

    High turnover of nursing assistants (NAs) has implications for the quality of nursing home care. Greater understanding of correlates of NA turnover is needed to provide insight into possible retention strategies. This study examined nursing home organizational characteristics and specific job characteristics of staff in relation to turnover of NAs. Cross-sectional data on 944 nationally representative nursing homes were derived from the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey. Using a 3-month turnover rate, 25% of the facilities with the lowest turnover rates were classified as low turnover, 25% of the facilities with the highest turnover were classified as high turnover, and the remaining 50% of the facilities were classified as moderate turnover. Multinomial logistic regression was used to examine organizational and job characteristics associated with low and high turnover compared with moderate turnover. One organizational characteristic, staffing levels at or greater than 4.0 hours per patient day, was associated with greater odds of low NA turnover and reduced odds of high NA turnover. Job characteristics including higher wages and union membership were associated with greater odds of low NA turnover, whereas wages, fully paid health insurance, employee assistance benefits, and involvement in resident care planning were associated with reduced odds of high NA turnover. The results of this study suggest that job characteristics of NA staff may be particularly important for turnover. Specifically, the provision of competitive wages and benefits (particularly health insurance) and involvement of NAs in resident care planning could potentially reduce NA turnover, as could maintaining high levels of nurse staffing.

  19. Experiences of reduced work hours for nurses and assistant nurses at a surgical department: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyllensten, Kristina; Andersson, Gunnar; Muller, Helena

    2017-01-01

    There is a shortage of registered nurses in the European Union (EU), and job dissatisfaction and perceived high work-family conflict have been identified as causes of nursing staff turnover. Reducing work hours is an organisational intervention that could have a positive effect on nurses' and assistant nurses' job satisfaction, work-life balance, and willingness to stay in the job. An orthopaedic surgery department at a large hospital in Sweden introduced reduced work hours for nurses and assistant nurses in order to improve the working situation. The aim of the study was to investigate the experiences of reduced work hours and no lunch breaks among nurses and assistant nurses at an orthopaedic surgery department at a hospital in Sweden, with a particular focus on recovery and psychosocial working environment. A qualitative design was used in the study. Eleven nurses and assistant nurses working at the particular orthopaedic department took part in the study, and semi-structured interviews were used to collect data. The interviews were analysed by interpretative phenomenological analysis. Four main themes were developed in the analysis of the data: A more sustainable working situation, Improved work-life balance, Consequences of being part of a project, and Improved quality of care. Each theme consisted of subthemes. Overall, reduced work hours appeared to have many, mainly positive, effects for the participants in both work and home life.

  20. Attitudes of Registered and Licensed Practical Nurses About the Importance of Families in Surgical Hospital Units: Findings From the Landspitali University Hospital Family Nursing Implementation Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blöndal, Katrin; Zoëga, Sigridur; Hafsteinsdottir, Jorunn E; Olafsdottir, Olof Asdis; Thorvardardottir, Audur B; Hafsteinsdottir, Sigrun A; Sveinsdóttir, Herdis

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine attitudes of registered nurses and licensed practical nurses about the importance of the family in surgical hospital units before (T1) and after (T2) implementation of a Family Systems Nursing educational intervention based on the Calgary Family Assessment and Intervention Models. This study was part of the Landspitali University Hospital Family Nursing Implementation Project and used a nonrandomized, quasi-experimental design with nonequivalent group before and after and without a control group. There were 181 participants at T1 and 130 at T2. No difference was found in nurses' attitudes as measured by the Families Importance in Nursing Care-Nurses' Attitudes (FINC-NA) questionnaire, before and after the educational intervention. Attitudes toward families were favorable at both times. Analysis of demographic variables showed that age, work experience, and workplace (inpatient vs. outpatient units) had an effect on the nurses' attitudes toward families. The influence of work experience on attitudes toward family care warrants further exploration. © The Author(s) 2014.

  1. Japanese professional nurses spend unnecessarily long time doing nursing assistants' tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Yasushi; Yoshimura, Emiko; Shahzad, Machiko Taruzuka; Shibuya, Akitaka; Aizawa, Yoshiharu

    2012-09-01

    In environments in which professional nurses do simple tasks, e.g., laundry, cleaning, and waste disposal, they cannot concentrate on technical jobs by utilizing their expertise to its fullest benefit. Particularly, in Japan, the nursing shortage is a serious problem. If professional nurses take their time to do any of these simple tasks, the tasks should be preferentially allocated to nursing assistants. Because there has been no descriptive study to investigate the amount of time Japanese professional nurses spent doing such simple tasks during their working time, their actual conditions remain unclear. Professional nurses recorded their total working time and the time they spent doing such simple tasks during the week of the survey period. The time an individual respondent spent doing one or more simple tasks during that week was summed up, as was their working time. Subsequently, the percentage of the summed time he or she spent doing any of those tasks in his or her summed working time was calculated. A total of 1,086 respondents in 19 hospitals that had 87 to 376 beds were analyzed (response rate: 53.3%). The average time (SD) that respondents spent doing those simple tasks and their total working time were 2.24 (3.35) hours and 37.48 (10.88) hours, respectively. The average percentage (SD) of the time they spent doing the simple tasks in their working time was 6.00% (8.39). Hospital administrators must decrease this percentage. Proper working environments in which professional nurses can concentrate more on their technical jobs must be created.

  2. Applicability of Item Response Theory to the Korean Nurses' Licensing Examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geum-Hee Jeong

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available To test the applicability of item response theory (IRT to the Korean Nurses' Licensing Examination (KNLE, item analysis was performed after testing the unidimensionality and goodness-of-fit. The results were compared with those based on classical test theory. The results of the 330-item KNLE administered to 12,024 examinees in January 2004 were analyzed. Unidimensionality was tested using DETECT and the goodness-of-fit was tested using WINSTEPS for the Rasch model and Bilog-MG for the two-parameter logistic model. Item analysis and ability estimation were done using WINSTEPS. Using DETECT, Dmax ranged from 0.1 to 0.23 for each subject. The mean square value of the infit and outfit values of all items using WINSTEPS ranged from 0.1 to 1.5, except for one item in pediatric nursing, which scored 1.53. Of the 330 items, 218 (42.7% were misfit using the two-parameter logistic model of Bilog-MG. The correlation coefficients between the difficulty parameter using the Rasch model and the difficulty index from classical test theory ranged from 0.9039 to 0.9699. The correlation between the ability parameter using the Rasch model and the total score from classical test theory ranged from 0.9776 to 0.9984. Therefore, the results of the KNLE fit unidimensionality and goodness-of-fit for the Rasch model. The KNLE should be a good sample for analysis according to the IRT Rasch model, so further research using IRT is possible.

  3. An Exploration of Nursing Assistants' Perceptions About Job Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Darcie M

    2016-01-01

    High levels of staff turnover of certified nursing assistants (CNAs) are costly and disruptive to patient care. A variety of factors contribute to a 36% turnover rate of CNAs nationwide (2015 Staffing Report, 2015). According to Stone and Wiener, high rates of turnover and staff vacancies have multilayered consequences; patient care suffers, cost of constantly replacing workers soars, and worker job dissatisfaction increases. This study examined the CNAs' beliefs about job satisfaction as an approach to prevent job turnover and retain high achieving staff in one acute care hospital in a south eastern region. The goal was to determine how CNAs define job satisfaction, evaluate their understanding of and gauge interest in the career options presented at information sessions as well as listen to their ideas on how they believe are the best approaches to achieve job satisfaction for the CNAs at this facility. A qualitative key informant design was used to interview a purposive sample of 9 nursing assistants who were currently employed at the hospital for at least 6 months and who attended a brief information session. Individual 20-minute face-to-face interviews of consented participants were recorded, transcribed, and coded for themes using constant comparative analysis. Four major categories emerged from the interviews: CNA views of job satisfaction, clinical ladder option, support services option, and what CNAs want.

  4. Exploring nursing assistants' roles in the process of pain management for cognitively impaired nursing home residents: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Justina Y W

    2014-05-01

    To explore nursing assistants' roles during the actual process of pain management (assessment, reporting, implementation of pain-relieving interventions and re-assessment) for cognitively impaired home residents with pain. Nursing assistants provide most of the direct care to residents and represent the major taskforce in nursing homes. They may develop specialized knowledge of residents' pain experience that enables them to play both a pivotal role in pain assessment and possibly a supporting role in pain treatment. Currently, there is a lack of research into nursing assistants' functions in pain management. This is a descriptive, exploratory qualitative study. Forty-nine nursing assistants were recruited from 12 nursing homes, 12 of them participating in semi-structured individual interviews and 37 in 8 semi-structured focus groups. All interviews were carried out from May to September 2010. Data collected via both data collection methods were transcribed verbatim and analysed by content analysis. Nursing assistants were found to play four roles in the pain management process: (1) pain assessor; (2) reporter; (3) subordinate implementing prescribed medications; and (4) instigator implementing non-pharmacological interventions. This study highlights the importance of nursing assistants in successful pain assessment and identifies their possible supporting roles in other aspects of pain management. However, nursing assistants' scope of practice resulted in their functions in pain management being continually undervalued by other healthcare professionals. Continuous in-service training, the use of a standardized pain management protocol and strategies for building coherent work teams in nursing homes are suggested to improve this situation. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Euthanasia and assisted suicide in Dutch hospitals: the role of nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bruchem-van de Scheur, G G; van der Arend, Arie J G; Huijer Abu-Saad, Huda; van Wijmen, Frans C B; Spreeuwenberg, Cor; Ter Meulen, Ruud H J

    2008-06-01

    To report a study on the role of nurses in euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide in hospitals, conducted as part of a wider study on the role of nurses in medical end-of-life decisions. Issues concerning legislation and regulation with respect to the role of nurses in euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide gave the Dutch Minister for Health reason to commission a study on the role of nurses in medical end-of-life decisions in hospitals, homecare and nursing homes. A questionnaire was sent in 2003 to 692 nurses employed in 73 hospital locations. The response suitable for analysis was from 532 (76.9%) nurses. Data were quantitatively analysed using spss version 11.5 for Windows. In almost half of the cases (45.1%), the nurse was the first with whom patients discussed their request for euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide. Consultations between physicians and nurses quite often took place (78.8%). In several cases (15.4%), nurses themselves administered the euthanatics with or without a physician. It is not self-evident that hospitals have guidelines concerning euthanasia/physician-assisted suicide. In the decision-making process, the consultation between the physician and the nurse needs improvement. In administering the euthanatics, physicians should take responsibility and should not leave these actions to nurses. Guidelines may play an important role to improve the collaboration between physicians and nurses and to prevent procedural, ethical and legal misunderstandings. Nurses in clinical practice are often closely involved in the last stage of a person's life. Consequently, they are often confronted with caring for patients requesting euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide. The results provide relevant information and may help nurses in defining their role in euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide, especially in case these practices should become legalised.

  6. Death and Dying Attitudes, Anxieties, and Fears of Certified Nursing Assistants: A Descriptive Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Josephine A.

    2010-01-01

    The critical role of Certified Nursing Assistants (CNAs) to help elderly nursing home residents' move through declining conditions or diseases to death is salient. It is important for CNAs and nursing home leaders to understand CNAs' attitudes, fears, and anxieties toward death and dying. The quantitative study investigated CNA's…

  7. Pain in Alzheimer's disease: comparison of nursing assistents' assessment with the patient's own evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scherder, E.J.A.; van Manen, F.M.

    2005-01-01

    Aim. This paper reports on a study examining the level of agreement between the pain perceptions of nursing assistants, older people without dementia and patients with Alzheimer's dementia. It was hypothesized that nursing assistants would overestimate the pain experience of patients with

  8. 77 FR 60128 - Noncompetitive Supplements to Nursing Assistant and Home Health Aide Program Grantees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-02

    ... Noncompetitive Supplements to Nursing Assistant and Home Health Aide Program Grantees AGENCY: Health Resources... expansion supplements of $100,000 to 10 Nursing Assistant and Home Health Aide (NAHHA) Program grantees to... Management; Care Coordination and Follow Up; and Behavioral Health and Social Support for Home Health Aides...

  9. Emergency Nursing Experiences in Assisting People With Suicidal Behavior: A Grounded Theory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedana, Kelly Graziani Giacchero; Magrini, Daniel Fernando; Miasso, Adriana Inocenti; Zanetti, Ana Carolina Guidorizzi; de Souza, Jacqueline; Borges, Tatiana Longo

    2017-08-01

    To understand emergency nursing experiences in assisting people with suicidal behavior. Grounded theory study with symbolic interactionism conducted in 2015 to 2016 in Brazil with 19 nurses. Assistance for people with suicidal behavior is critical, challenging, evokes different feelings and requires knowledge, skills and emotional control. Nurses did not feel prepared or supported, and identified recurrent gaps and problems. Nurses occupied a limited role, restricted to attending to physical needs. They predominantly manifested opposition, judgments and incomprehension about patients. This study presents key elements to be addressed in interventions and investigations regarding nursing support, training and supervision. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Nursing Assistants' Job Commitment: Effect of Nursing Home Organizational Factors and Impact on Resident Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Christine E.; Weinberg, Dana Beth; Leutz, Walter; Dossa, Almas; Pfefferle, Susan G.; Zincavage, Rebekah M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate (a) whether certified nursing assistants (CNAs) are more committed to nursing home jobs when they perceive their jobs as enhanced (greater autonomy, use of knowledge, teamwork), and (b) whether CNA job commitment affects resident satisfaction. Design and Methods: A qualitative exploration of…

  11. Assisted Living Facilities, This file contains the name, address, contact and some licensing information for the Assisted Living Facilites for the State of Maryland., Published in 2010, Smaller than 1:100000 scale, Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — Assisted Living Facilities dataset current as of 2010. This file contains the name, address, contact and some licensing information for the Assisted Living Facilites...

  12. Nursing home practices following resident death: the experience of Certified Nursing Assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barooah, Adrita; Boerner, Kathrin; van Riesenbeck, Isabelle; Burack, Orah R

    2015-01-01

    This study examined certified nursing assistants' (CNAs) experiences of nursing home practices following resident death. Participants were 140 CNAs who had experienced recent resident death. In semi-structured, in-person interviews, CNAs were asked about their experiences with the removal of the resident's body, filling the bed with a new resident, and how they were notified about the death. The facilities' practice of filling the bed quickly was most often experienced as negative. Responses to body removal and staff notification varied, but negative experiences were reported by a substantial minority. Being notified prior to returning to work was associated with a more positive experience. Learning about the death by walking into a room to find the bed empty or already filled was the most negative experience. Study findings suggest that more mindful approaches to the transitions related to resident deaths would be valued by CNAs and could improve their work experience. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Substituting physicians with nurse practitioners, physician assistants or nurses in nursing homes: protocol for a realist evaluation case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovink, Marleen Hermien; Persoon, Anke; van Vught, Anneke J A H; Schoonhoven, Lisette; Koopmans, Raymond T C M; Laurant, Miranda G H

    2017-06-08

    In developed countries, substituting physicians with nurse practitioners, physician assistants and nurses (physician substitution) occurs in nursing homes as an answer to the challenges related to the ageing population and the shortage of staff, as well as to guarantee the quality of nursing home care. However, there is great diversity in how physician substitution in nursing homes is modelled and it is unknown how it can best contribute to the quality of healthcare. This study aims to gain insight into how physician substitution is modelled and whether it contributes to perceived quality of healthcare. Second, this study aims to provide insight into the elements of physician substitution that contribute to quality of healthcare. This study will use a multiple-case study design that draws upon realist evaluation principles. The realist evaluation is based on four concepts for explaining and understanding interventions: context, mechanism, outcome and context-mechanism-outcome configuration. The following steps will be taken: (1) developing a theory, (2) conducting seven case studies, (3) analysing outcome patterns after each case and a cross-case analysis at the end and (4) revising the initial theory. The research ethics committee of the region Arnhem Nijmegen in the Netherlands concluded that this study does not fall within the scope of the Dutch Medical Research Involving Human Subjects Act (WMO) (registration number 2015/1914). Before the start of the study, the Board of Directors of the nursing home organisations will be informed verbally and by letter and will also be asked for informed consent. In addition, all participants will be informed verbally and by letter and will be asked for informed consent. Findings will be disseminated by publication in a peer-reviewed journal, international and national conferences, national professional associations and policy partners in national government. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated

  14. Does Assisted Living Capacity Influence Case Mix at Nursing Homes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Jan P; Khushalani, Jaya

    2015-01-01

    Assisted living facilities (ALFs) have grown over the past few decades. If they attract residents with lower care needs away from nursing homes (NHs), NHs may be left with higher case mix residents. We study the relationship between ALF bed market capacity and NH case mix in a state (Virginia) where ALF bed capacity stabilized after a period of growth. Similarly, NH capacity and use had been stable. While it is interesting to study markets in flux, for planning purposes, it is also important to examine what happens after periods of turbulence and adaptation. Our findings show some substitution of ALF for NH care, but the relationship is not linear with ALF market capacity. Communities need to consider the interplay of ALFs and NHs in planning for long-term care services and supports. Policies supporting ALFs may enable care needs to be met in a lower cost setting than the NH.

  15. Does Assisted Living Capacity Influence Case Mix at Nursing Homes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan P. Clement PhD

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Assisted living facilities (ALFs have grown over the past few decades. If they attract residents with lower care needs away from nursing homes (NHs, NHs may be left with higher case mix residents. We study the relationship between ALF bed market capacity and NH case mix in a state (Virginia where ALF bed capacity stabilized after a period of growth. Similarly, NH capacity and use had been stable. While it is interesting to study markets in flux, for planning purposes, it is also important to examine what happens after periods of turbulence and adaptation. Our findings show some substitution of ALF for NH care, but the relationship is not linear with ALF market capacity. Communities need to consider the interplay of ALFs and NHs in planning for long-term care services and supports. Policies supporting ALFs may enable care needs to be met in a lower cost setting than the NH.

  16. Between Licensed and Unlicense:The Professionalization of Nurse and a Postwar History of Unlicensed Nurses in Akita

    OpenAIRE

    和泉, 浩; 菊地, よしこ; IZUMI, Hiroshi; KIKUCHI, Yoshiko

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to shed light on the postwar history of unlicensed nurses in Akita Prefecture.After World War n, under the control of GHQ (General Headquarters of the Allied Powers), the Public Health Nurse, Midwife and Nurse Law was enacted in 1948. Since then the professionalization of nurse and the improvement of their social status have been fostered in Japan, by law, educational system, administrative system, professional organization, amelioration of working conditions and ...

  17. Pilot trial of a licensed practical nurse intervention for hypertension and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogner, Hillary R; de Vries, Heather F; Kaye, Elise M; Morales, Knashawn H

    2013-05-01

    Depression is a risk factor for hypertension, and risk of depression is increased substantially in patients with hypertension. Our objective was to examine whether an intervention carried out by Licensed Practical Nurses (LPNs) integrating depression treatment into care for hypertension improved blood pressure control and depressive symptoms. In all, 60 patients ages 41 to 92 years with hypertension and depressive symptoms at a large primary care practice in Philadelphia were randomly assigned to an integrated care intervention carried out by LPNs (n=30) or usual care (n=30). Intervention and control groups did not differ statistically on baseline measures. Outcomes assessed at baseline and 12 weeks included standard laboratory procedures to measure blood pressure control and the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) to assess depression. Patients in the integrated care intervention had lower diastolic blood pressure (intervention 74.2 mmHg versus usual care 82.0 mmHg) and fewer depressive symptoms (PHQ-9 mean scores, intervention 2.4 versus usual care 7.1) compared with patients in the usual care group at 12 weeks after adjustment for baseline values. Patients in the integrated care intervention also had lower systolic blood pressure (intervention 130.0 mmHg versus usual care 140.6 mmHg) compared with patients in the usual care group at 12 weeks although the results approached but did not reach conventional levels of statistical significance. Training existing primary care practice office staff will facilitate implementation in real world practices with limited resources and competing demands.

  18. Pilot Trial of a Licensed Practical Nurse Intervention for Hypertension and Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogner, Hillary R.; de Vries, Heather F.; Kaye, Elise M.; Morales, Knashawn H.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES Depression is a risk factor for hypertension, and risk of depression is increased substantially in patients with hypertension. Our objective was to examine whether an intervention carried out by Licensed Practical Nurses (LPNs) integrating depression treatment into care for hypertension improved blood pressure control and depressive symptoms. METHODS In all, 60 patients ages 41 to 92 years with hypertension and depressive symptoms at a large primary care practice in Philadelphia were randomly assigned to an integrated care intervention carried out by LPNs (n=30) or usual care (n=30). Intervention and control groups did not differ statistically on baseline measures. Outcomes assessed at baseline and 12 weeks included standard laboratory procedures to measure blood pressure control and the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) to assess depression. RESULTS Patients in the integrated care intervention had lower diastolic blood pressure (intervention 74.2 mmHg versus usual care 82.0 mmHg) and fewer depressive symptoms (PHQ-9 mean scores, intervention 2.4 versus usual care 7.1) compared with patients in the usual care group at 12 weeks after adjustment for baseline values. Patients in the integrated care intervention also had lower systolic blood pressure (intervention 130.0 mmHg versus usual care 140.6 mmHg) compared with patients in the usual care group at 12 weeks although the results approached but did not reach conventional levels of statistical significance. CONCLUSION Training existing primary care practice office staff will facilitate implementation in real world practices with limited resources and competing demands. PMID:23681683

  19. Nursing home staff members' attitudes and knowledge about urinary incontinence: the impact of technology and training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlman, Katie; Wilson, Amy; Dugger, Renee; Eggleston, Brandon; Coudret, Nadine; Mathis, Sherri

    2012-01-01

    Urinary incontinence (UI) poses challenges for nursing home personnel. The authors of this study explored differences in attitude and knowledge about UI among registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, and certified nursing assistants working in skilled nursing homes before and after study interventions.

  20. End-of-Life Education and Discussions With Assisted Living Certified Nursing Assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohlman, Wendy L; Dassel, Kara; Supiano, Katherine P; Caserta, Michael

    2018-06-01

    In previous work, the current researchers examined attitudes and experiences of certified nursing assistants (CNAs) providing end-of-life (EOL) care in an assisted living facility (ALF). Results showed that 70% of participating CNAs felt unprepared to provide EOL care, largely due to not having received prior EOL care education within their schools or workplaces. Therefore, the goal of the current study was to implement and evaluate EOL and postmortem education to ALF CNAs. A focus group of 14 CNAs within an ALF was provided EOL education pertaining to the physiological and psychological changes observed in patients nearing EOL and postmortem care. Immediately following training, CNAs participated in a 30-minute focus group in which they discussed their experiences and educational needs regarding EOL care. Responses were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed for common themes using descriptive qualitative inquiry. All participants reported that CNA programs need to place greater emphasis on teaching EOL care, and 80% desired continuing education on EOL care through their employers. There is a need for CNAs to receive EOL care education to understand the psychological and physical signs and symptoms associated with the dying process to provide best practices in postmortem care. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 44(6), 41-48.]. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. Value of wireless personal digital assistants for practice: perceptions of advanced practice nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Bernard; Klein, Gerri

    2008-08-01

    The aims were to explore advanced practice nurses' perceptions on wireless Personal Digital Assistant technologies, to establish the type and range of tools that would be useful to support their practice and to identify any requirements and limitations that may impact the implementation of wireless Personal Digital Assistants in practice. The wireless Personal Digital Assistant is becoming established as a hand-held computing tool for healthcare professionals. The reflections of advanced practice nurses' about the value of wireless Personal Digital Assistants and its potential to contribute to improved patient care has not been investigated. A qualitative interpretivist design was used to explore advanced practice nurses' perceptions on the value of wireless Personal Digital Assistant technologies to support their practice. The data were collected using survey questionnaires and individual and focus group interviews with nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists and information technology managers based in British Columbia, Canada. An open-coding content analysis was performed using qualitative data analysis software. Wireless Personal Digital Assistant's use supports the principles of pervasivity and is a technology rapidly being adopted by advanced practice nurses. Some nurses indicated a reluctance to integrate wireless Personal Digital Assistant technologies into their practices because of the cost and the short technological life cycle of these devices. Many of the barriers which precluded the use of wireless networks within facilities are being removed. Nurses demonstrated a complex understanding of wireless Personal Digital Assistant technologies and gave good rationales for its integration in their practice. Nurses identified improved client care as the major benefit of this technology in practice and the type and range of tools they identified included clinical reference tools such as drug and diagnostic/laboratory reference applications and wireless

  2. A Correlational Study of the Relationship between TEAS V and Success in Licensed Practical Nursing Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Jamila

    2017-01-01

    Practical nurses can provide quality, cost-effective care in an ever-changing health care setting which is faced with a shortage of nurses. A community college system in the southeastern area of the United States began using the Test of Essential Academic Skills (TEAS) V as part of admission criteria for nursing programs. While Assessment…

  3. The effect of skill mix in non-nursing assistants on work engagements among home visiting nurses in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naruse, Takashi; Taguchi, Atsuko; Kuwahara, Yuki; Nagata, Satoko; Sakai, Mahiro; Watai, Izumi; Murashima, Sachiyo

    2015-05-01

    This study evaluated the effect of a skill-mix programme intervention on work engagement in home visiting nurses. A skill-mix programme in which home visiting nurses are assisted by non-nursing workers is assumed to foster home visiting nurses' work engagement. Pre- and post-intervention evaluations of work engagement were conducted using self-administered questionnaires. A skill-mix programme was introduced in the intervention group of home visiting nurses. After 6 months, their pre- and post-intervention work engagement ratings were compared with those of a control group. Baseline questionnaires were returned by 174 home visiting nurses (44 in the intervention group, 130 in the control group). Post-intervention questionnaires were returned by 38 and 97 home visiting nurses from each group. The intervention group's average work engagement scores were 2.2 at baseline and 2.3 at post-intervention; the control group's were 3.3 and 2.6. Generalised linear regression showed significant between-group differences in score changes. The skill-mix programme might foster home visiting nurses' work engagement by improving the quality of care for each client. Future research is needed to explain the exact mechanisms that underlie its effectiveness. In order to improve the efficiency of services provided by home visiting nurses and foster their work engagement, skill-mix programmes might be beneficial. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Laparoscopic assistance by operating room nurses: Results of a virtual-reality study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschold, M; Huber, T; Maedge, S; Zeissig, S R; Lang, H; Kneist, W

    2017-04-01

    Laparoscopic assistance is often entrusted to a less experienced resident, medical student, or operating room nurse. Data regarding laparoscopic training for operating room nurses are not available. The aim of the study was to analyse the initial performance level and learning curves of operating room nurses in basic laparoscopic surgery compared with medical students and surgical residents to determine their ability to assist with this type of procedure. The study was designed to compare the initial virtual reality performance level and learning curves of user groups to analyse competence in laparoscopic assistance. The study subjects were operating room nurses, medical students, and first year residents. Participants performed three validated tasks (camera navigation, peg transfer, fine dissection) on a virtual reality laparoscopic simulator three times in 3 consecutive days. Laparoscopic experts were enrolled as a control group. Participants filled out questionnaires before and after the course. Nurses and students were comparable in their initial performance (p>0.05). Residents performed better in camera navigation than students and nurses and reached the expert level for this task. Residents, students, and nurses had comparable bimanual skills throughout the study; while, experts performed significantly better in bimanual manoeuvres at all times (p<0.05). The included user groups had comparable skills for bimanual tasks. Residents with limited experience reached the expert level in camera navigation. With training, nurses, students, and first year residents are equally capable of assisting in basic laparoscopic procedures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Students' Demographic, Academic Characteristics and Performance in Registered General Nursing Licensing Examination in Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doe, Patience Fakornam; Oppong, Elizabeth Agyeiwaa; Sarfo, Jacob Owusu

    2018-01-01

    The decreasing performance of student nurses in the professional licensure examinations (LE) in Ghana is a major concern to stakeholders, especially at a time when the nurse-patient ratio stands at 1: 1500. The study sought to determine the effect of students' demographic and academic characteristics on performance in the Registered General…

  6. Physician Assistants and Nurse Practitioners in Rural Washington Emergency Departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Scott C; Hooker, Roderick S

    2016-06-01

    One role of physician assistants (PAs) and nurse practitioners (NPs) is to meet the growing demand for access to rural health care. Critical Access Hospitals, those with less than 25 beds, are usually located in rural communities, often providing continuity of care that clinics cannot deliver. Because little is known about staffing in these small hospital emergency departments, an exploratory study was undertaken using a mixed-methods approach. In Washington State, 18 of the 39 Critical Access Hospitals staff their emergency departments with PAs and NPs. Utilization data were collected through structured interviews by phone or in person on site. Most PAs and NPs lived within the community and staffing tended to be either 24 hours in-house or short notice if they lived or worked nearby. Emergency department visits ranged from 200 to 25,000 per year. All sites were designated level V or IV trauma centers and often managed cardiac events, significant injuries and, in some larger settings, obstetrics. In most instances, PAs were the sole providers in the emergency departments, albeit with physician backup and emergency medical technician support if a surge of emergency cases arose. Two-thirds of the PAs had graduated within the last 5 years. Most preferred the autonomy of the emergency department role and all expressed job satisfaction. Geographically, the more remote a Washington State Critical Access Hospital is, the more likely it will be staffed by PAs/NPs. The diverse utilization of semiautonomous PAs and NPs and their rise in rural hospital employment is a new workforce observation that requires broader investigation.

  7. Work values and intention to become a registered nurse among healthcare assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trede, Ines; Schweri, Juerg

    2014-06-01

    To examine the work values of Swiss healthcare assistant students, who, at the end of their vocational education in hospitals and nursing homes, choose to pursue a registered nurse degree. A prospective, cross-sectional survey was administered to a full cohort of healthcare assistant students in their last year of study in the canton of Bern (n=272). Multivariate methods (logistic regression) were applied to estimate the joint effect of work experience and work values in choosing to pursue a registered nurse education. Among work values, extrinsic values (regarding wage, career und educational perspectives) had a strong effect on the decisions of healthcare assistant students to pursue further education as registered nurses. Grades, socio-economic background and satisfaction during education also had an effect. Higher valuation of income, career and further education affect the career intentions of nursing assistants who have already obtained a recognized healthcare education and nursing experience. Teachers and trainers should actively identify the work values and expectations of these students. Provision of adequate advice and suggestions for the career development of these students may be an important route by which to address the nursing shortage and recruitment problems. © 2013.

  8. The relationship between weight status and the need for health care assistance in nursing home residents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Anne Marie

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between underweight status and weight loss events on the need for health care assistance among a sample of Danish nursing home residents over 12-months. Design: Longitudinal, repeated measures design with three data collection...... points at baseline (2004) and six and 12 months post baseline. Setting: 11 Danish nursing home facilities. Participants: 441 Danish nursing home residents over the age of 65. Measurements: Resident Assessment Instrument (RAI-NH) data were abstracted for each participant at each of three data collection...... of this study suggest that elderly nursing home residents with a low BMI or weight loss may add to the substantial and costly burden of nursing home care due to the associated need for higher levels of ADL assistance....

  9. The Role of Preceptorship and Group Cohesion on Newly Licensed Registered Nurses' Satisfaction and Intent to Stay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bontrager, Sarah; Hart, Patricia L; Mareno, Nicole

    2016-03-01

    Thirteen percent of newly licensed registered nurses (NLRNs) vacate their first job after 1 year, and 37% report that they feel ready to change jobs. Turnover can lead to consistent and detrimental nursing shortages in nursing units, as well as increased costs for health care systems. A descriptive, prospective, cross-sectional design was used to understand how preceptor role effectiveness and group cohesion affect NLRNs' satisfaction and intent to stay. NLRNs reported high levels of perceived preceptor role effectiveness, group cohesion, and job satisfaction, with only moderate levels of intent to stay. Statistically significant relationships were found among preceptor role effectiveness, job satisfaction, and intent to stay, as well as among group cohesion, job satisfaction, and intent to stay. Preceptor role effectiveness and group cohesion are predictors of NLRNs' level of job satisfaction. Job satisfaction is a predictor of NLRNs' intent to stay. Effective preceptors and positive group cohesion are factors that are important to NLRNs' job satisfaction and intent to stay. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  10. Pros and cons of using paid feeding assistants in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remsburg, Robin E

    2004-01-01

    Recently the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), citing increasing resident acuity, staffing shortages, and high turnover rates that make it difficult for nursing homes to provide adequate feeding assistance to residents who need minimal help at mealtimes, began allowing nursing facilities to use single-task workers to provide assistance during mealtimes. This article describes the use of single-task workers to provide feeding assistance to nutritionally at-risk residents during a 6-month clinical study designed to evaluate the effectiveness and feasibility of implementing a buffet-dining program in an academic long-term care facility.

  11. The relationship of positive work environments and workplace injury: evidence from the National Nursing Assistant Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaughey, Deirdre; McGhan, Gwen; Walsh, Erin M; Rathert, Cheryl; Belue, Rhonda

    2014-01-01

    With estimates of a 51% growth in the number of nursing assistants needed by 2016, there is a critical need to examine workplace factors that negatively contribute to the recruitment and retention of nursing assistants. Studies have shown that high demands, physical stress, and chronic workforce shortages contribute to a working environment that fosters one of the highest workforce injury rates in the United States. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between nursing assistant injury rates and key outcomes, such as job satisfaction and turnover intent, while exploring workplace environment factors, such as injury prevention training, supervisor support, and employee engagement, that can decrease the rates of workplace injury. Data from the 2004 National Nursing Assistant Survey were used to examine the negative effects of workplace injury on nursing assistants and the workplace environment factors that are related to the rate of worker injury. Nursing assistants who experience job-related injuries have lower levels of job satisfaction, increased turnover intentions, and are less likely to recommend their facility as a place to work or seek care services. It was also found that nursing assistant injury rates are related to employee ratings of injury prevention training, supervisor support, and employee engagement. NAs with multiple injuries (>2) were 1.3-1.6 times more likely to report being injured at work than NAs who had not been injured when supervisor support, employee engagement, and training ratings were low. Evidence that health care organizations can use to better understand how workplace injuries occur and insight into ways to reduce the current staggering rate of on-the-job injuries occurring in health care workplaces were offered in this study. The findings also offer empirical support for an extension of the National Institute for Occupational Health and Safety/National Occupational Research Agenda Work Organization Framework for

  12. Exploring the Synergic Effects of Nursing Home Work on Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders Among Nursing Assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ching, Shirley S Y; Szeto, Grace; Lai, Godfrey Kin Bun; Lai, Xiao Bin; Chan, Ying Tung; Cheung, Kin

    2018-03-01

    Little is known about how nursing assistants (NAs) perceive the nature of their work and how their work contributes to work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs). This qualitative study addressed these gaps. Twenty-four NAs with WMSDs working in four nursing homes participated in semistructured focus group interviews. Their WMSDs were not limited to the lower back but involved several body parts. The risk factors for WMSDs included physical, psychosocial, organizational, and personal factors as well as coworkers and clients. However, it is the synergistic effects of long work hours without sufficient rest, work even with musculoskeletal pain because of staff shortages, ineffective management with insufficient prework training and inadequate equipment maintenance, and an aging workforce with strong commitment to resident care that play a crucial role in WMSDs among NAs working in nursing homes. The study found that multidimensional intervention strategies using engineering, administrative, and personal controls should be developed to reduce WMSDs among NAs working in nursing homes.

  13. Views and experiences of mental health nurses working with undergraduate assistants in nursing in an acute mental health setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Michelle; Horsfall, Jan; O'Hara-Aarons, Maureen; Mannix, Judy; Jackson, Debra; Hunt, Glenn E

    2012-04-01

    Undergraduate nurses are employed as assistants in nursing (AIN) in inpatient mental health settings; however, there is a paucity of published research exploring registered nurses' (RN) views about the AIN role in these settings. This qualitative study documents the views and experiences of RN working with undergraduate AIN. Fifty structured face-to-face interviews were analysed, and the results are discussed in three sections. The first section outlines RN perceptions of qualities and skills required of AIN in mental health, and the responses primarily focus on communication skills, initiative, and willingness to learn. The second section targets factors in the workplace that might enhance the interest of AIN in a mental health nursing career; the responses emphasize their need to work with experienced staff. The last section outlines RN expectations of AIN, most of which are met and involve physical observations and technical tasks; less fulfilled activities primarily cluster around interactions with patients. Findings highlight the advantages and disadvantages of drawing on undergraduate nursing students as AIN in mental health settings. Communication skills, personal initiative, safety training to prevent violence, and education to increase knowledge and awareness about mental illness, diagnosis, and mental status-related skills were all important concerns articulated by RN. © 2011 The Authors. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing © 2011 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  14. The introduction of a nursing guideline on depression at psychogeriatric nursing home wards: effects on Certified Nurse Assistants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkaik, R.; Francke, A.L.; van Meijel, B.; Spreeuwenberg, P.M.; Ribbe, M.W.; Bensing, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: To improve care for residents with depression in dementia, an evidence based nursing guideline was developed. Using the guideline has already shown positive effects on depression in psychogeriatric nursing home residents. Objective: To study the effects of the introduction of the nursing

  15. The introduction of a nursing guideline on depression at psychogeriatric nursing home wards: effects on Certified Nurse Assistants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkaik, R.; Francke, A.L.; Meijel, B. van; Spreeuwenberg, P.M.M.; Ribbe, M.W.; Bensing, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: To improve care for residents with depression in dementia, an evidence based nursing guideline was developed. Using the guideline has already shown positive effects on depression in psychogeriatric nursing home residents. Objective: To study the effects of the introduction of the nursing

  16. Essential competencies for the education of nursing assistants and care helpers in elderly care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeseburg, Barth; Hilberts, Rudi; Roodbol, Petrie F

    2015-10-01

    The Dutch health care system faces huge challenges with regard to the demand on elderly care and the competencies of professionals required to meet this demand. However, a recent study showed that the curricula in vocational education for nursing assistants and care helpers remains inadequate to prepare them for the social and healthcare needs of the elderly. To determine the essential competencies for the initial education of nursing assistants and care helpers in elderly care. First, a draft version of essential competencies for the education of nursing assistants and care helpers in elderly care (N=120) was developed and approved by experts, also members of the project steering committee. Second, a Delphi survey was conducted to determine the essential competencies. The Delphi panel consisted of eleven field experts (teachers/educational developers) working for different vocational education training colleges in the Netherlands. Ten panel members participated in a two-round consensus building process via email. A definitive set of 116 essential competencies for the initial education of nursing assistants and 42 essential competencies for the initial education of care helpers were determined. The competencies in the definitive set are more in line with social and healthcare needs of the elderly like: autonomy, daily functioning prevention of health problems, healthy ageing and wellbeing, involvement of informal care, collaboration between professionals and informal care. The main challenge now is to translate these competencies into educational programmes for vocational education training colleges for care helpers and nursing assistants. Recommendations are made for the implementation of these competencies in the Dutch vocational education training colleges for care helpers and nursing assistants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Nurse Practitioner/Physician Assistant | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Within the Leidos Biomedical Research Inc.’s Clinical Research Directorate, the Clinical Monitoring Research Program (CMRP) provides high-quality comprehensive and strategic operational support to the high-profile domestic and international clinical research initiatives of the National Cancer Institute (NCI), National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), Clinical Center (CC), National Institute of Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI), National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS), National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS), National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), and the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). Since its inception in 2001, CMRP’s ability to provide rapid responses, high-quality solutions, and to recruit and retain experts with a variety of backgrounds to meet the growing research portfolios of NCI, NIAID, CC, NHLBI, NIAMS, NCATS, NINDS, and NIMH has led to the considerable expansion of the program and its repertoire of support services. CMRP’s support services are strategically aligned with the program’s mission to provide comprehensive, dedicated support to assist National Institutes of Health researchers in providing the highest quality of clinical research in compliance with applicable regulations and guidelines, maintaining data integrity, and protecting human subjects. For the scientific advancement of clinical research, CMRP services include comprehensive clinical trials, regulatory, pharmacovigilance, protocol navigation and development, and programmatic and project management support for facilitating the conduct of 400+ Phase I, II, and III domestic and international trials on a yearly basis. These trials investigate the prevention, diagnosis, treatment of, and therapies for cancer, influenza, HIV, and other infectious diseases and viruses such as hepatitis C, tuberculosis, malaria, and Ebola virus; heart, lung, and

  18. [Religion and spirituality in education and nursing assistance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gussi, Maria Aparecida; Dytz, Jane Lynn Garrison

    2008-01-01

    Intersectional study between nursing discourse and precepts which embrace religion/religiousness and spirituality, and how these were incorporated and their reflection upon nursing practice, education and the history of the organization of the profession. For bibliographic review LILACS and BDENF databases of the Electronic Health Library were used. A total of 57 full-text articles, published from 1957 to 2007, were analyzed upon the light of the ideas of Maurice Halbwachs, about " collective memory" . The results show that Brazilian nursing has a religious root with profound ramifications on its development. This configuration is so embedded in the collective memory that, even with the expansion of non-religious institutions, the Christian precepts remain present and strong.

  19. Capacity development for community health nurses in Pakistan: the assistant manager role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulzar, S A; Mistry, R; Upvall, M J

    2011-09-01

    Community health nurses (CHNs), as leaders in developing countries, can promote successful outcomes in meeting the targets of the Millennium Development Goals. A community-based organization in Pakistan is striving to achieve the goals of maternal and child health through the development of the assistant manager role for community health nursing. The purpose of this study was to assess the perception of the role of the CHN assistant manager, with the goal of strengthening that role. This interpretive, qualitative study included 13 participants already familiar with CHNs in Pakistan. Interviewing was utilized to explore perceptions of the assistant manager role and to uncover challenges currently existing within this new role. Content analysis revealed the following themes: 'role perceptions', 'expectations of the role' and 'collaboration with other community healthcare providers'. Changes to the role are necessary including increased education of the assistant manager CHNs and preparing administration to work with the assistant mangers for effective leadership. © 2011 The Authors. International Nursing Review © 2011 International Council of Nurses.

  20. Usefulness of the DETECT program for assessing the internal structure of dimensionality in simulated data and results of the Korean nursing licensing examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Gi Seo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose The dimensionality of examinations provides empirical evidence of the internal test structure underlying the responses to a set of items. In turn, the internal structure is an important piece of evidence of the validity of an examination. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the performance of the DETECT program and to use it to examine the internal structure of the Korean nursing licensing examination. Methods Non-parametric methods of dimensional testing, such as the DETECT program, have been proposed as ways of overcoming the limitations of traditional parametric methods. A non-parametric method (the DETECT program was investigated using simulation data under several conditions and applied to the Korean nursing licensing examination. Results The DETECT program performed well in terms of determining the number of underlying dimensions under several different conditions in the simulated data. Further, the DETECT program correctly revealed the internal structure of the Korean nursing licensing examination, meaning that it detected the proper number of dimensions and appropriately clustered the items within each dimension. Conclusion The DETECT program performed well in detecting the number of dimensions and in assigning items for each dimension. This result implies that the DETECT method can be useful for examining the internal structure of assessments, such as licensing examinations, that possess relatively many domains and content areas.

  1. Nurses' and nurse assistants' beliefs, attitudes and actions related to role and function in an inpatient stroke rehabilitation unit-A qualitative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loft, Mia I; Poulsen, Ingrid; Esbensen, Bente A

    2017-01-01

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To explore nurses' and nurse assistants' beliefs, attitudes and actions related to their function in an inpatient stroke rehabilitation unit. BACKGROUND: Several attempts have been made to describe nurses' roles and functions in inpatient neurorehabilitation. However, current...... understandings of the contributions that nurses and nurse assistants make to neurorehabilitation remain sparse. DESIGN: Descriptive, interpretive qualitative study. METHODS: Participant observations were conducted during 1 month in a stroke rehabilitation unit at a university hospital in the Capital Region...... stroke rehabilitation. We obtained insights into nursing staff's beliefs and attitudes about rehabilitation-as well as their own role and function-and furthermore how the latter affects their actions in daily practice. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: The nursing role and function are still not clearly...

  2. Nursing assistants' behavior during morning care: effects of the implementation of snoezelen, integrated in 24-hours dementia care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weert, J.C.M. van; Janssen, B.M.; Dulmen, A.M. van; Spreeuwenberg, P.M.M.; Bensing, J.M.; Ribbe, M.W.

    2006-01-01

    Aim: This paper reports an investigation of the effects of the implementation of snoezelen, or multisensory stimulation, on the quality of nursing assistants' behaviour during morning care. Background: Nursing assistants in long-term dementia care are often unaware of the impact of their behaviour

  3. French hospital nurses' opinion about euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide: a national phone survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendiane, M K; Bouhnik, A-D; Galinier, A; Favre, R; Obadia, Y; Peretti-Watel, P

    2009-04-01

    Hospital nurses are frequently the first care givers to receive a patient's request for euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide (PAS). In France, there is no consensus over which medical practices should be considered euthanasia, and this lack of consensus blurred the debate about euthanasia and PAS legalisation. This study aimed to investigate French hospital nurses' opinions towards both legalisations, including personal conceptions of euthanasia and working conditions and organisation. A phone survey conducted among a random national sample of 1502 French hospital nurses. We studied factors associated with opinions towards euthanasia and PAS, including contextual factors related to hospital units with random-effects logistic models. Overall, 48% of nurses supported legalisation of euthanasia and 29%, of PAS. Religiosity, training in pallative care/pain management and feeling competent in end-of-life care were negatively correlated with support for legalisation of both euthanasia and PAS, while nurses working at night were more prone to support legalisation of both. The support for legalisation of euthanasia and PAS was also weaker in pain treatment/palliative care and intensive care units, and it was stronger in units not benefiting from interventions of charity/religious workers and in units with more nurses. Many French hospital nurses uphold the legalisation of euthanasia and PAS, but these nurses may be the least likely to perform what proponents of legalisation call "good" euthanasia. Improving professional knowledge of palliative care could improve the management of end-of-life situations and help to clarify the debate over euthanasia.

  4. The Relationship between Home Nursing Coverage, Sleep and Daytime Functioning in Parents of Ventilator-Assisted Children

    OpenAIRE

    Meltzer, Lisa J.; Boroughs, Deborah S.; Downes, John J.

    2009-01-01

    This descriptive study examined the relationship between home care nursing support, sleep and daytime functioning in familial caregivers of ventilator-assisted children. Thirty-six primary caregivers (27 mothers, seven fathers, one foster mother, and one grandmother) of ventilator-assisted children completed measures of home nursing support, sleep, depression, fatigue, and daytime sleepiness. Daytime nursing coverage was not related to caregiver sleep or daytime functioning, but caregivers wi...

  5. Euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide: knowledge, attitudes and experiences of nurses in Andalusia (Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamayo-Velázquez, María-Isabel; Simón-Lorda, Pablo; Cruz-Piqueras, Maite

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the knowledge, attitudes and experiences of Spanish nurses in relation to euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide. In an online questionnaire completed by 390 nurses from Andalusia, 59.1% adequately identified a euthanasia situation and 64.1% a situation involving physician-assisted suicide. Around 69% were aware that both practices were illegal in Spain, while 21.4% had received requests for euthanasia and a further 7.8% for assisted suicide. A total of 22.6% believed that cases of euthanasia had occurred in Spain and 11.4% believed the same for assisted suicide. There was greater support (70%) for legalisation of euthanasia than for assisted suicide (65%), combined with a greater predisposition towards carrying out euthanasia (54%), if it were to be legalised, than participating in assisted suicide (47.3%). Nurses in Andalusia should be offered more education about issues pertaining to the end of life, and extensive research into this area should be undertaken.

  6. Suicide Risk in Nursing Homes and Assisted Living Facilities: 2003–2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohman, Matthew; Leslie, Marc; Powell, Virginia

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We investigated the epidemiology of suicide among adults aged 50 years and older in nursing homes and assisted living facilities and whether anticipating transitioning into long-term care (LTC) is a risk factor for suicide. Methods. Data come from the Virginia Violent Death Reporting System (2003–2011). We matched locations of suicides (n = 3453) against publicly available resource registries of nursing homes (n = 285) and assisted living facilities (n = 548). We examined individual and organizational correlates of suicide by logistic regression. We identified decedents anticipating entry into LTC through qualitative text analysis. Results. Incidence of suicide was 14.16 per 100 000 in nursing homes and 15.66 in the community. Better performance on Nursing Home Compare quality metrics was associated with higher odds of suicide in nursing homes (odds ratio [OR] = 1.95; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.21, 3.14). Larger facility size was associated with higher suicide risk in assisted living facilities (OR = 1.01; 95% CI = 1.00, 1.01). Text narratives identified 38 decedents anticipating transitioning into LTC and 16 whose loved one recently transitioned or resided in LTC. Conclusions. LTC may be an important point of engagement in suicide prevention. PMID:25973805

  7. Suicide Risk in Nursing Homes and Assisted Living Facilities: 2003-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezuk, Briana; Lohman, Matthew; Leslie, Marc; Powell, Virginia

    2015-07-01

    We investigated the epidemiology of suicide among adults aged 50 years and older in nursing homes and assisted living facilities and whether anticipating transitioning into long-term care (LTC) is a risk factor for suicide. Data come from the Virginia Violent Death Reporting System (2003-2011). We matched locations of suicides (n = 3453) against publicly available resource registries of nursing homes (n = 285) and assisted living facilities (n = 548). We examined individual and organizational correlates of suicide by logistic regression. We identified decedents anticipating entry into LTC through qualitative text analysis. Incidence of suicide was 14.16 per 100 000 in nursing homes and 15.66 in the community. Better performance on Nursing Home Compare quality metrics was associated with higher odds of suicide in nursing homes (odds ratio [OR] = 1.95; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.21, 3.14). Larger facility size was associated with higher suicide risk in assisted living facilities (OR = 1.01; 95% CI = 1.00, 1.01). Text narratives identified 38 decedents anticipating transitioning into LTC and 16 whose loved one recently transitioned or resided in LTC. LTC may be an important point of engagement in suicide prevention.

  8. Assistance algorithm of nursing for amiodarone intravenous infusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francimar Tinoco de Oliveira

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at identifying scientific publication on phlebitis caused by amiodarone and proposes a nursing care algorithm for interventions in intravenous amiodarone administration grounded in the Infusion Nursing Society and the Center for Disease Control and Prevention. It is a descriptive study mediated by integrative review in MedLine, LILACS, IBECS, BDENF, Cochrane Library and Scielo bases, published from 2006 to 2013. The sample consisted of nine articles. The evidence pointed the incidence of phlebitis due to the infusion of amiodarone and the need to control this event. The algorithm proposed shows the materials to be used and the procedure of drug administration in order to minimize injury. Besides subsidizing the development of future studies, this algorithm also promotes the incorporation of the best recommendation for the interventionist clinical practice.

  9. Dental nursing education and the introduction of technology-assisted learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, C; Gorman, T; Claffey, N

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to explore the profile of dental nursing students in the National Dental Nurse Training Programme of Ireland and their adjustment to a technology-assisted learning environment. Evaluation by students of the course and their reactions to the course were analysed. Dental nurses must possess the skills and knowledge to proficiently function in the modern day dental surgery. The implementation of a dental nurse programme that is heavily reliant on technology has started to create a group of dental nurses equipped with basic skills to access and retrieve information over a lifetime. However, the transition to a technology-assisted learning environment including online learning activities requires adaptation and expertise by educators and students alike. Careful evaluation and stakeholder feedback is imperative in the creation and maintaining of a quality programme. In conclusion, the students in this study responded well to the transition to a technology-based learning environment. Furthermore, the findings of this study suggest that the use of an online environment is an effective and stimulating learning environment for the students of a dental nurse programme; however, familiarity skills and knowledge of information technology is a prerequisite for success.

  10. [Nurses as a support to improve the quality of life during assisted reproduction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castells-Ayuso, Paula; Berenguer-Labaig, Cristina; Sánchez-Martín, Pascual; Sánchez-Martín, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure how infertility and assisted reproduction treatments (including artificial insemination) could affect the quality of life, and to evaluate how nurses could be helpful in this process, by alleviating anxiety and increasing the quality of life. A cross-sectional observational study was conducted on 48 patients (26 cycles) in an Assisted Reproduction Unit from 2nd December 2013 to 30th April 2014. Socio-demographic data were obtained, with the quality of life being assessed using the FertiQoL questionnaire before and after the treatment, and the consultations with a nurse by telephone or e-mail of these patients were also analyzed. The study results show a decreased quality of life in these patients, which was worse in men and in couples who had no previous children. Patient-centered care improved quality of life and tolerability to the assisted reproduction treatment. Patients frequently telephoned the nurse to solve their doubts and problems. The present study suggests that nurses can play an important role in improving the quality of life of patients undergoing assisted reproduction treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Essential competencies for the education of nursing assistants and care helpers in elderly care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oeseburg, Barth; Hilberts, Rudi; Roodbol, Petrie F

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Dutch health care system faces huge challenges with regard to the demand on elderly care and the competencies of professionals required to meet this demand. However, a recent study showed that the curricula in vocational education for nursing assistants and care helpers remains

  12. Physician-Assisted Dying: Are Education and Religious Beliefs Related to Nursing Students' Attitudes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margalith, Ilana; Musgrave, Catherine F.; Goldschmidt, Lydia

    2003-01-01

    A survey of 190 Israeli nursing students found that just over half were opposed to legalization of physician-assisted dying. Exposure to theory about euthanasia or clinical oncology experience had a small effect on these attitudes. Religious beliefs and degree of religiosity were significant determinants of these attitudes. (Contains 23…

  13. Effects of Using Licensed Practical Nurses to Assist with Telephone Consultation Management

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wiley, Jennifer L

    2006-01-01

    .... The study compared means of pre- and post-implementation provider overall job satisfaction, provider satisfaction with the telephone consult process, average daily hours providers spent on telephone...

  14. Perceived barriers to effective job performance among nursing assistants in long-term care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmelee, Patricia A; Laszlo, Mary C; Taylor, Jo A

    2009-10-01

    This research explored perceived barriers to job performance among a national sample of nursing assistants (NAs). Specific objectives were (1) to clarify which of the problems identified by previous research are most troublesome for NAs, (2) to develop a reliable quantitative measure of perceived barriers to job performance, and (3) to test construct validity of the measure vis-à-vis work-related psychological empowerment and job satisfaction. Nursing assistants attending the 2006 national conference of the National Association of Health Care Assistants completed a paper-and-pencil survey including 33 barriers to job performance and standardized measures of empowerment and job satisfaction. The barriers were also rated by a small sample of NAs at a single Georgia nursing home. Factor analysis of barriers items yielded a 30-item Nursing Assistants Barriers Scale (NABS) comprising 6 subscales: Teamwork, Exclusion, Respect, Workload, Work Stress, and New NAs. Lack of teamwork and exclusion from communication processes were rated as most problematic by both samples. The 6 NABS subscales were significantly and independently associated with empowerment and satisfaction; different barriers predicted the 2 constructs. This study is a first step toward quantitative assessment of NAs' perceptions of barriers to doing their jobs. Primary limitations are the select sample and use of a job satisfaction measure that may have artificially inflated correlations with the NABS. Nonetheless, results confirm the validity of the new scale as an operationalization of the barriers construct. The concept of barriers to job performance is a unique construct from work empowerment and satisfaction with one's job. Nursing assistants clearly differentiate various barriers, converging on workload and lack of teamwork as most problematic. Further work is needed to substantiate validity and reliability of the NABS, particularly with respect to NAs' actual job performance, intent to stay on the

  15. Using computer assisted learning for clinical skills education in nursing: integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, Jacqueline G; While, Alison E; Roberts, Julia D

    2008-08-01

    This paper is a report of an integrative review of research investigating computer assisted learning for clinical skills education in nursing, the ways in which it has been studied and the general findings. Clinical skills are an essential aspect of nursing practice and there is international debate about the most effective ways in which these can be taught. Computer assisted learning has been used as an alternative to conventional teaching methods, and robust research to evaluate its effectiveness is essential. The CINAHL, Medline, BNI, PsycInfo and ERIC electronic databases were searched for the period 1997-2006 for research-based papers published in English. Electronic citation tracking and hand searching of reference lists and relevant journals was also undertaken. Twelve studies met the inclusion criteria. An integrative review was conducted and each paper was explored in relation to: design, aims, sample, outcome measures and findings. Many of the study samples were small and there were weaknesses in designs. There is limited empirical evidence addressing the use of computer assisted learning for clinical skills education in nursing. Computer assisted learning has been used to teach a limited range of clinical skills in a variety of settings. The paucity of evaluative studies indicates the need for more rigorous research to investigate the effect of computer assisted learning for this purpose. Areas that need to be addressed in future studies include: sample size, range of skills, longitudinal follow-up and control of confounding variables.

  16. Intrinsic job satisfaction, overall satisfaction, and intention to leave the job among nursing assistants in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Frederic H; Harris-Kojetin, Lauren D; Bercovitz, Anita

    2009-10-01

    We examined predictors of intrinsic job satisfaction, overall satisfaction, and intention to leave the job among nursing assistants (NAs). The study focused on NAs who worked 30 or more hours per week in a nursing home. Data on 2,146 NAs meeting this criterion came from the 2004 National Nursing Assistant Survey, the first telephone interview survey of NAs nationwide. Regression equations were calculated in which intrinsic satisfaction, overall satisfaction, and intention to leave were dependent variables. NA attributes (e.g., job tenure and education) and extrinsic job factors (e.g., assessment of supervisor behavior, pay satisfaction, and benefits) were exogenous variables. A positive assessment of the supervisor's behavior had the strongest association with intrinsic satisfaction. Pay satisfaction had the second strongest association with intrinsic satisfaction. Predictors with the strongest associations with intention to leave were overall and intrinsic satisfaction. Assessment of the supervisor was not associated directly with intention to leave. Assessments of the supervisor and pay may affect overall satisfaction and intention to leave in part through their direct effects on intrinsic satisfaction. Some facility and NA attributes were related to intrinsic satisfaction but not to overall satisfaction, suggesting that intrinsic satisfaction may be an intervening variable in the impact of these attributes on overall satisfaction. Intrinsic satisfaction and extrinsic job factors amenable to change appear central to NAs' overall satisfaction and intention to leave. A facility may be able to improve extrinsic job factors that improve NAs' job-related affects, including intrinsic satisfaction.

  17. Stayers, Leavers, and Switchers among Certified Nursing Assistants in Nursing Homes: A Longitudinal Investigation of Turnover Intent, Staff Retention, and Turnover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Jules; Stiehl, Emily M.; Mittal, Vikas; Leana, Carrie R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Studies of certified nursing assistant (CNA) turnover in nursing homes are typically cross-sectional and include full-time and part-time workers. We conducted a longitudinal study to evaluate the job factors and work attitudes associated with just full-time staying or leaving. For those who did not stay, we assessed reasons for leaving…

  18. The effect of integrated emotion-oriented care versus usual care on elderly persons with dementia in the nursing home and on nursing assistants: a randomized clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Finnema, E.J.; Dr�es, R.M.; Ettema, T.P.; Ooms, M.E.; Adèr, H.J.; Ribbe, M.W.; van Tilburg, W.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the effect of integrated emotion-oriented care on nursing home residents with dementia and nursing assistants. Design: A multi-site randomized clinical trial with matched groups, and measurements at baseline and after seven months. Setting: Sixteen psychogeriatric wards in

  19. The effect of integrated emotion-oriented care versus usual care on elderly persons with dementia in the nursing home and on nursing assistants: a randomized clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Finnema, E.J.; Dr�es, R.M.; Ettema, T.P.; Ooms, M.E.; Adèr, H.J.; Ribbe, M.W.; Tilburg, van W.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To examine the effect of integrated emotion-oriented care on nursing home residents with dementia and nursing assistants. DESIGN: A multi-site randomized clinical trial with matched groups, and measurements at baseline and after seven months. SETTING: Sixteen psychogeriatric wards in

  20. A Multidisciplinary Workplace Intervention for Chronic Low Back Pain among Nursing Assistants in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shojaei, Sarallah; Tavafian, Sedigheh Sadat; Jamshidi, Ahmad Reza; Wagner, Joan

    2017-06-01

    Interventional research with a 6-month follow-up period. We aimed to establish the effectiveness of a multidisciplinary workplace intervention on reduction of work-related low back pain (WRLBP), using ergonomic posture training coupled with an educational program based on social cognitive theory. WRLBP is a major occupational problem among healthcare workers, who are often required to lift heavy loads. Patient handling is a particular requirement of nurse aides, and has been reported as the main cause of chronic WRLBP. We included 125 nursing assistants from two hospitals affiliated to Qom University of Medical Sciences from May to December 2015. There was an intervention hospital with a number of 63 nursing assistants who received four multidisciplinary educational sessions for 2 hours each plus ergonomic posture training over two days and a control hospital with a number of 62 nursing assistants who didn't receive educational intervention about low back pain. The outcomes of interest were reductions in WRLBP intensity and disability from baseline to the follow up at 6 months, which were measured using a visual analog scale and the Quebec Disability Scale. Descriptive and analytical statistics were used to analyze the data. The comparison tests showed significant change from baseline in reduction of WRLBP intensity following the multidisciplinary program, with scores of 5.01±1.97 to 3.42±2.53 after 6 months on the visual analog scale in the intervention group ( p working in hospitals.

  1. Acceptability of an e-learning program to help nursing assistants manage relationship conflict in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marziali, Elsa; Mackenzie, Corey Scott; Tchernikov, Illia

    2015-02-01

    Management of nursing assistants' (NAs) emotional stress from relationship conflicts with residents, families, and coworkers is rarely the focus of educational programs. Our objective was to gather feedback from NAs and their nursing supervisors (NSs) about the utility of our e-learning program for managing relationship stress. A total of 147 NAs and their NSs from 17 long-term care homes viewed the educational modules (DVD slides with voice-over), either individually or in small groups, and provided feedback using conference call focus groups. Qualitative analysis of NA feedback showed that workplace relationship conflict stress was associated with workload and the absence of a forum for discussing relationship conflicts that was not acknowledged by NSs. This accessible e-learning program provides NAs with strategies for managing stressful emotions arising from workplace relationship conflict situations and underscores the importance of supervisory support and team collaboration in coping with emotionally evoked workplace stress. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. Assessment of dementia in nursing home residents by nurses and assistants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lisbeth Uhrskov; Foldspang, Anders; Gulmann, Nils Christian

    2001-01-01

    Objectives To describe the criterion validity of nursing home staff's assessment of organic disorder compared with ICD-10 criteria, and to identify determinants of staff assessment of organic disorder. Method Two hundred and eighty-eight residents were diagnosed using the GMS-AGECAT. Nursing staff...... members were interviewed about the residents' activities of Daily Living, behavioural problems, orientation in surroundings and communication skills, and asked if the resident had an organic disorder. Multiple logistic regression was used to select the items that most strongly determined staff assessment...... as under-labelling of residents, a tendency that will affect communication with medical personnel and may lead to inadequate or wrong medical treatment and to negative performance as well as negative role expectations in everyday life in nursing homes....

  3. Experiences of undergraduate nursing students in peer assisted learning in clinical practice: a qualitative systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Matthew C; Kent, Bridie; Latour, Jos M

    2018-05-01

    The objective of this qualitative systematic review was to identify and synthesize the best available evidence on experiences of peer assisted learning (PAL) among student nurses in clinical practice so as to understand the value of PAL for this population. Peer-assisted learning considers the benefits of peers working in collaboration and supporting each other in professional roles. This approach to facilitate learning is effective within universities, but there is limited exploration within the clinical practice environment. Within the UK, 50% of student nurses' learning is undertaken within clinical practice, providing a large portion of student allocation within these areas, but is unexplored in relation to PAL. Therefore, existing evidence examining PAL in clinical practice needs further exploration for a better understanding of its value to student nurses' learning. The systematic review considered studies that included male and female nursing students aged 18-50 years that explored undergraduate nursing students' experiences of PAL within the clinical practice environment. Studies that utilized designs such as phenomenology, grounded theory, ethnography, action research and feminist research were considered. Other text such as opinion papers and reports were to be considered if no qualitative studies could be located. The review excluded quantitative studies, as well as those addressing PAL outside the nursing profession and students within the nursing profession but not including undergraduate student nurses. This review considered studies that included aspects related to experiences of PAL in the clinical practice setting, as seen by undergraduate nursing students and the researcher. A three-step search strategy was undertaken to find both published and unpublished studies in English from 2003 to 2017 in various databases, and included searching of reference lists within articles selected for appraisal. Each of the included studies were assessed for

  4. Identifying work ability promoting factors for home care aides and assistant nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larsson Agneta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In workplace health promotion, all potential resources needs to be taken into consideration, not only factors relating to the absence of injury and the physical health of the workers, but also psychological aspects. A dynamic balance between the resources of the individual employees and the demands of work is an important prerequisite. In the home care services, there is a noticeable trend towards increased psychosocial strain on employees at work. There are a high frequency of work-related musculoskeletal disorders and injuries, and a low prevalence of sustainable work ability. The aim of this research was to identify factors promoting work ability and self-efficacy in care aides and assistant nurses within home care services. Methods This study is based on cross-sectional data collected in a municipality in northern Sweden. Care aides (n = 58 and assistant nurses (n = 79 replied to a self-administered questionnaire (response rate 46%. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were performed to assess the influence of several independent variables on self-efficacy (model 1 and work ability (model 2 for care aides and assistant nurses separately. Results Perceptions of personal safety, self-efficacy and musculoskeletal wellbeing contributed to work ability for assistant nurses (R2adj of 0.36, p 2adj of 0.29, p = 0.001. Self-efficacy was associated with the safety climate and the physical demands of the job in both professions (R2adj of 0.24, p = 0.003 for care aides, and also by sex and age for the assistant nurses (R2adj of 0.31, p Conclusions The intermediate factors contributed differently to work ability in the two professions. Self-efficacy, personal safety and musculoskeletal wellbeing were important for the assistant nurses, while the work ability of the care aides was associated with the safety climate, but also with the non-changeable factors age and seniority. All these factors are important to acknowledge in

  5. Stress, coping and presenteeism in nurses assisting critical and potentially critical patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Umann

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective to verify the associations between stress, Coping and Presenteeism in nurses operating on direct assistance to critical and potentially critical patients. Method this is a descriptive, cross-sectional and quantitative study, conducted between March and April 2010 with 129 hospital nurses. The Inventory of stress in nurses, Occupational and Coping Questionnaire Range of Limitations at Work were used. For the analysis, the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, correlation coefficient of Pearson and Spearman, Chi-square and T-test were applied. Results it was observed that 66.7% of the nurses showed low stress, 87.6% use control strategies for coping stress and 4.84% had decrease in productivity. Direct and meaningful relationships between stress and lost productivity were found. Conclusion stress interferes with the daily life of nurses and impacts on productivity. Although the inability to test associations, the control strategy can minimize the stress, which consequently contributes to better productivity of nurses in the care of critical patients and potentially critical.

  6. [Planned home births assisted by nurse midwives: maternal and neonatal transfers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koettker, Joyce Green; Brüggemann, Odaléa Maria; Dufloth, Rozany Mucha

    2013-02-01

    The objective of this explorative and descriptive study was to describe the rates and reasons for intrapartum transfers from home to hospital among women assisted by nurse midwives, and the outcomes of those deliveries. The sample consisted of eleven women giving birth and their newborns, from January 2005 to December 2009. Data was collected from the maternal and neonatal records and was analyzed using descriptive statistics. The transfer rate was 11%, most of the women were nulliparous (63.6%), and all of them were transferred during the first stage of labor. The most common reasons for transfer were arrested cervical dilation, arrested progress of the fetal head and cephalopelvic disproportion. Apgar scores were >7 for 81.8% of the newborns; and there were no admissions to the neonatal intensive care unit. The results show that planned home births assisted by nurse midwives following a clinical protocol, had good outcomes even when a transfer to the hospital was needed.

  7. Transformational leadership and workplace injury and absenteeism: analysis of a National Nursing Assistant Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Doohee; Coustasse, Alberto; Sikula, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Transformational leadership (TL) has long been popular among management scholars and health services researchers, but no research studies have empirically tested the association of TL with workplace injuries and absenteeism among nursing assistants (NAs). This cross-sectional study seeks to explore whether TL is associated with workplace injuries and absenteeism among NAs. We analyzed the 2004 National Nursing Assistant Survey data (n = 2,882). A multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to test the role of TL in the context of workplace performances. Results reveal that the TL model was positively linked to workplace injury in the level of NAs. Injury-related absenteeism was also associated with the TL style, indicating that TL behaviors may help address workplace absence among NAs. Findings suggest that introducing TL practices may benefit NAs in improving workplace performances.

  8. Certified nursing assistants' perspectives of nursing home residents' pain experience: communication patterns, cultural context, and the role of empathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbs, Debra; Baker, Tamara; Carrion, Iraida V; Vongxaiburana, Elizabeth; Hyer, Kathryn

    2014-03-01

    This study explored the following issues related to pain management among nursing home (NH) residents: 1) communication patterns between NH residents and certified nursing assistants (CNAs) about pain; 2) how race and ethnicity influence NH residents' pain experiences; and 3) CNAs' personal experiences with pain that may affect their empathy toward the resident's pain experience. The study consisted of a convenience sample of four focus groups (n = 28) from a NH in central Florida. A content analysis approach was used. Data were analyzed with the use of Atlas.ti version 6.2. The content analysis identified four main themes: 1) attitudes as barriers to communication about resident pain care; 2) cultural, religious, and gender influences of resident pain care by CNAs; 3) the role of empathy in CNAs care of residents with pain; and 4) worker strategies to detect pain. Attitudes among CNAs about resident cognitive status and perceived resident burden need to be recognized as barriers to the detection and reporting of pain by CNAs and should be addressed. In addition, NHs should consider a person-centered approach to pain that is culturally competent given the cultural influences of both residents and staff. Finally, educational programs for CNAs that include empathy-inducing scenarios could potentially improve the care provided by CNAs when dealing with residents' pain. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Early assisted discharge with generic community nursing for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbations: Results of a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M.A. Utens (Cecile); L.M.A. Goossens (Lucas); F.W.J.M. Smeenk (Frank); M.P.M.H. Rutten-van Mölken (Maureen); M. van Vliet (Monique); M.W. Braken (Maria); L. van Eijsden (Loes); O.C.P. Schayck (Onno)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractObjectives: To determine the effectiveness of early assisted discharge for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbations, with home care provided by generic community nurses, compared with usual hospital care. Design: Prospective, randomised controlled and multicentre trial

  10. Dysphonia in nursing home and assisted living residents: prevalence and association with frailty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    G Nichols, Brent; Varadarajan, Varun; Bock, Jonathan M; Blumin, Joel H

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies of geriatric dysphonia prevalence have been limited to ambulatory outpatient and senior communities. Our goal was to identify prevalence of dysphonia in nursing home residents and assisted living residents and search for correlations between indices of dysphonia and indices of frailty. Prospective epidemiological survey. Residents of a vertically integrated senior care organization who were 65 or older and able to understand and complete the questionnaire were recruited to complete the voice handicap index 10 (VHI-10) to assess for dysphonia (VHI-10 > 10 = dysphonia) and Vulnerable Elders Survey 13 (VES-13), a validated instrument to assess for frailty (VES > 3 = frailty). A total of 119 residents were surveyed. Thirty-three percent of nursing home residents, and 25% of assisted living residents reported dysphonia with 29% of all respondents reporting dysphonia. The mean VHI-10 was 7.4, the median was 5, and the interquartile range was 2-12.5. There was a significant relationship between VHI-10 and VES-13 score (P = 0.029). There were no statistically significant relationships between frailty, age, or type of living and dysphonia or VHI-10. There is a high prevalence of voice dysfunction in assisted living and nursing home residents. The correlation between VHI-10 and VES-13 suggests that voice declines as frailty increases. Copyright © 2015 The Voice Foundation. All rights reserved.

  11. Perceptions and employment intentions among aged care nurses and nursing assistants from diverse cultural backgrounds: A qualitative interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fengsong; Tilse, Cheryl; Wilson, Jill; Tuckett, Anthony; Newcombe, Peter

    2015-12-01

    The residential aged care industry faces shortages and high turnover rates of direct care workers. This situation is further complicated by the increasing cultural diversity of residents and staff. To retain direct care workers, it is crucial to explore their perceptions of the rewards and difficulties of care work, and their employment intentions in multicultural environments. A qualitative descriptive study was used to understand perceptions of the rewards and difficulties of residential aged care work for core direct care workers (i.e. nurses and nursing assistants), how these were related to their intentions to stay or leave, and how these varied between nurses and nursing assistants, and between locally and overseas born workers. Individual interviews were conducted between June and September 2013 with 16 direct care workers in an Australian residential aged care facility with a specific focus on people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. It was found that direct care workers' employment intentions were related to their perceptions and management of the rewards and difficulties of care work. Their experiences of care work, the employment characteristics, and the organizational resources that fitted their personality, ability, expectations, and essential needs were viewed as rewards. Evaluating their jobs as meaningful was a shared perception for direct care workers who intended to stay. Individual workers' perceptions of the rewarding aspects of care work served to counterbalance the challenges of care work, and promoted their intentions to stay. Perceptions and employment intentions varied by occupational groups and by cultural backgrounds. Overseas born direct care workers are valuable resources in residential aged care facility rather than a limitation, but they do require organizational support, such as cultural awareness of the management, English language support, a sense of family, and appropriate job responsibility. The findings

  12. Occupational stress among nursing technicians and assistants: coping focused on the problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Araújo Bastos Teixeira

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To analyze the association between strategies used to cope with occupational stress that are focused on the problem wand the personal characteristics of nursing technicians and assistants. Methodology. This quantitative and correlational study was conducted in a large teaching hospital in the São Paulo State, Brazil, in 2013. A randomized sample with 310 participants (198 nursing assistants and 112 nursing technicians comprised the study population. Data were collected using a sociodemographic characteristics questionnaire and Scale of Ways of Coping with Problems. Data were submitted to univariate analysis, and variables with statistical significance (p<0.20 were submitted posteriorly in a multiple regression model. Results. Most employees were women (76.1% older than 40 years (67.7%, had nine to 11 years of formal education (73.5%, had a partner (58.7%, were Catholic (53.2%, and had children (74.5%. The final multiple regression model consisted of variable years of formal education and number of children. Conclusion. In this study, formal education and number of children were more strongly associated with a greater use of coping strategies focused on the problem. Such a strategy is related to minimal vulnerability to stress related to the working environment.

  13. Developing an e-learning resource for nurse airway assistants in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersey, Peter; McAleer, Sean

    2017-02-23

    The aims of this project were to determine the required competencies for a nurse in the emergency department assisting with a rapid sequence induction of anaesthesia (RSI), and to produce a relevant e-learning resource. A three-round multidisciplinary Delphi process produced the following competencies: ability to describe the steps and sequence of events of an RSI, familiarity with the equipment used during an RSI, ability to recognise and help manage problems occurring during an RSI, ability to prepare for an RSI, ability to apply cricoid pressure, and understanding the modification of an RSI in special circumstances. An interactive e-learning package was produced and made available online. Twelve emergency department nurses took part in an evaluation of the e-learning package. All either agreed or strongly agreed that they had increased their knowledge and found the learning useful, and 11 out of 12 nurses reported being somewhat or very confident in the role of airway assistant following completion of the learning.

  14. Nurses and Aides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, John

    1976-01-01

    Gerontological nursing (the care of the elderly) as a specialization for registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, and nursing aides is discussed with respect to training and qualifications, employment outlook, and earnings for each group. (JT)

  15. Operator licensing examiner standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-05-01

    The Operator Licensing Examiner Standards provide policy and guidance to NRC examiners and establish the procedures and practices for examining and licensing of applicants for NRC operator licenses pursuant to Part 55 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR 55). They are intended to assist NRC examiners and facility licensees to understand the examination process better and to provide for equitable and consistent administration of examinations to all applicants by NRC examiners. These standards are not a substitute for the operator licensing regulations and are subject to revision or other internal operator examination licensing policy changes

  16. [The construction of professional images of healthcare assistants and registered nurses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, Dominik; Schaffert, René

    2016-02-01

    In the field of nursing in Switzerland, educations have experienced a fundamental reorganization with the implementation of the new law on Vocational and Professional Education and Training (2004). Among other things, this change affects professional images. To show how the different professional images in the field of nursing are being constructed in the descriptions of professions by graduates after the reshaping of the educations and the occupational field in general. In 110 semi-structured interviews, healthcare assistants and registered nurses (college diploma and Bachelor of Science) in their early careers were asked to explain their professional image. The participant's answers were analysed based on a qualitative content analysis and considering the theoretical background of Berger and Luckmann (1977). The interviews show that professional images emerge on the interaction of societal attributes and individual processes of adoption and revision. Graduates are challenged to adjust stereotypes and to achieve a balance between their own professional image and a missing or inappropriately perceived societal image. There should be further emphasis on the differentiation between the professions and the different educations in the field of nursing in order to achieve a better public perception of the different professions.

  17. Nursing assistance for spring coil occlusion for the treatment of intracranial giant internal carotid artery aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Yugang; Mao Yanjun; Yuan Yili; Hu Yaqin; Liu Jing; Xi Juan

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the importance of balloon occlusion test before interventional treatment of the intracranial giant internal carotid artery aneurysms and to sum up the nursing experience in assisting the procedure. Methods: Proper perioperative nursing measures were carried out for 12 patients, who suffered from intracranial giant internal carotid artery aneurysm and underwent spring coil occlusion treatment. Nursing measures included mental care, observation of the vital signs, prevention of the complications, etc. Results: Neither death nor exacerbation of the condition occurred in all the 12 patients. The patients were discharged from the hospital with a mean hospitalization of nine days. During a follow-up period ranged from 4 months to one year, seven patients had no disagreeable feeling, one patient complained of discomfort but no abnormality was found on follow-up DSA, and disappearance of the aneurysm was observed in 4 patients. Conclusion: The monitoring of the vital signs, the prevention of the complications and the standard nursing care are the key points for ensuring a successful operation in treating intracranial giant internal carotid artery aneurysms with spring coil occlusion. (authors)

  18. Non-physician practitioners in radiation oncology: advanced practice nurses and physician assistants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelvin, Joanne Frankel; Moore-Higgs, Giselle J.; Maher, Karen E.; Dubey, Ajay K.; Austin-Seymour, Mary M.; Daly, Nancy Riese; Mendenhall, Nancy Price; Kuehn, Eric F.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: With changes in reimbursement and a decrease in the number of residents, there is a need to explore new ways of achieving high quality patient care in radiation oncology. One mechanism is the implementation of non-physician practitioner roles, such as the advanced practice nurse (APN) and physician assistant (PA). This paper provides information for radiation oncologists and nurses making decisions about: (1) whether or not APNs or PAs are appropriate for their practice, (2) which type of provider would be most effective, and (3) how best to implement this role. Methods: Review of the literature and personal perspective. Conclusions: Specific issues addressed regarding APN and PA roles in radiation oncology include: definition of roles, regulation, prescriptive authority, reimbursement, considerations in implementation of the role, educational needs, and impact on resident training. A point of emphasis is that the non-physician practitioner is not a replacement or substitute for either a resident or a radiation oncologist. Instead, this role is a complementary one. The non-physician practitioner can assist in the diagnostic work-up of patients, manage symptoms, provide education to patients and families, and assist them in coping. This support facilitates the physician's ability to focus on the technical aspects of prescribing radiotherapy

  19. Self-esteem among nursing assistants: reliability and validity of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullen, Tara; Resnick, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    To establish the reliability and validity of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) when used with nursing assistants (NAs). Testing the RSES used baseline data from a randomized controlled trial testing the Res-Care Intervention. Female NAs were recruited from nursing homes (n = 508). Validity testing for the positive and negative subscales of the RSES was based on confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) using structural equation modeling and Rasch analysis. Estimates of reliability were based on Rasch analysis and the person separation index. Evidence supports the reliability and validity of the RSES in NAs although we recommend minor revisions to the measure for subsequent use. Establishing reliable and valid measures of self-esteem in NAs will facilitate testing of interventions to strengthen workplace self-esteem, job satisfaction, and retention.

  20. [Euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide : Attitudes of physicians and nurses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenz, J; Tryba, M; Zenz, M

    2015-04-01

    The current debate about end-of-life decisions in Germany focuses on physician-assisted suicide (PAS). However, there is only limited information available on physicians' attitudes towards euthanasia or PAS, and no data on nurses' attitudes. The aim is to explore attitudes of physicians and nurses with a special interest in palliative care and pain medicine using a case-related questionnaire. An anonymous questionnaire, consisting of eight questions, was distributed to all participants of a palliative care congress and a pain symposium. The questions focused on two scenarios: (1) a patient with an incurable fatal illness, (2) a patient with an incurable but nonfatal illness. The question was: Should euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide (PAS) be allowed. In addition, the participants were asked what they wanted for themselves if they were the patient concerned. A total of 317 questionnaires were analyzed; the return rate was 70 %. The general support for euthanasia and PAS was high: 40.5 % supported euthanasia in case of a fatal illness ("definitely…", "probably should be allowed"), 53.5 % supported PAS. The support decreased in case of a nonfatal illness; however, it increased when the participants were asked about their attitudes if they were the patient concerned. Nurses were more open towards euthanasia and PAS. In physicians the rejection of PAS was directly related to a higher level of qualification in the field of palliative care. The fact that nurses had a more positive attitude towards euthanasia and PAS and that all respondents accepted life-ending acts for themselves more than for their patients hints to still existing severe deficits in Germany.

  1. Licensing issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, J.P.; Desell, L.J.; Birch, M.L.; Berkowitz, L.; Bader, J.F.

    1992-01-01

    To provide guidance for the Department of Energy's (DOE) Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has issued a draft regulatory guide on the Format and Content for the License Application for the High-Level Waste Repository (FCRG). To facilitate the development of the FCRG, NRC suggested that DOE use the draft guide as the basis for preparing an annotated outline for a license application. DOE is doing so using an iterative process called the Annotated Outline Initiative. DOE;s use of the Initiative will assist in achieving the desired incorporation of actual experience in the FCRG, contribute to the development of shared interpretation and understanding of NRC regulations, and provide other important programmatic benefits described in this paper

  2. Identifying strategies to assist final semester nursing students to develop numeracy skills: a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramjan, Lucie M; Stewart, Lyn; Salamonson, Yenna; Morris, Maureen M; Armstrong, Lyn; Sanchez, Paula; Flannery, Liz

    2014-03-01

    It remains a grave concern that many nursing students within tertiary institutions continue to experience difficulties with achieving medication calculation competency. In addition, universities have a moral responsibility to prepare proficient clinicians for graduate practice. This requires risk management strategies to reduce adverse medication errors post registration. To identify strategies and potential predictors that may assist nurse academics to tailor their drug calculation teaching and assessment methods. This project builds on previous experience and explores students' perceptions of newly implemented interventions designed to increase confidence and competence in medication calculation. This mixed method study surveyed students (n=405) enrolled in their final semester of study at a large, metropolitan university in Sydney, Australia. Tailored, contextualised interventions included online practice quizzes, simulated medication calculation scenarios developed for clinical practice classes, contextualised 'pen and paper' tests, visually enhanced didactic remediation and 'hands-on' contextualised workshops. Surveys were administered to students to determine their perceptions of interventions and to identify whether these interventions assisted with calculation competence. Test scores were analysed using SPSS v. 20 for correlations between students' perceptions and actual performance. Qualitative open-ended survey questions were analysed manually and thematically. The study reinforced that nursing students preferred a 'hands-on,' contextualised approach to learning that was 'authentic' and aligned with clinical practice. Our interventions assisted with supporting students' learning and improvement of calculation confidence. Qualitative data provided further insight into students' awareness of their calculation errors and preferred learning styles. Some of the strongest predictors for numeracy skill performance included (1) being an international student, (2

  3. Euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide in cases of terminal cancer: the opinions of physicians and nurses in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parpa, Efi; Mystakidou, Kyriaki; Tsilika, Eleni; Sakkas, Pavlos; Patiraki, Elisabeth; Pistevou-Gombaki, Kyriaki; Govina, Ourania; Vlahos, Lambros

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the opinions of physicians and nurses on euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide in advanced cancer patients in Greece. Two hundred and fifteen physicians and 250 nurses from various hospitals in Greece completed a questionnaire concerning issues on euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide. More physicians (43.3%) than nurses (3.2%, p < 0.0005) reported that in the case of a cardiac or respiratory arrest, they would not attempt to revive a terminally ill cancer patient. Only 1.9% of physicians and 3.6% of nurses agreed on physician-assisted suicide. Forty-seven per cent of physicians and 45.2% of nurses would prefer the legalization of a terminally ill patient's hastened death; in the case of such a request, 64.2% of physicians and 55.2% of nurses (p = 0.06) would consider it if it was legal. The majority of the participants tended to disagree with euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide in terminally ill cancer patients, probably due to the fact that these acts in Greece are illegal.

  4. 42 CFR 431.710 - Provisional licenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Licensing Nursing Home Administrators § 431.710 Provisional licenses. To fill a position of nursing home... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Provisional licenses. 431.710 Section 431.710 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...

  5. Burnout syndrome in nursing assistants of a public hospital in the state of São Paulo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Naiza do Nascimento; de Lucca, Sergio Roberto

    2015-01-01

    The burnout syndrome is a psychosocial phenomenon that arises as a response to chronic interpersonal stressors present at work. There are many aspects that make nursing assistants vulnerable to chronic stress situations that may lead to burnout, highlighting the low degree of autonomy in the healthcare staff and spending more in direct contact with patients. To assess the prevalence of the burnout syndrome in nursing assistants in a public hospital, as well as its association with socio-demographic and professional variables. A socio-demographic and professional questionnaire and the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI-SS) were applied to 534 nursing assistants. The prevalence of burnout syndrome among nursing assistants was 5.9%. High emotional exhaustion was observed in 23.6%, 21.9% showed high depersonalization, and 29.9% low professional achievement. It was found statistically significant associations between emotional exhaustion, job sector and marital status; depersonalization, having children and health problems; low professional achievement and job sector and number of jobs. There was association between job satisfaction and the three dimensions. Professionals working in the health area must pay intense and extended attention to people who are dependent upon others. The intimate contact of the nursing assistants with hard-to-handle patients, as well as being afraid to make mistakes in healthcare are additional chronic stress factors and burnout syndrome cases related in this study.

  6. An exploration of how positive emotions are expressed by older people and nurse assistants in homecare visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyn, Lena; Ellington, Lee; Eide, Hilde

    2017-11-01

    We don´t know how positive emotions are being expressed by patients and health care providers in consultations. The aim of this study is to identify positive emotions expressed by older people and nurse assistants to discuss the function of these in the visits. This paper presents secondary analysis of consultations in the COMHOME project. In this pilot study, six transcribed consultations between nurse assistants and older people in home health care were analysed using a coding system for positive emotions with seven categories capturing both content and emotional intensity of positive affect. We found 114 expressions of positive emotions, 63% from nurse assistants and 37% from patients. Patients mostly expressed gratitude, indicating that patients are grateful for being helped. Nurse assistants mostly expressed Praise or Support, indicating that they gave their patients positive affirmation. The praise and support given by nurse assistants to older people in home health care seemed effective in fostering relationships and maintaining patient resilience. Thus, we claim that emotional talk in communication also should include positive emotions. Teaching health care providers about the importance of expressions of positive emotions should be integrated in communication skills training. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The use of computer assisted technology to enhance student psychiatric nurses learning during a practice placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denny, Margaret; Higgins, Agnes

    2003-06-01

    Despite the available literature that identifies the value of integrating computer-assisted learning into the curriculum, psychiatric nurse education lags behind in this area of curriculum development. The purpose of this paper is to report on a pilot project involving the use of a computer assisted learning (CAL) interactive multimedia (IMM) package called 'Admissions,' as a self-directed learning tool with two-second year psychiatric nursing students. The students were on a practice placement in an Irish mental health service. The aim of using the multimedia resource was to augment the students' learning during their practice placement and enable them to re-examine the issue of psychosis from a multiplicity of perspectives. This paper provides a brief description of the interactive multimedia package, together with a discussion on the support offered to the students during its use. experiential taxonomy is used as a framework to guide the discussion on the learning and evaluation process used. Feedback from the students suggests that the CAL package is easy to use, informative and promoted independence and self-directed study.

  8. Nursing Delegation to Unlicensed Assistive Personnel in the School Setting. Position Statement. Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagginello, Joan; Blackborow, Mary; Porter, Jessica; Disney, Jody; Andresen, Kathleen; Tuck, Christine

    2014-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that the delegation of nursing tasks in the school setting can be a valuable tool for the registered professional school nurse (hereinafter referred to as school nurse), when based on the nursing definition of delegation (American Nurses Association [ANA], 2012) and in…

  9. Variation in Hospice Services by Location of Care: Nursing Home Versus Assisted Living Facility Versus Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unroe, Kathleen T; Bernard, Brittany; Stump, Timothy E; Tu, Wanzhu; Callahan, Christopher M

    2017-07-01

    To describe differences in hospice services for patients living at home, in nursing homes or in assisted living facilities, including the overall number and duration of visits by different hospice care providers across varying lengths of stay. Retrospective cohort study using hospice patient electronic medical record data. Large, national hospice provider. Data from 32,605 hospice patients who received routine hospice care from 2009 to 2014 were analyzed. Descriptive statistics were calculated for utilization measures for each type of provider and by location of care. Frequency and duration of service contacts were standardized to a 1 week period and pairwise comparisons were used to detect differences in care provided between the three settings. Minimal differences were found in overall intensity of service contacts across settings, however, the mix of services were different for patients living at home versus nursing home versus assisted living facility. Overall, more nurse care was provided at the beginning and end of the hospice episode; intensity of aide care services was higher in the middle portion of the hospice episode. Nearly 43% of the sample had hospice stays less than 2 weeks and up to 20% had stays greater than 6 months. There are significant differences between characteristics of hospice patients in different settings, as well as the mix of services they receive. Medicare hospice payment methodology was revised starting in 2016. While the new payment structure is in greater alignment with the U shape distribution of services, it will be important to evaluate the impact of the new payment methodology on length of stay and mix of services by different providers across settings of care. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  10. Associations between state regulations, training length, perceived quality and job satisfaction among certified nursing assistants: cross-sectional secondary data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kihye; Trinkoff, Alison M; Storr, Carla L; Lerner, Nancy; Johantgen, Meg; Gartrell, Kyungsook

    2014-08-01

    In the U.S., there are federal requirements on how much training and annual continuing education a certified nursing assistant must complete in order to be certified. The requirements are designed to enable them to provide competent and quality care to nursing home residents. Many states also require additional training and continuing education hours as improved nursing home quality indicators have been found to be related to increased training. This study investigated the associations among state level regulations, initial training quality and focus, and job satisfaction in certified nursing assistants. Cross-sectional secondary data analysis. This study used the National Nursing Home Survey and National Nursing Assistant Survey as well as data on state regulations of certified nursing assistant training. 2897 certified nursing assistants in 580 nursing homes who were currently working at a nursing home facility, who represented 680,846 certified nursing assistants in US. State regulations were related to initial training and job satisfaction among certified nursing assistants using chi square tests and binomial logistic regression models. Analyses were conducted using SAS-callable SUDAAN to correct for complex sampling design effects in the National Nursing Home Survey and National Nursing Assistant Survey. Models were adjusted for personal and facility characteristics. Certified nursing assistants reporting high quality training were more likely to work in states requiring additional initial training hours (p=0.02) and were more satisfied with their jobs (OR=1.51, 95% CI=1.09-2.09) than those with low quality training. In addition, those with more training focused on work life skills were 91% more satisfied (OR=1.91, 95% CI=1.41-2.58) whereas no relationship was found between training focused on basic care skills and job satisfaction (OR=1.36, 95% CI=0.99-1.84). Certified nursing assistants with additional initial training were more likely to report that their

  11. Operator licensing examiner standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The Operator Licensing Examiner Standards provide policy and guidance to NRC examiners and establish the procedures and practices for examining licensees and applicants for reactor operator and senior reactor operator licenses at power reactor facilities pursuant to Part 55 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR 55). The Examiner Standards are intended to assist NRC examiners and facility licensees to better understand the initial and requalification examination processes and to ensure the equitable and consistent administration of examinations to all applicants. These standards are not a substitute for the operator licensing regulations and are subject to revision or other internal operator licensing policy changes

  12. Fall prevention by nursing assistants among community-living elderly people. A randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahlström, Gunilla; Kamwendo, Kitty; Forsberg, Jenny; Bodin, Lennart

    2017-08-29

    Falls among elderly are a major public health issue in Sweden. The aim was to determine whether nursing assistants can prevent falls by supervising community-living elderly individuals with a history of falling in performing individually designed home exercise programmes. A randomised controlled trial was performed in Sweden, in eight municipalities in the county of Örebro, during 2007-2009. Community-living persons 65 years or older having experienced at least one fall during the last 12 months were included. The intervention group consisted of 76 participants, and there were 72 in the control group. The interventions were free of charge and were shared between a physiotherapist and a nursing assistant. The former designed a programme aiming to improve balance, leg strength and walking ability. The nursing assistant supervised the performance of activities during eight home visits during a 5-month intervention period. The measures and instruments used were health-related quality of life (SF-36), activity of daily living (ADL-staircase), balance, (Falls Efficacy Scale, and Berg Balance Scale), walking ability (Timed Up and Go and the 3-metre walking test), leg strength, (chair stand test). All participants were asked to keep a structured calendar of their physical exercise, walks and occurrence of falls during their 12-month study period. Hospital healthcare consumption data were collected. Although the 5-month intervention did not significantly decrease the risk for days with falls, RR 1.10 (95% CI 0.58, 2.07), p = 0.77, significant changes in favour of the intervention group were noted for balance (p = 0.03), ADL (p = 0.035), bodily pain (p = 0.003) and reported health transition over time (p = 0.008) as well as less hospital care due to fractures (p = 0.025). Additional studies with more participants are needed to establish whether or not falls can be significantly prevented with this model which is workable in home-based fall prevention. © 2017

  13. Conflict resolution styles: a comparison of assisted living and nursing home facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Jeff A; Montoro-Rodriguez, Julian

    2006-01-01

    In this exploratory study, the authors investigated how interpersonal conflict is resolved in assisted living and nursing home facilities. In particular, the authors examined whether conflict resolution styles differed between type of facility and between residents and staff in each type of facility. Four focus groups were conducted--two with residents and two with staff from each type of facility. The focus groups centered on discussing the occurrence of conflict and how each participant handled it. Discourse analysis was employed to identify participants' use of three styles of conflict resolution: controlling, solution-oriented, and non-confrontational. The results indicate that staff in each care context showed a preference for the solution-oriented approach. Residents in each setting reported equal use of the non-confrontational and solution-oriented styles. The findings suggest that preferred conflict resolution styles may vary more as a function of the role of each communicator than the context of the care setting.

  14. Sickness absence in student nursing assistants following a preventive intervention programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, A L; Marott, J L; Suadicani, P

    2011-01-01

    reduced SF-36 scores for general health perception [general health (GH)], psychological well-being [mental health (MH)] and energy/fatigue [vitality (VT)] compared with the intervention group, which remained at the baseline level for all three measures. AIMS: To ascertain whether this effect remained......BACKGROUND: We have previously shown that a multidimensional programme combining physical training, patient transfer techniques and stress management significantly reduced sickness absence rates in student nurse assistants (NAs) after 14 months of follow-up. At follow-up, the control group had...... after a further 36 months of follow-up and to analyse the association of GH, MH and VT scores with sickness absence. METHODS: This was a cluster randomized prospective study. The original study involved assessment at baseline and follow-up at 14 months (the duration of the student NA course). Of 568...

  15. Biofeedback-assisted relaxation training to decrease test anxiety in nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prato, Catherine A; Yucha, Carolyn B

    2013-01-01

    Nursing students experiencing debilitating test anxiety may be unable to demonstrate their knowledge and have potential for poor academic performance. A biofeedback-assisted relaxation training program was created to reduce test anxiety. Anxiety was measured using Spielberger's Test Anxiety Inventory and monitoring peripheral skin temperature, pulse, and respiration rates during the training. Participants were introduced to diaphragmatic breathing, progressive muscle relaxation, and autogenic training. Statistically significant changes occurred in respiratory rates and skin temperatures during the diaphragmatic breathing session; respiratory rates and peripheral skin temperatures during progressive muscle relaxation session; respiratory and pulse rates, and peripheral skin temperatures during the autogenic sessions. No statistically significant difference was noted between the first and second TAI. Subjective test anxiety scores of the students did not decrease by the end of training. Autogenic training session was most effective in showing a statistically significant change in decreased respiratory and pulse rates and increased peripheral skin temperature.

  16. Animal assisted therapy and perception of loneliness in geriatric nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrbanac, Zoran; Zecević, Iva; Ljubić, Marijana; Belić, Maja; Stanin, Damir; Bottegaro, Nika Brkljaca; Jurkić, Gabrijela; Skrlin, Branimir; Bedrica, Ljiljana; Zubcić, Damir

    2013-09-01

    Use of animals for therapeutic purposes, animal assisted therapy or AAT is a method for improving quality of life for long-term inpatients. The object of this paper was to evaluate dog companionship as a form of AAT and its effects on perception of loneliness in geriatric nursing home residents. The participants were involved in a six-month program of dog companionship three times weekly for 90 minutes. There were 21 residents included in the program, with a mean age of 80 years. Loneliness was measured by the short version of the UCLA Scale of loneliness. Comparison of test results before and after participation in the program showed that dog companionship reduces the perception of loneliness.

  17. The experience of clinical supervision for nurses and healthcare assistants in a secure adolescent service: Affecting service improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarron, R H; Eade, J; Delmage, E

    2018-04-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: Regular and effective clinical supervision for mental health nurses and healthcare assistants (HCAs) is an important tool in helping to reduce stress and burnout, and in ensuring safe, effective and high-quality mental health care. Previous studies of clinical supervision within secure mental health environments have found both a low availability of clinical supervision, and a low level of staff acceptance of its value, particularly for HCAs. WHAT DOES THIS PAPER ADD TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: In previous studies, the understanding shown by HCAs and nurses around the benefits of clinical supervision may have been limited by the methods used. This study was specifically designed to help them best express their views. In contrast to previous studies, both nurses and HCAs showed a good understanding of the function and value of clinical supervision. Significant improvements in the experience of, and access to, clinical supervision for nurses and HCAs working in secure mental health services may be achieved by raising staff awareness, demonstrating organizational support and increasing monitoring of clinical supervision. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: Organizations should consider reviewing their approach to supervision to include raising staff awareness, multidisciplinary supervision, group supervision, and recording and tracking of supervision rates. Organizations should be mindful of the need to provide effective clinical supervision to HCAs as well as nurses. Introduction Studies have found a low availability and appreciation of clinical supervision, especially for healthcare assistants (HCAs). Qualitative research is needed to further understand this. Aims Increase understanding of nurses' and HCAs' experiences of, and access to, clinical supervision. Identify nurses' and HCAs' perceptions of the value and function of clinical supervision. Assess how interventions affect staff's experiences of clinical supervision. Methods In

  18. [Nursing professionals and health care assistants' perception of patient safety culture in the operating room].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernalte-Martí, Vicente; Orts-Cortés, María Isabel; Maciá-Soler, Loreto

    2015-01-01

    To assess nursing professionals and health care assistants' perceptions, opinions and behaviours on patient safety culture in the operating room of a public hospital of the Spanish National Health Service. To describe strengths and weaknesses or opportunities for improvement according to the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality criteria, as well as to determine the number of events reported. A descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted using the Spanish version of the questionnaire Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture. The sample consisted of nursing professionals, who agreed to participate voluntarily in this study and met the selection criteria. A descriptive and inferential analysis was performed depending on the nature of the variables and the application conditions of statistical tests. Significance if p < .05. In total, 74 nursing professionals responded (63.2%). No strengths were found in the operating theatre, and improvements are needed concerning staffing (64.0%), and hospital management support for patient safety (52.9%). A total of 52.3% (n = 65) gave patient safety a score from 7 to 8.99 (on a 10 point scale); 79.7% (n = 72) reported no events last year. The total variance explained by the regression model was 0.56 for "Frequency of incident reporting" and 0.26 for "Overall perception of safety". There was a more positive perception of patient safety culture at unit level. Weaknesses have been identified, and they can be used to design specific intervention activities to improve patient safety culture in other nearby operating theatres. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Managing nursing assistants with a web-based system: an empirical investigation of the mixed-staff strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, I-Chun; Hou, Ying-Hui; Huang, Hui-Ling; Chu, Tsui-Ping; Chang, Ray-E

    2010-06-01

    Under the global shortage of Registered Nurses (RNs), some hospitals have integrated nursing assistants (NAs) into their teams to help to provide maximum quality care for acute patients, while keeping the hospital's staff-related costs down. However, the RNs may have to shoulder an increased burden of assigning and overseeing NAs. A web-based Nursing Assistants Management System (NAMS) was developed and evaluated for a case hospital in Taiwan to compare the processes of assigning and managing NAs before and after the NAMS intervention. The results showed that NAMS saved 80% of the time needed for manual operation and there were no more complains about NAs being slow in dealing with patients after the system intervention. The satisfaction levels of all NA managers and RNs were acceptable. Based on the research findings, the implication and limitations of this study were discussed.

  20. Assessment of immigrant certified nursing assistants' communication when responding to standardized care challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Meredith; Roter, Debra L

    2016-01-01

    Certified nursing assistants (CNAs) provide 80% of the hands-on care in US nursing homes; a significant portion of this work is performed by immigrants with limited English fluency. This study is designed to assess immigrant CNA's communication behavior in response to a series of virtual simulated care challenges. A convenience sample of 31 immigrant CNAs verbally responded to 9 care challenges embedded in an interactive computer platform. The responses were coded with the Roter Interaction Analysis System (RIAS), CNA instructors rated response quality and spoken English was rated. CNA communication behaviors varied across care challenges and a broad repertoire of communication was used; 69% of response content was characterized as psychosocial. Communication elements (both instrumental and psychosocial) were significant predictors of response quality for 5 of 9 scenarios. Overall these variables explained between 13% and 36% of the adjusted variance in quality ratings. Immigrant CNAs responded to common care challenges using a variety of communication strategies despite fluency deficits. Virtual simulation-based observation is a feasible, acceptable and low cost method of communication assessment with implications for supervision, training and evaluation of a para-professional workforce. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Racial and ethnic disparities in work-related injuries and socio-economic resources among nursing assistants employed in US nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tak, SangWoo; Alterman, Toni; Baron, Sherry; Calvert, Geoffrey M

    2010-10-01

    We aimed to estimate the proportion of nursing assistants (NAs) in the US with work-related injuries and insufficient socio-economic resources by race/ethnicity. Data from the 2004 National Nursing Assistant Survey (NNAS), a nationally representative sample survey of NAs employed in United States nursing homes, were analyzed accounting for the complex survey design. Among 2,880 participants, 44% reported "scratch, open wounds, or cuts" followed by "back injuries" (17%), "black eyes or other types of bruising" (16%), and "human bites" (12%). When compared to non-Hispanic white NAs, the adjusted rate ratio (RR) for wound/cut was 0.74 for non-Hispanic black NAs (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.65-0.85). RRs for black eyes/bruises were 0.18 for non-Hispanic black NAs (95% CI: 0.12-0.26), and 0.55 for Hispanic NAs (95% CI: 0.37-0.82). Minority racial and ethnic groups were less likely to report having experienced injuries compared with non-Hispanic white NAs. Future research should focus on identifying preventable risk factors, such as differences by race and ethnicity in the nature of NA jobs and the extent of their engagement in assisting patients with activities of daily living. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Perceived facilitators and inhibitors for the use of personal digital assistants (PDAs) by nurses: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moloney, Clint; Becarria, Lisa

    It is clear from the literature that more investigation into the infusion of this technology within nursing is required with a particular emphasis on the advantages of documenting best practices in nursing education. Current literature highlights the importance of incorporating wireless devices in nursing organisations without discussing how effectively nurses can collect data. Good information is found on the factors of adoption and barriers associated with such devices in nursing however the evidence supplied in such findings is yet to be well substantiated. Therefore, this study conducted an investigation into the factors of adoption of wireless applications for data collection. By doing so, this review has attempted to fill-in the gap in the literature and provides insights into those factors that need to be given priority when implementing handheld technologies in nursing. The overarching aim of this systematic review was therefore to explore and confirm the facilitators and inhibitors to the adoption of handheld technology in nursing. The objective of this review was to summarise the available evidence on the facilitators and inhibitors of adopting and utilising handheld wireless technology into the nursing profession. In particular this review set out to understand the supportive interventions that assist nurses to adjust to the use of such technology. Types of participants - This review was only interested in the nursing profession and was not limited to any one culture or setting. Therefore the review included nurses both Australian and overseas who were working in acute settings, community settings, and student nurses still in an academic setting.Types of intervention(s)/phenomena of interest - The review only considered studies that were endeavouring to understand the behavioural intention and user acceptance of handheld wireless technology (PDA's) in a nursing setting.Types of studies - This review considered studies that focus on qualitative data

  3. Operator licensing examiner standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-10-01

    The Operator Licensing Examiner Standards provide policy and guidance to NRC examiners and establish the procedures and practices for examining and licensing of applicants for NRC operator licenses pursuant to Part 55 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR 55). They are intended to assist NRC examiners and facility licensees to understand the examination process better and to provide for equitable and consistent administration of examinations to all applicants by NRC examiners. These standards are not a substitute for the operator licensing regulations and are subject to revision or other internal operator examination licensing policy changes. As appropriate, these standards will be revised periodically to accommodate comments and reflect new information or experience

  4. An ethical perspective on euthanasia and assisted suicide in The Netherlands from a nursing point of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Arend, A J

    1998-07-01

    In the Netherlands, euthanasia and assisted suicide are formally forbidden by criminal law, but, under certain strictly formulated conditions, physicians are excused for administering these to patients on the basis of necessity. These conditions are bound up with a long process of criteria development. Therefore, physicians still live in uncertainty. Future court decisions may change the criteria. Apart from that, physicians can always be prosecuted. The position of nurses, however, is perfectly clear; they are never allowed to administer euthanasia or assisted suicide. Nevertheless, they should be involved in the decision-making process because they are an important source of information and have consultation skills. The openness of the discussion about these issues in the Netherlands may prevent an escalation of medical or nursing responsibility and falling victim to the 'slippery slope'.

  5. Workplace Hazards Faced by Nursing Assistants in the United States: A Focused Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, AnnMarie Lee; Rogers, Bonnie

    2017-01-01

    Nursing assistants (NAs) make up a large share of the healthcare provider workforce and their numbers are expected to grow. NAs are predominantly women who earn a low wage and report financial, work, and family demands. Working as a NA is hazardous; this manuscript specifically examines the biological/infectious, chemical, enviromechanical, physical and psychosocial hazards that appear in the literature to date. A focused search strategy was used to review literature about hazards that fell into each of the five aforementioned domains. While some hazards that were documented were clear, such as exposure to influenza because of close contact with patients (biological/infectious), or exposure to hazardous drugs (chemical), literature was limited. The majority of the literature we reviewed fell into the domain of psychosocial hazards and centered on stress from workplace organization issues (such as mandatory overtime, lack of managerial support, and feeling rushed). More research is needed to understand which hazards NAs identify as most concerning and tailored interventions are needed for risk mitigation. PMID:28534859

  6. Meaning making in long-term care: what do certified nursing assistants think?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Michelle; Shadden, Barbara; Henry, Jean; Di Brezzo, Ro; Ferguson, Alishia; Fort, Inza

    2016-09-01

    Certified nursing assistants (CNAs) provide up to 80% of the direct care to older adults in long-term care facilities. CNAs are perceived as being at the bottom of the hierarchy among healthcare professionals often negatively affecting their job satisfaction. However, many CNAs persevere in providing quality care and even reporting high levels of job satisfaction. The aim of the present investigation was to identify primary themes that may help CNAs make meaning of their chosen career; thus potentially partially explaining increases in job satisfaction among this group. Focus groups were conducted with CNAs at three long-term care facilities. Four themes emerged from the data: CNA work is good or special; CNA as relationship builder; CNA as expert; CNA as team member. These themes reflect the perceptions that these CNAs held in regard to themselves and their relationships to others in the work environment and, when present, can contribute to intrinsic job satisfaction. Our meaning-making themes support the premise that CNAs do not passively accept the evaluations of others but instead actively frame identities that validate their importance to residents and the institution. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Workplace Hazards Faced by Nursing Assistants in the United States: A Focused Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, AnnMarie Lee; Rogers, Bonnie

    2017-05-19

    Nursing assistants (NAs) make up a large share of the healthcare provider workforce and their numbers are expected to grow. NAs are predominantly women who earn a low wage and report financial, work, and family demands. Working as a NA is hazardous; this manuscript specifically examines the biological/infectious, chemical, enviromechanical, physical and psychosocial hazards that appear in the literature to date. A focused search strategy was used to review literature about hazards that fell into each of the five aforementioned domains. While some hazards that were documented were clear, such as exposure to influenza because of close contact with patients (biological/infectious), or exposure to hazardous drugs (chemical), literature was limited. The majority of the literature we reviewed fell into the domain of psychosocial hazards and centered on stress from workplace organization issues (such as mandatory overtime, lack of managerial support, and feeling rushed). More research is needed to understand which hazards NAs identify as most concerning and tailored interventions are needed for risk mitigation.

  8. Workplace Hazards Faced by Nursing Assistants in the United States: A Focused Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AnnMarie Lee Walton

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Nursing assistants (NAs make up a large share of the healthcare provider workforce and their numbers are expected to grow. NAs are predominantly women who earn a low wage and report financial, work, and family demands. Working as a NA is hazardous; this manuscript specifically examines the biological/infectious, chemical, enviromechanical, physical and psychosocial hazards that appear in the literature to date. A focused search strategy was used to review literature about hazards that fell into each of the five aforementioned domains. While some hazards that were documented were clear, such as exposure to influenza because of close contact with patients (biological/infectious, or exposure to hazardous drugs (chemical, literature was limited. The majority of the literature we reviewed fell into the domain of psychosocial hazards and centered on stress from workplace organization issues (such as mandatory overtime, lack of managerial support, and feeling rushed. More research is needed to understand which hazards NAs identify as most concerning and tailored interventions are needed for risk mitigation.

  9. Effect of Integrating Computer-Assisted Language Learning in the TOEFL Performance of Nursing Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlene R. Castillo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to determine the relationship between the use of a computer-assisted language learning (CALL software and the TOEFL performance of nursing students. This descriptive study used a pre-test and post-test and a survey questionnaire to gather data. Interviews and observations were also conducted to gain further insights in the use of the software. Results indicate that for the three areas of the TOEFL model practice test, there is a statistically significant increase in the gain scores of the students in the post-test after being exposed to the use of the software for two semesters. They performed well in Sentence Completion and Error Identification, both under Structure and Written Expression. On the other hand, they performed only fairly for Reading Comprehension and Vocabulary. For Structure and Written Expression, the areas of strength included correct choice of main verbs, subject pronouns, and comparative use of adjective while the areas of weaknesses include correlative conjunctions, adverb-related structures, and indefinite subject and verb agreement.

  10. The LEONARDO-DA-VINCI pilot project "e-learning-assistant" - Situation-based learning in nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfefferle, Petra Ina; Van den Stock, Etienne; Nauerth, Annette

    2010-07-01

    E-learning will play an important role in the training portfolio of students in higher and vocational education. Within the LEONARDO-DA-VINCI action programme transnational pilot projects were funded by the European Union, which aimed to improve the usage and quality of e-learning tools in education and professional training. The overall aim of the LEONARDO-DA-VINCI pilot project "e-learning-assistant" was to create new didactical and technical e-learning tools for Europe-wide use in nursing education. Based on a new situation-oriented learning approach, nursing teachers enrolled in the project were instructed to adapt, develop and implement e- and blended learning units. According to the training contents nursing modules were developed by teachers from partner institutions, implemented in the project centers and evaluated by students. The user-package "e-learning-assistant" as a product of the project includes two teacher training units, the authoring tool "synapse" to create situation-based e-learning units, a student's learning platform containing blended learning modules in nursing and an open sourced web-based communication centre. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Are Nutrition and Food Security Concerns a Priority of Certified Nursing Assistants in Work and Family Environments?

    OpenAIRE

    Holsinger, Amanda Joy Toscano

    2002-01-01

    Certified Nursing Assistants (CNAs) are responsible for the care of Americaâ s aging population. CNAs are paid a miniscule amount of money and are often ineligible for medical benefits through their employers. CNAs bathe, change, feed, and help toilet the residents of long-term care facilities. The stressful work and personal lives of CNAs leads to many problems such as high turnover rates, absenteeism, health problems, and elder abuse. In the United States, food insecurity is a concern ...

  12. ITER licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, C.W.

    2005-01-01

    ITER was fortunate to have four countries interested in ITER siting to the point where licensing discussions were initiated. This experience uncovered the challenges of licensing a first of a kind, fusion machine under different licensing regimes and helped prepare the way for the site specific licensing process. These initial steps in licensing ITER have allowed for refining the safety case and provide confidence that the design and safety approach will be licensable. With site-specific licensing underway, the necessary regulatory submissions have been defined and are well on the way to being completed. Of course, there is still work to be done and details to be sorted out. However, the informal international discussions to bring both the proponent and regulatory authority up to a common level of understanding have laid the foundation for a licensing process that should proceed smoothly. This paper provides observations from the perspective of the International Team. (author)

  13. Recognising Health Care Assistants' Prior Learning through a Caring Ideology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandberg, Fredrik

    2010-01-01

    This article critically appraises a process of recognising prior learning (RPL) using analytical tools from Habermas' theory of communicative action. The RPL process is part of an in-service training program for health care assistants where the goal is to become a licensed practical nurse. Data about the RPL process were collected using interviews…

  14. Thinking about the patient's wishes: practical wisdom of discharge planning nurses in assisting surrogate decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kageyama, Yoko; Asano, Midori

    2017-12-01

    The accelerating trend towards shorter hospital stays in Japan has made modes of decision-making essential for effective patient transition from the hospital to recuperation in the regional community, and the ageing of the population has brought a rise in surrogate decision-making by the families of patients lacking decision-making ('self-decision') capacity. To verbalise and elucidate the practical wisdom of discharge planning nurses by focusing on the perceptions and judgements, they apply in practice and describing their methodology in concrete terms. Participants were six discharge planning nurses and one person with previous experience as a discharge planning nurse, all working at discharge planning departments of acute care hospitals. Separate, semi-structured, interactive interviews were conducted with each participant. The study design was qualitative descriptive in form with qualitative content analysis. All participants provided written informed consent to participate in the study, which was approved by the study institution. Three concepts were extracted as the basis for discharge planning nurses' perception and judgement at acute care hospitals: working for mutual envisionment of the available postdischarge options; helping the family act as spokesperson(s) for the patient's wishes; and understanding the family inclusive of the patient as a relationship of strongly interaffecting interests. The practical wisdom of the nurse, working in mutual envisionment with the family, and collaborative decision-making through discussion with those who know the patient, leads to rational discharge assistance. © 2017 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  15. Occupational closure in nursing work reconsidered: UK health care support workers and assistant practitioners: A focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traynor, Michael; Nissen, Nina; Lincoln, Carol; Buus, Niels

    2015-07-01

    In healthcare, occupational groups have adopted tactics to maintain autonomy and control over their areas of work. Witz described a credentialist approach to occupational closure adopted by nursing in the United Kingdom during the 19th and early 20th centuries. However, the recent advancement of assistant, 'non-qualified' workers by governments and managers forms part of a reconfiguration of traditional professional work. This research used focus groups with three cohorts of healthcare support workers undertaking assistant practitioner training at a London university from 2011 to 13 (6 groups, n = 59). The aim was to examine how these workers positioned themselves as professionals and accounted for professional boundaries. A thematic analysis revealed a complex situation in which participants were divided between articulating an acceptance of a subordinate role within traditional occupational boundaries and a usurpatory stance towards these boundaries. Participants had usually been handpicked by managers and some were ambitious and confident in their abilities. Many aspired to train to be nurses claiming that they will gain recognition that they do not currently get but which they deserve. Their scope of practice is based upon their managers' or supervisors' perception of their individual aptitude rather than on a credentialist claim. They 'usurp' nurses claim to be the healthcare worker with privileged access to patients, saying they have taken over what nursing has considered its core work, while nurses abandon it for largely administrative roles. We conclude that the participants are the not unwilling agents of a managerially led project to reshape the workforce that cuts across existing occupational boundaries. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Leadership in Nursing Homes: Directors of Nursing Aligning Practice With Regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Elena O; Bettega, Kristen; Bakerjian, Debra; Sikma, Suzanne

    2018-06-01

    Nursing homes use team nursing, with minimal RN presence, leaving the majority of direct care to licensed practical/vocational nurses (LPNs/LVNs) and unlicensed assistive personnel (UAP), including medication aides. The current article describes challenges faced by nursing home directors of nursing (DONs) leading and managing a team nursing approach, including consideration of scope of practice, delegation and supervision regulations, and related policy implications. A secondary data analysis was performed of qualitative data from a study to develop and test DON guidelines for delegation in nursing home practice. A convenience sample (N = 29) of current or previous DONs and other nursing home leaders with knowledge and expertise in the DON role participated in in-depth, guided interviews. The findings highlight a core concern to nursing licensure policy and regulation: knowledge and practice gaps related to scope of practice and delegation and supervision among DONs, RNs, and LPNs/LVNs, as well as administrators, and the role of nursing leaders in supporting appropriate delegation practices. The findings offer directions for research and practice in addressing challenges in aligning team nursing practices with regulatory standards as well as the related gaps in knowledge among DONs, administrators, and nursing staff. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 44(6), 10-14.]. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  17. Nurse practitioners and physician assistants: preparing new providers for hospital medicine at the mayo clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spychalla, Megan T; Heathman, Joanne H; Pearson, Katherine A; Herber, Andrew J; Newman, James S

    2014-01-01

    Hospital medicine is a growing field with an increasing demand for additional healthcare providers, especially in the face of an aging population. Reductions in resident duty hours, coupled with a continued deficit of medical school graduates to appropriately meet the demand, require an additional workforce to counter the shortage. A major dilemma of incorporating nonphysician providers such as nurse practitioners and physician assistants (NPPAs) into a hospital medicine practice is their varying academic backgrounds and inpatient care experiences. Medical institutions seeking to add NPPAs to their hospital medicine practice need a structured orientation program and ongoing NPPA educational support. This article outlines an NPPA orientation and training program within the Division of Hospital Internal Medicine (HIM) at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN. In addition to a practical orientation program that other institutions can model and implement, the division of HIM also developed supplemental learning modalities to maintain ongoing NPPA competencies and fill learning gaps, including a formal NPPA hospital medicine continuing medical education (CME) course, an NPPA simulation-based boot camp, and the first hospital-based NPPA grand rounds offering CME credit. Since the NPPA orientation and training program was implemented, NPPAs within the division of HIM have gained a reputation for possessing a strong clinical skill set coupled with a depth of knowledge in hospital medicine. The NPPA-physician model serves as an alternative care practice, and we believe that with the institution of modalities, including a structured orientation program, didactic support, hands-on learning, and professional growth opportunities, NPPAs are capable of fulfilling the gap created by provider shortages and resident duty hour restrictions. Additionally, the use of NPPAs in hospital medicine allows for patient care continuity that is otherwise missing with resident practice models.

  18. Supporting Regional Aged Care Nursing Staff to Manage Residents' Behavioural and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia, in Real Time, Using the Nurses' Behavioural Assistant (NBA): A Pilot Site 'End-User Attitudes' Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Britt; Clinnick, Lisa; Chesler, Jessica; Stranieri, Andrew; Bignold, Adam; Dazeley, Richard; McLaren, Suzanne; Lauder, Sue; Balasubramanian, Venki

    2018-01-01

    This regional pilot site 'end-user attitudes' study explored nurses' experiences and impressions of using the Nurses' Behavioural Assistant (NBA) (a knowledge-based, interactive ehealth system) to assist them to better respond to behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) and will be reported here. Focus groups were conducted, followed by a four-week pilot site 'end-user attitudes' trial of the NBA at a regional aged care residential facility (ACRF). Brief interviews were conducted with consenting nursing staff. Focus group feedback (N = 10) required only minor cosmetic changes to the NBA prototype. Post pilot site end-user interview data (N = 10) indicated that the regional ACRF nurses were positive and enthusiastic about the NBA, however several issues were also identified. Overall the results supported the utility of the NBA to promote a person centred care approach to managing BPSD. Slight modifications may be required to maximise its uptake across all ACRF nursing staff.

  19. Development and psychometric evaluation of the Core Nurse Resource Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Michelle R

    2010-11-01

    To examine the factor structure, internal consistency reliability and concurrent-related validity of the Core Nurse Resource Scale. A cross-sectional survey study design was used to obtain a sample of 149 nurses and nursing staff [Registered Nurse (RNs), Licensed Practical Nurse (LPNs) and Certified Nursing Assistant (CNAs)] working in long-term care facilities. Exploratory factor analysis, Cronbach's alpha and bivariate correlations were used to evaluate validity and reliability. Exploratory factor analysis yielded a scale with 18 items on three factors, accounting for 52% of the variance in scores. Internal consistency reliability for the composite and Core Nurse Resource Scale factors ranged from 0.79 to 0.91. The Core Nurse Resource Scale composite scale and subscales correlated positively with a measure of work engagement (r=0.247-0.572). The initial psychometric evaluation of the Core Nurse Resource Scale demonstrates it is a sound measure. Further validity and reliability assessment will need to be explored and assessed among nurses and other nursing staff working in other practice settings. The intent of the Core Nurse Resource Scale is to evaluate the presence of physical, psychological and social resources of the nursing work environment, to identify workplaces at risk for disengaged (low work engagement) nursing staff and to provide useful diagnostic information to healthcare administrators interested in interventions to improve the nursing work environment. © 2010 The Author. Journal compilation © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Effect of nursing care hours on the outcomes of Intensive Care assistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana do Altíssimo Nogueira

    Full Text Available To correlate the average number of nursing care hours dedicated to Intensive Care Unit (ICU patients with nursing care indicators.Transverse, descriptive study conducted between 2011 and 2013. Data were obtained from the electronic records system and from the nursing staff daily schedule. Generalized Linear Models were used for analysis.A total of 1,717 patients were included in the study. The average NAS (Nursing Activities Score value was 54.87. The average ratio between the number of nursing care hours provided to the patient and the number of nursing care hours required by the patient (hours ratio was 0.87. Analysis of the correlation between nursing care indicators and the hours ratio showed that the indicators phlebitis and ventilator-associated pneumonia significantly correlated with hours ratio; that is, the higher the hours ratio, the lower the incidence of phlebitis and ventilator-associated pneumonia.The number of nursing care hours directly impacts patient outcomes, which makes adjustment of nurse staffing levels essential.

  1. License renewal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newberry, S.

    1993-01-01

    This article gives an overview of the process of license renewal for nuclear power plants. It explains what is meant by license renewal, the significance of license renewal, and goes over key elements involved in the process of license renewal. Those key elements are NRC requirements embodied in 10 CFR Part 54 (Reactor Safety) and 10 CFR Part 51 (Environmental Issues). In addition Industry Reports must be developed and reviewed. License renewal is essentially the process of applying for a 20 year extension to the original 40 year operating license granted for the plant. This is a very long term process, which involves a lot of preparation, and compliance with regulatory rules and guidelines. In general it is a process which is expected to begin when plants reach an operating lifetime of 20 years. It has provisions for allowing the public to become involved in the review process

  2. Stayers, Leavers, and Switchers Among Certified Nursing Assistants in Nursing Homes: A Longitudinal Investigation of Turnover Intent, Staff Retention, and Turnover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Jules

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Studies of certified nursing assistant (CNA) turnover in nursing homes are typically cross-sectional and include full-time and part-time workers. We conducted a longitudinal study to evaluate the job factors and work attitudes associated with just full-time staying or leaving. For those who did not stay, we assessed reasons for leaving and satisfaction following job transition. Design and Methods: A random sample of CNAs identified through the Pennsylvania Department of Health's CNA registry, working≥30 hr weekly in a nursing facility was surveyed by telephone at baseline and 1 year later. Results: Of the 620 responding to both surveys, 532 (85.8%) remained (stayers), 52 (8.4%) switched to another facility (switchers), and 36 (5.8%) left the industry (leavers). At baseline, switchers reported higher turnover intentions and fewer benefits compared with stayers and left for new opportunities. Leavers had lower job satisfaction and emotional well-being and left for health reasons. Turnover intentions were predicted by low job satisfaction and low emotional well-being. Actual turnover was predicted only by turnover intentions and by the absence of health insurance. Pay was not a predictor of turnover intent or turnover. Implications: There are two distinct groups of CNAs contributing to turnover. Attitudinal factors, such as job satisfaction and emotional well-being, are mediated via turnover intentions to effect actual turnover. Even accounting for methodological differences, this turnover rate is lower than previous studies, which use alternative methods and include part-time workers. This study should help nursing home administrators better understand the work-related factors associated with staff turnover. PMID:21498629

  3. Assessing the academic and professional needs of trauma nurse practitioners and physician assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Laurie N; Wainwright, Gail A; Stehly, Christy D; Stoltzfus, Jill; Hoff, William S

    2013-01-01

    Because of multiple changes in the health care environment, the use of services of physician assistants (PAs) and nurse practitioners (NPs) in trauma and critical care has expanded. Appropriate training and ongoing professional development for these providers are essential to optimize clinical outcomes. This study offers a baseline assessment of the academic and professional needs of the contemporary trauma PAs/NPs in the United States. A 14-question electronic survey, using SurveyMonkey, was distributed to PAs/NPs at trauma centers identified through the American College of Surgeons Web site and other online resources. Demographic questions included trauma center level, provider type, level of education, and professional affiliations. Likert scale questions were incorporated to assess level of mentorship, comfort level with training, and individual perceived needs for academic and professional development. There were 120 survey respondents: 60 NPs and 60 PAs. Sixty-two respondents (52%) worked at level I trauma centers and 95 (79%) were hospital-employed. Nearly half (49%) reported working in trauma centers for 3 years or less. One hundred nineteen respondents (99%) acknowledged the importance of trauma-specific education; 98 (82%) were required by their institution to obtain such training. Thirty-five respondents (32%) reported receiving $1000 per year or less as a continuing medical education benefit. Insufficient mentorship, professional development, and academic development were identified by 22 (18%), 16 (13%), and 30 (25%) respondents, respectively. Opportunities to network with trauma PAs/NPs outside their home institution were identified as insufficient by 79 (66%). While PAs/NPs in trauma centers recognize the importance of continued contemporary trauma care and evidence-based practices, attending trauma-related education is not universally required by their employers. Financial restrictions may pose an additional impediment to academic development

  4. Comparison of the quality of patient referrals from physicians, physician assistants, and nurse practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohr, Robert H; West, Colin P; Beliveau, Margaret; Daniels, Paul R; Nyman, Mark A; Mundell, William C; Schwenk, Nina M; Mandrekar, Jayawant N; Naessens, James M; Beckman, Thomas J

    2013-11-01

    To compare the quality of referrals of patients with complex medical problems from nurse practitioners (NPs), physician assistants (PAs), and physicians to general internists. We conducted a retrospective comparison study involving regional referrals to an academic medical center from January 1, 2009, through December 31, 2010. All 160 patients referred by NPs and PAs combined and a random sample of 160 patients referred by physicians were studied. Five experienced physicians blinded to the source of referral used a 7-item instrument to assess the quality of referrals. Internal consistency, interrater reliability, and dimensionality of item scores were determined. Differences between item scores for patients referred by physicians and those for patients referred by NPs and PAs combined were analyzed by using multivariate ordinal logistical regression adjusted for patient age, sex, distance of the referral source from Mayo Clinic, and Charlson Index. Factor analysis revealed a 1-dimensional measure of the quality of patient referrals. Interrater reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient for individual items: range, 0.77-0.93; overall, 0.92) and internal consistency for items combined (Cronbach α=0.75) were excellent. Referrals from physicians were scored higher (percentage of agree/strongly agree responses) than were referrals from NPs and PAs for each of the following items: referral question clearly articulated (86.3% vs 76.0%; P=.0007), clinical information provided (72.6% vs 54.1%; P=.003), documented understanding of the patient's pathophysiology (51.0% vs 30.3%; P<.0001), appropriate evaluation performed locally (60.3% vs 39.0%; P<.0001), appropriate management performed locally (53.5% vs 24.1%; P<.0001), and confidence returning patient to referring health care professional (67.8% vs 41.4%; P<.0001). Referrals from physicians were also less likely to be evaluated as having been unnecessary (30.1% vs 56.2%; P<.0001). The quality of referrals to an

  5. Patient-care time allocation by nurse practitioners and physician assistants in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, David L; Gregg, Sara R; Owens, Daniel S; Buchman, Timothy G; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2012-02-15

    Use of nurse practitioners and physician assistants ("affiliates") is increasing significantly in the intensive care unit (ICU). Despite this, few data exist on how affiliates allocate their time in the ICU. The purpose of this study was to understand the allocation of affiliate time into patient-care and non-patient-care activity, further dividing the time devoted to patient care into billable service and equally important but nonbillable care. We conducted a quasi experimental study in seven ICUs in an academic hospital and a hybrid academic/community hospital. After a period of self-reporting, a one-time monetary incentive of $2,500 was offered to 39 affiliates in each ICU in which every affiliate documented greater than 75% of their time devoted to patient care over a 6-month period in an effort to understand how affiliates allocated their time throughout a shift. Documentation included billable time (critical care, evaluation and management, procedures) and a new category ("zero charge time"), which facilitated record keeping of other patient-care activities. At baseline, no ICUs had documentation of 75% patient-care time by all of its affiliates. In the 6 months in which reporting was tied to a group incentive, six of seven ICUs had every affiliate document greater than 75% of their time. Individual time documentation increased from 53% to 84%. Zero-charge time accounted for an average of 21% of each shift. The most common reason was rounding, which accounted for nearly half of all zero-charge time. Sign out, chart review, and teaching were the next most common zero-charge activities. Documentation of time spent on billable activities also increased from 53% of an affiliate's shift to 63%. Time documentation was similar regardless of during which shift an affiliate worked. Approximately two thirds of an affiliate's shift is spent providing billable services to patients. Greater than 20% of each shift is spent providing equally important but not reimbursable

  6. Co-Designing Mobile Apps to Assist in Clinical Nursing Education: A Study Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Siobhan; Andrews, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Mobile applications (apps) to train health professionals is gaining momentum as the benefits of mobile learning (mLearning) are becoming apparent in complex clinical environments. However, most educational apps are generic, off-the-shelf pieces of software that do not take into consideration the unique needs of nursing students. The proposed study will apply a user-centred design process to create a tailored mobile app for nursing students to learn and apply clinical skills in practice. The app will be piloted and evaluated to understand how nursing students use mobile technology in clinical settings to support their learning and educational needs.

  7. Contestable Licensing

    OpenAIRE

    Zvika Neeman; Gerhard O. Orosel

    2000-01-01

    We analyze a model of repeated franchise bidding for natural monopoly with contestable licensing - a franchisee halds an (exclusive) license to operate a franchise until another rm offers to pay more for it. In a world where quality is observable but not veri able, the simple regulatory scheme we describe combines market-like incentives with regulatory oversight to generate efficient outcomes.

  8. Radiopharmaceutical licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mather, S.J.

    1992-01-01

    Recent health service legislation, and especially the loss of crown immunity has once again focussed attention on the arrangements for licensing of radiopharmaceuticals. The aim of the article is to describe in general terms the UK licensing system and in particular to provide guidance to those responsible for the supply of radiopharmaceuticals in hospitals. (author)

  9. Reactor licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvie, J.D.

    2002-01-01

    This presentation discusses reactor licensing and includes the legislative basis for licensing, other relevant legislation , the purpose of the Nuclear Safety and Control Act, important regulations, regulatory document, policies, and standards. It also discusses the role of the CNSC, its mandate and safety philosophy

  10. [The effects of multimedia-assisted instruction on the skin care learning of nurse aides in long-term care facilities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yu-Ling; Kao, Yu-Hsiu

    2014-08-01

    Skin care is an important responsibility of nurse aides in long-term care facilities, and the nursing knowledge, attitudes, and skills of these aides significantly affects quality of care. However, the work schedule of nurse aides often limits their ability to obtain further education and training. Therefore, developing appropriate and effective training programs for nurse aides is critical to maintaining and improving quality of care in long-term care facilities. This study investigates the effects of multimedia assisted instruction on the skin care learning of nurse aides working in long-term care facilities. A quasi-experimental design and convenient sampling were adopted in this study. Participants included 96 nurse aides recruited from 5 long-term care facilities in Taoyuan County, Taiwan. The experimental group received 3 weeks of multimedia assisted instruction. The control group did not receive this instruction. The Skin Care Questionnaire for Nurse Aides in Long-term Care Facilities and the Skin Care Behavior Checklist were used for assessment before and after the intervention. (1) Posttest scores for skin care knowledge, attitudes, behavior, and the skin care checklist were significantly higher than pretest scores for the intervention group. There was no significant difference between pretest and posttest scores for the control group. (2) A covariance analysis of pretest scores for the two groups showed that the experimental group earned significantly higher average scores than their control group peers for skin care knowledge, attitudes, behavior, and the skin care checklist. The multimedia assisted instruction demonstrated significant and positive effects on the skin care leaning of nurse aides in long-term care facilities. This finding supports the use of multimedia assisted instruction in the education and training of nurse aides in long-term care facilities in the future.

  11. Operator licensing examiner standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    The Operator Licensing Examiner Standards provide policy and guidance to NRC examiners and establish the procedures and practices for examining licensees and applicants for reactor operator and senior reactor operator licenses at power reactor facilities pursuant to Part 55 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR 55). The Examiner Standards are intended to assist NRC examiners and facility licensees to better understand the initial and requalification examination processes and to ensure the equitable and consistent administration of examinations to all applicants. These standards are not a substitute for the operator licensing regulations and are subject to revision or other internal operator licensing policy changes. Revision 7 was published in January 1993 and became effective in August 1993. Supplement 1 is being issued primarily to implement administrative changes to the requalification examination program resulting from the amendment to 10 CFR 55 that eliminated the requirement for every licensed operator to pass an NRC-conducted requalification examination as a condition for license renewal. The supplement does not substantially alter either the initial or requalification examination processes and will become effective 30 days after its publication is noticed in the Federal Register. The corporate notification letters issued after the effective date will provide facility licensees with at least 90 days notice that the examinations will be administered in accordance with the revised procedures

  12. Australian perioperative nurses' experiences of assisting in multi-organ procurement surgery: a grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Zaneta; Leslie, Gavin; Wynaden, Dianne

    2015-03-01

    Multi-organ procurement surgical procedures through the generosity of deceased organ donors, have made an enormous impact on extending the lives of recipients. There is a dearth of in-depth knowledge relating to the experiences of perioperative nurses working closely with organ donors undergoing multi-organ procurement surgical procedures. The aim of this study was to address this gap by describing the perioperative nurses experiences of participating in multi-organ procurement surgical procedures and interpreting these findings as a substantive theory. This qualitative study used grounded theory methodology to generate a substantive theory of the experiences of perioperative nurses participating in multi-organ procurement surgery. Recruitment of participants took place after the study was advertised via a professional newsletter and journal. The study was conducted with participants from metropolitan, rural and regional areas of two Australian states; New South Wales and Western Australia. Thirty five perioperative nurse participants with three to 39 years of professional nursing experience informed the study. Semi structured in-depth interviews were undertaken from July 2009 to April 2010 with a mean interview time of 60 min. Interview data was transcribed verbatim and analysed using the constant comparative method. The study results draw attention to the complexities that exist for perioperative nurses when participating in multi-organ procurement surgical procedures reporting a basic social psychological problem articulated as hiding behind a mask and how they resolved this problem by the basic social psychological process of finding meaning. This study provides a greater understanding of how these surgical procedures impact on perioperative nurses by providing a substantive theory of this experience. The findings have the potential to guide further research into this challenging area of nursing practice with implications for clinical initiatives, management

  13. Nursing and midwifery students' experiences with the course of infertility and assisted reproductive techniques: A focus group study from Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isbir, Gozde Gokçe; Ozan, Yeter Durgun

    2018-01-01

    Nurses and midwifes without sufficient knowledge of infertilitare not likely to provide counseling and support for people suffering from infertility. This study aimed to evaluate nursing and midwifery students' experiences with the Course on Infertility and Assisted Reproductive Techniques. Our study had a qualitative descriptive design. Total number of the participants was 75. The analysis revealed five primary themes and twenty-one sub-themes. The themes were (1) action, (2) learner centered method, (3) interaction, (4) nursing competencies, and (5) evaluation. The active learning techniques enabled the students to retrieve the knowledge that they obtained for a long time, contributed to social and cultural development and improved skills required for selfevaluation, communication and leadership, enhanced critical thinking, skills increased motivation and satisfaction and helped with knowledge integration. Infertility is a biopsychosocial condition, and it may be difficult for students to understand what infertile individuals experience. The study revealed that active learning techniques enabled the students to acquire not only theoretical knowledge but also an emotional and psychosocial viewpoint and attitude regarding infertility. The content of an infertility course should be created in accordance with changes in the needs of a given society and educational techniques. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The effect of flooring on musculoskeletal symptoms in the lower extremities and low back among female nursing assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlström, Jens; Ostman, Christina; Leijon, Ola

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the effect of changing the floor from a 2-mm homogenous vinyl floor to a 4-mm heterogeneous vinyl floor (1.5-mm wear layer and 2.5-mm foam layer) on musculoskeletal symptoms in the lower extremities and low back among nursing assistants in a geriatric care centre. A pre-post design with a reference group consisting of nursing assistants from a similar geriatric care centre was used. Follow-up measurements were carried out 12 and 24 months after the intervention by means of questionnaires. At the 1-year follow-up, the pain intensity score in the feet of the intervention group had decreased compared with the baseline value and remained statistically significant at the 2-year follow-up. The decrease in pain intensity score of the feet in the intervention group was statistically significantly different from the reference group, both after 1 and 2 years. The results show the importance of flooring in the workplace with regard to reducing musculoskeletal symptoms. Appropriate flooring is especially important in the female-dominated health care sector, where workers must stand or walk for long periods.

  15. Attitudes and Usage of the Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System Among Gastroenterology Nurse Practitioners and Physician Assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salk, Allison; Ehrenpreis, Eli D

    2016-01-01

    The Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) is used for postmarketing pharmacovigilance. Our study sought to assess attitudes and usage of the FAERS among gastroenterology nurse practitioners (NPs) and physician assistants (PAs). A survey was administered at the August 2012 Principles of Gastroenterology for the Nurse Practitioner and Physician Assistant course, held in Chicago, IL. Of the 128 respondents, 123 (96%) reported a specialty in gastroenterology or hepatology and were included in analysis. Eighty-nine participants were NPs and 32 PAs, whereas 2 did not report their profession. Although 119 (98%) agreed or strongly agreed with the statement that accurately reporting adverse drug reactions is an important process to optimize patient safety, the majority of participants (54% NPs and 81% PAs) were unfamiliar with the FAERS. In addition, only 20% of NPs and 9% of PAs reported learning about the FAERS in NP or PA schooling. Our study shows enthusiasm among gastroenterology NPs and PAs for the reporting of adverse drug reactions, coupled with a lack of familiarity with the FAERS. This presents an opportunity for enhanced education about reporting of adverse drug reactions for gastroenterology NPs and PAs.

  16. NURSE STAFFING AND RENAL ANAEMIA OUTCOMES IN HAEMODIALYSIS CARE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlingmark, Julia; Hedström, Mariann; Lindberg, Magnus

    2016-09-01

    Current trends in renal anaemia management place greater emphasis, and thus increased workload, on the role of the nurse in haemodialysis settings. However, there is little evidence that demonstrates the relationship between nurse staffing and patient outcomes. To describe nurse staffing in haemodialysis settings, its relationship with target levels of renal anaemia management and to describe target level achievement for different ways of organising anaemia management. Cross-sectional audit. Forty (out of 78) haemodialysis centres in Sweden reported quality assurance data. The numbers of bedside registered nurses, licensed nurse assistants and patients undergoing haemodialysis during a predefined morning shift; type of anaemia management and achieved target levels of anaemia management. The mean patient:registered nurse ratio was 2.4 and the mean patient:nurse assistant ratio was 12.8. There were no significant relationships between registered nurse staffing and target level achievement. On average, 45.6% of the patients had haemoglobin within the target levels at centres applying nurse-driven anaemia management, compared with 47.3% at physician-driven centres. These cross-sectional data suggest that renal anaemia outcomes are unrelated to the patient:registered nurse ratio. There is, however, room for improvement in renal anaemia management in the units included in this study, particularly the achievement of target levels of haemoglobin and transferrin saturation. © 2016 European Dialysis and Transplant Nurses Association/European Renal Care Association.

  17. Teamwork in Acute Care: Perceptions of Essential but Unheard Assistive Personnel and the Counterpoint of Perceptions of Registered Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellury, Lanell; Hodges, Helen; Camp, Amanda; Aduddell, Kathie

    2016-10-01

    Teams of unlicensed personnel and registered nurses have provided hospital-based nursing care for decades. Although ineffective teamwork has been associated with poor patient outcomes, little is known of the perspectives of nursing assistive personnel (NAP). The purpose of this study was to gain insights into the perceptions of NAP and professional registered nurses (RNs) on teamwork in acute care. In a qualitative descriptive approach in a metropolitan hospital in the southeastern United States, 33 NAP participated in audio-recorded focus group sessions, and 18 RNs provided responses to open-ended electronic survey questions. Findings were examined in relation to previously identified coordinating mechanisms of teamwork: shared mental models, closed-loop communication, and mutual trust. None of the mechanisms was strongly represented in these data. In contrast to RNs' mental models, NAP perceptions of teamwork included the centrality of holistic caring to the NAP role, functional teams as NAP-only teams, NAPs and RNs working in parallel spheres rather than together, and team coordination in silos. Closed-loop communication was less common than one-way requests. Mutual trust was desired, but RNs' delegation of tasks conveyed to NAP a lack of value and respect for the NAP role, while RNs perceived a professional obligation to delegate care to ensure quality of care amid changing patient priorities. Further empirical research into NAP practice is needed to enhance understanding of teamwork issues and direct effective interventions to improve work environments and ultimately patient outcomes. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Homelessness as culture: How transcultural nursing theory can assist caring for the homeless.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Kate; John, William

    2012-11-01

    The concepts of culture and homelessness are both complex and contested. This paper examines homelessness through the lens of transcultural nursing theory, increasing understanding of both homelessness and transcultural theory. We argue that homelessness can be usefully conceptualised as a culture and that the application of transcultural theory to caring for homeless people will add further to the utility of these theories. The application of transcultural theory can add to the repertoire of skills the nurse needs to care for not only homeless clients, but, for a diverse range of client groups. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Best practices in nursing homes. Clinical supervision, management, and human resource practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellefield, Mary Ellen

    2008-07-01

    Human resource practices including supervision and management are associated with organizational performance. Evidence supportive of such an association in nursing homes is found in the results of numerous research studies conducted during the past 17 years. In this article, best practices related to this topic have been culled from descriptive, explanatory, and intervention studies in a range of interdisciplinary research journals published between 1990 and 2007. Identified best practices include implementation of training programs on supervision and management for licensed nurses, certified nursing assistant job enrichment programs, implementation of consistent nursing assignments, and the use of electronic documentation. Organizational barriers and facilitators of these best practices are described. Copyright 2009, SLACK Incorporated.

  20. Staff Assist: A Resource to Improve Nursing Home Quality and Staffing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, Nicholas G.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study describes the creation and use of a web-based resource, designed to help nursing homes implement quality improvements through changes in staffing characteristics. Design and Methods: Information on staffing characteristics (i.e., staffing levels, turnover, stability, and use of agency staff), facility characteristics (e.g.,…

  1. School Nurses' Perceptions and Practices of Assisting Students in Obtaining Public Health Insurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickard, Megan L.; Hendershot, Candace; Khubchandani, Jagdish; Price, James H.; Thompson, Amy

    2010-01-01

    Background: From January through June 2009, 6.1 million children were uninsured in the United States. On average, students with health insurance are healthier and as a result are more likely to be academically successful. Some schools help students obtain health insurance with the help of school nurses. Methods: This study assessed public school…

  2. Training Nonnursing Staff to Assist with Nutritional Care Delivery in Nursing Homes: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Sandra F; Hollingsworth, Emily K; Long, Emily A; Liu, Xulei; Shotwell, Matthew S; Keeler, Emmett; An, Ruopeng; Silver, Heidi J

    2017-02-01

    To determine the effect and cost-effectiveness of training nonnursing staff to provide feeding assistance for nutritionally at-risk nursing home (NH) residents. Randomized, controlled trial. Five community NHs. Long-stay NH residents with an order for caloric supplementation (N = 122). Research staff provided an 8-hour training curriculum to nonnursing staff. Trained staff were assigned to between-meal supplement or snack delivery for the intervention group; the control group received usual care. Research staff used standardized observations and weighed-intake methods to measure frequency of between-meal delivery, staff assistance time, and resident caloric intake. Fifty staff (mean 10 per site) completed training. The intervention had a significant effect on between-meal caloric intake (F = 56.29, P staff time to provide assistance. It is cost effective to train nonnursing staff to provide caloric supplementation, and this practice has a positive effect on residents' between-meal intake. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  3. The role of health care assistants in supporting district nurses and family carers to deliver palliative care at home: findings from an evaluation project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingleton, Christine; Chatwin, John; Seymour, Jane; Payne, Sheila

    2011-07-01

    To examine the role of trained health and personal care assistants in supporting district nurses and family carers in providing palliative and end of life care in the community. In the UK, there is a policy directive to improve end of life care and to enable greater numbers of people to die at home. This places considerable demands on community nursing services and family carers. In response to this, the Complex and Palliative Continuing Care Service employing generic health and personal care assistants was developed as part of the Marie Curie Delivering Choice Programme in one city in the UK. This paper draws on findings from an independent evaluation of the scheme. The wider evaluation used a formative evaluation methodology. This paper draws on in-depth interviews with a range of stakeholders (n = 17), in-depth interviews with bereaved carers (n = 6) and an analysis of documentation. Stakeholders and bereaved carers perceived that the health and personal care assistants made a vital contribution to community palliative care. Careful recruitment, specific training, case management by district nursing with allocation of specific tasks and close ongoing communication were key features which stakeholders indentified. Family carers welcomed the way assistants developed relationships and became familiar and able to meet the care needs of patients. There were some problems reported which related to capacity, work flow and the need for extensive written care plans. Employing health care assistants under the supervision of district nurses appears to support patients and family at home during end of life care and contribute to good quality nursing care. The needs for community-based palliative and end of life care will increase rapidly over the course of the next 20 years, placing pressure on community nursing services and family carers. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Flexible licensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martyn Jansen

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The case is presented for a more flexible approach to licensing online library resources. Today's distributed education environment creates pressure for UK higher and further education institutions (HEI/FEIs to form partnerships and to develop educational products and roll them out across the globe. Online library resources are a key component of distributed education and yet existing licensing agreements struggle to keep pace with the increasing range of users and purposes for which they are required. This article describes the process of developing a flexible approach to licensing and proposes a new model licence for online library resources which has the adaptability needed in this new global educational landscape. These ideas have been presented and discussed at various workshops across Eduserv's and JISC Collections' higher education and publisher communities, and further consultation is ongoing.

  5. THE ADOLESCENT FEELINGS RELATED TO THE BULLYING PHENOMENA: POSSIBILITIES TO THE NURSING ASSISTANCE IN THIS CONTEXT

    OpenAIRE

    Agnes Schutz de Oliveira; Priscila da Silva Antonio

    2006-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Bullying is a devastating phenomenon that can affect the adolescent’s self-esteem and mental health. Generally occurs in school environment when the adolescent is more susceptible or vulnerable to verbal or moral aggressions that cause to them anguish and pain, meaning as a status of social exclusion. Most of time, health problems as anorexia, bulimia, depression, anxiety and also the suicide, appears. By the way, nurses are able to prevent injuries to various problems, and also con...

  6. HOROPLAN: computer-assisted nurse scheduling using constraint-based programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darmoni, S J; Fajner, A; Mahé, N; Leforestier, A; Vondracek, M; Stelian, O; Baldenweck, M

    1995-01-01

    Nurse scheduling is a difficult and time consuming task. The schedule has to determine the day to day shift assignments of each nurse for a specified period of time in a way that satisfies the given requirements as much as possible, taking into account the wishes of nurses as closely as possible. This paper presents a constraint-based, artificial intelligence approach by describing a prototype implementation developed with the Charme language and the first results of its use in the Rouen University Hospital. Horoplan implements a non-cyclical constraint-based scheduling, using some heuristics. Four levels of constraints were defined to give a maximum of flexibility: French level (e.g. number of worked hours in a year), hospital level (e.g. specific day-off), department level (e.g. specific shift) and care unit level (e.g. specific pattern for week-ends). Some constraints must always be verified and can not be overruled and some constraints can be overruled at a certain cost. Rescheduling is possible at any time specially in case of an unscheduled absence.

  7. What are community nurses experiences of assessing frailty and assisting in planning subsequent interventions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Hannah

    2017-09-02

    With an ageing population and increasing focus on community care, this study aimed to explore the experiences of community nurses in assessing frailty and planning interventions around frailty. Six community nurses were recruited for face-to-face semi-structured interviews as part of this qualitative study which was underpinned by a competence framework ( Royal College of Nursing, 2009 ). Thematic analysis was used and frailty was identified as an emerging topic within practice. Participants discussed several aspects associated with frailty; however, some uncertainty around the concept of frailty and its definition was noted, particularly for staff who had received limited frailty training. Participants had a growing awareness of frailty in practice, but challenges-including time constraints and staffing within some roles, a perception of limited services to support older people, and for some a lack of confidence and training-presented barriers to frailty assessment. The Rockwood frailty scale was used by participants within practice, but evidence suggested it was felt to lack validity within the community setting.

  8. The systematization of nursing Assistance in care when a patient with Anemia Falciform with Leg Ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Baptista Vieira

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: levantar os diagnósticos de enfermagem mais evidentes e suas respectivas intervenções de acordo com Nursing Diagnostic Terminology (NANDA e Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC. Métodos: trata-se de um estudo exploratório o qual teve seu desenho metodológico baseado na vivência dos autores no ambulatório de curativo de um Hospital Estadual especializado em hematologia, como parte do programa de residência em enfermagem. Resultados: foram determinados oito DE, sendo dois de risco e seis reais, os quais foram descritos conforme a Taxonomia I da NANDA. Buscou-se também, após a determinação desses diagnósticos, propor intervenções de enfermagem baseadas na Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC. Conclusão: os achados revelaram que conhecer os diagnósticos de enfermagem dos indivíduos portadores de úlcera de perna secundária a anemia falciforme é de extrema importância para que os enfermeiros possam planejar individualmente o cuidado prestado a esta clientela. Descritores: Doença da hemoglobina SC; Diagnóstico de Enfermagem; Cuidados de Enfermagem

  9. Bridging the Gap Between Continuous Sedation Until Death and Physician-Assisted Death: A Focus Group Study in Nursing Homes in Flanders, Belgium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rys, S.; Deschepper, R.; Mortier, F.; Deliens, L.; Bilsen, J.

    2015-01-01

    The distinction between continuous sedation until death (CSD) and physician-assisted death (PAD) has become a topic of medical ethical debate. We conducted 6 focus groups to examine how nursing home clinicians perceive this distinction. For some, the difference is clear whereas others consider CSD a

  10. Animal-assisted therapy and agitation and depression in nursing home residents with dementia: a matched case-control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majić, Tomislav; Gutzmann, Hans; Heinz, Andreas; Lang, Undine E; Rapp, Michael A

    2013-11-01

    To investigate the efficacy of animal-assisted therapy (AAT) on symptoms of agitation/aggression and depression in nursing home residents with dementia in a randomized controlled trial. Previous studies have indicated that AAT has beneficial effects on neuropsychiatric symptoms in various psychiatric disorders but few studies have investigated the efficacy of AAT in patients suffering from dementia. Of 65 nursing home residents with dementia (mean [standard deviation] age: 81.8 [9.2] years; mean Mini-Mental State Examination score: 7.1 [0.7]), 27 matched pairs (N = 54) were randomly assigned to either treatment as usual or treatment as usual combined with AAT, administered over 10 weekly sessions. Blinded raters assessed cognitive impairment with the Mini-Mental State Examination, presence of agitation/aggression with the Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory, and depression with the Dementia Mood Assessment Scale at baseline and during a period of 4 weeks after AAT intervention. In the control group, symptoms of agitation/aggression and depression significantly increased over 10 weeks; in the intervention group, patients receiving combined treatment displayed constant frequency and severity of symptoms of agitation/aggression (F1,48 = 6.43; p <0.05) and depression (F1,48 = 26.54; p <0.001). Symptom amelioration did not occur in either group. AAT is a promising option for the treatment of agitation/aggression and depression in patients with dementia. Our results suggest that AAT may delay progression of neuropsychiatric symptoms in demented nursing home residents. Further research is needed to determine its long-time effects. Copyright © 2013 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Certified Nursing Assistants Balancing Family Caregiving Roles: Health Care Utilization Among Double- and Triple-Duty Caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePasquale, Nicole; Bangerter, Lauren R; Williams, Jessica; Almeida, David M

    2016-12-01

    This study examines how certified nursing assistants (CNAs) balancing family caregiving roles-child care (double-duty child caregivers), elder care (double-duty elder caregivers), and both child and elder care (triple-duty caregivers)-utilize health care services relative to nonfamily caregiving counterparts (formal-only caregivers). A sample of 884 CNAs from the Work, Family and Health Study was drawn on to assess the number of acute care (i.e., emergency room or urgent care facility) and other health care (i.e., outpatient treatment or counseling) visits made during the past 6 months. Double-duty elder and triple-duty caregivers had higher acute care utilization rates than formal-only caregivers. CNAs with and without family caregiving roles had similar rates of other health care visits. CNAs providing informal care for older adults have higher acute care visit rates. Given the increasing need for family caregivers and the vital importance of the health of the nursing workforce for the health of others, future research on how double- and triple-duty caregivers maintain their health amidst constant caregiving should be a priority. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Advanced practice registered nurses and physician assistants in sleep centers and clinics: a survey of current roles and educational background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvin, Loretta; Cartwright, Ann; Collop, Nancy; Freedman, Neil; McLeod, Don; Weaver, Terri E; Rogers, Ann E

    2014-05-15

    To survey Advanced Practice Registered Nurse (APRN) and Physician Assistant (PA) utilization, roles and educational background within the field of sleep medicine. Electronic surveys distributed to American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) member centers and APRNs and PAs working within sleep centers and clinics. Approximately 40% of responding AASM sleep centers reported utilizing APRNs or PAs in predominantly clinical roles. Of the APRNs and PAs surveyed, 95% reported responsibilities in sleep disordered breathing and more than 50% in insomnia and movement disorders. Most APRNs and PAs were prepared at the graduate level (89%), with sleep-specific education primarily through "on the job" training (86%). All APRNs surveyed were Nurse Practitioners (NPs), with approximately double the number of NPs compared to PAs. APRNs and PAs were reported in sleep centers at proportions similar to national estimates of NPs and PAs in physicians' offices. They report predominantly clinical roles, involving common sleep disorders. Given current predictions that the outpatient healthcare structure will change and the number of APRNs and PAs will increase, understanding the role and utilization of these professionals is necessary to plan for the future care of patients with sleep disorders. Surveyed APRNs and PAs reported a significant deficiency in formal and standardized sleep-specific education. Efforts to provide formal and standardized educational opportunities for APRNs and PAs that focus on their clinical roles within sleep centers could help fill a current educational gap.

  13. The operationalisation of religion and world view in surveys of nurses' attitudes toward euthanasia and assisted suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gielen, Joris; Van den Branden, Stef; Broeckaert, Bert

    2009-11-01

    Most quantitative studies that survey nurses' attitudes toward euthanasia and/or assisted suicide, also attempt to assess the influence of religion on these attitudes. We wanted to evaluate the operationalisation of religion and world view in these surveys. In the Pubmed database we searched for relevant articles published before August 2008 using combinations of search terms. Twenty-eight relevant articles were found. In five surveys nurses were directly asked whether religious beliefs, religious practices and/or ideological convictions influenced their attitudes, or the respondents were requested to mention the decisional basis for their answers on questions concerning end-of-life issues. In other surveys the influence of religion and world view was assessed indirectly through a comparison of the attitudes of different types of believers and/or non-believers toward euthanasia or assisted suicide. In these surveys we find subjective religious or ideological questions (questions inquiring about the perceived importance of religion or world view in life, influence of religion or world view on life in general, or how religious the respondents consider themselves) and objective questions (questions inquiring about religious practice, acceptance of religious dogmas, and religious or ideological affiliation). Religious or ideological affiliation is the most frequently used operationalisation of religion and world view. In 16 surveys only one religious or ideological question was asked. In most articles the operationalisation of religion and world view is very limited and does not reflect the diversity and complexity of religion and world view in contemporary society. Future research should pay more attention to the different dimensions of religion and world view, the religious plurality of Western society and the particularities of religion in non-Western contexts.

  14. The relationship of California's Medicaid reimbursement system to nurse staffing levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukamel, Dana B; Kang, Taewoon; Collier, Eric; Harrington, Charlene

    2012-10-01

    Policy initiatives at the Federal and state level are aimed at increasing staffing in nursing homes. These include direct staffing standards, public reporting, and financial incentives. To examine the impact of California's Medicaid reimbursement for nursing homes which includes incentives directed at staffing. Two-stage limited-information maximum-likelihood regressions were used to model the relationship between staffing [registered nurses (RNs), licensed practical nurses, and certified nursing assistants hours per resident day] and the Medicaid payment rate, accounting for the specific structure of the payment system, endogeneity of payment and case-mix, and controlling for facility and market characteristics. A total of 927 California free-standing nursing homes in 2006. The model included facility characteristics (case-mix, size, ownership, and chain affiliation), market competition and excess demand, labor supply and wages, unemployment, and female employment. The instrumental variable for Medicaid reimbursement was the peer group payment rate for 7 geographical market areas, and the instrumental variables for resident case-mix were the average county revenues for professional therapy establishments and the percent of county population aged 65 and over. Consistent with the rate incentives and rational expectation behavior, expected nursing home reimbursement rates in 2008 were associated with increased RN staffing levels in 2006 but had no relationship with licensed practical nurse and certified nursing assistant staffing. The effect was estimated at 2 minutes per $10 increase in rate. The incentives in the Medicaid system impacted only RN staffing suggesting the need to improve the state's rate setting methodology.

  15. Knowing 'something is not right' is beyond intuition: development of a clinical algorithm to enhance surveillance and assist nurses to organise and communicate clinical findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brier, Jessica; Carolyn, Moalem; Haverly, Marsha; Januario, Mary Ellen; Padula, Cynthia; Tal, Ahuva; Triosh, Henia

    2015-03-01

    To develop a clinical algorithm to guide nurses' critical thinking through systematic surveillance, assessment, actions required and communication strategies. To achieve this, an international, multiphase project was initiated. Patients receive hospital care postoperatively because they require the skilled surveillance of nurses. Effective assessment of postoperative patients is essential for early detection of clinical deterioration and optimal care management. Despite the significant amount of time devoted to surveillance activities, there is lack of evidence that nurses use a consistent, systematic approach in surveillance, management and communication, potentially leading to less optimal outcomes. Several explanations for the lack of consistency have been suggested in the literature. Mixed methods approach. Retrospective chart review; semi-structured interviews conducted with expert nurses (n = 10); algorithm development. Themes developed from the semi-structured interviews, including (1) complete, systematic assessment, (2) something is not right (3) validating with others, (4) influencing factors and (5) frustration with lack of response when communicating findings were used as the basis for development of the Surveillance Algorithm for Post-Surgical Patients. The algorithm proved beneficial based on limited use in clinical settings. Further work is needed to fully test it in education and practice. The Surveillance Algorithm for Post-Surgical Patients represents the approach of expert nurses, and serves to guide less expert nurses' observations, critical thinking, actions and communication. Based on this approach, the algorithm assists nurses to develop skills promoting early detection, intervention and communication in cases of patient deterioration. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. THE ADOLESCENT FEELINGS RELATED TO THE BULLYING PHENOMENA: POSSIBILITIES TO THE NURSING ASSISTANCE IN THIS CONTEXT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes Schutz de Oliveira

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Bullying is a devastating phenomenon that can affect the adolescent’s self-esteem and mental health. Generally occurs in school environment when the adolescent is more susceptible or vulnerable to verbal or moral aggressions that cause to them anguish and pain, meaning as a status of social exclusion. Most of time, health problems as anorexia, bulimia, depression, anxiety and also the suicide, appears. By the way, nurses are able to prevent injuries to various problems, and also concerns about this traumatic incident in adolescence. The aim of this study was to identify feelings that can be related to” bullying “in adolescent students in 5th to 8th classes. It is a descriptive research by qualitative approach, developed in a religious setting state school. Data was collected by taped interviews and, after transcribed, submitted to thematic analysis. The results showed that feelings related to this phenomena are multiple and varied, being categorized as positive aspects character, negative aspects character and necessary aspects character. KEY WORDS: School Health; Pediatric Nursing; Teen Health; Violence.

  17. Assisted Living

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it, too. Back to top What is the Cost for Assisted Living? Although assisted living costs less than nursing home ... Primarily, older persons or their families pay the cost of assisted living. Some health and long-term care insurance policies ...

  18. Country of origin and racio-ethnicity: are there differences in perceived organizational cultural competency and job satisfaction among nursing assistants in long-term care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allensworth-Davies, Donald; Leigh, Jennifer; Pukstas, Kim; Geron, Scott Miyake; Hardt, Eric; Brandeis, Gary; Engle, Ryann L; Parker, Victoria A

    2007-01-01

    Long-term care facilities nationwide are finding it difficult to train and retain sufficient numbers of nursing assistants, resulting in a dire staffing situation. Researchers, managers, and practitioners alike have been trying to determine the correlates of job satisfaction to address this increasingly untenable situation. One factor that has received little empirical attention in the long-term care literature is cultural competence. Cultural competence is defined as a set of skills, attitudes, behaviors, and policies that enable organizations and staff to work effectively in cross-cultural situations. To examine organizational cultural competence as perceived by nursing assistants and determine if this was related to differences in job satisfaction across countries of origin and racio-ethnic groups. Primary data collected from a cross-section of 135 nursing assistants at four New England nursing homes. Demographics, perceptions of organizational cultural competence, and ratings of job satisfaction were collected. A multivariate, generalized linear model was used to assess predictors of job satisfaction. A secondary analysis was then conducted to identify the most important components of organizational cultural competency. Perception of organizational cultural competence (p = .0005) and autonomy (p = .001) were the strongest predictors of job satisfaction among nursing assistants; as these increase, job satisfaction also increases. Neither country of origin nor racio-ethnicity was associated with job satisfaction, but racio-ethnicity was associated with perceived organizational cultural competence (p = .05). A comfortable work environment for employees of different races/cultures emerged as the strongest organizational cultural competency factor (p = .04). Developing and maintaining organizational cultural competency and employee autonomy are important managerial strategies for increasing job satisfaction and improving staff retention. Toward this end, creating a

  19. How the perspectives of nursing assistants and frail elderly residents on their daily interaction in nursing homes affect their interaction: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lung, Chi-Chi; Liu, Justina Yat Wa

    2016-01-14

    Good support from and positive relations with institutional staff can enhance the psychosocial wellbeing of residents admitted to a nursing home. Nursing assistants (NAs) interact most frequently with residents and play an important role in developing good rapport with them. Most studies have described the daily interactions between NAs and residents as task oriented. Only few have attempted to explore the perspectives of NAs and residents on their daily interactions. Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify the types of daily interactions perceived by NAs and residents. We also investigated those intentions/beliefs held by NAs and residents that might direct their interactive behaviors. A descriptive, exploratory, qualitative approach was used to explore the perspectives of 18 NAs (mean age: 51) and 15 residents (mean age: 84.4) on their daily interactions. Unstructured in-depth interviews were used to collect data. All of the interviews were conducted from July to December 2013. The collected data were transcribed verbatim and analyzed by content analysis. Three types of interactions were found that described the NAs' and residents' perspectives on their daily interactions: (1) physiologically-oriented daily interactions; (2) cordial interactions intended to maintain a harmonious atmosphere; and (3) reciprocal social interactions intended to develop closer rapport. One or more themes reflecting the participants' intentions or beliefs were identified from each group to support each type of interaction. An over-emphasis on the formal caring relationship and over-concern about maintaining a harmonious atmosphere contributed to a superficial and distant relationship between the two parties. Building close rapport takes time and involves repeated reciprocal social interactions. The findings showed that with good intentions to establish closer rapport, both NAs and residents did favors for each other. All of those favors were easily integrated in the care

  20. Skill mix change between general practitioners, nurse practitioners, physician assistants and nurses in primary healthcare for older people: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovink, Marleen H; van Vught, Anneke J A H; Persoon, Anke; Schoonhoven, Lisette; Koopmans, Raymond T C M; Laurant, Miranda G H

    2018-05-02

    More and more older adults desire to and are enabled to grow old in their own home, regardless of their physical and mental capabilities. This change, together with the growing number of older adults, increases the demand for general practitioners (GPs). However, care for older people lacks prestige among medical students and few medical students are interested in a career in care for older people. Innovative solutions are needed to reduce the demand for GPs, to guarantee quality of healthcare and to contain costs. A solution might be found in skill mix change by introducing nurse practitioners (NPs), physician assistants (PAs) or registered nurses (RNs). The aim of this study was to describe how skill mix change is organised in daily practice, what influences it and what the effects are of introducing NPs, PAs or RNs into primary healthcare for older people. In total, 34 care providers working in primary healthcare in the Netherlands were interviewed: GPs (n = 9), NPs (n = 10), PAs (n = 5) and RNs (n = 10). Five focus groups and 14 individual interviews were conducted. Analysis consisted of open coding, creating categories and abstraction. In most cases, healthcare for older people was only a small part of the tasks of NPs, PAs and RNs; they did not solely focus on older people. The tasks they performed and their responsibilities in healthcare for older people differed between, as well as within, professions. Although the interviewees debated the usefulness of proactive structural screening on frailty in the older population, when implemented, it was also unclear who should perform the geriatric assessment. Interviewees considered NPs, PAs and RNs an added value, and it was stated that the role of the GP changed with the introduction of NPs, PAs or RNs. The roles and responsibilities of NPs, PAs and RNs for the care of older people living at home are still not established. Nonetheless, these examples show the potential of these professionals. The

  1. The Monticello license renewal project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clauss, J.M.; Harrison, D.L.; Pickens, T.A.

    1993-01-01

    Today, 111 nuclear power plants provide over 20 percent of the electrical energy generated in the United States. The operating license of the oldest operating plant will expire in 2003, one-third of the existing operating licenses will expire by 2010 and the newest plant's operating license will expire in 2033. The National Energy Strategy (NES) prepared by the Department of Energy (DOE) assumes that 70 percent of the current operating plants will continue to operate beyond their current license expiration. Power from current operating plants can assist in ensuring an adequate, diverse, and environmentally acceptable energy supply for economic growth and improved U.S. competitiveness. In order to preserve this energy resource, three major tasks must be successfully completed: (1) establishment of regulations, technical standards, and procedures for the preparation and review of License Renewal Applications (LRAs); (2) development of technical criteria and bases for monitoring, refurbishing or replacing plant equipment; and (3) demonstration of the regulatory process by a plant obtaining a renewed license. Since 1986, the DOE has been working with the nuclear industry and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to establish and demonstrate the option to extend the life of a nuclear power plant by renewing the operating license. The Monticello Lead Plant demonstration project was initiated in September 1988, following the Pilot Plant studies. This paper is primarily focused on the status and insights gained from the Northern States Power Company (NSP) Monticello Lead Plant demonstration project. The following information is included: (1) Current Status - Monticello License Renewal Application; (2) Economic Analysis; (3) License Renewal Regulatory Uncertainty Issues; (4) Key Decisions; (5) Management Structure; (6) Technical and Licensing Perspective; (7) NRC Interactions; (8) Summary

  2. Assisted Living

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are not licensed by the federal government, the services provided and quality controls vary by state.) More than 500,000 ... residents ( Note : This does not mean that skilled nursing must be available 24 hours a day.) Social services Housekeeping and laundry Recreation and meals Help with ...

  3. License to Learn

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leone, Maria Isabella; Boccardelli, Paolo; Reichstein, Toke

    2016-01-01

    the technology. Drawing on a sample of 133 licensees and an equal number of matched nonlicensees, we present empirical evidence that thick contracts propel the licensees' likelihood of introducing new inventions. It is also found that thick contracts act as a substitute for licensees' absorptive capacity....... Licensees that are more familiar with the licensed technology are in less need of assistance from the licensors to assimilate and integrate the knowledge. However, this substitution effect is neutralized once the hurdle of invention has been overcome, meaning that the licensees have succeeded to ignite...... the invention process, suggesting the exploitation of the learning curve, triggered by their mutual understanding....

  4. The Role of Veterinary Education in Safety Policies for Animal-Assisted Therapy and Activities in Hospitals and Nursing Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, Deborah E; Mueller, Megan K; Gibbs, Debra M; Siebens, Hannah C; Freeman, Lisa M

    Animal-assisted activities (AAA) and animal-assisted therapy (AAT) programs are increasing in popularity, but current programs vary in their safety and health policies. Veterinarians can have an important role in ensuring the safety of both the animals and humans involved, but it is unclear how best to educate veterinary students to serve effectively in this role. Therefore, the goal of this study was to assess the knowledge gaps and perceptions of first-year veterinary students on health and safety aspects of AAA/AAT programs by administering a survey. This information could then guide future educational training in veterinary schools to address the knowledge gaps in this area. Formal education during the veterinary curriculum had not yet been provided to these students on AAA/AAT before the survey. Of 98 first-year veterinary students, 91 completed the survey. When asked about policies on visiting animals, 58% of students responded that nursing homes are required to have a policy and 67% responded that hospitals are required to have one. Three quarters of students reported that veterinarians, animal handlers, and facilities should share the responsibility for ensuring safe human-animal interaction in AAA/AAT programs. Most (82%) of the students responded that all or most national and local therapy animal groups prohibit animals that consume raw meat diets from participating in AAA/AAT programs. The results of this survey will help veterinary schools better identify knowledge gaps that can be addressed in veterinary curricula so future veterinarians will be equipped to provide appropriate public health information regarding AAA/AAT programs.

  5. THE TECHNICAL SKILLS OF THE NURSES ON THE ASSISTANCE OF THE NEWBORN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Leticia Monteiro Gomes

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: Caracterizar o perfil profissional do enfermeiro e analisar os conhecimentos e habilidades essenciais dos enfermeiros que atuam no atendimento ao recém-nascido. Método: Quantitativo, transversal, descritivo, aplicado um formulário a 12 enfermeiros selecionados com técnica de amostragem por conglomerados. Os dados foram processados no Microsoft Office Excel 2007 e analisados através de manuais da Confederação Internacional das Parteiras e do Ministério da Saúde. Aprovado pelo comitê de ética da Secretaria Municipal de Saúde e Defesa Civil, CAAE:0265.0.314.000-10. Resultados: Identificou-se que 66,66% dos enfermeiros têm todos os 8 conhecimentos avaliados. E quanto às habilidades básicas, especialmente nos procedimentos de emergência, temos aproximadamente 46% de enfermeiros não treinados e 79% que não realizam os procedimentos. Conclusão: A ausência de conhecimento e habilidades estabelecidos pela Confederação Internacional das Parteiras confere um risco ao recém-nascido na assistência básica, principalmente nos casos de emergência, devendo o profissional ter um treinamento que assegure sua competência.procedimentos de emergência, temos aproximadamente 46% de enfermeiros não treinados e 79% que não realizam os procedimentos. Conclusão: A ausência de conhecimento e habilidades estabelecidos pela Confederação Internacional das Parteiras confere um risco ao recém-nascido na assistência básica, principalmente nos casos de emergência, devendo o profissional ter um treinamento que assegure sua competência.

  6. The effectiveness of delegation interventions by the registered nurse to the unlicensed assistive personnel and their impact on quality of care, patient satisfaction, and RN staff satisfaction: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Una; Itty, Any Sajan; Nazario, Helen; Pinon, Miriam; Slyer, Jason; Singleton, Joanne

    Delegation by the registered nurse is a decision making process that includes assessment, planning, implementation, and evaluation. Due to an ever-expanding global shortage of nurses, registered nurses are increasingly dependent on unlicensed assistive personnel to assist in the provision of safe patient care. Delegation is recognised as a fundamental nursing skill that can be utilised effectively to improve quality care. To examine and synthesize the best available evidence regarding the impact of delegation interventions used by the registered nurse with the unlicensed assistive personnel and their impact on quality of care, patient satisfaction, and registered nurse staff satisfaction. Registered nurses and unlicensed assistive personnel in patient care settings where delegation occurs.This review considered studies that evaluated the effectiveness of delegation interventions by registered nurses to unlicensed assistive personnel.The outcomes examined were quality of care, patient satisfaction, and/or registered nurse staff satisfaction as measured by validated and reliable tools.The review first considered randomised controlled trials; in their absence other research designs, such as non-randomised controlled trials, or other quasi-experimental studies, observational studies and descriptive studies were considered for inclusion in the systematic review. The search strategy aimed to find both published and unpublished studies in the English language from the inception of the included databases through December 2011. The databases searched included the Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), EMBASE, MEDLINE, CINAHL, Healthsource Nursing/Academic edition, and PsycINFO. A search of the grey literature and electronic hand searching of relevant journals was also performed. The studies selected for retrieval were critically evaluated by two independent reviewers for methodological quality using standardised critical appraisal instruments from the Joanna

  7. Prescribing exercise for older adults: A needs assessment comparing primary care physicians, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauenhauer, Jason A; Podgorski, Carol A; Karuza, Jurgis

    2006-01-01

    To inform the development of educational programming designed to teach providers appropriate methods of exercise prescription for older adults, the authors conducted a survey of 177 physicians, physician assistants, and nurse practitioners (39% response rate). The survey was designed to better understand the prevalence of exercise prescriptions, attitudes, barriers, and educational needs of primary care practitioners toward older adults. Forty-seven percent of primary care providers report not prescribing exercise for older adults; 85% of the sample report having no formal training in exercise prescription. Practitioner attitudes were positive toward exercise, but were not predictive of their exercise prescribing behavior, which indicates that education efforts aimed at changing attitudes as a way of increasing exercise-prescribing behaviors would not be sufficient. In order to facilitate and reinforce practice changes to increase exercise-prescribing behaviors of primary care providers, results suggest the need for specific skill training on how to write an exercise prescription and motivate older adults to follow these prescriptions.

  8. The productivity of physician assistants and nurse practitioners and health work force policy in the era of managed health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffler, R M; Waitzman, N J; Hillman, J M

    1996-01-01

    Managed care is spreading rapidly in the United States and creating incentives for physician practices to find the most efficient combination of health professionals to deliver care to an enrolled population. Given these trends, it is appropriate to reexamine the roles of physician assistants (PAs) and nurse practitioners (NPs) in the health care workforce. This paper briefly reviews the literature on PA and NP productivity, managed care plans' use of PAs and NPs, and the potential impact of PAs and NPs on the size and composition of the future physician workforce. In general, the literature supports the idea that PAs and NPs could have a major impact on the future health care workforce. Studies show significant opportunities for increased physician substitution and even conservative assumptions about physician task delegation imply a large increase in the number of PAs and NPs that can be effectively deployed. However, the current literature has certain limitations that make it difficult to quantify the future impact of PAs and NPs. Among these limitations is the fact that virtually all formal productivity studies were conducted in fee-for-service settings during the 1970s, rather than managed care settings. In addition, the vast majority of PA and NP productivity studies have viewed PAs and NPs as physician substitutes rather than as members of interdisciplinary health care teams, which may become the dominant health care delivery model over the next 10-20 years.

  9. [Surgeons' hope: expanding the professional role of co-medical staff and introducing the nurse practitioner/physician assistant and team approach to the healthcare system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maehara, Tadaaki; Nishida, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Takashi; Tominaga, Ryuji; Tabayashi, Koichi

    2010-07-01

    The healthcare system surrounding surgeons is collapsing due to Japan's policy of limiting health expenditure, market fundamentalism, shortage of healthcare providers, unfavorable working environment for surgeons, increasing risk of malpractice suits, and decreasing number of those who desire to pursue the surgery specialty. In the USA, nonphysician and mid-level clinicians such as nurse practitioners (NPs) and physician assistants (PAs) have been working since the 1960s, and the team approach to medicine which benefits patients is functioning well. One strategy to avoid the collapse of the Japanese surgical healthcare system is introducing the NP/PA system. The division of labor in medicine can provide high-quality, safe healthcare and increase the confidence of the public by contributing to: reduced postoperative complications; increased patient satisfaction; decreased length of postoperative hospital stay: and economic benefits. We have requested that the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare establish a Japanese NP/PA system to care for patients more efficiently perioperatively. The ministry has decided to launch a trial profession called "tokutei (specifically qualified) nurse" in February 2010. These nurses will be trained and educated at the Master's degree level and allowed to practice several predetermined skill sets under physician supervision. We hope that all healthcare providers will assist in transforming the tokutei nurse system into a Japanese NP/PA system.

  10. A taxonomy of nursing care organization models in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Carl-Ardy; D'Amour, Danielle; Tchouaket, Eric; Rivard, Michèle; Clarke, Sean; Blais, Régis

    2012-08-28

    Over the last decades, converging forces in hospital care, including cost-containment policies, rising healthcare demands and nursing shortages, have driven the search for new operational models of nursing care delivery that maximize the use of available nursing resources while ensuring safe, high-quality care. Little is known, however, about the distinctive features of these emergent nursing care models. This article contributes to filling this gap by presenting a theoretically and empirically grounded taxonomy of nursing care organization models in the context of acute care units in Quebec and comparing their distinctive features. This study was based on a survey of 22 medical units in 11 acute care facilities in Quebec. Data collection methods included questionnaire, interviews, focus groups and administrative data census. The analytical procedures consisted of first generating unit profiles based on qualitative and quantitative data collected at the unit level, then applying hierarchical cluster analysis to the units' profile data. The study identified four models of nursing care organization: two professional models that draw mainly on registered nurses as professionals to deliver nursing services and reflect stronger support to nurses' professional practice, and two functional models that draw more significantly on licensed practical nurses (LPNs) and assistive staff (orderlies) to deliver nursing services and are characterized by registered nurses' perceptions that the practice environment is less supportive of their professional work. This study showed that medical units in acute care hospitals exhibit diverse staff mixes, patterns of skill use, work environment design, and support for innovation. The four models reflect not only distinct approaches to dealing with the numerous constraints in the nursing care environment, but also different degrees of approximations to an "ideal" nursing professional practice model described by some leaders in the

  11. [Benefits of nursing care service in the assisted reproduction clinic to self-cycle-management and self-efficiency of infertility patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Qin; Sun, Chao-Feng; Guo, Mei

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the benefits of nursing care service in the assisted reproduction clinic to self-cycle-management and self-efficiency of the outpatients with infertility. We randomly divided 600 females preliminarily diagnosed with infertility into a control and an experimental group, 288 in the former and 285 in the latter group excluding those whose husbands had azoospermia. For the women patients of the experimental group, we conducted nursing care intervention concerning related knowledge, skills, diet, excise, medication, and psychology, by one-to-one consultation, individualized or group communication, establishing files, telephone follow-up, and wechat guidance. After 3 months of intervention, we compared the compliance of medical visits, effectiveness of cycle management, sense of self-efficiency, satisfaction, and anxiety score between the two groups of patients. In comparison with the controls, the patients of the experimental group showed significantly better knowledge about assisted reproduction and higher effectiveness of self-cycle-management, self-efficiency, and satisfaction (P <0.05), but a markedly lower degree of anxiety (P <0.05). Nursing care service in the assisted reproduction clinic can improve the compliance of medical visits, effectiveness of self-cycle-management, self-efficiency, and satisfaction and reduce the anxiety of the patients.

  12. Non-working nurses in Japan: estimated size and its age-cohort characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Yoshifumi; Miyazaki, Satoru

    2008-12-01

    This paper aims to forecast the total number of non-working nursing staff in Japan both overall and in terms of separate age groups for assistant nurses and fully qualified nurses. This also examines policy implications of those forecasts. Although the existence of around 550,000 of non-working nursing staff has been announced, the actual number of non-working nurses is not so clear that we might make errors in making policy to meet nurse workforce demand and supply in Japan. Estimations by integrating various data on the quantitative characteristics of non-working nursing staff were carried out. Considering the length and the type of education or training in referred four nursing positions; registered nurses, assistant nurses, public health nurses and midwives, we first estimated the number of students who completed a full course. And then multiplying by the ratio for gender and age classifications at the time of entry into courses, the number of those who obtained licenses was estimated. The number of non-working nurses was estimated at 100,000 higher than those in 2005 by government. Looking at age group, it is also possible to see a strong reflection of an employment pattern that follows the life cycle of female workers. Further analysis of life cycle effects and cohort effects proved the effect of life cycles even when subtracting the differences between the working behaviours of different generations. Our findings strongly suggest the need to provide an urgent policy that workplace conditions can be created in which a balance between work and family is achievable. Moreover, to empower clinical activity, we also believe there is an urgent need to reexamine the overall career vision for assistant nurses including in terms of compensation. Relevance to clinical practice. Our findings strongly suggests that consideration for work-life balance of nursing staff; particularly, female staff is all the more important to provide a stable quality care.

  13. Raising the Level of Awareness of Nurse-to-Nurse Lateral Violence in a Critical Access Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L. Embree

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Significance of Problem. Nurse-to-nurse lateral violence (NNLV has been internationally reported for greater than two decades and results in new nurse turnover and serious negative outcomes. Clinical Question/Project Objective. Will NNLV and cognitive rehearsal (CR education result in a decrease in perceived nurse-to-nurse lateral violence in a critical access hospital (CAH? The scope of this project was to determine perceived extent and increase awareness of NNLV through an educational project about NNLV and CR. Clinical Appraisal of Literature/Best Evidence. Trends of NNLV were assessed through an extensive literature review from Health Source, CINAHL, ProQuest Health, and Medical Complete. An educational forum about NNLV with CR was advocated for newly licensed nurses and current nurses (potential perpetrators of NNLV with the goal of liberation of oppressed individuals. Integration into Practice/Discussion of Results. An interventional study with one group and pre-/postintervention was used to determine NNLV and CR education on perceived levels of lateral violence. Evidence-based measurement occurred through use of the Nurse Workplace Scale and the Silencing the Self-Work Scale. Outcomes were analyzed quantitatively through independent t-tests. Awareness of NNLV was increased. Evaluation of Evidence-Based Practice/Implications. Organizations must learn to eliminate NNLV. With increased levels of awareness of NNLV, nurses requested additional assistance in dealing with inappropriate behavior.

  14. INFORMATION ON HEALTH: RELATIONSHIP OF THE IMPLANTATION OF SYSTEMATIZATION OF NURSING ASSISTANCE IN A HOSPITAL OF VALE DO TAQUARI/RS, BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Felipe Pissaia

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to share experiences of the implantation of the Nursing Assistance Systematization with the aid of computer science in a medical clinic unit of a small hospital in Vale do Taquari / RS, Brazil. This is a descriptive and exploratory experience report with a qualitative approach, in which nine nursing professionals were followed during the implantation of the SAE with the help of computer technology in a medical clinic unit of a general hospital, the implantation of the process began in September The results were analyzed as recommended by Bardin. There were some difficulties in the implementation of systematization, such as lack of knowledge about the process and difficulties in handling computer equipment. We also found facilities in the use of information technology during the implementation, such as the availability of information and improved communication between the multiprofessional team. Improvements such as client security and optimization of work processes were also observed. It is considered that the report has a limitation because it contemplates a short time of implantation of the process, nevertheless it leads to a greater discussion on the subject. It was observed the importance of a qualified training for nursing professionals regarding the use of this work methodology, as well as the qualification of assistance and implementation facilitated with the use of information technology.

  15. Licensed Healthcare Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — The Licensed Healthcare Facilities point layer represents the locations of all healthcare facilities licensed by the State of California, Department of Health...

  16. 2015 Business Licenses

    Data.gov (United States)

    City of Jackson, Mississippi — This data displays all business license information for the year of 2015. This information details license classifications and status. This information will updated...

  17. The top eight issues Queensland Australia's aged-care nurses and assistants-in-nursing worried about outside their workplace: a qualitative snapshot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuckett, Anthony; Hegney, Desley; Parker, Deborah; Eley, Robert M; Dickie, Robyn

    2011-10-01

    The attainment of a work-life balance is an important issue for recruitment, retention and workforce planning. This paper aims to report on the free text data provided by the aged-care sector nurses around perceptions of important work-life issues. Data were written responses of aged-care nurses to the open-ended request at the end of a survey, which asked them to list up to five political/social/environmental issues concerning them outside of their work. For aged-care nurses, when asked to list political/social/environmental issues they were concerned about outside of work in late 2007, there emerged considered issues around work and life. Among the top eight themes there is an intriguing balance between the themes work, industrial relations, aged care/elder care and health-care services compared with the themes environment, water, societal values and housing. Qualitative insights into the political/social/environmental issues aged-care nurses are concerned about outside of your work suggest their desire for a labour/life or work/life harmony. Aged-care nurses place an equal importance on the nature of labour and the basics of life. The findings provide information for aged-care sector managers and workforce planners on areas in need of consideration to recruit and retain a workforce within aged care. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  18. The development of an ergonomics training program to identify, evaluate, and control musculoskeletal disorders among nursing assistants at a state-run veterans' home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Erica L; McGlothlin, James D; Blue, Carolyn L

    2004-01-01

    Nursing assistants (NAs) who work in nursing and personal care facilities are twice and five times more likely, respectively, to suffer a musculoskeletal disorder compared to service industries and other health care facilities, respectively. The purpose of this study was to develop an ergonomics training program for selected NAs at a state-run veterans' home to decrease musculoskeletal disorders by 1) developing questionnaires to assess musculoskeletal stress, 2) evaluating the work environment, 3) developing and using a training package, and 4) determining the application of the information from the training package by NAs on the floor. Results show two new risk factors not previously identified for nursing personnel in the peer-reviewed literature. Quizzes given to the nursing personnel before and after training indicated a significant improvement in understanding the principles of ergonomics and patient-handling techniques. Statistical analysis comparing the pre-training and post-training questionnaires indicated no significant decrease in musculoskeletal risk factors and no significant reduction in pain or discomfort or overall mental or physical health.

  19. Nurse Bullying: Impact on Nurses' Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Penny A; McCoy, Thomas P

    2017-12-01

    Workplace bullying has been experienced by 27% to 80% of nurses who have participated in studies. Bullying behaviors negatively impact the health of nurses. This study examined whether nurses' resilience had an impact on the effects of bullying on the nurse's health. This cross-sectional descriptive study surveyed licensed registered nurses in one state. The sample ( N = 345) was predominately female (89%) and Caucasian (84%), with an average age of 46.6 years. In this sample, 40% of nurses were bullied. Higher incidence of bullying was associated with lower physical health scores ( p = .002) and lower mental health scores ( p = .036). Nurses who are bullied at work experience lower physical and mental health, which can decrease the nurses' quality of life and impede their ability to deliver safe, effective patient care.

  20. 13 CFR 107.1900 - Surrender of license.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Surrender of license. 107.1900 Section 107.1900 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Ending Operations as a Licensee § 107.1900 Surrender of license. You may not surrender your...

  1. Bridging the gap between continuous sedation until death and physician-assisted death: a focus group study in nursing homes in Flanders, Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rys, Sam; Deschepper, Reginald; Mortier, Freddy; Deliens, Luc; Bilsen, Johan

    2015-06-01

    The distinction between continuous sedation until death (CSD) and physician-assisted death (PAD) has become a topic of medical ethical debate. We conducted 6 focus groups to examine how nursing home clinicians perceive this distinction. For some, the difference is clear whereas others consider CSD a form of euthanasia. Another group situates CSD between pain relief and ending life. Arguments for these perspectives refer to the following themes: intention, dosage of sedative drugs, unconsciousness, and the pace of the dying process. Generally, CSD is considered emotionally easier to deal with since it entails a gradual dying process. Nursing home clinicians have diverging perceptions of the relation between CSD and PAD; some consider CSD to be more than a purely palliative measure, that is, also as a means to hasten death. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. A taxonomy of nursing care organization models in hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Over the last decades, converging forces in hospital care, including cost-containment policies, rising healthcare demands and nursing shortages, have driven the search for new operational models of nursing care delivery that maximize the use of available nursing resources while ensuring safe, high-quality care. Little is known, however, about the distinctive features of these emergent nursing care models. This article contributes to filling this gap by presenting a theoretically and empirically grounded taxonomy of nursing care organization models in the context of acute care units in Quebec and comparing their distinctive features. Methods This study was based on a survey of 22 medical units in 11 acute care facilities in Quebec. Data collection methods included questionnaire, interviews, focus groups and administrative data census. The analytical procedures consisted of first generating unit profiles based on qualitative and quantitative data collected at the unit level, then applying hierarchical cluster analysis to the units’ profile data. Results The study identified four models of nursing care organization: two professional models that draw mainly on registered nurses as professionals to deliver nursing services and reflect stronger support to nurses’ professional practice, and two functional models that draw more significantly on licensed practical nurses (LPNs) and assistive staff (orderlies) to deliver nursing services and are characterized by registered nurses’ perceptions that the practice environment is less supportive of their professional work. Conclusions This study showed that medical units in acute care hospitals exhibit diverse staff mixes, patterns of skill use, work environment design, and support for innovation. The four models reflect not only distinct approaches to dealing with the numerous constraints in the nursing care environment, but also different degrees of approximations to an “ideal” nursing professional practice

  3. Utilization of a biomedical device (VeinViewer® ) to assist with peripheral intravenous catheter (PIV) insertion for pediatric nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeely, Heidi L; Ream, Theresa L; Thrasher, Jodi M; Dziadkowiec, Oliwier; Callahan, Tiffany J

    2018-04-01

    Vascular access in pediatric patients can be challenging even with the currently available technological resources. This nurse-driven research study explored time, cost, and resources for intravenous access to determine if a biomedical device, VeinViewer ® Vision, would facilitate improvements in pediatric access. In addition, this study looked at nurse perceptions of skills and confidence around intravenous insertion and if the use of the VeinViewer ® impacted these perceptions. Literature examining pediatric intravenous access success rates compared with nurse perceived skills and confidence is lacking. Nonblinded randomized control trial of pediatric nurses working in an acute care hospital setting. A preliminary needs assessment solicited feedback from nurses regarding their practice, perceived skills, and confidence with placing peripheral intravenous catheters (PIVs). Due to the results of the preliminary needs assessment, a research study was designed and 40 nurses were recruited to participate. The nurses were randomized into either a VeinViewer ® or standard practice group. Nurse participants placed intravenous catheters on hospitalized pediatric patients using established procedures while tracking data for the study. Needs assessment showed a majority of nurses felt a biomedical device would be helpful in building their intravenous insertion skills and their confidence. The study results did not demonstrate any clinically significant differences between VeinViewer ® use and standard practice for intravenous catheter insertion in pediatric patients for success of placement, number of attempts, or overall cost. In addition, no difference was noted between nurses in either group on perceived skills or confidence with insertion of PIVs. The ongoing need for resources focused on building nurse skills and confidence for PIV insertion was highlighted and organizations should continue to direct efforts toward developing skills and competency for staff that

  4. Identification of Hypertension Management-related Errors in a Personal Digital Assistant-based Clinical Log for Nurses in Advanced Practice Nurse Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nam-Ju Lee, DNSc, RN

    2010-03-01

    Conclusion: The Hypertension Diagnosis and Management Error Taxonomy was useful for identifying errors based on documentation in a clinical log. The results provide an initial understanding of the nature of errors associated with hypertension diagnosis and management of nurses in APN training. The information gained from this study can contribute to educational interventions that promote APN competencies in identification and management of hypertension as well as overall patient safety and informatics competencies.

  5. Association Between the Nursing Home Minimum Data Set for Vision and Vision-Targeted Health-Related Quality of Life in Nursing Home Residents as Assessed by Certified Nursing Assistants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark W. Swanson

    2009-01-01

    Conclusions: Ratings by CNAs on the vision-targeted quality of life of nursing home residents under their care is in general agreement with the MDS category assigned by the nurse coordinator. However, CNA ratings are largely homogeneous in the adequate vision to moderately impaired categories.

  6. Do guidelines on euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide in Dutch hospitals and nursing homes reflect the law? A content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesselink, B A M; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, B D; Janssen, A J G M; Buiting, H M; Kollau, M; Rietjens, J A C; Pasman, H R W

    2012-01-01

    To describe the content of practice guidelines on euthanasia and assisted suicide (EAS) and to compare differences between settings and guidelines developed before or after enactment of the euthanasia law in 2002 by means of a content analysis. Most guidelines stated that the attending physician is responsible for the decision to grant or refuse an EAS request. Due care criteria were described in the majority of guidelines, but aspects relevant for assessing these criteria were not always described. Half of the guidelines described the role of the nurse in the performance of euthanasia. Compared with hospital guidelines, nursing home guidelines were more often stricter than the law in excluding patients with dementia (30% vs 4%) and incompetent patients (25% vs 4%). As from 2002, the guidelines were less strict in categorically excluding patients groups (32% vs 64%) and in particular incompetent patients (10% vs 29%). Healthcare institutions should accurately state the boundaries of the law, also when they prefer to set stricter boundaries for their own institution. Only then can guidelines provide adequate support for physicians and nurses in the difficult EAS decision-making process.

  7. Effect of animal-assisted interventions on depression, agitation and quality of life in nursing home residents suffering from cognitive impairment or dementia: a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Christine; Pedersen, Ingeborg; Bergland, Astrid; Enders-Slegers, Marie-José; Patil, Grete; Ihlebaek, Camilla

    2016-12-01

    The prevalence of neuropsychiatric symptoms in cognitively impaired nursing home residents is known to be very high, with depression and agitation being the most common symptoms. The possible effects of a 12-week intervention with animal-assisted activities (AAA) in nursing homes were studied. The primary outcomes related to depression, agitation and quality of life (QoL). A prospective, cluster randomized multicentre trial with a follow-up measurement 3 months after end of intervention was used. Inclusion criteria were men and women aged 65 years or older, with a diagnosis of dementia or having a cognitive deficit. Ten nursing homes were randomized to either AAA with a dog or a control group with treatment as usual. In total, 58 participants were recruited: 28 in the intervention group and 30 in the control group. The intervention consisted of a 30-min session with AAA twice weekly for 12 weeks in groups of three to six participants, led by a qualified dog handler. Norwegian versions of the Cornell Scale for Depression, the Brief Agitation Rating Scale and the Quality of Life in Late-stage Dementia scale were used. A significant effect on depression and QoL was found for participants with severe dementia at follow-up. For QoL, a significant effect of AAA was also found immediately after the intervention. No effects on agitation were found. Animal-assisted activities may have a positive effect on symptoms of depression and QoL in older people with dementia, especially those in a late stage. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Lost and misplaced items and assistive devices in nursing homes: Identifying problems and technological opportunities through participatory design research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oude Weernink, C E; Sweegers, L; Relou, L; van der Zijpp, T J; van Hoof, J

    2018-02-06

    Modern healthcare, including nursing home care, goes together with the use of technologies to support treatment, the provision of care and daily activities. The challenges concerning the implementation of such technologies are numerous. One of these emerging technologies are location technologies (RTLS or Real-Time Location Systems). that can be utilized in the nursing home for monitoring the use and location of assets. This paper describes a participatory design study of RTLS based on context mapping, conducted in two nursing home organizations. Rather than investigating the technological possibilities, this study investigates the needs and wishes from the perspective of the care professional. The study identified semantic themes that relate to the practicalities of lost and misplaced items in the nursing home, as well as latent themes that cover the wishes regarding technology in the nursing homes. The organizational culture and building typology may play a role in losing items. The participants in this study indicated that RTLS can provide a solution to some of the challenges that they encounter in the workplace. However, the implementation of new technologies should be done with care and should be integrated into existing ICT systems in order to minimize additional training and posing a burden on the workload.

  9. Pressure ulcer prevention in nursing homes: nurse descriptions of individual and organization level factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellefield, Mary Ellen; Magnabosco, Jennifer L

    2014-01-01

    Sustaining pressure ulcer prevention (PUP) in nursing homes has been difficult to achieve. Implementation science researchers suggest that identification of individual staff and organizational factors influencing current practices is essential to the development of an effective and customized plan to implement practice changes in a specific setting. A mixed methods approach was used to describe nurses' perceptions of individual and organization-level factors influencing performance of PUP in two Veterans Health Administration (VHA) nursing homes prior to implementation of a national VHA initiative on Hospital Acquired Pressure Ulcers (HAPUs). Individual interviews of 16 nursing staff were conducted. Individual factors influencing practice were a personal sense of responsibility to Veterans and belief in the effectiveness and importance of preventive measures. Organizational factors were existence of cooperative practices between nursing assistants and licensed nurses in assessing risk; teamwork, communication, and a commitment to Veterans' well-being. Integration and reinforcement of such factors in the development and maintenance of customized plans of PUP initiatives is recommended. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  10. A qualitative study exploring the impact of student nurses working part time as a health care assistant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasson, Felicity; McKenna, Hugh P; Keeney, Sinead

    2013-08-01

    National and international evidence indicates that university students engage in employment whilst studying. Research has suggested that nursing students either enter training with previous care experience or tend to work part time in a health related area whilst undertaking higher education. The impact of this on the socialisation process remains unclear. Based on the symbolic interactionist framework, this paper reports on a theme from a large mixed methods study - the extent and implications of student nurses' work experience on learning and training. One qualitative stage from a sequential exploratory mixed methods design. One higher education institution in the United Kingdom. Forty-five pre-registration nursing students. Thirty-two students took part in four focus groups and 13 took part in individual interviews. Findings revealed that 27 (60%) of students were in paid nursing related employment. This was reported to be advantageous by most participants with regards to enhancing confidence, skills and time spent in the clinical setting. However, it was also perceived by a small number of participants as being detrimental to subsequent learning resulting in role confusion, influencing placement behaviour, and preferences for future nursing practice. Student participants with no prior work experience believed this placed them at a disadvantage, negatively influencing their learning, ability to fit in, and adjustment on placement. Findings have suggested that student participants desire more recognition of the experience and skills they have gained from their employment. Whilst care experience among the student nursing population is advocated, the results of this study show that it is perceived to impinged on their learning and educational journey. Policy makers, educationalists and health service providers need to be aware of the students who operate within the dual roles of student and health care worker so as to provide guidance and appropriate direction

  11. A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF STATE LICENSING BOARDS FOR SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION AND OTHER SELECTED PROFESSIONS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MOLINARI, RALPH G.; AND OTHERS

    COMPARISON OF THE COMPOSITION, CHARACTERISTICS, AND CURRENT LICENSING PRACTICES OF STATE LICENSING BOARDS FOR EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION WITH LICENSING PROGRAMS FOR SEVEN OTHER PROFESSIONS, (ACCOUNTANCY, ARCHITECTURE, DENTISTRY, ENGINEERING, LAW, MEDICINE, AND NURSING) WAS THE PURPOSE OF THIS NATIONWIDE STUDY. THE RESEARCH PROCEDURES WERE DIVIDED…

  12. Assistência de enfermagem perioperatória: ensino em cursos de enfermagem Enseñanza de enfermería perioperatoria en los cursos de Pre grado en enfermería The teaching of the perioperatory nursing assistance in undergraduate courses in Nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria do Carmo Querido Avelar

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Buscou-se no presente estudo, retratar a realidade do ensino da assistência de enfermagem perioperatória, analisando e delineando suas tendências entre docentes de cursos de graduação em enfermagem que ministram esse conteúdo. A assistência de enfermagem perioperatória como processo realizado por profissionais de enfermagem, em uma fase específica de atenção ao paciente, frente ao procedimento anestésico-cirúrgico, envolve estratégias e orientações expressas na práxis do enfermeiro. Aqui o ensino da assistência de enfermagem perioperatória, como atividade dinâmica das ações dos docentes de Enfermagem em Centro Cirúrgico, desenvolvida num processo coletivo, emerge como práxis ritual no mundo do sistema, da razão técnica instrumental, distanciando-se do entendimento consensual, da razão comunicativa e do fomento às alternativas voltadas à práxis social/emancipatória.En el presente estudio se buscó retratar la realidad de la enseñanza de la asistencia de enfermería perioperatoria, analizando y delineando sus tendencias entre los docentes de enfermería perioperatoria. Como proceso realizado por los profesionales de enfermería en una fase específica de atención al paciente frente al procedimiento anestésico-quirúrgico, involucra estrategias y orientaciones expresadas en la praxis del enfermero. Se puede concluir que la enseñanza de la asistencia de enfermería perioperatoria, como actividad dinámica de las acciones de los docentes de Enfermería en Centro Quirúrgico, desarrollada en un proceso colectivo, emerge como praxis ritual en el mundo del sistema, de la razón técnica instrumental, distanciándose del entendimiento consensual de la razón comunicativa y de fomento de alternativas relativas a la praxis social/emancipadora.In the present study, the authors describe the reality of the perioperatory nursing assistance, analyzing and outlining its trends among professors of undergraduate courses in

  13. Technology licensing in China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Yuandi; Li-Ying, Jason; Chen, Jin

    2015-01-01

    We explore the landscape of technology licensing among Chinese entities in the period 2000–12, using a unique database on technological licensing from the State Intellectual Property Office of China. We find that: first, among Chinese licensee organizations, firms have dominated in terms...... of the number of licensed technologies; second, the geographical distribution of licensed technologies among the provinces has gradually reached a new quantitative balance; third, utility models are the most popular technologies to be licensed and the majority of technology licensing in China has been between...... Chinese entities, and most transactions have been local within provinces; and finally, Chinese firms have gradually in-licensed newer and newer technologies, but the technologies in-licensed from foreign sources are by no means state-of-the-art. We make several suggestions for innovation policy...

  14. State Licenses & Permits

    Data.gov (United States)

    Small Business Administration — Starting a business? Confused about whether you need a business license or permit? Virtually every business needs some form of license or permit to operate legally....

  15. Online driver's license renewal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The Kentucky Department of Vehicle Regulation is exploring the possibility of developing and implementing online : drivers license renewal. The objective of this project was to: 1) evaluate online drivers license and REAL ID renewal : programs ...

  16. Standardized training in nurse model travel clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofarelli, Theresa A; Ricks, Jane H; Anand, Rahul; Hale, Devon C

    2011-01-01

    International travel plays a significant role in the emergence and redistribution of major human diseases. The importance of travel medicine clinics for preventing morbidity and mortality has been increasingly appreciated, although few studies have thus far examined the management and staff training strategies that result in successful travel-clinic operations. Here, we describe an example of travel-clinic operation and management coordinated through the University of Utah School of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases. This program, which involves eight separate clinics distributed statewide, functions both to provide patient consult and care services, as well as medical provider training and continuing medical education (CME). Initial training, the use of standardized forms and protocols, routine chart reviews and monthly continuing education meetings are the distinguishing attributes of this program. An Infectious Disease team consisting of one medical doctor (MD) and a physician assistant (PA) act as consultants to travel nurses who comprise the majority of clinic staff. Eight clinics distributed throughout the state of Utah serve approximately 6,000 travelers a year. Pre-travel medical services are provided by 11 nurses, including 10 registered nurses (RNs) and 1 licensed practical nurse (LPN). This trained nursing staff receives continuing travel medical education and participate in the training of new providers. All nurses have completed a full training program and 7 of the 11 (64%) of clinic nursing staff serve more than 10 patients a week. Quality assurance measures show that approximately 0.5% of charts reviewed contain a vaccine or prescription error which require patient notification for correction. Using an initial training program, standardized patient intake forms, vaccine and prescription protocols, preprinted prescriptions, and regular CME, highly trained nurses at travel clinics are able to provide standardized pre-travel care to

  17. Nuclear power stations licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solito, J.

    1978-04-01

    The judicial aspects of nuclear stations licensing are presented. The licensing systems of the United States, Spain, France and Federal Republic of Germany are focused. The decree n 0 60.824 from July 7 sup(th), 1967 and the following legislation which define the systematic and area of competence in nuclear stations licensing are analysed [pt

  18. The effectiveness of strategies and interventions that aim to assist the transition from student to newly qualified nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Deborah; Hawker, Clare; Carrier, Judith; Rees, Colin

    2011-01-01

    Background: The transition period from student to newly qualified nurse where nurses are adjusting to their new role and consolidating their knowledge and skills can be stressful. It is a time when many newly qualified nurses are left feeling inadequately prepared. A variety of strategies to ease the transition process have been reported, which aim to increase confidence, competence, sense of belonging of new graduates, improve recruitment and retention and reduce turnover costs. To synthesise the best available evidence on the effectiveness of support strategies and interventions aimed for newly qualified nurses. A comprehensive search was undertaken on major electronic databases to identify both published and unpublished studies from 2000 to the present date. Reference lists of retrieved papers were searched and authors contacted. Only quantitative studies published in English language were considered.Methodological quality and data extraction: Two reviewers independently assessed methodological quality and extracted data from the included studies. A third reviewer resolved any disagreements through discussion. The review did not identify comparable Randomised Controlled Trials (RCTs), and as such meta-analysis of the data was not appropriate. The data extracted from the included studies were synthesized into a narrative summary. Thirty three studies were included in the review: RCT (1), Quasi-experimental (3) and observational/descriptive studies (29). Countries of origin were: USA (25), Australia (4), England (2), New Zealand (1) and Thailand (1). Studies were categorised according to the type of programme or support strategy provided: nurse internship/residency programmes (14) and graduate nurse orientation programmes (7), preceptorship (4), simulation (3) and mentoring (2), final year nursing students transition programs (2) and externship (1).Outcomes were categorised as being important to the employer (recruitment, retention, turnover rates, competence

  19. Assistência de enfermagem ao portador de Hanseníase: abordagem transcultural Asistencia de enfermería al portador de Lepra: abordaje transcultural Nursing assistance to a Leprosy-infected patient: transcultural approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando José Guedes da Silva Júnior

    2008-11-01

    com la lepra de forma culturalmente satisfactória.This is a case study, developed in a health center in Teresina-PI, which dealt with the issue of nursing assistance given to a patient with Multibacillary Leprosy, focusing on the Transcultural Nursing care, Diagnosis and Nursing Interventions according to NANDA Taxonomy II. A semi-structured interview and participant observation were carried out, which enabled data collection handled according to normative patterns, values and daily practices, ways of popular care and cares required in the professional system. In this study, we realized that nursing assistance planning aimed, especially, to contribute on the disease treatment support, reducing potential risks and using preservation, negotiation and re-standardization of the professional system. We also observed the support to the treatment and the development of self care turned to leprosy in a culturally satisfactory way.

  20. Assistência de enfermagem a paciente com fibrilação atrial Asistencia de enfermería al paciente con fibrilación atrial Nursing assistance to patients with atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutgarde Magda Suzanne Vanheusden

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo tem por objetivo apresentar uma revisão atualizada sobre as questões que envolvem a assistência à paciente que desenvolve fibrilação atrial. Essa revisão discute a condição complexa dessa taquiarritmia que influencia a mortalidade, morbidade, abordando o seu elevado custo para o sistema de saúde. A assistência e o importante papel da educação para a enfermagem nessa área estão sendo discutidos. Como a prevalência da fibrilação atrial aumenta com a idade e o Brasil tem uma população idosa cada vez mais crescente, a enfermagem enfrenta atualmente o desafio para cuidar dessa população que apresenta necessidades variadas.Este estudio tiene por objetivo presentar una revisión actualizada sobre las cuestiones que envuelven la asistencia al paciente que desarrolla fibrilación atrial. Esa revisión discute la condición compleja de esa taquiarritmia que influencia la morbidad, mortalidad, enfocando el costo que es muy grande para el sistema de salud. Se discute también la asistencia y el importante papel de la educación para la enfermería en esa área. Como la prevalencia de la fibrilación atrial aumenta con la edad y como el Brasil tiene una población de ancianos cada vez más creciente, la enfermería, actualmente, enfrenta el desafío para cuidar de esa población que presenta necesidades variadas.The objective of this study is to present an up to date revision about the assistance of the patient that develops atrial fibrilation. This revision raises the discussion on the complexity of atrial fibrillation that influences the mortality, morbidity, and the high cost for the health system. The assistance and the important paper of education of nursing on atrial fibrillation are here discussed. The population of Brazil is increasing in time and age consequently the prevalence of atrial fibrillation is also increasing. Thus, nursing faces the current challenge to take care of this specific population that presents

  1. Nuclear reactor operator licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bursey, R.J.

    1978-01-01

    The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, which was amended in 1974 by the Energy Reorganization Act, established the requirement that individuals who had the responsibility of operating the reactors in nuclear power plants must be licensed. Section 107 of the act states ''the Commission shall (1) prescribe uniform conditions for licensing individuals; (2) determine the qualifications of such individuals; and (3) issue licenses to such individuals in such form as the Commission may prescribe.'' The article discusses the types of licenses, the selection and training of individuals, and the administration of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensing examinations

  2. NUPLEX Licensing Subcommittee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, D.W.; Allen, S.R.

    1988-01-01

    The NUPLEX Licensing Subcommittee was organized to seek a formal license renewal mechanism that institutionalizes the current licensing basis and consequent level of safety of a plant as the legitimate standard for acceptance and approval of an application for extended operation. Along with defining the most workable approach to and scope of review for license renewal, this paper explains the reasons why a regulatory framework is needed by the early 1990s. The initial results of development work on two key issues, licensing criteria and hearing process, are also presented. at this point six potential license renewal criteria have emerged: evaluation of existing monitoring/maintenance programs, revalidation of current licensing basis, conformance to special regulations, evaluation to a safety goal, plant performance history, and environmental assessment. The work on a hearing process has led to the development of two models for future consideration: hybrid legislative and hybrid adjudicatory

  3. Stress, coping, and general health of nurses who work in units that assist AIDS-carriers and patients with

    OpenAIRE

    Da Silva Britto, Eliane; Pimenta Carvalho, Ana Maria

    2008-01-01

    Based on Lazarus and Folkman’s theory about stress and coping, this research aimed at answering questions related to how nurses, who work in two specialized units of a general hospital, evaluate their working environment, their health and how they manage with stressing situations. In the unit of infectious diseases, the nurses’ evaluation of their working environment did not surpass the limits of what is considered as acceptable. In the unit of hematological alterations, the results showed hi...

  4. The impact of ethics and work-related factors on nurse practitioners' and physician assistants' views on quality of primary healthcare in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Connie M; Zhou, Qiuping Pearl; Hanlon, Alexandra; Danis, Marion; Grady, Christine

    2014-08-01

    Nurse practitioners (NPs) and physician assistants (PAs) provide primary care services for many American patients. Ethical knowledge is foundational to resolving challenging practice issues, yet little is known about the importance of ethics and work-related factors in the delivery of quality care. The aim of this study was to quantitatively assess whether the quality of the care that practitioners deliver is influenced by ethics and work-related factors. This paper is a secondary data analysis of a cross-sectional self-administered mailed survey of 1,371 primary care NPs and PAs randomly selected from primary care and primary care subspecialties in the United States. Ethics preparedness and confidence were significantly associated with perceived quality of care (pfactors. Investing in ethics education and addressing restrictive practice environments may improve collaborative practice, teamwork, and quality of care. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Coping, Cognitive Emotion Regulation, and Burnout in Long-Term Care Nursing Staff: A Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamonti, Patricia; Conti, Elizabeth; Cavanagh, Casey; Gerolimatos, Lindsay; Gregg, Jeffrey; Goulet, Carol; Pifer, Marisa; Edelstein, Barry

    2017-06-01

    Direct care workers (e.g., certified nursing assistants [CNAs]) employed in long-term care (LTC) are particularly vulnerable to the experience of burnout, yet they have received relatively less research attention compared to Licensed Practical Nurses and Registered Nurses. Within the burnout literature, evidence suggests that the deployment of certain coping strategies influences levels of burnout. The current study examined the extent to which coping (e.g., problem-focused, emotion-focused, and dysfunctional coping) and cognitive emotion regulation strategies (e.g., positive reappraisal) predicted burnout after controlling for covariates (age, sleep duration). Fifty-six CNAs were surveyed at four skilled nursing facilities in the United States. Dysfunctional coping was significantly associated with emotional exhaustion and depersonalization. Among cognitive emotion regulation strategies, positive reappraisal was significantly associated with depersonalization. Shorter sleep duration was associated with significantly greater depersonalization. Findings suggest the need to develop interventions for CNAs aimed at reducing dysfunctional coping strategies and increasing sleep duration.

  6. Blending technology in teaching advanced health assessment in a family nurse practitioner program: using personal digital assistants in a simulation laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Lydia; DeCristofaro, Claire; Carpenter, Alesia

    2012-09-01

    This article describes the development and implementation of integrated use of personal handheld devices (personal digital assistants, PDAs) and high-fidelity simulation in an advanced health assessment course in a graduate family nurse practitioner (NP) program. A teaching tool was developed that can be utilized as a template for clinical case scenarios blending these separate technologies. Review of the evidence-based literature, including peer-reviewed articles and reviews. Blending the technologies of high-fidelity simulation and handheld devices (PDAs) provided a positive learning experience for graduate NP students in a teaching laboratory setting. Combining both technologies in clinical case scenarios offered a more real-world learning experience, with a focus on point-of-care service and integration of interview and physical assessment skills with existing standards of care and external clinical resources. Faculty modeling and advance training with PDA technology was crucial to success. Faculty developed a general template tool and systems-based clinical scenarios integrating PDA and high-fidelity simulation. Faculty observations, the general template tool, and one scenario example are included in this article. ©2012 The Author(s) Journal compilation ©2012 American Academy of Nurse Practitioners.

  7. Education and empowerment of the nursing assistant: validating their important role in skin care and pressure ulcer prevention, and demonstrating productivity enhancement and cost savings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Lynn

    2008-06-01

    This article details an educational program designed to utilize nonlicensed personnel (certified nursing assistants [CNAs] and nursing assistants [NAs]) in the prevention of pressure ulcers and improved skin care in a 250-bed acute care facility in a suburban setting. The article is divided into 2 parts: A and B. Part A addresses the educational program, which was part of a major initiative for improving patient outcomes that included a review and standardization of skin care products and protocols. Part B addresses productivity enhancement and cost savings experienced because of changing bathing and incontinence care products and procedures. The educational program included instruction on time-saving methods for increasing productivity in bathing and incontinence care, and effectively promoted the importance of proper skin care and pressure ulcer prevention techniques. Methods incorporated into the educational training targeted different reading and comprehension levels, ranging from the use of PowerPoint slides, hands-on return demonstration, and group discussion related to pressure ulcer staging and wound treatment. These educational methods provided the participants with significant reinforcement of each day's learning objectives. Productivity enhancement and cost savings are addressed in part B, as well as the results of a time-motion study. Because of the program, CNAs/NAs were empowered in their integral caregiver roles. This program was part of a larger, major process improvement initiative, but the rate of acquired pressure ulcers declined from 2.17% in 2002 to 1.71% in 2003. This educational program was considered a contributor to the improved patient outcomes.

  8. Licensing process in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiippana, Petteri

    2011-01-01

    In accordance with the Nuclear Energy Act, the use of nuclear energy constitutes operations subject to license. The licensing process and conditions for granting a license is defined in the legislation. The licenses are applied from and granted by the Government. This paper discusses briefly the licensing process in Finland and also the roles and responsibilities of main stakeholders in licensing. Licensing of a nuclear power plant in Finland has three steps. The first step is the Decision in Principle (DiP). Goal of DiP is to decide whether using nuclear power is for the overall good for the Finnish society. The second step is Construction License (CL) and the goal of CL phase is to determine whether the design of the proposed plant is safe and that the participating organisations are capable of constructing the plant to meet safety goals. The third step is the Operating License (OL) and the goal of the OL phase is to determine whether the plant operates safely and licensee is capable to operate the plant safely. Main stakeholders in the licensing process in Finland are the utility (licensee) interested in using nuclear power in Finland, Ministry of Employment and the Economy (MEE), Government, Parliament, STUK, the municipality siting the plant and the general public. Government grants all licenses, and Parliament has to ratify Government's Decision in Principle. STUK has to assess the safety of the license applications in each step and give statement to the Ministry. Municipality has to agree to site the plant. Both STUK and the municipality have a veto right in the licensing process

  9. 48 CFR 1852.225-70 - Export Licenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... writing, that the Contracting Officer authorizes it to export ITAR-controlled technical data (including... licenses or other approvals, if required, for exports of hardware, technical data, and software, or for the provision of technical assistance. (b) The Contractor shall be responsible for obtaining export licenses, if...

  10. 77 FR 65673 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive Patent License

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-30

    ... Exclusive Patent License AGENCY: National Institute of Standards and Technology, Commerce. ACTION: Notice of prospective grant of exclusive patent license. SUMMARY: This is a notice in accordance with 35 U.S.C. 209(e.... Patent Application No. 61/625,511 titled ``UV-Assisted Alcohol Sensing with Zinc Oxide Functionalized...

  11. 14 CFR 1274.942 - Export licenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... writing, that the Agreement Officer authorize it to export ITAR-controlled technical data (including... appropriate licenses or other approvals, if required, for exports of hardware, technical data, and software, or for the provision of technical assistance. (b) The Recipient shall be responsible for obtaining...

  12. A Regional Collaboration for Educational and Career Mobility: The Nursing Education Mobility Action Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolince, Patricia; Giesser, Nancy; Greig, Judith; Knittel, Kathleen; Mahowald, Jane F.; McAloney-Madden, Lisa; Schloss, Robert A.

    2001-01-01

    A collaborative group of 25 Northeast Ohio nursing deans/directors has developed an access model to provide new education and career mobility pathways into nursing. Model components describe the routes of licensed practical nurse to registered nurse and registered nurse to bachelor of science in nursing. Cost effectiveness and equity are…

  13. 78 FR 38336 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-26

    ..., President (QI), Stephen B. Schwark, Treasurer, Application Type: License Transfer to EFL Container Lines...., Suite K, Mobile, AL 36609, Officers: Thomas (Mac) H. McPhillips IV, Assistant Vice President (QI), Oscar...

  14. NRC's license renewal regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akstulewicz, Francis

    1991-01-01

    In order to provide for the continuity of the current generation of nuclear power plant operating licenses and at the same time ensure the health and safety of the public, and the quality of the environment, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) established a goal of developing and issuing regulations and regulatory guidance for license renewal in the early 1990s. This paper will discuss some of those activities underway to achieve this goal. More specifically, this paper will discuss the Commission's regulatory philosophy for license renewal and the two major license renewal rule makings currently underway. The first is the development of a new Part 54 to address procedural and technical requirements for license renewal; the second is a revision to existing Part 51 to exclude environmental issues and impacts from consideration during the license renewal process. (author)

  15. Trends in nuclear licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalton, N.W.

    1990-01-01

    The development of nuclear safety and licensing is briefly reviewed in four stages namely: The Formative Period (1946-1959), The Expansive Period (1960-1969), The Mature Period (1970-1979) and the Apprehensive Period (1980-1989). Particular safety issues in the respective periods are highlighted to indicate the changing emphasis of nuclear licensing over the past thirty years or so. Against this background, nuclear licensing. (author)

  16. Trends in nuclear licensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalton, N W [Council for Nuclear Safety, Hennopsmeer, Pretoria (South Africa)

    1990-06-01

    The development of nuclear safety and licensing is briefly reviewed in four stages namely: The Formative Period (1946-1959), The Expansive Period (1960-1969), The Mature Period (1970-1979) and the Apprehensive Period (1980-1989). Particular safety issues in the respective periods are highlighted to indicate the changing emphasis of nuclear licensing over the past thirty years or so. Against this background, nuclear licensing. (author)

  17. Licensing of the Ignalina NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutas, S.

    1999-01-01

    Since 1991 State Nuclear Power Safety Inspectorate (VATESI) has regulated Ignalina NPP operation by issuing annual operating permits. Those have been issued following submission of specified documents by the Ignalina NPP that have been reviewed by VATESI. However, according to to the procedures that are now established in the Law on Nuclear Energy and subordinate regulations the use of nuclear energy in the Republic of Lithuania is subject to strict licensing. Therefore a decision about the licence for continued operation of unit 1 should be taken. Licence would be granted by VATESI in cooperation with the Ministry of Health, Ministry of Environment and the institutions of local authorities. Ignalina NPP presented to the VATESI safety analysis report (SAR) with other documents. SAR was made mainly by foreign experts and financed by European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD). VATESI in this process is supported by western regulators. A special project LAP - Licensing Assistance Project was launched to help VATESI perform licensing according western practices

  18. Nursing and spirituality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael de Brito Pedrão

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the spiritual well-being of nurses; to appraise their opinions as to the importance of offering patients spiritual assistance, and to verify whether nurses received any specific type of preparation during their professional training for giving spiritual assistance to patients. Methods: This is an exploratory and descriptive study, carried out with a sample of 30 nurses who worked at the Stepdown Unit and Oncology Unit of Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, using the application of the Spiritual Well-Being Scale (SWS and a questionnaire prepared by the authors. Results: On the Spiritual Well-Being Scale, 76.6% of nurses produced positive scores. On the Existential Well-Being subscale, 80% had positive scores, and on the Religious Well-Being subscale, 76.6% had positive scores. On the SWBS, the general average score was 107.26, and for the Existential and Religious ones, the average scores were 54.4 and 53.2, respectively. Most nurses responded affirmatively as to the importance of offering patients spiritual assistance, and 40% of nurses offered as rationale “to provide well-being and comfort to the patient”. Most nurses reported not having received professional training for giving spiritual assistance to patients in any of the nursing courses they had done. Conclusions: The results indicate the need for professional training and/or continued education courses in nursing to extend the reflection and discussion on spirituality and spiritual assistance to patients.

  19. Libraries and licensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Žumer

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In the mid 90s, the abundance of various electronic publications exposed libraries to the problems of licensing electronic content. Various licensing principles have been prepared recently to help libraries in the process; it can be said that in general, the knowledge of licensing issues has improved in libraries of all types. Libraries form consortia in order to gain stronger negotiating positions and obtain better conditions.In the article, new licensing principles are presented in more detail, as well as some domestic and foreign experiences with consortia forming.

  20. School Nurse Workload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endsley, Patricia

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this scoping review was to survey the most recent (5 years) acute care, community health, and mental health nursing workload literature to understand themes and research avenues that may be applicable to school nursing workload research. The search for empirical and nonempirical literature was conducted using search engines such as Google Scholar, PubMed, CINAHL, and Medline. Twenty-nine empirical studies and nine nonempirical articles were selected for inclusion. Themes that emerged consistent with school nurse practice include patient classification systems, environmental factors, assistive personnel, missed nursing care, and nurse satisfaction. School nursing is a public health discipline and population studies are an inherent research priority but may overlook workload variables at the clinical level. School nurses need a consistent method of population assessment, as well as evaluation of appropriate use of assistive personnel and school environment factors. Assessment of tasks not directly related to student care and professional development must also be considered in total workload.

  1. Education, licensure, and certification of school nurses: position statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that every school-age child deserves a school nurse who has a baccalaureate degree in nursing from an accredited college or university and is licensed as a registered nurse through the state board of nursing. These requirements constitute minimal preparation needed to practice at the entry level of school nursing (American Nurses Association [ANA] & NASN, 2011). Additionally, NASN supports state school nurse certification, where required, and promotes national certification of school nurses through the National Board for Certification of School Nurses.

  2. Incorporating Peplau's Theory of Interpersonal Relations to Promote Holistic Communication Between Older Adults and Nursing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deane, William H; Fain, James A

    2016-03-01

    With the increased life expectancy, older adults will interact with multiple health care providers to manage acute and chronic conditions. These interactions include nursing students who use various health care settings to meet the clinical practicum requirements of their programs. Nursing faculty are charged with facilitating students' learning throughout the program from basic human needs, to holistic communication, to advanced medical surgical concepts. Despite educating students on holistic communication, there remains a lack of a reliable framework to undertake the task of teaching holistic communication skills. Nursing students preparing to function as licensed practitioners need to develop appropriate knowledge to holistically care for older adults. The purpose of this article is to examine Hildegard Peplau's interpersonal relations theory as a framework to assist nursing students to understand holistic communication skills during their encounters with older adults. Peplau's theory provides nursing a useful set of three interlocking and oftentimes overlapping working phases for nurses' interaction with patients in the form of the nurse-patient relationship. Nursing education could adopt the three phases of Peplau's interpersonal relations theory to educate students on holistically communicating with older adults. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Complexity Science and the Dynamics of Climate and Communication: Reducing Nursing Home Turnover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Ruth A.; Corazzini, Kirsten N.; McDaniel, Reuben R.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Turnover in nursing homes is a widespread problem adversely affecting care quality. Using complexity theory, we tested the effect of administrative climate, communication patterns, and the interaction between the two on turnover, controlling for facility context. Design and Methods Perceptions of administrative climate and communication were collected from 3,449 employees in 164 randomly sampled nursing homes, and they were linked to secondary data on facility characteristics, resource allocation, and turnover. We used hierarchical regression to test the hypotheses. Results Climate and communication both affected turnover, but lower turnover was dependent on the interaction between climate and communication. In nursing homes with reward-based administrative climates, higher levels of communication openness and accuracy explained lower turnover of licensed vocational nurses and certified nurse assistants, relative to nursing homes with an ambiguous climate. Adequate staffing and longer tenure of the nursing director were also important predictors of turnover. Implications Although context is important, managers can also influence turnover by addressing climate and communication patterns and by encouraging stable nursing leadership. PMID:15197292

  4. License renewal process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fable, D.; Prah, M.; Vrankic, K.; Lebegner, J.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide information about license renewal process, as defined by Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The Atomic Energy Act and NRC regulations limit commercial power reactor licenses to an initial 40 years but also permit such licenses to be renewed. This original 40-year term for reactor licenses was based on economic and antitrust considerations not on limitations of nuclear technology. Due to this selected time period; however, some structures and components may have been engineered on the basis of an expected 40-year service life. The NRC has established a timely license renewal process and clear requirements codified in 10 CFR Part 51 and 10 CFR Part 54, that are needed to assure safe plant operation for extended plant life. The timely renewal of licenses for an additional 20 years, where appropriate to renew them, may be important to ensuring an adequate energy supply during the first half of the 21st Century. License renewal rests on the determination that currently operating plants continue to maintain adequate levels of safety, and over the plant's life, this level has been enhanced through maintenance of the licensing bases, with appropriate adjustments to address new information from industry operating experience. Additionally, NRC activities have provided ongoing assurance that the licensing bases will continue to provide an acceptable level of safety. This paper provides additional discussion of license renewal costs, as one of key elements in evaluation of license renewal justifiability. Including structure of costs, approximately value and two different approaches, conservative and typical. Current status and position of Nuclear Power Plant Krsko, related to license renewal process, will be briefly presented in this paper. NPP Krsko is designed based on NRC Regulations, so requirements from 10 CFR 51, and 10 CFR 54, are applicable to NPP Krsko, as well. Finally, this paper will give an overview of current status of

  5. Nuclear plant license renewal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gazda, P.A.; Bhatt, P.C.

    1991-01-01

    During the next 10 years, nuclear plant license renewal is expected to become a significant issue. Recent Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) studies have shown license renewal to be technically and economically feasible. Filing an application for license renewal with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) entails verifying that the systems, structures, and components essential for safety will continue to perform their safety functions throughout the license renewal period. This paper discusses the current proposed requirements for this verification and the current industry knowledge regarding age-related degradation of structures. Elements of a license renewal program incorporating NRC requirements and industry knowledge including a schedule are presented. Degradation mechanisms for structural components, their significance to nuclear plant structures, and industry-suggested age-related degradation management options are also reviewed

  6. The SLOWPOKE licensing model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snell, V. G.; Takats, F.; Szivos, K.

    1989-08-15

    The SLOWPOKE Energy System (SES-10) is a 10 MW heating reactor that has been developed in Canada. It will be capable of running without a licensed operator in continuous attendance, and will be sited in urban areas. It has forgiving safety characteristics, including transient time-scales of the order of hours. A process called `up-front` licensing has been evolved in Canada to identify, and resolve, regulatory concerns early in the process. Because of the potential market in Hungary for nuclear district heating, a licensing plan has been developed that incorporates Canadian licensing experience, identifies specific Hungarian requirements, and reduces the risk of licensing delays by seeking agreement of all parties at an early stage in the program.

  7. Using the Nursing Culture Assessment Tool (NCAT) in Long-Term Care: An Update on Psychometrics and Scoring Standardization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennerly, Susan; Heggestad, Eric D; Myers, Haley; Yap, Tracey L

    2015-07-29

    An effective workforce performing within the context of a positive cultural environment is central to a healthcare organization's ability to achieve quality outcomes. The Nursing Culture Assessment Tool (NCAT) provides nurses with a valid and reliable tool that captures the general aspects of nursing culture. This study extends earlier work confirming the tool's construct validity and dimensionality by standardizing the scoring approach and establishing norm-referenced scoring. Scoring standardization provides a reliable point of comparison for NCAT users. NCAT assessments support nursing's ability to evaluate nursing culture, use results to shape the culture into one that supports change, and advance nursing's best practices and care outcomes. Registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, and certified nursing assistants from 54 long-term care facilities in Kentucky, Nevada, North Carolina, and Oregon were surveyed. Confirmatory factor analysis yielded six first order factors forming the NCAT's subscales (Expectations, Behaviors, Teamwork, Communication, Satisfaction, Commitment) (Comparative Fit Index 0.93) and a second order factor-The Total Culture Score. Aggregated facility level comparisons of observed group variance with expected random variance using rwg(J) statistics is presented. Normative scores and cumulative rank percentages and how the NCAT can be used in implementing planned change are provided.

  8. Sistematização da Assistência de Enfermagem em Unidade de Terapia Intensiva Sistematización de la Asistencia de Enfermería en Unidad de Terapía Intensiva Systematization of Nursing Assistance in Critical Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Christel Truppel

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Trata-se de uma pesquisa metodológica, cujo objetivo foi reestruturar a Sistematização da Assistência de Enfermagem (SAE em uma Unidade de Terapia Intensiva (UTI. Realizaram-se neste estudo as seguintes etapas: descrição da prática de enfermagem; transcrição dos diagnósticos; construção do protocolo de diagnósticos baseado na classificação internacional para a prática de enfermagem (CIPE; determinação das prescrições e construção de normas, rotinas e procedimentos. Caracterizou-se a prática da enfermagem em UTI e a complexidade do cuidado ao paciente crítico. Assim, compreende-se a SAE como um instrumento valioso de valorização da prática da Enfermagem.Tratase de una investigación metodologica, cuyo objetivo ha sido reestructurar la sistematización de assistência de enfermería en una unidad de terapia intensiva. Las siguientes etapas fueron realizadas en este estudio: descripción del los diagnósticos de enfermería, construcción del protocolo basado en la Clasificación Internacional para la Práctica de Enfermería (CIPE, determinación de prescripciones y construcción de reglas, rutinas e procedimientos. La práctica de enfermería y la complejidad de la asistencia a pacientes críticos en UTI fueron caracterizadas. Así, la sistematización de la asistencia de enfermería es comprendida cómo un instrumento de valoración de la práctica de enfermeria.This is a methodological research, which aimed at organizing the systematization of nursing assistance in a critical care unit. The following steps were carried out: description of the nursing practice; transcription of nursing diagnoses; elaboration of a protocol for nursing diagnosis based in International Classification for Nursing Practice (ICNP; determination of nursing prescriptions and the elaboration of guidelines for care and procedures. The nursing practice and care complexity in ICU were characterized. Thus, systematization of nursing assistance is

  9. Product Licenses Database Application

    CERN Document Server

    Tonkovikj, Petar

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this project is to organize and centralize the data about software tools available to CERN employees, as well as provide a system that would simplify the license management process by providing information about the available licenses and their expiry dates. The project development process is consisted of two steps: modeling the products (software tools), product licenses, legal agreements and other data related to these entities in a relational database and developing the front-end user interface so that the user can interact with the database. The result is an ASP.NET MVC web application with interactive views for displaying and managing the data in the underlying database.

  10. Understanding Licensing Behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cabaleiro, Goretti; Moreira, Solon; Reichstein, Toke

    The potential for rent dissipation has been argued to be the main cause of firms? licensing out behavior being stifled.However, this aspect has been scarcely studied empirically. We draw on rent dissipation arguments, and hypothesize that firms suffering from the not-invented-here (NIH) syndrome......, firms in competitive product markets, and firms that have incurred substantial sunk cost are associated with lower rates of technology out-licensing. We also posit that sunk costs negatively moderate the relationship between competition in the licensor?s product market, and licensing rate. We test our...

  11. Auditoria do método de assistência de enfermagem Auditoria del método de asistencia de enfermería Auditing the nursing care methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Maximiano Faraco

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo descreve o desenvolvimento de um processo de auditoria do Método de Assistência de Enfermagem em uma unidade de internação de um Hospital Universitário. Identificados os padrões, elaborou-se o instrumento, sob a forma de indicadores, no qual foram examinados, aleatoriamente, cinco prontuários com exame do usuário "in loco". Os dados foram mensurados e classificados numa quanti-qualificação da assistência de Enfermagem. Os resultados encontrados indicam a necessidade de revisão dos Padrões do Método de Assistência de Enfermagem e da retomada imediata do programa de auditoria da assistência de Enfermagem.Este estudio describe el desarrollo de un proceso de auditoría del Método de Asistencia de Enfermería en una unidad de la internación de un Hospital de la Universidad. Identificó los estándares, el instrumento fue elaborado, bajo forma de indicadores, en los cuales había sido examinado, al azar, cinco manuales con la examinación del usuario «in loco». Los datos habían sido agregar y clasificado en una quanti-calificación de la asistencia enfermería. Los resultados unidos indican la necesidad de la revisión de los estándares del método de asistencia enfermería y de vuelto a tomar el inmediato del programa de auditoría de la asistencia de enfermería.This study it describes the development of a process of audit of the Method of Assistance of Nursing in a unit of internment of a University Hospital. Identified the standards, the instrument was elaborated, under the form of indicators, in which had been examined, random, five handbooks with examination of the user "in loco". The data had been to add and classified in a quanti-qualification of the assistance of Nursing. The found results indicate the necessity of revision of the Standards of the Method of Assistance of Nursing and of the immediate retaking of the program of auditor of the assistance of Nursing.

  12. Canadian nurse practitioner job satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaMarche, Kimberley; Tullai-McGuinness, Susan

    2009-01-01

    To examine the level of job satisfaction and its association with extrinsic and intrinsic job satisfaction characteristics among Canadian primary healthcare nurse practitioners (NPs). A descriptive correlational design was used to collect data on NPs' job satisfaction and on the factors that influence their job satisfaction. A convenience sample of licensed Canadian NPs was recruited from established provincial associations and special-interest groups. Data about job satisfaction were collected using two valid and reliable instruments, the Misener Nurse Practitioner Job Satisfaction Survey and the Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire. Descriptive statistics, Pearson correlation and regression analysis were used to describe the results. The overall job satisfaction for this sample ranged from satisfied to highly satisfied. The elements that had the most influence on overall job satisfaction were the extrinsic category of partnership/collegiality and the intrinsic category of challenge/autonomy. These findings were consistent with Herzberg's Dual Factor Theory of Job Satisfaction. The outcomes of this study will serve as a foundation for designing effective human health resource retention and recruitment strategies that will assist in enhancing the implementation and the successful preservation of the NP's role.

  13. Changes in malnutrition and quality of nutritional care among aged residents in all nursing homes and assisted living facilities in Helsinki 2003-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saarela, Riitta K T; Muurinen, Seija; Suominen, Merja H; Savikko, Niina N; Soini, Helena; Pitkälä, Kaisu H

    2017-09-01

    While nutritional problems have been recognized as common in institutional settings for several decades, less is known about how nutritional care and nutrition has changed in these settings over time. To describe and compare the nutritional problems and nutritional care of residents in all nursing homes (NH) in 2003 and 2011 and residents in all assisted living facilities (ALF) in 2007 and 2011, in Helsinki, Finland. We combined four cross-sectional datasets of (1) residents from all NHs in 2003 (N=1987), (2) residents from all ALFs in 2007 (N=1377), (3) residents from all NHs in 2011 (N=1576) and (4) residents from all ALFs in 2011 (N=1585). All participants at each time point were assessed using identical methods, including the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA). The mean age of both samples from 2011 was higher and a larger proportion suffered from dementia, compared to earlier collected samples. A larger proportion of the residents in 2011 were assessed either malnourished or at-risk for malnutrition, according to the MNA, than in 2003 (NH: 93.5% vs. 88.9%, pimprovement. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Use of modeling in repository licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGarry, J.M. III; Echols, F.S.

    1995-01-01

    A review of the regulatory history of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations applicable to the licensing of a geologic repository, as well as a review of NRC administrative (licensing) decisions and federal case law, support the NRC's use of simplified models, in appropriate circumstances, which provide well-documented and reasonably conservative bounding assumptions, together with the use of expert judgement, natural analogues, and other aids to supplement available information, in reaching its reasonable assurance determination whether the public health and safety will be adequately protected if the Yucca Mountain, Nevada site should be licensed for development as a geologic repository. Specific examples are provided to assist the reader to better understand how such qualitative concepts as open-quote reasonable assurance close-quote, open-quote reasonably conservative close-quote, and open-quote adequate close-quote protection are used in an administrative context to resolve technical issues

  15. Processo de Enfermagem: instrumento da Sistematização da Assistência de enfermagem na percepção dos enfermeiros Nursing process: systematization of the nursing care instrument in the perception of nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Alves Benedet

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: com objetivo de identificar a percepção dos enfermeiros acerca da contribuição do Processo de Enfermagem para a Sistematização da Assistência de Enfermagem realizado em Hospital de Ensino do Sul do Brasil. Método: estudo qualitativo com caráter descritivo e exploratório. Os participantes da pesquisa foram 38 enfermeiros. A análise qualitativa foi de conteúdo e com os recursos do software Atlas Ti®. Resultados: após a análise foram encontradas as seguintes categorias temáticas: aspectos operacionais do Processo de Enfermagem; o Processo de Enfermagem e sua aplicação prática; facilidades e dificuldades na implementação do Processo de Enfermagem. Conclusão: a utilização de um modelo assistencial para guiar a prática de enfermagem há mais de três décadas, tem repercutido de maneira positiva na qualidade da assistência prestada, bem como na satisfação dos enfermeiros ao perceberem seu trabalho reconhecido. O Processo de Enfermagem melhora a sistematização da assistência de enfermagem, com a filosofia da Instituição e do Serviço de Enfermagem alinhadas a uma política de educação permanente.

  16. Allegheny County Dog Licenses

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — A list of dog license dates, dog breeds, and dog name by zip code. Currently this dataset does not include City of Pittsburgh dogs.

  17. Credentialing, Licensing, and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... V W X Y Z Credentialing, Licensing, and Education Share: On This Page The Bottom Line Credentials, ... and practices that chiropractors are allowed to perform. Education and Training Professional organizations in some complementary health ...

  18. Site Specific Vendor's License

    Data.gov (United States)

    Montgomery County of Maryland — This dataset contains information of a site-specific vendor's license which is required if an individual sells or offers to sell goods or services from a stationary...

  19. License to build

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huntelaar, Mark; Vos, Renate de; Roobol, Lars

    2007-01-01

    Full text: A new license under the nuclear power act is applied for at the Dutch Government for the building of a High Active Repackaging Unit (HAVA-VU in Dutch) at NRG in Petten, The Netherlands. This new building is necessary to comply with our nuclear license to dispose of high active nuclear waste at Petten to the intermediate storage facility (COVRA). In the first part of this paper attention is given to the formal procedure followed by the Government, what type of documents are to be submitted, what time frames are followed, how citizen participation is organized, and as final result a new license. In the second part more detailed information is given about the present license renewal needed for the High Active Repackaging Unit

  20. Cultivating future nurse leaders with student nurses associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akans, Merlana; Harrington, Maura; McCash, John; Childs, Ashlyn; Gripentrog, Jessica; Cole, Sharon; Fitzgerald, Kevin; Searing, Kimberly; Fuehr, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    Student nurses associations (SNAs) assist in developing tomorrow's nurse leaders. In this article, executive board members of an SNA in a traditional baccalaureate nursing program at a public regional university recounted common themes in their participation in an SNA. These broad themes included leadership, mentorship and communication, all which foster professional development through the acquisition of specific knowledge, skills and experiences. © 2013 AWHONN.

  1. Nuclear facilities licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, A.J.M. de.

    1978-01-01

    The need for the adoption of a legal and normative system, defining objectives, pescriptions and the process of nuclear licensing and building of nuclear power plants in Brazil is enphasized. General rules for the development of this system are presented. The Brazilian rules on the matter are discussed. A general view of the German legal system for nuclear power plant licensing and the IAEA recommendations on the subject are finally presented. (A.L.S.L.) [pt

  2. Cuidados paliativos e bioética: estudo com enfermeiros assistenciais Palliative care and bioethics: study with assistance nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiani Garrido de Andrade

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Objetivou-se investigar as observâncias éticas utilizadas pelos enfermeiros ao assistirem o paciente sem possibilidades de cura. Métodos: Pesquisa exploratória, de natureza qualitativa, realizada com 28 enfermeiros de um hospital público, localizado na cidade de João Pessoa – PB. Os dados foram coletados por meio de questionário, de agosto a outubro de 2012 e submetidos à técnica de análise de conteúdo. Resultados: As categorias identificadas foram: Cuidados Paliativos: princípios da Bioética ao paciente sem possibilidades de cura e Privacidade e sigilo profissional no âmbito dos cuidados paliativos. Tais categorias indicaram que os profissionais passam a valorizar os princípios da Bioética, assim como a privacidade e o sigilo profissional, utilizando-os como estratégia para auxiliar o cuidar ao paciente sem possibilidades de cura. Conclusão: Espera-se que este estudo subsidie novas investigações, pois ainda são incipientes as pesquisas que abordam a bioética na assistência ao paciente sob cuidados paliativos.

  3. ACR: Licensing and design readiness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alizadeh, A.

    2009-01-01

    Full text The Canadian nuclear technology has a long history dating back to the 1940s. In this regard, Canada is in a unique situation, shared only by a very few countries, where original nuclear power technology has been invented and further developed. Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC), then called AECB, was established in 1946. CNSC focuses on nuclear security, nuclear safety, establishing health and safety regulations, and has also played an instrumental role in the formation of the IAEA. CNSC has provided assistance to the establishment of regulatory authorities in AECL's client countries such as Korea, Argentina, China and Romania. AECL has developed the Gen III+ ACR 1000 as evolutionary advancement of the current CANDU 6 reactor. ACR-1000 has evolved from AECL's in depth experience with CANDU systems, components, and materials, as well as the feedback received from owners and operators of CANDU plants. The ACR-1000 design retains the proven strengths and features of CANDU reactors, while incorporating innovations and state-of-the-art technology. It also features major improvements in economics, inherent safety characteristics, and performance. ACR-1000 has completed its Basic Engineering, has advanced in the licensing process in Canada, and is ready for deployment in Canadian and world markets. EC6 is an evolution of CANDU 6 and is a Gen III natural uranium fuelled reactor. Its medium size and potential for fuel localization and advanced fuel cycles is an optimal strategic solution in many markets.AECL's reactor products are shown to be compliant with a variety of licensing and regulatory requirements. These include the new CNSC DRD-337, IAEA NS-R1, and EUR. This allows the countries interested in CANDU reactor products to be confident of its licensing in their own regulatory regimes.

  4. Nursing teamwork, staff characteristics, work schedules, and staffing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalisch, Beatrice J; Lee, Hyunhwa

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to explore whether and how staff characteristics, staffing, and scheduling variables are associated with the level of teamwork in nursing staff on acute care hospital patient units. This was a cross-sectional study with a sample of 1,758 nursing staff members from two different hospitals on 38 patient care units who completed the Nursing Teamwork Survey in 2008. This study focused on nursing teams who are stationed on a particular patient care unit (as opposed to visitors to the units). The return rate was 56.9%. The sample was made up of 77.4% nurses (registered nurses and licensed practical nurses), 11.9% assistive personnel, and 7.9% unit secretaries. Teamwork varied by unit and service type, with the highest scores occurring in pediatrics and maternity and the lowest scores on the medical-surgical and emergency units. Staff with less than 6 months of experience, those working 8- or 10-hour shifts (as opposed to 12 hours or a combination of 8 and 12 hours), part-time staff (as opposed to full time), and those working on night shift had higher teamwork scores. The higher teamwork scores were also associated with no or little overtime. The higher perception of the adequacy of staffing and the fewer patients cared for on a previous shift, the higher the teamwork scores. There is a relationship between selected staff characteristics, aspects of work schedules, staffing, and teamwork. Nursing staff want to work where teamwork is high, and perceptions of good staffing lead to higher teamwork. Higher teamwork scores correlated with those who worked less overtime.

  5. RELEVANCE OF SERVICE INFECTION CONTROL IN THE VISION OF NURSING TECHNICIANS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Leonardo Nogueira da Silva

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to identify the relevance of Service Infection Control in an Intensive Care Unit in the view of licensed practical nurses. This is a qualitative, descriptive, exploratory and research field. We used an interview in which he applied a semi-structured to eleven practical nurses working in intensive care of a hospital foundation. As the understanding of the benefits arising from the Service Infection Control for the industry, contacted that the respondents cited more often by the prevention of infections, was also mentioned as a boon to the maintenance of the organization in the industry, the quality and safety of assistance as other benefits generated by this executor service standards. It is concluded that the nursing staff have a lack of knowledge about the activities undertaken by the service control infections since the actions of the members of the Commission executors encompass a series of regulatory actions.

  6. Critical Thinking Skill Acquisition in Accelerated LVN to RN Nursing Programs: An Evaluative Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchison, Billy Eugene

    2013-01-01

    Accelerated transitional nursing programs (ATNPs) designed specifically for licensed vocational nurses (LVNs) to transition to become registered nurses (RNs) are graduating novice nurses who need critical thinking skills to solve patient problems. The health care industry and patient outcomes depend on graduate nurses to be proficient with quality…

  7. Advancing the nursing profession begins with leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Jennifer A

    2013-04-01

    This bimonthly department, sponsored by the American Organization of Nurse Executives (AONE), presents information to assist nurse leaders in shaping the future of healthcare through creative and innovative leadership. The strategic priorities of AONE anchor the editorial content. They reflect contemporary healthcare and nursing practice issues that challenge nurse executives as they strive to meet the needs of patients.

  8. Factors associated with high job satisfaction among care workers in Swiss nursing homes - a cross sectional survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwendimann, René; Dhaini, Suzanne; Ausserhofer, Dietmar; Engberg, Sandra; Zúñiga, Franziska

    2016-01-01

    While the relationship between nurses' job satisfaction and their work in hospital environments is well known, it remains unclear, which factors are most influential in the nursing home setting. The purpose of this study was to describe job satisfaction among care workers in Swiss nursing homes and to examine its associations with work environment factors, work stressors, and health issues. This cross-sectional study used data from a representative national sample of 162 Swiss nursing homes including 4,145 care workers from all educational levels (registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, nursing assistants and aides). Care worker-reported job satisfaction was measured with a single item. Explanatory variables were assessed with established scales, as e.g. the Practice Environment Scale - Nursing Work Index. Generalized Estimating Equation (GEE) models were used to examine factors related to job satisfaction. Overall, 36.2 % of respondents reported high satisfaction with their workplace, while another 50.4 % were rather satisfied. Factors significantly associated with high job satisfaction were supportive leadership (OR = 3.76), better teamwork and resident safety climate (OR = 2.60), a resonant nursing home administrator (OR = 2.30), adequate staffing resources (OR = 1.40), fewer workplace conflicts (OR = .61), less sense of depletion after work (OR = .88), and fewer physical health problems (OR = .91). The quality of nursing home leadership-at both the unit supervisor and the executive administrator level-was strongly associated with care workers' job satisfaction. Therefore, recruitment strategies addressing specific profiles for nursing home leaders are needed, followed by ongoing leadership training. Future studies should examine the effects of interventions designed to improve nursing home leadership and work environments on outcomes both for care staff and for residents.

  9. Nuclear licensing in Slovenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prah, M.; Spiler, J.; Vojnovic, D.; Pristavec, M.

    1998-01-01

    The article presents the approach to nuclear licensing in Slovenia. The paper describes, the initialization, internal authorization and review process in the Krsko NPP. The overall process includes preparation, internal independent evaluation, the Krsko Operating Committee and the Krsko Safety Committee review and internal approval. In addition, the continuation of the licensing process is discussed which includes independent evaluation by an authorized institution and a regulatory body approval process. This regulatory body approval process includes official hearing of the licensee, communication with the licensee, and final issuance of a license amendment. The internal evaluation, which follows the methodology of US NRC (defined in 10 CFR 50.59 and NUMARC 125) is described. This concept is partially implemented in domestic legislation.(author)

  10. Software licenses: Stay honest!

    CERN Multimedia

    Computer Security Team

    2012-01-01

    Do you recall our article about copyright violation in the last issue of the CERN Bulletin, “Music, videos and the risk for CERN”? Now let’s be more precise. “Violating copyright” not only means the illegal download of music and videos, it also applies to software packages and applications.   Users must respect proprietary rights in compliance with the CERN Computing Rules (OC5). Not having legitimately obtained a program or the required licenses to run that software is not a minor offense. It violates CERN rules and puts the Organization at risk! Vendors deserve credit and compensation. Therefore, make sure that you have the right to use their software. In other words, you have bought the software via legitimate channels and use a valid and honestly obtained license. This also applies to “Shareware” and software under open licenses, which might also come with a cost. Usually, only “Freeware” is complete...

  11. Non-Power Reactor Operator Licensing Examiner Standards. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    The Non-Power Reactor Operator Licensing Examiner Standards provide policy and guidance to NRC examiners and establish the procedures and practices for examining and licensing of applicants for NRC operator licenses pursuant to Part 55 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR 55). They are intended to assist NRC examiners and facility licensees to understand the examination process better and to provide for equitable and consistent administration of examinations to all applicants by NRC examiners. These standards are not a substitute for the operator licensing regulations and are subject to revision or other internal operator examination licensing policy changes. As appropriate, these standards will be revised periodically to accommodate comments and reflect new information or experience

  12. Non-Power Reactor Operator Licensing Examiner Standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    The Non-Power Reactor Operator Licensing Examiner Standards provide policy and guidance to NRC examiners and establish the procedures and practices for examining and licensing of applicants for NRC operator licenses pursuant to Part 55 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR Part 55). They are intended to assist NRC examiners and facility licensees to understand the examination process better and to provide for equitable and consistent administration of examinations to all applicants by NRC examiners. These standards are not a substitute for the operator licensing regulations and are subject to revision or other internal operator examination licensing policy changes. As appropriate, this standard will be revised periodically to accommodate comments and reflect new information or experience

  13. Non-Power Reactor Operator Licensing Examiner Standards. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    The Non-Power Reactor Operator Licensing Examiner Standards provide policy and guidance to NRC examiners and establish the procedures and practices for examining and licensing of applicants for NRC operator licenses pursuant to Part 55 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR 55). They are intended to assist NRC examiners and facility licensees to understand the examination process better and to provide for equitable and consistent administration of examinations to all applicants by NRC examiners. These standards are not a substitute for the operator licensing regulations and are subject to revision or other internal operator examination licensing policy changes. As appropriate, these standards will be revised periodically to accommodate comments and reflect new information or experience.

  14. Licensing safety critical software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archinoff, G.H.; Brown, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    Licensing difficulties with the shutdown system software at the Darlington Nuclear Generating Station contributed to delays in starting up the station. Even though the station has now been given approval by the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) to operate, the software issue has not disappeared - Ontario Hydro has been instructed by the AECB to redesign the software. This article attempts to explain why software based shutdown systems were chosen for Darlington, why there was so much difficulty licensing them, and what the implications are for other safety related software based applications

  15. Licensing in an international triopoly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Fernanda A.; Ferreira, Flávio

    2011-12-01

    We study the effects of entry of two foreign firms on domestic welfare in the presence of licensing, when the incumbent is technologically superior to the entrants. We consider two different situations: (i) the cost-reducing innovation is licensed to both entrants; (ii) the cost-reducing innovation is licensed to just one of the entrants. We analyse three kind of license: (lump-sum) fixed-fee; (per-unit) royalty; and two-part tariff, that is a combination of a fixed-fee and a royalty. We prove that a two part tariff is never an optimal licensing scheme for the incumbent. Moreover, (i) when the technology is licensed to the two entrants, the optimal contract consists of a licensing with only output royalty; and (ii) when the technology is licensed to just one of the entrants, the optimal contract consists of a licensing with only a fixed-fee.

  16. Taking care of you and care for others: an analysis of the activity of the work of technical and nursing assistants of a psychiatric institution for children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Davidson Passos; Moraes, Geraldo Fabiano de Souza; Mendes, Juliana Cristina de Lima

    2012-01-01

    Our objective in this study, the analysis of potential fields of risk management in nursing work in psychiatric care to adolescents and children, while settings that go from the relationship between technical and organizational determinants of work activity and the skills of operators. It was established focus on the work process of the Technical and Nursing Assistants to seek for response elements in an attempt to understand the health-disease process experienced by these workers. It was used for analysis and data collection, through the method of Ergonomic Work Analysis (EWA), fifteen workers of nursing staff - T&NA, between effectives and contractors, and the strategies of action and regulation of these workers in relation to the interface that they deal with. The results show that the workers are exposed to all charges in an intense and specific way, causing physical and mental wear, as it approaches the psychological distress, exposure to the psychic pressure, not only through contact with the object of work, but the complexity of these relationships that are involved in nursing staff.

  17. Should Health Care Aides Assist With Medications in Long-Term Care?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mubashir Arain PhD

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of the study was to determine whether health care aides (HCAs could safely assist in medication administration in long-term care (LTC. Method: We obtained medication error reports from LTC facilities that involve HCAs in oral medication assistance and we analyzed Resident Assessment Instrument (RAI data from these facilities. Standard ratings of error severity were “no apparent harm,” “minimum harm,” and “moderate harm.” Results: We retrieved error reports from two LTC facilities with 220 errors reported by all health care providers including HCAs. HCAs were involved in 137 (63% errors, licensed practical nurses (LPNs/registered nurses (RNs in 77 (35%, and pharmacy in four (2%. The analysis of error severity showed that HCAs were significantly less likely to cause errors of moderate severity than other nursing staff (2% vs. 7%, chi-square = 5.1, p value = .04. Conclusion: HCAs’ assistance in oral medications in LTC facilities appears to be safe when provided under the medication assistance guidelines.

  18. Licensing the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demski, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    The University of San Diego (USD) and Point Loma Nazarene University (PLNU) are licensing the sun. Both California schools are generating solar power on campus without having to sink large amounts of capital into equipment and installation. By negotiating power purchasing agreements (PPAs) with Amsolar and Perpetual Energy Systems, respectively,…

  19. Trends in CANDU licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snell, V.G.; Grant, S.D.

    1997-01-01

    Modern utilities view nuclear power more and more as a commodity - it must compete 'today' with current alternatives to attract their investment. With its long construction times and large capital investment, nuclear plants are vulnerable to delays once they have been committed. There are two related issues. Where the purchaser and the regulator are experienced in CANDU, the thrust is a very practical one: to identify and resolve major licensing risks at a very early stage in the project. Thus for a Canadian project, the designer (AECL) and the prospective purchaser would deal directly with the AECB. However CANDU has also been successfully licensed in other countries, including Korea, Romania, Argentina, India and Pakistan. Each of these countries has its own regulatory agency responsible for licensing the plant. In addition, however, the foreign customer and regulator may seek input from the AECB, up to and including a statement of licensability in Canada; this is not normally needed for a ''repeat'' plant and/or if the customer is experienced in CANDU, but can be requested if the plant configuration has been modified significantly from an already-operating CANDU. It is thus the responsibility of the designer to initiate early discussions with the AECB so the foreign CANDU meets the expectations of its customers

  20. Future of nuclear licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denton, H.R.

    1984-01-01

    The following topics are outlined: Comparison of US and best foreign experience in nuclear power plant construction and operation; Status of licensing and construction; Observed attributes; Reduced construction time; Fewer reactor trips; Higher capacity factor; Diesel generator reliability; Steam generator tube leakage; and US regulatory initiatives: NRC efforts and industry efforts

  1. Nursing skill mix in European hospitals: cross-sectional study of the association with mortality, patient ratings, and quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, Linda H; Sloane, Douglas; Griffiths, Peter; Rafferty, Anne Marie; Bruyneel, Luk; McHugh, Matthew; Maier, Claudia B; Moreno-Casbas, Teresa; Ball, Jane E; Ausserhofer, Dietmar; Sermeus, Walter

    2017-07-01

    To determine the association of hospital nursing skill mix with patient mortality, patient ratings of their care and indicators of quality of care. Cross-sectional patient discharge data, hospital characteristics and nurse and patient survey data were merged and analysed using generalised estimating equations (GEE) and logistic regression models. Adult acute care hospitals in Belgium, England, Finland, Ireland, Spain and Switzerland. Survey data were collected from 13 077 nurses in 243 hospitals, and 18 828 patients in 182 of the same hospitals in the six countries. Discharge data were obtained for 275 519 surgical patients in 188 of these hospitals. Patient mortality, patient ratings of care, care quality, patient safety, adverse events and nurse burnout and job dissatisfaction. Richer nurse skill mix (eg, every 10-point increase in the percentage of professional nurses among all nursing personnel) was associated with lower odds of mortality (OR=0.89), lower odds of low hospital ratings from patients (OR=0.90) and lower odds of reports of poor quality (OR=0.89), poor safety grades (OR=0.85) and other poor outcomes (0.80nurses is associated with an 11% increase in the odds of death. In our hospital sample, there were an average of six caregivers for every 25 patients, four of whom were professional nurses. Substituting one nurse assistant for a professional nurse for every 25 patients is associated with a 21% increase in the odds of dying. A bedside care workforce with a greater proportion of professional nurses is associated with better outcomes for patients and nurses. Reducing nursing skill mix by adding nursing associates and other categories of assistive nursing personnel without professional nurse qualifications may contribute to preventable deaths, erode quality and safety of hospital care and contribute to hospital nurse shortages. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please

  2. THE EARLY DAYS OF THE ASSISTANCE TO THE NEW-BORN BABIES IN EXTERIOR AND IN BRAZIL: PERSPECTIVES TO KNOWLEDGE IT OF NURSING IN THE NEONATOLOGY (1870-1903.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Gomes Rodrigues

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY: It is a historical study that has as objective to describe the early days of the assistance to the new-born babies in foreign countries and in Brazil, from 1870 to 1903. The primary sources are existing articles in the Foundation National Library. The secondary sources are pertinent studies to the thematic one. With the purpose to keep warm the premature babies, in the end of XIX century were created the first incubator. In Brazil, the “Lion” new-born babies arrived in the beginning of XX century (1903. The use of the new born babies and the peculiarities of the cares to the new-born babies are Importants landmarks for the development of the neonatology. KEY WORDS: Nursing; Neonatology; Nursing History.

  3. Competence for older people nursing in care and nursing homes: An integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiljunen, Outi; Välimäki, Tarja; Kankkunen, Päivi; Partanen, Pirjo

    2017-09-01

    People living in care and nursing homes are vulnerable individuals with complex needs; therefore, a wide array of nursing competence is needed to ensure their well-being. When developing the quality of care in these units, it is essential to know what type of competence is required for older people nursing. The aim of this integrative review was to identify the competence needed for older people nursing in licensed practical nurses' and registered nurses' work in care and nursing homes. Integrative literature review. We performed an integrative review using Whittemore and Knafl's method. The CINAHL, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, SocINDEX and Scopus databases were searched for studies published from 2006 to April 2016. We assessed the quality of the studies using Joanna Briggs Institute critical appraisal tools and analysed the data by applying qualitative content analysis. Ten articles were included in the review. Most of the studies focused on registered nurses' work. We identified five competence areas that are needed for older people nursing in registered nurses' work in care and nursing homes: attitudinal and ethical, interactional, evidence-based care, pedagogical, and leadership and development competence. Empirical evidence of competence requirements related to licensed practical nurses' work in these facilities was scarce. The competence required for registered nurses and licensed practical nurses should be clearly identified to support competence management in the care and nursing home context. Well-educated nursing staff are needed in care and nursing homes to provide high-quality care because comprehensive and advanced nurse competence is required to meet the needs of older people. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. 31 CFR 596.309 - Specific license.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY TERRORISM LIST GOVERNMENTS SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 596.309 Specific license. The term specific license means any license or...

  5. Operating reactors licensing actions summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-08-01

    The Operating Reactors Licensing Actions Summary is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors

  6. Using the Nursing Culture Assessment Tool (NCAT in Long-Term Care: An Update on Psychometrics and Scoring Standardization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Kennerly

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available An effective workforce performing within the context of a positive cultural environment is central to a healthcare organization’s ability to achieve quality outcomes. The Nursing Culture Assessment Tool (NCAT provides nurses with a valid and reliable tool that captures the general aspects of nursing culture. This study extends earlier work confirming the tool’s construct validity and dimensionality by standardizing the scoring approach and establishing norm-referenced scoring. Scoring standardization provides a reliable point of comparison for NCAT users. NCAT assessments support nursing’s ability to evaluate nursing culture, use results to shape the culture into one that supports change, and advance nursing’s best practices and care outcomes. Registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, and certified nursing assistants from 54 long-term care facilities in Kentucky, Nevada, North Carolina, and Oregon were surveyed. Confirmatory factor analysis yielded six first order factors forming the NCAT’s subscales (Expectations, Behaviors, Teamwork, Communication, Satisfaction, Commitment (Comparative Fit Index 0.93 and a second order factor—The Total Culture Score. Aggregated facility level comparisons of observed group variance with expected random variance using rwg(J statistics is presented. Normative scores and cumulative rank percentages and how the NCAT can be used in implementing planned change are provided.

  7. Nurses' experiences of using a smart mobile device application to assist home care for patients with chronic disease: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Kuei-Feng; Wang, Hsiu-Hung

    2016-07-01

    To examine nurses' experiences regarding the benefits and obstacles of using a smart mobile device application in home care. The popularity of mobile phones and Internet technology has established an opportunity for interaction between patients and health care professionals. Line is an application allowing instant communication that is available for free globally. However, the literature relating to use of Line in this area is limited. A qualitative study involving individual in-depth interviews. Participants included community nurses (N = 17) from six home care facilities in southern Taiwan who had used Line for home care of chronically ill patients for at least six months. The study was conducted using semi-structured in-depth interviews, which were recorded and converted into transcripts for content analysis. Seven themes emerged from data analysis: reduction in medical care consumption and costs, reduction in workload and stress, facilitating improvement in the quality of care, promotion of the nurse-patient relationship, perceived risk, lack of organisational incentives and operating procedures and disturbance to personal life. Nurses considered Line valuable for use in home care. While this application has diverse functions, its video transfer function could in particular help nursing staff make prompt decisions about patients' problems and promote nurse-patient relationships. However, there might be hidden risks including legal consequences, safety risks to patients, possible violations of professionalism and increased risk of nurse burnout. Increasing nursing staff awareness of using mobile messaging software applications is necessary. This study provides relevant information about the benefits, disadvantages, risks and limitations of nurses' use of Line. The study also provides suggestions for software programmers and future organisational strategy and development. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Factors influencing decision of general practitioners and managers to train and employ a nurse practitioner or physician assistant in primary care: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Biezen, Mieke; Derckx, Emmy; Wensing, Michel; Laurant, Miranda

    2017-02-07

    Due to the increasing demand on primary care, it is not only debated whether there are enough general practitioners (GPs) to comply with these demands but also whether specific tasks can be performed by other care providers. Although changing the workforce skill mix care by employing Physician Assistants (PAs) and Nurse Practitioners (NPs) has proven to be both effective and safe, the implementation of those professionals differs widely between and within countries. To support policy making regarding PAs/NPs in primary care, the aim of this study is to provide insight into factors influencing the decision of GPs and managers to train and employ a PA/NP within their organisation. A qualitative study was conducted in 2014 in which 7 managers of out-of-hours primary care services and 32 GPs who owned a general practice were interviewed. Three main topic areas were covered in the interviews: the decision-making process in the organisation, considerations and arguments to train and employ a PA/NP, and the tasks and responsibilities of a PA/NP. Employment of PAs/NPs in out-of-hours services was intended to substitute care for minor ailments in order to decrease GPs' caseload or to increase service capacity. Mangers formulated long-term planning and role definitions when changing workforce skill mix. Lastly, out-of-hours services experienced difficulties with creating team support among their members regarding the employment of PAs/NPs. In general practices during office hours, GPs indented both substitution and supplementation for minor ailments and/or target populations through changing the skill mix. Supplementation was aimed at improving quality of care and extending the range of services to patients. The decision-making in general practices was accompanied with little planning and role definition. The willingness to employ PAs/NPs was highly influenced by an employees' motivation to start the master's programme and GPs' prior experience with PAs/NPs. Knowledge about

  9. Psychosocial Determinants of Chronic Stress in Nursing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-12-22

    registered nurses with current licenses were unemployed and that only 3% of the unemployed registered nurses were looking for jobs in the field of...characteristic symptoms involve a re-experiencing of the traumatic event (intrusive recollections of the event, dreams or nightmares) and psychic numbing

  10. Licensing in an International Market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Fernanda A.

    2008-09-01

    We study the effects of entry of a foreign firm on domestic welfare in the presence of licensing, when the entrant is technologically superior to the incumbent. We show that foreign entry increases domestic welfare for sufficiently large technological differences between the firms under both fixed-fee licensing and royalty licensing.

  11. Operating reactors licensing actions summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-04-01

    The operating reactors licensing actions summary is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors. These reports utilize data collected from the Division of Licensing in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and are prepared by the Office of Management and Program Analysis

  12. I was never recruited: challenges in cross-Canada nurse mobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Linda McGillis; Peterson, Jessica; Sheri, Sheri; Andrews, Gavin; Lalonde, Michelle; Harris, Alexandra; MacDonald-Rencz, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    The internal migration of nurses within Canada has had limited study. This paper reports the results of a survey of registered nurses and licensed practical nurses who had migrated between the provinces and territories in Canada. Factors contributing to internal nurse mobility included seeking full-time work, opportunities for career advancement and flexible scheduling options. Few nurses received incentives to move between the provinces/territories to work. A number of challenges with internal migration are identified, including complexities related to licensing and limitations in available job information. Implications for nursing health human resources policy related to nurse retention in Canada are identified and discussed.

  13. Assisted Living Facilities - CARE_LONG_TERM_FACILITIES_ISDH_IN: Residential Care Facilities, Nursing Homes, and Hospices in Indiana in 2007 (Indiana State Department of Health, Point Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — CARE_LONG_TERM_FACILITIES_ISDH_IN is a point shapefile showing the locations of 86 residential care facilities, 525 long-term care facilities (nursing homes), and 81...

  14. The nuclear licensing procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, H.

    1976-01-01

    To begin with, the present nuclear licensing procedure is illustrated by a diagram. The relationship between the state and the Laender, the various experts (GRS - IRS + LRA -, TUEV, DWD, university institutes, firms of consulting engineers, etc), participation of the public, e.g. publication of the relevant documents, questions, objections (made by individuals or by groups such as citizens' initiatives), public discussion, official notice, appeals against the decision, the right of immediate execution of the decision are shortly dealt with. Finally, ways to improve the licensing procedure are discussed, from the evaluation of the documents to be submitted, published, and examined by the authorities (and their experts) up to an improvement of the administrative procedure. An improved licensing procedure should satisfy the well-founded claims of the public for more transparency as well as the equally justifiable claims of industry and utilities in order to ensure that the citizens' legal right to have safe and adequate electric power is guaranteed. The updated energy programme established by the Federal Government is mentioned along with the effectiveness of dealing with nuclear problems on the various levels of a Land government. (orig.) [de

  15. Sistematização da Assistência de Enfermagem ao portador de Diabetes Mellitus e Insuficiência Renal Crônica Sistematización de la Asistencia de Enfermería al portador de Diabetes Mellitus y Insuficiencia Renal Systematization of Nursing Assistance to patients with Diabetes Mellitus and Chronic Renal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nildo Batista Mascarenhas

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Tratou-se de um estudo de caso clínico desenvolvido durante as atividades práticas da disciplina Enfermagem Clínico-Cirúrgica I, do curso de Graduação em Enfermagem de uma universidade pública do Estado da Bahia, que objetivou relatar a aplicação da Sistematização da Assistência de Enfermagem na assistência a um paciente portador de Diabetes Mellitus e Insuficiência Renal Crônica. Com o desenvolvimento do estudo, em especial após a melhora positiva da paciente face às condutas planejadas e implementadas e, considerando as reflexões que emergiram, foi possível constatar a necessidade da interface entre a Sistematização da Assistência de Enfermagem, equipe de enfermagem e paciente no processo do cuidar, frente à excelência e singularidade dos cuidados de enfermagemEste es un estudio de caso desarrollado durante las actividades prácticas de la disciplina de Enfermería Clínica Quirúrgica I, del curso de Grado en Enfermería en una universidad pública del Estado de Bahía, que tuvo por objetivo relatar la aplicación de la Sistematización de la Asistencia de Enfermería (SAE en asistencia a un paciente conducir a la Diabetes Mellitus y la Insuficiencia Renal Crónica. Con el desarrollo del estudio, sobre todo después de la mejora positiva del paciente, se enfrentan para llevar a cabo y planifiquen y ejecuten teniendo en cuenta las ideas que surgieron, es posible ver la necesidad de interfaz entre la Sistematización de la Asistencia de Enfermería y el personal de enfermería y el paciente en el proceso de atención, en la excelencia y la singularidad de los cuidados de enfermeríaThis is a clinical case study developed during the practical activities of the discipline Surgical Clinical Nursing I, of course of Graduation in Nursing of a public university of Bahia State, that aimed to report the application of the Systematization of Nursing Assistance in the assistance to a client whit Diabetes Mellitus and Chronic Renal

  16. Association between Continuing Education and Job Satisfaction of Nurses Employed in Long-Term Care Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Ethel M.; Higgins, Leslie; Rozmus, Cathy; Robinson, James P.

    1999-01-01

    Continuing-education participation and job satisfaction of 85 licensed practical nurses and 25 registered nurses in long-term care were compared. There were no differences between full- and part-time staff. Nurses with higher family incomes participated more frequently. Registered nurses participated more and had greater job satisfaction. (SK)

  17. Atendimento à mulher vítima de violência sexual: protocolo de assistência de Enfermagem Atención a la Mujer Víctima de Violencia Sexual: Protocolo de Asistencia de Enfermería Assistance to women victims of sexual violence: a nursing care protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosângela Higa

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available O Ministério da Saúde preconiza o atendimento integral e humanizado às mulheres vítimas de violência sexual. Teve-se por objetivo descrever o Protocolo de Enfermagem na Assistência às Mulheres Vítimas de Violência Sexual do Centro de Atenção Integral à Saúde da Mulher da Universidade Estadual de Campinas, recentemente revisado. Para tanto, seguiram-se as etapas do processo de enfermagem e após a identificação dos principais diagnósticos da North American Nursing Diagnosis Association (NANDA foram determinadas as intervenções, com base em normas técnicas nacionais e internacionais. O protocolo atual engloba o atendimento imediato e tardio, o acompanhamento ambulatorial e as ações relacionadas à interrupção legal da gravidez decorrente do estupro. O protocolo de enfermagem tem proporcionado à cliente um atendimento integral e humanizado e à enfermeira, maior autonomia na sua área de atuação, favorecendo o trabalho colaborativo e interativo com a equipe multidisciplinar.El Ministerio de Salud preconiza la atención integral y humanizada a las mujeres víctimas de violencia sexual. Se tuvo como objetivo describir el Protocolo de Enfermería en la Asistencia a las Mujeres Víctimas de Violencia Sexual del Centro de Atención Integral a la Salud de la Mujer de la Universidad Estatal de Campinas, recientemente revisado. Para tal efecto, se siguieron las etapas del proceso de enfermería y después de la identificación de los principales diagnósticos de la North American Nursing Diagnosis Association (NANDA fueron determinadas las intervenciones, con base en normas técnicas nacionales e internacionales. El protocolo actual engloba la atención inmediata y tardía, el acompañamiento ambulatorio y las acciones relacionadas a la interrupción legal del embarazo derivado de la violación. El protocolo de enfermería ha proporcionado a la cliente una atención integral y humanizada y a la enfermera, mayor autonomía en su

  18. Indicadores de gênero da assistência de enfermagem às mulheres Indicadores de género de la asistencia a las mujeres Gender indicators of nursing care for women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enilda Rosendo do Nascimento

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available O texto apresenta um estudo realizado em uma unidade assistencial de saúde de Salvador/ Bahia, com o propósito de construir indicadores de qualidade para a assistência de enfermagem a partir de uma perspectiva de gênero. A construção dos indicadores deu-se através de uma investigação que analisou as concepções de mulheres sobre a assistência pré-natal de enfermagem a elas prestadas, a partir da identificação de ações promotoras de autonomia, dignificação e participação. A coleta de dados realizou-se através de entrevista semi-estruturada a 14 mulheres usuárias da assistência pré-natal de enfermagem que aceitaram participar do estudo e tinham sido atendidas por uma enfermeira em gravidez (es anterior (es ou durante a gravidez atual. Foram construídos dois tipos de indicadores de gênero da assistência de enfermagem: indicadores práticos e indicadores estratégicos de gênero.El texto presenta un estudio realizado en una unidad asistencial de salud de Salvador/Bahia, con el propósito de construir indicadores de calidad para la asistencia de enfermería a partir de una perspectiva del género. La construcción de los indicadores se llevó a cabo a través de una investigación que analizó las concepciones de mujeres a cerca de la asistencia prenatal de enfermería a ellas dada, a contar de la identificación de acciones promotoras de autonomía, dignificación y participación. La coleta de dados se realizó a partir de la entrevista semiestructurada a 14 mujeres usuarias de la asistencia prenatal de enfermería que aceptaron participar del estudio y a quienes atendió una enfermera en embarazo(s anterior(es o durante el embarazo actual. Se adoptaron dos tipos de indicadores de género de la asistencia de enfermería: indicadores prácticos e indicadores estratégicos de género.This text presents a study carried out at a healthcare unit in Salvador/Bahia, with the purpose of building quality indicators for nursing

  19. Clinical judgement within the South African clinical nursing environment: A concept analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna C. van Graan

    2016-12-01

    The findings emphasized clinical judgement as skill within the clinical nursing environment, thereby improving autonomous and accountable nursing care. These findings will assist nurse leaders and clinical nurse educators in developing a teaching-learning strategy to promote clinical judgement in undergraduate nursing students, thereby contributing to the quality of nursing care.

  20. Licensed operating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-11-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly Licensed Operating Reactors Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Information Resources Management, from the Headquarters Staff of NRC's Office of Inspection and Enforcement, from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. Since all of the data concerning operation of the units is provided by the utility operators less than two weeks after the end of the month, necessary corrections to published information are shown on the errata page

  1. Licensed operating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-04-01

    The Operating Units Status Report --- Licensed Operating Reactors provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Information Resources Management from the Headquarters staff on NRC's Office of Enforcement (OE), from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. The three sections of the report are: monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC's Regional Offices, OE Headquarters and the utilities; and an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor-years of experience and non- power reactors in the US

  2. Validation, acceptance and licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wene, C.O.

    1992-01-01

    The licensing process requires communication of complex scientific and technical information. In this paper transfer of such information is discussed using concepts and ideas from systems analysis, cybernetics and argumentation theory. A simple model for the decision process is developed. The analysis stresses the need for careful design of the communication channels between the three systems involved: the political system, the judicial-regulatory system and the scientific-technical community. The Dialogue - Scenario project initiated by the Swedish nuclear Inspectorate is briefly presented

  3. License agreement, employee work

    OpenAIRE

    Poncová, Veronika

    2012-01-01

    The rigorous thesis is focused on license agreement and employee work. The aim of the thesis is not only an analysis of the use of a copyrighted work by a person different from the author of the work, but also an analysis of the performance of copyright by a person different from the author of the work. The thesis consists of five chapters. The opening chapter provides a summary of the notion of copyright, its sources at the national and international levels, but also the European Union legis...

  4. Licensing of New Nuclear Power Plants in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, Garry; Miller, Doug

    2011-01-01

    The regulatory process for new power plant licensing in Canada, from receipt of the initial application to commercial operation, can be divided into three phases: - Environmental Assessment (EA) and License to Prepare Site; - License to Construct; and - License to Operate. The Nuclear Safety and Control Act (NSCA) does not have provisions for combined licenses for site preparation, construction, or operation. Separate licenses must, therefore, be granted for each phase, and would be issued in sequence. However, applications to prepare a site, to construct and to operate a new nuclear power plant could be assessed in parallel. The total duration from the application for the License to Prepare Site to the issuance of the License to Operate (which is a prerequisite for first fuel load) has been established as 9 years subject to certain factors. To help facilitate this timeline, the CNSC has undertaken an aggressive program of documenting regulatory practices, requirements and guidance to assist applicants in submitting complete applications. Working level procedures to assist CNSC staff in their review of submissions are also under development. Extensive program and project management has been introduced to ensure that timelines will be achieved. In parallel with the above activities, regulatory oversight measures to be employed during site preparation activities and plant construction and commissioning are also being developed. On the international front, the CNSC is participating in the MDEP program to leverage the resources and knowledge of other national regulatory authorities in reviews the CNSC is undertaking. The CNSC also participates in IAEA and other international activities to utilize/adapt international practices as appropriate in Canada. (authors)

  5. From Entry to Practice to Advanced Nurse Practitioner - The Progression of Competencies and How They Assist in Delivery of eHealth Programs for Healthy Ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodger, Daragh; Hussey, Pamela

    2017-01-01

    Most of the health issues encountered in persons of older age are the result of one or more chronic diseases. The evidence base reports that chronic diseases can be prevented or delayed by engaging in healthy behaviors. Education provides a cost effective intervention on both economic grounds in addition to delivery of optimal patient outcomes. Information and Communication Technology (ICT) increasingly is viewed as a critical utility in eHealth delivery, providing scope for expanding online education facilities for older persons. Developing nursing competencies in the delivery of eHealth solutions to deliver user education programs therefore makes sense. This chapter discusses nursing competencies on the development of targeted eHealth programs for healthy ageing. The role of Advanced Nurse Practitioner in Ireland and its associated competency set identifies how a strong action learning model can be designed to deliver eHealth educational programs for effective delivery of healthy ageing in place.

  6. Cardiomiopatia Hipertrófica: atualização e assistência de enfermagem Cardiomiopatía Hipertrófica: actualización y atención de enfermería Hypertrophic Cardiomyophaty: update and nursing assistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samanta Mariano

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Trata-se de uma atualização cujo objetivo foi descrever aspectos da fisiopatologia da Cardiomiopatia Hipertrófica (CMH e suas terapêuticas, relacionando-as com a assistência de enfermagem. A fonte de dados considerou a Base de Dados LILACS, usando-se como expressão de pesquisa os unitermos "miocardiopatia hipertrófica" e "cuidados de enfermagem". A CMH é uma doença que surge a partir de alteração cromossômica causando hipertrofia do ventrículo esquerdo, tendo progressão rápida e podendo ocasionar insuficiência cardíaca classe funcional III e IV. O tratamento consiste do uso de medicações paliativas ou outros procedimentos como o implante de Marca-Passo, ventriculoplastia e transplante cardíaco. A assistência de enfermagem baseada em Diagnósticos e Intervenções de Enfermagem são apresentadas.Tratase de una actualización que objetivó describir algunos aspectos fisiopatológicos sobre la Cardiomioplatía Hipertófica y corelacionar con la atención de enfermería. La basis para la recogida de datos fue la basis de datos bibliograficos LILACS usandose la expresión de busqueda "Cardiomiopatía Hipertrófica" y "atención de enfermería". La CMH es una enfermedad que empeza con alteraciones cromosómicas teniendo rápida progresión y podiendo causar insuficiencia cardiaca clase funcional III o IV. El tratamiento consiste del uso de medicaciones paliativas o otros procedimientos como el implante de Marca-Paso, ventriculoplastia y transplante cardiaco. La atención de enfermería basada en Diagnósticos y Intervenciones de Enfermería son presentadas.This is an update that aimed to describe some aspects of physiopathology of Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM and its therapeutics correlating them to nursing assistance. Data source was based on LILACS bibliographical database using the search expression "hypertrophic cardiomiopathy" and "nursing care". The HCM is a disease that appears from cromossomic alterations that causes

  7. Evaluation of AHRQ's on-time pressure ulcer prevention program: a facilitator-assisted clinical decision support intervention for nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsho, Lauren E W; Spector, William D; Williams, Christianna S; Rhodes, William; Fink, Rebecca V; Limcangco, Rhona; Hurd, Donna

    2014-03-01

    Pressure ulcers present serious health and economic consequences for nursing home residents. The Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality, in partnership with the New York State Department of Health, implemented the pressure ulcer module of On-Time Quality Improvement for Long Term Care (On-Time), a clinical decision support intervention to reduce pressure ulcer incidence rates. To evaluate the effectiveness of the On-Time program in reducing the rate of in-house-acquired pressure ulcers among nursing home residents. We employed an interrupted time-series design to identify impacts of 4 core On-Time program components on resident pressure ulcer incidence in 12 New York State nursing homes implementing the intervention (n=3463 residents). The sample was purposively selected to include nursing homes with high baseline prevalence and incidence of pressure ulcers and high motivation to reduce pressure ulcers. Differential timing and sequencing of 4 core On-Time components across intervention nursing homes and units enabled estimation of separate impacts for each component. Inclusion of a nonequivalent comparison group of 13 nursing homes not implementing On-Time (n=2698 residents) accounts for potential mean-reversion bias. Impacts were estimated via a random-effects Poisson model including resident-level and facility-level covariates. We find a large and statistically significant reduction in pressure ulcer incidence associated with the joint implementation of 4 core On-Time components (incidence rate ratio=0.409; P=0.035). Impacts vary with implementation of specific component combinations. On-Time implementation is associated with sizable reductions in pressure ulcer incidence.

  8. The overall impact of emotional intelligence on nursing students and nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori Michelangelo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Healthcare employers often criticize the lack of emotional competency and critical thinking skills demonstrated by newly licensed nurses. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether emotional intelligence (EI training for nurses improves critical thinking and emotional competence enough to justify including EI in nursing curricula. A meta-analysis was conducted inclusive of EI related nursing abilities and traits such as leadership, health, reflection, ethical behavior, nursing student performance, and job retention/satisfaction. Studies of EI constructs, test instruments, and contrary viewpoints were also examined. The analysis included 395 EI studies of approximately 65,300 participants. All the studies reported a positive correlation with EI ranging from weak to strong with a moderate cumulative effect size of r = 0.3022 across all studies. This study may contribute to positive social change by reducing employers time and cost for training newly licensed nurses, thereby decreasing the overall cost of health care to the public.

  9. A nursing career lattice pilot program to promote racial/ethnic diversity in the nursing workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sporing, Eileen; Avalon, Earlene; Brostoff, Marcie

    2012-03-01

    The nursing career lattice program (NCLP) at Children's Hospital Boston has provided employees with social, educational, and financial assistance as they begin or advance their nursing careers. At the conclusion of a pilot phase, 35% of employees in the NCLP were enrolled in nursing school and 15% completed nursing school. The NCLP exemplifies how a workforce diversity initiative can lead to outcomes that support and sustain a culture rich in diversity and perpetuate excellence in nursing in one organization.

  10. Improving Elderly's Dental Hygiene Through Nursing Home Staff's Dental Health Education at the Nursing Home

    OpenAIRE

    Santoso, Bedjo; Eko Ningtyas, Endah Aryati; Fatmasari, Diyah

    2017-01-01

    Stomatitis often occurs in elderly at nursing home. They need nursing home staff assistance to maintain their dental and oral health. Therefore, nursing home staff need dental health education. Lecture or discussion methods, which are more effective to improve knowledge, attitude and skill of nursing home staff was the purpose of this research. The research design was quasi-experiment research and pretest-posttest with control group. The sample was 42 nursing home staffs and 74 elderlies, div...

  11. Exporting the Canadian licensing program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whelan, D.J.

    1981-06-01

    This paper deals with the problems of an overseas regulatory agency in licensing a Canadian-supplied nuclear plant which is referenced to a plant in Canada. Firstly, the general problems associated with the use of a reference plant are discussed. This is followed by a discussion of specific problems which arise from the licensing practices in Canada. The paper concludes with recommendations to simplify the task of demonstrating the licensability of an overseas CANDU plant

  12. Operating reactors licensing actions summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The operating reactors licensing actions summary is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors. These reports utilize data collected from the Division of Licensing in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and are prepared by the Office of Management and Program Analysis. This summary report is published primarily for internal NRC use in managing the operating reactors licensing actions program. Its content will change based on NRC management informational requirements

  13. Operating reactors licensing actions summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-05-01

    The operating reactors licensing actions summary is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors. These reports utilize data collected from the Division of Licensing in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and are prepared by the Office of Management and Program Analysis. This summary report is published primarily for internal NRC use in managing the operating reactors licensing actions program. Its content will change based on NRC management informational requirements

  14. Operating reactors licensing actions summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-03-01

    The operating reactors licensing actions summary is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors. These reports utilize data collected from the Division of Licensing in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and are prepared by the Office of Management and Program Analysis. This summary report is published primarily for internal NRC use in managing the operating reactors licensing actions program. Its content will change based on NRC management informational requirements

  15. Operating reactors licensing actions summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-07-01

    The operating reactors licensing actions summary is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors. These reports utilize data collected from the Division of Licensing in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and are prepared by the Office of Management and Program Analysis. This summary report is published primarily for internal NRC use in managing the operating reactors licensing actions program. Its content will change based on NRC management informational requirements

  16. Operating reactors licensing actions summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-11-01

    The operating reactors licensing actions summary is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors. These reports utilize data collected from the Division of Licensing in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and are prepared by the Office of Management and Program Analysis. This summary report is published primarily for internal NRC use in managing the operating reactors licensing actions program. Its content will change based on NRC management informational requirements

  17. Technology Licensing and Firm Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moreira, Solon

    acquisition. The findings indicate that technology licensing is positively related to the number of inventions produced by the licensee in the years subsequent to the licensing deal. Subsequently, I investigate the moderating effect that organizational slack and myopia have on this main relationship....... The findings also suggest that high levels of Organizational Slack (available financial resources) strengthen the positive effect of licensing on innovation. However, higher levels of Organizational Myopia (the extent to which a firm draws on its own knowledge) can decrease the main effect of licensing....

  18. Operating reactors licensing actions summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-10-01

    The operating reactors licensing actions summary is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors. These reports utilize data collected from the Division of Licensing in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and are prepared by the Office of Management and Program Analysis. This summary report is published primarily for internal NRC use in managing the operating reactors licensing actions program. Its content will change based on NRC management informational requirements

  19. Operating reactors licensing actions summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-08-01

    The operating reactors licensing actions summary is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors. These reports utilize data collected from the Division of Licensing in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and are prepared by the Office of Management and Program Analysis. This summary report is published primarily for internal NRC use in managing the operating reactors licensing actions program. Its content will change based on NRC management informational requirements

  20. Operating reactors licensing actions summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-09-01

    The operating reactors licensing actions summary is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors. These reports utilize data collected from the Division of Licensing in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and are prepared by the Office of Management and Program Analysis. This summary report is published primarily for internal NRC use in managing the operating reactors licensing actions program. Its content will change based on NRC management informational requirements

  1. Satisfação do cliente na avaliação da assistência de enfermagem La satisfacción del cliente en la evaluación de la asistencia de enfermería The costumer's satisfaction in the nursing assistance avaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regiane Polizer

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available O estudo destaca a importância da percepção do cliente no processo de avaliação da assistência de enfermagem. Através da pesquisa bibliográfica no período compreendido entre 1990 e 2004. Realizou-se uma revisão sobre satisfação do cliente, onde foram identificados conceitos e publicações que abordassem a percepção do cliente como fator importante na avaliação da assistência de enfermagem. Assim, concluindo que o cliente tem papel importante na obtenção do verdadeiro resultado da assistência oferecida, pois se caracteriza como fonte de opiniões e sugestões auxiliando no processo de avaliação.Este estudio destaca la importancia de la opinión del cliente en el proceso de la evaluación de la asistencia de enfermería. Atravéz de la investigación bibliográfica en el período comprendido entre 1990 y 2004. Fue realizado una revisión acerca de la satisfacción del cliente, donde fueran identificados los conceptos y a las publicaciones de la opinión del cliente como factor importante en la evaluación de la asistencia de enfermería. La conclusíon fue que el cliente tiene papel importante en el obtencíon del verdadero resultado de la asistencia ofrecida, por lo tanto se caracteriza como fuente de las opiniones y sugestiones que asisten al proceso de la evaluación.This study detaches the importance of the perception of the customer in the process of evaluation of the nursing assistance. Through of bibliographical study research in the period understood between 1990 and 2004. This study reviewed on customer's satisfaction, where had been identified to concepts and publications that approached the perception of the customer as important factor in the evaluation of the nursing assistance. Thus, concluding, that customer has important paper in the attainment of the resulted real of the offered assistance, therefore characterizes as source of opinions and suggestions assisting in the process of evaluation.

  2. An international definition for "nursing home"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanford, A.M.; Orrell, M.; Tolson, D.; Abbatecola, A.M.; Arai, H.; Bauer, J.M.; Cruz-Jentoft, A.J.; Dong, B.; Ga, H.; Goel, A.; Hajjar, R.; Holmerova, I.; Katz, P.R.; Koopmans, R.T.; Rolland, Y.; Visvanathan, R.; Woo, J.; Morley, J.E.; Vellas, B.

    2015-01-01

    There is much ambiguity regarding the term "nursing home" in the international literature. The definition of a nursing home and the type of assistance provided in a nursing home is quite varied by country. The International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics and AMDA foundation developed a

  3. Role of Community and Technical Colleges in Producing Nursing Graduates: Rethinking the Pipeline for Guided Pathways. Research Report 17-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges, 2017

    2017-01-01

    Though it is still possible to enter the nursing profession with a Licensed Practical Nursing Certificate (LPN) or an Associate's Degree in Nursing (ADN), it is becoming increasingly necessary to get a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) in order to be assured of continued employment. The Associate in Applied Science-T Nursing Degree prepares…

  4. ITER Safety and Licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girard, J-.P; Taylor, N.; Garin, P.; Uzan-Elbez, J.; GULDEN, W.; Rodriguez-Rodrigo, L.

    2006-01-01

    The site for the construction of ITER has been chosen in June 2005. The facility will be implemented in Europe, south of France close to Marseille. The generic safety scheme is now under revision to adapt the design to the host country regulation. Even though ITER will be an international organization, it will have to comply with the French requirements in the fields of public and occupational health and safety, nuclear safety, radiation protection, licensing, nuclear substances and environmental protection. The organization of the central team together with its partners organized in domestic agencies for the in-kind procurement of components is a key issue for the success of the experimentation. ITER is the first facility that will achieve sustained nuclear fusion. It is both important for the experimental one-of-a-kind device, ITER itself, and for the future of fusion power plants to well understand the key safety issues of this potential new source of energy production. The main safety concern is confinement of the tritium, activated dust in the vacuum vessel and activated corrosion products in the coolant of the plasma-facing components. This is achieved in the design through multiple confinement barriers to implement the defence in depth approach. It will be demonstrated in documents submitted to the French regulator that these barriers maintain their function in all postulated incident and accident conditions. The licensing process started by examination of the safety options. This step has been performed by Europe during the candidature phase in 2002. In parallel to the final design, and taking into account the local regulations, the Preliminary Safety Report (RPrS) will be drafted with support of the European partner and others in the framework of ITER Task Agreements. Together with the license application, the RPrS will be forwarded to the regulatory bodies, which will launch public hearings and a safety review. Both processes must succeed in order to

  5. NRC licensing of uranium enrichment plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moran, B.W.

    1991-01-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is preparing a rule making that establishes the licensing requirements for low-enriched uranium enrichment plants. Although implementation of this rule making is timed to correspond with receipt of a license application for the Louisiana Energy Services centrifuge enrichment plant, the rule making is applicable to all uranium enrichment technologies. If ownership of the US gaseous diffusion plants and/or atomic vapor laser isotope separation is transferred to a private or government corporation, these plants also would be licensable under the new rule making. The Safeguards Studies Department was tasked by the NRC to provide technical assistance in support of the rule making and guidance preparation process. The initial and primary effort of this task involved the characterization of the potential safeguards concerns associated with a commercial enrichment plant, and the licensing issues associated with these concerns. The primary safeguards considerations were identified as detection of the loss of special nuclear material, detection of unauthorized production of material of low strategic significance, and detection of production of uranium enriched to >10% 235 U. The primary safeguards concerns identified were (1) large absolute limit of error associated with the material balance closing, (2) the inability to shutdown some technologies to perform a cleanout inventory of the process system, and (3) the flexibility of some technologies to produce higher enrichments. Unauthorized production scenarios were identified for some technologies that could prevent conventional material control and accounting programs from detecting the production and removal of 5 kg 235 U as highly enriched uranium. Safeguards techniques were identified to mitigate these concerns

  6. Nursing workloads: the results of a study of Queensland Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegney, Desley; Plank, Ashley; Parker, Victoria

    2003-09-01

    This paper reports the findings of a survey undertaken in Queensland, Australia in October 2001. The participants were registered and enrolled nurses and assistants in nursing who were members of the industrial body - the Queensland Nursing Union (QNU), and who were in paid employment in nursing in Queensland. Participants were selected by random sampling from each of the three major employment groups - the aged care, public and private acute sectors. Of the 2800 invited participants, 1477 responded resulting in an overall response rate of 53%. The findings indicate that over 50% of nurses in the aged-care sector, 32% of nurses in the public and 30% of nurses in the private acute sector experience difficulties in meeting patient needs because of insufficient staffing levels. The nurses in this study also believed that there was poor skills-mix, mostly caused by lack of funding, too few experienced staff or too many inexperienced staff. Many nurses in this study expressed their anger and frustration about their inability to complete their work to their professional satisfaction in the paid time available. Further, many nurses also expressed the view that because of this inability they were planning to leave the nursing profession. These findings are consistent with other research into the nursing workforce both within Australia and internationally.

  7. Licensed operating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-08-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission's annual summary of licensed nuclear power reactor data is based primarily on the report of operating data submitted by licensees for each unit for the month of December because that report contains data for the month of December, the year to date (in this case calendar 1990) and cumulative data, usually from the date of commercial operation. The data is not independently verified, but various computer checks are made. The report is divided into two sections. The first contains summary highlights and the second contains data on each individual unit in commercial operation. Section 1 capacity and availability factors are simple arithmetic averages. Section 2 items in the cumulative column are generally as reported by the licensee and notes as to the use of weighted averages and starting dates other than commercial operation are provided

  8. Licensed operating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartfield, R.A.

    1994-03-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commissions annual summary of licensed nuclear power reactor data is based primarily on the report of operating data submitted by licensees for each unit for the month of December, the year to date (in this case calendar year 1993) and cumulative data, usually for the date of commercial operation. The data is not independently verified, but various computer checks are made. The report is divided into two sections. The first contains summary highlights and the second contains data on each individual unit in commercial operation. Section 1 capacity and availability factors are simple arithmetic averages. Section 2 items in the cumulative column are generally as reported by the licensee and notes as to the use of weighted averages and starting dates other than commercial operation are provided

  9. Licensed operating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-08-01

    THE OPERATING UNITS STATUS REPORT - LICENSED OPERATING REACTORS provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Information Resources Management from the Headquarters staff of NRC's Office of Enforcement (OE), from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. The three sections of the report are: monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC's Regional Offices, OE Headquarters and the utilities; and an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor-years of experience and non-power reactors in the US

  10. Licensed operating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly LICENSED OPERATING REACTORS Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Information Resources Management, from the Headquarters Staff of NRC's Office of Inspection and Enforcement, from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  11. Licensing, supervision, retrofitting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinkemper, H.

    1991-01-01

    The following proposals for the amendment to the Atomic Energy Act are made: the term of provisions against damage and the content and scope of the principle of commensurability should be defined by law. Their concretization should be left to the level of the statutory instruments and technical codes. In usage the scope of application of the subsequent obligation should be approximated to the category of element relevant to licensing. Lability to indemnification for subsequent obligations should be abolished. The need for a backfitting licence in the case of 'substantial' alterations requires a closer definition. A legal obligation should be placed on operators of nuclear reactors to carry out periodical safety checks. (orig./HSCH) [de

  12. Licensed operating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartfield, R.A.

    1990-03-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly Licensed Operating Reactors Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Information Resources Management, from the Headquarters Staff of NRC's Office of Inspection and Enforcement, from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  13. Licensed operating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-08-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly LICENSED OPERATING REACTORS Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Information Resources Management, from the Headquarters Staff of NRC's Office of Inspection and Enforcement, from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  14. Decommissioning licensing procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perello, M.

    1979-01-01

    Decommissioning or closure of a nuclear power plant, defined as the fact that takes place from the moment that the plant stops producing for the purpose it was built, is causing preocupation. So this specialist meeting on Regulatory Review seems to be the right place for presenting and discusing the need of considering the decommissioning in the safety analysis report. The main goal of this paper related to the licensing procedure is to suggest the need of a new chapter in the Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (P.S.A.R.) dealing with the decommissioning of the nuclear power plant. Therefore, after a brief introduction the problem is exposed from the point of view of nuclear safety and finally a format of the new chapter is proposed. (author)

  15. Challenges of SMR licensing practices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soderholm, K., E-mail: kristiina.soderholm@fortum.com [Fortum Power, Espoo (Finland)

    2012-12-15

    This paper aims to increase the understanding of high level Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) licensing processes in Finland, France, the UK, Canada and the USA. These countries have been selected for this study because of their different licensing processes and recent actions in new NPP construction. After discussing their similarities and differences, suitable features for Small Modular Reactor licensing can be emphasized and suggested. Some of the studied licensing processes have elements that are already quite well suited for application to SMRs, but all of these different national processes can benefit from studying and implementing lessons learned from SMR specific licensing needs. The main SMR features to take into account in licensing are standardization of the design, modularity, mass production and serial construction. Modularity can be divided into two different categories: the first category is simply a single unit facility constructed of independently engineered modules (e.g., construction process for Westinghouse AP-1000 NPP) and the second is a facility structure composed of many reactor modules where modules are manufactured in factories and installed into the facility as needed (e.g., NuScale Power SMR design). Short construction schedules will not be fully benefited from if the long licensing process prolongs the commissioning and approach to full-power operation. The focus area of this study is to better understand the possibility of SMR deployment in small nuclear countries, such as Finland, which currently has four operating NPPs. The licensing process needs to be simple and clear to make SMR deployment feasible from an economical point of view. This paper uses public information and interviews with experts to establish the overview of the different licensing processes and their main steps. A high-level comparison of the licensing steps has been carried out. Certain aspects of the aviation industry licensing process have also been studied and certain

  16. Waste management and licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dauk, W.

    1980-01-01

    It is the Court's consideration of the repercussions the regulation on waste management of Sect. 9a of the Atomic Energy Law will have, relating to the licensing of a plant according to Sect. 7 (2) of the Atomic Energy Law which is noteworthy. Overruling its former legal conception, the Administrative Court Schleswig now assumes, together with the public opinion, that the problem of waste management being brought to a point only with the initial operation of a nuclear power station is accordingly to be taken into account in line with the discretion of licensing according to Sect. 7 (2) of the Atomic Energy Law. In addition, the Administrative Court expressed its opinion on the extent to the right of a neighbour to a nuclear power station to file suit. According to the Sections 114 and 42 (2) of the rules of Administrative Courts it is true that a plaintiff cannot take action to set aside the licence because public interests have not been taken into account sufficiently, but he may do so because his own interests have not been included in the discretionary decision. The Administrative Court is reserved when qualifying the regulation on waste management with regard to the intensity of legal control. The Court is not supposed to replace controversial issues of technology and natural sciences on the part of the executive and its experts by its own assessment. According to the proceedings, the judicial review refers to the finding as to whether decisions made by authorities are suited - according to the way in which they were made - to guarantee the safety standard prescribed in Subdivision 3 of Sect. 7 (2) of the Atomic Energy Law. (HSCH) [de

  17. IRIS Licensing Status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kling, Charles L.; Carelli, Mario D.

    2006-01-01

    The International Reactor Innovative and Secure (IRIS) nuclear power plant is well into the pre-application review process with the US NRC and has accomplished its first near term goal of obtaining US NRC feedback on the long term testing program. To date, the IRIS team has submitted to the US NRC a number of documents patterned after the Evaluation Model Development and Assessment Process (EMDAP) outlined in Regulatory Guide 1,203. They have covered a detailed description of IRIS, initial safety analysis results, PIRT development for limiting transients, scaling analysis and a description of the test program. The IRIS Safety-by-Desing TM intrinsically eliminates and/or significantly reduces the consequences of traditional LWR accidents. In addition, the fewer passive safety systems are similar in principle to those of the US NRC approved AP1000 design. For these reasons, the IRIS testing program only needs to include those features unique to the IRIS design. NRC feedback was that the planned test program appeared to be complete and could generate sufficient information to support a Design Certification (DC) submittal. The US NRC has also stated that a DC application must include complete information regarding the test program. On this basis the IRIS team has initiated an aggressive program to conduct IRIS testing to support a DC submittal by the end of 2008. Subsequent US NRC review should be expeditious because of the AP1000 precedent, allowing IRIS to obtain its Final Design Approval (FDA) in 2012; thereby, maintaining its goal of deployment in the 2015-2017 time frame. The next steps in the pre-application review process will be to provide the US NRC with a road map of the anticipated IRIS licensing process, a review of current licensing requirements showing that IRIS meets or exceeds all current criteria and information to support the long term goal of redefining the Emergency Planning Zone (EPZ)

  18. Planejamento da assistência de enfermagem: proposta de um software-protótipo Planificación del cuidado de enfermería: propuesta de un software-prototipo Nursing care planning: proposal for a software prototype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dircelene Jussara Sperandio

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available O propósito deste estudo foi descrever as etapas de desenvolvimento de um software-protótipo que possibilite aos enfermeiros, no âmbito hospitalar, atender ao planejamento da assistência de enfermagem, prescrição de enfermagem e a documentação de forma informatizada. A metodologia utilizada fundamentou-se no conceito do ciclo de vida de prototipação. Sedimentou-se em duas fases: a de definição e a de desenvolvimento. A fase de definiç��o iniciou-se com a etapa de planejamento, seguida pela definição e análise dos requisitos necessários para a construção e culminou com a produção da especificação de requisitos do software. A fase de desenvolvimento traduziu o conjunto de requisitos em um modelo informatizado, com 10 módulos, referentes ao processo de sistematização da assistência de enfermagem. A avaliação desse recurso inovador para a Sistematização da Assistência de Enfermagem nos diferentes estágios do seu processo será objeto de estudo posterior.El propósito de este estudio es desarrollar un software-prototipo para ayudar las enfermeras planear el cuidado de enfermería, hacer intervenciones y toda la documentación de una manera informatizada. La metodología se basa en el ciclo de vida de desarrollo del sistema, particularmente el concepto del prototipo, siguiendo dos fases: la definición y el desarrollo. La fase de la definición empezó con una etapa de planificación, seguido por la definición y el análisis de los requisitos para la construcción, y culminó con la especificación de los requisitos del software. La fase de desarrollo tradujo el grupo de requisitos en modelo informatizado, estructurado en 10 módulos, con respecto al proceso de alimentar el sistema del cuidado. El desempeño de este recurso innovador en las diferentes etapas del proceso de sistematización de la atención de enfermería será objeto de un estudio subsiguiente.This study aims to develop a software prototype to help

  19. Nurse's Aid And Housekeeping Mobile Robot For Use In The Nursing Home Workplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sines, John A.

    1987-01-01

    The large nursing home market has several natural characteristics which make it a good applications area for robotics. The environment is already robot accessible and the work functions require large quantities of low skilled services on a daily basis. In the near future, a commercial opportunity for the practical application of robots is emerging in the delivery of housekeeping services in the nursing home environment. The robot systems will assist in food tray delivery, material handling, and security, and will perform activities such as changing a resident's table side drinking water twice a day, and taking out the trash. The housekeeping work functions will generate cost savings of approximately 22,000 per year, at a cost of 6,000 per year. Technical system challenges center around the artificial intelligence required for the robot to map its own location within the facility, to find objects, and to avoid obstacles, and the development of an energy efficient mechanical lifting system. The long engineering and licensing cycles (7 to 12 years) required to bring this type of product to market make it difficult to raise capital for such a venture.

  20. Assessing the Effect of an Educational Intervention on Nurses' and Patient Care Assistants' Comprehension and Documentation of Functional Ability in Pediatric Patients with Sickle Cell Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernier, Katherine M; Strobel, Megan; Lucas, Ruth

    2018-04-13

    In 2014, the Youth Acute Pain Functional Ability Questionnaire (YAPFAQ) was developed to investigate patient's self-rated functional ability during times of acute pain in the inpatient clinical setting. Although it has great potential, the application of this tool has not been made a standard of care. The purpose of this multiple methods study was to determine if, through an educational intervention, hospital staff could consistently document the YAPFAQ in children with sickle cell disease (SCD) during a vaso-occlusive episode. Twenty-two staff members participated in an educational intervention and semi-structured group discussions. Pre/post surveys measured knowledge of the YAPFAQ before and after the intervention. Group discussions were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed for thematic clusters. Retrospective chart reviews of children with SCD were reviewed for YAPFAQ documentation frequency before and after the intervention. Staff knowledge of who completes the YAPFAQ increased after the intervention, (pcontinues to hold high potential for directing nursing care, but requires staff investment for clinical practice change. A seamless integration between nursing education and translation through EHR is recommended as technology continues to integrate into nursing practice. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Autonomia/mutualidade na assistência de enfermagem Autonomía/participación mutua en la asistencia de enfermería Autonomy/mutuality in nursing care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Lúcia Araújo Sadala

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Utilizando um estudo de caso como ilustração, a autora discute as possibilidades da participação ativa dos pacientes na assistência à saúde, visando estimulá-los ao autocuidado. A partir de considerações sobre as formas tradicionais e autoritárias da assistência à saúde nos quais os profissionais determinam os procedimentos e os pacientes aceitam passivamente o que lhes é determinado, o estudo discute as questões da dependência e independência da enfermeira e do cliente no processo saúde-doença, propondo uma inter-relação que mantenha a autonomia de um e de outro. No sentido de que ambos participem ativamente do processo de enfermagem. Tal postura entre a autonomia e a mutualidade é descrita como uma relação dialética entre duas pessoas que se percebem nas suas especificidades e potencialidades, tendo como objetivo comum desenvolver uma assistência de enfermagem que contempla os valores éticos e humanísticos.Teniendo como referenciales principales las consideraciones sobre las formas tradicionales y autoritarias en la asistencia a la salud, la autora discute las cuestiones de la dependencia e independencia de la enfermera y del enfermo en el proceso salud-enfermedad. Dentro de esto concepto se propone una relación de interdependencia en la cual se mantengan la autonomía de uno y de otro de forma que los dos tengan participación activa en el proceso de enfermería.Taking into consideration the traditional official health assistance forms, the present paper discusses questions related to dependence and independence of nurse and patient in the health/illness process. Under that perspective it proposes a relationship that preserves the autonomy of one and the other, so that both can participate in the process of nursing and self-care.

  2. Unlicensed Assistive Personnel: Their Role on the School Health Services Team. Position Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Kathleen C.; Disney, Jody; Andresen, Kathleen; Tuck, Christine; Porter, Jessica; Bobo, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that, where laws permit, unlicensed assistive personnel (UAP) can have valuable and necessary roles as assistants to school nurses. It is the professional responsibility of the registered professional school nurse (herein after referred to as school nurse) to identify UAP in…

  3. Free-lance nursing in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, E; Lindsay, J S

    1993-01-01

    In 1987 Registered Nurses Ernesta 'Tina' Galli and Joanne Lindsay embarked on a unique venture--a private agency* organized and run by nurses that engages free-lance nurses to fill the need for nursing assistance both at home and in public and private institutions. The response has been overwhelming. Today they have branches throughout Italy and have expanded their services to include research and primary health care. Below, their story.

  4. Final Report of Nursing Transition: A Process to Facilitate Career Mobility, July 1, 1980-June 30, 1981.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookdale Community Coll., Lincroft, NJ.

    A program was developed to facilitate the transition of Licensed Practical Nurses (LPNs) into a program to become registered nurses (RNs) and acquire an associate degree in allied health at Brookdale Community College (New Jersey). A committee of four nursing faculty compared the curriculum of an exemplary practical nursing program with…

  5. Determinants of the nurses’ and nursing assistants’ request for antipsychotics for people with dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janus, Sarah; van Manen, Jeanette Gabrielle; IJzerman, Maarten Joost; Bisseling, Marloes; Drossaert, Constance H.C.; Zuidema, Sytse U.

    2017-01-01

    Although physicians are responsible for writing the antipsychotic prescriptions for patients with dementia, the initiative is often taken by nurses or nursing assistants. To reduce antipsychotics uses, one needs to understand the reasons for nurses and nursing assistants to request them. This study

  6. Nursing, Nursing Education, and Anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggers, Thompson; And Others

    In response to the current crisis in the field of nursing, a study examined nursing students' perceived work-related stress and differences among associate degree, diploma, and baccalaureate nursing programs in their preparation of nursing students. The 171 subjects, representing the three different nursing programs, completed a questionnaire…

  7. 31 CFR 596.306 - License.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY TERRORISM LIST GOVERNMENTS SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 596.306 License. Except as otherwise specified, the term license means any license or...

  8. 31 CFR 596.305 - General license.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY TERRORISM LIST GOVERNMENTS SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 596.305 General license. The term general license means any license or authorization...

  9. Licensed operating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly LICENSED OPERATING REACTORS Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Information Resources Management, from the Headquarters Staff of NRC's Office of Inspection and Enforcement, from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. Since all of the data concerning operation of the units is provided by the utility operators less than two weeks after the end of the month, necessary corrections to published information are shown on the ERRATA page. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  10. VEHICLES LICENSED IN SWITZERLAND

    CERN Multimedia

    Service des Relations avec les Pays-Hôtes

    2000-01-01

    1.\tVehicle licensinga)\tTime limitsVehicles must have a Swiss registration document and Swiss number plates: -\tif the owner has been residing in Switzerland for more than one year without a break of more than three consecutive months and has been using it for more than one month on Swiss territory, or -\tif the vehicle itself has been on Swiss territory for more than one year without a break of more than three consecutive months. b)\tTechnical details Vehicles belonging to non-Swiss members of the personnel who hold a carte de légitimation issued by the Swiss Federal Department of Foreign Affairs (hereinafter referred to as 'DFAE') and who were not permanently resident in Switzerland before taking up their appointment may be licensed in Switzerland with virtually no restrictions provided that their owner produces: -\tthe vehicle registration document and number plates of the country in which the car was previously registered, or -\ta manufacturer's certi...

  11. Impact on future licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasedag, W.F.; Postma, A.K.

    1986-01-01

    The TMI-2 accident has had a dramatic impact on the assessment of severe accidents, particularly on accident source term assumptions. TMI not only demonstrated that regulatory interest in severe accidents is appropriate, but also illustrated our limited understanding of fission product behaviour under degraded core conditions. The resulting reassessment of accident source terms has resulted in a concerted, world-wide research effort, which has produced a new source term estimation methodology. In order to assess the potential impact of the application of this methodology on regulatory requirements, a comparison with the approach used in licensing analyses is necessary. Such a comparison performed for the TMI-2 accident sequence, shows that differences in assumptions concerning accident progression far outweigh the differences in the methodology per se. In particular, the degree of conservatism incorporated into assumptions concerning operator action and containment response has over-riding influence on source term estimates. A major contribution to the impact of the new source term methodology on regulatory requirements, therefore, is its capability to provide the improved level of understanding necessary for reassessment of regulatory assumptions in this area

  12. Licensed operating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-06-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly LICENSED OPERATING REACTORS Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Information Resources Management, from the Headquarters Staff of NRC's Office of Inspection and Enforcement, from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. Since all of the data concerning operation of the units are provided by the utility operators less than two weeks after the end of the month, necessary corrections to published information are shown on the ERRATA page. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  13. Department of Energy licensing strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frei, M.W.

    1984-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is authorized by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (Act) to site, design, construct, and operate mined geologic repositories for high-level radioactive wastes and is required to obtain licenses from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to achieve that mandate. To this end the DOE has developed a licensing approach which defines program strategies and which will facilitate and ease the licensing process. This paper will discuss the regulatory framework within which the repository program is conducted, the DOE licensing strategy, and the interactions between DOE and NRC in implementing the strategy. A licensing strategy is made necessary by the unique technical nature of the repository. Such a facility has never before been licensed; furthermore, the duration of isolation of waste demanded by the proposed EPA standard will require a degree of reliance on probabilistic performance assessment as proof of compliance that is a first of a kind for any industry. The licensing strategy is also made necessary by the complex interrelationships among the many involved governmental agencies and even within DOE itself, and because these relationships will change with time. Program activities which recognize these relationships are essential for implementing the Act. The guiding principle in this strategy is an overriding commitment to safeguarding public health and safety and to protecting the environment

  14. Excel-based scheduling for reallocation of nursing staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-19

    Outi Annelli Tuominen and colleagues write in Nursing Management about the use of an Excel-based scheduling system for reallocation of nursing staff, which was trialled on ward managers and assistant ward managers.

  15. Managing Licensing in a Market for Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arora, Ashish; Rønde, Thomas; Fosfuri, Andrea

    the technology makes licensing decisions—to centralized licensing. The business unit has superior information about licensing opportunities but may not have the appropriate incentives because its rewards depend upon product market performance. If licensing is decentralized, the business unit forgoes valuable...... licensing opportunities since the rewards for licensing are (optimally) weaker than those for product market profits. This distortion is stronger when production-based incentives are more powerful, making centralization more attractive. Growth of technology markets favors centralization and drives higher...

  16. FOSS License Selection and Code Management

    OpenAIRE

    Vescuso, Peter

    2011-01-01

    With nearly 2,000 free and open source software (FLOSS) licenses, software license proliferation¿ can be a major headache for software development organizations trying to speed development through software component reuse, as well as companies redistributing software packages as components of their products. Scope is one problem: from the Free Beer license to the GPL family of licenses to platform-specific licenses such as Apache and Eclipse, the number and variety of licenses make it difficu...

  17. A study examining senior nursing students' expectations of work and the workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saber, Deborah A; Anglade, Debbie; Schirle, Lori M

    2016-03-01

    This study explored traditional and accelerated Bachelor of Science nursing students' expectations of nursing work and the workforce. Role transition difficulty is blamed for much of the 15-60% newly licensed registered nurse turnover in their first 3 years of employment. This qualitative study consisted of 14 focus groups (n = 98) to determine Bachelor of Science nursing students' expectations of work as newly licensed registered nurses. Two overriding themes for accelerated and traditional students emerged: stressors and coping strategies. Students believe four stressors will affect their progression into the newly licensed registered nurse role and have developed coping strategies. This study suggests that students have experienced stressors in the clinical environment and anticipate them in the newly licensed registered nurse role. During transition, strategies such as 'fitting in' and 'staying safe' will be employed to ensure work success. Younger generations value a healthy work-life balance and a positive working environment. These nurses will not tolerate positions that do not align with their values. With the aging of citizens in the USA and the predicted nursing shortage, nursing management needs to employ strategies to retain newly licensed registered nurses. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Nursing communication in nursing care to mastectomized women: a grounded theory study La comunicación de la enfermera em la asistencia de enfermería a la mujer mastectomizada: um estudio de Grounded Theory A comunicação da enfermeira na assistência de enfermagem à mulher mastectomizada: um estudo de Grounded Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iliana Maria de Almeida Araújo

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The goal was to understand the nurse / patient communication process, emphasizing nursing care to mastectomized women. Symbolic Interactionism and Grounded Theory were used to interview eight nurses from a referral institution in cancer treatment, using the guiding question: how do nurses perceive their communication process with mastectomized women? Data analysis allowed for the creation of a central theory: the meaning of communication in nursing care to women, constituted by three distinct but inter-related phenomena: perceiving communication, the relationship nurse / mastectomized woman and rethinking the communication nurse / mastectomized woman. With a view to satisfactory communication, professionals need to get involved and believe that their presence is as important as the performance of technical procedures that relieve situations of stress.El objetivo fue comprender el proceso de comunicación enfermera/ paciente, con énfasis en la asistencia de enfermería a la mujer mastectomizada. Se utilizó el Interaccionismo Simbólico y la Grounded Theory, para entrevistar ocho enfermeras de una institución con reconocido prestigio en el tratamiento de cáncer, utilizándose la siguiente pregunta: ¿Cómo la enfermera percibe su proceso de comunicación con la mujer mastectomizada? El análisis de los datos permitió la creación de la teoría central: el significado de la comunicación en la atención de enfermería a la mujer; esta se constituye de tres fenómenos diferentes que se interrelacionan: percibiendo la comunicación, la relación enfermera/mujer mastectomizada y repensando la comunicación enfermera/mujer mastectomizada. Así, se comprende que, para que la comunicación se torne satisfactoria, la profesional precisa envolverse y creer que su presencia es tan importante como la realización de procedimientos técnicos y que disminuye situaciones de estrés.Objetivou-se, aqui, compreender o processo de comunicação enfermeira

  19. Regulatory guidance for license renewal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoma, John A.

    1991-01-01

    The proposed 10 CFR Part 54 rule proceduralizes the process for license renewal by identifying both the administrative and technical requirements for a renewal application. To amplify and support this regulation, written guidance has been provided in the form of a draft Regulatory Guide (DG 1009) and a draft Standard Review Plan for License Renewal (NUREG 1299). This guidance is scheduled to be finalized in 1992. Similar guidance will be provided for the proposed revisions to 10 CFR Part 51 concerning the environmental aspects of license renewal. (author)

  20. Suicide in Guyana: Nurses' Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Maureen; Groh, Carla; Gash, Jean

    Guyana, an English-speaking country on the north coast of South America, has the highest suicide rate in the world. Nurses are an integral part of the healthcare team working with patients experiencing psychological distress and are uniquely qualified to add to the discourse on factors contributing to the high suicide rate in Guyana. The purpose of this study was to explore the attitudes and experiences of nurses and nurse assistants in Guyana related to suicide. Nine registered nurses and nurse assistants who worked at a private hospital in Georgetown, Guyana, were recruited to participate in a focus group. The focus group lasted approximately 70 minutes and was recorded. The audio recordings were later transcribed word for word. Four themes emerged from the data: family issues as they relate to the high suicide rate, suicide attempts as a cry for help, lack of support, and coping mechanisms used by nurses when caring for victims of attempted suicide. Nurses are uniquely positioned to intervene with families in crisis, whether it be suicide, suicide attempts, or the underlying factors of family dysfunction, child maltreatment, poverty, or alcoholism. Establishing forensic nursing as a specialty in Guyana would validate this important role through education and certification of nurses.

  1. Commitment tracking in the licensing renewal process: A perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurican, Gregory M.; Breslauer, Stephen K.

    1991-01-01

    The NRC's proposed 10 CFR 54 defines 'Current licensing basis' as inclusive of all licensee commitments. During the last five years, the regulatory commitment tracking group (RCTG) has been developing guidance for member utilities to track such commitments. The RCTG guidance for commitment tracking assists utilities in developing a system to store and maintain commitments related to the CLB. But a majority believe it unlikely that any one commitment tracking system will capture all commitments contained in the proposed definition of a 'Current Licencing Basis'. For future renewal applications the NRC proposes that utilities must identify and compile all licensing basis commitments. In addition, utilities 'shall maintain...(them) in an auditable and retrievable form'. Some utilities are already compiling and tracking licensing basis commitments; others are not. (author)

  2. Development of Advanced Non-LOCA Analysis Methodology for Licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Chansu; Um, Kilsup; Choi, Jaedon

    2008-01-01

    KNF is developing a new design methodology on the Non-LOCA analysis for the licensing purpose. The code chosen is the best-estimate transient analysis code RETRAN and the OPR1000 is aimed as a target plant. For this purpose, KNF prepared a simple nodal scheme appropriate to the licensing analyses and developed the designer-friendly analysis tool ASSIST (Automatic Steady-State Initialization and Safety analysis Tool). To check the validity of the newly developed methodology, the single CEA withdrawal and the locked rotor accidents are analyzed by using a new methodology and are compared with current design results. Comparison results show a good agreement and it is concluded that the new design methodology can be applied to the licensing calculations for OPR1000 Non-LOCA

  3. Operator licensing examination standards for power reactors. Interim revision 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    These examination standards are intended to assist NRC examiners and facility licensees to better understand the processes associated with initial and requalification examinations. The standards also ensure the equitable and consistent administration of examinations for all applicants. These standards are for guidance purposes and are not a substitute for the operator licensing regulations (i.e., 10 CFR Part 55), and they are subject to revision or other changes in internal operator licensing policy. This interim revision permits facility licensees to prepare their initial operator licensing examinations on a voluntary basis pending an amendment to 10 CFR Part 55 that will require facility participation. The NRC intends to solicit comments on this revision during the rulemaking process and to issue a final Revision 8 in conjunction with the final rule

  4. Assessment of knowledge of nurses regarding bioethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Radha; Saini, Parvesh; Alagh, Preety

    2014-01-01

    Nurses involved in research, whether as a principal investigator, a study coordinator, clinical trials nurse, or as a staff nurse caring for patients who are research subjects have a responsibility to promote the ethical conduct of clinical research. Will a registered nurse be ever able to challenge and infact unearth the unscrupulous medical practices which make poor patients guinea pigs in pharmaceutical company-sponsored clinical trials? Keeping this in view an exploratory study was carried out to assess the knowledge of bioethics among MSc Nursing students studying in recognised Nursing Colleges of North India. 92 percent of MSc nursing students scored below average knowledge regarding bioethics even after studying ethics in MSc (N) 1st year and B.Sc. Nursing degree programme. This research study strongly recommends the Indian Nursing Council-the statutory licensing body of nurses in India to ensure strict compliance of all researches (at masters as well as bachelors level) in nursing education with all the principles and components of bioethics. Need of the hour is to include at least one clinical nurse in the Institutional Ethics Committee in every medical and research institution.

  5. Características de profesionales y auxiliares de enfermería del Huila. 2010 Características dos profissionais e auxiliares de enfermagem de Huila. 2010 Characteristics of Professionals and Nursing Assistants from Huila. 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolly Arias

    2012-07-01

    maioria são mulheres dos estratos sociais 1, 2 e 3 que moram desde há mais de dez anos em Huila. Os profissionais estão concentrados na capital do departamento e nos municípios mais habitados; 70 % é formado da Universidade Surcolombiana, 27 % tem estudos de pós-graduação e menos de 20 % tem alguma especialização no componente disciplinar. As auxiliares de enfermagem terminaram em escolas de Neiva, com uma caracterização laboral de perto de 60% dedicado à atenção curativa e menos de 35 % trabalhando em empresas sociais do Estado (ESE de primeiro nível. Trinta e três por cento dos profissionais são funcionários fixos e duas terceiras partes têm menos de cinco anos de vinculação com a empresa atual, 29,6 % dos auxiliares de enfermagem são funcionários fixos. Mais de 60 % dos profissionais ganham uma média de $1.600.000 e só 2,6 % recebe mais de $3.090.000; 73,4 % dos auxiliares ganham entre um e dois salários mínimos.Objective: Describe and analyze social-demographic and labor characteristics of nursing professionals and assistants who work in Huila. Methodology: Transversal descriptive study of a population of 308 nurses and 1025 nursing assistants distributed in the 37 municipalities of the department. Direct method and a self-managed questionnaire were used. The information was processed with Epi Info 6.04 D and Excel 2000. Results: Social and demographic characteristics: most of the population was women within class 1, 2 and 3 residing in Huila from over ten years. Professionals are concentrated in the capital of the department and in the most populated municipalities; 70 % graduated from the Universidad Surcolombiana, 27% has a master's degree and less than 20 % specialized in the disciplinary component. Nursing assistants ended up in schools of Neiva, work characteristics: about 60% works in healing assistance, less than 35 % work in first level Social State Companies (ESE. 33 % of professionals are part of the staff and two thirds have

  6. License plate recognition (phase B).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    License Plate Recognition (LPR) technology has been used for off-line automobile enforcement purposes. The technology has seen mixed success with correct reading rate as high as 60 to 80% depending on the specific application and environment. This li...

  7. Licensing and advanced fuel designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, S.L.; Novendstern, E.H.

    1991-01-01

    For the past 15 years, Westinghouse has been actively involved in the development and licensing of fuel designs that contain major advanced features. These designs include the optimized fuel assembly, The VANTAGE 5 fuel assembly, the VANTAGE 5H, and most recently the VANTAGE+ fuel assembly. Each of these designs was supported by extensive experimental data, safety evaluations, and design efforts and required intensive interaction with the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) during the review and approval process. This paper presents a description of the licensing approach and how it was utilized by the utilities to facilitate the licensing applications of the advanced fuel designs for their plants. The licensing approach described in this paper has been successfully applied to four major advanced fuel design changes ∼40 plant-specific applications, and >350 cycle-specific reloads in the past 15 years

  8. Concern about the Expanding Prescription Drug Epidemic: A Survey of Licensed Prescribers and Dispensers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, R Eric; Reed, Nia; Carnes, Neal; Kooreman, Harold E

    2016-01-01

    Prescription drug misuse and abuse has reached epidemic levels in the U.S., and stands as a leading cause of death. As the primary gatekeepers to the medications contributing to this epidemic, it is critical to understand the views of licensed health care professionals. In this study, we examine health care professionals' concern regarding prescription drug abuse in their communities and the impact their concern has had on their prescribing and dispensing practices. An online survey of licensed health care providers. Conducted in Indiana. This study was a state-wide evaluation of Indiana's prescription drug monitoring program. The questionnaire asked respondents how concerned they were about prescription drug abuse in their community. Variation in the level of concern was examined using ordinary least squares regression and information about the respondents' demographic background and clinical experience. In addition, we used logistic regression to examine whether concern was associated with changing prescribing and/or dispensing behavior. The majority of providers indicated they were "moderately" or "extremely concerned" about prescription drug abuse in their communities. The level of concern, however, varied significantly by profession, with pharmacists, physicians, nurse practitioners/physician assistants being more concerned than dentists. Additional analyses indicate that providers with higher levels of concern were those who also reported recently changing their prescribing and/or dispensing behavior. The voluntary nature and geographical focus of the study limits the generalizability of the findings. Concern about prescription drug abuse is generally high across the major health care professions; however, a significant minority of providers, particularly among dentists, expressed little or no concern about the epidemic. Increasing health care providers' general level of concern about prescription drug abuse may be an effective public health tool for

  9. Experiences of final year nursing students in their preparedness to become registered nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Carlson

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were: firstly, to explore and describe the experiences of final year nursing students relating to how they experience their preparedness to fulfil the role of professional nurse; secondly, to explore and describe the experiences of novice professional nurses in the role of professional nurse; finally, to generate a model which will assist the final year nursing student to become a professional nurse. A theory-generative, qualitative, explorative, descriptive and contextual research design was utilized to reach the objectives of the study. Results indicated that final year nursing students experience a lack of confidence to take on the responsibilities of professional nursing. The results are displayed in table form and discussed in the article. This abstract forms part of a bigger study that addresses the professional maturity of the novice professional nurse for the practice of nursing.

  10. A assistência preventiva do enfermeiro ao trabalhador de enfermagem La asistencia preventiva de la enfermera al trabajador de enfermería Nurse's preventive attendance to the nursing worker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lúcia de Almeida Campos

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available A temática do presente estudo surgiu da experiência que temos em nossa prática profissional, onde pudemos observar o absenteísmo dos profissionais de enfermagem decorrentes de doenças relacionadas ao trabalho, o que nos despertou o interesse em nos aprofundar no papel do enfermeiro nas ações preventivas relacionadas à saúde do trabalhador de enfermagem em sua trajetória profissional comparando-as com as Normas Regulamentadoras. As ações preventivas em saúde do trabalhador é uma busca constante, que necessita de mais investimento com o objetivo de melhorar as condições de trabalho, proporcionando um ambiente saudável.El tema del estudio presente resulta de la experiencia que nosotros tenemos en nuestra práctica profesional dónde nosotros podríamos observar el ausentismo de los profesionales relacionado com enfermedades, lo que se nos despertó el interés ahondándonos en el papel de la enfermera en las acciones preventivas relacionó a la salud del trabajador de enfermería en su camino profesional comparandolas con la Norma Regulatoria. Las acciones preventivas en la salud del trabajador son una búsqueda constant, que necesita más inversión con el objetivo de mejorar las condiciones de trabajo, mientras proporcionando una atmósfera saludable.The theme of the present study emerged from the experience that we have in our professional practice, where we could observe the absenteeism of nursing professionals related to diseases, what woke up us the interest in deepening in the nurse's paper in the preventive actions related to the nursing worker's health in his/her professional path comparing them with the Regulatory Norms. The preventive actions in the worker's health is a constant search, that needs more investment with the objective of improving the work conditions, providing a healthy atmosphere.

  11. 13 CFR 107.1590 - Special rules for companies licensed on or before March 31, 1993.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... undergo a quasi-reorganization in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. (3) If your... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Special rules for companies licensed on or before March 31, 1993. 107.1590 Section 107.1590 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL...

  12. Nurses' professional and personal values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassin, Michal

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure professional and personal values among nurses, and to identify the factors affecting these values. The participants were 323 Israeli nurses, who were asked about 36 personal values and 20 professional values. The three fundamental professional nursing values of human dignity, equality among patients, and prevention of suffering, were rated first. The top 10 rated values all concerned nurses' responsibility towards patients. Altruism and confidentiality were not highly rated, and health promotion and nursing research were rated among the last three professional values. For personal (instrumental) values, honesty, responsibility and intelligence were rated first, while ambition and imagination were rated 14th and 16th respectively out of 18. Significant differences (P personal and professional values rated as functions of culture, education, professional seniority, position and field of expertise. The results may assist in understanding the motives of nurses with different characteristics and help to promote their work according to professional ethical values.

  13. Licensing of nuclear reactor operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-09-01

    Recommendations are presented for the licensing of nuclear reactor operators in units licensed according to the legislation in effect. They apply to all physical persons designated by the Operating Organization of the nuclear reactor or reactors to execute any of the following functional activities: a) to manipulate the controls of a definite reactor b) to direct the authorized activities of the reactor operators licesed according to the present recommendations. (F.E.) [pt

  14. DOE Patents Available for Licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuber, C.

    1981-01-01

    DOE Patents Available for Licensing (DOE PAL) provides abstracting and indexing coverage of the DOE patent literature, including patent applications, that concerns any apsect of energy production, conservation, and utilization. The citations are arranged by subject category. DOE is prepared to grant exclusive or nonexclusive, revocable licenses under DOE-owned US patents and patent applications in accordance with the provisions of 10CFR781

  15. Exploring incentives for RNs to return to practice: a partial solution to the nursing shortage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langan, Joanne C; Tadych, Rita A; Kao, Chia-Chan

    2007-01-01

    Although many have suggested strategies to resolve the nursing shortage, few have considered inactive RNs. This pilot study investigated reasons why nurses leave the practice, the type of work environment and resources necessary to entice RNs to return to practice, and the specific skills required to assist RNs in feeling confident and competent to return to practice. Herzberg's Two-Factor Theory was used to study motivation and hygiene factors enticing RNs to practice. A screening questionnaire was sent to 1,004 randomly selected RNs in Missouri to determine who were licensed but not practicing. Fifty-two full questionnaires were mailed and 33 (63%) were returned. Quantitative data were analyzed using SPSS, whereas qualitative data were coded and analyzed using manifest content analysis. The lack of motivators such as recognition of one's work and achievements was one reason why RNs left the practice. The hygiene factors of money, improved working conditions, refresher courses, and health insurance would motivate RNs to return to practice. Those wishing to entice inactive nurses to practice will need to offer sign-on bonuses or make the hourly wages and benefits package very competitive. This study indicates that nurses value flexible working hours, part-time opportunities, consideration of family lives, and positive relationships with administrators.

  16. The USNCR license renewal process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuo, Pao-Tsin

    2002-01-01

    The US Congress promulgated a law in 1954, entitled 'Atomic Energy Act'. This Act states that operating licenses for commercial nuclear power plants are limited to a fixed term of 40 years, but they may be renewed for a period not to exceed 20 years. The terms were established mainly for economic considerations, not based on technical limitations. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) published the license renewal rule, Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 54 (10 CFR Part 54), in December, 1991. The rule has since been amended in May, 1995. The underlying principle of the rule is that the regulatory process is adequate for ensuring safety of operating plants. The regulatory process includes NRC's issuance of Orders, Bulletins, Generic Letters, and Information Notices, as well as a number of special inspections in addition to the continuous oversight and routine inspection activities performed by on-site inspectors. Because of this comprehensive regulatory process, compilation of the current license basis or re-verification of the current licensing basis is not considered necessary for a license renewal review. The USNRC also determined on the basis of the findings of its research programs that active structures and components are well maintained by the existing programs. Therefore, the focus of the license renewal review is on passive, long-lived structures and components and on time-limited ageing analyses. The time-limited ageing analyses are for those structures and components which were originally designed to a 40 year service life

  17. Dry spent fuel storage licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sturz, F.C.

    1995-01-01

    In the US, at-reactor-site dry spent fuel storage in independent spent fuel storage installations (ISFSI) has become the principal option for utilities needing storage capacity outside of the reactor spent fuel pools. Delays in the geologic repository operational date at or beyond 2010, and the increasing uncertainty of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) being able to site and license a Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) facility by 1998 make at-reactor-site dry storage of spent nuclear fuel increasingly desirable to utilities and DOE to meet the need for additional spent fuel storage capacity until disposal, in a repository, is available. The past year has been another busy year for dry spent fuel storage licensing. The licensing staff has been reviewing 7 applications and 12 amendment requests, as well as participating in inspection-related activities. The authors have licensed, on a site-specific basis, a variety of dry technologies (cask, module, and vault). By using certified designs, site-specific licensing is no longer required. Another new cask has been certified. They have received one new application for cask certification and two amendments to a certified cask design. As they stand on the brink of receiving multiple applications from DOE for the MPC, they are preparing to meet the needs of this national program. With the range of technical and licensing options available to utilities, the authors believe that utilities can meet their need for additional spent fuel storage capacity for essentially all reactor sites through the next decade

  18. A relevância do exame físico do idoso para a assistência de enfermagem hospitalar La relevancia del examen fisico del anciano para la asistencia de enfermería hospitalar The relevance of physical examination of the elderly patient in the nursing assistance hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Coutinho de Paula

    2005-09-01

    contemplado. La mayoría de los entrevistados (88% realiza el examen físico y se muestra motivada para efectuarlo, aunque lo hagan de manera incompleta. Conn Los datos obtenidos apuntan la necesidad de capacitación de los enfermeros que cuidan de los ancianos, considerando las particularidades de este examen y las necesidades de estos pacientes.BACKGROUND: In nursing practice, it has been noticed that those examinations are rarely done in a singular and systematic way. AIM: To verify the importance attributed by nurses to the physical examination in elderly, for hospital nursing assistance. METHOD: Twenty five nurses from the following wards were interviewed: Surgery, Gastroenterology, Cardiology and Pneumology, and Adult General ward I - II at the Clinical Hospital, Campinas State University. RESULTS: Only one of the informants had no information on physical examination during graduation and most of them had lack of information or no information at all on senescence and senility. Most informants (88% perform the physical examination and show motivation to execute it, though they do it in an incomplete way. FINAL CONSIDERATIONS: This results show the requirement of capacitation for nurses who treats the aged, considering that physical examination in elderly has its specificities.

  19. Nurses' Needs for Care Robots in Integrated Nursing Care Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jai-Yon; Song, Young Ae; Jung, Ji Young; Kim, Hyun Jeong; Kim, Bo Ram; Do, Hyun-Kyung; Lim, Jae-Young

    2018-05-13

    To determine the need for care robots among nurses and to suggest how robotic care should be prioritized in an integrated nursing care services. Korea is expected to be a super-aged society by 2030. To solve care issues with elderly inpatient caused by informal caregivers, the government introduced 'integrated nursing care services'; these are comprehensive care systems staffed by professionally trained nurses. To assist them, a care robot development project has been launched. The study applied a cross-sectional survey. In 2016, we conducted a multi-center survey involving 302 registered nurses in five hospitals including three tertiary and two secondary hospitals in Korea. The questionnaire consisted of general characteristics of nurses and their views on and extents of agreement about issues associated with robotic care. Trial center nurses and those with ≥10 years of experience reported positively on the prospects for robotic care. The top three desired primary roles for care robots were 'measuring/monitoring', 'mobility/activity' and 'safety care'. 'Reduction in workload', especially in terms of 'other nursing services' which were categorized as non-value-added nursing activities, was the most valued feature. The nurses approved of the aid by care robots but were concerned about device malfunction and interruption of rapport with patients. Care robots are expected to be effective in integrated nursing care services, particularly in 'measuring/monitoring'. Such robots should decrease nurses' workload and minimize non-value-added nursing activities efficiently. No matter how excellent care robots are, they must co-operate with and be controlled by nurses. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. Mobbing among care workers in nursing homes: A cross-sectional secondary analysis of the Swiss Nursing Homes Human Resources Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Myriam; Schwendimann, René; Zúñiga, Franziska

    2017-01-01

    As a category of bullying, mobbing is a form of violence in the workplace that damages the employing organization as well as the targeted employee. In Europe, the overall prevalence of mobbing in healthcare is estimated at 4%. However, few studies have explored mobbing among long-term care workers. This study aims to examine the frequency of mobbing in Swiss nursing homes and its relationships with care workers' (i.e. registered nurse, licensed practical nurse, assistant nurse, nurse aide) health status, job satisfaction, and intention to leave, and to explore the work environment as a contributing factor to mobbing. A cross-sectional, multi-center sub-study of the Swiss Nursing Homes Human Resource Project (SHURP). Nursing homes in Switzerland's three language regions. A total of 162 randomly selected nursing homes with 20 or more beds, including 5311 care workers with various educational levels. Controlling for facility and care worker characteristics, generalized estimation equations were used to assess the relationships between mobbing and care workers' health status, job satisfaction, and intention to leave as well as the association of work environment factors with mobbing. In Swiss nursing homes, 4.6% of surveyed care workers (n=242) reported mobbing experiences in the last 6 months. Compared to untargeted persons, those directly affected by mobbing had higher odds of health complaints (Odds Ratios (OR): 7.81, 95% CI 5.56-10.96) and intention to leave (OR: 5.12, 95% CI 3.81-6.88), and lower odds of high job satisfaction (OR: 0.19, 95% CI 0.14-0.26). Odds of mobbing occurrences increased with declining teamwork and safety climate (OR: 0.41, 95% CI 0.30-0.58), less supportive leadership (OR: 0.42, 95% CI 0.30-0.58), and higher perceived inadequacy of staffing resources (OR: 0.66, 95% CI 0.48-0.92). Mobbing experiences in Swiss nursing homes are relatively rare. Alongside teamwork and safety climate, risk factors are strongly associated with superiors

  1. Homophobia in Registered Nurses: Impact on LGB Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwell, Christopher W.; Kiehl, Ermalynn M.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined registered nurses' overall attitudes and homophobia towards gays and lesbians in the workplace. Homophobia scores, represented by the Attitudes Toward Lesbians and Gay Men (ATLG) Scale, was the dependent variable. Overall homophobia scores were assessed among a randomized stratified sample of registered nurses licensed in the…

  2. Nursing Distance Learning Course Comparison of Assignments and Examination Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundine, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Nursing programs have embraced distance learning in their curricula, but discussion is ongoing about course assignments and grading criteria to increase examination scores in nursing distance learning courses. Because course examinations are a predictor of success on the postgraduate licensing examination (NCLEX-RN), the purpose of this study was…

  3. Guide for the preparation of applications for licenses for the use of sealed sources in portable gauging devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this regulatory guide is to provide assistance to applicants and licensees in preparing applications for new licenses, license amendments, and license renewals for the use of sealed sources in portable gauging devices. An example of a portable gauging device is a moisture-density gauge that contains a gamma-emitting sealed source, cesium-137, and a sealed neutron source, americium-242-beryllium

  4. Assistência de Enfermagem na opinião das mulheres com pré-eclâmpsia Asistencia de Enfermería en la opinión de las mujeres con preeclampsia Nursing assistance in the opinion of women with pre-eclampsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla Joelma Bezerra Cunha

    2007-06-01

    técnicos, y cuanto a la insatisfacción, destacase la carencia de atención, apoyo y diálogo. La relación equipo de enfermería-paciente fué considerado impersonal y sin compromiso. No obstante, hay expectativas de mayor humanización en el equipo y el establecimiento de acciones dignas de confianza y motivación. Concluyese que la ayuda de enfermería debe ser más humana en la ayuda a las necesidades físicas, sociales y psicoemocionales de los clientes.Qualitative study whose object is the assistance of nursing in the optics of the women with pre-eclampsia. The objectives had been to describe the reasons of hospitalization and its expectations; and, to argue the assistance of nursing received in a public maternity of Teresina - Piaui (Brazil. The used methodology was a half-structuralized form which the technique of data collection was made through interview. The results had been presented in categories evidencing as reasons more common than had taken to the 12 women the internment: edema and chronic headache; the assistance of given nursing limited it the verification of the arterial pressure and medicine administration. How much to the satisfaction they had mentioned accomplishment to it of the procedures technician and the no satisfaction was distinguished for the lack of attention, support and dialogue. The relationship nursing team-patient was considered cold, impersonal and without commitment. However it has expectations of more humanization in the team and the establishment of trustworthy and motivation actions. It is concluded that the nursing assistance must be more human in the attendance to the physical, social and psycho emotions needs of the client.

  5. Relationships between Concept Mapping and Critical Thinking Skills of Vocational Nursing Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson-Davis, Shirley

    2012-01-01

    The task of developing vocational nursing students' critical thinking abilities is one of the greatest challenges facing nurse educators today. Licensed vocational nurses (LVNs) must be trained to think critically in order to provide safe patient care. Due to the expanded role and functions in the LVN's scope of practice, LVNs are making more…

  6. A training program to enhance recognition of depression in nursing homes, assisted living, and other long-term care settings: Description and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Robert C; Nathanson, Mark; Silver, Stephanie; Ramirez, Mildred; Toner, John A; Teresi, Jeanne A

    2017-01-01

    Low levels of symptom recognition by staff have been "gateway" barriers to the management of depression in long-term care. The study aims were to refine a depression training program for front-line staff in long-term care and provide evaluative knowledge outcome data. Three primary training modules provide an overview of depression symptoms; a review of causes and situational and environmental contributing factors; and communication strategies, medications, and clinical treatment strategies. McNemar's chi-square tests and paired t-tests were used to examine change in knowledge. Data were analyzed for up to 143 staff members, the majority from nursing. Significant changes (p depressive disorder.

  7. USNRC licensing process as related to nuclear criticality safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketzlach, N.

    1987-01-01

    The U.S. Code of Federal Regulations establishes procedures and criteria for the issuance of licenses to receive title to, own, acquire, deliver, receive, possess, use, and initially transfer special nuclear material; and establishes and provides for the terms and conditions upon which the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) will issue such licenses. Section 70.22 of the regulations, ''Contents of Applications'', requires that applications for licenses contain proposed procedures to avoid accidental conditions of criticality. These procedures are elements of a nuclear criticality safety program for operations with fissionable materials at fuels and materials facilities (i.e., fuel cycle facilities other than nuclear reactors) in which there exists a potential for criticality accidents. To assist the applicant in providing specific information needed for a nuclear criticality safety program in a license application, the NRC has issued regulatory guides. The NRC requirements for nuclear criticality safety include organizational, administrative, and technical requirements. For purely technical matters on nuclear criticality safety these guides endorse national standards. Others provide guidance on the standard format and content of license applications, guidance on evaluating radiological consequences of criticality accidents, or guidance for dealing with other radiation safety issues. (author)

  8. Considerations about the licensing process of special nuclear industrial facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talarico, M.A., E-mail: talaricomarco@hotmail.com [Marinha do Brasil, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao do Porgrama de Submarino com Propulsao Nuclear; Melo, P.F. Frutuoso e [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2015-07-01

    This paper brings a discussion about the challenges involved in the development of a new kind of nuclear facility in Brazil, a naval base for nuclear submarines, with attention to the licensing process and considerations about the risk-informed decision making application to the licensing process. Initially, a model of such a naval base, called in this work, special industrial facility, is proposed, with its systems and respective sets of basic requirements, in order to make it possible the accomplishment of the special industrial facility support function to the nuclear submarine. A discussion about current challenges to overcome in this project is presented: the challenges due to the new characteristics of this type of nuclear facility; existence of several interfaces between the special industrial facilities systems and nuclear submarine systems in design activities; lack of specific regulation in Brazil to allow the licensing process of special industrial facilities by the nuclear safety authority; and comments about the lack of information from reference nuclear facilities, as is the case with nuclear power reactors (for example, the German Grafenrheinfeld nuclear plant is the reference plant for the Brazilian Angra 2 nuclear plant). Finally, in view of these challenges, an analysis method of special industrial facility operational scenarios to assist the licensing process is proposed. Also, considerations about the application of risk-informed decision making to the special industrial facility activity and licensing process in Brazil are presented. (author)

  9. Considerations about the licensing process of special nuclear industrial facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talarico, M.A.; Melo, P.F. Frutuoso e

    2015-01-01

    This paper brings a discussion about the challenges involved in the development of a new kind of nuclear facility in Brazil, a naval base for nuclear submarines, with attention to the licensing process and considerations about the risk-informed decision making application to the licensing process. Initially, a model of such a naval base, called in this work, special industrial facility, is proposed, with its systems and respective sets of basic requirements, in order to make it possible the accomplishment of the special industrial facility support function to the nuclear submarine. A discussion about current challenges to overcome in this project is presented: the challenges due to the new characteristics of this type of nuclear facility; existence of several interfaces between the special industrial facilities systems and nuclear submarine systems in design activities; lack of specific regulation in Brazil to allow the licensing process of special industrial facilities by the nuclear safety authority; and comments about the lack of information from reference nuclear facilities, as is the case with nuclear power reactors (for example, the German Grafenrheinfeld nuclear plant is the reference plant for the Brazilian Angra 2 nuclear plant). Finally, in view of these challenges, an analysis method of special industrial facility operational scenarios to assist the licensing process is proposed. Also, considerations about the application of risk-informed decision making to the special industrial facility activity and licensing process in Brazil are presented. (author)

  10. American Nurses Association Position Statement on guidelines for commercial support of continuing nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    The attached guidelines on "Commercial Support of Continuing Nursing Education" have been developed by the American Nurses Association (ANA) to assist/guide nursing continuing educators who wish to utilize the resources of corporations to provide continuing education programs. These guidelines enable the provider to maintain a balance between the need for industry-supported dissemination of scientific information and promotional activities which meet the requirements of law, as well as professional standards of the American Nurses Association.

  11. To License or Not to License Remanufacturing Business?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zu-Jun Ma

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Many original equipment manufacturers (OEMs face the choice of whether to license an independent remanufacturer (IR to remanufacture their used products. In this paper, we develop closed-loop supply chain models with licensed and unlicensed remanufacturing operations to analyze the competition and cooperation between an OEM and an IR. The OEM sells new products and collects used products through trade-ins, while the IR intercepts the OEM’s cores to produce remanufactured products and sell them in the same market. We derive optimal decisions for each of the two types of firms in licensed and unlicensed remanufacturing scenarios and identify conditions under which the OEM and the IR would be most likely to cooperate with each other in implementing remanufacturing. The results show although it is beneficial for an OEM to license an IR to remanufacture its cores, it is not always necessary for an IR to accept OEM’s authorization. Moreover, we contrast the result for licensed remanufacturing scenario in the decentralized system with that in the centrally coordinated system to quantify potential inefficiency resulting from decentralization of decision making.

  12. 22 CFR 96.30 - State licensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Licensing and Corporate Governance § 96.30 State licensing. (a) The agency or person is properly licensed or... person follows applicable State licensing and regulatory requirements in all jurisdictions in which it provides adoption services. (c) If it provides adoption services in a State in which it is not itself...

  13. Motivational Factors of Student Nurse Athletes Attributing to Academic Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forst, Kimberly A

    Student nurse athletes experience difficulties achieving academic success in nursing programs. The purpose of this study was to identify facilitators, barriers, and motivators of student nurse athletes that attribute to their academic success. Athletes ranked time management and prioritization as critical skills to success in the nursing program. This study reinforced the importance of academic support services for student nurse athletes to assist in their academic success.

  14. Percepções de enfermeiras sobre a assistência prestada a mulheres diante do óbito fetal Percepciones de enfermeros acerca de la atención a la mujeres delante de la muerte del feto Nurses' perception on the assistance provided to women facing fetal death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila da Silva Santos

    2012-06-01

    los recursos humanos, las cuestiones estructurales de los servicios de salud.This study aimed to assess the nurses' perception on the nursing care provided to women facing the diagnosis of fetal death. Research with qualitative approach carried out in a maternity school in Fortaleza-CE , Brazil, from September to October 2009. The sample was composed of nine nurses who worked in the service of high-risk pregnancy.The results showed that the focus of assistance offered was the provision of psychological support, through the permission given to women or family members to see the dead fetus. The difficulties most frequently mentioned were associated with the structural issue of motherhood that did not have a specific ward for mothers with a diagnosis of fetal death. They also mentioned the heavy workload, once they had functions that were not part of the procedures of praxis. Thus, we emphasize the need for a different assistance to women facing fetal death covering, in addition to human resources, structural issues of health services.

  15. Assistência de enfermagem às famílias de indivíduos que tentaram suicídio Asistencia de enfermería a la familia durante la atención de un miembro que intentó suicidio Nursing assistance to a family of a member who attempted suicide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Aparecida Buriola

    2011-12-01

    pueden subsidiar la actuación de los enfermeros con vistas a una asistencia que considere la persona y la familia de manera holística.This qualitative study aimed to identify nursing care offered to families of individuals who attempted suicide. Data was collected in May and June 2008, from 21 active nurses in Emergency Care Units, of three cities in the South of Brazil, through a semi-structured interview. From the analysis two categories emerged: "The professional practice and care to the individual's family attempt suicide " and "Emotions that emerge in the life of a professional", which reveal that the families are usually sought for information on the case, but they rarely constitute focus of the assistance. Professionals appear to be unhappy with this situation. However, perceive themselves limited, although they believe that more attention would institute effective measures to a humanized care. These results can subsidize the performance of nurses with views to an assistance that considers the person and the family in a holistic manner.

  16. A percepção das enfermeiras sobre a competência social no desenvolvimento da assistência pré-natal La percepción de las enfermeras sobre la competencia social en el desarrollo de la asistencia prenatal Nurses' perception of social competence when delivering pre-natal assistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yara Macambira Santana Lima

    2008-12-01

    , comprendiendo la necesidad de la busca de una consciencia crítica de la realidad y el interés de superar las dificultades en los servicios de salud pública. No es suficiente solamente tener un bueno desempeño profesional, es fundamental el apoyo institucional para promover el crecimiento personal.This study, an extract from a dissertation in progress, aims to analyze a social competence of the nurses when delivering pre-natal assistance. Forty-two nurses, engaged in the Politics National Women's Health Care, carried out at the Municipal Health Care Centers in Belem, Pará, have taken part in the project. This is a qualitative research based on Claus Moller's quality standards (1992 which describes the human aspect of personal quality. Data has been collected through questionnaires completed under the researcher's supervision. The ethical issues raised were in compliance with the National Health Board Resolution number 196/96. As a result of the data analysis, the category of social competence emerged. According to the subjects interviewed , it comprises the nurses' professional commitment to the pregnant women they assist; their need to have a more critical attitude towards reality and their willingness to overcome the difficulties inherent in the public health services. This reseach shows that not only good professional performance, but also institutional support are essential to ensure personal development.

  17. Qualidade na assistência de enfermagem hospitalar: visão de alunos de graduação Calidad en la atención de enfermería hospitalaria: visión de alumnos de pregrado Quality in hospital nursing care: the view of undergraduate nursing students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Silvia Gabriel

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Estudo com abordagem qualitativa, desenvolvido em universidade pública do interior do Estado de São Paulo com o objetivo de identificar o conceito de qualidade na assistência de enfermagem hospitalar na perspectiva de alunos do último ano do curso de Bacharelado em Enfermagem. Foram realizadas entrevistas semi-estruturadas com 24 alunos, sendo as falas analisadas segundo o referencial de Bardin. Os núcleos de sentido das falas foram divididos em seis categorias: holismo, humanização, equipe capacitada técnica e cientificamente, promoção do autocuidado, gerenciamento adequado das unidades e respeito aos princípios de segurança na assistência. Os resultados nos permitiram concluir que a visão dos alunos acerca do tema é ampla, sendo necessário, no entanto, incorporar pontos importantes ao conceito de qualidade na assistência de enfermagem, tais como valorização do trabalho em equipe, sistematização da assistência e questões relacionadas à satisfação dos diversos atores envolvidos na assistência em saúde no ambiente hospitalar.Estudio cualitativo desarrollado en una universidad pública en el Estado de Sao Paulo, Brasil, con el objetivo de identificar el concepto de calidad en la atención de enfermería hospitalaria en la perspectiva de estudiantes del último año del curso de bachillerato en enfermería. Para la recolección de los datos, fueron realizadas entrevistas semi-estructuradas con 24 alumnos y las declaraciones fueron analizadas según el referencial de Bardin. Las ideas principales se dividían en seis categorías: holismo, humanización, equipo capacitado técnica y científicamente, promoción del auto cuidado, gerenciamiento adecuado de las unidades y respecto a los principios de seguridad en la atención. La visión de los alumnos acerca del tema es amplia pero aún es necesario que identifiquen temas importantes como la valoración del trabajo en equipo, sistematización de la atención y la satisfacci

  18. Sistematização da assistência de enfermagem na perspectiva dos enfermeiros: uma abordagem metodológica na teoria fundamentada Sistematización de la asistencia enfermería en vista de las enfermeras: un enfoque metodológico de la teoría fundamentada Nursing care systematization according to the nurses' view: a methodological approach based on grounded theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lúcia de Medeiros

    2012-09-01

    enfermería en obstetricia. Se concluye que las enfermeras perciben el SAE como instrumento de articulación teórico-práctico que conduce a la asistencia personalizada.This study was aimed at understanding, from the nurses' perspective, the experience of going through the Systematization of Nursing Care (SNC in an obstetric service unit. We used grounded theory as the theoretical and methodological framework. The subjects of this study consisted of thirteen nurses from a public hospital in the city of João Pessoa, in the state of Paraíba. The data analysis resulted in the following phenomenon: "perceiving SNC as a working method that organizes, directs and improves the quality of care by bringing visibility and providing security for the nursing staff." The nurses expressed the extent of knowledge about the SNC experienced in obstetrics as wellas considered the nursing process as a decision-making process, which guides the reasoning of nurses in the planning of nursing care in obstetrics. It was concluded that nurses perceive the SNC as an instrument of theoretical-practical articulation leading to personalized assistance.

  19. Evaluation of Terminated Nuclear Material Licenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, K.M.; Zeighami, E.A.

    1999-01-01

    This report presents the results of a six-year project that reviewed material licenses that had been terminated during the period from inception of licensing until approximately late-1994. The material licenses covered in the review project were Part 30, byproduct material licenses; Part 40, source material licenses; and Part 70, special nuclear material licenses. This report describes the methodology developed for the project, summarizes the findings of the license file inventory process, and describes the findings of the reviews or evaluations of the license files. The evaluation identified nuclear material use sites that need review of the licensing material or more direct follow-up of some type. The review process also identified licenses authorized to possess sealed sources for which there was incomplete or missing documentation of the fate of the sources

  20. Medication administration errors in assisted living: scope, characteristics, and the importance of staff training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Sheryl; Love, Karen; Sloane, Philip D; Cohen, Lauren W; Reed, David; Carder, Paula C

    2011-06-01

    To compare rates of medication errors committed by assisted living staff with different training and to examine characteristics of errors. Observation of medication preparation and passes, chart review, interviews, and questionnaires. Stratified random sample of 11 assisted living communities in South Carolina (which permits nonnurses to administer medications) and Tennessee (which does not). All staff who prepared or passed medications: nurses (one registered nurse and six licensed practical nurses (LPNs)); medication aides (n=10); and others (n=19), including those with more and less training. Rates of errors related to medication, dose and form, preparation, route, and timing. Medication preparation and administration were observed for 4,957 administrations during 83 passes for 301 residents. The error rate was 42% (20% when omitting timing errors). Of all administrations, 7% were errors with moderate or high potential for harm. The odds of such an error by a medication aide were no more likely than by a LPN, but the odds of one by staff with less training was more than two times as great (odds ratio=2.10, 95% confidence interval=1.27-3.49). A review of state regulations found that 20 states restrict nonnurses to assisting with self-administration of medications. Medication aides do not commit more errors than LPNs, but other nonnurses who administered a significant number of medications and assisted with self-administration committed more errors. Consequently, all staff who handle medications should be trained to the level of a medication aide. © 2011, Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2011, The American Geriatrics Society.

  1. Factors contributing to nursing task incompletion as perceived by nurses working in Kuwait general hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Kandari, Fatimah; Thomas, Deepa

    2009-12-01

    Unfinished care has a strong relationship with quality of nursing care. Most issues related to tasks incompletion arise from staffing and workload. This study was conducted to assess the workload of nurses, the nursing activities (tasks) nurses commonly performed on medical and surgical wards, elements of nursing care activities left incomplete by nurses during a shift, factors contributing to task incompletion and the relationship between staffing, demographic variables and task incompletion. Exploratory survey using a self-administered questionnaire developed from IHOC survey, USA. All full time registered nurses working on the general medical and surgical wards of five government general hospitals in Kuwait. Research assistants distributed and collected back the questionnaires. Four working days were given to participants to complete and return the questionnaires. A total of 820 questionnaires were distributed and 95% were returned. Descriptive and inferential analysis using SPSS-11. The five most frequently performed nursing activities were: administration of medications, assessing patient condition, preparing/updating nursing care plans, close patient monitoring and client health teaching. The most common nursing activities nurses were unable to complete were: comfort talk with patient and family, adequate documentation of nursing care, oral hygiene, routine catheter care and starting or changing IV fluid on time. Tasks were more complete when the nurse-patient load was less than 5. Nurses' age and educational background influenced task completion while nurses' gender had no influence on it. Increased patient loads, resulting in increased frequency of nursing tasks and non-nursing tasks, were positively correlated to incompletion of nursing activities during the shift. Emphasis should be given to maintaining the optimum nurse-patient load and decreasing the non-nursing workload of nurses to enhance the quality of nursing care.

  2. Licensing reform in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The licensing process for nuclear power plants in the USA is currently in two distinct stages: the issuance of a construction permit followed later by the issuance of an operation license. The ''two-step'' process has come under heavy criticism from the U.S. nuclear industry on the grounds that it causes uncertainty and delays and therefore inhibits new commitments to nuclear power plants. In 1989 the NRC published new regulations for the licensing of nuclear power plants which provide for the issuance of early site permits, safety certifications of standard designs, and combined construction permits and operating licences. The new rule was challenged by intervenors representing antinuclear groups who filed a legal challenge seeking to have the rule set aside on the grounds that it violates the Atomic Energy Act which they allege makes two-step licensing mandatory. In November 1990 the US Court of Appeals upheld the NRC's authority to issue combined licenses. An appeal for a rehearing has been filed. The paper analyses the events and the possible consequences of an adverse court decision. It reviews the options open to the NRC and industry if the court decision is upheld. The possibility of congressional action to amend the Atomic Energy Act is discussed. (author)

  3. The level of knowledge and radiation safety practice amongst cardiovascular technology, medical assistant, nursing and diagnostic radiography students and dose monitoring in radiography laboratory of Kolej Islam Sains dan Teknologi, Kelantan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ainul Fadhlin Othman; Amran Abdul Majid

    2013-01-01

    Full-text: This study investigated the knowledge level and practices regarding radiation safety among the cardiovascular technology, medical assistant nursing and radiography diagnostic students of Kolej Islam Sains dan Teknologi (KIST). The objectives of this study are to monitor the dose rate at radiography lab and to propose the guideline on radiation safety topics to improve the syllabus. 274 respondents including 30 psychology students acting as the control group were asked to answer questions from the questionnaires which cover the topics of basic knowledge of radiation and radiation safety practice. There was a significant difference (p < 0.05) between the correct answers and courses for 18 questions except for the question 4. There was a significant different (p < 0.05) between the correct answers and year of study for the questions 4, 5, 7, 12 to 15 and 18 to 20. There was a significance different (p < 0.05) between the correct answers and gender for questions 7, 11 and 19. For area dose monitoring in the radiography diagnostic lab, the assessment report on film batches of 4 walls in the lab were recorded and Victoreen451-RYR survey meter was used to monitor the dose rate for 7 selected areas with the exposure factors set for the chest, abdomen, upper extremity, lower extremity and skull radiography examinations. The dose rates at area 1 to 4, area 5 during the examination of chest, abdomen and skull, area 6 during the examination of abdomen and area 7 during the examination of abdomen, had exceeded the dose limit for radiation worker. The dose rate at the area 1 and 4 are slightly higher than the other areas. The contributing factors are the distance, tube potential, collimation and X-ray tube angulation. This study had shown that the cardiovascular technology and diagnostic radiography students have better knowledge and radiation safety practice level than the medical assistant and nursing students. In general, the level of knowledge and radiation safety

  4. [Centennial retrospective on the evolution and development of the nursing profession in Taiwan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kwua-Yun; Chang, Shu-Rong

    2014-08-01

    This article explores the evolution and development of the Taiwanese nursing profession. After introducing the origins of nursing, this article proceeds to introduce nursing during various periods in Taiwan, including the early-Qing Dynasty, foreign missionary nursing, the Japanese Colonial Era, and the Nationalist Chinese Era following World War Two up to the present. The authors then present the current situation in the Taiwanese nursing profession in terms of gender issues, high-technology developments, educational issues, the nursing licensing examination, hiring and training, multiple role functions, and the skill-mix care model. Finally, the authors make recommendations for the further development and improvement of the nursing profession in Taiwan.

  5. Certified Nursing Assistants’ Explanatory Models of Nursing Home Resident Depression

    OpenAIRE

    Piven, Mary Lynn; Anderson, Ruth A.; Colón-Emeric, Cathleen S.; Sandelowski, Margarete

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we explored how Certified Nursing Assistants (CNAs) understood resident depression. Interviews with 18 CNAs, working in two nursing homes were guided by Kleinman’s Explanatory Models of Illness framework. Interview data were content analyzed and CNAs’ descriptions of depression were compared to the MDS 2.0 Mood Screen and to DSM-IV-TR Depression Criteria. CNAs identified causes, signs, and symptoms of depression, but they were unsure about the duration and normalcy of depressio...

  6. The district nursing service: a national treasure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldman, Crystal

    2014-08-01

    District nurses are a national treasure. They are the key professionals who will enable the agenda of patients being cared for at home to be realised. They are highly trusted and valued by communities who lead and manage teams of nurses and nursing assistants expertly to deliver high-quality care in the patient's own home. In an era where the focus is now turning to the community for more care, more actions are required to increase our district nursing workforce. This article discusses the above issues in relation to recent reports on the current status of community nursing.

  7. School Nurse Perceptions of Student Anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muggeo, Michela A; Ginsburg, Golda S

    2018-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are common in youth. Because somatic complaints are a hallmark feature of anxiety, these students frequently visit their school nurse, creating an ideal opportunity for nurses to identify and assist them. In an effort to better understand current practices, we surveyed a large sample ( N = 93) of school nurses. Results indicated that the majority of nurses perceived anxiety as the most prevalent mental health issue in their students. Moreover, the majority of nurses reported that they did not use any formal screening tool or intervention protocol and stated wanting to expand their training in anxiety intervention. These data suggest that school nurses identify anxiety as a top problem but do not receive adequate training to address it. Data from this survey may be used to plan how best to fill gaps in nurse training and practices that can enhance nurses' capacity to optimize outcomes for anxious students.

  8. Nurses who work outside nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffield, Christine; Pallas, Linda O'Brien; Aitken, Leanne M

    2004-09-01

    The desire to care for people, a family history of professional health care work, and security in career choice are documented reasons for entering nursing. Reasons for leaving include workload, unsafe work environments and harassment. The relationship between these factors and the time nurses spend in the profession has not been explored. This paper reports a study with people who have left nursing, to investigate why they became a nurse, how long they stayed in nursing, and their reasons for leaving. A questionnaire was mailed to Registered Nurses currently working outside nursing, seeking respondents' reasons for entering and leaving nursing, and perceptions of the skills gained from nursing and the ease of adjustment to working in a non-nursing environment. Data analysis included descriptive statistics, exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis, correlational analysis and linear and multiple regression analysis. A model incorporating the factors 'altruistic reasons', 'default choice' and 'stepping stone' explained 36.2% of the variance in reasons for becoming a nurse. A model incorporating the factors 'legal and employer', 'external values and beliefs about nursing', 'professional practice', 'work life/home life' and 'contract requirements' explained 55.4% of the variance in reasons for leaving nursing. Forty-eight per cent of the variance in tenure in nursing practice was explained through personal characteristics of nurses (36%), reasons for becoming a nurse (7%) and reasons for leaving (6%). The reasons why nurses entered or left the profession were varied and complex. While personal characteristics accounted for a large component of tenure in nursing, those managing the nursing workforce should consider professional practice issues and the balance between work life and home life.

  9. Diversity and education of the nursing workforce 2006-2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovner, Christine T; Djukic, Maja; Jun, Jin; Fletcher, Jason; Fatehi, Farida K; Brewer, Carol S

    The Institute of Medicine (IOM) report, The Future of Nursing, included recommendations to increase nurse diversity, the percent of nurses obtaining a bachelor's degree, and inter-professional education. The purpose of this paper is to report the progress toward achievement of these recommendations. We used a longitudinal, multi-state data from four cohorts of nurses newly licensed in 2004 to 2005, 2007 to 2008, 2010 to 2011, and 2014 to 2015 to examine and compare the trends. The percentage of males who became licensed increased, from 8.8% in 2004 to 2005 cohort to 13.6% in the 2014 to 2015 cohort. The percentage of white-non-Hispanic nurses who were licensed decreased from 78.9% in 2007 to 2008 to 73.8% in 2014 to 2015. These differences primarily reflect an increase in white-Hispanic nurses. More nurses are obtaining a bachelor's degree as their first professional degree, from 36.6% in 2004 to 2005 cohort to 48.5% in 2014 to 2015 cohort. About 40% of the 2014 to 2015 cohort reported that they learned to work in inter-professional teams. Collegial nurse-physician relations had an upward positive trajectory over time increasing almost 7%. The diversity and education of new nurses have increased, but are short of meeting the IOM recommendations. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. NRC licensing requirements: DOD options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pike, W.J.; O'Reilly, P.D.

    1982-09-01

    This report describes the licensing process (both safety and environmental) that would apply if the Department of Defense (DOD) chooses to obtain licenses from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for using nuclear energy for power and luminous sources. The specific nuclear energy sources being considered include: small or medium-size nuclear power reactors; radioisotopic thermoelectric generators with 90 Sr or 238 Pu; radioisotopic dynamic electric generators with 90 Sr or 238 Pu; and applications of radioisotopes for luminous sources (lights) with 3 H, 85 Kr, or 147 Pm. The steps of the licensing process are summarized in the following sections, with particular attention given to the schedule and level of effort necessary to support the process

  11. Nuclear power plant operator licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The guide applies to the nuclear power plant operator licensing procedure referred to the section 128 of the Finnish Nuclear Energy Degree. The licensing procedure applies to shift supervisors and those operators of the shift teams of nuclear power plant units who manipulate the controls of nuclear power plants systems in the main control room. The qualification requirements presented in the guide also apply to nuclear safety engineers who work in the main control room and provide support to the shift supervisors, operation engineers who are the immediate superiors of shift supervisors, heads of the operational planning units and simulator instructors. The operator licensing procedure for other nuclear facilities are decided case by case. The requirements for the basic education, work experience and the initial, refresher and complementary training of nuclear power plant operating personnel are presented in the YVL guide 1.7. (2 refs.)

  12. Licensing of simple digital devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, T. W.

    2008-01-01

    The inability to guarantee error-free software gave rise to the potential for common-cause failure of digital safety systems in nuclear power plants. To address this vulnerability, the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) required a quality software development process and a defense-in-depth and diversity analysis for digital safety systems. As a result of recent interim [NRC] staff guidance in the digital instrumentation and control (I and C) area, licensing of simple digital devices decreases some regulatory burden with respect to demonstrating a quality software development process and defense-in-depth and diversity analysis. This paper defines simple digital devices and addresses the interim staff guidance that applies to such devices. The paper also highlights the technical aspects that affect the licensing of such devices and incorporates licensing experience in the U.S. to date. (authors)

  13. Nurses' Perceptions of the Electronic Health Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawley, Rocquel Devonne

    2013-01-01

    The implementation of electronic health records (EHR) by health care organizations has been limited. Despite the broad consensus on the potential benefits of EHRs, health care organizations have been slow to adopt the technology. The purpose of this qualitative phenomenological study was to explore licensed practical and registered nurses'…

  14. A vivência de alunos de graduação em enfermagem na assistência à saúde da mulher em uma comunidade de baixa renda: uma abordagem fenomenológica The background got on assistance to woman health in a low income community by undergraduate students of nursing: A phenomenological approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Aparecida Barbosa Merighi

    1998-08-01

    Full Text Available Neste estudo nossa trajetória dirigiu-se para a compreensão da experiência vivida pelos alunos do Curso de Graduação em Enfermagem, da EEUSP, na assistência à mulher em uma comunidade de baixa renda da cidade de São Paulo. Obtivemos descrições dos alunos e os dados foram analisados seguindo os passos da fenomenologia. Identificamos cinco temas: experiência gratificante, estimulante e valiosa; experiência de vida, de crescimento pessoal e de quebra de preconceito; atividade que permite conhecer o outro lado da assistência; atividade prática que possibilita sedimentação do conhecimento adquirido teoricamente; experiência importante e necessária. A experiência vivenciada pelos alunos mostrou-se satisfatória favorecendo o processo de ensino-aprendizagem.Our trajectory in this study has addressed to the comprehension of experience which undergraduate students in the Nursing School of USP. This work has been developed in a low incomme community of São Paulo city. We've got descriptions of the students and the data were discussed following the steps of phenomenological assay. We've identified five themes: rewarding experience, stimulant and necessary; experience of life, personal growth and disrupting with prejudice; activity which permits to know the other side of assistance; important and valuable experience; practice activity which makes possible the acquired know edge sedimentation theoretically. The graduation students experience was satisfactory and it was favorable to the teaching-learning process.

  15. Report of the Task Force on bonding and perpetual care of nuclear licensed activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snellings, D.D. Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The primary concern was to consider the bonding and perpetual care requirements of state-licensed shallow land burial sites used for the disposal of radioactive wastes. The specific charge of the task force was to examine in detail the requirements for establishing bonding and perpetual care programs for all types of licensed nuclear activities and to report the findings of the task force as guidance to assist states in program development. Goals and recommendations of the task force are discussed

  16. Overview of Robotic Devices for Nursing Care Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirukawa, Hirohisa

    2017-01-01

    METI/AMED are conducting a project on the development and deployment of robotic devices for nursing care to enhance the autonomy of elderly persons and assist care givers. An evaluation protocol is presented and the devices developed in the project are introduced. The devices consist of transfer assist devices (wearable/non-wearable), walking assist devices (outdoor/indoor), safety surveillance sensors (nursing home/private home), bath lift and toilet assist.

  17. Putting Safety in the Frame: Nurses' Sensemaking at Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keeffe, Valerie Jean; Thompson, Kirrilly Rebecca; Tuckey, Michelle Rae; Blewett, Verna Lesley

    2015-01-01

    Current patient safety policy focuses nursing on patient care goals, often overriding nurses' safety. Without understanding how nurses construct work health and safety (WHS), patient and nurse safety cannot be reconciled. Using ethnography, we examine social contexts of safety, studying 72 nurses across five Australian hospitals making decisions during patient encounters. In enacting safe practice, nurses used "frames" built from their contextual experiences to guide their behavior. Frames are produced by nurses, and they structure how nurses make sense of their work. Using thematic analysis, we identify four frames that inform nurses' decisions about WHS: (a) communicating builds knowledge, (b) experiencing situations guides decisions, (c) adapting procedures streamlines work, and (d) team working promotes safe working. Nurses' frames question current policy and practice by challenging how nurses' safety is positioned relative to patient safety. Recognizing these frames can assist the design and implementation of effective WHS management.

  18. Social media use in nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Terri L; Sims-Giddens, Susan S; Booth, Richard G

    2012-09-30

    As technological advances continue to expand connectivity and communication, the number of patients and nurses engaging in social media increases. Nurses play a significant role in identification, interpretation, and transmission of knowledge and information within healthcare. Social media is a platform that can assist nursing faculty in helping students to gain greater understanding of and/or skills in professional communication; health policy; patient privacy and ethics; and writing competencies. Although there are barriers to integration of social media within nursing education, there are quality resources available to assist faculty to integrate social media as a viable pedagogical method. This article discusses the background and significance of social media tools as pedagogy, and provides a brief review of literature. To assist nurse educators who may be using or considering social media tools, the article offers selected examples of sound and pedagogically functional use in course and program applications; consideration of privacy concerns and advantages and disadvantages; and tips for success.

  19. Distinguishing the Clinical Nurse Specialist From Other Graduate Nursing Roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Lynn D; Coke, Lola A

    Today's healthcare environment poses diverse and complex patient care challenges and requires a highly qualified and experienced nursing workforce. To mitigate these challenges are graduate nursing roles, each with a different set of competencies and expertise. With the availability of many different graduate nursing roles, both patients and healthcare professionals can be confused in understanding the benefit of each role. To gain the maximum benefit from each role, it is important that healthcare providers and administrators are able to distinguish the uniqueness of each role to best use the role and develop strategies for effective collaboration and interprofessional interaction. The purpose of this article was to define the role, educational preparation, role differences, and practice competencies for the clinical nurse specialist (CNS), nurse practitioner, clinical nurse leader, and nurse educator/staff development educator roles. A second purpose was to provide role clarity and demonstrate the unique value the CNS brings to the healthcare environment. Using evidence and reviewing role competencies established by varying organizations, each role is presented with similarities and differences among the roles discussed. In addition, collaboration among the identified roles was reviewed, and recommendations were provided for the new and practicing CNSs. Although there are some similarities among the graduate nursing roles such as in educational, licensing, and certification requirements, each role must be understood to gain the full role scope and benefit and glean the anticipated outcomes. Healthcare providers must be aware of the differences in graduate nursing roles, especially in comparing the CNS with other roles to avoid confusion that may lead to roles being underused with a limited job scope. The CNS provides a unique set of services at all system outcome levels and is an essential part of the healthcare team especially in the acute care setting.

  20. Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home › Aging & Health A to Z › Nursing Homes Font size A A A Print Share Glossary Basic ... Reason For Living in A Nursing Home Some type of disability with activities of daily living (ADLs) ...