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Sample records for nurse stress index

  1. Turkish Version of the Student Nurse Stress Index: Validity and Reliability

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    Gamze Sarikoc, PhD, RN

    2017-06-01

    Conclusion: Results showed that the SNSI had a satisfactory level of reliability and validity in nursing students in Turkey. Multicenter studies including nursing students from different nursing schools are recommended for the SNSI to be generalized.

  2. Stress in Nursing Students

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    Sofia Zyga

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Throughout a Nursing academic course, students are confronted by situations that generate stress. Students from professionalizing Nursing courses are especially demanded at practical skills, such asperforming invasive procedures with venous punctures, bandaging, hygiene, and comfort care in patients with different degrees of illness. For these students, stress levels may render learning difficulty with the possibility of leading to errors, lack of concentration and oscillation of attention levels.

  3. Work environment, job satisfaction, stress and burnout among haemodialysis nurses.

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    Hayes, Bronwyn; Douglas, Clint; Bonner, Ann

    2015-07-01

    To examine the relationships among nurse and work characteristics, job satisfaction, stress, burnout and the work environment of haemodialysis nurses. Haemodialysis nursing is characterised by frequent and intense contact with patients in a complex and intense environment. A cross-sectional online survey of 417 haemodialysis nurses that included nurse and work characteristics, the Brisbane Practice Environment Measure, Index of Work Satisfaction, Nursing Stress Scale and the Maslach Burnout Inventory. Haemodialysis nurses reported an acceptable level of job satisfaction and perceived their work environment positively, although high levels of burnout were found. Nurses who were older and had worked in haemodialysis the longest had higher satisfaction levels, experienced less stress and lower levels of burnout than younger nurses. The in-centre type of haemodialysis unit had greater levels of stress and burnout than home training units. Greater satisfaction with the work environment was strongly correlated with job satisfaction, lower job stress and emotional exhaustion. Haemodialysis nurses experienced high levels of burnout even though their work environment was favourable and they had acceptable levels of job satisfaction. Targeted strategies are required to retain and avoid burnout in younger and less experienced nurses in this highly specialised field of nursing. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. [Appraisal of occupational stress and its influential factors in nurses].

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    Yang, Xin-wei; Wang, Zhi-ming; Wang, Mian-zhen; Lan, Ya-jia

    2004-04-01

    To assess the occupational stress and its influential factors in nurses. A test of occupational stress, its influential factors, work ability were carried out for 248 nurses and 319 controls with revised occupational stress inventory (OSI-R) and work ability index (WAI). The scores of personal cope resource (131.266 +/- 17.176) and work ability index (32.581 +/- 3.158) in nurse group were significantly higher than those in control group (126.931 +/- 19.108, 31.840 +/- 4.069) (P < 0.05). The main occupational stressors scores (role insufficiency, role clash, and responsibility) in nurses were higher than those in controls (P < 0.05). The stress response of interpersonal relationship in nurses was also higher. The items of personal cope resource, such as recreation, self-care and social support of nurses were superior to those of controls (P < 0.05). Stress response was positively correlated with occupational role (r = 0.512, P < 0.01), and negatively correlated with the personal cope resource (r = -0.475, P < 0.01). The primary influential factors of personal stress were recreation, social support, rational conduct, role insufficiency, role clash, responsibility, and poor work environment. To strengthen social support, to improve work condition for nurses, so as to reduce the occupational stress and to enhance the work ability of nurses are important task in occupational health field.

  5. Stress in nurses: The 100 top-cited papers published in nursing journals.

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    Martín-Del-Río, Beatriz; Solanes-Puchol, Ángel; Martínez-Zaragoza, Fermín; Benavides-Gil, Gemma

    2018-03-08

    To identify and analyse the 100 most cited papers on stress in nurses published in nursing journals. The number of citations an article receives is an index of its impact on the scientific community. An analysis of the most cited articles on stress in nursing would allow us to identify the most important articles and to obtain information about this area of knowledge. A retrospective bibliometric analysis. In 2016, 111 journals belonging to the "nursing" category were identified in the Science and Social Science Citation Index. A search was performed of the Science Core Collection Website for articles on stress published in these journals. The topic, type of article, publishing journal, countries and institutions of origin and year of publication were extracted from the articles. The impact factor, immediacy index, journal country and publisher and h index were collected from the Institute for Scientific Information. The citation density, citation tendency and Bradford's law were calculated. They identified articles were mostly empirical quantitative studies with a transversal design, published from 1975 - 2011 in 23 journals. They were signed by 233 authors, most of whom are English-speaking from the USA and UK. The core distribution of the publications comprises a single journal, the Journal of Advanced Nursing. The study of stress in nursing has shown increased visibility and recognition each decade. The most recent articles have the highest number of citations, are the highest in rank and have the higher citation densities. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Effects of stress on nursing integrity.

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    McIntosh, Bryan; Sheppy, Bruce

    This article looks at the relationship between stress, nursing integrity and patient care. It has been argued that the professional integrity of nurses has been eroded and consequently they have become more susceptible to anxiety, stress and exhaustion, potentially affecting care delivery. The authors suggest that the goal of providing high professional standards is threatened by increased service demands, and there is therefore a need for nurses to develop effective coping strategies to manage stress resulting from competing tensions in the workplace.

  7. Influence of stress factors and socio-demographic characteristics on the sleep quality of nursing students

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    Benavente, Sonia Betzabeth Ticona; Silva, Rodrigo Marques da; Higashi, Aline Baraldi; Guido, Laura de Azevedo; Costa, Ana Lucia Siqueira

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To analyze the influence of stress factors and socio-demographic characteristics on the sleep quality of nursing students. Method: An analytical cross-sectional and quantitative study, conducted with 151 nursing students in São Paulo between March and April of 2012. A form for socio-demographic characteristics, the Instrument to Evaluate Stress in Nursing Students and the Pittsburgh Sleep Index were applied. Results: High levels of stress was predominant for Time Management (27.8%) ...

  8. Workplace stress in nursing: a literature review.

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    McVicar, Andrew

    2003-12-01

    Stress perception is highly subjective, and so the complexity of nursing practice may result in variation between nurses in their identification of sources of stress, especially when the workplace and roles of nurses are changing, as is currently occurring in the United Kingdom health service. This could have implications for measures being introduced to address problems of stress in nursing. To identify nurses' perceptions of workplace stress, consider the potential effectiveness of initiatives to reduce distress, and identify directions for future research. A literature search from January 1985 to April 2003 was conducted using the key words nursing, stress, distress, stress management, job satisfaction, staff turnover and coping to identify research on sources of stress in adult and child care nursing. Recent (post-1997) United Kingdom Department of Health documents and literature about the views of practitioners was also consulted. Workload, leadership/management style, professional conflict and emotional cost of caring have been the main sources of distress for nurses for many years, but there is disagreement as to the magnitude of their impact. Lack of reward and shiftworking may also now be displacing some of the other issues in order of ranking. Organizational interventions are targeted at most but not all of these sources, and their effectiveness is likely to be limited, at least in the short to medium term. Individuals must be supported better, but this is hindered by lack of understanding of how sources of stress vary between different practice areas, lack of predictive power of assessment tools, and a lack of understanding of how personal and workplace factors interact. Stress intervention measures should focus on stress prevention for individuals as well as tackling organizational issues. Achieving this will require further comparative studies, and new tools to evaluate the intensity of individual distress.

  9. The European Financial Market Stress Index

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    Shaen Corbet

    2014-01-01

    This research constructs and develops a financial stress index based on European financial markets. The integration of numerous sovereign states has created difficulty identifying stress in any one single financial component, but incorporating twenty-three headline European stress indicators across equities, bonds and currencies, in terms of both spreads and levels offer substantial explanatory benefits. The incorporation of a logistical framework specifically analysing the levels, volatility...

  10. Factors related to teamwork performance and stress of operating room nurses.

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    Sonoda, Yukio; Onozuka, Daisuke; Hagihara, Akihito

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate operating room nurses' perception of teamwork performance and their level of mental stress and to identify related factors. Little is known about the factors affecting teamwork and the mental stress of surgical nurses, although the performance of the surgical team is essential for patient safety. The questionnaire survey for operation room nurses consisted of simple questions about teamwork performance and mental stress. Multivariate analyses were used to identify factors causing a sense of teamwork performance or mental stress. A large number of surgical nurses had a sense of teamwork performance, but 30-40% of operation room nurses were mentally stressed during surgery. Neither the patient nor the operation factors were related to the sense of teamwork performance in both types of nurses. Among scrub nurses, endoscopic and abdominal surgery, body mass index, blood loss and the American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status class were related to their mental stress. Conversely, circulating nurses were stressed about teamwork performance. The factors related to teamwork performance and mental stress during surgery differed between scrub and circulating nurses. Increased support for operation room nurses is necessary. The increased support leads to safer surgical procedures and better patient outcomes. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Nurses' self-care behaviors related to weight and stress.

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    Nahm, Eun-Shim; Warren, Joan; Zhu, Shijun; An, Minjeong; Brown, Jeanine

    2012-01-01

    Considerable research on preventive health care behaviors has been conducted in different segments of the population. Although nurses are the largest group of direct health care providers (3 million), little is known about their preventive health care behaviors. As the average age of nurses working in the United States (US) increases (mean age 47 years), maintaining their health to ensure they can continue to provide optimal health care to others becomes a greater priority. This descriptive online study examined registered nurses' dietary and exercise practices, weight status, stress levels, and preferred preventive health strategies using a sample of nurses recruited from a community-based, urban teaching hospital (n = 183; mean age 47 ± 11.3 years). The majority of participants (72.2%, n = 122) reported a lack of exercise, and more than half (53.8%, n = 91) had an irregular meal pattern. The average body mass index (BMI) was 28.3 ± 6.8, and 59.2% (n = 100) were either overweight (n = 47) or obese (n = 53). BMI had a significant inverse relationship with having a regular meal schedule and the amount of time spent exercising. Participants who reported greater stress had more irregular meal schedules. The most frequently used stress-release method was eating (n = 32), followed by exercise (n = 31). Nurses are fully aware of measures that should be taken for healthy living. Their knowledge, however, has not been well translated into their own self-care. As nursing shortages loom, maintaining the health of the aging nursing workforce is essential to retention. Further research is needed to identify factors that may motivate nurses to better care for themselves and measures that can be implemented by employers to initiate and sustain these preventive health care behaviors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Relationship between occupational stress and depression among psychiatric nurses in Japan.

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    Yoshizawa, Kaori; Sugawara, Norio; Yasui-Furukori, Norio; Danjo, Kazuma; Furukori, Hanako; Sato, Yasushi; Tomita, Tetsu; Fujii, Akira; Nakagam, Taku; Sasaki, Masahide; Nakamura, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Psychiatric nursing is a stressful area of nursing practice. The purpose of this study was to examine occupational stress among psychiatric nurses in Japan. In this cross-sectional study, 238 psychiatric nurses were recruited from 7 hospitals. Data regarding the Generic Job Stress Questionnaire (GJSQ), the Center for Epidemiologic Studies for Depression Scale (CES-D), and the Health Practice Index (HPI) were obtained via self-report questionnaires. After adjusting for all the variables, CES-D scores were associated with job stress, but social support reduced the effect of stress on depression among psychiatric nurses. However, the interpretation of these results was hampered by the lack of data concerning important occupational factors, such as working position, personal income, and working hours. Further longitudinal investigation into the factors associated with depression may yield useful information for administrative and psychological interventions.

  13. Stress Levels of Nurses in Oncology Outpatient Units.

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    Ko, Woonhwa; Kiser-Larson, Norma

    2016-04-01

    Oncology nursing is often a source of substantial stress for nurses. Many nurses, particularly novice nurses, have inadequate preparation to care for patients at the end of life and their families. Unless nurses prevent or manage work-related stress by using effective coping strategies, oncology nursing staff will continue to suffer from burnout and compassion fatigue. The purpose of this article is to identify stress levels and stressful factors of nurses working in oncology outpatient units and to explore coping behaviors for work-related stress of oncology staff nurses in outpatient units. A descriptive, cross-sectional design was used to identify stress levels and stressful factors for outpatient oncology nurses, investigate differences in stress levels among nurses' demographic characteristics, and explore coping behaviors of the nurses. Study participants (N = 40) included RNs and licensed practical nurses who completed the Nursing Stress Scale, three open-ended questions, and a demographic questionnaire. The highest sources of stress were workload and patient death and dying. Demographic variables of age and work experience in nursing showed a significant positive relationship to work-related stress scores. The three most frequently used coping behaviors were verbalizing, exercising or relaxing, and taking time for self. Continuing education programs on stress management are highly recommended. Outpatient oncology nurses should be nurtured and supported through tailored interventions at multiple levels to help them find effective coping strategies and develop self-care competencies. Although younger and less experienced nurses had lower mean stress scores than older and more experienced nurses, the continuing education programs and tailored interventions would be helpful for all oncology nursing staff.

  14. Stress among employees in psychiatric nursing

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    Urška Nemec

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Evidence suggests that stressful situations are frequent in the field of psychiatry and that professionals working in this speciality are more prone to stress. Stressful situations may be compounded by ignoring the principles and strategies of therapeutic communication in all interactions with patients. The purpose of the research was to determine the presence of stress among the nursing team members. Methods: The research is based on a quantitative methodology; the data were collected using a semi-structured questionnaire. The sample consisted of 73 nurses working in a special social welfare institution (n = 37 and in a psychiatric hospital (n = 36. The survey was conducted in the first half of the year 2016. Descriptive statistics and chi-square test were used. Results: The list of stress factors most frequently reported by the participants include low pay (n = 40, 55 %, poor interpersonal relationships in the workplace (n = 23, 32 %, and the sense of insecurity due to unpredictable behaviour of patients (n = 32, 44 %. One fifth of the respondents are regularly subjected to patient physical violence and psychological abuse in the workplace (n = 14, 19 % and a large majority (n = 53, 72.5 % are frequently exposed to dangerous situations. The respondents are not fully aware of the crucial importance of therapeutic communication with the patients (n = 38, 52 %. Discussion and conclusion: It is impossible to completely avoid stressful situations in psychiatric settings. Psychiatric nurses should possess good communication skills and the ability to develop good interpersonal relationships.

  15. Relationship between Work Ability Index and Cognitive Failure among Nurses.

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    Abbasi, Milad; Zakerian, Abolfazl; Kolahdouzi, Malihe; Mehri, Ahmad; Akbarzadeh, Arash; Ebrahimi, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-03-01

    Frequent nursing errors are considered as factors that affect the quality of healthcare of patients. Capable nurses who are compatible with work conditions are more focused on their tasks, and this reduces their errors and cognitive failures. Therefore, this study was conducted with the aim of investigating the relationship between work ability index (WAI) and cognitive failures (CFs) as well as some factors that affect them in nurses working in the ICU, CCU, and emergency wards. This descriptive-analytical and cross-sectional study was conducted with 750 nurses at educational hospitals affiliated with the Tehran University of Medical Sciences in 2015. A questionnaire of work ability index and cognitive failures was used to collect data. The data were analyzed using SPSS 20 and the Pearson and Spearman correlation coefficients, chi-squared, ANOVA, and the Kruskal-Wallis tests. Using the Pearson correlation test, the results of this study showed that there is a significant, inverse relationship between WAI, personal prognosis of work ability, and mental resources with CFs along with all its subscales in nurses (p work impairment due to diseases (p work experience, and body mass index (BMI) (p working units (p work ability of nurses be improved and that their CFs be reduced through various measures, including pre-employment examinations, proper management of work-shift conditions, and using engineering and administrative strategies to ensure the safety of hospitalized patients.

  16. Secondary traumatic stress in nurses: a systematic review.

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    Beck, Cheryl Tatano

    2011-02-01

    Is there a "cost of caring" for health care providers of traumatized patients? The aim of this study is to review the literature on secondary traumatic stress in nurses in order to answer the following questions: What studies have been conducted on secondary traumatic stress in nurses in all clinical specialties? What instruments were used to measure secondary traumatic stress in nurses and what psychometric properties were reported? A systematic review. CINAHL, PubMed, and PsycINFO databases were searched for the years 1981 to the present. Keywords used in the database searches included secondary traumatic stress, compassion fatigue, vicarious traumatization, secondary trauma, PTSD, and nurses. Research studies were reviewed for the following inclusion criteria: the sample included nurses, the secondary traumatic stress symptoms were measured, and the language was English. Seven studies were found in which researchers examined secondary traumatic stress in nurses. The samples in five of these studies consisted of all nurses, whereas in the remaining two studies, nurses were included in the samples but the results were not specifically reported for the subgroup of nurses. Presence of secondary traumatic stress was reported in forensic nurses, emergency department nurses, oncology nurses, pediatric nurses, and hospice nurses. Three instruments were identified that measured secondary traumatic stress in practitioners who care for traumatized populations: Secondary Traumatic Stress Scale, Compassion Fatigue Self Test for Helpers, and the Compassion Fatigue Scale-Revised. Presence of secondary traumatic stress in nurses was reported in all of the studies included in this literature review. The use of small samples and a number of different instruments to measure secondary traumatic stress symptoms, however, hindered the ability to make comparisons across studies and to draw conclusions. None of the studies conducted to date have focused on secondary traumatic stress in

  17. Filipino nurses in the United States: recruitment, retention, occupational stress, and job satisfaction.

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    Hayne, Arlene N; Gerhardt, Clara; Davis, Jonathan

    2009-07-01

    Solutions to the nursing shortage in North America include the recruitment of international nurses. This descriptive study examines strategies to facilitate the cultural adaptation, job satisfaction, and perception of role and social support of a group of recruited Filipino nurses. Instruments used were the Nursing Work Index-Revised Edition and Occupation Stress Inventory-Revised Edition. Results indicated that the investment in promoting the well-being of recruits in both social and work contexts positively benefits job satisfaction and spills over into related areas of satisfaction and positive adaptation. The literature study also focuses on areas of cultural competence in the context of transcultural nursing.

  18. Coping with organizational stress among hospital nurses in Southern Ontario.

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    Tyson, Paul D; Pongruengphant, Rana; Aggarwal, Bela

    2002-05-01

    Government cutbacks and anticipated staff reductions were hypothesized to be a unique source of organizational stress. The study focused on how nurses coped with stress and whether any strategy effectively reduced occupational stress. A sample of 107 nurses were asked to rate their occupational stress, job satisfaction, and coping strategies. Avoidance and social support were found to be significantly correlated with stress, but neither of these coping strategies appeared to reduce nurses' level of organizational stress. However, an interaction between problem solving and job satisfaction was found to be highly significant and it added 42% to predicting stress levels. Supporting the stress-buffering hypothesis, nurses with lower intrinsic job satisfaction seemed to benefit from employing problem solving as a coping strategy whereas dissatisfied nurses who infrequently use problem solving reported the highest levels of organizational stress. Paradoxically, intrinsically satisfied nurses who most frequently utilize problem solving experienced heightened organizational stress.

  19. The consequences of nursing stress and need for integrated solutions.

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    Roberts, Rashaun K; Grubb, Paula L

    2014-01-01

    In a 2011 survey sponsored by the American Nurses Association (ANA), nurses identified the acute and chronic effects of stress and overwork as one of their two top safety and health concerns. A review of the literature was conducted to investigate the impact that job stress has on the health and safety of nursing professionals and the role that working conditions and job characteristics play in fostering job stress. Strong evidence supporting links between job stress, safety and health in general and within different types of nursing populations exists. Working conditions also contribute to the development of job stress. Combining and integrating "person-focused" strategies designed to build nurses' ability to manage stress at the individual level with "organization-focused" strategies that eliminate stressful working conditions is critical to the reduction and prevention of job stress among nursing professionals. © 2013 Association of Rehabilitation Nurses.

  20. Pilot Testing of the NURSE Stress Management Intervention.

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    Delaney, Colleen; Barrere, Cynthia; Robertson, Sue; Zahourek, Rothlyn; Diaz, Desiree; Lachapelle, Leeanne

    2016-12-01

    Student nurses experience significant stress during their education, which may contribute to illness and alterations in health, poor academic performance, and program attrition. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the feasibility and potential efficacy of an innovative stress management program in two baccalaureate nursing programs in Connecticut, named NURSE (Nurture nurse, Use resources, foster Resilience, Stress and Environment management), that assists nursing students to develop stress management plans. An explanatory sequential mixed-methods design was used to evaluate the effects of the intervention with 40 junior nursing students. Results from this study provide evidence that the NURSE intervention is highly feasible, and support further testing to examine the effect of the intervention in improving stress management in nursing students. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Stress in nurses: stress-related affect and its determinants examined over the nursing day.

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    Johnston, Derek W; Jones, Martyn C; Charles, Kathryn; McCann, Sharon K; McKee, Lorna

    2013-06-01

    Nurses are a stressed group and this may affect their health and work performance. The determinants of occupational stress in nurses and other occupational groups have almost invariably been examined in between subject studies. This study aimed to determine if the main determinants of occupation stress, i.e. demand, control, effort and reward, operate within nurses. A real time study using personal digital-assistant-based ecological momentary assessment to measure affect and its hypothesised determinants every 90 min in 254 nurses over three nursing shifts. The measures were negative affect, positive affect, demand/effort, control and reward. While the effects varied in magnitude between people, in general increased negative affect was predicted by high demand/effort, low control and low reward. Control and reward moderated the effects of demand/effort. High positive affect was predicted by high demand/effort, control and reward. The same factors are associated with variations in stress-related affect within nurses as between.

  2. Job stress, achievement motivation and occupational burnout among male nurses.

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    Hsu, Hsiu-Yueh; Chen, Sheng-Hwang; Yu, Hsing-Yi; Lou, Jiunn-Horng

    2010-07-01

    This paper is a report of an exploration of job stress, achievement motivation and occupational burnout in male nurses and to identify predictors of occupational burnout. Since the Nightingale era, the nursing profession has been recognized as 'women's work'. The data indicate that there are more female nurses than male nurses in Taiwan. However, the turnover rate for male nurses is twice that of female nurses. Understanding the factors that affect occupational burnout of male nurses may help researchers find ways to reduce the likelihood that they will quit. A survey was conducted in Taiwan in 2008 using a cross-sectional design. A total of 121 male nurses participated in the study. Mailed questionnaires were used to collect data, which were analysed using descriptive statistics and stepwise multiple regression. The job stress of male nurses was strongly correlated with occupational burnout (r = 0.64, P job stress was the only factor to have a statistically significant direct influence on occupational burnout, accounting for 45.8% of the variance in this. Job stress was comprised of three dimensions, of which role conflict accounted for 40.8% of the variance in occupational burnout. The contribution of job stress to occupational burnout of male nurses was confirmed. As occupational burnout may influence the quality of care by these nurses, nurse managers should strive to decrease male nurses' job stress as this should lead to a reduction of negative outcomes of occupational burnout.

  3. Stress and ways of coping among nurse managers: An integrative review.

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    Labrague, Leodoro J; McEnroe-Petitte, Denise M; Leocadio, Michael C; Van Bogaert, Peter; Cummings, Greta G

    2018-04-01

    To appraise and synthesise empirical studies examining sources of occupational stress and ways of coping utilised by nurse managers when dealing with stress. The Nurse Manager's role is challenging yet draining and stressful and has adverse consequences on an individual's overall health and well-being, patients' outcomes and organisational productivity. Considerable research has been carried out; however, an updated and broader perspective on this critical organisational issue has not been performed. An integrative review. Five databases (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, SCOPUS, PubMed, PsychINFO and MEDLINE) were searched to identify relevant articles. Search terms and MeSH terms included: "charge nurse," "coping," "coping strategy," "coping style," "psychological adaptation," "psychological stress," "stressors," "nurse manager" and "unit manager." Twenty-two articles were included in this review. Reporting followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement guidelines. Four themes were identified: moderate stress levels, common sources of stress, ways of coping and the impact of nurses' characteristics on stress. Nurse managers experienced moderate levels of stress mainly from heavy workloads, lack of resources and financial responsibilities. Enhancing social support and promoting job control were seen as important in reducing work stress and its related consequences. Additional studies using a more rigorous method and a larger sample size preferably in multicultural settings would shed more light on this topic. Hospital and nurse administrators play an important role in promoting supportive structures for daily professional practice for nurse managers through staffing, organisational resources, support services, leadership and stress management training. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Nurse teacher stress in Northern Ireland.

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    Hunter, P; Houghton, D M

    1993-08-01

    Occupational stress among a 60% sample of all nurse tutors in Northern Ireland was investigated by means of the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ), Maslach Burnout Inventory and a stress questionnaire. Seventy per cent of tutors judged themselves to be worse or much worse than usual on 45% of GHQ items. Significant levels of moderate and high burnout were discovered on the sub-scales of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization, with an almost unanimous (95%) report of high burnout arising out of feelings of lack of personal accomplishment. Male nurse tutors reported more frequent and more intense signs of burnout than their female counterparts at a statistically significant level of difference in emotional exhaustion (P = 0.028 and P = 0.003 respectively) and in depersonalization (P work stressor most commonly identified by tutors (72%) was that of experiencing too little time to perform their duties to their satisfaction. The most common request for help to alleviate workplace stress (61%) was for more support and appreciation from their seniors.

  5. Role stress amongst nurses at the workplace: concept analysis.

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    Riahi, Sanaz

    2011-09-01

    The present study explicates the concept of role stress amongst nurses through an analysis adopted from Walker and Avant; Strategies for Theory Construction in Nursing, 4th edn, Prentice Hall, New Jersey, NY. Role stress has become a significant problem amongst nurses and has created much distress leading to burnout among many in the nursing profession. It is significant to analyse the concept of role stress and its relative attributes and consequences, in order to recognize the necessary antecedents needed to create better conditions for nurses at the workplace. A modified method developed by Walker and Avant was used for this concept analysis. A model representing the concept of role stress was developed through careful consideration of the attributes, consequences, antecedents and empirical referents of role stress. The concept analysis of role stress among nurses at the workplace recognized the vulnerability of the nursing discipline towards burnout and distress in general. It is critical to be aware of the current state of health care and note the increased workload created for nurses. Nurses are at a greater vulnerability for role stress, making it imperative for health care organizations to critically evaluate and establish preventative measures for the concept of role stress. 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Stress and eustress in nursing students.

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    Gibbons, Chris; Dempster, Martin; Moutray, Marianne

    2008-02-01

    This paper is a report of a study to identify experiences that led to both distress and eustress and to make recommendations to help students cope with course demands. Much of the research on stress in nursing students is quantitative in focus and all draws on their experience of distress, with little attempt to understand experiences of eustress. A series of focus groups were carried out with a volunteer sample of final year nursing students (n = 16) in the United Kingdom in 2007. The data were thematically analysed. The themes identified were clinical experience, support, learning and teaching experience and course structure. There were experiences within each that were perceived as sources of distress and eustress. Many of the sources of distress concur with earlier findings but they are more likely to be experienced and commented on because the demands of present-day programmes and the profile of many nursing students mean that more effort is invested in meeting educational demands. The experiential learning and patient-care opportunity that placements provided was an important source of eustress. Students who coped well drew on effective support networks and adopted a positive, optimistic perspective towards programme issues. Effective educators did not offer more time than those perceived as less effective but seemed more effective at tuning into students' concerns, showing more empathy and offering clearer guidance.

  7. The Nurses' Well-Being Index and Factors Influencing This Index among Nurses in Central China: A Cross-Sectional Study.

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    Runtang Meng

    Full Text Available A discussion and analysis of factors that contribute to nurses' happiness index can be useful in developing effective interventions to improve nurses' enthusiasm, sense of honor and pride and to improve the efficiency and quality of medical services.In this study, 206 registered nurses at the 2011 annual encounter for 12 Hanchuan hospitals completed a questionnaire survey that covered three aspects of the well-being index and thus served as a comprehensive well-being and general information tool.Based on their index score, the nurses' overall happiness level was moderate. The dimensions of the happiness index are listed in descending order of their contribution to the nurses' comprehensive happiness levels: health concerns, friendly relationships, self-worth, altruism, vitality, positive emotions, personality development, life satisfaction and negative emotions. Four variables (positive emotion, life satisfaction, negative emotions, and friendly relationships jointly explained 47.80% of the total variance of the happiness index; positive emotions had the greatest impact on the happiness index.Appropriate nursing interventions can improve nurses' happiness index scores, thereby increasing nurses' motivation and promoting the development of their nursing practice.

  8. Inductions Buffer Nurses' Job Stress, Health, and Organizational Commitment.

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    Kamau, Caroline; Medisauskaite, Asta; Lopes, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Nurses suffer disproportionate levels of stress and are at risk of sickness-absence and turnover intentions, but there is a lack of research clarifying preventions. This study investigated the impact of inductions (job preparation courses) about mental health for nurses' job stress, general health, and organizational commitment. Data from 6,656 nurses were analyzed using structural equation modeling (SEM), showing that mental health inductions increase nurses' job satisfaction, which reduces their occupational stress and improves their health. SEM showed that these occupational health benefits increase the nurses' commitment to the organization. Job satisfaction (feeling valued, rewarded) also had a direct effect on nurses' intentions to continue working for the organization. Mental health inductions are therefore beneficial beyond job performance: they increase occupational health in the nursing profession.

  9. Nursing team stress in the perioperative period: an integrative review

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    Dafne Eva Corrêa Brandão

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This integrative review aimed at analyzing evidences available in literature regarding stress levels in nursing teams during the perioperative period. Primary studies were searched in the following databases: PubMed, CINAHL and LILACS. Included studies were grouped into the following thematic categories: stress level in the workplace and stress factors (n=8 and stress coping strategies used by the nursing staff (n=6. Evidence suggests that stress in the workplace worsens the health of the nursing team, provoking undesirable effects both in the professional and personal lives of these professionals. The assessment of working conditions to identify the main stressing factors and the implementation of individual and organizational measures to reduce nursing teams stress may increase productivity and workers’ satisfaction, improving the assistance quality offered to surgical patients.

  10. How nurses cope with occupational stress outside their workplaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happell, Brenda; Reid-Searl, Kerry; Dwyer, Trudy; Caperchione, Cristina M; Gaskin, Cadeyrn J; Burke, Karena J

    2013-01-01

    Nursing is acknowledged as a stressful occupation, and the negative impact of high stress levels have been widely researched. Less attention has been paid to methods for coping with stress. The researchers conducted a study to explore and identify how nurses cope with work-related stress away from their work environments. Six focus groups were conducted with 38 nurses, including nursing directors, nurse unit managers, and ward nurses from a wide range of clinical areas. From the interview material, 11 coping strategies were identified: drinking alcohol, smoking, using the staff social club, using social networking websites, exercising, family activities, home-based activities, outdoor activities, avoiding people, displacement, and sleep. Although several adaptive strategies appear in this list (e.g., exercising, home-based activities), some nurses were using unhealthy behaviours to cope with work-related stress (e.g., drinking alcohol, smoking, displacement). This study clearly demonstrates the value of using qualitative approaches to understanding how nurses cope with stress. Knowledge produced locally, such as that generated for the hospital in this study, should serve as the foundation for organisational strategies to enhance the health of nurses.

  11. Workplace Stress and Ethical Challenges Experienced by Nursing Staff in a Nursing Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vondras, Dean D.; Flittner, Diane; Malcore, Sylvia A.; Pouliot, Gregory

    2009-01-01

    This research explores the workplace stress and ethical challenges reported by healthcare staff in a nursing home. A brief self-report survey was administered to 44 members of the nursing staff in a not-for-profit nursing home. The survey included items that elicited identification of specific workplace stressors and ethical challenges and global…

  12. Patient satisfaction, stress and burnout in nursing personnel in emergency departments: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ríos-Risquez, M Isabel; García-Izquierdo, Mariano

    2016-07-01

    Patient satisfaction is considered a measure of the status of the interaction between health- care professionals and service users. The level of this measure indicates the quality of the care received. Burnout is a common phenomenon in nursing professionals and it is a response to the chronic occupational stress. Different studies have shown a link between patient satisfaction and stress and burnout syndrome experienced by nursing personnel in various hospital units. The main objective of this study was to analyze the associations between patients' satisfaction with emergency services and perception of work stress and burnout by the nursing professionals who looked after these patients at a group level. The study followed a descriptive and cross-sectional design; the data were collected by means of questionnaires. Emergency services at two general hospitals in Murcia (Spain). Two samples, one formed of emergency service nursing professionals (n=148) and the other formed by patients (n=390), who were grouped in 48 units of analysis. To evaluate perception of stress and burnout of the nursing personnel, we used the Spanish adaptation of the Nursing Stress Scale for hospital emergency nursing personnel, and the Spanish adaptation of the Maslach Burnout Inventory, respectively. A Spanish adaptation of the La Mónica-Obsert Patient Satisfaction Scale was used to define the patients' feelings about their nursing care. Moreover, some socio-demographic variables and the length of stay in the emergency unit were included in the protocol. Before statistical analysis, the data were collated at a group level. The intraclass correlation coefficients and the Average Deviation Index support the aggregation of these data at a unit level. Neither perception of stress nor the various elements of burnout experienced by nursing staff were related to patients' levels of satisfaction. We observed a significant and positive association between stress perception among the nurses and two

  13. Nurse leader mindfulness meditation program for stress management: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipe, Teri Britt; Bortz, Jennifer J; Dueck, Amylou; Pendergast, Debra; Buchda, Vicki; Summers, Jay

    2009-03-01

    The aim of this study was to rigorously evaluate a brief stress management intervention for nurse leaders. Despite the nursing shortage, evidence-based workplace approaches addressing nurse stress have not been well studied. Nurse leaders (n = 33) were randomly assigned to brief mindfulness meditation course (MMC) or leadership course (control). Self-report measures of stress were administered at baseline and within 1 week of course completion. Among MMC participants, change scores (from baseline to postintervention) on several subscales of the Symptom Checklist 90-Revised showed significantly more improvement in self-reported stress symptoms relative to controls. Mindfulness meditation course participants had significantly more improvement in Positive Symptom Distress Index (P = 0.010; confidence interval [CI] = -0.483 to -0.073) and Global Severity Index (P = 0.019; CI = -0.475 to -0.046) and nearly significantly more improvement in Positive Symptom Total (P = 0.066; CI = -16.66 to 0.581) compared with controls. Results support preliminary effectiveness of a 4-week MMC in reducing self-reported stress symptoms among nursing leaders.

  14. Stress and coping strategies among nursing students: an international study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrague, Leodoro J; McEnroe-Petitte, Denise M; Papathanasiou, Ioanna V; Edet, Olaide B; Tsaras, Konstantinos; Leocadio, Michael C; Colet, Paolo; Kleisiaris, Christos F; Fradelos, Evangelos C; Rosales, Rheajane A; Vera Santos-Lucas, Katherine; Velacaria, Pearl Irish T

    2017-12-20

    Mounting literature on stress and coping in nursing students are available; however, most of the findings are confined to a single cultural group. This study was conducted to determine the level of stress, its sources and coping strategies among nursing students from three countries: Greece, the Philippines and Nigeria. Using a descriptive, comparative research design, 547 nursing students (161 Greek nursing students, 153 Filipino nursing students, 233 Nigerian nursing students) participated in the study from August 2015 to April 2016. Two standardized instruments were used, the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) and the Coping Behavior Inventory (CBI). Findings revealed that the degree of stress and the type of stressors and coping styles utilized by nursing students differ according to the country of origin. The year of study predicted overall stress (β = -0.149, p stress and lessen its impact such as stress management counseling, counseling programs, establishing peer and family support systems, and formulating hospital policies that will support nursing students.

  15. An examination of stress, coping, and adaptation in nurses in a recovery and monitoring program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Marie Katherine; Taylor, Kathleen P; Marcus-Aiyeku, Ulanda; Krause-Parello, Cheryl A

    2012-10-01

    Addiction rates in nurses are higher than in the general population. The relationship between stress, coping, and adaptation in nurses (N = 82) enrolled in a recovery and monitoring program in the state of New Jersey was examined. Social support, a variable tested as a mediator of this relationship, was also examined. Participants completed the Perceived Stress Scale, Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support, and Psychological General Well-Being Index. Negative relationships were found between stress and social support and stress and well-being, and a positive relationship was found between social support and well-being (all ps prevent potential untoward consequences. Ultimately, methods to strengthen social support and social networks will enhance the probability of sustained recovery, relapse prevention, and safe reentry into nursing practice. Implications for behavioral health providers and health care practitioners are discussed.

  16. Stress and coping in Singaporean nurses: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Joanne; Bogossian, Fiona; Ahern, Kathy

    2010-06-01

    Stress is ubiquitous in the nursing profession and is also prevalent in Asian countries, particularly the "four tigers of Asia": Singapore, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and South Korea. Based on the theoretical framework of Lazarus and Folkman (1984), the present review of the nursing literature aims to identify sources and effects of stress in Singaporean nurses and the coping strategies they use. Nurses reported major stressors including shortage of staff, high work demands and conflict at work. Common coping strategies included problem orientation, social support and relaxation techniques. Several studies reported nurses' intent to leave the profession. Recommendations to minimize the impact of stress include in-service programs to facilitate a problem-solving approach to resolving work-related issues such as conflict. Relaxation therapy and debriefing sessions may also help in reducing negative effects of work stressors. Finally, nurses' emotional coping can be enhanced by strengthening sources of social support, particularly from family.

  17. [Job satisfaction and work ability index in nurses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viola, Fiorella; Larese Filon, Francesca

    2015-01-22

    Job satisfaction and work ability are important in the nursing profession to ensure good working conditions and to reduce work-related diseases and illness. Psychosocial factors such as social support and decision latitude (autonomy) could have a role in cardiovascular diseases, low back pain, injuries and sick leave. To evaluate work ability, job satisfaction, psychosocial factors and diseases in 10 departments of the Monfalcone Hospital. The Work Ability Index (WAI) questionnaire and Karasek Job Content Questionnaire with other questions related to working conditions and diseases were administered to 160 nurses working in 10 departments. The response rate was 90%. SPSS Statistic packaging was used for statistical analysis. The study population had a mean age of 41.1 ± 7 years and the majority were female (81.25%). WAI gave a rating of over 37 points (good and excellent) for 86.4%, with an average of 39.9 ± 5.9 in women and 40.6 ± 6.4 in men. The WAI differences between the departments were significant with Medicine and Surgery showing lower values (p=0.012). WAI was significantly lower in subjects with sick leave higher than 10 days per year (p=0.000) and in subjects with cardiovascular diseases (p=0.031). Our study showed very good working conditions for nurses. A follow-up of the analyzed population over time will add further information on this aspect.

  18. A regular yoga intervention for staff nurse sleep quality and work stress: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Ronghua; Li, Xia

    2015-12-01

    Although many studies have assessed the efficacy of yoga in older individuals, minimal research has focused on how nurses use yoga to improve sleep quality and to reduce work stress after work hours. We used the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index in Chinese and the Questionnaire on Medical Worker's Stress in Chinese to determine the impact of yoga on the quality of sleep and work stress of staff nurses employed by a general hospital in China. Disturbances in the circadian rhythm interrupt an individual's pattern of sleep. Convenient sampling method. One hundred and twenty nurses were randomised into two groups: a yoga group and a non-yoga group. The yoga group performed yoga more than two times every week for 50-60 minutes each time after work hours. The NG group did not participate in yoga. After six months, self-reported sleep quality and work stress were compared between the two groups, and then we used linear regression to confirm the independent factors related to sleep quality. Nurses in the yoga group had better sleep quality and lower work stress compared with nurses in the non-yoga group. The linear regression model indicated that nursing experience, age and yoga intervention were significantly related to sleep quality. Regular yoga can improve sleep quality and reduce work stress in staff nurses. This study provides evidence that hospital management should pay attention to nurse sleep quality and work stress, thereby taking corresponding measures to reduce work pressure and improve health outcomes. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Nurse stress at two different organizational settings in Alexandria

    OpenAIRE

    Zaghloul, Ashraf

    2009-01-01

    Ashraf AZ Zaghloul, Nagwa Y Abou El EneinDepartment of Health Administration and Behavioural Sciences, High Institute of Public Health, University of Alexandria, Alexandria, EgyptObjective: The objective of the study was to explore the difference in stress levels among nurses working at two different health care organizations and the determinants of nurse stress within each organization. Job stress is defined as the harmful emotional and physical reactions resulting from the interactions betw...

  20. Stress among nurses working in an acute hospital in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Donnelly, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Stress among nurses leads to absenteeism, reduced efficiency, long-term health problems and a decrease in the quality of patient care delivered. A quantitative cross-sectional study was conducted. The study\\'s aim was to identify perceived stressors and influencing factors among nurses working in the critical and non-critical care practice areas. A convenience sample of 200 nurses were invited to complete the Bianchi Stress Questionnaire. Information was collected on demographics and daily nursing practice. Findings indicated that perceived stressors were similar in both groups. The most severe stressors included redeployment to work in other areas and staffing levels. Results from this study suggest that age, job title, professional experience and formal post-registration qualifications had no influence on stress perception. These results will increase awareness of nurses\\' occupational stress in Ireland.

  1. Prevalence of secondary traumatic stress among emergency nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez-Gomez, Elvira; Rutledge, Dana N

    2009-06-01

    Emergency nurses often care for persons exposed to traumatic events. In the presence of empathetic caring, nurses exposed to such stressors over time can suffer from Secondary Traumatic Stress (STS), or Compassion Fatigue (CF). STS symptoms (intrusion, avoidance, and arousal) may lead to job dissatisfaction or burnout. The purpose of this study is to investigate the prevalence of STS in emergency nurses. Exploratory comparative design, with 67 emergency nurses from three general community hospitals in California. Survey instruments included a demographic tool and the STS Survey (STSS). Nurses were most likely to have Arousal symptoms (irritability reported by 54% of nurses), followed by Avoidance symptoms (avoidance of patients 52%), and Intrusion symptoms (intrusive thoughts about patients 46%). The majority of nurses (85%) reported at least one symptom in the past week. Utilizing Bride's algorithm to identify STS, 15% of nurses met no criteria, while 33% met all. Nurse participation in stress management activities was associated with less prevalence of STS symptoms. High prevalence of STS in our sample indicates that potentially large numbers of emergency nurses may be experiencing the negative effects of STS. Symptoms may contribute to emotional exhaustion and job separation of emergency nurses. Subsequent studies should be done to evaluate the association of CF/STS on actual burnout and attrition among emergency nurses.

  2. Organizational politics, nurses' stress, burnout levels, turnover intention and job satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrague, L J; McEnroe-Petitte, D M; Gloe, D; Tsaras, K; Arteche, D L; Maldia, F

    2017-03-01

    This is a research report examining the influence of organizational politics perceptions on nurses' work outcomes (job satisfaction, work stress, job burnout and turnover intention). Organizational politics is a phenomenon common in almost all institutions and is linked with undesirable consequences in employees. Despite the plethora of research around the world on this topic, studies describing organizational politics in nursing remain underexplored. A cross-sectional research design was utilized in this study. One hundred sixty-six (166) nurses participated. Five standardized tools were used: the Job Satisfaction Index, the Job Stress Scale, the Burnout Measure Scale, the Turnover Intention Inventory Scale and the Perception of Organizational Politics Scale. Nurses employed both in private and government-owned hospitals perceived moderate levels of organizational politics. Positive correlations were identified between perceived organizational politics and job stress, turnover intention and job burnout. Negative correlations were found between perceived organizational politics and job satisfaction. Perceptions of workplace politics in Filipino nurses were lower when compared to findings in other international studies. A strong link was found between organizational politics perceptions and the four job outcomes (stress and burnout levels, turnover intention and job satisfaction). Use of a self-reporting questionnaire and exclusion of nurses from other provinces. Perceived organizational politics predicted nurses' stress and burnout levels, turnover intention and job satisfaction. The findings of this study may provide a valuable perspective of this organizational issue and could assist policymakers and nurse administrators in formulating interventions that could minimize the effect of workplace politics. © 2016 International Council of Nurses.

  3. Everyday ethics: ethical issues and stress in nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Connie M; Taylor, Carol; Soeken, Karen; O'Donnell, Patricia; Farrar, Adrienne; Danis, Marion; Grady, Christine

    2010-11-01

    This paper is a report of a study of the type, frequency, and level of stress of ethical issues encountered by nurses in their everyday practice. Everyday ethical issues in nursing practice attract little attention but can create stress for nurses. Nurses often feel uncomfortable in addressing the ethical issues they encounter in patient care. A self-administered survey was sent in 2004 to 1000 nurses in four states in four different census regions of the United States of America. The adjusted response rate was 52%. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics, cross-tabulations and Pearson correlations. A total of 422 questionnaires were used in the analysis. The five most frequently occurring and most stressful ethical and patient care issues were protecting patients' rights; autonomy and informed consent to treatment; staffing patterns; advanced care planning; and surrogate decision-making. Other common occurrences were unethical practices of healthcare professionals; breaches of patient confidentiality or right to privacy; and end-of-life decision-making. Younger nurses and those with fewer years of experience encountered ethical issues more frequently and reported higher levels of stress. Nurses from different regions also experienced specific types of ethical problems more commonly. Nurses face daily ethical challenges in the provision of quality care. To retain nurses, targeted ethics-related interventions that address caring for an increasingly complex patient population are needed. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Violence against nurses and its impact on stress and productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Donna M; Gillespie, Gordon L; Succop, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how violence from patients and visitors is related to emergency department (ED) nurses' work productivity and symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Researchers have found ED nurses experience a high prevalence of physical assaults from patients and visitors. Yet, there is little research which examines the effect violent events have on nurses' productivity, particularly their ability to provide safe and compassionate patient care. A cross-sectional design was used to gather data from ED nurses who are members of the Emergency Nurses Association in the United States. Participants were asked to complete the Impact of Events Scale-Revised and Healthcare Productivity Survey in relation to a stressful violent event. Ninety-four percent of nurses experienced at least one posttraumatic stress disorder symptom after a violent event, with 17% having scores high enough to be considered probable for PTSD. In addition, there were significant indirect relationships between stress symptoms and work productivity. Workplace violence is a significant stressor for ED nurses. Results also indicate violence has an impact on the care ED nurses provide. Interventions are needed to prevent the violence and to provide care to the ED nurse after an event.

  5. Effect of stress management interventions on job stress among nurses working in critical care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Light Irin, C; Bincy, R

    2012-01-01

    Stress in nurses affects their health and increases absenteeism, attrition rate, injury claims, infection rates and errors in treating patients. This in turn significantly increases the cost of employment in healthcare units. Proper management of stress ensures greater efficiency at work place and improved wellbeing of the employee. Therefore, a pre-experimental study was conducted among 30 Critical Care Unit nurses working inMedical College Hospital, Thiruvananthapuram, (Kerala) to assess the effect of stress management interventions such as Job Stress Awareness, Assertiveness Training, Time Management, andProgressive Muscle Relaxation on job stress. The results showed that caring for patients, general job requirements and workload were the major sources of stress for the nurses. The level of severe stress was reduced from 60 percent to 20 percent during post-test. The Stress Management Interventions were statistically effective in reducing the stress of nurses at p<0.001 level.

  6. Reducing surgical nurses' aseptic practice-related stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aholaakko, Teija-Kaisa

    2011-12-01

    This paper aims to explore aseptic practice-related stress in surgery. The objectives are to define stress-related factors and the means to reduce the stress. Occupational stress is related to personal characteristics: job satisfaction and physiological and psychological well-being. The stress symptoms are often classified as part of a negative mood. Nurses have expressed stress when deadening their conscience to external demands with co-workers or internal working role-related demands. Surgery nurses expect fair division of work and compliance with rules. The hospital management, technology and the medical profession, instead of the needs of the patient, are recognised as a danger in the development of surgery nurses' role. A qualitative stimulated recall interview was performed in the surgery of the university hospital. Thirty-one operations were videotaped, and 31 nurses interviewed during videotape stimulation. The 1306 text pages were transcripted and analysed by a qualitative membership categorisation device analysis. The analysis revealed aseptic practice-related stress which constructed a sixteen level category. The membership categorisation identified connections between qualitatively attributed personnel and seven stress factors: working experience; time; equipment; person; patient; working morals and power. Final analysis revealed nurses reducing aseptic practice-related stress by safe, peaceful, competent and relative means. The aseptic practice-related stress varied from positive motivating feelings to exhaustion. The stress was experienced by medical and nursing co-workers and reduced by means which varied according to expertise and co-workers. This study showed needs for both the shared multiprofessional documentation of aseptic practice and better adherence to recommendations. Constructive means are useful when solving conflicts and replacing person-related aseptic practice with evidence-based. They may support nurses' professional growth, reduce

  7. Chinese nurse stress in Taiwan, Republic of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, S L

    1993-01-01

    An exploratory study was conducted to understand the Chinese nurses' perceptions of their work stress in Taiwan, Republic of China (ROC). Data were based on the written answers to two open-ended questions from the randomly selected Chinese nurses working at 3 of the 10 first-ranked teaching hospitals that had 900-2,000 hospital beds. The findings showed that stressors in work situations for Chinese nurses were similar to those of their Western colleagues in four categories: nursing care related to patient condition, interpersonal relationships, workload, and opportunity for promotion. In addition, the Chinese respondents especially identified pressure in the role of a unit educator as stressful. Any troubled interpersonal relationship of the Chinese nurse may have been experienced as a greater source of pressure than nurses in other cultures. It is suggested that there might be some similar stressors in the nurse work situation when comparing the Chinese nurse working in the modern hospital in Taiwan to the nurses in large hospitals in the Western culture. Yet the difference between these nurses was the greater emphasis the Chinese nurses placed on the value of advanced study and interpersonal harmony.

  8. Stress and its determinants in a sample of Iranian nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Asiyeh; Javanbakht, Mahnaz; Ezzatababdi, Mohammad Ranjbar

    2014-01-01

    Health care professions including nursing are ranked among the most stressful jobs. The harmful aspects of this stress can affect the nurses, their families, patients, and health care services. The purpose of this study was to investigate the most important stressors among nurses. This quantitative cross-sectional study was conducted among 225 nurses in Yazd, and data were analyzed with SPSS software. Findings showed that 73.4% of nurses had faced severe stress in the preceding 2 years, and workplace stressors were the most significant factors compared with other sources of stress (mean score of 4.62 on a 7-point Likert scale). Heavy workload (mean: 5.76), insufficient salary (5.67), discrimination (5.56), high expectations (5.48), high degree of responsibility for patients (5.48), and physical atmosphere at the workplace (5.25) were the most important workplace stressors. The results also indicated a significant relationship between the percentage of nurses facing stress in the workplace and gender (P = .037), the type of ward (P = .003), the type of employment (P = .050) and also work experience (P = .020). Findings indicate the necessity of improving the work environment for nurses such as changes in physical work conditions, better salaries and terms of employment, educational programs for stress reduction, and coping techniques.

  9. Determinants of job related stress experienced by nursing staff.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veer, A. de; Francke, A.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Stress levels of Dutch nurses have been found to increase since 2005. There is evidence that personal resources such as coping style and social support influence job related stress. However when formulating policy to reduce such stress, specific jobrelated factors must also be

  10. WORK STRESS LEVEL AND CARING BEHAVIOUR OF NURSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Retno Lestari

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A nurse who experience burnout feelings will influence their motivation, and quality performance. This situation is probably affecting a decline in work quality towards the caring behaviour demonstrated by nurses to their patiens, particularly for a nurse who are working in the long-stay installation room facing directly to patient's problems. The purpose of this research is to identify the work stress level of nurse towards the nurse's caring behaviour in the long-stay installation room (IRNA in general hospital in Malang. Method: This research used descriptive – correlational, the sampling was Non Probability Purposive Sampling with 93 nurses as the corresponds. The data was analyzed by operating Correlation Pearson, with a significance of p < 0.05. Result: The result found that there was a substantial correlation between the work stress level and the nurse's caring behaviour with p = 0.008 and r = -0.274, and it was a negative correlation. Discussion: It means that when the stress level of nurses will declined, the nurse's caring behavior automatically will beamplified. Conversely, if the stess level of nurses intensively increased, the nurse's caring behaviour become decreased. Thus, this research is needed to be analyzed further in order to asses the quality of caring behaviour by expanding the connected indicator and variable. It is aimed to improve the professionalism and quality of nurses in giving the best service to patients this research need to be continued further in order to asses the quality of nurse's caring behavior by expanding the variable, which is related to internal factors, such as knowledge, perception, emotion, ect and also connected to external factors, such as environment, both physically and non physically like: climate, human being, social economic, culture and ect.

  11. Emotional labour and stress within mental health nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, S; Cowburn, J

    2005-04-01

    For many within the nursing profession, the work role involves a great deal of emotional work or 'emotional labour'. Such emotional work can be performed through 'surface acting' in which the individual simply feigns an appropriate emotion, or through 'deep acting' in which they actually try to feel the required emotion. The current study aims to aid understanding of the complex relationship between components of emotional labour and stress within the mental health nursing sector. Thirty-five mental health nurses completed questionnaires relating to a total of 122 nurse-patient interactions. Data were collected in relation to: (1) the duration and intensity of the interaction; (2) the variety of emotions expressed; (3) the degree of surface or deep acting the nurse performed; and (4) the perceived level of stress the interaction involved. Nurses also completed Daily Stress Indicators. Results suggest that: (1) emotional labour is positively correlated with both 'interaction stress' and daily stress levels; (2) the deeper the intensity of interactions and the more variety of emotions experienced, the more emotional labour was reported; and (3) surface acting was a more important predictor of emotional labour than deep acting. Implications for mental health nurses are outlined.

  12. Decreased Stress Levels in Nurses: A Benefit of Quiet Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riemer, Heather C; Mates, Joanna; Ryan, Linda; Schleder, Bonnie J

    2015-09-01

    The benefits of quiet time, a therapeutic method of improving the health care environment, have been evaluated in patients, but only a few studies have examined the effects of quiet time on intensive care nurses. To evaluate the effects of implementing quiet time in a medical-surgical intensive care unit on levels of light, noise, and nurses' stress. Quiet time consisted of turning down the unit lights for a designated time. Levels of light, noise, and nurses' stress were measured. Nurses' stress levels were measured by using a 100-point visual analog scale; unit noise, by using a digital sound level meter (model 407736, Extech Instruments); and unit light, by using an illumination light meter (model 615, Huygen Corporation). Measurements were obtained 30 minutes before and 30 minutes, 1 hour, and 2 hours after implementation of quiet time. Analysis of variance and comparisons of means indicated that both light levels and nurses' stress levels were significantly decreased after quiet time (both P quiet time, but the decrease was not significant (P = .08). Use of quiet time resulted in decreased light levels and decreased stress levels among nurses. Quiet time is an easily performed energy-saving intervention to promote a healthy work environment. ©2015 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  13. A Shortened Stress Measure in Military Nursing Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-17

    REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED (From- To) 10/17/2017 Abstract 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Sa. CONTRACT NUMBER A Shortened Stress Measure in Military...Psychology 14. ABSTRACT A Shortened Stress Measure with Military Nursing Personnel Abstract Stress is a psychological construct with important...consequences for human health. A substantial number of stress measures are available that vary in length and dimensionality. The purpose of this study was to

  14. Effects of Stress on Critical Care Nurses: A National Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahedian-Azimi, Amir; Hajiesmaeili, Mohammadreza; Kangasniemi, Mari; Fornés-Vives, Joana; Hunsucker, Rita L; Rahimibashar, Farshid; Pourhoseingholi, Mohammad A; Farrokhvar, Leily; Miller, Andrew C

    2017-01-01

    Health care is a demanding field, with a high level of responsibility and exposure to emotional and physical danger. High levels of stress may result in depression, anxiety, burnout syndrome, and in extreme cases, post-traumatic stress disorder. The aim of this study was to determine which personal, professional, and organizational variables are associated with greater perceived stress among critical care nurses for purposes of developing integrative solutions to decrease stress in the future. We conducted a correlation research survey using a cross-sectional design and an in-person survey method. The questionnaire consisted of 2 parts: (1) socioeconomic, professional, and institutional variables and (2) work stressors. Surveys were conducted between January 1, 2011, and December 1, 2015. Multistage cluster random sampling was utilized for data collection. Inclusion criteria were (1) age ≥18 years, (2) registered nurse, (3) works in the intensive care unit (ICU), and (4) willing and able to complete the survey. We surveyed 21 767 ICU nurses in Iran and found that male sex, lower levels of peer collaboration, working with a supervisor in the unit, nurse-patient ratios, and working in a surgical ICU were positively associated with greater stress levels. Increasing age and married status were negatively associated with stress. Intensive care unit type (semi-closed vs open), ICU bed number, shift time, working on holidays, education level, and demographic factors including body mass index, and number of children were not significantly associated with stress levels. As the largest study of its kind, these findings support those found in various European, North, and South American studies. Efforts to decrease workplace stress of ICU nurses by focusing on facilitating peer collaboration, improving resource availability, and staffing ratios are likely to show the greatest impact on stress levels.

  15. Triglyceride glucose index and common carotid wall shear stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripolino, Cesare; Irace, Concetta; Scavelli, Faustina B; de Franceschi, Maria S; Esposito, Teresa; Carallo, Claudio; Gnasso, Agostino

    2014-02-01

    Alterations in wall shear stress contribute to both clinical and subclinical atherosclerosis. Several conditions such as hypertension, diabetes, and obesity can impair shear stress, but the role of insulin resistance has never been investigated. The present study was designed to investigate whether insulin resistance assessed by TyG Index associates with wall shear stress in the common carotid artery. One hundred six individuals were enrolled. Blood pressure, lipids, glucose, and cigarette smoking were evaluated. TyG Index was calculated as log[fasting triglycerides × fasting glucose / 2]. Subjects underwent blood viscosity measurement and echo-Doppler evaluation of carotid arteries to calculate wall shear stress. The association between TyG Index and carotid wall shear stress was assessed by simple and multiple regression analyses. TyG Index was significantly and inversely associated with carotid wall shear stress both in simple (r = -0.44, P glucose greater than 100 mg/dL, and triglycerides greater than 150 mg/dL. The present findings suggest that increasing insulin resistance, as assessed by TyG Index, associates with atherosclerosis-prone shear stress reduction in the common carotid artery.

  16. Stress levels of psychiatric nursing staff

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Looff, P.C. de; Kuijpers, E.; Nijman, H.L.I.

    2014-01-01

    During a total of 30 shifts, the arousal levels of 10 psychiatric nurses were assessed while working on a (forensic) psychiatric admissions ward. Arousal was assessed by means of a small device (wristband) by which the Skin Conductance Level (SCL) of the participating nurses was monitored. Each

  17. Psychosocial Determinants of Chronic Stress in Nursing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-12-22

    registered nurses with current licenses were unemployed and that only 3% of the unemployed registered nurses were looking for jobs in the field of...characteristic symptoms involve a re-experiencing of the traumatic event (intrusive recollections of the event, dreams or nightmares) and psychic numbing

  18. Nurse stress at two different organizational settings in Alexandria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf AZ Zaghloul

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Ashraf AZ Zaghloul, Nagwa Y Abou El EneinDepartment of Health Administration and Behavioural Sciences, High Institute of Public Health, University of Alexandria, Alexandria, EgyptObjective: The objective of the study was to explore the difference in stress levels among nurses working at two different health care organizations and the determinants of nurse stress within each organization. Job stress is defined as the harmful emotional and physical reactions resulting from the interactions between the worker and her/his work environment where the demands of the job exceed the worker’s capabilities and resources.Methodology: A convenient sample of nurses in two hospitals in Alexandria; Shark Al Madina (n = 120 and Karmouz (n = 170 hospitals. All nurses present at the time of the study were approached to be included in the study. The response rate for Shark Al Madina hospital was 94% and for Karmouz hospital, 71%. Data collection took place using a nurse stress questionnaire previously developed and tested for validity and reliability to measure stress in clinical nursing practice. The 5% level of significance was used throughout the statistical analysis for all relevant tests.Results: The highest mean stress scores were the same for both hospitals. The dimension of coping with new situations was 2.7 ± 0.6 at Shark Al Madina hospital and was 2.5 ± 0.7 at Karmouz hospital while the dimension of job security was 2.7 ± 0.6 and 2.5 ± 0.7 at Shark Al Madina and Karmouz hospitals, respectively. Stepwise multiple regression for Shark Al Madina hospital model revealed workload (β = 1.38, security (β = 5.04, and shortage of support staff (β = 3.39. For the Karmouz hospital model, stepwise multiple regression revealed security (β = 4.78 and shortage of resources (β = 3.66.Conclusion: Stressors among nurses appear to be the same despite the differences in organizational or hierarchical structure where they work or the type of consumer they serve. It

  19. Levels of occupational stress and stressful activities for nurses working in emergency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ricardo Ferreira da Fonseca

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to identify stress levels, areas and their activities identified as stressful by nurses working in the emergence in Manaus, AM, Brazil. It is an epidemiological, cross-sectional design, with 36 emergency nurses from December 2010 to January 2011. The Bianchi Stress Scale with 57 questions was used. The nurses were at risk for high levels of stress. The most stressful areas were the operation of the unit, conditions of work and personnel administration, and the most stressful activity was the request for equipment review and repair. The difference by Friedman test between the areas was significant (p <0.05, Dunn post-test significant (p <0.05 when compared by peers. The accumulation of management activities with the assistance activities can generate higher levels of stress, it is necessary to invest in improving the work environment and management support to minimize the stress experienced at work.

  20. Managing work-related stress in the district nursing workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Michelle

    2013-11-01

    This article aims to highlight the issue of work-related stress within the district nursing workplace. It will acknowledge how the management of work-related stress has previously been discussed within nursing literature and will consider the emerging relationship between staff working conditions, staff wellbeing and quality of patient care. It will reintroduce the Health and Safety Executive's (HSE's) Management Standards approach to tackling work-related stress, which provides management support to reduce environmental work stressors and encourage enabling work environments and a positive workplace culture.

  1. The Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index: An updated review and recommendations for use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swiger, Pauline A; Patrician, Patricia A; Miltner, Rebecca S Susie; Raju, Dheeraj; Breckenridge-Sproat, Sara; Loan, Lori A

    2017-09-01

    The Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index (PES-NWI) is an instrument, which measures the nursing practice environment - defined as factors that enhance or attenuate a nurse's ability to practice nursing skillfully and deliver high quality care. The purpose of this paper is to provide an updated review of the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index's use to date and provide recommendations that may be helpful to nursing leaders and researchers who plan to use this instrument. A narrative review of quantitative studies. PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health Literature were searched to identify relevant literature using the search terms, Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index and PES-NWI. Studies were included if they were published in English between 2010 and 2016 and focused on the relationship between the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index and patient, nurse, or organizational outcomes. Data extraction focused on the reported survey scores and the significance and strength of the reported associations. Forty-six articles, from 28 countries, were included in this review. The majority reported significant findings between the nursing practice environment and outcomes. Although some modifications have been made, the instrument has remained primarily unchanged since its development. Most often, the scores regarding staffing and resource adequacy remained the lowest. The frequency of use of this instrument has remained high. Many researchers advocate for a move beyond the study of the connection between the Practice Environment Scale and nurse, patient, and organizational outcomes. Research should shift toward identifying interventions that improve the environment in which nurses practice and determining if changing the environment results in improved care quality. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Psychometric evaluation of the Nursing Stress Scale (NSS) among Chinese nurses in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mei-Hua; Holzemer, William L; Faucett, Julia

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to translate the Nursing Stress Scale (NSS) into Chinese and test its reliability and validity among Chinese nurses in Taiwan. Potential participants were asked to self-administer a Chinese version of the NSS. The agreement estimation was used to determine the equivalence of the meaning between the Chinese and original English versions and was rated by five bilingual nurses as 92% accurate for the 34 items. The test-retest reliability for the NSS at 2 weeks was .71 (p = .022, n=10). Internal consistency reliability and factor analysis were tested with 770 nurses from 65 inpatient units at a medical center in Taiwan. The internal consistency of the Chinese version of the NSS for an overall coefficient alpha is .91 for the total scale, and ranges from .67 to .79 for the subscales. The Chinese version of the NSS explains 53.77% of the variance in work stressors among Chinese nurses in Taiwan. Overall, the Chinese version of the NSS is internally consistent but may not be stable over 2 weeks. There was adequate evidence of the reliability and validity of the NSS-Chinese as an instrument appropriate to measure work stress among Chinese nurses. The translated NSS could be a useful tool for examining the frequency and major sources of stress experienced by Chinese nurses in hospital settings, and for the development of appropriate interventions for stress reduction.

  3. Relationship between stress coping and burnout in Japanese hospital nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Megumi; Kitaoka-Higashiguchi, Kazuyo; Morikawa, Yuko; Nakagawa, Hideaki

    2009-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between stress coping and burnout in Japanese hospital nurses. Findings on effective stress management training are required in order to reduce nurse's stress and prevent it from becoming chronic. The study included 1291 nurses who completed the General Coping Questionnaire and the Japanese version of the Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey. The data were analysed using structural equation modelling. In women, a frequent use of cognitive reinterpretation predicted low exhaustion and cynicism and high professional efficacy. In men, a frequent use of problem solving predicted low cynicism and high professional efficacy. Although for women, a frequent use of problem solving predicted high professional efficacy that was similar to men, there was also a concurrent high exhaustion. These findings suggested that enhancement of cognitive coping skills for women and problem-solving skills for men could contribute to a reduction of burnout in nurses. Our findings suggested that effective intervention strategies in order to prevent hospital nurse's stress from becoming chronic might be different between men and women. This difference should be taken into account in nursing management.

  4. Does the arrival index predict physiological stress reactivity in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Veld, Danielle M J; Riksen-Walraven, J Marianne; de Weerth, Carolina

    2014-09-01

    Knowledge about children's stress reactivity and its correlates is mostly based on one stress task, making it hard to assess the generalizability of the results. The development of an additional stress paradigm for children, that also limits stress exposure and test time, could greatly advance this field of research. Research in adults may provide a starting point for the development of such an additional stress paradigm, as changes in salivary cortisol and alpha-amylase (sAA) over a 1-h pre-stress period in the laboratory correlated strongly with subsequent reactivity to stress task (Balodis et al., 2010, Psychoneuroendocrinology 35:1363-73). The present study examined whether such strong correlations could be replicated in 9- to 11-year-old children. Cortisol and sAA samples were collected from 158 children (83 girls) during a 2.5-h visit to the laboratory. This visit included a 1-h pre-stress period in which children performed some non-stressful tasks and relaxed before taking part in a psychosocial stress task (TSST-C). A higher cortisol arrival index was significantly and weakly correlated with a higher AUCg but unrelated to cortisol reactivity to the stressor. A higher sAA arrival index was significantly and moderately related to lower stress reactivity and to a lower AUCi. Children's personality and emotion regulation variables were unrelated to the cortisol and sAA arrival indices. The results of this study do not provide a basis for the development of an additional stress paradigm for children. Further replications in children and adults are needed to clarify the potential meaning of an arrival index.

  5. Taking aim at nurse stress: a call to action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashani, Mariam; Eliasson, Arn; Chrosniak, Linda; Vernalis, Marina

    2010-02-01

    The study investigates stress levels and related behaviors of nurses in a military medical center during wartime. In 2007, nurses completed a questionnaire survey with objective validation of data in a subsample using actigraphy over 12 weeks. Of 270 nurses, 255 (94%) returned surveys. A total of 81% reported moderately high or high stress with sources listed as work (66%) and fatigue (39%). Many reported coming to work despite feeling ill and/or stressed (13.6 days/3 months). In contrast, morale was high or moderately high in 71%. Nurses reported an average of 5.5 hours of sleep/night, 8.8 h/wk taken for self, and 3.8 h/wk for exercise. Actigraphy data showed an average of 6.0 hours of sleep/night. These findings highlight a mismatch between stress levels and coping perceptions indicating an inability to properly care for self. To manage the effects of chronic stress, nurse leaders should implement systems targeting healthy life balance.

  6. Relationship among perceived stress, anxiety, depression and craniocervical pain in nursing professionals under stress at work

    OpenAIRE

    Pozzebon,Daniela; Piccin,Chaiane Facco; Silva,Ana Maria Toniolo da; Corrêa,Eliane Castilhos Rodrigues

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: The appearance and evolution of some clinical pain conditions may be influenced by stress and other psychosocial factors. Face, head and cervical muscles may increase their activity and tension in the presence of stress, leading to craniocervicomandibular pain in individuals exposed to stress. Objective: To assess the relationship among perceived stress, anxiety, depression and craniocervicomandibular pain in nursing professionals under stress at work. Materials and...

  7. Stress Management and Coping Strategies among Nurses : A Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    Iyi, Obiora

    2015-01-01

    There is obvious need to have the safest working environments and the best quality of health care delivery to patients by nurses working in the hospitals. Effective stress management and coping strategies is one very important step towards this goal. This research aims to identify the major stressors for nurses and the most effective management and coping strategies as contained in literature. This involved excellent review of relevant articles in addition to deductive content analysis of the...

  8. Urban sprawl, physical activity, and body mass index: Nurses' Health Study and Nurses' Health Study II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Peter; Troped, Philip J; Hart, Jaime E; Joshu, Corinne E; Colditz, Graham A; Brownson, Ross C; Ewing, Reid; Laden, Francine

    2013-02-01

    We evaluated the association between the county sprawl index, a measure of residential density and street accessibility, and physical activity and body mass index (BMI). We conducted a multilevel cross-sectional analysis in a sample of Nurses' Health Study participants living throughout the United States in 2000 to 2001 (n = 136 592). In analyses adjusted for age, smoking status, race, and husband's education, a 1-SD (25.7) increase in the county sprawl index (indicating a denser, more compact county) was associated with a 0.13 kilograms per meters squared (95% confidence interval [CI] = -0.18, -0.07) lower BMI and 0.41 (95% CI = 0.17, 0.65) more metabolic equivalent (MET) hours per week of total physical activity, 0.26 (95% CI = 0.19, 0.33) more MET hours per week of walking, and 0.47 (95% CI = 0.34, 0.59) more MET hours per week of walking, bicycling, jogging, and running. We detected potential effect modification for age, previous disease status, husband's education level (a proxy for socioeconomic status), and race. Our results suggest that living in a dense, compact county may be conducive to higher levels of physical activity and lower BMI in women.

  9. How nurses can cope with stress and avoid burnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Stephanie

    2014-11-01

    This article draws on a systematic literature review to identify stressors in emergency and trauma nursing settings, and their potential effects on staff. After a search of relevant databases, six articles were chosen and analysed, and the main causes of stress in the workplace for emergency and trauma nurses were identified. These stressors include work demands and lack of time, lack of managerial support, patient aggression and violence, and staff exposure to traumatic events. Their effects on nurses include burnout, compassion fatigue, somatic complaints, mental health problems and difficulties in life outside work. The article goes on to discuss the implications of the findings on practice.

  10. Nurses respond to Hurricane Hugo victims' disaster stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinrich, S; Hardin, S B; Johnson, M

    1990-06-01

    Hugo, a class IV hurricane, hit South Carolina September 22, 1989, and left behind a wake of terror and destruction. Sixty-one nursing students and five faculty were involved in disaster relief with families devastated by the hurricane. A review of the literature led these authors to propose a formulation of the concept of disaster stress, a synthesis of theories that explains response to disaster as a crisis response, a stress response, or as posttraumatic stress. With the concept of disaster stress serving as a theoretical foundation, the nurses observed, assessed, and intervened with one population of hurricane Hugo victims, noting their immediate psychosocial reactions and coping mechanisms. Victims' reactions to disaster stress included confusion, irritability, lethargy, withdrawal, and crying. The most frequently observed coping strategy of these hurricane Hugo victims was talking about their experiences; other coping tactics involved humor, religion, and altruism.

  11. Stress among nurses: an examination of salivary cortisol levels on work and day off

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cecilia Pires da Rocha

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study evaluates the use of salivary cortisol concentration as a physiological index of the stress level among nurses on their work day and day off and correlates it with the questionnaire used to measure occupational stress in nurses (Inventário de Estresse em Enfermeiros - IEE. This is a comparative, cross-sectional descriptive study in which sociodemographic data, IEE results and salivary cortisol levels were used. Fifty-seven nurses participated in the study (80.7% females and a mean age of 37.1 years old. The IEE average score was 124.5. The average cortisol level was 564.1 ng/m on work day and 354.1 ng/mL on day off. Nurses who had double workdays presented high values of salivary cortisol during the work day (638.1 ng/mL. In conclusion, salivary cortisol identified the nurses’ stress level, and differences were found between a work day and day off. On the nurses’ day off, their salivary cortisol levels and stress scores were lower.

  12. Nurse stress at two different organizational settings in Alexandria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaghloul, Ashraf Az; Abou El Enein, Nagwa Y

    2009-04-15

    The objective of the study was to explore the difference in stress levels among nurses working at two different health care organizations and the determinants of nurse stress within each organization. Job stress is defined as the harmful emotional and physical reactions resulting from the interactions between the worker and her/his work environment where the demands of the job exceed the worker's capabilities and resources. A convenient sample of nurses in two hospitals in Alexandria; Shark Al Madina (n = 120) and Karmouz (n = 170) hospitals. All nurses present at the time of the study were approached to be included in the study. The response rate for Shark Al Madina hospital was 94% and for Karmouz hospital, 71%. Data collection took place using a nurse stress questionnaire previously developed and tested for validity and reliability to measure stress in clinical nursing practice. The 5% level of significance was used throughout the statistical analysis for all relevant tests. The highest mean stress scores were the same for both hospitals. The dimension of coping with new situations was 2.7 ± 0.6 at Shark Al Madina hospital and was 2.5 ± 0.7 at Karmouz hospital while the dimension of job security was 2.7 ± 0.6 and 2.5 ± 0.7 at Shark Al Madina and Karmouz hospitals, respectively. Stepwise multiple regression for Shark Al Madina hospital model revealed workload (β = 1.38), security (β = 5.04), and shortage of support staff (β = 3.39). For the Karmouz hospital model, stepwise multiple regression revealed security (β = 4.78) and shortage of resources (β = 3.66). Stressors among nurses appear to be the same despite the differences in organizational or hierarchical structure where they work or the type of consumer they serve. It is important to reduce occupational stress in nurses and to strengthen their coping resources to prevent nurse burnout. This could be achieved with job redesign, modification of shift work systems, and by offering occupational health

  13. [Job stress of nursing aides in Swiss nursing homes : Nonlinear canonical analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, A; Bernet, M; Metzenthin, P; Conca, A; Hahn, S

    2016-08-01

    Due to demographic changes, the demand for care in nursing homes for the elderly and infirmed is growing. At the same time nursing staff shortages are also increasing. Nursing aides are the primary care providers and comprise the largest staff group in Swiss nursing homes. They are exposed to various forms of job stress, which threaten job retention. The aim of this study was to discover which features of the work situation and which personal characteristics of the nursing aides were related to the workload. Data from nursing aides in Swiss nursing homes were investigated through a secondary analysis of a national quantitative cross-sectional study, using descriptive statistics and a nonlinear canonical correlation analysis. A total of 1054 nursing aides were included in the secondary analysis, 94.6 % of whom were women between the ages of 42 and 61 years. The job stress most frequently mentioned in the descriptive analysis, almost 60 % of the participants referred to it, was staff shortage. The nonlinear canonical correlation analysis revealed that many job strains are caused by social and organizational issues. In particular, a lack of support from supervisors was associated with staff not feeling appreciated. These job strains correlated with a high level of responsibility, the feeling of being unable to work independently and a feeling of being exploited. These strains were predominant in the nursing aides between 32 and 51 years old who had part time jobs but workloads of 80-90 %. Middle-aged nursing aides who worked to 80-90 % are particularly at risk to resign from the position prematurely. Measures need to be mainly implemented in the social and organizational areas. It can be assumed that a targeted individual support, recognition and promotion of nursing aides may decrease the level of job strain.

  14. Self-Esteem and Academic Stress among Nursing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya Pandey, R; Chalise, H N

    2015-01-01

    Stress and self-esteem are common issues that everyone has to cope with at some time in their lives and they could also affect other things going on in a persons' life. Academic stress is psychological condition often experienced by college students as, to some extent, being multidimensional variables. Among others are self-esteem and psychological well-being which are considered to have influences in explaining why college students experience stress. Objective The objective of this study was to assess the self-esteem level and academic stress among the nursing students. Method This is a cross-sectional study carried out in 2012. Total respondents were 190 nursing students selected randomly from Kathmandu University. Academic stress was assed using 30-item Scale for Assessing Academic Stress (SAAS) and Self esteem was assessed using 10 item Rosenberg's Self-Esteem Scale. Information was collected through the self-administered questionnaire. The collected data was analyzed using SPSS version 16 software. Simple statistics measurement, percentage, means, correlation was used for the data analysis. Result This study shows mean age of the respondent's was 20.44±2.67 years. Majority (88%) of students getting financial support of less than NRs 6000 per month and 64% have low perceived family support. This study found mean score of self esteem and academic stress was 11.9 and 18.4 respectively. Further nearly 78% students have low self esteem and 74% have high academic stress. Significant variable for high academic stress and low self esteem were lower the age, lower the education and low perceived family support. Lower financial support has also high academic stress. Conclusion Nursing students have low self esteem and high academic stress. Intervention to lower the academic stress and increase the self esteem should be carried out so that the learning of students will be efficient.

  15. [Empowerment, stress vulnerability and burnout among Portuguese nursing staff].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orgambídez-Ramos, Alejandro; Borrego-Alés, Yolanda; Ruiz-Frutos, Carlos

    2018-01-01

    The work environment in Portuguese hospitals, characterized by economic cutbacks, can lead to higher levels of burnout experienced by nursing staff. Furthermore, vulnerability to stress can negatively affect the perception of burnout in the workplace. However, structural empowerment is an organizational process that can prevent and decrease burnout among nurses. Consequently, the aim of the study was to examine to what extent structural empowerment and vulnerability to stress can play a predictive role in core burnout in a sample of Portuguese nurses. A convenience sample of 297 nursing staff members from Portuguese hospitals was used in this study. Core burnout was negatively and significantly related to all the dimensions of structural empowerment, and it was positively and significantly related to vulnerability to stress. Regression models showed that core burnout was significantly predicted by access to funds, access to opportunities and vulnerability to stress. Organizational administrations must make every effort in designing interventions focused on structural empowerment, as well as interventions focused on individual interventions that enhance skills for coping with stress.

  16. Stress in emergency departments: experiences of nurses and doctors.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Healy, Sonya

    2012-01-31

    The effects of stressful incidents on emergency department (ED) staff can be profound. Witnessing aggression, violence or the death of patients, or participating in resuscitation, can be emotionally and physically demanding. Despite the frequency of these events, ED staff do not become immune to the stress they cause, and are often ill prepared and under supported to cope with them. This article reports on a study of nurses\\' and doctors\\' attitudes to, and experiences of, workplace stress in three EDs in Ireland, and offers some suggestions on how stress among ED staff can be reduced.

  17. [Reflections on stress and burnout and their relationship with nursing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murofuse, Neide Tiemi; Abranches, Sueli Soldati; Napoleão, Anamaria Alves

    2005-01-01

    This bibliographic review aimed to differentiate between stress and Burnout and to establish their relationship with nursing work to support the understanding of psychical suffering at work. The study was based on the analysis and interpretation of articles, thesis and dissertations produced between 1990 and 2001. Although there is a consensus among the individuals on the existence of stress and burnout, there are several controversies surrounding these terms. These theories were created in the context of capitalist production increase. Stress refers to a personal tiring that interferes in the life of the person but not necessarily in his/her relationship with the work. Burnout is a syndrome involving negative attitudes and behaviors towards users, clients, organization and work. It is a gradual process of subjective experiences that result in practical and emotional problems to workers and organizations. Nursing work facilitates stress and burnout and causes suffering and illness among workers.

  18. Patient safety and nursing: interface with stress and Burnout Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Cristiane Filgueira Martins Rodrigues

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To analyze studies on stress, Burnout Syndrome, and patient safety in the scope of nursing care in the hospital environment. Method: This was an integrative literature review. Data collection was performed in February 2016 in the following databases: Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online - PubMed/MEDLINE, Latin American and Caribbean Literature in Health Sciences - LILACS. Results: Ten scientific productions were selected, which listed that factors contributing to stress and Burnout Syndrome of nursing professionals are the work environment as a source of stress, and excessive workload as a source of failures. Conclusion: The analysis found that the stress and Burnout Syndrome experienced by these professionals lead to greater vulnerability and development of unsafe care, and factors such as lack of organizational support can contribute to prevent these failures.

  19. Sleep, stress and compensatory behaviors in Australian nurses and midwives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jillian Dorrian

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe sleep, stress and compensatory behaviors in nurses and midwives. METHODS: The study included 41 midwives and 21 nurses working in Australian hospitals between 2005 and 2009. Participation was voluntary. All participants recorded on a daily basis their work and sleep hours, levels of stress and exhaustion, caffeine intake and use of sleep aids for a month (1,736 days, 1,002 work shifts. RESULTS: Participants reported moderate to high levels of stress and exhaustion on 20-40% of work days; experienced sleep disruption on more than 50% of work days; struggled to remain awake on 27% of work days; and suffered extreme drowsiness or experienced a near accident while travelling home on 9% of workdays. Age, perceived sleep duration and work hours were significant predictors of caffeine intake. About 60% of participants reported using sleep aids (about 20% reported taking prescription medications and 44% of nurses and 9% of midwives reported alcohol use as a sleep aid at least once during the study. Stress and workdays were significant predictors of sedative use. Overall, 22% reported being indifferent or mildly dissatisfied with their job. CONCLUSIONS: Sleep problems, high levels of stress and exhaustion and low job satisfaction are prevalent among nurses and midwives. The use of alcohol and sleeping pills as sleep aids, and the use of caffeine to help maintain alertness is also common. Nurses and midwives may use caffeine to compensate for reduced sleep, especially on workdays, and sleeping pills to cope with their daily work-related stress.

  20. Is work stress in palliative care nurses a cause for concern? A literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Louise; Cant, Robyn; Sellick, Kenneth; O'Connor, Margaret; Lee, Susan; Burney, Sue; Karimi, Leila

    2012-11-01

    Palliative care nurses are at risk of work stress because their role involves exposure to frequent deaths and family grieving. Little is known about their degree of stress or whether they suffer stress or burnout more than nurses in other disciplines. The aim of this paper is to critically examine the current literature concerning stress and burnout in palliative care nurses. Sixteen papers were included in the review. Although work demands were a common cause of stress in the studies reported, there was no strong evidence that palliative care or hospice nurses experienced higher levels of stress than nurses in other disciplines. Common causes of stress were the work environment, role conflict, and issues with patients and their families. Constructive coping styles appeared to help nurses to manage stress. Managers have a key role in providing education and training for palliative care nurses to support their personal development and to help reduce vulnerability to and the impact of stress in the workplace.

  1. Effect of the clinical support nurse role on work-related stress for nurses on an inpatient pediatric oncology unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ann; Kicis, Jennifer; Sangha, Gurjit

    2007-01-01

    High patient acuity, heavy workload, and patient deaths can all contribute to work-related stress for pediatric oncology nurses. A new leadership role, the clinical support nurse (CSN), was recently initiated on the oncology unit of a large Canadian pediatric hospital to support frontline staff and reduce some of the stresses related to clinical activity. The CSN assists nurses with complex patient care procedures, provides hands-on education at the bedside, and supports staff in managing challenging family situations. This study explores the effect of the CSN role on the nurses' work-related stress using the Stressor Scale for Pediatric Oncology Nurses. A total of 58 nurses participated in this study for a response rate of 86%. The results show that the intensity of work-related stress experienced by nurses in this study is significantly less (P < .001) on shifts staffed with a CSN compared with shifts without a CSN.

  2. Factors related to stress and coping among Chinese nurses in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaghan, P; Tak-Ying, S A; Wyatt, P A

    2000-06-01

    Few empirical studies have investigated the issues linked to Hong Kong nurses work-related health. The present study investigated factors related to stress and coping among Chinese nurses in Hong Kong. The researchers employed a cross-sectional survey and made within-group comparisons of nurses' stress and coping. Using stratified random sampling the researchers selected nurses from the mailing list of a local professional organization. One hundred and sixty-eight (33.6%) nurses responded. Nurses reported lower stress levels than other workers assessed with the same measure. Paediatric nurses reported the highest stress levels. Nurses at the lower grades reported higher stress levels than nurses at the higher grades. Single nurses had marginally higher stress scores than married nurses and females had slightly higher stress scores than males. However, none of these results were statistically significant. The respondents' major sources of stress were related to nursing issues like too much work, interpersonal relationships, and dealing with hospital administration. The respondents coped with their stresses by seeking support from friends and colleagues, using different cognitive strategies and through leisure activities. There was a statistically significant link between the respondents' stress and sickness levels. The results raise issues about the nature of nurses' working experiences.

  3. Comparison of indexing times among articles from medical, nursing, and pharmacy journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Ryan W

    2016-04-15

    Results of an analysis of the times to indexing of articles published in medical, nursing, and pharmacy journals are reported. MEDLINE data were retrieved for articles published in selected general practice medical, nursing, and pharmacy journals and entered into the PubMed system in 2012 and 2013. Collected data included PubMed entry date, date of indexing with Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) terms, and publication characteristics. Survival analysis was performed to assess the primary outcome of time to indexing. Cox proportional hazards models were developed to assess the effect of healthcare discipline and source journal on the primary outcome. Data were collected for 19,259 articles, of which 78.7%, 12.6%, and 8.7% originated from medical, nursing, and pharmacy journals, respectively. For medical, pharmacy, and nursing journals, 97.8%, 90.8%, and 50.1% of articles, respectively, were indexed within one year of PubMed entry; the corresponding median (interquartile range) times to indexing were 52 (20-68), 186 (150-246), and 252 (168-301) days. Unadjusted hazard ratios derived from Cox models indicated that indexing within one year was significantly less likely for articles published in pharmacy or nursing journals versus medical journals and for articles from all evaluated journals versus a designated reference publication (New England Journal of Medicine). Analysis of major medical, nursing, and pharmacy journals found that articles from nursing and pharmacy journals were indexed with MeSH terms more slowly than articles from medical journals. Journal identity was significantly associated with time to indexing. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Predicting stress in pre-registration nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryjmachuk, Steven; Richards, David A

    2007-02-01

    To determine which variables from a pool of potential predictors predict General Health Questionnaire 'caseness' in pre-registration nursing students. Cross-sectional survey, utilizing self-report measures of sources of stress, stress (psychological distress) and coping, together with pertinent demographic measures such as sex, ethnicity, educational programme and nursing specialty being pursued, and age, social class and highest qualifications on entry to the programme. Questionnaire packs were distributed to all pre-registration nursing students (N=1,362) in a large English university. Completed packs were coded, entered into statistical software and subjected to a series of logistic regression analyses. Of the questionnaire packs 1,005 (74%) were returned, of which up to 973 were available for the regression analyses undertaken. Four logistic regression models were considered and, on the principle of parsimony, a single model was chosen for discussion. This model suggested that the key predictors of caseness in the population studied were self-report of pressure, whether or not respondents had children (specifically, whether these children were pre-school or school-age), scores on a 'personal problems' scale and the type of coping employed. The overall caseness rate among the population was around one-third. Since self-report and personal, rather than academic, concerns predict stress, personal teachers need to play a key role in supporting students through 'active listening', especially when students self-report high levels of stress and where personal/social problems are evident. The work-life balance of students, especially those with child-care responsibilities, should be a central tenet in curriculum design in nurse education (and, indeed, the education of other professional and occupational groups). There may be some benefit in offering stress management (coping skills) training to nursing students and, indeed, students of other disciplines.

  5. Application of case mix index in the allocation of nursing human resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Binru; Chen, Xi; Li, Qiuping

    2018-02-23

    To investigate the feasibility of the case mix index and compare the allocation of nursing human resources between two departments of a hospital with different case mix indexes in China. The case mix index is used to assess the resource allocation of all cases in two departments of a hospital. Its values can determine the resource allocation required to diagnose and treat the patients. Clinical data were obtained from 23 different departments in 2015 and analysed retrospectively from October to November, 2016. Factors influencing the allocation of registered nurses were identified, and balanced quantities of patients with different case mix indexes were chosen from two departments. Spearman correlation analysis was performed. The per capita nursing workload was significant (r = .669, p = .000). The length of hospital stay, quantity of nurses, and department case mix index were correlated with the nursing workload (t = 4.211, p = .000; t = 2.962, p = .008; t = 2.266, p = .035). Education levels (Z = -1.391, p = .164) and the professional titles (Z = -1.832, p = .067) of the nurses were not statistically significant, whereas the registered nurse level differed between two departments (Z = -2.125, p = .034). The case management index provides references for the efficient allocation of registered nurses in clinical practice. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. [Job retention and nursing practice environment of hospital nurses in Japan applying the Japanese version of the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index (PES-NWI)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Yasuko; Nagano, Midori; Fukuda, Takashi; Hashimoto, Michio

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how the nursing practice environment affects job retention and the turnover rate among hospital nurses. The Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index (PES-NWI) was applied to investigate the nurse working environment from the viewpoint of hospital nurses in Japan. Methods A postal mail survey was conducted using the PES-NWI questionnaire targeting 2,211 nurses who were working at 91 wards in 5 hospitals situated in the Tokyo metropolitan area from February to March in 2008. In the questionnaire, hospital nurses were asked about characteristics such as sex, age and work experience as a nurse, whether they would work at the same hospital in the next year, the 31 items of the PES-NWI and job satisfaction. Nurse managers were asked to provide staff numbers to calculate the turnover rate of each ward. Logistic regression analyses were carried out, with "intention to retain or leave the workplace next year" as the dependent variable, with composite and 5 sub-scale scores of the PES-NWI and nurse characteristics as independent variables. Correlation coefficients were calculated to investigate the relationship between nurse turnover rates and nursing practice environments. A total of 1,067 full-time nurses (48.3%) from 5 hospitals responded. Almost all of them were men (95.9%), with an average age of 29.2 years old. They had an average of 7.0 years total work experience in hospitals and 5.8 years of experience at their current hospital. Cronbach's alpha coefficients were 0.75 for composite of the PES-NWI, and 0.77-0.85 for the sub-scales. All correlation coefficients between PES-NWI and job satisfaction were significant (P Leadership, and Support of Nurses" and "Staffing and Resource Adequacy" among the 5 sub-scales correlated with the intention of nurses to stay on (P < 0.05). The means for turnover rate were 10.4% for nurses and 17.6% for newly hired nurses. These rates were significantly correlated to the composite and

  7. A study of stress and burnout in nursing students in Hong Kong: A questionnaire survey

    OpenAIRE

    Watson, R.; Deary, I.; Thompson, D.; Li, G.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Stress in nursing students may be related to attrition from nursing programmes and lead to a shortage of nurses entering clinical careers. In addition, stress leads to psychological morbidity which may have profound adverse consequences for individual nursing students.\\ud \\ud Objectives: To follow a cohort of nursing students from entry to their programme to the end of the first year and to study the interrelationship between a range of psychological variables including personalit...

  8. Differences in job stress experienced by female and male Japanese psychiatric nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yada, Hironori; Abe, Hiroshi; Omori, Hisamitsu; Matsuo, Hisae; Masaki, Otsubo; Ishida, Yasushi; Katoh, Takahiko

    2014-10-01

    In psychiatric nursing, female nurses tend to spend more time building rapport with patients and developing cooperative working relationships with colleagues; they encounter more sexual harassment by patients. In contrast, male nurses respond to aggressive patients and tend to resist physically caring for female patients; they encounter more physical and verbal assault from patients. These gender differences might result in differences in job-related stress. We quantitatively examined gender differences in psychiatric nurses' job stress. The Psychiatric Nurse Job Stressor Scale and the Stress Reaction Scale of the Brief Job Stress Questionnaire were administered to 159 female and 85 male Japanese psychiatric nurses. The results indicated that female nurses had significantly higher stress levels than males related to psychiatric nursing ability, attitude towards nursing, and stress reactions of fatigue and anxiety. Moreover, the factors affecting stress reactions differed somewhat between sexes. In particular, male nurses reported that greater irritability was affected by patients' attitudes. Their anxiety and somatic symptoms were affected by their attitude towards nursing, and depressed mood was affected by psychiatric nursing ability. Knowledge of these differences can lead to better mental health-care interventions for psychiatric nurses. © 2014 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  9. Conflict and Stress in Hospital Nursing: Improving Communicative Responses to Enduring Professional Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreland, Jennifer J; Apker, Julie

    2016-07-01

    Nurses function as central figures of health teams, coordinating direct care and communication between team members, patients, and their families. The importance of nurses to health care cannot be understated, but neither can the environmental struggles nurses routinely encounter in their jobs. Organizational communication and nursing scholarship show conflict and stress as two visible and ongoing challenges. This case study aims to (a) explore the ways conflict communication and communicative stress are experienced and endure in nursing and (b) understand how nurses discursively (mis)manage conflict and stress. Open-ended survey comments from nurses (N = 135) employed at a large teaching and research hospital were qualitatively analyzed. Weick's model of organizing, specifically his notion of communication cycles, emerged as a conceptual lens helpful for understanding cyclical conflict and stress. Results show that exclusionary communication, specifically nonparticipatory and unsupportive messages, contribute to nurse conflict and stress. Nurses tend to (mis)manage conflict and stress using respectful and disrespectful discourse. These communication patterns can facilitate or prohibit positive change. Metaphorically, nurse communicative conflict and stress can be depicted as fire. Relationships can go up in flames due to out-of-control fires in the form of destructive conflict. However, conflict and stress, like fire, can be harnessed for positive ends such as organizational decision making and innovation. Findings suggest conveying respect may help nurses manage and even avoid flames of conflict and stress. Solutions are offered to mitigate the effects of conflict and stress while developing respectful organizational cultures.

  10. Stress and suicide in the Nurses' Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feskanich, D; Hastrup, J L; Marshall, J R; Colditz, G A; Stampfer, M J; Willett, W C; Kawachi, I

    2002-02-01

    Although stress is thought to be a risk factor for suicide, most research has been retrospective or has focused on attempted suicides or suicide ideation. This study examined prospectively the associations between self perceived stress, diazepam use, and death from suicide among adult women. A cohort study was conducted with 14 years of follow up. Stress at home and at work were assessed by questionnaire and scored on a four point scale: minimal, light, moderate, or severe. Eleven states within the United States. Female nurses (n=94 110) who were 36 to 61 years of age when they answered questions on stress and diazepam use in 1982. During 1 272 000 person years of observation 73 suicides were identified. After adjustment for age, smoking, coffee consumption, alcohol intake, and marital status, the relation between self reported stress and suicide remained U shaped. Compared with the light home and work stress categories, which had the lowest incidences of suicide, risks were increased among women reporting either severe (relative risk (RR) = 3.7, 95% confidence intervals (CI) 1.7 to 8.3) or minimal (RR=2.1, 95% CI 1.0 to 4.5) home stress and either severe (RR=1.9, 95% CI 0.8 to 4.7) or minimal (RR=2.4, 95% CI 0.9 to 6.1) work stress. When responses to home and work stress were combined, there was an almost fivefold increase in risk of suicide among women in the high stress category. Risk of suicide was over eightfold among women reporting high stress or diazepam use compared with those reporting low stress and no diazepam use. The relation between self reported stress and suicide seems to be U shaped among adult women. The excess risk for those reporting minimal stress may reflect denial or undiagnosed depression or an association with some other unmeasured risk factor for suicide.

  11. Nurses' work-related stress in China: a comparison between psychiatric and general hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yun-Ke; Xiang, Yu-Tao; An, Feng-Rong; Wang, Jing; Zeng, Jiao-Ying; Ungvari, Gabor S; Newhouse, Robin; Yu, Doris S F; Lai, Kelly Y C; Ding, Yan-Ming; Yu, Liuyang; Zhang, Xiang-Yang; Chiu, Helen F K

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the level of work-related stress in nurses in China.This study compared the level of work-related stress between female nurses working in psychiatric and general hospitals in China. A descriptive comparative cross-sectional design was used.A consecutive sample of nurses from two psychiatric hospitals (N = 297) and a medical unit (N = 408) of a general hospital completed a written survey including socio-demographic data and a measure of work-related stress (Nurse Stress Inventory). Compared to the nurses working in the general hospital, those working in the psychiatric setting had a higher level of stress in the domains of working environment and resources (p working experience, and working in psychiatric hospitals were associated with high work-related stress (b = .2, p work-related stress, specific stress management workshops and effective staff supportive initiatives for Chinese nurses are warranted.

  12. The Impact of Perceived Stress and Coping Adequacy on the Health of Nurses: A Pilot Investigation

    OpenAIRE

    Jordan, Timothy R.; Khubchandani, Jagdish; Wiblishauser, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Stress and coping abilities influence the health and work performance of nurses. However, little is known about the combined influence of stress perception and perceived coping adequacy and its impact on the health of nurses. This study examined the relationship between stress, coping, and the combined influences of perceived stress and coping abilities on health and work performance. A valid and reliable questionnaire was completed by 120 nurses in a Midwestern hospital in the USA. In genera...

  13. A Three-Dimensional Index for Characterizing Crop Water Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica A. Torrion

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The application of remotely sensed estimates of canopy minus air temperature (Tc-Ta for detecting crop water stress can be limited in semi-arid regions, because of the lack of full ground cover (GC at water-critical crop stages. Thus, soil background may restrict water stress interpretation by thermal remote sensing. For partial GC, the combination of plant canopy temperature and surrounding soil temperature in an image pixel is expressed as surface temperature (Ts. Soil brightness (SB for an image scene varies with surface soil moisture. This study evaluates SB, GC and Ts-Ta and determines a fusion approach to assess crop water stress. The study was conducted (2007 and 2008 on a commercial scale, center pivot irrigated research site in the Texas High Plains. High-resolution aircraft-based imagery (red, near-infrared and thermal was acquired on clear days. The GC and SB were derived using the Perpendicular Vegetation Index approach. The Ts-Ta was derived using an array of ground Ts sensors, thermal imagery and weather station air temperature. The Ts-Ta, GC and SB were fused using the hue, saturation, intensity method, respectively. Results showed that this method can be used to assess water stress in reference to the differential irrigation plots and corresponding yield without the use of additional energy balance calculation for water stress in partial GC conditions.

  14. Occupational stress and coping strategies among emergency department nurses of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Dong-Mei; Sun, Ning; Hong, Su; Fan, Yu-ying; Kong, Fan-ying; Li, Qiu-jie

    2015-08-01

    Emergency department(ED) nurses work in a rapidly changing environment with patients that have wide variety of conditions. Occupational stress in emergency department nurses is a common problem. The purpose of this study was to describe the relationship between coping strategies and occupational stress among ED nurses in China. A correlational, cross-sectional design was adopted. Two questionnaires were given to a random sample of 127 ED nurses registered at the Heilongjiang Nurses' Association. Data were collected from the nurses that worked in the ED of five general hospitals in Harbin China. Occupational stress and coping strategies were measured by two questionnaires. A multiple regression model was applied to analyze the relationship between stress and coping strategies. The stressors of ED nurses mainly come from the ED specialty of nursing (2.97±0.55), workload and time distribution (2.97±0.58). The mean score of positive coping strategies was 2.19±0.35, higher than the norm (1.78±0.52). The mean score of negative coping strategies was 1.20±0.61, lower than the norm (1.59±0.66), both had significant statistical difference (Pwork, criticism, instrument equipment shortage, night shift, rank of professional were the influence factors about occupational stress to positive coping styles. Too much documents work, and medical insurance for ED nurses were the influential factors on occupational stress to negative coping styles. This study identified several factors associated with occupational stress in ED nurses. These results could be used to guide nurse managers of ED nurses to reduce work stress. The managers could pay more attention to the ED nurse's coping strategies which can further influence their health state and quality of nursing care. Reducing occupational stress and enhancing coping strategies are vital not only for encouraging nurses but also for the future of nursing development. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. What stresses remote area nurses? Current knowledge and future action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenthall, Sue; Wakerman, John; Opie, Tess; Dollard, Maureen; Dunn, Sandra; Knight, Sabina; Macleod, Martha; Watson, Colin

    2009-08-01

    Review and synthesise the literature identifying the stresses experienced by remote area nurses (RANs). Identify interventions implemented to address identified stresses. Explore the use of the job demands-resources (JD-R) model. A comprehensive literature review was conducted using the meta-databases Ovid and Informit. Remote Australian primary health care centres. The reported demands experienced by RANs can be grouped into four themes: (i) the remote context; (ii) workload and extended scope of practice; (iii) poor management; and (iv) violence in the workplace and community. In this high-demand, low-resource context, the JD-R model of occupational stress is particularly pertinent to examining occupational stress among RANs. The demands on RANs, such as the isolated geographical context, are immutable. However, there are key areas where resources can be enhanced to better meet the high level of need. These are: (i) adequate and appropriate education, training and orientation; (ii) appropriate funding of remote health services; and (iii) improved management practices and systems. There is a lack of empirical evidence relating to stresses experienced by RANs. The literature identifies some of the stresses experienced by RANs as unique to the remote context, while some are related to high demands coupled with a deficit of appropriate resources. Use of models, such as the JD-R model of occupational stress, might assist in identifying key areas where resources can be enhanced to better meet the high level of need and reduce RANs' levels of stress.

  16. Job stress, coping and health perceptions of Hong Kong primary care nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joseph K L

    2003-04-01

    Few empirical studies have investigated job stress, coping and health perceptions of nurses working in primary care settings. One thousand self-report questionnaires, which consisted of the modified Nursing Stress Scale, Coping with Work Stress Checklist and Health Perceptions Questionnaire, were distributed randomly to a group of Hong Kong nurses working in primary care settings, to examine issues related to job stress. Three hundred and sixty-two nurses responded. Findings indicated that nurses in these settings experienced low-to-moderate frequency of stress, adopted direct coping strategies, and perceived themselves as rather healthy. There were also statistically significant links between job stress, coping and perceived health status. The findings of this study suggest that job stress, coping and health perception of nurses working in primary care settings were distinct from their colleagues working in acute care settings.

  17. The professional stress of nurses employed in medical institutions in the Lublin Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Michalik

    2017-08-01

    Conclusions: Nurses were heavily exposed to psychological stressors affecting their work. Most of the nurses surveyed were satisfied with their work, but a significant percentage of the respondents reported symptoms of chronic stress and fatigue.

  18. The incidence of technological stress among baccalaureate nurse educators using technology during course preparation and delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Mary S

    2009-01-01

    The concept of technology-related stress was first introduced in the 1980s when computers became more prevalent in the business and academic world. Nurse educators have been impacted by the rapid changes in technology in recent years. A review of the literature revealed no research studies that have been conducted to investigate the incidence of technological stress among nurse educators. The purpose of this descriptive-correlational study was to describe the technological stressors that Louisiana baccalaureate nurse educators experienced while teaching nursing theory courses. A researcher-developed questionnaire, the nurse educator technostress scale (NETS) was administered to a census sample of 311 baccalaureate nurse educators in Louisiana. Findings revealed that Louisiana baccalaureate nurse educators are experiencing technological stress. The variable, perceived administrative support for use of technology in the classroom, was a significant predictor in a regression model predicting Louisiana baccalaureate nurse educators' technological stress (F=14.157, p<.001).

  19. The relationship between sex life satisfaction and job stress of married nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hsiu-Hui; Lung, For-Wey; Lee, Pei-Rong; Kao, Wei-Tsung; Lee, Yu-Lan

    2012-08-19

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship among work stress, sex life satisfaction, and mental health of married nurses. Demographic information, work stress, sex life satisfaction, sexual desire and mental health measured using the Chinese Health Questionnaire, data were collected from 100 married nurses in Taiwan. Sex life satisfaction and age were negatively correlated, but sex life satisfaction and sexual desire were positively correlated. The mental health of over-committed nursing staff was not affected. Higher reward for effort was positively correlated with sex life satisfaction. No matter whether job stress was high or low, receiving a higher reward for effort led to better sex life satisfaction, which had a satisfying positive effect on the nurses' lives. To improve nursing care quality at the hospital, nursing administrators should assist nurses in confronting work stress via positive adjustment, which is associated with the nurses' sexual harmony, and quality of life.

  20. Factors affecting the job stress and job satisfaction of Australian nurses: implications for recruitment and retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartram, Timothy; Joiner, Therese A; Stanton, Pauline

    2004-10-01

    Against a background of nurse shortages in Australian hospitals, a significant challenge facing the healthcare sector is the recruitment and retention of nurses. The job stress and job satisfaction of nurses have been associated with recruitment and retention. The aim of this study is to consider two factors that may contribute to the job satisfaction and job stress of nurses: social support and empowerment. Using a sample of 157 registered nurses in a private hospital in Melbourne, Australia, we found that social support derived from the nurse's supervisor and work colleagues lowered job stress and at the same time increased job satisfaction. The presence of nurse empowerment, meaning, impact, competence and self-determination, also lowered job stress and increased job satisfaction. Finally, we discuss contributions of this study and implications for recruitment and retention of nurses in the health sector.

  1. A physical workload index to evaluate a safe resident handling program for nursing home personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurowski, Alicia; Buchholz, Bryan; Punnett, Laura

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to obtain a comprehensive analysis of the physical workload of clinical staff in long-term care facilities, before and after a safe resident handling program (SRHP). Ergonomic exposures of health care workers include manual handling of patients and many non-neutral postures. A comprehensive assessment requires the integration of loads from these varied exposures into a single metric. The Postures, Activities, Tools, and Handling observational protocol, customized for health care, was used for direct observations of ergonomic exposures in clinical jobs at 12 nursing homes before the SRHP and 3, 12, 24, and 36 months afterward. Average compressive forces on the spine were estimated for observed combinations of body postures and manual handling and then weighted by frequencies of observed time for the combination. These values were summed to obtain a biomechanical index for nursing assistants and nurses across observation periods. The physical workload index (PWI) was much higher for nursing assistants than for nurses and decreased more after 3 years (-24% versus -2.5%). Specifically during resident handling, the PWI for nursing assistants decreased by 41% of baseline value. Spinal loading was higher for nursing assistants than for nurses in long-term care centers. Both job groups experienced reductions in physical loading from the SRHP, especially the nursing assistants and especially while resident handling. The PWI facilitates a comprehensive investigation of physical loading from both manual handling and non-neutral postures. It can be used in any work setting to identify high-risk tasks and determine whether reductions in one exposure are offset by increases in another.

  2. The Bahasa Melayu version of the Nursing Stress Scale among nurses: a reliability study in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosnawati, Muhamad Robat; Moe, Htay; Masilamani, Retneswari; Darus, A

    2010-10-01

    The Nursing Stress Scale (NSS) has been shown to be a valid and reliable instrument to assess occupational stressors among nurses. The NSS, which was previously used in the English version, was translated and back-translated into Bahasa Melayu. This study was conducted to assess the reliability of the Bahasa Melayu version of the NSS among nurses for future studies in this country. The reliability of the NSS was assessed after its readministration to 30 nurses with a 2-week interval. The Spearman coefficient was calculated to assess its stability. The internal consistency was measured through 4 measures: Cronbach's α, Spearman-Brown, Guttman split-half, and standardized item α coefficients. The total response rate was 70%. Test-retest reliability showed remarkable stability (Spearman's ρ exceeded .70). All 4 measures of internal consistency among items indicated a satisfactory level (coefficients in the range of .68 to .87). In conclusion, the Bahasa Melayu version of the NSS is a reliable and useful instrument for measuring the possible stressors at the workplace among nurses.

  3. Stress and stressors in the clinical environment: a comparative study of fourth-year student nurses and newly qualified general nurses in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Suresh, Patricia

    2013-03-01

    To measure and compare the perceived levels of job-related stress and stressors of newly qualified nurses and fourth-year student nurses in the clinical environment and to explore the participants\\' views on stress and stressors.

  4. Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Nurses Working in an Open Ward: Stress and Work Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie-Tremblay, Mélanie; Feeley, Nancy; Lavigne, Geneviève L; Genest, Christine; Robins, Stéphanie; Fréchette, Julie

    2016-01-01

    There is some research on the impact of open-ward unit design on the health of babies and the stress experienced by parents and nurses in neonatal intensive care units. However, few studies have explored the factors associated with nurse stress and work satisfaction among nurses practicing in open-ward neonatal intensive care units. The purpose of this study was to examine what factors are associated with nurse stress and work satisfaction among nurses practicing in an open-ward neonatal intensive care unit. A cross-sectional correlational design was used in this study. Participants were nurses employed in a 34-bed open-ward neonatal intensive care unit in a major university-affiliated hospital in Montréal, Quebec, Canada. A total of 94 nurses were eligible, and 86 completed questionnaires (91% response rate). Descriptive statistics were computed to describe the participants' characteristics. To identify factors associated with nurse stress and work satisfaction, correlational analysis and multiple regression analyses were performed with the Nurse Stress Scale and the Global Work Satisfaction scores as the dependent variables. Different factors predict neonatal intensive care unit nurses' stress and job satisfaction, including support, family-centered care, performance obstacles, work schedule, education, and employment status. In order to provide neonatal intensive care units nurses with a supportive environment, managers can provide direct social support to nurses and influence the culture around teamwork.

  5. Role stress among first-line nurse managers and registered nurses - a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Gunilla; Sandahl, Christer; Hasson, Dan

    2013-04-01

    Studies show that first-line nurse managers (F-LNMs) experience high psychological job demands and inadequate managerial guidance. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether F-LNMs have higher stress levels and show more signs of stress-related ill health than registered nurses (RNs). The aim of this study was to examine possible differences in self-rated health between F-LNMs and RNs on various psychosocial factors (e.g. job demand, job control and managerial support). Data were collected at a university hospital in Sweden. Sixty-four F-LNMs and 908 RNs filled in a web-based questionnaire. Both F-LNMs and RNs reported having good health. Approximately 10-15% of the F-LNMs and RNs showed signs of being at risk for stress-related ill health. Statistically significant differences (Mann-Whitney U-test) were found in the distribution between the F-LNMs and the RNs on three indices of job control, job demand and managerial support. Our findings suggest that F-LNMs were able to cope with high-demand job situations because of relatively high control over work. The implication for nursing management shows the needs for a work environment for both F-LNMs and RNs that includes high job control and good managerial support. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Stress, depression, and anxiety among undergraduate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernomas, Wanda M; Shapiro, Carla

    2013-11-07

    Admission to a professional program marks the beginning of fulfilling a career goal. However, the rigors of professional education can be demanding. Stress, depression, and anxiety (SDA) can interfere with learning, affect academic performance, and impair clinical practice performance. Studies report a general increase in the severity of and extent of mental health problems among college/university students. The literature regarding nursing students' mental health distress identifies academic and personal sources of stress and coping efforts, with emphasis on the stress and anxiety associated with clinical practice. This cross-sectional descriptive exploratory study investigated levels of SDA among nursing students in 3 years of a university-based program. The association between quality of life indicators including known stressors, such as financial concerns and balance between school and personal life, and SDA was also investigated. Through an online survey, 437 participants from one mid-western Canadian undergraduate nursing program completed the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales and provided data on quality of life indicators and demographic information. Participants also were invited to provide narrative data about their experiences with SDA. This article will present significant findings including: levels of SDA; comparisons between our sample and a normative sample on the dimensions of SDA; and the results of multiple regression analysis identifying significant predictors of each dimension. Themes from the qualitative comments from 251 of the participants were identified and added depth and clarity to the quantitative findings. The predominant themes represented were: perceptions of clinical practice, coping, personal issues, and balancing school, work, and personal life. Implications and recommendations for curriculum design, ensuring students understand program expectations prior to admission, and enhancing accessibility to mental health/support services

  7. Examining stress perceptions and coping strategies among Saudi nursing students: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrague, Leodoro J; McEnroe-Petitte, Denise M; De Los Santos, Janet Alexis A; Edet, Olaide B

    2018-06-01

    Stress is a perennial problem in nursing education and Saudi student nurses are not immune. Despite the growing literature examining stress in Saudi student nurses, a broader perspective on this concept has not been explored. This paper is a report of a review systematically appraising and synthesizing existing scientific articles reporting stress perceptions and coping styles in Saudi student nurses. A systematic review method guided this review. Four (SCOPUS, CINAHL, PubMed, Ovid) bibliographic databases were searched to locate relevant articles. An electronic database search was performed in August 2017 to locate studies published from 2010 onwards. The search words included: "stress" OR "psychological stress", "coping" OR "psychological adaptation", "Saudi Arabia", "student", and "nurse". Eleven (11) articles met the inclusion criteria. Review of the findings showed moderate to high stress levels in Saudi student nurses that originated mainly from heavy workloads and taking care of patients. However, when the students' demographic characteristics were taken into account, inconclusive results were found, although some evidence showed higher stress levels in higher level students. Both active and passive coping styles were used by nursing students when dealing with stress. Consistent with international studies, Saudi student nurses experience a considerable levels of stress from various sources. Findings may provide a direction for nursing faculty in formulating stress interventions that are empirically tested and culturally appropriate. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Occupational Stress and Quality of Life in Nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Moraes da Silva

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract To reduce the work related to stress and the psychosocial risk is not only an imperative question, but also moral. This epistemological study aims to verify the presence of the occupational stress and quality of life related to health in nursing professionals. We used three questionnaires: (a Socio Demographic Questionnaire, (b Job Strain Scale, and (c Item Short Form Health Survey. Statistical analysis was performed between the questionnaires, analysis of variance (ANOVA and simple and multiple linear regression. It was found that 60.8% of the participants see the high demand of work, 71.8% high control on the developed activity and 85.5% low social support. Related to eight dominant of quality of life, the most damaged are: pain (µ = 61.87 and vitality (µ = 62.25. It was concluded that although in most sample experiences an intermediary risk situation to stress, the quality of life showed a damaged.

  9. Inverse relationship between body mass index and mortality in older nursing home residents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veronese, N; Cereda, E; Solmi, M

    2015-01-01

    Body mass index (BMI) and mortality in old adults from the general population have been related in a U-shaped or J-shaped curve. However, limited information is available for elderly nursing home populations, particularly about specific cause of death. A systematic PubMed/EMBASE/CINAHL/SCOPUS...

  10. How Do the Nurses Cope with Job Stress? A Study with Grounded Theory Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasool Eslami Akbar

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Due to the adverse effects of job stress on health of nurses and the importance of coping process of nurses in management of job stress, the present study was carried out with the aim of exploring the experiences of the nurses in order to reveal the original coping process of the nurses in the case of encountering occupational stress. Methods: This qualitative study was conducted with grounded theory approach. Research participants were 15 clinical nurses and four directors of nursing. Sampling method of study were purposive and theoretical sampling. Data collection done with unstructured interviews and field notes and continued until data saturation. Data analysis was performed using the Strauss and Corbin 1998 constant comparative method. Results: The results of the analysis led to four axial concepts: "feeling stress at nursing work", "situational coping", "and the effect of personal and environmental factors in coping with job stress" and "Grey outcome of coping". The core variable in the nurse’s process of coping with job stress was "comprehensive effort to calm stressed condition". Conclusion: Explaining the basic and original psychosocial process of nurses to cope with job stress, revealed context-based nature of the coping processes that nurses adopt, which that can help in taking appropriate measures to lighten up the grey consequences of coping of nurses.

  11. Relationship among perceived stress, anxiety, depression and craniocervical pain in nursing professionals under stress at work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Pozzebon

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: The appearance and evolution of some clinical pain conditions may be influenced by stress and other psychosocial factors. Face, head and cervical muscles may increase their activity and tension in the presence of stress, leading to craniocervicomandibular pain in individuals exposed to stress. Objective: To assess the relationship among perceived stress, anxiety, depression and craniocervicomandibular pain in nursing professionals under stress at work. Materials and Methods: Forty-three women under stress at work, according to the Job Stress Scale (JSS, were assessed by the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS, pressure pain threshold, measured by algometry, and muscle sensitivity to hand palpation of the masticatory and cervical muscles. Results: A low moderate level of perceived stress was found in 62.79% of the sample, anxiety in 11.63% and depression in 9.30%. The psychosocial scales correlated with each other. No correlation was found between pressure pain threshold and perceived stress, anxiety and depression. The level of pain to hand palpation correlated with the perceived stress scores. Conclusion: Pressure pain threshold was not influenced by the psychosocial factors assessed. Pain intensity to hand palpation, however, was higher as the perception of stress increased.

  12. Patient participation: causing moral stress in psychiatric nursing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Trine-Lise; Hanssen, Ingrid

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to explore psychiatric nurses' experiences and perspectives regarding patient participation. Patient participation is an ambiguous, complex and poorly defined concept with practical/clinical, organisational, legal and ethical aspects, some of which in psychiatric units may cause ethical predicaments and moral stress in nurses, for instance when moral caring acts are thwarted by constraints. An explorative quantitative pilot study was conducted at a psychiatric subacute unit through three focus group interviews with a total of nine participants. A thematic analytic approach was chosen. Preliminary empirical findings were discussed with participants before the final data analysis. Ethical research guidelines were followed. Patient participation is a difficult ideal to realise because of vagueness of aim and content. What was regarded as patient participation differed. Some interviewees held that patients may have a say within the framework of restraints while others saw patient participation as superficial. The interviewees describe themselves as patient's spokespersons and contributing to patients participating in their treatment as a great responsibility. They felt squeezed between their ethical values and the 'system'. They found themselves in a negotiator role trying to collaborate with both the doctors and the patients. Privatisation of a political ideal makes nurses vulnerable to burn out and moral distress. Nurses have a particular ethical responsibility towards vulnerable patients, and may themselves be vulnerable when caught in situations where their professional and moral values are threatened. Unclear concepts make for unclear division of responsibility. Patient participation is often a neglected value in current psychiatric treatment philosophy. When healthcare workers' ethical sensibilities are compromised, this may result in moral stress. © 2016 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  13. MEASURING WORKLOAD OF ICU NURSES WITH A QUESTIONNAIRE SURVEY: THE NASA TASK LOAD INDEX (TLX).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoonakker, Peter; Carayon, Pascale; Gurses, Ayse; Brown, Roger; McGuire, Kerry; Khunlertkit, Adjhaporn; Walker, James M

    2011-01-01

    High workload of nurses in Intensive Care Units (ICUs) has been identified as a major patient safety and worker stress problem. However, relative little attention has been dedicated to the measurement of workload in healthcare. The objectives of this study are to describe and examine several methods to measure workload of ICU nurses. We then focus on the measurement of ICU nurses' workload using a subjective rating instrument: the NASA TLX.We conducted secondary data analysis on data from two, multi-side, cross-sectional questionnaire studies to examine several instruments to measure ICU nurses' workload. The combined database contains the data from 757 ICU nurses in 8 hospitals and 21 ICUs.Results show that the different methods to measure workload of ICU nurses, such as patient-based and operator-based workload, are only moderately correlated, or not correlated at all. Results show further that among the operator-based instruments, the NASA TLX is the most reliable and valid questionnaire to measure workload and that NASA TLX can be used in a healthcare setting. Managers of hospitals and ICUs can benefit from the results of this research as it provides benchmark data on workload experienced by nurses in a variety of ICUs.

  14. The relationship between sex life satisfaction and job stress of married nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Hsiu-Hui

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship among work stress, sex life satisfaction, and mental health of married nurses. Demographic information, work stress, sex life satisfaction, sexual desire and mental health measured using the Chinese Health Questionnaire, data were collected from 100 married nurses in Taiwan. Findings Sex life satisfaction and age were negatively correlated, but sex life satisfaction and sexual desire were positively correlated. The mental health of over-committed nursing staff was not affected. Higher reward for effort was positively correlated with sex life satisfaction. Conclusions No matter whether job stress was high or low, receiving a higher reward for effort led to better sex life satisfaction, which had a satisfying positive effect on the nurses' lives. To improve nursing care quality at the hospital, nursing administrators should assist nurses in confronting work stress via positive adjustment, which is associated with the nurses’ sexual harmony, and quality of life.

  15. Structural empowerment, job stress and burnout of nurses in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jiajia; Chen, Juan; Fu, Jie; Ge, Xinling; Chen, Min; Liu, Yanhui

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the status of structural empowerment, job stress and burnout in China, and to explore the relationships among them. The questionnaires of CWEQ-II, job stressors and MBI were used to investigate 1002 nurses working at tertiary-level hospitals. The average score of CWEQ-II was 2.23±0.59. The score of EE of MBI was 29.75±13.94, PA was 27.40±11.21, both of them showed a high level of exhaustion, DP was 8.07±5.82 and showed a middle level of exhaustion. The findings showed that workload and time pressure were the most frequently encountered job stress among staff nurses, the score was 3.23±0.95; There was a significantly correlation among structural empowerment, job stressors and the level of burnout(pburnout, job stressors had significant influence on the every factors of burnout (pnurses felt that structural empowerment in their workplace resulted in lower levels of job stress which in turn strongly influenced Burnout. These results provide initial support for an expanded model of structural empowerment, and offer a broader understanding of the empowerment process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Mental health nursing in Jordan: an investigation into experience, work stress and organizational support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan-Mansour, Ayman M; Al-Gamal, Ekhlas; Puskar, Kathryn; Yacoub, Mohammad; Marini, Anita

    2011-04-01

    Changes in mental health services have an impact on the role and practice of mental health nurses. The purpose of this study was to examine Jordanian mental health nurses' experiences of providing mental health care, their work-related stress, and organizational support received. A descriptive correlation design was used. Data were collected using self-report questionnaires from 92 mental health nurses in Jordan. The result of this study revealed that mental health nurses shared a high level of agreement on the importance of most nursing tasks. Mental health nurses reported a moderate level of stress, with a lack of resources and relationship and conflict with other professionals being the most frequent stressors. Nurses perceived a low level of support for their work from their supervisors. Work stress and conflict with other professionals had a significant, negative correlation with the perception the nurses had of their immediate supervisors (r = -0.29, P work stress, organizational support, and the nurses' age, sex, or level of education. This study has clinical implications in terms of developing strategies for reducing stress and improving organizational support among mental health nurses, and it should help in future research. © 2011 The Authors. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing © 2011 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  17. Nurse manager cognitive decision-making amidst stress and work complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirey, Maria R; Ebright, Patricia R; McDaniel, Anna M

    2013-01-01

      The present study provides insight into nurse manager cognitive decision-making amidst stress and work complexity.   Little is known about nurse manager decision-making amidst stress and work complexity. Because nurse manager decisions have the potential to impact patient care quality and safety, understanding their decision-making processes is useful for designing supportive interventions.   This qualitative descriptive study interviewed 21 nurse managers from three hospitals to answer the research question: What decision-making processes do nurse managers utilize to address stressful situations in their nurse manager role? Face-to-face interviews incorporating components of the Critical Decision Method illuminated expert-novice practice differences. Content analysis identified one major theme and three sub-themes.   The present study produced a cognitive model that guides nurse manager decision-making related to stressful situations. Experience in the role, organizational context and situation factors influenced nurse manager cognitive decision-making processes.   Study findings suggest that chronic exposure to stress and work complexity negatively affects nurse manager health and their decision-making processes potentially threatening individual, patient and organizational outcomes.   Cognitive decision-making varies based on nurse manager experience and these differences have coaching and mentoring implications. This present study contributes a current understanding of nurse manager decision-making amidst stress and work complexity. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Role stress among auxiliary nurses midwives in Gujarat, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purohit, Bhaskar; Vasava, Paul

    2017-01-23

    Understanding Role Stress is important as health service providers, especially nurses experience high levels of Role Stress which is linked to burnout, poor quality of care and high turnover. The current study explicates the concept of Role Stress and assesses the Role Stress experienced by the Auxiliary Nurse Midwives (ANMs) working with rural government health centres from Gujarat, India. The study included 84 ANMs working with government health centres from one district in India. A structured instrument with established reliability and validity was used to measure 10 dimensions of Role Stress namely: Inter-role distance, role stagnation, role expectation conflict, role erosion: role overload, role isolation, personal inadequacy, self-role distance, role ambiguity and resource inadequacy. The study instrument was based on 5 point Likert rating scale that contained 50 unidirectional negative statements, 5 for each dimension. Kolmogorov-Smirnov and Shapiro-Wilk test were carried out to assess if the data were normally distributed. Cronbach's alpha test was carried out to assess reliability of the instrument. The study data was analyzed using descriptive statistics mainly using mean scores with higher scores indicating higher Role Stress and vice versa. The data was analyzed using SPSS version 19. Kolmogorov-Smirnov and Shapiro-Wilk test indicated that the data were normally distributed. Cronbach's alpha test indicated values of 0.852 suggesting high reliability of the tool. The highest Role Stress among ANMs was experienced for resource inadequacy. Role overload, role stagnation and inter-role distance were among the other important role stressors for ANMs. The study results suggests that ANMs frequently feel that: they do not have adequate amount of resources, facilities and financial support from the high levels authorities; people have too many expectations from their roles and as result they are overloaded with work and have very limited opportunities for

  19. Hardiness as a mediator between perceived stress and happiness in nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdollahi, A; Abu Talib, M; Yaacob, S N; Ismail, Z

    2014-01-01

    The relevance of the study of happiness and stress in nurses has been emphasized. In this sense, the intelligent use of hardiness is enable nurses to cope better with stress and contribute to being happier. This study aimed to examine the relationship among hardiness, perceived stress, and happiness in nurses. Moreover, we examined the mediator role of hardiness on the relationship between perceived stress and happiness in nurses. Our study revealed that hardi-attitude nurses evaluate situations as less stressful which results in a higher happiness. This study showed hardiness as being a protective factor against perceived stress and a facilitating factor for happiness in nurses. The findings could be important in training future nurses so that hardiness can be imparted, thereby giving them the ability to control their stress. Nursing is a stressful occupation with high levels of stress within the health professions. Given that hardiness is an important construct to enable nurses to cope better with stress and contribute to being happier; therefore, it is necessary we advance our knowledge about the aetiology of happiness, especially the role of hardiness in decreasing stress levels and increasing happiness. The present study sought to investigate the role of hardiness as a mediator between perceived stress and happiness. The participants, comprising 252 nurses from six private hospitals in Tehran, completed the Personal Views Survey, the Perceived Stress Scale, and the Oxford Happiness Inventory. Structural Equation Modelling (SEM) was used to analyse the data and answer the research hypotheses. As expected, hardiness partially mediated between perceived stress and happiness among nurses, and nurses with low levels of perceived stress were more likely to report greater hardiness and happiness. In addition, nurses with high levels of hardiness were more likely to report happiness. This study showed hardiness as being a protective factor against perceived stress and

  20. The Malay Version of the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS)-10 is a Reliable and Valid Measure for Stress among Nurses in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhu, Sukhvinder Singh; Ismail, Noor Hassim; Rampal, Krishna Gopal

    2015-11-01

    The Perceived Stress Scale-10 (PSS-10) is widely used to assess stress perception. The aim of this study was to translate the original PSS-10 into Malay and assess the reliability and validity of the Malay version among nurses. The Malay version of the PSS-10 was distributed among 229 nurses from four government hospitals in Selangor State. Test-retest reliability and concurrent validity was conducted with 25 nurses with the Malay version of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales (DASS) 21. Cronbach's alpha, confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), intraclass correlation coefficient and Pearson's r correlation coefficient were used to determine the psychometric properties of the Malay PSS-10. Two factor components were yielded through exploratory factor analysis with eigenvalues of 3.37 and 2.10, respectively. Both of the factors accounted for 54.6% of the variance. CFA yielded a two-factor structure with satisfactory goodness-of-fit indices [x 2 /df = 2.43; comparative fit index (CFI) = 0.92, goodness-of-fit Index (GFI) = 0.94; standardised root mean square residual (SRMR) = 0.07 and root mean square error of approximation (RMSEA) = 0.08 (90% CI = 0.07-0.09)]. The Cronbach's alpha coefficient for the total items was 0.63 (0.82 for factor 1 and 0.72 for factor 2). The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was 0.81 (95% CI: 0.62-0.91) for test-retest reliability testing after seven days. The total score and the negative component of the PSS-10 correlated significantly with the stress component of the DASS-21: (r = 0.61, P < 0.001) and (r = 0.56, P < 0.004), respectively. The Malay version of the PSS-10 demonstrated a satisfactory level of validity and reliability to assess stress perception. Therefore, this questionnaire is valid in assessing stress perception among nurses in Malaysia.

  1. Nursing students' perceived stress and coping behaviors in clinical training in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaideh, Shaher H; Al-Omari, Hasan; Al-Modallal, Hanan

    2017-06-01

    Clinical training has been recognized as a stressful experience for nursing students. The aims of this study were to identify levels and types of stressors among nursing students during their clinical training and their coping behaviors. Data were collected using a purposive sampling method from 100 nursing students using a self-reported questionnaire composed of Perceived Stress Scale and Coping Behavior Inventory. Results showed that "assignments and workload" as well as "teachers and nursing staff" were the highest sources of stress in clinical training. The most common coping behaviors used were "problem-solving" and "staying optimistic". There was a significant difference in perceived stress among students in regard to the way of choosing nursing. There were significant differences in coping behaviors in regard to the presence of relatives in nursing, living status and mothers' educational level. The predictors of perceived stress were self-choosing for nursing and the presence of relatives in nursing, while the predictors for coping behaviors were stress from peers and daily life as well as mothers' educational level. Nursing teachers and staff are encouraged to develop strategies that decrease level of stress and promote adaptive coping behaviors among nursing students during their clinical training.

  2. Occupational stress, coping strategies, and psychological-related outcomes of nurses working in psychiatric hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Abd Alhadi; Elsayed, Sonia; Tumah, Hussein

    2018-02-25

    Psychiatric nurses experience a wide range of stressful events, evolving from the care of violent, aggressive patients, recurrent relapse, and poor prognosis of mental disorders. The aim of the study was to assess workplace stress, coping strategies, and levels of depression among psychiatric nurses. A descriptive correlation design was conducted on psychiatric nurses working in mental health settings Port-Said, Egypt. Data were collected from 70 nurses at a mental health hospital. The results revealed that psychiatric nurses had moderate levels of work-related stress and depression, and exhibiting different coping strategies. Stress and depression are prevalent among psychiatric nurses. Implementing programs aimed at teaching them how to deal with stress at work and improving their coping strategies and problem-solving skills are recommended. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. A survey of role stress, coping and health in Australian and New Zealand hospital nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Esther M L; Bidewell, John W; Huntington, Annette D; Daly, John; Johnson, Amanda; Wilson, Helen; Lambert, Vicki A; Lambert, Clinton E

    2007-11-01

    Previous research has identified international and cultural differences in nurses' workplace stress and coping responses. We hypothesised an association between problem-focused coping and improved health, emotion-focused coping with reduced health, and more frequent workplace stress with reduced health. Test the above hypotheses with Australian and New Zealand nurses, and compare Australian and New Zealand nurses' experience of workplace stress, coping and health status. Three hundred and twenty-eight New South Wales (NSW) and 190 New Zealand (NZ) volunteer acute care hospital nurses (response rate 41%) from randomly sampled nurses. Postal survey consisting of a demographic questionnaire, the Nursing Stress Scale, the WAYS of Coping Questionnaire and the SF-36 Health Survey Version 2. Consistent with hypotheses, more frequent workplace stress predicted lower physical and mental health. Problem-focused coping was associated with better mental health. Emotion-focused coping was associated with reduced mental health. Contrary to hypotheses, coping styles did not predict physical health. NSW and NZ scored effectively the same on sources of workplace stress, stress coping methods, and physical and mental health when controlling for relevant variables. Results suggest mental health benefits for nurses who use problem-solving to cope with stress by addressing the external source of the stress, rather than emotion-focused coping in which nurses try to control or manage their internal response to stress. Cultural similarities and similar hospital environments could account for equivalent findings for NSW and NZ.

  4. The Impact of Perceived Stress and Coping Adequacy on the Health of Nurses: A Pilot Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy R. Jordan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress and coping abilities influence the health and work performance of nurses. However, little is known about the combined influence of stress perception and perceived coping adequacy and its impact on the health of nurses. This study examined the relationship between stress, coping, and the combined influences of perceived stress and coping abilities on health and work performance. A valid and reliable questionnaire was completed by 120 nurses in a Midwestern hospital in the USA. In general, the nurses were not healthy: 92% had moderate-to-very high stress levels; 78% slept less than 8 hours of sleep per night; 69% did not exercise regularly; 63% consumed less than 5 servings of fruits and vegetables per day; and 22% were classified as binge drinkers. When confronted with workplace stress, 70% of nurses reported that they consumed more junk food and 63% reported that they consumed more food than usual as a way of coping. Nurses in the “high stress/poor coping” group had the poorest health outcomes and highest health risk behaviors compared to those in other groups. The combined variables of perceived stress and perceived coping adequacy influenced the health of nurses. Therefore, worksite health promotion programs for nurses should focus equally on stress reduction, stress management, and the development of healthy coping skills.

  5. A study on work stress, stress coping strategies and health promoting lifestyle among district hospital nurses in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wei-Lun; Tsai, Shieunt-Han; Tsai, Chao-Wen; Lee, Chia-Ying

    2011-01-01

    To determine work stress, and stress-coping strategies, and to analyze their the relationships in order to improve health-promoting lifestyle of nurses in Taiwan. Three hundred eighty-five nurses who had work experience for more than 6 mo, were selected from four district hospitals in Kaohsiung and Ping Tung. We used a stratified cluster random sampling method for the selection. The nurses answered a self-report questionnaire, which was categorized into four sections: personal background data, work stress, stress-coping strategies, and health-promoting lifestyle. The findings indicate work stress and the health promoting lifestyle of nurses are at a higher level, with stress-coping strategies being at a medium level. Work stress and stress-coping strategies were significantly and positively correlated. Professional relationships, managerial role, personal responsibility, and recognition of work stress and the responsibilities of a health-promoting lifestyle were negatively correlated. Managerial role, personal responsibility, and organizational atmosphere of work stress as well as realization, an item of health-promoting lifestyle, were negatively correlated. Recognition of work stress and stress management, items of health-promoting lifestyle, were negatively correlated. Health responsibility, and self-actualization, items of health-promoting lifestyle, as well as stress-coping strategies were negatively correlated. Nutrition, an item of health-promoting lifestyle, and the support stress-coping strategy was negatively correlated. Nurses have greater work pressure and better work stress-coping strategies, but worse health responsibility and realization of a health-promoting lifestyle. We suggest hospitals build good relationships and appropriately increase employment of nurses through a good work atmosphere to achieve nurses' realization of a health-promoting lifestyle.

  6. Do hospital shift charge nurses from different cultures experience similar stress? An international cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Admi, Hanna; Eilon-Moshe, Yael

    2016-11-01

    There is a need to improve understanding of role stress and how it affects nurses' wellbeing, burnout and health; and hence the quality and safety of patients' care, organizational outcomes and costs. The focus is on shift charge nurses in hospitals who are accountable during a specific shift for the patients' care and staff functioning in accordance with hospital and unit policy. To compare perceptions of stress and its intensity among hospital shift charge nurses amongst three countries: Israel, USA (state of Ohio) and Thailand. A cross-sectional study was performed across three countries, focusing on a convenience sample of 2616 hospital shift charge nurses recruited from 23 general hospitals. A validated shift Charge Nurse Stress Questionnaire was used to assess impacts of four factors: patient & family complaints, lack of resources, responsibility burden and professional conflict. Descriptive statistics were used to describe demographic and professional characteristics of the participants. Chi square and the Fisher Exact Test were performed to test for demographic differences amongst the three samples. Parametric and non-parametric tests were used to compare mean stress levels amongst the study samples. The mean stress level for the total sample was 2.84 (±0.71) on a Likert scale of 1-5, implying moderate stress levels. Significant differences in stress levels were found among countries, with Thai nurses scoring the highest and Israeli nurses the lowest. Similar perceptions of stress intensity were found for all countries, with the factors "responsibility burden" and "lack of resources" considered the most stressful. Israeli and American nurses perceived similar situations as stressful and different from those perceived by Thai nurses. The findings can be partially explained by demographic, professional and cultural differences. Similarities along with differences were found in the nature and levels of stress experienced across the studied countries. A

  7. Effects of mindfulness-based stress reduction on depression, anxiety, stress and mindfulness in Korean nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yeoungsuk; Lindquist, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Nursing students often experience depression, anxiety, stress and decreased mindfulness which may decrease their patient care effectiveness. Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) effectively reduced depression, anxiety and stress, and increased mindfulness in previous research with other populations, but there is sparse evidence regarding its effectiveness for nursing students in Korea. To examine the effects of MBSR on depression, anxiety, stress and mindfulness in Korean nursing students. A randomized controlled trial. Fifty (50) nursing students at KN University College of Nursing in South Korea were randomly assigned to two groups. Data from 44 students, MBSR (n=21) and a wait list (WL) control (n=23) were analyzed. The MBSR group practiced mindfulness meditation for 2 h every week for 8 weeks. The WL group did not receive MBSR intervention. Standardized self-administered questionnaires of depression, anxiety, stress and mindfulness were administered at the baseline prior to the MBSR program and at completion (at 8 weeks). Compared with WL participants, MBSR participants reported significantly greater decreases in depression, anxiety and stress, and greater increase in mindfulness. A program of MBSR was effective when it was used with nursing students in reducing measures of depression, anxiety and stress, and increasing their mindful awareness. MBSR shows promise for use with nursing students to address their experience of mild depression, anxiety and stress, and to increase mindfulness in academic and clinical work, warranting further study. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Use of crop water stress index for monitoring water stress in some sinanthropic plant species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinela Roxana ROŞESCU

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The water stress indicator (crop water stress index, CWSI is a measure of the transpiration rate of a plant, influenced by the leaf and air temperature difference from the plant’s vicinity and the air pressure deficit of the water vapors from the atmosphere. The experiments were realized in July-August 2008 and 2009 for six species in the cities Pitesti, Mioveni and Maracineni: Cichorium intybus L., Conyza canadensis (L. Cronq., Erigeron annuus L. (Pers., Lactuca serriola Torn., Polygonum aviculare L. and Echinochloa crus-galli (L. Beauv. For those species we calculated the CWSI to estimate the water stress on the selected plants in the urban environment conditions. The analyzed species were exposed to a less accentuated water stress while vegetating in the soil and to a more intense one they were grown in the asphalt cracks. Cichorium intybus had the smallest CWSI value (0.26 while Lactuca serriola the highest one (0.44.

  9. Mindfulness-based stress reduction: an intervention to enhance the effectiveness of nurses' coping with work-related stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sarah A

    2014-06-01

    This critical literature review explored the current state of the science regarding mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) as a potential intervention to improve the ability of nurses to effectively cope with stress. Literature sources include searches from EBSCOhost, Gale PowerSearch, ProQuest, PubMed Medline, Google Scholar, Online Journal of Issues in Nursing, and reference lists from relevant articles. Empirical evidence regarding utilizing MBSR with nurses and other healthcare professionals suggests several positive benefits including decreased stress, burnout, and anxiety; and increased empathy, focus, and mood. Nurse use of MBSR may be a key intervention to help improve nurses' ability to cope with stress and ultimately improve the quality of patient care provided. © 2014 NANDA International, Inc.

  10. Patient safety and nursing: interface with stress and Burnout Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Cláudia Cristiane Filgueira Martins; Santos, Viviane Euzébia Pereira; Sousa, Paulo

    2017-01-01

    To analyze studies on stress, Burnout Syndrome, and patient safety in the scope of nursing care in the hospital environment. This was an integrative literature review. Data collection was performed in February 2016 in the following databases: Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online - PubMed/MEDLINE, Latin American and Caribbean Literature in Health Sciences - LILACS. Ten scientific productions were selected, which listed that factors contributing to stress and Burnout Syndrome of nursing professionals are the work environment as a source of stress, and excessive workload as a source of failures. The analysis found that the stress and Burnout Syndrome experienced by these professionals lead to greater vulnerability and development of unsafe care, and factors such as lack of organizational support can contribute to prevent these failures. Analisar estudos que versam sobre o estresse e Síndrome de Burnout, bem como a segurança do paciente no âmbito da assistência de enfermagem no ambiente hospitalar. Tratou-se de uma revisão integrativa de literatura. O levantamento dos dados foi efetuado nas bases de dados Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online - PubMed / MEDLINE, Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde -LILACS em fevereiro de 2016. Foram selecionadas10 produções científicas que apontaram que os fatores que contribuem para o estresse e a Síndrome de Burnout dos profissionais de enfermagem são o ambiente de trabalho como fonte de estresse e a carga de trabalho excessiva como geradora de falhas. A análise apontou que o estresse e a Síndrome de Burnout vivenciada por esses profissionais acarretam maior vulnerabilidade ao desenvolvimento de uma assistência insegura e que fatores como a falta de apoio organizacional podem contribuir para dirimir essas falhas.

  11. Secondary traumatic stress among emergency nurses: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Emer; Avalos, Gloria; Dowling, Maura

    2015-04-01

    Emergency department nurses are required to deal with emotional trauma issues on a daily basis, which may result in them experiencing symptoms of secondary traumatic stress, a consequence of stress experienced when helping or wanting to help a person traumatised or suffering. This study measured emergency department nurses' self-reported levels of secondary traumatic stress. Registered nurses (n = 117) working at three emergency departments in the Western geographical region of Ireland were invited to complete the secondary traumatic stress scale (STSS). A response rate of 90% (n = 105) was achieved. Most participants (n = 67/64%) met the criteria for secondary traumatic stress. A statistically significant finding was that the highest proportion (82%) of secondary traumatic stress existed in the staff nurse group (p = 0.042). Moreover, for those nurses reporting secondary traumatic stress, statistical significance was found for the variables 'change of career considered' (p = 0.017) and 'finds alcohol helpful in alleviating work-related stress' (p = 0.004), when compared with nurses not reporting secondary traumatic stress. The findings suggest the need to examine current crisis management interventions and to introduce new systems to support nurses in Irish emergency departments. Moreover, because different types of traumatic events in the ED require different types of interventions, the prevention and management of STS among emergency department nurses must be tackled using a variety of approaches. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Stress and Coping of Critical Care Nurses After Unsuccessful Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMeekin, Dawn E; Hickman, Ronald L; Douglas, Sara L; Kelley, Carol G

    2017-03-01

    Participation by a critical care nurse in an unsuccessful resuscitation can create a unique heightened level of psychological stress referred to as postcode stress, activation of coping behaviors, and symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). To explore the relationships among postcode stress, coping behaviors, and PTSD symptom severity in critical care nurses after experiencing unsuccessful cardiopulmonary resuscitations and to see whether institutional support attenuates these repeated psychological traumas. A national sample of 490 critical care nurses was recruited from the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses' eNewsline and social media. Participants completed the Post-Code Stress Scale, the Brief COPE (abbreviated), and the Impact of Event Scale-Revised, which were administered through an online survey. Postcode stress and PTSD symptom severity were weakly associated ( r = 0.20, P = .01). No significant associations between coping behaviors and postcode stress were found. Four coping behaviors (denial, self-distraction, self-blame, and behavioral disengagement) were significant predictors of PTSD symptom severity. Severity of postcode stress and PTSD symptoms varied with the availability of institutional support. Critical care nurses show moderate levels of postcode stress and PTSD symptoms when asked to recall an unsuccessful resuscitation and the coping behaviors used. Identifying the critical care nurses most at risk for PTSD will inform the development of interventional research to promote critical care nurses' psychological well-being and reduce their attrition from the profession. ©2017 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  13. Associations of menopausal symptoms with job-related stress factors in nurses in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzaki, Kazuyo; Uemura, Hirokazu; Yasui, Toshiyuki

    2014-09-01

    The main objective was to ascertain the typical menopausal symptoms and job-related stress factors in Japanese nurses during the menopausal transition, and the associations of menopausal symptoms with job-related stress. A supplementary objective was to determine whether there were any differences in menopausal symptoms and job-related stress factors among nurses in managerial positions. One thousand seven hundred female registered nurses aged 45-60 years who were working in hospitals in Japan were asked to complete a self-administered survey that included Greene's Climacteric Scale and the Brief Job Stress Questionnaire. The proportions of nurses who reported feelings of tiredness, irritability and difficulty in concentration were higher than the proportions with other menopausal symptoms. The proportions of nurses reporting feeling unhappy or depressed and having crying spells were higher among nurses in managerial positions than among other nurses. Stresses related to 'quantitative overload' on the Brief Job Stress Questionnaire among nurses in managerial positions were significantly greater than among nurses not in managerial positions, while stresses related to 'physical overload', 'job control', 'skill discretion', 'workplace environment' and 'job satisfaction' among nurses not in managerial positions were significantly greater than they were among nurses in managerial positions. Psychological symptoms were significantly correlated with poor job-related interpersonal relationships. Health care practitioners should be aware that menopausal symptoms are associated with job-related stress during the menopausal transition. Information on the differences in these associations between nurses in managerial positions and other nurses is important as it will allow their health care to be managed on a more individual basis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The impact of professional identity on role stress in nursing students: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Li; Gao, Ying; Yang, Juan; Zang, Xiao-Ying; Wang, Yao-Gang

    2016-11-01

    As newcomers to the clinical workplace, nursing students will encounter a high degree of role stress, which is an important predictor of burnout and engagement. Professional identity is theorised to be a key factor in providing high-quality care to improve patient outcomes and is thought to mediate the negative effects of a high-stress workplace and improve clinical performance and job retention. To investigate the level of nursing students' professional identity and role stress at the end of the first sub-internship, and to explore the impact of the nursing students' professional identity and other characteristics on role stress. A cross-sectional study. Three nursing schools in China. Nursing students after a 6-month sub-internship in a general hospital (n=474). The Role Stress Scale (score range: 12-60) and the Professional Identity Questionnaire for Nursing students (score range: 17-85) were used to investigate the levels of nursing students' role stress and professional identity. Higher scores indicated higher levels of role stress and professional identity. Basic demographic information about the nursing students was collected. The Pearson correlation, point-biserial correlation and multiple linear regression analysis were used to analyse the data. The mean total scores of the Role Stress Scale and Professional Identity Questionnaire for Nursing Students were 34.04 (SD=6.57) and 57.63 (SD=9.63), respectively. In the bivariate analyses, the following independent variables were found to be significantly associated with the total score of the Role Stress Scale: the total score of the Professional Identity Questionnaire for Nursing Students (r=-0.295, pNursing Students (standardised coefficient Beta: -0.260, pStress Scale. The multiple linear regression model explained 18.2% (adjusted R 2 scores 16.5%) of the Role Stress Scale scores variance. The nursing students' level of role stress at the end of the first sub-internship was high. The students with higher

  15. Testing a diagnosis-related group index for skilled nursing facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotterill, Philip G.

    1986-01-01

    Interest in case-mix measures for use in nursing home payment systems has been stimulated by the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for short-term acute-care hospitals. Appropriately matching payment with care needs is important to equitably compensate providers and to encourage them to admit patients who are most in need of nursing home care. The skilled nursing facility (SNF) Medicare benefit covers skilled convalescent or rehabilitative care following a hospital stay. Therefore, it might appear that diagnosis-related groups (DRG's), the basis for patient classification in PPS, could also be used for the Medicare SNF program. In this study, a DRG-based case-mix index (CMI) was developed and tested to determine how well it explains cost differences among SNF's. The results suggest that a DRG-based SNF payment system would be highly problematic. Incentives of this system would appear to discourage placement of patients who require relatively expensive care. PMID:10311674

  16. [How to improve the visibility of Spanish research in nursing? Reference journals and quality indexes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima-Serrano, Marta; Lima-Rodríguez, Joaquín S; Porcel-Gálvez, Ana M; Gil-García, Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    Research ends when the results are shared in the academic and professional community, and for this reason they need to be published in scientific journals of reference. But the question is where should the results of nursing research be published? Taking into account the expanding context and scientific consolidation of the discipline. To answer this question, an analysis will be made of the benefits and the most common criticisms of the two most important multidisciplinary literature data bases, as well as examining the context of the Spanish nursing journals in these data bases. A description will also be made of the indexing systems, as well as making proposals to contribute to improved visibility of Spanish nursing research through the positioning of its journals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of the medication nursing assistant role on nurse job satisfaction and stress in long-term care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Margaret J

    2008-01-01

    Long-term care nurses continue to struggle with increasing workloads, fulfilling regulatory requirements and limited staffing resources. One method of impacting the workload is the introduction of the new medication nursing assistant (MNA) role to alleviate the nurse from prolonged time intervals spent administering medications. An early step in MNA role implementation is to evaluate its impact by comparing agencies using the MNA and those not using the role. This article presents findings from a mixed method study examining the efficacy of the MNA role in relationship to job satisfaction and the degree of perceived stress experienced by long-term care nurses. Ninety-one nurses employed at 2 large New Hampshire facilities responded. Findings offer empirical evidence supporting the use of the MNA to reduce job stress and increase satisfaction for licensed nurses. The MNA role is accepted by nurse leaders and viewed as a benefit. Findings also support a correlation between empowerment and decision making in the nursing environment with levels of nurse satisfaction.

  18. Beyond the job demand control (-support) model : explaining stress reactions in nurses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pisanti, Renato

    2012-01-01

    Nurses have been identified as having a risk of experiencing stress and burnout. The nature and organization of the job make nursing inherently difficult. Research highlights that occupational stress is largely dependent on psychosocial job characteristics, such as job demands and job resources. The

  19. Conflict management style, supportive work environments and the experience of work stress in emergency nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Mary L; Cadmus, Edna

    2016-03-01

    To examine the conflict management style that emergency department (ED) nurses use to resolve conflict and to determine whether their style of managing conflict and a supportive work environment affects their experience of work stress. Conflict is a common stressor that is encountered as nurses strive to achieve patient satisfaction goals while delivering quality care. How a nurse perceives support may impact work stress levels and how they deal with conflict. A correlational design examined the relationship between supportive work environment, and conflict management style and work stress in a sample of 222 ED nurses using the expanded nurse work stress scale; the survey of perceived organisational support; and the Rahim organisational conflict inventory-II. Twenty seven percent of nurses reported elevated levels of work stress. A supportive work environment and avoidant conflict management style were significant predictors of work stress. Findings suggest that ED nurses' perception of a supportive work environment and their approach to resolving conflict may be related to their experience of work stress. Providing opportunities for ED nurses in skills training in constructive conflict resolution may help to reduce work stress and to improve the quality of patient care. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Problem-solving skills and hardiness as protective factors against stress in Iranian nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdollahi, Abbas; Talib, Mansor Abu; Yaacob, Siti Nor; Ismail, Zanariah

    2014-02-01

    Nursing is a stressful occupation, even when compared with other health professions; therefore, it is necessary to advance our knowledge about the protective factors that can help reduce stress among nurses. The present study sought to investigate the associations among problem-solving skills and hardiness with perceived stress in nurses. The participants, 252 nurses from six private hospitals in Tehran, completed the Personal Views Survey, the Perceived Stress Scale, and the Problem-Solving Inventory. Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) was used to analyse the data and answer the research hypotheses. As expected, greater hardiness was associated with low levels of perceived stress, and nurses low in perceived stress were more likely to be considered approachable, have a style that relied on their own sense of internal personal control, and demonstrate effective problem-solving confidence. These findings reinforce the importance of hardiness and problem-solving skills as protective factors against perceived stress among nurses, and could be important in training future nurses so that hardiness ability and problem-solving skills can be imparted, allowing nurses to have more ability to control their perceived stress.

  1. The role of emotional intelligence and organisational support on work stress of nurses in Ibadan, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawal, Abiodun M; Idemudia, Erhabor S

    2017-05-23

    Universally, nurses have been reported to be a group at high risk of workplace stress. However, nurses' responses to stressful situations at work could be the outcomes of individual differences and organisational factors. We examined the independent and joint contributions of four dimensions of emotional intelligence and perceived organisational support in work stress of nurses in a teaching hospital in Nigeria. The study was a cross-sectional survey research design, which selected 228 (41 male and 187 female nurses) nurses through the use of convenience sampling. Questionnaires comprising demographics with work stress, organisational support and emotional intelligence scales were administered to the sampled 228 nurses in the study. Data were analysed with the use of correlational matrix and hierarchical multiple regression. Self-emotion appraisal, others' emotion appraisal, use of emotion, regulation of emotion and perceived organisational support were found to have joint contributions to explaining work stress among nurses. Others' emotion appraisal, use of emotion and perceived organisational support were found to have independent relationships with work stress. Our findings stress that judgement of others' emotions, accurate use of emotion by nurses and support from management of the hospital are most important in explaining their reactions towards work-related stress.

  2. Coping with serious events at work: a study of traumatic stress among nurses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buurman, Bianca M.; Mank, Arno P. M.; Beijer, Hein J. M.; Olff, Miranda

    2011-01-01

    Nurses often encounter serious events during their work, which can lead to traumatic stress. To examine how serious events, demographic variables, and coping strategies are associated with traumatic stress in a sample of nurses working in the medical department of a university teaching hospital. The

  3. Differential Effectiveness of Coping in Managing Stress and Burnout in Oncology Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rounds, James B., Jr.; Zevon, Michael A.

    High levels of stress experienced by primary care oncology nursing staff, and the competency impairment which results from such stress, has become a matter of much concern in health care settings. This study was conducted to identify the coping strategies employed by oncology nurses, and to relate these strategies to differential indices of stress…

  4. Decreasing Stress and Burnout in Nurses: Efficacy of Blended Learning With Stress Management and Resilience Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magtibay, Donna L; Chesak, Sherry S; Coughlin, Kevin; Sood, Amit

    The study's purpose was to assess efficacy of blended learning to decrease stress and burnout among nurses through use of the Stress Management and Resiliency Training (SMART) program. Job-related stress in nurses leads to high rates of burnout, compromises patient care, and costs US healthcare organizations billions of dollars annually. Many mindfulness and resiliency programs are taught in a format that limits nurses' attendance. Consistent with blended learning, participants chose the format that met their learning styles and goals; Web-based, independent reading, facilitated discussions. The end points of mindfulness, resilience, anxiety, stress, happiness, and burnout were measured at baseline, postintervention, and 3-month follow-up to examine within-group differences. Findings showed statistically significant, clinically meaningful decreases in anxiety, stress, and burnout and increases in resilience, happiness, and mindfulness. Results support blended learning using SMART as a strategy to increase access to resiliency training for nursing staff.

  5. Inpatient aggression and work stress: comparing civil and forensic psychiatric nursing

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Joyce Yan

    2017-01-01

    In their daily work, psychiatric nurses are subjected to patient-perpetrated verbal and physical aggression. They manage a high level of work stress. As compared to their colleagues working in civil settings, forensic psychiatric nurses may experience different rates of patient aggression and work stress. Such experiences have implications for the mental health and productivity of nursing staff. In inpatient settings, homicide by a patient is a rare event. Representing the most severe f...

  6. Work Related Stress, Burnout, Job Satisfaction and General Health of Nurses

    OpenAIRE

    Khamisa, Natasha; Oldenburg, Brian; Peltzer, Karl; Ilic, Dragan

    2015-01-01

    Gaps in research focusing on work related stress, burnout, job satisfaction and general health of nurses is evident within developing contexts like South Africa. This study identified the relationship between work related stress, burnout, job satisfaction and general health of nurses. A total of 1200 nurses from four hospitals were invited to participate in this cross-sectional study (75% response rate). Participants completed five questionnaires and multiple linear regression analysis was us...

  7. Empathy and stress in nurses working in haemodialysis: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vioulac, Christel; Aubree, Colette; Massy, Ziad A; Untas, Aurélie

    2016-05-01

    To explore the concepts of empathy and stress in nurses working in haemodialysis units in France and their possible interactions. Nurses' work in haemodialysis is rather complex. It requires technical expertise, because of the peculiarity of the treatment, and emotional skills, to care for patients throughout a long-lasting therapy. Empathy is considered as a key in the concept of caring, which allows nurses to give appropriate answers to their patients' needs. In addition, nurses' work environment can generate stress. A qualitative descriptive design. Nurses (N = 23) working in haemodialysis units were interviewed in three different sites in 2014. The analysis of nurses' speech emphasized a predominance of the cognitive attributes of empathy: understanding, communication, adjusted response (43%), and a special feature of the relationship due to the chronicity of the care (23%). The main stressors highlighted were time management (14%), emergencies (12%) and technical nature of the task (8%). Nurses' experience in haemodialysis seemed to be a modulating factor regarding empathy and stress. The main stressors highlighted were time management (14%), emergencies (12%) and technical nature of the task (8%). Nurses' experience in haemodialysis seemed to be a modulating factor regarding empathy and stress. The results showed the special features of nurses' work in haemodialysis and the need for further studies to investigate these concepts. The influence of stress on empathy needs to be explored more precisely, especially regarding nurses' experience and its impact on patients. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Regional differences as barriers to body mass index screening described by Ohio school nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalter, Ann M; Chaudry, Rosemary V; Polivka, Barbara J

    2011-08-01

    Body mass index (BMI) screening is advocated by the National Association of School Nurses (NASN). Research identifying barriers to BMI screening in public elementary school settings has been sparse. The purpose of the study was to identify barriers and facilitating factors of BMI screening practices among Ohio school nurses working in suburban, rural, and urban public elementary schools. This descriptive study used focus groups with 25 school nurses in 3 geographic regions of Ohio. An adapted Healthy People 2010 model guided the development of semistructured focus group questions. Nine regional themes related to BMI screening emerged specific to suburban, rural, and/or urban school nurses' experiences with BMI screening practice, policy, school physical environment, school social environment, school risk/protection, and access to quality health care. Key facilitating factors to BMI screening varied by region. Key barriers to BMI screening were a lack of privacy, time, policy, and workload of school nurses. Regionally specific facilitating factors to BMI screening in schools provide opportunities for schools to accentuate the positive and to promote school health. © 2011, American School Health Association.

  9. Self-esteem and stress coping among proficiency certificate level nursing students in nursing campus Maharajgunj and Lalitpur Nursing Campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, T

    2013-09-01

    Nursing requires high self-esteem and effective coping strategies for the quality of health services that they deliver. Self -esteem and stress coping mechanism developed during education period is foundation for professional practice. So, this study was conducted to identify self-esteem, coping activities, and their relationship. Descriptive cross sectional study was conducted among 287 PCL nursing students currently studying in different level in nursing campuses of the Institute of Medicine during June and July 2013. Self administered semi structured questionnaire and rating scales were used for the data collection. Findings showed that 21 (7.31%), 194 (67.5%), and 67 (23.34%), students had have very high, high and moderate, self-esteem and only five (1.74%) have low self-esteem.The difference in self-esteem level was insignificant with the level of the students. Students most frequently used problem focused (3.36±0.54) followed by emotion focused (3.04±0.45) and avoidance coping activities (2.91±0.63). The relationship of use of coping activities and level of students was statistically insignificant. Self-esteem level had positive relation with problem focused and emotion focused coping activities (Pearson r: 0.114 and 0.118), though the correlation was significant with emotion focused coping activities only. Bicytopenia and pancytopenia were seen in two cases each of myelodysplastic syndrome. Chronic myeloid leukemia and Non-Hodgkin lymphoma showed anemia and pancytopenia respectively. Majority of PCL nursing students have high level of self-esteem. They used problem focused coping activities most however, use of it decreased with increased level of students. Students with high self -esteem used problem focused followed by emotion focused coping activities. Students should be encouraged to use problem focused coping activities.

  10. Protein intake and stress levels in nurses and housewives of Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wattoo, Feroza Hamid; Memon, Muhammad Saleh; Memon, Allah Nawaz; Wattoo, Muhammad Hamid Sarwar; Asad, Muhammad Javaid; Siddique, Farzana

    2011-01-01

    Stress has many biological effects on human daily life. In the present study, dietary protein intake was correlated with the investigated stress levels of nurses and housewives of the targeted urban population. Age group ranged from 30 to 45 years and both the groups belonged to middle socioeconomic status. After calculations of environmental, psychological and physiological stresses, it was observed that the levels of stress in housewives were significantly higher than those of nurses. Recommended dietary allowances, RDA and actual protein intakes, API were also compared in both the groups. The found protein intake was less in housewives as compared to that of nurses. PMID:23961140

  11. Job Stress and Self-Efficacy among Psychiatric Nursing Working in Mental Health Hospitals at Cairo, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaki, Rania. A.

    2016-01-01

    Nursing stress is considered a problem that affects the practice worldwide. Job stress is a harmful response physically and emotionally when the nurses' skills, resources, and needs could not fulfill the requirement of the job. This study was aimed to assess job stress and self-efficacy among psychiatric nursing working in mental health hospitals…

  12. Emotional intelligence as a moderator in the stress-burnout relationship: a questionnaire study on nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görgens-Ekermans, Gina; Brand, Tamari

    2012-08-01

    To investigate inter-relationships between emotional intelligence (EI), work stress and burnout in a group of nurses in the Western Cape Province, South Africa. The moderating effect of EI in the stress-burnout relationship and group differences (nurses working in different wards) in burnout were also investigated. Stress and subsequent burnout commonly threaten the occupational health and well-being of nurses in South Africa and elsewhere. Developing EI in nurses may increase individual stress resistance and combat burnout. A cross-sectional research design with anonymous questionnaires was conducted. Self-report data were used. Survey data were collected from 122 nurses working in different wards at four hospitals from a private hospital group. The Swinburne University Emotional Intelligence Test, Sources of Work Stress Inventory and Maslach Burnout Inventory were used to measure EI, stress and burnout, respectively. Consistent inverse relationships between emotional control and management as dimensions of EI, and stress and burnout emerged. A differential effect of high vs. low EI on the stress-burnout relationship was evident. Workload and the work/family interface emerged as significant predictors of burnout. Respondents working in maternity, paediatric and ER wards reported more feelings of personal accomplishment than those working in general wards. Higher EI is significantly related with lower stress and burnout in a sample of South African nurses. The moderator effect of EI in the stress-burnout relationship suggests that enhanced EI may help diminish burnout development when chronic stress is experienced. EI developmental interventions, if introduced in nursing curricula, may increase emotional coping resources and enhanced social skills, which may benefit the long-term occupational health of nurses. This may be relevant in developing countries, where environmental stressors related to the organisational context (budget constraints) and wider social

  13. Stress and its Impact on the Neurocognitive Performance of Australian Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, Ty; Lal, Sara

    2017-02-01

    Nurses function inside a particularly stressful occupation that requires the provision of continuous care to individuals who are often in great need. Stress has been shown to impair performance and specifically shown to impair nursing quality. However, we do not yet know how stress influences the cognitive performance of nurses, and hence, the present study investigated the associations between stress and cognitive performance in nurses using electroencephalography and administered cognitive assessments. Thirty-six nurses (34 women) of mean age 37.77 ± 11.40 years were recruited. Stress was examined using the Lifestyle Appraisal Questionnaire. Broad spectrum electroencephalogram activity at positions Fp1, Fp2, C3 and C4 was recorded for a 5-min baseline and active phase to physiologically assess cognitive performance. Additionally, the Mini-Mental State Exam and Cognistat were also used to measure cognitive performance. Assessed cognitive performance was not associated to stress, however, lifestyle factors, as well as a number of the examined cognitive electroencephalographic variables including changes in theta, alpha activity and gamma reactivity were. Definitively determining how stress affects the cognitive performance of nurses requires additional research; the present study forms a foundation from which future research can further expand the examination of stress exposure in nurses. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Relationships among work stress, job satisfaction, mental health, and healthy lifestyle behaviors in new graduate nurses attending the nurse athlete program: a call to action for nursing leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnyk, Bernadette Mazurek; Hrabe, David P; Szalacha, Laura A

    2013-01-01

    Although nurses are educated to take outstanding care of others, they themselves often have poor health outcomes, including high rates of depression and obesity, which are associated with stressful work environments. Furthermore, a high percentage of new graduate nurses leave their positions in the first year of employment, resulting in exorbitant costs to health care systems. The aim of this study was to determine the relationships among key variables that influence job satisfaction and healthy lifestyle behaviors of new graduate nurses, including workplace stress, work environment, lifestyle beliefs, and mental health. A descriptive correlational design was used with baseline data from 61 new graduate nurses attending the 2-day Nurse Athlete program, a workshop that focuses on nutrition, energy management, and physical activity. Higher levels of workplace stress were associated with higher levels of depression and anxiety as well as lower levels of resiliency, job satisfaction, and healthy lifestyle beliefs. Nurse leaders and managers must invest in creating healthy work environments for new and experienced nurses as well as provide mental health screening, resources, and intervention programs that focus on education and skills-building in health promoting behaviors, including emotional regulation of stress, anxiety, and depression.

  15. Job stress and burnout: A comparative study of senior and head nurses in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Xiaorong; Wang, Ping; Hou, Wenxiu; Chen, Lili; Lou, Fenglan

    2017-06-01

    Senior nurses can suffer from high job stress and burnout, which can lead to negative patient outcomes and higher turnover rates; however, few studies have examined this topic. We recruited 224 head and senior nurses from September to December 2015 using convenience and cluster sampling, to compare job stress and burnout levels between the two groups. The Nurse Job Stressors Inventory and Maslach Burnout Inventory scales were used to evaluate job stress and burnout, respectively. Results indicated that job stress scores significantly differed between head and senior nurses. The highest scoring subscales in both groups were time allocation and workload problems. Scores for the three burnout dimensions also significantly differed between the groups. Positive correlations between job stress and burnout were stronger among senior nurses than head nurses. Burnout may be higher among senior nurses given head nurses' potential for greater perceived job control. Our findings suggest that measures need to be taken to reduce burnout and turnover rates among senior nurses. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  16. Coping with interpersonal stress and psychological distress at work: comparison of hospital nursing staff and salespeople

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kato T

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tsukasa Kato Department of Social Psychology, Toyo University, Tokyo, Japan Abstract: Hospital nurses frequently experience relationships with patients as stressors in the workplace. Nurses’ coping behavior is one potential buffering factor that can reduce the effects of job stress on their psychological functioning and well-being. In this study, the association between nurses' strategies for coping with interpersonal stress from patients and their psychological distress was examined. Participants included 204 hospital nurses and 142 salespeople, who were used as a comparison group. Participants completed measures of coping with interpersonal stress and psychological distress. Hospital nurses reported more psychological distress than did salespeople. Moreover, distancing coping was correlated with high psychological distress in both nurses and salespeople, and reassessing coping was correlated with low psychological distress in nurses. For nurses only, constructive coping appeared to be an effective strategy for reducing psychological distress. It is important for nurses to understand the role of constructive coping in nurse–patient communication and interaction. Keywords: nurse, relationships with patients, interpersonal stress, coping behavior, job stress

  17. Safety as a criterion for quality: the critical nursing situation index in paediatric critical care, an observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Neef, Marjorie; Bos, Albert P.; Tol, Dirk

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The Critical Nursing Situation Index (CNSI) identifies deviations from safe practice as laid down in guidelines, using an observational approach. The CNSI contains a list of predefined items that stem from nursing protocols and guidelines. Deviation from these may lead to adverse

  18. [Suggestions for stress relieve at the workplace: opinion of postgraduate nurses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, L M; Bronzatti, J A; Vieira, C S; Parra, S H; da Silva, Y B

    2000-03-01

    The work overload, relationship and communication problems, institution's characteristics and ambiental pollution were the stressing organization agents with the greatest punctuation in this study composed by 30 nurses. The work planning, work humanization, suitable human resources, improving communication and continued education were the suggestions given by nurses to minimize these stressing organizational agents. Analysing the stressing extra organizational agents, economic and familiar problems, work distance and transportation to work, were the most pointed.

  19. The Correlation of Organizational Role Stressors with Stress Level of Icu Nurses

    OpenAIRE

    Nursalam, Nursalam; Efendi, Ferry; Puspawati, Ni Luh Putu Dewi

    2009-01-01

    Introduction : Work stress which is often experienced by ICU nurses may affects nurse’s performance, nurse’s health and wealth so that the factors which may affect work stress such as organizational role stressors must be noticed. This study was aimed to explain the correlation between organizational role stressors and work stress level in ICU Nurses. Method : This study used cross-sectional design  involved 13 respondents, taken by purposive sampling. The independent variable was organizatio...

  20. The Correlation of Organizational Role Stressors with Stress Level of ICU Nurses

    OpenAIRE

    Nursalam, Nursalam; Efendi, Ferry; Puspawati, Ni Luh Putu Dewi

    2017-01-01

    Introduction : Work stress which is often experienced by ICU nurses may affects nurse’s performance, nurse’s health and wealth so that the factors which may affect work stress such as organizational role stressors must be noticed. This study was aimed to explain the correlation between organizational role stressors and work stress level in ICU Nurses. Method : This study used cross-sectional design  involved 13 respondents, taken by purposive sampling. The independent variable was organizatio...

  1. An exploration of the factor structure of the nursing work index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Paul; McCormack, Brendan

    2007-01-01

    The nurse shortage is increasing in the developed world. Organisational context is important in determining issues associated with nurse shortages, such as retention, recruitment, and job satisfaction. Recent research has utilised the Nursing Work Index-Revised (NWI-R) as a measure of organisational context traits. Within the NWI-R a four-factor model has been reported as being important in determining good organisational context, yet researchers have recently questioned the stability of the four-factor structure. No known study has attempted to replicate the four-factor structure reported in the NWI-R. The aim of this research is to examine the factor structure of the 15 items that comprise the four factors of the NWI-R. The NWI-R is an instrument that is focused on capturing organisational attributes that characterise professional nursing environments. A random sample of 172 (50%) acute care hospital nurses completed the NWI-R as part of a larger research project. The sample was diverse concerning nursing grade and specialty. Data were analysed using SPSS.11.0 to extract factors' structures (principal component and maximum likelihood), measures of homogeneity and descriptive statistics were generated from the findings. The four-factor structure of the NWI-R was not replicated in the data analysis. Instead a modified three-factor structure was identified accounting for 57% of the variance. Measures of internal consistency were acceptable. Previous research utilised the four factors of the NWI-R as a method to identify supportive organisational context and practice. The three-factor model raises questions regarding the stability of the findings using the NWI-R. This research shows the synthesis of the two models in light of previous findings. The findings might have far reaching implications for research that has utilised the NWI-R as a measure of organisational context. Further research is required to examine this study's findings and literature.

  2. Relationship of workplace incivility, stress, and burnout on nurses' turnover intentions and psychological empowerment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyeleye, Olubunmi; Hanson, Patricia; O'Connor, Nancy; Dunn, Deborah

    2013-10-01

    This study explored the relationships among perceived workplace incivility, stress, burnout, perceived turnover intentions, and perceived level of psychological empowerment among acute care nurses (medical-surgical and critical care) in community and tertiary hospitals through the lens of complexity science. An exploratory study was conducted, and findings demonstrate significant relationships among workplace incivility, stress, burnout, turnover intentions, total years of nursing experience, and RN education levels. Creating targeted retention strategies and policies that will be sensitive to the needs and interests of nurses at high risk for leaving their organizations is imperative for nurse executives.

  3. Stress and burnout among hemodialysis nurses: a single-center, prospective survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karkar, Ayman; Dammang, Mienalyn Lim; Bouhaha, Betty Mandin

    2015-01-01

    Stress is a well known and identified problem within the nursing profession. Dialysis nurses are exposed to high level of stress. Increasing workload can aggravate stress and cause burnout and exhaustion. Stress and burnout are capable of having a detrimental impact on organizational productivity and pose serious health and safety hazards on the job. We aimed in this study to determine the type and level of stress and the amount of burnout among our dialysis nurses, and to evaluate the managing skills and the impact of stress on their work performance. There were 93 nurses (19 national and 74 expatriate nurses) who answered modified questionnaires to the aims of our prospective and descriptive correlational study. Our results show that most nurses involved in the study (national and expatriate) experienced a mild level of stress (79% and 68%, respectively) and moderate level of burnout (42% and 38%, respectively). The most common stressor among the national nurses was technical breakdowns of machines (15.9%) and that among expatriates was job insecurity (16.9%). The majority of the national nurses (21%) coped with this by increased sick leaves, whereas the majority (25%) of the expatriates responded by becoming easily frustrated. The most utilized coping skill among both groups was the relaxation methods (20.8% versus 24.9%) and the least utilized was denial (3.9% versus 0.5%). In conclusion, our results suggest the exposure of dialysis nurses to different types of stress and demonstrate the different experienced coping skills. These results may have implications for nursing management and hospital administration.

  4. A study of stress and burnout in nursing students in Hong Kong: a questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Roger; Deary, Ian; Thompson, David; Li, Gloria

    2008-10-01

    Stress in nursing students may be related to attrition from nursing programmes and lead to a shortage of nurses entering clinical careers. In addition, stress leads to psychological morbidity which may have profound adverse consequences for individual nursing students. To follow a cohort of nursing students from entry to their programme to the end of the first year and to study the interrelationship between a range of psychological variables including personality, stress, coping and burnout. Prospective, repeated measures survey using self-administered questionnaires. A university school of nursing in Hong Kong. Students were selected on the basis of entry to their nursing programme in 2004; 158 students entered the study and 147 completed; 37 were male and 121 were female at entry. The mean age of the cohort at entry was 19.1 (S.D. 0.85); ages ranged from 18 to 26. The questionnaires administered at wave 1 were: the NEO Five Factor Inventory, the Coping in Stressful Situations questionnaire, the 12-item General Health Questionnaire, the Maslach Burnout Inventory and the Stress in Nursing Students questionnaire. At wave 2 the 12-item General Health Questionnaire, the Maslach Burnout Inventory and the Stress in Nursing Students questionnaire were administered. Students suffered greater levels of psychological morbidity and burnout at the second time wave and this was largely explained by the personality trait of neuroticism. Stress also increased and this was largely explained by emotion-oriented coping. Undertaking a nursing programme leads to increased level of stress, burnout and psychological morbidity and this is largely related to individual personality and coping traits.

  5. Stress and burnout among hemodialysis nurses: A single-center, prospective survey study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman Karkar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress is a well known and identified problem within the nursing profession. Dialysis nurses are exposed to high level of stress. Increasing workload can aggravate stress and cause burnout and exhaustion. Stress and burnout are capable of having a detrimental impact on organizational productivity and pose serious health and safety hazards on the job. We aimed in this study to determine the type and level of stress and the amount of burnout among our dialysis nurses, and to evaluate the managing skills and the impact of stress on their work performance. There were 93 nurses (19 national and 74 expatriate nurses who answered modified questionnaires to the aims of our prospective and descriptive correlational study. Our results show that most nurses involved in the study (national and expatriate experienced a mild level of stress (79% and 68%, respectively and moderate level of burnout (42% and 38%, respectively. The most common stressor among the national nurses was technical breakdowns of machines (15.9% and that among expatriates was job insecurity (16.9%. The majority of the national nurses (21% coped with this by increased sick leaves, whereas the majority (25% of the expatriates responded by becoming easily frustrated. The most utilized coping skill among both groups was the relaxation methods (20.8% versus 24.9% and the least utilized was denial (3.9% versus 0.5%. In conclusion, our results suggest the exposure of dialysis nurses to different types of stress and demonstrate the different experienced coping skills. These results may have implications for nursing management and hospital administration.

  6. The British Nursing Index and CINAHL: a comparison of journal title coverage and the implications for information professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briscoe, Simon; Cooper, Chris

    2014-09-01

    This paper compares the journal coverage of the British Nursing Index (BNI) and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL). The main objectives are to assess whether BNI is a useful source of UK publications and to consider the implications for information professionals. Lists of the journals indexed in BNI and CINAHL, CINAHL Plus and CINAHL Complete were compared. The date coverage and article entry date of a selection of UK nursing journals were also compared. One hundred and fifty-nine journals are uniquely indexed in BNI compared with the basic version of CINAHL. Eighty-one journals are uniquely indexed in BNI compared with all versions of CINAHL. Fifty-one of these journals are UK publications. Most of the selected UK nursing journals have earlier start and entry dates in CINAHL than BNI. BNI is smaller than CINAHL, and BNI indexes a relatively small number of unique journals. An information professional with access to CINAHL Plus or CINAHL Complete could reasonably not search BNI for a nursing topic, particularly if the topic is not UK specific. UK nursing research is more likely to benefit from using BNI, although the acquisition of BNI by ProQuest could impact this finding. © 2014 The authors. Health Information and Libraries Journal © 2014 Health Libraries Journal.

  7. Regulating the Flow of Change to Reduce Fontline Nurse Stress and Burnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppel, Jenna; Virkstis, Katherine; Strumwasser, Sarah; Katz, Marie; Boston-Fleischhauer, Carol

    2015-11-01

    The nursing workforce is at the center of many changes associated with care delivery transformation. To achieve this transformation, frontline nursing staff must be engaged in their work, committed to their organization's mission, and capable of delivering high-quality care. To identify top opportunities for driving nursing engagement, researchers from The Advisory Board Company analyzed engagement survey responses from more than 343 000 employees at 575 healthcare organizations. In this article, the authors describe 3 strategies for addressing 1 of the greatest opportunities for improving nurse engagement: ensuring nurses feel their organization helps them reduce stress and burnout.

  8. Factors associated with work ability index (WAI) among intensive care units' (ICUs') nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostamabadi, Akbar; Zamanian, Zahra; Sedaghat, Zahra

    2017-03-28

    Work ability is a crucial occupational health issue in health care settings where a high physical and psychosocial work capacity is required and a high risk of disabling injuries and illnesses is predictable. This study aims to examine the association between the work ability index (WAI) and individual characterizations, workload, fatigue, and diseases among intensive care units' (ICUs') nurses. The study sample included 214 nurses selected by a random sampling method from a target population consisting of 321 registered nurses working in eight ICUs. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to test the association between WAI scores and each of the independent variables. Results of multivariate analysis revealed a strong and negative association between WAI scores and diseases (B=-5.82, 95% CI=-7.16, -4.48, Pindex (BMI) was significantly and inversely associated with WAI scores. A significant and negative association was also found between WAI scores and dimensions of MFI-20, such as general fatigue (B=-0.31, 95% CI=-0.53, -0.09, P=0.005) and physical fatigue (B=-0.44, 95% CI=-0.65, -0.23, Pwork environment characterized by a well-structured preventive attitude toward controlling diseases, and a well-designed organizational framework toward increasing the level of performance and motivation, reducing the level of fatigue, as well as reducing the workload, is necessary to promote work ability among ICUs' nurses.

  9. The Comparative Study of Nursing Students and Nurses in Their Twenties on Interpersonal Relations. : Analysis Centering on the Stress Response Burnout

    OpenAIRE

    和田, 由紀子; 小林, 祐子; Wada, Yukiko; Kobayashi, Yuko

    2006-01-01

    We did a questionnaire survey and exam to clarity the connection between stress response burnout and interpersonal relations. The subject of our investigation were nursing students n=226 and 20s nurses in the terminal care unit in the whole country. The results of the exam on nursing students were completely different from a consistent tendency on 20, 30, and 40 nurses. And we analyzed the results on nursing students and 20's nurses based on stress response burnout . According to that, in the...

  10. The Different Facets of Work Stress: A Latent Profile Analysis of Nurses' Work Demands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenull, Brigitte B; Wiedermann, Wolfgang

    2015-10-01

    Work-related stress has been identified as a relevant problem leading to negative effects on health and quality of life. Using data from 844 nurses, latent profile analyses (LPA) were applied to identify distinct patterns of work stress. Several sociodemographic variables, including nurses' working and living conditions, as well as nurses' reactions to workload, were considered to predict respondents' profile membership. LPA revealed three distinct profiles that can be distinguished by a low, moderate, and higher stress level. Being financially secure is positively related to the low stress profile, whereas working in an urban area and having low job satisfaction increases the chance of belonging to the higher stress profile. Our results can be used as a basis to develop interventions to create a healthy nursing home environment by supporting the balance between family and work, providing access to job resources and optimizing recovery opportunities. © The Author(s) 2013.

  11. Use of a student support group to reduce student stress in a nurse anesthesia program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kless, J R

    1989-02-01

    Stress in nurse anesthesia programs may be excessive at times, especially in new students. While some degree of stress is necessary to motivate learning, excessive or prolonged stress can interfere with the normal learning process, thereby prolonging a student's clinical and academic progress. In the extreme, excessive stress may even preclude a student's successful completion of the educational program. Active faculty intervention through a student support group is advocated as a method for controlling stress levels and facilitating student learning. The positive effects of such intervention also increase the overall productivity of a program and better prepare nurse anesthesia students for their future careers.

  12. Predictors of nurse manager stress: a dominance analysis of potential work environment stressors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kath, Lisa M; Stichler, Jaynelle F; Ehrhart, Mark G; Sievers, Andree

    2013-11-01

    Nurse managers have important but stressful jobs. Clinical or bedside nurse predictors of stress have been studied more frequently, but less has been done on work environment predictors for those in this first-line leadership role. Understanding the relative importance of those work environment predictors could be used to help identify the most fruitful areas for intervention, potentially improving recruitment and retention for nurse managers. Using Role Stress Theory and the Job Demands-Resources Theory, a model was tested examining the relative importance of five potential predictors of nurse manager stress (i.e., stressors). The work environment stressors included role ambiguity, role overload, role conflict, organizational constraints, and interpersonal conflict. A quantitative, cross-sectional survey study was conducted with a convenience sample of 36 hospitals in the Southwestern United States. All nurse managers working in these 36 hospitals were invited to participate. Of the 636 nurse managers invited, 480 responded, for a response rate of 75.5%. Questionnaires were distributed during nursing leadership meetings and were returned in person (in sealed envelopes) or by mail. Because work environment stressors were correlated, dominance analysis was conducted to examine which stressors were the most important predictors of nurse manager stress. Role overload was the most important predictor of stress, with an average of 13% increase in variance explained. The second- and third-most important predictors were organizational constraints and role conflict, with an average of 7% and 6% increase in variance explained, respectively. Because other research has shown deleterious effects of nurse manager stress, organizational leaders are encouraged to help nurse managers reduce their actual and/or perceived role overload and organizational constraints. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Job stress, recognition, job performance and intention to stay at work among Jordanian hospital nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbuAlRub, Raeda Fawzi; Al-Zaru, Ibtisam Moawiah

    2008-04-01

    To investigate: (1) relationships between job stress, recognition of nurses' performance, job performance and intention to stay among hospital nurses; and (2) the buffering effect of recognition of staff performance on the 'stress-intention to stay at work' relationship. Workplace stress tremendously affects today's workforce. Recognition of nurses' performance needs further investigation to determine if it enhances the level of intention to stay at work and if it can buffer the negative effects of stress on nurses' intention to stay at work. The sample of the present study was a convenience one. It consisted of 206 Jordanian staff nurses who completed a structured questionnaire. The findings of the study indicated a direct and a buffering effect of recognition of nurses' performance on job stress and the level of intention to stay at work. The results of the study indicated the importance of recognition for outstanding performance as well as achievements. Implications for nursing management The results of this study support the need to focus on the implementation of recognition strategies in the workplace to reduce job stress and enhance retention.

  14. Job satisfaction, stress and burnout associated with haemodialysis nursing: a review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Bronwyn; Bonnet, Ann

    2010-12-01

    Job dissatisfaction, stress and burnout are linked to high rates of nurses leaving the profession, poor morale and poor patient outcomes. Haemodialysis (HD) nursing is uniquely characterised by the intense-prolonged interaction with patients who require complex technological care. A review of nine papers found that factors affecting job satisfaction were aspects of nursing care, organisational factors and length of time that a nurse has been working in nephrology nursing. Factors affecting job stress and burnout were due to interpersonal relationships with physicians, patient care activities, violence and abuse from patients, organisational factors and a lack of access to ongoing education. © 2010 European Dialysis and Transplant Nurses Association/European Renal Care Association.

  15. Work Related Stress, Burnout, Job Satisfaction and General Health of Nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Khamisa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gaps in research focusing on work related stress, burnout, job satisfaction and general health of nurses is evident within developing contexts like South Africa. This study identified the relationship between work related stress, burnout, job satisfaction and general health of nurses. A total of 1200 nurses from four hospitals were invited to participate in this cross-sectional study (75% response rate. Participants completed five questionnaires and multiple linear regression analysis was used to determine significant relationships between variables. Staff issues are best associated with burnout as well as job satisfaction. Burnout explained the highest amount of variance in mental health of nurses. These are known to compromise productivity and performance, as well as affect the quality of patient care. Issues, such as security risks in the workplace, affect job satisfaction and health of nurses. Although this is more salient to developing contexts it is important in developing strategies and intervention programs towards improving nurse and patient related outcomes.

  16. Work Related Stress, Burnout, Job Satisfaction and General Health of Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamisa, Natasha; Oldenburg, Brian; Peltzer, Karl; Ilic, Dragan

    2015-01-01

    Gaps in research focusing on work related stress, burnout, job satisfaction and general health of nurses is evident within developing contexts like South Africa. This study identified the relationship between work related stress, burnout, job satisfaction and general health of nurses. A total of 1200 nurses from four hospitals were invited to participate in this cross-sectional study (75% response rate). Participants completed five questionnaires and multiple linear regression analysis was used to determine significant relationships between variables. Staff issues are best associated with burnout as well as job satisfaction. Burnout explained the highest amount of variance in mental health of nurses. These are known to compromise productivity and performance, as well as affect the quality of patient care. Issues, such as security risks in the workplace, affect job satisfaction and health of nurses. Although this is more salient to developing contexts it is important in developing strategies and intervention programs towards improving nurse and patient related outcomes. PMID:25588157

  17. Work related stress, burnout, job satisfaction and general health of nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamisa, Natasha; Oldenburg, Brian; Peltzer, Karl; Ilic, Dragan

    2015-01-12

    Gaps in research focusing on work related stress, burnout, job satisfaction and general health of nurses is evident within developing contexts like South Africa. This study identified the relationship between work related stress, burnout, job satisfaction and general health of nurses. A total of 1200 nurses from four hospitals were invited to participate in this cross-sectional study (75% response rate). Participants completed five questionnaires and multiple linear regression analysis was used to determine significant relationships between variables. Staff issues are best associated with burnout as well as job satisfaction. Burnout explained the highest amount of variance in mental health of nurses. These are known to compromise productivity and performance, as well as affect the quality of patient care. Issues, such as security risks in the workplace, affect job satisfaction and health of nurses. Although this is more salient to developing contexts it is important in developing strategies and intervention programs towards improving nurse and patient related outcomes.

  18. Food cravings mediate the relationship between chronic stress and body mass index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Ariana; Grilo, Carlos M; White, Marney A; Sinha, Rajita

    2015-06-01

    This study examined the relationships between chronic stress, food cravings, and body mass index. A community-based sample of adults (N = 619) completed a comprehensive assessment battery and heights and weights were measured. Chronic stress had a significant direct effect on food cravings, and food cravings had a significant direct effect on body mass index. The total effect of chronic stress on body mass index was significant. Food cravings partially mediated the relationship between chronic stress and body mass index. These findings are consistent with research that chronic stress may potentiate motivation for rewarding substances and behaviors and indicate that high food cravings may contribute to stress-related weight gain. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. The Nurses’ Well-Being Index and Factors Influencing This Index among Nurses in Central China: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bing; Hu, Ying; Yu, Chuanhua

    2015-01-01

    Backgrounds/Objectives A discussion and analysis of factors that contribute to nurses’ happiness index can be useful in developing effective interventions to improve nurses’ enthusiasm, sense of honor and pride and to improve the efficiency and quality of medical services. Methods In this study, 206 registered nurses at the 2011 annual encounter for 12 Hanchuan hospitals completed a questionnaire survey that covered three aspects of the well-being index and thus served as a comprehensive well-being and general information tool. Results Based on their index score, the nurses’ overall happiness level was moderate. The dimensions of the happiness index are listed in descending order of their contribution to the nurses’ comprehensive happiness levels: health concerns, friendly relationships, self-worth, altruism, vitality, positive emotions, personality development, life satisfaction and negative emotions. Four variables (positive emotion, life satisfaction, negative emotions, and friendly relationships) jointly explained 47.80% of the total variance of the happiness index; positive emotions had the greatest impact on the happiness index. Conclusions Appropriate nursing interventions can improve nurses’ happiness index scores, thereby increasing nurses’ motivation and promoting the development of their nursing practice. PMID:26680594

  20. The Effect of Morningness-Eveningness on Shift Work Nurses: Sleep Quality, Depressive Symptoms and Occupational Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gil Sang Yoo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of morningness-eveningness type on nurses relative to sleep quality, depressive symptoms and occupational stress. Methods Data was collected using self-administering questionnaires by 257 three eight-hour randomly rotating shift system nurses at St. Vincent’s Hospital. Questionnaires were composed of baseline demographic data, Korean version of Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS, Beck Depression Inventory and Korean Occupational Stress Scale. Kruskal-Wallis H test and analysis of covariance were used to identify significant differences in sleep parameters, depressive symptoms and occupational stress according to morningness-eveningness type. Results There was significant difference in Subjective Sleep Quality score (p = 0.018. Post hoc analysis revealed differences between eveningness vs. morningness (p = 0.001 in Subjective Sleep Quality score. There were tendencies in sleep efficiency, PSQI total score and ESS between morningness-eveningness type. However, there were no significant differences in total sleep time, depressive symptoms and occupational stress including eight sub-categories according to morningness-eveningness type. Conclusions Eveningness type nurses revealed lower Subjective Sleep Quality and tendency for poor sleep efficiency, poor overall sleep efficiency and more severe daytime sleepiness than other type. However, morningness-eveningness were not decisive factors for total sleep time, depressive symptoms and occupational stress. Short-term medication, workers’ chronotypes consideration and naps before night shifts may be helpful in improving mental health and quality of life for shift nurses, especially for evening shifts.

  1. Depression, stress, emotional support, and self-esteem among baccalaureate nursing students in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Ratchneewan; Zeller, Richard; Srisaeng, Pakvilai; Yimmee, Suchawadee; Somchid, Sujidra; Sawatphanit, Wilaiphan

    2005-01-01

    Nursing students are valuable human resources. Detection of potential depression among nursing students is crucial since depression can lead to low productivity, minimized quality of life, and suicidal ideas. Identifying factors affecting depression among students can help nursing educators to find ways to decrease depression. The purpose of this study was to examine rates of depression and the associations between depression and stress, emotional support, and self-esteem among baccalaureate nursing students in Thailand. This correlational, cross-sectional study recruited 331 baccalaureate Thai nursing students. Students completed three instruments that had been translated into Thai: The Center for Epidemiology Studies Depression Scale, Perceived Stress Questionnaire, and Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. Another instrument created in Thai was used to measure emotional support. Results revealed that, when using the standard definition, 50.1% of the students were depressed. Stress was positively related to depression, whereas emotional support and self-esteem were negatively related to depression.

  2. The relationship between perceived stress and gastrointestinal symptoms in nursing and midwifery students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Huseyin Cam

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Students are subjected to different kinds of stressors, such as the pressure of academics with an obligation, an uncertain future and difficulties of integrating into the system. Although nursing and midwifery students experience a high level of stress during their training, there has been limited research on stress and its impact on the student's physical responses, such as gastrointestinal symptoms. The aims of this study are to assess the prevalence of gastrointestinal symptoms in nursing and midwifery students and to examine the association between the perceived stress and gastrointestinal symptoms. Methods: This performed using cross-sectional descriptive study design study enrolled a total of 449 students participates in the study in a university degree program was carried out on 366 nursing and midwifery students accepted. A personal information questionnaire, Perceived Stress Scale and a Gastrointestinal Symptoms Questionnaire were administered through a self-reported system. Results: Seventy point two percent of the nursing and midwifery students experienced at least one gastrointestinal symptom, with 35.8% of students reporting at least three gastrointestinal symptoms. Most of the nursing and midwifery students complained of upper dysmotility and bowel symptoms. In addition, students who reported higher perceived stress were significantly more likely to complain of gastrointestinal symptoms. Compared to students with the lowest perceived stress level, the adjusted odds ratio for gastrointestinal symptoms in students with the highest perceived stress level was 6.45 times higher. Conclusions: Gastrointestinal symptoms that are highly prevalent among nursing and midwifery students are significantly associated with the perceived stress level. High perceived stress should be considered a risk factor for gastrointestinal symptoms. Based on the study findings, there is a critical need of instructing the nursing and midwifery students

  3. Perceived stress, psychological well-being and burnout among female nurses working in government hospitals

    OpenAIRE

    Divinakumar K J; Shivram Bhat Pookala; Ram Chandra Das

    2014-01-01

    Background: Few studies have studied about the Burnout among government employed Female Nurses in India. Methods: A cross sectional survey was done by mailing questionnaires containing Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-10), Copenhagen Burnout Inventory (CBI) and General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28) to all 603 Nurses posted in thirty government hospitals of central India. Fifty seven percent responded and 298 valid questionnaires were analysed. Results: Sixty three nurses (21%) had GHQ 28 sc...

  4. The Barthel Index: comparing inter-rater reliability between nurses and doctors in an older adult rehabilitation unit.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hartigan, Irene

    2011-02-01

    To ensure accuracy in recording the Barthel Index (BI) in older people, it is essential to determine who is best placed to administer the index. The aim of this study was to compare doctors\\' and nurses\\' reliability in scoring the BI.

  5. Work stress among nursing home care attendants in Taiwan: a questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hui-Chuan; Kung, Yuan-Wei; Huang, Hsiao-Chien; Ho, Pei-Yu; Lin, Ya-Ying; Chen, Wen-Shin

    2007-07-01

    Care attendants constitute the main workforce in nursing homes, but their heavy workload, low autonomy, and indefinite responsibility result in high levels of stress and may affect quality of care. However, few studies have focused of this problem. The aim of this study was to examine work-related stress and associated factors that affect care attendants in nursing homes and to offer suggestions for how management can alleviate these problems in care facilities. We recruited participants from nine nursing homes with 50 or more beds located in middle Taiwan; 110 care attendants completed the questionnaire. The work stress scale for the care attendants was validated and achieved good reliability (Cronbach's alpha=0.93). We also conducted exploratory factor analysis. Six factors were extracted from the work stress scale: insufficient ability, stressful reactions, heavy workload, trouble in care work, poor management, and working time problems. The explained variance achieved 64.96%. Factors related to higher work stress included working in a hospital-based nursing home, having a fixed schedule, night work, feeling burden, inconvenient facility, less enthusiasm, and self-rated higher stress. Work stress for care attendants in nursing homes is related to human resource management and quality of care. We suggest potential management strategies to alleviate work stress for these workers.

  6. The role of social support on occupational stress among hospital nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jiegen; Ren, Xiaohua; Wang, Quanhai; He, Lianping; Wang, Jinquan; Jin, Yuelong; Chen, Yan; Wang, Linghong; Nie, Zhonghua; Guo, Daoxia; Yao, Yingshui

    2014-01-01

    Stress is a nonspecific reaction to everything the body needs. Although occupational stress exists in every occupation, it is seen with more frequency and intensity amongst those occupations related to human health. In this study, we aimed to investigate the relationship between occupational stress and social support (SS) among hospital nurses. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 1144 hospital nurse in China. They were investigated with a self-administered questionnaire about socio-demographic characteristics, occupational stress and social support. A validated version of the revised Occupational Stress Inventory (OSI-R) was applied to evaluate occupational stress; SS was measured by nine questions. Logistic regression analysis was used to study the association between occupational stress and SS and adjusted for income, gender, marital status, working years, educational level, and profession. Of 1144 nurses, the majority age group was less than 30 years, and the mean age across participants was 31.8 years. Further correlation analysis indicated that score of ORQ and PSQ had a significant negative correlation with score of SS (Poccupational stress in hospitals nurse. We also should pay more attention to occupational stress of married and long working years nurse.

  7. Perceptions of conscience, stress of conscience and burnout among nursing staff in residential elder care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juthberg, Christina; Eriksson, Sture; Norberg, Astrid; Sundin, Karin

    2010-08-01

    This paper is a report of a study of patterns of perceptions of conscience, stress of conscience and burnout in relation to occupational belonging among Registered Nurses and nursing assistants in municipal residential care of older people. Stress and burnout among healthcare personnel and experiences of ethical difficulties are associated with troubled conscience. In elder care the experience of a troubled conscience seems to be connected to occupational role, but little is known about how Registered Nurses and nursing assistants perceive their conscience, stress of conscience and burnout. Results of previous analyses of data collected in 2003, where 50 Registered Nurses and 96 nursing assistants completed the Perceptions of Conscience Questionnaire, Stress of Conscience Questionnaire and Maslach Burnout Inventory, led to a request for further analysis. In this study Partial Least Square Regression was used to detect statistical predictive patterns. Perceptions of conscience and stress of conscience explained 41.9% of the variance in occupational belonging. A statistical predictive pattern for Registered Nurses was stress of conscience in relation to falling short of expectations and demands and to perception of conscience as demanding sensitivity. A statistical predictive pattern for nursing assistants was perceptions that conscience is an authority and an asset in their work. Burnout did not contribute to the explained variance in occupational belonging. Both occupational groups viewed conscience as an asset and not a burden. Registered Nurses seemed to exhibit sensitivity to expectations and demands and nursing assistants used their conscience as a source of guidance in their work. Structured group supervision with personnel from different occupations is needed so that staff can gain better understanding about their own occupational situation as well as the situation of other occupational groups.

  8. Stress, coping and presenteeism in nurses assisting critical and potentially critical patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Umann

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective to verify the associations between stress, Coping and Presenteeism in nurses operating on direct assistance to critical and potentially critical patients. Method this is a descriptive, cross-sectional and quantitative study, conducted between March and April 2010 with 129 hospital nurses. The Inventory of stress in nurses, Occupational and Coping Questionnaire Range of Limitations at Work were used. For the analysis, the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, correlation coefficient of Pearson and Spearman, Chi-square and T-test were applied. Results it was observed that 66.7% of the nurses showed low stress, 87.6% use control strategies for coping stress and 4.84% had decrease in productivity. Direct and meaningful relationships between stress and lost productivity were found. Conclusion stress interferes with the daily life of nurses and impacts on productivity. Although the inability to test associations, the control strategy can minimize the stress, which consequently contributes to better productivity of nurses in the care of critical patients and potentially critical.

  9. Profiling nurses' job satisfaction, acculturation, work environment, stress, cultural values and coping abilities: A cluster analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Yong-Shian; Lee, Alice; Chan, Sally Wai-Chi; Chan, Moon Fai

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to determine whether definable profiles existed in a cohort of nursing staff with regard to demographic characteristics, job satisfaction, acculturation, work environment, stress, cultural values and coping abilities. A survey was conducted in one hospital in Singapore from June to July 2012, and 814 full-time staff nurses completed a self-report questionnaire (89% response rate). Demographic characteristics, job satisfaction, acculturation, work environment, perceived stress, cultural values, ways of coping and intention to leave current workplace were assessed as outcomes. The two-step cluster analysis revealed three clusters. Nurses in cluster 1 (n = 222) had lower acculturation scores than nurses in cluster 3. Cluster 2 (n = 362) was a group of younger nurses who reported higher intention to leave (22.4%), stress level and job dissatisfaction than the other two clusters. Nurses in cluster 3 (n = 230) were mostly Singaporean and reported the lowest intention to leave (13.0%). Resources should be allocated to specifically address the needs of younger nurses and hopefully retain them in the profession. Management should focus their retention strategies on junior nurses and provide a work environment that helps to strengthen their intention to remain in nursing by increasing their job satisfaction. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  10. Managing job stress among nurses : what kind of job resources do we need?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tooren, van den M.; Jonge, de J.

    2008-01-01

    Aim. This paper is a report of a study to investigate the functionality of different kinds of job resources for managing job stress in nursing. Background. There is increasing recognition that healthcare staff, and especially nurses, are at high risk for burnout and physical complaints. Several

  11. Nursing staff stress from challenging behaviour of residents with dementia: a concept analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hazelhof, T.J.G.M.; Schoonhoven, L.; Gaal, B.G. van; Koopmans, R.T.C.M.; Gerritsen, D.L.

    2016-01-01

    AIM: Provide insight into the concept of stress in the context of challenging behaviour of nursing home residents with dementia and its causes and consequences. BACKGROUND: Challenging behaviour is frequent in residents with dementia, but consequences for nursing staff are unclear. INTRODUCTION:

  12. The Relationship Between Second Language Anxiety and International Nursing Students Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khawaja, Nigar G.; Chan, Sabrina; Stein, Georgia

    2017-01-01

    We examined the relationship between second language anxiety and international nursing student stress after taking into account the demographic, cognitive, and acculturative factors. International nursing students (N = 152) completed an online questionnaire battery. Hierarchical regression analysis revealed that spoken second language anxiety and…

  13. The effect of Reiki on work-related stress of the registered nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuneo, Charlotte L; Curtis Cooper, Maureen R; Drew, Carolyn S; Naoum-Heffernan, Christine; Sherman, Tricia; Walz, Kathleen; Weinberg, Janice

    2011-03-01

    The Reiki Master Teacher group at a large academic, urban medical center studied the effects of Reiki on work-related stress in Registered Nurse Reiki I class participants. Research suggests that work-related stress is an influential factor in nursing burn out and retention. Reiki, an ancient form of Oriental "energy work" or healing, has been found to decrease stress. The Perceived Stress Scale tool was administered prior to the Reiki I class and after three weeks of practicing self-Reiki. Seventeen participants returned follow-up data. Results indicated that practicing Reiki more often resulted in reduced perceived stress levels. Data from this small pilot study supports educating nurses about Reiki practice to decrease work-related stress.

  14. Stress and coping among surgical unit nurses of a teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura de Azevedo Guido

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at identifying the stressors, the level of stress and coping strategies used by nurses in a surgical clinic of a university hospital. It is a cross-sectional study whose population consisted of nine nurses. Data were collected, between May and June 2005, through the Survey Form for Daily Activities and Coping Strategies Inventory. It was verified that activities related to personnel management were valued as the most stressful. Indicating a nurse in a state of alert for high levels of stress was valued like three medium levels and five with low level of stress. It was observed that solving problems was the most commonly used factor to face stress. Knowledge of the stressors and the ways of coping with them can help assist in the development of possible solutions to minimize their effects and become the most productive and less stressful aspect of the daily life.

  15. A cross-country comparative study on stress and quality of life in nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrague, Leodoro J; McEnroe-Petitte, Denise M; Papathanasiou, Ioanna V; Edet, Olaide B; Tsaras, Konstantinos; Christos, Kleisiaris F; Fradelos, Evangelos C; Rosales, Rheajane A; Cruz, Jonas P; Leocadio, Michael; Lucas, Katherine Vera S

    2017-10-27

    This study was conducted to compare perceptions of stress and quality of life (QoL) among nursing students from three countries (the Philippines, Greece, and Nigeria) and to examine the impact of stress on their QoL. A comparative, cross-sectional research design was used in this study. Data were collected from 547 nursing students from three countries using the perceived stress scale (PSS) and the quality of life evaluation skill (QOLES). Students' perceptions of stress and QoL were different across the three countries. Furthermore, higher stress perceptions were identified from taking care of patients, the clinical environment, and faculty, peer, and staff encounters, which predicted a negative QoL. The findings emphasized the need for empirically tested and culturally tailored interventions to effectively reduce stress and enhance the QoL in nursing students. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Hong Kong baccalaureate nursing students' stress and their coping strategies in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Christine K L; So, Winnie K W; Fong, Daniel Y T

    2009-01-01

    This study examined Hong Kong baccalaureate nursing students' stress and their coping strategies in clinical practice. Two hundred five nursing students completed a self-administrative survey including demographics, Perceived Stress Scale, and Coping Behavior Inventory. Results showed that students perceived a moderate level of stress (M = 2.10, SD =0.44). The most common stressor was lack of professional knowledge and skills. Among the four types of coping strategies (transference, stay optimistic, problem solving, and avoidance), transference was the most frequently used. Furthermore, senior students who perceived a higher level of stress from taking care of patients were more likely to choose problem-solving strategies. Senior students who had no religious belief and perceived a higher level of stress from teachers and nursing staff were more likely to use avoidance strategies. The results provided valuable information for clinical educators in identifying students' needs, facilitating their learning in the clinical setting, and developing effective interventions to reduce stress.

  17. [Effect of occupational stress on oxidation/antioxidant capacity in nurses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Lili; Tian, Honger; Zhang, Qingdong; Zhu, Xinyun; Zhan, Yongguo; Su, Jingguo; Xu, Tian; Zhu, Huabin; Liu, Ling

    2014-02-01

    To investigate the effect of occupational stress on the oxidation/antioxidant capacity in nurses. A total of 131 nurses were included as study subjects. The occupational health information collection system (based on the Internet of things) was used for measurement of occupational stress. Levels of hydroxyl free radicals and antioxidant enzymes were determined. The serum level of superoxide dismutase (SOD) was the highest in nurses under the age of 30 and the lowest in those over 45 (P occupational stress factors for SOD. Job hazards were negative occupational stress factors for POD. Psychological satisfaction was negative occupational stress reaction for hydroxyl free radicals. Calmness was positive occupational stress reaction for SOD, and daily stress was a negative one. The positive occupational stress reactions for GSH-Px were psychological satisfaction and job satisfaction, and daily stress was negative reaction. Nurses with higher occupational stress have stronger oxidation and weaker antioxidant capacity, which intensifies oxidant-antioxidant imbalance and leads to oxidative stress damage.

  18. [Stress in nurses at a hemodynamics ward in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linch, Graciele Fernanda da Costa; Guido, Laura de Azevedo

    2011-03-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between stress and symptoms reported by nurses working in units hemodynamics. Data were collected through a questionnaire. For analysis, the results were considered statistically significant if p nurses with a predominance of females (90.5%) and average age of 35.24 (+/- 8.21) years. Most participants werepostgraduate (77.8%) and did not have another job (77.8%). In relation to stress, 52.4% of nurses had an average between 1.11 and 1.97, classified as medium stress, and the critical situations domain presented the highest score (1.63 +/- 0.29). Regarding symptoms, the domain skeletal muscle had a higher average (1.39 +/- 0.94). In this study, there was high significant positive correlation between stress and symptoms (r = 0.629, p nurses.

  19. Stress and stressors in the clinical environment: a comparative study of fourth-year student nurses and newly qualified general nurses in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, Patricia; Matthews, Anne; Coyne, Imelda

    2013-03-01

    To measure and compare the perceived levels of job-related stress and stressors of newly qualified nurses and fourth-year student nurses in the clinical environment and to explore the participants' views on stress and stressors. Stress in the nursing workplace has significant consequences for the person, the patient and the organisation, such as psychological and physical health deterioration and impaired professional practice. To address this problem, stress and stressors need to be measured and identified. This study used a cross-sectional survey design and self-reporting questionnaires to measure and compare levels of stress in both groups. Convenience sampling involved all newly qualified nurses (n = 120) and fourth-year student nurses (n = 128) in Dublin North-East region in Ireland. The instrument used was 'The Nursing Stress Scale' (Gray-Toft & Anderson 1981, Journal of Behavioral Assessment 3, 11-23). Descriptive, qualitative analysis was conducted on an open-ended question. Data were obtained from newly qualified nurses (n = 31) and fourth-year student nurses (n = 40) in six acute hospital sites. Levels of perceived stress and stressors were high in both groups. Themes identified from the responses to the open question by both groups included excessive workload, difficult working relationships and unmet clinical learning needs. Student nurses also reported the combination of academic demands with clinical placement as a major stressor. There was no significant difference between each group. Stress continues to be a problem for nurses in the clinical setting. Excessive workload requires urgent attention by hospital managers in view of widespread retention difficulties. Themes identified could provide a framework for possible interventions for improving the clinical environment for nurses. These results can help stakeholders in nurse education and practice to develop interventions to reduce stress for both groups and to ease the transition from student to

  20. Job stressors and job stress among teachers engaged in nursing activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muto, Shigeki; Muto, Takashi; Seo, Akihiko; Yoshida, Tsutomu; Taoda, Kazushi; Watanabe, Misuzu

    2007-01-01

    Teachers and staff members engaged in nursing activity experience more stress than other workers. However, it is unknown whether teachers engaged in nursing activity in schools for handicapped children experience even greater stress. This study evaluated job stressors and job stress among such teachers using a cross-sectional study design. The subjects were all 1,461 teachers from all 19 prefectural schools for handicapped children in Shizuoka Prefecture, Japan. We used a brief job stress questionnaire for the survey and 831 teachers completed the questionnaire. Job stressors among teachers engaged in nursing activity were compared with those among teachers not engaged in nursing activity. Job stress among such teachers was estimated by the score for total health risk, and was compared with the score in the Japanese general population. Male and female teachers engaged in nursing activity had a significantly higher level of job stressors for physical work load and job control compared with those not engaged in nursing activity. The scores for total health risk among male and female teachers engaged in nursing activity were 102 points and 98 points, respectively. These scores were not markedly above 100 points which is the mean score in the Japanese general population.

  1. Job satisfaction, workplace stress, unhealthy lifestyle choices, and productivity among Canadian nurses: an empirical study

    OpenAIRE

    Karen J. Buhr

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nurses’ occupational stress and job satisfaction can have an affect on lifestyle choices and productivity. OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study is to provide a detailed examination of the relationship between job satisfaction, job stress, unhealthy lifestyle choices, and productivity among Canadian nurses. METHODS: This study uses data from the confidential master data files of the 2005 National Survey of the Work and Health of Nurses (NSWHN). Ordinary least squares regressions...

  2. Nurses' experiences, expectations, and preferences for mind-body practices to reduce stress

    OpenAIRE

    McCool Jane A; Ott Mary; Krueger Deborah; Bulla Sally; Kemper Kathi; Gardiner Paula

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Most research on the impact of mind-body training does not ask about participants' baseline experience, expectations, or preferences for training. To better plan participant-centered mind-body intervention trials for nurses to reduce occupational stress, such descriptive information would be valuable. Methods We conducted an anonymous email survey between April and June, 2010 of North American nurses interested in mind-body training to reduce stress. The e-survey included:...

  3. Depression, Anxiety and Symptoms of Stress among Hong Kong Nurses: A Cross-sectional Study

    OpenAIRE

    Cheung, Teris; Yip, Paul S.F.

    2015-01-01

    Recent epidemiological data suggests 13.3% of Hong Kong residents suffered from Common Mental Disorders, most frequently mixed anxiety and depressive disorder. This study examines the weighted prevalence and associated risk factors of depression, anxiety and stress among Hong Kong nurses. A total of 850 nurses were invited to participate in this cross-sectional study. Participants completed the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale 21 and multiple logistic regression was used to determine sign...

  4. The effect of massage therapy on occupational stress of Intensive Care Unit nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazari, Fateme; Mirzamohamadi, Mojtaba; Yousefi, Hojatollah

    2015-01-01

    One of the main causes of stress in the lives of people is their jobs. Occupational stress is causing a wide range of significant issues in health and community services. Nursing is the most stressful profession in the health services. Massage therapy is one way of coping with stress. This study was conducted to determine the effect of massage therapy on stress in nurses. This study was a clinical trial on 66 male and female nurses working in intensive care units (dialysis, ICU, and CCU) of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Iran, in 2013. Participants were selected according to the aims and inclusion criteria of the study. Then, they were randomly divided into experimental and control groups. The Occupational Stress Inventory (OSI) (Osipow and Spokane, 1987) was completed by participants of the two groups before, immediately after, and 2 weeks after the intervention. General Swedish massage was performed on participants of the experimental group for 25 min in each session, twice a week for 4 weeks. Data were analyzed by descriptive and inferential statistics [Chi-square, t-test, and repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA)] using SPSS software. Results showed that the difference in overall mean occupation stress scores between experimental and control groups 2 weeks after the intervention was significant (P < 0.001). According to the results, it is recommended that massage, as a valuable noninvasive method, be used for nurses in intensive care units to reduce their stress, promote mental health, and prevent the decrease in quality of nursing work life.

  5. Emergency department nurses' experiences of occupational stress: A qualitative study from a public hospital in Bangkok, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuwanich, Nuttapol; Sandmark, Hélène; Akhavan, Sharareh

    2015-10-30

    Occupational stress has been a health-related issue among nurses for many decades. Emergency department nurses are frequently confronted with occupational stress in their workplace; in particular, they encounter stressful situations and unpredictable events. These encounters could make them feel more stressed than nurses in other departments. Research considering occupational stress from the perspective of Thai emergency department nurses is limited. This study aimed to explore nurses' perceptions of occupational stress in an emergency department. A qualitative approach was used to gain an understanding of nurses' experiences and perceptions regarding stress in their workplace. Semi-structured interviews were used for data collection. Twenty-one emergency department nurses working in a public hospital in Thailand were interviewed, and the data were analyzed using content analysis. The findings comprised three themes: (1) perceived stress, (2) consequences of stress, and (3) stress management. The results of this study can be used by hospital management to help them adopt effective strategies, such as support programs involving co-workers/supervisors, to decrease occupational stress among emergency department nurses. Future research that explores each of the themes found in this study could offer a more comprehensive understanding of nurses' occupational stress in the emergency department.

  6. Association between stress at work and primary headache among nursing staff in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kao-Chang; Huang, Chin-Chang; Wu, Chiou-Chuen

    2007-04-01

    Stress, one of the most commonly identified triggers for primary headache in the workplace, usually leads to inefficient work during attacks. Stress-related primary headaches in the nursing staff of hospitals have received little attention. To realize the association between stress and headache, and the means of coping with this kind of headache. A cross-sectional, hospital-based study using a semi-structured questionnaire was administered to 900 nursing staffers in a tertiary medical center in southern Taiwan. Thirty-two items, including basic information, headache- and stress-related questions, work satisfaction, and coping strategies were measured. Headache sufferers with either migraine or episodic tension headache (attacks Headache Society (IHS) criteria were enrolled for analysis. The Student's t-test, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), and chi-square test were used for statistical analysis. Three hundred eighty-six out of 779 responders (49.6%) had experienced primary headaches in the previous year, and 374 (48.1%) had had episodic-type headaches (headache, 37 (4.8%) had mixed migraine and tension headache, and 11 (1.4%) had other causes of headache. There were no demographic differences between the sufferers and nonsufferers, although a statistically significant difference was noted in self-reported sources of stress (individual P values ranged from .021 to Headache sufferers had more stress at work than non-headache sufferers (P stress. The methods used to deal with headaches were sleep, taking medicine, taking a rest, visiting the doctor, and seeking psychological help. Nurses commonly used acetaminophen (panadol--500 mg) to relieve their pain. These results indicate that stress at work is associated with primary headaches among nursing staff, and that nurses rarely seek help in the beginning. Therefore, nursing staff education aimed at ameliorating the stress and coping with the headaches, thus allowing the nurses to provide better patient care, may

  7. Healthy dietary habits, body mass index, and predictors among nursing students, northeast Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osaka, R; Nanakorn, S; Sanseeha, L; Nagahiro, C; Kodama, N

    1999-03-01

    This study aimed to assess body mass index (BMI) of nursing students, and examine the links between health behavior in terms of healthy dietary habits, positive health habits, dieting and BMI. A structured questionnaire was used for obtaining information on dietary habits, positive health habits, demographic characteristic including body weight, and height by administering self-answering questionnaires to all of nursing students in the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th year-classes of the College of Nursing located in northeast Thailand. Three hundred and eleven female nursing students with an average age of 19.9 (SD = 1.4), had an average BMI of 20.3 kg/m2 (SD = 1.9). Most of the subjects (82.6%) were in the acceptable weight category (BMI > 18.5-24.99 kg/m2), 5.1% underweight (BMI or = 25.0 kg/m2). About half of them (50.8-66.2%) practiced healthy dietary habits in terms of avoiding eating fat/cholesterol, enriched fiber foods, while one-fourth practiced daily fruit consumption. Positive health habits in terms of having breakfast, and taking exercise over the last two weeks, were practiced by 49.5% and 59.8%, respectively. Persistent health problem occurred 13.5% amongst the subjects. The univariate analyses revealed significant associations between dieting with the BMI; perception of body size with the BMI; the enriched fiber food consumption with dieting; and the avoidance of fat/cholesterol with dieting. It suggests that the choice of food was predominantly attributable to dieting. Results from multiple logistic regression analysis showed that dietary belief, dieting, and exercise had effects on the strength of the association (p = 0.0191, 0.0024, 0.0165; Odds ratios = 0.97, 2.21, 1.87, respectively). The results and implications are discussed.

  8. Diet quality in elderly nursing home residents evaluated by Diet Quality Index Revised (DQI-R).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumbak, Ivana; Satalić, Zvonimir; Keser, Irena; Krbavcić, Ines Panjkota; Giljević, Zlatko; Zadro, Zvonko; Barić, Irena Colić

    2010-06-01

    The objective of this research was to evaluate diet quality in elderly nursing home residents and to point out the critical dietary components. The participants (277 females and 62 males) were recruited from all elderly nursing homes in Zagreb and each of elderly nursing homes was equally represented in this study. The age of subjects was ranging from 61 to 93 years; most of the females (53.4%) and males (53.2%) were between 70 and 80 years old. The dietary data from the multi pass 24-hour recall were used to compute the Diet Quality Index Revised (DQI-R). DQI-R is an instrument that provides a summary assessment of a diet's overall healthfulness and is based on ten different aspects, including recommendations for both nutrient and food types. Pearson correlation analysis was used to compare the total DQI-R score with dietetic parameters and t-test was calculated between mean values of all the components of DQI-R as well as for total DQI-R score for men and women. The mean DQI-R score for the 339 sample was 62.1 +/- 11.7. The biggest number of participants satisfied recommendations about dietary cholesterol intake (88.5% of participants) and dietary moderation score (71.1% of participants) but nobody satisfied recommendation about dietary diversity score. Only 3.2% of subjects had an adequate calcium intake (6.5% of male participants and only 2.5% of female participants). Recommended servings of fruit intake were satisfied by 19.8% of population, 30.4% satisfied vegetables recommendations and 38.6% recommendations for grains. According to DQI-R, beside positive dietary habits regarding dietary moderation and dietary cholesterol intake the population of elderly nursing home residents in the capital of Croatia needs improvement in other dietary habits in order to enhance successful aging.

  9. Home care nurses' experience of job stress and considerations for the work environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samia, Linda W; Ellenbecker, Carol Hall; Friedman, Donna Haig; Dick, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Home care nurses report increased stress in their jobs due to work environment characteristics that impact professional practice. Stressors and characteristics of the professional practice environment that moderate nurses' experience of job stress were examined in this embedded multiple case study. Real life experiences within a complex environment were drawn from interviews and observations with 29 participants across two home care agencies from one eastern U.S. state. Findings suggest that role overload, role conflict, and lack of control can be moderated in agencies where there are meaningful opportunities for shared decision making and the nurse-patient relationship is supported.

  10. Effect of stress on serum cholestrol levels in nurses and housewives of Hyderabad - Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watto, F.H.; Memon, M.S.; Memon, A.N.; Ghanghro, A.B.; Yaquib, M.; Watto, M.H.S.; Tirmizi, S.A.

    2010-01-01

    A cohort type study was designed to evaluate environmental, psychological and physiological stresses in nurses and housewives and to correlate with their serum total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and triglyceride levels. Total 160 females from middle socioeconomic groups (nurses, n=80 and housewives, n=80) aged between 25-45 years participated in this study and subjects were selected from Hyderabad and its adjoining areas. Environmental, psychological and physiological stress levels were measured with likert scale. Total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and HDL cholesterol were measured by CHOD-PAP method and triglyceride levels were measured by GPO method. Housewives were found to have high levels of total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and triglycerides. The HDL cholesterol were lower. Environmental, psychological and physiological stresses were significantly higher in housewives as compared to the nurses. Highest level of environmental stress was observed in nonworking group i.e. housewives. A significant relation between serum cholesterol levels and three types of stresses was observed. (author)

  11. Home health nurses: stress, self-esteem, social intimacy, and job satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, S; Lindquist, S; Katz, B

    1997-06-01

    A survey of 253 home health care nurses' perceptions of work-related stress, self-esteem, social intimacy, and job satisfaction found that stress has a negative correlation with self-esteem, social intimacy, and job satisfaction. A positive correlation, however, was found between self-esteem and social intimacy and job satisfaction. Health system administrators, owners, and directors had significantly higher levels of self-esteem, nurses with 5 years or more in their home health nursing position had significantly higher levels of self-esteem. The survey found that nurses with less than a baccalaureate degree possessed significantly lower levels of sociability than those with a graduate or baccalaureate degree. Administrators and managers scored significantly higher on sociability than head nurses.

  12. Perceptions of stress, burnout, and support systems in pediatric bone marrow transplantation nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Regan; Gormley, Denise K

    2009-12-01

    Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) is used to treat various conditions, ranging from immune disorders to many types of cancer. The critical complexity of patients and the environment in which BMT nurses work can lead to stress, burnout, and, ultimately, poor retention. This study aimed to investigate nurses' perceptions of work-related stress and burnout as well as current support systems for nurses. The study included 30 BMT staff nurses from a large pediatric medical center in the midwestern United States. Critical illness or acuity of patients was reported as the most stressful factor; long work hours was the least stressful factor. Most nurses perceived moderate to high levels of emotional exhaustion, and 33% reported moderate levels of depersonalization. Fifty percent perceived high levels of personal accomplishment, despite the critical illness or acuity of their patients, demanding patient families, rotating shifts, short staffing, and caring for dying patients. Most nurses felt that support systems were in place and that staff was accessible, but most respondents were undecided about the helpfulness of the support systems. Results suggest that support systems may significantly affect work satisfaction and feelings of accomplishment for BMT nurses.

  13. Coping, stress, and personality in Spanish nursing students: A longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornés-Vives, Joana; Garcia-Banda, Gloria; Frias-Navarro, Dolores; Rosales-Viladrich, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the dominant stress coping style in nursing students, its relationships with stressful life events and personality traits, and the students' changes during their academic training. A non-experimental two-wave longitudinal design was carried out in 199 nursing students recruited from three Spanish nursing schools. The Stressful Life Events Scale, NEO-FFI, and COPE questionnaire were administered at the beginning (T1) and end (T2) of their nursing studies. Descriptive statistics, Anova(s), NPar tests, and Pearson correlations were carried out. Results show that nursing students' dominant coping style was emotion-focused coping, both at T1 and T2. Highly significant correlations between emotional coping and the neuroticism trait were found. Coping, stress, and personality changed positively during the training program. At T2, the use of problem-focused strategies increased, and participants became more extroverted, agreeable, and conscientious. Coping and personality changes experienced by nursing students throughout their degree program seem to mirror the professional competences needed by future licensed nurses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. [Mediating effect of mental elasticity on occupational stress and depression in female nurses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y W; Liu, G Z; Zhou, X T; Sheng, P J; Cui, F F; Shi, T

    2017-06-20

    Objective: To investigate the interaction between mental elasticityand occupational stress and depressionin female nurses and the mediating effect of mental elasticity, as well as the functioning way of mental elasticity in occupational stress-depression. Methods: From August to October, 2015, cluster sampling was used to select 122 female nurses in a county-level medical institution as study subjects. The Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC) , Occupational Stress Inventory-Revised Edition (OSI-R) , and Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS) were used to collect the data on mental elasticity, occupational stress, and depression and analyze their correlation and mediating effect. Results: The 122 female nurses had a mean mental elasticity score of 62.4±15.1, which was significantly lower than the Chinese norm (65.4±13.9) ( P occupational stress and depression ( r =-0.559 and -0.559, both P Occupational stress and the two subscales mental stress reaction and physical stress reaction were positively correlated with depression ( r =0.774, 0.734, and 0.725, all P occupational stress had a positive predictive effect on depression ( β =0.744, P occupational stress on depression and a significant mediating effect of mental elasticity ( a =-0.527, b =-0.227, c =0.744, c '=0.627; all P occupational stress and depression and can alleviate the adverse effect of occupational stress and reduce the development of depression.

  15. The Sources of Work Stress among Nurses in Private Hospitals in Shiraz, 2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heshmatollah Asadi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Since there are few studies on stress experienced by nursing staff in private hospitals, this study aimed to determine the sources of job stress among nurses in private hospitals in southwest of Iran. Method: In a cross-sectional design, nurses in private hospitals in Shiraz were investigated; about 160 nurses were selected by single-stage cluster sampling as the study samples in three selected hospitals. A standard questionnaire on the sources of job stress was used for data collection. The data were analyzed through SPSS, version 21, using Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis tests. The level of significance was considered as 0.05. Results: Five important causes of stress among nurses were low income, lack of job security, work-home interface, lack of enough time for work, and exposure with unsuitable physical situation. There were significant associations between the source of stress and having persons with chronic disease in family and concurrent education and work (P = 0.021, X2= 426.5 and P = 0.022, X2 = 717.5, respectively. Conclusion: The sources of job stress should be considered for effective working of the hospital. Attention to nurses’ salary and job security reduces job stress.

  16. [Investigation on job stress of pediatricians and nurses working in pediatric department].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, San-qiao; Tian, Ling; Pang, Bao-dong; Bai, Yu-ping; Fan, Xue-yun; Shen, Fu-hai; Jin, Yu-lan

    2008-09-01

    To investigate the occupational stressors and modifiers of pediatricians and nurses in order to find the measurements for control of the job stress. 427 pediatricians and nurses working in five hospitals of a city served as subjects. Of them, the staff in section of pharmacy and toll offices in each hospital mentioned above served as control group. The General Job Stress Questionnaire was used to investigate the job stress by self-assessment. The scores of job demand, job risk, drug using, daily job stress, positive feelings, patient A behavior, physical environment and feeling balance in pediatricians and nurses were higher than those of control group, but the scores of job-person conflict, environmental control, technology utility, mental health, responsibility on things were lower than those of control group (Pdepression in nurses were higher than those of pediatricians, and non-work activities, job risk and daily life stress were lower than those of doctors (Pwork job, lower job control, more job risk, job future ambiguous, poorer social support, lower job locus control and lower self-esteem. The stress degree of pediatric staff is higher than that of controls. The pediatricians have more job stress than that of nurses. The main stressors of pediatric staff are job monotony, higher job demand, more non-worker activity, lower job control, higher job risk and ambiguous job future. The main modifiers are good social support, external job locus of control and higher self-esteem.

  17. An exploration of post-traumatic stress disorder in emergency nurses following Hurricane Katrina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battles, Elizabeth D

    2007-08-01

    As a result of Hurricane Katrina on August 29, 2005, ED nurses were faced with chaos during and after the storm. The purpose of this pilot study was to determine if emergency nurses have experienced signs and symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as a result of working in an emergency department of the New Orleans metropolitan area during and immediately after Hurricane Katrina. The research identifies if the nurses perceived satisfaction with measures administrators took to provide Critical Incident Stress Management (CISM). To combat burnout, absenteeism, emotional difficulties, and health problems in nurses, administration must offer adequate crisis management for those affected by a traumatic event in the workplace. Data were captured through a cross-sectional research design using self-reporting questionnaires. A questionnaire captured demographic information as well as information regarding satisfaction with CISM offered by management. The Post Traumatic Checklist (PCL) was utilized to assess PTSD symptoms in the nurse. An emergency department located approximately 40 miles north of downtown New Orleans, Louisiana, served as the setting for this study. The sample included 21 registered nurses who worked in the emergency department. Twenty percent of the nurses has symptoms of PTSD. In addition, 100% of the nurses reported that administrators did not offer CISM. To combat consequences of long-term effects of PTSD, hospital administrators must offer adequate treatment to employees. Further research is needed to expand the sample and gain a wider perspective on PTSD symptoms in nurses who worked during the Hurricane.

  18. Work stress and emotional exhaustion in nurses: the mediating role of internal locus of control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partlak Günüşen, Neslihan; Ustün, Besti; Erdem, Sabri

    2014-01-01

    Burnout is a major problem for nursing. There is a strong relationship between work stress and emotional exhaustion. Although studies report a negative correlation between the internal locus of control and emotional exhaustion and work stress, the number of studies available on the subject is limited. This study intends to examine the extent to which the relationship between work stress and emotional exhaustion is mediated by nurses' internal locus of control. The study adopted a cross-sectional survey design. The data were analyzed using structural equation modeling techniques. The study sample consisted of 347 nurses who worked in a university hospital in Izmir, Turkey and who agreed to participate in the study. The Work-Related Strain Inventory was used to evaluate the nurses' work stress level, Maslach Burnout Inventory was used to evaluate their emotional exhaustion levels, and the Locus of Control Scale was used to evaluate the internal locus of control. The variables of the study were based on the Neuman Systems Model. Work stress was positively related to internal locus of control (β3 = .21, p 0.1). Internal locus of control was negatively related to emotional exhaustion (β = -.14, p Work stress is directly (β = .87, p Work stress is directly (β = .87, p work stress was mediated, the impact of internal locus of control was limited. It is recommended that different variables be included in future studies so that they can mediate the relationship between work stress and emotional exhaustion.

  19. The impact of environmental factors on nursing stress, job satisfaction, and turnover intention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applebaum, Diane; Fowler, Susan; Fiedler, Nancy; Osinubi, Omowunmi; Robson, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate relationships between environmental factors of odor, noise, light, and color and perceived stress, job satisfaction, and turnover intention. The physical work environment may positively or negatively influence nurses' stress, and stress may negatively impact their job satisfaction and intention to change jobs. The research questions were answered using a descriptive, correlational design. The sample (n = 116) consisted of medical-surgical nurses working in acute-care settings. A 36-item questionnaire addressed odor, noise, light, color, perceived stress, job satisfaction, and turnover intention. Significant relationships were found between noise and perceived stress, perceived stress and job satisfaction, job satisfaction and turnover intention, and perceived stress and turnover intention. Nurses tend to overlook their physical environment and "do their job." Common environmental stressors in the work environment can be stressful to staff and influence job satisfaction and, ultimately, intention to change jobs. Mitigating or eliminating these environmental factors has the potential to improve staff satisfaction and retention. Stress influences nursing job satisfaction and, ultimately, intention to change jobs.

  20. Relationship Between Job Stress Among Nurses with Their General Health Status in Kamali Hospital in 1392

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Mashak

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: In jobs where human contact is like nursing, more tension there. This destructive and multidimensional phenomenon can be increased absenteeism, reduced work efficiency and create energy and physical and mental illnesses lead to a decline in the quality of patient care. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between stress and general health and help reduce the stress they are. Methods: This cross-sectional study on 78 public health nurses and Grft.prsshOsipow questionnaire included demographic information, job stress indicators (6 Stress workload involved, incompetence of duality role, scope, roles, responsibilities and physical environment and public health have been classified. Results: The findings show different aspects of occupational stress on 2/49% of the variation in the role and functions of stress, mild confusion, the burden of duties (45%, responsibility and physical environment (62%, stress higher. The aspects of public health, 48% of nurses in the physical symptoms (moderate and (63% of anxiety in the top 40 percent in the social dysfunction in Hdpayyn and 40% of the depression at the bottom were evaluated. Conclusion: The results of this study were determined and compared with previous studies in the same field  Create occupational stress can adversely affect the performance of nurses and public health they have.Implementing ways to reduce stress and burnout can promote mental health nurses to help improve the quality of nursing care.The results will help health systems to create a quiet working conditions largely reduce occupational stress.

  1. Occupational stress, sense of coherence, coping, burnout and work engagement of registered nurses in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna J. van der Colff

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between the occupational stress, sense of coherence, coping, burnout and work engagement of registered nurses in South Africa. A cross-sectional survey design was used. The study population consisted of 818 registered nurses. The Nursing Stress Inventory, the Orientation to Life Questionnaire, the COPE, the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey, and the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale were administered. The results show that the experience of depletion of emotional resources and feelings of depersonalisation by registered nurses were associated with stress due to job demands and a lack of organisational support, focus on and ventilation of emotions as a coping strategy, and a weak sense of coherence. Work engagement was predicted by a strong sense of coherence and approach-coping strategies.

  2. Examination of a cognitive model of stress, burnout, and intention to resign for Japanese nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohue, Takashi; Moriyama, Michiko; Nakaya, Takashi

    2011-06-01

    A reduction in burnout is required to decrease the voluntary turnover of nurses. This study was carried out with the aim of establishing a cognitive model of stress, burnout, and intention to resign for nurses. A questionnaire survey was administered to 336 nurses (27 male and 309 female) who had worked for ≤5 years at a hospital with multiple departments. The survey included an evaluation of burnout (Maslach Burnout Inventory), stress (Nursing Job Stressor Scale), automatic thoughts (Automatic Thoughts Questionnaire-Revised), and irrational beliefs (Japanese Irrational Belief Test), in addition to the intention to resign. The stressors that affected burnout in the nurses included conflict with other nursing staff, nursing role conflict, qualitative workload, quantitative workload, and conflict with patients. The irrational beliefs that were related to burnout included dependence, problem avoidance, and helplessness. In order to examine the automatic thoughts affecting burnout, groups with low and high negative automatic thoughts and low and high positive automatic thoughts were established. A two-way ANOVA showed a significant interaction of these factors with emotional exhaustion, but no significant interaction with depersonalization and a personal sense of accomplishment. Only the major effect was significant. The final model showed a process of "stressor → irrational beliefs → negative automatic thoughts/positive automatic thoughts → burnout". In addition, a relationship between burnout and an intention to resign was shown. These results suggest that stress and burnout in nurses might be prevented and that the number of nurses who leave their position could be decreased by changing irrational beliefs to rational beliefs, decreasing negative automatic thoughts, and facilitating positive automatic thoughts. © 2010 The Authors. Japan Journal of Nursing Science © 2010 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  3. Role stress and personal resources in nursing: a cross-sectional study of burnout and engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrosa, Eva; Moreno-Jiménez, Bernardo; Rodríguez-Muñoz, Alfredo; Rodríguez-Carvajal, Raquel

    2011-04-01

    The experience of role stress has been linked to burnout as an important job stressor, but the impact of this stressor in the context of engagement (characterized by vigor, dedication, and absorption) has not yet been sufficiently studied among nurses. Personal resources also appear to influence the process of burnout and engagement. This study examines the influence of role stress and personal resources (optimism, hardy personality and emotional competence) in nursing on burnout and engagement dimensions. Cross-sectional data from 508 nurses from general hospitals in Madrid (Spain) showed that both role stress and personal resources were related to burnout and engagement dimensions, although role stress was more closely related to nursing burnout, whereas personal resources were more closely related to nursing engagement. In addition, optimism as a personal resource, showed a moderator effect on exhaustion and the three dimensions of engagement. The study provides additional support about role stress as an important predictor of burnout and engagement in nursing, even after controlling for personal resources and socio-demographic variables. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Occupational stress, job satisfaction and job performance among hospital nurses in Kampala, Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabirye, Rose C; Brown, Kathleen C; Pryor, Erica R; Maples, Elizabeth H

    2011-09-01

    To assess levels of occupational stress, job satisfaction and job performance among hospital nurses in Kampala, Uganda; and how they are influenced by work and personal characteristics. Occupational stress is reported to affect job satisfaction and job performance among nurses, thus compromising nursing care and placing patients' lives at risk. Although these factors have been studied extensively in the US and Europe, there was a need to explore them from the Ugandan perspective. A correlational study was conducted with 333 nurses from four hospitals in Kampala, Uganda. A questionnaire measuring occupational stress, job satisfaction and job performance was used. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and anova. There were significant differences in levels of occupational stress, job satisfaction and job performance between public and private not-for-profit hospitals, nursing experience and number of children. Organizational differences between public and private not-for-profit hospitals influence the study variables. On-the-job training for nurse managers in human resource management to increase understanding and advocacy for organizational support policies was recommended. Research to identify organizational, family or social factors which contribute to reduction of perceived occupational stress and increase job satisfaction and job performance was recommended. 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Nursing work stress: the impacts of social network structure and organizational citizenship behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Seng-Su; Chen, Tzu-Yin; Wang, Shih-Fong; Tai, Hsin-Ling

    2012-03-01

    The nursing workplace imposes significantly more stress on its employees than other workplace settings. Organizational resources, both physical and psychological, have been recognized in prior studies as important alleviators of nursing workplace stress. Whereas physical resources are less difficult to manipulate because of their tangibility, psychological resources, particularly psychological support from colleagues, are typically not deployed to greatest effect. This article investigated the alleviation of nursing work stress using resources already extant in coworker social networks. Researchers conducted a survey in a dialysis department at a medical center located in Taipei City, Taiwan. This survey measured nurse work stress, satisfaction, organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) and social network structures. Researchers employed UCINET to analyze the network structure data, which were in dyadic matrix format to estimate nurse network centralities and used partial least squares analysis to estimate research construct path coefficients and test extrapolated hypotheses. The level of OCB induced by nurse social ties was satisfactory and did not only directly increased work satisfaction but also alleviated work stress, which indirectly boosted work satisfaction. Findings suggest that managers may be able to use social network analysis to identify persons appropriate to conduct the distribution of organizational resources. Choosing those with multiple social connections can help distribute resources effectively and induce higher OCB levels within the organization. In addition, staff with strong friendship network connections may provide appropriate psychological resources (support) to coworkers. If those with high friendship network centrality receive proper counseling training, they should be in a good position to provide assistance when needed.

  6. Do Health Promotion Behaviors Affect Levels of Job Satisfaction and Job Stress for Nurses in an Acute Care Hospital?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Heather L; Costley, Teresa; Bellury, Lanell M; Moobed, Jasmine

    2018-06-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the relationships between nurse-reported health-promoting behaviors (HPBs), job stress, and job satisfaction in a hospital setting. Job stress and satisfaction are key components of the nursing work environment; however, evidence of the relationship between HPB and job stress and satisfaction is lacking. A cross-sectional, 144-item survey was administered to nurses working in an acute care, community hospital in the southeastern United States. Higher levels of HPB were associated with lower job stress and higher job satisfaction. Total HPB was associated with the competence subscale of job stress. Lower job stress was significantly associated with HPB subscales: spiritual growth, interpersonal relations, and stress management. Nursing organizations can implement interventions that support HPB for nurses to reduce job stress and improve satisfaction.

  7. [BURNOUT SYNDROME AND STRESS OF NURSING STAFF IN A OURENSE HOSPITAL].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Rodríguez, Anxela; Pérez-Fernandez, Ma Reyes

    2015-02-01

    Set up the stress prevalence and burnout syndrome in different units of nursing staff of the Complexo Hospitalario Universitario de Ourense (CHUOU) and analyse which factors cause it. It has been designed a transversal, descriptive study by performing three assessment instruments: questionnaire of social-demographic variables; Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), and Nursing Stress Scale (NSS), to a 117 nursing staff of CHUOU as population. The average age was 39.23 years old and 83.8% were women. The average scoring in the emotional exhaustion dimension was 24.44, in the component of depersonalization was 7.58, and in the personal accomplishment was 34.50. Moreover, 89.7% suffer stress related with work environment. The average score in the dimension of emotional exhaustion was 24.44, the depersonalization of 7.58 and the personal accomplishment of 34.50. The 89.7% suffered from work-related stress. Nursing staff present high burnout syndrome and stress. It has been observed a higher vulnerability to the syndrome from subjects with temporary contract and rotary shift. There has been statistically significant differences in young nursing staff and less career seniority, whom present hiqher stress levels.

  8. Role stress in nurses: review of related factors and strategies for moving forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Esther M; Hancock, Karen M; Johnson, Amanda; Daly, John; Jackson, Debra

    2005-03-01

    The aim of this paper was to review the literature on factors related to role stress in nurses, and present strategies for addressing this issue based on the findings of this review while considering potential areas for development and research. Computerized databases were searched as well as hand searching of articles in order to conduct this review. This review identified multiple factors related to the experience of role stress in nurses. Role stress, in particular, work overload, has been reported as one of the main reasons for nurses leaving the workforce. This paper concludes that it is a priority to find new and innovative ways of supporting nurses in their experience of role stress. Some examples discussed in this article include use of stress education and management strategies; team-building strategies; balancing priorities; enhancing social and peer support; flexibility in work hours; protocols to deal with violence; and retention and attraction of nursing staff strategies. These strategies need to be empirically evaluated for their efficacy in reducing role stress.

  9. Stress level among intensive care nurses in the municipality of Paraná (Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Cristina Inoue

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To identify stress levels among intensive care nurses who work in the municipality of Western Paraná, Brazil. Methodology. This is a cross-sectional cohort study, carried out from May to July 2010, included 60 nurses from intensive care units (adult, pediatric, or neonatal of five hospitals. All participants completed the Bianchi Stress Scale. Results. The mean participant age was 31 years; 70% of the nurses were women, 33% had more than 15 years of experience, and 88% conducted care activities. The general level of stress was medium. Stress levels were low for relationships with other units and supervisors, activities related to adequate functioning of the unit and the coordination of activities of the unit. Levels were medium for the following domains: activities related to personnel management, labor conditions for the development of nursing activities, and delivery of care to patient; this last domain was related to the following stress factors: facing patient death, attending to emergencies in the unit, advising patients' family members, and conducting tasks in the minimal time available. Conclusion. Although the general stress level was medium, the identification of domains with a high score can be used to plan intervention strategies to preserve the health of intensive care nurses and, in turn, improve quality of care delivered to severely ill patients.

  10. The effects of aromatherapy in relieving symptoms related to job stress among nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Miao-Chuan; Fang, Shu-Hui; Fang, Li

    2015-02-01

    Workplace-related stress has become today's most serious occupational hazard. Aromatherapy is a simple, convenient and non-invasive method of stress relief. There is little research regarding the efficacy of aromatherapy by means of inhaling essential oil in reducing workplace stress-related symptoms among nurses. Therefore, this study was to examine the effectiveness of lavender oil inhalation in reducing job stress-related symptoms among nurses. The 53 nurses in the experimental group pinned small bottles containing 3% lavender oil on the clothes of their right chests, whereas 57 participants in the control group pinned bottles with no lavender oil. Aromatherapy was shown to be effective in the reduction of the number of stress symptoms for 3 or 4 days. The stress symptoms of the experimental group decreased from 6.1 to 2.8 after aromatherapy was carried out (P = 0.126, 0.159, 0.035 and 0.026). This represented a significant decrease in stress, whereas the stress symptoms in the control group increased from 5.6 to 5.8. Hospital staff managers are still encouraged to include aromatherapy concepts and techniques in the continuing education of nursing staff. Concurrently, future research should focus on the possible side effects of aromatherapy to assure safety. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  11. Towards a model for understanding the development of post-traumatic stress and general distress in mental health nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joyce; Daffern, Michael; Ogloff, James R P; Martin, Trish

    2015-02-01

    In their daily work, mental health nurses (MHN) are often exposed to stressful events, including patient-perpetrated aggression and violence. Personal safety and health concerns, as well as concern for the physical and psychological well-being of patients, dominate; these concerns have a profound impact on nurses. This cross-sectional study explored and compared the psychological well-being of 196 hospital-based MHN (97 forensic and 99 mainstream registered psychiatric nurses or psychiatric state enrolled nurses). The aim was to examine exposure to inpatient aggression and work stress, and identify factors contributing to the development of post-traumatic stress reactions and general distress. Multiple regression analyses indicated that working in a mainstream setting is associated with increased work stress; however, mainstream and forensic nurses experienced similar psychological well-being. As a group, 14-17% of mainstream and forensic nurses met the diagnostic criteria for post-traumatic stress disorder, and 36% scored above the threshold for psychiatric caseness. A tentative model of post-traumatic stress and general distress in nurses was developed, illustrating the impact of aggression and stress on well-being. The present study affirms that mental health nursing is a challenging and stressful occupation. Implications for organizations, managers, and individual nurses are discussed. © 2014 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  12. Environmental stress affects DNA methylation of a CpG rich promoter region of serotonin transporter gene in a nurse cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jukka S Alasaari

    Full Text Available Shift-working nurses are exposed to a stressful work environment, which puts them at an increased risk for burnout and depression. We explored the effect of environmental stress on serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4 promoter methylation among nurses from high and low work stress environments.Using bisulfite sequencing, we investigated the methylation status of five CpG residues of a CpG-rich region in the promoter of SLC6A4 by comparing female shift working nurses from a high work stress environment (n = 24 to low work stress environment (n = 25. We also analyzed the association of 5-HTTLPR polymorphism at 5' end of SLC6A4. Work stress was assessed by the Karasek's Model and possible signs of burnout or depression were measured by the Maslach Burnout Index General Survey and Beck Depression Index. Methylation levels were assessed by bisulfite sequencing of DNA extracted from peripheral blood leucocytes. Restriction enzyme treatment followed by standard PCR was used to identify 5-HTTLPR genotypes.We found that nurses in the high stress environment had significantly lower promoter methylation levels at all five CpG residues compared to nurses in the low stress environment (p<0.01. There was no significant interaction of 5-HTTLPR genotype and work stress with methylation (p = 0.58. In unadjusted (bivariate analysis, burnout was not significantly associated to methylation levels. However, when mutually adjusted for both, burnout and work stress were significant contributors (p = 0.038 and p<0.0001 respectively to methylation levels.Our findings show that environmental stress is concurrent with decreased methylation of the SLC6A4 promoter. This may lead to increased transcriptional activity of the gene, increased reuptake of serotonin from synaptic clefts, and termination of the activity of serotonin. This could present a possible coping mechanism for environmental stress in humans that could eventually increase risk for disturbed functional

  13. Depression, Anxiety and Symptoms of Stress among Baccalaureate Nursing Students in Hong Kong: A Cross-Sectional Study

    OpenAIRE

    Cheung, Teris; Wong, Siu Yi; Wong, Kit Yi; Law, Lap Yan; Ng, Karen; Tong, Man Tik; Wong, Ka Yu; Ng, Man Ying; Yip, Paul S.F.

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the prevalence of depression, anxiety and symptoms of stress among baccalaureate nursing students in Hong Kong. Recent epidemiological data suggest that the prevalence of mild to severe depression, anxiety and stress among qualified nurses in Hong Kong stands at 35.8%, 37.3% and 41.1%, respectively. A total of 661 nursing students were recruited to participate in our cross-sectional mental health survey using the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale 21. Multiple logistic r...

  14. The effect of emotional freedom technique on stress and anxiety in nursing students: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Susan Librizzi

    2016-05-01

    Stress and anxiety have been identified as significant issues experienced by student nurses during their education. Some studies have suggested that the stress experienced by nursing students is greater than that experienced by medical students, other non-nursing healthcare students, degreed nurses, and the female population in general. A recently introduced energy type therapy, emotional freedom technique (EFT), has shown some success in reducing symptoms of anxiety, stress, and fear in a variety of settings. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of EFT in decreasing anxiety and stress as a potential intervention to assist students in stress management. The study used a mixed method design of both qualitative and quantitative measures. Quantitatively, in a one group pretest-posttest design, participants received group instruction in the technique and were encouraged to repeat it daily. Self-reported anxiety was measured at baseline, and then weekly for four weeks using the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). The qualitative survey was completed by participants at the end of the study in order to capture a more subjective experience. The pilot study was conducted in a two-year college in the southeastern region of the United States. All enrolled nursing students in an associate degree nursing program were invited to participate. Participation was voluntary, resulting in an original convenience sample of thirty-nine nursing students (N=39). Data collection instruments included a demographic questionnaire, pretest State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and Perceived Stress Scale (PSS). A qualitative questionnaire was also administered at the end of the four weeks. STAI and PSS were administered weekly. Data analysis using RMANOVA was performed at the second, third and the fourth week. Decreases in anxiety as measured on both the STAI and PSS were statistically significant (p=.05). For PSS, STAI state and trait

  15. Compassion satisfaction, compassion fatigue, anxiety, depression and stress in registered nurses in Australia: phase 2 results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, Vicki; Craigie, Mark; Francis, Karen; Aoun, Samar; Hegney, Desley G

    2014-05-01

    This is the first two-phase Australian study to explore the factors impacting upon compassion satisfaction, compassion fatigue, anxiety, depression and stress and to describe the strategies nurses use to build compassion satisfaction into their working lives. Compassion fatigue has been found to impact on job satisfaction, the quality of patient care and retention within nursing. This study provides new knowledge on the influences of anxiety, stress and depression and how they relate to compassion satisfaction and compassion fatigue. In Phase 2 of the study, 10 nurses from Phase 1 of the study participated in individual interviews and a focus group. A semi-structured interview schedule guided the conversations with the participants. Data analysis resulted in seven main themes: social networks and support;infrastructure and support; environment and lifestyle; learning; leadership; stress; and suggestions to build psychological wellness in nurses. Findings suggest that a nurse’s capacity to cope is enhanced through strong social and collegial support, infrastructure that supports the provision of quality nursing care and positive affirmation. These concepts are strongly linked to personal resilience. for nursing management These findings support the need for management to develop appropriate interventions to build resilience in nurses.

  16. Personality, stress and coping in intensive care nurses: a descriptive exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Lorraine; Irvine, Fiona; Wallymahmed, Akhtar

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between personality traits, perception of workplace stress and coping among intensive care unit (ICU) nurses. Research has indicated that ICUs are stressful environments. There is a tendency for research studies to investigate causes of stress and ways of coping, but few studies, particularly in recent years, have considered the personality traits of the staff who thrive in this challenging environment, the work stress they perceive and the coping strategies they use. A convenience sample of critical care nurses (n = 46) completed three standardised questionnaires during September 2007: the revised NEO personality inventory (NEO-PI-R); the nurses stress scale (NSI) and the Brief Coping Orientations to Problems Experienced (COPE) scale. ICU nurses did not perceive their workplaces to be stressful. Certain personality traits, openness, agreeableness and conscientiousness, were associated with problem-solving coping strategies such as active planning and reframing. Openness and extraversion were associated with less perceived stress from the 'patients and relatives' dimension of the NSI; there were also negative correlations between conscientiousness and the 'workload stress' and stress from lack of 'confidence and competence' dimensions of the NSI. Certain personality traits may have a buffering effect on workplace stress. Pre-employment screening to identify staff that exhibit personality and coping traits associated with low perceived stress may be considered as part of the recruitment strategy to address problems relating to stress, sickness and retention. The retention and recruitment of staff who have lower perceived workplace stress and who utilise problem-focused coping may result in less reported absences and fewer critical incidents and errors.

  17. Effects of role stress on nurses' turnover intentions: The mediating effects of organizational commitment and burnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sang-Sook; Han, Jeong-Won; An, Young-Suk; Lim, So-Hee

    2015-10-01

    This paper was designed to extend the extant research regarding factors related to nurses' turnover intentions. This survey-based study was based on a path analysis designed to verify a hypothesized causal model involving nurses' role stress, organizational commitment, turnover intentions, and burnout. This study distributed 500 questionnaires to nurses in general hospitals with more than 500 beds located in Seoul, Korea, during 16-30 April 2012. Role conflict, an underlying factor in role stress, had no significant effect on role stress, but the results showed that role ambiguity reduced organizational commitment. On the other hand, role conflict and role ambiguity increased the level of burnout. Organizational commitment reduced turnover intentions, and burnout increased turnover intentions. Role conflict and role ambiguity had no direct effect on turnover intentions, but they had indirect effects on organizational commitment and burnout. To reduce nurses' turnover rate, this study recommends developing plans to improve their organizational commitment because it mediates role stress and turnover intention. © 2014 The Authors. Japan Journal of Nursing Science © 2014 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  18. Compassion satisfaction, compassion fatigue, anxiety, depression and stress in registered nurses in Australia: study 1 results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegney, Desley G; Craigie, Mark; Hemsworth, David; Osseiran-Moisson, Rebecca; Aoun, Samar; Francis, Karen; Drury, Vicki

    2014-05-01

    To explore compassion fatigue and compassion satisfaction with the potential contributing factors of anxiety, depression and stress. To date, no studies have connected the quality of work-life with other contributing and co-existing factors such as depression, anxiety and stress. A self-report exploratory cross sectional survey of 132 nurses working in a tertiary hospital. The reflective assessment risk profile model provides an excellent framework for examining the relationships between the professional quality of work factors and contributing factors within the established risk profiles. The results show a definite pattern of risk progression for the six factors examined for each risk profile. Additionally, burnout and secondary traumatic stress were significantly related to higher anxiety and depression levels. Higher anxiety levels were correlated with nurses who were younger, worked full-time and without a postgraduate qualification. Twenty percent had elevated levels of compassion fatigue: 7.6% having a very distressed profile. At-risk nurses' stress and depression scores were significantly higher than nurses with higher compassion satisfaction scores. The employed nurse workforce would benefit from a psychosocial capacity building intervention that reduces a nurse's risk profile, thus enhancing retention. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. A longitudinal, mixed methods investigation of newly qualified nurses' workplace stressors and stress experiences during transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpin, Yvonne; Terry, Louise M; Curzio, Joan

    2017-11-01

    To investigate transition in newly qualified nurses through an exploration of their stressors and stress experiences during their first 12 months postqualifying. Globally, thousands of new nurses qualify annually. They are crucial for the profession and healthcare service delivery. Work-related stress has multiple serious consequences, yet there is a lack of robust, empirical evidence that directly analyses newly qualified nurses and the stress they feel and experience in the workplace. Understanding what causes newly qualified nurses' stress is vital to retaining and nurturing this vital component of the workforce. Longitudinal, explanatory sequential mixed methods, cohort study. At the point of qualification (n = 288), 6 months postqualifying (n = 107) and 12 months postqualifying (n = 86), newly qualified nurses completed the Nursing Stress Scale, with 14 completing a one-to-one interview at 12 months postqualifying. Data were collected from 2010 - 2012. Inferential statistics, "thematic analysis" and "side-by-side comparisons in a discussion" were used for analysis. Workload was consistently the highest reported stressor with inadequate staffing and managing multiple role demands given as explanations. Incivility within the workplace was a noted stressor. Conversely, being part of "a good team" provided a civil, supportive, facilitative work environment. Entering nurse education with previous healthcare experience had a mediating effect on the reported frequency of stressors. Newly qualified nurses encounter multiple work-related stressors over their first 12 months postqualifying, which are intrinsically entwined with their transition. Employing organizations need to be more proactive in managing their workload and addressing workplace incivility. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Evaluating the relationship between job stress and job satisfaction among female hospital nurses in Babol: An application of structural equation modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Bagheri Hosseinabadi

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study was designed to investigate job satisfaction and its relation to perceived job stress among hospital nurses in Babol County, Iran.Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 406 female nurses in 6 Babol hospitals.Respondents completed the Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire (MSQ, the health and safety executive (HSE indicator tool and a demographic questionnaire. Descriptive, analytical and structural equation modeling (SEM analyses were carried out applying SPSS v. 22 and AMOS v. 22.Results: The Normed Fit Index (NFI, Non-normed Fit Index (NNFI, Incremental Fit Index (IFIand Comparative Fit Index (CFI were greater than 0.9. Also, goodness of fit index (GFI=0.99and adjusted goodness of fit index (AGFI were greater than 0.8, and root mean square error of approximation (RMSEA were 0.04, The model was found to be with an appropriate fit. The R-squared was 0.42 for job satisfaction, and all its dimensions were related to job stress. The dimensions of job stress explained 42% of changes in the variance of job satisfaction. There was a significant relationship between the dimensions of job stress such as demand (β =0.173,CI =0.095 - 0.365, P≤0.001, control (β =0.135, CI =0.062 - 0.404, P =0.008, relationships(β =-0.208, CI =-0.637– -0.209; P≤0.001 and changes (β =0.247, CI =0.360 - 1.026, P≤0.001with job satisfaction.Conclusion: One of the important interventions to increase job satisfaction among nurses maybe improvement in the workplace. Reducing the level of workload in order to improve job demand and minimizing role conflict through reducing conflicting demands are recommended.

  1. Evaluating the relationship between job stress and job satisfaction among female hospital nurses in Babol: An application of structural equation modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri Hosseinabadi, Majid; Etemadinezhad, Siavash; Khanjani, Narges; Ahmadi, Omran; Gholinia, Hemat; Galeshi, Mina; Samaei, Seyed Ehsan

    2018-01-01

    Background: This study was designed to investigate job satisfaction and its relation to perceived job stress among hospital nurses in Babol County, Iran. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 406 female nurses in 6 Babol hospitals. Respondents completed the Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire (MSQ), the health and safety executive (HSE) indicator tool and a demographic questionnaire. Descriptive, analytical and structural equation modeling (SEM) analyses were carried out applying SPSS v. 22 and AMOS v. 22. Results: The Normed Fit Index (NFI), Non-normed Fit Index (NNFI), Incremental Fit Index (IFI)and Comparative Fit Index (CFI) were greater than 0.9. Also, goodness of fit index (GFI=0.99)and adjusted goodness of fit index (AGFI) were greater than 0.8, and root mean square error of approximation (RMSEA) were 0.04, The model was found to be with an appropriate fit. The R-squared was 0.42 for job satisfaction, and all its dimensions were related to job stress. The dimensions of job stress explained 42% of changes in the variance of job satisfaction. There was a significant relationship between the dimensions of job stress such as demand (β =0.173,CI =0.095 - 0.365, P≤0.001), control (β =0.135, CI =0.062 - 0.404, P =0.008), relationships(β =-0.208, CI =-0.637- -0.209; P≤0.001) and changes (β =0.247, CI =0.360 - 1.026, P≤0.001)with job satisfaction. Conclusion: One of the important interventions to increase job satisfaction among nurses maybe improvement in the workplace. Reducing the level of workload in order to improve job demand and minimizing role conflict through reducing conflicting demands are recommended.

  2. Perceived Stress and Professional Quality of Life in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Nurses in Gujarat, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Amee A; Vankar, Jagdish R; Nimbalkar, Somashekhar M; Phatak, Ajay G

    2015-11-01

    To study the levels of perceived stress in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) nurses and its association with professional quality of life domains viz. compassion satisfaction, burnout and secondary trauma. In this multicenter, cross sectional study, data was collected by surveying 129 nurses from nine NICUs across six cities of Gujarat, India using demographic questionnaire, Perceived Stress Scale (PSS14) and Professional Quality of Life Scale (ProQOL5) during July to September 2013. Descriptive statistics, correlation coefficient and multiple regression were used for analysis. The mean (SD) age of participants was 28.37 (8.20) y. Most were single, satisfied with salary benefits and reported 'good' to 'excellent' relationships at work. The mean (SD) duration of duty hours was 8.12 (0.76) h and 43.6% were attending to more than 4 patients/shift. The mean (SD) perceived stress level was 22.19 (7.17) [Range: 3 to 39]. High compassion satisfaction, high burnout, and high secondary traumatic stress were reported by 25 (19.4%), 30 (23.3%) and 30 (23.3%) nurses respectively. PSS14 was negatively correlated with compassion satisfaction (r = -0.28) and positively correlated with burnout (r = 0.43) and secondary traumatic stress (r = 0.24). Most of the nurses (91, 70.5%) were identified as perceiving moderate to high stress. Professional quality of life domains correlated with perceived stress. There is further need to study domains influencing NICU nurses' professional QOL. Identifying stress and QOL issues in NICU nurses can help formulate relevant policies.

  3. The impact of protocol on nurses' role stress: a longitudinal perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd-McCue, Diane; Tartaglia, Alexander; Veazey, Kenneth W; Streetman, Pamela S

    2005-04-01

    The study examined the impact of a protocol directed at increasing organ donation on the role stress and work attitudes of critical care nurses involved in potential organ donation cases. The research examined whether the protocol could positively affect nurses' perceptions of role stress, and if so, could the work environment improvements be sustained over time. The Family Communication Coordinator (FCC) protocol promotes effective communication during potential organ donation cases using a multidisciplinary team approach. Previous research found it associated with improved donation outcomes and with improved perceptions of role stress by critical care nurses. However, the previous study lacked methodological rigor necessary to determine causality and sustainability over time. The study used a quasi-experimental prospective longitudinal design. The sample included critical care nurses who had experience with potential organ donation cases with the protocol. Survey data were collected at 4 points over 2 years. Surveys used previously validated and reliable measures of role stress (role ambiguity, role conflict, role overload) and work attitudes (commitment, satisfaction). Interviews supplemented these data. The nurses' perceptions of role stress associated with potential organ donation cases dramatically dropped after the protocol was implemented. All measures of role stress, particularly role ambiguity and role conflict, showed statistically significant and sustained improvement. Nurses' professional, unit, and hospital commitment and satisfaction reflect an increasingly positive workplace. The results demonstrate that the FCC protocol positively influenced the workplace through its impact on role stress over the first 2 years following its implementation. The findings suggest that similar protocols may be appropriate in improving the critical care environment by reducing the stress and uncertainty of professionals involved in other end-of-life situations. However

  4. The crop water stress index (CWSI) for drip irrigated cotton in a semi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The crop water stress index (CWSI) for drip irrigated cotton in a semi-arid region of Turkey. ... Four irrigation treatments designated as full (I100) with no water stress and slight (DI70), moderate (DI50) and strong water ... from 32 Countries:.

  5. Occupational Stress Management and Burnout Interventions in Nursing and Their Implications for Healthy Work Environments: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowrouzi, Behdin; Lightfoot, Nancy; Larivière, Michael; Carter, Lorraine; Rukholm, Ellen; Schinke, Robert; Belanger-Gardner, Diane

    2015-07-01

    This article reports on a literature review of workplace interventions (i.e., creating healthy work environments and improving nurses' quality of work life [QWL]) aimed at managing occupational stress and burnout for nurses. A literature search was conducted using the keywords nursing, nurses, stress, distress, stress management, burnout, and intervention. All the intervention studies included in this review reported on workplace intervention strategies, mainly individual stress management and burnout interventions. Recommendations are provided to improve nurses' QWL in health care organizations through workplace health promotion programs so that nurses can be recruited and retained in rural and northern regions of Ontario. These regions have unique human resources needs due to the shortage of nurses working in primary care. © 2015 The Author(s).

  6. A systematic review on the relationship between the nursing shortage and nurses' job satisfaction, stress and burnout levels in oncology/haematology settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gi, Toh Shir; Devi, Kamala M; Neo Kim, Emily Ang

    2011-01-01

    Nursing shortage is a global issue that which affects oncology nursing. Oncology nurses are more prone to experience job dissatisfaction, stress and burnout when they work in units with poor staffing. There is thus a need for greater understanding of the relationship between the nursing shortage and nursing outcomes in oncology/haematology settings. This review aimed to establish the best available evidence concerning the relationship between the nursing shortage and nurses' job satisfaction, stress and burnout levels in oncology/haematology settings; and to make recommendations for practice and future research. Types of participants: This review considered studies that included oncology registered nurses (RNs) who were more than 18 years of age and worked in either inpatient or outpatient oncology/haematology wards or units for the adult or paediatric patients.Types of intervention: This review considered studies that evaluated the relationship between the nursing shortage and nurses' job satisfaction, stress and burnout levels in oncology/haematology settings.Types of outcomes: This review included studies that measured job satisfaction, stress and burnout levels using different outcomes measures. Job satisfaction was determined by the Measure of Job Satisfaction scale, the Misener Nurse Practitioner Job Satisfaction Scale and the Likert scale, stress by the Pediatric Oncology Nurse Stressor Questionnaire and burnout by the Maslash Burnout Inventory scale.Types of studies: This review included descriptive/descriptive-correlational studies which were published in English. The search strategy sought to identify published and unpublished studies conducted between 1990 and 2010. Using a three-step search strategy, the following databases were accessed: CINAHL, Medline, Scopus, ScienceDirect, PsycInfo, PsycArticles, Web of Science, The Cochrane Library, Proquest and Mednar. Two independent reviewers assessed each paper for methodological validity prior to inclusion in

  7. Subjective stress, role perceptions and coping strategies among mental health nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spyridoula Doupi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Lack of nursing personnel, the consequent nurses’ work pressure within health care units and the particularities of nursing services provision in mental health institutions, render the examination of stress at work a necessity. Aim: The current study aims in presenting the stress levels among nurses in mental health institutions, their perceptions of the nursing role and the coping strategies they use. Methodology: This cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted in the population of 85 nurses in mental health open and closed units of two public hospitals of Attica, one psychiatric and one general. Participants filled in questionnaires on demographic characteristics, perceived stress, role conflict and ambiguity and ways of coping with stressful situations. Results: 57 women (67,1% and 28 men (32,9%, aged (mean 41,08 years, mostly married (74,1% and graduates of Technological institutions (29,4% participated in the study. Most were working 16-20 years (32,9%, were nurses (71,8% and were being occupied in a psychiatric structure for more than 21 years (27,1%. Female nurses had a greater amount of role ambiguity (p=0.048 and higher levels of stress (p=0.007. The same pattern was observed to those who worked for more years (p=0.038. Those who were not satisfied with their job suffered from greater role ambiguity (p<0.001 and conflict (p<0.001, while the graduates of secondary education and specialised nurses had higher levels of stress (p=0.004. Nurses with most working years in a psychiatric facility, experienced greater role conflict (p=0.034. Role ambiguity was positively associated with role conflict (p<0.001, perceived stress (p=0.006, positive approach strategy (negatively; p=0.003, self-rated health (negatively; p=0.003 and age (negatively; p=0.006. Perceived stress was negatively associated with positive approach (p=0.019 and self-rated health (p<0.001. Finally, positive approach was positively associated with social

  8. Conceptualizing the dynamics of workplace stress: a systems-based study of nursing aides

    OpenAIRE

    Jetha, Arif; Kernan, Laura; Kurowski, Alicia

    2017-01-01

    Background Workplace stress is a complex phenomenon that may often be dynamic and?evolving over time. Traditional linear modeling does not allow representation of recursive feedback loops among the implicated factors. The objective of this study was to develop a multidimensional system dynamics model (SDM) of workplace stress among nursing aides and conduct simulations to illustrate how changes in psychosocial perceptions and workplace factors might influence workplace stress over time. Metho...

  9. Effects of autogenic training on stress response and heart rate variability in nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Seung-Joo; Kim, Chunmi

    2014-12-01

    This study was undertaken to confirm the effects of autogenic training (AT) on stress response and heart rate variability in nursing school students experiencing stress related to clinical training. The study was carried out from September 2012 to April 2013 in a quasi-experimental nonequivalent control group using a pretest-posttest design. The participants were 40 nursing students in their third year at either of two nursing colleges. All consented to participate. Nineteen nursing students at one college were assigned to the experimental group and underwent the 8-week AT program, and the other 21 were assigned to the control group and did not undergo any training. Stress response was assessed by questionnaire and HRV was measured three times, that is, before the program, at the end of the program, and 6 months after the end of the AT program. A significant time/group interaction was found for stress response (F = 4.68, p = .012), a subjective indicator. However, no significant interaction was found for the objective indicators of heart rate variability, normalized low frequency (F = 2.59, p = .090), normalized high frequency (F = 2.59, p = .090), or low frequency to high frequency ratio (F = 1.38, p = .257). The results suggest that AT provides an acceptable approach to stress reduction in nursing students. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Stress and Anxiety Management in Nursing Students: Biofeedback and Mindfulness Meditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratanasiripong, Paul; Park, Janet F; Ratanasiripong, Nop; Kathalae, Duangrat

    2015-09-01

    The current study investigated the efficacy of two brief intervention programs-biofeedback and mindfulness meditation-on levels of state anxiety and perceived stress in second-year Thai nursing students as they began clinical training. Eighty-nine participants from a public nursing college in Thailand were randomly assigned to one of three groups: biofeedback group, mindfulness meditation group, or a control group. All participants were given pre- and postintervention surveys, which included demographic information; the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (State Anxiety Scale); and the Perceived Stress Scale. Findings indicated that biofeedback significantly reduced anxiety and maintained stress levels in nursing students. Mindfulness meditation similarly decreased anxiety levels, while also significantly lowering stress levels. The biofeedback group exhibited significant reduction in anxiety levels among the three groups at postintervention. Despite stressors and demands nursing students experience as they begin clinical practice, study findings support the use of biofeedback and mindfulness meditation interventions to assist nursing students in managing stress and anxiety. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. Relationship between job stress level and coping strategies used by Hong Kong nurses working in an acute surgical unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenru; Kong, Amelia Wai Man; Chair, Sek Ying

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the relationship between job stress and coping strategies of Hong Kong nurses working in an acute surgical unit. This is a descriptive correlational study. Data were collected from 98 Hong Kong surgical nurses using the Nursing Stress Scale and the Jalowiec Coping Scale. Results showed that workload (M = 15.36), lack of support (M = 13.32), and inadequate preparation (M = 12.33) are the most common stressors for Hong Kong surgical nurses. The most frequent strategies used by nurses to cope with stress can be characterized as evasive (M = 19.23), confrontive (M = 17.46), and optimistic (M = 15.81), all of which are also rated as the most effective strategies in reducing stress levels. Only the confrontive, optimistic, supportant, and emotive coping strategies reveal significant correlations (p stress levels of nurses, whereas the evasive, fatalistic, palliative, and self-reliant strategies showed no significant correlation with stress levels (p > .05). Recognizing the impacts of job-related stress and making use of effective coping methods play a vital role in reducing nurse's stress. A change in leadership styles from the managerial level and reallocation of manpower may help reduce job stress. The use of confrontive and optimistic coping strategies in reducing job-related stress for surgical nurses should be advocated and promoted in their daily work. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Biofeedback Intervention for Stress, Anxiety, and Depression among Graduate Students in Public Health Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratanasiripong, Paul; Kaewboonchoo, Orawan; Ratanasiripong, Nop; Hanklang, Suda; Chumchai, Pornlert

    2015-01-01

    Globally, graduate students have been found to have high prevalence of mental health problems. With increasing severity of mental health problems on university campuses and limited resources for mental health treatment, alternative interventions are needed. This study investigated the use of biofeedback training to help reduce symptoms of stress, anxiety, and depression. A sample of 60 graduate students in public health nursing was randomly assigned to either the biofeedback intervention or the control group. Results indicated that biofeedback intervention was effective in significantly reducing the levels of stress, anxiety, and depression over the 4-week period, while the control group had increases in symptoms of anxiety and depression over the same timeframe. As future leaders in the public health nursing arena, the more psychologically healthy the graduate students in public health nursing are, the better the public health nursing professionals they will be as they go forth to serve the community after graduation.

  13. Biofeedback Intervention for Stress, Anxiety, and Depression among Graduate Students in Public Health Nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Ratanasiripong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Globally, graduate students have been found to have high prevalence of mental health problems. With increasing severity of mental health problems on university campuses and limited resources for mental health treatment, alternative interventions are needed. This study investigated the use of biofeedback training to help reduce symptoms of stress, anxiety, and depression. A sample of 60 graduate students in public health nursing was randomly assigned to either the biofeedback intervention or the control group. Results indicated that biofeedback intervention was effective in significantly reducing the levels of stress, anxiety, and depression over the 4-week period, while the control group had increases in symptoms of anxiety and depression over the same timeframe. As future leaders in the public health nursing arena, the more psychologically healthy the graduate students in public health nursing are, the better the public health nursing professionals they will be as they go forth to serve the community after graduation.

  14. Potentially stressful situations for nurses considering the condition of accreditation of hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscilla Higashi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cross-sectional study that aimed to evaluate and compare the frequency of perceived/self-reported stress by nurses in hospitals with and without accreditation. One conducted in an accredited and two non-accredited hospitals in São Paulo in 2010 and 2011. Data collection included a questionnaire and the Stress Inventory for Nurses, with 262 participants, who evaluated stressful situations in the categories: Intrinsic Factors of Work, Interpersonal Relationships at Work and Stressful Roles in Career. The differences among hospitals concerning nurses’ perception/self-declaration about potentially stressful factors were evaluated by the chi-square test, considering p <0.05 the critical level. Working in an accredited hospital protected against perception/self-declaration of stress caused by stressful factors in the categories: Intrinsic Factors of Work and Stressful Roles in their Career, being a risk factor related to the category Relationships at Work. One concludes that nurses from the accredited hospital perceived/self-reported more stressful factors in situations related to interpersonal relationships.

  15. Affective temperament, job stress and professional burnout in nurses and civil servants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaracz, Marcin; Rosiak, Izabela; Bertrand-Bucińska, Anna; Jaskulski, Maciej; Nieżurawska, Joanna; Borkowska, Alina

    2017-01-01

    The risk of professional burnout is constituted by job-related as well as individual factors. The latter involve affective temperament, which influences the perception of job-related stress. The aim of the present study was to assess the affective temperament, the level of job stress and professional burnout, as well as the relationships between these variables, in public servants and nurses. 100 civil servants and 100 nurses were enrolled in the study. Affective temperament and burnout were assessed by means of TEMPS-A and MBI questionnaires, respectively. To measure the level of job-related stress, we have designed a 6-item self-reported questionnaire, which considered stressors common for both professions. Compared to the civil servants, nurses showed higher rate of anxious temperament and experienced greater intensity of job-related stress. The groups did not differ in the intensity of burnout symptoms. The rates of cyclothymic and anxious temperaments correlated with the intensity of stress, and burnout symptoms in the group of nurses. Within the civil servants group, the level of stress correlated with intensity of burnout, however no correlations with affective temperament were observed. The regression analysis performed in both groups revealed the significant effect of stress and cyclothymic temperament on burnout, while the effect of anxious temperament was not significant. Cyclothymic and anxious temperaments are related to the level of experienced job stress and the risk of burnout. In professions like nursing, where employees show elevated rates of these temperaments, burnout prevention and stress management education is of particular importance.

  16. Affective temperament, job stress and professional burnout in nurses and civil servants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Jaracz

    Full Text Available The risk of professional burnout is constituted by job-related as well as individual factors. The latter involve affective temperament, which influences the perception of job-related stress. The aim of the present study was to assess the affective temperament, the level of job stress and professional burnout, as well as the relationships between these variables, in public servants and nurses.100 civil servants and 100 nurses were enrolled in the study. Affective temperament and burnout were assessed by means of TEMPS-A and MBI questionnaires, respectively. To measure the level of job-related stress, we have designed a 6-item self-reported questionnaire, which considered stressors common for both professions.Compared to the civil servants, nurses showed higher rate of anxious temperament and experienced greater intensity of job-related stress. The groups did not differ in the intensity of burnout symptoms. The rates of cyclothymic and anxious temperaments correlated with the intensity of stress, and burnout symptoms in the group of nurses. Within the civil servants group, the level of stress correlated with intensity of burnout, however no correlations with affective temperament were observed. The regression analysis performed in both groups revealed the significant effect of stress and cyclothymic temperament on burnout, while the effect of anxious temperament was not significant.Cyclothymic and anxious temperaments are related to the level of experienced job stress and the risk of burnout. In professions like nursing, where employees show elevated rates of these temperaments, burnout prevention and stress management education is of particular importance.

  17. Development and evaluation of targeted psychological skills training for oncology nurses in managing stressful patient and family encounters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traeger, Lara; Park, Elyse R; Sporn, Nora; Repper-DeLisi, Jennifer; Convery, Mary Susan; Jacobo, Michelle; Pirl, William F

    2013-07-01

    To reduce workplace stress by developing a brief psychological skills training for nurses and to evaluate program feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary efficacy in decreasing burnout and stress. Intervention development and evaluation. Outpatient chemotherapy unit at a comprehensive cancer center. 26 infusion nurses and oncology social workers. Focus groups were conducted with nurses. Results informed the development and evaluation of training for nurses. Participants completed the Maslach Burnout Inventory and Perceived Stress Scale post-training. Burnout and stress. Focus groups indicated strong commitment among nurses to psychosocial care and supported the idea that relationships with patients and families were sources of reward and stress. Stressors included factors that interfered with psychosocial care such as difficult family dynamics, patient behaviors and end-of-life care issues. Psychological skills training was developed to address these stressors. Evaluations suggested that the program was feasible and acceptable to nurses. At two months, participants showed reductions in emotional exhaustion (p = 0.02) and stress (p = 0.04). Psychological skills training for managing difficult encounters showed feasibility, acceptability, and potential benefit in reducing emotional exhaustion and stress. Brief training that targets sources of clinical stress may be useful for nurses in outpatient chemotherapy units. Specific stressors in relationships with patients and families present challenges to nurses' therapeutic use of self. Targeted psychological skills training may help nurses problem-solve difficult encounters while taking care of themselves. System-level strategies are needed to support and promote training participation.

  18. A study of role stress, organizational commitment and intention to quit among male nurses in southern Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Jiunn-Horng; Yu, Hsing-Yi; Hsu, Hsiu-Yueh; Dai, Hung-Da

    2007-03-01

    Gender and sex role stereotyping are recognized as having the potential to limit the professional development of males within the nursing profession. The purpose of this study was to understand the relationships between demographic data and the dimensions of role stress, organizational commitment, and intentions to quit among male nurses in southern Taiwan. Research also investigated the correlations with three dependent variables and identified best predictors of male nurse intentions to quit the nursing profession. A total of 91 male nurses volunteered to participate in this cross-sectional research. Research results were based on data collected from questionnaires sent by mail to participants. A total of 76 valid questionnaires were returned and used in analysis (response rate = 83.5%). Findings pointed to patients, colleagues and society as the major sources of role stress for male nurses. These sources of stress, and the resultant intention to quit on the part of male nurses, are due in significant part to the widespread stereotyping of the profession of nursing as a "woman's occupation". Such stress pressures male nurses to consider quitting to take jobs in other professional fields. Role stress is correlated to intention to quit among male nurses. Role stress and years of service are highly relevant predictors of male nurse intention to quit and leave the nursing profession, explaining 33.8% of variability. We suggest that at various levels of education and society, promotion of male and female equality should be increased. There is also a need for psychological consultation as well as the promotion of male nurse role models to prevent male nurses turning away from nursing careers.

  19. The relationship between educational stress, stress coping, self-esteem, social support, and health status among nursing students in Turkey: A structural equation modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yıldırım, N; Karaca, A; Cangur, S; Acıkgoz, F; Akkus, D

    2017-01-01

    Nursing education can be a stressful experience. To fully benefit from this experience and develop a positive professional identity, it is essential for nursing students to effectively cope with education-related stress. The aim of the study was to investigate the relationships between nursing students' education-related stress and stress coping, self-esteem, social support, and health status. This study utilized a cross-sectional, descriptive, and correlational design. The sample consisted 517 nursing students from a bachelor program in Turkey during the 2014-2015 academic year. Participants provided data on sociodemographic characteristics as well as completing the following instruments: Nursing Education Stress Scale, Coping Behavior Inventory for Nursing Students, Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, and General Health Questionnaire. Relationships were examined using multivariate structural equation modeling. Results indicated that nursing students' stress coping levels were affected by self-esteem and social support. Additionally, this interaction appears to affect general health status. Although the direct effect of stress on coping was non-significant, its overall effect was significant within the model. It is necessary to conduct further intervention studies examining the role of self-esteem and social support in facilitating nursing students' stress-related coping during their education. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The Effect of Progressive Muscle Relaxation on The Occupational Stress of Nurses in Critical Care Units

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    Pegah Matourypour

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: In the nursing profession, there are numerous factors which altogether cause occupational stress and as a result occupational exhaustion in nurses and decrease the quality of patient care. Regarding the importance of this issue which influences the health indices of the society, this study investigates the effect of progressive muscle relaxation on the occupational stress of nurses.Materials and Methods: This semi-experimental and before-after study was conducted using progressive muscle relaxation intervention on 33 nurses in special treatment (ICU and CCU and emergency units through simple sampling in Yazd in 2012. To assess occupational stress,Toft-Anderson questionnaire was used. The procedure of applying relaxation in a practical way was given to nurses in pamphlets and questionnaires were filled before and two weeks after the intervention. Analysis was done using SPSS.16 software and T-test.Results: The average total score of stress in nurses before and after the intervention was determined as – 28.12±43.74 and 52.12±04.72 respectively and this difference was not statistically significant (39.0>p. However, in the dimensions of nurses’ workload (/0>p 03 and t=2.27 and patients’ suffering and death, these scores were significantly different (0001.0>p and t=3.94.Conclusion: This study showed that applying progressive muscle relaxation technique as a method of emotion-focused coping cannot be effective in the reduction of occupational stress in nurses.

  1. Work stress associated cool down reactions among nurses and hospital physicians and their relation to burnout symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büssing, Arndt; Falkenberg, Zarah; Schoppe, Carina; Recchia, Daniela Rodrigues; Poier, Désirée

    2017-08-10

    Hospital staff experience high level of work stress and they have to find strategies to adapt and react to it. When they perceive emotional exhaustion and job dissatisfaction in response to constant work stress, one reaction might be emotional withdrawal. This emotional distancing can be seen as an adaptive strategy to keep 'functionality' in the job. Both, perception of emotional exhaustion and emotional distancing as a strategy, can be operationalized as 'Cool Down'. We assume that work stress associated variables are positively associated with Cool Down reactions, while internal and external resources are negatively associated and might function as a buffer against emotional distancing. Moreover, we assume that the perception of stress and work burden might be different between nurses and physicians and women and men, but not their cool down reactions as a strategy. Anonymous cross-sectional survey with standardized instruments among 1384 health care professionals (66% nurses, 34% hospital physicians). Analyses of variance, correlation and also stepwise regression analyses were performed to analyze the influence of demands and resources on Cool Down reactions. As measured with the Cool Down Index (CDI), frequency and strength of Cool Down reactions did not significantly differ between women and men, while women and men differ significantly for their burnout symptoms, stress perception and perceived work burden. With respect to profession, Cool Down and stress perception were not significantly different, but burnout and work burden. For nurses, "Emotional Exhaustion" was the best CDI predictor (51% explained variance), while in physicians it was "Depersonalization" (44% explained variance). Among putative resources which might buffer against Cool Down reactions, only team satisfaction and situational awareness had some influence, but not self-efficacy expectation. The perceptions of emotional exhaustion and distancing of nurses and physicians (and women and men

  2. The study of Job Stress and Tension Management among Oncology Nurses of Ahvaz Hospitals in 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina abdali Bardeh

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Nursing care for cancer patients is stressful for nurses and to maintain the quality of care they should be able to manage these tensions. Therefore, the aim of current study was to determine the level of job stress and tension management among oncology nurses of hospitals in the city of Ahvaz in 2015. Our descriptive survey was conducted on 93 oncology nurses at the hospitals of Ahvaz (Imam Khomeini, Oil Company, Arya, Golestan, and Shafa. Census method was used for sampling and required data collected by research-designed questionnaire. Validity of the questionnaire was determined by formal content validity and its reliability was obtained through internal consistency using Cronbach's alpha. Cronbach's alpha for t job stress scale questionnaire and tension-relieve management were0.966 and 0.958, respectively. The study showed that most of the subjects, female, married, bachelor, contract employment, working in public hospitals, aged less than 30 years, working for 1-5 years (as a nurse and 1-5 years of experience as oncology nurses haven’t take effective courses on stress management. In terms of job tension associated with patient, his family, colleagues and physicians all nurses experienced average levels of stress. Job stress level of 3.61 percent of the participants was about average. Tension relive rate of all nurses in the areas of distraction, selfregulation, social support at workplace and a positive attitude towards the profession was moderate. The level of tension relieve management was moderate among 58.1 percent of the subjects. The results of variance analysis with repeated measurements showed that there is a significant difference in the average of four types of job stress (p<0.05 and 4 areas of tension relieve management (p<0.001. According to the level of nurses’ occupational stress, the stress level can be minimized through being aware of the needs of nurses and providing practical and fundamental approaches for management

  3. Causes and consequences of occupational stress in emergency nurses, a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adriaenssens, Jef; De Gucht, Veronique; Maes, Stan

    2015-04-01

    This longitudinal study examines the influence of changes over time in work and organisational characteristics on job satisfaction, work engagement, emotional exhaustion, turnover intention and psychosomatic distress in emergency room nurses. Organisational and job characteristics of nurses are important predictors of stress-health outcomes. Emergency room nurses are particularly exposed to stressful work-related events and unpredictable work conditions. The study was carried out in 15 emergency departments of Belgian general hospitals in 2008 (T1) and 18 months later (T2) (n = 170). Turnover rates between T1 and T2 were high. Important changes over time were found in predictors and outcomes. Changes in job demand, control and social support predicted job satisfaction, work engagement and emotional exhaustion. In addition, changes in reward, social harassment and work agreements predicted work engagement, emotional exhaustion and intention to leave, respectively. Work-related interventions are important to improve occupational health in emergency room nurses and should focus on lowering job demands, increasing job control, improving social support and a well-balanced reward system. Nursing managers should be aware of the causes and consequences of occupational stress in emergency room nurses in order to enable preventive interventions. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. [Effects of nurses' mentoring on turnover intention: focused on the mediating effects role stress and burnout].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sangsook; Kim, Ohsook; Joo, Yunsu; Choi, Eunduck; Han, Jeongwon

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the casual relationship between nurses' mentoring and turnover intention and to verify the goodness of fit between a hypothetical model and actual data in order to suggest an adequate model. The survey was conducted with 434 nurses working in general hospitals in Seoul. Data were collected during February 2013, and analyzed with SPSS Windows 18.0 and AMOS 7.0. Mentoring was found to have a direct effect on decrease in role stress. Role stress had a direct effect on increase in burnout and mentoring, with role stress as a mediator, there was an indirect effect on burnout. Burnout had a direct effect on increase in turnover intention, and role stress, with burnout as a mediator, and mentoring, through role stress and burnout, an indirect effect was found on increase in turnover intention. The results of this study indicate that nursing managers should put effort into reducing role stress and burnout, while seeking to establish a more efficient mentoring system so that for nurses, there will be a lowering of turnover intention.

  5. Legal aspects of work related stress in nursing. Exploring the issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu al Rub, R

    2000-03-01

    Nurses are under a great deal of distress related to a variety of work stressors. Work related stress jeopardizes the mental and physical well being of nurses, as well as the quality of care provided for clients. The Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 holds employers responsible for the mental and physical well being of their employees. However, the regulations are not always straightforward concerning compensation claims for mental disabilities due to work stress. Recovery of claims is possible if standards (i.e., personal injury, causal relationship between injury and employment) are met. Requirements for recovery of physical/mental and mental/physical claims are agreed on by most states, whereas mental/mental claims are controversial among states and courts. Nurses can monitor and influence legislation to create requirements to encourage employers to develop preventive approaches to reducing work induced stress.

  6. Cogitation on Occupational Stress and Social Support among Hospital Nurses: a Case Study of Zanjan Province, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira Jafari

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite extensive research on stress among hospital nurses, the important effects of support and stress on care quality are not yet well established. Similar to other jobs, nurses face stress in their routine working day. The relationship between occupational stress, social support and factors relating to each of them, among Iranian nurses are attempted to correlate. This cross-sectional analytical-descriptive study was carried out in 2013 in Zanjan province where 248 nurses filled the given questionnaires including Demographic data, Work Factors, Nursing Stress Scale, and Social Integration Scale. Data were analyzed using SPSS 16.00. In our study, we found that the stress and social support were significantly correlated. Our findings revealed a significant relation between social supports and occupational stress in nurses. Conclusively, support from supervisors and coworkers can help control nurses’ stress. In addition, both social support and occupational stress are related to three major components: job satisfaction, job security and others' attitude towards nursing. Therefore, creating a positive attitude towards nursing in society, and a suitable working environment for them is a way to increase their efficiency.

  7. The association between rotating shift work and increased occupational stress in nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Pei-Chen; Chen, Chung-Hey; Pan, Shung-Mei; Chen, Yao-Mei; Pan, Chih-Hong; Hung, Hsin-Chia; Wu, Ming-Tsang

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether rotating shift work increases occupational stress in nurses. This study measured shift work scheduling and occupational stress by using the Effort-Reward Imbalance model with self-reported questionnaires in a sample of 654 female nurses. Overcommitment risk was higher in nurses who worked rotating shifts than in those who worked day/non-night shifts (OR, 2.16; 95% CI, 1.03-4.66). However, an effort/reward imbalance was not directly associated with work schedules (OR, 1.88; 95% CI, 0.87-4.35). Among nurses working rotation rotating shifts, those who had 2 days off after their most recent night shifts showed an alleviated risk of overcommitment (OR, 0.52; 95% CI, 0.32-0.82), but those who had worked for at least one series of 7 consecutive work days per month had an increased risk of effort/reward imbalance (OR, 2.75; 95% CI, 1.69-4.48). Additionally, those who had little or no participation in planning working hours and shift scheduling and worked overtime at least three times per week during the preceding 2 months tended to have high stress. The nurses who worked rotating shifts tended to experience work-related stress, but their stress levels improved if they had at least 2 days off after their most recent night shift and if they were not scheduled to work 7 consecutive days. These empirical data can be used to optimize work schedules for nurses to alleviate work stress.

  8. Coverage of Google Scholar, Scopus, and Web of Science: a case study of the h-index in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Groote, Sandra L; Raszewski, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    This study compares the articles cited in CINAHL, Scopus, Web of Science (WOS), and Google Scholar and the h-index ratings provided by Scopus, WOS, and Google Scholar. The publications of 30 College of Nursing faculty at a large urban university were examined. Searches by author name were executed in Scopus, WOS, and POP (Publish or Perish, which searches Google Scholar), and the h-index for each author from each database was recorded. In addition, the citing articles of their published articles were imported into a bibliographic management program. This data was used to determine an aggregated h-index for each author. Scopus, WOS, and Google Scholar provided different h-index ratings for authors and each database found unique and duplicate citing references. More than one tool should be used to calculate the h-index for nursing faculty because one tool alone cannot be relied on to provide a thorough assessment of a researcher's impact. If researchers are interested in a comprehensive h-index, they should aggregate the citing references located by WOS and Scopus. Because h-index rankings differ among databases, comparisons between researchers should be done only within a specified database. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Competition and facilitation structure plant communities under nurse tree canopies in extremely stressful environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Namazi, Ali A; El-Bana, Magdy I; Bonser, Stephen P

    2017-04-01

    Nurse plant facilitation in stressful environments can produce an environment with relatively low stress under its canopy. These nurse plants may produce the conditions promoting intense competition between coexisting species under the canopy, and canopies may establish stress gradients, where stress increases toward the edge of the canopy. Competition and facilitation on these stress gradients may control species distributions in the communities under canopies. We tested the following predictions: (1) interactions between understory species shift from competition to facilitation in habitats experiencing increasing stress from the center to the edge of canopy of a nurse plant, and (2) species distributions in understory communities are controlled by competitive interactions at the center of canopy, and facilitation at the edge of the canopy. We tested these predictions using a neighbor removal experiment under nurse trees growing in arid environments. Established individuals of each of four of the most common herbaceous species in the understory were used in the experiment. Two species were more frequent in the center of the canopy, and two species were more frequent at the edge of the canopy. Established individuals of each species were subjected to neighbor removal or control treatments in both canopy center and edge habitats. We found a shift from competitive to facilitative interactions from the center to the edge of the canopy. The shift in the effect of neighbors on the target species can help to explain species distributions in these canopies. Canopy-dominant species only perform well in the presence of neighbors in the edge microhabitat. Competition from canopy-dominant species can also limit the performance of edge-dominant species in the canopy microhabitat. The shift from competition to facilitation under nurse plant canopies can structure the understory communities in extremely stressful environments.

  10. The association of perceived stress, contextualized stress, and emotional eating with body mass index in college-aged Black women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diggins, Allyson; Woods-Giscombe, Cheryl; Waters, Sandra

    2015-12-01

    A growing body of literature supports the association between adverse stress experiences and health inequities, including obesity, among African American/Black women. Adverse stress experiences can contribute to poor appetite regulation, increased food intake, emotional eating, binge eating, and sedentary behavior, all of which can contribute to weight gain and obesity. Most research studies concerning the effect of psychological stress on eating behaviors have not examined the unique stress experience, body composition, and eating behaviors of African American/Black women. Even fewer studies have examined these constructs among Black female college students, who have an increased prevalence of overweight and obesity compared to their counterparts. Therefore, the aim of the current study is to examine the associations among emotional eating, perceived stress, contextualized stress, and BMI in African American female college students. All participants identified as African American or Black (N=99). The mean age of the sample was 19.4 years (SD=1.80). A statistically significant eating behavior patterns×perceived stress interaction was evident for body mass index (BMI) (β=0.036, S.E.=.0118, pstress interaction was observed for BMI (β=0.007, S.E.=.0027, p=.015). Findings from this study demonstrate that the stress experience interacts with emotional eating to influence BMI. Based on these findings, culturally relevant interventions that target the unique stress experience and eating behavior patterns of young African American women are warranted. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Assessment of stress in the inclusion of nursing students in hospital practice

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    Francisco Gilberto Fernandes Pereira

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To verify the presence of stress among undergraduate nursing students in different stages of hospital practice. Method. Descriptive, cross-sectional study addressing 86 nursing students in their 6th, 7th, and 9th semesters in 2011. An instrument developed by Costa and Polak for the Assessment of Stress Among Nursing Students was used. It is composed of six domains: performance of practical activities, professional communication, time management, environment, professional training, and theoretical activity. Results. Most participants were women (95% and the average age was 23 years old. A total of 84% of students passed the program's courses and 91% participated in extracurricular activities. Stressors are present during the entire program but intensify when students are introduced to care practice with an emphasis on the domain of professional training; related stress was high in all the semesters. The scores concerning the practical activity domain were higher only in the 6th semester. There were statistically significant levels at 0.01 and 0.10 in the difference in the averages in the domains of training and time management, respectively, between the semesters. As the students advance in the program, scores obtained in the domains presented by AEEE change. As stress can interfere in the performance and learning of nursing students, coping strategies should be devised to enable them to deal with stress during the program.

  12. Heart Rate Variability Frequency Domain Alterations among Healthy Nurses Exposed to Prolonged Work Stress

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    Rossana Borchini

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The deregulation of the autonomic nervous system assessed through the heart rate variability (HRV analysis is a promising pathway linking work stress and cardiovascular diseases. We aim to investigate the associations between HRV High Frequency (HF and Low Frequency (LF powers and work stress in a sample of 36 healthy nurses. Perceived work stress was assessed twice one year apart, using the Job Content and Effort Reward Imbalance questionnaires. This allows to classify nurses in three exposure groups: “prolonged high stress” (PHS, “recent high stress” (RHS and “stable low stress” (SLS. A 24-h ECG monitoring was later performed during a working day (WD and a subsequent resting day (RD. Statistically significantly lower (p < 0.02 HF and LF means were found in PHS and RHS nurses during the working periods. In the subsequent resting periods, HF means showed increases over time in the RHS (beta = +0.41, p < 0.05, but not in PHS nurses. LF means did not show any substantial increases in the resting periods, in the PHS group with geometric means lower when compared to SLS, in the non-working and resting periods. Our study evidences that both prolonged and recent perceived high work stress were associated with a reduction of HF and LF powers during work. In addition, prolonged stress was associated with a lack of recovery during not-working and resting periods.

  13. Evaluation of a Web-Based Holistic Stress Reduction Pilot Program Among Nurse-Midwives.

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    Wright, Erin M

    2018-06-01

    Work-related stress among midwives results in secondary traumatic stress, posttraumatic stress disorder, and job attrition. The purpose of this pilot project was to evaluate the effectiveness of a holistic, web-based program using holistic modalities for stress reduction and improved coping among certified nurse-midwives. A convenience sample of 10 midwives participated in a web-based holistic stress reduction intervention using yoga, mindfulness-based stress reduction, and meditation for four days each week over 4 weeks. Participants completed pre- and postintervention questionnaires (Perceived Stress Scale [PSS] and the Coping Self-Efficacy Scale [CSES]) for evaluation of effectiveness. The PSS means showed improvement in midwives' stress (16.4-12.3). The CSES means showed improvement in coping (174.8-214.5). Improvement was shown in each subscale of the CSES ("uses problem-focused coping": 19.2%; "stops unpleasant thoughts and emotions": 20.3%; and "gets support from family and friends": 16.6%). Findings suggest the potential for stress reduction and improved coping skills after using holistic techniques in a web-based format within a cohort of nurse-midwives. Further research of web-based, holistic intervention for stress reduction among midwives is warranted.

  14. The Role of Support in Alleviating Stress among Nursing Assistants.

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    Chappell, Neena L.; Novak, Mark

    1992-01-01

    Tested the buffering hypothesis that negative effects of stressors (measured as burden, burnout, and perceived job pressure) on nursing assistants (n=245) in long-term care institutions are moderated by social support (at work and external to work). Buffering hypothesis was not confirmed, though some support for a main effects view was found.…

  15. Comparing the Heat Stress Index of HSI and WBGT in BakeryWorkplaces in Hamadan

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    S. Mahdavi

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims   Thermal stress is one of the important issues of physical stress in workplaces. Bakery workers that are one of widely population that under occupation heat stress. In this study, heat stress indexes consist of HSI and WBGT in worker positions in total of 88  bakeries in Hamadan city was assessed.   Methods   In this study 88 bakery workplace was considered. Measuring of air variables to obtain  of HSI and WBGTheat stress indices was performed by axial fan anemometer, WBGTmeter and  hygrometer made in CASELLA CompanyIn this study 88 bakery workplace was considered.   Measuring of air variables to obtain of HSI and WBGTheat stress indices was performed by axial fan anemometer, WBGTmeter and hygrometer made in CASELLACompany.   Results   Results showed that the average HSI index (214.2 ± 43.7 % and the average work experience were (28.57±1.97 C. Analyzing of results showed that Pearson's correlation of coefficient between HSI and WBGT was equal to 0.509. Depending of HSI to air velocity was considerable (r = -0.811 that was not expected.   Conclusion   Values of HSI index had a wide scatter in variances in study fields comparing of  WBGTindex that had a minimal scatter, whereas those are measuring of variables and computing of indexes were same workplaces. Finally, although both heat indexes showed exceeded values form criteria, but calibration between HSI and WBGT in this study, showed that, the HSI index  had any weakness.    

  16. Stress in telephone helpline nurses is associated with failures of concentration, attention and memory, and with more conservative referral decisions.

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    Allan, Julia L; Farquharson, Barbara; Johnston, Derek W; Jones, Martyn C; Choudhary, Carolyn J; Johnston, Marie

    2014-05-01

    Nurses working for telephone-based medical helplines must maintain attentional focus while quickly and accurately processing information given by callers to make safe and appropriate treatment decisions. In this study, both higher levels of general occupational stress and elevated stress levels on particular shifts were associated with more frequent failures of attention, memory, and concentration in telephone nurses. Exposure to a stressful shift was also associated with a measurable increase in objectively assessed information-processing errors. Nurses who experienced more frequent cognitive failures at work made more conservative decisions, tending to refer patients on to other health professionals more often than other nurses. As stress is associated with cognitive performance decrements in telephone nursing, stress-reduction interventions could improve the quality and safety of care that callers to medical helplines receive. © 2013 The British Psychological Society.

  17. Healthy Dietary Patterns and Oxidative Stress as Measured by Fluorescent Oxidation Products in Nurses' Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Seungyoun; Smith-Warner, Stephanie A; Willett, Walter C; Wang, Molin; Wu, Tianying; Jensen, Majken; Hankinson, Susan E; Eliassen, A Heather

    2016-09-21

    Healthy diets may lower oxidative stress and risk of chronic diseases. However, no previous studies examined associations between diet and fluorescent oxidation products (FlOP), a global marker of oxidative stress. We evaluated associations between healthy eating patterns (Alternative Healthy Eating Index (AHEI), Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension (DASH), and Alternate Mediterranean Diet (aMED)) and FlOP, measured at three excitation/emission wavelengths (FlOP_360, FlOP_320, FlOP_400) from 2021 blood samples collected from 1688 women within the Nurses' Health Study. AHEI, DASH, and aMED scores were significantly positively associated with FlOP_360 and FlOP_320 concentrations ( p -trend ≤ 0.04), but not associated with FlOP_400. Among specific food groups that contribute to these diet scores, significantly positive associations were observed with legumes and vegetables for FlOP_360, vegetables and fruits for FlOP_320, and legumes and alcohol for FlOP_400. Inverse associations were observed with nuts, sweets or desserts, and olive oil for FlOP_360, nuts for FlOP_320 and sweets or desserts for FlOP_400 (all p -trend ≤ 0.05). However, FlOP variation due to diet was small compared to overall FlOP variation. In conclusion, AHEI, DASH, and aMED scores were unexpectedly positively, but weakly, associated with FlOP_360 and FlOP_320. However, these findings should be interpreted cautiously as the determinants of FlOP concentrations are not fully understood.

  18. [Study of adaptation and validation of the Practice environment scale of the nursing work index for the Portuguese reality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Maria Regina Sardinheiro do Céu Furtado; Martins, José Joaquim Penedos Amendoeira

    2014-08-01

    Testing the psychometric properties of the Portuguese version of the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index. A descriptive, analytical and cross-sectional study, for the cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the psychometric properties of the scale. The study participants were 236 nurses from two hospitals in the regions of Lisbon and Vale do Tejo. The 0.92 Cronbach's alpha was obtained for overall reliability and support of a five-dimension structure. The excellent quality of adjustment of analysis confirms the validity of the adapted version to hospital care settings, although there was no total coincidence of items in the five dimensions

  19. The influence of personality traits and social support on male nursing student life stress: a cross-sectional research design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Jiunn-Horng; Chen, Sheng-Hwang; Yu, Hsing-Yi; Li, Ren-Hau; Yang, Cheng-I; Eng, Cheng-Joo

    2010-06-01

    Understanding how male nursing students alleviate life stress during their academic career is conducive to their development as successful nursing professionals. This study was designed to understand the personality traits, social support, and life stresses of male nursing students. The respective influences of personality traits and social support on life stress were also explored. The study used a cross-sectional research design. A college in central Taiwan was targeted as the site for data collection. A total of 158 questionnaires were dispatched, with 145 valid copies returned (valid response rate = 91.7%). Structured questionnaires were designed to collect data on participant demographics, personality traits, social support, and life stress. Statistical methods such as descriptive statistics, one-way analysis of variance, and multiple regression analysis were applied to data analysis. Major findings of this study revealed that (a) in general, the personality traits, social support, and life stress of male nursing students scored in the medium to high range. Participants reported encountering more stress from learning and life goals than from interpersonal stress. (b) Male nursing student demographic variables (e.g., parent [father and mother considered separately] education level) and the personality traits of conscientiousness and family support, respectively, were found to impact significantly on participant life stress perceptions. And (c) the only significant predictors of life stress were support from family and education level of participant fathers and mothers, accounting for about 23.7% of variability. It is suggested that nursing students in each year of their academic career should be exposed to courses geared to reduce the life stress perceptions (especially in the areas of learning and career development) of male nursing students. Increased family support is an effective way to decrease male nursing student life stress. This study could be a

  20. Nursing students' time management, reducing stress and gaining satisfaction: a grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaei, Tayebeh; Oskouie, Fatemeh; Rafii, Forough

    2012-03-01

    In the course of their studies, nursing students must learn many skills and acquire the knowledge required for their future profession. This study investigates how Iranian nursing students manage their time according to the circumstances and obstacles of their academic field. Research was conducted using the grounded theory method. Twenty-one nursing students were purposefully chosen as participants. Data was collected through semi-structured interviews and analyzed using the method suggested by Corbin and Strauss. One of the three processes that the nursing students used was "unidirectional time management." This pattern consists of accepting the nursing field, overcoming uncertainty, assessing conditions, feeling stress, and trying to reduce stress and create satisfaction. It was found that students allotted most of their time to academic tasks in an attempt to overcome their stress. The findings of this study indicate the need for these students to have time for the extra-curricular activities and responsibilities that are appropriate to their age. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  1. Nursing Students' Attitudes and Use of Holistic Therapies for Stress Relief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinchen, Elizabeth V; Loerzel, Victoria

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore student nurses' openness to using or recommending holistic therapies, the strategies they use to manage stress from school or work, and their perceptions of the impact of holistic therapies on personal health. Qualitative component of a quasi-experimental, mixed-methods study. A convenience sample of undergraduate nursing students in a southeastern U.S. university completed baseline surveys, including demographics and three open-ended questions regarding attitudes toward holistic therapies and strategies used for stress management. Qualitative thematic analysis was undertaken to identify recurring themes in textual data. Students are open to using or recommending holistic therapies but identify lack of knowledge and lack of time as barriers to their practice. Among strategies used by student nurses to manage stress from school or work were physical activity, prayer and meditation, time management, distraction, socialization, artistic pursuits, animal interactions, and other activities. Themes describing holistic therapies' impact on personal health were wholeness, self-empowerment, relaxation/restoration, and alternative/complement to traditional medicine. Findings indicate receptiveness by student nurses to the use of holistic therapies but point to the need for the inclusion of informational as well as experiential education on holistic therapies within nursing curricula.

  2. The relation of depression, anxiety and stress with personal characteristics of nurses in hospitals of Tabriz, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmail Khodadadi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The current industrialized world and ever advancing technology has changed human life by a significant increase in the level of stress and anxiety. Nurses are among those professionals who experience an overwhelming level of stress, anxiety and depression due to work overload and subsequent burnout. The nature of nursing profession for a vulnerable human character increases the possibility of emotional setbacks. Hence, this study was designed to explore and identify the prevalence of anxiety, stress and depression among the Iranian nurses and investigate how these variables relate to personal characteristics and influence the quality of patient care. Using a correlational descriptive design and random cluster method, 242 nurses who worked at different hospital wards in Tabriz, Iran were assessed for anxiety, stress and depression, while their personal characteristics were identified. Data were collected by using a standard questionnaire for stress, anxiety and depression (DASS-21 and later analyzed by SPSS (ver.17.Results showed that Iranian nurses suffered from a moderate level of anxiety, stress and depression and gender influenced these variable rates (p<0.05. Hospital ward type had a relation with stress level (p<0.05, being interested in nursing had an inverse relation to anxiety, stress and depression (p<0.05, while the education level positively related to depression rate among nurses (p<0.05. Type of work at different shifts influenced stress (p<0.05 and marital status reduced depression among nurses (p<0.05. Prevalence of stress and anxiety among the Iranian nurses were at a significant level with susceptibility to experience psychological disorders and provide lower quality of patient care. Findings of this study can alarm the Iranian authorities in healthcare systems to adopt a new policy and improve the current state of health for nurses and patients.

  3. Burnout, Perceived Stress, and Job Satisfaction Among Trauma Nurses at a Level I Safety-Net Trauma Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munnangi, Swapna; Dupiton, Lynore; Boutin, Anthony; Angus, L D George

    Nurses are at the forefront of our health care delivery system and have been reported to exhibit a high level of burnout. Burnout and stress in trauma nurses at a safety-net hospital can negatively impact patient care. Safety-net hospitals are confronted with unique social, financial, as well as resource problems that can potentially make the work environment frustrating. The purpose of this study was to explore the levels of burnout, stress, and job satisfaction in nurses providing care to trauma patients at a Level I safety-net trauma center. A cross-sectional survey design was used to investigate principal factors including personal and professional demographics, burnout, perceived stress, and job satisfaction. Trauma nurses working at a Level I safety-net trauma center are stressed and exhibited moderate degree of burnout. The extent of emotional exhaustion experienced by the nurses varied with work location and was highest in surgical intensive care unit nurses. The level of job satisfaction in terms of opportunities for promotion differed significantly by race and the health status of the nurses. Satisfaction with coworkers was lowest in those nurses between the ages of 60-69 years. Female nurses were more satisfied with their coworkers than male nurses. In addition, the study revealed that significant relationships exist among perceived stress, burnout, and job satisfaction. Work environment significantly impacts burnout, job satisfaction, and perceived stress experienced by trauma nurses in a safety-net hospital. Nursing administration can make an effort to understand the levels of burnout and strategically improve work environment for trauma nurses in order to minimize stressors leading to attrition and enhance job satisfaction.

  4. Pediatric novice nurses: examining compassion fatigue as a mediator between stress exposure and compassion satisfaction, burnout, and job satisfaction.

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    Meyer, Rika M L; Li, Angela; Klaristenfeld, Jessica; Gold, Jeffrey I

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether compassion fatigue mediated associations between nurse stress exposure and job satisfaction, compassion satisfaction, and burnout, controlling for pre-existing stress. The Life Events Checklist was administered to 251 novice pediatric nurses at the start of the nurse residency program (baseline) and 3 months after to assess pre-existing and current stress exposure. Compassion satisfaction, compassion fatigue, and burnout were assessed 3 months after baseline and job satisfaction 6 months after. Stress exposure significantly predicted lower compassion satisfaction and more burnout. Compassion fatigue partially mediated these associations. Results demonstrate a need for hospitals to prevent compassion fatigue in healthcare providers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Stress and nurses' horizontal mobbing: moderating effects of group identity and group support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topa, Gabriela; Moriano, Juan A

    2013-01-01

    Horizontal mobbing is a process of systematic and repeated aggression towards a worker by coworkers. Among others, stress has been pointed out as one of the antecedents that favors the onset of horizontal mobbing, whereas group support to the target could act as a buffer. Moreover, the social identity approach emphasizes that group identity is an antecedent of group support. This study explores the interaction of group support and group identity in the explanation of horizontal mobbing in a sample (N = 388) of registered nurses and licensed practical nurses employed at two large hospitals in Madrid and Navarre (Spain). The results show that stress is positively associated to horizontal mobbing, whereas group support and group identity were negative predictors of horizontal mobbing. Furthermore, the combination of low group identity and low group support precipitated HM among nurses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. First Year Nursing Students' Coping Strategies in Stressful Clinical Practice Situations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodys-Cupak, Iwona; Majda, Anna; Skowron, Justyna; Zalewska-Puchala, Joanna; Trzcinska, Aneta

    2018-01-01

    Performing the social service professions, to which a profession of nurse includes, is considered one of the most stress-inducing jobs. The reason behind this is deep emotional involvement in contact with patient followed by responsibility for human health and life. The time dedicated to gaining knowledge and practical skills constitutes both a…

  7. Perceived Stress and Coping Strategies among Newly Nurse Students in Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahfouz, Rasha; Alsahli, Haya

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed at assessing the stress level and coping strategies among students who were newly in Practicing the clinical training in different hospitals, at the Nursing College, Princess Nourah University. The study design was a descriptive analytical one. The study was conducted at the beginning of second semester in the academic year…

  8. Assessment of Heat Stress Index, and evaluation of theirvalidity in Mobarakeh Steel Association's Mobarakeh Steel Association's

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Sadeghi Aliabadi

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Existence of heat in industries is considered as a serious problem. Someindexes have been invited to evaluate the rate of heat loud on worker. These indexes have beenused & comprised in different researches. This research validity of some of these indexes wasevaluated.Method: In purpose of evaluation of indexes and environmental factor ordinary and CataTermometer, WBCT Meter instrument and Humidity Meter was used. As a first step Molding unitdivided into 15 stations, and in the second step parameters measurement was begone . After thatthe obtained figures was used in special equation to calculate heat stress indexes.Mouth, skin, and core body temperature of 90 healthy and adopted male worker was recorded.Then the obtained result was analysed by Spss, and mean, standard deviation and correlationcoficient was ealeutated for each of them.Results: At first mean, minimum, maximum and standard deviation was calculated forenvironmental parameter and indexes.At the second step the relationship between personalfactors (mouth, skin and core body temperature and parameters and environmental indexes. (Airtemperature, radiation temperature, air velocity and relative humidity was assessed.The result showed no significance relationship between personal factor and heat stressor. Factor(p>5% only purse index had significance relationship (p=0/005, and the others indexes did notshowed significance relationship.Conclusion: In this research the relationship between purse and all variables was significance.Therefore this index considered as a first valid index in this research.WBGTindex shows the most relationship after the purse index in comparison with other indexes.Because of the other indexes's no significance relationship, so pours had a good validity in thisresearch.

  9. A Daily Diary Approach to the Examination of Chronic Stress, Daily Hassles and Safety Perceptions in Hospital Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louch, Gemma; O'Hara, Jane; Gardner, Peter; O'Connor, Daryl B

    2017-12-01

    Stress is a significant concern for individuals and organisations. Few studies have explored stress, burnout and patient safety in hospital nursing on a daily basis at the individual level. This study aimed to examine the effects of chronic stress and daily hassles on safety perceptions, the effect of chronic stress on daily hassles experienced and chronic stress as a potential moderator. Utilising a daily diary design, 83 UK hospital nurses completed three end-of-shift diaries, yielding 324 person days. Hassles, safety perceptions and workplace cognitive failure were measured daily, and a baseline questionnaire included a measure of chronic stress. Hierarchical multivariate linear modelling was used to analyse the data. Higher chronic stress was associated with more daily hassles, poorer perceptions of safety and being less able to practise safely, but not more workplace cognitive failure. Reporting more daily hassles was associated with poorer perceptions of safety, being less able to practise safely and more workplace cognitive failure. Chronic stress did not moderate daily associations. The hassles reported illustrate the wide-ranging hassles nurses experienced. The findings demonstrate, in addition to chronic stress, the importance of daily hassles for nurses' perceptions of safety and the hassles experienced by hospital nurses on a daily basis. Nurses perceive chronic stress and daily hassles to contribute to their perceptions of safety. Measuring the number of daily hassles experienced could proactively highlight when patient safety threats may arise, and as a result, interventions could usefully focus on the management of daily hassles.

  10. A literature review of the application of the Geriatric Depression Scale, Depression Anxiety Stress Scales and Post-traumatic Stress Disorder Checklist to community nursing cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jacqui; Annells, Merilyn

    2009-04-01

    To explore through literature review the appropriateness of three common tools for use by community nurses to screen war veteran and war widow(er) clients for depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder. War veterans and, to a lesser extent, war widow(er)s, are prone to mental health challenges, especially depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder. Community nurses do not accurately identify such people with depression and related disorders although they are well positioned to do so. The use of valid and reliable self-report tools is one method of improving nurses' identification of people with actual or potential mental health difficulties for referral to a general practitioner or mental health practitioner for diagnostic assessment and treatment. The Geriatric Depression Scale, Depression Anxiety Stress Scales and Post-traumatic Stress Disorder Checklist are frequently recommended for mental health screening but the appropriateness of using the tools for screening war veteran and war widow(er) community nursing clients who are often aged and have functional impairment, is unknown. Systematic review. Current literature informs that the Geriatric Depression Scale accurately predicts a diagnosis of depression in community nursing cohorts. The three Depression Anxiety Stress Scales subscales of depression, anxiety and stress are valid; however, no studies were identified that compared the performance of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales in predicting diagnoses of depression or anxiety. The Post-traumatic Stress Disorder Checklist predicts post-traumatic stress disorder in community cohorts although no studies meeting the selection criteria included male participants. This review provides recommendations for the use of the Geriatric Depression Scale, Depression Anxiety Stress Scales and The Post-traumatic Stress Disorder Checklist based on examination of the published evidence for the application of these screening tools in samples

  11. [Cross-sectional study on the determinants of work stress for nurses and intention of leaving the profession].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Marina; Festini, Filippo; Bronner, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    Occupational stress is one of the main causes of sick leaves among healthcare professionals and it determines high costs to health systems. Monitoring occupational related stress can be an important tool for policy makers. The Italian nursing research gave little attention to nurses' occupational stress. The aims of this study is to estimate the prevalence of occupational stress and evaluate risks factors among Italian nurses in order to evaluate health promotion intervention. Cross-sectional study on a convenience sample of nurses from three Italian public hospitals was carried out. The Nursing Stress Scale was administrated together with socio-demographic data information(age, occupational age, family structure etc). The Nursing Stress Scale includes 34 items with a score from 0 to 3. Seven areas of job related stress are investigate in the scale: conflict with physicians, inadequate training, lack of support, conflict with other nurses, workload, uncertainty about treatments, death and suffering. Scores were calculated for each item and for each area. Associations between stress scores and socio-demographic data were analyzed. 231 nurses participated to the study. The two stress areas with the highest scores were "workload" (1.58) and "death and suffering" (1.39). Among the 13 items that exceed the overall mean stress score (i.e. 1.07), five belong to the "workload" area. "Watching a suffering patient" is the single item with the highest mean score. Demographic data associated to higher stress scores are, female gender (p=0.03) and working with night shifts (p=0.02). Intention to leave the nursing profession is associated to higher stress scores (p=0.002). Age, occupational age, time to commute to work, number of children, having disabled relatives at home, were not correlated to higher stress scores. Our study provides data regarding nurses' occupational stress that was not available before. This data may be useful for policy makers to plan preventive

  12. Relation of Compassionate Competence to Burnout, Job Stress, Turnover Intention, Job Satisfaction and Organizational Commitment for Oncology Nurses in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sun-A; Ahn, Seung-Hee

    2015-01-01

    Nursing focuses on the development of an empathic relationship between the nurse and the patients. Compassionate competence, in particular, is a very important trait for oncology nurses. The current study sought to determine the degree of compassionate competence in oncology nurses, as well as to determine the relationships between compassionate competence, burnout, job stress, turnover intention, degrees of job satisfaction, and organizational commitment in oncology nurses. A descriptive correlational study evaluating the relationships between compassionate competence, burnout, job stress, turnover intention, degrees of job satisfaction, and organizational commitment in 419 oncology nurses was conducted between January 30 and February 20, 2015. The average score of compassionate competence for oncology nurses in the current study was higher than for clinical nurses. The correlational analysis between compassionate competence and organizational commitment, burnout, job stress, turnover intention, and degree of job satisfaction revealed a high correlation between compassionate competence and positive job satisfaction and organizational commitment. Compassionate competence was higher in oncology nurses than in nurses investigated in previous studies and positively correlated with work experience. Job satisfaction and organizational commitment in nurses may be improved through compassionate competence enhancement programs that employ a variety of experiences.

  13. A water stress index based on water balance modelling for discrimination of grapevine quality and yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rémi Gaudin

    2014-01-01

    Significance and impact of the study: This water stress index is a valuable tool for explaining the variations in grape yield and quality among various locations and years because it reflects the vineyard water stress history in relation to rainfall regime and soil conditions. Improvement would come from the simulation of FTSW during winter, notably for soils of high Total Transpirable Soil Water. One potential application is the quantification of water stress change brought by irrigation in Mediterranean vineyards, and its relation to grapevine production.

  14. Happiness, stress, a bit of vulgarity, and lots of discursive conversation: a pilot study examining nursing students' tweets about nursing education posted to Twitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Richard G

    2015-02-01

    The use of social media platforms like Twitter within/for nursing education has become more common in recent years. Regardless, it is unclear how nursing students use technology like Twitter during the course of their nursing education. The aim of this paper was to explore how nursing students describe elements of their nursing education via the social media platform, Twitter. Tweets about nursing courses, classes, and clinical were collected in October 2011 and analyzed for themes. Overall, 498 tweets were collected over a collective six day period, and 189 tweets were codified into five thematic representations. Nursing students were found to discuss a variety of elements related to their nursing education, including events and situations they perceived to be positive or exciting. Stress and annoyance messaging was also noted as a salient theme expressed by nursing students when describing their education. Vulgarity and derogative messaging targeting elements of nursing education (including courses, students, and faculty) were found in a subset of tweets. The majority of the tweets collected in this study contained random discursive conversations regarding nursing education, including information seeking requests and declarative statements about temporal events. The findings of this study point to a need for educators to explore aspects surrounding eProfessionalism within nursing education. Similarly, this paper also highlights the growing requirement for nursing educators to learn more about how social media is being used by nursing students within/for their education, in order to better develop learning and networking opportunities for students. Without this, nursing education may miss a significant opportunity to help shape students' professional use of social media technology like Twitter. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Stress resiliency, psychological empowerment and conflict management styles among baccalaureate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pines, Eula W; Rauschhuber, Maureen L; Norgan, Gary H; Cook, Jennifer D; Canchola, Leticia; Richardson, Cynthia; Jones, Mary Elaine

    2012-07-01

    This article is a report of a Neuman Systems Model-guided correlational study of the relations of stress resiliency, psychological empowerment, selected demographic characteristics (age, ethnicity, semester in school) and conflict management styles. Emerging evidence suggests that stress resiliency and psychological empowerment can strengthen student nurses in academic achievement and coping with stress. Little is known about conflict management styles of students and the relationship to empowerment, resiliency and the implications for managing workplace conflict. A correlational study was conducted in Spring 2010 with 166 baccalaureate students. Most participants were female, single, Hispanic and 25 years old. The data collection instruments included the Stress Resiliency Profile, the Psychological Empowerment Instrument, the Conflict Mode Instrument and a demographic inventory. Descriptive and inferential correlational statistics were used to analyse the data. Students scored in the high range for focusing on their deficiencies in conflict situations; they scored above the 60th percentile for avoiding and accommodating behaviours and were less likely to use competing or collaborating strategies to manage conflict. Empowerment scores were significantly correlated with stress resiliency scores. Students with high scores on empowerment had high scores on the skill recognition subscale of the Stress Resiliency Profile suggesting more resilience; high scores on empowerment were related to high necessitating subscale scores of the Stress Resiliency Profile suggesting a predisposition to stress. Neuman Systems Model may provide guidance for educators to strengthen student nurses' management of stressors in the workplace. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Heart Rate Variability Frequency Domain Alterations among Healthy Nurses Exposed to Prolonged Work Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchini, Rossana; Veronesi, Giovanni; Bonzini, Matteo; Gianfagna, Francesco; Dashi, Oriana; Ferrario, Marco Mario

    2018-01-11

    The deregulation of the autonomic nervous system assessed through the heart rate variability (HRV) analysis is a promising pathway linking work stress and cardiovascular diseases. We aim to investigate the associations between HRV High Frequency (HF) and Low Frequency (LF) powers and work stress in a sample of 36 healthy nurses. Perceived work stress was assessed twice one year apart, using the Job Content and Effort Reward Imbalance questionnaires. This allows to classify nurses in three exposure groups: "prolonged high stress" (PHS), "recent high stress" (RHS) and "stable low stress" (SLS). A 24-h ECG monitoring was later performed during a working day (WD) and a subsequent resting day (RD). Statistically significantly lower ( p working periods. In the subsequent resting periods, HF means showed increases over time in the RHS (beta = +0.41, p working and resting periods. Our study evidences that both prolonged and recent perceived high work stress were associated with a reduction of HF and LF powers during work. In addition, prolonged stress was associated with a lack of recovery during not-working and resting periods.

  17. Stress and coping mechanisms of nursing students during clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Science and Technology (Ghana) ... Stress impacts negatively and positively depending on how effectively the ... in the clinical area and used coping strategies that were mainly relationship-based. ... AJOL African Journals Online.

  18. Work stress, occupational burnout and depression levels: a clinical study of paediatric intensive care unit nurses in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tzu-Ching; Lin, Huey-Shyan; Cheng, Su-Fen; Wu, Li-Min; Ou-Yang, Mei-Chen

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to examine the relationship between work stress and depression; and investigate the mediating effect of occupational burnout among nurses in paediatric intensive care units. The relationships among work stress, occupational burnout and depression level have been explored, neither regarding occupational burnout as the mediating role that causes work stress to induce depression nor considering the paediatric intensive care unit context. A cross-sectional correlational design was conducted. One hundred and forty-four female paediatric intensive care unit nurses from seven teaching hospitals in southern Taiwan were recruited as the participants. Data were collected by structured questionnaires including individual demographics, the Nurse Stress Checklist, the Occupational Burnout Inventory and the Taiwan Depression Questionnaire. The results indicated that after controlling for individual demographic variables, the correlations of work stress with occupational burnout, as well as work stress and occupational burnout with depression level were all positive. Furthermore, occupational burnout may exert a partial mediating effect on the relationship between work stress and depression level. This study provides information about work stress, occupational burnout and depression level, and their correlations, as well as the mediating role of occupational burnout among paediatric intensive care unit nurses. It suggests government departments and hospital administrators when formulating interventions to prevent work stress and occupational burnout. These interventions can subsequently prevent episodes of depression in paediatric intensive care unit nurses, thereby providing patients with a safe and high-quality nursing environment. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Predicting Job Stress Based on Elements of Coping Styles in Nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoureh Nezari Sedeh

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Using coping methods can help to dominate on physical, mental, and social relationships, individual contradiction problems, and can be considered as one of effective factors in general and mental health of nurses. The objective of the present research is predicting job stress based on elements of coping styles in nurses. By correlative methodology for this research, 120 female20-45 years old nurses in Tehran city were selected by simple random sampling method based on Cochran formula. The research instrument includes job stress questionnaire and coping style questionnaire of Lazzarus & Folkman; the Pearson correlation coefficient test, and linear regression were used to test hypotheses and generalize the obtained information from tests. Findings showed that participants’ scores were near normal range and Cronbach’s alpha coefficient was 0.58 which indicated scores internal consistency. The obtained results showed that coping elements in 0.05 significant level with f-value of 12.403 significantly predicted job stress. In addition, regression coefficient among support, responsibility, and managerial solution elements was negative and positive with two other relationships including job stress and escape-avoidance. Therefore, it can be concluded that elements of support, responsibility, escape-avoidance, and managerial solution significantly predict nurses’ job stress among coping elements.

  20. Depression, Anxiety and Symptoms of Stress among Hong Kong Nurses: A Cross-sectional Study

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    Teris Cheung

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent epidemiological data suggests 13.3% of Hong Kong residents suffered from Common Mental Disorders, most frequently mixed anxiety and depressive disorder. This study examines the weighted prevalence and associated risk factors of depression, anxiety and stress among Hong Kong nurses. A total of 850 nurses were invited to participate in this cross-sectional study. Participants completed the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale 21 and multiple logistic regression was used to determine significant relationships between variables. Chronic past-year illness and poor self-perceived mental health were significant correlates of past-week depression, anxiety and stress. It confirmed further positive correlations between depression and divorce, widowhood and separation, job dissatisfaction, disturbance with colleagues, low physical activity levels and sleep problems. Marital status; general medicine; sleep problems, and a lack of leisure significantly correlated with anxiety. Stress was significantly associated with younger age, clinical inexperience, past-year disturbance with colleagues, low physical activity, no leisure and drinking alcohol. Nurses were more depressed, anxious and stressed than the local general population, with over one-third of our respondents classified as subject to these disorders.

  1. Depression, Anxiety and Symptoms of Stress among Hong Kong Nurses: A Cross-sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Teris; Yip, Paul S.F.

    2015-01-01

    Recent epidemiological data suggests 13.3% of Hong Kong residents suffered from Common Mental Disorders, most frequently mixed anxiety and depressive disorder. This study examines the weighted prevalence and associated risk factors of depression, anxiety and stress among Hong Kong nurses. A total of 850 nurses were invited to participate in this cross-sectional study. Participants completed the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale 21 and multiple logistic regression was used to determine significant relationships between variables. Chronic past-year illness and poor self-perceived mental health were significant correlates of past-week depression, anxiety and stress. It confirmed further positive correlations between depression and divorce, widowhood and separation, job dissatisfaction, disturbance with colleagues, low physical activity levels and sleep problems. Marital status; general medicine; sleep problems, and a lack of leisure significantly correlated with anxiety. Stress was significantly associated with younger age, clinical inexperience, past-year disturbance with colleagues, low physical activity, no leisure and drinking alcohol. Nurses were more depressed, anxious and stressed than the local general population, with over one-third of our respondents classified as subject to these disorders. PMID:26371020

  2. Depression, Anxiety and Symptoms of Stress among Hong Kong Nurses: A Cross-sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Teris; Yip, Paul S F

    2015-09-07

    Recent epidemiological data suggests 13.3% of Hong Kong residents suffered from Common Mental Disorders, most frequently mixed anxiety and depressive disorder. This study examines the weighted prevalence and associated risk factors of depression, anxiety and stress among Hong Kong nurses. A total of 850 nurses were invited to participate in this cross-sectional study. Participants completed the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale 21 and multiple logistic regression was used to determine significant relationships between variables. Chronic past-year illness and poor self-perceived mental health were significant correlates of past-week depression, anxiety and stress. It confirmed further positive correlations between depression and divorce, widowhood and separation, job dissatisfaction, disturbance with colleagues, low physical activity levels and sleep problems. Marital status; general medicine; sleep problems, and a lack of leisure significantly correlated with anxiety. Stress was significantly associated with younger age, clinical inexperience, past-year disturbance with colleagues, low physical activity, no leisure and drinking alcohol. Nurses were more depressed, anxious and stressed than the local general population, with over one-third of our respondents classified as subject to these disorders.

  3. Awareness of bispectral index monitoring system among the critical care nursing personnel in a tertiary care hospital of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shikha Thakur

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bispectral index monitoring system (BIS is one of the several systems used to measure the effects of anaesthetic and sedative drugs on the brain and to track changes in the patient′s level of sedation and hypnosis. BIS monitoring provides information clinically relevant to the adjustment of dosages of sedating medication. It can help the nursing personnel in preventing under- and over sedation among intensive care unit (ICU patients. Objective: The present study was conducted to assess the knowledge of nursing personnel working in the ICU regarding BIS. Methods: Fifty-four subjects participated in the study. A structured questionnaire was developed to assess the knowledge of the nursing personnel regarding BIS. Focus group discussions were held among the nursing personnel to know their views regarding BIS. Results: Mean age (years of the subjects was 30.7΁7.19 (21-47 years, with a female preponderance. Although the use of BIS in ICU is not common, majority (94.44% were aware of BIS and its purpose. 79.62% of the subjects knew about its implication in patient care. The mean knowledge score of the subjects was 11.87΁2.43 (maximum score being 15. Conclusion: There exists an awareness among the critical care nursing staff in our institution regarding BIS and its clinical implications. Its use in the critical care setting may benefit the patients in terms of providing optimal sedation.

  4. Stress-induced alterations of left-right electrodermal activity coupling indexed by pointwise transinformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Světlák, M; Bob, P; Roman, R; Ježek, S; Damborská, A; Chládek, J; Shaw, D J; Kukleta, M

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we tested the hypothesis that experimental stress induces a specific change of left-right electrodermal activity (EDA) coupling pattern, as indexed by pointwise transinformation (PTI). Further, we hypothesized that this change is associated with scores on psychometric measures of the chronic stress-related psychopathology. Ninety-nine university students underwent bilateral measurement of EDA during rest and stress-inducing Stroop test and completed a battery of self-report measures of chronic stress-related psychopathology. A significant decrease in the mean PTI value was the prevalent response to the stress conditions. No association between chronic stress and PTI was found. Raw scores of psychometric measures of stress-related psychopathology had no effect on either the resting levels of PTI or the amount of stress-induced PTI change. In summary, acute stress alters the level of coupling pattern of cortico-autonomic influences on the left and right sympathetic pathways to the palmar sweat glands. Different results obtained using the PTI, EDA laterality coefficient, and skin conductance level also show that the PTI algorithm represents a new analytical approach to EDA asymmetry description.

  5. Stressful situations and factors in students of nursing in clinical practice

    OpenAIRE

    Llapa Rodrigues, Eliana Ofélia; Almeida Marques, Daniel; Lopes Neto, David; López Montesinos, María José; Amado de Oliveira, Adriana Sousa

    2016-01-01

    Objective.To assess the risk factors for stress in undergraduate students of nursing in clinical practice in a public university in the Northeast region of Brazil. Methods. Cross-sectional descriptive study with 116 students from the fifth to the ninth period. The bilingual KEZKAK questionnaire, validated for Portuguese, was used. Stress was considered to be present when the score was equal or superior to 2. Results. The students with stress in clinical practice were 18 to 22 years old (2.82 ...

  6. Work related stress, burnout, job satisfaction and general health of nurses: A follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamisa, Natasha; Peltzer, Karl; Ilic, Dragan; Oldenburg, Brian

    2016-12-01

    Nurses experience high levels of work related stress and burnout as well as low job satisfaction and poor general health owing to the nature of their work. This paper seeks to provide a better understanding of the nature of relationships between work related stress, burnout, job satisfaction and general health of nurses over one year. This study involved a longitudinal design. Two hundred and seventy seven nurses from four hospitals completed a follow up survey consisting of five questionnaires. Data were collected between 2013 and 2014. The data were analysed using generalized estimation equation analysis. Lack of support was associated with burnout, patient care was associated with job satisfaction and staff issues were associated with general health of nurses. Burnout is more strongly related to job satisfaction than general health. The findings of this study could inform evidence based policy and practice through interventions aimed at improving job satisfaction and reducing the impact of burnout on general health of nurses. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  7. [Coping with occupational stress among nursing staff by participatory action research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morano-Báez, Rocío; Albar-Marín, María Jesús; García-Ramírez, Manuel; Prieto-Guerrero, María Milagros; García-Nieto, Alejandro Antonio

    2009-01-01

    To describe a collaborative practice focused on coping with the occupational stress among nursing staff in a hospital setting. These practices focus on the contextualization of the problems and the design and implementation of actions using the psychopolitical model and the participatory action research (PAR) methodology. Participants were the nurses of 4 units of internal medicine at the public hospital "Virgen Macarena" in Seville. We have used the ISTAS questionnaire, interviews and discussion groups through which nurses and researchers have assessed, defined, proposed and implemented different actions in order to improve their work conditions. Problematic situations detected by the questionnaires are associated to psychological demands, role conflicts and esteem. The main cause of stress in healthcare professionals is the lack of staff, according to the opinion laid by supervisors. In the discussion groups, nurses accorded to get involved in three situations: a) the need of the continuous presence of an orderly to move patients which aren't autonomous; b) the need of controlling visit hours and the number of accompanying people with each patient; and c) the need to improve the registration of the activities assigned to nursing staff. Among the strength of the psychopolitical model and PAR in a hospital context we must emphasize on the mobilization of professionals and the development of a critical consciousness. Among the weakness, those derived from bureaucratic processes. These barriers imply a challenge for change and organizational development.

  8. Job stress and intent to stay at work among registered female nurses working in Thai hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaewboonchoo, Orawan; Yingyuad, Boonrord; Rawiworrakul, Tassanee; Jinayon, Adchara

    2014-01-01

    Job stress is one of the factors that increase the likelihood of turnover. Intent to leave work is one of the most accurate predictors of turnover. This cross-sectional study was created to evaluate the intent of nurses working at hospitals to continue working and to determine the relationship between job stress and intent to stay at work. The subjects were 514 female hospital nurses aged 21-58 years old, who had worked full time at the study hospitals for at least 1 year. Data were collected using a self-administered questionnaire, which included sections on demographic characteristics, the Thai version of the Job Content Questionnaire (JCQ), and intent to stay at work. Multiple regression analysis was used to identify factors related to intent to stay at work. The prevalences of high job strain and low intent to stay at work were 17.5 and 22.4%, respectively. The mean (SD) scores of the nurses for psychological job demand, decision latitude, workplace social support, and intent to stay at work were 33.5 (4.4), 70.7 (6.9), 23.8 (2.8), and 14.6 (2.9), respectively. Multiple regression analysis indicated that intent to stay at work was significantly correlated with only supervisor support among the nurses with high-strain jobs and with coworker support in nurses with active jobs. The findings suggest that different job types need different sources of social support in the workplace. Proactive steps by nurse managers to increase workplace social support might lead to an increase in intent to stay and reduce nursing turnover in hospitals and possibly other settings.

  9. Stress and burnout in forensic mental health nursing: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Tommy; Wright, Karen M

    Forensic mental health nurses who work with patients who have severe and enduring mental health needs have been identified as at risk of suffering from occupational stress, and even developing burnout syndrome. Therefore, this article reviews the available literature on stress and burnout in inpatient forensic mental health nursing to identify the stressors and to highlight recommendations. From the review, the main stressors placed on forensic nurses are identified as interprofessional conflicts, workload, and lack of involvement in decision-making. Recommendations to reduce stress and burnout for nurses within this specialty are highlighted. These are identified as follows: staff should have easy access to support systems including clinical supervision; managers should foster an open and honest culture to enable staff members to express their feelings openly or in confidence and learn how to deal with their frustrations; and staff should be encouraged to rotate wards to increase personal and professional development and reduce boredom and apathy. Furthermore, staff should be provided with, and encouraged to undertake, continuing professional development which may include psychosocial interventions training.

  10. The relationship between job stress and burnout levels of oncology nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rujnan Tuna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Job stress and burnout levels of oncology nurses increase day-by-day in connection with rapidly increasing cancer cases worldwide as well as in Turkey. The purpose of this study was to establish job stress and burnout levels of oncology nurses and the relationship in between. Methods: The sample of this descriptive study comprised of 189 nurses that are selected by nonprobability sampling method, employed by 11 hospitals in Istanbul. Survey form of 20 questions, Job Stressors Scale and Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI were used during collection of data. Data were evaluated using percentage, Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney U and Spearman correlation analyses. Results: In the study, there was a positively weak correlation between "Work Role Ambiguity" subdimension of Job Stressors Scale and "Emotional Exhaustion" and "Personal Accomplishment" subdimensions, whereas a positively weak and medium correlation was encountered between "Work Role Conflict" subdimension and "Emotional Exhaustion" and "Depersonalization" subdimensions. A negatively weak correlation was found between "Work Role Overload" subdimension and "Emotional Exhaustion" and "Depersonalization" subdimensions. Conclusion: A significant relationship was established between subdimensions of job stress level and of burnout level, that a lot of oncology nurses who have participated in the study wanted to change their units, because of the high attrition rate.

  11. The mediating effect of emotional intelligence between emotional labour, job stress, burnout and nurses' turnover intention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Eunyoung; Lee, Young Sook

    2016-12-01

    This study was designed to construct and test the structural equation modelling on nurses' turnover intention including emotional labour, job stress, emotional intelligence and burnout in order to identify the mediating effect of emotional intelligence between those variables. Emotional labour, job stress and burnout increase turnover intention of nurses. However, emotional intelligence is negatively correlated with emotional labour and reduces job stress, burnout and turnover intention. Structural equation modelling was used to analyse the goodness of fit of the hypothetical model of nurses' turnover intention. Research data were collected via questionnaires from 4 to 22 August 2014 and analysed using SPSS version 18.0 and AMOS version 20.0. The model fit indices for the hypothetical model were suitable for recommended. Emotional intelligence has decreasing effect on turnover intention through burnout, although its direct effect on turnover intention is not significant. Emotional intelligence has mediation effect between emotional labour and burnout. This study's results suggest that increasing emotional intelligence might critically decrease nurses' turnover intention by reducing the effect of emotional labour on burnout. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  12. Comparison of job stress and obesity in nurses with favorable and unfavorable work schedules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kihye; Trinkoff, Alison M; Storr, Carla L; Geiger-Brown, Jeanne; Johnson, Karen L; Park, Sungae

    2012-08-01

    To compare obesity-related factors between female nurses with favorable work schedules (WSs) and unfavorable WSs. In a cross-sectional study, 1724 female nurses were stratified by WS (favorable vs unfavorable). For each schedule type, the odds of obesity were related to health behaviors, home demands, and job stress using logistic regression models. Among nurses with unfavorable WSs, healthy behaviors (exercise, sleep) were inversely associated with obesity, whereas for those with favorable WSs, obese nurses reported significantly more unhealthy behaviors (smoking, alcohol use; odds ratio [OR], 1.19; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02-1.38), more physical lifting of children/dependents (OR, 1.43; 95% CI, 1.06-1.93), having more nurse input into their jobs (OR, 1.21; 95% CI, 1.02-1.44), yet less boss support at work (OR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.68-0.99). Considering impacts of WSs on obesity and potential obesity-related health outcomes, healthful scheduling should be provided to nurses.

  13. The effects of teaching stress management skills on the quality of life in ICU nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FARIBA GHODSBIN

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Job stress is one of the main factors in decreasing productivity in organizations and the leading cause of psychosomatic disorders in personnel. Since job stress of nurses working in Intensive Care Units (ICUs is considered as an important segment in health and medical systems, it significantly affects the quality of care and the nurse’s quality of life. To this end, the purpose of this research is to examine the effects of teaching stress management skills on the quality of life of the nurses working at ICU of the hospitals affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. Methods: The subjects of the study consisted of 60 ICU nurses with the average stress score in Osipow job stress exam working at the hospitals affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. The subjects were randomly assigned to two groups (30 in the case and 30 in the control group. The intervention was performed as a teaching stress management workshop for eight hours throughout two-days (four hours per day, and the nurses were followed up for two months. The data were collected through a two part questionnaire including demographic characteristics and WHO Quality of life BREF and were analyzed in SPSS software using paired t test, and t-test. Results: The findings showed that the nurses of both the case and control groups were homogeneous considering the demographic data such as age, sex, marital status, number of children, shift position, job satisfaction, number of working hours per week, work experience and the amount of income. Moreover, there was no significant difference between the mean score of the life quality before the intervention in both groups. But after the intervention, a significant increase was revealed in the mean score of the life quality of the case group as compared to that of the control group (P<0.0001. Conclusion: The findings revealed the efficacy of the stress management workshop in improving the life quality of ICU

  14. Depressive symptoms and perceived chronic stress predict test anxiety in nursing students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Augner

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study is to identify predictors of test anxiety in nursing students. Design: Cross sectional pilot study. Methods: A questionnaire was administered to 112 students of an Austrian nursing school (mean age = 21.42, SD = 5.21. Test anxiety (measured by the standardized PAF Test Anxiety Questionnaire, perceived chronic stress, depressive symptoms, pathological eating and further psychological and health parameters were measured. Results: We found highly significant correlations between test anxiety and working hours (0.25, depression score (0.52, emotional stability (-0.31, and perceived chronic stress (0.65 (p < 0.01, for all. Regression analysis revealed chronic stress and emotional instability as best predictors for test anxiety. Furthermore, path analysis revealed that past negative academic performance outcomes contribute to test anxiety via depressive symptoms and perceived chronic stress. Conclusion: Depressive symptoms and perceived chronic stress are strongly related to test anxiety. Therefore therapy and training methods that address depressive symptoms and perceived chronic stress, and thereby aim to modify appraisal of potential stressful situations, may be successful in addressing test anxiety.

  15. Job satisfaction, workplace stress, unhealthy lifestyle choices, and productivity among Canadian nurses: an empirical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen J. Buhr

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nurses’ occupational stress and job satisfaction can have an affect on lifestyle choices and productivity. OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study is to provide a detailed examination of the relationship between job satisfaction, job stress, unhealthy lifestyle choices, and productivity among Canadian nurses. METHODS: This study uses data from the confidential master data files of the 2005 National Survey of the Work and Health of Nurses (NSWHN. Ordinary least squares regressions and binary probit regression models were used to estimate the relationships between job satisfaction and job stress on productivity and unhealthy lifestyle choices. RESULTS: Workplace stress variables have a small effect on lifestyle choices. Job satisfaction has an effect on the probability of smoking, but not on drinking. Workplace stress and job satisfaction do not have statistically significant effects on productivity. DISCUSSION: The study found weak relationships among the work related stress variables and productivity. These findings can allow policy makers to consider efforts to reduce workplace stress which can be beneficial to productivity.

  16. Stress among care givers: The impact of nursing a relative with cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyadarshini Kulkarni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The aim of the present study is to assess the level and areas of stress among care givers nursing their loved ones suffering from cancer. Setting and Design: An assessment of care givers′ stress providing care to cancer patients at Cipla Palliative Care Center was conducted. The study involves data collection using a questionnaire and subsequent analysis. Materials and Methods: A close-ended questionnaire that had seven sections on different aspects of caregivers′ stress was developed and administered to 137 participants and purpose of conducting the survey was explained to their understanding. Caregivers who were willing to participate were asked to read and/or explained the questions and requested to reply as per the scales given. Data was collected in the questionnaires and was quantitatively analyzed. Results: The study results showed that overall stress level among caregivers is 5.18 ± 0.26 (on a scale of 0-10; of the total, nearly 62% of caregivers were ready to ask for professional help from nurses, medical social workers and counselors to cope up with their stress. Conclusion: Stress among caregivers ultimately affects quality of care that is being provided to the patient. This is also because they are unprepared to provide care, have inadequate knowledge about care giving along with financial burden, physical and emotional stress. Thus interventions are needed to help caregivers to strengthen their confidence in giving care and come out with better quality of care.

  17. Stressful situations and factors in students of nursing in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana Ofélia Llapa Rodrigues

    Full Text Available Objective.To assess the risk factors for stress in undergraduate students of nursing in clinical practice in a public university in the Northeast region of Brazil. Methods. Cross-sectional descriptive study with 116 students from the fifth to the ninth period. The bilingual KEZKAK questionnaire, validated for Portuguese, was used. Stress was considered to be present when the score was equal or superior to 2. Results. The students with stress in clinical practice were 18 to 22 years old (2.82 ± 0.98, women (2.81 ± 0.96, married (2.80 ± 0.97, and who were permanent contracted employees (2.74 ± 0.94. The factors which were most associated with stress were: Lack of competence (2.99 ± 0.88; Impotence and uncertainty (2.98 ± 0.85; and Patients seeking a closer relationship (2.93 ± 1.01. The students of the sixth period were the most vulnerable to stress (2.85±0.96. Conclusion. The studies showed the main risk factors for stress among students of nursing in their clinical practice. These results could be used in the development of strategies seeking to reduce stress in this context as well as to contribute to promoting mental health.

  18. New low back pain in nurses: work activities, work stress and sedentary lifestyle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Vera Yin Bing

    2004-05-01

    Low back pain is common among nurses. Previous studies have shown that the risk of low back pain increases rapidly with greater amounts of physical work and psychological stress, but is inversely related to leisure activities. However, these previous studies were predominantly retrospective in design and not many took account of three factors simultaneously. This 12-month prospective study examined the relationships between work activities, work stress, sedentary lifestyle and new low back pain. A total of 144 nurses from six Hong Kong district hospitals completed a face-to-face baseline interview, which was followed-up by a telephone interview. The main study measures were demographic characteristics, work activities, work stress, physical leisure activities and the nature of new low back pain during the 12-month follow-up period. Level of work stress, quality of relationships at work, level of enjoyment experienced at work, and work satisfaction were self-reported. Fifty-six (38.9%) nurses reported experiencing new low back pain. Sedentary leisure time activity was not associated with new low back pain. Being comparatively new on a ward (adjusted relative risk 2.90), working in bending postures (adjusted relative risk 2.76) and poor work relationships with colleagues (adjusted relative risk 2.52) were independent predictors of new low back pain. The findings of this study suggest that low back pain is a common problem in the population of nurses in Hong Kong. Being comparatively new on a ward, bending frequently during work and having poor work relationships with colleagues are independent predictors of new low back pain. Training for high-risk work activities and ergonomic assessment of awkward work postures are essential. Moreover, relaxation and team-building workshops for nurses, especially those who are less experienced in the type of work on their current ward, are recommended.

  19. Potential predictors of susceptibility to occupational stress in Japanese novice nurses - a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okita, Shinobu; Daitoku, Satoshi; Abe, Masaharu; Arimura, Emi; Setoyama, Hitoshi; Koriyama, Chihaya; Ushikai, Miharu; Kawaguchi, Hiroaki; Horiuchi, Masahisa

    2017-04-04

    Occupational stress is a known factor behind employee resignations; thus, early identification of individuals prone to such stress is important. Accordingly, in this pilot study we evaluated potential predictors of susceptibility to occupational stress in Japanese novice nurses. Forty-two female novice nurses at Kagoshima University Hospital were recruited for the study population. Each underwent physical health and urinary examinations, and completed a lifestyle questionnaire at the time of job entry. Each also completed a Brief Job Stress Questionnaire (BJSQ), related to mental health status, at job entry and 5 months post-entry. Psychological stress, somatic symptoms, and combined BJSQ scores were determined for each time point. All three stress condition scores had significantly decreased at 5 months post-entry, suggesting occupational stress. Systolic blood pressure (r = -0.324, p stress condition scores were significantly low in subjects reporting substantial 1-year body weight change (≤ ± 3 kg) and short times between dinner and bedtimes (≤2 h), though baseline stress condition scores were not. Urinary sodium concentration, 1-year body weight change, and pre-sleep evening meals were then targeted for multivariate analysis, and confirmed as independent explanatory variables for post-entry stress condition scores. One-year body weight change, times between dinner and bedtimes, and urinary sodium concentration are promising potential predictors of susceptibility to occupational stress, and should be further investigated in future research. ISRCTN ISRCTN17516023. Retrospectively registered 7 December 2016.

  20. A Different Approach to Assess Oxidative Stress in Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever Patients Through The Calculation of Oxidative Stress Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edi Hartoyo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to determine the involvement of Oxidative Stress (OS in the pathogenesis of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF through the analysis of oxidative stress Index (OSI. The levels of malondialdehyde (MDA, superoxide dismutase (SOD and catalase (CAT activity, and OSI were measured in 61 child dengue patients and (aged 6 months–18 years with three different stages of DHF, i.e stage I, II, and III. The results show that the levels of MDA, SOD and CAT activity, and OSI significantly different between the group. The all parameters that investigated in this present study seems higher MDA level and OSI in the higher grade of DHF, except for SOD and CAT activity. From this result, it can be concluded that oxidative stress pathways might be involved in the pathomechanism of DHF and OSI might be used as a biomarker for OS and the severity in DHF patients.

  1. Effect of personal and work stress on burnout, job satisfaction and general health of hospital nurses in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Khamisa

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The majority of studies to date have focused on the effects of work stress in the nursing environment, with the effect of personal stress in nursing being less explored. This study sought to determine whether personal stress is a more significant predictor of burnout, job satisfaction and general health than work stress. Of the 1200 nurses randomly selected to participate in the study, 895 agreed to complete six questionnaires over 3 weeks. Data was analysed using hierarchical multiple linear regression. Findings revealed that personal stress is a better predictor of burnout and general health than job satisfaction, which is better predicted by work stress. The findings of this study could inform potential solutions to reduce the impact of personal and work stress on burnout, job satisfaction and general health. Coping strategies and staffing strategies need to be evaluated within developing contexts such as South Africa to as certain their effectiveness.

  2. The Relationship of Relaxation Technique, Test Anxiety, Academic Stress, and Nursing Students Intention to Stay in a Baccalaureate Degree Nursing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manansingh, Sherry

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of relaxation techniques among first semester Baccalaureate Degree nursing students' test anxiety and academic stress. Additionally, this study examined if there was a relationship among demographic characteristics of the respondents and test anxiety and academic stress. The pretest and posttest…

  3. The weekend matters: exploring when and how nurses best recover from work stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drach-Zahavy, Anat; Marzuq, Nabil

    2013-03-01

    This article is a report of a comparative study examining nurses' levels of emotional exhaustion and vigour after a short respite taken on weekends as compared with two midweek days taken off. Recovery from work stress - a respite experience that generates replenishing of psychological and physical resources that have been depleted by meeting effortful demands - is crucial to offset future deleterious consequences to mental and physical health. Longitudinal panel survey. Nurses (n = 400) completed questionnaires during 2010-2011 on three occasions: (1) Before the respite (weekend or midweek), we measured the timing of the respite and emotional exhaustion and vigour; (2) during the respite we measured respite experiences; and (3) after the respite we re-measured emotional exhaustion and vigour. Nurses' emotional exhaustion was significantly lower and their vigour significantly higher after a short weekend respite than after two-midweek-days taken off. Specific experiences during the respite can compensate for the inferior recovery process on weekdays compared with weekends: emotional exhaustion levels of nurses who experienced high relaxation during their respite did not differ whether the respite was at the midweek or weekend. Vigour levels of nurses who experienced control during their respite did not differ whether their respite was midweek or at the weekend. Insights gained on leisure experiences carry important practical implications for nurses and nursing managers. Staff nurses and their managers should be educated in how to recover from work during leisure time, including preferring weekend on midweek respites and engagement in relaxation and control experiences as much as possible. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Stressors, Appraisal of Stressors, Experienced Stress and Cardiac Response: A Real-Time, Real-Life Investigation of Work Stress in Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Derek; Bell, Cheryl; Jones, Martyn; Farquharson, Barbara; Allan, Julia; Schofield, Patricia; Ricketts, Ian; Johnston, Marie

    2016-04-01

    Stress in health care professionals may reflect both the work and appraisal of work and impacts on the individuals, their patients, colleagues and managers. The purpose of the present study is to examine physiological and psychological effects of stressors (tasks) and theory-based perceptions of work stressors within and between nurses in real time. During two work shifts, 100 nurses rated experienced stress, affect, fatigue, theory-based measures of work stress and nursing tasks on electronic diaries every 90 min, whereas heart rate and activity were measured continuously. Heart rate was associated with both demand and effort. Experienced stress was related to demand, control, effort and reward. Effort and reward interacted as predicted (but only within people). Results were unchanged when allowance was made for work tasks. Real-time appraisals were more important than actual tasks in predicting both psychological and physiological correlates of stress. At times when effort was high, perceived reward reduced stress.

  5. Infrared thermometry and the crop water stress index. I. History, theory, and baselines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, B.R.; Nielsen, D.C.; Shock, C.C.

    1992-01-01

    Development of portable infrared thermometers and the definition of the Crop Water Stress Index (CWSI) have led to widespread interest in infrared thermometry to monitor water stress and schedule irrigations. But the CWSI concept is still new and poorly understood by many. The purpose of this paper is to review the definition of CWSI, and the determination and interpretation of the non-water-stressed baselines used to compute CWSI. The non-water-stressed baseline equation normalizes the canopy minus air temperature differential for variations in vapor pressure deficit. Non-water-stressed baselines can be determined empirically from measurements of canopy and air temperatures and vapor pressure deficit, made diurnally on a single day, or at a single time of day over many days, on well-watered plants. The value of the maximum canopy minus air temperature differential under maximum water stress should also be determined empirically. Causes for CWSI values falling outside of the defined 0 to 10 unit range are reviewed. Non-water-stressed baselines may shift with plant growth stage. Effective use of CWSI is dependent on understanding the definition of CWSI, and the proper determination and use of non-water-stressed baselines. (author)

  6. [Impact of work place stresses on work ability index in patients with depressive disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarević, Sanja Brekalo; Pranjić, Nurka; Selmanović, Senada; Grbović, Mensur

    2011-01-01

    Depression seriously affects one's ability to perform work tasks and function at work. We studied the impact of both the individual and work factors on work ability index in patients suffering from depression. The prospective study, which was conducted by using questionnaires, included 210 patients with depression, who had been on sick leave from 60 to 360 days. The individual factors were evaluated by the standardized abridged form of Occupational Stress Questionnaire, while the work place factors in relation to work ability were evaluated by the work ability index. Poor work ability was observed in 151 (71%) of subjects suffering from depression. All workplace stresses, lack of support by colleagues and supervisors, ergonomically not adjusted work and huge work load are statistically associated with poor work ability index (P=0.001). More than 95% of variables of the evaluated work ability index are the result of varying in the group of stresses at work place (R2=0.95). Perception of bad health condition (Rsq=0.412, P=0.001), low level of life satisfaction (Rsq=0.309, P=0.001), low level of motivation and work knowledge (Rsq=0.309, P=0.001) are predictors for poor work ability. The work ability cannot be related with age and sex. The key activities for maintaining the work ability at the times when epidemic of depression emerges, as it is nowadays, are timely carrying out the psycho-treatments, mental and professional rehabilitation, occupational therapy and adapted work place.

  7. Quantitative work demands, emotional demands, and cognitive stress symptoms in surgery nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfering, Achim; Grebner, Simone; Leitner, Monika; Hirschmüller, Anja; Kubosch, Eva Johanna; Baur, Heiner

    2017-06-01

    In surgery, cognitive stress symptoms, including problems in concentrating, deciding, memorising, and reflecting are risks to patient safety. Recent evidence points to social stressors as antecedents of cognitive stress symptoms in surgery personnel. The current study tests whether cognitive stress symptoms are positively associated with emotional abuse, emotional- and task-related demands and resources in surgery work. Forty-eight surgery nurses from two hospitals filled out the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire in its German version. Task-related and emotional demands were positively related to cognitive stress symptoms. In a stepwise, multiple, linear regression of cognitive stress symptoms on task-related and emotional demands, emotional abuse and emotional demands were unique predictors (p emotional abuse, emotional demands, and, therefore, communication and cooperation team climate in surgery personnel.

  8. Responding to Emotional Stress in Pediatric Hospitals: Results From a National Survey of Chief Nursing Officers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huetsch, Michael; Green, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify leadership awareness of emotional stress and employee support efforts in pediatric hospitals. The current pediatric environment has seen increases in treatment intensity, care duration, and acuity of patients resulting in increased likelihood of being exposed to emotional events. Mail survey was sent to chief nursing officers at 87 pediatric hospitals. A total of 49 responses (56%) were received. Hospitals with less than 250 beds were significantly more likely to rate emotional stress as a large to very large problem, whereas ANCC Magnet® hospitals felt better about support efforts after patient deaths. Most commonly used support offerings focused on staff recovery after a traumatic event as opposed to training for prevention of emotional stress. Emotional stress is a well-recognized issue in pediatric hospitals with comparatively large resource commitment. Further focus on caregiver prevention training and unit leadership recognition of stress may be needed.

  9. Association between oxidative stress index and serum lipid levels in healthy young adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turkdogan, K.E.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the relationship between lipid levels and oxidative stress index in healthy young adults. Methods: The study was camed out at the Department of Emergency Service, Faculty of Medicine, Cumhuriyet University, Sivas, Turkey, between January 2011 and July 2012. A total of 100 healthy adult volunteers were enrolled in the study. Venous blood samples (10 ml) were collected from all individuals, and serum lipid parameters, total antioxidant capacity and total oxidative levels were studied. SPSS 15 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Overall, there were 84 (84%) males and 16 (16%) females. The mean age of the male population was 30+-3 years, while that of the females was 31+-3 years. Overall age ranged from 25 to 35 years. A statistically significant correlation was found between the oxidative stress index and serum cholesterol (p<0.001; r=0.596), triglyceride (p<0.001; r=0.476) and low-density lipoprotein levels (p<0.001; r=0.318). However, no significant correlation was found between oxidative stress index and serum high-density lipoprotein levels (p=0.564; r=0.058). Conclusion: The results showed that even at an early age, there is a direct linear correlation between oxidative stress and serum lipid levels. (author)

  10. Relationship between job stress, temperament and depressive symptoms in female nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko Kikuchi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: A casual relationship between temperament, job stress and depressive symptoms has not been established yet. The purpose of this study was to assess the relationships between job stress, temperament and depressive symptoms in female nurses at a Japanese general hospital. Material and Methods: A self-report survey was conducted among 706 nurses. We measured job stress, temperament, and depressive symptoms using the Brief-Job Stress Questionnaire, the TEMPS-A and a screening scale of items from the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare of Japan. In order to examine the causal relationship between the measures the stepwise multiple regression and path analyses were used. Results: Depressive symptoms were modestly correlated with job stress (γ = -0.23-0.30. Except for hyperthymic temperament measures, the correlations between depressive symptoms and temperament types were significant and moderate (γ = 0.36-0.50. Overtime, job control as well as depressive and cyclothymic types of temperament were significantly correlated with depressive symptoms (β = 0.15, p < 0.05; β = 0.19, p < 0.01; β = 0.26, p < 0.001; β = 0.32, p < 0.001, respectively. Path-analysis revealed that depressive and cyclothymic types of temperament influenced depressive symptoms both directly (β = 0.67, p < 0.001 and indirectly via job stress (β = 0.35, p < 0.001 from temperament to job stress; β = 0.20, p < 0.05 from job stress to depressive symptoms. Irritable and anxious types of temperament and quantitative job overload did not contri­bute to the path-analytic model. Conclusions: Health care professionals should consider temperament, especially depressive and cyclothymic types, in order to help employees cope better with job stress factors. We need further research about the effective intervention to help employees better cope with their job stress.

  11. Impact of Heartfulness Meditation on Reducing Stress in Nursing Students: A Prospective Observational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raja Amarnath G

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study and assess the effectiveness of Heartfulness Meditation in reducing stress levels of nursing students in a learning environment. Methodology: A cross-sectional research designed using a standard Perceived Stress Questionnaire pertaining to the subjective perception of things in the learning and clinical environment leading to emotional stress such as workload, worries, tension, and harassment as well as joyful conditions. Overall 120 students from I, II and IV years of a private nursing college in Chennai, in the state of Tamil Nadu, India participate in 3 hours (1 hour each day on 3 consecutive days Heartfulness meditation workshop. Results: The predominant themes represented are perceptions of the learning environment and clinical practice, coping, personal issues, balancing college work, and personal life. Mean Baseline stress scores of workload is higher for first and second-year students compared with final year students; Worries and Harassment score is higher in second-year students; Joy score is higher for first-year students; Tension score is higher in final year students. After Heartfulness meditation workshop, the mean decrease in workload, worries, tension and harassment score and mean increase in Joy score is observed in the participants. Conclusion: The investigation on the effectiveness of Heartfulness Meditation as a mental and emotional support tool to deal with and to mitigate stress reveals positive results. Based on these results, it is evident that Heartfulness meditation can be employed as a coping mechanism to deal with stress in a clinical and learning environment. Given the adverse effects of stress on the physiological and psychological well-being of caregivers; Heartfulness Meditation may be considered for inclusion in the standard curriculum of nursing colleges.

  12. The NASA Task Load Index as a measure of overall workload among neonatal, paediatric and adult intensive care nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubbs-Cooley, Heather L; Mara, Constance A; Carle, Adam C; Gurses, Ayse P

    2018-02-12

    The NASA Task Load Index (NASA-TLX) is a subjective workload assessment scale developed for use in aviation and increasingly applied to healthcare. The scale purports to measure overall workload as a single variable calculated by summing responses to six items. Since no data address the validity of this scoring approach in health care, we evaluated the single factor structure of the NASA-TLX as a measure of overall workload among intenisive care nurses. Confirmatory factor analysis of data from two studies of nurse workload in neonatal, paediatric, and adult intensive care units. Study 1 data were obtained from 136 nurses in one neonatal intensive care unit. Study 2 data were collected from 300 nurses in 17 adult, paediatric and neonatal units. Nurses rated their workload using the NASA-TLX's paper version. A single factor model testing whether all six items measured a single overall workload variable fit least well (RMSEA = 0.14; CFI = 0.91; TLI = 0.85). A second model that specified two items as outcomes of overall workload had acceptable fit (RMSEA = 0.08; CFI = 0.97; TLI = 0.95) while a third model of four items fit best (RMSEA = 0.06; CFI > 0.99; TLI = 0.99). A summed score from four of six NASA-TLX items appears to most reliably measure a single overall workload variable among intensive care nurses. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Stress and Burnout in Demanding Nursing Home Care : A literature review of the causes, prevention and coping strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Di

    2017-01-01

    Nursing job is generally related to intense pressure and high-level burnout because of its high demanding, challenging and stressful professional characteristic. Nursing staff in elderly home and long-term care facilities particularly experience higher level of physical job demands, more emotional exhaustion and lower level of job satisfaction than those in other units, thus bringing out higher burnout ratio among the nursing staffs. The main aim of this study was to reveal the causing factor...

  14. [Relationship between occupational stress, recovery experience, and physiological health of nurses in a municipal grade A tertiary hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, L; Zhang, C L; Yang, T; Lan, Y J

    2017-06-20

    Objective: To examine the relationship between recovery experience, occupational stress, and physiological health of nurses in a municipal grade A tertiary hospital. Methods: A total of 296 in-service nurses from 7 municipal grade A tertiary hospitals were selected from October 2015 to February 2016. Individual characteristics of the subjects were collected using a self-made questionnaire. The recovery experience, occupational stress, and physiological health of the subjects were assessed based on the physiological health dimensions in the Chinese version of Recovery Experience Questionnaire (REQ-C) , Job Content Questionnaire (JCQ) , and Quality of Work Life (QWL7-32) . Results: The mean recovery experience score of nurses from the municipal grade A tertiary hospital was 45.04±7.72, and 51.35% of the nurses had satisfactory recovery experience. Occupational stress was identified in 81.76% of the nurses. Based on the four categories of occupational stress, 65 nurses were identified with high-strain jobs (21.95%) , 56 with relaxed (low-strain) jobs (18.92%) , 49 with passive jobs (16.55%) , and 126 with active jobs (42.57%) . In addition, the mean physiological health score of the nurses was 21.20±4.24. Physiological health was negatively correlated with occupational stress ( r =-0.173, P stress ( r =-0.116, P stress, where subjects with high-demand active jobs had the poorest recovery experience ( F =2.610, P stress of nurses, where increased job demand can lead to stronger stress response, reduced recovery experience, and poorer physiological health.

  15. The hierarchy of the activities of daily living in the Katz index in residents of skilled nursing facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrard, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Nursing facility patients are a population that has not been well studied with regard to functional status and independence previously. As such, the manner in which activities of daily living (ADL) relate to one another is not well understood in this population. An understanding of ADL difficulty ordering has helped to devise systems of functional independence grading in other populations, which have value in understanding patients' global levels of independence and providing expectations regarding changes in function. This study seeks to examine the hierarchy of ADL in the nursing facility population. Data were analyzed from the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey, a cross-sectional data set of 13 507 skilled nursing facility subjects with functional independence items. The ADL difficulty hierarchy was determined using Rasch analysis. Item fit values for the Rasch model using Mean-Square infit statistics were also determined. The robustness of the hierarchy was tested for each ADL. Two grading systems were devised from the results of the item difficulty ordering. One was based on the most difficult item that he or she could perform, and the other assigned a grade based on the least difficult item that a subject could not perform. A total of 13 113 patients were included in this analysis, the majority of whom were female and white. They had an average age of 81 years. An ordered hierarchy of ADL was found with eating being the easiest and bathing the most difficult. All items in the Katz index fit the Rasch model adequately well. The majority of patients able to perform any particular ADL were also able to perform all easier ADL. Cohen's κ for the 2 grading systems was 0.73. This study is the first to show the expected hierarchy of difficulty of the 6 activities of daily proposed in the Katz index in the nursing facility population. The hierarchy found in this population matches the original hierarchy found in older adults in the community and acute care settings

  16. The five-factor model of personality, work stress and professional quality of life in neonatal intensive care unit nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Peter

    2018-06-01

    The study aim was to determine the direct and indirect relations of the five-factor model of personality traits and work stress with professional quality of life in neonatal nurses. Neonatal intensive care nursing has positive and negative effects on neonatal nurses' psychological well-being. Although individual and situational factors interact to influence professional quality of life, there have been few studies of these relationships in neonatal nurses. A cross-sectional study conducted in 2016. Self-report questionnaires were used to measure professional quality of life (burnout, secondary traumatic stress and compassion satisfaction), five-factor model of personality traits (neuroticism, agreeableness, extraversion, conscientiousness and openness) and work stress (role ambiguity, role conflict and role overload). One hundred and forty (34%) of 405 eligible neonatal nurses provided the data. After controlling for work stress, neuroticism and agreeableness were related to burnout, neuroticism was related to secondary traumatic stress, and extraversion was related to compassion satisfaction. Work stress controlled for personality traits was related to burnout and secondary traumatic stress, but not to compassion satisfaction. Neuroticism moderated the effect of work stress on secondary traumatic stress and agreeableness and openness moderated the effect of work stress on compassion satisfaction. Work stress mediated the effect of neuroticism and extraversion on burnout and the effects of extraversion and conscientiousness on compassion satisfaction. Strategies to reduce work stress may not lessen burnout and secondary traumatic stress or increase compassion satisfaction in neonatal nurses who are prone to high neuroticism, low agreeableness and low extraversion. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Effects of Work-Related Stress on Work Ability Index among Iranian Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharibi, Vahid; Mokarami, Hamidreza; Taban, Abrahim; Yazdani Aval, Mohsen; Samimi, Kazem; Salesi, Mahmood

    2016-03-01

    Work Ability Index (WAI) is a well-known and valid self-report tool that has been widely used in various studies to identify and avoid early retirement and work-related disability. Nevertheless, very few studies have been carried out to evaluate work ability in Iran. We aimed to investigate the WAI and the effect of work-related stress on it among Iranian workers. A cross-sectional, descriptive and analytic study was carried out among 449 workers from five working sectors in three big cities of Iran. Work ability and work-related stress were measured using the Persian version of WAI and the Persian version of Health and Safety Executive Stress Indicator Tool. More than a third of the workers surveyed (34.70%) did not have an appropriate level of work ability (WAI work-related stress and the mean score of WAI. Furthermore, the variables of body mass index, sleep quality, exercise activity, job tenure, and three subscales of work-related stress including demands, supervisor support, and role were significant predictors of WAI. According to the results of this study, the interventional programs must be focused on improving supervisors support, eliminating ambiguity and conflicts in the role of workers in their job and organization, reducing job demands, improving sleep quality, and increasing exercise activity.

  18. Managing job stress in nursing: what kind of resources do we need?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Tooren, Marieke; de Jonge, Jan

    2008-07-01

    This paper is a report of a study to investigate the functionality of different kinds of job resources for managing job stress in nursing. There is increasing recognition that healthcare staff, and especially nurses, are at high risk for burnout and physical complaints. Several researchers have proposed that job resources moderate the relationship between job demands and job-related outcomes, particularly when there is a match between the type of demands, resources, and outcomes. Based on the Demand-Induced Strain Compensation Model, cross-sectional survey data were collected between November 2006 and February 2007 by a paper-and-pencil questionnaire. The final sample consisted of 69 nurses from a Dutch nursing home (response rate 59.4%). Data were analyzed by hierarchical regression analyses. High physical demands had adverse effects on both physical complaints and emotional exhaustion (i.e. burnout), unless employees had high physical resources. A similar pattern was found for high physical demands and emotional resources in predicting emotional exhaustion. The likelihood of finding theoretically-valid moderating effects was related to the degree of match between demands, resources, and outcomes. Job resources do not randomly moderate the relationship between job demands and job-related outcomes. Both physical and emotional resources seem to be important stress buffers for human service employees such as nurses, and their moderating effects underline the importance of specific job resources in healthcare work. Job redesign in nursing homes should therefore primarily focus on matching job resources to job demands in order to diminish poor health and ill-being.

  19. Emotional intelligence and stress management in Nursing professionals in a hospital emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nespereira-Campuzano, Tatiana; Vázquez-Campo, Miriam

    To determine stress levels and to identify if there is a relationship between emotional intelligence and work stress in nurses and healthcare assistants of the Emergency Department. Observational, descriptive and cross-sectional study with a quantitative approach. The population were nurses and healthcare assistants of the Emergency Department of the University Hospital of Ourense. The data were collected between January and May 2016. The tool used was a validated, anonymous, and self-administered questionnaire that included the Trait Meta-Mood Scale and Moreno's Brief Burnout Questionnaire. The study was approved by the Clinical Research Ethics Committee of Galicia. Descriptive and association analyses were performed using the SPSS 15.0 statistics program. A total of 60 professionals participated, of whom 36 were qualified nurses and 24 were auxiliary nurses. The response rate was 68.1%. The results showed a deficiency in emotional care, with a score of 22.87, while emotional clarity and reparation of emotions were situated within normal levels, with values of 26.42 and 26.60, respectively. The burnout levels of the sample were medium-high. The mean score in the depersonalisation dimension was 8.05, whereas emotional fatigue obtained a mean of 6.90, with a value of 7.50 for professional fulfilment. Significant positive correlations were found between the employment situation and emotional clarity (r=.276; P=.033), and between the latter and personal fulfilment (r=.277; P=.032), and organisation (r=.316; P=.014). Nurses and healthcare assistants of the Emergency Department showed medium-high average levels of burnout, with depersonalisation being the symptom that reflects the highest values. Emotional Intelligence is related to work stress and, specifically, the understanding of one's own emotional states influences personal fulfilment. Professionals with more job stability show a better capacity to feel and express their feelings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Espa

  20. Infrared thermometry and the crop water stress index. II. Sampling procedures and interpretation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, B. R. [BP Research, Cleveland, OH (United States); Nielsen, D. C.; Shock, C. C.

    1992-10-15

    Infrared thermometry can be a valuable research and production tool for detecting and quantifying water stress in plants, as shown by a large volume of published research. Users of infrared thermometers (IRT) should be aware of the many equipment, environmental, and plant factors influencing canopy temperature measured by an IRT. The purpose of this paper is to describe factors influencing measured plant temperature, outline sampling procedures that will produce reliable Crop Water Stress Index (CWSI) values, and offer interpretations of CWSI and plant temperatures relative to crop production and other water stress parameters by reviewing previously conducted research. Factors that are considered are IRT condition, configuration, and position; psychrometer location; wind speed; solar radiation; time of day; leaf area and orientation; and appropriate non-water-stressed baseline equation. Standard sampling and CWSI calculation procedures are proposed. Use of CWSI with crops varying in type of response to water stress is described. Previously conducted research on plant temperatures or CWSI is tabulated by crop and water stress parameters measured. The paper provides valuable information to assist interested users of IRTs in making reliable water stress measurements. (author)

  1. Infrared thermometry and the crop water stress index. II. Sampling procedures and interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, B.R.; Nielsen, D.C.; Shock, C.C.

    1992-01-01

    Infrared thermometry can be a valuable research and production tool for detecting and quantifying water stress in plants, as shown by a large volume of published research. Users of infrared thermometers (IRT) should be aware of the many equipment, environmental, and plant factors influencing canopy temperature measured by an IRT. The purpose of this paper is to describe factors influencing measured plant temperature, outline sampling procedures that will produce reliable Crop Water Stress Index (CWSI) values, and offer interpretations of CWSI and plant temperatures relative to crop production and other water stress parameters by reviewing previously conducted research. Factors that are considered are IRT condition, configuration, and position; psychrometer location; wind speed; solar radiation; time of day; leaf area and orientation; and appropriate non-water-stressed baseline equation. Standard sampling and CWSI calculation procedures are proposed. Use of CWSI with crops varying in type of response to water stress is described. Previously conducted research on plant temperatures or CWSI is tabulated by crop and water stress parameters measured. The paper provides valuable information to assist interested users of IRTs in making reliable water stress measurements. (author)

  2. Effects of work-related stress on work ability index among refinery workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi, Ehsanollah; Dehghan, Habibollah; Safari, Shahram; Mahaki, Behzad; Hassanzadeh, Akbar

    2014-01-01

    Work-related stress is one of the basic problems in industrial also top 10 work-related health problems and it is increasingly implicated in the development a number of problems such as cardiovascular disease, musculoskeletal diseases, early retirement to employees. On the other hand, early retirement to employees from the workplace has increased on the problems of today's industries. Hereof, improving work ability is one of the most effective ways to enhance the ability and preventing disability and early retirement. The aim of This study is determine the relationship between job stress score and work ability index (WAI) at the refinery workers. This is a cross-sectional study in which 171 workers from a refinery in isfahan in 2012 who were working in different occupational groups participated. Based on appropriate assignment sampling, 33 office workers, 69 operational workers, and 69 maintenance workers, respectively, were invited to participate in this study. Two questionnaires including work related-stress and WAI were filled in. Finally, the information was analyzed using the SPSS-20 and statistic tests namely, analysis of covariance Kruskal-Wallis test. Pearson correlation coefficient, ANOVA and t-test. Data analysis revealed that 86% and 14% of participants had moderate and severe stress respectively. Average score of stress and standard deviation was 158.7 ± 17.3 that was in extreme stress range. Average score and standard deviation of WAI questionnaire were 37.18 and 3.86 respectively. That placed in a good range. Pearson correlation coefficient showed that WAI score had significant reversed relationship with a score of stress. According to the results, mean stress score among refinery worker was high and one fator that affect work abiity was high stress, hence training on communication skills and safe working environment in order to decreses stress, enhance the work ability of workers.

  3. Stress no trabalho do enfermeiro Estrés en el trabajo del enfermero Stress the nurse's work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Roberto Alves da Costa

    2003-09-01

    levels of nurses working with mentally ill psychiatric hospital patients. This quantitative study was conducted in seven psychiatric hospitals in the city of Fortaleza, Ceará, Brazil, and was carried out with the use of the following instruments: Socio-demographic descriptive information of the sample and an inventory to identify the stress symptoms of the nurses. The sample size was 48, of which 42 (93% were female. The results of the sample showed that 62% felt no stress, 31% were at the endurance level and 7% at the exhaustion level. No statistically significant relationship was found between the hours of work performed and the symptoms of stress. Therefore, the present study showed no occurrence of stress in these nurses.

  4. [Effect of workplace bullying on posttraumatic stress disorder in nursing staff].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Y Q; Ge, Y X; Ke, Z W; Li, Y Y; Jin, Q X; Lu, Y F

    2018-01-20

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between workplace bullying and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in nursing staff, and to analyze the role of psychological capital between workplace bullying and PTSD. Methods: From December 2014 to June 2015, convenience sampling was used to collect 496 nurses from 5 grade A tertiary hospitals in a province of China. Their workplace bullying, psychological capital, and PTSD status were assessed using the Negative Acts Questionnaire, Psychological Capital Questionnaire, and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Self-Rating Scale, respectively. The correlation between variables was analyzed using a structural equation model. Results: Among these nurses, the scores of negative acts, psychological capital, and PTSD were 37.15±12.83, 78.81±16.54, and 34.56±12.52, respectively. The score on each dimension of negative acts was positively correlated with that on each dimension of PTSD ( P bullying is a predictive factor for PTSD, and psychological capital plays a mediating role between workplace bullying and PTSD. The manager should reduce workplace bullying to improve the psychological capital in nursing staff and to prevent and reduce PTSD.

  5. Coping strategies used by nurses before, during and after work to deal with work stress: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios Manomenidis

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The nursing profession is characterized by high levels of work stress and serious associated health problems. The aim of the present study was to explore the strategies nurses employ before, during and after work to cope with every day work stress. The literature review indicated that nurses use mechanisms which at the beginning of shift work as preparation mechanisms, during work as stress controllers and after the end of it as an opportunity for nursing staff’s emotional recovery. In terms of effectiveness, the use of stress coping mechanisms not only reduces job burnout but also increases nurses’ job satisfaction and wellbeing. However, evidence show that their duration is short and their effectiveness may be limited. Changes mainly in organizational level are required to create a more positive working environment and advocate for nurses’ good level of health and wellbeing.

  6. Work Life Stress and Career Resilience of Licensed Nursing Facility Administrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Dennis R; Rogers, Rob; LeCrone, Harold H; Kelley, Katherine; Scott, Joel H

    2018-04-01

    Career resilience provided a frame for understanding how Licensed Nursing Facility Administrators (LNFAs) sustain role performance and even thrive in stressful skilled nursing facility work environments. Quantitative and qualitative analyses of in-depth interviews with18 LNFAs, averaging 24 years of experience were conducted by a five-member research team. Analysis was informed by evidence-based frameworks for career resilience in the health professions as well as the National Association of Long-Term Care Administrator Boards' (NAB) five domains of competent administrative practice. Findings included six sources of work stressors and six sources of professional satisfaction. Also, participants identified seven strategic principles and 10 administrative practices for addressing major sources of stress. Recommendations are provided for research and evidence-based application of the career resilience perspective to LNFA practice aimed at reducing role abandonment and energizing the delivery of the quality of care that each resident deserves.

  7. Effects of Classical Background Music on Stress, Anxiety, and Knowledge of Filipino Baccalaureate Nursing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelista, Kevin; Macabasag, Romeo Luis A; Capili, Brylle; Castro, Timothy; Danque, Marilee; Evangelista, Hanzel; Rivero, Jenica Ana; Gonong, Michell Katrina; Diño, Michael Joseph; Cajayon, Sharon

    2017-10-28

    Previous work on the use of background music suggests conflicting results in various psychological, behavioral, and educational measures. This quasi-experiment examined the effect of integrating classical background music during a lecture on stress, anxiety, and knowledge. A total of 42 nursing students participated this study. We utilized independent sample t-test and multivariate analysis of variance to examine the effect of classical background music. Our findings suggest that the presence or absence of classical background music do not affect stress, anxiety, and knowledge scores (Λ = 0.999 F(3, 78) = 0.029, p = 0.993). We provided literature to explain the non-significant result. Although classical music failed to establish a significant influence on the dependent variables, classical background music during lecture hours can be considered a non-threatening stimulus. We recommend follow up studies regarding the role of classical background music in regulating attention control of nursing students during lecture hours.

  8. Examining critical care nurses' critical incident stress after in hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laws, T

    2001-05-01

    The object of this study was to determine if critical care nurses' emotional responses to having performed cardiopulmonary resuscitation were indicative of critical incident stress. A descriptive approach was employed using a survey questionnaire of 31 critical care nurses, with supportive interview data from 18 of those participants. Analysis of the data generated from the questionnaire indicated that the respondents experienced thought intrusion and avoidance behaviour. A majority of those interviewed disclosed that they had experienced a wide range of emotional stressors and physical manifestations in response to having performed the procedure. The findings from both questionnaire and interview data were congruent with signs of critical incident stress, as described in the literature. This has been found to be detrimental to employees' mental health status and, for this reason, employers have a duty of care to minimise the risk of its occurrence and to manage problems as they arise.

  9. Job related stress among nurses working in Jimma Zone public hospitals, South West Ethiopia: a cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagget, Tadesse; Molla, Ashagre; Belachew, Tefera

    2016-01-01

    Occupational stress exists in every profession, nevertheless, the nursing profession appears to experience more stress at work compared to other health care workers. Unmanaged stress leads to high levels of employee dissatisfaction, illness, absenteeism, high turnover, and decreased productivity that compromise provision of quality service to clients. However, there is a scarcity of information about nurses' job stress in Jimma zone public hospital nurses. The aim of the present study was to assess job related stress and its predictors among nurses working in Jimma Zone public hospitals, South-West Ethiopia in 2014. An institution based cross sectional study was conducted from March 10 to April 10, 2014 through a census of nurses who are working in Jimma Zone public hospitals using a structured self-administered questionnaire. SPSS Statistics Version 20 used. For the outcome variable: overall job related stress, the participant's responses on each item score summed: a stress score ranging from a minimum of 26 and maximum score of 116. The higher the sum the more the stressed the nurse. The level of stress calculated through tertial the lower to low stress, the middle to moderate & the higher to high stress. Moreover, bivariate and multivariable linear regressions done to see the association between the predictor (sex, age, mutual understanding at work, Job satisfaction and working unit/department) and the outcome variable (Job related stress). A total of 341 nurses working in Jimma Zone public hospitals were given the questionnaire, and the response rate was 92.3 % (315). This study indicated an average overall job related stress level of 58.46 ± 12.62. The highest level of job related stress was on the sub scale of dealing with death & dying mean score of 62.94 % followed by uncertainty regarding patient treatment 57.72 % and workload 57.6 %. While job related stress from sexual harassment had the lowest mean score of 46.19 %. Overall job related stress varies

  10. Geographic Disparities in Access to Nursing Home Services: Assessing Fiscal Stress and Quality of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young Joo; Martin, Erika G

    2017-11-12

    We test whether nursing homes serving predominately low-income and racial minority residents (compositional explanation) or located in neighborhoods with higher concentrations of low-income and racial minority residents (contextual explanation) have worse financial outcomes and care quality. Healthcare Cost Report Information System, Nursing Home Compare, Online Survey Certification and Reporting Certification, and American Community Survey. A cross-sectional study design of nursing homes within U.S. metropolitan areas. Data were obtained from Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services and U.S. Census Bureau. Medicaid-dependent nursing homes have a 3.5 percentage point lower operating ratio. Those serving primarily racial minorities have a 2.64-point lower quality rating. A 1 percent increase in the neighborhood population living in poverty is associated with a 1.20-point lower quality rating, on a scale from 10 to 50, and a 1 percent increase in the portion of neighborhood black residents is associated with a 0.8 percentage point lower operating ratio and a 0.37 lower quality rating. Medicaid dependency (compositional effect) and concentration of racial minority residents in neighborhoods (contextual effect) are associated with higher fiscal stress and lower quality of care, indicating that nursing homes' geographic location may exacerbate long-term care inequalities. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  11. Exposure of mental health nurses to violence associated with job stress, life satisfaction, staff resilience, and post-traumatic growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itzhaki, Michal; Peles-Bortz, Anat; Kostistky, Hava; Barnoy, Dor; Filshtinsky, Vivian; Bluvstein, Irit

    2015-10-01

    Workplace violence towards health workers in hospitals and in mental health units in particular is increasing. The aim of the present study was to explore the effects of exposure to violence, job stress, staff resilience, and post-traumatic growth (PTG) on the life satisfaction of mental health nurses. A descriptive, cross-sectional design was used. The sample consisted of mental health nurses (n = 118) working in a large mental health centre in Israel. Verbal violence by patients was reported by 88.1% of the nurses, and 58.4% experienced physical violence in the past year. Physical and verbal violence towards nurses was correlated with job stress, and life satisfaction was correlated with PTG and staff resilience. Linear regression analyses indicated that life satisfaction was mainly affected by PTG, staff resilience, and job stress, and less by exposure to verbal and physical violence. The present study is the first to show that, although mental health nurses are frequently exposed to violence, their life satisfaction is affected more by staff resilience, PTG, and job stress than by workplace violence. Therefore, it is recommended that intervention programmes that contribute to PTG and staff resilience, as well as those that reduce job stress among mental health nurses, be explored and implemented. © 2015 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  12. Body mass index and risk for mental stress induced ischemia in coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soufer, Robert; Fernandez, Antonio B; Meadows, Judith; Collins, Dorothea; Burg, Matthew M

    2016-05-19

    Acute emotionally reactive mental stress (MS) can provoke prognostically relevant deficits in cardiac function and myocardial perfusion, and chronic inflammation increases risk for this ischemic phenomenon. We have described parasympathetic withdrawal and generation of inflammatory factors in MS. Adiposity is also associated with elevated markers of chronic inflammation. High body mass index (BMI) is frequently used as a surrogate for assessment of excess adiposity, and associated with traditional CAD risk factors, and CAD mortality. BMI is also associated with autonomic dysregulation, adipose tissue derived proinflammatory cytokines, which are also attendant to emotion provoked myocardial ischemia. Thus, we sought to determine if body mass index (BMI) contributes to risk of developing myocardial ischemia provoked by mental stress. We performed a prospective interventional study in a cohort of 161 patients with stable CAD. They completed an assessment of myocardial blood flow with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) simultaneously during 2 conditions: laboratory mental stress and at rest. Multivariate logistic regression determined the independent contribution of BMI to the occurrence of mental-stress induced ischemia. Mean age was 65.6±9.0 years; 87.0% had a history of hypertension, and 28.6% had diabetes. Mean BMI was 30.4±4.7. Prevalence of mental stress ischemia was 39.8%. BMI was an independent predictor of mental stress ischemia, OR=1.10, 95% CI [1.01-1.18] for one-point increase in BMI and OR=1.53, 95% CI [1.06-2.21] for a 4.7 point increase in BMI (one standard deviation beyond the cohort BMI mean), p=0.025 for all. These data suggest that BMI may serve as an independent risk marker for mental stress ischemia. The factors attendant with greater BMI, which include autonomic dysregulation and inflammation, may represent pathways by which high BMI contribute to this risk and serve as a conceptual construct to replicate these findings in larger

  13. The Burnout on Nurses in ICU, Emergency and Surgery at Teaching Hospital Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences and Relationship with Perceived Stress

    OpenAIRE

    MK Fakhri; A Aslipoor

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Nursing Profession is stressful and the stress of the job, it will eventually cause burnout but people's different perception of stressful event can adjust this relation. The purpose of study is to assessment burnout on nurses in ICU, emergency and surgical and relationship with perceived stress. Methods: This is a descriptive analytically cross-sectional study. The population of study were all male and female nurses who are working in 4 teaching hospitals which ...

  14. Professional burnout, stress and job satisfaction of nursing staff at a university hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Silvia Portero de la Cruz; Manuel Vaquero Abellán

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: to describe the social and work characteristics of the nursing staff at a tertiary hospital in the Public Health Service of Andaluc?a, to assess the degree of professional professional burnout and job satisfaction of those professionals and to study the possible relation between the professional burnout variables and the stress and job satisfaction levels on the one hand and social and employment variables on the other. METHOD: descriptive and cross-sectional study in a sample of ...

  15. Education system and exposure to stress and the sense of satisfaction of nursing students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Lewandowska

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The phenomenon of occupational stress can very often be found during the education process among nursing students. A very large number of hours of practical training, contact with the real treatment environment, constitute the same threats as in the case of people already in the profession. Stress, which can have a chronic dimension, poses a risk of dissatisfaction with the decision made and medical mistakes made by students. Satisfaction with the decision made about the profession is a multidimensional factor, including psychosocial values related to work. Objective: The aim of the study is to assess the level of stress among nursing students during the practical education process and to analyze the level of satisfaction with the professional choice made. Material and method: The study covered 200 people who are nursing students graduating from the three-year education period. The selection of respondents was random. The study group consisted of 100% women aged 23-45, living in urban areas (48% and rural (52%. Research method: The research method used in the work was a diagnostic survey. The research tool used is a self-help questionnaire. Results: The nursing education by the respondents was caused by the need to help others (46%, was a matter of chance (25%, a continuation of family traditions (3%, and the possibility of constant contact with people (8%. Over half of the respondents (56% are satisfied with the decision made. The respondents feel needed during work with the patient (65%, mentally exhausted (43%, physically exhausted (34%, tired (20%, valued (20%, satisfied with life (18%, burned out (10% %, frustrated (8%. Only 7% of respondents can talk about their feelings, the remaining respondents are afraid of the teacher's poor opinion (87% and the therapeutic team (90%. 40% of respondents would definitely go to work abroad. Conclusions: The most common causes of occupational stress are the responsibility for human life and

  16. Nursing staff competence, work strain, stress and satisfaction in elderly care: a comparison of home-based care and nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasson, Henna; Arnetz, Judith E

    2008-02-01

    The aims of this study were to: (1) compare older people care nursing staff's perceptions of their competence, work strain and work satisfaction in nursing homes and home-based care; and (2) to examine determinants of work satisfaction in both care settings. The shift in older people care from hospitals to community-based facilities and home care has had implications for nursing practice. Lack of competence development, high levels of work strain and low levels of work satisfaction among nursing staff in both care settings have been associated with high turnover. Few studies have compared staff perceptions of their competence and work in nursing homes as opposed to home-based care. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey. Nursing staff perceptions of their competence, work strain, stress and satisfaction were measured by questionnaire in 2003 in two older people care organizations in Sweden. Comparisons of all outcome variables were made between care settings both within and between the two organizations. Multiple regression analysis was used to determine predictors of work satisfaction in home care and nursing homes respectively. In general, staff in home-based care reported significantly less sufficient knowledge compared with staff in nursing homes. However, home care staff experienced significantly less physical and emotional strain compared with staff in nursing homes. Ratings of work-related exhaustion, mental energy and overall work satisfaction did not differ significantly between care settings. In both care settings, work-related exhaustion was the strongest (inverse) predictor of work satisfaction. Future interventions should focus on counteracting work-related exhaustion and improving competence development to improve work satisfaction among older people care nursing staff in both care settings. Relevance to clinical practice. Work-related exhaustion and lack of competence development may have significant negative implications for work satisfaction among

  17. Investigation of marital satisfaction and its relationship with job stress and general health of nurses in Qazvin, Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Azimian, Jalil; Piran, Pegah; Jahanihashemi, Hassan; Dehghankar, Leila

    2017-01-01

    Background Pressures in nursing can affect family life and marital problems, disrupt common social problems, increase work-family conflicts and endanger people?s general health. Aim To determine marital satisfaction and its relationship with job stress and general health of nurses. Methods This descriptive and cross-sectional study was done in 2015 in medical educational centers of Qazvin by using an ENRICH marital satisfaction scale and General Health and Job Stress questionnaires completed ...

  18. Occupational stress among Thai emergency department nurses : Development and validation of an instrument for measuring stressors in emergency departments

    OpenAIRE

    Yuwanich, Nuttapol

    2017-01-01

    Working at an emergency department has some characteristics, which may generate stress. In this thesis, the stressors for emergency nurses were evaluated and an instrument was developed for measuring their impact. In order to gain a deeper understanding regarding the occupational stress among emergency nurses, a descriptive qualitative design with semi-structured interviews were used in two studies (I, II), one at a private and the other at a public hospital in Thailand. Three main categories...

  19. Study of adaptation and validation of the Practice environment scale of the nursing work index for the portuguese reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Regina Sardinheiro do Céu Furtado Ferreira

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Testing the psychometric properties of the Portuguese version of the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index. Method: A descriptive, analytical and cross-sectional study, for the cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the psychometric properties of the scale. The study participants were 236 nurses from two hospitals in the regions of Lisbon and Vale do Tejo. Results: The 0.92 Cronbach’s alpha was obtained for overall reliability and support of a five-dimension structure. Conclusion: The excellent quality of adjustment of analysis confirms the validity of the adapted version to hospital care settings, although there was no total coincidence of items in the five dimensions

  20. Professional burnout, stress and job satisfaction of nursing staff at a university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portero de la Cruz, Silvia; Vaquero Abellán, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    to describe the social and work characteristics of the nursing staff at a tertiary hospital in the Public Health Service of Andalucía, to assess the degree of professional professional burnout and job satisfaction of those professionals and to study the possible relation between the professional burnout variables and the stress and job satisfaction levels on the one hand and social and employment variables on the other. descriptive and cross-sectional study in a sample of 258 baccalaureate and auxiliary nurses. As research instruments, an original and specific questionnaire was used to collect social and employment variables, the Maslach Burnout Inventory, the Nursing Stress Scale and the Font-Roja questionnaire. Descriptive, inferential statistics and multivariate analysis were applied. average scores were found for professional stress and satisfaction, corresponding to 44,23 and 65,46 points, respectively. As regards professional burnout, an average score was found on the emotional exhaustion subscale; a high score for depersonalization and a low score for professional accomplishment. Studies are needed to identify the scores on these subscales in health organizations and to produce knowledge on their interrelations.

  1. Professional burnout, stress and job satisfaction of nursing staff at a university hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Portero de la Cruz

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: to describe the social and work characteristics of the nursing staff at a tertiary hospital in the Public Health Service of Andalucía, to assess the degree of professional professional burnout and job satisfaction of those professionals and to study the possible relation between the professional burnout variables and the stress and job satisfaction levels on the one hand and social and employment variables on the other.METHOD: descriptive and cross-sectional study in a sample of 258 baccalaureate and auxiliary nurses. As research instruments, an original and specific questionnaire was used to collect social and employment variables, the Maslach Burnout Inventory, the Nursing Stress Scale and the Font-Roja questionnaire. Descriptive, inferential statistics and multivariate analysis were applied.RESULTS: average scores were found for professional stress and satisfaction, corresponding to 44,23 and 65,46 points, respectively. As regards professional burnout, an average score was found on the emotional exhaustion subscale; a high score for depersonalization and a low score for professional accomplishment. Studies are needed to identify the scores on these subscales in health organizations and to produce knowledge on their interrelations.

  2. Midwifery and nursing students' communication skills and life orientation: correlation with stress coping approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Gülsün; Kaya, Hatice

    2013-06-01

    Methods learnt by nursing and midwifery students' such as communication skills, optimisim and coping with stress would be used in their profeesional life. It is very important to promote their positive thinking and communication skills to raise coping with stress. This cross sectional study was performed to examine the nursing and midwifery students' communication skills and optimistic life orientation and its correlation with coping strategies with stress. The study population included 2572 students who were studying in departments of nursing and midwifery in Istanbul. The sample was included 1419 students. Three questionnaires including Communication Skills Test, Life Orientation Test and Ways of Coping Inventory were used for data collection. The data were evaluated by calculating frequency, percentage, arithmetic mean, standard deviation and Pearson correlation coefficient. Students' total mean score from the Communication Skills Scale was 165.27 ± 15.39 and for the Life Orientation Test was 18.51 ± 4.54. There was a positive correlation between their Life Orientation scores and the scores for self confidence (r = 0.34, P students in optimistic life orientation and communication skills increased self confidence approach, optimistic, and social support seeking scores increased, whereas helpless, and submissive scores decreased.

  3. Nurse practitioners' role perception, stress, satisfaction, and intent to stay at a Midwestern academic medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brom, Heather M; Melnyk, Bernadette M; Szalacha, Laura A; Graham, Margaret

    2016-05-01

    There is a growing demand for nurse practitioners (NPs) within academic medical centers (AMCs) because of physician shortages and increased need for access to care. In order to retain these NPs, it is important to assess their role perception and satisfaction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate these concepts and their relationships to stress and intent to stay. A 90-item descriptive survey, including a new role perception scale and the Misener Nurse Practitioner Job Satisfaction Scale, was administered to all NPs at a Midwestern AMC. The response rate was 62.4% (n = 181). Overall, the NPs had moderate role perception (M = 4.30, SD = 1.23) and were somewhat satisfied (M = 4.23, SD = 0.74). Over a third (39.4%) reported they were unsure about staying or did not intend to stay in their position. Intent to stay and stress were moderately correlated with overall satisfaction and weakly correlated with role perception. There were significant differences in the intrapractice and professional aspects of job satisfaction based on their supervisor. With increased NP needs, it is crucial for AMCs and NP supervisors to assess role perception, satisfaction, and stress among NPs in order to ensure a stable, satisfied, and productive workforce. ©2015 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  4. Stress, Social Support, and Burnout Among Long-Term Care Nursing Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodhead, Erin L; Northrop, Lynn; Edelstein, Barry

    2016-01-01

    Long-term care nursing staff are subject to considerable occupational stress and report high levels of burnout, yet little is known about how stress and social support are associated with burnout in this population. The present study utilized the job demands-resources model of burnout to examine relations between job demands (occupational and personal stress), job resources (sources and functions of social support), and burnout in a sample of nursing staff at a long-term care facility (N = 250). Hierarchical linear regression analyses revealed that job demands (greater occupational stress) were associated with more emotional exhaustion, more depersonalization, and less personal accomplishment. Job resources (support from supervisors and friends or family members, reassurance of worth, opportunity for nurturing) were associated with less emotional exhaustion and higher levels of personal accomplishment. Interventions to reduce burnout that include a focus on stress and social support outside of work may be particularly beneficial for long-term care staff. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. Organisational intervention to reduce occupational stress and turnover in hospital nurses in the Northern Territory, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickard, Greg; Lenthall, Sue; Dollard, Maureen; Opie, Tessa; Knight, Sabina; Dunn, Sandra; Wakerman, John; MacLeod, Martha; Seller, Jo; Brewster-Webb, Denise

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of an organisational intervention aimed to reduce occupational stress and turnover rates of 55% in hospital nurses. The evaluation used a pre- and post-intervention design, triangulating data from surveys and archival information. Two public hospitals (H1 and H2) in the Northern Territory (NT) Australia participated in the intervention. 484 nurses from the two NT hospitals (H1, Wave 1, N = 103, Wave 2, N = 173; H2, Wave 1, N = 75, Wave 2, N = 133) responded to questionnaires administered in 2008 and in 2010. The intervention included strategies such as the development and implementation of a nursing workload tool to assess nurse workloads, roster audits, increased numbers of nursing personnel to address shortfall, increased access to clinical supervision and support for graduates, increased access to professional development including postgraduate and short courses, and a recruitment campaign for new graduates and continuing employees. We used an extended Job Demand-Resources framework to evaluate the intervention and 17 evaluation indicators canvassing psychological distress, emotional exhaustion, work engagement, job satisfaction, job demands, job resources, and system factors such as psychosocial safety climate. Turnover rates were obtained from archival data. Results demonstrated a significant reduction in psychological distress and emotional exhaustion and a significant improvement in job satisfaction, across both hospitals, and a reduction in turnover in H2 from 2008 and 2010. Evidence suggests that the intervention led to significant improvements in system capacity (adaptability, communication) in combination with a reduction in job demands in both hospitals, and an increase in resources (supervisor and coworker support, and job control) particularly in H1. The research addresses a gap in the theoretical and intervention literature regarding system/organisation level approaches to occupational stress. The approach was very successful

  6. Systematic review on the relationship between the nursing shortage and job satisfaction, stress and burnout levels among nurses in oncology/haematology settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Shir Gi; Ang, Emily; Devi, M Kamala

    2012-06-01

    To establish the best available evidence regarding the relationship between the nursing shortage and nurses' job satisfaction, stress and burnout levels in oncology/haematology settings. Electronic databases (CINAHL, Medline, Scopus, ScienceDirect, PsycInfo, PsycArticles, Web of Science, The Cochrane Library, Proquest and Mednar) were searched using a three-step strategy in order to identify published and unpublished studies conducted between 1990 and 2010. Grey literature was excluded in the review. The identified studies were evaluated using standardised critical appraisal instruments from the Joanna Briggs Institute-Meta Analysis of Statistics Assessment and Review Instrument (JBI-MAStARI). A total of seven descriptive and descriptive-correlational studies published in English were included and data were presented in a narrative summary. Findings revealed a positive bidirectional relationship between the nursing shortage and oncology registered nurses' (RNs') job dissatisfaction, stress and burnout. The extent of the job dissatisfaction, stress and burnout experienced by the oncology RNs and their perception of staffing inadequacy differed according to their demography and work settings. Particularly, nurses who had higher qualifications and positions, who worked full-time and who worked in inpatient settings and non-Magnet hospitals were more likely to attribute staffing inadequacy as one of the main contributing factors for their job dissatisfaction, stress and burnout. This led to a rise in the number of oncology RNs leaving the speciality. Within the constraints of the study and the few quality papers available, it appears that oncology RNs who worked in substandard staffing units often express job dissatisfaction, stress and burnout, which prompt them to seek new employment out of the oncology specialty. This entails a pressing need for organisations to ensure sufficient staffing in oncology/haematology settings, in order to ensure that quality patient care

  7. Indexed

    CERN Document Server

    Hagy, Jessica

    2008-01-01

    Jessica Hagy is a different kind of thinker. She has an astonishing talent for visualizing relationships, capturing in pictures what is difficult for most of us to express in words. At indexed.blogspot.com, she posts charts, graphs, and Venn diagrams drawn on index cards that reveal in a simple and intuitive way the large and small truths of modern life. Praised throughout the blogosphere as “brilliant,” “incredibly creative,” and “comic genius,” Jessica turns her incisive, deadpan sense of humor on everything from office politics to relationships to religion. With new material along with some of Jessica’s greatest hits, this utterly unique book will thrill readers who demand humor that makes them both laugh and think.

  8. [Work-related Stress and the Allostatic Load Index - A Systematic Review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauss, D; Li, J; Schmidt, B; Angerer, P; Jarczok, M N

    2017-12-01

    Work-related stress is a growing social challenge and has been associated with reduced employee health, well-being, and productivity. One tool to measure the stress-related wear and tear of the body is the Allostatic Load Index (ALI). This review summarizes recent evidence on the association between work-related stress and ALI in working adults. A systematic literature search following the PRISMA-Statement was conducted in 21 databases including Medline, PubPsych, MedPilot, and Cochrane Register. Publications addressing work related-stress and medical parameters using ALI were considered. Data on study population, analytic techniques, and results were tabulated. Methodological quality was evaluated using a standardized checklist. 9 articles were identified with a total of 3 532 employees from 5 countries reporting cross-sectional data from the years 2003-2013. Overall, 7 studies reported a positive and significant association between work-related stress and ALI, while 2 studies showed no or an insignificant association. Substantial heterogeneity was observed in methods applied and study quality. This systematic review provides evidence that work-related stress is associated with ALI in cross-sectional studies. This association needs to be demonstrated by future studies using longitudinal data on working populations. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Effect of Nurse-Led Telephone Follow ups (Tele-Nursing) on Depression, Anxiety and Stress in Hemodialysis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargar Jahromi, Marzieh; Javadpour, Shohreh; Taheri, Leila; Poorgholami, Farzad

    2015-07-26

    Depressive and anxious patients on hemodialysis have a higher risk of death and hospitalizations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of nurse-led telephone follow ups (tele-nursing) on depression, anxiety and stress in hemodialysis patients. The subjects of the study who were selected based on double blind randomized clinical trial consisted of 60 patients with advanced chronic renal disease treated with hemodialysis. The patients were placed in two groups of 30 individuals. Before the intervention, a questionnaire was completed by patients.  There was no telephone follow up in the control group and the patients received only routine care in the hospital. The participants allocated to the intervention group received telephone follow-up 30 days after dialysis shift, in addition to conventional treatment. Every session lasted 30 minutes, as possible. Then the DASS scale was filled out by the patients after completion of study by two groups. Significant differences were observed between the two groups in the posttest regarding the dimensions scores of DASS scale. The result of this trial is expected to provide new knowledge to support the effective follow-up for hemodialysis patient in order to improve their emotional and health status.

  10. Nursing, Nursing Education, and Anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggers, Thompson; And Others

    In response to the current crisis in the field of nursing, a study examined nursing students' perceived work-related stress and differences among associate degree, diploma, and baccalaureate nursing programs in their preparation of nursing students. The 171 subjects, representing the three different nursing programs, completed a questionnaire…

  11. Stress in hospice at home nurses: a qualitative study of their experiences of their work and wellbeing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunnah, Karen; Jones, Angela; Johnstone, Rosalynde

    2012-06-01

    The literature has evaluated studies of hospice nurses and stress but very few studies have focused on community hospice nurses. This study explored hospice at home nurses' experiences of caring for palliative and dying patients. Hospice at home nurses working in the community across North West Wales were interviewed and a grounded theory approach was used to categorise the data into the following themes: job satisfaction, stressors, coping strategies, and support. Recommendations arising from the study include encouraging the use of clinical supervision, attendance at multidisciplinary meetings, and the provision of stress-awareness training, and raising awareness of the role of hospice at home nurses in primary care. Implementation of these recommendations might be beneficial for staff wellbeing. Further work would identify whether such recommendations can help to prevent sickness and promote staff retention.

  12. Adolescents’ Level of Perceived Stress and its Relationship with Body Mass Index in a Bangladeshi Population

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    Sarker Shamima Ahmed

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Several behavioral factors, specially stress, eating behavior, and physical activity have been linked with adolescent obesity. In our country, mental health of adolescents is often neglected. So, we designed this study to describe the current perception of stress in Bangladeshi adolescent students. Objective: Aim of this study was to assess association between stress and body mass index of adolescents while controlling for physical activity and examining stress associated eating behavior. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was carried out among 278 adolescent students during the period from January to December 2013. Data were collected through self-administered questionnaire which included physical activity questions, Dutch Eating Behavior Questionnaire (DEBQ, Adolescent stress questionnaire (ASQ and standard anthropometric measurements and were analyzed statistically using SPSS version 21.0. Results: In this study majority of the respondents were males. Among the female respondents, about 12.23% were overweight and obese compared to their male peers (4.1%. The normal and high BMI adolescents in the study showed significantly different proportions regarding gender (p<0.001, father’s education (p=0.036 and smoking status (p=0.22. Findings in this study reveals negative correlation between physical activity score and body mass index (ρ=−0.15, p<0.05. Body mass index was found significantly correlated with all three DEBQ eating subscales the restraint score, emotional eating score (ρ=0.58 p<0.001, and external eating score (ρ=0.55, p<0.001. Based on sample data, the mean stress scores were due to home life (3.40±0.54, school performance (3.31±0.63, school attendance (2.42±0.87, romantic relationship (3.02±0.92, peer pressure (2.85±0.72, due to teacher interaction (2.89±0.56, future uncertainty (3.83±0.90, school/leisure conflict (3.55±0.68, financial pressure (2.99±0.79 and emerging adult responsibility (3

  13. The impact of shift work on nurses' job stress, sleep quality and self-perceived health status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shu-Hui; Liao, Wen-Chun; Chen, Mei-Yen; Fan, Jun-Yu

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the current state of nurses' shift work in Taiwan and how it affects nurses' stress, sleep quality and self-perceived health status. To enable the provision of 24-hour patient care, nurses need to work various shifts. Long-term shift work significantly affects nurses' overall physical and mental health. Nurses from four Chiayi County district hospitals in Taiwan (n = 266) participated in this cross-sectional study from August to September 2010. Demographics, work schedule forms, a stress checklist, a sleep-quality measure and a health-status measure were used to collect data. Independent t-test, one-way anova, Pearson's r, and hierarchical regression were applied for analysis. The results showed that regardless of the amount of shift work they performed, nurses reported moderate job stress, poor sleep quality and moderate self-perceived health. The following significant relationships were observed: job stress was inversely related to sleep quality, which was directly related to self-perceived health status. Hospital managers need to ensure more healthy shift work scheduling in order to improve nurses' clinical performance and personal health status, thereby also improving the quality of patient care. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. [Stress level assessment of the nursing staff in the Intensive Care Unit of a university hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo-García, C; Ríos-Rísquez, M I; Martínez-Hurtado, R; Noguera-Villaescusa, P

    2016-01-01

    The objective was to determine the work stress level among nursing staff in the Intensive Care Unit of a university hospital and to analyse its relationship with the various sociodemographic and working variables of the studied sample. A study was designed using a quantitative, descriptive and cross-sectional approach. The target population of the study was the nursing staff selected by non-random sampling. The instrument used was the Job Content Questionnaire. Data analysis was performed using SPSS 20. The mean, ranges and standard deviation for each of the variables were calculated. A bivariate analysis was also performed on the social and occupational variables of the sample. The participation rate was 80.90% (N=89). The mean of the Social support dimension was 3.13±0.397, for the Psychological demands at work dimension it was 3.10±0.384, with a mean of 2.96±0.436 being obtained for the Control over the work dimension. In the analysis of sociodemographic and work variables of the sample, only the professional category was significant, with nurses recording higher values in perception of job demands and control over their work compared to nursing assistants. In conclusion, there is a moderate perception of work stress in the analysed group of professionals. Among the sources of stress in the workplace was the low control in decision-making by practitioners, as well as the need to continually learn new things. On the other hand, the support received from colleagues is valued positively by the sample. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEEIUC. All rights reserved.

  15. The effect of cognitive–behavioral stress management training on improving psychological symptoms and quality of life in nurses

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    Leila Bahmanzadeh

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available As a stressful profession, nursing deals with different aspects of human health and illness, and stress can threaten nurses’ health and performance. As a result, using preventive stress management programs seems necessary. The present study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of cognitive–behavioral stress management training in improving psychological symptoms (stress, anxiety, and depression and quality of life in nurses. The design of this study was quasi-experimental with pretest-posttest and a control group. The statistical population comprised all nurses working in Bandar Abbas Shari'ati Hospital. The study sample included all 30 nurses selected through convenience sampling method. They equally and randomly were divided into experiment and control groups. Depression, anxiety, and stress scale and the Farsi version of WHOQOL-BREF were used to collect data. The results showed there was a significant difference between pretest and posttest of experimental group in the mean scores of stress, anxiety, and quality of life; however, there was no significant difference in depression. Control group mean scores did not show a significant difference between pretest and posttest. There was no significant difference between the control and experimental groups before intervention in stress, anxiety, depression, and quality of life. The findings of this study suggest that, as a useful clinical intervention, stress management skill training is an effective way to improve mental distress and quality of life.

  16. Workplace culture in psychiatric nursing described by nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurjenluoma, K; Rantanen, A; McCormack, B; Slater, P; Hahtela, N; Suominen, T

    2017-12-01

    This study looks to describe the workplace culture from the viewpoints of stress, job satisfaction and practice environment. Data were collected from nurses (n = 109) using a web-based survey, The Person-Centred Nursing Index, from two purposefully selected hospital districts in Finland. Data were statistically analysed. Nurses described their workplace culture in slightly positive terms. Nurses only occasionally experienced stress (mean = 2.56, SD = 0.55) and were fairly satisfied with their job (mean = 4.75, SD = 0.66) and their practice environment (mean = 4.42, SD = 0.81). Demographic variables such as the nurses' age, length of time in nursing, time at their present hospital, working shifts and their use of patient restriction were more frequently associated with their perceived workplace culture. Older nurses and those with a longer work history in the nursing profession tended to be more satisfied with their workplace culture in psychiatric nursing. Young and/or newly graduated nurses felt more negatively on their workplace culture; this issue should be recognised and addressed with appropriate support and mentoring. Nurses who used restrictive measures were more often less satisfied with their workplace culture. Continuous efforts are needed to reduce the use of coercive measures, which challenge also the managers to support nursing practice to be more person-centred. © 2017 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  17. Establishment of the reliability and validity of the Stress Index for Children or Adolescents with Tourette Syndrome (SICATS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Kuo-Yu; Wang, Huei-Shyong; Chang, Hsueh-Ling; Wang, Yi-Wen; See, Lai-Chu

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the validity and reliability of the stress index for 10-18-years-old children or adolescents with Tourette syndrome. Tourette syndrome is a chronic tic disorder, which occurs in childhood. Children with Tourette syndrome exhibit sudden and unexpected voices or movements that may have influence on their daily activities and cause interaction barriers for children with Tourette syndrome. Therefore, a self-report stress index is necessary for children with Tourette syndrome to quickly measure the stress they have. Eight experts rated appropriateness, comprehensiveness and relevance of the questionnaire to establish content validity. A total of 116 paediatric patients filled out the stress index for 10-18-years-old children or adolescents with Tourette syndrome to evaluate its construct validity using exploratory factor analysis and internal consistency. Data from 90 pairs of paediatric patients and their caregivers were used to evaluate the inter-rater reliability. The criterion validity index ranged from 80-98%. One item was deleted because of a small item-to-total correlation. Therefore, 26 items made up the final stress index for 10-18-years-old children or adolescents with Tourette syndrome. In exploratory factor analysis, four factors (unfairly treated, psychological, symptom control and future concern) were achieved and accounted for 52.3% of the total variance. Cronbach's alphas of the stress index for 10-18-years-old children or adolescents with Tourette syndrome were 0.89. The inter-rater reliability of stress Index for 10-18-years-old children or adolescents with Tourette syndrome (Pearson correlation coefficient between patients and their caregivers) was 0.56. The stress Index for 10-18-years-old children or adolescents with Tourette syndrome is a self-administered tool to assess the stress of children or adolescents with Tourette syndrome. Validity (content and construct) and reliability (internal consistency and inter

  18. Impact of role-, job- and organizational characteristics on Nursing Unit Managers' work related stress and well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bogaert, Peter; Adriaenssens, Jef; Dilles, Tinne; Martens, Daisy; Van Rompaey, Bart; Timmermans, Olaf

    2014-11-01

    To study the impact of role, job- and organizational characteristics on nurse managers' work related stress and well-being such as feelings of emotional exhaustion, work engagement, job satisfaction and turnover intention. Various studies investigated role-, job- and organizational characteristics influencing nurse-related work environments. Research on nurse managers' related work environments define influencing factors, but, a clear understanding of the impact of nurse-managers' work-environment characteristics on their work related stress and well-being is limited. A cross-sectional design with a survey. A cross-sectional survey (N = 365) was carried out between December 2011-March 2012. The questionnaire was based on various validated measurement instruments identified by expert meetings (e.g. staff nurses, nurse managers and executives and physicians). Hierarchical regression analyses were performed using emotional exhaustion, work engagement, job satisfaction and turnover intentions as outcome variables. Study results showed one out of six nursing unit managers have high to very high feelings of emotional exhaustion and two out of three respondents have high to very high work engagement. Hierarchical regression models showed that role conflict and role meaningfulness were strong predictors of nursing unit managers' work related stress and well-being, alongside with job- and organizational characteristics. Several risk factors and stimulating factors influencing nurse unit managers' work related stress and well-being were identified. Further challenges will be to develop proper interventions and strategies to support nursing unit managers and their team in daily practice to deliver the best and safest patient care. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Tradução e adaptação para a cultura brasileira do "Nursing Work Index - Revised" Traducción y adaptación a la cultura brasileña del "Nursing Work Index - Revised" Translation and cross-cultural adaptation of the "Nursing Work Index - Revised" into Brazilian Portuguese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Cristina Gasparino

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Traduzir e adaptar o "Nursing Work Index - Revised", para a cultura brasileira. MÉTODOS: Para o procedimento metodológico seguiram-se as etapas recomendadas internacionalmente: tradução; retro-tradução; avaliação por um grupo de juízes e pré-teste. RESULTADOS: As etapas de tradução e retro-tradução foram realizadas satisfatoriamente e a avaliação da versão síntese pelo comitê de juízes resultou em alteração na maioria dos itens assegurando as equivalências entre as versões original e traduzida. Durante o pré-teste, verificou-se a necessidade de reformulações de alguns itens tornando-os mais claros e de fácil compreensão. CONCLUSÃO: Destaca-se que apesar da complexidade do instrumento, o processo de tradução e adaptação cultural do Nursing Work Index - Revised, para a cultura brasileira, foi concluído com sucesso.OBJETIVO: Traducir y adaptar el "Nursing Work Index - Revised", a la cultura brasileña. MÉTODOS: Para el procedimiento metodológico se siguieron las etapas recomendadas internacionalmente: traducción; retrotraducción; evaluación por un grupo de jueces y pre-test. RESULTADOS: Las etapas de traducción y retrotraducción fueron realizadas satisfactoriamente, la evaluación de la versión síntesis por el comité de jueces resultó en alteración en la mayoría de los ítems, garantizando las equivalencias entre las versiones original y traducida. Durante el pre-test, se verificó la necesidad de reformulaciones de algunos ítems, tornándolos más claros y de fácil comprensión. CONCLUSION: Se destaca que, a pesar de la complejidad del instrumento, el proceso de traducción y adaptación cultural del Nursing Work Index - Revised, a la cultura brasileña fue concluido con êxito.OBJECTIVE: To translate and establish the cross-cultural validation of the "Nursing Work Index - Revised" into Brazilian Portuguese. METHODS: Internationally recommended methodological procedures were followed

  20. The ratio of nurse consultation and physician efficiency index of senior rheumatologists is significantly higher than junior physicians in rheumatology residency training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emamifar, Amir; van Bui Hansen, Morten Hai; Jensen Hansen, Inger Marie

    2017-01-01

    To elucidate the difference between ratios of nurse consultation sought by senior rheumatologists and junior physicians in rheumatology residency training, and also to evaluate physician efficiency index respecting patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Data regarding outpatient visits for RA...... patients between November 2013 and 2015 were extracted. The mean interval (day) between consultations, the nurse/physician visits ratio, and physician efficiency index (nurse/physician visits ratio × mean interval) for each senior and junior physicians were calculated. Disease Activity Score in 28 joints....../physician visits ratio (P = .01) and mean efficiency index (P = .04) of senior rheumatologists were significantly higher than that of junior physicians. Regression analysis showed a positive correlation between physician postgraduate experience and physician efficiency index adjusted for DAS28 at baseline...

  1. Work satisfaction, stress, quality of care and morale of older people in a nursing home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redfern, Sally; Hannan, Shirina; Norman, Ian; Martin, Finbarr

    2002-11-01

    The aim in the present study, which was carried out in one nursing home for older people, was to determine the feasibility of working with care workers and very frail service users to investigate links between the levels of work satisfaction and stress of the staff, and the quality of care and morale of the residents. Most of the 44 care staff (70%) and 22 cognitively intact residents (82%) participated willingly in completing rating scales through self-completion questionnaire or by interview. Well-validated scales were used to measure job satisfaction, work stress, organisational commitment, perceived quality of care, and morale and mental health. The findings revealed a staff group with a fairly high level of job dissatisfaction and stress, who were, nevertheless, very committed to the nursing home. The morale of the residents was good although the residents rated the home atmosphere lower than the staff did. Significant correlations emerged, in the expected direction, between satisfaction, commitment, stress and quality of care perceived by staff. The correlations between home atmosphere perceived by residents, and their morale and mental health were low; further investigation is needed with a larger sample. This feasibility study supports the need for further research using a case-study approach in a small number of homes because of the labour-intensive nature of the data collection and the importance of triangulating data from many sources.

  2. Nursing staff under heavy stress: focus on Greece A critical review

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    Dimitrios Theofanidis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Current global financial constrains place a burden on the development of health care services worldwide. Although nurses are the backbone of any health establishment, they seem are under constant occupational stress which varies from country to country.Aim: This paper aims to present and analyze critically the key stress factors on contemporary nursing.Method: A strategically planned four-step literature review was used focusing on identifying key stress factors in selected papers.Results: The refining process identified 26 key references which were analyzed and tabulated. These revealed areas of concern such as: insufficient work recourses, poor communication with superiors, dissatisfaction with psychosocial work environment, lowering levels of education achieved and pay, split-shifts and prolonged night shifts, high demanding tasks, verbal abuse, mobbing and antagonistic attitudes in work place and poor organization at work.Conclusions: A number of intervention strategies to avoid excess stress are presented which include: improved education of the workforce and awareness building; assessment-focused interventions; therapeutic counseling; skill-building and reorganizing the work environment.

  3. Positive Effects of a Stress Reduction Program Based on Mindfulness Meditation in Brazilian Nursing Professionals: Qualitative and Quantitative Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Teresa Maria; Kozasa, Elisa Harumi; Carmagnani, Isabel Sampaio; Tanaka, Luiza Hiromi; Lacerda, Shirley Silva; Nogueira-Martins, Luiz Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Mindfulness meditation has been shown to effectively mitigate the negative effects of stress among nursing professionals, but in countries like Brazil, these practices are relatively unexplored. To evaluate the effects of a Stress Reduction Program (SRP) including mindfulness and loving kindness meditation among nursing professionals working in a Brazilian hospital setting. Pilot study with a mixed model using quantitative and qualitative methods was used to evaluate a group of participants. The quantitative data were analyzed at three different time points: pre-intervention, post-intervention, and follow-up. The qualitative data were analyzed at post-intervention. Hospital São Paulo (Brazil). Sample 13 nursing professionals, including nurses, technicians, and nursing assistants working in a hospital. Participants underwent mindfulness and loving kindness meditation during a period of six weeks. Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Satisfaction With Life Scale (SWLS), Self-Compassion Scale (SCS), WHOQOL-BREF quality of life assessment, and Work Stress Scale (WSS). Qualitative data were collected via a group interview following six weeks participation in the SRP. The quantitative analyses revealed a significant reduction (P stress, burnout, depression, and anxiety (trait). These variables showed no significant differences between post-intervention and follow-up scores. The WHOQOL-BREF revealed significant increase (P nursing activities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The Effect of Perceiving a Calling on Pakistani Nurses' Organizational Commitment, Organizational Citizenship Behavior, and Job Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsar, Bilal; Shahjehan, Asad; Cheema, Sadia; Javed, Farheen

    2018-03-01

    People differ considerably in the way in which they express and experience their nursing careers. The positive effects associated with having a calling may differ substantially based on individuals' abilities to live out their callings. In a working world where many individuals have little to no choice in their type of employment and thus are unable to live out a calling even if they have one, the current study examined how perceiving a calling and living a calling interacted to predict organizational commitment, organizational citizenship behavior, and job stress with career commitment mediating the effect of the interactions on the three outcome variables. The purpose of the study is to investigate the mediating effect of career commitment between the relationships of calling and (a) nurses' attitudes (organizational commitment), (b) behaviors (organizational citizenship behavior), and (c) subjective experiences regarding work (job stress). Using a descriptive exploratory design, data were collected from 332 registered nurses working in Pakistani hospitals. Descriptive analysis and hierarchical regression analysis were used for data analysis. Living a calling moderated the effect of calling on career commitment, organizational citizenship behavior, and job stress, and career commitment fully mediated the effect of calling on organizational commitment, organizational citizenship behavior, and job stress. Increasing the understanding of calling, living a calling, and career commitment may increase nurses' organizational commitment and organizational citizenship behavior and decrease job stress. The study provided evidence to help nursing managers and health policy makers integrate knowledge and skills related to calling into career interventions and help nurses discover their calling.

  5. "A stressful and frightening experience"? Children's nurses' perceived readiness to care for children with cancer following pre-registration nurse education: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jestico, Elizabeth; Finlay, Teresa

    2017-01-01

    In the UK children with cancer are cared for by children's nurses in a variety of settings, specialist and non-specialist. Whilst post-registration specialist education is available to some nurses, many nurses rely solely on pre-registration education to competently care for these children. This study explores whether nurses perceive that this adequately prepares them. To explore the extent to which qualified nurses perceive that pre-registration nurse education prepares them to care for children with cancer; to consider the implications for children's nursing pre-registration curricula. A small-scale qualitative study was undertaken using an interpretivist approach. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with six qualified children's nurses in two clinical areas - a specialist children's cancer inpatient ward, and a general children's ward where inpatients included children with cancer. Findings are discussed in relation to three emergent themes: Learning in Theory and Practice, Care of the Child and Family, and Resilience. Participants attached significance to the quantity and quality of practice experience. They reflected on barriers to specific and transferable theoretical learning and stressed the importance of integrating theory and practice. Understanding of family-centred care formed a significant part of their preparation. Preconceptions, communication with families and the emotional impact of this speciality were stressful. Improved pre-registration preparation may have developed participants' resilience. The complexities of caring for children with cancer and their families require well-prepared nurses. Participants' perceptions of preparedness were influenced by aspects of pre-registration education. Their experiences suggest that curricula should be practice-focused and include a range of placements. Specialist theoretical content must be integrated with practice and transferability of knowledge and skills made explicit. Reflection and problem

  6. [Effect of a "Like!" seal on the stress reactions of nurses in a hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Eri; Yamada, Kazuko; Morioka, Ikuharu

    2016-01-01

    Improving the work environment is effective as a primary measure against mental health disorders. The aim of this study was to verify the hypothesis that using a "Like!" seal would promote friendly relations in the workplace, and reduce the stress reactions of nurses in a hospital. The "Like!" seal was inspired by "Thanks" cards conveying appreciation mutually, "OK" cards conveying the recognition of good points, and the "Like" button frequently used in social networking services. The subjects were 362 nurses working in a university hospital, of whom, 156 (43.1%) permitted the use of data collected before and after the intervention. A total of 151 (41.7%) subjects were analyzed. The intervention using the "Like!" seal lasted 8 weeks. The controls were 105 nurses who answered the same questionnaire in the same hospital and who permitted the use of the collected data. The question items comprised: basic attributes, the Brief Job Stress Questionnaire, the Sense of Coherence (SOC) scale, the Brief Scales for Coping Profile (BSCP), the lifestyles (HPI), and the number of uses of the "Like!" seal. To examine the effects of the intervention, a two-way analysis of variance was performed. To examine the factors related to changed psychological symptoms, a multiple linear regression analysis (stepwise method) was performed with the variation as the dependent variable. The number of uses of the "Like!" seal was 7,010 seals in total, and 19.4 seals on average per nurse. Many seals read phrases showing thanks and/or approval. Psychological symptoms showed a significant interaction. The scores increased in the intervention group after the intervention, but showed no change in the control group. Among the subscales of SOC, manageability showed a significant interaction. Increased scores were found in the intervention group after the intervention, but there was no change in the control group. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that two factors were related to the

  7. Occupational stress among nursing technicians and assistants: coping focused on the problem

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    Carla Araújo Bastos Teixeira

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To analyze the association between strategies used to cope with occupational stress that are focused on the problem wand the personal characteristics of nursing technicians and assistants. Methodology. This quantitative and correlational study was conducted in a large teaching hospital in the São Paulo State, Brazil, in 2013. A randomized sample with 310 participants (198 nursing assistants and 112 nursing technicians comprised the study population. Data were collected using a sociodemographic characteristics questionnaire and Scale of Ways of Coping with Problems. Data were submitted to univariate analysis, and variables with statistical significance (p<0.20 were submitted posteriorly in a multiple regression model. Results. Most employees were women (76.1% older than 40 years (67.7%, had nine to 11 years of formal education (73.5%, had a partner (58.7%, were Catholic (53.2%, and had children (74.5%. The final multiple regression model consisted of variable years of formal education and number of children. Conclusion. In this study, formal education and number of children were more strongly associated with a greater use of coping strategies focused on the problem. Such a strategy is related to minimal vulnerability to stress related to the working environment.

  8. Nurse prescribing in general practice: a qualitative study of job satisfaction and work-related stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousins, Rosanna; Donnell, Christine

    2012-04-01

    Studies examining the impact nurse prescribing have largely focused on the efficacy of the service. It was suggested in pro-prescribing policy arguments that extending the nursing role to include prescribing would increase job satisfaction. This assertion has not been fully explored. To investigate the impact of independent prescribing for experienced nurse practitioners (NPs) working in general practice. In-depth interviews were conducted with six NPs who each had at least 3 years experience of independent prescribing in a busy inner city general practice. Analysis of interview data yielded two main themes: as independent prescribers NPs experienced increased levels of both job satisfaction and work-related stress. Increased satisfaction was associated with having greater autonomy and being able to provide more holistic care. Increased work-related stress emerged from greater job demands, perceived insufficient support and perceived effort-reward imbalance that centred upon the enhanced role not being recognized in terms of an increase in grade and pay. Independent prescribing increases job satisfaction for NPs in general practice, but there is also evidence of stressors associated with the role. It is important that NPs in general practice are encouraged and supported towards providing the effective patient-centred care in the community envisaged by current UK government. We acknowledge that the results presented in this paper are based on a sample limited to one city; however, it provides information that has important implications for the well being of NPs and ultimately patient care.

  9. Reliability and validity analysis of modified Nursing Stress Scale for Indian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Vasundhara; Chakraborty, Tania; Mukhopadhyay, Suman

    2013-01-01

    The original Nursing Stress Scale (NSS) was structurally modified according to results of factorial analysis and a new scale was named as modified nursing stress scale (MNSS). This is the first study to modify and validate NSS for Indian nursing population. Factorial analysis showed different factor loading for two subscales and items were shifted according to their loading to provide a more meaningful structure. After relocation of Items 13, 14, and 15 into first factor, this factor was renamed as "emotional and painful conditions of patients" to provide a more appropriate name to the first factor. Items 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, and 29 were found to be distributed under two different factors; one of these two was renamed as "unpredictable changes" and another retained its original name (i.e., workload). This distribution was also supported by rational analysis. All other items were distributed under factors as in the original scale. Rest of the validity assessment was done with the modified scale. Thus, with minor changes in structure, the scale was found to have better content validity.

  10. A study of job stress, stress coping strategies, and job satisfaction for nurses working in middle-level hospital operating rooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chung-Kuang; Lin, Cecilia; Wang, Shu-Hui; Hou, Tung-Hsu

    2009-09-01

    Understanding the interactive relationships between demographics and work-related variables, job stress, job stress coping strategies, and job satisfaction for operating room (OR) nurses is important. The purpose of this study was to determine the stressors, the stress coping strategies, and the job satisfaction of nursing staff who worked in the OR and to evaluate influence of demographic characteristics on job stress, stress coping strategies, and job satisfaction. A cross-sectional research design was used to collect data. Participants included 121 nurses with more than 6 months of work experience at seven hospitals in Yunlin and Chiayi Counties. Data were collected from March through May 2008. One hundred twelve questionnaires were returned, giving a response rate of 92.56%. The questionnaire included four parts designed to gather data on demographics and work-related information, job stress, stress coping strategies, and job satisfaction. Major findings of this study were as follows: (a) stress level and frequency perception of OR nurses were significantly related to the type of hospital; (b) the most intense stressor perceived by OR nurses was patient safety; (c) the stressor most frequently perceived by OR nurses was administrative feedback; (d) although all job stressors were positively related to destructive stress coping strategies, professional status, patient safety, and OR environment were also positively related to constructive stress coping strategies; (e) factors including work rewards, OR environment, and administrative management of job satisfaction were inversely related to destructive stress coping strategies; and (f) factors including work rewards, OR environment, and administrative management of job satisfaction were inversely related to all job stressors. Major suggestions of this study include the following: (a) hospitals should ensure set standard operating procedures for the OR, strengthen the designed-in security of the OR working

  11. Psychosocial Work Environment, Stress Factors and Individual Characteristics among Nursing Staff in Psychiatric In-Patient Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuvesson Hanna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The psychosocial work environment is an important factor in psychiatric in-patient care, and knowing more of its correlates might open up new paths for future workplace interventions. Thus, the aims of the present study were to investigate perceptions of the psychosocial work environment among nursing staff in psychiatric in-patient care and how individual characteristics—Mastery, Moral Sensitivity, Perceived Stress, and Stress of Conscience—are related to different aspects of the psychosocial work environment. A total of 93 nursing staff members filled out five questionnaires: the QPSNordic 34+, Perceived Stress Scale, Stress of Conscience Questionnaire, Moral Sensitivity Questionnaire, and Mastery scale. Multivariate analysis showed that Perceived Stress was important for Organisational Climate perceptions. The Stress of Conscience subscale Internal Demands and Experience in current units were indicators of Role Clarity. The other Stress of Conscience subscale, External Demands and Restrictions, was related to Control at Work. Two types of stress, Perceived Stress and Stress of Conscience, were particularly important for the nursing staff’s perception of the psychosocial work environment. Efforts to prevent stress may also contribute to improvements in the psychosocial work environment.

  12. Work-related stress and associated factors among nurses working in public hospitals of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salilih, Selamawit Zewdu; Abajobir, Amanuel Alemu

    2014-08-01

    Work-related stress is a pattern of reactions to work demands unmatched to nurses' knowledge, skills, or abilities; these challenges exceed their ability to cope, resulting in burnout, turnover, and low quality patient care. An institution-based cross-sectional study of 343 nurses was conducted in public hospitals of Addis Ababa in 2012. Data were collected by pretested and self-administered questionnaires using a nursing stress scale. One hundred twenty-one (37.8%) (95% confidence interval: 34.3 to 39.1) nurses reported experiencing occupational stress. Significant associations were found between nurses' stress and gender, work shift, illness, marital status, and worksite or unit. Prevalence of work-related stress was higher than expected and opportunities exist for stake holders to design stress reduction and management programs for nurses. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. Cross-sectional study on nurses' attitudes regarding coercive measures: the importance of socio-demographic characteristics, job satisfaction, and strategies for coping with stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bregar, Branko; Skela-Savič, Brigita; Kores Plesničar, Blanka

    2018-06-04

    Coercive measures are containment methods used in psychiatry to curb patients' disruptive and aggressive behaviours towards themselves, others or objects. The prevalence of the practice of coercive measures in psychiatry is directly related to the attitudes of the staff. When discussing these attitudes, nurses are often particularly singled out. The purpose of the study is to research the impact of individual factors on nurses' attitudes in the decision-making process for the use of coercive measures. A cross-sectional study among all psychiatric nursing staff in Slovenia (n = 367, 79%) was conducted over the years 2013/2014. Standardized questionnaires were used, including a survey of nurses' attitudes to the use of seclusion, the Job Descriptive Index, and the Folkman-Lazarus test. Nurses' attitudes towards special coercive measures are predominantly negative ([Formula: see text] = 11.312, SD = 2.641). The factors that explain a positive attitude are as follows: female gender (β = - 0.236, p <  0.001), fewer years of service (β = - 0.149, p = 0.023), emotion-focused strategies of coping with stress (β = 0.139, p = 0.020), and less-threatening patient behaviour (β = 0.157, p = 0.012). The effects of some known factors did not prove important in the model. Newly recognized factors are "less-threatening patient behaviour" and "emotion-focused strategies of coping with stress". Therefore, attitudes towards special coercive measures in psychiatry must be regarded as contextualized, interactive, and multidimensional phenomena that cannot be explained merely through a defined set of factors.

  14. Workforce Characteristics, Perceptions, Stress, and Satisfaction among Staff in Green House and Other Nursing Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Patrick B; Hudak, Sandra L; Horn, Susan D; Cohen, Lauren W; Reed, David Allen; Zimmerman, Sheryl

    2016-02-01

    To compare workforce characteristics and staff perceptions of safety, satisfaction, and stress between Green House (GH) and comparison nursing homes (CNHs). Primary data on staff perceptions of safety, stress, and satisfaction from 13 GHs and 8 comparison NHs in 11 states; secondary data from human resources records on workforce characteristics, turnover, and staffing from 01/01/2011-06/30/2012. Observational study. Workforce data were from human resources offices; staff perceptions were from surveys. Few significant differences were found between GH and CNHs. Exceptions were GH direct caregivers were older, provided twice the normalized hours per week budgeted per resident than CNAs in CNHs or Legacy NHs, and trended toward lower turnover. GH environment may promote staff longevity and does not negatively affect worker's stress, safety perceptions, or satisfaction. Larger studies are needed to confirm findings. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  15. Occupational stressors in nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Nikpeyma

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and aimsNursing provides a wide range of potential workplace stressors as it is  a profession that requires a high level of skill, teamworking in a variety of situations and provision  of 24-hour delivery of care .Occupational stress is a major factor of Staff sickness an  absenteeism.This study investigates the main occupational stressors in nursing profession in the  hope of identification and reducing it.MethodsIn this study a questionnaire consisting of three parts:demoghraphic data,the nurses  background and questions about occupational stress from Revised index fulfilled by 140 nurses.ResultsLack of reward for work well done(48/6%, Heavy workload(46/4% ,lack of Participation in decisions (39/3% , poor Control of work place(38/4%and lack of job  development (36/4% have been the main sources of Occupational stress for nurses.chronic  diseases, Night Shift working and working hours were positively associated with occupstional  stress.Conclusion Analysis indicated that effects of work factors on occupational stress are more than demoghraphic data. The findings of this study can assist health service organisations to provide an attractive working climate in order to decrease side effects and consequences of occupational stress. Furthermore, understanding this situation can help to develop coping strategies in order to reduce work-related stress.

  16. Job stress and job satisfaction among new graduate nurses during the first year of employment in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ching-Yu; Liou, Shwu-Ru; Tsai, Hsiu-Min; Chang, Chia-Hao

    2015-08-01

    Nurse graduates are leaving their first employment at an alarming rate. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships between job stress, job satisfaction and related factors over time among these nurses. This study applied a longitudinal design with three follow-ups after nurse graduates' first employment began. Using convenience sampling, participants were 206 new graduates from a university. The Work Environment Nursing Satisfaction Survey and the Clinical Stress Scale were used in this study. Results indicated that job stress remained moderate across three time points. Participants working 12 h shifts exhibited less job stress. Job satisfaction significantly increased in the twelfth month. Participants working 12 h shifts had a higher degree of job satisfaction. Job stress was negatively correlated with job satisfaction. The 12 h work shifts were related to job stress and job satisfaction. These results implied that health-care administrators need to provide longer orientation periods and flexible shift schedules for new graduate nurses to adapt to their work environment. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  17. Mental Health Nurse's Exposure to Workplace Violence Leads to Job Stress, Which Leads to Reduced Professional Quality of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itzhaki, Michal; Bluvstein, Irit; Peles Bortz, Anat; Kostistky, Hava; Bar Noy, Dor; Filshtinsky, Vivian; Theilla, Miriam

    2018-01-01

    Professional quality of life (ProQOL) reflects how individuals feel about their work as helpers. Psychiatric ward nurses cope with significant psychological and physical challenges, including exposure to verbal and physical violence. This study was based on two aspects of ProQOL, the positive compassion satisfaction, and the negative compassion fatigue, with the aim of investigating the relation of ProQOL to job stress and violence exposure at a large mental health center. Data were collected from 114 mental health nurses (49/63 M/F) who completed a self-administered questionnaire examining violence exposure, ProQOL, and job stress. The results showed that during the last year, almost all nurses (88.6%) experienced verbal violence, and more than half (56.1%) experienced physical violence. Only 2.6% experienced no violence. ProQOL was not associated with violence exposure but was reduced by work stress and by previous exposure to violence; nurses who perceived their work as more stressful had lower satisfaction from their work. In conclusion, although most mental health nurses are exposed to physical and verbal violence, their ProQOL is more related to job stress than to workplace violence (WPV). Hospital managements should conduct work stress reduction intervention programs and promote strategizes to reduce WPV. Further exploration of (a) factors affecting ProQOL and (b) the effect of violence coping workshops on ProQOL is warranted.

  18. Assessment of Clinical Stressful Factors Among Academic Students of Nursing and Operating Room of Dezful University of Medical Sciences (2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Raji

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Nursing students are exposed to clinical environmental stresses in addition to educational environmental stresses. The aim of this study was to assessment of clinical stressful factors among Academic Students of Nursing and Operating Room of Dezful University of Medical Sciences in 2015.Materials and Methods: This study was a description-analytical study with 234 students of nursing and operation room up to two semesters for enrolled. Data was using a self-made researcher Questionnaire consisted of demographic information and clinical stressful factors. Data analysis was performed by descriptive and inferential statistics using SPSS-PC (v.20.Results: The findings showed that the main stressors in students of nursing and operation room were unpleasant emotions and least stressful areas were interpersonal communication in a clinical environment. The results showed that the average score of the field of education and humiliating experiences using Spearman correlation test (P=0/045 (r=0/16.Conclusion: Study showed, the mean stress is the moderate level. Stressful areas obtained in the four areas of personal communication, clinical practice stressful, unpleasant feelings and humiliating experience that fortunately, in many cases reform and change.

  19. Moderating effects of coping on work stress and job performance for nurses in tertiary hospitals: a cross-sectional survey in China

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Li; Ai, Hua; Gao, Lei; Zhou, Hao; Liu, Xinyan; Zhang, Zhong; Sun, Tao; Fan, Lihua

    2017-01-01

    Background Work stress is a major problem for nurses and it can negatively influence job performance. Therefore, it is critical to explore variables that can reduce or buffer the negative effects of work stress. This study explores the moderating effects of coping strategies on the relationship between work stress and job performance for nurses in China. Methods A cross-sectional survey of 852 nurses from four tertiary hospitals in Heilongjiang Province, China, was conducted in 2013. Descript...

  20. Mental health nursing students' experiences of stress during training: a thematic analysis of qualitative interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvin, J; Suominen, E; Morgan, C; O'Connell, E-J; Smith, A P

    2015-12-01

    What is known on the subject? Stress can impact students on mental health nurse training. This can have implications at the individual level (e.g. their own mental health) and at the level of the organization (e.g. sickness absence and attrition). What this paper adds to existing knowledge? We interviewed 12 mental health nursing students regarding the stress they experienced during training. Participants described how the academic demands can at times be unbearable during clinical placements. There were also issues with 'being a student' on some placements, with participants describing negative attitudes towards them from staff. The younger participants reported feeling overwhelmed on their initial placements and described some of the main challenges of mental health work for them. Raising concerns about the quality of care on wards was also described as particularly challenging for the students. What are the implications for practice? This paper can be useful to help training providers support mental health nursing students. Recommendations include reducing academic demands during clinical placements and extending and promoting existing support services beyond normal 9 am-5 pm working hours, even if these services are limited. Younger students could be better supported by being allocated to the more well-resourced placements in the early stages of their training. Raising awareness among staff of the tasks students can and cannot perform can help improve staff/student relations. Finally, students should be educated about the issues around raising concerns on placements to help the government's drive for a more open and transparent National Health Service (NHS). Previous studies investigating stress in nursing students focus on general nursing students or adopt quantitative measures. A qualitative study focusing specifically on mental health nursing students is required. One-to-one interviews were carried out with mental health nursing students (n = 12). Data were

  1. Emotional labour and work engagement among nurses: examining perceived compassion, leadership and work ethic as stress buffers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauno, Saija; Ruokolainen, Mervi; Kinnunen, Ulla; De Bloom, Jessica

    2016-05-01

    The study examined whether three resources, that is, compassion, transformational leadership and work ethic feasibility, buffer against the negative effects of emotional labour on work engagement. Emotional labour is a common job stressor among nurses, but little is known about whether certain personal and work resources buffer against it in relation to work engagement. Revealing buffers of emotional labour would help organizations to design tailored interventions. Cross-sectional online survey conducted in 2014. Participants were 3466 Finnish nurses. Hypotheses were tested via hierarchical moderated regression analyses. Higher emotional labour related to lower engagement. Two interaction effects were found. First, work ethic feasibility buffered against emotional labour: the nurses who perceived work ethic feasibility as high in a situation of high emotional labour, scored higher on engagement compared with those nurses who in this stress situation perceived work ethic feasibility to be low. Second, high compassion was detrimental to engagement in the presence of high emotional labour. Transformational leadership did not act as a buffer but showed a positive relationship with engagement. Work ethic feasibility (being able to work according to high ethical standards) is an important resource in nursing as it protects an employee against the negative effects of emotional labour and as it also directly promotes engagement. However, compassion may not always be beneficial in nursing, especially if co-occurring with high job stress. Transformational leadership has potential to improve engagement in nursing although it may not operate as a stress buffer. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. The impact of multiple care giving roles on fatigue, stress, and work performance among hospital staff nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Linda D; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Rogers, Ann E

    2006-02-01

    This study describes fatigue and stress among a random sample of full-time hospital staff nurses (n=393) who provide care for aging family members, compares the results to nurses with and without children younger than 18 years living at home, examines differences in sleep duration, and explores the effects on work performance by care giving status during a 4-week period. Little attention has been given to the effects of care giver well-being when individuals assume dual roles as family and professional care givers. Hospital staff nurses recorded daily information concerning their work hours, errors, sleep/wake patterns, perceptions of fatigue, alertness, and stress and periods of drowsiness and sleep episodes while on duty for 28 days. Fatigue and stress levels were significantly higher among nurses caring for both children and elders. However, nurses providing elder care at home were more fatigued, sleep-deprived, and likely to make errors at work. These findings underscore the importance of restorative sleep interventions and fatigue countermeasures for hospital staff nurses involved in dual care giving roles. Limiting overtime and applying circadian principles to hospital scheduling processes would ensure a more alert workforce, minimize health risks for nurses, and maximize the safety of those in their care.

  3. Nurses' experiences, expectations, and preferences for mind-body practices to reduce stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, Kathi; Bulla, Sally; Krueger, Deborah; Ott, Mary Jane; McCool, Jane A; Gardiner, Paula

    2011-04-11

    Most research on the impact of mind-body training does not ask about participants' baseline experience, expectations, or preferences for training. To better plan participant-centered mind-body intervention trials for nurses to reduce occupational stress, such descriptive information would be valuable. We conducted an anonymous email survey between April and June, 2010 of North American nurses interested in mind-body training to reduce stress. The e-survey included: demographic characteristics, health conditions and stress levels; experiences with mind-body practices; expected health benefits; training preferences; and willingness to participate in future randomized controlled trials. Of the 342 respondents, 96% were women and 92% were Caucasian. Most (73%) reported one or more health conditions, notably anxiety (49%); back pain (41%); GI problems such as irritable bowel syndrome (34%); or depression (33%). Their median occupational stress level was 4 (0 = none; 5 = extreme stress). Nearly all (99%) reported already using one or more mind-body practices to reduce stress: intercessory prayer (86%), breath-focused meditation (49%), healing or therapeutic touch (39%), yoga/tai chi/qi gong (34%), or mindfulness-based meditation (18%). The greatest expected benefits were for greater spiritual well-being (56%); serenity, calm, or inner peace (54%); better mood (51%); more compassion (50%); or better sleep (42%). Most (65%) wanted additional training; convenience (74% essential or very important), was more important than the program's reputation (49%) or scientific evidence about effectiveness (32%) in program selection. Most (65%) were willing to participate in a randomized trial of mind-body training; among these, most were willing to collect salivary cortisol (60%), or serum biomarkers (53%) to assess the impact of training. Most nurses interested in mind-body training already engage in such practices. They have greater expectations about spiritual and emotional than

  4. Nurses' experiences, expectations, and preferences for mind-body practices to reduce stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCool Jane A

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most research on the impact of mind-body training does not ask about participants' baseline experience, expectations, or preferences for training. To better plan participant-centered mind-body intervention trials for nurses to reduce occupational stress, such descriptive information would be valuable. Methods We conducted an anonymous email survey between April and June, 2010 of North American nurses interested in mind-body training to reduce stress. The e-survey included: demographic characteristics, health conditions and stress levels; experiences with mind-body practices; expected health benefits; training preferences; and willingness to participate in future randomized controlled trials. Results Of the 342 respondents, 96% were women and 92% were Caucasian. Most (73% reported one or more health conditions, notably anxiety (49%; back pain (41%; GI problems such as irritable bowel syndrome (34%; or depression (33%. Their median occupational stress level was 4 (0 = none; 5 = extreme stress. Nearly all (99% reported already using one or more mind-body practices to reduce stress: intercessory prayer (86%, breath-focused meditation (49%, healing or therapeutic touch (39%, yoga/tai chi/qi gong (34%, or mindfulness-based meditation (18%. The greatest expected benefits were for greater spiritual well-being (56%; serenity, calm, or inner peace (54%; better mood (51%; more compassion (50%; or better sleep (42%. Most (65% wanted additional training; convenience (74% essential or very important, was more important than the program's reputation (49% or scientific evidence about effectiveness (32% in program selection. Most (65% were willing to participate in a randomized trial of mind-body training; among these, most were willing to collect salivary cortisol (60%, or serum biomarkers (53% to assess the impact of training. Conclusions Most nurses interested in mind-body training already engage in such practices. They have greater

  5. Conceptualizing the dynamics of workplace stress: a systems-based study of nursing aides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jetha, Arif; Kernan, Laura; Kurowski, Alicia

    2017-01-05

    Workplace stress is a complex phenomenon that may often be dynamic and evolving over time. Traditional linear modeling does not allow representation of recursive feedback loops among the implicated factors. The objective of this study was to develop a multidimensional system dynamics model (SDM) of workplace stress among nursing aides and conduct simulations to illustrate how changes in psychosocial perceptions and workplace factors might influence workplace stress over time. Eight key informants with prior experience in a large study of US nursing home workers participated in model building. Participants brainstormed the range of components related to workplace stress. Components were grouped together based on common themes and translated into feedback loops. The SDM was parameterized through key informant insight on the shape and magnitude of the relationship between model components. Model construction was also supported utilizing survey data collected as part of the larger study. All data was entered into the software program, Vensim. Simulations were conducted to examine how adaptations to model components would influence workplace stress. The SDM included perceptions of organizational conditions (e.g., job demands and job control), workplace social support (i.e., managerial and coworker social support), workplace safety, and demands outside of work (i.e. work-family conflict). Each component was part of a reinforcing feedback loop. Simulations exhibited that scenarios with increasing job control and decreasing job demands led to a decline in workplace stress. Within the context of the system, the effects of workplace social support, workplace safety, and work-family conflict were relatively minor. SDM methodology offers a unique perspective for researchers and practitioners to view workplace stress as a dynamic process. The portrayal of multiple recursive feedback loops can guide the development of policies and programs within complex organizational contexts

  6. Stress, coping and burnout among Intensive Care Unit nursing staff: associated factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andolhe, Rafaela; Barbosa, Ricardo Luis; Oliveira, Elaine Machado de; Costa, Ana Lúcia Siqueira; Padilha, Katia Grillo

    2015-02-01

    Objective To investigate emotional stress, coping and burnout among nursing staff and their association with biosocial factors and characteristics of work in Intensive Care Units (ICU). Method This was a cross-sectional study, conducted in eight ICUs at a teaching hospital in the city of São Paulo, Brazil, in October 2012. Biosocial data and information about the professionals' work was gathered, and they were given the Scale of Occupational Stress, Scale of Occupational Coping, List of Signs and Symptoms of Stress and the Maslach Burnout Inventory. Results The study sample consisted of 287 subjects, predominately women, with partners and children. Most professionals presented moderate stress levels and control as a coping strategy (74.47% and 79.93%, respectively), and burnout was present among 12.54%. Factors associated with stress were related to working conditions. The most prevalent protective factors were having a partner, working in the clinical ICU and liking work, while adequate amount of sleep was a protective factor for burnout. Conclusion Control of the working environment and adequate sleep are decisive and protective factors in dealing with situations of occupational stress.

  7. CORRELATION OF LOW BACK PAIN WITH BODY MASS INDEX, FUNCTIONAL REACH TEST AMONG FEMALE NURSING PROFESSIONALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shameela .T .V

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Among health care workers the highest level of work related back injuries are more affected in nurses. There were many studies done to assess low back pain by using different tools. So this study aimed to identify the prevalence low back pain disability among female nursing professionals and the association between BMI, functional reach test and low back pain, so that a better tool can be used during the clinical examination for the betterment of the patient. The objective of the study is to identify the prevalence of low back pain disability, the association of Low Back Pain(LBP with BMI and functional reach test among female nursing professionals. Methods: A total of 256 subjects were assessed for disability due to back pain using OswestryLBP Disability Questionnaire and the prevalence of disability was determined. The sit and reach test, forward reach test and their BMI were calculated for those who had a disability score of 20 and above (n=87. Results: Data was analyzed using Pearson’s correlation.The study result showed a significant correlation (p=0.03 of sit and reach test with low back pain disability scores. There was a negative correlationseen among BMI and LBP disability score forward reach test and LBP disability score, and BMI and no low back pain disability score. Conclusion: The prevalence of LBP disability among nursing professionals was 33.9%. This study suggest that sit and reach test can be used as an indicator of low back pain. Whereas BMI and forward reach test do not indicate low back pain.

  8. The relation between energy intake and chewing index of diets fed to nursing ewes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette Vestergaard; Nadeau, E.; Markussen, Bo

    2017-01-01

    after lambing of 91 kg (SD = 9.7), and nursed an average of 2.2 lambs (SD = 0.37). The average daily MEI was 42.0 MJ (SD = 8.35). The NorFor CI (min/MJ ME) values of the diets was estimated from the content of neutral detergent fibre (NDF; g/kg DM), indigestible NDF (iNDF; g/kg NDF), and the theoretical...

  9. Stress Factors among Nurses at the Primary and Secondary Level of Public Sector Health Care: The Case of Slovenia

    OpenAIRE

    Jasmina Starc

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Working in nursing is mentally and physically demanding and is one of the most stressful professions. AIM: To determine the basic causes of stress and examine the symptoms of stress among healthcare professionals at the primary and secondary level of health care. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The research was based on the descriptive and causal non-experimental method of empirical research. The independent samples t-test was used. RESULTS: The survey results have shown that th...

  10. The nature, measurement and management of student nurse stress, distress and coping

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Martyn C.

    1998-01-01

    Following a review of the stress, distress and coping reported by student health professionals and students in higher education, see Chapters 2 and 3, the hypothesis that a problem existed with distress early in training was confirmed by screening two cohorts of first year student nurses, see Chapter 4. Some 50.5% of students, in Cohort one (N=109, Week 40) and 67.9% of students in Cohort two (N=111, Week 24) suffered significant levels of affective distress. All students were enrolled on the...

  11. The prevalence of stress urinary incontinence in women studying nursing and related quality of life

    OpenAIRE

    Opara, J?zef; Czerwi?ska-Opara, Wioletta Ewa

    2014-01-01

    Urinary incontinence is a growing problem that affects millions of people worldwide. The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) in women studying nursing. Respondents completed a questionnaire assessing urinary incontinence, severity of symptoms and quality of life. Short forms to assess symptoms of distress for urinary incontinence and quality of life: UDI-6 and IIQ-7 have been used. The study’s conclusions are as follows: 1) among the 113 int...

  12. Pulsatility Index as a Diagnostic Parameter of Reciprocating Wall Shear Stress Parameters in Physiological Pulsating Waveforms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idit Avrahami

    Full Text Available Arterial wall shear stress (WSS parameters are widely used for prediction of the initiation and development of atherosclerosis and arterial pathologies. Traditional clinical evaluation of arterial condition relies on correlations of WSS parameters with average flow rate (Q and heart rate (HR measurements. We show that for pulsating flow waveforms in a straight tube with flow reversals that lead to significant reciprocating WSS, the measurements of HR and Q are not sufficient for prediction of WSS parameters. Therefore, we suggest adding a third quantity-known as the pulsatility index (PI-which is defined as the peak-to-peak flow rate amplitude normalized by Q. We examine several pulsating flow waveforms with and without flow reversals using a simulation of a Womersley model in a straight rigid tube and validate the simulations through experimental study using particle image velocimetry (PIV. The results indicate that clinically relevant WSS parameters such as the percentage of negative WSS (P[%], oscillating shear index (OSI and the ratio of minimum to maximum shear stress rates (min/max, are better predicted when the PI is used in conjunction with HR and Q. Therefore, we propose to use PI as an additional and essential diagnostic quantity for improved predictability of the reciprocating WSS.

  13. From job stress to intention to leave among hospital nurses: A structural equation modelling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Wen-Yen; Chien, Li-Yin; Hwang, Fang-Ming; Huang, Nicole; Chiou, Shu-Ti

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the structural relationships linking job stress to leaving intentions through job satisfaction, depressed mood and stress adaptation among hospital nurses. High turnover among nurses is a global concern. Structural relationships linking job stress to leaving intentions have not been thoroughly examined. Two nationwide cross-sectional surveys of full-time hospital staff in 2011 and 2014. The study participants were 26,945 and 19,386 full-time clinical nurses in 2011 and 2014 respectively. Structural equation modelling was used to examine the interrelationships among the study variables based on the hypothesized model. We used cross-validation procedures to ensure the stability and validity of the model in the two samples. There were five main paths from job stress to intention to leave the hospital. In addition to the direct path, job stress directly affected job satisfaction and depressed mood, which in turn affected intention to leave the hospital. Stress adaptation mitigated the effects of job stress on job satisfaction and depressed mood, which led to intention to leave the hospital. Intention to leave the hospital preceded intention to leave the profession. Those variables explained about 55% of the variance in intention to leave the profession in both years. The model fit was good for both samples, suggesting validity of the model. Strategies to decrease turnover intentions among nurses could focus on creating a less stressful work environment, increasing job satisfaction and stress adaptation and decreasing depressed mood. Hospitals should cooperate in this issue to decrease nurse turnover. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Work ability and work-related stress: A cross-sectional study of obstetrical nurses in urban northeastern Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowrouzi, Behdin; Lightfoot, Nancy; Carter, Lorraine; Larivière, Michel; Rukholm, Ellen; Schinke, Robert; Belanger-Gardner, Diane

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine: 1) if quality of work life (QWL), location of cross-training, stress variables, and various demographic factors in nurses are associated with work ability, and 2) nursing occupational stress, QWL, and various associated factors are related with nurses' work ability. There is limited research examining the obstetrical nursing environment. Given the amount of time and energy people expend at the workplace, it is crucial for employees to be satisfied with their lives at work. This cross sectional study was conducted in 2012 in four hospitals in northeastern Ontario, Canada. A stratified random sample of registered nurses (n= 111) were selected. The majority of participants were female (94.6%) ranging in age from 24 to 64 years (M = 41.9, s.d. = 10.2). For the stress and QWL model, one variable: QWL (home-work support - see Methods for definition) (p= 0.015), cross-trained (see Methods for definition) nurses (p= 0.048), and having more than 4 patients per shift (p= 0.024) significantly contributed to the variance in work ability scores. In the logistic regression model, the odds of a higher work ability for nurses who received home-work support were estimated to be 1.32 (95% CI, 1.06 to 1.66) times the odds of a higher work ability for nurses who did not receive home-work support. Work ability in the work environment of obstetrical nursing is important. To be high functioning, workplaces should maximize the use of their employees' actual and potential skills.

  15. Index of thermal stress for cows (ITSC) under high solar radiation in tropical environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Silva, Roberto Gomes; Maia, Alex Sandro C.; de Macedo Costa, Leonardo Lelis

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a new thermal stress index for dairy cows in inter-tropical regions, with special mention to the semi-arid ones. Holstein cows were measured for rectal temperature ( T R), respiratory rate ( F R) and rates of heat exchange by convection ( C), radiation ( R), skin surface evaporation ( E S) and respiratory evaporation ( E R) in the north eastern region of Brazil, after exposure to sun for several hours. Average environmental measurements during the observations were air temperature ( T A) 32.4 °C (24.4-38.9°), wind speed ( U) 1.8 m.s-1 (0.01-11.0), relative humidity 63.6 % (36.8-81.5) and short-wave solar radiation 701.3 W m-2 (116-1,295). The effective radiant heat load (ERHL) was 838.5 ± 4.9 W m-2. Values for the atmospheric transmittance ( τ) were also determined for tropical regions, in order to permit adequate estimates of the solar radiation. The average value was τ = 0.611 ± 0.004 for clear days with some small moving clouds, with a range of 0.32 to 0.91 in the day period from 1000 to 1300 hours. Observed τ values were higher (0.62-0.66) for locations near the seacoast and in those regions well-provided with green fields. Effects of month, location and time of the day were all statistically significant ( P cows exposed for 1 to 8 h to sun during the day; in 7 months (February, March, April, July, August, September and November), 4 days per month on the average. A principal component analysis summarised the T R, F R, C, R, E S and E R measurements into just one synthetic variable ( y 1); several indexes were then obtained by multiple regression of y 1 on the four environmental variables and its combinations, by using Origin 8.1 software (OriginLab Corp.). The chosen equation was the index of thermal stress for cows, ITSC = 77.1747 + 4.8327 T A - 34.8189 U + 1.111 U 2 + 118.6981 P V - 14.7956 P V 2 - 0.1059 ERHL with r 2 = 0.812. The correlations of ITSC with T R, F R, C, E S, R and E R were 0.275, 0.255, -0.493, -0.647, -0.818 and 0

  16. Development of a global Agricultural Stress Index System (ASIS) based on remote sensing data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hoolst, R.

    2016-12-01

    According to the 2012 IPCC SREX report, extreme drought events are projected to become more frequent and intense in several regions of the world. Wide and timely monitoring systems are required to mitigate the impact of agricultural drought. Therefore, FAO's Global Information and Early Warning System (GIEWS) and the Climate, Energy and Tenure Division (NRC) have established the `Agricultural Stress Index System' (ASIS). The ASIS is a remote sensing application that provides early warnings of agricultural drought at a global scale. The ASIS has first been designed and described by Rojas et al. (2011). This study focused on the African continent and was based on the back processing of low resolution data of the NOAA-satellites. In the current setup, developed by VITO (Flemish Institute for Technological Research), the system operates in Near Real Time using data from the METOP-AVHRR sensor. The Agricultural Stress Index (ASI) is the percentage of agricultural area affected by drought in the course of the growing season within a given administrative unit. The start and end of the growing season are derived per pixel from the long term NDVI average of SPOT-VEGETATION. The Global Administrative Unit Layer (GAUL) defines the administrative boundaries at level 0, 1 and 2. A global cropland and grassland map eliminates non-agricultural areas. Temperature and NDVI anomalies are used as drought indicators and calculated at a per pixel base. The ASIS aggregates this information and produces every dekad global maps to highlight hotspots of drought stress. New developments are ongoing to strengthen the ASIS to produce country specific outputs, improve existing drought indicators and estimate production deficits using a probabilistic approach.

  17. Mobbing, stress, and work ability index among physicians in Bosnia and Herzegovina: survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pranjić, Nurka; Males-Bilić, Ljiljana; Beganlić, Azijada; Mustajbegović, Jadranka

    2006-10-01

    To assess the frequency of reported mobbing and the association among mobbing, working environment factors, stress, health outcome, personality type, and work ability index in a sample of physicians in Bosnia and Herzegovina. We conducted a questionnaire survey using a validated self-reported questionnaire among 511 physicians in national health sector of Bosnia and Herzegovina. The questions covered five major categories of mobbing behavior. Characteristics of the work, perceived work environment and its effects, stress, health, and satisfaction with work and life were assessed by the standardized abridged form of Occupational Stress Questionnaire (OSQ). A standardized questionnaire Work Ability Index (WAI) was used to determine the relation between mobbing and work ability. Of 511 surveyed physicians, 387 (76%) physicians self-reported mobbing behavior in the working environment and 136 (26%) was exposed to persistent mobbing. More than a half of the physicians experienced threats to their professional status and almost a half felt isolated. Logistic regression analysis showed that lack of motivation, loss of self-esteem, loss of confidence, fatigue, and depressiveness were significantly associated with lack of support from colleagues. Intention to leave work was associated with lack of support from colleagues (OR 2.3, 95% CI, 1.065-3.535; t =4.296, P =0.003) and lack of support from superiors (OR 1.526, 95% CI, 0.976-2.076; t =5.753; P =0.001). Isolation or exclusion and threats to professional status were predictors for mental health symptoms. Persistent mobbing experience was a significant predictor for sick leave. Exposure to persistent threat to professional status and isolation or exclusion as forms of mobbing are associated with mental health disturbances and lack of self-esteem and confidence. Setting up a system of support for physicians exposed to mobbing may have important benefits.

  18. Associations Among Nursing Work Environment and Health-Promoting Behaviors of Nurses and Nursing Performance Quality: A Multilevel Modeling Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyeonmi; Han, Kihye

    2018-05-14

    This study aimed to determine the relationships among the unit-level nursing work environment and individual-level health-promoting behaviors of hospital nurses in South Korea and their perceived nursing performance quality. This study used a cross-sectional design. Data were collected using self-reported questionnaires from 432 nurses in 57 units at five hospitals in South Korea. Nursing performance quality, nursing work environment, and health-promoting behaviors were measured using the Six Dimension Scale of Nursing Performance, Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index, and Health Promoting Lifestyle Profile-II, respectively. Nurses working in units with nurse managers who were characterized by better ability and by quality leadership, and who provided more support to nurses exhibited significantly greater health responsibility and physical activity. Nurses working with sufficient staffing and resources reported better stress management. Positive collegial nurse-physician relationships in units were significantly associated with more healthy eating among nurses. Nurses working in units with sufficient staffing and resources, and who had a higher level of spiritual growth and health responsibility, were more likely to perceive their nursing performance quality as being higher. To improve the quality of nursing practice, hospitals should focus on helping nurses maintain healthy lifestyles, as well as improving their working conditions in South Korea. Organizational support for adequate human resources and materials, mutual cooperation among nurses and physicians, and workplace health-promotion interventions for spiritual growth and health responsibility are needed. Organizational efforts to provide sufficient staffing and resources, boost the development of personal resources among nurses, and promote nurses' responsibility for their own health could be effective strategies for improving nursing performance quality and patient outcomes. © 2018 Sigma

  19. Determining the optimal index of heat stress in foundry, die casting and road construction industries using FAHP_Topsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Dehghanipoor

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Heat stress is one of the harmful risks in casting and die casting industries, which can not only cause work-related diseases but also can impair the performance and safety of workers. Since the indicators that are used to evaluate heat stress are very different, it is very difficult to choose a suitable index. The aim of this study was to determine the optimum heat stress index in foundry, die-cast, and road construction industries using FAHP and Topsis methods. Material and Method: In order to determine optimum heat stress index in foundry, die-cast, and road construction industries, first, the prioritization criteria were defined by experts (including ease of measurement, measurement accuracy, comprehensiveness, time, cost, and correlation. Then, considering these criteria, the best heat stress index was determined based on experts’ opinions and using FAHP and Topsis methods. Result: The results of this study suggest that given the current conditions and criteria, WBGT and P4SR is the best indices for foundry, die casting and construction. Conclusion: The results showed that according to comprehensiveness, accuracy and correlation criteria, the WBGT index is considered as the best indicator of heat stress assessment in foundry, die-cast and road construction industries. Moreover, the HSI ranked in the last place due to the complexity and cost of its calculation.

  20. Depression, Anxiety and Symptoms of Stress among Baccalaureate Nursing Students in Hong Kong: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Teris; Wong, Siu Yi; Wong, Kit Yi; Law, Lap Yan; Ng, Karen; Tong, Man Tik; Wong, Ka Yu; Ng, Man Ying; Yip, Paul S F

    2016-08-03

    This study examines the prevalence of depression, anxiety and symptoms of stress among baccalaureate nursing students in Hong Kong. Recent epidemiological data suggest that the prevalence of mild to severe depression, anxiety and stress among qualified nurses in Hong Kong stands at 35.8%, 37.3% and 41.1%, respectively. A total of 661 nursing students were recruited to participate in our cross-sectional mental health survey using the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale 21. Multiple logistic regression was used to determine significant relationships between variables. Working in general medicine, being in financial difficulty, having sleep problems, not having leisure activity and perceiving oneself in poor mental health were significant correlates of past-week depression, anxiety and stress. Year of study, physical inactivity and family crisis in the past year correlated significantly with depression. Imbalanced diets significantly correlated with anxiety. Stress was significantly associated with a lack of alone time. This is the first study to confirm empirically that clinical specialty, financial difficulties and lifestyle factors can increase nursing students' levels of depression and anxiety and symptoms of stress. Prevention, including the early detection and treatment of mental disorder, promises to reduce the prevalence of these indicators among this group.

  1. A longitudinal study of the impact of cumulative violence victimization on comorbid posttraumatic stress and depression among female nurses and nursing personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanaugh, Courtenay; Campbell, Jacquelyn; Messing, Jill T

    2014-06-01

    This study examined the impact of cumulative violence victimization on health care workers' subsequent posttraumatic stress-depression comorbidity. Female nurses and nursing personnel (N = 1,044) answered questions about lifetime violence victimization (e.g., childhood abuse, intimate partner violence, and workplace violence) at baseline and completed the Primary Care Posttraumatic Stress (PTS) Disorder screen and Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale 6 months later. Seven percent screened positive for comorbid posttraumatic stress-depression at 6-month monitoring. Workers who reported one, two, or three or more types of violence victimization at baseline had 2.41 (p .05), and 6.44 (p violence victimization at baseline. These results suggest the need to provide female nurses and nursing personnel with information about (1) the risk cumulative violence victimization poses for poorer mental health and functioning, and (2) evidence-based trauma informed treatment options outside their place of employment for those affected by violence victimization who develop mental health symptoms. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  2. Work-related stress according to the demand-control model and minor psychic disorders in nursing workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janete de Souza Urbanetto

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This was a cross-sectional study that aimed to assess the association between work-related stress according to the Demand-Control Model, and the occurrence of Minor Psychic Disorder (MPD in nursing workers. The participants were 335 professionals, out of which 245 were nursing technicians, aged predominantly between 20 and 40 years. Data were collected using the Job Stress Scale and the Self-Reporting Questionnaire-20. The analysis was performed using descriptive and analytical statistics. The prevalence of suspected MPD was 20.6%. Workers classified in the quadrants active job and high strain of the Demand-Control Model presented higher potential for developing MPD compared with those classified in the quadrant low strain. In conclusion, stress affects the mental health of workers and the aspects related to high psychological demands and high control still require further insight in order to understand their influence on the disease processes of nursing workers.

  3. Comparison of Nursing Home Hearing Handicap Index with Audiological Findings: A Presbycusis Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Nilforoush

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hearing evaluation usually includes hearing threshold assessment, middle ear function, and word recognition tests that lead to an accurate result of peripheral and central auditory system. However, they have some limitations because they cannot fully encompass all aspects of hearing loss problems. Using self-assessment approach, via a questionnaire or telephone survey, is one of the easiest methods to study hearing loss in population. In this research, 60 nursing home residents (27 females and 33 males ranging from 55 to 85 years with a mean age of were studied via completing self-assessment questionnaire by the elderly cases (NHHI self-version and the other one was filled by the nursing home personnel (NHHI staff-version. The effects of the hearing loss level on the self- and staff-version scores indicated that there is a significant relationship between self- and staff-version with hearing loss levels ( in male and female. Results from this study demonstrate the usefulness of NHHI questionnaire for evaluating hearing handicap of aged people and it may be a useful adjunct in setting up treatment and determining proper care.

  4. Work-family conflict as a mediator between occupational stress and psychological health among mental health nurses in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, Norio; Danjo, Kazuma; Furukori, Hanako; Sato, Yasushi; Tomita, Tetsu; Fujii, Akira; Nakagami, Taku; Kitaoka, Kazuyo; Yasui-Furukori, Norio

    2017-01-01

    Occupational stress among mental health nurses may affect their psychological health, resulting in reduced performance. To provide high-quality, sustainable nursing care, it is necessary to identify and control the factors associated with psychological health among mental health nurses. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of work-family conflict (WFC) in the well-known relationship between occupational stress and psychological health among mental health nurses in Japan. In this cross-sectional study, data were gathered from 180 mental health nurses who had a coresident child or were married. Data from the Work-Family Conflict Scale, the Generic Job Stress Questionnaire, the Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey, and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies for Depression Scale were obtained via self-report questionnaires. The effects of occupational stress and WFC on psychological health were explored by hierarchical linear regression analysis. The relationship between emotional exhaustion and occupational factors, including quantitative workload and the variance in workload, disappeared with the addition of WFC (each work interference with family [WIF] or family interference with work [FIW]). The relationship between emotional exhaustion and mental demands disappeared only with the addition of WIF. The relationship between depressive symptoms and variance in workload disappeared with the addition of WFC (each WIF or FIW). Our findings may encourage hospital administrators to consider the risks of medical staff WFC. Furthermore, longitudinal investigations into the factors associated with WFC are required for administrative and psychological interventions.

  5. [Counterproductive behaviors and moral disengagement of nurses as potential consequences of stress-related work: validity and reliability of measurement scales].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sili, Alessandro; Fida, Roberta; Zaghini, F; Tramontano, C; Paciello, Marinella

    2014-07-15

    Several studies, but no one in the nursing, have shown that work stress can facilitate the adoption of specific behaviors that the literature identifies as Counterproductive Work Behaviors (CWB). Individuals, however, not giving up to their moral principles, may transgress social, organizational, moral and ethical norms, through the adoption of moral disengagement (MD). The purpose of this study is to validate two specific scales of deviant behaviors and MD in nursing: the Nursing Counterproductive Work Behaviours Scale (Nursing CWBS) and Nursing Moral Disengagement Scale (Nursing MDS). 460 nurses participated in the study. After the adaptation of the Counterproductive Work Behavior Checklist by Spector and Fox to Nursing context (Nursing CWBS) and the ex novo development of the Nursing MDS, the psychometric properties of the two scales were tested. Also, the two scales were correlated. Through a cross-validation approach and based on the results of exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), we have shown that the scales have good psychometric properties. Furthermore, the results, attest that the nurse with high levels of MD implements more CWB in the workplace. The Nursing CWBS and Nursing MDS represent a valid starting point for the study of such phenomena in this specific context where stress among nursing staff is sometimes of considerable extent, especially in specific contexts of clinical care.

  6. Implementation of stress assessments by occupational health nurses working in occupational health agencies and their confidence in conducting such assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Chiseko; Saeki, Kazuko; Hirano, Michiyo

    2016-06-21

    Stress assessments are due to be conducted in December 2015. It is expected that there will be an increase in the number of private health agencies that provide stress assessment services and mental health care. This study aimed to clarify the current situation of and the factors related to stress assessments conducted by nurses in occupational health agencies. Nurses working full time were randomly selected from 60 organizations that were members of the National Federation of Industrial Health Organization. Self-administered questionnaires were sent out between November 2013 and January 2014. The questionnaire included the personal attributes of the participants, training programs, job contents, and how practical mental health care, including stress assessment, is. The study was approved by the ethics committees in the respective organizations. Out of the 162 questionnaires that were distributed, 89 (54.9%) were returned and 85 (53.1%) were valid for analysis. Stress assessments were conducted by 38.8% of the participants. With reference to their confidence in conducting stress assessments, "confidence and" 70.6%, respectively. The groups that conducted and did not conduct the stress assessments did not show any differences in the findings or other attributes. Further, the implementation of stress assessment was not associated with occupational health nurse (OHN) training, education, position, age, years of experience, attendance of lectures on mental health, etc. However, the confidence in conducting the assessment was related to age when dealing with cases on confidence stress assessment consultation in follow-up to the implementation of screening, such as stress, persons at high risk, and so on. Approximately 40% of the nurses were already conducting stress assessments, but most of them conducted such assessments about once a year and were not deeply involved in them. Approximately 70% of the nurses were confident in implementing stress assessments. Further

  7. Personality, organizational stress, and attitudes toward work as prospective predictors of professional burnout in hospital nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudek-Knežević, Jasna; Kalebić Maglica, Barbara; Krapić, Nada

    2011-01-01

    Aim To examine to what extent personality traits (extraversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness, neuroticism, and openness), organizational stress, and attitudes toward work and interactions between personality and either organizational stress or attitudes toward work prospectively predict 3 components of burnout. Methods The study was carried out on 118 hospital nurses. Data were analyzed by a set of hierarchical regression analyses, in which personality traits, measures of organizational stress, and attitudes toward work, as well as interactions between personality and either organizational stress or attitudes toward work were included as predictors, while 3 indices of burnout were measured 4 years later as criteria variables. Results Personality traits proved to be significant but weak prospective predictors of burnout and as a group predicted only reduced professional efficacy (R2 = 0.10), with agreeableness being a single negative predictor. Organizational stress was positive, affective-normative commitment negative predictor, while continuance commitment was not related to any dimension of burnout. We found interactions between neuroticism as well as conscientiousness and organizational stress, measured as role conflict and work overload, on reduced professional efficacy (βNRCWO = -0.30; ßcRCWO = -0.26). We also found interactions between neuroticism and affective normative commitment (β = 0.24) and between openness and continuance commitment on reduced professional efficacy (β = -0.23), as well as interactions between conscientiousness and continuance commitment on exhaustion. Conclusion Although contextual variables were strong prospective predictors and personality traits weak predictors of burnout, the results suggested the importance of the interaction between personality and contextual variables in predicting burnout. PMID:21853549

  8. Scoping the common antecedents of job stress and job satisfaction for nurses (2000-2013) using the job demands-resources model of stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVicar, Andrew

    2016-03-01

    To identify core antecedents of job stress and job satisfaction, and to explore the potential of stress interventions to improve job satisfaction. Decreased job satisfaction for nurses is strongly associated with increased job stress. Stress management strategies might have the potential to improve job satisfaction. Comparative scoping review of studies (2000-2013) and location of their outcomes within the 'job demands-job resources' (JD-R) model of stress to identify commonalities and trends. Many, but not all, antecedents of both phenomena appeared consistently suggesting they are common mediators. Others were more variable but the appearance of 'emotional demands' as a common antecedent in later studies suggests an evolving influence of the changing work environment. The occurrence of 'shift work' as a common issue in later studies points to further implications for nurses' psychosocial well-being. Job satisfaction problems in nursing might be co-responsive to stress management intervention. Improving the buffering effectiveness of increased resilience and of prominent perceived job resource issues are urgently required. Participatory, psychosocial methods have the potential to raise job resources but will require high-level collaboration by stakeholders, and participative leadership and facilitation by managers to enable better decision-latitude, support for action planning and responsive changes. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Challenges in Selecting an Appropriate Heat Stress Index to Protect Workers in Hot and Humid Underground Mines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedram Roghanchi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: A detailed evaluation of the underground mine climate requires extensive measurements to be performed coupled to climatic modeling work. This can be labor-intensive and time-consuming, and consequently impractical for daily work comfort assessments. Therefore, a simple indicator like a heat stress index is needed to enable a quick, valid, and acceptable evaluation of underground climatic conditions on a regular basis. This can be explained by the unending quest to develop a “universal index,” which has led to the proliferation of many proposed heat stress indices. Methods: The aim of this research study is to discuss the challenges in identifying and selecting an appropriate heat stress index for thermal planning and management purposes in underground mines. A method is proposed coupled to a defined strategy for selecting and recommending heat stress indices to be used in underground metal mines in the United States and worldwide based on a thermal comfort model. Results: The performance of current heat stress indices used in underground mines varies based on the climatic conditions and the level of activities. Therefore, carefully selecting or establishing an appropriate heat stress index is of paramount importance to ensure the safety, health, and increasing productivity of the underground workers. Conclusion: This method presents an important tool to assess and select the most appropriate index for certain climatic conditions to protect the underground workers from heat-related illnesses. Although complex, the method presents results that are easy to interpret and understand than any of the currently available evaluation methods. Keywords: climatic conditions, heat stress index, thermal comfort, underground mining

  10. Nurse practitioner job content and stress effects on anxiety and depressive symptoms, and self-perceived health status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chin-Huang; Wang, Jane; Yang, Cheng-San; Fan, Jun-Yu

    2016-07-01

    We explored the impact of job content and stress on anxiety, depressive symptoms and self-perceived health status among nurse practitioners (NPs). Taiwan's NP roles vary between hospitals as a result of the diverse demands and complex tasks that cause job-related stress, potentially affecting the health of the NP. This study utilised a cross-sectional descriptive design with 161 NPs from regional hospitals participating. Data collection involved demographics, the Taiwan Nurse Stress Checklist, the Job Content Questionnaire, the Beck Anxiety Inventory, the Beck Depression Inventory, a General Health Status Checklist and salivary cortisol tests. NPs reported moderate job stress, similar job control to nurses, mild anxiety and depression, and below-average self-perceived health. Being a licensed NP, personal response, competence, and incompleteness of the personal arrangements subscales of job stress, and anxiety predicted self-perceived health after adjusting for other covariates. Job stress and anxiety affect NP health. NPs are a valuable resource, and the healthcare system demand is growing. Reasonable NP staffing, working hours, proper promotion systems, the causes of job stress, job content clarification and practical work shift scheduling need to be considered. The occupational safety and physical and psychological health of NPs are strongly associated with the quality of patient care. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Utility of the Oswestry Disability Index for studies of back pain related disability in nurses: evaluation of psychometric and measurement properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Anna P; Steele, Emily J; Hodges, Paul W; Stewart, Simon

    2010-05-01

    Disability due to back pain in nurses results in reduced productivity, work absenteeism and attrition from the nursing workforce internationally. Consistent use of outcome measures is needed in intervention studies to enable meta-analyses that determine efficacy of back pain preventive programs. This study investigated the psychometric and measurement properties of the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) in nursing students to determine its suitability for assessing back pain related disability in intervention studies. Bachelor of Nursing students were recruited. Test-retest reliability and the ability of the ODI to discriminate between individuals with serious and non-serious back pain were investigated. The measurement error of the ODI was examined with the minimal detectable change at the 90% confidence level (MDC(90)). Student nurses (n=214) had a low mean ODI score of 8.8+/-7.4%. Participants with serious back pain recorded higher scores than the rest of the cohort (pdisability in this population. Data from this and previous studies demonstrate that the measurement properties of the ODI are inappropriate for studying back pain related disability in nurses. The ODI is not recommended for back pain intervention studies in the nursing population and an alternative tool that is sensitive to lower levels of disability must be determined. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Role of internal marketing, organizational commitment, and job stress in discerning the turnover intention of Korean nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Haejung; Kim, Myoung-Soo; Yoon, Jung-A

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the discriminating factors of Korean nurses' turnover intention (TI) among internal marketing (IM), organizational commitment (OC), and job stress (JS). Nurses (n = 185) who had worked for 1-10 years were surveyed from six general hospitals in South Korea. The data were collected by using questionnaires and were analyzed with descriptive statistics and discriminant analysis. The participants were grouped into three groups, depending on the level of their TI: "low TI group" (n = 58), "moderate TI group" (n = 96), and "high TI group" (n = 31). One function significantly discriminated between the high TI and low TI groups. The function correctly classified 84.3% of the participants into the two groups and 75.3% were correctly classified in the cross-validation. Organizational commitment was the most important factor. Job stress and the IM components of staffing-promotion, reward, management philosophy, working environment, and segmentation were significant discriminant factors of TI. Based on the findings of this study, we could conclude that OC, JS, and IM play important roles in the TI of nurses. Implying a career development system as an OC management strategy, an innovative promotion policy to change conservative organizational climates and a balance of effort-reward can be considered as managerial interventions to reduce nurses' TI. © 2010 The Authors. Japan Journal of Nursing Science © 2010 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  13. Investigation of marital satisfaction and its relationship with job stress and general health of nurses in Qazvin, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azimian, Jalil; Piran, Pegah; Jahanihashemi, Hassan; Dehghankar, Leila

    2017-04-01

    Pressures in nursing can affect family life and marital problems, disrupt common social problems, increase work-family conflicts and endanger people's general health. To determine marital satisfaction and its relationship with job stress and general health of nurses. This descriptive and cross-sectional study was done in 2015 in medical educational centers of Qazvin by using an ENRICH marital satisfaction scale and General Health and Job Stress questionnaires completed by 123 nurses. Analysis was done by SPSS version 19 using descriptive and analytical statistics (Pearson correlation, t-test, ANOVA, Chi-square, regression line, multiple regression analysis). The findings showed that 64.4% of nurses had marital satisfaction. There was significant relationship between age (p=0.03), job experience (p=0.01), age of spouse (p=0.01) and marital satisfaction. The results showed that there was a significant relationship between marital satisfaction and general health (pstress and disorder in general health of nurses and low marital satisfaction by running health promotion programs and paying attention to its dimensions can help work and family health of nurses.

  14. Effect of ubiquinol supplementation on biochemical and oxidative stress indexes after intense exercise in young athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlando, Patrick; Silvestri, Sonia; Galeazzi, Roberta; Antonicelli, Roberto; Marcheggiani, Fabio; Cirilli, Ilenia; Bacchetti, Tiziana; Tiano, Luca

    2018-12-01

    Physical exercise significantly impacts the biochemistry of the organism. Ubiquinone is a key component of the mitochondrial respiratory chain and ubiquinol, its reduced and active form, is an emerging molecule in sport nutrition. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of ubiquinol supplementation on biochemical and oxidative stress indexes after an intense bout of exercise. 21 male young athletes (26 + 5 years of age) were randomized in two groups according to a double blind cross-over study, either supplemented with ubiquinol (200 mg/day) or placebo for 1 month. Blood was withdrawn before and after a single bout of intense exercise (40 min run at 85% maxHR). Physical performance, hematochemical parameters, ubiquinone/ubiquinol plasma content, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, paraoxonase activity and oxidative DNA damage were analyzed. A single bout of intense exercise produced a significant increase in most hematochemical indexes, in particular CK and Mb while, on the contrary, normalized coenzyme Q 10 plasma content decreased significantly in all subjects. Ubiquinol supplementation prevented exercise-induced CoQ deprivation and decrease in paraoxonase activity. Moreover at a cellular level, in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, ubiquinol supplementation was associated with a significant decrease in cytosolic ROS while mitochondrial membrane potential and oxidative DNA damage remained unchanged. Data highlights a very rapid dynamic of CoQ depletion following intense exercise underlying an increased demand by the organism. Ubiquinol supplementation minimized exercise-induced depletion and enhanced plasma and cellular antioxidant levels but it was not able to improve physical performance indexes or markers of muscular damage.

  15. [Understanding a hospitalized, school-aged child's stress in the PICU: the application of picture books in nursing care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pei-Ju; Feng, Jui-Ying

    2013-06-01

    Hospitalization in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) can be a very stressful and sometimes traumatic experience for school-aged children due to illness, painful procedures, unfamiliar environment, and separation from family. We incorporated picture books into PICU nursing care to explore the stress response in a school-aged child with compartment syndrome who was hospitalized in the PICU. Observation, interview and communication with the patient were used to assess her psychological reactions and emotional and behavioral responses to stress related to hospitalization and medical treatment. Autonomy and control were provided and strengthened by giving the patient choices and purposive life plans. Picture books were used to establish rapport and help the patient express her feelings, needs, and desires for parental love and company. This case report highlights the importance of nurses' awareness of children's stresses and needs during hospitalization in the PICU as well as the value of picture books or other age-appropriate tools for this patient population.

  16. Psychometric properties of the Parenting Stress Index with parents of children with autistic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dardas, L A; Ahmad, M M

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the psychometric properties and the theoretical structure of the Parenting Stress Index-short form (PSI-SF) with Jordanian parents of children with autistic disorder. Using a cross-sectional design for data collection, the convenience sample of the study was composed of 184 Jordanian parents of children with autistic disorder. The factor structure for the PSI-SF was examined using confirmatory and exploratory factor analyses. We found that the modified three-factor model (30 items) fits the data significantly better than the 36-item model. The results showed that the 12 items of the Parental Distress sub-scale support the original scale structure. However, items in the Parent-Child Dysfunctional Interaction and Difficult Child sub-scales did not show stability in their structure. The results in this study showed that the PSI-SF in its 30-item model has endorsed the necessary validity of the scale with parents of children with autistic disorder. The study provides information on the effects of Arab culture on the validity of PSI-SF. It is recommended to use the new factors structure of the PSI-SF with the 30 items in the studies that intend to examine the stress among parents with children with autistic disorder in the Arab world. © 2013 MENCAP and International Association of the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Water stress index for alkaline fen habitat based on UAV and continuous tower measurements of canopy infrared temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciężkowski, Wojciech; Jóźwiak, Jacek; Chormański, Jarosław; Szporak-Wasilewska, Sylwia; Kleniewska, Małgorzata

    2017-04-01

    This study is focused on developing water stress index for alkaline fen, to evaluate water stress impact on habitat protected within Natura 2000 network: alkaline fens (habitat code:7230). It is calculated based on continuous measurements of air temperature, relative humidity and canopy temperature from meteorological tower and several UAV flights for canopy temperature registration. Measurements were taken during the growing season in 2016 in the Upper Biebrza Basin in north-east Poland. Firstly methodology of the crop water stress index (CWSI) determination was used to obtained non-water stress base line based on continuous measurements (NWSBtower). Parameters of NWSBtower were directly used to calculate spatial variability of CWSI for UAV thermal infrared (TIR) images. Then for each UAV flight day at least 3 acquisition were performed to define NWSBUAV. NWSBUAV was used to calculate canopy waters stress for whole image relative to the less stressed areas. The spatial distribution of developed index was verified using remotely sensed indices of vegetation health. Results showed that in analysed area covered by sedge-moss vegetation NWSB cannot be used directly. The proposed modification of CWSI allows identifying water stress in alkaline fen habitats and was called as Sedge-Moss Water Stress Index (SMWSI). The study shows possibility of usage remotely sensed canopy temperature data to detect areas exposed to the water stress on wetlands. This research has been carried out under the Biostrateg Programme of the Polish National Centre for Research and Development (NCBiR), project No.: DZP/BIOSTRATEG-II/390/2015: The innovative approach supporting monitoring of non-forest Natura 2000 habitats, using remote sensing methods (HabitARS).

  18. Predicting heat stress index in Sasso hens using automatic linear modeling and artificial neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakubu, A.; Oluremi, O. I. A.; Ekpo, E. I.

    2018-03-01

    There is an increasing use of robust analytical algorithms in the prediction of heat stress. The present investigation therefore, was carried out to forecast heat stress index (HSI) in Sasso laying hens. One hundred and sixty seven records on the thermo-physiological parameters of the birds were utilized. They were reared on deep litter and battery cage systems. Data were collected when the birds were 42- and 52-week of age. The independent variables fitted were housing system, age of birds, rectal temperature (RT), pulse rate (PR), and respiratory rate (RR). The response variable was HSI. Data were analyzed using automatic linear modeling (ALM) and artificial neural network (ANN) procedures. The ALM model building method involved Forward Stepwise using the F Statistic criterion. As regards ANN, multilayer perceptron (MLP) with back-propagation network was used. The ANN network was trained with 90% of the data set while 10% were dedicated to testing for model validation. RR and PR were the two parameters of utmost importance in the prediction of HSI. However, the fractional importance of RR was higher than that of PR in both ALM (0.947 versus 0.053) and ANN (0.677 versus 0.274) models. The two models also predicted HSI effectively with high degree of accuracy [r = 0.980, R 2 = 0.961, adjusted R 2 = 0.961, and RMSE = 0.05168 (ALM); r = 0.983, R 2 = 0.966; adjusted R 2 = 0.966, and RMSE = 0.04806 (ANN)]. The present information may be exploited in the development of a heat stress chart based largely on RR. This may aid detection of thermal discomfort in a poultry house under tropical and subtropical conditions.

  19. Stress, coping, and general health of nurses who work in units that assist AIDS-carriers and patients with

    OpenAIRE

    Da Silva Britto, Eliane; Pimenta Carvalho, Ana Maria

    2008-01-01

    Based on Lazarus and Folkman’s theory about stress and coping, this research aimed at answering questions related to how nurses, who work in two specialized units of a general hospital, evaluate their working environment, their health and how they manage with stressing situations. In the unit of infectious diseases, the nurses’ evaluation of their working environment did not surpass the limits of what is considered as acceptable. In the unit of hematological alterations, the results showed hi...

  20. Self-Care for Nurse Leaders in Acute Care Environment Reduces Perceived Stress: A Mixed-Methods Pilot Study Merits Further Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyess, Susan Mac Leod; Prestia, Angela S; Marquit, Doren-Elyse; Newman, David

    2018-03-01

    Acute care practice settings are stressful. Nurse leaders face stressful demands of numerous competing priorities. Some nurse leaders experience unmanageable stress, but success requires self-care. This article presents a repeated measures intervention design study using mixed methods to investigate a self-care simple meditation practice for nurse leaders. Themes and subthemes emerged in association with the three data collection points: at baseline (pretest), after 6 weeks, and after 12 weeks (posttest) from introduction of the self-care simple meditation practice. An analysis of variance yielded a statistically significant drop in perceived stress at 6 weeks and again at 12 weeks. Conducting future research is merited.

  1. Validation of Environmental Stress Index by Measuring Infrared Radiation as a Substitute for Solar Radiation in Indoor Workplaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peymaneh Habibi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background The exposure of individuals to heat at different jobs warrants the use of heat stress evaluation indices. Objectives The aim of this study was to validate environmental stress index using an infrared radiation (IR measurement instrument as a substitute for pyranometer in indoor workplaces. Methods This study was conducted on 2303 indoor workstations in different industries in Isfahan, Iran, during July, August, and September in 2012. The intensity of the Infrared Radiation (IR (w/m2 was measured at five-centimeter distances in six different directions, above, opposite, right, left, behind and below the globe thermometer. Then, the dry globe temperature (Ta, wet globe temperature (Tnw, globe temperature (Tg and relative humidity (RH were also simultaneously measured. The data were analyzed using correlation and regression by the SPSS18 software. Results The study results indicate that a high correlation (r = 0.96 exists between the environmental stress index (ESI and the values of wet bulb globe temperature (P < 0.01. According to the following equation, WBGT = 1.086 × ESI - 1.846, the environmental stress index is able to explain 91% (R2 = 0.91 of the WBGT index variations (P < 0.01. Conclusions Based on the results, to study heat stress in indoor workplaces when the WBGT measurement instrument is not available and also in short-term exposures (shorter than 30 minutes when measuring the wet bulb globe temperature shows a considerable error, it is possible to calculate the environmental stress index and accordingly to the WBGT index, by measuring the parameters of dry bulb temperature (Ta, relative humidity (RH, and infrared radiation intensity that can be easily measured in a short time.

  2. Effect of communication skill training using group psychoeducation method on the stress level of psychiatry ward nurses.

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    Ghazavi, Zahra; Lohrasbi, Fatemeh; Mehrabi, Tayebeh

    2010-12-01

    Nursing is a dynamic and supportive job, with the main role of taking care of patients. Maintaining appropriate communication of the nurse with the patients is particularly known as the main core of care in mental health. However, in spite of the importance of providing communication, one of the main sources of stress in nurses of psychiatry wards is communication with the patients. Some important reasons for inappropriate relationship between the nurse and patient can be lack of necessary skills to communicate with patients because of insufficient training. Although training communication skills is an important part of the education of medical and paramedical students, in recent studies it has been demonstrated that the communication skills learned in theoretical courses would not necessarily be transferred to clinical settings, and proving training in clinical settings is a must. The present study was carried out to determine the effect of training communication skills using psychoeducation method on the stress level of nurses of psychiatry wards in 2010. This is a quasi-experimental study. The participants were 45 nurses; 23 and 22 in the experiment and control groups, respectively, working in psychiatry wards of Noor and Farabi hospitals, Isfahan, Iran. The sampling was carried out by the census method, and then the participants were randomly assigned to the two groups of experiment and control, using random number table. The two groups filled out the demographic data form and also the questionnaire on nurses' occupational stress, designed by the researcher. The questionnaire was filled out three times; before, immediately after, and one month after the training. Training of communication skills was carried out using group psychoeducation method, in six sessions, each lasted for 1.5 hours. The training sessions of the experiment group were held in Farabi Hospital. The findings indicated that before the intervention, the members of the two groups had a high

  3. Workplace Stresses and Musculoskeletal Disorders Among Nurses: A Cross-Sectional Study

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    Alireza Dehdashti

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives Work-related musculoskeletal disorders are a significant occupational problem among employees and workers. This study attempted to explore the effect of stressors in the hospital environment on nurses’ development of musculoskeletal disorders. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey in a random sample of 123 hospital nurses from Semnan University of Medical Sciences. Data were collected during working days over 3 months starting from January 2014. Participants completed a standardized questionnaire for stresses and musculoskeletal disorders at work. Musculoskeletal disorders were used as the dependent variables, while demographic, physical, and psychosocial work factors were used as independent variables. Results Our study revealed prevalence of low back ache, neck ache, shoulder ache, arm-elbow ache, and hand-wrist pain rated 48.3%, 39.5%, 33.1%, 31.3%, and 23.4%, respectively. The findings showed significant statistical association between musculoskeletal complaints in neck and upper extremity with exposed stress levels (P = 0.04. Musculoskeletal symptoms rates increased in employees experienced poor work posture (P = 0.01, fatigue (P = 0.04, and work-family conflict (P = 0.04. Conclusions This study provides indication of the relationship between work environment stress levels and musculoskeletal disorders. Physical and psychosocial stressors should be considered for the development of preventive measures.

  4. Effect of assertiveness training on levels of stress and assertiveness experienced by nurses in Taiwan, Republic of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S; Crockett, M S

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the effectiveness of assertiveness training in improving self-perceived levels of stress and assertiveness among nurses in Taiwan, Republic of China. The two-group experimental design was conducted in a 2,000-bed veteran general hospital. A sample of 60 volunteer Chinese-speaking nurses participated in the study. Subjects were randomly assigned to one of two treatments: assertiveness training (AT) or alternate treatment control (ATC), which served as a control and contained updated knowledge of new computer technology for in patient settings. Subjects in each group participated in six 2-hour workshops in the same two-week period. All subjects were pre-, post-, and follow-up posttested for stress and assertiveness with the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) and Rathus Assertiveness Schedule (RAS), respectively. Results revealed the following: (1) subjects in both groups of pretest were clearly subassertive and under considerable stress; (2) by the end of training, the AT group scored significantly higher on the rating of assertiveness than those in the ATC group, and had successfully maintained their improvement by the 4-week follow-up; and (3) by the end of training, the AT group reported significantly lower levels of stress than the ATC group as indicated on the PSS, and successfully maintained their improvements at the 4-week follow-up. Overall, the results indicate clear support for the effectiveness of assertiveness training for treating subassertive behaviors and stress in a population of professional nurses in Taiwan.

  5. Heat index and adjusted temperature as surrogates for wet bulb globe temperature to screen for occupational heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Thomas E; Iheanacho, Ivory

    2015-01-01

    Ambient temperature and relative humidity are readily ava-ilable and thus tempting metrics for heat stress assessment. Two methods of using air temperature and relative humidity to create an index are Heat Index and Adjusted Temperature. The purposes of this article are: (1) to examine how well Heat Index and Adjusted Temperature estimated the wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT) index, and (2) to suggest how Heat Index and Adjusted Temperature can be used to screen for heat stress level. Psychrometric relationships were used to estimate values of actual WBGT for conditions of air temperature, relative humidity, and radiant heat at an air speed of 0.5 m/s. A relationship between Heat Index [°F] and WBGT [°C] was described by WBGT = -0.0034 HI(2) + 0.96 HI - 34. At lower Heat Index values, the equation estimated WBGTs that were ± 2 °C-WBGT around the actual value, and to about ± 0.5 °C-WBGT for Heat Index values > 100 °F. A relationship between Adjusted Temperature [°F] and WBGT [°C] was described by WBGT = 0.45 Tadj - 16. The actual WBGT was between 1 °C-WBGT below the estimated value and 1.4 °C-WBGT above. That is, there was a slight bias toward overestimating WBGT from Adjusted Temperature. Heat stress screening tables were constructed for metabolic rates of 180, 300, and 450