WorldWideScience

Sample records for numerous classroom examples

  1. Numerical approaches towards life cycle interpretation five examples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijungs, R.; Kleijn, R.

    2001-01-01

    The ISO-standard for LCA distinguishes four phases, of which the last one, the interpretation, is the least elaborated. It can be regarded as containing procedural steps (like a completeness check) as well as numerical steps (like a sensitivity check). This paper provides five examples of techniques

  2. An example of numerical simulation in causal set dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krugly, Alexey L; Tserkovnikov, Ivan A

    2013-01-01

    The model of a discrete pregeometry on a microscopic scale is an x-graph. This is a directed acyclic graph. An outdegree and an indegree of each vertex are not more than 2. The sets of vertices and edges of x-graph are particular cases of causal sets. The sequential growth of a graph is an addition of new vertices one by one. A simple stochastic algorithm of sequential growth of x-graph are considered. It is based on a random walk at the x-graph. The particles in this model must be self-organized repetitive structures. We introduce the method of search of such repetitive structures. It is based on a discrete Fourier transformation. An example of numerical simulation is introduced.

  3. [Effects decomposition in mediation analysis: a numerical example].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zugna, Daniela; Richiardi, Lorenzo

    2018-01-01

    Mediation analysis aims to decompose the total effect of the exposure on the outcome into a direct effect (unmediated) and an indirect effect (mediated by a mediator). When the interest also lies on understanding whether the exposure effect differs in different sub-groups of study population or under different scenarios, the mediation analysis needs to be integrated with interaction analysis. In this setting it is necessary to decompose the total effect not only into two components, the direct and indirect effects, but other two components linked to interaction. The interaction between the exposure and the mediator in their effect on the outcome could indeed act through the effect of the exposure on the mediator or through the mediator when the mediator is not totally explained by the exposure. We describe options for decomposition, proposed in literature, of the total effect and we illustrate them through a hypothetical example of the effect of age at diagnosis of cancer on survival, mediated and unmediated by the therapeutical approach, and a numerical example.

  4. Development of a Computerized In-Basket Exercise for the Classroom: A Sales Management Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Michael M.; Barnes, John W.; Onken, Marina H.

    2006-01-01

    This article follows the development of a sales management in-basket exercise for use in the classroom. The authors have computerized the exercise and added features to allow for additional and more quantitative input from the students. The exercise has evolved and been tested in numerous classroom situations. The computerized in-basket exercise…

  5. Implementing a flipped classroom approach in a university numerical methods mathematics course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Barbara M.

    2017-05-01

    This paper describes and analyses the implementation of a 'flipped classroom' approach, in an undergraduate mathematics course on numerical methods. The approach replaced all the lecture contents by instructor-made videos and was implemented in the consecutive years 2014 and 2015. The sequential case study presented here begins with an examination of the attitudes of the 2014 cohort to the approach in general as well as analysing their use of the videos. Based on these responses, the instructor makes a number of changes (for example, the use of 'cloze' summary notes and the introduction of an extra, optional tutorial class) before repeating the 'flipped classroom' approach the following year. The attitudes to the approach and the video usage of the 2015 cohort are then compared with the 2014 cohort and further changes that could be implemented for the next cohort are suggested.

  6. From Classroom to Career Development Planning: Eportfolio Use Examples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Coric Samardzija

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we will present several examples of different maturity levels of ePortfolio usage at the Faculty of Organization and Informatics, University of Zagreb, Croatia. Firstly, we will illustrate basic in-class uses of ePortfolio in which students are introduced with the ePortfolio concept, self-reflection, self-monitoring and knowledge management. The primary goal of this phase is to show students how to record, plan and improve their professional skills in order to facilitate their preparation for the labour market. This phase is also aimed at recording and showcasing of students’ work and self-assessment. The second example of ePortfolio usage in this paper concerns self-guidance monitoring at the postgraduate level, where it is used to monitor the activities and progress of PhD students as well as to simplify communication between supervisors and doctoral candidates. In addition, by using the ePortfolio pattern, doctoral students are encouraged to start planning their careers as scientific researchers and experts. Finally, we introduce an example of using ePortfolios for academic human resources management as part of institutional quality assurance. For that purpose, a career development plan was developed to collect and monitor the work and progress of academic staff (both young researchers and teaching assistants.

  7. A finite difference, multipoint flux numerical approach to flow in porous media: Numerical examples

    KAUST Repository

    Osman, Hossam Omar; Salama, Amgad; Sun, Shuyu; Bao, Kai

    2012-01-01

    It is clear that none of the current available numerical schemes which may be adopted to solve transport phenomena in porous media fulfill all the required robustness conditions. That is while the finite difference methods are the simplest of all, they face several difficulties in complex geometries and anisotropic media. On the other hand, while finite element methods are well suited to complex geometries and can deal with anisotropic media, they are more involved in coding and usually require more execution time. Therefore, in this work we try to combine some features of the finite element technique, namely its ability to work with anisotropic media with the finite difference approach. We reduce the multipoint flux, mixed finite element technique through some quadrature rules to an equivalent cell-centered finite difference approximation. We show examples on using this technique to single-phase flow in anisotropic porous media.

  8. A finite difference, multipoint flux numerical approach to flow in porous media: Numerical examples

    KAUST Repository

    Osman, Hossam Omar

    2012-06-17

    It is clear that none of the current available numerical schemes which may be adopted to solve transport phenomena in porous media fulfill all the required robustness conditions. That is while the finite difference methods are the simplest of all, they face several difficulties in complex geometries and anisotropic media. On the other hand, while finite element methods are well suited to complex geometries and can deal with anisotropic media, they are more involved in coding and usually require more execution time. Therefore, in this work we try to combine some features of the finite element technique, namely its ability to work with anisotropic media with the finite difference approach. We reduce the multipoint flux, mixed finite element technique through some quadrature rules to an equivalent cell-centered finite difference approximation. We show examples on using this technique to single-phase flow in anisotropic porous media.

  9. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this section of Resonance, we invite readers to pose questions likely to be raised in a classroom ... sharing personal experiences and viewpoints on matters related to teaching and learning ... Is there any well charaderised example of.

  10. Dynamical Systems Method and Applications Theoretical Developments and Numerical Examples

    CERN Document Server

    Ramm, Alexander G

    2012-01-01

    Demonstrates the application of DSM to solve a broad range of operator equations The dynamical systems method (DSM) is a powerful computational method for solving operator equations. With this book as their guide, readers will master the application of DSM to solve a variety of linear and nonlinear problems as well as ill-posed and well-posed problems. The authors offer a clear, step-by-step, systematic development of DSM that enables readers to grasp the method's underlying logic and its numerous applications. Dynamical Systems Method and Applications begins with a general introduction and

  11. Upscaling of permeability field of fractured rock system: Numerical examples

    KAUST Repository

    Bao, K.; Salama, Amgad; Sun, S.

    2012-01-01

    When the permeability field of a given porous medium domain is heterogeneous by the existence of randomly distributed fractures such that numerical investigation becomes cumbersome, another level of upscaling may be required. That is such complex permeability field could be relaxed (i.e., smoothed) by constructing an effective permeability field. The effective permeability field is an approximation to the real permeability field that preserves certain quantities and provides an overall acceptable description of the flow field. In this work, the effective permeability for a fractured rock system is obtained for different coarsening scenarios starting from very coarse mesh all the way towards the fine mesh simulation. In all these scenarios, the effective permeability as well as the pressure at each cell is obtained. The total flux at the exit boundary is calculated in all these cases, and very good agreement is obtained.

  12. High-performance parallel computing in the classroom using the public goods game as an example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perc, Matjaž

    2017-07-01

    The use of computers in statistical physics is common because the sheer number of equations that describe the behaviour of an entire system particle by particle often makes it impossible to solve them exactly. Monte Carlo methods form a particularly important class of numerical methods for solving problems in statistical physics. Although these methods are simple in principle, their proper use requires a good command of statistical mechanics, as well as considerable computational resources. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate how the usage of widely accessible graphics cards on personal computers can elevate the computing power in Monte Carlo simulations by orders of magnitude, thus allowing live classroom demonstration of phenomena that would otherwise be out of reach. As an example, we use the public goods game on a square lattice where two strategies compete for common resources in a social dilemma situation. We show that the second-order phase transition to an absorbing phase in the system belongs to the directed percolation universality class, and we compare the time needed to arrive at this result by means of the main processor and by means of a suitable graphics card. Parallel computing on graphics processing units has been developed actively during the last decade, to the point where today the learning curve for entry is anything but steep for those familiar with programming. The subject is thus ripe for inclusion in graduate and advanced undergraduate curricula, and we hope that this paper will facilitate this process in the realm of physics education. To that end, we provide a documented source code for an easy reproduction of presented results and for further development of Monte Carlo simulations of similar systems.

  13. NITARP: An Example of Effective Data-Based Research in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Laura; Rowe, Jamie L.; Lineberger, Howard; Duranko, Gary; Gorjian, Varoujan

    2018-01-01

    The use of data in the classroom is a core component of both project based learning and STEM based education. Authentic student driven research using real-world data is a primary focus of both teaching strategies. To make the educational outcome effective and long lasting, the type and quality of data used in the lessons is important. The NASA/IPAC Teacher Archive Research Project (NITARP) program encapsulates this in very meaningful ways by providing both teachers and students the opportunity to ask deep meaningful questions, collaborate with peers, and arrive at meaningful conclusions. Teachers trained in the use of scientific archives and the application of those archives for authentic research is critical for this type of learning to be successful.In this study we use the NITARP program as an example of effective STEM project based learning using archived scientific data. We explore the components of the program that are most effective, the effects on teacher competency and ease of use with students, and use in the classroom. For each area we also explore alternate sources of teacher support, data archives, and techniques for implementation in classrooms for various topics and skill levels.

  14. Implementing a Flipped Classroom Approach in a University Numerical Methods Mathematics Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Barbara M.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes and analyses the implementation of a "flipped classroom" approach, in an undergraduate mathematics course on numerical methods. The approach replaced all the lecture contents by instructor-made videos and was implemented in the consecutive years 2014 and 2015. The sequential case study presented here begins with an…

  15. Direct design of LPV feedback controllers: technical details and numerical examples

    OpenAIRE

    Novara, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    The paper contains technical details of recent results developed by the author, regarding the design of LPV controllers directly from experimental data. Two numerical examples are also presented, about control of the Duffing oscillator and control of a two-degree-of-freedom manipulator.

  16. On vortex loops and filaments: three examples of numerical predictions of flows containing vortices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Egon

    2003-01-01

    Vortex motion plays a dominant role in many flow problems. This article aims at demonstrating some of the characteristic features of vortices with the aid of numerical solutions of the governing equations of fluid mechanics, the Navier-Stokes equations. Their discretized forms will first be reviewed briefly. Thereafter three problems of fluid flow involving vortex loops and filaments are discussed. In the first, the time-dependent motion and the mutual interaction of two colliding vortex rings are discussed, predicted in good agreement with experimental observations. The second example shows how vortex rings are generated, move, and interact with each other during the suction stroke in the cylinder of an automotive engine. The numerical results, validated with experimental data, suggest that vortex rings can be used to influence the spreading of the fuel droplets prior to ignition and reduce the fuel consumption. In the third example, it is shown that vortices can also occur in aerodynamic flows over delta wings at angle of attack as well as pipe flows: of particular interest for technical applications of these flows is the situation in which the vortex cores are destroyed, usually referred to as vortex breakdown or bursting. Although reliable breakdown criteria could not be established as yet, the numerical predictions obtained so far are found to agree well with the few experimental data available in the recent literature.

  17. An Internet of Things Example: Classrooms Access Control over Near Field Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Daniel; Agudo, Juan Enrique; Sánchez, Héctor; Macías, Miguel Macías

    2014-01-01

    The Internet of Things is one of the ideas that has become increasingly relevant in recent years. It involves connecting things to the Internet in order to retrieve information from them at any time and from anywhere. In the Internet of Things, sensor networks that exchange information wirelessly via Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, Zigbee or RF are common. In this sense, our paper presents a way in which each classroom control is accessed through Near Field Communication (NFC) and the information is shared via radio frequency. These data are published on the Web and could easily be used for building applications from the data collected. As a result, our application collects information from the classroom to create a control classroom tool that displays access to and the status of all the classrooms graphically and also connects this data with social networks. PMID:24755520

  18. An internet of things example: classrooms access control over near field communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Daniel; Agudo, Juan Enrique; Sánchez, Héctor; Macías, Miguel Macías

    2014-04-21

    The Internet of Things is one of the ideas that has become increasingly relevant in recent years. It involves connecting things to the Internet in order to retrieve information from them at any time and from anywhere. In the Internet of Things, sensor networks that exchange information wirelessly via Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, Zigbee or RF are common. In this sense, our paper presents a way in which each classroom control is accessed through Near Field Communication (NFC) and the information is shared via radio frequency. These data are published on the Web and could easily be used for building applications from the data collected. As a result, our application collects information from the classroom to create a control classroom tool that displays access to and the status of all the classrooms graphically and also connects this data with social networks.

  19. An Internet of Things Example: Classrooms Access Control over Near Field Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Palma

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The Internet of Things is one of the ideas that has become increasingly relevant in recent years. It involves connecting things to the Internet in order to retrieve information from them at any time and from anywhere. In the Internet of Things, sensor networks that exchange information wirelessly via Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, Zigbee or RF are common. In this sense, our paper presents a way in which each classroom control is accessed through Near Field Communication (NFC and the information is shared via radio frequency. These data are published on the Web and could easily be used for building applications from the data collected. As a result, our application collects information from the classroom to create a control classroom tool that displays access to and the status of all the classrooms graphically and also connects this data with social networks.

  20. An Invitation to Kitchen Earth Sciences, an Example of MISO Soup Convection Experiment in Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurita, K.; Kumagai, I.; Davaille, A.

    2008-12-01

    In recent frontiers of earth sciences such as computer simulations and large-scale observations/experiments involved researchers are usually remote from the targets and feel difficulty in having a sense of touching the phenomena in hands. This results in losing sympathy for natural phenomena particularly among young researchers, which we consider a serious problem. We believe the analog experiments such as the subjects of "kitchen earth sciences" proposed here can be a remedy for this. Analog experiments have been used as an important tool in various research fields of earth science, particularly in the fields of developing new ideas. The experiment by H. Ramberg by using silicone pate is famous for guiding concept of the mantle dynamics. The term, "analog" means something not directly related to the target of the research but in analogical sense parallel comparison is possible. The advantages of the analog experiments however seem to have been overwhelmed by rapid progresses of computer simulations. Although we still believe in the present-day meaning, recently we are recognizing another aspect of its significance. The essence of "kitchen earth science" as an analog experiment is to provide experimental setups and materials easily from the kitchen, by which everyone can start experiments and participate in the discussion without special preparations because of our daily-experienced matter. Here we will show one such example which can be used as a heuristic subject in the classrooms at introductory level of earth science as well as in lunch time break of advanced researchers. In heated miso soup the fluid motion can be easily traced by the motion of miso "particles". At highly heated state immiscible part of miso convects with aqueous fluid. At intermediate heating the miso part precipitates to form a sediment layer at the bottom. This layered structure is destroyed regularly by the instability caused by accumulated heat in the miso layer as a bursting. By showing

  1. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Classroom. In this section of Resonance, we in'Vite readers to pose questions likely to be raised in a classroom situation. We may suggest strategies for dealing with them, or in'Vite responses, or ... "Classroom" is equally a forum for raising broader issues and .... Now we can approach the question from a different viewpoint.

  2. Classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butin, Dan

    This paper addresses classroom design trends and the key issues schools should consider for better classroom space flexibility and adaptability. Classroom space design issues when schools embrace technology are discussed, as are design considerations when rooms must accommodate different grade levels, the importance of lighting, furniture…

  3. Numerical spin tracking in a synchrotron computer code Spink: Examples (RHIC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luccio, A.

    1995-01-01

    In the course of acceleration of polarized protons in a synchrotron, many depolarizing resonances are encountered. They are classified in two categories: Intrinsic resonances that depend on the lattice structure of the ring and arise from the coupling of betatron oscillations with horizontal magnetic fields, and imperfection resonances caused by orbit distortions due to field errors. In general, the spectrum of resonances vs spin tune Gγ(G = 1.7928, the proton gyromagnetic anomaly, and y the proton relativistic energy ratio) for a given lattice tune ν, or vs ν for a given Gγ, contains a multitude of lines with various amplitudes or resonance strengths. The depolarization due to the resonance lines can be studied by numerically tracking protons with spin in a model accelerator. Tracking will allow one to check the strength of resonances, to study the effects of devices like Siberian Snakes, to find safe lattice tune regions where to operate, and finally to study in detail the operation of special devices such as Spin Flippers. A few computer codes exist that calculate resonance strengths E k and perform tracking, for proton and electron machines. Most relevant to our work for the AGS and RHIC machines are the programs Depol and Snake. Depol, calculates the E k 's by Fourier analysis. The input to Depol is the output of a machine model code, such as Synch or Mad, containing all details of the lattice. Snake, does the tracking, starting from a synthetic machine, that contains a certain number of periods, of FODO cells, of Siberian snakes, etc. We believed the complexities of machines like the AGS or RHIC could not be adequately represented by Snake. Then, we decided to write a new code, Spink, that combines some of the features of Depol and Snake. I.E., Spink reads a Mad output like Depol and tracks as Snake does. The structure of the code and examples for RHIC are described in the following

  4. Encouraging Teachers to Build Collaborations with Researchers; Examples From the Classroom (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, M.

    2013-12-01

    Bringing experts into our schools allows for highly engaging lessons, encourages career thinking, adds authenticity to the topic, and allows student's questions to be answered by experts. Researchers can physically visit classrooms or appear through presentation technologies, such as Skype, or Google Hangouts. Virtual visits allow students to see laboratories and field sites. Collaborating with scientists builds the connective tissue that helps all educators and our students learn more deeply. When K-12 teachers collaborate with scientists and graduate students, teachers learn more science, and scientists learn more teaching. This growth of background knowledge is a win-win situation and helps us meet the expectations of the Common Core State Standards. Teachers need to feel encouraged to contact their local or regional scientists for support. Reaching out into the universities to make contact with polar scientists or graduate students is a good place to start. Building professional networks allows PI's to address the 'broader impact' requirement on many grant applications, and helps spread the university's work in the polar regions out to the general public. These collaborations also give teachers expert insights and current data to build authentic lessons, and excite their students to seek careers in the sciences. This presentation will focus on three completed interactive opportunities I have built with researchers in my classroom. Students adding daily sediment to their sediment core, after communications from the field with scientist Heidi Roop in Alaska.

  5. A Classroom Note on Generating Examples for the Laws of Sines and Cosines from Pythagorean Triangles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sher, Lawrence; Sher, David

    2007-01-01

    By selecting certain special triangles, students can learn about the laws of sines and cosines without wrestling with long decimal representations or irrational numbers. Since the law of cosines requires only one of the three angles of a triangle, there are many examples of triangles with integral sides and a cosine that can be represented exactly…

  6. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    "Classroom" is equally a forum for raising broader issues and sharing personal experiences and viewpoints on matters related to teaching and learning science. ! Quantum Theory of the Doppler Effed. Generally text books give only the wave ...

  7. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    "Classroom" is equally a foru11J. for raising broader issues and sharing personal experiences and viewpoints on matters related to teaching and learning science. Point Set Topological ... a new way of looking at this problem and we will prove.

  8. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    responses, or both. "Classroom" is equally a forum for raising broader issues and sharing personal experiences and viewpoints on matters related to teaching and learning science. ... I shall give the solution to the problem, along with relevant.

  9. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    in a classroom situation. We may suggest strategies for dealing with them, or invite responses, or both. ... research, could then both inject greater vigour into teaching of ... ture, forestry and fishery sciences, management of natural resources.

  10. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    responses, or both. "Classroom" is equally a forum for raising broader issues and .... Research Institute, Bangalore ... From Bohr's theory we can calculate v = (En - En -1) / h the ... important reason for the failure of the qualitative arguments. An.

  11. The creation of a pedagogy of promise: Examples of educational excellence in high-stakes science classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCollough, Cherie A.

    agencies. For example, their classroom climate was fair and democratic with elements of mutual respect, student advocacy, the freedom to make mistakes, and student-teacher negotiation practices. Common teacher qualities included being enthusiastic, life-long learners with high expectations for students. When teachers did not agree with administrative mandates that were not in the best interest of their students, they utilized a "close-door" policy. This report provides recommendations including the increased development of student-centered curricula, using multiple test-criteria versus one single standardized test, and increased teacher training to assist in the creation of a climate of caring. Future studies are also suggested.

  12. SU-A-BRA-00: Education Council Symposium: Revitalizing Your Medical Physics Classroom: Some Examples and Thoughts from the Trenches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    Vic Montemayor - No one has been more passionate about improving the quality and effectiveness of the teaching of Medical Physics than Bill Hendee. It was in August of 2008 that the first AAPM Workshop on Becoming a Better Teacher of Medical Physics was held, organized and run by Bill Hendee. This was followed up in July of 2010 with a summer school on the same topic, again organized by Bill. There has been continued interest in alternate approaches to teaching medical physics since those initial gatherings. The momentum established by these workshops is made clear each year in the annual Innovation in Medical Physics Education session, which highlights work being done in all forms of medical physics education, from one-on-one residencies or classroom presentations to large-scale program revisions and on-line resources for international audiences. This symposium, presented on behalf of the Education Council, highlights the work of three finalists from past Innovation in Education sessions. Each will be presenting their approaches to and innovations in teaching medical physics. It is hoped that audience members interested in trying something new in their teaching of medical physics will find some of these ideas and approaches readily applicable to their own classrooms. Rebecca Howell - The presentation will discuss ways to maximize classroom learning, i.e., increasing the amount of material covered while also enhancing students’ understanding of the broader implications of the course topics. Specifically, the presentation will focus on two teaching methodologies, project based learning and flip learning. These teaching methods will be illustrated using an example of graduate medical physics course where both are used in conjunction with traditional lectures. Additionally, the presentation will focus on our experience implementing these methods including challenges that were overcome. Jay Burmeister - My presentation will discuss the incorporation of active

  13. SU-A-BRA-00: Education Council Symposium: Revitalizing Your Medical Physics Classroom: Some Examples and Thoughts from the Trenches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-06-15

    Vic Montemayor - No one has been more passionate about improving the quality and effectiveness of the teaching of Medical Physics than Bill Hendee. It was in August of 2008 that the first AAPM Workshop on Becoming a Better Teacher of Medical Physics was held, organized and run by Bill Hendee. This was followed up in July of 2010 with a summer school on the same topic, again organized by Bill. There has been continued interest in alternate approaches to teaching medical physics since those initial gatherings. The momentum established by these workshops is made clear each year in the annual Innovation in Medical Physics Education session, which highlights work being done in all forms of medical physics education, from one-on-one residencies or classroom presentations to large-scale program revisions and on-line resources for international audiences. This symposium, presented on behalf of the Education Council, highlights the work of three finalists from past Innovation in Education sessions. Each will be presenting their approaches to and innovations in teaching medical physics. It is hoped that audience members interested in trying something new in their teaching of medical physics will find some of these ideas and approaches readily applicable to their own classrooms. Rebecca Howell - The presentation will discuss ways to maximize classroom learning, i.e., increasing the amount of material covered while also enhancing students’ understanding of the broader implications of the course topics. Specifically, the presentation will focus on two teaching methodologies, project based learning and flip learning. These teaching methods will be illustrated using an example of graduate medical physics course where both are used in conjunction with traditional lectures. Additionally, the presentation will focus on our experience implementing these methods including challenges that were overcome. Jay Burmeister - My presentation will discuss the incorporation of active

  14. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    CLASSROOM. Figure 1. An antibubble photographed with a white backdrop. contrast to the case of soap bubbles,. Soap bubbles float in air and descend due to gravity on account of higher density of the soap solution, while antibubbles rise due to buoyancy of the air film and float just below the surface of the soap solution.

  15. Bringing Student Research into the Classroom: An Example from a Course on Radar Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, D. A.

    2011-12-01

    Student learning is enhanced through the hands-on experience of working with real data. I present an example where a course is designed around student research projects where the students process and interpret a data set. In this particular case, synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data is the chosen data product. The students learn several skills that are critical to being a good scientist, including how to formulate a project and motivate the objectives. The skills that are taught in the course represent transferable skills. For example, many of the students are exposed to the Unix environment for the first time. Students also learn how best to convey their findings in both written and oral formats. For many undergraduates, this course represents their first research experience where they are working with real data (and all the uncertainties and complexities therein), and the first time they are attempting to answer an open-ended research question. The course format is divided into two parts: (1) a series of lectures and homework assignments that teach the theoretical and technical aspects of radar interferometry, and (2) a series of lab periods where students develop the practical skills of working with the data in a Unix computing environment. Over the term, each student develops an independent research project where they identify a geologic process of interest (such as fault creep, land subsidence, volcanic inflation) and process SAR data over their chosen research target. Since the outcome of each student project is unknown prior to doing the work, the student experiences the thrill of discovery that comes with scientific research. The computational resources and course development was funded by the NSF Career Program, and SAR data was provided through the WInSAR Consortium. Student course reports are published online so that their findings can be shared with the broader community. This was done using a wiki, a server-side software that allows for the

  16. Literature survey, numerical examples, and recommended design studies for main-coolant pumps. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allaire, P.E.; Barrett, L.E.

    1982-06-01

    This report presents an up-to-date literature survey, examples of calculations of seal forces or other pump properties, and recommendations for future work pertaining to primary coolant pumps and primary recirculating pumps in the nuclear power industry. Five main areas are covered: pump impeller forces, fluid annuli, bearings, seals, and rotor calculations. The main conclusion is that forces in pump impellers is perhaps the least well understood area, seals have had some good design work done on them recently, fluid annuli effects are being discussed in the literature, bearing designs are fairly well known, and rotor calculations have been discussed widely in the literature. It should be noted, however, that usually the literature in a given area is not applied to pumps in nuclear power stations. The most immediate need for a combined theoretical and experimental design capability exists in mechanical face seals

  17. Resolution of VTI anisotropy with elastic full-waveform inversion: theory and basic numerical examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podgornova, O.; Leaney, S.; Liang, L.

    2018-03-01

    Extracting medium properties from seismic data faces some limitations due to the finite frequency content of the data and restricted spatial positions of the sources and receivers. Some distributions of the medium properties make low impact on the data (including none). If these properties are used as the inversion parameters, then the inverse problem becomes over-parametrized, leading to ambiguous results. We present an analysis of multiparameter resolution for the linearized inverse problem in the framework of elastic full-waveform inversion. We show that the spatial and multiparameter sensitivities are intertwined and non-sensitive properties are spatial distributions of some non-trivial combinations of the conventional elastic parameters. The analysis accounts for the Hessian information and frequency content of the data; it is semi-analytical (in some scenarios analytical), easy to interpret, and enhances results of the widely used radiation pattern analysis. Single-type scattering is shown to have limited sensitivity, even for full-aperture data. Finite-frequency data lose multiparameter sensitivity at smooth and fine spatial scales. Also, we establish ways to quantify a spatial-multiparameter coupling and demonstrate that the theoretical predictions agree well with the numerical results.

  18. Between Certainty and Uncertainty Statistics and Probability in Five Units with Notes on Historical Origins and Illustrative Numerical Examples

    CERN Document Server

    Laudański, Ludomir M

    2013-01-01

    „Between Certainty & Uncertainty” is a one-of–a-kind short course on statistics for students, engineers  and researchers.  It is a fascinating introduction to statistics and probability with notes on historical origins and 80 illustrative numerical examples organized in the five units:   ·         Chapter 1  Descriptive Statistics:  Compressing small samples, basic averages - mean and variance, their main properties including God’s proof; linear transformations and z-scored statistics .   ·         Chapter 2 Grouped data: Udny Yule’s concept of qualitative and quantitative variables. Grouping these two kinds of data. Graphical tools. Combinatorial rules and qualitative variables.  Designing frequency histogram. Direct and coded evaluation of quantitative data. Significance of percentiles.   ·         Chapter 3 Regression and correlation: Geometrical distance and equivalent distances in two orthogonal directions  as a prerequisite to the concept of two regressi...

  19. Language to Language: Nurturing Writing Development in Multilingual Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shagoury, Ruth

    2009-01-01

    The author spent four years embedded in a multilingual kindergarten classroom in which children spoke six different languages and several more years observing multilingual Head Start classrooms. She shares numerous examples of young dual language learners actively figuring out the way written language works in their first and second languages.…

  20. Comparison between numeric and approximate analytic solutions for the prediction of soil metal uptake by roots. Example of cadmium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, André; Lin, Zhongbing; Sterckeman, Thibault; Nguyen, Christophe

    2018-04-01

    The dissociation of metal complexes in the soil solution can increase the availability of metals for root uptake. When it is accounted for in models of bioavailability of soil metals, the number of partial differential equations (PDEs) increases and the computation time to numerically solve these equations may be problematic when a large number of simulations are required, for example for sensitivity analyses or when considering root architecture. This work presents analytical solutions for the set of PDEs describing the bioavailability of soil metals including the kinetics of complexation for three scenarios where the metal complex in solution was fully inert, fully labile, or partially labile. The analytical solutions are only valid i) at steady-state when the PDEs become ordinary differential equations, the transient phase being not covered, ii) when diffusion is the major mechanism of transport and therefore, when convection is negligible, iii) when there is no between-root competition. The formulation of the analytical solutions is for cylindrical geometry but the solutions rely on the spread of the depletion profile around the root, which was modelled assuming a planar geometry. The analytical solutions were evaluated by comparison with the corresponding PDEs for cadmium in the case of the French agricultural soils. Provided that convection was much lower than diffusion (Péclet's number<0.02), the cumulative uptakes calculated from the analytic solutions were in very good agreement with those calculated from the PDEs, even in the case of a partially labile complex. The analytic solutions can be used instead of the PDEs to predict root uptake of metals. The analytic solutions were also used to build an indicator of the contribution of a complex to the uptake of the metal by roots, which can be helpful to predict the effect of soluble organic matter on the bioavailability of soil metals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Numerical Recipes in C++: The Art of Scientific Computing (2nd edn). Numerical Recipes Example Book (C++) (2nd edn). Numerical Recipes Multi-Language Code CD ROM with LINUX or UNIX Single-Screen License Revised Version

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borcherds, P

    2003-01-01

    The two Numerical Recipes books are marvellous. The principal book, The Art of Scientific Computing, contains program listings for almost every conceivable requirement, and it also contains a well written discussion of the algorithms and the numerical methods involved. The Example Book provides a complete driving program, with helpful notes, for nearly all the routines in the principal book. The first edition of Numerical Recipes: The Art of Scientific Computing was published in 1986 in two versions, one with programs in Fortran, the other with programs in Pascal. There were subsequent versions with programs in BASIC and in C. The second, enlarged edition was published in 1992, again in two versions, one with programs in Fortran (NR(F)), the other with programs in C (NR(C)). In 1996 the authors produced Numerical Recipes in Fortran 90: The Art of Parallel Scientific Computing as a supplement, called Volume 2, with the original (Fortran) version referred to as Volume 1. Numerical Recipes in C++ (NR(C++)) is another version of the 1992 edition. The numerical recipes are also available on a CD ROM: if you want to use any of the recipes, I would strongly advise you to buy the CD ROM. The CD ROM contains the programs in all the languages. When the first edition was published I bought it, and have also bought copies of the other editions as they have appeared. Anyone involved in scientific computing ought to have a copy of at least one version of Numerical Recipes, and there also ought to be copies in every library. If you already have NR(F), should you buy the NR(C++) and, if not, which version should you buy? In the preface to Volume 2 of NR(F), the authors say 'C and C++ programmers have not been far from our minds as we have written this volume, and we think that you will find that time spent in absorbing its principal lessons will be amply repaid in the future as C and C++ eventually develop standard parallel extensions'. In the preface and introduction to NR

  2. Numerical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Boumaza

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Transient convection heat transfer is of fundamental interest in many industrial and environmental situations, as well as in electronic devices and security of energy systems. Transient fluid flow problems are among the more difficult to analyze and yet are very often encountered in modern day technology. The main objective of this research project is to carry out a theoretical and numerical analysis of transient convective heat transfer in vertical flows, when the thermal field is due to different kinds of variation, in time and space of some boundary conditions, such as wall temperature or wall heat flux. This is achieved by the development of a mathematical model and its resolution by suitable numerical methods, as well as performing various sensitivity analyses. These objectives are achieved through a theoretical investigation of the effects of wall and fluid axial conduction, physical properties and heat capacity of the pipe wall on the transient downward mixed convection in a circular duct experiencing a sudden change in the applied heat flux on the outside surface of a central zone.

  3. Building Models in the Classroom: Taking Advantage of Sophisticated Geomorphic Numerical Tools Using a Simple Graphical User Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, S. G.; Koons, P. O.; Gerbi, C. C.; Capps, D. K.; Tucker, G. E.; Rogers, Z. A.

    2014-12-01

    Sophisticated numerical tools exist for modeling geomorphic processes and linking them to tectonic and climatic systems, but they are often seen as inaccessible for users with an exploratory level of interest. We have improved the accessibility of landscape evolution models by producing a simple graphics user interface (GUI) that takes advantage of the Channel-Hillslope Integrated Landscape Development (CHILD) model. Model access is flexible: the user can edit values for basic geomorphic, tectonic, and climate parameters, or obtain greater control by defining the spatiotemporal distributions of those parameters. Users can make educated predictions by choosing their own parametric values for the governing equations and interpreting the results immediately through model graphics. This method of modeling allows users to iteratively build their understanding through experimentation. Use of this GUI is intended for inquiry and discovery-based learning activities. We discuss a number of examples of how the GUI can be used at the upper high school, introductory university, and advanced university level. Effective teaching modules initially focus on an inquiry-based example guided by the instructor. As students become familiar with the GUI and the CHILD model, the class can shift to more student-centered exploration and experimentation. To make model interpretations more robust, digital elevation models can be imported and direct comparisons can be made between CHILD model results and natural topography. The GUI is available online through the University of Maine's Earth and Climate Sciences website, through the Community Surface Dynamics Modeling System (CSDMS) model repository, or by contacting the corresponding author.

  4. Introducing Geoscience Students to Numerical Modeling of Volcanic Hazards: The example of Tephra2 on VHub.org

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah M. Courtland

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The Tephra2 numerical model for tephra fallout from explosive volcanic eruptions is specifically designed to enable students to probe ideas in model literacy, including code validation and verification, the role of simplifying assumptions, and the concepts of uncertainty and forecasting. This numerical model is implemented on the VHub.org website, a venture in cyberinfrastructure that brings together volcanological models and educational materials. The VHub.org resource provides students with the ability to explore and execute sophisticated numerical models like Tephra2. We present a strategy for using this model to introduce university students to key concepts in the use and evaluation of Tephra2 for probabilistic forecasting of volcanic hazards. Through this critical examination students are encouraged to develop a deeper understanding of the applicability and limitations of hazard models. Although the model and applications are intended for use in both introductory and advanced geoscience courses, they could easily be adapted to work in other disciplines, such as astronomy, physics, computational methods, data analysis, or computer science.

  5. The Fundamentals of Economic Dynamics and Policy Analyses : Learning through Numerical Examples. Part Ⅳ. Overlapping Generations Model

    OpenAIRE

    Futamura, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    An overlapping generations model is an applied dynamic general equilibrium model for which the lifecycle models are employed as main analytical tools. At any point in time, there are overlapping generations consisting of individuals born this year, individuals born last year, individuals born two years ago, and so on. As we saw in the analysis of lifecycle models, each individual makes an optimal consumption-saving plan to maximize lifetime utility over her/his lifecycle. For example, an indi...

  6. Success of Using Technology and Manipulatives To Introduce Numerical Problem Solving Skills in Monolingual/Bilingual Early Childhood Classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainsa, Trisha

    1999-01-01

    Pilots and evaluates a math activity initially utilizing M&Ms as manipulatives, then progressing to computer software math activities, in five early childhood classrooms. Concludes that there were no significant differences between learning tasks, monolingual students vs. bilingual students, and manipulative (hands-off) activities vs. computer…

  7. Arts Integration: A Classroom Example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrion, Margaret Dee; Boothby, Paula R.

    1986-01-01

    To integrate the arts and basic curriculum, teachers used advertising as a theme. Viewing it as a form of communication, they developed an integrated reading/language arts and music unit to strengthen both right and left brain modes of knowing. (LHW)

  8. Numerical and statistical based damage analysis by the example of kiln elements; Numerisch und statistisch gestuetzte Schadensanalyse am Beispiel von Brennofenelementen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinert, U. [DEKRA-ETS Europaeische Gesellschaft fuer Technische Sicherheit mbH, Saarbruecken (Germany); Klaer, P. [Saar-Hartmetall und Werkzeuge GmbH, Voelklingen (Germany)

    1999-02-01

    The nonoxidic ceramics (for example SiC), used as a supporting structure in kilns, are subject to instantaneous damage, which as a rule is accompanied by high costs. Of interest in this context is the question whether a satisfactory statement can be made about the increase of damage frequency as a function of the firing temperature, the firing time, the geometry of the component, the material properties and the loading. Knowledge of these correlations provides the user with the possibility of minimizing the costs of damage by means of suitable selection of material and timely replacement of the components. The procedure presented in the following is based on the combination of numerical studies with statistically evaluated experiments. (orig.)

  9. What can a numerical landscape evolution model tell us about the evolution of a real landscape? Two examples of modeling a real landscape without recreating it

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparini, N. M.; Whipple, K. X.; Willenbring, J.; Crosby, B. T.; Brocard, G. Y.

    2013-12-01

    Numerical landscape evolution models (LEMs) offer us the unique opportunity to watch a landscape evolve under any set of environmental forcings that we can quantify. The possibilities for using LEMs are infinite, but complications arise when trying to model a real landscape. Specifically, numerical models cannot recreate every aspect of a real landscape because exact initial conditions are unknown, there will always be gaps in the known tectonic and climatic history, and the geomorphic transport laws that govern redistribution of mass due to surface processes will always be a simplified representation of the actual process. Yet, even with these constraints, numerical models remain the only tool that offers us the potential to explore a limitless range of evolutionary scenarios, allowing us to, at the very least, identify possible drivers responsible for the morphology of the current landscape, and just as importantly, rule out others. Here we highlight two examples in which we use a numerical model to explore the signature of different forcings on landscape morphology and erosion patterns. In the first landscape, the Northern Bolivian Andes, the relative imprint of rock uplift and precipitation patterns on landscape morphology is widely contested. We use the CHILD LEM to systematically vary climate and tectonics and quantify their fingerprints on channel profiles across a steep mountain front. We find that rock uplift and precipitation patterns in this landscape and others can be teased out by examining channel profiles of variably sized catchments that drain different parts of the topography. In the second landscape, the South Fork Eel River (SFER), northern California, USA, the tectonic history is relatively well known; a wave of rock uplift swept through the watershed from headwaters to outlet, perturbing the landscape and sending a wave of bedrock incision upstream. Nine millennial-scale erosion rates from along the mainstem of the river illustrate a pattern of

  10. A Finite Difference, Semi-implicit, Equation-of-State Efficient Algorithm for the Compositional Flow Modeling in the Subsurface: Numerical Examples

    KAUST Repository

    Saavedra, Sebastian

    2012-07-01

    The mathematical model that has been recognized to have the more accurate approximation to the physical laws govern subsurface hydrocarbon flow in reservoirs is the Compositional Model. The features of this model are adequate to describe not only the performance of a multiphase system but also to represent the transport of chemical species in a porous medium. Its importance relies not only on its current relevance to simulate petroleum extraction processes, such as, Primary, Secondary, and Enhanced Oil Recovery Process (EOR) processes but also, in the recent years, carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration. The purpose of this study is to investigate the subsurface compositional flow under isothermal conditions for several oil well cases. While simultaneously addressing computational implementation finesses to contribute to the efficiency of the algorithm. This study provides the theoretical framework and computational implementation subtleties of an IMplicit Pressure Explicit Composition (IMPEC)-Volume-balance (VB), two-phase, equation-of-state, approach to model isothermal compositional flow based on the finite difference scheme. The developed model neglects capillary effects and diffusion. From the phase equilibrium premise, the model accounts for volumetric performances of the phases, compressibility of the phases, and composition-dependent viscosities. The Equation of State (EoS) employed to approximate the hydrocarbons behaviour is the Peng Robinson Equation of State (PR-EOS). Various numerical examples were simulated. The numerical results captured the complex physics involved, i.e., compositional, gravitational, phase-splitting, viscosity and relative permeability effects. Regarding the numerical scheme, a phase-volumetric-flux estimation eases the calculation of phase velocities by naturally fitting to phase-upstream-upwinding. And contributes to a faster computation and an efficient programming development.

  11. A Comparison of the CHILD and Landlab Computational Landscape Evolution Models and Examples of Best Practices in Numerical Modeling of Surface Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparini, N. M.; Hobley, D. E. J.; Tucker, G. E.; Istanbulluoglu, E.; Adams, J. M.; Nudurupati, S. S.; Hutton, E. W. H.

    2014-12-01

    Computational models are important tools that can be used to quantitatively understand the evolution of real landscapes. Commonalities exist among most landscape evolution models, although they are also idiosyncratic, in that they are coded in different languages, require different input values, and are designed to tackle a unique set of questions. These differences can make applying a landscape evolution model challenging, especially for novice programmers. In this study, we compare and contrast two landscape evolution models that are designed to tackle similar questions, but the actual model designs are quite different. The first model, CHILD, is over a decade-old and is relatively well-tested, well-developed and well-used. It is coded in C++, operates on an irregular grid and was designed more with function rather than user-experience in mind. In contrast, the second model, Landlab, is relatively new and was designed to be accessible to a wide range of scientists, including those who have not previously used or developed a numerical model. Landlab is coded in Python, a relatively easy language for the non-proficient programmer, and has the ability to model landscapes described on both regular and irregular grids. We present landscape simulations from both modeling platforms. Our goal is to illustrate best practices for implementing a new process module in a landscape evolution model, and therefore the simulations are applicable regardless of the modeling platform. We contrast differences and highlight similarities between the use of the two models, including setting-up the model and input file for different evolutionary scenarios, computational time, and model output. Whenever possible, we compare model output with analytical solutions and illustrate the effects, or lack thereof, of a uniform vs. non-uniform grid. Our simulations focus on implementing a single process, including detachment-limited or transport-limited fluvial bedrock incision and linear or non

  12. The use of Web-based GIS data technologies in the construction of geoscience instructional materials: examples from the MARGINS Data in the Classroom project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, J. G.; McIlrath, J. A.

    2008-12-01

    Web-accessible geospatial information system (GIS) technologies have advanced in concert with an expansion of data resources that can be accessed and used by researchers, educators and students. These resources facilitate the development of data-rich instructional resources and activities that can be used to transition seamlessly into undergraduate research projects. MARGINS Data in the Classroom (http://serc.carleton.edu/ margins/index.html) seeks to engage MARGINS researchers and educators in using the images, datasets, and visualizations produced by NSF-MARGINS Program-funded research and related efforts to create Web-deliverable instructional materials for use in undergraduate-level geoscience courses (MARGINS Mini-Lessons). MARGINS science data is managed by the Marine Geosciences Data System (MGDS), and these and all other MGDS-hosted data can be accessed, manipulated and visualized using GeoMapApp (www.geomapapp.org; Carbotte et al, 2004), a freely available geographic information system focused on the marine environment. Both "packaged" MGDS datasets (i.e., global earthquake foci, volcanoes, bathymetry) and "raw" data (seismic surveys, magnetics, gravity) are accessible via GeoMapApp, with WFS linkages to other resources (geodesy from UNAVCO; seismic profiles from IRIS; geochemical and drillsite data from EarthChem, IODP, and others), permitting the comprehensive characterization of many regions of the ocean basins. Geospatially controlled datasets can be imported into GeoMapApp visualizations, and these visualizations can be exported into Google Earth as .kmz image files. Many of the MARGINS Mini-Lessons thus far produced use (or have studentss use the varied capabilities of GeoMapApp (i.e., constructing topographic profiles, overlaying varied geophysical and bathymetric datasets, characterizing geochemical data). These materials are available for use and testing from the project webpage (http://serc.carleton.edu/margins/). Classroom testing and assessment

  13. Numerická simulace v biomechanice – forenzní příklad Numerical simulation in biomechanics – a forensic example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norbert Praxl

    2006-02-01

    áním odpovídají zcela pasivnímu lidskému tělu. The paper presents an example of a forensic application of biomechanical methods including numerical simulation with human body models. By means of a case study of an unwitnessed lethal fall the course of the biomechanical forensic reconstruction is demonstrated. The traces available at the place of finding and the injuries of the victim are the facts that the analysis is based on. The ultimate expected result of the biomechanical analysis is the assignment of all available traces and the explanation of the event. The injuries observed in the described case were partly typical fall injuries, but there were also some injuries that could not be prima vista assigned. The police investigation at the place of finding also brought to light some facts that could not be satisfactorily explained at first. By using numerical simulation, additional information was obtained that enabled us to explain many aspects of the case that could not have been analysed otherwise. Numerical simulation offers objective and quantitative data enabling a far more exact analysis of the studied event – the kinematical as well as dynamical parameters of the human body and its interaction with the surroundings structures can be studied and even the human body’s internal forces can be analysed enabling thus an accurate injury prediction. All the important unknown parameters (initial conditions of the simulated event, i. e. body position, body orientation, initial velocity etc. can be easily varied so that all the possibilities can be taken into account. Another very important asset of this method is its powerful visualisation capability that enhances the understanding of the studied events even for persons without extensive biomechanical knowledge. The major limitation of numerical simulation at the moment is the lack of muscle activity; the models represent only a totally passive human body so far.

  14. Development of a Generalized Version of the Poisson-Nernst-Planck Equations Using the Hybrid Mixture Theory: Presentation of 2D Numerical Examples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesson, Björn

    2010-01-01

    A numerical scheme for the transient solution of generalized version of the Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations is presented. The finite element method is used to establish the coupled non-linear matrix system of equations capable of solving the present problem iteratively. The Poisson......-scale and that it includes the volume fractions of phases in its structure. The background to the Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations can by the HMT approach be described by using the postulates of mass conservation of constituents together with the Gauss’ law used together with consistent constitutive laws. The HMT theory......-Nernst-Planck equations represent a set of diffusion equations for charged species, i.e. dissolved ions. These equations are coupled to the ‘internally’ induced electrical field and to the velocity field of the fluid. The Nernst-Planck equations describing the diffusion of the ionic species and the Gauss’ law in used are...

  15. Faults architecture and growth in clay-limestone alternation. Examples in the S-E Basin alternations (France) and numerical modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    The following work has been carried out in the framework of the studies conducted by IRSN in support of its safety evaluation of the geological disposal programme of high and intermediate level, long-lived radioactive waste. Such a disposal is planned to be hosted by the Callovian-Oxfordian indurate clay formation between two limestone formations in eastern Paris basin, France. Hypothetical faults may cross-cut this layered section, decreasing the clay containment ability by creating preferential pathways for radioactive solute towards limestones. This study aims at characterising the fault architecture and the normal fault growth in clay/limestone layered sections. Structural analysis and displacement profiles have been carried out in normal faults crossing several decimetres to metre thick sedimentary alternations in the South-Eastern Basin (France) and petrophysical properties have been determined for each layer. The studied faults are simple fault planes or complex fault zones showing are significantly controlled by the layering. The analysis of the fault characteristics and the results obtained on numerical models enlighten several processes such as fault nucleation, fault restriction, and fault growth through layered section. Some studied faults nucleated in the limestone layers, without using pre-existing fractures such as joints, and according to our numerical analysis, a strong stiffness, a low strength contrast between the limestone and the clay layer, and/or s a greater thickness of the clay layer are conditions which favour nucleation of faults in limestone. The range of mechanical properties leading to the fault nucleation in one layer type or another was investigated using a 3D modelling approach. After its nucleation, the fault propagates within a homogeneous medium with a constant displacement gradient until its vertical propagation is stopped by a restrictor. The evidenced restrictors are limestone-clay interfaces or faults in clays, sub

  16. Evaluation of a landscape evolution model to simulate stream piracies: Insights from multivariable numerical tests using the example of the Meuse basin, France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benaïchouche, Abed; Stab, Olivier; Tessier, Bruno; Cojan, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    In landscapes dominated by fluvial erosion, the landscape morphology is closely related to the hydrographic network system. In this paper, we investigate the hydrographic network reorganization caused by a headward piracy mechanism between two drainage basins in France, the Meuse and the Moselle. Several piracies occurred in the Meuse basin during the past one million years, and the basin's current characteristics are favorable to new piracies by the Moselle river network. This study evaluates the consequences over the next several million years of a relative lowering of the Moselle River (and thus of its basin) with respect to the Meuse River. The problem is addressed with a numerical modeling approach (landscape evolution model, hereafter LEM) that requires empirical determinations of parameters and threshold values. Classically, fitting of the parameters is based on analysis of the relationship between the slope and the drainage area and is conducted under the hypothesis of equilibrium. Application of this conventional approach to the capture issue yields incomplete results that have been consolidated by a parametric sensitivity analysis. The LEM equations give a six-dimensional parameter space that was explored with over 15,000 simulations using the landscape evolution model GOLEM. The results demonstrate that stream piracies occur in only four locations in the studied reach near the city of Toul. The locations are mainly controlled by the local topography and are model-independent. Nevertheless, the chronology of the captures depends on two parameters: the river concavity (given by the fluvial advection equation) and the hillslope erosion factor. Thus, the simulations lead to three different scenarios that are explained by a phenomenon of exclusion or a string of events.

  17. Numerical analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Rao, G Shanker

    2006-01-01

    About the Book: This book provides an introduction to Numerical Analysis for the students of Mathematics and Engineering. The book is designed in accordance with the common core syllabus of Numerical Analysis of Universities of Andhra Pradesh and also the syllabus prescribed in most of the Indian Universities. Salient features: Approximate and Numerical Solutions of Algebraic and Transcendental Equation Interpolation of Functions Numerical Differentiation and Integration and Numerical Solution of Ordinary Differential Equations The last three chapters deal with Curve Fitting, Eigen Values and Eigen Vectors of a Matrix and Regression Analysis. Each chapter is supplemented with a number of worked-out examples as well as number of problems to be solved by the students. This would help in the better understanding of the subject. Contents: Errors Solution of Algebraic and Transcendental Equations Finite Differences Interpolation with Equal Intervals Interpolation with Unequal Int...

  18. The Flipped Classroom in Counselor Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Kristen; Milsom, Amy

    2015-01-01

    The flipped classroom is proposed as an effective instructional approach in counselor education. An overview of the flipped-classroom approach, including advantages and disadvantages, is provided. A case example illustrates how the flipped classroom can be applied in counselor education. Recommendations for implementing or researching flipped…

  19. Example book

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donnat, Ph.; Treimany, C.; Gouedard, C.; Morice, O.

    1998-06-01

    This document presents some examples which were used for debugging the code. It seemed useful to write these examples onto a book to be sure the code would not regret; to give warranties for the code's functionality; to propose some examples to illustrate the possibilities and the limits of Miro. (author)

  20. Learning Algebra from Worked Examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Karin E.; Booth, Julie L.; Newton, Kristie J.

    2014-01-01

    For students to be successful in algebra, they must have a truly conceptual understanding of key algebraic features as well as the procedural skills to complete a problem. One strategy to correct students' misconceptions combines the use of worked example problems in the classroom with student self-explanation. "Self-explanation" is the…

  1. Aerospace Example

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This is a textbook, created example for illustration purposes. The System takes inputs of Pt, Ps, and Alt, and calculates the Mach number using the Rayleigh Pitot...

  2. Using Technology to Expand the Classroom in Time, Space, and Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Joshua

    2015-11-01

    Diverse classrooms offer distinct advantages over homogeneous classrooms, for example by providing a greater diversity of perspectives and opportunities. However, there is substantial underrepresentation of numerous groups throughout science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education, from secondary schools through professional ranks and academia. In this piece I offer a critical analysis of three worked examples of how technology can be used to expand traditional definitions of the classroom environment. In doing so I show how technology can be used to help make STEM classrooms more expansive, equitable, and effective learning environments. First I highlight how peer-to-peer learning was used to foster knowledge of marine conservation with high school youth across Fiji and Chicago. Second I show how social media can be used to facilitate conversations in New York City after a natural disaster. Finally, I show how integrating digital and real-world learning can help a diverse group of students from the Pacific islands gain field-based STEM techniques in an extended workshop format. Taken together these examples show how digital technology could expand the fixed walls of the academy and that technology can help show students the vivid splendor of life outside the classroom. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. When classroom becomes school

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noer, Vibeke Røn

    (Christensen, 2013), this presentation will focus on ‘what’s happening in the classroom’ when classroom is ‘school’ among fellow students opposed to ‘real nursing practice’ among future colleagues. Focusing on student strategies in the classroom, the presentation will further elaborate on the inherent...... & Perrenoud, 2006). In Denmark alone changes have been made numerously times in the last two decades. Concurrently, a considerable amount of studies has been published focusing on the nursing education, stressing a call for transformation. Division of learning contexts into clinical and classroom settings...... is a strong marker of the nursing education and has as such also been of interest for research. There is a large number of studies (e.g. Larsen, 2000; Johnsen, 2003; Kragelund, 2006; Voigt, 2007; Henriksen, 2009; Højbjerg, 2011) that explore the learning contexts in the nursing education. However, most...

  4. Outdoor Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, Valynda

    2010-01-01

    An outdoor classroom is the ideal vehicle for community involvement: Parents, native plant societies, 4-H, garden clubs, and master naturalists are all resources waiting to be tapped, as are local businesses offering support. If you enlist your community in the development and maintenance of your outdoor classroom, the entire community will…

  5. Flipped classroom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Tobias Kidde; Jørgensen, Søren

    2016-01-01

    Artiklen beskriver Flipped Classroom som et didaktisk princip, der kan være med til at organisere og tilrettelægge en undervisning, med fokus på forskellige læringsformer. Det handler om at forstå Flipped Classroom som en opdeling i 2 faser og 3 led, som samlet set skaber en didaktisk organisering....

  6. Using superheroes such as Hawkeye, Wonder Woman and the Invisible Woman in the physics classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Barry W.

    2018-05-01

    Communication of difficult concepts in the physics classroom can be negatively affected by the absence of a strong link between physics content and the experiences or interests of students. One possible method towards addressing this issue is to motivate physics content with reference to popular culture figures such as superheroes. We find ourselves in an age where superhero films are immensely popular with numerous superhero films scheduled for release over the coming years. With many students familiar with many of these characters and their superpowers, superheroes can facilitate a unique platform to aid in the dissemination of physics materials in the classroom. In this paper, we present three examples where superheroes can be used to motivate learning objectives in physics and, if desired, promote critical thinking on behalf of the student. We also reflect on how using the superhero genre in the classroom can be used to address underrepresentation of women, stereotyping, and diversity issues in physics.

  7. FINAS. Example manual. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwata, Koji; Tsukimori, Kazuyuki; Ueno, Mutsuo

    2003-12-01

    FINAS is a general purpose structural analysis computer program which was developed by Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute for the analysis of static, dynamic and thermal responses of elastic and inelastic structures by the finite element method. This manual contains typical analysis examples that illustrate applications of FINAS to a variety of structural engineering problems. The first part of this manual presents fundamental examples in which numerical solutions by FINAS are compared with some analytical reference solutions, and the second part of this manual presents more complex examples intended for practical application. All the input data images and principal results for each problem are included in this manual for beginners' convenience. All the analyses are performed by using the FINAS Version 13.0. (author)

  8. Scholar Dollars: Their Use in Classroom Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deery, Ruth

    Suggestions and background information to help teachers use classroom currency to influence students' behavior and academic efforts are provided. There are five parts to the publication. Part 1 discusses the many uses of classroom currency in teaching economics content, for motivation, and in discipline. For example, if teachers find that…

  9. The Implementation of a Flipped Classroom in Foreign Language Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basal, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    Alongside the rise of educational technology, many teachers have been taking gradual but innovative steps to redesign their teaching methods. For example, in flipped learning or a flipped classroom, students watch instructional videos outside the classroom and do assignments or engage in activities inside the classroom. Language teachers are one…

  10. Introductory numerical analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Pettofrezzo, Anthony J

    2006-01-01

    Written for undergraduates who require a familiarity with the principles behind numerical analysis, this classical treatment encompasses finite differences, least squares theory, and harmonic analysis. Over 70 examples and 280 exercises. 1967 edition.

  11. Numerical analysis of the bearing capacity of complex rock mechanical underground systems with filigree structures in the presence of imponderables. A contribution to the systematization of the investigative process with application/demonstration using the example of the salt cavern ASSE II/south flank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyogtyev, Oleksandr

    2017-01-01

    The thesis dealing with the numerical analysis of the bearing capacity of complex rock mechanical underground systems with filigree structures in the presence of imponderables covers the following issues: status of science and technology, concept for the performance of numerical studies on the bearing capacity of large-volume underground systems, application example salt cavern ASSE II - application of the developed concept/development of numerical tools for the overall system/application of the global model to the given questions/realization of the modification potential.

  12. Numerical Chladni figures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Müller, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The Chladni patterns of vibrating membranes or thin plates were already considered fascinating in the 18th century. As a simple way to visualize acoustic phenomena it is a valuable experiment for beginners' courses. In this paper I present NumChladni, an interactive tool for studying arbitrary two-dimensional vibrating membranes based on the finite element method. I also describe the straightforward approach of the underlying mathematical details and give some examples. NumChladni is directly applicable in the undergraduate classroom, for example, as a complement to experimental setups. (paper)

  13. Numerical analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Jacques, Ian

    1987-01-01

    This book is primarily intended for undergraduates in mathematics, the physical sciences and engineering. It introduces students to most of the techniques forming the core component of courses in numerical analysis. The text is divided into eight chapters which are largely self-contained. However, with a subject as intricately woven as mathematics, there is inevitably some interdependence between them. The level of difficulty varies and, although emphasis is firmly placed on the methods themselves rather than their analysis, we have not hesitated to include theoretical material when we consider it to be sufficiently interesting. However, it should be possible to omit those parts that do seem daunting while still being able to follow the worked examples and to tackle the exercises accompanying each section. Familiarity with the basic results of analysis and linear algebra is assumed since these are normally taught in first courses on mathematical methods. For reference purposes a list of theorems used in the t...

  14. The Implementation of A Flipped Classroom in Foreign Language Teaching

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmet BASAL

    2015-01-01

    Alongside the rise of educational technology, many teachers have been taking gradual but innovative steps to redesign their teaching methods. For example, in flipped learning or a flipped classroom, students watch instructional videos outside the classroom and do assignments or engage in activities inside the classroom. Language teachers are one group of educators exploring the flipped classroom. In foreign language classes, such an approach may offer great benefits for both the teachers and ...

  15. Fluid dynamics theory, computation, and numerical simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Pozrikidis, C

    2017-01-01

    This book provides an accessible introduction to the basic theory of fluid mechanics and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) from a modern perspective that unifies theory and numerical computation. Methods of scientific computing are introduced alongside with theoretical analysis and MATLAB® codes are presented and discussed for a broad range of topics: from interfacial shapes in hydrostatics, to vortex dynamics, to viscous flow, to turbulent flow, to panel methods for flow past airfoils. The third edition includes new topics, additional examples, solved and unsolved problems, and revised images. It adds more computational algorithms and MATLAB programs. It also incorporates discussion of the latest version of the fluid dynamics software library FDLIB, which is freely available online. FDLIB offers an extensive range of computer codes that demonstrate the implementation of elementary and advanced algorithms and provide an invaluable resource for research, teaching, classroom instruction, and self-study. This ...

  16. Practicing Hospitality in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burwell, Rebecca; Huyser, Mackenzi

    2013-01-01

    This article explores pedagogical approaches to teaching students how to practice hospitality toward the other. Using case examples from the college classroom, the authors discuss the roots of Christian hospitality and educational theory on transformative learning to explore how students experience engaging with others after they have…

  17. Maple by example

    CERN Document Server

    Abell, Martha L

    2005-01-01

    Maple by Example, Third Edition, is a reference/text with CD for beginning and experienced students, professional engineers, and other Maple users. This new edition has been updated to be compatible with the most recent release of the Maple software. Coverage includes built-in Maple commands used in courses and practices that involve calculus, linear algebra, business mathematics, ordinary and partial differential equations, numerical methods, graphics and more. The CD-ROM provides updated Maple input and all text from the book.* Updated coverage of Maple features and functions * Backwards compatible for all versions* New applications from a variety of fields, including biology, physics and engineering* Expanded topics with many additional examples

  18. Virtual Classroom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ove

    2013-01-01

    In the Scandinavian countries: Sweden, Norway and Denmark, the project GNU (Grænseoverskridende Nordisk Undervisning, i.e. Transnational Nordic Teaching) is experimenting with ways of conducting teaching across the borders in the elementary schools. The cloud classes are organised with one class...... and benefits in regard to learning and pedagogy with virtual classroom....

  19. Classroom Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozzard, David

    2017-01-01

    Australian company Antarctica Flights runs summer sightseeing trips out of Australian capital cities to tour the Antarctic coast. The Laby Foundation of the University of Melbourne, through its "Classroom Antarctica" program, sponsored Kent Street High School science teacher, Ms Suzy Urbaniak and 18 of her students to take the trip, to…

  20. Numerical methods using Matlab

    CERN Document Server

    Lindfield, George

    2012-01-01

    Numerical Methods using MATLAB, 3e, is an extensive reference offering hundreds of useful and important numerical algorithms that can be implemented into MATLAB for a graphical interpretation to help researchers analyze a particular outcome. Many worked examples are given together with exercises and solutions to illustrate how numerical methods can be used to study problems that have applications in the biosciences, chaos, optimization, engineering and science across the board. Numerical Methods using MATLAB, 3e, is an extensive reference offering hundreds of use

  1. Numerical relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piran, T.

    1982-01-01

    There are many recent developments in numerical relativity, but there remain important unsolved theoretical and practical problems. The author reviews existing numerical approaches to solution of the exact Einstein equations. A framework for classification and comparison of different numerical schemes is presented. Recent numerical codes are compared using this framework. The discussion focuses on new developments and on currently open questions, excluding a review of numerical techniques. (Auth.)

  2. Ethnographic analysis: a study of classroom environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griswold, L A

    1994-05-01

    Occupational therapists assess and adapt an environment to enhance clients' abilities to function. Therapists working in schools may assess several classroom environments in a week. Identifying relevant information in an efficient manner is essential yet presents a challenge for school therapists. In this study, ethnographic research methodology was used to analyze the plethora of data gained from observations in eight classrooms. Three major categories were identified to structure observations: activities, people, and communication. These categories were used to compile a Classroom Observation Guide that gives therapists relevant questions to ask in each category. Using the Classroom Observation Guide, occupational therapists can recommend classroom activities that suit a particular teacher's style. For example, working with a teacher who prefers structural activities with clear time and space boundaries for one specific purpose, a therapist might suggest organized sensorimotor games with a distinct purpose to be carried out for a given time period.

  3. The Classroom Animal: Crickets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, David C.

    1985-01-01

    Suggests using crickets for classroom activities, providing background information on their anatomy and reproduction and tips on keeping individual organisms or a breeding colony in the classroom. (JN)

  4. THE POWER OF LITERATURE IN EFL CLASSROOMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flora Debora Floris

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes the importance of acknowledging literature as one of the best resources for promoting language learning in EFL (English as a Foreign Language classrooms. It reviews briefly various theoretical issues in teaching English through literature. Highlights are given to the justifications and guidelines for literature in the language classroom. Finally, the article presents examples of practical teaching and learning tasks based on one specific literary text.

  5. Twelve tips for "flipping" the classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffett, Jennifer

    2015-04-01

    The flipped classroom is a pedagogical model in which the typical lecture and homework elements of a course are reversed. The following tips outline the steps involved in making a successful transition to a flipped classroom approach. The tips are based on the available literature alongside the author's experience of using the approach in a medical education setting. Flipping a classroom has a number of potential benefits, for example increased educator-student interaction, but must be planned and implemented carefully to support effective learning.

  6. Eye-gaze patterns as students study worked-out examples in mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian H. Ross

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This study explores what introductory physics students actually look at when studying worked-out examples. Our classroom experiences indicate that introductory physics students neither discuss nor refer to the conceptual information contained in the text of worked-out examples. This study is an effort to determine to what extent students incorporate the textual information into the way they study. Student eye-gaze patterns were recorded as they studied the examples to aid them in solving a target problem. Contrary to our expectations from classroom interactions, students spent 40±3% of their gaze time reading the textual information. Their gaze patterns were also characterized by numerous jumps between corresponding mathematical and textual information, implying that they were combining information from both sources. Despite this large fraction of time spent reading the text, student recall of the conceptual information contained therein remained very poor. We also found that having a particular problem in mind had no significant effects on the gaze-patterns or conceptual information retention.

  7. Numerical analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Khabaza, I M

    1960-01-01

    Numerical Analysis is an elementary introduction to numerical analysis, its applications, limitations, and pitfalls. Methods suitable for digital computers are emphasized, but some desk computations are also described. Topics covered range from the use of digital computers in numerical work to errors in computations using desk machines, finite difference methods, and numerical solution of ordinary differential equations. This book is comprised of eight chapters and begins with an overview of the importance of digital computers in numerical analysis, followed by a discussion on errors in comput

  8. Numerical relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Shibata, Masaru

    2016-01-01

    This book is composed of two parts: First part describes basics in numerical relativity, that is, the formulations and methods for a solution of Einstein's equation and general relativistic matter field equations. This part will be helpful for beginners of numerical relativity who would like to understand the content of numerical relativity and its background. The second part focuses on the application of numerical relativity. A wide variety of scientific numerical results are introduced focusing in particular on the merger of binary neutron stars and black holes.

  9. Analysis of numerical methods

    CERN Document Server

    Isaacson, Eugene

    1994-01-01

    This excellent text for advanced undergraduates and graduate students covers norms, numerical solution of linear systems and matrix factoring, iterative solutions of nonlinear equations, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, polynomial approximation, and other topics. It offers a careful analysis and stresses techniques for developing new methods, plus many examples and problems. 1966 edition.

  10. Past and current sediment dispersion pattern estimates through numerical modeling of wave climate: an example of the Holocene delta of the Doce River, Espírito Santo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abílio C.S.P. Bittencourt

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a numerical modeling estimation of the sediment dispersion patterns caused by waves inciding through four distinct coastline contours of the delta plain of the Doce River during the Late Holocene. For this, a wave climate model based on the construction of wave refraction diagrams, as a function of current boundary conditions, was defined and was assumed to be valid for the four coastlines. The numerical modeling was carried out on basis of the refraction diagrams, taking into account the angle of approximation and the wave height along the coastline. The results are shown to be comparable with existing data regarding the directions of net longshore drift of sediments estimated from the integration of sediment cores, interpretation of aerial photographs and C14 datings. This fact apparently suggests that, on average, current boundary conditions appear to have remained with the same general characteristics since 5600 cal yr BP to the present. The used approach may prove useful to evaluate the sediment dispersion patterns during the Late Holocene in the Brazilian east-northeast coastal region.O presente trabalho apresenta uma estimativa, por modelagem numérica, dos padrões de dispersão de sedimentos causados por ondas ao longo de quatro distintos traçados da linha decosta durante o Holoceno Tardio na planície deltaica do Rio Doce. Para tanto, foi definido um modelo de clima de ondas baseado na construção de diagramas de refração de ondas, em função das condições de contorno atuais, que foi assumido como válido para as quatro linhas de costa. A modelagem numérica foi realizada a partir dos diagramas de refração, levando-se em conta o ângulo de aproximação e a altura da onda ao longo da linha de costa. Os resultados obtidos mostraram-se compatíveis com os dados existentes relativos aos sentidos da deriva litorânea efetiva de sedimentos estimados a partir da integração de testemunhos de vibra

  11. A teoria das cores de newton: um exemplo do uso da história da ciência em sala de aula Newton’s color theory: an example of the use of the history of science in classroom situations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cibelle Celestino Silva

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Neste artigo, discutiremos o trabalho sobre luz e cores de Newton publicado em 1672 para vermos exemplos de questões que podem ser abordadas em sala de aula através da História da Ciência. No entanto, alguns cuidados devem ser tomados para não apresentarmos uma visão distorcida do método científico e uma idéia mítica sobre a Ciência. Este estudo analisa o experimento principal de Newton cuja intenção era mostrar que a luz branca é uma mistura de raios com diferentes refrangibilidades. Embora atualmente essa teoria seja aceita e ensinada sem discussão, um estudo histórico crítico sobre ela levanta muitas questões que serão discutidas neste artigo.This paper analyses some features of Newton's theory of light and colors, especially as presented in his paper of 1672, as an example of the classroom use of History of Science. Although this theory is nowadays accepted and taught without discussion, it is not so simple as it seems and many questions arise from a critical study. Besides, an inadequate use of History of Science in Science Teaching may convey to the students a wrong conception of the scientific method.

  12. Sexual Harassment in the Classroom: Teacher as Target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tochterman, Suzanne; Barnes, Fred

    1998-01-01

    Discusses teachers as victims of sexual harassment in their classrooms. Includes examples involving preservice and new teachers. Discusses the impact of harassment on teachers themselves and on classroom performance. Offers strategies to support and intervene with new teachers who have been victims of sexual harassment. (MKA)

  13. Using Rational-Emotive Therapy to Prevent Classroom Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Jo; Coleman, Maggie

    1988-01-01

    Teachers are encouraged to utilize rational-emotive therapy to prevent and deal with classroom behavior problems. Rational-emotive therapy is defined, the ABC model of rational thinking briefly explained, types of irrational thinking identified, and suggestions for becoming a rational thinker are offered. Classroom examples are given. (DB)

  14. The Flipped Classroom: Implementing Technology to Aid in College Mathematics Student's Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buch, George R.; Warren, Carryn B.

    2017-01-01

    August 2016 there was a call (Braun, Bremser, Duval, Lockwood & White, 2017) for post-secondary instructors to use active learning in their classrooms. Once such example of active learning is what is called the "flipped" classroom. This paper presents the need for, and the methodology of the flipped classroom, results of…

  15. Classroom Capsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Warren, Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Presents ideas that are intended to convey new insights on familiar topics and to enhance pedagogy. The mathematical topics addressed are applications of transformations to numerical integration, the golden ratio, Cramer's rule, a counting problem, and the general form of the arithmetic-geometric mean inequality. (PK)

  16. Numerical Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegler, Robert S.; Braithwaite, David W.

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we attempt to integrate two crucial aspects of numerical development: learning the magnitudes of individual numbers and learning arithmetic. Numerical magnitude development involves gaining increasingly precise knowledge of increasing ranges and types of numbers: from non-symbolic to small symbolic numbers, from smaller to larger…

  17. Hindi Numerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, William

    In most languages encountered by linguists, the numerals, considered as a paradigmatic set, constitute a morpho-syntactic problem of only moderate complexity. The Indo-Aryan language family of North India, however, presents a curious contrast. The relatively regular numeral system of Sanskrit, as it has developed historically into the modern…

  18. Numerical modelling of mine workings.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Lightfoot, N

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available to cover most of what is required for a practising rock mechanics engineer to be able to use any of these five programs to solve practical mining problems. The chapters on specific programs discuss their individual strengths and weaknesses and highlight... and applications of numerical modelling in the context of the South African gold and platinum mining industries. This includes an example that utilises a number of different numerical 3 modelling programs to solve a single problem. This particular example...

  19. SMART Teaching in New and Old Classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunter Saunders

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The University of Westminster is undertaking a major classroom refurbishment program that is linked to a new approach to staff development in mobile learning. Feedback obtained from academic staff and students previously highlighted how classrooms should be changed so as to promote more active forms of curriculum delivery. Both technology and classroom furniture were considered significant enablers for effective in-class delivery, with the simplicity of the former and flexibility of the latter identified as key. To date nearly 70 classrooms have been re-designed and the impact of the changes on both staff and students has been assessed. Generally, the feedback has been positive with high praise for the easy to use technology solutions provided and the adaptability of the furniture. In addition, the significance of "getting right" basic features in new classrooms (lighting, acoustics for example was frequently cited by staff and students. This paper will highlight the features of new classrooms that students and staff have indicated they feel are most significant for their learning and teaching experiences. The paper will also assess the extent to which the new classrooms have been successful through analyzing the impact of both new technology and furniture arrangements on approaches to curriculum delivery. In addition, staff views on the utility of the new staff development approach will be discussed.

  20. Magni Reproducibility Example

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    An example of how to use the magni.reproducibility package for storing metadata along with results from a computational experiment. The example is based on simulating the Mandelbrot set.......An example of how to use the magni.reproducibility package for storing metadata along with results from a computational experiment. The example is based on simulating the Mandelbrot set....

  1. Numerical analysis of the bearing capacity of complex rock mechanical underground systems with filigree structures in the presence of imponderables. A contribution to the systematization of the investigative process with application/demonstration using the example of the salt cavern ASSE II/south flank; Numerische Analyse des Tragverhaltens komplexer gebirgsmechanischer untertaegiger Systeme mit filigranen Strukturen bei Anwesenheit von Imponderabilien. Ein Beitrag zur Systematisierung des Untersuchungsprozesses mit Anwendung/Demonstration am Beispiel des Salzbergwerks Schacht ASSE II/Suedflanke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyogtyev, Oleksandr

    2017-03-02

    The thesis dealing with the numerical analysis of the bearing capacity of complex rock mechanical underground systems with filigree structures in the presence of imponderables covers the following issues: status of science and technology, concept for the performance of numerical studies on the bearing capacity of large-volume underground systems, application example salt cavern ASSE II - application of the developed concept/development of numerical tools for the overall system/application of the global model to the given questions/realization of the modification potential.

  2. Gender Performativity through Musicking: Examples from a Norwegian Classroom Study

    OpenAIRE

    Onsrud, Silje Valde

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT This article is based on findings from the doctoral thesis Gender at Stake: A Study of Secondary School Pupils’ Musicking. The study explores how pupils stage and construct gender through the music they perform in the lower-secondary school music education in Norway. The observations and interviews of four music teaching practices in two urban lower-secondary schools that provided the qualitative data of the study are intended to highlight both the teachers’ and the pupils’ perspe...

  3. Numerical analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Scott, L Ridgway

    2011-01-01

    Computational science is fundamentally changing how technological questions are addressed. The design of aircraft, automobiles, and even racing sailboats is now done by computational simulation. The mathematical foundation of this new approach is numerical analysis, which studies algorithms for computing expressions defined with real numbers. Emphasizing the theory behind the computation, this book provides a rigorous and self-contained introduction to numerical analysis and presents the advanced mathematics that underpin industrial software, including complete details that are missing from most textbooks. Using an inquiry-based learning approach, Numerical Analysis is written in a narrative style, provides historical background, and includes many of the proofs and technical details in exercises. Students will be able to go beyond an elementary understanding of numerical simulation and develop deep insights into the foundations of the subject. They will no longer have to accept the mathematical gaps that ex...

  4. Creating a Classroom Where Readers Flourish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Donalyn

    2012-01-01

    Numerous research studies prove that wide reading improves children's comprehension, background knowledge, vocabulary, fluency, and writing. The author, a sixth-grade language arts teacher, describes the classroom conditions and instructional practices that encourage wide reading and increase her students' reading motivation such as choice in…

  5. Library Databases as Unexamined Classroom Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faix, Allison

    2014-01-01

    In their 1994 article, "The Politics of the Interface: Power and its Exercise in Electronic Contact Zones," compositionists Cynthia Selfe and Richard Selfe give examples of how certain features of word processing software and other programs used in writing classrooms (including their icons, clip art, interfaces, and file structures) can…

  6. Game Theory in the Social Studies Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesperman, Dean Patrick; Clark, Chris H.

    2016-01-01

    This article explores using game theory in social studies classrooms as a heuristic to aid students in understanding strategic decision making. The authors provide examples of several simple games teachers can use. Next, we address how to help students design their own simple (2 × 2) games.

  7. Review of Social Interaction and L2 Classroom Discourse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    aus der Wieschen, Maria Vanessa

    2015-01-01

    Social Interaction and L2 Classroom Discourse investigates interactional practices in L2 classrooms. Using Conversation Analysis, the book unveils the processes underlying the co-construction of mutual understanding in potential interactional troubles in L2 classrooms – such as claims...... taster sessions over foreign language classrooms in monolingual contexts to English as an Additional Language settings in a multilingual context. This variety of settings allows him to examine a range of verbal and non-verbal features of classroom interaction, for example how code-switching is used......-6), and application (Chapters 7 and 8). A central focus throughout the entire book is classroom interactional competence and its influence on language learning....

  8. Numerical model CCC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodvarsson, G.S.; Lippmann, M.J.

    1980-01-01

    The computer program CCC (conduction-convection-consolidation), developed at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, solves numerically the heat and mass flow equations for a fully saturated medium, and computes one-dimensional consolidation of the simulated systems. The model employs the Integrated Finite Difference Method (IFDM) in discretizing the saturated medium and formulating the governing equations. The sets of equations are solved either by an iterative solution technique (old version) or an efficient sparse solver (new version). The deformation of the medium is calculated using the one-dimensional consolidation theory of Terzaghi. In this paper, the numerical code is described, validation examples given and areas of application discussed. Several example problems involving flow through fractured media are also presented

  9. Classroom Management. TESOL Classroom Practice Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Thomas S. C., Ed.

    2008-01-01

    This series captures the dynamics of the contemporary ESOL classroom. It showcases state-of-the-art curricula, materials, tasks, and activities reflecting emerging trends in language education and seeks to build localized language teaching and learning theories based on teachers' and students' unique experiences in and beyond the classroom. Each…

  10. Observing Classroom Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielson, Charlotte

    2012-01-01

    Classroom observation is a crucial aspect of any system of teacher evaluation. No matter how skilled a teacher is in other aspects of teaching--such as careful planning, working well with colleagues, and communicating with parents--if classroom practice is deficient, that individual cannot be considered a good teacher. Classroom observations can…

  11. Encouraging Classroom Discussion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Joseph McKee

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Classroom discussion has the potential to enhance the learning environment and encourages students to become active participants in the educational process. Student participation in classroom discussion has been shown to significantly improve the student learning experience. Research suggests that classroom discussion is an effective method for encouraging student classroom participation and for motivating student learning beyond the classroom. Participation in classroom discussion encourages students to become active collaborators in the learning process, while at the same time providing instructors with a practical method of assessing student learning. Classroom discussion is an effective tool for developing higher-level cognitive skills like critical thinking. Despite the potential discussion holds for student learning, many in academia lament the lack of participation in the classroom. The lack of student participation in classroom discussion is not a recent problem; it is one that has frustrated instructors for decades. Instructors report that some of the more current methods for encouraging classroom discussion can be exasperating and at times non-productive. This two-year study of 510 college and university students provides insight into the reasons why some students do not participate in classroom discussion. This study, which also elicited input from sixteen college and university professors and two high school teachers, offers some suggestions for creating and encouraging an environment conducive to student participation in the classroom.

  12. Better Classroom Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kecskemeti, Maria; Winslade, John

    2016-01-01

    The usual approaches to classroom relationships are either teacher-centred or student-centred. This book breaks new ground in its exploration of relationship-centred classrooms. In relationship-centred classrooms, the teacher and the student are equally important. That shifts the focus to the quality of their interaction and whether it is…

  13. The power of example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liliana Gheorghian, Mariana

    2014-05-01

    beginning of the XXI century" with the participation of several schools in the country in 2009 and 2011. The papers presented were diverse and gave examples of various teaching experiences and scientific information. Topics by the teachers: The impact of tourism on the environment, Tornadoes, Natural science and environmental education in school, Air Pollution and health, Ecological education of children from primary school, The effects of electromagnetic radiation, Formation of an ecological mentality using chemistry, Why should we protect water, Environmental education, Education for the future, SOS Nature, Science in the twenty-first century, etc. Topics by students: Nature- the palace of thermal phenomena, Life depends on heat, Water Mysteries, Global Heating, The Mysterious universe, etc. In March 2013 our school hosted an interesting exchange of ideas on environmental issues between our students and those from Bulgaria, Poland and Turkey, during a symposium of the Comenius multilateral project "Conserving Nature". In order to present the results of protecting nature in their communities, two projects "Citizen" qualified in the Program Civitas in the autumn of 2013. "The Battle" continues both in nature and in classrooms, in order to preserve the environment.

  14. Trout in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Trout in the Classroom (TIC) is a conservation-oriented environmental education program for elementary, middle, and high school students. During the year each teacher tailors the program to fit his or her curricular needs. Therefore, each TIC program is unique. TIC has interdisciplinary applications in science, social studies, mathematics, language arts, fine arts, and physical education. In the program, students and teachers raise trout from fertilized eggs supplied by Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries (VGIF) hatcheries, in aquariums equipped with special chillers designed to keep the water near 50 degrees F. The students make daily temperature measurements, and monitor pH, dissolved oxygen, conductivity, and ammonia levels. They record their data, plot trends, and make sure that the water quality is sufficient to support trout development. The fingerlings, which hatch in late October, are almost an inch and a half long by mid-January. And towards the end of the school year, students will release the fry into VGIF approved watersheds. TIC programs have been in place all across the country for more than 20 years, and are the result of numerous collaborations between teachers, volunteers, government agencies, and local organizations like Trout Unlimited. The programs were designed specifically for teachers who wanted to incorporate more environmental education into their curriculum. While the immediate goal of Trout in the Classroom is to increase student knowledge of water quality and cold water conservation, its long-term goal is to reconnect an increasingly urbanized population of youth to the system of streams, rivers, and watersheds that sustain them. Successful programs have helped: connect students to their local environments and their local watersheds; teach about watershed health and water quality, and; get students to care about fish and the environment. In Virginia, the TIC program is now in its 8th year. Over the past year, the program

  15. Modeling a student-classroom interaction in a tutorial-like system using learning automata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oommen, B John; Hashem, M Khaled

    2010-02-01

    Almost all of the learning paradigms used in machine learning, learning automata (LA), and learning theory, in general, use the philosophy of a Student (learning mechanism) attempting to learn from a teacher. This paradigm has been generalized in a myriad of ways, including the scenario when there are multiple teachers or a hierarchy of mechanisms that collectively achieve the learning. In this paper, we consider a departure from this paradigm by allowing the Student to be a member of a classroom of Students, where, for the most part, we permit each member of the classroom not only to learn from the teacher(s) but also to "extract" information from any of his fellow Students. This paper deals with issues concerning the modeling, decision-making process, and testing of such a scenario within the LA context. The main result that we show is that a weak learner can actually benefit from this capability of utilizing the information that he gets from a superior colleague-if this information transfer is done appropriately. As far as we know, the whole concept of Students learning from both a teacher and from a classroom of Students is novel and unreported in the literature. The proposed Student-classroom interaction has been tested for numerous strategies and for different environments, including the established benchmarks, and the results show that Students can improve their learning by interacting with each other. For example, for some interaction strategies, a weak Student can improve his learning by up to 73% when interacting with a classroom of Students, which includes Students of various capabilities. In these interactions, the Student does not have a priori knowledge of the identity or characteristics of the Students who offer their assistance.

  16. Selection of robust methods. Numerical examples and results

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Víšek, Jan Ámos

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 11 (2005), s. 1-58 ISSN 1212-074X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA402/03/0084 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : robust regression * model selection * uniform consistency of M-estimators Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  17. Two denominators for one numerator: the example of neonatal mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, Quaker E; Basso, Olga; Weinberg, Clarice R; Wilcox, Allen J

    2018-06-01

    Preterm delivery is one of the strongest predictors of neonatal mortality. A given exposure may increase neonatal mortality directly, or indirectly by increasing the risk of preterm birth. Efforts to assess these direct and indirect effects are complicated by the fact that neonatal mortality arises from two distinct denominators (i.e. two risk sets). One risk set comprises fetuses, susceptible to intrauterine pathologies (such as malformations or infection), which can result in neonatal death. The other risk set comprises live births, who (unlike fetuses) are susceptible to problems of immaturity and complications of delivery. In practice, fetal and neonatal sources of neonatal mortality cannot be separated-not only because of incomplete information, but because risks from both sources can act on the same newborn. We use simulations to assess the repercussions of this structural problem. We first construct a scenario in which fetal and neonatal factors contribute separately to neonatal mortality. We introduce an exposure that increases risk of preterm birth (and thus neonatal mortality) without affecting the two baseline sets of neonatal mortality risk. We then calculate the apparent gestational-age-specific mortality for exposed and unexposed newborns, using as the denominator either fetuses or live births at a given gestational age. If conditioning on gestational age successfully blocked the mediating effect of preterm delivery, then exposure would have no effect on gestational-age-specific risk. Instead, we find apparent exposure effects with either denominator. Except for prediction, neither denominator provides a meaningful way to define gestational-age-specific neonatal mortality.

  18. Global-scale seismic interferometry : Theory and numerical examples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruigrok, E.N.; Draganov, D.S.; Wapenaar, K.

    2008-01-01

    Progress in the imaging of the mantle and core is partially limited by the sparse distribution of natural sources; the earthquake hypocenters are mainly along the active lithospheric plate boundaries. This problem can be approached with seismic interferometry. In recent years, there has been

  19. Numerical analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Brezinski, C

    2012-01-01

    Numerical analysis has witnessed many significant developments in the 20th century. This book brings together 16 papers dealing with historical developments, survey papers and papers on recent trends in selected areas of numerical analysis, such as: approximation and interpolation, solution of linear systems and eigenvalue problems, iterative methods, quadrature rules, solution of ordinary-, partial- and integral equations. The papers are reprinted from the 7-volume project of the Journal of Computational and Applied Mathematics on '/homepage/sac/cam/na2000/index.html<

  20. The Interactional Architecture of the Language Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Seedhouse

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This article provides a summary of some of the key ideas of Seedhouse (2004. The study applies Conversation Analysis (CA methodology to an extensive and varied database of language lessons from around the world and attempts to answer the question ‘How is L2 classroom interaction organised?’ The main thesis is that there is a reflexive relationship between pedagogy and interaction in the L2 classroom. This means that there is a two-way, mutually dependent relationship. Furthermore, this relationship is the foundation of the organisation of interaction in L2 classrooms. The omnipresent and unique feature of the L2 classroom is this reflexive relationship between pedagogy and interaction. So whoever is taking part in L2 classroom interaction and whatever the particular activity during which the interactants are speaking the L2, they are always displaying to one another their analyses of the current state of the evolving relationship between pedagogy and interaction and acting on the basis of these analyses. So interaction in the L2 classroom is based on the relationship between pedagogy and interaction. Interactants are constantly analysing this relationship and displaying their analyses in their talk. An example of data analysis is provided, including discussion of socially distributed cognition and learning.

  1. Numerical Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, John G.

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in numerical relativity have fueled an explosion of progress in understanding the predictions of Einstein's theory of gravity, General Relativity, for the strong field dynamics, the gravitational radiation wave forms, and consequently the state of the remnant produced from the merger of compact binary objects. I will review recent results from the field, focusing on mergers of two black holes.

  2. Projector Method: theory and examples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahl, E.D.

    1985-01-01

    The Projector Method technique for numerically analyzing lattice gauge theories was developed to take advantage of certain simplifying features of gauge theory models. Starting from a very general notion of what the Projector Method is, the techniques are applied to several model problems. After these examples have traced the development of the actual algorithm from the general principles of the Projector Method, a direct comparison between the Projector and the Euclidean Monte Carlo is made, followed by a discussion of the application to Periodic Quantum Electrodynamics in two and three spatial dimensions. Some methods for improving the efficiency of the Projector in various circumstances are outlined. 10 refs., 7 figs

  3. Using Mixed Methods to Analyze Video Data: A Mathematics Teacher Professional Development Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCuir-Gunby, Jessica T.; Marshall, Patricia L.; McCulloch, Allison W.

    2012-01-01

    This article uses data from 65 teachers participating in a K-2 mathematics professional development research project as an example of how to analyze video recordings of teachers' classroom lessons using mixed methods. Through their discussion, the authors demonstrate how using a mixed methods approach to classroom video analysis allows researchers…

  4. Design Principles of Worked Examples: A Review of the Empirical Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chun-Yi; Tsai, Hui-Chun

    2009-01-01

    Many researchers investigated the efficacy of using worked examples in classroom instruction and provided evidence in the effectiveness of worked example instruction in mathematics, computer programming, physics, and etc. However, there are limited studies in worked example design. The purpose of this study is to generate the instructional design…

  5. Numerical relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Nakamura, T

    1993-01-01

    In GR13 we heard many reports on recent. progress as well as future plans of detection of gravitational waves. According to these reports (see the report of the workshop on the detection of gravitational waves by Paik in this volume), it is highly probable that the sensitivity of detectors such as laser interferometers and ultra low temperature resonant bars will reach the level of h ~ 10—21 by 1998. in this level we may expect the detection of the gravitational waves from astrophysical sources such as coalescing binary neutron stars once a year or so. Therefore the progress in numerical relativity is urgently required to predict the wave pattern and amplitude of the gravitational waves from realistic astrophysical sources. The time left for numerical relativists is only six years or so although there are so many difficulties in principle as well as in practice.

  6. Numerical methods

    CERN Document Server

    Dahlquist, Germund

    1974-01-01

    ""Substantial, detailed and rigorous . . . readers for whom the book is intended are admirably served."" - MathSciNet (Mathematical Reviews on the Web), American Mathematical Society.Practical text strikes fine balance between students' requirements for theoretical treatment and needs of practitioners, with best methods for large- and small-scale computing. Prerequisites are minimal (calculus, linear algebra, and preferably some acquaintance with computer programming). Text includes many worked examples, problems, and an extensive bibliography.

  7. Power Play: Rethinking Roles in the Art Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffington, Melanie L.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes how art teachers can work toward changing the power dynamics in their classrooms by using a student centered approach, as demonstrated by an example lesson about contemporary painter Kehinde Wiley. As the class unpacked the idea of power prevalent in Wiley's portraits, the students gave relevant examples of how power…

  8. Theory and applications of numerical analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Phillips, G M

    1996-01-01

    This text is a self-contained Second Edition, providing an introductory account of the main topics in numerical analysis. The book emphasizes both the theorems which show the underlying rigorous mathematics andthe algorithms which define precisely how to program the numerical methods. Both theoretical and practical examples are included.* a unique blend of theory and applications* two brand new chapters on eigenvalues and splines* inclusion of formal algorithms* numerous fully worked examples* a large number of problems, many with solutions

  9. An introduction to numerical methods and analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Epperson, James F

    2013-01-01

    Praise for the First Edition "". . . outstandingly appealing with regard to its style, contents, considerations of requirements of practice, choice of examples, and exercises.""-Zentralblatt MATH "". . . carefully structured with many detailed worked examples.""-The Mathematical Gazette The Second Edition of the highly regarded An Introduction to Numerical Methods and Analysis provides a fully revised guide to numerical approximation. The book continues to be accessible and expertly guides readers through the many available techniques of numerical methods and analysis. An Introduction to

  10. Virtual classroom project

    OpenAIRE

    Gmeiner, Nicholas

    2017-01-01

    This project aims to provide students with disabilities the same in class learning experience through virtual reality technology, 360-degree video capture, and the use of Arduino units. These technologies will be combined to facilitate communication between teachers in physical classrooms with students in virtual classrooms. The goal is to provide a person who is affected by a disability (which makes it hard to be in a traditional classroom) the same benefits of a safe and interactive learnin...

  11. The Implementation of A Flipped Classroom in Foreign Language Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet BASAL

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Alongside the rise of educational technology, many teachers have been taking gradual but innovative steps to redesign their teaching methods. For example, in flipped learning or a flipped classroom, students watch instructional videos outside the classroom and do assignments or engage in activities inside the classroom. Language teachers are one group of educators exploring the flipped classroom. In foreign language classes, such an approach may offer great benefits for both the teachers and students since classroom time can be applied to more interactive tasks. By extending classroom hours in this way, language teachers can focus on successfully addressing all subjects in the curriculum. The aim of this study is (a to gain insights into the perceptions of prospective English language teachers at a state university in Turkey on flipped classrooms and (b to introduce the implementation of a flipped classroom into an English language class. A total of 47 prospective English teachers participated in the study. Qualitative research design was used and data were collected via an open-ended question. Findings of the study indicated that pre-service English teachers had positive perceptions towards the use of the flipped classroom as an integral part of face-to-face courses. It can be concluded that flipped classroom was beneficial in terms of 4 categories based on the content analysis of the responses: learning at one’s own pace, advance student preparation, overcoming the limitations of class time, increasing the participation in the classroom. The study also provides recommendations towards LMS integration into courses in other English language teaching departments and for implementing flipped classrooms in language teaching.

  12. Flipped Classroom Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fezile Ozdamli

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Flipped classroom is an active, student-centered approach that was formed to increase the quality of period within class. Generally this approach whose applications are done mostly in Physical Sciences, also attracts the attention of educators and researchers in different disciplines recently. Flipped classroom learning which wide-spreads rapidly in the world, is not well recognized in our country. That is why the aim of study is to attract attention to its potential in education field and provide to make it recognize more by educators and researchers. With this aim, in the study what flipped classroom approach is, flipped classroom technology models, its advantages and limitations were explained.

  13. GLOBAL EDUCATION: WHAT TEACHERS CAN DO IN THE CLASSROOMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Eka Rini

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available This article will give examples of what teachers of second language can do to implement global education, especially peace and environmental education in the classrooms in university level. This is an attempt to give a new meaning to the same materials used in the classrooms. Besides enabling the students to acquire and use a second language, teachers can make the students aware of the importance of environment. Moreover, teachers can initiate to spread peace in the small world of a classroom and a chain reaction is expected to happen from this small world to the bigger world outside the classroom. The skill and content courses used as examples here are taken from the ones used at English Department at Petra Christian University.

  14. Numerical ecology with R

    CERN Document Server

    Borcard, Daniel; Legendre, Pierre

    2018-01-01

    This new edition of Numerical Ecology with R guides readers through an applied exploration of the major methods of multivariate data analysis, as seen through the eyes of three ecologists. It provides a bridge between a textbook of numerical ecology and the implementation of this discipline in the R language. The book begins by examining some exploratory approaches. It proceeds logically with the construction of the key building blocks of most methods, i.e. association measures and matrices, and then submits example data to three families of approaches: clustering, ordination and canonical ordination. The last two chapters make use of these methods to explore important and contemporary issues in ecology: the analysis of spatial structures and of community diversity. The aims of methods thus range from descriptive to explanatory and predictive and encompass a wide variety of approaches that should provide readers with an extensive toolbox that can address a wide palette of questions arising in contemporary mul...

  15. Regression analysis by example

    CERN Document Server

    Chatterjee, Samprit

    2012-01-01

    Praise for the Fourth Edition: ""This book is . . . an excellent source of examples for regression analysis. It has been and still is readily readable and understandable."" -Journal of the American Statistical Association Regression analysis is a conceptually simple method for investigating relationships among variables. Carrying out a successful application of regression analysis, however, requires a balance of theoretical results, empirical rules, and subjective judgment. Regression Analysis by Example, Fifth Edition has been expanded

  16. Action methods in the classroom: creative strategies for nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Dorcas E; Freed, Patricia E; Tadych, Rita A

    2006-01-01

    Nursing education recognizes the need for a framework of experiential learning that supports the development of professional roles. Action methods, originated by Jacob L. Moreno (1953), can be readily adapted to any nursing classroom to create the conditions under which students learn and practice professional nursing roles. While nurse faculty can learn to use action methods, they may not fully comprehend their theoretical underpinnings or may believe they are only used in therapy. This article explores Moreno's ideas related to psychodrama and sociodrama applied in classroom settings, and presents many examples and tips for classroom teachers who wish to incorporate action methods into their classes.

  17. Managing Classroom Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, James D.

    Schools need to meet unique problems through the development of special classroom management techniques. Factors which contribute to classroom problems include lack of supervision at home, broken homes, economic deprivation, and a desire for peer attention. The educational atmosphere should encourage creativity for both the student and the…

  18. Classroom -RE-SONANCE

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    in a classroom situation. We may suggest strategies for dealing with them, or invite responses, or both. "Classroom" is equally a forum for raising broader issues and sharing personal experiences and viewpoints on matters related to· teaching and learning science. Logarithm and agM. In [1] we had discussed the evaluation.

  19. Classroom -RE-SONANCE

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    raised in a classroom situation. We may suggest strategies for dealing with them, or invite responses, or both. "Classroom" is equally a forum for raising broader issues and sharing personal experiences and viewpoints on matters related to teaching and learning science. Proving a Result in Combinatorics using Equations.

  20. Relationships in Inclusive Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Graça Duarte; Sardinha, Susana; Reis, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Climate in the classroom is one of the determining factors in the development of practices in Inclusive Education. Many factors contribute to the climate in the classroom. However, there are predominance on affective-relational factors, with impact on action, norms and values, social interactions and learning processes. In this paper, the authors…

  1. Flipped Classroom, active Learning?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Dyreborg; Levinsen, Henrik; Philipps, Morten

    2015-01-01

    Action research is conducted in three physics classes over a period of eighteen weeks with the aim of studying the effect of flipped classroom on the pupils agency and learning processes. The hypothesis is that flipped classroom teaching will potentially allocate more time to work actively...

  2. Flipped Classroom Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdamli, Fezile; Asiksoy, Gulsum

    2016-01-01

    Flipped classroom is an active, student-centered approach that was formed to increase the quality of period within class. Generally this approach whose applications are done mostly in Physical Sciences, also attracts the attention of educators and researchers in different disciplines recently. Flipped classroom learning which wide-spreads rapidly…

  3. Freeform aberrations in phase space: an example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babington, James

    2017-06-01

    We consider how optical propagation and aberrations of freeform systems can be formulated in phase space. As an example system, a freeform prism is analyzed and discussed. Symmetry considerations and their group theory descriptions are given some importance. Numerical aberrations are also highlighted and put into the context of the underlying aberration theory.

  4. Mathematics difficulties & classroom leadership

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Maria Christina Secher

    2016-01-01

    This article investigates possible links between inclusion, students, for whom mathematics is extensively difficult, and classroom leadership through a case study on teaching strategies and student participation in four classrooms at two different primary schools in Denmark. Three sets of results...... are presented: 1) descriptions of the teachers’ classroom leadership to include all their students in the learning community, 2) the learning community produced by stated and practiced rules for teaching and learning behavior, 3) the classroom behavior of students who experience difficulties with mathematics....... The findings suggest that the teachers’ pedagogical choices and actions support an active learning environment for students in diverse learning needs, and that the teachers practise dimensions of inclusive classroom leadership that are known to be successful for teaching mathematics to all students. Despite...

  5. Teaching Pragmatic Particles in the LCTL Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faizah Sari

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The success and effectiveness of teaching the LCTL class-room depend on the LCTL research. The study investigated the into-nation contours of seven Indonesian pragmatic particles (kan, ya, kok, lho, dong, deh, and sih to review the functions of the particles. Vide-otaped data of naturally occurring conversations by native speakers of Indonesian were collected. Results indicated the number of into-nation contours for the Indonesian pragmatic particles used by the speakers to organize information (for example, to extend common ground and mark shared knowledge and to convey the speaker’s ex-pression (for example, surprise and emphasis. The particle contour analysis forms a natural link between grammatical and interactional competence and bears an important LCTL pedagogical consequence in terms of both improving teaching materials and bringing the cul-ture closer to the learner. Based on the findings, four strategies in teaching the LCTL classroom are recommended.

  6. Use of social media in the classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Kobal, Maruša

    2012-01-01

    In the thesis I examined the use of social media in the classroom at school. In the first part I presented the use of social networks in the European Union and information literacy in Slovenia. I presented, more specifically, social software and selected currently the most popular social networks and the one, used for educational purposes. I also presented good and bad sites of social media, according to teachers who already use social media in the learning process. I also collected examples ...

  7. Numerical simulation in plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samarskii, A.A.

    1980-01-01

    Plasma physics is not only a field for development of physical theories and mathematical models but also an object of application of the computational experiment comprising analytical and numerical methods adapted for computers. The author considers only MHD plasma physics problems. Examples treated are dissipative structures in plasma; MHD model of solar dynamo; supernova explosion simulation; and plasma compression by a liner. (Auth.)

  8. Numerical computation of MHD equilibria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atanasiu, C.V.

    1982-10-01

    A numerical code for a two-dimensional MHD equilibrium computation has been carried out. The code solves the Grad-Shafranov equation in its integral form, for both formulations: the free-boundary problem and the fixed boundary one. Examples of the application of the code to tokamak design are given. (author)

  9. Code query by example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaucouleur, Sebastien

    2011-02-01

    We introduce code query by example for customisation of evolvable software products in general and of enterprise resource planning systems (ERPs) in particular. The concept is based on an initial empirical study on practices around ERP systems. We motivate our design choices based on those empirical results, and we show how the proposed solution helps with respect to the infamous upgrade problem: the conflict between the need for customisation and the need for upgrade of ERP systems. We further show how code query by example can be used as a form of lightweight static analysis, to detect automatically potential defects in large software products. Code query by example as a form of lightweight static analysis is particularly interesting in the context of ERP systems: it is often the case that programmers working in this field are not computer science specialists but more of domain experts. Hence, they require a simple language to express custom rules.

  10. Managing Your Classroom for Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Harry; Wong, Rosemary; Rogers, Karen; Brooks, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    Effective teachers view classroom management as a process of organizing and structuring classroom events for student learning. Creating a well-managed classroom with established procedures is the priority of a teacher the first two weeks of school. In an elementary classroom where each day may have a different array of subjects and at different…

  11. Classroom Research by Classroom Teachers, 1992.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Michael, Ed.

    1992-01-01

    This volume celebrates teachers as life-long learners of the art of teaching, by presenting 21 action research studies designed and implemented by classroom teachers. A "How To Get Started" section outlines action research steps and offers worksheets. Descriptions of the research studies begin with ethnographic studies, which include "Adopt a…

  12. Nuclear transparency: the French example

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phuc Tran Dai

    2016-01-01

    In France nuclear industry is from far the industrial sector that has set the most numerous commissions that allow a dialogue with the public in order to favor transparency. There are 4 local structures of information: -)there are 38 Local Committees of Information (CLI) associated with nuclear facilities, -) the Information Committees (CI) associated with secret nuclear facilities, -) the Follow-up Committees (CSS) for facilities dedicated to the processing of wastes, and the Committees for the prevention of industrial pollution (SPPPI). These committees involve numerous actors: public service, industrialists, supervisory authorities, elected representatives, employee representatives, members of associations and residents living nearby. Since 2000, 10 national public hearings around the 'atom' have been organized by the CNDP (National Commission for Public Consultation). Most actors of the nuclear industry allow residents living nearby to visit their installations, EDF ranks 3 as the company most visited with 400.000 people a year. Following the nuclear example the French chemical industry progressively moves toward more transparency. (A.C.)

  13. Examples to Keep the Passion for the Geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Raga, María; Palencia Coto, Covadonga; Cerdà, Artemi

    2014-05-01

    It is said that the beasts can smell fear. The translation to education is that students know when our vocation is really teaching or when you are teaching as a result of the sequence of events like a side effect of an investigating vocation path. But to become a good teacher, you need to love teaching!!! Education work requires a dynamic appeal by the students. It should be entertaining, motivating, interactive and dynamic. In this session I will present several tips and examples to get attention on your geology sessions: 1. The teacher should maintain a high interest in the subject of your work. Motivation is contagious!!!!If you show passion the other will feel it. 2. Change the attitude of students. Some activities can help you to do that like asking for the preparation of an experiment, and analyzing the results. Some examples will be shown. 3. Arouse the curiosity of the students. Some strategies could be asking questions in novel, controversial or inconsistent ways, asking conceptual conflicts and paradox that looks not expected from what is studied or 4. Use some tools to get the attention of the students. Examples of these tools can be Google Maps and Google Earth (teaching them to design routes and marking studies), Google drive (to create documents online in a team and file sharing), Google plus (to hang interesting news). 5. Examine students each week. Although it will be laborious, their work and learning will be more gradual. 6. Increase levels of competition among peers. 7. Relate what you know with what you learn. It is very important to be aware of the basis on which pupils, through prior knowledge test match. 8. Feel competent. Teacher's confidence is vital when teaching a class. You must be aware of our weaknesses and humble, but our nerves should help us to improve the quality of our classes. 9. Individualized teaching and learning. Numerous psychological and sociological studies suggest that the existence of social networks contribute to the

  14. The Transformative Power of Communication: Democratizing Practices for the General Education Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynal, Kaitlyn

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the common communication practices of deliberation, discussion, delivery, and debate, for their democratizing potential through their greater inclusion in all general education classrooms. It argues that these tools are underutilized outside of communication classrooms but offer numerous benefits to teachers and students…

  15. The Effects of Virtual Communities on Group Identity in Classroom Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Tu-Kuang; Lin, Yu-Tzeng

    2016-01-01

    Group identity is a critical component in developing effective classroom management. While there have been numerous studies on group identity, they have primarily focused on its effects on the physical classroom entity. Advances in information technology, however, have enabled the creation of virtual communities, which have become a vital channel…

  16. Integrating Pedagogy into Intercultural Teaching in a Vietnamese Setting: From Policy to the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Long

    2014-01-01

    Language education policy needs to be realised in the language classroom. For example, when a specific policy advocates the development of learners' competence in interacting with people from other cultures, classroom teaching practices and assessment have to address learners' intercultural competence. Teachers need to fully understand the…

  17. The Classroom Animal: Mealworms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, David C., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Describes appearance, longevity, and changes in each step of the mealworm life cycle. Guidelines for starting a classroom colony are given with housing and care instructions. Suggested observations, activities, and questions for students are included. (DH)

  18. For the Classroom: Scrimshaw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Current, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Procedures are described for practicing the art of scrimshaw in the classroom. Several materials are suggested for use. These include beef soup bones, old piano keys, nails, sandpaper, and lampblack or charcoal. (SA)

  19. Culture in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medin, Douglas L.; Bang, Megan

    2014-01-01

    Culture plays a large but often unnoticeable role in what we teach and how we teach children. We are a country of immense diversity, but in classrooms the dominant European-American culture has become the language of learning.

  20. Goodbye Classrooms (Redux).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geber, Beverly

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the location of corporate training in view of modern technology. Indicates that training will be brought out of the classroom and to the work station. Describes training programs offered at several large corporations. (JOW)

  1. Classroom -RE-SONANCE

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    "Classroom" is equally a forum for raising broader issues and sharing personal experiences and viewpoints on matters related to teaching and learning science. ! Energy transfer in an elastic collision. One may intuitively feel that in an elastic ...

  2. Constructive Classroom Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dollard, Norin; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Reviews classroom management strategies that are child-centered and consistent with constructivist approaches to education, in which teachers create situations that facilitate learning. Describes strategies including techniques for establishing dialog, cognitive interventions (including self management and conflict resolution), cognitive…

  3. Worked Examples with Errors: When Self-Explanation Prompts Hinder Learning of Teachers Diagnostic Competences on Problem-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitzmann, Nicole; Fischer, Frank; Fischer, Martin R.

    2018-01-01

    To diagnose classroom situations is crucial for teachers' everyday practice. The approach of worked examples with errors seems promising to support the diagnosis of classroom situations in student teachers (Stark et al. in "Learn Instr" 21(1):22-33, 2011). To enhance that approach, error-explanation prompts and an adaptable feedback…

  4. Worked Examples Leads to Better Performance in Analyzing and Solving Real-Life Decision Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevik, Yasemin Demiraslan; Andre, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    This study compared the impact of three types of case-based methods (worked example, faded worked example, and case-based reasoning) on preservice teachers' (n=71) decision making and reasoning related to realistic classroom management situations. Participants in this study received a short-term implementation of one of these three major…

  5. Flipped Classroom Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Fezile Ozdamli; Gulsum Asiksoy

    2016-01-01

    Flipped classroom is an active, student-centered approach that was formed to increase the quality of period within class. Generally this approach whose applications are done mostly in Physical Sciences, also attracts the attention of educators and researchers in different disciplines recently. Flipped classroom learning which wide-spreads rapidly in the world, is not well recognized in our country. That is why the aim of study is to attract attention to its potential in education field and pr...

  6. Classroom observation and feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana GOREA

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Classroom observation is a didactic activity from which both the observer and the observed teacher are to win. The present article comments on and discusses the aims of observation, the stages of observation, the methodological recommendations of offering feedback and the need to introduce a system of classroom observation at institutional or even national level, which would contribute to improving the teaching/learning process.

  7. Classroom Games: Making Money

    OpenAIRE

    Susan K. Laury; Charles A. Holt

    2000-01-01

    Economics is often taught at a level of abstraction that can hinder some students from gaining basic intuition. However, lecture and textbook presentations can be complemented with classroom exercises in which students make decisions and interact. The approach can increase interest in and decrease skepticism about economic theory. This feature offers short descriptions of classroom exercises for a variety of economics courses, with something of an emphasis on the more popular undergraduate co...

  8. Neutrosophic Examples in Physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Yuhua

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Neutrosophy can be widely applied in physics and the like. For example, one of the reasons for 2011 Nobel Prize for physics is "for the discovery of the accelerating expansion of the universe through observations of distant supernovae", but according to neutrosophy, there exist seven or nine states of accelerating expansion and contraction and the neutrosophic state in the universe. Another two examples are "a revision to Gödel's incompleteness theorem by neutrosophy" and "six neutral (neutrosophic fundamental interactions". In addition, the "partial and temporary unified theory so far" is discussed (including "partial and temporary unified electromagnetic theory so far", "partial and temporary unified gravitational theory so far", "partial and temporary unified theory of four fundamental interactions so far", and "partial and temporary unified theory of natural science so far".

  9. Examples of plasma horizons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanni, R.S.

    1975-01-01

    The concept of the plasma horizon, defined as the boundary of the region in which an infinitely thin plasma can be supported against Coulomb attraction by a magnetic field, shows that the argument of selective accretion does not rule out the existence of charged black holes embedded in a conducting plasma. A detailed account of the covariant definition of plasma horizon is given and some examples of plasma horizons are presented. 7 references

  10. Robust Programming by Example

    OpenAIRE

    Bishop , Matt; Elliott , Chip

    2011-01-01

    Part 2: WISE 7; International audience; Robust programming lies at the heart of the type of coding called “secure programming”. Yet it is rarely taught in academia. More commonly, the focus is on how to avoid creating well-known vulnerabilities. While important, that misses the point: a well-structured, robust program should anticipate where problems might arise and compensate for them. This paper discusses one view of robust programming and gives an example of how it may be taught.

  11. The Power of Example

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, Anne Marie

    2013-01-01

    This paper suggests that for negotiation studies, the well-researched role of cognitive closure in decision-making should be supplemented with specific research on what sort of information is seized on as unambiguous, salient and easily processable by negotiators. A study of email negotiation...... is reported that suggests that negotiators seize on concrete examples as building blocks that produce immediate positive feedback and consequent utilization in establishing common ground....

  12. Aristotle's Example: The Rhetorical Induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, William Lyon

    1980-01-01

    Examines the concept of example in Aristotle's inventional theory. Rejects recent claims that the example reasons from part to part, without a mediating generalization, and then explicates Aristotle's view of the example. (JMF)

  13. Example based style classification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welnicka, Katarzyna; Bærentzen, Jakob Andreas; Aanæs, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    We address the problem of analysis of families of shapes which can be classified according to two categories: the main one corresponding usually to the coarse shape which we call the function and the more subtle one which we call the style. The style and the function both contribute to the overal...... this similarity should be reflected across different functions. We show the usability of our methods first on the example of a number of chess sets which our method helps sort. Next, we investigate the problem of finding a replacement for a missing tooth given a database of teeth....

  14. Example of feedstock optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boustros, E.

    1991-01-01

    An example of feedstock optimization at an olefins plant which has the flexibility to process different kinds of raw materials while maintaining the same product slate, is presented. Product demand and prices, and the number of units in service as well as the required resources to operate these units are considered to be fixed. The plant profitability is a function of feedstock choice, plus constant costs which are the non-volume related costs. The objective is to find a set or combination of feedstocks that could match the client product demands and fall within the unit's design and capacity, while maximizing the financial operating results

  15. On numerically pluricanonical cyclic coverings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulikov, V S; Kharlamov, V M

    2014-01-01

    We investigate some properties of cyclic coverings f:Y→X (where X is a complex surface of general type) branched along smooth curves B⊂X that are numerically equivalent to a multiple of the canonical class of X. Our main results concern coverings of surfaces of general type with p g =0 and Miyaoka-Yau surfaces. In particular, such coverings provide new examples of multi-component moduli spaces of surfaces with given Chern numbers and new examples of surfaces that are not deformation equivalent to their complex conjugates

  16. Planar Quantum Mechanics: an Intriguing Supersymmetric Example

    CERN Document Server

    Veneziano, Gabriele

    2006-01-01

    After setting up a Hamiltonian formulation of planar (matrix) quantum mechanics, we illustrate its effectiveness in a non-trivial supersymmetric example. The numerical and analytical study of two sectors of the model, as a function of 't Hooft's coupling $\\lambda$, reveals both a phase transition at $\\lambda=1$ (disappearence of the mass gap and discontinuous jump in Witten's index) and a new form of strong-weak duality for $\\lambda \\to 1/\\lambda$.

  17. Numerically and experimentally analysis of creep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontanive, J.A.

    1982-11-01

    The problems of creep in concrete are analyzed experimentally and numerically, comparing with classical methods and suggesting a numerical procedure for the solution of these problems. Firstly, fundamentals of viscoelasticity and its application to concrete behaviour representation are presented. Then the theories of Dischinger and Arutyunyan are studied, and a computing numerical solutions are compared in several examples. Finally, experiences on creep and relaxation are described, and its result are analyzed. Some coments on possible future developments are included. (Author) [pt

  18. Numerical Feedback Stabilization with Applications to Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Göttlich

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The focus is on the numerical consideration of feedback boundary control problems for linear systems of conservation laws including source terms. We explain under which conditions the numerical discretization can be used to design feedback boundary values for network applications such as electric transmission lines or traffic flow systems. Several numerical examples illustrate the properties of the results for different types of networks.

  19. Numerical Analysis Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Michael

    1997-08-01

    The Numerical Analysis Objects project (NAO) is a project in the Mathematics Department of IBM's TJ Watson Research Center. While there are plenty of numerical tools available today, it is not an easy task to combine them into a custom application. NAO is directed at the dual problems of building applications from a set of tools, and creating those tools. There are several "reuse" projects, which focus on the problems of identifying and cataloging tools. NAO is directed at the specific context of scientific computing. Because the type of tools is restricted, problems such as tools with incompatible data structures for input and output, and dissimilar interfaces to tools which solve similar problems can be addressed. The approach we've taken is to define interfaces to those objects used in numerical analysis, such as geometries, functions and operators, and to start collecting (and building) a set of tools which use these interfaces. We have written a class library (a set of abstract classes and implementations) in C++ which demonstrates the approach. Besides the classes, the class library includes "stub" routines which allow the library to be used from C or Fortran, and an interface to a Visual Programming Language. The library has been used to build a simulator for petroleum reservoirs, using a set of tools for discretizing nonlinear differential equations that we have written, and includes "wrapped" versions of packages from the Netlib repository. Documentation can be found on the Web at "http://www.research.ibm.com/nao". I will describe the objects and their interfaces, and give examples ranging from mesh generation to solving differential equations.

  20. Sherlock Holmes in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faia, Jean E.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a three-day classroom activity combining criminal investigations and scientific skills, especially observation skills. Provides detailed classroom procedures with an illustration of eight basic fingerprint patterns and a classification chart. (YP)

  1. Classroom Resources | Argonne National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center Community Outreach Learning Experiences School Competitions Teacher Programs Classroom Resources Learning Center Community Outreach Learning Experiences School Competitions Teacher Programs Classroom every student and that is free from harassment and discrimination based upon race, color, religion

  2. The Dirt on Outdoor Classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Steve

    2000-01-01

    Explains the planning procedure for outdoor classrooms and introduces an integrated unit on monarch butterflies called the Monarch Watch program. Makes recommendations to solve financial problems of outdoor classrooms. (YDS)

  3. Embedding "Clickers" into Classroom Instruction: Benefits and Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blood, Erika; Gulchak, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Student response systems, often called clickers, have become more popular and visible in the K-12 classroom in recent years. There are numerous competing systems on the market, but all perform the same function: to allow the student to use a small hand-held device (i.e., a clicker), or even web browsers on laptops or mobile phones, to respond to…

  4. Wireless Infrared Networking in the Duke Paperless Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stetten, George D.; Guthrie, Scott D.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses wireless (diffuse infrared) networking technology to link laptop computers in a computer programming and numerical methods course at Duke University (North Carolina). Describes products and technologies, and effects on classroom dynamics. Reports on effective instructional strategies for lecture, solving student problems, building shared…

  5. Creating a Culture of Candor in the Leadership Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galpin, Timothy; Whittington, J. Lee

    2009-01-01

    A culture of candor can bring numerous benefits to any organization. Yet, candor is rare in most organizations. Despite the scarcity of its practice there is a need to develop leaders who value and use candor by demonstrating and practicing candor in the leadership classroom. A description of seven key actions that enable leadership instructors to…

  6. The Use of Technology in the Medical Assisting Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozielski, Tracy L.

    2014-01-01

    The growing presence of technology in health care has infiltrated educational institutions. Numerous software and hardware technologies have been designed to improve student learning; however, their use in the classroom is unclear. The purpose of this qualitative case study was to examine the experiences of medical assisting faculty using…

  7. The Mathematics of Medical Imaging in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funkhouser, Charles P.; Jafari, Farhad; Eubank, William B.

    2002-01-01

    Presents an integrated exposition of aspects of secondary school mathematics and a medical science specialty. Reviews clinical medical practice and theoretical and empirical literature in mathematics education and radiology to develop and pilot model integrative classroom topics and activities. Suggests mathematical applications in numeration and…

  8. Gender and Race, Online Communities, and Composition Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Jill

    2011-01-01

    As the culmination of a two-year long Internet ethnographic study of three separate sites, I use examples of women and minorities fighting against discrimination online to explore the power structures inherent to networks and how these might affect classroom practice. I will show how our ordinary assumptions in rhetoric and composition as well as…

  9. Generating Testable Questions in the Science Classroom: The BDC Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, ChingMei; Chen, Shu-Bi Shu-Bi; Chang, Wen-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Guiding students to generate testable scientific questions is essential in the inquiry classroom, but it is not easy. The purpose of the BDC ("Big Idea, Divergent Thinking, and Convergent Thinking") instructional model is to to scaffold students' inquiry learning. We illustrate the use of this model with an example lesson, designed…

  10. Journeys to the Self: Using Movie Directors in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Jose Luis; Miller, Paddy; Levy, Jan; Svejenova, Silviya

    2004-01-01

    This article suggests that temporary (project based) filmmaking organizations, and film directors as their leaders, lend themselves to examining a plethora of leadership issues, from social sources of power to competencies in network organizations. It advances for classroom discussion and teaching the cases of Almodovar and Coppola as examples of…

  11. Lakatos' Proofs and Refutations Comes Alive in an Elementary Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Sandra L.

    1997-01-01

    Presents an alternative pedagogy implicit in Imre Lakatos's "Proofs and Refutations: The Logic of Mathematical Discovery." Lakatos reveals that learning mathematics is a discourse-laden activity in which it is acceptable, if not preferable, to refute conjecture. Provides examples of using a Lakatosian approach in an elementary classroom.…

  12. Inverting the Linear Algebra Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbert, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The inverted classroom is a course design model in which students' initial contact with new information takes place outside of class meetings, and students spend class time on high-level sense-making activities. The inverted classroom model is so called because it inverts or "flips" the usual classroom design where typically class…

  13. The flipped classroom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Triantafyllou, Evangelia

    2015-01-01

    One of the novel ideas in teaching that heavily relies on current technology is the “flipped classroom” approach. In a flipped classroom the traditional lecture and homework sessions are inverted. Students are provided with online material in order to gain necessary knowledge before class, while...... class time is devoted to clarifications and application of this knowledge. The hypothesis is that there could be deep and creative discussions when teacher and students physically meet. This paper presents design considerations for flipped classrooms, and discusses how Moodle can facilitate...... with a discussion of the opportunities and challenges when implementing the flipped model in a virtual learning environment (VLE) like Moodle....

  14. The Incredible Years Teacher Classroom Management Program: Using Coaching to Support Generalization to Real-World Classroom Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinke, Wendy M.; Stormont, Melissa; Webster-Stratton, Carolyn; Newcomer, Lori L.; Herman, Keith C.

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on the Incredible Years Teacher Classroom Management Training (IY TCM) intervention as an example of an evidence-based program that embeds coaching within its design. First, the core features of the IY TCM program are described. Second, the IY TCM coaching model and processes utilized to facilitate high fidelity of…

  15. Extensible numerical library in JAVA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aso, T.; Okazawa, H.; Takashimizu, N.

    2001-01-01

    The authors present the current status of the project for developing the numerical library in JAVA. The authors have presented how object-oriented techniques improve usage and also development of numerical libraries compared with the conventional way at previous conference. The authors need many functions for data analysis which is not provided within JAVA language, for example, good random number generators, special functions and so on. Authors' development strategy is focused on easiness of implementation and adding new features by users themselves not only by developers. In HPC field, there are other focus efforts to develop numerical libraries in JAVA. However, their focus is on the performance of execution, not easiness of extension. Following the strategy, the authors have designed and implemented more classes for random number generators and so on

  16. Numerical models for differential problems

    CERN Document Server

    Quarteroni, Alfio

    2017-01-01

    In this text, we introduce the basic concepts for the numerical modelling of partial differential equations. We consider the classical elliptic, parabolic and hyperbolic linear equations, but also the diffusion, transport, and Navier-Stokes equations, as well as equations representing conservation laws, saddle-point problems and optimal control problems. Furthermore, we provide numerous physical examples which underline such equations. We then analyze numerical solution methods based on finite elements, finite differences, finite volumes, spectral methods and domain decomposition methods, and reduced basis methods. In particular, we discuss the algorithmic and computer implementation aspects and provide a number of easy-to-use programs. The text does not require any previous advanced mathematical knowledge of partial differential equations: the absolutely essential concepts are reported in a preliminary chapter. It is therefore suitable for students of bachelor and master courses in scientific disciplines, an...

  17. Animals in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Ken

    2011-01-01

    Use of animals in middle school science classrooms is a curriculum component worthy of consideration, providing proper investigation and planning are addressed. A responsible approach to this action, including safety, must be adopted for success. In this month's column, the author provides some suggestions on incorporating animals into the…

  18. Multiculturalism in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, Carl; Clark, Aaron; DeLuca, V. William; Kelly, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    The changing demographics of U.S. society have prompted a focus on multiculturalism in today's classrooms. Educators and students are expected to be aware of the individual differences and characteristics that exist and use these attributes to everyone's advantage. This awareness begins with developing a broad understanding of the diverse…

  19. Flipping the Classroom Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riendeau, Diane

    2013-02-01

    I received many emails following the first column on flipping the classroom. Many of my local colleagues also approached me at our physics alliance, Physics Northwest. Teachers are very interested in this new pedagogy. As I result, I wanted to share some more videos to inspire you.

  20. The CAS Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Sue

    2004-01-01

    The Victorian Curriculum and Assessment Authority (VCAA) Computer Algebra System (CAS)Pilot study (2001-2005) is monitoring the use of CAS in senior secondary mathematics. This article explores the author's experiences in the CAS classroom and delineates changes in teaching style, as a result of the introduction of CAS into the senior mathematics…

  1. Classroom Management and Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brophy, Jere E.

    1982-01-01

    Survey results show that planning and constant vigilance are the price of effective teaching. Effective classroom management involves awareness, good organizational skills, preparation, letting students know what is expected of them and following through, and the ability to diagnose student problems. (CT)

  2. Classroom Contexts for Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beghetto, Ronald A.; Kaufman, James C.

    2014-01-01

    Various factors influence the development of creative potential, including everything from individual differences to the kinds of experiences and opportunities that creators experience throughout the lifespan. When it comes to nurturing creativity in the classroom, the learning environment is one of the most important factors--determining, in…

  3. My Classroom: Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Cerise

    2017-01-01

    In his first teaching assignment, as a fifth-grade English teacher, Edgar Manaran had only 20 desks for 48 students. Yet he was able to apply productive classroom strategies throughout his 25-hour teaching week. Some of his students sat on plastic chairs due to the shortage of desks, but that did not change the dynamic of Mr. Manaran's classes. He…

  4. Tips from the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    TESOL Journal, 1993

    1993-01-01

    Seven articles on classroom icebreakers are compiled: "Picture Stories and Other Opportunities" (Joy Egbert, Deborah Hanley, Rosemary Delaney); "Hey, What's Your Name" (Janet Leamy); "Surprise!" (Lynne Burgess); "Memory Game" (Sally Winn); "Picturesque" (Margaret Beiter); "The Name Game" (Jeanne-Marie Garcia); "Exercise the Body--And the Mind…

  5. "Frankenstein" in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veidemanis, Gladys V.

    1986-01-01

    Presents five reasons for classroom study of Mary Shelley's gothic work: (1)intriguing style and subject matter, brevity and novelty; (2)narrative versatility; (3)representation of the Romantic Era in English literature; (4)female authorship; (5)significance of the central theme of "scientific aims pursued in reckless disregard of human…

  6. Computers and Classroom Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, Janet Ward

    This book explores the meaning of computer technology in schools. The book is based on data gathered from a two-year observation of more than 30 different classrooms in an urban high school: geometry classes in which students used artificially intelligent tutors; business classes in which students learned word processing; and computer science…

  7. Learning in Tomorrow's Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Richard F.

    2015-01-01

    Teaching today remains the most individualistic of all the professions, with educators characteristically operating in a highly fragmented world of "their" courses, "their" skills, and "their" students. Learning will occur in the classrooms of the future through a sustainable set of complementary capabilities:…

  8. Differentiation in Classroom Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mottelson, Martha

    Differentiation in School Practice is an ongoing research project currently being carried out in UCC’s research department by myself and my coworker Christina Jørgensen. The project includes a field study of everyday life in a Danish 5th grade classroom with the aim to observe, describe and analyze...

  9. Discussion in Postsecondary Classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curt Dudley-Marling

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Spoken language is, arguably, the primary means by which teachers teach and students learn. Much of the literature on language in classrooms has focused on discussion that is seen as both a method of instruction and a curricular outcome. While much of the research on discussion has focused on K-12 classrooms, there is also a body of research examining the efficacy of discussion in postsecondary settings. This article provides a review of this literature in order to consider the effect of discussion on student learning in college and university classrooms, the prevalence of discussion in postsecondary settings, and the quality of discussion in these settings. In general, the results of research on the efficacy of discussion in postsecondary settings are mixed. More seriously, researchers have not been explicit about the meaning of discussion and much of what is called discussion in this body of research is merely recitation with minimal levels of student participation. Although the research on discussion in college and university classrooms is inconclusive, some implications can be drawn from this review of the research including the need for future researchers to clearly define what they mean by “discussion.”

  10. Singing Smoothes Classroom Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Sarah E.

    2012-01-01

    Just as humming a merry tune helped Snow White and her furry animal friends to quickly clean a filthy cottage in the movie "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs" (Disney & Cottrell, 1937), singing can be an effective way to help keep young children fully engaged during classroom transitions. The purposes of this article are to: (1) consider why…

  11. The Classroom Animal: Snails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, David S.

    1985-01-01

    Points out that snails are interesting and easily-managed classroom animals. One advantage of this animal is that it requires no special attention over weekends or holidays. Background information, anatomy, reproduction, and feeding are discussed, along with suggestions for housing aquatic and/or land snails. (DH)

  12. The Fifth Grade Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Michael; And Others

    An interdisciplinary design project report investigates the relationship of the fifth grade educational facility to the student and teacher needs in light of human and environmental factors. The classroom, activity and teaching spaces are analyzed with regard to the educational curriculum. Specifications and design criteria concerning equipment…

  13. Effective Classroom Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansor, Azlin Norhaini; Eng, Wong Kim; Rasul, Mohamad Sattar; Hamzah, Mohd Izham Mohd; Hamid, Aida Hanim A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper attempts to explore and identify the characteristics of an effective teacher who teaches English as a second language to 10 year old students from different ethnics, various social economic background and multi-level language ability, at a private primary school in Malaysia. The study focused on classroom management using a case study…

  14. Classroom Social Signal Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raca, Mirko; Dillenbourg, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    We present our efforts towards building an observational system for measuring classroom activity. The goal is to explore visual cues which can be acquired with a system of video cameras and automatically processed to enrich the teacher's perception of the audience. The paper will give a brief overview of our methodology, explored features, and…

  15. Classroom planning and organizing as tasks for the home economics teacher at secondary schools / Lesley Ann Greyvenstein

    OpenAIRE

    Greyvenstein, Lesley Ann

    1986-01-01

    Classroom management, as part-discipline of Educational Management, is a function of the teacher in his role of teacher-manager, consisting of the specific regulative tasks or actions performed by the teacher to facilitate the achievement of effective education within the classroom. The four major classroom managerial tasks for the teacher are the planning, organizing, leading and controlling actions, each consisting of numerous sub-tasks, which, although researched as separ...

  16. Example and Non-Example Pada Pembelajaran Matematika

    OpenAIRE

    Yunarto, Wanda Nugroho

    2016-01-01

    Abstrak Example and Non-Example Learning Model merupakan model pembelajaran yang menggunakan gambar sebagai media pembelajaran yang bertujuan mendorong mahasiswa untuk belajar berfikir kritis dengan jalan memecahkan permasalahan-permasalahan yang terkandung dalam contoh-contoh permasalahan/ konsep yang disajikan. Tujuan dari penelitian ini adalah mendapatkan gambaran mengenai bagaimana penerapan model pembelajaran Example and non-Example pada mahasiswa program studi Pendidikan Matematika Univ...

  17. Nonlinear dynamics and numerical uncertainties in CFD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, H. C.; Sweby, P. K.

    1996-01-01

    The application of nonlinear dynamics to improve the understanding of numerical uncertainties in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is reviewed. Elementary examples in the use of dynamics to explain the nonlinear phenomena and spurious behavior that occur in numerics are given. The role of dynamics in the understanding of long time behavior of numerical integrations and the nonlinear stability, convergence, and reliability of using time-marching, approaches for obtaining steady-state numerical solutions in CFD is explained. The study is complemented with spurious behavior observed in CFD computations.

  18. Transportation package design using numerical optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harding, D.C.; Witkowski, W.R.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this overview is twofold: first, to outline the theory and basic elements of numerical optimization; and second, to show how numerical optimization can be applied to the transportation packaging industry and used to increase efficiency and safety of radioactive and hazardous material transportation packages. A more extensive review of numerical optimization and its applications to radioactive material transportation package design was performed previously by the authors (Witkowski and Harding 1992). A proof-of-concept Type B package design is also presented as a simplified example of potential improvements achievable using numerical optimization in the design process

  19. Bringing Artificial Gravity into the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Grant; Aning, Isaac

    2018-01-01

    We recently conducted an experimental test of artificial gravity by placing various species of plants in centrifuges and analyzed the plants’ germination and growth. This research project incorporated several topics covered in undergraduate astronomy, biology, and physics courses. Given the interest of introductory astronomy students in artificial gravity and their pre-existing images of applications such as rotating spacecraft from pop culture, the results of the experiment may provide a gateway to discuss artificial gravity beyond teaching the traditional examples of Newton’s laws. We will discuss the experiment in detail and provide suggestions for how the experiment could be incorporated into your classroom.

  20. Fostering Critical Thinking in the Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husniah Sahamid

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The ability to cite reasons, to justify claims and give support to arguments is seen as primary characteristics of a critical thinker. This paper discusses how the ‘Elements of Reasoning’ is employed with Socratic Questioning to develop critical thinking in the language classroom. The principles that guide the questioning are laid out clearly, just as is the response which must be backed by valid reasons, examples, and illustrations, pushing students beyond mere recall and into abstract thinking. It is based on the notion that through questioning, the process that occurs in the student’s mind creates thinking and learning.

  1. Reflective Blogfolios in the Language Classroom: Impact on EFL Tertiary Students' Argumentative Writing Skills and Ways of Knowing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammar, Abdullah Mahmoud Ismial

    2016-01-01

    The emerging paradigm shift in educational contexts from walled classroom environments to virtual, hybrid, blended, and lately personal learning environments has brought about vast changes in the foreign language classroom practices. Numerous calls for experimenting with new instructional treatments to enhance students' language performance in…

  2. Numerical Optimization in Microfluidics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristian Ejlebjærg

    2017-01-01

    Numerical modelling can illuminate the working mechanism and limitations of microfluidic devices. Such insights are useful in their own right, but one can take advantage of numerical modelling in a systematic way using numerical optimization. In this chapter we will discuss when and how numerical...... optimization is best used....

  3. Methods of numerical relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piran, T.

    1983-01-01

    Numerical Relativity is an alternative to analytical methods for obtaining solutions for Einstein equations. Numerical methods are particularly useful for studying generation of gravitational radiation by potential strong sources. The author reviews the analytical background, the numerical analysis aspects and techniques and some of the difficulties involved in numerical relativity. (Auth.)

  4. Taking It to the Classroom: Number Board Games as a Small Group Learning Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramani, Geetha B.; Siegler, Robert S.; Hitti, Aline

    2012-01-01

    We examined whether a theoretically based number board game could be translated into a practical classroom activity that improves Head Start children's numerical knowledge. Playing the number board game as a small group learning activity promoted low-income children's number line estimation, magnitude comparison, numeral identification, and…

  5. Using Psychology in the Physics Classroom: Five Steps to Improving Classroom Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jo-Anne

    2018-01-01

    Psychology has been an avocation of mine for almost 20 years, and over the past decade I have begun integrating this knowledge into my classroom. My first introduction to psychology was through the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator®. MBTI looks at preferences in how people interact with the world around them. By recognizing how different students receive, process, and communicate information, and how my communication style likely interacts with theirs, I have been able to improve my competence in the classroom. For example, my student evaluations have gone from the low- to mid-5's 13 years ago to mid-6's (out of 7) consistently over the last five years, during which time I have also won four teaching awards and have been nominated for one more at my institution.

  6. CLASSROOM CULTURE OF PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia FĂT

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the results obtained during an enquiry based on a questionnaire about the classroom culture. This concept it is understood as a micro-society with its own characteristics derived from the dynamic of socialization and training process. This research aims to investigate certain specific aspects of micro-sociology and emphasis on classroom culture. A relatively new concept is reflected by the normative consensus or the integrated system of values that belongs to the teachers, pupils and school, as a social entity. The integrative ensemble of values, class cohesion degree and training strategies are only a few of the aspects described by 62 pupils aged 17-18 years old, from a very prestigious school in Bucharest. The perception of pupils regarding our concept is the effect of the relational practices and training used constantly by the teachers. Those practices reflect the school’s focus mostly on cognitive performance.

  7. Young Scientist in Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, Rosa

    very powerful tool that allows educators to address a diversity of topics ranging from ICT tools to the Exploration of our Universe. Instead of using traditional methods to teach about certain subjects for instance: stellar spectra, extra-solar planets or the classification of galaxies, they can use these powerful tools. Among other advantages a clear benefit of such tool is that teachers can use telescopes during regular classroom hours, provided they choose one located in the opposite part of the planet, where it is night time. Participants will also have the opportunity to use one of the radio antennas devoted for education from the EUHOU Consortium (European Hands-on Universe). A map of the arms of our galaxy will be built during the training session. Image Processing - After acquiring the images participants will be introduced to Salsa J, an image processing software that allows educators to explore the potential of astronomical images. The first example will be a simple measurement task: measuring craters on the Moon. Further exploration will guide them from luminosity studies to the construction of colour images, from making movies exhibiting the circular motion of the Sun to Jupiter Moons dance around the planet. e-learning repositories - In the ICT age it is very important that educators have support and know where to find meaningful and curriculum adapted resources for the construction of modern lessons. Some repositories will be presented in this session. Examples of such repositories are: Discover the Cosmos and EUHOU or a congregator of such repositories with quite advanced possibilities to support the work of teachers, the Open Discovery Space portal. This type of sessions are being successfully implemented by the Galileo Teacher Training Program team in Portugal under the scope of the EC funded GO-LAB project. This is a project devoted to demonstrate innovative ways to involve teachers and students in e-Science through the use of virtual labs, that

  8. Classroom Use of Martial Arts Exhibitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Shane Garrett; Denn, Grant R.

    2006-10-01

    Martial arts are becoming increasingly popular, and many of the techniques used by martial artists can provide effective demonstrations to showcase basic physics concepts. Many students have martial arts experience by the time they reach the senior level of high school or college. In one conceptual physics course, seven students out of 40 had studied some form of martial arts. Teachers can use experienced students as a resource and exploit the popularity of martial arts to demonstrate some basic points in Newtonian mechanics via martial arts demonstrations. This interactive mode of learning, we have found, is very popular and highly motivational for the students. In this paper we provide some of the possible examples of effective classroom demonstrations; there are many additional examples that your students may want to introduce.

  9. Classroom strategies in teaching the media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reijo Kupiainen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Th is article is based on Chapter 5 of my book Media and Digital Literacies in Secondary School (2013. The chapter has been shortened and rewritten in some parts for the article. The article focuses on different classroom strategies identified during the ethnographic school research in one of the Finnish secondary schools carried out during the academic year 2009–2010. The study indicates that teachers analyse and produce media texts as key strategies in media education. In the article, I will give examples of an advertisement project, a soap opera drama, an animation project, a "life career assignment" and a newspaper strategy in different learning settings. All examples indicate that media education needs to build a strong bridge between youth and school culture and that technology in the school follows the content of learning.

  10. Numerical investigation on exterior conformal mappings with application to airfoils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamad Rashidi Md Razali; Hu Laey Nee

    2000-01-01

    A numerical method is described in computing a conformal map from an exterior region onto the exterior of the unit disk. The numerical method is based on a boundary integral equation which is similar to the Kerzman-Stein integral equation for interior mapping. Some examples show that numerical results of high accuracy can be obtained provided that the boundaries are smooth. This numerical method has been applied to the mapping airfoils. However, due to the fact that the parametric representation of an air foil is not known, a cubic spline interpolation method has been used. Some numerical examples with satisfying results have been obtained for the symmetrical and cambered airfoils. (Author)

  11. Effects of worked examples, example-problem, and problem-example pairs on novices’ learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Gog, Tamara; Kester, Liesbeth; Paas, Fred

    2010-01-01

    Van Gog, T., Kester, L., & Paas, F. (2011). Effects of worked examples, example-problem, and problem-example pairs on novices’ learning. Contemporary Educational Psychology, 36(3), 212-218. doi:10.1016/j.cedpsych.2010.10.004

  12. Revisiting Classroom Routines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Gloria Lodato

    2016-01-01

    Most co-teachers agree that there just isn't enough time for co-teachers to appropriately and effectively preplan every aspect of every activity in every lesson. This lack of time leads co-teachers to turn to models that fail to maximize the benefits of a two-teacher classroom. Wilson suggests that if co-teachers use their limited planning time to…

  13. Examining Preservice Teachers' Classroom Management Decisions in Three Case-Based Teaching Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevik, Yasemin Demiraslan; Andre, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    This study was aimed at comparing the impact of three types of case-based approaches (worked example, faded work example, and case-based reasoning) on preservice teachers' decision making and reasoning skills related to realistic classroom management situations. Participants in this study received a short-term implementation of one of these three…

  14. Classroom Texting in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettijohn, Terry F.; Frazier, Erik; Rieser, Elizabeth; Vaughn, Nicholas; Hupp-Wilds, Bobbi

    2015-01-01

    A 21-item survey on texting in the classroom was given to 235 college students. Overall, 99.6% of students owned a cellphone and 98% texted daily. Of the 138 students who texted in the classroom, most texted friends or significant others, and indicate the reason for classroom texting is boredom or work. Students who texted sent a mean of 12.21…

  15. The Classroom Animal: Box Turtles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, David C.

    1986-01-01

    Provides basic information on the anatomy, physiology, behaviors, and distribution patterns of the box turtle. Offers suggestions for the turtle's care and maintenance in a classroom environment. (ML)

  16. Evaluation of steel corrosion by numerical analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Kawahigashi, Tatsuo

    2017-01-01

    Recently, various non-destructive and numerical methods have been used and many cases of steel corrosion are examined. For example, methods of evaluating corrosion through various numerical methods and evaluating macrocell corrosion and micro-cell corrosion using measurements have been proposed. However, there are few reports on estimating of corrosion loss with distinguishing the macro-cell and micro-cell corrosion and with resembling an actuality phenomenon. In this study, for distinguishin...

  17. Making interdisciplinary solid Earth modeling and analysis tools accessible in a diverse undergraduate and graduate classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, T. W.

    2011-12-01

    I present results from ongoing, NSF-CAREER funded educational and research efforts that center around making numerical tools in seismology and geodynamics more accessible to a broader audience. The goal is not only to train students in quantitative, interdisciplinary research, but also to make methods more easily accessible to practitioners across disciplines. I describe the two main efforts that were funded, the Solid Earth Research and Teaching Environment (SEATREE, geosys.usc.edu/projects/seatree/), and a new Numerical Methods class. SEATREE is a modular and user-friendly software framework to facilitate using solid Earth research tools in the undergraduate and graduate classroom and for interdisciplinary, scientific collaboration. We use only open-source software, and most programming is done in the Python computer language. We strive to make use of modern software design and development concepts while remaining compatible with traditional scientific coding and existing, legacy software. Our goals are to provide a fully contained, yet transparent package that lets users operate in an easy, graphically supported "black box" mode, while also allowing to look under the hood, for example to conduct numerous forward models to explore parameter space. SEATREE currently has several implemented modules, including on global mantle flow, 2D phase velocity tomography, and 2D mantle convection and was used at the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, and at a 2010 CIDER summer school tutorial. SEATREE was developed in collaboration with engineering and computer science undergraduate students, some of which have gone on to work in Earth Science projects. In the long run, we envision SEATREE to contribute to new ways of sharing scientific research, and making (numerical) experiments truly reproducible again. The other project is a set of lecture notes and Matlab exercises on Numerical Methods in solid Earth, focusing on finite difference and element methods. The

  18. Numerical methods for metamaterial design

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    This book describes a relatively new approach for the design of electromagnetic metamaterials.  Numerical optimization routines are combined with electromagnetic simulations to tailor the broadband optical properties of a metamaterial to have predetermined responses at predetermined wavelengths. After a review of both the major efforts within the field of metamaterials and the field of mathematical optimization, chapters covering both gradient-based and derivative-free design methods are considered.  Selected topics including surrogate-base optimization, adaptive mesh search, and genetic algorithms are shown to be effective, gradient-free optimization strategies.  Additionally, new techniques for representing dielectric distributions in two dimensions, including level sets, are demonstrated as effective methods for gradient-based optimization.  Each chapter begins with a rigorous review of the optimization strategy used, and is followed by numerous examples that combine the strategy with either electromag...

  19. Strategies for Teachers to Manage Stuttering in the Classroom: A Call for Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidow, Jason H; Zaroogian, Lisa; Garcia-Barrera, Mauricio A

    2016-10-01

    This clinical focus article highlights the need for future research involving ways to assist children who stutter in the classroom. The 4 most commonly recommended strategies for teachers were found via searches of electronic databases and personal libraries of the authors. The peer-reviewed evidence for each recommendation was subsequently located and detailed. There are varying amounts of evidence for the 4 recommended teacher strategies outside of the classroom, but there are no data for 2 of the strategies, and minimal data for the others, in a classroom setting. That is, there is virtually no evidence regarding whether or not the actions put forth influence, for example, stuttering frequency, stuttering severity, participation, or the social, emotional, and cognitive components of stuttering in the classroom. There is a need for researchers and speech-language pathologists in the schools to study the outcomes of teacher strategies in the classroom for children who stutter.

  20. Numerical methods for image registration

    CERN Document Server

    Modersitzki, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Based on the author's lecture notes and research, this well-illustrated and comprehensive text is one of the first to provide an introduction to image registration with particular emphasis on numerical methods in medical imaging. Ideal for researchers in industry and academia, it is also a suitable study guide for graduate mathematicians, computer scientists, engineers, medical physicists, and radiologists.Image registration is utilised whenever information obtained from different viewpoints needs to be combined or compared and unwanted distortion needs to be eliminated. For example, CCTV imag

  1. Time's arrow: A numerical experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowles, G. Richard

    1994-04-01

    The dependence of time's arrow on initial conditions is illustrated by a numerical example in which plane waves produced by an initial pressure pulse are followed as they are multiply reflected at internal interfaces of a layered medium. Wave interactions at interfaces are shown to be analogous to the retarded and advanced waves of point sources. The model is linear and the calculation is exact and demonstrably time reversible; nevertheless the results show most of the features expected of a macroscopically irreversible system, including the approach to the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution, ergodicity, and concomitant entropy increase.

  2. An Example of Inquiry in Linear Algebra: The Roles of Symbolizing and Brokering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandieh, Michelle; Wawro, Megan; Rasmussen, Chris

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we address practical questions such as: How do symbols appear and evolve in an inquiry-oriented classroom? How can an instructor connect students with traditional notation and vocabulary without undermining their sense of ownership of the material? We tender an example from linear algebra that highlights the roles of the instructor…

  3. What's Wrong with Bribery? An Example Utilizing Access to Safe Drinking Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhooge, Lucien J.

    2013-01-01

    This case study examines the role of bribery in the global marketplace through an example involving access to safe drinking water in the developing world. Parts II and III set out the objectives and methods of classroom delivery for the case study. Part IV is the background reading relating to bribery with particular emphasis on the Foreign…

  4. Banzhuren and Classrooming: Democracy in the Chinese Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiacheng; Chen, Jing

    2013-01-01

    The issue of education and democracy has become more and more important in China. This paper firstly explains the theory of democracy in Chinese classrooms, and then focuses on the Chinese banzhuren who is responsible for classrooming, an important educational area equal to instruction. We illustrate how Chinese students achieve development…

  5. Augmented reality on poster presentations, in the field and in the classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawemann, Friedrich; Kolawole, Folarin

    2017-04-01

    Augmented reality (AR) is the direct addition of virtual information through an interface to a real-world environment. In practice, through a mobile device such as a tablet or smartphone, information can be projected onto a target- for example, an image on a poster. Mobile devices are widely distributed today such that augmented reality is easily accessible to almost everyone. Numerous studies have shown that multi-dimensional visualization is essential for efficient perception of the spatial, temporal and geometrical configuration of geological structures and processes. Print media, such as posters and handouts lack the ability to display content in the third and fourth dimensions, which might be in space-domain as seen in three-dimensional (3-D) objects, or time-domain (four-dimensional, 4-D) expressible in the form of videos. Here, we show that augmented reality content can be complimentary to geoscience poster presentations, hands-on material and in the field. In the latter example, location based data is loaded and for example, a virtual geological profile can be draped over a real-world landscape. In object based AR, the application is trained to recognize an image or object through the camera of the user's mobile device, such that specific content is automatically downloaded and displayed on the screen of the device, and positioned relative to the trained image or object. We used ZapWorks, a commercially-available software application to create and present examples of content that is poster-based, in which important supplementary information is presented as interactive virtual images, videos and 3-D models. We suggest that the flexibility and real-time interactivity offered by AR makes it an invaluable tool for effective geoscience poster presentation, class-room and field geoscience learning.

  6. Creating robust vocabulary frequently asked questions and extended examples

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, Isabel L

    2008-01-01

    Bringing Words to Life has enlivened the classrooms of hundreds of thousands of teachers. Responding to readers' success stories, practical questions, and requests for extended examples, this ideal volume builds on the groundbreaking work of Bringing Words to Life. The authors present additional tools, tips, and detailed explanations of such questions as which words to teach, when and how to teach them, and how to adapt instruction for English language learners. They provide specific instructional sequences, including assessments, for grades K-2, 3-5, 6-8, and 9-12, as well as interactive less

  7. Numerical methods in simulation of resistance welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Chris Valentin; Martins, Paulo A.F.; Zhang, Wenqi

    2015-01-01

    Finite element simulation of resistance welding requires coupling betweenmechanical, thermal and electrical models. This paper presents the numerical models and theircouplings that are utilized in the computer program SORPAS. A mechanical model based onthe irreducible flow formulation is utilized...... a resistance welding point of view, the most essential coupling between the above mentioned models is the heat generation by electrical current due to Joule heating. The interaction between multiple objects is anothercritical feature of the numerical simulation of resistance welding because it influences...... thecontact area and the distribution of contact pressure. The numerical simulation of resistancewelding is illustrated by a spot welding example that includes subsequent tensile shear testing...

  8. Rent Seeking: A Textbook Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecorino, Paul

    2007-01-01

    The author argues that the college textbook market provides a clear example of monopoly seeking as described by Tullock (1967, 1980). This behavior is also known as rent seeking. Because this market is important to students, this example of rent seeking will be of particular interest to them. (Contains 24 notes.)

  9. Numerical integration of asymptotic solutions of ordinary differential equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurston, Gaylen A.

    1989-01-01

    Classical asymptotic analysis of ordinary differential equations derives approximate solutions that are numerically stable. However, the analysis also leads to tedious expansions in powers of the relevant parameter for a particular problem. The expansions are replaced with integrals that can be evaluated by numerical integration. The resulting numerical solutions retain the linear independence that is the main advantage of asymptotic solutions. Examples, including the Falkner-Skan equation from laminar boundary layer theory, illustrate the method of asymptotic analysis with numerical integration.

  10. HTML5 digital classroom

    CERN Document Server

    Osborn, Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    This training package - complete with full-color book and instructional video - is the easiest way to learn HTML5!HTML5 boasts extensive new features that allow you to create dynamic web pages and present users with amazing multimedia experiences, and this one-of-a-kind training package is your guide to creating websites that wow! HTML5 Digital Classroom provides step-by-step instruction to help you gain the essential HTML5 knowledge you need to master the latest HTML5 specifications. This book-and-video package will have you creating web pages and web applications using HTML5, styling using

  11. Trends in Classroom Observation Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casabianca, Jodi M.; Lockwood, J. R.; McCaffrey, Daniel F.

    2015-01-01

    Observations and ratings of classroom teaching and interactions collected over time are susceptible to trends in both the quality of instruction and rater behavior. These trends have potential implications for inferences about teaching and for study design. We use scores on the Classroom Assessment Scoring System-Secondary (CLASS-S) protocol from…

  12. Sharing Power in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard-Amato, Patricia

    2002-01-01

    Suggests that be sharing power in the classroom teachers allow the development of participatory classrooms in which all students can thrive. Examines participatory teaching and critical pedagogy, components of the participatory learning experience, manifestations of participatory teaching, an application of the language experience approach,…

  13. Improving Technology in Agriscience Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Krista

    2014-01-01

    Teachers must make persistent efforts in integrating technology in the classroom. In Georgia agriscience curriculum, no data are available regarding the type and amount of technology integration used in the classrooms. Some teachers integrate actively while others incorporate very little technology in their teaching. The purpose of this…

  14. Fight Obesity in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratsis, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    U.S. health experts declared obesity an epidemic over a decade ago. Schools have tried to implement prevention programs for students, but as budgets shrink, educating students about obesity is increasingly falling to classroom instructors, including science teachers. The good news is that obesity-related classroom activities can be engaging, and…

  15. Nurturing Creativity in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beghetto, Ronald A., Ed.; Kaufman, James C., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Nurturing Creativity in the Classroom" is a groundbreaking collection of essays by leading scholars, who examine and respond to the tension that many educators face in valuing student creativity but believing that they cannot support it given the curricular constraints of the classroom. Is it possible for teachers to nurture creative…

  16. Working Alliances in College Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Steven A.

    2008-01-01

    I explain how professors can establish working alliances with students to cultivate a climate conducive to learning. This process involves (a) attending to the emotional bonds that exist in the college classroom, (b) developing shared educational goals and tasks to promote a common sense of purpose, and (c) addressing classroom conflict to repair…

  17. Inverting an Introductory Statistics Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraut, Gertrud L.

    2015-01-01

    The inverted classroom allows more in-class time for inquiry-based learning and for working through more advanced problem-solving activities than does the traditional lecture class. The skills acquired in this learning environment offer benefits far beyond the statistics classroom. This paper discusses four ways that can make the inverted…

  18. Mendel in the Modern Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mike U.; Gericke, Niklas M.

    2015-01-01

    Mendel is an icon in the history of genetics and part of our common culture and modern biology instruction. The aim of this paper is to summarize the place of Mendel in the modern biology classroom. In the present article we will identify key issues that make Mendel relevant in the classroom today. First, we recount some of the historical…

  19. Classroom Furniture: The Mod Squad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raths, David

    2012-01-01

    This is the first article in a six-part series on the elements of a collaborative classroom: furniture, social media, video/web conferencing tools, collaborative software, interactive devices, and mobile devices. With most universities facing tight budgets, convincing administrators to invest in expensive new classrooms is a challenge. Many higher…

  20. Classroom Implementation. Issues in Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinowski, Patricia A., Ed.

    This booklet, second in a series on issues in assessment, seeks to describe an initiative supported by Finger Lakes Community College (New York) to use classroom assessment techniques (CATs) in different academic areas and to present an overview of some assessment approaches that have been used in the classroom. Papers include: (1) "Enhancing…

  1. Science beyond the Classroom Boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feasey, Rosemary; Bianchi, Lynne

    2011-01-01

    There have been many years of innovation in primary science education. Surprisingly, however, most of this has taken place within the confines of the classroom. What primary science has not yet done with universal success is step outside the classroom boundaries to use the school grounds for teaching and learning across all aspects of the science…

  2. Incivility in the Accounting Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinney, Laurie; Elder, Bruce; Seaton, Lloyd

    2010-01-01

    Classroom incivility is any action that interferes with a harmonious and cooperative learning atmosphere in the classroom (Feldman, 2001). We compared the perceptions of accounting faculty to the perceptions of cross-disciplinary faculty relating to both the definition of student actions as incivility and the occurrence of incivility. We also…

  3. Numerical methods for hyperbolic differential functional problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Ciarski

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the initial boundary value problem for quasilinear first order partial differential functional systems. A general class of difference methods for the problem is constructed. Theorems on the error estimate of approximate solutions for difference functional systems are presented. The convergence results are proved by means of consistency and stability arguments. A numerical example is given.

  4. Spectral Methods in Numerical Plasma Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coutsias, E.A.; Hansen, F.R.; Huld, T.

    1989-01-01

    An introduction is given to the use of spectral methods in numerical plasma simulation. As examples of the use of spectral methods, solutions to the two-dimensional Euler equations in both a simple, doubly periodic region, and on an annulus will be shown. In the first case, the solution is expanded...

  5. Toward the virtual classroom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pihlman, M.; Dirks, D.H.

    1990-01-03

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) encourages its employees to remotely attend classes given by Stanford University, University of California at Davis, and the National Technological University (NTU). To improve the quality of education for LLNL employees, we are cooperating with Stanford University in upgrading the Stanford Instructional Television Network (SITN). A dedicated high-speed communication link (Tl) between Stanford and LLNL will be used for enhanced services such as videoconferencing, real time classnotes distribution, and electronic distribution of homework assignments. The new network will also allow students to take classes from their offices with the ability to ask the professor questions via an automatically dialed telephone call. As part of this upgrade, we have also proposed a new videoconferencing based classroom environment where students taking remote classes would feel as though they are attending the live class. All paperwork would be available in near real time and students may converse normally with, and see, other remote students as though they were all in the same physical location. We call this the Virtual Classroom.'' 1 ref., 6 figs.

  6. FPGA prototyping by Verilog examples Xilinx Spartan-3 version

    CERN Document Server

    Chu, Pong P

    2008-01-01

    FPGA Prototyping Using Verilog Examples will provide you with a hands-on introduction to Verilog synthesis and FPGA programming through a "learn by doing" approach. By following the clear, easy-to-understand templates for code development and the numerous practical examples, you can quickly develop and simulate a sophisticated digital circuit, realize it on a prototyping device, and verify the operation of its physical implementation. This introductory text that will provide you with a solid foundation, instill confidence with rigorous examples for complex systems and prepare you for future development tasks.

  7. Extended asymptotic functions - some examples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todorov, T.D.

    1981-01-01

    Several examples of extended asymptotic functions of two variables are given. This type of asymptotic functions has been introduced as an extension of continuous ordinary functions. The presented examples are realizations of some Schwartz distributions delta(x), THETA(x), P(1/xsup(n)) and can be multiplied in the class of the asymptotic functions as opposed to the theory of Schwartz distributions. The examples illustrate the method of construction of extended asymptotic functions similar to the distributions. The set formed by the extended asymptotic functions is also considered. It is shown, that this set is not closed with respect to addition and multiplication

  8. RE-NUMERATE: A Workshop to Restore Essential Numerical Skills and Thinking via Astronomy Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, D.; Follette, K.

    2013-04-01

    The quality of science teaching for all ages is degraded by our students' gross lack of skills in elementary arithmetic and their unwillingness to think, and to express themselves, numerically. Out of frustration educators, and science communicators, often choose to avoid these problems, thereby reinforcing the belief that math is only needed in “math class” and preventing students from maturing into capable, well informed citizens. In this sense we teach students a pseudo science, not its real nature, beauty, and value. This workshop encourages and equips educators to immerse students in numerical thinking throughout a science course. The workshop begins by identifying common deficiencies in skills and attitudes among non-science collegians (freshman-senior) enrolled in General Education astronomy courses. The bulk of the workshop engages participants in well-tested techniques (e.g., presentation methods, curriculum, activities, mentoring approaches, etc.) for improving students' arithmetic skills, increasing their confidence, and improving their abilities in numerical expression. These techniques are grounded in 25+ years of experience in college classrooms and pre-college informal education. They are suited for use in classrooms (K-12 and college), informal venues, and science communication in general and could be applied across the standard school curriculum.

  9. The Effectiveness of Classroom Capture Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Maire B.; Burns, Colleen E.; Mitch, Nathan; Gomez, Melissa M.

    2012-01-01

    The use of classroom capture systems (systems that capture audio and video footage of a lecture and attempt to replicate a classroom experience) is becoming increasingly popular at the university level. However, research on the effectiveness of classroom capture systems in the university classroom has been limited due to the recent development and…

  10. Guidance for Technology Decisions from Classroom Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielefeldt, Talbot

    2012-01-01

    Correlational analysis of two years of classroom observation indicates relationships between technology use and various classroom characteristics, including teacher roles and instructional strategies. Three observers used the ISTE Classroom Observation Tool (ICOT) to record 144 observations of classrooms participating in a variety of educational…

  11. Classroom Management: What Does Research Tell Us?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postholm, May Britt

    2013-01-01

    The article reviews studies that focus on classroom management. The aim of classroom management is twofold. The first is to establish a quiet and calm environment in the classroom so that the pupils can take part in meaningful learning in a subject. The second aim is that classroom management contributes to the pupils' social and moral…

  12. Examining the Flipped Classroom through Action Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Chung Kwan

    2017-01-01

    There is a growing interest in using a flipped classroom format in day-to-day teaching. Direct computer-based individual instruction outside the classroom and interactive group learning activities inside the classroom are the two essential components of the flipped classroom model. By watching instructional videos, students can work through some…

  13. From Utterance to Example Sentence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristoffersen, Jette Hedegaard

    This poster will address some of the problems on excerption of example sentences for the online dictionary of Danish Sign Language (DTS) from a raw corpus of dialogues and monologues. In the Danish Sign Language Dictionary every meaning is illustrated by one or more sentences showing the sign...... lexicographers. The sentences were excerpted by hand from a raw corpus of dialogues and monologues – given to us by our group of consultants. The poster describes the process from utterance in a corpus in a larger context to an example sentence in a dictionary, where the purpose of having examples sentences...... for use in the dictionary consists of 11 stages in the DTS dictionary project. Special focus will be on the stage in the process where the sentence is judged suitable for dictionary use. A set of guidelines for what makes up a good example sentence has been developed for the DTS dictionary project...

  14. Introduction: The Power of Example

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højer, Lars; Bandak, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    It is the contention of this introduction that examples are important prisms through which both reality and anthropological analysis are thought and, equally importantly, reconfigured. The aim of the introduction is to redress the theoretical disregard for exemplification by exploring the persuas....... The introduction further proposes that the example serves to confuse ontological divides, such as the one between theory and ethnography, and also draws attention to the fact that theory is as much suggestive as descriptive....

  15. EFFECTIVENESS OF FLIPPED CLASSROOM IN MATHEMATICS TEACHING

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. N. Ramakrishnan; Mrs. J. Johnsi Priya

    2016-01-01

    Flipped Classroom is an instructional strategy and a type of blended learning that reverses the traditional learning environment by delivering instructional content, often online, outside of the classroom. It moves activities, including those that may have traditionally been considered homework, into the classroom. In a flipped classroom, students watch online lectures, collaborate in online discussions, or carry out research at home and engage in concepts in the classroom with the guidance o...

  16. APPROBATION OF THE NUMERICAL METHOD OF CALCULATING THE DYNAMIC STRESS-STRAIN STATE OF THE THREE-DIMENSIONAL SYSTEM “FOUNDATION – FACILITY OF THE PRESSURE FRONT HYDRAULIC ENGINEERING STRUCTURE – WATER RESERVOIR” ON THE EXAMPLE OF THE CLUSTER-REGULATOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry S. Dmitriev

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In the article, the results of approbation of the developed technique of the refined numerical simula-tion of the dynamic stress-strain state of the three-dimensional system “ground base (earth foundation – reser-voir – construction of the pressure head of the hydraulic system” under seismic influences. A comparison is made between two different ways of modeling the fluid interacting with the structure and the base of the hydroe-lectric power station. The issues of choosing the dimensions of the base unit and taking into account the inertial load from it, as well as the method of determining the initial seismic action, are touched upon.

  17. The Social Network Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunus, Peter

    Online social networking is an important part in the everyday life of college students. Despite the increasing popularity of online social networking among students and faculty members, its educational benefits are largely untested. This paper presents our experience in using social networking applications and video content distribution websites as a complement of traditional classroom education. In particular, the solution has been based on effective adaptation, extension and integration of Facebook, Twitter, Blogger YouTube and iTunes services for delivering educational material to students on mobile platforms like iPods and 3 rd generation mobile phones. The goals of the proposed educational platform, described in this paper, are to make the learning experience more engaging, to encourage collaborative work and knowledge sharing among students, and to provide an interactive platform for the educators to reach students and deliver lecture material in a totally new way.

  18. Tablets in the classroom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Bente Tobiesen

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on the multiple agents of educational change associated with the implementation of ICTs in elementary schooling. The focus of the paper is on emergent patterns of change, i.e. the way technologies are adapted over time in different configurations that involve both pupils......, teachers, activities and the different resources used in the classroom. The paper focuses on the concept of socio-material bricolage (Johri 2011) as an approach to understanding how digital devices contribute to constructing both relevant and innovative practices in teaching and learning in schools...... a school development project in Denmark where five classes of seventh graders were given iPads on a one pupil one device basis for the school year of 2012-13....

  19. Green space as classroom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentsen, Peter; Schipperijn, Jasper; Jensen, Frank Søndergaard

    2013-01-01

    More and more Danish teachers have started introducing curriculum-based outdoor learning as a weekly or biweekly ‘outdoor school’ day for school children. This move towards schooling in non-classroom spaces presents a challenge for green space managers. Basic managerial knowledge related to what......, who, when and where has thus far only been supported by anecdotal evidence, but seems fundamental to the decision-making of a range of green space providers. The present study aims to describe, characterise and discuss outdoor teachers’ use, preferences and ecostrategies in relation to green space....... A nationwide survey was conducted among Danish teachers practising outdoor teaching (107 respondents), and it showed that a majority used and preferred forest areas. The outdoor teachers used mainly school grounds and local green space for their outdoor teaching with a majority using the same place or mostly...

  20. Numerical modeling in photonic crystals integrated technology: the COPERNICUS Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malaguti, Stefania; Armaroli, Andrea; Bellanca, Gaetano

    2011-01-01

    Photonic crystals will play a fundamental role in the future of optical communications. The relevance of the numerical modeling for the success of this technology is assessed by using some examples concerning the experience of the COPERNICUS Project.......Photonic crystals will play a fundamental role in the future of optical communications. The relevance of the numerical modeling for the success of this technology is assessed by using some examples concerning the experience of the COPERNICUS Project....

  1. The Classroom Animal: Daddy Longlegs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, David C.

    1987-01-01

    Describes some of the characteristics of the common harvestmen, or daddy longlegs, and the true spider. Provides information on harvestmen's habitats and life cycles and includes tips on housing and observing these organisms in science classrooms. (TW)

  2. Learning about Language in Classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florio-Ruane, Susan

    1985-01-01

    Research on communication in classrooms is reviewed to provide implications for the writing process. Studies address language, social identity, and teacher expectation. The importance of meaning as the focus of writing is stressed. (CL)

  3. The Classroom Animal: Snapping Turtles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, David C.

    1987-01-01

    Describes the distinctive features of the common snapping turtle. Discusses facts and misconceptions held about the turtle. Provides guidelines for proper care and treatment of a young snapper in a classroom environment. (ML)

  4. Instructional Style Meets Classroom Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novelli, Joan

    1991-01-01

    Nine elementary teachers explain how they design their classrooms to match and support their instructional styles. The teachers focus on whole language programs, student portfolios, science activity set-ups, technology transformation, learning center strategies, and space utilization. (SM)

  5. Concussion Management in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, Danielle M; Caperell, Kerry S

    2016-12-01

    There is a new emphasis on the team approach to pediatric concussion management, particularly in the classroom. However, it is expected that educators are unfamiliar with the "Returning to Learning" recommendations. The authors' primary objective was to assess and improve high school educators' knowledge regarding concussions and management interventions using an online education tool. A total of 247 high school educators completed a 12 question pretest to assess core knowledge of concussions and classroom management followed by a 20-minute online literature-based education module. Participants then completed an identical posttest. The improvement in core knowledge was statistically significant (P weakness were the description and identification of concussions. Questions regarding concussion classroom management also showed a statistically significant increase in scores (P knowledge of educators regarding concussions and classroom management as well as the significant improvement after an online educational module. © The Author(s) 2016.

  6. Behavior Modification in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitman, Mryon; Whitman, Joan

    1971-01-01

    This article presents the theoretical rationale for behavior modification, principally through its comparison with traditional psychotherapies, and suggests some behavior modification techniques for the classroom management of maladaptive behavior. (Author)

  7. Collaboration systems for classroom instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C. Y. Roger; Meliksetian, Dikran S.; Chang, Martin C.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we discuss how classroom instruction can benefit from state-of-the-art technologies in networks, worldwide web access through Internet, multimedia, databases, and computing. Functional requirements for establishing such a high-tech classroom are identified, followed by descriptions of our current experimental implementations. The focus of the paper is on the capabilities of distributed collaboration, which supports both synchronous multimedia information sharing as well as a shared work environment for distributed teamwork and group decision making. Our ultimate goal is to achieve the concept of 'living world in a classroom' such that live and dynamic up-to-date information and material from all over the world can be integrated into classroom instruction on a real-time basis. We describe how we incorporate application developments in a geography study tool, worldwide web information retrievals, databases, and programming environments into the collaborative system.

  8. Fundamental Travel Demand Model Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanssen, Joel

    2010-01-01

    Instances of transportation models are abundant and detailed "how to" instruction is available in the form of transportation software help documentation. The purpose of this paper is to look at the fundamental inputs required to build a transportation model by developing an example passenger travel demand model. The example model reduces the scale to a manageable size for the purpose of illustrating the data collection and analysis required before the first step of the model begins. This aspect of the model development would not reasonably be discussed in software help documentation (it is assumed the model developer comes prepared). Recommendations are derived from the example passenger travel demand model to suggest future work regarding the data collection and analysis required for a freight travel demand model.

  9. Numerical models for high beta magnetohydrodynamic flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brackbill, J.U.

    1987-01-01

    The fundamentals of numerical magnetohydrodynamics for highly conducting, high-beta plasmas are outlined. The discussions emphasize the physical properties of the flow, and how elementary concepts in numerical analysis can be applied to the construction of finite difference approximations that capture these features. The linear and nonlinear stability of explicit and implicit differencing in time is examined, the origin and effect of numerical diffusion in the calculation of convective transport is described, and a technique for maintaining solenoidality in the magnetic field is developed. Many of the points are illustrated by numerical examples. The techniques described are applicable to the time-dependent, high-beta flows normally encountered in magnetically confined plasmas, plasma switches, and space and astrophysical plasmas. 40 refs

  10. Examples of safety culture practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    This report has been prepared to illustrate the concepts and principles of safety culture produced in 1991 by the International Safety Advisory Group as 75-INSAG-4. It provides a small selection of examples taken from a worldwide collection of safety performance evaluations (e.g. IAEA safety series, national regulatory inspections, utility audits and a plant assessments). These documented evaluations collectively provide a database of safety performance strengths and weakness, and related safety culture observations. The examples which have been selected for inclusion in this report are those which are considered worthy of special mention and which illustrate a specific attribute of safety culture given in 75-INSAG-4

  11. Bathymetry in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Kurt Y.

    2013-01-01

    The "Titanic" caught the attention and imagination of the public when, in 1985, the sunken ship was discovered 370 miles off the coast of Newfoundland (PBS, 2012). Since that time, scientists have conducted numerous expeditions using high-resolution SONAR working in tandem with remote-operated vehicles (ROV) to collect information used…

  12. Eyeglasses in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ding-wei; Huang, Wei-neng; Tseng, Hsiang-chi

    2010-01-01

    Optical phenomena can be divided into two categories: ray optics and wave optics. The former is also known as "geometrical optics", and examples are reflection and refraction, while the latter is also known as "physical optics" and includes interference and diffraction. In most textbooks, these two topics are presented in…

  13. Introduction to Classroom Sprego

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csernoch, Mária; Biró, Piroska

    2016-01-01

    Sprego is programming with spreadsheet functions. The present paper provides introductory Sprego examples which have so far only been available in Hungarian. Spreadsheet environments offer both a programming tool which best serves beginner and end-user programmers' interest, and an approach which lightens the burden of coding and language details.…

  14. The numerical solution of boundary value problems over an infinite domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepherd, M.; Skinner, R.

    1976-01-01

    A method is presented for the numerical solution of boundary value problems over infinite domains. An example that illustrates also the strength and accuracy of a numerical procedure for calculating Green's functions is described in detail

  15. Automatic validation of numerical solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stauning, Ole

    1997-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with ``Automatic Validation of Numerical Solutions''. The basic theory of interval analysis and self-validating methods is introduced. The mean value enclosure is applied to discrete mappings for obtaining narrow enclosures of the iterates when applying these mappings...... differential equations, but in this thesis, we describe how to use the methods for enclosing iterates of discrete mappings, and then later use them for discretizing solutions of ordinary differential equations. The theory of automatic differentiation is introduced, and three methods for obtaining derivatives...... are described: The forward, the backward, and the Taylor expansion methods. The three methods have been implemented in the C++ program packages FADBAD/TADIFF. Some examples showing how to use the three metho ds are presented. A feature of FADBAD/TADIFF not present in other automatic differentiation packages...

  16. Physical and Relativistic Numerical Cosmology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anninos, Peter

    1998-01-01

    In order to account for the observable Universe, any comprehensive theory or model of cosmology must draw from many disciplines of physics, including gauge theories of strong and weak interactions, the hydrodynamics and microphysics of baryonic matter, electromagnetic fields, and spacetime curvature, for example. Although it is difficult to incorporate all these physical elements into a single complete model of our Universe, advances in computing methods and technologies have contributed significantly towards our understanding of cosmological models, the Universe, and astrophysical processes within them. A sample of numerical calculations addressing specific issues in cosmology are reviewed in this article: from the Big Bang singularity dynamics to the fundamental interactions of gravitational waves; from the quark-hadron phase transition to the large scale structure of the Universe. The emphasis, although not exclusively, is on those calculations designed to test different models of cosmology against the observed Universe.

  17. Physical and Relativistic Numerical Cosmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Anninos

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to account for the observable Universe, any comprehensive theory or model of cosmology must draw from many disciplines of physics, including gauge theories of strong and weak interactions, the hydrodynamics and microphysics of baryonic matter, electromagnetic fields, and spacetime curvature, for example. Although it is difficult to incorporate all these physical elements into a single complete model of our Universe, advances in computing methods and technologies have contributed significantly towards our understanding of cosmological models, the Universe, and astrophysical processes within them. A sample of numerical calculations addressing specific issues in cosmology are reviewed in this article: from the Big Bang singularity dynamics to the fundamental interactions of gravitational waves; from the quark--hadron phase transition to the large scale structure of the Universe. The emphasis, although not exclusively, is on those calculations designed to test different models of cosmology against the observed Universe.

  18. Shaping Discourse and Setting Examples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Anders

    2017-01-01

    around an issue. By using Tuomas Forsberg's framework of four different mechanisms of normative power: persuasion, invoking norms, shaping the discourse and the power of example on three important case studies from the conflict (EC/EU's declaratory diplomacy on the need for a just peace in the conflict...

  19. Active Learning with Irrelevant Examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagstaff, Kiri; Mazzoni, Dominic

    2009-01-01

    An improved active learning method has been devised for training data classifiers. One example of a data classifier is the algorithm used by the United States Postal Service since the 1960s to recognize scans of handwritten digits for processing zip codes. Active learning algorithms enable rapid training with minimal investment of time on the part of human experts to provide training examples consisting of correctly classified (labeled) input data. They function by identifying which examples would be most profitable for a human expert to label. The goal is to maximize classifier accuracy while minimizing the number of examples the expert must label. Although there are several well-established methods for active learning, they may not operate well when irrelevant examples are present in the data set. That is, they may select an item for labeling that the expert simply cannot assign to any of the valid classes. In the context of classifying handwritten digits, the irrelevant items may include stray marks, smudges, and mis-scans. Querying the expert about these items results in wasted time or erroneous labels, if the expert is forced to assign the item to one of the valid classes. In contrast, the new algorithm provides a specific mechanism for avoiding querying the irrelevant items. This algorithm has two components: an active learner (which could be a conventional active learning algorithm) and a relevance classifier. The combination of these components yields a method, denoted Relevance Bias, that enables the active learner to avoid querying irrelevant data so as to increase its learning rate and efficiency when irrelevant items are present. The algorithm collects irrelevant data in a set of rejected examples, then trains the relevance classifier to distinguish between labeled (relevant) training examples and the rejected ones. The active learner combines its ranking of the items with the probability that they are relevant to yield a final decision about which item

  20. Numerical distance protection

    CERN Document Server

    Ziegler, Gerhard

    2011-01-01

    Distance protection provides the basis for network protection in transmission systems and meshed distribution systems. This book covers the fundamentals of distance protection and the special features of numerical technology. The emphasis is placed on the application of numerical distance relays in distribution and transmission systems.This book is aimed at students and engineers who wish to familiarise themselves with the subject of power system protection, as well as the experienced user, entering the area of numerical distance protection. Furthermore it serves as a reference guide for s

  1. Numerical problems in physics

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Devraj

    2015-01-01

    Numerical Problems in Physics, Volume 1 is intended to serve the need of the students pursuing graduate and post graduate courses in universities with Physics and Materials Science as subject including those appearing in engineering, medical, and civil services entrance examinations. KEY FEATURES: * 29 chapters on Optics, Wave & Oscillations, Electromagnetic Field Theory, Solid State Physics & Modern Physics * 540 solved numerical problems of various universities and ompetitive examinations * 523 multiple choice questions for quick and clear understanding of subject matter * 567 unsolved numerical problems for grasping concepts of the various topic in Physics * 49 Figures for understanding problems and concept

  2. Faults architecture and growth in clay-limestone alternation. Examples in the S-E Basin alternations (France) and numerical modeling; Architecture et croissance des failles dans les alternances argilo-calcaires. Exemples dans les alternances du Bassin du Sud-Est (France) et modelisation numerique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roche, Vincent

    2011-10-28

    The following work has been carried out in the framework of the studies conducted by IRSN in support of its safety evaluation of the geological disposal programme of high and intermediate level, long-lived radioactive waste. Such a disposal is planned to be hosted by the Callovian-Oxfordian indurate clay formation between two limestone formations in eastern Paris basin, France. Hypothetical faults may cross-cut this layered section, decreasing the clay containment ability by creating preferential pathways for radioactive solute towards limestones. This study aims at characterising the fault architecture and the normal fault growth in clay/limestone layered sections. Structural analysis and displacement profiles have been carried out in normal faults crossing several decimetres to metre thick sedimentary alternations in the South-Eastern Basin (France) and petrophysical properties have been determined for each layer. The studied faults are simple fault planes or complex fault zones showing are significantly controlled by the layering. The analysis of the fault characteristics and the results obtained on numerical models enlighten several processes such as fault nucleation, fault restriction, and fault growth through layered section. Some studied faults nucleated in the limestone layers, without using pre-existing fractures such as joints, and according to our numerical analysis, a strong stiffness, a low strength contrast between the limestone and the clay layer, and/or s a greater thickness of the clay layer are conditions which favour nucleation of faults in limestone. The range of mechanical properties leading to the fault nucleation in one layer type or another was investigated using a 3D modelling approach. After its nucleation, the fault propagates within a homogeneous medium with a constant displacement gradient until its vertical propagation is stopped by a restrictor. The evidenced restrictors are limestone-clay interfaces or faults in clays, sub

  3. The numerical simulation of convection delayed dominated diffusion equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Kumar P. Murali

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a fitted numerical method for solving convection delayed dominated diffusion equation. A fitting factor is introduced and the model equation is discretized by cubic spline method. The error analysis is analyzed for the consider problem. The numerical examples are solved using the present method and compared the result with the exact solution.

  4. Aida and Her Mainstream Classroom: A Case Study of a Young English Language Learner's Literacy Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambang Yudi Cahyono

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This article reports a nine-month study of literacy development of Aida, a young English language learner from Indonesia, who was mainstreamed in a Grade 2 classroom in a primary school in the south-eastern part of Australia. This article initially reviews the literature concerning features of the mainstream classroom conducive for second language learning and for literacy development. Following the presentation of methodological issues, it examines English learning activities in Aida's classroom and highlights her literacy development with examples of her work. The results from this study show that Aida developed literacy skills considered important for her second language and learning development. The variety of English learning activities and the encouraging environment in her classroom contributed much to her literacy development.

  5. Numerical bifurcation analysis of a class of nonlinear renewal equations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breda, Dimitri; Diekmann, Odo; Liessi, Davide; Scarabel, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    We show, by way of an example, that numerical bifurcation tools for ODE yield reliable bifurcation diagrams when applied to the pseudospectral approximation of a one-parameter family of nonlinear renewal equations. The example resembles logistic-and Ricker-type population equations and exhibits

  6. DLESE Teaching Boxes: Earth System Science Resources And Strategies For Using Data In The Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olds, S. E.; Weingroff, M.

    2005-12-01

    The DLESE Teaching Box project is both a professional development opportunity and an educational resource development project providing a pedagogic context that support teachers' use of data in the classroom. As a professional development opportunity, it is designed to augment teachers' science content knowledge, enhance their use of inquiry teaching strategies, and increase their confidence and facility with using digital libraries and online learning resources. Teams of educators, scientists, and instructional designers work together during a three part Teaching Box Development Workshop series to create Teaching Boxes on Earth system science topics. The resulting Teaching Boxes use Earth system science conceptual frameworks as their core and contain inquiry-based lessons which model scientific inquiry and process by focusing on the gathering and analysis of evidence. These lines of evidence employ an Earth systems approach to show how processes across multiple spheres, for example, how the biosphere, atmosphere, and geosphere interact in a complex Earth process. Each Teaching Box has interconnected lessons that provide 3-6 weeks of instruction, incorporate National and California science standards, and offer guidance on teaching pathways through the materials. They contain up-to-date digital materials including archived and real-time data sets, simulations, images, lesson plans, and other resources available through DLESE, NSDL, and the participating scientific institutions. Background information provided within the Box supports teacher learning and guides them to facilitate student access to the tools and techniques of authentic, modern science. In developing Teaching Boxes, DLESE adds value to existing educational resources by helping teachers more effectively interpret their use in a variety of standards-based classroom settings. In the past twelve months we have had over 100 requests for Teaching Box products from teachers and curriculum developers from

  7. Numerical Analysis of Partial Differential Equations

    CERN Document Server

    Lui, S H

    2011-01-01

    A balanced guide to the essential techniques for solving elliptic partial differential equations Numerical Analysis of Partial Differential Equations provides a comprehensive, self-contained treatment of the quantitative methods used to solve elliptic partial differential equations (PDEs), with a focus on the efficiency as well as the error of the presented methods. The author utilizes coverage of theoretical PDEs, along with the nu merical solution of linear systems and various examples and exercises, to supply readers with an introduction to the essential concepts in the numerical analysis

  8. On the Hughes model and numerical aspects

    KAUST Repository

    Gomes, Diogo A.

    2017-01-05

    We study a crowd model proposed by R. Hughes in [11] and we describe a numerical approach to solve it. This model comprises a Fokker-Planck equation coupled with an eikonal equation with Dirichlet or Neumann data. First, we establish a priori estimates for the solutions. Second, we study radial solutions and identify a shock formation mechanism. Third, we illustrate the existence of congestion, the breakdown of the model, and the trend to the equilibrium. Finally, we propose a new numerical method and consider two examples.

  9. Numerical calculation of impurity charge state distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crume, E.C.; Arnurius, D.E.

    1977-09-01

    The numerical calculation of impurity charge state distributions using the computer program IMPDYN is discussed. The time-dependent corona atomic physics model used in the calculations is reviewed, and general and specific treatments of electron impact ionization and recombination are referenced. The complete program and two examples relating to tokamak plasmas are given on a microfiche so that a user may verify that his version of the program is working properly. In the discussion of the examples, the corona steady-state approximation is shown to have significant defects when the plasma environment, particularly the electron temperature, is changing rapidly

  10. Remarks on numerical semigroups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, F.

    1995-12-01

    We extend results on Weierstrass semigroups at ramified points of double covering of curves to any numerical semigroup whose genus is large enough. As an application we strengthen the properties concerning Weierstrass weights state in [To]. (author). 25 refs

  11. Numerical semigroups and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Assi, Abdallah

    2016-01-01

    This work presents applications of numerical semigroups in Algebraic Geometry, Number Theory, and Coding Theory. Background on numerical semigroups is presented in the first two chapters, which introduce basic notation and fundamental concepts and irreducible numerical semigroups. The focus is in particular on free semigroups, which are irreducible; semigroups associated with planar curves are of this kind. The authors also introduce semigroups associated with irreducible meromorphic series, and show how these are used in order to present the properties of planar curves. Invariants of non-unique factorizations for numerical semigroups are also studied. These invariants are computationally accessible in this setting, and thus this monograph can be used as an introduction to Factorization Theory. Since factorizations and divisibility are strongly connected, the authors show some applications to AG Codes in the final section. The book will be of value for undergraduate students (especially those at a higher leve...

  12. Advances in Numerical Methods

    CERN Document Server

    Mastorakis, Nikos E

    2009-01-01

    Features contributions that are focused on significant aspects of current numerical methods and computational mathematics. This book carries chapters that advanced methods and various variations on known techniques that can solve difficult scientific problems efficiently.

  13. Introduction to numerical analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Hildebrand, F B

    1987-01-01

    Well-known, respected introduction, updated to integrate concepts and procedures associated with computers. Computation, approximation, interpolation, numerical differentiation and integration, smoothing of data, other topics in lucid presentation. Includes 150 additional problems in this edition. Bibliography.

  14. Numerical analysis of bifurcations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guckenheimer, J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper is a brief survey of numerical methods for computing bifurcations of generic families of dynamical systems. Emphasis is placed upon algorithms that reflect the structure of the underlying mathematical theory while retaining numerical efficiency. Significant improvements in the computational analysis of dynamical systems are to be expected from more reliance of geometric insight coming from dynamical systems theory. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  15. Numerical computations with GPUs

    CERN Document Server

    Kindratenko, Volodymyr

    2014-01-01

    This book brings together research on numerical methods adapted for Graphics Processing Units (GPUs). It explains recent efforts to adapt classic numerical methods, including solution of linear equations and FFT, for massively parallel GPU architectures. This volume consolidates recent research and adaptations, covering widely used methods that are at the core of many scientific and engineering computations. Each chapter is written by authors working on a specific group of methods; these leading experts provide mathematical background, parallel algorithms and implementation details leading to

  16. Example Problems in LES Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-26

    Lesieur, M., Turbulence in Fluids , 2nd Revised Ed., Fluid Mechanics and Its Applications, Vol. 1, Kluwer Academic Publishers, Boston, Massachusetts, 1990...34, Journal of Fluid Mechanics , Vol. 238, 1992, pp. 155-185. 5. Hirsch, C., Numerical Computation of Internal and External Flows, Vol. 2, Computational...reaction mechanisms for the oxidation of hydrocarbon fuels in flames", Combustion Science and Technology, Vol. 27, 1981, pp. 31-43. 14. Spalding, D.B

  17. Instructor-Student Rapport in Taiwan ESL Classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan G. Webb

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Positive relationships between instructors and students are critical to effective learning in the classroom. Rooted in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL, and centered at the crossroads of interpersonal communication and instructional communication (Affective Learning Model, this study examines how instructors in a Taiwan ESL school build relationships with Taiwanese students. Instructors were interviewed regarding the behaviors they use to build rapport with their students. Results show that instructors build rapport with their students using several specific techniques: uncommonly attentive behaviors, common grounding behaviors, courteous behaviors, connecting behavior, information sharing behavior, a balancing of connection and authority, adaptation of rapport to student level, and provision of a respite to norms. The findings provide specific examples of how instructors can build rapport in intercultural classrooms.

  18. Take your seats: Leftward asymmetry in classroom seating choice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Lynn Harms

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite an overall body symmetry, human behaviour is full of examples of asymmetry, from writing or gesturing to kissing and cradling. Prior research has revealed that theatre patrons show a bias towards sitting on the right side of a movie theatre. Two competing theories have attempted to explain this seating asymmetry: one posits that expectation of processing demand drives the bias; the other posits that basic motor asymmetries drive the bias. To test these theories we assessed the real-world classroom seating choices of university students using photographs. A bias for students to choose seats on the left side of the classroom was observed, in contrast to the right side bias observed in theatre seating studies. These results provide evidence in support of a processing-expectation bias.

  19. Generic Example Proving Criteria for All

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yopp, David; Ely, Rob; Johnson­-Leung, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    We review literature that discusses generic example proving and highlight ambiguities that pervade our research community's discourse about generic example arguments. We distinguish between pedagogical advice for choosing good examples that can serve as generic examples when teaching and advice for developing generic example arguments. We provide…

  20. 12 CFR 222.2 - Examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Examples. 222.2 Section 222.2 Banks and Banking... (REGULATION V) General Provisions § 222.2 Examples. The examples in this part are not exclusive. Compliance with an example, to the extent applicable, constitutes compliance with this part. Examples in a...

  1. 12 CFR 334.2 - Examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Examples. 334.2 Section 334.2 Banks and Banking... General Provisions § 334.2 Examples. The examples in this part are not exclusive. Compliance with an example, to the extent applicable, constitutes compliance with this part. Examples in a paragraph...

  2. 12 CFR 571.2 - Examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Examples. 571.2 Section 571.2 Banks and Banking... Examples. The examples in this part are not exclusive. Compliance with an example, to the extent applicable, constitutes compliance with this part. Examples in a paragraph illustrate only the issue described in the...

  3. 12 CFR 717.2 - Examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Examples. 717.2 Section 717.2 Banks and Banking... Provisions § 717.2 Examples. The examples in this part are not exclusive. Compliance with an example, to the extent applicable, constitutes compliance with this part. Examples in a paragraph illustrate only the...

  4. Different Regions, Diverse Classrooms? a Study of Primary Classrooms in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNaught, Carmel; Lok, Beatrice; Yin, Hongbiao; Lee, John Chi-Kin; Song, Huan

    2014-01-01

    Classroom experience is shaped by a number of factors. In this paper, we report a classroom observation study in China, illustrating regional variation in students' classroom learning experiences. Through comparing and contrasting observed classroom practices in three different regions in China (Chongqing, Hong Kong and Shanghai), the paper…

  5. Does a Teacher's Classroom Observation Rating Vary across Multiple Classrooms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Xiaoxuan; Li, Hongli; Leroux, Audrey J.

    2018-01-01

    Classroom observations have been increasingly used for teacher evaluations, and it is important to examine the measurement quality and the use of observation ratings. When a teacher is observed in multiple classrooms, his or her observation ratings may vary across classrooms. In that case, using ratings from one classroom per teacher may not be…

  6. An Investigation of the Use of the "Flipped Classroom" Pedagogy in Secondary English Language Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chi Cheung Ruby

    2017-01-01

    Aim/Purpose: To examine the use of a flipped classroom in the English Language subject in secondary classrooms in Hong Kong. Background: The research questions addressed were: (1) What are teachers' perceptions towards the flipped classroom pedagogy?; (2) How can teachers transfer their flipped classroom experiences to teaching other…

  7. The Printout: Desktop Pulishing in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balajthy, Ernest; Link, Gordon

    1988-01-01

    Reviews software available to the classroom teacher for desktop publishing and describes specific classroom activities. Suggests using desktop publishing to produce large print texts for students with limited sight or for primary students.(NH)

  8. Have You Considered Gamifying Your Classroom?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Graham

    2018-01-01

    New classroom practices can be brought into the classroom that engage students through their enjoyment of games, while building their confidence and bolstering their understanding that mistakes are valuable stops along the journey to understanding.

  9. Effective Classroom Management Techniques for Secondary Schools

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effective Classroom Management Techniques for Secondary Schools. ... engagement of students in activities, use of innovative instructional strategies by teachers, ... and teachers in their perception regarding the effects of teachers classroom ...

  10. ORIGINAL ARTICLE An Assessment of Mathematics Classroom ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bdu

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE. An Assessment of Mathematics Classroom Teaching- ... the study was to assess whether the learning classroom environment was compliant with constructivism. ... of our education system. Applefield ... share control of the design, management, and evaluation ..... development of formative assessment.

  11. Teacher classroom practices and Mathematics performance in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Mathematics teacher questionnaire, administered as part of the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) 2011, comprised questions pertaining to the classroom practices of Teacher Clarity, Classroom Discussion, Feedback, Formative Assessment, Problem Solving and Metacognitive Strategies, ...

  12. Classroom interventions for children with ADHD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, Yvonne; Gaastra, Geraldina F.; Tucha, Lara I.; Tucha, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    In a typical classroom, children are instructed to remain seated, perform independent seatwork and follow teachers’ instructions. Children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may find these classroom demands particularly difficult to adhere to because, by definition, children with

  13. Classroom versus Computer-Based CPR Training: A Comparison of the Effectiveness of Two Instructional Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehberg, Robb S.; Gazzillo Diaz, Linda; Middlemas, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to determine whether computer-based CPR training is comparable to traditional classroom training. Design and Setting: This study was quantitative in design. Data was gathered from a standardized examination and skill performance evaluation which yielded numerical scores. Subjects: The subjects were 64…

  14. Code-switching in university classroom interaction: A case study of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kate H

    lecturers teaching first-year students in the departments of Political Science ... from a range of perspectives, including formal or structural linguistics (cf. ... All these ideological changes have had a significant impact on the language-in- ..... Numerous studies on code-switching in multilingual classrooms at the ... Methodology.

  15. The effect of points and audio on concentration, engagement, enjoyment, learning, motivation, and classroom dynamics using Kahoot!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Alf Inge; Lieberoth, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    There are many examples on the use of game-based learning in and outside the classroom, along with evaluation of their effect in terms of engagement, learning, classroom dynamics, concentration, motivation and enjoyment. Most of the research in this area focuses on evaluations of the use of game-...... affected by use of audio. A total of 593 students participated in this experiment with a gender distribution of 44% female and 56 male students. Contribution: Factorial design method, lit review...

  16. Reading the Rainbow: LGBTQ-Inclusive Literacy Instruction in the Elementary Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Caitlin L.; Hermann-Wilmarth, Jill M.

    2018-01-01

    Drawing on examples of teaching from elementary school classrooms, this timely book for practitioners explains why LGBTQ-inclusive literacy instruction is possible, relevant, and necessary in grades K-5. The authors show how expanding the English language arts curriculum to include representations of LGBTQ people and themes will benefit all…

  17. Leaving the Classroom: A Didactic Framework for Education in Environmental Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dopico, Eduardo; Garcia-Vazquez, Eva

    2011-01-01

    In Continuous Education curricula in Spain, the programs on sciences of the environment are aimed toward understandings of sustainability. Teaching practice rarely leaves the classroom for outdoor field studies. At the same time, teaching practice is generally focused on examples of how human activities are harmful for ecosystems. From a pedagogic…

  18. "Dismantling the Wall, One Brick at a Time": Overcoming Barriers to Parochialism in Social Studies Classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Stuart J.; Hoge, John D.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the classroom practice of Geri Collins who is a veteran eighth grade social studies teacher. Explains how, through her teaching, she attempts to break down the wall her students have around them. Highlights the four characteristics that make her teaching an example of wise practice. (CMK)

  19. Heteronormativity in the University Classroom: Novelty Attachment and Content Substitution among Gay-Friendly Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripley, Matthew; Anderson, Eric; McCormack, Mark; Rockett, Ben

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the complex relationship between an openly gay instructor, homophobia, and heteronormativity in a university classroom. The authors first tabulated the frequency with which the instructor used the lives of heterosexuals and homosexuals as examples of content or as content itself, and then they interviewed 32 students about…

  20. Linking Research and Practice: Effective Strategies for Teaching Vocabulary in the ESL Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Jihyun

    2010-01-01

    Vocabulary plays a pivotal role in the ESL classroom. Whereas a considerable amount of research has examined effective ESL vocabulary teaching and learning, missing are studies that provide examples of how to put various research findings into practice: that is, apply them to real texts including target vocabulary items. In order to close the gap…

  1. Using Active Learning in a Studio Classroom to Teach Molecular Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogaj, Luiza A.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the conversion of a lecture-based molecular biology course into an active learning environment in a studio classroom. Specific assignments and activities are provided as examples. The goal of these activities is to involve students in collaborative learning, teach them how to participate in the learning process, and give…

  2. Diverging from Traditional Paths: Reconstructing Fairy Tales in the EFL Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayik, Rawia

    2015-01-01

    Framed by transactional and critical literacy theories, this teacher-research introduces practical examples of implementing antisexist pedagogy in an EFL Middle Eastern classroom. After a short preview of the gender-biased educational messages abundant in literature and pop culture, the article focuses on students' transaction with "Cinder…

  3. French Interrogative Structures: A New Pedagogical Norm for the 21st-Century Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antes, Theresa A.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated interrogative structures most frequently used by native speakers of French, in an attempt to reconcile differences between language forms taught in the French as a foreign language classroom and those that are encountered in authentic input. Radio, television, and magazine interviews provided multiple examples of…

  4. The "Finding Physics" Project: Recognizing and Exploring Physics outside the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Judith; Perkins, James

    2016-01-01

    Students in introductory physics classes often have difficulty recognizing the relevance of physics concepts outside the confines of the physics classroom, lab, and textbook. Even though textbooks and instructors often provide examples of physics applications from a wide array of areas, students have difficulty relating physics to their own lives.…

  5. CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES IN AN EFL CLASS

    OpenAIRE

    Eva Fitriani Syarifah; Raynesa Noor Emiliasari

    2017-01-01

    In a foreign language context, classroom management is very important to be considered by the teachers since the target language is taught mostly in classroom. However, managing classroom is not an easy task to do. Most of teachers think it is difficult because they need to organize the class, deal with students‘ behavior and manage the time. Taking the issues above into account, this research was conducted to find out strategies in managing EFL classrooms applied by a teacher ...

  6. Classroom Action Research: Penelitian Tindakan Kelas

    OpenAIRE

    Juliandi, Azuar

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of this article is to provide a basic knowledge of classroom action research, systematic proposal and classroom action reporting. The Knowledge is so important because a professional lecturer must be able to understand the problems themselves and their learning environment through classroom action research activities. Various issues in classroom action research, including: planning, process, use of methods, media, resources and learning evaluations and other relevant issues. ...

  7. Nurturing creativity in the classroom

    CERN Document Server

    Kaufman, James C

    2010-01-01

    Nurturing Creativity in the Classroom is a groundbreaking collection of essays by leading scholars, who examine and respond to the tension that many educators face in valuing student creativity but believing that they cannot support it given the curricular constraints of the classroom. Is it possible for teachers to nurture creative development and expression without drifting into curricular chaos? Do curricular constraints necessarily lead to choosing conformity over creativity? This book combines the perspectives of top educators and psychologists to generate practical advice for considering and addressing the challenges of supporting creativity within the classroom. It is unique in its balance of practical recommendations for nurturing creativity and thoughtful appreciation of curricular constraints. This approach helps ensure that the insights and advice found in this collection will take root in educators’ practice, rather than being construed as yet another demand placed on their overflowing plate of ...

  8. Google Tools in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albee, E. M.; Koons, P. O.; Schauffler, M.; Zhu, Y.; Segee, B. E.

    2009-12-01

    The Maine Learning Technology Initiative provides every seventh and eighth grade student in the state with MacBook laptop computers. Limitless education possibilities exist with the inclusion of Google Tools and laptops as learning tools in our modern classrooms. Google Applications allow students to create documents, spreadsheets, charts, graphs, forms, and presentations and easily allows the sharing of information with their fellow classmates and teachers. These applications invite the use of inquiry and critical thinking skills, collaboration among peers, and subject integration to teach students crucial concepts. The benefits for teachers extend into the realm of using Google sites to easily create a teacher website and blog to upload classroom information and create a communication connection for parents and students as well as collaborations between the teachers and University researchers and educators. Google Applications further enhances the possibilities for learning, sharing a wealth of information, and enhancing communication inside and outside of the classroom.

  9. Towards standard testbeds for numerical relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcubierre, Miguel; Allen, Gabrielle; Bona, Carles; Fiske, David; Goodale, Tom; Guzman, F Siddhartha; Hawke, Ian; Hawley, Scott H; Husa, Sascha; Koppitz, Michael; Lechner, Christiane; Pollney, Denis; Rideout, David; Salgado, Marcelo; Schnetter, Erik; Seidel, Edward; Shinkai, Hisa-aki; Shoemaker, Deirdre; Szilagyi, Bela; Takahashi, Ryoji; Winicour, Jeff

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, many different numerical evolution schemes for Einstein's equations have been proposed to address stability and accuracy problems that have plagued the numerical relativity community for decades. Some of these approaches have been tested on different spacetimes, and conclusions have been drawn based on these tests. However, differences in results originate from many sources, including not only formulations of the equations, but also gauges, boundary conditions, numerical methods and so on. We propose to build up a suite of standardized testbeds for comparing approaches to the numerical evolution of Einstein's equations that are designed to both probe their strengths and weaknesses and to separate out different effects, and their causes, seen in the results. We discuss general design principles of suitable testbeds, and we present an initial round of simple tests with periodic boundary conditions. This is a pivotal first step towards building a suite of testbeds to serve the numerical relativists and researchers from related fields who wish to assess the capabilities of numerical relativity codes. We present some examples of how these tests can be quite effective in revealing various limitations of different approaches, and illustrating their differences. The tests are presently limited to vacuum spacetimes, can be run on modest computational resources and can be used with many different approaches used in the relativity community

  10. Towards standard testbeds for numerical relativity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcubierre, Miguel [Inst. de Ciencias Nucleares, Univ. Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 70-543, Mexico Distrito Federal 04510 (Mexico); Allen, Gabrielle; Goodale, Tom; Guzman, F Siddhartha; Hawke, Ian; Husa, Sascha; Koppitz, Michael; Lechner, Christiane; Pollney, Denis; Rideout, David [Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Gravitationsphysik, Albert-Einstein-Institut, 14476 Golm (Germany); Bona, Carles [Departament de Fisica, Universitat de les Illes Balears, Ctra de Valldemossa km 7.5, 07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Fiske, David [Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-4111 (United States); Hawley, Scott H [Center for Relativity, Univ. of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Salgado, Marcelo [Inst. de Ciencias Nucleares, Univ. Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 70-543, Mexico Distrito Federal 04510 (Mexico); Schnetter, Erik [Inst. fuer Astronomie und Astrophysik, Universitaet Tuebingen, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Seidel, Edward [Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Gravitationsphysik, Albert-Einstein-Inst., 14476 Golm (Germany); Shinkai, Hisa-aki [Computational Science Div., Inst. of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), Hirosawa 2-1, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Shoemaker, Deirdre [Center for Radiophysics and Space Research, Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Szilagyi, Bela [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Takahashi, Ryoji [Theoretical Astrophysics Center, Juliane Maries Vej 30, 2100 Copenhagen, (Denmark); Winicour, Jeff [Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Gravitationsphysik, Albert-Einstein-Institut, 14476 Golm (Germany)

    2004-01-21

    In recent years, many different numerical evolution schemes for Einstein's equations have been proposed to address stability and accuracy problems that have plagued the numerical relativity community for decades. Some of these approaches have been tested on different spacetimes, and conclusions have been drawn based on these tests. However, differences in results originate from many sources, including not only formulations of the equations, but also gauges, boundary conditions, numerical methods and so on. We propose to build up a suite of standardized testbeds for comparing approaches to the numerical evolution of Einstein's equations that are designed to both probe their strengths and weaknesses and to separate out different effects, and their causes, seen in the results. We discuss general design principles of suitable testbeds, and we present an initial round of simple tests with periodic boundary conditions. This is a pivotal first step towards building a suite of testbeds to serve the numerical relativists and researchers from related fields who wish to assess the capabilities of numerical relativity codes. We present some examples of how these tests can be quite effective in revealing various limitations of different approaches, and illustrating their differences. The tests are presently limited to vacuum spacetimes, can be run on modest computational resources and can be used with many different approaches used in the relativity community.

  11. Using Informal Classroom Observations to Improve Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ing, Marsha

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to describe the variability of principals' classroom observations across schools and to relate classroom observations to the schools' instructional climate. This helps identify the conditions under which classroom observations effectively improve instruction in some schools and not in other schools.…

  12. Chinese Teachers' Perceptions of Students' Classroom Misbehaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Meixia; Li, Yeping; Li, Xiaobao; Kulm, Gerald

    2008-01-01

    This study focuses on Chinese teachers' perceptions of students' classroom misbehaviour. A questionnaire was designed to assess teachers' general concerns about classroom management, teachers' perceptions of the most frequent and troublesome types of misbehaviour, and teachers' perceived needs for help with improving classroom management. A total…

  13. Learning Road Safety Skills in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Freddy Jackson; Gillard, Duncan

    2009-01-01

    This case study demonstrates the effectiveness of a classroom based learning programme in the acquisition of road safety skills. The participant, a child with severe learning disabilities, was taught road safety behaviours in the classroom with the aid of photograph cards. When he had mastered these skills in the classroom, he returned to the…

  14. Validation of the Classroom Behavior Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blunden, Dale; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Factor-analytic methods were used toassess contruct validity of the Classroom Behavior Inventory, a scale for rating behaviors associated with hyperactivity. The Classroom Behavior Inventory measures three dimensions of behavior: Hyperactivity, Hostility, and Sociability. Significant concurrent validity was obtained for only one Classroom Behavior…

  15. Curriculum Connection: Create a Classroom Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donlan, Leni

    1991-01-01

    One elementary teacher runs her classroom as a technology-based token economy. Students hold classroom jobs and use software to track money earned, manage checking accounts, and disburse classroom cash. The strategy boosts math and technology skills. A list of software programs is included. (SM)

  16. Reading and Quality Discipline in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ediger, Marlow

    Time spent on disciplining children in the classroom is time taken away from achieving the objectives of instruction. The classroom teacher needs to have appropriate guidelines to use in teaching as well as specific workable procedures which help students to achieve. This paper discusses various methods of classroom discipline. The paper first…

  17. Diverse Perspectives on a Flipped Biostatistics Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Todd A.; Andridge, Rebecca R.; Sainani, Kirstin L.; Stangle, Dalene K.; Neely, Megan L.

    2016-01-01

    "Flipping" the classroom refers to a pedagogical approach in which students are first exposed to didactic content outside the classroom and then actively use class time to apply their newly attained knowledge. The idea of the flipped classroom is not new, but has grown in popularity in recent years as the necessary technology has…

  18. The Dance of Elementary School Classroom Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Pamela

    2014-01-01

    At times, classroom management and guidance elude even the most seasoned teachers. Yet, students need guidance and practice in self-regulatory skills to assist in the learning that occurs in classrooms. Teachers need both practical and research-based classroom management strategies that benefit the environment and help create a space conducive to…

  19. Pre-Service Teachers and Classroom Authority

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrino, Anthony M.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the classroom practices of five pre-service teachers from three secondary schools in a large southeastern state. Through classroom observations, survey responses, reviews of refection logs, and focus-group interview responses, we centered on the issue of developing classroom authority as a means to effective classroom…

  20. Motivational Strategies in Medical English Classroom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Jun-ying

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To explore strategies to motivate students in the classroom of Medical English. Methods:The motivational strategies applied in medical English classroom including defining course goals early in the semester, appropriate teacher behavior, creating real context and giving helpful and frequent Feedback were recommended. Results & Conclusion: The motivational strategies make a positive impact on students’motivation in medical English classroom.

  1. A Lesson in Classroom Size Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hymon, Steve

    1997-01-01

    The goal of California's classroom size reduction (CSR) program is to have 20 or fewer students in kindergarten through grade 3 classrooms. Districts receive $650 for each student in a reduced classroom. Describes how districts implemented the plan and offers five lessons from struggles and successes with CSR. A table displays average elementary…

  2. STEM Teacher Efficacy in Flipped Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Daniel; Denson, Cameron

    2017-01-01

    The flipped classroom instructional model continues to grow in adoption and use in K-12 classrooms. Although there are an increasing number of studies into the implementation of the flipped classroom, there is limited empirical research into its effectiveness and even fewer into the educational, psychological, and theoretical constructs underlying…

  3. Curriculum Integration in the General Music Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munroe, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Arts integration is a topic that has been researched and discussed by music educators and general educators alike. Some feel this is a worthwhile endeavor in both the arts classroom and the general classroom, while others feel that we should be spending what little time we have in the music classroom focusing on music goals. This article will…

  4. Routines Are the Foundation of Classroom Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Robin Rawlings; Allanson, Patricia Bolton; Notar, Charles E.

    2017-01-01

    Classroom management is the key to learning. Routines are the foundation of classroom management. Students require structure in their lives. Routines provide that in all of their life from the time they awake until the time they go to bed. Routines in a school and in the classroom provide the environment for learning to take place. The paper is…

  5. The Flipped Classroom: A Twist on Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Stacy M. P.; Ralph, David L.

    2016-01-01

    The traditional classroom has utilized the "I Do", "We Do", "You Do" as a strategy for teaching for years. The flipped classroom truly flips that strategy. The teacher uses "You Do", "We Do", "I Do" instead. Homework, inquiry, and investigation happen in the classroom. At home students…

  6. The Classroom Environment Study: Teaching for Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Lorin W.

    1987-01-01

    The IEA's Classroom Environment Study, implemented in grades 5-9 in 9 countries, examined effects on student outcomes of home, community, school, teacher, and student characteristics and classroom practices. Across countries, course content varied widely, but teachers relied on relatively few classroom behaviors. Student learning was affected by…

  7. Application examples of EFPACS series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchiya, Yasunori; Aoki, Makoto; Yamahata, Noboru

    1989-01-01

    This paper introduces some application examples of picture archiving and communications system EFPACS series which achieves efficient management of a volume of image data generated in a hospital, and powerfully support image diagnosis using multi-modality. EFPACS can be applied to various objectives of system installation, and can meet the scale of a hospital and the way of image filing. EFPACS has been installed in a middle-scale hospital for image conference, in a general hospital for long-term archiving of MRI data and for referring in the outpatient clinic, in a dental hospital for dental image processing, and so on. (author)

  8. AN EXAMPLE IN SURFACE AREA*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffman, Casper

    1969-01-01

    For length and area, a central fact is that the value of the length of a curve or the area of a surface, as given by the Lebesgue theory, is at least as great as that given by the classical formula, whenever the latter has meaning. This is now found not to be valid in higher dimensions. We give an example of a continuous mapping of the unit cube into itself for which the value given by the formula exceeds the three-dimensional Lebesgue area of the corresponding suface. PMID:16591750

  9. Numerical Transducer Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriquez, Vicente Cutanda

    This thesis describes the development of a numerical model of the propagation of sound waves in fluids with viscous and thermal losses, with application to the simulation of acoustic transducers, in particular condenser microphones for measurement. The theoretical basis is presented, numerical...... manipulations are developed to satisfy the more complicated boundary conditions, and a model of a condenser microphone with a coupled membrane is developed. The model is tested against measurements of ¼ inch condenser microphones and analytical calculations. A detailed discussion of the results is given....

  10. On numerical Bessel transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommer, B.; Zabolitzky, J.G.

    1979-01-01

    The authors present a computer program to calculate the three dimensional Fourier or Bessel transforms and definite integrals with Bessel functions. Numerical integration of systems containing Bessel functions occurs in many physical problems, e.g. electromagnetic form factor of nuclei, all transitions involving multipole expansions at high momenta. Filon's integration rule is extended to spherical Bessel functions. The numerical error is of the order of the Simpson error term of the function which has to be transformed. Thus one gets a stable integral even at large arguments of the transformed function. (Auth.)

  11. Industrial numerical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKee, S.; Elliott, C.M.

    1986-01-01

    The applications of mathematics to industrial problems involves the formulation of problems which are amenable to mathematical investigation, mathematical modelling, the solution of the mathematical problem and the inter-pretation of the results. There are 12 chapters describing industrial problems where mathematics and numerical analysis can be applied. These range from the numerical assessment of the flatness of engineering surfaces and plates, the design of chain links, control problems in tidal power generation and low thrust satellite trajectory optimization to mathematical models in welding. One chapter, on the ageing of stainless steels, is indexed separately. (UK)

  12. Exact solutions, numerical relativity and gravitational radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winicour, J.

    1986-01-01

    In recent years, there has emerged a new use for exact solutions to Einstein's equation as checks on the accuracy of numerical relativity codes. Much has already been written about codes based upon the space-like Cauchy problem. In the case of two Killing vectors, a numerical characteristic initial value formulation based upon two intersecting families of null hypersurfaces has successfully evolved the Schwarzschild and the colliding plane wave vacuum solutions. Here the author discusses, in the context of exact solutions, numerical studies of gravitational radiation based upon the null cone initial value problem. Every stage of progress in the null cone approach has been associated with exact solutions in some sense. He begins by briefly recapping this history. Then he presents two new examples illustrating how exact solutions can be useful

  13. Numerical Simulation of Cyclic Thermodynamic Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Stig Kildegård

    2006-01-01

    This thesis is on numerical simulation of cyclic thermodynamic processes. A modelling approach and a method for finding periodic steady state solutions are described. Examples of applications are given in the form of four research papers. Stirling machines and pulse tube coolers are introduced...... and a brief overview of the current state of the art in methods for simulating such machines is presented. It was found that different simulation approaches, which model the machines with different levels of detail, currently coexist. Methods using many simplifications can be easy to use and can provide...... models flexible and easy to modify, and to make simulations fast. A high level of accuracy was achieved for integrations of a model created using the modelling approach; the accuracy depended on the settings for the numerical solvers in a very predictable way. Selection of fast numerical algorithms...

  14. Numerical methods and analysis of multiscale problems

    CERN Document Server

    Madureira, Alexandre L

    2017-01-01

    This book is about numerical modeling of multiscale problems, and introduces several asymptotic analysis and numerical techniques which are necessary for a proper approximation of equations that depend on different physical scales. Aimed at advanced undergraduate and graduate students in mathematics, engineering and physics – or researchers seeking a no-nonsense approach –, it discusses examples in their simplest possible settings, removing mathematical hurdles that might hinder a clear understanding of the methods. The problems considered are given by singular perturbed reaction advection diffusion equations in one and two-dimensional domains, partial differential equations in domains with rough boundaries, and equations with oscillatory coefficients. This work shows how asymptotic analysis can be used to develop and analyze models and numerical methods that are robust and work well for a wide range of parameters.

  15. Introduction to numerical computation in Pascal

    CERN Document Server

    Dew, P M

    1983-01-01

    Our intention in this book is to cover the core material in numerical analysis normally taught to students on degree courses in computer science. The main emphasis is placed on the use of analysis and programming techniques to produce well-designed, reliable mathematical software. The treatment should be of interest also to students of mathematics, science and engineering who wish to learn how to write good programs for mathematical computations. The reader is assumed to have some acquaintance with Pascal programming. Aspects of Pascal particularly relevant to numerical computation are revised and developed in the first chapter. Although Pascal has some drawbacks for serious numerical work (for example, only one precision for real numbers), the language has major compensating advantages: it is a widely used teaching language that will be familiar to many students and it encourages the writing of clear, well­ structured programs. By careful use of structure and documentation, we have produced codes that we be...

  16. Numerical stability in problems of linear algebra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babuska, I.

    1972-01-01

    Mathematical problems are introduced as mappings from the space of input data to that of the desired output information. Then a numerical process is defined as a prescribed recurrence of elementary operations creating the mapping of the underlying mathematical problem. The ratio of the error committed by executing the operations of the numerical process (the roundoff errors) to the error introduced by perturbations of the input data (initial error) gives rise to the concept of lambda-stability. As examples, several processes are analyzed from this point of view, including, especially, old and new processes for solving systems of linear algebraic equations with tridiagonal matrices. In particular, it is shown how such a priori information can be utilized as, for instance, a knowledge of the row sums of the matrix. Information of this type is frequently available where the system arises in connection with the numerical solution of differential equations.

  17. Classroom Management and Students' Self-Esteem: Creating Positive Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirdag, Seyithan

    2015-01-01

    Middle school students experience substantial changes in their emotion and cognition while they grow. They have mixed feelings, which may negatively affect their motivation, self-esteem, and academic success due to different classroom management strategies of their teachers. There is available research about motivation of middle school students…

  18. Out of Classroom Instruction in the Flipped Classroom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Triantafyllou, Evangelia; Timcenko, Olga

    2015-01-01

    This article presents experiences and student perceptions on the introduction of the flipped classroom model in two consecutive semesters at Media Technology department of Aalborg University, Copenhagen, Denmark. We introduced the flipped instruction model to a statistics course and a mathematics...

  19. Nonlinear time series theory, methods and applications with R examples

    CERN Document Server

    Douc, Randal; Stoffer, David

    2014-01-01

    FOUNDATIONSLinear ModelsStochastic Processes The Covariance World Linear Processes The Multivariate Cases Numerical Examples ExercisesLinear Gaussian State Space Models Model Basics Filtering, Smoothing, and Forecasting Maximum Likelihood Estimation Smoothing Splines and the Kalman Smoother Asymptotic Distribution of the MLE Missing Data Modifications Structural Component Models State-Space Models with Correlated Errors Exercises Beyond Linear ModelsNonlinear Non-Gaussian Data Volterra Series Expansion Cumulants and Higher-Order Spectra Bilinear Models Conditionally Heteroscedastic Models Thre

  20. Communication Patterns in Preschool Education Institutions ? Practical Examples

    OpenAIRE

    Radic-Hozo, Endica

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Proper communication in pre-school institutions for education is undeniable importance to the development of the child, as evidenced by numerous studies. After the child's birth follows the most complex phase in its early phases - preschool education. Only high-quality, synergistic relationship triad: parent-child-educator and the modern postulates of preschool child education, warrants successful preschool child education. Methods and materials: Description, with examples from ...

  1. A novel numerical approach for workspace determination of parallel mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Yiqun; Niu, Junchuan; Liu, Zhihui; Zhang, Fuliang [Shandong University, Shandong (China)

    2017-06-15

    In this paper, a novel numerical approach is proposed for workspace determination of parallel mechanisms. Compared with the classical numerical approaches, this presented approach discretizes both location and orientation of the mechanism simultaneously, not only one of the two. This technique makes the presented numerical approach applicable in determining almost all types of workspaces, while traditional numerical approaches are only applicable in determining the constant orientation workspace and orientation workspace. The presented approach and its steps to determine the inclusive orientation workspace and total orientation workspace are described in detail. A lower-mobility parallel mechanism and a six-degrees-of-freedom Stewart platform are set as examples, the workspaces of these mechanisms are estimated and visualized by the proposed numerical approach. Furthermore, the efficiency of the presented approach is discussed. The examples show that the presented approach is applicable in determining the inclusive orientation workspace and total orientation workspace of parallel mechanisms with high efficiency.

  2. Piecewise Polynomial Aggregation as Preprocessing for Data Numerical Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobronets, B. S.; Popova, O. A.

    2018-05-01

    Data aggregation issues for numerical modeling are reviewed in the present study. The authors discuss data aggregation procedures as preprocessing for subsequent numerical modeling. To calculate the data aggregation, the authors propose using numerical probabilistic analysis (NPA). An important feature of this study is how the authors represent the aggregated data. The study shows that the offered approach to data aggregation can be interpreted as the frequency distribution of a variable. To study its properties, the density function is used. For this purpose, the authors propose using the piecewise polynomial models. A suitable example of such approach is the spline. The authors show that their approach to data aggregation allows reducing the level of data uncertainty and significantly increasing the efficiency of numerical calculations. To demonstrate the degree of the correspondence of the proposed methods to reality, the authors developed a theoretical framework and considered numerical examples devoted to time series aggregation.

  3. Supporting Children with Genetic Syndromes in the Classroom: The Example of 22q Deletion Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Colin; Stedman, Lindsey

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of children are likely to have a known genetic cause for their special educational needs. One such genetic condition is 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22qDS), a genetic syndrome associated with early speech and language difficulties, global and specific cognitive impairments, difficulties with attention and difficulties with…

  4. Using Variable Interval Reinforcement Schedules to Support Students in the Classroom: An Introduction with Illustrative Examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulac, David; Benson, Nicholas; Nesmith, Matthew C.; Wollersheim Shervey, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    When behaviors are reinforced with a variable interval reinforcement schedule, reinforcement is available only after an unknown period of time. These types of reinforcement schedules are most useful for reinforcing slow and steady responding and for differentially reinforcing behaviors that are incompatible with some problematic behaviors. This…

  5. Making physics fun key concepts, classroom activities, and everyday examples, grades K-8

    CERN Document Server

    Prigo, Robert

    2007-01-01

    In easy-to-understand language, this resource presents engaging, ready-to-use learning experiences that address the "big ideas" in K-8 science education and help students make larger, real-world connections.

  6. Cloning in the classroom: an example of the didactical use of popularization of science text

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Martins

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a science lesson in which different texts,such as newspapers, popular science magazines and textbooks were used as didactic resources. Our theoretical framework explores the relevance of communicative approaches to teaching and discusses the relationships between text and discourse. Data were collected through videotapes of a Biology lesson about cloning in an adult education class in Brazil. The analyses focussed on the teacher’s discursive re-elaborations and revealed a variety of roles played by a popular science text in a science lesson, such as motivation and lesson structuring, as well as, helpingorganise explanations, fostering debate, broadening reading practices and establishing relationships between scientific and everyday contexts. Amongst the discursive re-elaborations observed are strategies for adaptation of originals, the emphasis on reading activities and joint use of popular science texts and textbooks.

  7. The "Cultural Turn" in the Classroom: Two Examples of Pedagogy and the Politics of Representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Laurel

    2002-01-01

    This article offers video lessons that interweave visual and written materials in order to introduce university undergraduates (who may or may not be geography majors) to some recent shifts in geographic inquiry. What is often described as the "cultural turn" in human geography invites us to examine more closely the politics of representation,…

  8. Numerical analysis using Sage

    CERN Document Server

    Anastassiou, George A

    2015-01-01

    This is the first numerical analysis text to use Sage for the implementation of algorithms and can be used in a one-semester course for undergraduates in mathematics, math education, computer science/information technology, engineering, and physical sciences. The primary aim of this text is to simplify understanding of the theories and ideas from a numerical analysis/numerical methods course via a modern programming language like Sage. Aside from the presentation of fundamental theoretical notions of numerical analysis throughout the text, each chapter concludes with several exercises that are oriented to real-world application.  Answers may be verified using Sage.  The presented code, written in core components of Sage, are backward compatible, i.e., easily applicable to other software systems such as Mathematica®.  Sage is  open source software and uses Python-like syntax. Previous Python programming experience is not a requirement for the reader, though familiarity with any programming language is a p...

  9. Numerical Estimation in Preschoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berteletti, Ilaria; Lucangeli, Daniela; Piazza, Manuela; Dehaene, Stanislas; Zorzi, Marco

    2010-01-01

    Children's sense of numbers before formal education is thought to rely on an approximate number system based on logarithmically compressed analog magnitudes that increases in resolution throughout childhood. School-age children performing a numerical estimation task have been shown to increasingly rely on a formally appropriate, linear…

  10. Numerical analysis targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sollogoub, Pierre

    2001-01-01

    Numerical analyses are needed in different steps of the overall design process. Complex models or non-linear reactor core behaviour are important for qualification and/or comparison of results obtained. Adequate models and test should be defined. Fuel assembly, fuel row, and the complete core should be tested for seismic effects causing LOCA and flow-induced vibrations (FIV)

  11. Development of numerical concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Peucker

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The development of numerical concepts is described from infancy to preschool age. Infants a few days old exhibit an early sensitivity for numerosities. In the course of development, nonverbal mental models allow for the exact representation of small quantities as well as changes in these quantities. Subitising, as the accurate recognition of small numerosities (without counting, plays an important role. It can be assumed that numerical concepts and procedures start with insights about small numerosities. Protoquantitative schemata comprise fundamental knowledge about quantities. One-to-one-correspondence connects elements and numbers, and, for this reason, both quantitative and numerical knowledge. If children understand that they can determine the numerosity of a collection of elements by enumerating the elements, they have acquired the concept of cardinality. Protoquantitative knowledge becomes quantitative if it can be applied to numerosities and sequential numbers. The concepts of cardinality and part-part-whole are key to numerical development. Developmentally appropriate learning and teaching should focus on cardinality and part-part-whole concepts.

  12. Paradoxes in numerical calculations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brandts, J.; Křížek, Michal; Zhang, Z.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 3 (2016), s. 317-330 ISSN 1210-0552 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-02067S Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : round-off errors * numerical instability * recurrence formulae Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.394, year: 2016

  13. Bringing Seismology's Grand Challenges to the Undergraduate Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, M. H.; Taber, J.; Hubenthal, M.

    2011-12-01

    The "Seismological Grand Challenges in Understanding Earth's Dynamic Systems," a community-written long-range science plan for the next decade, poses 10 questions to guide fundamental seismological research. Written in an approachable fashion suitable for policymakers, the broad questions and supporting discussion contained in this document offer an ideal framework for the development of undergraduate curricular materials. Leveraging this document, we have created a collection of inquiry-based classroom modules that utilize authentic data to modernize seismological instruction in 100 and 200 level undergraduate courses. The modules not only introduce undergraduates to the broad questions that the seismological community seeks to answer in the future but also showcase the numerous areas where modern seismological research is actively contributing to our understanding of fundamental Earth processes. To date 6 in-depth explorations that correspond to the Grand Challenges document have been developed. The specific topics for each exploration were selected to showcase modern seismological research while also covering topics commonly included in the curriculum of these introductory classes. Examples of activities that have been created and their corresponding Grand Challenge include: -A guided inquiry that introduces students to episodic tremor and slip and compares the GPS and seismic signatures of ETS with those produced from standard tectonic earthquakes (Grand Challenge "How do faults slip?"). - A laboratory exercise where students engage in b-value mapping of volcanic earthquakes to assess potential eruption hazards (How do magmas ascend and erupt?). - A module that introduce students to glacial earthquakes in Greenland and compares their frequency and spatial distribution to tectonic earthquakes (How do processes in the ocean and atmosphere interact with the solid Earth?). What is the relationship between stress and strain in the lithosphere? - An activity that

  14. Some examples of the estimation of error for calorimetric assay of plutonium-bearing solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodenburg, W.W.

    1977-04-01

    This report provides numerical examples of error estimation and related measurement assurance programs for the calorimetric assay of plutonium. It is primarily intended for users who do not consider themselves experts in the field of calorimetry. These examples will provide practical and useful information in establishing a calorimetric assay capability which fulfills regulatory requirements. 10 tables, 5 figures

  15. Electrochemistry. The basics, with examples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefrou, Christine [LEPMI, Saint Martin d' Heres (France); Poignet, Jean-Claude; Fabry, Pierre

    2012-07-01

    This book offers original and new approaches to the teaching of electrochemical concepts, principles and applications. Throughout the text the authors provide a balanced coverage of the thermodynamic and kinetic processes at the heart of electrochemical systems. The first half of the book outlines fundamental concepts appropriate to undergraduate students and the second half gives an in-depth account of electrochemical systems suitable for experienced scientists and course lecturers. Concepts are clearly explained and mathematical treatments are kept to a minimum or reported in appendices. This book features: 1. Questions and answers for self-assessment 2. Basic and advanced level numerical descriptions. 3. Illustrated electrochemistry applications This book is accessible to both novice and experienced electrochemists and supports a deep understanding of the fundamental principles and laws of electrochemistry.

  16. Virtual Reality in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantelidis, Veronica S.

    1993-01-01

    Considers the concept of virtual reality; reviews its history; describes general uses of virtual reality, including entertainment, medicine, and design applications; discusses classroom uses of virtual reality, including a software program called Virtus WalkThrough for use with a computer monitor; and suggests future possibilities. (34 references)…

  17. System for assessing classroom attention.

    OpenAIRE

    Raca Mirko; Dillenbourg Pierre

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we give a preview of our system for automatically evaluating attention in the classroom. We demonstrate our current behaviour metrics and preliminary observations on how they reflect the reactions of people to the given lecture. We also introduce foundations of our hypothesis on peripheral awareness of students during lectures.

  18. Leadership for Differentiating Schools & Classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Carol Ann; Allan, Susan Demirsky

    Differentiation is simply a teacher attending to the learning needs of a particular student or small group of students, rather than teaching a class as though all individuals in it were basically alike. This book explores in 10 chapters how school leaders can develop responsive, personalized, and differentiated classrooms: (1) "Understanding…

  19. Pupil Behavior in Junior Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boydell, D.

    1975-01-01

    The purpose of the exploratory study reported here was to investigate the nature of children's behavior in unstreamed, informal, junior classrooms where the children sit in small groups and the incidence of private teacher talk to small groups and individual children is high. (Author)

  20. Learning Science beyond the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramey-Gassert, Linda

    1997-01-01

    Examines a cross-section of craft knowledge and research-based literature of science learning beyond the classroom. Describes informal science education programs, and discusses implications for science teaching, focusing on the importance of informal science learning for children and in-service and preservice teachers. Proposes a model for…

  1. English Teachers Classroom Assessment Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saefurrohman; Balinas, Elvira S.

    2016-01-01

    The new language assessment policies in the Philippines and in Indonesia have impact on English teachers' assessment practices. Classroom assessment; as mandated in the current curriculum of both countries swifts from sources of information to the inseparable process of teaching and learning. This study describes Filipino and Indonesian high…

  2. Educational Theory and Classroom Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Ronald G.; Smith, William S.

    1979-01-01

    Described are two instruments used in a workshop designed to help teachers clarify their own beliefs about education and to shape their classroom behavior accordingly. The Student-Content Inventory concerns styles of student-teacher interaction and the Educational Theory Inventory correlates the respondent's beliefs to major educational theories.…

  3. Using Technology in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boles, Stephanie Reeve

    2011-01-01

    The author describes how she has come to use technology in her classroom over the years. Her main topics include using the internet, experiencing podcasts, using technology for assessment, and recording results from science research. (Contains 3 online resources and 5 figures.)

  4. Enhancing Classroom Creativity. Premier PD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, Elizabeth; Ernst, Jeremy; Clark, Aaron; DeLuca, V. William; Kelly, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    Educators often hear about the need for students to be more creative, more free-thinking, and more exploratory throughout projects and class assignments. This article will highlight the importance of creating and implementing an open-classroom environment where students are confident in their ability to ask questions and capable of exploring a…

  5. Individualizing in Traditional Classroom Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornell, John G.

    1980-01-01

    Effective individualized instruction depends primarily on the teacher possessing the skills to implement it. Individualization is therefore quite compatible with the traditional self-contained elementary classroom model, but not with its alternative, departmentalization, which allows teachers neither the time flexibility nor the familiarity with…

  6. Relationships in the Flipped Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCollum, Brett M.; Fleming, Cassidy L.; Plotnikoff, Kara M.; Skagen, Darlene N.

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the effectiveness of flipped classrooms in chemistry, and identifies relationships as a major factor impacting the success of flipped instruction methods. Examination of student interview data reveals factors that affect the development of peer-peer, peer-peer leader, and peer-expert relationships in firstyear general chemistry…

  7. Price Discrimination: A Classroom Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiló, Paula; Sard, Maria; Tugores, Maria

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe a classroom experiment aimed at familiarizing students with different types of price discrimination (first-, second-, and third-degree price discrimination). During the experiment, the students were asked to decide what tariffs to set as monopolists for each of the price discrimination scenarios under…

  8. Language Alternation in University Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, T. A.

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the alternate use of Arabic and English in the context of a university classroom, where a policy to use the former language in place of the latter was being implemented. Analysis of a sample of recorded university lectures of English and Arabic medium classes in sciences and humanities reveals that teachers use code switching,…

  9. Wondering Discourse in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Jane Susan

    A study examined classroom discourse in three literature class discussions among 15 high school juniors and their teacher as they tried to make sense of "Hamlet" and "Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead." Participants' moves (what the students and teacher were trying to do with their language during the discussion);…

  10. Multitasking in the University Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burak, Lydia

    2012-01-01

    Although research evidence indicates that multitasking results in poorer learning and poorer performance, many students engage with text messaging, Facebook, internet searching, emailing, and instant messaging, while sitting in university classrooms. Research also suggests that multitasking may be related to risk behaviors. This study's purpose…

  11. Co-ordinated Classroom Lectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, Darell Boyd

    From a series of lectures, a selection of eight are oriented principally toward the biologically developing child, and the physiological operations in visual process. The numbered lectures are--(1) The Coordinated Classroom, its Philosophy and Principles, (2) An Outline of a Biological Point of View, (3) The Evolution of Structure--despite man's…

  12. Using QR Codes in Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetner, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    For years, many schools and districts have had strict policies banning the use of students' personal electronic devices in classrooms. However, some schools are beginning to embrace the educational value of handheld Web-enabled devices that students already bring to school each day. As teachers begin to explore the educational opportunities that…

  13. A Classroom Experiment on Banking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassis, Mary Mathewes; Hazlett, Denise; Ygosse Battisti, Jolanda E.

    2012-01-01

    This classroom experiment uses double oral auction credit markets to illustrate the role of banks as financial intermediaries. The experiment demonstrates how risk affects market interest rates in the presence of asymmetric information. It provides fodder for a discussion of the moral-hazard problem of deposit insurance and its impact on depositor…

  14. Assigning Effective Homework. Classroom Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Federation of Teachers (NJ), 2010

    2010-01-01

    Each new school year brings high hopes, great expectations and challenges for both new and seasoned educators. The American Federation of Teachers (AFT) has developed a series called "Classroom Tips" to help educators start the year right and anticipate the year ahead. Over the past 40 years, most research studies on homework have found that…

  15. Statics learning from engineering examples

    CERN Document Server

    Emri, Igor

    2016-01-01

    This textbook introduces and explains the basic concepts on which statics is based utilizing real engineering examples. The authors emphasize the learning process by showing a real problem, analyzing it, simplifying it, and developing a way to solve it. This feature teaches students intuitive thinking in solving real engineering problems using the fundamentals of Newton’s laws. This book also: · Stresses representation of physical reality in ways that allow students to solve problems and obtain meaningful results · Emphasizes identification of important features of the structure that should be included in a model and which features may be omitted · Facilitates students' understanding and mastery of the "flow of thinking" practiced by professional engineers.

  16. Globalization and Classroom Practice: Insights on Learning about the World in Swedish and Australian Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Reynolds

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Globalization and global education implies changes to practices at the classroom level to adapt to new imperatives associated with technology use and awareness, and environmental sustainability. It also implies much more. It implies that teachers apply their classroom pedagogy to take account of students’ new found global understandings of which they, and the school community, is largely unaware. This article addresses and discuses three key consequences of globalization for classrooms worldwide; an increased diversity of experience of the students within the classroom, an increased competitiveness of educational outcomes between national states and subsequently some standardisation of curriculum across nations to enable this, and an increased emphasis on teaching skills and values associated with intercultural understanding. Young children’s map knowledge and their resultant, and associated, interpretations of the world from a comparative study a from Swedish and Australian primary classrooms is used as examples of some of these implications of the impact of ‘global culture’ and ‘global issues’ on current and future classroom practice.

  17. Ethical Considerations Regarding Classroom Use of Personal Genomic Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa S. Parker

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Rapidly decreasing costs of genetic technologies—especially next-generation sequencing—and intensifying need for a clinical workforce trained in genomic medicine have increased interest in having students use personal genomic information to motivate and enhance genomics education. Numerous ethical issues attend classroom/pedagogical use of students’ personal genomic information, including their informed decision to participate, pressures to participate, privacy concerns, and psychosocial sequelae of learning genomic information. This paper addresses these issues, advocates explicit discussion of these issues to cultivate students’ ethical reasoning skills, suggests ways to mitigate potential harms, and recommends collection of ethically relevant data regarding pedagogical use of personal genomic information.

  18. Solar thermal energy as a topic in secondary mathematics classrooms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brinkmann, A.; Brinkmann, K. [EnviPro Environmental Process Engineering Prof. Dr. Klaus Brinkmann, Iserlohn (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    One of the most effective methods to achieve a sustainable change of our momentary existing power supply system to a system mainly based on renewable energy conversion is the education of our children. For this purpose the compulsory school subject mathematics appears to be suitable. In order to promote renewable energy issues in mathematics classrooms, the authors have developed a special didactical concept to open this field for students, as well as for their teachers. The aim of this paper is to present firstly an overview of our concept and secondly examples of problems to the special topic of solar thermal energy, developed on the basis of our concept. (orig.)

  19. Games in the classroom: the market of lemons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Alejandro Palacio García

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Classroom games are a pedagogical tool for the appropriation of concepts and enrich traditional microeconomic classes with the methodology of experimental economics. This article presents an example of participatory research that seeks to collaboratively change the learning process. We propose the lemons-market game: an experimental protocol, programed for laboratory sessions, that motivates students to debate about adverse selection due to information asymmetries, that is, about the extent to which good-quality goods are expelled from the market by inferior-quality goods (lemons.

  20. Alfanet Worked Example: What is Greatness?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    dr. Pierre Gorissen

    2004-01-01

    This document consists of an example of a Learning Design based on the What is Greatness example originally created by James Dalziel from WebMCQ using LAMS. Note: The example has been created in parallel with the actual development of the Alfanet system. So no claims can be made that the example

  1. 12 CFR 41.2 - Examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FAIR CREDIT REPORTING General Provisions § 41.2 Examples. The examples in this part are not exclusive. Compliance with an example, to the extent applicable, constitutes compliance with this part. Examples in a paragraph illustrate only the issue described in the...

  2. 16 CFR 680.2 - Examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Examples. 680.2 Section 680.2 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION THE FAIR CREDIT REPORTING ACT AFFILIATE MARKETING § 680.2 Examples. The examples in this part are not exclusive. Compliance with an example, to the extent applicable, constitutes...

  3. 42 CFR 408.26 - Examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Examples. 408.26 Section 408.26 Public Health... PREMIUMS FOR SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE Amount of Monthly Premiums § 408.26 Examples. Example 1. Mr. J... 10 percent greater than if he had enrolled in his initial enrollment period. Example 2. Mr. V, who...

  4. 17 CFR 248.102 - Examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Examples. 248.102 Section 248... AND S-AM Regulation S-AM: Limitations on Affiliate Marketing § 248.102 Examples. The examples in this subpart are not exclusive. The examples in this subpart provide guidance concerning the rules' application...

  5. 29 CFR 4022.95 - Examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Examples. 4022.95 Section 4022.95 Labor Regulations... IN TERMINATED SINGLE-EMPLOYER PLANS Certain Payments Owed Upon Death § 4022.95 Examples. The following examples show how the rules in §§ 4022.91 through 4022.94 apply. For examples on how these rules...

  6. 29 CFR 4022.104 - Examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Examples. 4022.104 Section 4022.104 Labor Regulations... Future Periods After Death § 4022.104 Examples. The following examples show how the rules in §§ 4022.101.... (1) Example 1: where surviving beneficiary predeceases participant. Ellen died before Charlie. As...

  7. Mathematica with a Numerical Methods Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varley, Rodney

    2003-04-01

    An interdisciplinary "Numerical Methods" course has been shared between physics, mathematics and computer science since 1992 at Hunter C. Recently, the lectures and workshops for this course have become formalized and placed on the internet at http://www.ph.hunter.cuny.edu (follow the links "Course Listings and Websites" >> "PHYS385 (Numerical Methods)". Mathematica notebooks for the lectures are available for automatic download (by "double clicking" the lecture icon) for student use in the classroom or at home. AOL (or Netscape/Explorer) can be used provided Mathematica (or the "free" MathReader) has been made a "helper application". Using Mathematica has the virtue that mathematical equations (no LaTex required) can easily be included with the text and Mathematica's graphing is easy to use. Computational cells can be included within the notebook and students may easily modify the calculation to see the result of "what if..." questions. Homework is sent as Mathematica notebooks to the instructor via the internet and the corrected workshops are returned in the same manner. Most exam questions require computational solutions.

  8. Numerical simulation in astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyama, Shoken

    1985-01-01

    There have been many numerical simulations of hydrodynamical problems in astrophysics, e.g. processes of star formation, supernova explosion and formation of neutron stars, and general relativistic collapse of star to form black hole. The codes are made to be suitable for computing such problems. In astrophysical hydrodynamical problems, there are the characteristics: problems of self-gravity or external gravity acting, objects of scales very large or very short, objects changing by short period or long time scale, problems of magnetic force and/or centrifugal force acting. In this paper, we present one of methods of numerical simulations which may satisfy these requirements, so-called smoothed particle methods. We then introduce the methods briefly. Then, we show one of the applications of the methods to astrophysical problem (fragmentation and collapse of rotating isothermal cloud). (Mori, K.)

  9. Numerical solution of ordinary differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Fox, L

    1987-01-01

    Nearly 20 years ago we produced a treatise (of about the same length as this book) entitled Computing methods for scientists and engineers. It was stated that most computation is performed by workers whose mathematical training stopped somewhere short of the 'professional' level, and that some books are therefore needed which use quite simple mathematics but which nevertheless communicate the essence of the 'numerical sense' which is exhibited by the real computing experts and which is surely needed, at least to some extent, by all who use modern computers and modern numerical software. In that book we treated, at no great length, a variety of computational problems in which the material on ordinary differential equations occupied about 50 pages. At that time it was quite common to find books on numerical analysis, with a little on each topic ofthat field, whereas today we are more likely to see similarly-sized books on each major topic: for example on numerical linear algebra, numerical approximation, numeri...

  10. Numerical Characterization of Piezoceramics Using Resonance Curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Nicolás; Buiochi, Flávio; Brizzotti Andrade, Marco Aurélio; Adamowski, Julio Cezar

    2016-01-01

    Piezoelectric materials characterization is a challenging problem involving physical concepts, electrical and mechanical measurements and numerical optimization techniques. Piezoelectric ceramics such as Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) belong to the 6 mm symmetry class, which requires five elastic, three piezoelectric and two dielectric constants to fully represent the material properties. If losses are considered, the material properties can be represented by complex numbers. In this case, 20 independent material constants are required to obtain the full model. Several numerical methods have been used to adjust the theoretical models to the experimental results. The continuous improvement of the computer processing ability has allowed the use of a specific numerical method, the Finite Element Method (FEM), to iteratively solve the problem of finding the piezoelectric constants. This review presents the recent advances in the numerical characterization of 6 mm piezoelectric materials from experimental electrical impedance curves. The basic strategy consists in measuring the electrical impedance curve of a piezoelectric disk, and then combining the Finite Element Method with an iterative algorithm to find a set of material properties that minimizes the difference between the numerical impedance curve and the experimental one. Different methods to validate the results are also discussed. Examples of characterization of some common piezoelectric ceramics are presented to show the practical application of the described methods. PMID:28787875

  11. Numerical Characterization of Piezoceramics Using Resonance Curves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolás Pérez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Piezoelectric materials characterization is a challenging problem involving physical concepts, electrical and mechanical measurements and numerical optimization techniques. Piezoelectric ceramics such as Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT belong to the 6 mm symmetry class, which requires five elastic, three piezoelectric and two dielectric constants to fully represent the material properties. If losses are considered, the material properties can be represented by complex numbers. In this case, 20 independent material constants are required to obtain the full model. Several numerical methods have been used to adjust the theoretical models to the experimental results. The continuous improvement of the computer processing ability has allowed the use of a specific numerical method, the Finite Element Method (FEM, to iteratively solve the problem of finding the piezoelectric constants. This review presents the recent advances in the numerical characterization of 6 mm piezoelectric materials from experimental electrical impedance curves. The basic strategy consists in measuring the electrical impedance curve of a piezoelectric disk, and then combining the Finite Element Method with an iterative algorithm to find a set of material properties that minimizes the difference between the numerical impedance curve and the experimental one. Different methods to validate the results are also discussed. Examples of characterization of some common piezoelectric ceramics are presented to show the practical application of the described methods.

  12. Hybrid undulator numerical optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hairetdinov, A.H. [Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Zukov, A.A. [Solid State Physics Institute, Chernogolovka (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    3D properties of the hybrid undulator scheme arc studied numerically using PANDIRA code. It is shown that there exist two well defined sets of undulator parameters which provide either maximum on-axis field amplitude or minimal higher harmonics amplitude of the basic undulator field. Thus the alternative between higher field amplitude or pure sinusoidal field exists. The behavior of the undulator field amplitude and harmonics structure for a large set of (undulator gap)/(undulator wavelength) values is demonstrated.

  13. Comments on numerical simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, T.

    1984-01-01

    The author comments on a couple of things about numerical simulation. One is just about the philosophical discussion that is, spontaneous or driven. The other thing is the numerical or technical one. Frankly, the author didn't want to touch on the technical matter because this should be a common sense one for those who are working at numerical simulation. But since many people take numerical simulation results at their face value, he would like to remind you of the reality hidden behind them. First, he would point out that the meaning of ''driven'' in driven reconnection is different from that defined by Schindler or Akasofu. The author's definition is closer to Axford's definition. In the spontaneous case, for some unpredicted reason an excess energy of the system is suddenly released at a certain point. However, one does not answer how such an unstable state far beyond a stable limit is realized in the magnetotail. In the driven case, there is a definite energy buildup phase starting from a stable state; namely, energy in the black box increases from a stable level subject to an external source. When the state has reached a certain position, the energy is released suddenly. The difference between driven and spontaneous is whether the cause (plasma flow) to trigger reconnection is specified or reconnection is triggered unpredictably. Another difference is that in driven reconnection the reconnection rate is dependent on the speed of the external plasma flow, but in spontaneous reconnection the rate is dependent on the internal condition such as the resistivity

  14. Numerical simulation of plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dnestrovskii, Y.N.; Kostomarov, D.P.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains a modern consistent and systematic presentation of numerical computer simulation of plasmas in controlled thermonuclear fusion. The authors focus on the Soviet research in mathematical modelling of Tokamak plasmas, and present kinetic hydrodynamic and transport models with special emphasis on the more recent hybrid models. Compared with the first edition (in Russian) this book has been greatly revised and updated. (orig./WL)

  15. Numerical analysis II essentials

    CERN Document Server

    REA, The Editors of; Staff of Research Education Association

    1989-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Numerical Analysis II covers simultaneous linear systems and matrix methods, differential equations, Fourier transformations, partial differential equations, and Monte Carlo methods.

  16. Handbook of numerical analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Ciarlet, Philippe G

    Mathematical finance is a prolific scientific domain in which there exists a particular characteristic of developing both advanced theories and practical techniques simultaneously. Mathematical Modelling and Numerical Methods in Finance addresses the three most important aspects in the field: mathematical models, computational methods, and applications, and provides a solid overview of major new ideas and results in the three domains. Coverage of all aspects of quantitative finance including models, computational methods and applications Provides an overview of new ideas an

  17. Evaluating OO example programs for CS1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Börstler, Jürgen; Christensen, Henrik Bærbak; Bennedsen, Jens

    2008-01-01

    Example programs play an important role in learning to program. They work as templates, guidelines, and inspiration for learners when developing their own programs. It is therefore important to provide learners with high quality examples. In this paper, we discuss properties of example programs...... that might affect the teaching and learning of object-oriented programming. Furthermore, we present an evaluation instrument for example programs and report on initial experiences of its application to a selection of examples from popular introductory programming textbooks....

  18. PUMAS: The On-line journal of Math and Science Examples for Pre-College Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trainer, Melissa G.; Kahn, Ralph A.

    2015-11-01

    PUMAS - “Practical Uses of Math And Science” - is an on-line collection of brief examples showing how math and science topics taught in K-12 classes can be used in interesting settings, including every day life. The examples are written primarily by scientists, engineers, and other content experts having practical experience with the material. They are aimed mainly at classroom teachers to enrich their presentation of math and science topics. The goal of PUMAS is to capture, for the benefit of pre-college education, the flavor of the vast experience that working scientists have with interesting and practical uses of math and science. There are currently over 80 examples in the PUMAS collection, and they are organized by curriculum topics and tagged with relevant grade levels and curriculum topic benchmarks. The published examples cover a wide range of subject matter: from demonstrating why summer is hot, to describing the fluid dynamics of a lava lamp, to calculating the best age to collect Social Security Benefits. The examples are available to all interested parties via the PUMAS web site: http://pumas.nasa.gov/.We invite the community to participate in the PUMAS collection. We seek scientists and scientific thinkers to provide innovative examples of practical uses for teachers to use to enrich the classroom experience, and content experts to participate in peer-review. We also seek teachers to review examples for originality, accuracy of content, clarity of presentation, and grade-level appropriateness. Finally, we encourage teachers to mine this rich repository for real-world examples to demonstrate the value of math in science in everyday life.

  19. The Subsystem of Numerals in Catalan Sign Language: Description and Examples from a Psycholinguistic Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Mariana; Tolchinsky, Liliana

    2004-01-01

    Linguistic descriptions of sign languages are important to the recognition of their linguistic status. These languages are an essential part of the cultural heritage of the communities that create and use them and vital in the education of deaf children. They are also the reference point in language acquisition studies. Ours is exploratory…

  20. Unified algorithm for partial differential equations and examples of numerical computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Tsuguhiro

    1999-01-01

    A new unified algorithm is proposed to solve partial differential equations which describe nonlinear boundary value problems, eigenvalue problems and time developing boundary value problems. The algorithm is composed of implicit difference scheme and multiple shooting scheme and is named as HIDM (Higher order Implicit Difference Method). A new prototype computer programs for 2-dimensional partial differential equations is constructed and tested successfully to several problems. Extension of the computer programs to 3 or more higher order dimension problems will be easy due to the direct product type difference scheme. (author)

  1. On some examples of pollutant transport problems solved numerically using the boundary element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azis, Moh. Ivan; Kasbawati; Haddade, Amiruddin; Astuti Thamrin, Sri

    2018-03-01

    A boundary element method (BEM) is obtained for solving a boundary value problem of homogeneous anisotropic media governed by diffusion-convection equation. The application of the BEM is shown for two particular pollutant transport problems of Tello river and Unhas lake in Makassar Indonesia. For the two particular problems a variety of the coefficients of diffusion and the velocity components are taken. The results show that the solutions vary as the parameters change. And this suggests that one has to be careful in measuring or determining the values of the parameters.

  2. Costs of travel time uncertainty and benefits of travel time information: Conceptual model and numerical examples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ettema, D.F.; Timmermans, H.J.P.

    2006-01-01

    A negative effect of congestion that tends to be overlooked is travel time uncertainty. Travel time uncertainty causes scheduling costs due to early or late arrival. The negative effects of travel time uncertainty can be reduced by providing travellers with travel time information, which improves

  3. Subsolutions of an Isaacs Equation and Efficient Schemes for Importance Sampling: Examples and Numerics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dupuis, Paul; Wang, Hui

    2005-01-01

    It has been established that importance sampling algorithms for estimating rare-event probabilities are intimately connected with two-person zero-sum differential games and the associated Isaacs equation...

  4. On the Problem of Constructing Routes, Part II: Methodology and Numerical Example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linis V. K.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We consider a periodic aviation schedule which is a finite collection of flights with given arrival/departure times. For this schedule, we solve the problem of finding the minimal number of aircrafts needed to carry out the flights. The crucial role in solving this problem is played by so-called deficit function (DFs defined as the difference between departures and arrivals on interval [0,t] for each terminal.

  5. International classroom teachers in need of professional development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Karen M.

    International classroom teachers in need of professional development: Outcomes of the IntlUni Erasmus Academic Network project 2012-15 The IntlUni Erasmus Academic Network (2012-15) has addressed the opportunities and the challenges of the multicultural (international) classroom where higher educ...... and challenges in the multilingual and multicultural learning space. Final document of the IntlUni Erasmus Academic Network project 2012-15. Aarhus: IntlUni. http://intluni.eu/uploads/media/The_opportunities_and_challenges_of_the_MMLS_Final_report_sept_2015.pdf...... and reflect on their teaching processes and negotiate the learning processes with their students as well as manage and leverage diversity in the classroom. Therefore, one of the IntlUni Recommendations is for the higher education institutions to provide the necessary professional development and teacher...... sources (e.g. Gregersen-Hermans, 2016), all pointing towards the need for more professional development and training of higher education teachers teaching multicultural student cohorts. Based on these very recent sources, the paper will discuss and offer examples of how such activities may be organized...

  6. Cosmic Times: Astronomy History and Science for the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lochner, James C.; Mattson, B.

    2008-05-01

    Cosmic Times is a series of curriculum support materials and classroom activities for upper middle school and high school students which teach the nature of science by exploring the history of our understanding of the universe during the past 100 years. Starting with the confirmation of Einstein's theory of gravity in 1919 to the current conundrum posed by the discovery of dark energy, Cosmic Times examines the discoveries, the theories, and the people involved in this changing [understanding] of the universe. Cosmic Times takes the form of 6 posters, each resembling the front page of a newspaper from a particular time in this history with articles describing the discoveries. Each poster is accompanied by 4-5 classroom lessons which enable students to examine the science concepts behind the discoveries, develop techniques to improve science literacy, and investigate the nature of science using historical examples. Cosmic Times directly connects with the IYA theme of Astronomy in the Classroom, as well as the general theme of the impact of astronomy history. Cosmic Times has been developed with a freelance writer to write the articles for the posters, a group of teachers to develop the lessons, and evaluator to provide testing of the materials with a group of rural teachers in underserved communities. This poster presentation previews the Cosmic Times materials, which are posted on http://cosmictimes.gsfc.nasa.gov/ as they become available. Cosmic Times is funded in part via a NASA IDEAS grant.

  7. The "Finding Physics" Project: Recognizing and Exploring Physics Outside the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Judith; Perkins, James

    2016-11-01

    Students in introductory physics classes often have difficulty recognizing the relevance of physics concepts outside the confines of the physics classroom, lab, and textbook. Even though textbooks and instructors often provide examples of physics applications from a wide array of areas, students have difficulty relating physics to their own lives. Encouraging students to apply physics to their own surroundings helps them develop the critical analysis skills of a scientifically literate and competent citizen. Fink, in his book Creating Significant Learning Experiences, emphasizes the importance of constructing opportunities to help students connect what they learn in their academic courses with past and current life experiences and link them to possible future life experiences. Several excellent papers in this journal have presented labs and activities that address this concern by encouraging teachers to bring real-world examples into the classroom or to take students into the field for data collection and observation. Alternatively, Smith suggests a writing exercise in which his students identify and explain an event in terms of their understanding of physics. In this paper we present a multiphase exercise that challenges students to find their own examples of physics from outside the classroom and analyze them using the conceptual understanding and quantitative skills which they are developing in the classroom. The ultimate goal of the "Finding Physics" project is to improve students' learning through enhancing their recognition that, to quote one participant's end-of-course survey, "Physics is everywhere!"

  8. The global classroom model simultaneous campus- and home-based education using videoconferencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weitze, Charlotte Lærke; Ørngreen, Rikke

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents and discusses findings about how students, teachers, and the organization experience a start-up-project applying videoconferences between campus and home. This is new territory for adult learning centers. The research is based on the Global Classroom Model as it is implemented...... experiences and on the organizational issues related to the transition to the Global Classroom Model as well as provide outlines to the consequences these findings may have, for example in relation to the continued development of the teachers' educational designs....

  9. Numerical Modeling of Ocean Circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Robert N.

    2007-01-01

    The modelling of ocean circulation is important not only for its own sake, but also in terms of the prediction of weather patterns and the effects of climate change. This book introduces the basic computational techniques necessary for all models of the ocean and atmosphere, and the conditions they must satisfy. It describes the workings of ocean models, the problems that must be solved in their construction, and how to evaluate computational results. Major emphasis is placed on examining ocean models critically, and determining what they do well and what they do poorly. Numerical analysis is introduced as needed, and exercises are included to illustrate major points. Developed from notes for a course taught in physical oceanography at the College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences at Oregon State University, this book is ideal for graduate students of oceanography, geophysics, climatology and atmospheric science, and researchers in oceanography and atmospheric science. Features examples and critical examination of ocean modelling and results Demonstrates the strengths and weaknesses of different approaches Includes exercises to illustrate major points and supplement mathematical and physical details

  10. Benjamin's Angel of History and the Work of Mourning in Ethical Remembrance: Understanding the Effect of W.G. Sebald's Novels in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joldersma, Clarence W.

    2014-01-01

    The paper develops a conceptual framework for understanding the work of ethical remembrance in the classroom. Using David Hansen's recent example of using Sebald's novels in his classroom to do the work or remembrance, the paper argues that the effect of Sebald's novels is best understood using Walter Benjamin's figure of the…

  11. Flipped classroom: a review of recent literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huseyin Uzunboylu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The use of learning technologies, especially multimedia provide varied facilities for students’ learning that are not possible with other media. Pedagogical literature has proved that individuals have different learning styles. Flipped classroom is a pedagogical approach which means that activities that have traditionally taken place inside the classroom take place outside the classroom and vice versa. Flipped classroom environment ensures that students become more active participants compared with the traditional classroom. The purpose of this paper is to fulfil the needs regarding the review of recent literature on the use of flipped classroom approach in education. The contribution of flipped classroom to education is discussed in relation to the change of students' and instructors' role. Subsequently, flipped classroom applications in various disciplines of education are illustrated. The recommendations made in the literature for design specifications that integrate flipped classrooms with technology are discussed. The paper concludes that a careful consideration of the warnings and recommendations made in the literature can help to produce effective flipped classroom environments and also this paper attempts to inform those who are thinking of using new technologies and approaches to deliver courses.

  12. Bringing Classroom-Based Assessment into the EFL classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Finch

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available   This paper describes how English as a Foreign Language (EFL teachers can bring reliable, valid, user-friendly assessment into their classrooms, and thus improve the quality of learning that occurs there. Based on the experience of the author as a an EFL teacher and teacher-trainer, it is suggested that the promotion and development of autonomy, intrinsic motivation, and self-esteem that takes place in a Classroom-Based Assessment (CBA environment facilitates an holistic approach to language learning and prepares the students for the high-stakes tests that often determine their motivation for learning English. Rather than relying on the memorization of language code, form, lexis, and prepared answers, students who have learned in a CBA environment are able to self-assess, peer-assess, build portfolios, and edit their own work. Not only does this reduce the assessment burden on the teacher, but it also develops the skills of problem-solving, critical thinking, and summarization in the students, in addition to a heightened awareness of the language-learning process. By learning how to set goals, assess their achievements, and reflect on their future learning needs, students become more efficient language learners. While acknowledging the place of standardized, summative tests in contemporary society, it is suggested that CBA in the EFL classroom can enhance long-term learning and consequently enable and empower students to prepare for their future learning needs.

  13. Profiles of classroom behavior in high schools: associations with teacher behavior management strategies and classroom composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pas, Elise T; Cash, Anne H; O'Brennan, Lindsey; Debnam, Katrina J; Bradshaw, Catherine P

    2015-04-01

    Although there has been considerable attention to the issue of classroom management and processes in educational reform models, there has been relatively limited research on these factors in high schools. The current study utilized observational data from 1262 classrooms in 52 high schools to examine teacher classroom management strategies and ratings of student compliance, engagement, and social disruption. Latent profile analysis (LPA) was conducted to examine specific patterns of classroom-wide student behavior in relation to teachers' use of classroom management strategies and classroom composition. The LPA revealed three distinct classroom behavioral profiles where students consistently met behavioral expectations (71%), inconsistently met expectations (23%), and were noncompliant (6%). Analyses indicated a functional association between patterns of student behavior and teachers' classroom management. In classrooms where students consistently met expectations, teachers provided more opportunities to respond and less disapproval and reactive behavioral management. Classrooms with noncompliant students had teachers who used the most disapproval and reactive behavior management. In addition, classrooms characterized as consistent had fewer males and more White students than classrooms characterized by inconsistent and noncompliant behaviors. These findings highlight the link between student patterns of behavior and teacher classroom management and have important implications for screening and professional development. Copyright © 2014 Society for the Study of School Psychology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Elimination of numerical diffusion in 1 - phase and 2 - phase flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajamaeki, M. [VTT Energy (Finland)

    1997-07-01

    The new hydraulics solution method PLIM (Piecewise Linear Interpolation Method) is capable of avoiding the excessive errors, numerical diffusion and also numerical dispersion. The hydraulics solver CFDPLIM uses PLIM and solves the time-dependent one-dimensional flow equations in network geometry. An example is given for 1-phase flow in the case when thermal-hydraulics and reactor kinetics are strongly coupled. Another example concerns oscillations in 2-phase flow. Both the example computations are not possible with conventional methods.

  15. Elimination of numerical diffusion in 1 - phase and 2 - phase flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajamaeki, M.

    1997-01-01

    The new hydraulics solution method PLIM (Piecewise Linear Interpolation Method) is capable of avoiding the excessive errors, numerical diffusion and also numerical dispersion. The hydraulics solver CFDPLIM uses PLIM and solves the time-dependent one-dimensional flow equations in network geometry. An example is given for 1-phase flow in the case when thermal-hydraulics and reactor kinetics are strongly coupled. Another example concerns oscillations in 2-phase flow. Both the example computations are not possible with conventional methods

  16. Numerical solution of the polymer system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haugse, V.; Karlsen, K.H.; Lie, K.-A.; Natvig, J.R.

    1999-05-01

    The paper describes the application of front tracking to the polymer system, an example of a nonstrictly hyperbolic system. Front tracking computes piecewise constant approximations based on approximate Remain solutions and exact tracking of waves. It is well known that the front tracking method may introduce a blow-up of the initial total variation for initial data along the curve where the two eigenvalues of the hyperbolic system are identical. It is demonstrated by numerical examples that the method converges to the correct solution after a finite time that decreases with the discretization parameter. For multidimensional problems, front tracking is combined with dimensional splitting and numerical experiments indicate that large splitting steps can be used without loss of accuracy. Typical CFL numbers are in the range of 10 to 20 and comparisons with the Riemann free, high-resolution method confirm the high efficiency of front tracking. The polymer system, coupled with an elliptic pressure equation, models two-phase, tree-component polymer flooding in an oil reservoir. Two examples are presented where this model is solved by a sequential time stepping procedure. Because of the approximate Riemann solver, the method is non-conservative and CFL members must be chosen only moderately larger than unity to avoid substantial material balance errors generated in near-well regions after water breakthrough. Moreover, it is demonstrated that dimensional splitting may introduce severe grid orientation effects for unstable displacements that are accentuated for decreasing discretization parameters. 9 figs., 2 tabs., 26 refs.

  17. Examples and applications in long-range ocean acoustics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vera, M D

    2007-01-01

    Acoustic energy propagates effectively to long ranges in the ocean interior because of the physical properties of the marine environment. Sound propagation in the ocean is relevant to a variety of studies in communication, climatology and marine biology. Examples drawn from ocean acoustics, therefore, are compelling to students with a variety of interests. The dependence of sound speed on depth results in a waveguide that permits the detection of acoustic energy at ranges, in some experiments, of thousands of kilometres. This effect serves as an illustration of Snell's law with a continuously variable index of refraction. Acoustic tomography also offers a means for imaging the ocean's thermal structure, because of the dependence of sound speed on temperature. The ability to perform acoustic thermometry for large transects of the ocean provides an effective means of studying climate change. This application in an area of substantial popular attention allows for an effective introduction to concepts in ray propagation. Aspects of computational ocean acoustics can be productive classroom examples in courses ranging from introductory physics to upper-division mathematical methods courses

  18. Examples of Pre-College Programs that Teach Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passow, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Programs to help pre-college students understand the importance of Sustainability can be found around the world. A key feature for many is the collaboration among educators, researchers, and business. Two examples will be described to indicate what is being done and goals for the future. "Educação para a Sustentabilidade" ("Education for Sustainability", http://sustentabilidade.colband.net.br/) developed at the Colegio Bandeirantes in Sao Paulo, Brazil, is a popular extracurricular offering at one of Brazil's top schools that empowers students to investigate major issues facing their country and the world. They recognized that merely knowing is insufficient, so they have created several efforts towards an "environmentally friendly, socially just, and economically viable" world. The Education Project for Sustainability Science interacts with students in various grade levels within the school, participates in sustainability initiatives in other parts of the nation, and communicates electronically with like-minded programs in other countries. A second example will spotlight the CHANGE Viewer (Climate and Health Analysis for Global Education Viewer, http://climatechangehumanhealth.org/), a visualization tool that uses NASA World Wind to explore climate science through socio-economic datasets. Collaboration among scientists, programmers, and classroom educators created a suite of activities available to teach about Food Security, Water Resources, Rising Sea Level, and other themes.

  19. Using Real-Time Oceanic and Atmospheric Data in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culbertson, Britta

    2014-05-01

    While serving as an Einstein Fellow at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), I conducted a research project based on the question, "How can science teachers use real-time oceanic and atmospheric data in their classrooms?" In the United States, new national science standards called the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) have been created. These standards provide more emphasis on the analysis of data and on modeling than previous state or national standards. Teachers are more tech-savvy than ever before and the internet provides free access to numerous scientific datasets. These data are useful when teachers have limited time and/or equipment to have students conduct their own experiments. However, the time it takes for practicing educators, even those with a scientific background, to understand how to access these data and use them in a meaningful way is a huge barrier. I wanted to find a way for teachers to make use of this readily available information and to create an online community where educators share best practices and lesson examples. I began by researching all of the websites hosted by NOAA that provide free, online access to real-time scientific data. I sorted the sites into categories based on their ease of usability for the non-scientist (e.g. teachers and their students). I gave several presentations on the use of real-time data in the classroom to teachers at National Science Teachers Association conferences and gathered teacher feedback on the successes and struggles of using data in the classroom. I began researching best practices for data use with the ultimate goal of creating a framework for matching available datasets from NOAA to the Next Generation Science Standards. After working on a NOAA research vessel, I developed a lesson using online data from the Alaska Fisheries Science Center Groundfish Survey. The overarching questions for this lesson are "How can pre-existing, large datasets help science students to

  20. Proof in Algebra: Reasoning beyond Examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otten, Samuel; Herbel-Eisenmann, Beth A.; Males, Lorraine M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an image of what proof could look like in beginning algebra, a course that nearly every secondary school student encounters. The authors present an actual classroom vignette in which a rich opportunity for student reasoning arose. After analyzing the proof schemes at play, the authors provide a…

  1. Natural releases from contaminated groundwater, Example Reference Biosphere 2B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, I. [CIEMAT/PIRA, Avda Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: isc@csn.es; Naito, M. [Nuclear Waste Management Organization of Japan (NUMO), 4-1-23 Shiba, Minato-ku, Tokyo, 108-0014 (Japan); Thorne, M.C. [Mike Thorne and Associates Limited, Abbotsleigh, Kebroyd Mount, Ripponden, Halifax, West Yorkshire HX6 3JA (United Kingdom); Walke, R. [Enviros QuantiSci, Building D5, Culham Science Centre, Culham, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2005-07-01

    Safety assessment is a tool which, by means of an iterative procedure, allows the evaluation of the performance of a disposal system and its potential impact on human health and the environment. Radionuclides from a deep geological disposal facility may not reach the surface environment until many tens of thousands of years after closure of the facility. The BIOMASS Programme on BIOsphere Modelling and ASSessment developed Examples of 'Reference Biospheres' to illustrate the use of the methodology and to demonstrate how biosphere models can be developed and justified as being fit for purpose. The practical examples are also intended to be useful in their own right. The Example Reference Biosphere 2B presented here involves the consideration of alternative types of geosphere-biosphere interfaces and calculation of doses to members of hypothetical exposure groups arising from a wide range of exposure pathways within agricultural and semi-natural environments, but without allowing for evolution of the corresponding biosphere system. The example presented can be used as a generic analysis in some situations although it was developed around a relatively specific conceptual model. It should be a useful practical example, but the above numerical results are not intended to be understood as prescribed biosphere 'conversion factors'.

  2. Natural releases from contaminated groundwater, Example Reference Biosphere 2B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, I.; Naito, M.; Thorne, M.C.; Walke, R.

    2005-01-01

    Safety assessment is a tool which, by means of an iterative procedure, allows the evaluation of the performance of a disposal system and its potential impact on human health and the environment. Radionuclides from a deep geological disposal facility may not reach the surface environment until many tens of thousands of years after closure of the facility. The BIOMASS Programme on BIOsphere Modelling and ASSessment developed Examples of 'Reference Biospheres' to illustrate the use of the methodology and to demonstrate how biosphere models can be developed and justified as being fit for purpose. The practical examples are also intended to be useful in their own right. The Example Reference Biosphere 2B presented here involves the consideration of alternative types of geosphere-biosphere interfaces and calculation of doses to members of hypothetical exposure groups arising from a wide range of exposure pathways within agricultural and semi-natural environments, but without allowing for evolution of the corresponding biosphere system. The example presented can be used as a generic analysis in some situations although it was developed around a relatively specific conceptual model. It should be a useful practical example, but the above numerical results are not intended to be understood as prescribed biosphere 'conversion factors'

  3. Flipping my environmental geochemistry classroom using Team-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, E. M.

    2016-02-01

    Recent studies indicate that active learning disproportionately benefits STEM students from disadvantaged backgrounds and women in male-dominated fields (Lorenzo et al., 2006; Haak et al., 2011). Freeman et al. (2014) went so far as to suggest that increasing the number of STEM graduates could be done, at least in part, by "abandoning traditional lecturing in favor of active learning". Motivated in part by these previous studies and working at a Hispanic-Serving Institution, I decided to flip my environmental geochemistry course, using Team-Based Learning (TBL) - an instructional strategy for using active learning in small groups (Michaelsen et al., 1982). The course is taught over a 3 hour long class period (once a week) with a mix of upper division undergraduate and graduate students from environmental science, geology, engineering, chemistry, and biological sciences. One of the major learning outcomes of my course is that students "will be able to explain and discuss environmental geochemical data and its significance with their peers." This is practiced each class period throughout the course using TBL, where both undergraduate and graduate students learn from each other and uncover misconceptions. It is essentially one version of a flipped classroom where the students' experience changes from acquiring course content in the classroom to applying course content in the classroom in teams. I will share an overview of the teaching and learning strategy and my experience as well as examples of activities done in the classroom. Cited references: Freeman et al. (2014) PNAS 111: 8410-8415; Haak et al. (2011) Science 332: 1213-1216; Lorenzo et al. (2006) Am J Phys 74: 118-122; Michaelsen et al. (1982) Organ Behav Teaching 7: 13-22.

  4. Numerical differential protection

    CERN Document Server

    Ziegler, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    Differential protection is a fast and selective method of protection against short-circuits. It is applied in many variants for electrical machines, trans?formers, busbars, and electric lines.Initially this book covers the theory and fundamentals of analog and numerical differential protection. Current transformers are treated in detail including transient behaviour, impact on protection performance, and practical dimensioning. An extended chapter is dedicated to signal transmission for line protection, in particular, modern digital communication and GPS timing.The emphasis is then pla

  5. Classroom Research and Professional Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omaira Vergara Luján

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available This article intends to share the experience of a group of teachers in the Classroom Research Seminar of the Teacher Development Program in English carried out at Universidad del Valle, Cali, from January to June, 2007. The seminar was part of a high-level in-service program for teachers of English of a network of private educational institutions. We would like to share the highlights and difficulties of the experience. We will start with the general framework of the program and the concept of professional development that underlies it. Next we will focus on the classroom research seminar, its objectives, methodology and results. Finally we share the voices of some of the participants, who talk about the influence this seminar had on their professional development and daily work.

  6. Effects of Worked Examples, Example-Problem Pairs, and Problem-Example Pairs Compared to Problem Solving

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Gog, Tamara; Kester, Liesbeth; Paas, Fred

    2010-01-01

    Van Gog, T., Kester, L., & Paas, F. (2010, August). Effects of worked examples, example-problem pairs, and problem-example pairs compared to problem solving. Paper presented at the Biannual EARLI SIG meeting of Instructional design and Learning and instruction with computers, Ulm, Germany.

  7. Sinking, merging and stationary plumes in a coupled chemotaxis-fluid model: a high-resolution numerical approach

    KAUST Repository

    Chertock, A.; Fellner, K.; Kurganov, A.; Lorz, A.; Markowich, P. A.

    2012-01-01

    examples, which illustrate (i) the formation of sinking plumes, (ii) the possible merging of neighbouring plumes and (iii) the convergence towards numerically stable stationary plumes. The examples with stable stationary plumes show how the surface

  8. EDPS 265: The Inclusive Classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Begeske, Jasmine

    2014-01-01

    EDPS 265: The Inclusive Classroom is a foundational, large enrollment lecture course and is taught in a lecture hall with a stadium style seating arraignment. This configuration results in a course that is not student-centered, promotes one-way communication and hinders cooperative learning. Education courses should be structured so that the course in itself is instructive. This course teaches interventions for reaching all students, using techniques that engage students in the learning proce...

  9. Conversation Analysis and Classroom Interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING A-ning; LI Fan; CUI Jing

    2015-01-01

    Conversation Analysis shows the evidence of the social nature of people’s action including talk-in-interaction from a micro-level perspective. The method for basing its analysis on the authentic data rather than the retrospective interviews for gain⁃ing the participants’perception makes it unique in discovering the emic perspective of the social interaction. CA, often called as a“micro”methodology, provides theoretical insights and useful analytical tool for exploring the interaction in classrooms.

  10. Student Engagement In Inclusive Classrooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rangvid, Beatrice Schindler

    There is general agreement that to thrive and learn at their best, students must be engaged. However, schools face a particular challenge to provide a suitable and engaging learning environment for SEN (special educational needs) students who are educated in general education classes. Using data......-students as for other students. This highlights the need for better inclusion initiatives aimed at strengthening engagement of SEN-students in regular classrooms....

  11. Confidence in Numerical Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemez, Francois M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-02-23

    This PowerPoint presentation offers a high-level discussion of uncertainty, confidence and credibility in scientific Modeling and Simulation (M&S). It begins by briefly evoking M&S trends in computational physics and engineering. The first thrust of the discussion is to emphasize that the role of M&S in decision-making is either to support reasoning by similarity or to “forecast,” that is, make predictions about the future or extrapolate to settings or environments that cannot be tested experimentally. The second thrust is to explain that M&S-aided decision-making is an exercise in uncertainty management. The three broad classes of uncertainty in computational physics and engineering are variability and randomness, numerical uncertainty and model-form uncertainty. The last part of the discussion addresses how scientists “think.” This thought process parallels the scientific method where by a hypothesis is formulated, often accompanied by simplifying assumptions, then, physical experiments and numerical simulations are performed to confirm or reject the hypothesis. “Confidence” derives, not just from the levels of training and experience of analysts, but also from the rigor with which these assessments are performed, documented and peer-reviewed.

  12. Confidence in Numerical Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemez, Francois M.

    2015-01-01

    This PowerPoint presentation offers a high-level discussion of uncertainty, confidence and credibility in scientific Modeling and Simulation (M&S). It begins by briefly evoking M&S trends in computational physics and engineering. The first thrust of the discussion is to emphasize that the role of M&S in decision-making is either to support reasoning by similarity or to ''forecast,'' that is, make predictions about the future or extrapolate to settings or environments that cannot be tested experimentally. The second thrust is to explain that M&S-aided decision-making is an exercise in uncertainty management. The three broad classes of uncertainty in computational physics and engineering are variability and randomness, numerical uncertainty and model-form uncertainty. The last part of the discussion addresses how scientists ''think.'' This thought process parallels the scientific method where by a hypothesis is formulated, often accompanied by simplifying assumptions, then, physical experiments and numerical simulations are performed to confirm or reject the hypothesis. ''Confidence'' derives, not just from the levels of training and experience of analysts, but also from the rigor with which these assessments are performed, documented and peer-reviewed.

  13. Polynomial model inversion control: numerical tests and applications

    OpenAIRE

    Novara, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    A novel control design approach for general nonlinear systems is described in this paper. The approach is based on the identification of a polynomial model of the system to control and on the on-line inversion of this model. Extensive simulations are carried out to test the numerical efficiency of the approach. Numerical examples of applicative interest are presented, concerned with control of the Duffing oscillator, control of a robot manipulator and insulin regulation in a type 1 diabetic p...

  14. Assertive classroom management strategies and students’ performance: The case of EFL classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Aliakbari; Bafrin Bozorgmanesh

    2015-01-01

    Ample research findings support the effective role that classroom management strategies play in enhancing students’ learning. Drawing upon Iranian high school teachers’ classroom management strategies, this article is intended to examine the extent to which these teachers follow assertive classroom management strategies and if these strategies affect students’ performance. Conducting a survey including 123 female students, it was found out that Iranian teachers apply classroom management stra...

  15. Teachers Awareness of Students’ Anxiety in Math Classroom: Teachers’ Treatment VS Students’ Anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanda Nugroho Yanuarto

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Math anxiety is a common phenomenon which can have a negative impact on numerical and arithmetic performance. However, so far little is known about the underlying neurocognitive mechanisms. This mini review provides an overview of studies investigating the neural correlates of math anxiety which provide several hints regarding its influence on math performance: while behavioral studies mostly observe an influence of math anxiety on difficult math tasks, neurophysiological studies show that processing efficiency is already affected in basic number processing. The purpose of this study is to provide some treatments to overcome students’ anxiety in math classroom at The University of Muhammadiyah Purwokerto, Indonesia especially in Math Department, but before it has attempted to investigate the factors that students’ anxiety can possibly stem from, both within the classroom environment and out of classroom in the wilder social context.

  16. Examples of algebrae with equal dynamic entropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narnhofer, H.

    1988-01-01

    For given dynamical entropy we construct uncountably many examples of corresponding algebras, some of them are quantum K systems, whereas at least one explicit example is not. Consequences for cluster properties are studied. 12 refs. (Author)

  17. Simple Perturbation Example for Quantum Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodfriend, P. L.

    1985-01-01

    Presents a simple example that illustrates various aspects of the Rayleigh-Schrodinger perturbation theory. The example is a particularly good one because it is straightforward and can be compared with both the exact solution and with experimental data. (JN)

  18. Social engineering attack examples, templates and scenarios

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mouton, Francois

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available that are representative of real-world examples, whilst still being general enough to encompass several different real-world examples. The proposed social engineering attack templates cover all three types of communication, namely bidirectional communication...

  19. Implementing Organizational Skills in the Classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Debora, Marisi

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the writer's experience in the classroom in implementing the organizational skills. The article also discuss the reason for teaching organizational skills in the classroom, materials needed for the teaching and the implementation of the organizational skills in the classroom. The materials can be adjusted to the availability in the class and the students' own stationery. The two stages of implementation later build the students' independence which is the goal of teaching...

  20. The Learning Journal Bridge: From Classroom Concepts to Leadership Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maellaro, Rosemary

    2013-01-01

    The value of reflective writing assignments as learning tools for business students has been well-established. While the management education literature includes numerous examples of such assignments that are based on Kolb's (1984) experiential learning model, many of them engage only the first two phases of the model. When students do not move…

  1. Excellence in College Teaching and Learning: Classroom and Online Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, George; Nash, Susan Smith

    2007-01-01

    This book will improve the quality of instruction that college students need. It makes numerous suggestions that must be tended to when teachers instruct students. For example, the authors speculate about ways teachers can present what may at times seem to be a mountain of information without burying students under it; why teachers must…

  2. The effect of points and audio on concentration, engagement, enjoyment, learning, motivation, and classroom dynamics using Kahoot!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Alf Inge; Lieberoth, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    There are many examples on the use of game-based learning in and outside the classroom, along with evaluation of their effect in terms of engagement, learning, classroom dynamics, concentration, motivation and enjoyment. Most of the research in this area focuses on evaluations of the use of game...... that produce a positive effect on engagement, motivation, enjoyment, concentration, classroom dynamics and learning. In this paper, we present an experiment where we investigated how the use of points and audio affect the learning environment. Specifically, the paper presents results from an experiment where...... points and audio. The results from the experiment reveal that there are some significant differences whether audio and points are used in game-based learning in the areas of concentration, engagement, enjoyment, and motivation. The most surprising finding was how the classroom dynamics was positively...

  3. Effects of education outside the classroom on objectively measured physical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneller, Mikkel Bo

    days without EOtC and physical education (PE), but lower than on PE days. EOtC days were associated with more light physical activity (LPA) than school days without EOtC and PE, and PE days. Boys spent a higher proportion of time in MVPA and girls in LPA in the EOtC domain compared to the classroom...... the potential to transform part of children’s time from inactive to active. Curriculum-based classroom activities constitute a large proportion of school time, in which more teaching and learning activities involving PA could be implemented. Education outside the classroom (EOtC) is an example of an educational...... approach that could increase PA, as case studies have shown positive effects of EOtC on PA, academic learning motivation, well-being and social relations. National surveys in Denmark have shown substantial and increasing proportions of schools and teachers regularly practicing EOtC. When evaluating...

  4. 26 CFR 1.1368-3 - Examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Examples. 1.1368-3 Section 1.1368-3 Internal... TAXES Small Business Corporations and Their Shareholders § 1.1368-3 Examples. The principles of §§ 1.1368-1 and 1.1368-2 are illustrated by the examples below. In each example Corporation S is a calendar...

  5. 26 CFR 7.465-5 - Examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Examples. 7.465-5 Section 7.465-5 Internal... INCOME TAX REGULATIONS UNDER THE TAX REFORM ACT OF 1976 § 7.465-5 Examples. The provisions of § 7.465-1 and § 7.465-2 may be illustrated by the following examples: Example (1). J and K, as equal partners...

  6. 26 CFR 20.2013-6 - Examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Examples. 20.2013-6 Section 20.2013-6 Internal...; ESTATES OF DECEDENTS DYING AFTER AUGUST 16, 1954 Credits Against Tax § 20.2013-6 Examples. The application of §§ 20.2013-1 to 20.2013-5 may be further illustrated by the following examples: Example (1). (a) A...

  7. The plasma focus - numerical experiments leading technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saw, S.H.; Lee, S.

    2013-01-01

    Numerical experiments on the plasma focus are now used routinely to assist design and provide reference points for diagnostics. More importantly guidance has been given regarding the implementation of technology for new generations of plasma focus devices. For example intensive series of experiments have shown that it is of no use to reduce static bank inductance L0 below certain values because of the consistent loading effects of the plasma focus dynamics on the capacitor bank. Thus whilst it was thought that the PF1000 could receive major benefits by reducing its bank inductance L 0 , numerical experiments have shown to the contrary that its present L 0 of 30 nH is already optimum and that reducing L 0 would be a very expensive fruitless exercise. This knowledge gained from numerical experiments now acts as a general valuable guideline to all high performance (ie low inductance) plasma focus devices not to unnecessarily attempt to further lower the static inductance L 0 . The numerical experiments also show that the deterioration of the yield scaling law (e.g. the fusion neutron yield scaling with storage energy) is inevitable again due to the consistent loading effect of the plasma focus, which becomes more and more dominant as capacitor bank impedance reduces with increasing capacitance C 0 as storage energy is increased. This line of thinking has led to the suggestion of using higher voltages (as an alternative to increasing C 0 ) and to seeding of Deuterium with noble gases in order to enhance compression through thermodynamic mechanisms and through radiation cooling effects of strong line radiation. Circuit manipulation e.g. to enhance focus pinch compression by current-stepping is also being numerically experimented upon. Ultimately however systems have to be built, guided by numerical experiments, so that the predicted technology may be proven and realized. (author)

  8. On the numerical solution of fault trees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demichela, M.; Piccinini, N.; Ciarambino, I.; Contini, S.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper an account will be given of the numerical solution of the logic trees directly extracted from the Recursive Operability Analysis. Particular attention will be devoted to the use of the NOT and INH logic gates for correct logical representation of Fault Trees prior to their quantitative resolution. The NOT gate is needed for correct logical representation of events when both non-intervention and correct intervention of a protective system may lead to a Top Event. The INH gate must be used to correctly represent the time link between two events that are both necessary, but must occur in sequence. Some numerical examples will be employed to show both the correct identification of the events entering the INH gates and how use of the AND gate instead of the INH gate leads to overestimation of the probability of occurrence of a Top Event

  9. Elliptic differential equations theory and numerical treatment

    CERN Document Server

    Hackbusch, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    This book simultaneously presents the theory and the numerical treatment of elliptic boundary value problems, since an understanding of the theory is necessary for the numerical analysis of the discretisation. It first discusses the Laplace equation and its finite difference discretisation before addressing the general linear differential equation of second order. The variational formulation together with the necessary background from functional analysis provides the basis for the Galerkin and finite-element methods, which are explored in detail. A more advanced chapter leads the reader to the theory of regularity. Individual chapters are devoted to singularly perturbed as well as to elliptic eigenvalue problems. The book also presents the Stokes problem and its discretisation as an example of a saddle-point problem taking into account its relevance to applications in fluid dynamics.

  10. A student's guide to numerical methods

    CERN Document Server

    Hutchinson, Ian H

    2015-01-01

    This concise, plain-language guide for senior undergraduates and graduate students aims to develop intuition, practical skills and an understanding of the framework of numerical methods for the physical sciences and engineering. It provides accessible self-contained explanations of mathematical principles, avoiding intimidating formal proofs. Worked examples and targeted exercises enable the student to master the realities of using numerical techniques for common needs such as solution of ordinary and partial differential equations, fitting experimental data, and simulation using particle and Monte Carlo methods. Topics are carefully selected and structured to build understanding, and illustrate key principles such as: accuracy, stability, order of convergence, iterative refinement, and computational effort estimation. Enrichment sections and in-depth footnotes form a springboard to more advanced material and provide additional background. Whether used for self-study, or as the basis of an accelerated introdu...

  11. Classroom Behaviour and Academic Achievement: How Classroom Behaviour Categories Relate to Gender and Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, Elin

    2015-01-01

    Latent profile analysis was used to identify different categories of students having different "profiles" using self-reported classroom behaviour. Four categories of students with unique classroom behaviour profiles were identified among secondary school students in Oslo, Norway (n = 1570). Analyses examined how classroom behaviour…

  12. Validating the Early Childhood Classroom Observation Measure in First and Third Grade Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xin; Pakarinen, Eija; Lerkkanen, Marja-Kristiina; Kikas, Eve; Muotka, Joona; Nurmi, Jari-Erik

    2017-01-01

    The present study reports on the psychometric properties of the Early Childhood Classroom Observation Measure (ECCOM) in Finnish and Estonian first and third grade classrooms. The observation data were collected from 91 first grade teachers and 70 third grade teachers. Teachers' curriculum goals, teaching experience and the classroom size were…

  13. Attitudes towards Teachers' Motivation, and Classroom Strategy, in English Language Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahlavanpoorfard, Samira; Soori, Afshin

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed at investigating the attitudes of Iranian EFL students towards teachers' motivation and classroom strategy in English classroom. The subjects of the study included a sample of 235 students in their classes. The findings of this study revealed that teachers' motivation and classroom strategy used by teachers have effects on the…

  14. Attitudes towards Teachers’ Motivation, and Classroom Strategy, in English Language classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira Pahlavanpoorfard

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at investigating the attitudes of Iranian EFL students towards teachers’ motivation and classroom strategy in English classroom. The subjects of the study included a sample of 235 students in their classes. The findings of this study revealed that teachers’ motivation and classroom strategy used by teachers have effects on the students’ motivation.

  15. Shaping Learner Contributions in an EFL Classroom: Implications for L2 Classroom Interactional Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can Daskin, Nilüfer

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the interactional patterns for shaping learner contributions in an EFL classroom with reference to Walsh's classroom interactional competence (CIC). In doing so, an EFL class at an English preparatory school in a Turkish state university was both videotaped and audiotaped in the course of six classroom hours. Conversation…

  16. Measuring Engagement in Fourth to Twelfth Grade Classrooms: The Classroom Engagement Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ze; Bergin, Christi; Bergin, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Research on factors that may promote engagement is hampered by the absence of a measure of classroom-level engagement. Literature has suggested that engagement may have 3 dimensions--affective, behavioral, and cognitive. No existing engagement scales measure all 3 dimensions at the classroom level. The Classroom Engagement Inventory (CEI) was…

  17. Classroom Writing Environments and Children's Early Writing Skills: An Observational Study in Head Start Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chenyi; Hur, Jinhee; Diamond, Karen E.; Powell, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the classroom writing environment in 31 Head Start classrooms, and explored the relations between the writing environment, children's (N = 262) name-writing, and children's letter knowledge using pathway analysis. Our analyses showed that Head Start classrooms provided opportunities (i.e., writing materials and teachers'…

  18. A Case Study of Classroom Management Practices and the Influence on Classroom Disruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusk, Robert Brian

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative case study explored how the classroom management practices of sampled teachers in a private school in central Oregon influenced classroom disruptions. Through the study, the researcher was able to provide insight on the differences in specific classroom management processes between teachers who had a high number of Positive…

  19. Assertive Classroom Management Strategies and Students' Performance: The Case of EFL Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliakbari, Mohammad; Bozorgmanesh, Bafrin

    2015-01-01

    Ample research findings support the effective role that classroom management strategies play in enhancing students' learning. Drawing upon Iranian high school teachers' classroom management strategies, this article is intended to examine the extent to which these teachers follow assertive classroom management strategies and if these strategies…

  20. How to Flip the Classroom--"Productive Failure or Traditional Flipped Classroom" Pedagogical Design?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yanjie; Kapur, Manu

    2017-01-01

    The paper reports a quasi-experimental study comparing the "traditional flipped classroom" pedagogical design with the "productive failure" (Kapur, 2016) pedagogical design in the flipped classroom for a 2-week curricular unit on polynomials in a Hong Kong Secondary school. Different from the flipped classroom where students…