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Sample records for number variants defining

  1. Identification of copy number variants defining genomic differences among major human groups.

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    Lluís Armengol

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Understanding the genetic contribution to phenotype variation of human groups is necessary to elucidate differences in disease predisposition and response to pharmaceutical treatments in different human populations. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have investigated the genome-wide profile of structural variation on pooled samples from the three populations studied in the HapMap project by comparative genome hybridization (CGH in different array platforms. We have identified and experimentally validated 33 genomic loci that show significant copy number differences from one population to the other. Interestingly, we found an enrichment of genes related to environment adaptation (immune response, lipid metabolism and extracellular space within these regions and the study of expression data revealed that more than half of the copy number variants (CNVs translate into gene-expression differences among populations, suggesting that they could have functional consequences. In addition, the identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs that are in linkage disequilibrium with the copy number alleles allowed us to detect evidences of population differentiation and recent selection at the nucleotide variation level. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, our results provide a comprehensive view of relevant copy number changes that might play a role in phenotypic differences among major human populations, and generate a list of interesting candidates for future studies.

  2. Constructing regular graphs with smallest defining number

    OpenAIRE

    Omoomi, Behnaz; Soltankhah, Nasrin

    2008-01-01

    In a given graph $G$, a set $S$ of vertices with an assignment of colors is a {\\sf defining set of the vertex coloring of $G$}, if there exists a unique extension of the colors of $S$ to a $\\Cchi(G)$-coloring of the vertices of $G$. A defining set with minimum cardinality is called a {\\sf smallest defining set} (of vertex coloring) and its cardinality, the {\\sf defining number}, is denoted by $d(G, \\Cchi)$. Let $ d(n, r, \\Cchi = k)$ be the smallest defining number of all $r$-regular $k$-chrom...

  3. Cosmic numbers the numbers that define our universe

    CERN Document Server

    Stein, James D

    2011-01-01

    Our fascination with numbers begins when we are children and continues throughout our lives. We start counting our fingers and toes and end up balancing checkbooks and calculating risk. So powerful is the appeal of numbers that many people ascribe to them a mystical significance. Other numbers go beyond the supernatural, working to explain our universe and how it behaves. In Cosmic Numbers , mathematics professor James D. Stein traces the discovery, evolution, and interrelationships of the numbers that define our world. Everyone knows about the speed of light and absolute zero, but numbers lik

  4. Identification of copy number variants in horses

    KAUST Repository

    Doan, R.

    2012-03-01

    Copy number variants (CNVs) represent a substantial source of genetic variation in mammals. However, the occurrence of CNVs in horses and their subsequent impact on phenotypic variation is unknown. We performed a study to identify CNVs in 16 horses representing 15 distinct breeds (Equus caballus) and an individual gray donkey (Equus asinus) using a whole-exome tiling array and the array comparative genomic hybridization methodology. We identified 2368 CNVs ranging in size from 197 bp to 3.5 Mb. Merging identical CNVs from each animal yielded 775 CNV regions (CNVRs), involving 1707 protein- and RNA-coding genes. The number of CNVs per animal ranged from 55 to 347, with median and mean sizes of CNVs of 5.3 kb and 99.4 kb, respectively. Approximately 6% of the genes investigated were affected by a CNV. Biological process enrichment analysis indicated CNVs primarily affected genes involved in sensory perception, signal transduction, and metabolism. CNVs also were identified in genes regulating blood group antigens, coat color, fecundity, lactation, keratin formation, neuronal homeostasis, and height in other species. Collectively, these data are the first report of copy number variation in horses and suggest that CNVs are common in the horse genome and may modulate biological processes underlying different traits observed among horses and horse breeds.

  5. Canvas SPW: calling de novo copy number variants in pedigrees.

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    Ivakhno, Sergii; Roller, Eric; Colombo, Camilla; Tedder, Philip; Cox, Anthony J

    2018-02-01

    Whole genome sequencing is becoming a diagnostics of choice for the identification of rare inherited and de novo copy number variants in families with various pediatric and late-onset genetic diseases. However, joint variant calling in pedigrees is hampered by the complexity of consensus breakpoint alignment across samples within an arbitrary pedigree structure. We have developed a new tool, Canvas SPW, for the identification of inherited and de novo copy number variants from pedigree sequencing data. Canvas SPW supports a number of family structures and provides a wide range of scoring and filtering options to automate and streamline identification of de novo variants. Canvas SPW is available for download from https://github.com/Illumina/canvas. sivakhno@illumina.com. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  6. Screening for common copy-number variants in cancer genes.

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    Tyson, Jess; Majerus, Tamsin M O; Walker, Susan; Armour, John A L

    2010-12-01

    For most cases of colorectal cancer that arise without a family history of the disease, it is proposed that an appreciable heritable component of predisposition is the result of contributions from many loci. Although progress has been made in identifying single nucleotide variants associated with colorectal cancer risk, the involvement of low-penetrance copy number variants is relatively unexplored. We have used multiplex amplifiable probe hybridization (MAPH) in a fourfold multiplex (QuadMAPH), positioned at an average resolution of one probe per 2 kb, to screen a total of 1.56 Mb of genomic DNA for copy number variants around the genes APC, AXIN1, BRCA1, BRCA2, CTNNB1, HRAS, MLH1, MSH2, and TP53. Two deletion events were detected, one upstream of MLH1 in a control individual and the other in APC in a colorectal cancer patient, but these do not seem to correspond to copy number polymorphisms with measurably high population frequencies. In summary, by means of our QuadMAPH assay, copy number measurement data were of sufficient resolution and accuracy to detect any copy number variants with high probability. However, this study has demonstrated a very low incidence of deletion and duplication variants within intronic and flanking regions of these nine genes, in both control individuals and colorectal cancer patients. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Genetically complex epilepsies, copy number variants and syndrome constellations.

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    Mefford, Heather C; Mulley, John C

    2010-10-05

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders, with a prevalence of 1% and lifetime incidence of 3%. There are numerous epilepsy syndromes, most of which are considered to be genetic epilepsies. Despite the discovery of more than 20 genes for epilepsy to date, much of the genetic contribution to epilepsy is not yet known. Copy number variants have been established as an important source of mutation in other complex brain disorders, including intellectual disability, autism and schizophrenia. Recent advances in technology now facilitate genome-wide searches for copy number variants and are beginning to be applied to epilepsy. Here, we discuss what is currently known about the contribution of copy number variants to epilepsy, and how that knowledge is redefining classification of clinical and genetic syndromes.

  8. Copy-number variants in neurodevelopmental disorders: promises and challenges.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Merikangas, Alison K

    2012-02-01

    Copy-number variation (CNV) is the most prevalent type of structural variation in the human genome. There is emerging evidence that copy-number variants (CNVs) provide a new vista on understanding susceptibility to neuropsychiatric disorders. Some challenges in the interpretation of current CNV studies include the use of overlapping samples, differing phenotypic definitions, an absence of population norms for CNVs and a lack of consensus in methods for CNV detection and analysis. Here, we review current CNV association study methods and results in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and schizophrenia, and provide suggestions for design approaches to future studies that might maximize the translation of this work to etiological understanding.

  9. Canvas: versatile and scalable detection of copy number variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roller, Eric; Ivakhno, Sergii; Lee, Steve; Royce, Thomas; Tanner, Stephen

    2016-08-01

    Versatile and efficient variant calling tools are needed to analyze large scale sequencing datasets. In particular, identification of copy number changes remains a challenging task due to their complexity, susceptibility to sequencing biases, variation in coverage data and dependence on genome-wide sample properties, such as tumor polyploidy or polyclonality in cancer samples. We have developed a new tool, Canvas, for identification of copy number changes from diverse sequencing experiments including whole-genome matched tumor-normal and single-sample normal re-sequencing, as well as whole-exome matched and unmatched tumor-normal studies. In addition to variant calling, Canvas infers genome-wide parameters such as cancer ploidy, purity and heterogeneity. It provides fast and easy-to-run workflows that can scale to thousands of samples and can be easily incorporated into variant calling pipelines. Canvas is distributed under an open source license and can be downloaded from https://github.com/Illumina/canvas eroller@illumina.com Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Endometriosis is associated with rare copy number variants.

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    Rakesh Chettier

    Full Text Available Endometriosis is a complex gynecological condition that affects 6-10% of women in their reproductive years and is defined by the presence of endometrial glands and stroma outside the uterus. Twin, family, and genome-wide association (GWA studies have confirmed a genetic role, yet only a small part of the genetic risk can be explained by SNP variation. Copy number variants (CNVs account for a greater portion of human genetic variation than SNPs and include more recent mutations of large effect. CNVs, likely to be prominent in conditions with decreased reproductive fitness, have not previously been examined as a genetic contributor to endometriosis. Here we employ a high-density genotyping microarray in a genome-wide survey of CNVs in a case-control population that includes 2,126 surgically confirmed endometriosis cases and 17,974 population controls of European ancestry. We apply stringent quality filters to reduce the false positive rate common to many CNV-detection algorithms from 77.7% to 7.3% without noticeable reduction in the true positive rate. We detected no differences in the CNV landscape between cases and controls on the global level which showed an average of 1.92 CNVs per individual with an average size of 142.3 kb. On the local level we identify 22 CNV-regions at the nominal significance threshold (P<0.05, which is greater than the 8.15 CNV-regions expected based on permutation analysis (P<0.001. Three CNV's passed a genome-wide P-value threshold of 9.3 × 10(-4; a deletion at SGCZ on 8p22 (P = 7.3 × 10(-4, OR = 8.5, Cl = 2.3-31.7, a deletion in MALRD1 on 10p12.31 (P = 5.6 × 10(-4, OR = 14.1, Cl = 2.7-90.9, and a deletion at 11q14.1 (P = 5.7 × 10(-4, OR = 33.8, Cl = 3.3-1651. Two SNPs within the 22 CNVRs show significant genotypic association with endometriosis after adjusting for multiple testing; rs758316 in DPP6 on 7q36.2 (P = 0.0045 and rs4837864 in ASTN2 on 9q33.1 (P = 0.0002. Together, the CNV-loci are detected in 6.9% of

  11. Copy-number variants in patients with a strong family history of pancreatic cancer.

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    Lucito, Robert; Suresh, Shubha; Walter, Kimberly; Pandey, Akhilesh; Lakshmi, B; Krasnitz, Alex; Sebat, Jonathan; Wigler, Michael; Klein, Alison P; Brune, Kieran; Palmisano, Emily; Maitra, Anirban; Goggins, Michael; Hruban, Ralph H

    2007-10-01

    Copy-number variants such as germ-line deletions and amplifications are associated with inherited genetic disorders including familial cancer. The gene or genes responsible for the majority of familial clustering of pancreatic cancer have not been identified. We used representational oligonucleotide microarray analysis (ROMA) to characterize germ-line copy number variants in 60 cancer patients from 57 familial pancreatic cancer kindreds. Fifty-seven of the 60 patients had pancreatic cancer and three had nonpancreatic cancers (breast, ovary, ovary). A familial pancreatic cancer kindred was defined as a kindred in which at least two first-degree relatives have been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. Copy-number variants identified in 607 individuals without pancreatic cancer were excluded from further analysis. A total of 56 unique genomic regions with copy-number variants not present in controls were identified, including 31 amplifications and 25 deletions. Two deleted regions were observed in two different patients, and one in three patients. The germ-line amplifications had a mean size of 662 Kb, a median size of 379 Kb (range 8.2 Kb to 2.5 Mb) and included 425 known genes. Examples of genes included in the germ-line amplifications include the MAFK, JunD and BIRC6 genes. The germ-line deletions had a mean size of 375Kb, a median size 151 Kb (range 0.4 Kb to 2.3 Mb) and included 81 known genes. In multivariate analysis controlling for region size, deletions were 90% less likely to involve a gene than were duplications (p time PCR, including a germ-line amplification on chromosome 19. These genetic copy-number variants define potential candidate loci for the familial pancreatic cancer gene.

  12. MAP: Mutation Arranger for Defining Phenotype-Related Single-Nucleotide Variant

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    In-Pyo Baek

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Next-generation sequencing (NGS is widely used to identify the causative mutations underlying diverse human diseases, including cancers, which can be useful for discovering the diagnostic and therapeutic targets. Currently, a number of single-nucleotide variant (SNV-calling algorithms are available; however, there is no tool for visualizing the recurrent and phenotype-specific mutations for general researchers. In this study, in order to support defining the recurrent mutations or phenotype-specific mutations from NGS data of a group of cancers with diverse phenotypes, we aimed to develop a user-friendly tool, named mutation arranger for defining phenotype-related SNV (MAP. MAP is a user-friendly program with multiple functions that supports the determination of recurrent or phenotype-specific mutations and provides graphic illustration images to the users. Its operation environment, the Microsoft Windows environment, enables more researchers who cannot operate Linux to define clinically meaningful mutations with NGS data from cancer cohorts.

  13. Rare copy number variants identified in prune belly syndrome.

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    Boghossian, Nansi S; Sicko, Robert J; Giannakou, Andreas; Dimopoulos, Aggeliki; Caggana, Michele; Tsai, Michael Y; Yeung, Edwina H; Pankratz, Nathan; Cole, Benjamin R; Romitti, Paul A; Browne, Marilyn L; Fan, Ruzong; Liu, Aiyi; Kay, Denise M; Mills, James L

    2018-03-01

    Prune belly syndrome (PBS), also known as Eagle-Barrett syndrome, is a rare congenital disorder characterized by absence or hypoplasia of the abdominal wall musculature, urinary tract anomalies, and cryptorchidism in males. The etiology of PBS is largely unresolved, but genetic factors are implicated given its recurrence in families. We examined cases of PBS to identify novel pathogenic copy number variants (CNVs). A total of 34 cases (30 males and 4 females) with PBS identified from all live births in New York State (1998-2005) were genotyped using Illumina HumanOmni2.5 microarrays. CNVs were prioritized if they were absent from in-house controls, encompassed ≥10 consecutive probes, were ≥20 Kb in size, had ≤20% overlap with common variants in population reference controls, and had ≤20% overlap with any variant previously detected in other birth defect phenotypes screened in our laboratory. We identified 17 candidate autosomal CNVs; 10 cases each had one CNV and four cases each had two CNVs. The CNVs included a 158 Kb duplication at 4q22 that overlaps the BMPR1B gene; duplications of different sizes carried by two cases in the intron of STIM1 gene; a 67 Kb duplication 202 Kb downstream of the NOG gene, and a 1.34 Mb deletion including the MYOCD gene. The identified rare CNVs spanned genes involved in mesodermal, muscle, and urinary tract development and differentiation, which might help in elucidating the genetic contribution to PBS. We did not have parental DNA and cannot identify whether these CNVs were de novo or inherited. Further research on these CNVs, particularly BMP signaling is warranted to elucidate the pathogenesis of PBS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Rare copy number variants implicated in posterior urethral valves.

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    Boghossian, Nansi S; Sicko, Robert J; Kay, Denise M; Rigler, Shannon L; Caggana, Michele; Tsai, Michael Y; Yeung, Edwina H; Pankratz, Nathan; Cole, Benjamin R; Druschel, Charlotte M; Romitti, Paul A; Browne, Marilyn L; Fan, Ruzong; Liu, Aiyi; Brody, Lawrence C; Mills, James L

    2016-03-01

    The cause of posterior urethral valves (PUV) is unknown, but genetic factors are suspected given their familial occurrence. We examined cases of isolated PUV to identify novel copy number variants (CNVs). We identified 56 cases of isolated PUV from all live-births in New York State (1998-2005). Samples were genotyped using Illumina HumanOmni2.5 microarrays. Autosomal and sex-linked CNVs were identified using PennCNV and cnvPartition software. CNVs were prioritized for follow-up if they were absent from in-house controls, contained ≥ 10 consecutive probes, were ≥ 20 Kb in size, had ≤ 20% overlap with variants detected in other birth defect phenotypes screened in our lab, and were rare in population reference controls. We identified 47 rare candidate PUV-associated CNVs in 32 cases; one case had a 3.9 Mb deletion encompassing BMP7. Mutations in BMP7 have been associated with severe anomalies in the mouse urethra. Other interesting CNVs, each detected in a single PUV case included: a deletion of PIK3R3 and TSPAN1, duplication/triplication in FGF12, duplication of FAT1--a gene essential for normal growth and development, a large deletion (>2 Mb) on chromosome 17q that involves TBX2 and TBX4, and large duplications (>1 Mb) on chromosomes 3q and 6q. Our finding of previously unreported novel CNVs in PUV suggests that genetic factors may play a larger role than previously understood. Our data show a potential role of CNVs in up to 57% of cases examined. Investigation of genes in these CNVs may provide further insights into genetic variants that contribute to PUV. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Contribution of rare copy number variants to isolated human malformations.

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    Clara Serra-Juhé

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Congenital malformations are present in approximately 2-3% of liveborn babies and 20% of stillborn fetuses. The mechanisms underlying the majority of sporadic and isolated congenital malformations are poorly understood, although it is hypothesized that the accumulation of rare genetic, genomic and epigenetic variants converge to deregulate developmental networks. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We selected samples from 95 fetuses with congenital malformations not ascribed to a specific syndrome (68 with isolated malformations, 27 with multiple malformations. Karyotyping and Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA discarded recurrent genomic and cytogenetic rearrangements. DNA extracted from the affected tissue (46% or from lung or liver (54% was analyzed by molecular karyotyping. Validations and inheritance were obtained by MLPA. We identified 22 rare copy number variants (CNV [>100 kb, either absent (n = 7 or very uncommon (n = 15, <1/2,000 in the control population] in 20/95 fetuses with congenital malformations (21%, including 11 deletions and 11 duplications. One of the 9 tested rearrangements was de novo while the remaining were inherited from a healthy parent. The highest frequency was observed in fetuses with heart hypoplasia (8/17, 62.5%, with two events previously related with the phenotype. Double events hitting candidate genes were detected in two samples with brain malformations. Globally, the burden of deletions was significantly higher in fetuses with malformations compared to controls. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data reveal a significant contribution of rare deletion-type CNV, mostly inherited but also de novo, to human congenital malformations, especially heart hypoplasia, and reinforce the hypothesis of a multifactorial etiology in most cases.

  16. Incidental copy-number variants identified by routine genome testing in a clinical population

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    Boone, Philip M.; Soens, Zachry T.; Campbell, Ian M.; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Cheung, Sau Wai; Patel, Ankita; Beaudet, Arthur L.; Plon, Sharon E.; Shaw, Chad A.; McGuire, Amy L.; Lupski, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Mutational load of susceptibility variants has not been studied on a genomic scale in a clinical population, nor has the potential to identify these mutations as incidental findings during clinical testing been systematically ascertained. Methods Array comparative genomic hybridization, a method for genome-wide detection of DNA copy-number variants, was performed clinically on DNA from 9,005 individuals. Copy-number variants encompassing or disrupting single genes were identified and analyzed for their potential to confer predisposition to dominant, adult-onset disease. Multigene copy-number variants affecting dominant, adult-onset cancer syndrome genes were also assessed. Results In our cohort, 83 single-gene copy-number variants affected 40 unique genes associated with dominant, adult-onset disorders and unrelated to the patients’ referring diagnoses (i.e., incidental) were found. Fourteen of these copy-number variants are likely disease-predisposing, 25 are likely benign, and 44 are of unknown clinical consequence. When incidental copy-number variants spanning up to 20 genes were considered, 27 copy-number variants affected 17 unique genes associated with dominant, adult-onset cancer predisposition. Conclusion Copy-number variants potentially conferring susceptibility to adult-onset disease can be identified as incidental findings during routine genome-wide testing. Some of these mutations may be medically actionable, enabling disease surveillance or prevention; however, most incidentally observed single-gene copy-number variants are currently of unclear significance to the patient. PMID:22878507

  17. An LL-diaminopimelate aminotransferase defines a novel variant of the lysine biosynthesis pathway in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, André O; Singh, Bijay K; Leustek, Thomas; Gilvarg, Charles

    2006-01-01

    Although lysine (Lys) biosynthesis in plants is known to occur by way of a pathway that utilizes diaminopimelic acid (DAP) as a central intermediate, the available evidence suggests that none of the known DAP-pathway variants found in nature occur in plants. A new Lys biosynthesis pathway has been identified in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) that utilizes a novel transaminase that specifically catalyzes the interconversion of tetrahydrodipicolinate and LL-diaminopimelate, a reaction requiring three enzymes in the DAP-pathway variant found in Escherichia coli. The LL-DAP aminotransferase encoded by locus At4g33680 was able to complement the dapD and dapE mutants of E. coli. This result, in conjunction with the kinetic properties and substrate specificity of the enzyme, indicated that LL-DAP aminotransferase functions in the Lys biosynthetic direction under in vivo conditions. Orthologs of At4g33680 were identified in all the cyanobacterial species whose genomes have been sequenced. The Synechocystis sp. ortholog encoded by locus sll0480 showed the same functional properties as At4g33680. These results demonstrate that the Lys biosynthesis pathway in plants and cyanobacteria is distinct from the pathways that have so far been defined in microorganisms.

  18. Three new alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency variants help to define a C-terminal region regulating conformational change and polymerization.

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    Anna M Fra

    Full Text Available Alpha1-antitrypsin (AAT deficiency is a hereditary disorder associated with reduced AAT plasma levels, predisposing adults to pulmonary emphysema. The most common genetic AAT variants found in patients are the mildly deficient S and the severely deficient Z alleles, but several other pathogenic rare alleles have been reported. While the plasma AAT deficiency is a common trait of the disease, only a few AAT variants, including the prototypic Z AAT and some rare variants, form cytotoxic polymers in the endoplasmic reticulum of hepatocytes and predispose to liver disease. Here we report the identification of three new rare AAT variants associated to reduced plasma levels and characterize their molecular behaviour in cellular models. The variants, called Mpisa (Lys259Ile, Etaurisano (Lys368Glu and Yorzinuovi (Pro391His, showed reduced secretion compared to control M AAT, and accumulated to different extents in the cells as ordered polymeric structures resembling those formed by the Z variant. Structural analysis of the mutations showed that they may facilitate polymerization both by loosening 'latch' interactions constraining the AAT reactive loop and through effects on core packing. In conclusion, the new AAT deficiency variants, besides increasing the risk of lung disease, may predispose to liver disease, particularly if associated with the common Z variant. The new mutations cluster structurally, thus defining a region of the AAT molecule critical for regulating its conformational state.

  19. Association tests and software for copy number variant data

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    Plagnol Vincent

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recent studies have suggested that copy number variation (CNV significantly contributes to genetic predisposition to several common disorders. These findings, combined with the imperfect tagging of CNVs by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, have motivated the development of association studies directly targeting CNVs. Several assays, including comparative genomic hybridisation arrays, SNP genotyping arrays, or DNA quantification through real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis, allow direct assessment of CNV status in cohorts sufficiently large to provide adequate statistical power for association studies. When analysing data provided by these assays, association tests for CNV data are not fundamentally different from SNP-based association tests. The main difference arises when the quality of the CNV assay is not sufficient to convert unequivocally the raw measurement into discrete calls -- a common issue, given the technological limitations of current CNV assays. When this is the case, association tests are more appropriately based on the raw continuous measurement provided by the CNV assay, instead of potentially inaccurate discrete calls, thus motivating the development of new statistical methods. Here, the programs available for CNV association testing for case control or family data are reviewed, using either discrete calls or raw continuous data.

  20. Deletion mutant defines DQ beta variants with DR4 positive DQw3 positive haplotypes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nepom, B.S.; Kim, S.J.; Nepom, G.T.

    1986-01-01

    We describe the production of an HLA deletion mutation by radiation mutagenesis of a DR4- and DQw3-homozygous, Dw4- and Dw14-heterozygous cell line designed to analyze polymorphisms associated with DR4 and DQw3. Southern blot analysis confirms a deletion of class I and class II genes on one haplotype. Variation in DQ beta alleles associated with DQw3 was previously described by characteristic RFLP patterns for a DQ beta bene. One pattern, which correlated precisely with A-10-83 monoclonal antibody reactivity (TA10), defined an allele which we call DQ''3.1''. The mutant cell line has lost the polymorphic bands on Southern blots corresponding to the DQ''3.1'' allele, while the intact Dw14 haplotype retains the alternate allele at DQ beta which is DQw-3 positive. TA10-negative. These data demonstrate the segregation of two DQw3 positive DQ beta allelic variants, both associated with DR4, which can be distinguished on the basis of both RFLP and monoclonal antibody reactivity

  1. Genetic mechanisms and age-related macular degeneration: common variants, rare variants, copy number variations, epigenetics, and mitochondrial genetics

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    Liu Melissa M

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a complex and multifaceted disease involving contributions from both genetic and environmental influences. Previous work exploring the genetic contributions of AMD has implicated numerous genomic regions and a variety of candidate genes as modulators of AMD susceptibility. Nevertheless, much of this work has revolved around single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, and it is apparent that a significant portion of the heritability of AMD cannot be explained through these mechanisms. In this review, we consider the role of common variants, rare variants, copy number variations, epigenetics, microRNAs, and mitochondrial genetics in AMD. Copy number variations in regulators of complement activation genes (CFHR1 and CFHR3 and glutathione S transferase genes (GSTM1 and GSTT1 have been associated with AMD, and several additional loci have been identified as regions of potential interest but require further evaluation. MicroRNA dysregulation has been linked to the retinal pigment epithelium degeneration in geographic atrophy, ocular neovascularization, and oxidative stress, all of which are hallmarks in the pathogenesis of AMD. Certain mitochondrial DNA haplogroups and SNPs in mitochondrially encoded NADH dehydrogenase genes have also been associated with AMD. The role of these additional mechanisms remains only partly understood, but the importance of their further investigation is clear to elucidate more completely the genetic basis of AMD.

  2. Distribution of Disease-Associated Copy Number Variants across Distinct Disorders of Cognitive Development

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    Pescosolido, Matthew F.; Gamsiz, Ece D.; Nagpal, Shailender; Morrow, Eric M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the present study was to discover the extent to which distinct "DSM" disorders share large, highly recurrent copy number variants (CNVs) as susceptibility factors. We also sought to identify gene mechanisms common to groups of diagnoses and/or specific to a given diagnosis based on associations with CNVs. Method:…

  3. Prospective diagnostic analysis of copy number variants using SNP microarrays in individuals with autism spectrum disorders.

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    Nava, Caroline; Keren, Boris; Mignot, Cyril; Rastetter, Agnès; Chantot-Bastaraud, Sandra; Faudet, Anne; Fonteneau, Eric; Amiet, Claire; Laurent, Claudine; Jacquette, Aurélia; Whalen, Sandra; Afenjar, Alexandra; Périsse, Didier; Doummar, Diane; Dorison, Nathalie; Leboyer, Marion; Siffroi, Jean-Pierre; Cohen, David; Brice, Alexis; Héron, Delphine; Depienne, Christel

    2014-01-01

    Copy number variants (CNVs) have repeatedly been found to cause or predispose to autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). For diagnostic purposes, we screened 194 individuals with ASDs for CNVs using Illumina SNP arrays. In several probands, we also analyzed candidate genes located in inherited deletions to unmask autosomal recessive variants. Three CNVs, a de novo triplication of chromosome 15q11-q12 of paternal origin, a deletion on chromosome 9p24 and a de novo 3q29 deletion, were identified as the cause of the disorder in one individual each. An autosomal recessive cause was considered possible in two patients: a homozygous 1p31.1 deletion encompassing PTGER3 and a deletion of the entire DOCK10 gene associated with a rare hemizygous missense variant. We also identified multiple private or recurrent CNVs, the majority of which were inherited from asymptomatic parents. Although highly penetrant CNVs or variants inherited in an autosomal recessive manner were detected in rare cases, our results mainly support the hypothesis that most CNVs contribute to ASDs in association with other CNVs or point variants located elsewhere in the genome. Identification of these genetic interactions in individuals with ASDs constitutes a formidable challenge.

  4. Measuring collective transport by defined numbers of processive and nonprocessive kinesin motors

    OpenAIRE

    Furuta, Ken’ya; Furuta, Akane; Toyoshima, Yoko Y.; Amino, Misako; Oiwa, Kazuhiro; Kojima, Hiroaki

    2012-01-01

    Intracellular transport is thought to be achieved by teams of motor proteins bound to a cargo. However, the coordination within a team remains poorly understood as a result of the experimental difficulty in controlling the number and composition of motors. Here, we developed an experimental system that links together defined numbers of motors with defined spacing on a DNA scaffold. By using this system, we linked multiple molecules of two different types of kinesin motors, processive kinesin-...

  5. EXCAVATOR: detecting copy number variants from whole-exome sequencing data.

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    Magi, Alberto; Tattini, Lorenzo; Cifola, Ingrid; D'Aurizio, Romina; Benelli, Matteo; Mangano, Eleonora; Battaglia, Cristina; Bonora, Elena; Kurg, Ants; Seri, Marco; Magini, Pamela; Giusti, Betti; Romeo, Giovanni; Pippucci, Tommaso; De Bellis, Gianluca; Abbate, Rosanna; Gensini, Gian Franco

    2013-01-01

    We developed a novel software tool, EXCAVATOR, for the detection of copy number variants (CNVs) from whole-exome sequencing data. EXCAVATOR combines a three-step normalization procedure with a novel heterogeneous hidden Markov model algorithm and a calling method that classifies genomic regions into five copy number states. We validate EXCAVATOR on three datasets and compare the results with three other methods. These analyses show that EXCAVATOR outperforms the other methods and is therefore a valuable tool for the investigation of CNVs in largescale projects, as well as in clinical research and diagnostics. EXCAVATOR is freely available at http://sourceforge.net/projects/excavatortool/.

  6. Candidate predisposing germline copy number variants in early onset colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brea-Fernandez, A J; Fernandez-Rozadilla, C; Alvarez-Barona, M; Azuara, D; Ginesta, M M; Clofent, J; de Castro, L; Gonzalez, D; Andreu, M; Bessa, X; Llor, X; Xicola, R; Jover, R; Castells, A; Castellvi-Bel, S; Capella, G; Carracedo, A; Ruiz-Ponte, C

    2017-05-01

    A great proportion of the heritability of colorectal cancer (CRC) still remains unexplained, and rare variants, as well as copy number changes, have been proposed as potential candidates to explain the so-called 'missing heritability'. We aimed to identify rare high-to-moderately penetrant copy number variants (CNVs) in patients suspected of having hereditary CRC due to an early onset. We have selected for genome-wide copy number analysis, 27 MMR-proficient early onset CRC patients (1% in the in-house control CNV database (n = 629 healthy controls). Copy number assignment was checked by duplex real-time quantitative PCR or multiplex ligation probe amplification. Somatic mutation analysis in candidate genes included: loss of heterozygosity studies, point mutation screening, and methylation status of the promoter. We have identified two rare germline deletions involving the AK3 and SLIT2 genes in two patients. The search for a second somatic mutational event in the corresponding CRC tumors showed loss of heterozygosity in AK3, and promoter hypermethylation in SLIT2. Both genes have been previously related to colorectal carcinogenesis. These findings suggest that AK3 and SLIT2 may be potential candidates involved in genetic susceptibility to CRC.

  7. Convergence of Complex Fuzzy一valued Function Defined in Complex Fuzzy Number

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BI Shu-juan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The author defines all fuzzy number which are symmetric respect to y-axis as zero fuzzy number,on the basis,the author defines the limitation of complex fuzzy-valued function and discusses the properties of convergence. This eater obtains a series of results about limited complex fuzzy -valued function,including the limitation of complex fuzzy-valued function is unique,the limited complex fuzzy-valued function has local boundedness and local protection,as well as the linear operation properties of the limitation. Furthermore,the convergence criterion and the Cauchy convergence criterion of complex fuzzy-valued function are given. In this paper,it is shown that the complex fuzzy-valued function is defined in a complex fuzzy set F( Cwhich valued the complex fuzzy number in F( C(set of all complex fuzzy number .

  8. Airline company management: 'Defining of necessary number of employees in airline by using artificial intelligence tools'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović Dragan M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the model for preliminary estimation of number of employees in airline by using of artificial intelligence tools. It is assumed that the tools of artificial intelligence can be applied even for complex tasks such as defining the number of employees in the airline. The results obtained can be used for planning the number of employees, ie. planning the necessary financial investments in human resources, and may also be useful for a preliminary analysis of the airlines that choose to do restructuring or plan to increase/decrease the number of operations. Results were compared with those obtained by regression analysis.

  9. High frequency of rare copy number variants affecting functionally related genes in patients with structural brain malformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kariminejad, Roxana; Lind-Thomsen, Allan; Tümer, Zeynep

    2011-01-01

    ) to investigate copy number variants (CNVs) in a cohort of 169 patients with various structural brain malformations including lissencephaly, polymicrogyria, focal cortical dysplasia, and corpus callosum agenesis. The majority of the patients had intellectual disabilities (ID) and suffered from symptomatic...

  10. Four Complete Datatype Defining Rewrite Systems for an Abstract Datatype of Natural Numbers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergstra, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    Natural numbers with zero, one, successor, addition and multiplication, constitute a classic example of an abstract datatype amenable for equational initial algebra specification. Datatype defining rewrite systems provide a specification which at the same time is a complete, that is confluent and

  11. A genome-wide copy number variant study of suicidal behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey A Gross

    Full Text Available Suicide and suicide attempts are complex behaviors that result from the interaction of different factors, including genetic variants that increase the predisposition to suicidal behaviors. Copy number variations (CNVs are deletions or duplications of a segment of DNA usually larger than one kilobase. These structural genetic changes, although quite rare, have been associated with genetic liability to mental disorders, such as autism, schizophrenia, and bipolar disorder. No genome-wide level studies have been published investigating the potential role of CNVs in suicidal behaviors. Based on single-nucleotide polymorphism array data, we followed the Penn-CNV standards to detect CNVs in 1,608 subjects, comprising 475 suicide and suicide attempt cases and 1,133 controls. Although the initial algorithms determined the presence of CNVs on chromosomes 6 and 12 in seven and eight cases, respectively, compared with none of the controls, visual inspection of the raw data did not support this finding. Furthermore we were unable to validate these findings by CNV-specific real-time polymerase chain reaction. Additionally, rare CNV burden analysis did not find an association between the frequency or length of rare CNVs and suicidal behavior in our sample population. Although our findings suggest CNVs do not play an important role in the etiology of suicidal behaviors, they are not inconsistent with the strong evidence from the literature suggesting that other genetic variants account for a portion of the total phenotypic variability in suicidal behavior.

  12. An ll-Diaminopimelate Aminotransferase Defines a Novel Variant of the Lysine Biosynthesis Pathway in Plants1[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, André O.; Singh, Bijay K.; Leustek, Thomas; Gilvarg, Charles

    2006-01-01

    Although lysine (Lys) biosynthesis in plants is known to occur by way of a pathway that utilizes diaminopimelic acid (DAP) as a central intermediate, the available evidence suggests that none of the known DAP-pathway variants found in nature occur in plants. A new Lys biosynthesis pathway has been identified in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) that utilizes a novel transaminase that specifically catalyzes the interconversion of tetrahydrodipicolinate and ll-diaminopimelate, a reaction requiring three enzymes in the DAP-pathway variant found in Escherichia coli. The ll-DAP aminotransferase encoded by locus At4g33680 was able to complement the dapD and dapE mutants of E. coli. This result, in conjunction with the kinetic properties and substrate specificity of the enzyme, indicated that ll-DAP aminotransferase functions in the Lys biosynthetic direction under in vivo conditions. Orthologs of At4g33680 were identified in all the cyanobacterial species whose genomes have been sequenced. The Synechocystis sp. ortholog encoded by locus sll0480 showed the same functional properties as At4g33680. These results demonstrate that the Lys biosynthesis pathway in plants and cyanobacteria is distinct from the pathways that have so far been defined in microorganisms. PMID:16361515

  13. Rare de novo copy number variants in patients with congenital pulmonary atresia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xie

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ongoing studies using genomic microarrays and next-generation sequencing have demonstrated that the genetic contributions to cardiovascular diseases have been significantly ignored in the past. The aim of this study was to identify rare copy number variants in individuals with congenital pulmonary atresia (PA. METHODS AND RESULTS: Based on the hypothesis that rare structural variants encompassing key genes play an important role in heart development in PA patients, we performed high-resolution genome-wide microarrays for copy number variations (CNVs in 82 PA patient-parent trios and 189 controls with an Illumina SNP array platform. CNVs were identified in 17/82 patients (20.7%, and eight of these CNVs (9.8% are considered potentially pathogenic. Five de novo CNVs occurred at two known congenital heart disease (CHD loci (16p13.1 and 22q11.2. Two de novo CNVs that may affect folate and vitamin B12 metabolism were identified for the first time. A de novo 1-Mb deletion at 17p13.2 may represent a rare genomic disorder that involves mild intellectual disability and associated facial features. CONCLUSIONS: Rare CNVs contribute to the pathogenesis of PA (9.8%, suggesting that the causes of PA are heterogeneous and pleiotropic. Together with previous data from animal models, our results might help identify a link between CHD and folate-mediated one-carbon metabolism (FOCM. With the accumulation of high-resolution SNP array data, these previously undescribed rare CNVs may help reveal critical gene(s in CHD and may provide novel insights about CHD pathogenesis.

  14. Copy number variants in patients with severe oligozoospermia and Sertoli-cell-only syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Tüttelmann

    Full Text Available A genetic origin is estimated in 30% of infertile men with the common phenotypes of oligo- or azoospermia, but the pathogenesis of spermatogenic failure remains frequently obscure. To determine the involvement of Copy Number Variants (CNVs in the origin of male infertility, patients with idiopathic severe oligozoospermia (N = 89, Sertoli-cell-only syndrome (SCOS, N = 37 and controls with normozoospermia (N = 100 were analysed by array-CGH using the 244A/400K array sets (Agilent Technologies. The mean number of CNVs and the amount of DNA gain/loss were comparable between all groups. Ten recurring CNVs were only found in patients with severe oligozoospermia, three only in SCOS and one CNV in both groups with spermatogenic failure but not in normozoospermic men. Sex-chromosomal, mostly private CNVs were significantly overrepresented in patients with SCOS. CNVs found several times in all groups were analysed in a case-control design and four additional candidate genes and two regions without known genes were associated with SCOS (P<1×10(-3. In conclusion, by applying array-CGH to study male infertility for the first time, we provide a number of candidate genes possibly causing or being risk factors for the men's spermatogenic failure. The recurring, patient-specific and private, sex-chromosomal CNVs as well as those associated with SCOS are candidates for further, larger case-control and re-sequencing studies.

  15. Measuring collective transport by defined numbers of processive and nonprocessive kinesin motors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuta, Ken'ya; Furuta, Akane; Toyoshima, Yoko Y; Amino, Misako; Oiwa, Kazuhiro; Kojima, Hiroaki

    2013-01-08

    Intracellular transport is thought to be achieved by teams of motor proteins bound to a cargo. However, the coordination within a team remains poorly understood as a result of the experimental difficulty in controlling the number and composition of motors. Here, we developed an experimental system that links together defined numbers of motors with defined spacing on a DNA scaffold. By using this system, we linked multiple molecules of two different types of kinesin motors, processive kinesin-1 or nonprocessive Ncd (kinesin-14), in vitro. Both types of kinesins markedly increased their processivities with motor number. Remarkably, despite the poor processivity of individual Ncd motors, the coupling of two Ncd motors enables processive movement for more than 1 μm along microtubules (MTs). This improvement was further enhanced with decreasing spacing between motors. Force measurements revealed that the force generated by groups of Ncd is additive when two to four Ncd motors work together, which is much larger than that generated by single motors. By contrast, the force of multiple kinesin-1s depends only weakly on motor number. Numerical simulations and single-molecule unbinding measurements suggest that this additive nature of the force exerted by Ncd relies on fast MT binding kinetics and the large drag force of individual Ncd motors. These features would enable small groups of Ncd motors to crosslink MTs while rapidly modulating their force by forming clusters. Thus, our experimental system may provide a platform to study the collective behavior of motor proteins from the bottom up.

  16. Clinical relevance of small copy-number variants in chromosomal microarray clinical testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollenbeck, Dana; Williams, Crescenda L; Drazba, Kathryn; Descartes, Maria; Korf, Bruce R; Rutledge, S Lane; Lose, Edward J; Robin, Nathaniel H; Carroll, Andrew J; Mikhail, Fady M

    2017-04-01

    The 2010 consensus statement on diagnostic chromosomal microarray (CMA) testing recommended an array resolution ≥400 kb throughout the genome as a balance of analytical and clinical sensitivity. In spite of the clear evidence for pathogenicity of large copy-number variants (CNVs) in neurodevelopmental disorders and/or congenital anomalies, the significance of small, nonrecurrent CNVs (<500 kb) has not been well established in a clinical setting. We investigated the clinical significance of all nonpolymorphic small, nonrecurrent CNVs (<500 kb) in patients referred for CMA clinical testing over a period of 6 years, from 2009 to 2014 (a total of 4,417 patients). We excluded from our study patients with benign or likely benign CNVs and patients with only recurrent microdeletions/microduplications <500 kb. In total, 383 patients (8.67%) were found to carry at least one small, nonrecurrent CNV, of whom 176 patients (3.98%) had one small CNV classified as a variant of uncertain significance (VUS), 45 (1.02%) had two or more small VUS CNVs, 20 (0.45%) had one small VUS CNV and a recurrent CNV, 113 (2.56%) had one small pathogenic or likely pathogenic CNV, 17 (0.38%) had two or more small pathogenic or likely pathogenic CNVs, and 12 (0.27%) had one small pathogenic or likely pathogenic CNV and a recurrent CNV. Within the pathogenic group, 80 of 142 patients (56% of all small pathogenic CNV cases) were found to have a single whole-gene or exonic deletion. The themes that emerged from our study are presented in the Discussion section. Our study demonstrates the diagnostic clinical relevance of small, nonrecurrent CNVs <500 kb during CMA clinical testing and underscores the need for careful clinical interpretation of these CNVs.Genet Med 19 4, 377-385.

  17. Detection of copy number variants reveals association of cilia genes with neural tube defects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoli Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neural tube defects (NTDs are one of the most common birth defects caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Currently, little is known about the genetic basis of NTDs although up to 70% of human NTDs were reported to be attributed to genetic factors. Here we performed genome-wide copy number variants (CNVs detection in a cohort of Chinese NTD patients in order to exam the potential role of CNVs in the pathogenesis of NTDs. METHODS: The genomic DNA from eighty-five NTD cases and seventy-five matched normal controls were subjected for whole genome CNVs analysis. Non-DGV (the Database of Genomic Variants CNVs from each group were further analyzed for their associations with NTDs. Gene content in non-DGV CNVs as well as participating pathways were examined. RESULTS: Fifty-five and twenty-six non-DGV CNVs were detected in cases and controls respectively. Among them, forty and nineteen CNVs involve genes (genic CNV. Significantly more non-DGV CNVs and non-DGV genic CNVs were detected in NTD patients than in control (41.2% vs. 25.3%, p<0.05 and 37.6% vs. 20%, p<0.05. Non-DGV genic CNVs are associated with a 2.65-fold increased risk for NTDs (95% CI: 1.24-5.87. Interestingly, there are 41 cilia genes involved in non-DGV CNVs from NTD patients which is significantly enriched in cases compared with that in controls (24.7% vs. 9.3%, p<0.05, corresponding with a 3.19-fold increased risk for NTDs (95% CI: 1.27-8.01. Pathway analyses further suggested that two ciliogenesis pathways, tight junction and protein kinase A signaling, are top canonical pathways implicated in NTD-specific CNVs, and these two novel pathways interact with known NTD pathways. CONCLUSIONS: Evidence from the genome-wide CNV study suggests that genic CNVs, particularly ciliogenic CNVs are associated with NTDs and two ciliogenesis pathways, tight junction and protein kinase A signaling, are potential pathways involved in NTD pathogenesis.

  18. Oxidation Numbers, Oxidants, and Redox Reactions: Variants of the Electrophilic Bromination of Alkenes and Variants of the Application of Oxone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eissen, Marco; Strudthoff, Merle; Backhaus, Solveig; Eismann, Carolin; Oetken, Gesa; Kaling, Soren; Lenoir, Dieter

    2011-01-01

    Oxidation-state and donor-acceptor concepts are important areas in the chemical education. Student worksheets containing problems that emphasize oxidation numbers, redox reactions of organic compounds, and stoichiometric reaction equations are presented. All of the examples are incorporated under one unifying topic: the production of vicinal…

  19. Sequence variants affecting eosinophil numbers associate with asthma and myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Bjornsdottir, Unnur S; Halapi, Eva

    2009-01-01

    Eosinophils are pleiotropic multifunctional leukocytes involved in initiation and propagation of inflammatory responses and thus have important roles in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases. Here we describe a genome-wide association scan for sequence variants affecting eosinophil counts in ...

  20. Redundancies in "H" Index Variants and the Proposal of the Number of Top-Cited Papers as an Attractive Indicator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornmann, Lutz

    2012-01-01

    Ruscio, Seaman, D'Oriano, Stremlo, and Mahalchik (this issue) evaluate 22 bibliometric indicators, including conventional measures, like the number of publications, the "h" index, and many "h" index variants. To assess the quality of the indicators, their well-justified criteria encompass conceptual, empirical, and practical…

  1. Contribution of copy number variants to schizophrenia from a genome-wide study of 41,321 subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marshall, Christian R.; Howrigan, Daniel P.; Merico, Daniele; Thiruvahindrapuram, Bhooma; Wu, Wenting; Greer, Douglas S.; Antaki, Danny; Shetty, Aniket; Holmans, Peter A.; Pinto, Dalila; Gujral, Madhusudan; Brandler, William M.; Malhotra, Dheeraj; Wang, Zhouzhi; Fajarado, Karin V. Fuentes; Maile, Michelle S.; Ripke, Stephan; Agartz, Ingrid; Albus, Margot; Alexander, Madeline; Amin, Farooq; Atkins, Joshua; Bacanu, Silviu A.; Belliveau, Richard A.; Bergen, Sarah E.; Ertalan, Marcelo; Bevilacqua, Elizabeth; Bigdeli, Tim B.; Black, Donald W.; Bruggeman, Richard; Buccola, Nancy G.; Buckner, Randy L.; Bulik-Sullivan, Brendan; Byerley, William; Cahn, Wiepke; Cai, Guiqing; Cairns, Murray J.; Campion, Dominique; Cantor, Rita M.; Carr, Vaughan J.; Carrera, Noa; Catts, Stanley V.; Chambert, Kimberley D.; Cheng, Wei; Cloninger, C. Robert; Cohen, David; Cormican, Paul; Craddock, Nick; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Crowley, James J.; Curtis, David; Davidson, Michael; Davis, Kenneth L.; Degenhardt, Franziska; Del Favero, Jurgen; DeLisi, Lynn E.; Dikeos, Dimitris; Dinan, Timothy; Djurovic, Srdjan; Donohoe, Gary; Drapeau, Elodie; Duan, Jubao; Dudbridge, Frank; Eichhammer, Peter; Eriksson, Johan; Escott-Price, Valentina; Essioux, Laurent; Fanous, Ayman H.; Farh, Kai-How; Farrell, Martilias S.; Frank, Josef; Franke, Lude; Freedman, Robert; Freimer, Nelson B.; Friedman, Joseph I.; Forstner, Andreas J.; Fromer, Menachem; Genovese, Giulio; Georgieva, Lyudmila; Gershon, Elliot S.; Giegling, Ina; Giusti-Rodriguez, Paola; Godard, Stephanie; Goldstein, Jacqueline I.; Gratten, Jacob; de Haan, Lieuwe; Hamshere, Marian L.; Hansen, Mark; Hansen, Thomas; Haroutunian, Vahram; Hartmann, Annette M.; Henskens, Frans A.; Herms, Stefan; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Hoffinann, Per; Hofman, Andrea; Huang, Hailiang; Ikeda, Masashi; Joa, Inge; Kahler, Anna K.; Kahn, Rene S.; Kalaydjieva, Luba; Karjalainen, Juha; Kavanagh, David; Keller, Matthew C.; Kelly, Brian J.; Kennedy, James L.; Kim, Yunjung; Knowles, James A.; Konte, Bettina; Laurent, Claudine; Lee, Phil; Lee, S. Hong; Legge, Sophie E.; Lerer, Bernard; Levy, Deborah L.; Liang, Kung-Yee; Lieberman, Jeffrey; Lonnqvist, Jouko; Loughland, Carmel M.; Magnusson, Patrik K. E.; Maher, Brion S.; Maier, Wolfgang; Mallet, Jacques; Mattheisen, Manuel; Mattingsdal, Morten; McCarley, Robert W.; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M.; Meier, Sandra; Meijer, Carin J.; Melle, Ingrid; Mesholam-Gately, Raquelle I.; Metspalu, Andres; Michie, Patricia T.; Milani, Lili; Milanova, Vihra; Mokrab, Younes; Morris, Derek W.; Muller-Myhsok, Bertram; Murphy, Kieran C.; Murray, Robin M.; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Nenadic, Igor; Nertney, Deborah A.; Nestadt, Gerald; Nicodemus, Kristin K.; Nisenbaum, Laura; Nordin, Annelie; O'Callaghan, Eadbhard; O'Dushlaine, Colm; Oh, Sang-Yun; Olincy, Ann; Olsen, Line; O'Neill, F. Anthony; Van Os, Jim; Pantelis, Christos; Papadimitriou, George N.; Parkhomenko, Elena; Pato, Michele T.; Paunio, Tiina; Perkins, Diana O.; Pers, Tune H.; Pietilainen, Olli; Pimm, Jonathan; Pocklington, Andrew J.; Powell, John; Price, Alkes; Pulver, Ann E.; Purcell, Shaun M.; Quested, Digby; Rasmussen, Henrik B.; Reichenberg, Abraham; Reimers, Mark A.; Richards, Alexander L.; Roffman, Joshua L.; Roussos, Panos; Ruderfer, Douglas M.; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanders, Alan R.; Savitz, Adam; Schall, Ulrich; Schulze, Thomas G.; Schwab, Sibylle G.; Scolnick, Edward M.; Scott, Rodney J.; Seidman, Larry J.; Shi, Jianxin; Silverman, Jeremy M.; Smoller, Jordan W.; Soderman, Erik; Spencer, Chris C. A.; Stahl, Eli A.; Strengman, Eric; Strohmaier, Jana; Stroup, T. Scott; Suvisaari, Jaana; Svrakic, Dragan M.; Szatkiewicz, Jin P.; Thirumalai, Srinivas; Tooney, Paul A.; Veijola, Juha; Visscher, Peter M.; Waddington, John; Walsh, Dermot; Webb, Bradley T.; Weiser, Mark; Wildenauer, Dieter B.; Williams, Nigel M.; Williams, Stephanie; Witt, Stephanie H.; Wolen, Aaron R.; Wormley, Brandon K.; Wray, Naomi R.; Wu, Jing Qin; Zai, Clement C.; Adolfsson, Rolf; Andreassen, Ole A.; Blackwood, Douglas H. R.; Bramon, Elvira; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Cichon, Sven; Collier, David A.; Corvin, Aiden; Daly, Mark J.; Darvasi, Ariel; Domenici, Enrico; Esko, Tonu; Gejman, Pablo V.; Gill, Michael; Gurling, Hugh; Hultman, Christina M.; Iwata, Nakao; Jablensky, Assen V.; Jonsson, Erik G.; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Kirov, George; Knight, Jo; Levinson, Douglas F.; Li, Qingqin S.; McCarroll, Steven A.; McQuillin, Andrew; Moran, Jennifer L.; Mowry, Bryan J.; Nothen, Markus M.; Ophoff, Roel A.; Owen, Michael J.; Palotie, Aarno; Pato, Carlos N.; Petryshen, Tracey L.; Posthuma, Danielle; Rietschel, Marcella; Riley, Brien P.; Rujescu, Dan; Sklar, Pamela; St Clair, David; Walters, James T. R.; Werge, Thomas; Siillivan, Patrick F.; O'Donovan, Michael C.; Scherer, Stephen W.; Neale, Benjamin M.; Sebat, Jonathan

    Copy number variants (CNVs) have been strongly implicated in the genetic etiology of schizophrenia (SCZ). However, genome-wide investigation of the contribution of CNV to risk has been hampered by limited sample sizes. We sought to address this obstacle by applying a centralized analysis pipeline to

  2. Contribution of copy number variants to schizophrenia from a genome-wide study of 41,321 subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marshall, Christian R.; Howrigan, Daniel P.; Merico, Daniele

    2017-01-01

    Copy number variants (CNVs) have been strongly implicated in the genetic etiology of schizophrenia (SCZ). However, genome-wide investigation of the contribution of CNV to risk has been hampered by limited sample sizes. We sought to address this obstacle by applying a centralized analysis pipeline...

  3. De novo copy number variants are associated with congenital diaphragmatic hernia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lan; Wynn, Julia; Ma, Lijiang; Guha, Saurav; Mychaliska, George B.; Crombleholme, Timothy M.; Azarow, Kenneth S.; Lim, Foong Yen; Chung, Dai H.; Potoka, Douglas; Warner, Brad W.; Bucher, Brian; LeDuc, Charles A.; Costa, Katherine; Stolar, Charles; Aspelund, Gudrun; Arkovitz, Marc; Chung, Wendy K.

    2013-01-01

    Background Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a common birth defect with significant morbidity and mortality. Although the etiology of CDH remains poorly understood, studies from animal models and patients with CDH suggest that genetic factors play an important role in the development of CDH. Chromosomal anomalies have been reported in CDH. Methods In this study, the authors investigate the frequency of chromosomal anomalies and copy number variants in 256 parent-child trios of CDH using clinical conventional cytogenetic and microarray analysis. The authors also selected a set of CDH related training genes to prioritize the genes in those segmental aneuploidies and identified the genes and gene sets that may contribute to the etiology of CDH. Results The authors identified chromosomal anomalies in 16 patients (6.3 %) of the series including 3 aneuploidies, 2 unbalanced translocation, and 11 patients with de novo CNVs ranging in size from 95 kb to 104.6 Mb. The authors prioritized the genes in the CNV segments and identified KCNA2, LMNA, CACNA1S, MYOG, HLX, LBR, AGT, GATA4, SOX7, HYLS1, FOXC1, FOXF2, PDGFA, FGF6, COL4A1, COL4A2, HOMER2, BNC1, BID, and TBX1 as genes that may be involved in diaphragm development. Gene enrichment analysis identified the most relevant gene ontology (GO) categories as those involved in tissue development (p=4.4×10−11) or regulation of multicellular organismal processes (p=2.8×10−10) and “receptor binding” (p = 8.7×10−14) and “DNA binding transcription factor activity” (p= 4.4×10−10). Conclusions Our findings support the role of chromosomal anomalies in CDH and provide a set of candidate genes including FOXC1, FOXF2, PDGFA, FGF6, COL4A1, COL4A2, SOX7,BNC1, BID, and TBX1 for further analysis in CDH. PMID:23054247

  4. Investigating the effects of copy number variants on reading and language performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gialluisi, Alessandro; Visconti, Alessia; Willcutt, Erik G; Smith, Shelley D; Pennington, Bruce F; Falchi, Mario; DeFries, John C; Olson, Richard K; Francks, Clyde; Fisher, Simon E

    2016-01-01

    Reading and language skills have overlapping genetic bases, most of which are still unknown. Part of the missing heritability may be caused by copy number variants (CNVs). In a dataset of children recruited for a history of reading disability (RD, also known as dyslexia) or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and their siblings, we investigated the effects of CNVs on reading and language performance. First, we called CNVs with PennCNV using signal intensity data from Illumina OmniExpress arrays (~723,000 probes). Then, we computed the correlation between measures of CNV genomic burden and the first principal component (PC) score derived from several continuous reading and language traits, both before and after adjustment for performance IQ. Finally, we screened the genome, probe-by-probe, for association with the PC scores, through two complementary analyses: we tested a binary CNV state assigned for the location of each probe (i.e., CNV+ or CNV-), and we analyzed continuous probe intensity data using FamCNV. No significant correlation was found between measures of CNV burden and PC scores, and no genome-wide significant associations were detected in probe-by-probe screening. Nominally significant associations were detected (p~10(-2)-10(-3)) within CNTN4 (contactin 4) and CTNNA3 (catenin alpha 3). These genes encode cell adhesion molecules with a likely role in neuronal development, and they have been previously implicated in autism and other neurodevelopmental disorders. A further, targeted assessment of candidate CNV regions revealed associations with the PC score (p~0.026-0.045) within CHRNA7 (cholinergic nicotinic receptor alpha 7), which encodes a ligand-gated ion channel and has also been implicated in neurodevelopmental conditions and language impairment. FamCNV analysis detected a region of association (p~10(-2)-10(-4)) within a frequent deletion ~6 kb downstream of ZNF737 (zinc finger protein 737, uncharacterized protein), which was also

  5. Genomic copy number variants: evidence for association with antibody response to anthrax vaccine adsorbed.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael I Falola

    Full Text Available Anthrax and its etiologic agent remain a biological threat. Anthrax vaccine is highly effective, but vaccine-induced IgG antibody responses vary widely following required doses of vaccinations. Such variation can be related to genetic factors, especially genomic copy number variants (CNVs that are known to be enriched among genes with immunologic function. We have tested this hypothesis in two study populations from a clinical trial of anthrax vaccination.We performed CNV-based genome-wide association analyses separately on 794 European Americans and 200 African-Americans. Antibodies to protective antigen were measured at week 8 (early response and week 30 (peak response using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. We used DNA microarray data (Affymetrix 6.0 and two CNV detection algorithms, hidden markov model (PennCNV and circular binary segmentation (GeneSpring to determine CNVs in all individuals. Multivariable regression analyses were used to identify CNV-specific associations after adjusting for relevant non-genetic covariates.Within the 22 autosomal chromosomes, 2,943 non-overlapping CNV regions were detected by both algorithms. Genomic insertions containing HLA-DRB5, DRB1 and DQA1/DRA genes in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC region (chromosome 6p21.3 were moderately associated with elevated early antibody response (β = 0.14, p = 1.78×10(-3 among European Americans, and the strongest association was observed between peak antibody response and a segmental insertion on chromosome 1, containing NBPF4, NBPF5, STXMP3, CLCC1, and GPSM2 genes (β = 1.66, p = 6.06×10(-5. For African-Americans, segmental deletions spanning PRR20, PCDH17 and PCH68 genes on chromosome 13 were associated with elevated early antibody production (β = 0.18, p = 4.47×10(-5. Population-specific findings aside, one genomic insertion on chromosome 17 (containing NSF, ARL17 and LRRC37A genes was associated with elevated peak antibody

  6. Pyrazine in supercritical xenon: local number density defined by experiment and calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrnjez, Bruce J; Kabarriti, Abdo; Dach, Benjamin I; Buldyrev, Sergey V; Asherie, Neer; Natanov, Georgiy R; Balderman, Joshua

    2008-12-04

    Toward our goal of using supercritical fluids to study solvent effects in physical and chemical phenomena, we develop a method to spatially define the solvent local number density at the solute in the highly compressible regime of a supercritical fluid. Experimentally, the red shift of the pyrazine n-pi* electronic transition was measured at high dilution in supercritical xenon as a function of pressure from 0 to approximately 24 MPa at two temperatures: one (293.2 K) close to the critical temperature and the other (333.2 K) remote. Computationally, several representative stationary points were located on the potential surfaces for pyrazine and 1, 2, 3, and 4 xenons at the MP2/6-311++G(d,p)/aug-cc-pVTZ-PP level. The vertical n-pi* ((1)B(3u)) transition energies were computed for these geometries using a TDDFT/B3LYP/DGDZVP method. The combination of experiment and quantum chemical computation allows prediction of supercritical xenon bulk densities at which the pyrazine primary solvation shell contains an average of 1, 2, 3, and 4 xenon molecules. These density predictions were achieved by graphical superposition of calculated shifts on the experimental shift versus density curves for 293.2 and 333.2 K. Predicted bulk densities are 0.50, 0.91, 1.85, and 2.50 g cm(-3) for average pyrazine primary solvation shell occupancy by 1, 2, 3, and 4 xenons at 293.2 K. Predicted bulk densities are 0.65, 1.20, 1.85, and 2.50 g cm(-3) for average pyrazine primary solvation shell occupancy by 1, 2, 3, and 4 xenons at 333.2 K. These predictions were evaluated with classical Lennard-Jones molecular dynamics simulations designed to replicate experimental conditions at the two temperatures. The average xenon number within 5.0 A of the pyrazine center-of-mass at the predicted densities is 1.3, 2.1, 3.0, and 4.0 at both simulation temperatures. Our three-component method-absorbance measurement, quantum chemical prediction, and evaluation of prediction with classical molecular dynamics

  7. Analysis of Intellectual Disability Copy Number Variants for Association With Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Elliott; Kendall, Kimberley; Pardiñas, Antonio F; Legge, Sophie E; Pocklington, Andrew; Escott-Price, Valentina; MacCabe, James H; Collier, David A; Holmans, Peter; O'Donovan, Michael C; Owen, Michael J; Walters, James T R; Kirov, George

    2016-09-01

    At least 11 rare copy number variants (CNVs) have been shown to be major risk factors for schizophrenia (SZ). These CNVs also increase the risk for other neurodevelopmental disorders, such as intellectual disability. It is possible that additional intellectual disability-associated CNVs increase the risk for SZ but have not yet been implicated in SZ because of previous studies being underpowered. To examine whether additional CNVs implicated in intellectual disability represent novel SZ risk loci. We used single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array data to evaluate a set of 51 CNVs implicated in intellectual disability (excluding the known SZ loci) in a large data set of patients with SZ and healthy persons serving as controls recruited in a variety of settings. We analyzed a new sample of 6934 individuals with SZ and 8751 controls and combined those data with previously published large data sets for a total of 20 403 cases of SZ and 26 628 controls. Burden analysis of CNVs implicated in intellectual disability (excluding known SZ CNVs) for association with SZ. Association of individual intellectual disability CNV loci with SZ. Of data on the 20 403 cases (6151 [30.15%] female) and 26 628 controls (14 252 [53.52%] female), 51 intellectual disability CNVs were analyzed. Collectively, intellectual disability CNVs were significantly enriched for SZ (P = 1.0 × 10-6; odds ratio [OR], 1.9 [95% CI, 1.46-2.49]). Of the 51 CNVs tested, 19 (37%) were more common in SZ cases; only 4 (8%) were more common in controls (no observations were made for the remaining 28 [55%] loci). One novel locus, deletion at 16p12.1, was significantly associated with SZ after correction for multiple testing (rate in SZ, 33 [0.16%]; rate in controls, 12 [0.05%]; corrected P = .017; OR, 3.3; 95% CI, 1.61-7.05), and 2 loci reached nominal levels of significance (deletions at 2q11.2: 6 [0.03%] vs 1 [0.004%]; OR, 9.3; 95% CI, 1.03-447.76; corrected P > .99; and duplications

  8. A clade of Listeria monocytogenes serotype 4b variant strains linked to recent listeriosis outbreaks associated with produce from a defined geographic region in the US

    OpenAIRE

    Burall, Laurel S.; Grim, Christopher J.; Datta, Atin R.

    2017-01-01

    Four listeriosis incidences/outbreaks, spanning 19 months, have been linked to Listeria monocytogenes serotype 4b variant (4bV) strains. Three of these incidents can be linked to a defined geographical region, while the fourth is likely to be linked. In this study, whole genome sequencing (WGS) of strains from these incidents was used for genomic comparisons using two approached. The first was JSpecies tetramer, which analyzed tetranucleotide frequency to assess relatedness. The second, the C...

  9. Human PTCHD3 nulls: rare copy number and sequence variants suggest a non-essential gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lionel Anath C

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Copy number variations (CNVs can contribute to variable degrees of fitness and/or disease predisposition. Recent studies show that at least 1% of any given genome is copy number variable when compared to the human reference sequence assembly. Homozygous deletions (or CNV nulls that are found in the normal population are of particular interest because they may serve to define non-essential genes in human biology. Results In a genomic screen investigating CNV in Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs we detected a heterozygous deletion on chromosome 10p12.1, spanning the Patched-domain containing 3 (PTCHD3 gene, at a frequency of ~1.4% (6/427. This finding seemed interesting, given recent discoveries on the role of another Patched-domain containing gene (PTCHD1 in ASD. Screening of another 177 ASD probands yielded two additional heterozygous deletions bringing the frequency to 1.3% (8/604. The deletion was found at a frequency of ~0.73% (27/3,695 in combined control population from North America and Northern Europe predominately of European ancestry. Screening of the human genome diversity panel (HGDP-CEPH covering worldwide populations yielded deletions in 7/1,043 unrelated individuals and those detected were confined to individuals of European/Mediterranean/Middle Eastern ancestry. Breakpoint mapping yielded an identical 102,624 bp deletion in all cases and controls tested, suggesting a common ancestral event. Interestingly, this CNV occurs at a break of synteny between humans and mouse. Considering all data, however, no significant association of these rare PTCHD3 deletions with ASD was observed. Notwithstanding, our RNA expression studies detected PTCHD3 in several tissues, and a novel shorter isoform for PTCHD3 was characterized. Expression in transfected COS-7 cells showed PTCHD3 isoforms colocalize with calnexin in the endoplasmic reticulum. The presence of a patched (Ptc domain suggested a role for PTCHD3 in various biological

  10. Engineered ribosomal RNA operon copy-number variants of E. coli reveal the evolutionary trade-offs shaping rRNA operon number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyorfy, Zsuzsanna; Draskovits, Gabor; Vernyik, Viktor; Blattner, Frederick F.; Gaal, Tamas; Posfai, Gyorgy

    2015-01-01

    Ribosomal RNA (rrn) operons, characteristically present in several copies in bacterial genomes (7 in E. coli), play a central role in cellular physiology. We investigated the factors determining the optimal number of rrn operons in E. coli by constructing isogenic variants with 5–10 operons. We found that the total RNA and protein content, as well as the size of the cells reflected the number of rrn operons. While growth parameters showed only minor differences, competition experiments revealed a clear pattern: 7–8 copies were optimal under conditions of fluctuating, occasionally rich nutrient influx and lower numbers were favored in stable, nutrient-limited environments. We found that the advantages of quick adjustment to nutrient availability, rapid growth and economic regulation of ribosome number all contribute to the selection of the optimal rrn operon number. Our results suggest that the wt rrn operon number of E. coli reflects the natural, ‘feast and famine’ life-style of the bacterium, however, different copy numbers might be beneficial under different environmental conditions. Understanding the impact of the copy number of rrn operons on the fitness of the cell is an important step towards the creation of functional and robust genomes, the ultimate goal of synthetic biology. PMID:25618851

  11. Development of bioinformatics resources for display and analysis of copy number and other structural variants in the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J; Feuk, L; Duggan, G E; Khaja, R; Scherer, S W

    2006-01-01

    The discovery of an abundance of copy number variants (CNVs; gains and losses of DNA sequences >1 kb) and other structural variants in the human genome is influencing the way research and diagnostic analyses are being designed and interpreted. As such, comprehensive databases with the most relevant information will be critical to fully understand the results and have impact in a diverse range of disciplines ranging from molecular biology to clinical genetics. Here, we describe the development of bioinformatics resources to facilitate these studies. The Database of Genomic Variants (http://projects.tcag.ca/variation/) is a comprehensive catalogue of structural variation in the human genome. The database currently contains 1,267 regions reported to contain copy number variation or inversions in apparently healthy human cases. We describe the current contents of the database and how it can serve as a resource for interpretation of array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) and other DNA copy imbalance data. We also present the structure of the database, which was built using a new data modeling methodology termed Cross-Referenced Tables (XRT). This is a generic and easy-to-use platform, which is strong in handling textual data and complex relationships. Web-based presentation tools have been built allowing publication of XRT data to the web immediately along with rapid sharing of files with other databases and genome browsers. We also describe a novel tool named eFISH (electronic fluorescence in situ hybridization) (http://projects.tcag.ca/efish/), a BLAST-based program that was developed to facilitate the choice of appropriate clones for FISH and CGH experiments, as well as interpretation of results in which genomic DNA probes are used in hybridization-based experiments. Copyright (c) 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Role of GSTM1 Copy Number Variant in the Prognosis of Thai Colorectal Cancer Patients Treated with 5-FU-based Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pongtheerat, Tanett; Saelee, Pensri

    2016-10-01

    Background: Glutathione S-transferase M1 (GSTM1) is involved in the detoxification of carcinogenic agents. DNA copy number variants of GSTM1 may be associated with cancer progression and may result in reduced survival time of various cancers. Determination of DNA copy number variants was here used to assess the association between GSTM1 copy number variant and pathological status and survival time of colorectal-cancer patients treated with 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy. Methods: One hundred thirteen Thai colorectal-cancer patients were investigated for GSTM1 copy number variant by real-time PCR. Relationships between gene copy number variants and clinico-pathological parameters were determined. Result: Associations were evident between GSTM1 copy number and stage of tumor (P = 0.026) and metastasis at diagnosis (P = 0.049), with odds ratio values of 0.2 and 0.3 respectively. Conclusions: GSTM1 copy number variant was here not related with reduced overall survival for the colorectal-cancer patients receiving 5-FU-based chemotherapy. Creative Commons Attribution License

  13. Use of Resolving Equation to Define the Lower Critical Reynolds Number

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander A. Solovyev

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Although the issue of streams with non-crossing trajectories of particle motions ranging from chaotic, random with irregular current lines, has been given a lot of attention, it still remains unresolved. The study features a relevant issue for hydromechanics, which is precise values determination of the Lower Critical Reynolds Number. It is suggested to put forward an updated approach to the use of energetic analysis for analytical calculation of the Reynolds Resolving Equation. The assessment of transition to mean motion from pulsation to the direction of laminar flows was fulfilled.

  14. Long insert whole genome sequencing for copy number variant and translocation detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Winnie S; Aldrich, Jessica; Tembe, Waibhav; Kurdoglu, Ahmet; Cherni, Irene; Phillips, Lori; Reiman, Rebecca; Baker, Angela; Weiss, Glen J; Carpten, John D; Craig, David W

    2014-01-01

    As next-generation sequencing continues to have an expanding presence in the clinic, the identification of the most cost-effective and robust strategy for identifying copy number changes and translocations in tumor genomes is needed. We hypothesized that performing shallow whole genome sequencing (WGS) of 900-1000-bp inserts (long insert WGS, LI-WGS) improves our ability to detect these events, compared with shallow WGS of 300-400-bp inserts. A priori analyses show that LI-WGS requires less sequencing compared with short insert WGS to achieve a target physical coverage, and that LI-WGS requires less sequence coverage to detect a heterozygous event with a power of 0.99. We thus developed an LI-WGS library preparation protocol based off of Illumina's WGS library preparation protocol and illustrate the feasibility of performing LI-WGS. We additionally applied LI-WGS to three separate tumor/normal DNA pairs collected from patients diagnosed with different cancers to demonstrate our application of LI-WGS on actual patient samples for identification of somatic copy number alterations and translocations. With the evolution of sequencing technologies and bioinformatics analyses, we show that modifications to current approaches may improve our ability to interrogate cancer genomes.

  15. Defining Determinants and Dynamics and Cellulose Microfibril Biosynthesis, Assembly and Degredation OSP Number: 63079/A001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2013-12-01

    been based on the idea that the most effective way to address this long standing and highly complex question is to adopt a broad ‘systems approach’. Accordingly, we assembled a multi-disciplinary collaborative team with collective expertise in plant biology and molecular genetics, polymer structure and chemistry, enzyme biochemistry and biochemical engineering. We used a spectrum of cutting edge technologies, including plant functional genomics, chemical genetics, live cell imaging, advanced microscopy, high energy X-ray spectroscopy and nanotechnology, to study the molecular determinants of cellulose microfibril structure. Importantly, this research effort was closely coupled with an analytical pipeline to characterize the effects of altering microfibril architecture on bioconversion potential, with the goal of generating predictive models to help guide the identification, development and implementation of new feedstocks. This project therefore spanned core basic science and applied research, in line with the goals of the program. Over the course of the project, accomplishments included: - Establishing platforms through reverse and forward genetics to identify and manipulate candidate genes that influence cellulose microfibril synthesis and structure in a model C3 grass, Brachypodium distachyon and a model C4 grass Setaria viridis; Identifying and characterizing the effects of a number of cellulose biosynthesis inhibitors (CBIs), and particularly those that target monocots with the aim of generating resistance loci; Developing protocols for the use of high energy X-ray diffraction (XRD) to study the structure and organization of cellulose microfibrils in plant walls, notably those in Arabidopsis and Brachypodium; Using the chemical and genetic based inhibition strategies to develop new mechanistic models of cellulose microfibril crystallization, and of how altering microfibril architecture influences digestibility.

  16. Copy Number Variants and Congenital Anomalies Surveillance: A Suggested Coding Strategy Using the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health Version of ICD-10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedard, Tanya; Lowry, R Brian; Sibbald, Barbara; Thomas, Mary Ann; Innes, A Micheil

    2016-01-01

    The use of array-based comparative genomic hybridization to assess DNA copy number is increasing in many jurisdictions. Such technology identifies more genetic causes of congenital anomalies; however, the clinical significance of some results may be challenging to interpret. A coding strategy to address cases with copy number variants has recently been implemented by the Alberta Congenital Anomalies Surveillance System and is described.

  17. Copy number variants in a sample of patients with psychotic disorders: is standard screening relevant for actual clinical practice?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van de Kerkhof NW

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Noortje WA Van de Kerkhof,1 Ilse Feenstra,2 Jos IM Egger,1,3,4 Nicole de Leeuw,2 Rolph Pfundt,2 Gerald Stöber,5 Frank MMA van der Heijden,1 Willem MA Verhoeven1,61Vincent van Gogh Institute for Psychiatry, Centre of Excellence for Neuropsychiatry, Venray, The Netherlands; 2Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Human Genetics, Nijmegen, The Netherlands; 3Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, 4Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University, Nijmegen, The Netherlands; 5University of Würzburg, Department of Psychiatry, Psychosomatics and Psychotherapy, Würzburg, Germany; 6Erasmus University Medical Centre, Department of Psychiatry, Rotterdam, The NetherlandsAbstract: With the introduction of new genetic techniques such as genome-wide array comparative genomic hybridization, studies on the putative genetic etiology of schizophrenia have focused on the detection of copy number variants (CNVs, ie, microdeletions and/or microduplications, that are estimated to be present in up to 3% of patients with schizophrenia. In this study, out of a sample of 100 patients with psychotic disorders, 80 were investigated by array for the presence of CNVs. The assessment of the severity of psychiatric symptoms was performed using standardized instruments and ICD-10 was applied for diagnostic classification. In three patients, a submicroscopic CNV was demonstrated, one with a loss in 1q21.1 and two with a gain in 1p13.3 and 7q11.2, respectively. The association between these or other CNVs and schizophrenia or schizophrenia-like psychoses and their clinical implications still remain equivocal. While the CNV affected genes may enhance the vulnerability for psychiatric disorders via effects on neuronal architecture, these insights have not resulted in major changes in clinical practice as yet. Therefore, genome-wide array analysis should presently be restricted to those patients in whom psychotic symptoms are paired with other

  18. Human genes with a greater number of transcript variants tend to show biological features of housekeeping and essential genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryu, Jae Yong; Kim, Hyun Uk; Lee, Sang Yup

    2015-01-01

    found to have a single transcript, and the remaining genes had 2 to 77 transcript variants. The genes with more transcript variants exhibited greater frequencies of acting as housekeeping and essential genes rather than tissue-selective and non-essential genes. They were found to be more conserved among...

  19. A clade of Listeria monocytogenes serotype 4b variant strains linked to recent listeriosis outbreaks associated with produce from a defined geographic region in the US.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurel S Burall

    Full Text Available Four listeriosis incidences/outbreaks, spanning 19 months, have been linked to Listeria monocytogenes serotype 4b variant (4bV strains. Three of these incidents can be linked to a defined geographical region, while the fourth is likely to be linked. In this study, whole genome sequencing (WGS of strains from these incidents was used for genomic comparisons using two approached. The first was JSpecies tetramer, which analyzed tetranucleotide frequency to assess relatedness. The second, the CFSAN SNP Pipeline, was used to perform WGS SNP analyses against three different reference genomes to evaluate relatedness by SNP distances. In each case, unrelated strains were included as controls. The analyses showed that strains from these incidents form a highly related clade with SNP differences of ≤101 within the clade and >9000 against other strains. Multi-Virulence-Locus Sequence Typing, a third standardized approach for evaluation relatedness, was used to assess the genetic drift in six conserved, known virulence loci and showed a different clustering pattern indicating possible differences in selection pressure experienced by these genes. These data suggest a high degree of relatedness among these 4bV strains linked to a defined geographic region and also highlight the possibility of alterations related to adaptation and virulence.

  20. A clade of Listeria monocytogenes serotype 4b variant strains linked to recent listeriosis outbreaks associated with produce from a defined geographic region in the US.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burall, Laurel S; Grim, Christopher J; Datta, Atin R

    2017-01-01

    Four listeriosis incidences/outbreaks, spanning 19 months, have been linked to Listeria monocytogenes serotype 4b variant (4bV) strains. Three of these incidents can be linked to a defined geographical region, while the fourth is likely to be linked. In this study, whole genome sequencing (WGS) of strains from these incidents was used for genomic comparisons using two approached. The first was JSpecies tetramer, which analyzed tetranucleotide frequency to assess relatedness. The second, the CFSAN SNP Pipeline, was used to perform WGS SNP analyses against three different reference genomes to evaluate relatedness by SNP distances. In each case, unrelated strains were included as controls. The analyses showed that strains from these incidents form a highly related clade with SNP differences of ≤101 within the clade and >9000 against other strains. Multi-Virulence-Locus Sequence Typing, a third standardized approach for evaluation relatedness, was used to assess the genetic drift in six conserved, known virulence loci and showed a different clustering pattern indicating possible differences in selection pressure experienced by these genes. These data suggest a high degree of relatedness among these 4bV strains linked to a defined geographic region and also highlight the possibility of alterations related to adaptation and virulence.

  1. Rare copy number variants and congenital heart defects in the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlynarski, Elisabeth E; Xie, Michael; Taylor, Deanne; Sheridan, Molly B; Guo, Tingwei; Racedo, Silvia E; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M; Chow, Eva W C; Vorstman, Jacob; Swillen, Ann; Devriendt, Koen; Breckpot, Jeroen; Digilio, Maria Cristina; Marino, Bruno; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Philip, Nicole; Simon, Tony J; Roberts, Amy E; Piotrowicz, Małgorzata; Bearden, Carrie E; Eliez, Stephan; Gothelf, Doron; Coleman, Karlene; Kates, Wendy R; Devoto, Marcella; Zackai, Elaine; Heine-Suñer, Damian; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth; Bassett, Anne S; Morrow, Bernice E; Emanuel, Beverly S

    2016-03-01

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS; velocardiofacial/DiGeorge syndrome; VCFS/DGS; MIM #192430; 188400) is the most common microdeletion syndrome. The phenotypic presentation of 22q11DS is highly variable; approximately 60-75 % of 22q11DS patients have been reported to have a congenital heart defect (CHD), mostly of the conotruncal type, and/or aortic arch defect. The etiology of the cardiac phenotypic variability is not currently known for the majority of patients. We hypothesized that rare copy number variants (CNVs) outside the 22q11.2 deleted region may modify the risk of being born with a CHD in this sensitized population. Rare CNV analysis was performed using Affymetrix SNP Array 6.0 data from 946 22q11DS subjects with CHDs (n = 607) or with normal cardiac anatomy (n = 339). Although there was no significant difference in the overall burden of rare CNVs, an overabundance of CNVs affecting cardiac-related genes was detected in 22q11DS individuals with CHDs. When the rare CNVs were examined with regard to gene interactions, specific cardiac networks, such as Wnt signaling, appear to be overrepresented in 22q11DS CHD cases but not 22q11DS controls with a normal heart. Collectively, these data suggest that CNVs outside the 22q11.2 region may contain genes that modify risk for CHDs in some 22q11DS patients.

  2. Copy number variation at 22q11.2: from rare variants to common mechanisms of developmental neuropsychiatric disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiroi, N; Takahashi, T; Hishimoto, A; Izumi, T; Boku, S; Hiramoto, T

    2013-01-01

    Recently discovered genome-wide rare copy number variants (CNVs) have unprecedented levels of statistical association with many developmental neuropsychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia, autism spectrum disorders, intellectual disability and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. However, as CNVs often include multiple genes, causal genes responsible for CNV-associated diagnoses and traits are still poorly understood. Mouse models of CNVs are in use to delve into the precise mechanisms through which CNVs contribute to disorders and associated traits. Based on human and mouse model studies on rare CNVs within human chromosome 22q11.2, we propose that alterations of a distinct set of multiple, noncontiguous genes encoded in this chromosomal region, in concert with modulatory impacts of genetic background and environmental factors, variably shift the probabilities of phenotypes along a predetermined developmental trajectory. This model can be further extended to the study of other CNVs and may serve as a guide to help characterize the impact of genes in developmental neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:23917946

  3. Recurrent Rare Genomic Copy Number Variants and Bicuspid Aortic Valve Are Enriched in Early Onset Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddharth Prakash

    Full Text Available Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections (TAAD are a major cause of death in the United States. The spectrum of TAAD ranges from genetic disorders, such as Marfan syndrome, to sporadic isolated disease of unknown cause. We hypothesized that genomic copy number variants (CNVs contribute causally to early onset TAAD (ETAAD. We conducted a genome-wide SNP array analysis of ETAAD patients of European descent who were enrolled in the National Registry of Genetically Triggered Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Cardiovascular Conditions (GenTAC. Genotyping was performed on the Illumina Omni-Express platform, using PennCNV, Nexus and CNVPartition for CNV detection. ETAAD patients (n = 108, 100% European American, 28% female, average age 20 years, 55% with bicuspid aortic valves were compared to 7013 dbGAP controls without a history of vascular disease using downsampled Omni 2.5 data. For comparison, 805 sporadic TAAD patients with late onset aortic disease (STAAD cohort and 192 affected probands from families with at least two affected relatives (FTAAD cohort from our institution were screened for additional CNVs at these loci with SNP arrays. We identified 47 recurrent CNV regions in the ETAAD, FTAAD and STAAD groups that were absent or extremely rare in controls. Nine rare CNVs that were either very large (>1 Mb or shared by ETAAD and STAAD or FTAAD patients were also identified. Four rare CNVs involved genes that cause arterial aneurysms when mutated. The largest and most prevalent of the recurrent CNVs were at Xq28 (two duplications and two deletions and 17q25.1 (three duplications. The percentage of individuals harboring rare CNVs was significantly greater in the ETAAD cohort (32% than in the FTAAD (23% or STAAD (17% cohorts. We identified multiple loci affected by rare CNVs in one-third of ETAAD patients, confirming the genetic heterogeneity of TAAD. Alterations of candidate genes at these loci may contribute to the pathogenesis of TAAD.

  4. Cognitive Performance Among Carriers of Pathogenic Copy Number Variants: Analysis of 152,000 UK Biobank Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Kimberley M; Rees, Elliott; Escott-Price, Valentina; Einon, Mark; Thomas, Rhys; Hewitt, Jonathan; O'Donovan, Michael C; Owen, Michael J; Walters, James T R; Kirov, George

    2017-07-15

    The UK Biobank is a unique resource for biomedical research, with extensive phenotypic and genetic data on half a million adults from the general population. We aimed to examine the effect of neurodevelopmental copy number variants (CNVs) on the cognitive performance of participants. We used Affymetrix Power Tools and PennCNV-Affy software to analyze Affymetrix microarrays of the first 152,728 genotyped individuals. We annotated a list of 93 CNVs and compared their frequencies with control datasets. We analyzed the performance on seven cognitive tests of carriers of 12 CNVs associated with schizophrenia (n = 1087) and of carriers of another 41 neurodevelopmental CNVs (n = 484). The frequencies of the 93 CNVs in the Biobank subjects were remarkably similar to those among 26,628 control subjects from other datasets. Carriers of schizophrenia-associated CNVs and of the group of 41 other neurodevelopmental CNVs had impaired performance on the cognitive tests, with nine of 14 comparisons remaining statistically significant after correction for multiple testing. They also had lower educational and occupational attainment (p values between 10 -7 and 10 -18 ). The deficits in cognitive performance were modest (Z score reductions between 0.01 and 0.51), compared with individuals with schizophrenia in the Biobank (Z score reductions between 0.35 and 0.90). This is the largest study on the cognitive phenotypes of CNVs to date. Adult carriers of neurodevelopmental CNVs from the general population have significant cognitive deficits. The UK Biobank will allow unprecedented opportunities for analysis of further phenotypic consequences of CNVs. Copyright © 2016 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Bamgineer: Introduction of simulated allele-specific copy number variants into exome and targeted sequence data sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samadian, Soroush; Bruce, Jeff P; Pugh, Trevor J

    2018-03-01

    Somatic copy number variations (CNVs) play a crucial role in development of many human cancers. The broad availability of next-generation sequencing data has enabled the development of algorithms to computationally infer CNV profiles from a variety of data types including exome and targeted sequence data; currently the most prevalent types of cancer genomics data. However, systemic evaluation and comparison of these tools remains challenging due to a lack of ground truth reference sets. To address this need, we have developed Bamgineer, a tool written in Python to introduce user-defined haplotype-phased allele-specific copy number events into an existing Binary Alignment Mapping (BAM) file, with a focus on targeted and exome sequencing experiments. As input, this tool requires a read alignment file (BAM format), lists of non-overlapping genome coordinates for introduction of gains and losses (bed file), and an optional file defining known haplotypes (vcf format). To improve runtime performance, Bamgineer introduces the desired CNVs in parallel using queuing and parallel processing on a local machine or on a high-performance computing cluster. As proof-of-principle, we applied Bamgineer to a single high-coverage (mean: 220X) exome sequence file from a blood sample to simulate copy number profiles of 3 exemplar tumors from each of 10 tumor types at 5 tumor cellularity levels (20-100%, 150 BAM files in total). To demonstrate feasibility beyond exome data, we introduced read alignments to a targeted 5-gene cell-free DNA sequencing library to simulate EGFR amplifications at frequencies consistent with circulating tumor DNA (10, 1, 0.1 and 0.01%) while retaining the multimodal insert size distribution of the original data. We expect Bamgineer to be of use for development and systematic benchmarking of CNV calling algorithms by users using locally-generated data for a variety of applications. The source code is freely available at http://github.com/pughlab/bamgineer.

  6. SCRIB and PUF60 are primary drivers of the multisystemic phenotypes of the 8q24.3 copy-number variant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dauber, Andrew; Golzio, Christelle; Guenot, Cécile

    2013-01-01

    Copy-number variants (CNVs) represent a significant interpretative challenge, given that each CNV typically affects the dosage of multiple genes. Here we report on five individuals with coloboma, microcephaly, developmental delay, short stature, and craniofacial, cardiac, and renal defects who...... phenotype, and the combinatorial suppression of both genes exacerbated some, but not all, phenotypic components. Consistent with these findings, we identified an individual with microcephaly, short stature, intellectual disability, and heart defects with a de novo c.505C>T variant leading to a p.His169Tyr...

  7. Characterization of the Copy Number and Variants of Deformed Wing Virus (DWV in the Pairs of Honey Bee Pupa and Infesting Varroa destructor or Tropilaelaps mercedesae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunfei Wu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent honey bee colony losses, particularly during the winter, have been shown to be associated with the presence of both ectoparasitic mites and Deformed Wing Virus (DWV. Whilst the role of Varroa destructor mites as a viral vector is well established, the role of Tropilaelaps mercedesae mites in viral transmission has not been fully investigated. In this study, we tested the effects that V. destructor and T. mercedesae infestation have on fluctuation of the DWV copy number and alteration of the virus variants in honey bees by characterizing individual pupae and their infesting mites. We observed that both mite species were associated with increased viral copy number in honey bee pupae. We found a positive correlation between DWV copy number in pupae and copy number in infesting mites, and the same DWV type A variant was present in either low or high copy number in both honey bee pupae and infesting V. destructor. These data also suggest that variant diversity is similar between honey bee pupae and the mites that infest them. These results support a previously proposed hypothesis that DWV suppresses the honey bee immune system when virus copy number reaches a specific threshold, promoting greater replication.

  8. A copy number variant at the KITLG locus likely confers risk for canine squamous cell carcinoma of the digit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle M Karyadi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The domestic dog is a robust model for studying the genetics of complex disease susceptibility. The strategies used to develop and propagate modern breeds have resulted in an elevated risk for specific diseases in particular breeds. One example is that of Standard Poodles (STPOs, who have increased risk for squamous cell carcinoma of the digit (SCCD, a locally aggressive cancer that causes lytic bone lesions, sometimes with multiple toe recurrence. However, only STPOs of dark coat color are at high risk; light colored STPOs are almost entirely unaffected, suggesting that interactions between multiple pathways are necessary for oncogenesis. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS on STPOs, comparing 31 SCCD cases to 34 unrelated black STPO controls. The peak SNP on canine chromosome 15 was statistically significant at the genome-wide level (P(raw = 1.60 × 10(-7; P(genome = 0.0066. Additional mapping resolved the region to the KIT Ligand (KITLG locus. Comparison of STPO cases to other at-risk breeds narrowed the locus to a 144.9-Kb region. Haplotype mapping among 84 STPO cases identified a minimal region of 28.3 Kb. A copy number variant (CNV containing predicted enhancer elements was found to be strongly associated with SCCD in STPOs (P = 1.72 × 10(-8. Light colored STPOs carry the CNV risk alleles at the same frequency as black STPOs, but are not susceptible to SCCD. A GWAS comparing 24 black and 24 light colored STPOs highlighted only the MC1R locus as significantly different between the two datasets, suggesting that a compensatory mutation within the MC1R locus likely protects light colored STPOs from disease. Our findings highlight a role for KITLG in SCCD susceptibility, as well as demonstrate that interactions between the KITLG and MC1R loci are potentially required for SCCD oncogenesis. These findings highlight how studies of breed-limited diseases are useful for disentangling multigene disorders.

  9. Identification of rare high-risk copy number variants affecting the dopamine transporter gene in mental disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoeffding, Louise Kristine Enggaard; Duong, Linh T T; Ingason, Andres

    2016-01-01

    rare high-risk variants of psychiatric disorders. METHODS: We performed a systematic screening for CNVs affecting SLC6A3 in 761 healthy controls, 672 schizophrenia patients, and 194 patients with bipolar disorder in addition to 253 family members from six large pedigrees affected by mental disorders...

  10. Identification and Functional Characterization of G6PC2 Coding Variants Influencing Glycemic Traits Define an Effector Transcript at the G6PC2-ABCB11 Locus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Anubha; Sim, Xueling; Ng, Hui Jin; Manning, Alisa; Rivas, Manuel A.; Highland, Heather M.; Locke, Adam E.; Grarup, Niels; Im, Hae Kyung; Cingolani, Pablo; Flannick, Jason; Fontanillas, Pierre; Fuchsberger, Christian; Gaulton, Kyle J.; Teslovich, Tanya M.; Rayner, N. William; Robertson, Neil R.; Beer, Nicola L.; Rundle, Jana K.; Bork-Jensen, Jette; Ladenvall, Claes; Blancher, Christine; Buck, David; Buck, Gemma; Burtt, Noël P.; Gabriel, Stacey; Gjesing, Anette P.; Groves, Christopher J.; Hollensted, Mette; Huyghe, Jeroen R.; Jackson, Anne U.; Jun, Goo; Justesen, Johanne Marie; Mangino, Massimo; Murphy, Jacquelyn; Neville, Matt; Onofrio, Robert; Small, Kerrin S.; Stringham, Heather M.; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Trakalo, Joseph; Abecasis, Goncalo; Bell, Graeme I.; Blangero, John; Cox, Nancy J.; Duggirala, Ravindranath; Hanis, Craig L.; Seielstad, Mark; Wilson, James G.; Christensen, Cramer; Brandslund, Ivan; Rauramaa, Rainer; Surdulescu, Gabriela L.; Doney, Alex S. F.; Lannfelt, Lars; Linneberg, Allan; Isomaa, Bo; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Jørgensen, Marit E.; Jørgensen, Torben; Kuusisto, Johanna; Uusitupa, Matti; Salomaa, Veikko; Spector, Timothy D.; Morris, Andrew D.; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Collins, Francis S.; Mohlke, Karen L.; Bergman, Richard N.; Ingelsson, Erik; Lind, Lars; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Hansen, Torben; Watanabe, Richard M.; Prokopenko, Inga; Dupuis, Josee; Karpe, Fredrik; Groop, Leif; Laakso, Markku; Pedersen, Oluf; Florez, Jose C.; Morris, Andrew P.; Altshuler, David; Meigs, James B.; Boehnke, Michael; McCarthy, Mark I.; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Gloyn, Anna L.

    2015-01-01

    Genome wide association studies (GWAS) for fasting glucose (FG) and insulin (FI) have identified common variant signals which explain 4.8% and 1.2% of trait variance, respectively. It is hypothesized that low-frequency and rare variants could contribute substantially to unexplained genetic variance. To test this, we analyzed exome-array data from up to 33,231 non-diabetic individuals of European ancestry. We found exome-wide significant (P<5×10-7) evidence for two loci not previously highlighted by common variant GWAS: GLP1R (p.Ala316Thr, minor allele frequency (MAF)=1.5%) influencing FG levels, and URB2 (p.Glu594Val, MAF = 0.1%) influencing FI levels. Coding variant associations can highlight potential effector genes at (non-coding) GWAS signals. At the G6PC2/ABCB11 locus, we identified multiple coding variants in G6PC2 (p.Val219Leu, p.His177Tyr, and p.Tyr207Ser) influencing FG levels, conditionally independent of each other and the non-coding GWAS signal. In vitro assays demonstrate that these associated coding alleles result in reduced protein abundance via proteasomal degradation, establishing G6PC2 as an effector gene at this locus. Reconciliation of single-variant associations and functional effects was only possible when haplotype phase was considered. In contrast to earlier reports suggesting that, paradoxically, glucose-raising alleles at this locus are protective against type 2 diabetes (T2D), the p.Val219Leu G6PC2 variant displayed a modest but directionally consistent association with T2D risk. Coding variant associations for glycemic traits in GWAS signals highlight PCSK1, RREB1, and ZHX3 as likely effector transcripts. These coding variant association signals do not have a major impact on the trait variance explained, but they do provide valuable biological insights. PMID:25625282

  11. Identification and functional characterization of G6PC2 coding variants influencing glycemic traits define an effector transcript at the G6PC2-ABCB11 locus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anubha Mahajan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Genome wide association studies (GWAS for fasting glucose (FG and insulin (FI have identified common variant signals which explain 4.8% and 1.2% of trait variance, respectively. It is hypothesized that low-frequency and rare variants could contribute substantially to unexplained genetic variance. To test this, we analyzed exome-array data from up to 33,231 non-diabetic individuals of European ancestry. We found exome-wide significant (P<5×10-7 evidence for two loci not previously highlighted by common variant GWAS: GLP1R (p.Ala316Thr, minor allele frequency (MAF=1.5% influencing FG levels, and URB2 (p.Glu594Val, MAF = 0.1% influencing FI levels. Coding variant associations can highlight potential effector genes at (non-coding GWAS signals. At the G6PC2/ABCB11 locus, we identified multiple coding variants in G6PC2 (p.Val219Leu, p.His177Tyr, and p.Tyr207Ser influencing FG levels, conditionally independent of each other and the non-coding GWAS signal. In vitro assays demonstrate that these associated coding alleles result in reduced protein abundance via proteasomal degradation, establishing G6PC2 as an effector gene at this locus. Reconciliation of single-variant associations and functional effects was only possible when haplotype phase was considered. In contrast to earlier reports suggesting that, paradoxically, glucose-raising alleles at this locus are protective against type 2 diabetes (T2D, the p.Val219Leu G6PC2 variant displayed a modest but directionally consistent association with T2D risk. Coding variant associations for glycemic traits in GWAS signals highlight PCSK1, RREB1, and ZHX3 as likely effector transcripts. These coding variant association signals do not have a major impact on the trait variance explained, but they do provide valuable biological insights.

  12. Identification of rare recurrent copy number variants in high-risk autism families and their prevalence in a large ASD population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nori Matsunami

    Full Text Available Structural variation is thought to play a major etiological role in the development of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs, and numerous studies documenting the relevance of copy number variants (CNVs in ASD have been published since 2006. To determine if large ASD families harbor high-impact CNVs that may have broader impact in the general ASD population, we used the Affymetrix genome-wide human SNP array 6.0 to identify 153 putative autism-specific CNVs present in 55 individuals with ASD from 9 multiplex ASD pedigrees. To evaluate the actual prevalence of these CNVs as well as 185 CNVs reportedly associated with ASD from published studies many of which are insufficiently powered, we designed a custom Illumina array and used it to interrogate these CNVs in 3,000 ASD cases and 6,000 controls. Additional single nucleotide variants (SNVs on the array identified 25 CNVs that we did not detect in our family studies at the standard SNP array resolution. After molecular validation, our results demonstrated that 15 CNVs identified in high-risk ASD families also were found in two or more ASD cases with odds ratios greater than 2.0, strengthening their support as ASD risk variants. In addition, of the 25 CNVs identified using SNV probes on our custom array, 9 also had odds ratios greater than 2.0, suggesting that these CNVs also are ASD risk variants. Eighteen of the validated CNVs have not been reported previously in individuals with ASD and three have only been observed once. Finally, we confirmed the association of 31 of 185 published ASD-associated CNVs in our dataset with odds ratios greater than 2.0, suggesting they may be of clinical relevance in the evaluation of children with ASDs. Taken together, these data provide strong support for the existence and application of high-impact CNVs in the clinical genetic evaluation of children with ASD.

  13. Subthreshold depression based on functional impairment better defined by symptom severity than by number of DSM-IV symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    Karsten, J.; Hartman, C. A.; Ormel, J.; Nolen, W. A.; Penninx, B. W. J. H.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Depression with fewer symptoms than required for a DSM-IV diagnosis of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) has consistently been found to be associated with functional impairment. In this study, we aim to define clinically significant depression below the DSM-IV threshold for Major Depressive Disorder (MOD) by means of functional impairment. Methods: Data used are from 2157 respondents of the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA). The Composite International Diagnostic I...

  14. General Electric Company study for defining the number of residential and non-residential projects, National Solar Demonstration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1976-04-01

    The methodology used to perform the ''Parametric Study'' to define a recommended demonstration program involved a decision making process. In this approach, selective solar buying factors were quantitatively evaluated for influencing key decision makers to install solar HVAC equipment. The selection of the recommended demo level also considered the probability of a decision maker actually seeing a demonstration as a function of how far he is located from a demo and how far he is willing to travel to see one. Demonstration levels of 200, 400, 800, 1600 and 3200 were assumed to determine the effects on Solar HVAC market penetration. The 800 demo level program is recommended to effectively stimulate the private sector to install solar HVAC systems. (WDM)

  15. Performance Evaluation of NIPT in Detection of Chromosomal Copy Number Variants Using Low-Coverage Whole-Genome Sequencing of Plasma DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Hongtai; Gao, Ya; Hu, Zhiyang

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to assess the performance of noninvasively prenatal testing (NIPT) for fetal copy number variants (CNVs) in clinical samples, using a whole-genome sequencing method. Method A total of 919 archived maternal plasma samples with karyotyping/microarray results...... through Maternal Plasma Sequencing (FCAPS) to compare to the karyotyping/microarray results. Sensitivity, specificity and were evaluated. Results 33 samples with deletions/duplications ranging from 1 to 129 Mb were detected with the consistent CNV size and location to karyotyping/microarray results......, including 33 CNVs samples and 886 normal samples from September 1, 2011 to May 31, 2013, were enrolled in this study. The samples were randomly rearranged and blindly sequenced by low-coverage (about 7M reads) whole-genome sequencing of plasma DNA. Fetal CNVs were detected by Fetal Copy-number Analysis...

  16. Bamgineer: Introduction of simulated allele-specific copy number variants into exome and targeted sequence data sets

    OpenAIRE

    Bruce, Jeff; Pugh, Trevor; Samadian, Soroush

    2017-01-01

    Somatic copy number variations (CNVs) play a crucial role in development of many human cancers. The broad availability of next-generation sequencing data has enabled the development of algorithms to computationally infer CNV profiles from a variety of data types including exome and targeted sequence data; currently the most prevalent types of cancer genomics data. However, systemic evaluation and comparison of these tools remains challenging due to a lack of ground truth reference sets. To ad...

  17. Rare copy number variants observed in hereditary breast cancer cases disrupt genes in estrogen signaling and TP53 tumor suppression network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katri Pylkäs

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women in developed countries, and the contribution of genetic susceptibility to breast cancer development has been well-recognized. However, a great proportion of these hereditary predisposing factors still remain unidentified. To examine the contribution of rare copy number variants (CNVs in breast cancer predisposition, high-resolution genome-wide scans were performed on genomic DNA of 103 BRCA1, BRCA2, and PALB2 mutation negative familial breast cancer cases and 128 geographically matched healthy female controls; for replication an independent cohort of 75 similarly mutation negative young breast cancer patients was used. All observed rare variants were confirmed by independent methods. The studied breast cancer cases showed a consistent increase in the frequency of rare CNVs when compared to controls. Furthermore, the biological networks of the disrupted genes differed between the two groups. In familial cases the observed mutations disrupted genes, which were significantly overrepresented in cellular functions related to maintenance of genomic integrity, including DNA double-strand break repair (P = 0.0211. Biological network analysis in the two independent breast cancer cohorts showed that the disrupted genes were closely related to estrogen signaling and TP53 centered tumor suppressor network. These results suggest that rare CNVs represent an alternative source of genetic variation influencing hereditary risk for breast cancer.

  18. Use of whole genome deep sequencing to define emerging minority variants in virus envelope genes in herpesvirus treated with novel antimicrobial K21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tweedy, Joshua G; Prusty, Bhupesh K; Gompels, Ursula A

    2017-10-01

    New antivirals are required to prevent rising antimicrobial resistance from replication inhibitors. The aim of this study was to analyse the range of emerging mutations in herpesvirus by whole genome deep sequencing. We tested human herpesvirus 6 treatment with novel antiviral K21, where evidence indicated distinct effects on virus envelope proteins. We treated BACmid cloned virus in order to analyse mechanisms and candidate targets for resistance. Illumina based next generation sequencing technology enabled analyses of mutations in 85 genes to depths of 10,000 per base detecting low prevalent minority variants (<1%). After four passages in tissue culture the untreated virus accumulated mutations in infected cells giving an emerging mixed population (45-73%) of non-synonymous SNPs in six genes including two envelope glycoproteins. Strikingly, treatment with K21 did not accumulate the passage mutations; instead a high frequency mutation was selected in envelope protein gQ2, part of the gH/gL complex essential for herpesvirus infection. This introduced a stop codon encoding a truncation mutation previously observed in increased virion production. There was reduced detection of the glycoprotein complex in infected cells. This supports a novel pathway for K21 targeting virion envelopes distinct from replication inhibition. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Accurate clinical detection of exon copy number variants in a targeted NGS panel using DECoN [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Fowler

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Targeted next generation sequencing (NGS panels are increasingly being used in clinical genomics to increase capacity, throughput and affordability of gene testing. Identifying whole exon deletions or duplications (termed exon copy number variants, ‘exon CNVs’ in exon-targeted NGS panels has proved challenging, particularly for single exon CNVs.  Methods: We developed a tool for the Detection of Exon Copy Number variants (DECoN, which is optimised for analysis of exon-targeted NGS panels in the clinical setting. We evaluated DECoN performance using 96 samples with independently validated exon CNV data. We performed simulations to evaluate DECoN detection performance of single exon CNVs and to evaluate performance using different coverage levels and sample numbers. Finally, we implemented DECoN in a clinical laboratory that tests BRCA1 and BRCA2 with the TruSight Cancer Panel (TSCP. We used DECoN to analyse 1,919 samples, validating exon CNV detections by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA.  Results: In the evaluation set, DECoN achieved 100% sensitivity and 99% specificity for BRCA exon CNVs, including identification of 8 single exon CNVs. DECoN also identified 14/15 exon CNVs in 8 other genes. Simulations of all possible BRCA single exon CNVs gave a mean sensitivity of 98% for deletions and 95% for duplications. DECoN performance remained excellent with different levels of coverage and sample numbers; sensitivity and specificity was >98% with the typical NGS run parameters. In the clinical pipeline, DECoN automatically analyses pools of 48 samples at a time, taking 24 minutes per pool, on average. DECoN detected 24 BRCA exon CNVs, of which 23 were confirmed by MLPA, giving a false discovery rate of 4%. Specificity was 99.7%.  Conclusions: DECoN is a fast, accurate, exon CNV detection tool readily implementable in research and clinical NGS pipelines. It has high sensitivity and specificity and acceptable

  20. Performance Evaluation of NIPT in Detection of Chromosomal Copy Number Variants Using Low-Coverage Whole-Genome Sequencing of Plasma DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongtai; Gao, Ya; Hu, Zhiyang; Lin, Linhua; Yin, Xuyang; Wang, Jun; Chen, Dayang; Chen, Fang; Jiang, Hui; Ren, Jinghui; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the performance of noninvasively prenatal testing (NIPT) for fetal copy number variants (CNVs) in clinical samples, using a whole-genome sequencing method. A total of 919 archived maternal plasma samples with karyotyping/microarray results, including 33 CNVs samples and 886 normal samples from September 1, 2011 to May 31, 2013, were enrolled in this study. The samples were randomly rearranged and blindly sequenced by low-coverage (about 7M reads) whole-genome sequencing of plasma DNA. Fetal CNVs were detected by Fetal Copy-number Analysis through Maternal Plasma Sequencing (FCAPS) to compare to the karyotyping/microarray results. Sensitivity, specificity and were evaluated. 33 samples with deletions/duplications ranging from 1 to 129 Mb were detected with the consistent CNV size and location to karyotyping/microarray results in the study. Ten false positive results and two false negative results were obtained. The sensitivity and specificity of detection deletions/duplications were 84.21% and 98.42%, respectively. Whole-genome sequencing-based NIPT has high performance in detecting genome-wide CNVs, in particular >10Mb CNVs using the current FCAPS algorithm. It is possible to implement the current method in NIPT to prenatally screening for fetal CNVs.

  1. Autism-specific copy number variants further implicate the phosphatidylinositol signaling pathway and the glutamatergic synapse in the etiology of the disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuscó, Ivon; Medrano, Andrés; Gener, Blanca; Vilardell, Mireia; Gallastegui, Fátima; Villa, Olaya; González, Eva; Rodríguez-Santiago, Benjamín; Vilella, Elisabet; Del Campo, Miguel; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A

    2009-05-15

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) constitute a group of severe neurodevelopmental conditions with complex multifactorial etiology. In order to explore the hypothesis that submicroscopic genomic rearrangements underlie some ASD cases, we have analyzed 96 Spanish patients with idiopathic ASD after extensive clinical and laboratory screening, by array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) using a homemade bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) array. Only 13 of the 238 detected copy number alterations, ranging in size from 89 kb to 2.4 Mb, were present specifically in the autistic population (12 out of 96 individuals, 12.5%). Following validation by additional molecular techniques, we have characterized these novel candidate regions containing 24 different genes including alterations in two previously reported regions of chromosome 7 associated with the ASD phenotype. Some of the genes located in ASD-specific copy number variants act in common pathways, most notably the phosphatidylinositol signaling and the glutamatergic synapse, both known to be affected in several genetic syndromes related with autism and previously associated with ASD. Our work supports the idea that the functional alteration of genes in related neuronal networks is involved in the etiology of the ASD phenotype and confirms a significant diagnostic yield for aCGH, which should probably be included in the diagnostic workup of idiopathic ASD.

  2. A robust variant of block Jacobi-Davidson for extracting a large number of eigenpairs: Application to grid-based real-space density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M; Leiter, K; Eisner, C; Breuer, A; Wang, X

    2017-09-21

    In this work, we investigate a block Jacobi-Davidson (J-D) variant suitable for sparse symmetric eigenproblems where a substantial number of extremal eigenvalues are desired (e.g., ground-state real-space quantum chemistry). Most J-D algorithm variations tend to slow down as the number of desired eigenpairs increases due to frequent orthogonalization against a growing list of solved eigenvectors. In our specification of block J-D, all of the steps of the algorithm are performed in clusters, including the linear solves, which allows us to greatly reduce computational effort with blocked matrix-vector multiplies. In addition, we move orthogonalization against locked eigenvectors and working eigenvectors outside of the inner loop but retain the single Ritz vector projection corresponding to the index of the correction vector. Furthermore, we minimize the computational effort by constraining the working subspace to the current vectors being updated and the latest set of corresponding correction vectors. Finally, we incorporate accuracy thresholds based on the precision required by the Fermi-Dirac distribution. The net result is a significant reduction in the computational effort against most previous block J-D implementations, especially as the number of wanted eigenpairs grows. We compare our approach with another robust implementation of block J-D (JDQMR) and the state-of-the-art Chebyshev filter subspace (CheFSI) method for various real-space density functional theory systems. Versus CheFSI, for first-row elements, our method yields competitive timings for valence-only systems and 4-6× speedups for all-electron systems with up to 10× reduced matrix-vector multiplies. For all-electron calculations on larger elements (e.g., gold) where the wanted spectrum is quite narrow compared to the full spectrum, we observe 60× speedup with 200× fewer matrix-vector multiples vs. CheFSI.

  3. Search for copy number variants in chromosomes 15q11-q13 and 22q11.2 in obsessive compulsive disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grabe Hans

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD is a clinically and etiologically heterogeneous syndrome. The high frequency of obsessive-compulsive symptoms reported in subjects with the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (DiGeorge/velocardiofacial syndrome or Prader-Willi syndrome (15q11-13 deletion of the paternally derived chromosome, suggests that gene dosage effects in these chromosomal regions could increase risk for OCD. Therefore, the aim of this study was to search for microrearrangements in these two regions in OCD patients. Methods We screened the 15q11-13 and 22q11.2 chromosomal regions for genomic imbalances in 236 patients with OCD using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA. Results No deletions or duplications involving 15q11-13 or 22q11.2 were identified in our patients. Conclusions Our results suggest that deletions/duplications of chromosomes 15q11-13 and 22q11.2 are rare in OCD. Despite the negative findings in these two regions, the search for copy number variants in OCD using genome-wide array-based methods is a highly promising approach to identify genes of etiologic importance in the development of OCD.

  4. Copy number variants and VNTR length polymorphisms of the carboxyl-ester lipase (CEL) gene as risk factors in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalva, Monica; El Jellas, Khadija; Steine, Solrun J; Johansson, Bente B; Ringdal, Monika; Torsvik, Janniche; Immervoll, Heike; Hoem, Dag; Laemmerhirt, Felix; Simon, Peter; Lerch, Markus M; Johansson, Stefan; Njølstad, Pål R; Weiss, Frank U; Fjeld, Karianne; Molven, Anders

    We have recently described copy number variants (CNVs) of the human carboxyl-ester lipase (CEL) gene, including a recombined deletion allele (CEL-HYB) that is a genetic risk factor for chronic pancreatitis. Associations with pancreatic disease have also been reported for the variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) region located in CEL exon 11. Here, we examined if CEL CNVs and VNTR length polymorphisms affect the risk for developing pancreatic cancer. CEL CNVs and VNTR were genotyped in a German family with non-alcoholic chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer, in 265 German and 197 Norwegian patients diagnosed with pancreatic adenocarcinoma, and in 882 controls. CNV screening was performed using PCR assays followed by agarose gel electrophoresis whereas VNTR lengths were determined by DNA fragment analysis. The investigated family was CEL-HYB-positive. However, an association of CEL-HYB or a duplication CEL allele with pancreatic cancer was not seen in our two patient cohorts. The frequency of the 23-repeat VNTR allele was borderline significant in Norwegian cases compared to controls (1.2% vs. 0.3%; P = 0.05). For all other VNTR lengths, no statistically significant difference in frequency was observed. Moreover, no association with pancreatic cancer was detected when CEL VNTR lengths were pooled into groups of short, normal or long alleles. We could not demonstrate an association between CEL CNVs and pancreatic cancer. An association is also unlikely for CEL VNTR lengths, although analyses in larger materials are necessary to completely exclude an effect of rare VNTR alleles. Copyright © 2016 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Variants of cellobiohydrolases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bott, Richard R.; Foukaraki, Maria; Hommes, Ronaldus Wilhelmus; Kaper, Thijs; Kelemen, Bradley R.; Kralj, Slavko; Nikolaev, Igor; Sandgren, Mats; Van Lieshout, Johannes Franciscus Thomas; Van Stigt Thans, Sander

    2018-04-10

    Disclosed are a number of homologs and variants of Hypocrea jecorina Ce17A (formerly Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase I or CBH1), nucleic acids encoding the same and methods for producing the same. The homologs and variant cellulases have the amino acid sequence of a glycosyl hydrolase of family 7A wherein one or more amino acid residues are substituted and/or deleted.

  6. "They Can't Find Anything Wrong with Him, Yet": Mothers' experiences of parenting an infant with a prenatally diagnosed copy number variant (CNV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner-Lin, Allison; Walser, Sarah; Barg, Frances K; Bernhardt, Barbara A

    2017-02-01

    Chromosome microarray (CMA) testing is used widely in prenatal settings. Some copy number variants (CNVs) detected using CMA are associated with variable or uncertain phenotype and/or possible neurocognitive involvement. Little is known about parenting an infant following such findings. Researchers conducted interviews with 23 mothers of infants diagnosed prenatally with a potentially pathogenic CNV to elicit perspectives on the child's development and disclosure of results to others. Interviews were audiotaped and analyzed for common themes. Most respondents reported their infants were developing typically. The majority expressed concern about their child's future development given the CNV. They reassured themselves their child was unaffected by: comparing him/her to siblings, scrutinizing the child's appearance and behavior, or following provider reassurances. Even without developmental and neurological concerns, some remained acutely observant of their child's neurocognitive development, leading to enrollment in early intervention or ongoing medical assessments. Mothers who were unconcerned stated they would likely attribute atypical behavior or developmental to the CNV. All interviewees shared the result with pediatricians, relatives, or friends, and many shared across groups. Most shared information with pregnant friends considering prenatal testing, but withheld partial or full information from family members due to stigma, lack of understanding, inability to explain the CNV, or presumptions that the child was unaffected. Research must address the long-term consequences of returning uncertain results for parent-child bonding and costs of ongoing assessment and early intervention for typically developing children. Follow up appointments will permit providers to screen for anxiety and assuage worry in the absence of symptoms. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. The development of standard samples with a defined number of antigen-specific T cells to harmonize T cell assays: a proof-of-principle study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Satwinder Kaur; Tummers, Bart; Schumacher, Ton N; Gomez, Raquel; Franken, Kees L M C; Verdegaal, Els M; Laske, Karoline; Gouttefangeas, Cécile; Ottensmeier, Christian; Welters, Marij J P; Britten, Cedrik M; van der Burg, Sjoerd H

    2013-03-01

    The validation of assays that quantify antigen-specific T cell responses is critically dependent on cell samples that contain clearly defined measurable numbers of antigen-specific T cells. An important requirement is that such cell samples are handled and analyzed in a comparable fashion to peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). We performed a proof-of-principle study to show that retrovirally TCR-transduced T cells spiked at defined numbers in autologous PBMC can be used as standard samples for HLA/peptide multimer staining. NY-ESO-1157-165-specific, TCR-transduced CD8+ T cell batches were successfully generated from PBMC of several HLA-A*0201 healthy donors, purified by magnetic cell sorting on the basis of HLA tetramer (TM) staining and expanded with specific antigen in vitro. When subsequently spiked into autologous PBMC, the detection of these CD3+CD8+TM+ T cells was highly accurate with a mean accuracy of 91.6 %. The standard cells can be preserved for a substantial period of time in liquid nitrogen. Furthermore, TM staining of fresh and cryopreserved standard samples diluted at decreasing concentrations into autologous cryopreserved unspiked PBMC revealed that the spiked CD3+CD8+TM+ T cells could be accurately detected at all dilutions in a linear fashion with a goodness-of-fit of over 0.99 at a frequency of at least 0.02 % among the CD3+CD8+ T cell population. Notably, the CD3+CD8+TM+ cells of the standard samples were located exactly within the gates used to analyze patient samples and displayed a similar scatter pattern. The performance of the cryopreserved standard samples in the hands of 5 external investigators was good with an inter-laboratory variation of 32.9 % and the doubtless identification of one outlier.

  8. A de novo mosaic mutation in SPAST with two novel alternative alleles and chromosomal copy number variant in a boy with spastic paraplegia and autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, A M; Tarailo-Graovac, M; Price, E M; Blydt-Hansen, I; Ghani, A; Drögemöller, B I; Robinson, W P; Ross, C J; Wasserman, W W; Siden, H; van Karnebeek, C D

    2017-10-01

    Here we report a 12 year old male with an extreme presentation of spastic paraplegia along with autism and dysmorphisms. Whole exome sequencing identified a predicted pathogenic pair of missense variants in SPAST at the same chromosomal location, each with a different alternative allele, while a chromosome microarray identified a 1.73 Mb paternally inherited copy gain of 1q21.1q21.2 resulting in a blended phenotype of both Spastic paraplegia 4 and 1q21.1 microduplication syndrome. We believe that the extreme phenotype observed is likely caused by the presence of cells which contain only mutant SPAST, but that the viability of the patient is possible due mosaicism of mutant alleles observed in different proportions across tissues. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Intact Protein Analysis at 21 Tesla and X-Ray Crystallography Define Structural Differences in Single Amino Acid Variants of Human Mitochondrial Branched-Chain Amino Acid Aminotransferase 2 (BCAT2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Lissa C.; Håkansson, Maria; Walse, Björn; Nilsson, Carol L.

    2017-09-01

    Structural technologies are an essential component in the design of precision therapeutics. Precision medicine entails the development of therapeutics directed toward a designated target protein, with the goal to deliver the right drug to the right patient at the right time. In the field of oncology, protein structural variants are often associated with oncogenic potential. In a previous proteogenomic screen of patient-derived glioblastoma (GBM) tumor materials, we identified a sequence variant of human mitochondrial branched-chain amino acid aminotransferase 2 as a putative factor of resistance of GBM to standard-of-care-treatments. The enzyme generates glutamate, which is neurotoxic. To elucidate structural coordinates that may confer altered substrate binding or activity of the variant BCAT2 T186R, a 45 kDa protein, we applied combined ETD and CID top-down mass spectrometry in a LC-FT-ICR MS at 21 T, and X-Ray crystallography in the study of both the variant and non-variant intact proteins. The combined ETD/CID fragmentation pattern allowed for not only extensive sequence coverage but also confident localization of the amino acid variant to its position in the sequence. The crystallographic experiments confirmed the hypothesis generated by in silico structural homology modeling, that the Lys59 side-chain of BCAT2 may repulse the Arg186 in the variant protein (PDB code: 5MPR), leading to destabilization of the protein dimer and altered enzyme kinetics. Taken together, the MS and novel 3D structural data give us reason to further pursue BCAT2 T186R as a precision drug target in GBM. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  10. Identification and Functional Characterization of G6PC2 Coding Variants Influencing Glycemic Traits Define an Effector Transcript at the G6PC2-ABCB11 Locus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahajan, Anubha; Sim, Xueling; Ng, Hui Jin

    2015-01-01

    . To test this, we analyzed exome-array data from up to 33,231 non-diabetic individuals of European ancestry. We found exome-wide significant (P1R (p.Ala316Thr, minor allele frequency (MAF)=1.5%) influencing FG levels...... and functional effects was only possible when haplotype phase was considered. In contrast to earlier reports suggesting that, paradoxically, glucose-raising alleles at this locus are protective against type 2 diabetes (T2D), the p.Val219Leu G6PC2 variant displayed a modest but directionally consistent......Genome wide association studies (GWAS) for fasting glucose (FG) and insulin (FI) have identified common variant signals which explain 4.8% and 1.2% of trait variance, respectively. It is hypothesized that low-frequency and rare variants could contribute substantially to unexplained genetic variance...

  11. Obesity, starch digestion and amylase: association between copy number variants at human salivary (AMY1) and pancreatic (AMY2) amylase genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Danielle; Dhar, Sugandha; Mitchell, Laura M; Fu, Beiyuan; Tyson, Jess; Shwan, Nzar A A; Yang, Fengtang; Thomas, Mark G; Armour, John A L

    2015-06-15

    The human salivary amylase genes display extensive copy number variation (CNV), and recent work has implicated this variation in adaptation to starch-rich diets, and in association with body mass index. In this work, we use paralogue ratio tests, microsatellite analysis, read depth and fibre-FISH to demonstrate that human amylase CNV is not a smooth continuum, but is instead partitioned into distinct haplotype classes. There is a fundamental structural distinction between haplotypes containing odd or even numbers of AMY1 gene units, in turn coupled to CNV in pancreatic amylase genes AMY2A and AMY2B. Most haplotypes have one copy each of AMY2A and AMY2B and contain an odd number of copies of AMY1; consequently, most individuals have an even total number of AMY1. In contrast, haplotypes carrying an even number of AMY1 genes have rearrangements leading to CNVs of AMY2A/AMY2B. Read-depth and experimental data show that different populations harbour different proportions of these basic haplotype classes. In Europeans, the copy numbers of AMY1 and AMY2A are correlated, so that phenotypic associations caused by variation in pancreatic amylase copy number could be detected indirectly as weak association with AMY1 copy number. We show that the quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay previously applied to the high-throughput measurement of AMY1 copy number is less accurate than the measures we use and that qPCR data in other studies have been further compromised by systematic miscalibration. Our results uncover new patterns in human amylase variation and imply a potential role for AMY2 CNV in functional associations. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  12. Obesity, starch digestion and amylase: association between copy number variants at human salivary (AMY1) and pancreatic (AMY2) amylase genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Danielle; Dhar, Sugandha; Mitchell, Laura M.; Fu, Beiyuan; Tyson, Jess; Shwan, Nzar A.A.; Yang, Fengtang; Thomas, Mark G.; Armour, John A.L.

    2015-01-01

    The human salivary amylase genes display extensive copy number variation (CNV), and recent work has implicated this variation in adaptation to starch-rich diets, and in association with body mass index. In this work, we use paralogue ratio tests, microsatellite analysis, read depth and fibre-FISH to demonstrate that human amylase CNV is not a smooth continuum, but is instead partitioned into distinct haplotype classes. There is a fundamental structural distinction between haplotypes containing odd or even numbers of AMY1 gene units, in turn coupled to CNV in pancreatic amylase genes AMY2A and AMY2B. Most haplotypes have one copy each of AMY2A and AMY2B and contain an odd number of copies of AMY1; consequently, most individuals have an even total number of AMY1. In contrast, haplotypes carrying an even number of AMY1 genes have rearrangements leading to CNVs of AMY2A/AMY2B. Read-depth and experimental data show that different populations harbour different proportions of these basic haplotype classes. In Europeans, the copy numbers of AMY1 and AMY2A are correlated, so that phenotypic associations caused by variation in pancreatic amylase copy number could be detected indirectly as weak association with AMY1 copy number. We show that the quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay previously applied to the high-throughput measurement of AMY1 copy number is less accurate than the measures we use and that qPCR data in other studies have been further compromised by systematic miscalibration. Our results uncover new patterns in human amylase variation and imply a potential role for AMY2 CNV in functional associations. PMID:25788522

  13. Association study of copy number variants in FCGR3A and FCGR3B gene with risk of ankylosing spondylitis in a Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Yang, Xiao; Cai, Guoqi; Xin, Lihong; Xia, Qing; Zhang, Xu; Li, Xiaona; Wang, Mengmeng; Wang, Kang; Xia, Guo; Xu, Shengqian; Xu, Jianhua; Zou, Yanfeng; Pan, Faming

    2016-03-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a common inherited autoimmune disease. Copy number variation (CNV) of DNA segments has been found to be an important part of genetic variation, and the FCGR3A and FCGR3B gene CNVs have been associated with various autoimmune disorders. The aim of the study was to determine whether CNVs of FCGR3A and FCGR3B were also associated with the susceptibility of AS. A total of 801 individuals including 402 AS patients and 399 healthy controls were enrolled in this study. The copy numbers of FCGR3 gene (two fragments, included FCGR3A and FCGR3B) were measured by AccuCopy™ methods. Chi-square test and logistic regression model were used to evaluate association between FCGR3 gene CNVs and AS susceptibility. P values, odds ratio, and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to estimate the effects of risk. Significantly, difference in the frequencies of FCGR3A and FCGR3B gene CNVs was founded between the patients with AS and controls. For the FCGR3A gene, a low (≤3) copy number was significantly associated with AS [for ≤3 copies versus 4 copies, (OR 2.17, 95% CI (1.41, 3.34), P < 0.001, adjusted OR 2.22, 95% CI (1.44, 3.43), P < 0.001)]. A low FCGR3B copy number was also significantly associated with increasing risk of AS [for ≤3 copies versus 4 copies, (OR 1.87, 95% CI (1.25, 2.79), P = 0.002, adjusted OR 1.94, 95% CI (1.29, 2.91), P = 0.001)]; however, both the high FCGR3A and FCGR3B copy numbers (≥5) were not significantly associated with the risk of AS (≥5 copies versus 4 copies). The lower copy numbers (≤3) of FCGR3A and FCGR3B genes confer a risk factor for AS susceptibility.

  14. Derivation of the Crick-Wyman equation for allosteric proteins defining the difference between the number of binding sites and the Hill coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poitevin, Frédéric; Edelstein, Stuart J

    2013-05-13

    In response to a 100-word footnote in the 1965 article by Monod, Wyman, and Changeux, a detailed manuscript signed by Francis Crick and Jeffries Wyman with 6000 words and 30 equations entitled "A Footnote on Allostery" circulated in 1965 among a limited group of scientists interested in allosteric interactions. This interesting and provocative document is published in this special issue for the first time. An intriguing equation in their text relates the difference between n (the number of ligand binding sites) and n' (the Hill coefficient) to the ratio of the saturation functions Y¯, for oligomers with n-1 and n binding sites. A compact derivation of this equation was not provided by Crick and Wyman, but one is presented here based on a definition of Y¯ involving the binding polynomial and its first derivative. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The profile and contribution of rare germline copy number variants to cancer risk in Li-Fraumeni patients negative for TP53 mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Amanda G; Krepischi, Ana Cristina Victorino; Pearson, Peter Lees; Hainaut, Pierre; Rosenberg, Carla; Achatz, Maria Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Background: The Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is an inherited rare cancer predisposition syndrome characterized by a variety of early-onset tumors. Although germline mutations in the tumor suppressor gene TP53 account for over 50% of the families matching LFS criteria, the lack of TP53 mutation in a significant proportion of LFS families, suggests that other types of inherited alterations must contribute to their cancer susceptibility. Recently, increases in copy number variation (CN...

  16. PCR-Based Simple Subgrouping Is Validated for Classification of Gliomas and Defines Negative Prognostic Copy Number Aberrations in IDH Mutant Gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakae, Shunsuke; Sasaki, Hikaru; Hayashi, Saeko; Hattori, Natsuki; Kumon, Masanobu; Nishiyama, Yuya; Adachi, Kazuhide; Nagahisa, Shinya; Hayashi, Takuro; Inamasu, Joji; Abe, Masato; Hasegawa, Mitsuhiro; Hirose, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    Genetic subgrouping of gliomas has been emphasized recently, particularly after the finding of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) mutations. In a previous study, we investigated whole-chromosome copy number aberrations (CNAs) of gliomas and have described genetic subgrouping based on CNAs and IDH1 mutations. Subsequently, we classified gliomas using simple polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods to improve the availability of genetic subgrouping. We selected IDH1/2 and TP53 as markers and analyzed 237 adult supratentorial gliomas using Sanger sequencing. Using these markers, we classified gliomas into three subgroups that were strongly associated with patient prognoses. These included IDH mutant gliomas without TP53 mutations, IDH mutant gliomas with TP53 mutations, and IDH wild-type gliomas. IDH mutant gliomas without TP53 mutations, which mostly corresponded to gliomas carrying 1p19q co-deletions, showed lower recurrence rates than the other 2 groups. In the other high-recurrence groups, the median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) of patients with IDH mutant gliomas with TP53 mutations were significantly longer than those of patients with IDH wild-type gliomas. Notably, most IDH mutant gliomas with TP53 mutations had at least one of the CNAs +7q, +8q, -9p, and -11p. Moreover, IDH mutant gliomas with at least one of these CNAs had a significantly worse prognosis than did other IDH mutant gliomas. PCR-based mutation analyses of IDH and TP53 were sufficient for simple genetic diagnosis of glioma that were strongly associated with prognosis of patients and enabled us to detect negative CNAs in IDH mutant gliomas.

  17. The profile and contribution of rare germline copy number variants to cancer risk in Li-Fraumeni patients negative for TP53 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Amanda G; Krepischi, Ana C V; Pearson, Peter L; Hainaut, Pierre; Rosenberg, Carla; Achatz, Maria Isabel

    2014-04-28

    The Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is an inherited rare cancer predisposition syndrome characterized by a variety of early-onset tumors. Although germline mutations in the tumor suppressor gene TP53 account for over 50% of the families matching LFS criteria, the lack of TP53 mutation in a significant proportion of LFS families, suggests that other types of inherited alterations must contribute to their cancer susceptibility. Recently, increases in copy number variation (CNV) have been reported in LFS individuals, and are also postulated to contribute to LFS phenotypic variability. Seventy probands from families fulfilling clinical criteria for either Li-Fraumeni or Li-Fraumeni-like (LFS/LFL) syndromes and negative for TP53 mutations were screened for germline CNVs. We found a significantly increased number of rare CNVs, which were smaller in size and presented higher gene density compared to the control group. These data were similar to the findings we reported previously on a cohort of patients with germline TP53 mutations, showing that LFS/LFL patients, regardless of their TP53 status, also share similar CNV profiles. These results, in conjunction with our previous analyses, suggest that both TP53-negative and positive LFS/LFL patients present a broad spectrum of germline genetic alterations affecting multiple loci, and that the genetic basis of LFS/LFL predisposition or penetrance in many cases might reside in germline transmission of CNVs.

  18. Both rare and de novo copy number variants are prevalent in agenesis of the corpus callosum but not in cerebellar hypoplasia or polymicrogyria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samin A Sajan

    Full Text Available Agenesis of the corpus callosum (ACC, cerebellar hypoplasia (CBLH, and polymicrogyria (PMG are severe congenital brain malformations with largely undiscovered causes. We conducted a large-scale chromosomal copy number variation (CNV discovery effort in 255 ACC, 220 CBLH, and 147 PMG patients, and 2,349 controls. Compared to controls, significantly more ACC, but unexpectedly not CBLH or PMG patients, had rare genic CNVs over one megabase (p = 1.48×10⁻³; odds ratio [OR] = 3.19; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.89-5.39. Rare genic CNVs were those that impacted at least one gene in less than 1% of the combined population of patients and controls. Compared to controls, significantly more ACC but not CBLH or PMG patients had rare CNVs impacting over 20 genes (p = 0.01; OR = 2.95; 95% CI = 1.69-5.18. Independent qPCR confirmation showed that 9.4% of ACC patients had de novo CNVs. These, in comparison to inherited CNVs, preferentially overlapped de novo CNVs previously observed in patients with autism spectrum disorders (p = 3.06×10⁻⁴; OR = 7.55; 95% CI = 2.40-23.72. Interestingly, numerous reports have shown a reduced corpus callosum area in autistic patients, and diminished social and executive function in many ACC patients. We also confirmed and refined previously known CNVs, including significantly narrowing the 8p23.1-p11.1 duplication present in 2% of our current ACC cohort. We found six novel CNVs, each in a single patient, that are likely deleterious: deletions of 1p31.3-p31.1, 1q31.2-q31.3, 5q23.1, and 15q11.2-q13.1; and duplications of 2q11.2-q13 and 11p14.3-p14.2. One ACC patient with microcephaly had a paternally inherited deletion of 16p13.11 that included NDE1. Exome sequencing identified a recessive maternally inherited nonsense mutation in the non-deleted allele of NDE1, revealing the complexity of ACC genetics. This is the first systematic study of CNVs in congenital brain malformations, and

  19. Define Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk-Madsen, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    "Project" is a key concept in IS management. The word is frequently used in textbooks and standards. Yet we seldom find a precise definition of the concept. This paper discusses how to define the concept of a project. The proposed definition covers both heavily formalized projects and informally...

  20. Podoplanin-positive cancer-associated fibroblast recruitment within cancer stroma is associated with a higher number of single nucleotide variants in cancer cells in lung adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakasone, Shoko; Mimaki, Sachiyo; Ichikawa, Tomohiro; Aokage, Keiju; Miyoshi, Tomohiro; Sugano, Masato; Kojima, Motohiro; Fujii, Satoshi; Kuwata, Takeshi; Ochiai, Atsushi; Tsuboi, Masahiro; Goto, Koichi; Tsuchihara, Katsuya; Ishii, Genichiro

    2018-05-01

    Podoplanin-positive cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) play an essential role in tumor progression. However, it is still unclear whether specific genomic alterations of cancer cells are required to recruit podoplanin-positive CAFs. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the mutation status of lung adenocarcinoma cells and the presence of podoplanin-positive CAFs. Ninety-seven lung adenocarcinomas for which whole exome sequencing data were available were enrolled. First, we analyzed the clinicopathological features of the cases, and then, evaluated the relationship between genetic features of cancer cells (major driver mutations and the number of single nucleotide variants, SNVs) and the presence of podoplanin-positive CAFs. The presence of podoplanin-positive CAFs was associated with smoking history, solid predominant subtype, and lymph node metastasis. We could not find any significant correlations between major genetic mutations (EGFR, KRAS, TP53, MET, ERBB2, BRAF, and PIC3CA) in cancer cells and the presence of podoplanin-positive CAFs. However, cases with podoplanin-positive CAFs had a significantly higher number of SNVs in cancer cells than the podoplanin-negative CAFs cases (median 84 vs 37, respectively; p = 0.001). This was also detected in a non-smoker subgroup (p = 0.037). Multivariate analyses revealed that the number of SNVs in cancer cells was the only statistically significant independent predictor for the presence of podoplanin-positive CAFs (p = 0.044). In lung adenocarcinoma, the presence of podoplanin-positive CAFs was associated with higher numbers of SNVs in cancer cells, suggesting a relationship between accumulations of SNVs in cancer cells and the generation of a tumor-promoting microenvironment.

  1. Psychology defined.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriques, Gregg R

    2004-12-01

    A new form of knowledge technology is used to diagnose psychology's epistemological woes and provide a solution to the difficulties. The argument presented is that psychology has traditionally spanned two separate but intimately related problems: (a) the problem of animal behavior and (b) the problem of human behavior. Accordingly, the solution offered divides the field into two broad, logically consistent domains. The first domain is psychological formalism, which is defined as the science of mind, corresponds to animal behavior, and consists of the basic psychological sciences. The second domain is human psychology, which is defined as the science of human behavior at the individual level and is proposed as a hybrid that exists between psychological formalism and the social sciences. 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Sagan numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Mendonça, J. Ricardo G.

    2012-01-01

    We define a new class of numbers based on the first occurrence of certain patterns of zeros and ones in the expansion of irracional numbers in a given basis and call them Sagan numbers, since they were first mentioned, in a special case, by the North-american astronomer Carl E. Sagan in his science-fiction novel "Contact." Sagan numbers hold connections with a wealth of mathematical ideas. We describe some properties of the newly defined numbers and indicate directions for further amusement.

  3. Defining Cyberbullying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englander, Elizabeth; Donnerstein, Edward; Kowalski, Robin; Lin, Carolyn A; Parti, Katalin

    2017-11-01

    Is cyberbullying essentially the same as bullying, or is it a qualitatively different activity? The lack of a consensual, nuanced definition has limited the field's ability to examine these issues. Evidence suggests that being a perpetrator of one is related to being a perpetrator of the other; furthermore, strong relationships can also be noted between being a victim of either type of attack. It also seems that both types of social cruelty have a psychological impact, although the effects of being cyberbullied may be worse than those of being bullied in a traditional sense (evidence here is by no means definitive). A complicating factor is that the 3 characteristics that define bullying (intent, repetition, and power imbalance) do not always translate well into digital behaviors. Qualities specific to digital environments often render cyberbullying and bullying different in circumstances, motivations, and outcomes. To make significant progress in addressing cyberbullying, certain key research questions need to be addressed. These are as follows: How can we define, distinguish between, and understand the nature of cyberbullying and other forms of digital conflict and cruelty, including online harassment and sexual harassment? Once we have a functional taxonomy of the different types of digital cruelty, what are the short- and long-term effects of exposure to or participation in these social behaviors? What are the idiosyncratic characteristics of digital communication that users can be taught? Finally, how can we apply this information to develop and evaluate effective prevention programs? Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  4. Dictionaries Defined.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kister, Ken

    1992-01-01

    Describes the growing number of dictionaries available to reference librarians, discusses factors that have led to the need for more dictionaries, and provides buying guidelines to help in selection decisions. Electronic versions of various dictionaries are described, and a sidebar examines the "American Heritage Dictionary" revisions.…

  5. Development of industrial variant specification systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Benjamin Loer

    With globalisation and increased competition industrial companies must be prepared to satisfy individual customer needs and still stay competitive with regards to lead times, quality, and prices. These factors require companies to be better prepared to handle specification activities during order...... to the four research tasks of the Ph.D. project: • Define and describe the variant specification system. • Create a procedure for the development of variant specification systems. • Create concepts, methods and tools to support the analysis and determination of the variant specification task. • Identify...... are presented for analysing and determining the variant specification task. These are grouped in external and internal task variables. Additionally functional characteristics, which can be used for defining performance measures, are defined. Based in the concept of “focus” different levels of tasks...

  6. Transmissibility of intra-host hepatitis C virus variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo, David S; Zhang, June; Ramachandran, Sumathi; Khudyakov, Yury

    2017-12-06

    Intra-host hepatitis C virus (HCV) populations are genetically heterogeneous and organized in subpopulations. With the exception of blood transfusions, transmission of HCV occurs via a small number of genetic variants, the effect of which is frequently described as a bottleneck. Stochasticity of transmission associated with the bottleneck is usually used to explain genetic differences among HCV populations identified in the source and recipient cases, which may be further exacerbated by intra-host HCV evolution and differential biological capacity of HCV variants to successfully establish a population in a new host. Transmissibility was formulated as a property that can be measured from experimental Ultra-Deep Sequencing (UDS) data. The UDS data were obtained from one large hepatitis C outbreak involving an epidemiologically defined source and 18 recipient cases. k-Step networks of HCV variants were constructed and used to identify a potential association between transmissibility and network centrality of individual HCV variants from the source. An additional dataset obtained from nine other HCV outbreaks with known directionality of transmission was used for validation. Transmissibility was not found to be dependent on high frequency of variants in the source, supporting the earlier observations of transmission of minority variants. Among all tested measures of centrality, the highest correlation of transmissibility was found with Hamming centrality (r = 0.720; p = 1.57 E-71). Correlation between genetic distances and differences in transmissibility among HCV variants from the source was found to be 0.3276 (Mantel Test, p = 9.99 E-5), indicating association between genetic proximity and transmissibility. A strong correlation ranging from 0.565-0.947 was observed between Hamming centrality and transmissibility in 7 of the 9 additional transmission clusters (p < 0.05). Transmission is not an exclusively stochastic process. Transmissibility, as

  7. Defining persistent hotspots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kittur, Nupur; Binder, Sue; Campbell, Carl H.

    2017-01-01

    , investigators and neglected tropical disease (NTD) program managers need to define them based on changes in prevalence and/or intensity. But how should the data be analyzed to define a persistent hotspot? We have analyzed a dataset from an operational research study in western Tanzania after three annual MDAs...... and contrast the outcomes of these analyses. Our intent is to showhowthe samedataset yields different numbers of persistent hotspots depending on the approach used to define them. We suggest that investigators and NTD program managers use the approach most suited for their study or program, but whichever...... using four different approaches to define persistent hotspots. The four approaches are 1) absolute percent change in prevalence; 2) percent change in prevalence; 3) change in World Health Organization guideline categories; 4) change (absolute or percent) in both prevalence and intensity. We compare...

  8. Semantic prioritization of novel causative genomic variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imane Boudellioua

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Discriminating the causative disease variant(s for individuals with inherited or de novo mutations presents one of the main challenges faced by the clinical genetics community today. Computational approaches for variant prioritization include machine learning methods utilizing a large number of features, including molecular information, interaction networks, or phenotypes. Here, we demonstrate the PhenomeNET Variant Predictor (PVP system that exploits semantic technologies and automated reasoning over genotype-phenotype relations to filter and prioritize variants in whole exome and whole genome sequencing datasets. We demonstrate the performance of PVP in identifying causative variants on a large number of synthetic whole exome and whole genome sequences, covering a wide range of diseases and syndromes. In a retrospective study, we further illustrate the application of PVP for the interpretation of whole exome sequencing data in patients suffering from congenital hypothyroidism. We find that PVP accurately identifies causative variants in whole exome and whole genome sequencing datasets and provides a powerful resource for the discovery of causal variants.

  9. Semantic prioritization of novel causative genomic variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudellioua, Imane; Mahamad Razali, Rozaimi B; Kulmanov, Maxat; Hashish, Yasmeen; Bajic, Vladimir B; Goncalves-Serra, Eva; Schoenmakers, Nadia; Gkoutos, Georgios V; Schofield, Paul N; Hoehndorf, Robert

    2017-04-01

    Discriminating the causative disease variant(s) for individuals with inherited or de novo mutations presents one of the main challenges faced by the clinical genetics community today. Computational approaches for variant prioritization include machine learning methods utilizing a large number of features, including molecular information, interaction networks, or phenotypes. Here, we demonstrate the PhenomeNET Variant Predictor (PVP) system that exploits semantic technologies and automated reasoning over genotype-phenotype relations to filter and prioritize variants in whole exome and whole genome sequencing datasets. We demonstrate the performance of PVP in identifying causative variants on a large number of synthetic whole exome and whole genome sequences, covering a wide range of diseases and syndromes. In a retrospective study, we further illustrate the application of PVP for the interpretation of whole exome sequencing data in patients suffering from congenital hypothyroidism. We find that PVP accurately identifies causative variants in whole exome and whole genome sequencing datasets and provides a powerful resource for the discovery of causal variants.

  10. Semantic prioritization of novel causative genomic variants

    KAUST Repository

    Boudellioua, Imene

    2017-04-17

    Discriminating the causative disease variant(s) for individuals with inherited or de novo mutations presents one of the main challenges faced by the clinical genetics community today. Computational approaches for variant prioritization include machine learning methods utilizing a large number of features, including molecular information, interaction networks, or phenotypes. Here, we demonstrate the PhenomeNET Variant Predictor (PVP) system that exploits semantic technologies and automated reasoning over genotype-phenotype relations to filter and prioritize variants in whole exome and whole genome sequencing datasets. We demonstrate the performance of PVP in identifying causative variants on a large number of synthetic whole exome and whole genome sequences, covering a wide range of diseases and syndromes. In a retrospective study, we further illustrate the application of PVP for the interpretation of whole exome sequencing data in patients suffering from congenital hypothyroidism. We find that PVP accurately identifies causative variants in whole exome and whole genome sequencing datasets and provides a powerful resource for the discovery of causal variants.

  11. Determination of membrane hydration numbers of alkali metal ions by insertion in a conducting polymer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaarup, Steen; Junaid Mohamed Jafeen, Mohamed; Careem, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    not necessarily define the same hydration shell. This work presents a systematic study of one special variant of the hydration numbers of the 5 alkali metal ions, using the electrochemical insertion of the ions in a conducting polymer (polypyrrole containing the large immobile anion DBS-). The technique...

  12. Protective effect of copy number polymorphism of glutathione S-transferase T1 gene on melanoma risk in presence of CDKN2A mutations, MC1R variants and host-related phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudru, Valérie; Lo, M T; Lesueur, F; Marian, C; Mohamdi, H; Laud, K; Barrois, M; Chompret, A; Avril, M F; Demenais, F; Bressac-de Paillerets, B

    2009-01-01

    The effect of CDKN2A, the major high-risk melanoma susceptibility gene, has been shown to be modified by host-related phenotypes and variants of MC1R gene. The glutathione S-transferase (GSTs) genes, implicated in detoxification of metabolites after UV exposure, are candidates for modulating CDKN2A penetrance. Few case-control studies have investigated the effect of GSTs on melanoma risk, and have led to controversial results while these genes have not yet been studied in CDKN2A melanoma-prone families. We examined the effect of GSTP1, GSTM1 and GSTT1 genotypes on melanoma risk in 25 multi-generational melanoma-prone families with CDKN2A mutations, in presence of MC1R gene variants, sun exposure, and host-related phenotypes. These data included 195 genotyped subjects for all studied genes. We applied the GEE (Generalized Estimating Equations) approach to test for the effect of GSTs while adjusting for age, sex and CDKN2A mutation status and including successively MC1R, sun exposure and host factors in the model. No significant effect of null GSTM1 allele and GSTP1 variants (p.I105V, p.A114V) on melanoma risk was found. However, a significant protective effect of carrying >or=1 null GSTT1 allele was shown: OR(adjusted for age,sex,CDKN2A ) = 0.41 (0.18-0.94) and OR(adjusted for age,sex,CDKN2A,MC1R ) = 0.24 (0.15-0.58). Altogether, the factors modifying significantly the melanoma risk associated with CDKN2A mutations (stepwise procedure) were: MC1R and dysplastic nevi (increasing the risk) and GSTT1 (decreasing the risk). This study shows that even when a high-risk gene (CDKN2A) has been identified, multiple genetic modifiers influence melanoma risk.

  13. Development of industrial variant specification systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Benjamin Loer

    acquisition and order fulfilment, i.e. the creation of drawings, bill-of-materials, routings, product descriptions, quote letters etc. The present thesis is rooted in the assumption that variant specification systems supporting the cross-functional processes of order acquisition and order fulfilment must...... be developed from a holistic and strategically anchored point of view. Another assumption is that this is a challenge for many industrial companies. Even though the literature presents many considerations on general issues covering new information technology, little work is found on the business perspectives...... to the four research tasks of the Ph.D. project: • Define and describe the variant specification system. • Create a procedure for the development of variant specification systems. • Create concepts, methods and tools to support the analysis and determination of the variant specification task. • Identify...

  14. Microsatellite Instability Use in Mismatch Repair Gene Sequence Variant Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryony A. Thompson

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Inherited mutations in the DNA mismatch repair genes (MMR can cause MMR deficiency and increased susceptibility to colorectal and endometrial cancer. Microsatellite instability (MSI is the defining molecular signature of MMR deficiency. The clinical classification of identified MMR gene sequence variants has a direct impact on the management of patients and their families. For a significant proportion of cases sequence variants of uncertain clinical significance (also known as unclassified variants are identified, constituting a challenge for genetic counselling and clinical management of families. The effect on protein function of these variants is difficult to interpret. The presence or absence of MSI in tumours can aid in determining the pathogenicity of associated unclassified MMR gene variants. However, there are some considerations that need to be taken into account when using MSI for variant interpretation. The use of MSI and other tumour characteristics in MMR gene sequence variant classification will be explored in this review.

  15. Common and Rare Variant Association Study for Plasma Lipids and Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Hayato; Kawashiri, Masa-aki; Konno, Tetsuo; Yamagishi, Masakazu; Hayashi, Kenshi

    2016-01-01

    Blood lipid levels are highly heritable and modifiable risk factors for coronary artery disease (CAD), and are the leading cause of death worldwide. These facts have motivated human genetic association studies that have the substantial potential to define the risk factors that are causal and to identify pathways and therapeutic targets for lipids and CAD.The success of the HapMap project that provided an extensive catalog of human genetic variations and the development of microarray based genotyping chips (typically containing variations with allele frequencies > 5%) facilitated common variant association study (CVAS; formerly termed genome-wide association study, GWAS) identifying disease-associated variants in a genome-wide manner. To date, 157 loci associated with blood lipids and 46 loci with CAD have been successfully identified, accounting for approximately 12%-14% of heritability for lipids and 10% of heritability for CAD. However, there is yet a major challenge termed "missing heritability problem," namely the observation that loci detected by CVAS explain only a small fraction of the inferred genetic variations. To explain such missing portions, focuses in genetic association studies have shifted from common to rare variants. However, it is challenging to apply rare variant association study (RVAS) in an unbiased manner because such variants typically lack the sufficient number to be identified statistically.In this review, we provide a current understanding of the genetic architecture mostly derived from CVAS, and several updates on the progress and limitations of RVAS for lipids and CAD.

  16. Genetic Variants Associated with Colorectal Adenoma Susceptibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Abulí

    Full Text Available Common low-penetrance genetic variants have been consistently associated with colorectal cancer risk.To determine if these genetic variants are associated also with adenoma susceptibility and may improve selection of patients with increased risk for advanced adenomas and/or multiplicity (≥ 3 adenomas.We selected 1,326 patients with increased risk for advanced adenomas and/or multiplicity and 1,252 controls with normal colonoscopy from population-based colorectal cancer screening programs. We conducted a case-control association study analyzing 30 colorectal cancer susceptibility variants in order to investigate the contribution of these variants to the development of subsequent advanced neoplasia and/or multiplicity.We found that 14 of the analyzed genetic variants showed a statistically significant association with advanced adenomas and/or multiplicity: the probability of developing these lesions increased with the number of risk alleles reaching a 2.3-fold risk increment in individuals with ≥ 17 risk alleles.Nearly half of the genetic variants associated with colorectal cancer risk are also related to advanced adenoma and/or multiplicity predisposition. Assessing the number of risk alleles in individuals within colorectal cancer screening programs may help to identify better a subgroup with increased risk for advanced neoplasia and/or multiplicity in the general population.

  17. Defining combined immunodeficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roifman, Chaim M; Somech, Raz; Kavadas, Fotini; Pires, Linda; Nahum, Amit; Dalal, Ilan; Grunebaum, Eyal

    2012-07-01

    Although the extreme condition of typical profound T-cell dysfunction (TD), severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), has been carefully defined, we are currently in the process of better defining less typical T-cell deficiencies, which tend to present with autologous circulating T-cell combined immunodeficiency (CID). Because autologous cells might interfere with the outcome of bone marrow transplantation, protocols usually include conditioning regimens. Therefore it is important to define the numbers of autologous cells usually detected in patients with CID versus those with SCID. We sought to determine the number of circulating T cells in patients with SCID as opposed to those with CID, to study their function, and to evaluate their possible detection during newborn screening using T-cell receptor excision circle (TREC) analysis. Numbers of circulating CD3(+) T cells (as determined by means of flow cytometry), in vitro responses to PHA, and TREC levels, all measured at presentation, were compiled from the research charts of the entire cohort of patients followed prospectively for T-cell immunodeficiency at the Hospital for Sick Children. Clinical data were ascertained retrospectively from the patient's hospital charts. One hundred three patients had CD3(+) determinations, and 80 of them had a genetic diagnosis. All patients considered to have typical SCID had CD3(+) T-cell counts of fewer than 500 cells/μL. Some variability was observed among different genotypes. In vitro responses to PHA were recorded in 88 patients, of whom 68 had a genetic diagnosis. All patients with low CD3(+) T-cell numbers (<500 cells/μL) also had markedly decreased responses to PHA (typical SCIDs). However, responses ranged widely in the groups of patients with TD who had more than 500 CD3(+) autologous circulating T cells per microliter. Although patients with Omenn syndrome and ζ chain-associated protein, 70 kDa (ZAP70), and purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) deficiencies had low

  18. Number series of atoms, interatomic bonds and interface bonds defining zinc-blende nanocrystals as function of size, shape and surface orientation: Analytic tools to interpret solid state spectroscopy data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    König, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) experience stress and charge transfer by embedding materials or ligands and impurity atoms. In return, the environment of NCs experiences a NC stress response which may lead to matrix deformation and propagated strain. Up to now, there is no universal gauge to evaluate the stress impact on NCs and their response as a function of NC size d NC . I deduce geometrical number series as analytical tools to obtain the number of NC atoms N NC (d NC [i]), bonds between NC atoms N bnd (d NC [i]) and interface bonds N IF (d NC [i]) for seven high symmetry zinc-blende (zb) NCs with low-index faceting: {001} cubes, {111} octahedra, {110} dodecahedra, {001}-{111} pyramids, {111} tetrahedra, {111}-{001} quatrodecahedra and {001}-{111} quadrodecahedra. The fundamental insights into NC structures revealed here allow for major advancements in data interpretation and understanding of zb- and diamond-lattice based nanomaterials. The analytical number series can serve as a standard procedure for stress evaluation in solid state spectroscopy due to their deterministic nature, easy use and general applicability over a wide range of spectroscopy methods as well as NC sizes, forms and materials.

  19. Hemoglobin Variants in Mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popp, Raymond A.

    1965-04-22

    Variability among mammalian hemoglobins was observed many years ago (35). The chemical basis for differences among hemoglobins from different species of mammals has been studied by several investigators (5, 11, 18, 48). As well as interspecies differences, hemoglobin variants are frequently found within a species of mammals (2, 3, 7, 16) The inheritance of these intraspecies variants can be studied, and pedigrees indicate that the type of hemoglobin synthesized in an individual is genetically controlled (20). Several of the variant human hemoglobins are f'unctionally deficient (7, 16). Such hemoglobin anomalies are of basic interest to man because of the vital role of hemoglobin for transporting oxygen to all tissues of the body.

  20. Word Variant Identification in Old French

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Willett

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing numbers of historical texts are available in machine-readable form, which retain the original spelling, which can be very different from the modern-day equivalents due to the natural evolution of a language, and because the concept of standardisation in spelling is comparatively modern. Among medieval vernacular writers, the same word could be spelled in different ways and the same author (or scribe might even use several alternative spellings in the same passage. Thus, we do not know,a priori, how many variant forms of a particular word there are in such texts, let alone what these variants might be. Searching on the modern equivalent, or even the commonest historical variant, of a particular word may thus fail to retrieve an appreciable number of occurrences unless the searcher already has an extensive knowledge of the language of the documents. Moreover, even specialist scholars may be unaware of some idiosyncratic variants. Here, we consider the use of computer methods to retrieve variant historical spellings.

  1. Schizophrenia genetic variants are not associated with intelligence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Scheltinga, A. F. Terwisscha; Bakker, S. C.; van Haren, N. E. M.; Derks, E. M.; Buizer-Voskamp, J. E.; Cahn, W.; Ripke, S.; Ophoff, R. A.; Kahn, R. S.; Sanders, A. R.; Kendler, K. S.; Levinson, D. F.; Sklar, P.; Holmans, P. A.; Lin, D. -Y.; Duan, J.; Andreassen, O. A.; Scolnick, E.; Cichon, S.; St Clair, D.; Corvin, A.; Gurling, H.; Werge, T.; Rujescu, D.; Blackwood, D. H. R.; Pato, C. N.; Malhotra, A. K.; Purcell, S.; Dudbridge, F.; Neale, B. M.; Rossin, L.; Visscher, P. M.; Posthuma, D.; Ruderfer, D. M.; Fanous, A.; Stefansson, H.; Steinberg, S.; Mowry, B. J.; Golimbet, V.; de Hert, M.; Jonsson, E. G.; Bitter, I.; Pietilainen, O. P. H.; Collier, D. A.; Tosato, S.; Agartz, I.; Albus, M.; Alexander, M.; Amdur, R. L.; Amin, F.; Bass, N.; Bergen, S. E.; Black, D. W.; Børglum, A. D.; Brown, M. A.; Bruggeman, R.; Buccola, N. G.; Byerley, W. F.; Cantor, R. M.; Carr, V. J.; Catts, S. V.; Choudhury, K.; Cloninger, C. R.; Cormican, P.; Craddock, N.; Danoy, P. A.; Datta, S.; de Haan, L.; Demontis, D.; Dikeos, D.; Djurovic, S.; Donnelly, P.; Donohoe, G.; Duong, L.; Dwyer, S.; Fink-Jensen, A.; Freedman, R.; Freimer, N. B.; Friedl, M.; Georgieva, L.; Giegling, I.; Gill, M.; Glenthøj, B.; Godard, S.; Hamshere, M.; Hansen, M.; Hansen, T.; Hartmann, A. M.; Henskens, F. A.; Hougaard, D. M.; Hultman, C. M.; Ingason, A.; Jablensky, A. V.; Jakobsen, K. D.; Jay, M.; Jurgens, G.; Keller, M. C.; Kenis, G.; Kenny, E.; Kim, Y.; Kirov, G. K.; Konnerth, H.; Konte, B.; Krabbendam, L.; Krasucki, R.; Lasseter, V. K.; Laurent, C.; Lawrence, J.; Lencz, T.; Lerer, F. B.; Liang, K. -Y.; Lichtenstein, P.; Lieberman, J. A.; Linszen, D. H.; Lonnqvist, J.; Loughland, C. M.; Maclean, A. W.; Maher, B. S.; Maier, W.; Mallet, J.; Malloy, P.; Mattheisen, M.; Mattingsdal, M.; McGhee, K. A.; McGrath, J. J.; McIntosh, A.; McLean, D. E.; McQuillin, A.; Melle, I.; Michie, P. T.; Milanova, V.; Morris, D. W.; Mors, O.; Mortensen, P. B.; Moskvina, V.; Muglia, P.; Myin-Germeys, I.; Nertney, D. A.; Nestadt, G.; Nielsen, J.; Nikolov, I.; Nordentoft, M.; Norton, N.; Nothen, M. M.; O'Dushlaine, C. T.; Olincy, A.; Olsen, L.; O'Neill, F. A.; Ørntoft, T. F.; Owen, M. J.; Pantelis, C.; Papadimitriou, G.; Pato, M. T.; Peltonen, L.; Petursson, H.; Pickard, B.; Pimm, J.; Pulver, A. E.; Puri, V.; Quested, D.; Quinn, E. M.; Rasmussen, H. B.; Rethelyi, J. M.; Ribble, R.; Rietschel, M.; Riley, B. P.; Ruggeri, M.; Schall, U.; Schulze, T. G.; Schwab, S. G.; Scott, R. J.; Shi, J.; Sigurdsson, E.; Silverman, J. M.; Spencer, C. C. A.; Stefansson, K.; Strange, A.; Strengman, E.; Stroup, T. S.; Suvisaari, J.; Terenius, L.; Thirumalai, S.; Thygesen, J. H.; Timm, S.; Toncheva, D.; van den Oord, E.; van Os, J.; van Winkel, R.; Veldink, J.; Walsh, D.; Wang, A. G.; Wiersma, D.; Wildenauer, D. B.; Williams, H. J.; Williams, N. M.; Wormley, B.; Zammit, S.; Sullivan, P. F.; O'Donovan, M. C.; Daly, M. J.; Gejman, P. V.

    2013-01-01

    Schizophrenia is associated with lower pre-morbid intelligence (IQ) in addition to (pre-morbid) cognitive decline. Both schizophrenia and IQ are highly heritable traits. Therefore, we hypothesized that genetic variants associated with schizophrenia, including copy number variants (CNVs) and a

  2. Genetic variants and risk of asthma in an American Indian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Lyle G; Azure, Crystal; Segarra, Alexandre; Enright, Kendra J; Hamley, Shawn; Jerome, Dara; O'Leary, Marcia A; O'Leary, Rae A; Parisien, Ashley; Trottier, Kayana; Yracheta, Joseph M; Torgerson, Dara G

    2017-07-01

    Asthma is recognized as a complex, multifactorial disease with a genetic component that is well recognized. Certain genetic variants are associated with asthma in a number of populations. To determine whether the same variants increase the risk of asthma among American Indian children. The electronic medical records of an Indian Health Service facility identified all children between 6 and 17 years of age with case-defining criteria for asthma (n = 108). Control children (n = 216), matched for age, were also identified. Real-time polymerase chain reaction assays were used to genotype 10 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 6 genetic loci. Genotypic distributions among cases and controls were evaluated by χ 2 and logistic regression methods. A variant at 5q22.1 revealed a statistically significant imbalance in the distribution of genotypes between case-control pairs (rs10056340, P < .001). In logistic regression analyses, the same variant at 5q22.1 and a variant at 17q21 were associated with asthma at P < .05 (rs10056340 and rs9303277). Inclusions of age, body mass index, and atopy in multivariate models revealed significant associations between rs10056340 (odds ratio, 2.020; 95% confidence interval, 1.283-3.180; P = .002) and all 5 17q21 SNPs and asthma in this population. In analyses restricted to atopic individuals, the association of rs10056340 was essentially unchanged, whereas among nonatopic individuals the trend was in the same direction but nonsignificant. The reverse was true for the 17q21 SNPs. These findings demonstrate that many variants commonly associated with asthma in other populations also accompany this condition among American Indian children. American Indian children also appear to have an increased risk of asthma associated with obesity. Copyright © 2017 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Analysis of mtDNA sequence variants in colorectal adenomatous polyps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grizzle William

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Colorectal tumors mostly arise from sporadic adenomatous polyps. Polyps are defined as a mass of cells that protrudes into the lumen of the colon. Adenomatous polyps are benign neoplasms that, by definition display some characteristics of dysplasia. It has been shown that polyps were benign tumors which may undergo malignant transformation. Adenomatous polyps have been classified into three histologic types; tubular, tubulovillous, and villous with increasing malignant potential. The ability to differentially diagnose these colorectal adenomatous polyps is important for therapeutic intervention. To date, little efforts have been directed to identifying genetic changes involved in adenomatous polyps. This study was designed to examine the relevance of mitochondrial genome alterations in the three adenomatous polyps. Using high resolution restriction endonucleases and PCR-based sequencing, fifty-seven primary fresh frozen tissues of adenomatous polyps (37 tumors and 20 matched surrounding normal tissues obtained from the southern regional Cooperative Human Tissue Network (CHTN and Grady Memorial Hospital at Atlanta were screened with three mtDNA regional primer pairs that spanned 5.9 kbp. Results from our data analyses revealed the presence of forty-four variants in some of these mitochondrial genes that the primers spanned; COX I, II, III, ATP 6, 8, CYT b, ND 5, 6 and tRNAs. Based on the MITODAT database as a sequence reference, 25 of the 44 (57% variants observed were unreported. Notably, a heteroplasmic variant C8515G/T in the MT-ATP 8 gene and a germline variant 8327delA in the tRNAlys was observed in all the tissue samples of the three adenomatous polyps in comparison to the referenced database sequence. A germline variant G9055A in the MT-ATP 6 gene had a frequency of 100% (17/17 in tubular and 57% (13/23 in villous adenomas; no corresponding variant was in tubulovillous adenomas. Furthermore, A9006G variant at MT-ATP 6 gene was

  4. Mining Process Variants: Goals and Issues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, J.; Li, C.; Reichert, M.U.; Wombacher, Andreas

    Recently, Process-Aware Information Systems (PAIS) were introduced, which allow for dynamic process and service changes. This, in turn, has led to a large number of process model variants, which are difficult to maintain and expensive to configure. This paper deals with goals and issues related to

  5. A unified phylogeny-based nomenclature for histone variants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talbert Paul B

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Histone variants are non-allelic protein isoforms that play key roles in diversifying chromatin structure. The known number of such variants has greatly increased in recent years, but the lack of naming conventions for them has led to a variety of naming styles, multiple synonyms and misleading homographs that obscure variant relationships and complicate database searches. We propose here a unified nomenclature for variants of all five classes of histones that uses consistent but flexible naming conventions to produce names that are informative and readily searchable. The nomenclature builds on historical usage and incorporates phylogenetic relationships, which are strong predictors of structure and function. A key feature is the consistent use of punctuation to represent phylogenetic divergence, making explicit the relationships among variant subtypes that have previously been implicit or unclear. We recommend that by default new histone variants be named with organism-specific paralog-number suffixes that lack phylogenetic implication, while letter suffixes be reserved for structurally distinct clades of variants. For clarity and searchability, we encourage the use of descriptors that are separate from the phylogeny-based variant name to indicate developmental and other properties of variants that may be independent of structure.

  6. Postnatally-transmitted HIV-1 Envelope variants have similar neutralization-sensitivity and function to that of nontransmitted breast milk variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Breastfeeding is a leading cause of infant HIV-1 infection in the developing world, yet only a minority of infants exposed to HIV-1 via breastfeeding become infected. As a genetic bottleneck severely restricts the number of postnatally-transmitted variants, genetic or phenotypic properties of the virus Envelope (Env) could be important for the establishment of infant infection. We examined the efficiency of virologic functions required for initiation of infection in the gastrointestinal tract and the neutralization sensitivity of HIV-1 Env variants isolated from milk of three postnatally-transmitting mothers (n=13 viruses), five clinically-matched nontransmitting mothers (n=16 viruses), and seven postnatally-infected infants (n = 7 postnatally-transmitted/founder (T/F) viruses). Results There was no difference in the efficiency of epithelial cell interactions between Env virus variants from the breast milk of transmitting and nontransmitting mothers. Moreover, there was similar efficiency of DC-mediated trans-infection, CCR5-usage, target cell fusion, and infectivity between HIV-1 Env-pseudoviruses from nontransmitting mothers and postnatal T/F viruses. Milk Env-pseudoviruses were generally sensitive to neutralization by autologous maternal plasma and resistant to breast milk neutralization. Infant T/F Env-pseudoviruses were equally sensitive to neutralization by broadly-neutralizing monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies as compared to nontransmitted breast milk Env variants. Conclusion Postnatally-T/F Env variants do not appear to possess a superior ability to interact with and cross a mucosal barrier or an exceptional resistance to neutralization that define their capability to initiate infection across the infant gastrointestinal tract in the setting of preexisting maternal antibodies. PMID:23305422

  7. Selection of optimal variant route based on dynamic fuzzy GRA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalil Heidary Dahooie

    2018-09-01

    Full Text Available Given the high costs of construction and maintenance, an optimum design methodology is one of the most important steps towards the development of transportation infrastructure, especially freeways. However, the effects of different variables on the decision-making process to find an optimal variant have caused the choice to become a very difficult and professional task for decision makers. So, the current paper aims to determine the optimal variant route for Isfahan-Shiraz freeway through MADM approaches. First, evaluation indices for an optimal route variant are derived through literature review and expert panel assessment. Then, a dynamic fuzzy GRA method is used for weightings and optimal route selection. Bases on the results, the road longevity, views of NGOs and route integration are identified as the highest-weighted criteria in route variant prioritization. Further, Route 3 is defined as the priority for the optimal variant for Isfahan–Shiraz freeway, which is the main basis in practice.

  8. Histone variants and lipid metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borghesan, Michela; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; Sheedfar, Fareeba; Oben, Jude; Pazienza, Valerio; Vinciguerra, Manlio

    2014-01-01

    Within nucleosomes, canonical histones package the genome, but they can be opportunely replaced with histone variants. The incorporation of histone variants into the nucleosome is a chief cellular strategy to regulate transcription and cellular metabolism. In pathological terms, cellular steatosis

  9. [Approach to diagnosis and management of myeloproliferative neoplasm variants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsumori, Toru; Kirito, Keita

    2015-08-01

    Myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) variants are defined as relatively uncommon myeloid neoplasms which do not meet the criteria for either classical MPN or myelodysplastic syndrome. Due to the lack of specific markers, it has been challenging to accurately diagnose these malignant diseases. Recent studies have revealed new genetic abnormalities in MPN variants. These research advances are anticipated to open new approaches to not only achieving accurate diagnosis but also novel therapeutic options for these diseases.

  10. A Systematic Assessment of Accuracy in Detecting Somatic Mosaic Variants by Deep Amplicon Sequencing: Application to NF2 Gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Contini

    Full Text Available The accurate detection of low-allelic variants is still challenging, particularly for the identification of somatic mosaicism, where matched control sample is not available. High throughput sequencing, by the simultaneous and independent analysis of thousands of different DNA fragments, might overcome many of the limits of traditional methods, greatly increasing the sensitivity. However, it is necessary to take into account the high number of false positives that may arise due to the lack of matched control samples. Here, we applied deep amplicon sequencing to the analysis of samples with known genotype and variant allele fraction (VAF followed by a tailored statistical analysis. This method allowed to define a minimum value of VAF for detecting mosaic variants with high accuracy. Then, we exploited the estimated VAF to select candidate alterations in NF2 gene in 34 samples with unknown genotype (30 blood and 4 tumor DNAs, demonstrating the suitability of our method. The strategy we propose optimizes the use of deep amplicon sequencing for the identification of low abundance variants. Moreover, our method can be applied to different high throughput sequencing approaches to estimate the background noise and define the accuracy of the experimental design.

  11. BigQ: a NoSQL based framework to handle genomic variants in i2b2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabetta, Matteo; Limongelli, Ivan; Rizzo, Ettore; Riva, Alberto; Segagni, Daniele; Bellazzi, Riccardo

    2015-12-29

    Precision medicine requires the tight integration of clinical and molecular data. To this end, it is mandatory to define proper technological solutions able to manage the overwhelming amount of high throughput genomic data needed to test associations between genomic signatures and human phenotypes. The i2b2 Center (Informatics for Integrating Biology and the Bedside) has developed a widely internationally adopted framework to use existing clinical data for discovery research that can help the definition of precision medicine interventions when coupled with genetic data. i2b2 can be significantly advanced by designing efficient management solutions of Next Generation Sequencing data. We developed BigQ, an extension of the i2b2 framework, which integrates patient clinical phenotypes with genomic variant profiles generated by Next Generation Sequencing. A visual programming i2b2 plugin allows retrieving variants belonging to the patients in a cohort by applying filters on genomic variant annotations. We report an evaluation of the query performance of our system on more than 11 million variants, showing that the implemented solution scales linearly in terms of query time and disk space with the number of variants. In this paper we describe a new i2b2 web service composed of an efficient and scalable document-based database that manages annotations of genomic variants and of a visual programming plug-in designed to dynamically perform queries on clinical and genetic data. The system therefore allows managing the fast growing volume of genomic variants and can be used to integrate heterogeneous genomic annotations.

  12. Defining an emerging disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutou, F; Pastoret, P-P

    2015-04-01

    Defining an emerging disease is not straightforward, as there are several different types of disease emergence. For example, there can be a 'real' emergence of a brand new disease, such as the emergence of bovine spongiform encephalopathy in the 1980s, or a geographic emergence in an area not previously affected, such as the emergence of bluetongue in northern Europe in 2006. In addition, disease can emerge in species formerly not considered affected, e.g. the emergence of bovine tuberculosis in wildlife species since 2000 in France. There can also be an unexpected increase of disease incidence in a known area and a known species, or there may simply be an increase in our knowledge or awareness of a particular disease. What all these emerging diseases have in common is that human activity frequently has a role to play in their emergence. For example, bovine spongiform encephalopathy very probably emerged as a result of changes in the manufacturing of meat-and-bone meal, bluetongue was able to spread to cooler climes as a result of uncontrolled trade in animals, and a relaxation of screening and surveillance for bovine tuberculosis enabled the disease to re-emerge in areas that had been able to drastically reduce the number of cases. Globalisation and population growth will continue to affect the epidemiology of diseases in years to come and ecosystems will continue to evolve. Furthermore, new technologies such as metagenomics and high-throughput sequencing are identifying new microorganisms all the time. Change is the one constant, and diseases will continue to emerge, and we must consider the causes and different types of emergence as we deal with these diseases in the future.

  13. Variants of glycoside hydrolases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teter, Sarah; Ward, Connie; Cherry, Joel; Jones, Aubrey; Harris, Paul; Yi, Jung

    2017-07-11

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent glycoside hydrolase, comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 21, 94, 157, 205, 206, 247, 337, 350, 373, 383, 438, 455, 467, and 486 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2, and optionally further comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 8, 22, 41, 49, 57, 113, 193, 196, 226, 227, 246, 251, 255, 259, 301, 356, 371, 411, and 462 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2 a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 8, 22, 41, 49, 57, 113, 193, 196, 226, 227, 246, 251, 255, 259, 301, 356, 371, 411, and 462 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2, wherein the variants have glycoside hydrolase activity. The present invention also relates to nucleotide sequences encoding the variant glycoside hydrolases and to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the nucleotide sequences.

  14. Variants of glycoside hydrolases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teter, Sarah; Ward, Connie; Cherry, Joel; Jones, Aubrey; Harris, Paul; Yi, Jung

    2013-02-26

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent glycoside hydrolase, comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 21, 94, 157, 205, 206, 247, 337, 350, 373, 383, 438, 455, 467, and 486 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2, and optionally further comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 8, 22, 41, 49, 57, 113, 193, 196, 226, 227, 246, 251, 255, 259, 301, 356, 371, 411, and 462 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2 a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 8, 22, 41, 49, 57, 113, 193, 196, 226, 227, 246, 251, 255, 259, 301, 356, 371, 411, and 462 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2, wherein the variants have glycoside hydrolase activity. The present invention also relates to nucleotide sequences encoding the variant glycoside hydrolases and to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the nucleotide sequences.

  15. Maternal Neutralization-Resistant Virus Variants Do Not Predict Infant HIV Infection Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milligan, Caitlin; Omenda, Maxwel M; Chohan, Vrasha; Odem-Davis, Katherine; Richardson, Barbra A; Nduati, Ruth; Overbaugh, Julie

    2016-02-02

    Mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV provides a setting for studying immune correlates of protection. Neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) are suggested to contribute to a viral bottleneck during MTCT, but their role in blocking transmission is unclear, as studies comparing the NAb sensitivities of maternal viruses have yielded disparate results. We sought to determine whether transmitting mothers differ from nontransmitting mothers in the ability to neutralize individual autologous virus variants present at transmission. Ten transmitting and 10 nontransmitting HIV-infected mothers at high risk of MTCT were included in this study. Full-length HIV envelope genes (n = 100) were cloned from peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained near transmission from transmitting mothers and at similar time points from nontransmitting mothers. Envelope clones were tested as pseudoviruses against contemporaneous, autologous maternal plasma in neutralization assays. The association between transmission and the log2 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) for multiple virus variants per mother was estimated by using logistic regression with clustered standard errors. t tests were used to compare proportions of neutralization-resistant viruses. Overall, transmitting mothers had a median IC50 of 317 (interquartile range [IQR], 202 to 521), and nontransmitting mothers had a median IC50 of 243 (IQR, 95 to 594). Transmission risk was not significantly associated with autologous NAb activity (odds ratio, 1.25; P = 0.3). Compared to nontransmitting mothers, transmitting mothers had similar numbers of or fewer neutralization-resistant virus variants, depending on the IC50 neutralization resistance cutoff. In conclusion, HIV-infected mothers harbor mostly neutralization-sensitive viruses, although resistant variants were detected in both transmitting and nontransmitting mothers. These results suggest that MTCT during the breastfeeding period is not driven solely by the presence of maternal

  16. Historically defined autobiographical periods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, Norman R.; Hansen, Tia G. B.; Lee, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    over time and theoretical implications are discussed, notably by introducing a new approach to autobiographical memory, Transition Theory, which assumes that autobiographical memory is organized by transitional events that can be selfinitiated or externally imposed - historically defined......The chapter reviews a research programme that has demonstrated the existence of historically defined autobiographical periods and identified the conditions that bring them about. Data from four samples of World War II-generation adults show that historically defined autobiographical periods endure...... autobiographical periods are the latter....

  17. Defining Plagiarism: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akbar Akbar

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Plagiarism has repeatedly occurred in Indonesia, resulting in focusing on such academic misbehavior as a “central issue” in Indonesian higher education. One of the issues of addressing plagiarism in higher education is that there is a confusion of defining plagiarism. It seems that Indonesian academics had different perception when defining plagiarism. This article aims at exploring the issue of plagiarism by helping define plagiarism to address confusion among Indonesian academics. This article applies literature review by firs finding relevant articles after identifying databases for literature searching. After the collection of required articles for review, the articles were synthesized before presenting the findings. This study has explored the definition of plagiarism in the context of higher education. This research found that plagiarism is defined in the relation of criminal acts. The huge numbers of discursive features used position plagiaristic acts as an illegal deed. This study also found that cultural backgrounds and exposure to plagiarism were influential in defining plagiarism.

  18. Ophthalmoplegic and lower cranial nerve variants merge into each other and into classical Guillain-Barre syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Bruggen, JP; van der Meche, FGA; de Jager, AEJ; Polman, CH

    We delineated the place of cranial nerve variants within the concept of clinically defined Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS), In the ophthalmoplegic variant (n = 7) the oculomotor nerves were early involved, In a lower cranial nerve variant (n = 9) the cranial nerves IX, X, and XI were early involved.

  19. Defining Overweight and Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local Programs Defining Adult Overweight and Obesity Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... weight for a given height is described as overweight or obese. Body Mass Index, or BMI, is ...

  20. Drinking Levels Defined

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Alcohol Consumption Alcohol's Effects on the Body Alcohol Use Disorder Fetal Alcohol Exposure Support & Treatment Alcohol Policy Special ... Definition of Drinking at Low Risk for Developing Alcohol Use Disorder (AUD): For women, low-risk drinking is defined ...

  1. Defining Documentary Film

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    A discussion of various attemts at defining documentary film regarding form, content, truth, stile, genre or reception - and a propoposal of a positive list of essential, but non-exclusive characteristica of documentary film......A discussion of various attemts at defining documentary film regarding form, content, truth, stile, genre or reception - and a propoposal of a positive list of essential, but non-exclusive characteristica of documentary film...

  2. Evaluation of the role of SNCA variants in survival without neurological disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G Heckman

    Full Text Available A variety of definitions of successful aging have been proposed, many of which relate to longevity, freedom from disease and disability, or preservation of high physical and cognitive function. Many behavioral, biomedical, and psychological factors have been linked with these various measures of successful aging, however genetic predictors are less understood. Parkinson's disease (PD is an age-related neurodegenerative disorder, and variants in the α-synuclein gene (SNCA affect susceptibility to PD. This exploratory study examined whether SNCA variants may also promote successful aging as defined by survival without neurological disease.We utilized 769 controls without neurological disease (Mean age: 79 years, Range: 33-99 years and examined the frequency of 20 different SNCA variants across age groups using logistic regression models. We also included 426 PD cases to assess the effect of these variants on PD risk.There was a significant decline in the proportion of carriers of the minor allele of rs10014396 as age increased (P = 0.021, from 30% in controls younger than 60 to 14% in controls 90 years of age or older. Findings were similar for rs3775439, where the proportion of carriers of the minor allele declined from 32% in controls less than 60 years old to 19% in those 90 or older (P = 0.025. A number of SNCA variants, not including rs10014396 or rs3775439, were significantly associated with susceptibility to PD.In addition to its documented roles in PD and α-synucleinopathies, our results suggest that SNCA has a role in survival free of neurological disease. Acknowledging that our findings would not have withstood correction for multiple testing, validation in an independent series of aged neurologically normal controls is needed.

  3. Detecting rare variants in case-parents association studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuang-Fu Cheng

    Full Text Available Despite the success of genome-wide association studies (GWASs in detecting common variants (minor allele frequency ≥0.05 many suggested that rare variants also contribute to the genetic architecture of diseases. Recently, researchers demonstrated that rare variants can show a strong stratification which may not be corrected by using existing methods. In this paper, we focus on a case-parents study and consider methods for testing group-wise association between multiple rare (and common variants in a gene region and a disease. All tests depend on the numbers of transmitted mutant alleles from parents to their diseased children across variants and hence they are robust to the effect of population stratification. We use extensive simulation studies to compare the performance of four competing tests: the largest single-variant transmission disequilibrium test (TDT, multivariable test, combined TDT, and a likelihood ratio test based on a random-effects model. We find that the likelihood ratio test is most powerful in a wide range of settings and there is no negative impact to its power performance when common variants are also included in the analysis. If deleterious and protective variants are simultaneously analyzed, the likelihood ratio test was generally insensitive to the effect directionality, unless the effects are extremely inconsistent in one direction.

  4. Diversification of histone H2A variants during plant evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima, Tomokazu; Lorković, Zdravko J; Nishihama, Ryuichi; Ishizaki, Kimitsune; Axelsson, Elin; Yelagandula, Ramesh; Kohchi, Takayuki; Berger, Frederic

    2015-07-01

    Among eukaryotes, the four core histones show an extremely high conservation of their structure and form nucleosomes that compact, protect, and regulate access to genetic information. Nevertheless, in multicellular eukaryotes the two families, histone H2A and histone H3, have diversified significantly in key residues. We present a phylogenetic analysis across the green plant lineage that reveals an early diversification of the H2A family in unicellular green algae and remarkable expansions of H2A variants in flowering plants. We define motifs and domains that differentiate plant H2A proteins into distinct variant classes. In non-flowering land plants, we identify a new class of H2A variants and propose their possible role in the emergence of the H2A.W variant class in flowering plants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Defining gratuitous violence.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article engages with the question of how to define gratuitous violence. If the term gratuitous is understood to mean 'for ... definition of gratuitous violence relates to the understanding of expressive violence. It seems ... high self-esteem', related to their anger at being criticised or disrespected, is then not 'for nothing'.

  6. Software Defined Cyberinfrastructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foster, Ian; Blaiszik, Ben; Chard, Kyle; Chard, Ryan

    2017-07-17

    Within and across thousands of science labs, researchers and students struggle to manage data produced in experiments, simulations, and analyses. Largely manual research data lifecycle management processes mean that much time is wasted, research results are often irreproducible, and data sharing and reuse remain rare. In response, we propose a new approach to data lifecycle management in which researchers are empowered to define the actions to be performed at individual storage systems when data are created or modified: actions such as analysis, transformation, copying, and publication. We term this approach software-defined cyberinfrastructure because users can implement powerful data management policies by deploying rules to local storage systems, much as software-defined networking allows users to configure networks by deploying rules to switches.We argue that this approach can enable a new class of responsive distributed storage infrastructure that will accelerate research innovation by allowing any researcher to associate data workflows with data sources, whether local or remote, for such purposes as data ingest, characterization, indexing, and sharing. We report on early experiments with this approach in the context of experimental science, in which a simple if-trigger-then-action (IFTA) notation is used to define rules.

  7. On Defining Mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, Eugene

    2011-01-01

    Though central to any pedagogical development of physics, the concept of mass is still not well understood. Properly defining mass has proven to be far more daunting than contemporary textbooks would have us believe. And yet today the origin of mass is one of the most aggressively pursued areas of research in all of physics. Much of the excitement…

  8. The Definability of Fields

    OpenAIRE

    BenDaniel, D. J.

    1998-01-01

    We look for a deep connection between mathematics and physics. Our approach is to propose a set theory T which leads to a concise mathematical description of physical fields and to a finite unit of action. The concept of "definability" of fields is then introduced. Definabilty of fields in T is necessary and sufficient for quantization and sufficient to avoid physical antinomies.

  9. Defining Abnormally Low Tenders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ølykke, Grith Skovgaard; Nyström, Johan

    2017-01-01

    The concept of an abnormally low tender is not defined in EU public procurement law. This article takes an interdisciplinary law and economics approach to examine a dataset consisting of Swedish and Danish judgments and verdicts concerning the concept of an abnormally low tender. The purpose...

  10. Defining depth of anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafer, S L; Stanski, D R

    2008-01-01

    In this chapter, drawn largely from the synthesis of material that we first presented in the sixth edition of Miller's Anesthesia, Chap 31 (Stanski and Shafer 2005; used by permission of the publisher), we have defined anesthetic depth as the probability of non-response to stimulation, calibrated against the strength of the stimulus, the difficulty of suppressing the response, and the drug-induced probability of non-responsiveness at defined effect site concentrations. This definition requires measurement of multiple different stimuli and responses at well-defined drug concentrations. There is no one stimulus and response measurement that will capture depth of anesthesia in a clinically or scientifically meaningful manner. The "clinical art" of anesthesia requires calibration of these observations of stimuli and responses (verbal responses, movement, tachycardia) against the dose and concentration of anesthetic drugs used to reduce the probability of response, constantly adjusting the administered dose to achieve the desired anesthetic depth. In our definition of "depth of anesthesia" we define the need for two components to create the anesthetic state: hypnosis created with drugs such as propofol or the inhalational anesthetics and analgesia created with the opioids or nitrous oxide. We demonstrate the scientific evidence that profound degrees of hypnosis in the absence of analgesia will not prevent the hemodynamic responses to profoundly noxious stimuli. Also, profound degrees of analgesia do not guarantee unconsciousness. However, the combination of hypnosis and analgesia suppresses hemodynamic response to noxious stimuli and guarantees unconsciousness.

  11. Defining Game Mechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sicart (Vila), Miguel Angel

    2008-01-01

    This article defins game mechanics in relation to rules and challenges. Game mechanics are methods invoked by agents for interacting with the game world. I apply this definition to a comparative analysis of the games Rez, Every Extend Extra and Shadow of the Colossus that will show the relevance...... of a formal definition of game mechanics. Udgivelsesdato: Dec 2008...

  12. Hardening Software Defined Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    the layers to act upon each other in very distinct ways. Examining the literature, we selected bipartite and tripartite network models are those...identify characteristics of multilayered networks . Bipartite and tripartite models are potentially most promising (and somewhat underutilized) in the... tripartite models are particularly well-suited to a confluence of traditional networks and software defined networks where SDN components are

  13. Defining Mathematical Giftedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parish, Linda

    2014-01-01

    This theoretical paper outlines the process of defining "mathematical giftedness" for a present study on how primary school teaching shapes the mindsets of children who are mathematically gifted. Mathematical giftedness is not a badge of honour or some special value attributed to a child who has achieved something exceptional.…

  14. Defining and classifying syncope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijs, Roland D.; Wieling, Wouter; Kaufmann, Horacio; van Dijk, Gert

    2004-01-01

    There is no widely adopted definition or classification of syncope and related disorders. This lack of uniformity harms patient care, research, and medical education. In this article, syncope is defined as a form of transient loss of consciousness (TLOC) due to cerebral hypoperfusion. Differences

  15. Leapfrog variants of iterative methods for linear algebra equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saylor, Paul E.

    1988-01-01

    Two iterative methods are considered, Richardson's method and a general second order method. For both methods, a variant of the method is derived for which only even numbered iterates are computed. The variant is called a leapfrog method. Comparisons between the conventional form of the methods and the leapfrog form are made under the assumption that the number of unknowns is large. In the case of Richardson's method, it is possible to express the final iterate in terms of only the initial approximation, a variant of the iteration called the grand-leap method. In the case of the grand-leap variant, a set of parameters is required. An algorithm is presented to compute these parameters that is related to algorithms to compute the weights and abscissas for Gaussian quadrature. General algorithms to implement the leapfrog and grand-leap methods are presented. Algorithms for the important special case of the Chebyshev method are also given.

  16. MALDI-ISD Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Hemoglobin Variants: a Top-Down Approach to the Characterization of Hemoglobinopathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Théberge, Roger; Dikler, Sergei; Heckendorf, Christian; Chui, David H. K.; Costello, Catherine E.; McComb, Mark E.

    2015-08-01

    Hemoglobinopathies are the most common inherited disorders in humans and are thus the target of screening programs worldwide. Over the past decade, mass spectrometry (MS) has gained a more important role as a clinical means to diagnose variants, and a number of approaches have been proposed for characterization. Here we investigate the use of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight MS (MALDI-TOF MS) with sequencing using in-source decay (MALDI-ISD) for the characterization of Hb variants. We explored the effect of matrix selection using super DHB or 1,5-diaminonaphthalene on ISD fragment ion yield and distribution. MALDI-ISD MS of whole blood using super DHB simultaneously provided molecular weights for the alpha and beta chains, as well as extensive fragmentation in the form of sequence defining c-, (z + 2)-, and y-ion series. We observed sequence coverage on the first 70 amino acids positions from the N- and C-termini of the alpha and beta chains in a single experiment. An abundant beta chain N-terminal fragment ion corresponding to βc34 was determined to be a diagnostic marker ion for Hb S (β6 Glu→Val, sickle cell), Hb C (β6 Glu→Lys), and potentially for Hb E (β26 Glu→Lys). The MALDI-ISD analysis of Hb S and HbSC yielded mass shifts corresponding to the variants, demonstrating the potential for high-throughput screening. Characterization of an alpha chain variant, Hb Westmead (α122 His→Gln), generated fragments that established the location of the variant. This study is the first clinical application of MALDI-ISD MS for the determination and characterization of hemoglobin variants.

  17. [Dandy-Walker variant: Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cueva-Núñez, José E; Lozano-Bustillo, Alejandra; Irias-Álvarez, Merlyn S; Vásquez-Montes, Raúl F; Varela-González, Douglas M

    Dandy Walker variant is defined by a variable hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermix with or without posterior fossa increase and without tentorium elevation. describe the case of a rare disease and emphasise the need to clarify the aetiology of prenatal malformations, as well as its multidisciplinary management. A male patient, 8 years of age, with a history of Infantile Cerebral Palsy and epilepsy, who was admitted with a history of tonic-clonic seizures. He was admitted due to psycho-motor developmental delay. During his hospitalisation, he had multiple seizure episodes, controlled with anticonvulsants. A computerized tomography was performed, in which communication was observed between the cisterna magna and fourth ventricle (the latter increased in size). In addition, the cerebellar vermix showed a partial hypoplasia. All these findings were compatible with a variant of the Dandy Walker syndrome. Dandy Walker variant may be asymptomatic and the images found may not indicate them as the cause of developmental disorders, due to its association with multiple syndromes and chromosomal abnormalities. Clinical presentation and prognosis depends on the related disorders, and a multidisciplinary approach is important, because the treatment depends on the symptoms presented. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Incorporating Non-Coding Annotations into Rare Variant Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom G Richardson

    studies to uncover a greater number of causal variants for complex traits and help elucidate their functional role in disease.

  19. Defining the fascial system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adstrum, Sue; Hedley, Gil; Schleip, Robert; Stecco, Carla; Yucesoy, Can A

    2017-01-01

    Fascia is a widely used yet indistinctly defined anatomical term that is concurrently applied to the description of soft collagenous connective tissue, distinct sections of membranous tissue, and a body pervading soft connective tissue system. Inconsistent use of this term is causing concern due to its potential to confuse technical communication about fascia in global, multiple discipline- and multiple profession-spanning discourse environments. The Fascia Research Society acted to address this issue by establishing a Fascia Nomenclature Committee (FNC) whose purpose was to clarify the terminology relating to fascia. This committee has since developed and defined the terms a fascia, and, more recently, the fascial system. This article reports on the FNC's proposed definition of the fascial system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Can play be defined?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eichberg, Henning

    2015-01-01

    Can play be defined? There is reason to raise critical questions about the established academic demand that at phenomenon – also in humanist studies – should first of all be defined, i.e. de-lineated and by neat lines limited to a “little box” that can be handled. The following chapter develops...... the critical argument against this academic technique by going back to the history of cultural anthropology of play. This history did not develop in a linear way, but by shifts between different periods of colonial and anticolonial positions, as well as between more positivistic and more relativist approaches....... The academic imperative of definition seems to be linked to the positivistic attempts – and produces sometimes monstrous definitions. Have they any philosophical value for our knowledge of what play is? Definition is not a universal instrument of knowledge-building, but a culturally specific construction...

  1. Defining Legal Moralism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thaysen, Jens Damgaard

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses how legal moralism should be defined. It is argued that legal moralism should be defined as the position that “For any X, it is always a pro tanto reason for justifiably imposing legal regulation on X that X is morally wrong (where “morally wrong” is not conceptually equivalent...... to “harmful”)”. Furthermore, a distinction between six types of legal moralism is made. The six types are grouped according to whether they are concerned with the enforcement of positive or critical morality, and whether they are concerned with criminalising, legally restricting, or refraining from legally...... protecting morally wrong behaviour. This is interesting because not all types of legal moralism are equally vulnerable to the different critiques of legal moralism that have been put forth. Indeed, I show that some interesting types of legal moralism have not been criticised at all....

  2. Defining clinical deterioration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Daryl; Mitchell, Imogen; Hillman, Ken; Story, David

    2013-08-01

    To review literature reporting adverse events and physiological instability in order to develop frameworks that describe and define clinical deterioration in hospitalised patients. Literature review of publications from 1960 to August 2012. Conception and refinement of models to describe clinical deterioration based on prevailing themes that developed chronologically in adverse event literature. We propose four frameworks or models that define clinical deterioration and discuss the utility of each. Early attempts used retrospective chart review and focussed on the end result of deterioration (adverse events) and iatrogenesis. Subsequent models were also retrospective, but used discrete complications (e.g. sepsis, cardiac arrest) to define deterioration, had a more clinical focus, and identified the concept of antecedent physiological instability. Current models for defining clinical deterioration are based on the presence of abnormalities in vital signs and other clinical observations and attempt to prospectively assist clinicians in predicting subsequent risk. However, use of deranged vital signs in isolation does not consider important patient-, disease-, or system-related factors that are known to adversely affect the outcome of hospitalised patients. These include pre-morbid function, frailty, extent and severity of co-morbidity, nature of presenting illness, delays in responding to deterioration and institution of treatment, and patient response to therapy. There is a need to develop multiple-variable models for deteriorating ward patients similar to those used in intensive care units. Such models may assist clinician education, prospective and real-time patient risk stratification, and guide quality improvement initiatives that prevent and improve response to clinical deterioration. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Defining Consumer Ombudsmen

    OpenAIRE

    Gill, Chris; Hirst, Carolyn

    2016-01-01

    This report seeks to describe consumer ombudsmen as they have developed in the United Kingdom. The recent European Union Directive on Consumer Alternative Dispute Resolution (2013/11/EU) defines consumer dispute resolution mechanisms in general, but does not distinguish between them individually. It does not, for instance, distinguish between consumer ombudsmen, arbitrators and adjudication schemes. Other existing approaches to definition, such as the Ombudsman Association’s criteria for ‘omb...

  4. Defining local food

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Safania Normann

    2013-01-01

    Despite evolving local food research, there is no consistent definition of “local food.” Various understandings are utilized, which have resulted in a diverse landscape of meaning. The main purpose of this paper is to examine how researchers within the local food systems literature define local...... food, and how these definitions can be used as a starting point to identify a new taxonomy of local food based on three domains of proximity....

  5. [To define internet addiction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonioni, Federico

    2013-01-01

    Internet addiction is a new behavioral disorder difficult to define, especially when referring to young teenagers who make great use of web-mediated relationships. It's necessary to separate the cases of overt dependency on those in which the abuse of internet seems to have a different value, offering the only way to achieve the possible relationship. Internet is mediating a new way of communicating and thinking, this may favor the onset of clinical phenomena intended to surprise.

  6. Han Chinese polycystic ovary syndrome risk variants in women of European ancestry: relationship to FSH levels and glucose tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, R; Georgopoulos, N A; Braaten, T J; Bjonnes, A C; Koika, V; Panidis, D; Welt, C K

    2015-06-01

    Are PCOS risk variants identified in women of Han Chinese ethnicity also associated with risk of PCOS or the phenotypic features of PCOS in European women? One variant, rs2268361-T, in the intron of FSHR was associated with PCOS and lower FSH levels, while another variant rs705702-G near the RAB5B and SUOX genes was associated with insulin and glucose levels after oral glucose testing in women with PCOS of European ethnicity. Three of the eleven variants associated with PCOS in the Han Chinese genome-wide association studies were also associated with PCOS in at least one European population when corrected for multiple testing (DENND1A, THADA and YAP1). However, additional replication is needed to establish the importance of these variants in European women and to determine the relationship to PCOS phenotypic traits. The study was a case-control examination in a discovery cohort of women with PCOS (n = 485) and controls (n = 407) from Boston (Boston 1). Replication was performed in women from Greece (cases n = 884 and controls n = 311) and an additional cohort from Boston (Boston electronic medical record (EMR); n = 350 cases and n = 1258 controls). Women had PCOS defined by the National Institutes of Health criteria in Boston 1 and Greece (n = 783), with additional subjects fulfilling the Rotterdam criteria (hyperandrogenism, polycystic ovary morphology and regular menses) in Greece (n = 101). Controls in Boston and Greece had regular menstrual cycles and no hyperandrogenism. The second cohort from Boston was defined using the EMR and natural language processing. Allele frequencies for variants associated with PCOS in Han Chinese women were examined in PCOS cases and controls, along with the relationship to quantitative traits. A variant rs2268361-T in an intron of FSHR was associated with PCOS (0.84 [0.76-0.93], OR [95% CI]; P = 0.002). The rs2268361-T was associated with lower FSH levels (-0.15 ± 0.05; P = 0.0029). A variant rs705702-G near RAB5B and SUOX was

  7. Early-onset Alzheimer disease clinical variants: Multivariate analyses of cortical thickness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ridgway, G.R.; Lehmann, M.; Barnes, J.; Rohrer, J.D.; Warren, J.D.; Crutch, S.J.; Fox, N.C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess patterns of reduced cortical thickness in different clinically defined variants of early-onset Alzheimer disease (AD) and to explore the hypothesis that these variants span a phenotypic continuum rather than represent distinct subtypes. Methods: The case-control study included

  8. Fibonacci numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Vorob'ev, Nikolai Nikolaevich

    2011-01-01

    Fibonacci numbers date back to an 800-year-old problem concerning the number of offspring born in a single year to a pair of rabbits. This book offers the solution and explores the occurrence of Fibonacci numbers in number theory, continued fractions, and geometry. A discussion of the ""golden section"" rectangle, in which the lengths of the sides can be expressed as a ration of two successive Fibonacci numbers, draws upon attempts by ancient and medieval thinkers to base aesthetic and philosophical principles on the beauty of these figures. Recreational readers as well as students and teacher

  9. Number names and number understanding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejersbo, Lisser Rye; Misfeldt, Morten

    2014-01-01

    through using mathematical names for the numbers such as one-ten-one for 11 and five-ten-six for 56. The project combines the renaming of numbers with supporting the teaching with the new number names. Our hypothesis is that Danish children have more difficulties learning and working with numbers, because...... the Danish number names are more complicated than in other languages. Keywords: A research project in grade 0 and 1th in a Danish school, Base-10 system, two-digit number names, semiotic, cognitive perspectives....

  10. Defining functional dyspepsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mearin, Fermín; Calleja, José Luis

    2011-12-01

    Dyspepsia and functional dyspepsia represent a highly significant public health issue. A good definition of dyspepsia is key for helping us to better approach symptoms, decision making, and therapy indications.During the last few years many attempts were made at establishing a definition of dyspepsia. Results were little successful on most occasions, and clear discrepancies arose on whether symptoms should be associated with digestion, which types of symptoms were to be included, which anatomic location should symptoms have, etc.The Rome III Committee defined dyspepsia as "a symptom or set of symptoms that most physicians consider to originate from the gastroduodenal area", including the following: postprandial heaviness, early satiety, and epigastric pain or burning. Two new entities were defined: a) food-induced dyspeptic symptoms (postprandial distress syndrome); and b) epigastric pain (epigastric pain syndrome). These and other definitions have shown both strengths and weaknesses. At times they have been much too complex, at times much too simple; furthermore, they have commonly erred on the side of being inaccurate and impractical. On the other hand, some (the most recent ones) are difficult to translate into the Spanish language. In a meeting of gastroenterologists with a special interest in digestive functional disorders, the various aspects of dyspepsia definition were discussed and put to the vote, and the following conclusions were arrived at: dyspepsia is defined as a set of symptoms, either related or unrelated to food ingestion, localized on the upper half of the abdomen. They include: a) epigastric discomfort (as a category of severity) or pain; b) postprandial heaviness; and c) early satiety. Associated complaints include: nausea, belching, bloating, and epigastric burn (heartburn). All these must be scored according to severity and frequency. Furthermore, psychological factors may be involved in the origin of functional dyspepsia. On the other hand

  11. The Clinical Significance of Unknown Sequence Variants in BRCA Genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calò, Valentina; Bruno, Loredana; Paglia, Laura La; Perez, Marco; Margarese, Naomi; Gaudio, Francesca Di; Russo, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Germline mutations in BRCA1/2 genes are responsible for a large proportion of hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancers. Many highly penetrant predisposition alleles have been identified and include frameshift or nonsense mutations that lead to the translation of a truncated protein. Other alleles contain missense mutations, which result in amino acid substitution and intronic variants with splicing effect. The discovery of variants of uncertain/unclassified significance (VUS) is a result that can complicate rather than improve the risk assessment process. VUSs are mainly missense mutations, but also include a number of intronic variants and in-frame deletions and insertions. Over 2,000 unique BRCA1 and BRCA2 missense variants have been identified, located throughout the whole gene (Breast Cancer Information Core Database (BIC database)). Up to 10–20% of the BRCA tests report the identification of a variant of uncertain significance. There are many methods to discriminate deleterious/high-risk from neutral/low-risk unclassified variants (i.e., analysis of the cosegregation in families of the VUS, measure of the influence of the VUSs on the wild-type protein activity, comparison of sequence conservation across multiple species), but only an integrated analysis of these methods can contribute to a real interpretation of the functional and clinical role of the discussed variants. The aim of our manuscript is to review the studies on BRCA VUS in order to clarify their clinical relevance

  12. The Clinical Significance of Unknown Sequence Variants in BRCA Genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calò, Valentina; Bruno, Loredana; Paglia, Laura La; Perez, Marco; Margarese, Naomi [Department of Surgery and Oncology, Regional Reference Center for the Biomolecular Characterization and Genetic Screening of Hereditary Tumors, University of Palermo, Via del Vespro 127, 90127 Palermo (Italy); Gaudio, Francesca Di [Department of Medical Biotechnologies and Legal Medicine, University of Palermo, Palermo (Italy); Russo, Antonio, E-mail: lab-oncobiologia@usa.net [Department of Surgery and Oncology, Regional Reference Center for the Biomolecular Characterization and Genetic Screening of Hereditary Tumors, University of Palermo, Via del Vespro 127, 90127 Palermo (Italy)

    2010-09-10

    Germline mutations in BRCA1/2 genes are responsible for a large proportion of hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancers. Many highly penetrant predisposition alleles have been identified and include frameshift or nonsense mutations that lead to the translation of a truncated protein. Other alleles contain missense mutations, which result in amino acid substitution and intronic variants with splicing effect. The discovery of variants of uncertain/unclassified significance (VUS) is a result that can complicate rather than improve the risk assessment process. VUSs are mainly missense mutations, but also include a number of intronic variants and in-frame deletions and insertions. Over 2,000 unique BRCA1 and BRCA2 missense variants have been identified, located throughout the whole gene (Breast Cancer Information Core Database (BIC database)). Up to 10–20% of the BRCA tests report the identification of a variant of uncertain significance. There are many methods to discriminate deleterious/high-risk from neutral/low-risk unclassified variants (i.e., analysis of the cosegregation in families of the VUS, measure of the influence of the VUSs on the wild-type protein activity, comparison of sequence conservation across multiple species), but only an integrated analysis of these methods can contribute to a real interpretation of the functional and clinical role of the discussed variants. The aim of our manuscript is to review the studies on BRCA VUS in order to clarify their clinical relevance.

  13. Reproducibility of Variant Calls in Replicate Next Generation Sequencing Experiments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Qi

    Full Text Available Nucleotide alterations detected by next generation sequencing are not always true biological changes but could represent sequencing errors. Even highly accurate methods can yield substantial error rates when applied to millions of nucleotides. In this study, we examined the reproducibility of nucleotide variant calls in replicate sequencing experiments of the same genomic DNA. We performed targeted sequencing of all known human protein kinase genes (kinome (~3.2 Mb using the SOLiD v4 platform. Seventeen breast cancer samples were sequenced in duplicate (n=14 or triplicate (n=3 to assess concordance of all calls and single nucleotide variant (SNV calls. The concordance rates over the entire sequenced region were >99.99%, while the concordance rates for SNVs were 54.3-75.5%. There was substantial variation in basic sequencing metrics from experiment to experiment. The type of nucleotide substitution and genomic location of the variant had little impact on concordance but concordance increased with coverage level, variant allele count (VAC, variant allele frequency (VAF, variant allele quality and p-value of SNV-call. The most important determinants of concordance were VAC and VAF. Even using the highest stringency of QC metrics the reproducibility of SNV calls was around 80% suggesting that erroneous variant calling can be as high as 20-40% in a single experiment. The sequence data have been deposited into the European Genome-phenome Archive (EGA with accession number EGAS00001000826.

  14. Reproducibility of Variant Calls in Replicate Next Generation Sequencing Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yuan; Liu, Xiuping; Liu, Chang-gong; Wang, Bailing; Hess, Kenneth R.; Symmans, W. Fraser; Shi, Weiwei; Pusztai, Lajos

    2015-01-01

    Nucleotide alterations detected by next generation sequencing are not always true biological changes but could represent sequencing errors. Even highly accurate methods can yield substantial error rates when applied to millions of nucleotides. In this study, we examined the reproducibility of nucleotide variant calls in replicate sequencing experiments of the same genomic DNA. We performed targeted sequencing of all known human protein kinase genes (kinome) (~3.2 Mb) using the SOLiD v4 platform. Seventeen breast cancer samples were sequenced in duplicate (n=14) or triplicate (n=3) to assess concordance of all calls and single nucleotide variant (SNV) calls. The concordance rates over the entire sequenced region were >99.99%, while the concordance rates for SNVs were 54.3-75.5%. There was substantial variation in basic sequencing metrics from experiment to experiment. The type of nucleotide substitution and genomic location of the variant had little impact on concordance but concordance increased with coverage level, variant allele count (VAC), variant allele frequency (VAF), variant allele quality and p-value of SNV-call. The most important determinants of concordance were VAC and VAF. Even using the highest stringency of QC metrics the reproducibility of SNV calls was around 80% suggesting that erroneous variant calling can be as high as 20-40% in a single experiment. The sequence data have been deposited into the European Genome-phenome Archive (EGA) with accession number EGAS00001000826. PMID:26136146

  15. A geometric framework for evaluating rare variant tests of association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Keli; Fast, Shannon; Zawistowski, Matthew; Tintle, Nathan L

    2013-05-01

    The wave of next-generation sequencing data has arrived. However, many questions still remain about how to best analyze sequence data, particularly the contribution of rare genetic variants to human disease. Numerous statistical methods have been proposed to aggregate association signals across multiple rare variant sites in an effort to increase statistical power; however, the precise relation between the tests is often not well understood. We present a geometric representation for rare variant data in which rare allele counts in case and control samples are treated as vectors in Euclidean space. The geometric framework facilitates a rigorous classification of existing rare variant tests into two broad categories: tests for a difference in the lengths of the case and control vectors, and joint tests for a difference in either the lengths or angles of the two vectors. We demonstrate that genetic architecture of a trait, including the number and frequency of risk alleles, directly relates to the behavior of the length and joint tests. Hence, the geometric framework allows prediction of which tests will perform best under different disease models. Furthermore, the structure of the geometric framework immediately suggests additional classes and types of rare variant tests. We consider two general classes of tests which show robustness to noncausal and protective variants. The geometric framework introduces a novel and unique method to assess current rare variant methodology and provides guidelines for both applied and theoretical researchers. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Variant (Swine Origin) Influenza Viruses in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Types Seasonal Avian Swine Variant Other Variant Influenza Viruses: Background and CDC Risk Assessment and Reporting Language: ... Background CDC Assessment Reporting Background On Variant Influenza Viruses Swine flu viruses do not normally infect humans. ...

  17. Eulerian numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Petersen, T Kyle

    2015-01-01

    This text presents the Eulerian numbers in the context of modern enumerative, algebraic, and geometric combinatorics. The book first studies Eulerian numbers from a purely combinatorial point of view, then embarks on a tour of how these numbers arise in the study of hyperplane arrangements, polytopes, and simplicial complexes. Some topics include a thorough discussion of gamma-nonnegativity and real-rootedness for Eulerian polynomials, as well as the weak order and the shard intersection order of the symmetric group. The book also includes a parallel story of Catalan combinatorics, wherein the Eulerian numbers are replaced with Narayana numbers. Again there is a progression from combinatorics to geometry, including discussion of the associahedron and the lattice of noncrossing partitions. The final chapters discuss how both the Eulerian and Narayana numbers have analogues in any finite Coxeter group, with many of the same enumerative and geometric properties. There are four supplemental chapters throughout, ...

  18. Distribution and medical impact of loss-of-function variants in the Finnish founder population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lim, Elaine T.; Würtz, Peter; Havulinna, Aki S.; Palta, Priit; Tukiainen, Taru; Rehnström, Karola; Esko, Tõnu; Mägi, Reedik; Inouye, Michael; Lappalainen, Tuuli; Chan, Yingleong; Salem, Rany M.; Lek, Monkol; Flannick, Jason; Sim, Xueling; Manning, Alisa; Ladenvall, Claes; Bumpstead, Suzannah; Hämäläinen, Eija; Aalto, Kristiina; Maksimow, Mikael; Salmi, Marko; Blankenberg, Stefan; Ardissino, Diego; Shah, Svati; Horne, Benjamin; McPherson, Ruth; Hovingh, Gerald K.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Watkins, Hugh; Goel, Anuj; Farrall, Martin; Girelli, Domenico; Reiner, Alex P.; Stitziel, Nathan O.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Gabriel, Stacey; Barrett, Jeffrey C.; Lehtimäki, Terho; Laakso, Markku; Groop, Leif; Kaprio, Jaakko; Perola, Markus; McCarthy, Mark I.; Boehnke, Michael; Altshuler, David M.; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Metspalu, Andres; Freimer, Nelson B.; Zeller, Tanja; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Koskinen, Seppo; Raitakari, Olli; Durbin, Richard; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Salomaa, Veikko; Ripatti, Samuli; Daly, Mark J.; Palotie, Aarno

    2014-01-01

    Exome sequencing studies in complex diseases are challenged by the allelic heterogeneity, large number and modest effect sizes of associated variants on disease risk and the presence of large numbers of neutral variants, even in phenotypically relevant genes. Isolated populations with recent

  19. Physical localization of NORs and ITS length variants in old ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The variation at the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the ribosomal DNA has been correlated with the number of nucleolar organizer regions (NORs) in some plant species. Besides, the number of NORs might influence the rate of homogenization of the rDNA repeats. In recent studies, ITS length variants ...

  20. Defining Urban Geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Christopher B.; Lyons, W. Berry; Long, David T.

    2014-12-01

    From 1950 to 2014, the proportion of the world's population living in urban centers has increased from 30% to 54%, and the United Nations' World Urbanization Prospects: The 2014 Revision estimates this number will reach 66%, or 6.3 billion, by 2050. Nearly 90% of this growth is projected to occur in Africa and Asia, which today remain mostly rural.

  1. Variants of beta-glucosidases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidantsef, Ana; Lamsa, Michael; Gorre-Clancy, Brian

    2014-10-07

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent beta-glucosidase, comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 142, 183, 266, and 703 of amino acids 1 to 842 of SEQ ID NO: 2 or corresponding to positions 142, 183, 266, and 705 of amino acids 1 to 844 of SEQ ID NO: 70, wherein the variant has beta-glucosidase activity. The present invention also relates to nucleotide sequences encoding the variant beta-glucosidases and to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the nucleotide sequences.

  2. Variants of beta-glucosidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidantsef, Ana [Davis, CA; Lamsa, Michael [Davis, CA; Gorre-Clancy, Brian [Elk Grove, CA

    2009-12-29

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent beta-glucosidase, comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 142, 183, 266, and 703 of amino acids 1 to 842 of SEQ ID NO: 2 or corresponding to positions 142, 183, 266, and 705 of amino acids 1 to 844 of SEQ ID NO: 70, wherein the variant has beta-glucosidase activity. The present invention also relates to nucleotide sequences encoding the variant beta-glucosidases and to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the nucleotide sequences.

  3. New population-based exome data are questioning the pathogenicity of previously cardiomyopathy-associated genetic variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Charlotte Hartig; Nielsen, Jonas B; Refsgaard, Lena

    2013-01-01

    variants in the NHLBI-Go Exome Sequencing Project (ESP) containing exome data from 6500 individuals. In ESP, we identified 94 variants out of 687 (14%) variants previously associated with HCM, 58 out of 337 (17%) variants associated with DCM, and 38 variants out of 209 (18%) associated with ARVC...... with these cardiomyopathies, but the disease-causing effect of reported variants is often dubious. In order to identify possible false-positive variants, we investigated the prevalence of previously reported cardiomyopathy-associated variants in recently published exome data. We searched for reported missense and nonsense...... times higher than expected from the phenotype prevalences in the general population (HCM 1:500, DCM 1:2500, and ARVC 1:5000) and our data suggest that a high number of these variants are not monogenic causes of cardiomyopathy....

  4. Transfinite Numbers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Transfinite Numbers. What is Infinity? S M Srivastava. In a series of revolutionary articles written during the last quarter of the nineteenth century, the great Ger- man mathematician Georg Cantor removed the age-old mistrust of infinity and created an exceptionally beau- tiful and useful theory of transfinite numbers. This is.

  5. Method of generating ploynucleotides encoding enhanced folding variants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradbury, Andrew M.; Kiss, Csaba; Waldo, Geoffrey S.

    2017-05-02

    The invention provides directed evolution methods for improving the folding, solubility and stability (including thermostability) characteristics of polypeptides. In one aspect, the invention provides a method for generating folding and stability-enhanced variants of proteins, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins, chromophoric proteins and enzymes. In another aspect, the invention provides methods for generating thermostable variants of a target protein or polypeptide via an internal destabilization baiting strategy. Internally destabilization a protein of interest is achieved by inserting a heterologous, folding-destabilizing sequence (folding interference domain) within DNA encoding the protein of interest, evolving the protein sequences adjacent to the heterologous insertion to overcome the destabilization (using any number of mutagenesis methods), thereby creating a library of variants. The variants in the library are expressed, and those with enhanced folding characteristics selected.

  6. COMPARISON OF THE TEST VARIANTS IN ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KLŮFA, Jindřich

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper contains an analysis of the differences of number of points in the test in mathematics between test variants, which were used in the entrance examinations at the Faculty of Business Administration at University of Economics in Prague in 2015. The differences may arise due to the varying difficulty of variants for students, but also because of the different level of knowledge of students who write these variants. This problem we shall study in present paper. The aim of this paper is to study dependence of the results of entrance examinations in mathematics on test variants. The results obtained will be used for further improvement of the admission process at University of Economics.

  7. Defining critical thoughts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovatt, Abbie

    2014-05-01

    Nursing education has long struggled to define critical thinking and explain how the process of critical thinking fits into the context of nursing. Despite this long time struggle, nurses and nurse educators continue to strive to foster critical thinking skills in nursing students as intuitively most nurses believe that critical thinking is necessary to function competently in the workplace. This article explores the most recent work of Dr. Stephen Brookfield and ties the concepts which are explored in Brookfield's work to nursing practice. Brookfield identifies that learners understand the meaning of critical thinking the best when the process is first demonstrated. Role modeling is a method educators can use to demonstrate critical thinking and is a strategy which nurses often use in the clinical area to train and mentor new nursing staff. Although it is not a new strategy in nursing education, it is a valuable strategy to engage learners in critical thinking activities. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Implementing Software Defined Radio

    CERN Document Server

    Grayver, Eugene

    2013-01-01

    Software Defined Radio makes wireless communications easier, more efficient, and more reliable. This book bridges the gap between academic research and practical implementation. When beginning a project, practicing engineers, technical managers, and graduate students can save countless hours by considering the concepts presented in these pages. The author covers the myriad options and trade-offs available when selecting an appropriate hardware architecture. As demonstrated here, the choice between hardware- and software-centric architecture can mean the difference between meeting an aggressive schedule and bogging down in endless design iterations. Because of the author’s experience overseeing dozens of failed and successful developments, he is able to present many real-life examples. Some of the key concepts covered are: Choosing the right architecture for the market – laboratory, military, or commercial Hardware platforms – FPGAs, GPPs, specialized and hybrid devices Standardization efforts to ens...

  9. Defining cyber warfare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragan D. Mladenović

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Cyber conflicts represent a new kind of warfare that is technologically developing very rapidly. Such development results in more frequent and more intensive cyber attacks undertaken by states against adversary targets, with a wide range of diverse operations, from information operations to physical destruction of targets. Nevertheless, cyber warfare is waged through the application of the same means, techniques and methods as those used in cyber criminal, terrorism and intelligence activities. Moreover, it has a very specific nature that enables states to covertly initiate attacks against their adversaries. The starting point in defining doctrines, procedures and standards in the area of cyber warfare is determining its true nature. In this paper, a contribution to this effort was made through the analysis of the existing state doctrines and international practice in the area of cyber warfare towards the determination of its nationally acceptable definition.

  10. Software Defined Networking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caba, Cosmin Marius

    resources are limited. Hence, to counteract this trend, current QoS mechanisms must become simpler to deploy and operate, in order to motivate NSPs to employ QoS techniques instead of overprovisioning. Software Defined Networking (SDN) represents a paradigm shift in the way telecommunication and data...... networks are designed and managed. This thesis argues that SDN can greatly simplify QoS provisioning in communication networks, and even improve QoS in various ways. To this end, the impact of SDN on QoS is assessed from both a network performance perspective (e.g. bandwidth, delay), and also from a more...... generic perspective (e.g. service provisioning speed, resources availability). As a result, new mechanisms for providing QoS are proposed, solutions for SDN-specific QoS challenges are designed and tested, and new network management concepts are prototyped, all aiming to improve QoS for network services...

  11. Identifying noncoding risk variants using disease-relevant gene regulatory networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Long; Uzun, Yasin; Gao, Peng; He, Bing; Ma, Xiaoke; Wang, Jiahui; Han, Shizhong; Tan, Kai

    2018-02-16

    Identifying noncoding risk variants remains a challenging task. Because noncoding variants exert their effects in the context of a gene regulatory network (GRN), we hypothesize that explicit use of disease-relevant GRNs can significantly improve the inference accuracy of noncoding risk variants. We describe Annotation of Regulatory Variants using Integrated Networks (ARVIN), a general computational framework for predicting causal noncoding variants. It employs a set of novel regulatory network-based features, combined with sequence-based features to infer noncoding risk variants. Using known causal variants in gene promoters and enhancers in a number of diseases, we show ARVIN outperforms state-of-the-art methods that use sequence-based features alone. Additional experimental validation using reporter assay further demonstrates the accuracy of ARVIN. Application of ARVIN to seven autoimmune diseases provides a holistic view of the gene subnetwork perturbed by the combinatorial action of the entire set of risk noncoding mutations.

  12. Mouse ribosomal RNA genes contain multiple differentially regulated variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung Tseng

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Previous cytogenetic studies suggest that various rDNA chromosomal loci are not equally active in different cell types. Consistent with this variability, rDNA polymorphism is well documented in human and mouse. However, attempts to identify molecularly rDNA variant types, which are regulated individually (i.e., independent of other rDNA variants and tissue-specifically, have not been successful. We report here the molecular cloning and characterization of seven mouse rDNA variants (v-rDNA. The identification of these v-rDNAs was based on restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs, which are conserved among individuals and mouse strains. The total copy number of the identified variants is less than 100 and the copy number of each individual variant ranges from 4 to 15. Sequence analysis of the cloned v-rDNA identified variant-specific single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the transcribed region. These SNPs were used to develop a set of variant-specific PCR assays, which permitted analysis of the v-rDNAs' expression profiles in various tissues. These profiles show that three v-rDNAs are expressed in all tissues (constitutively active, two are expressed in some tissues (selectively active, and two are not expressed (silent. These expression profiles were observed in six individuals from three mouse strains, suggesting the pattern is not randomly determined. Thus, the mouse rDNA array likely consists of genetically distinct variants, and some are regulated tissue-specifically. Our results provide the first molecular evidence for cell-type-specific regulation of a subset of rDNA.

  13. Number theory

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, George E

    1994-01-01

    Although mathematics majors are usually conversant with number theory by the time they have completed a course in abstract algebra, other undergraduates, especially those in education and the liberal arts, often need a more basic introduction to the topic.In this book the author solves the problem of maintaining the interest of students at both levels by offering a combinatorial approach to elementary number theory. In studying number theory from such a perspective, mathematics majors are spared repetition and provided with new insights, while other students benefit from the consequent simpl

  14. Defining the Anthropocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Simon; Maslin, Mark

    2016-04-01

    Time is divided by geologists according to marked shifts in Earth's state. Recent global environmental changes suggest that Earth may have entered a new human-dominated geological epoch, the Anthropocene. Should the Anthropocene - the idea that human activity is a force acting upon the Earth system in ways that mean that Earth will be altered for millions of years - be defined as a geological time-unit at the level of an Epoch? Here we appraise the data to assess such claims, first in terms of changes to the Earth system, with particular focus on very long-lived impacts, as Epochs typically last millions of years. Can Earth really be said to be in transition from one state to another? Secondly, we then consider the formal criteria used to define geological time-units and move forward through time examining whether currently available evidence passes typical geological time-unit evidence thresholds. We suggest two time periods likely fit the criteria (1) the aftermath of the interlinking of the Old and New Worlds, which moved species across continents and ocean basins worldwide, a geologically unprecedented and permanent change, which is also the globally synchronous coolest part of the Little Ice Age (in Earth system terms), and the beginning of global trade and a new socio-economic "world system" (in historical terms), marked as a golden spike by a temporary drop in atmospheric CO2, centred on 1610 CE; and (2) the aftermath of the Second World War, when many global environmental changes accelerated and novel long-lived materials were increasingly manufactured, known as the Great Acceleration (in Earth system terms) and the beginning of the Cold War (in historical terms), marked as a golden spike by the peak in radionuclide fallout in 1964. We finish by noting that the Anthropocene debate is politically loaded, thus transparency in the presentation of evidence is essential if a formal definition of the Anthropocene is to avoid becoming a debate about bias. The

  15. Nice numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Barnes, John

    2016-01-01

    In this intriguing book, John Barnes takes us on a journey through aspects of numbers much as he took us on a geometrical journey in Gems of Geometry. Similarly originating from a series of lectures for adult students at Reading and Oxford University, this book touches a variety of amusing and fascinating topics regarding numbers and their uses both ancient and modern. The author intrigues and challenges his audience with both fundamental number topics such as prime numbers and cryptography, and themes of daily needs and pleasures such as counting one's assets, keeping track of time, and enjoying music. Puzzles and exercises at the end of each lecture offer additional inspiration, and numerous illustrations accompany the reader. Furthermore, a number of appendices provides in-depth insights into diverse topics such as Pascal’s triangle, the Rubik cube, Mersenne’s curious keyboards, and many others. A theme running through is the thought of what is our favourite number. Written in an engaging and witty sty...

  16. Disease-associated variants in different categories of disease located in distinct regulatory elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Meng; Ru, Ying; Chuang, Ling-Shiang; Hsu, Nai-Yun; Shi, Li-Song; Hakenberg, Jörg; Cheng, Wei-Yi; Uzilov, Andrew; Ding, Wei; Glicksberg, Benjamin S; Chen, Rong

    2015-01-01

    The invention of high throughput sequencing technologies has led to the discoveries of hundreds of thousands of genetic variants associated with thousands of human diseases. Many of these genetic variants are located outside the protein coding regions, and as such, it is challenging to interpret the function of these genetic variants by traditional genetic approaches. Recent genome-wide functional genomics studies, such as FANTOM5 and ENCODE have uncovered a large number of regulatory elements across hundreds of different tissues or cell lines in the human genome. These findings provide an opportunity to study the interaction between regulatory elements and disease-associated genetic variants. Identifying these diseased-related regulatory elements will shed light on understanding the mechanisms of how these variants regulate gene expression and ultimately result in disease formation and progression. In this study, we curated and categorized 27,558 Mendelian disease variants, 20,964 complex disease variants, 5,809 cancer predisposing germline variants, and 43,364 recurrent cancer somatic mutations. Compared against nine different types of regulatory regions from FANTOM5 and ENCODE projects, we found that different types of disease variants show distinctive propensity for particular regulatory elements. Mendelian disease variants and recurrent cancer somatic mutations are 22-fold and 10- fold significantly enriched in promoter regions respectively (qdisease variants and recurrent cancer somatic mutations share very similar distribution across types of functional effects. We further found that regulatory regions are located within over 50% coding exon regions. Transcription promoters, methylation regions, and transcription insulators have the highest density of disease variants, with 472, 239, and 72 disease variants per one million base pairs, respectively. Disease-associated variants in different disease categories are preferentially located in particular regulatory

  17. Disease-associated variants in different categories of disease located in distinct regulatory elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Background The invention of high throughput sequencing technologies has led to the discoveries of hundreds of thousands of genetic variants associated with thousands of human diseases. Many of these genetic variants are located outside the protein coding regions, and as such, it is challenging to interpret the function of these genetic variants by traditional genetic approaches. Recent genome-wide functional genomics studies, such as FANTOM5 and ENCODE have uncovered a large number of regulatory elements across hundreds of different tissues or cell lines in the human genome. These findings provide an opportunity to study the interaction between regulatory elements and disease-associated genetic variants. Identifying these diseased-related regulatory elements will shed light on understanding the mechanisms of how these variants regulate gene expression and ultimately result in disease formation and progression. Results In this study, we curated and categorized 27,558 Mendelian disease variants, 20,964 complex disease variants, 5,809 cancer predisposing germline variants, and 43,364 recurrent cancer somatic mutations. Compared against nine different types of regulatory regions from FANTOM5 and ENCODE projects, we found that different types of disease variants show distinctive propensity for particular regulatory elements. Mendelian disease variants and recurrent cancer somatic mutations are 22-fold and 10- fold significantly enriched in promoter regions respectively (qdisease variants and recurrent cancer somatic mutations share very similar distribution across types of functional effects. We further found that regulatory regions are located within over 50% coding exon regions. Transcription promoters, methylation regions, and transcription insulators have the highest density of disease variants, with 472, 239, and 72 disease variants per one million base pairs, respectively. Conclusions Disease-associated variants in different disease categories are preferentially

  18. Number names and number understanding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejersbo, Lisser Rye; Misfeldt, Morten

    2014-01-01

    This paper concerns the results from the first year of a three-year research project involving the relationship between Danish number names and their corresponding digits in the canonical base 10 system. The project aims to develop a system to help the students’ understanding of the base 10 system...... the Danish number names are more complicated than in other languages. Keywords: A research project in grade 0 and 1th in a Danish school, Base-10 system, two-digit number names, semiotic, cognitive perspectives....

  19. Defining Information Security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundgren, Björn; Möller, Niklas

    2017-11-15

    This article proposes a new definition of information security, the 'Appropriate Access' definition. Apart from providing the basic criteria for a definition-correct demarcation and meaning concerning the state of security-it also aims at being a definition suitable for any information security perspective. As such, it bridges the conceptual divide between so-called 'soft issues' of information security (those including, e.g., humans, organizations, culture, ethics, policies, and law) and more technical issues. Because of this it is also suitable for various analytical purposes, such as analysing possible security breaches, or for studying conflicting attitudes on security in an organization. The need for a new definition is demonstrated by pointing to a number of problems for the standard definition type of information security-the so-called CIA definition. Besides being too broad as well as too narrow, it cannot properly handle the soft issues of information security, nor recognize the contextual and normative nature of security.

  20. Funny Numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodore M. Porter

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The struggle over cure rate measures in nineteenth-century asylums provides an exemplary instance of how, when used for official assessments of institutions, these numbers become sites of contestation. The evasion of goals and corruption of measures tends to make these numbers “funny” in the sense of becoming dis-honest, while the mismatch between boring, technical appearances and cunning backstage manipulations supplies dark humor. The dangers are evident in recent efforts to decentralize the functions of governments and corporations using incen-tives based on quantified targets.

  1. Fundamentals of number theory

    CERN Document Server

    LeVeque, William J

    1996-01-01

    This excellent textbook introduces the basics of number theory, incorporating the language of abstract algebra. A knowledge of such algebraic concepts as group, ring, field, and domain is not assumed, however; all terms are defined and examples are given - making the book self-contained in this respect.The author begins with an introductory chapter on number theory and its early history. Subsequent chapters deal with unique factorization and the GCD, quadratic residues, number-theoretic functions and the distribution of primes, sums of squares, quadratic equations and quadratic fields, diopha

  2. Number Guessing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezin, Fatin

    2009-01-01

    It is instructive and interesting to find hidden numbers by using different positional numeration systems. Most of the present guessing techniques use the binary system expressed as less-than, greater-than or present-absent type information. This article describes how, by employing four cards having integers 1-64 written in different colours, one…

  3. Transfinite Numbers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    this is a characteristic difference between finite and infinite sets and created an immensely useful branch of mathematics based on this idea which had a great impact on the whole of mathe- matics. For example, the question of what is a number (finite or infinite) is almost a philosophical one. However Cantor's work turned it ...

  4. Transfinite Numbers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 3. Transfinite Numbers - What is Infinity? S M Srivastava. General Article Volume 2 Issue 3 March 1997 pp 58-68. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/002/03/0058-0068 ...

  5. Lightning-fast genome variant detection with GROM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sean D; Kawash, Joseph K; Grigoriev, Andrey

    2017-10-01

    Current human whole genome sequencing projects produce massive amounts of data, often creating significant computational challenges. Different approaches have been developed for each type of genome variant and method of its detection, necessitating users to run multiple algorithms to find variants. We present Genome Rearrangement OmniMapper (GROM), a novel comprehensive variant detection algorithm accepting aligned read files as input and finding SNVs, indels, structural variants (SVs), and copy number variants (CNVs). We show that GROM outperforms state-of-the-art methods on 7 validated benchmarks using 2 whole genome sequencing (WGS) data sets. Additionally, GROM boasts lightning-fast run times, analyzing a 50× WGS human data set (NA12878) on commonly available computer hardware in 11 minutes, more than an order of magnitude (up to 72 times) faster than tools detecting a similar range of variants. Addressing the needs of big data analysis, GROM combines in 1 algorithm SNV, indel, SV, and CNV detection, providing superior speed, sensitivity, and precision. GROM is also able to detect CNVs, SNVs, and indels in non-paired-read WGS libraries, as well as SNVs and indels in whole exome or RNA sequencing data sets. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  6. Variants affecting exon skipping contribute to complex traits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Younghee Lee

    Full Text Available DNA variants that affect alternative splicing and the relative quantities of different gene transcripts have been shown to be risk alleles for some Mendelian diseases. However, for complex traits characterized by a low odds ratio for any single contributing variant, very few studies have investigated the contribution of splicing variants. The overarching goal of this study is to discover and characterize the role that variants affecting alternative splicing may play in the genetic etiology of complex traits, which include a significant number of the common human diseases. Specifically, we hypothesize that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in splicing regulatory elements can be characterized in silico to identify variants affecting splicing, and that these variants may contribute to the etiology of complex diseases as well as the inter-individual variability in the ratios of alternative transcripts. We leverage high-throughput expression profiling to 1 experimentally validate our in silico predictions of skipped exons and 2 characterize the molecular role of intronic genetic variations in alternative splicing events in the context of complex human traits and diseases. We propose that intronic SNPs play a role as genetic regulators within splicing regulatory elements and show that their associated exon skipping events can affect protein domains and structure. We find that SNPs we would predict to affect exon skipping are enriched among the set of SNPs reported to be associated with complex human traits.

  7. Histone variant innovation in a rapidly evolving chordate lineage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jansen Pascal WTC

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Histone variants alter the composition of nucleosomes and play crucial roles in transcription, chromosome segregation, DNA repair, and sperm compaction. Modification of metazoan histone variant lineages occurs on a background of genome architecture that shows global similarities from sponges to vertebrates, but the urochordate, Oikopleura dioica, a member of the sister group to vertebrates, exhibits profound modification of this ancestral architecture. Results We show that a histone complement of 47 gene loci encodes 31 histone variants, grouped in distinct sets of developmental expression profiles throughout the life cycle. A particularly diverse array of 15 male-specific histone variants was uncovered, including a testes-specific H4t, the first metazoan H4 sequence variant reported. Universal histone variants H3.3, CenH3, and H2A.Z are present but O. dioica lacks homologs of macroH2A and H2AX. The genome encodes many H2A and H2B variants and the repertoire of H2A.Z isoforms is expanded through alternative splicing, incrementally regulating the number of acetylatable lysine residues in the functionally important N-terminal "charge patch". Mass spectrometry identified 40 acetylation, methylation and ubiquitylation posttranslational modifications (PTMs and showed that hallmark PTMs of "active" and "repressive" chromatin were present in O. dioica. No obvious reduction in silent heterochromatic marks was observed despite high gene density in this extraordinarily compacted chordate genome. Conclusions These results show that histone gene complements and their organization differ considerably even over modest phylogenetic distances. Substantial innovation among all core and linker histone variants has evolved in concert with adaptation of specific life history traits in this rapidly evolving chordate lineage.

  8. Defining the role of common variation in the genomic and biological architecture of adult human height

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wood, A.R.; Esko, T.; Yang, J.; Vedantam, S.; Pers, T.H.; Gustafsson, S.; Chu, A.Y.; Estrada, K.; Luan, J.; Kutalik, Z.; Amin, N.; Buchkovich, M.L.; Croteau-Chonka, D.C.; Day, F.R.; Duan, Y.; Fall, T.; Fehrmann, R.; Ferreira, T.; Jackson, A.U.; Karjalainen, J.; Lo, K.S.; Locke, A.E.; Magi, R.; Mihailov, E.; Porcu, E.; Randall, J.C.; Scherag, A.; Vinkhuyzen, A.A.E.; Westra, H.J.; Winkler, T.W.; Workalemahu, T.; Zhao, J.H.; Absher, D.; Albrecht, E.; Anderson, D.; Baron, J.; Beekman, M.; Demirkan, A.; Ehret, G.B.; Feenstra, B.; Feitosa, M.F.; Fischer, K.; Fraser, R.M.; Goel, A.; Gong, J.; Justice, A.E.; Kanoni, S.; Kleber, M.E.; Kristiansson, K.; Lim, U.; Lotay, V.; Lui, J.C.; Mangino, M.; Leach, I.M.; Medina-Gomez, C.; Nalls, M.A.; Nyholt, D.R.; Palmer, C.D.; Pasko, D.; Pechlivanis, S.; Prokopenko, I.; Ried, J.S.; Ripke, S.; Shungin, D.; Stancakova, A.; Strawbridge, R.J.; Sung, Y.J.; Tanaka, T.; Teumer, A.; Trompet, S.; Laan, S.W. van der; Setten, J. van; Vliet-Ostaptchouk, J.V. Van; Wang, Z.; Yengo, L.; Zhang, W.; Afzal, U.; Arnlov, J.; Arscott, G.M.; Bandinelli, S.; Barrett, A.; Bellis, C.; Bennett, A.J.; Berne, C.; Bluher, M.; Bolton, J.L.; Bottcher, Y.; Boyd, H.A.; Bruinenberg, M.; Buckley, B.M.; Buyske, S.; Caspersen, I.H.; Chines, P.S.; Clarke, R.; Claudi-Boehm, S.; Cooper, M.; Daw, E.W.; Jong, P.A. de; Deelen, J.; Delgado, G.; Vermeulen, S.; Kiemeney, L.A.; et al.,

    2014-01-01

    Using genome-wide data from 253,288 individuals, we identified 697 variants at genome-wide significance that together explained one-fifth of the heritability for adult height. By testing different numbers of variants in independent studies, we show that the most strongly associated approximately

  9. Defining the role of common variation in the genomic and biological architecture of adult human height

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wood, Andrew R.; Esko, Tonu; Yang, Jian; Vedantam, Sailaja; Pers, Tune H.; Gustafsson, Stefan; Chun, Audrey Y.; Estrada, Karol; Luan, Jian'an; Kutalik, Zoltan; Amin, Najaf; Buchkovich, Martin L.; Croteau-Chonka, Damien C.; Day, Felix R.; Duan, Yanan; Fall, Tove; Fehrmann, Rudolf; Ferreira, Teresa; Jackson, Anne U.; Karjalainen, Juha; Lo, Ken Sin; Locke, Adam E.; Maegi, Reedik; Mihailov, Evelin; Porcu, Eleonora; Randall, Joshua C.; Scherag, Andre; Vinkhuyzen, Anna A. E.; Westra, Harm-Jan; Winkler, Thomas W.; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Zhao, Jing Hua; Absher, Devin; Albrecht, Eva; Anderson, Denise; Baron, Jeffrey; Beekman, Marian; Demirkan, Ayse; Ehret, Georg B.; Feenstra, Bjarke; Feitosa, Mary F.; Fischer, Krista; Fraser, Ross M.; Goel, Anuj; Gong, Jian; Justice, Anne E.; Kanoni, Stavroula; Kleber, Marcus E.; Kristiansson, Kati; Lim, Unhee; Lotay, Vaneet; Lui, Julian C.; Mangino, Massimo; Mateo Leach, Irene; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Nalls, Michael A.; Nyholt, Dale R.; Palmer, Cameron D.; Pasko, Dorota; Pechlivanis, Sonali; Prokopenko, Inga; Ried, Janina S.; Ripke, Stephan; Shungin, Dmitry; Stancakova, Alena; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Sung, Yun Ju; Tanaka, Toshiko; Teumer, Alexander; Trompet, Stella; van der Laan, Sander W.; van Setten, Jessica; Van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V.; Wang, Zhaoming; Yengo, Loic; Zhang, Weihua; Afzal, Uzma; Arnloev, Johan; Arscott, Gillian M.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Barrett, Amy; Bellis, Claire; Bennett, Amanda J.; Berne, Christian; Blueher, Matthias; Bolton, Jennifer L.; Boettcher, Yvonne; Boyd, Heather A.; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Buckley, Brendan M.; Buyske, Steven; Caspersen, Ida H.; Chines, Peter S.; Clarke, Robert; Claudi-Boehm, Simone; Cooper, Matthew; Daw, E. Warwick; De Jong, Pim A.; Deelen, Joris; Delgado, Graciela; Denny, Josh C.; Dhonukshe-Rutten, Rosalie; Dimitriou, Maria; Doney, Alex S. F.; Doerr, Marcus; Eklund, Niina; Eury, Elodie; Folkersen, Lasse; Garcia, Melissa E.; Geller, Frank; Giedraitis, Vilmantas; Go, Alan S.; Grallert, Harald; Grammer, Tanja B.; Graessler, Juergen; Groenberg, Henrik; de Groot, Lisette C. P. G. M.; Groves, Christopher J.; Haessler, Jeffrey; Hall, Per; Haller, Toomas; Hallmans, Goran; Hannemann, Anke; Hartman, Catharina A.; Hassinen, Maija; Hayward, Caroline; Heard-Costa, Nancy L.; Helmer, Quinta; Hemani, Gibran; Henders, Anjali K.; Hillege, Hans L.; Hlatky, Mark A.; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hoffmann, Per; Holmen, Oddgeir; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J.; Illig, Thomas; Isaacs, Aaron; James, Alan L.; Jeff, Janina; Johansen, Bent; Johansson, Asa; Jolley, Jennifer; Juliusdottir, Thorhildur; Junttila, Juhani; Kho, Abel N.; Kinnunen, Leena; Klopp, Norman; Kocher, Thomas; Kratzer, Wolfgang; Lichtner, Peter; Lind, Lars; Lindstroem, Jaana; Lobbens, Stephane; Lorentzon, Mattias; Lu, Yingchang; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Magnusson, Patrik K. E.; Mahajan, Anubha; Maillard, Marc; McArdle, Wendy L.; McKenzie, Colin A.; McLachlan, Stela; McLaren, Paul J.; Menni, Cristina; Merger, Sigrun; Milani, Lili; Moayyeri, Alireza; Monda, Keri L.; Morken, Mario A.; Mueller, Gabriele; Mueller-Nurasyid, Martina; Musk, Arthur W.; Narisu, Narisu; Nauck, Matthias; Nolte, Ilja M.; Noethen, Markus M.; Oozageer, Laticia; Pilz, Stefan; Rayner, Nigel W.; Renstrom, Frida; Robertson, Neil R.; Rose, Lynda M.; Roussel, Ronan; Sanna, Serena; Scharnagl, Hubert; Scholtens, Salome; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Schunkert, Heribert; Scott, Robert A.; Sehmi, Joban; Seufferlein, Thomas; Shin, Jianxin; Silventoinen, Karri; Smit, Johannes H.; Smith, Albert Vernon; Smolonska, Joanna; Stanton, Alice V.; Stirrups, Kathleen; Stott, David J.; Stringham, Heather M.; Sundstrom, Johan; Swertz, Morris A.; Syvanen, Ann-Christine; Tayo, Bamidele O.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; van Dijk, Suzanne; van Schoor, Natasja M.; van der Velde, Nathalie; van Heemst, Diana; van Oort, Floor V. A.; Vermeulen, Sita H.; Verweij, Niek; Vonk, Judith M.; Waite, Lindsay L.; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wennauer, Roman; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Willenborg, Christina; Wilsgaard, Tom; Wojczynski, Mary K.; Wong, Andrew; Wright, Alan F.; Zhang, Qunyuan; Arveiler, Dominique; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Beilby, John; Bergman, Richard N.; Bergmann, Sven; Biffar, Reiner; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Bovet, Pascal; Brambilla, Paolo; Brown, Morris J.; Campbell, Harry; Caulfield, Mark J.; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Collins, Rory; Collins, Francis S.; Crawford, Dana C.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Danesh, John; de Faire, Ulf; den Ruijter, Hester M.; Erbel, Raimund; Erdmann, Jeanette; Eriksson, Johan G.; Farrall, Martin; Ferrannini, Ele; Ferrieres, Jean; Ford, Ian; Forouhi, Nita G.; Forrester, Terrence; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Gejman, Pablo V.; Gieger, Christian; Golay, Alain; Gottesman, Omri; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gyllensten, Ulf; Haas, David W.; Hall, Alistair S.; Harris, Tamara B.; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Heath, Andrew C.; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hicks, Andrew A.; Hindorff, Lucia A.; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Hofman, Albert; Hovingh, G. Kees; Humphries, Steve E.; Hunt, Steven C.; Hypponen, Elina; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jousilahti, Pekka; Jula, Antti M.; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kastelein, John J. P.; Kayser, Manfred; Kee, Frank; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Kooperberg, Charles; Koskinen, Seppo; Kovacs, Peter; Kraja, Aldi T.; Kumari, Meena; Kuusisto, Johanna; Lakka, Timo A.; Langenberg, Claudia; Le Marchand, Loic; Lehtimaki, Terho; Lupoli, Sara; Madden, Pamela A. F.; Mannisto, Satu; Manunta, Paolo; Marette, Andre; Matise, Tara C.; McKnight, Barbara; Meitinger, Thomas; Moll, Frans L.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Morris, Andrew D.; Morris, Andrew P.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Nelis, Mari; Ohlsson, Claes; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; Ong, Ken K.; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Peters, Annette; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Price, Jackie F.; Qi, Lu; Raitakari, Olli T.; Rankinen, Tuomo; Rao, D. C.; Rice, Treva K.; Ritchie, Marylyn; Rudan, Igor; Salomaa, Veikko; Samani, Nilesh J.; Saramies, Jouko; Sarzynski, Mark A.; Schwarz, Peter E. H.; Sebert, Sylvain; Sever, Peter; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Sinisalo, Juha; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Stolk, Ronald P.; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Toenjes, Anke; Tremblay, Angelo; Tremoli, Elena; Virtamo, Jarmo; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Amouyel, Philippe; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Bochud, Murielle; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bottinger, Erwin P.; Bouchard, Claude; Cauchi, Stephane; Chambers, John C.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Cooper, Richard S.; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; Dedoussis, George; Ferrucci, Luigi; Franks, Paul W.; Froguel, Philippe; Groop, Leif C.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hamsten, Anders; Hayes, M. Geoffrey; Hui, Jennie; Hunter, David J.; Hveem, Kristian; Jukema, J. Wouter; Kaplan, Robert C.; Kivimaki, Mika; Kuh, Diana; Laakso, Markku; Liu, Yongmei; Martin, Nicholas G.; Maerz, Winfried; Melbye, Mads; Moebus, Susanne; Munroe, Patricia B.; Njolstad, Inger; Oostra, Ben A.; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Perola, Markus; Perusse, Louis; Peters, Ulrike; Powell, Joseph E.; Power, Chris; Quertermous, Thomas; Rauramaa, Rainer; Reinmaa, Eva; Ridker, Paul M.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rotter, Jerome I.; Saaristo, Timo E.; Saleheen, Danish; Schlessinger, David; Slagboom, P. Eline; Snieder, Harold; Spector, Tim D.; Strauch, Konstantin; Stumvoll, Michael; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uusitupa, Matti; van der Harst, Pim; Voelzke, Henry; Walker, Mark; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Watkins, Hugh; Wichmann, H-Erich; Wilson, James F.; Zanen, Pieter; Deloukas, Panos; Heid, Iris M.; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Mohlke, Karen L.; Speliotes, Elizabeth K.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Barroso, Ines; Fox, Caroline S.; North, Kari E.; Strachan, David P.; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Boehnke, Michael; Borecki, Ingrid B.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Metspalu, Andres; Stefansson, Kari; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Franke, Lude; Willer, Cristen J.; Price, Alkes L.; Lettre, Guillaume; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Weedon, Michael N.; Ingelsson, Erik; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Goddard, Michael E.; Visscher, Peter M.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Frayling, Timothy M.

    2014-01-01

    Using genome-wide data from 253,288 individuals, we identified 697 variants at genome-wide significance that together explained one-fifth of the heritability for adult height. By testing different numbers of variants in independent studies, we show that the most strongly associated similar to 2,000,

  10. Defining the role of common variation in the genomic and biological architecture of adult human height

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.R. Wood (Andrew); T. Esko (Tõnu); J. Yang (Jian); S. Vedantam (Sailaja); T.H. Pers (Tune); S. Gustafsson (Stefan); A.Y. Chu (Audrey Y); K. Estrada Gil (Karol); J. Luan; Z. Kutalik; N. Amin (Najaf); M.L. Buchkovich (Martin); D.C. Croteau-Chonka (Damien); F.R. Day (Felix); Y. Duan (Yanan); M. Fall (Magnus); R.S.N. Fehrmann (Rudolf); T. Ferreira (Teresa); A.U. Jackson (Anne); J. Karjalainen (Juha); K.S. Lo (Ken Sin); A. Locke (Adam); R. Mägi (Reedik); E. Mihailov (Evelin); E. Porcu (Eleonora); J.C. Randall (Joshua); A. Scherag (Andre); A.A.E. Vinkhuyzen (Anna A.); H.J. Westra (Harm-Jan); T.W. Winkler (Thomas W.); T. Workalemahu (Tsegaselassie); J.H. Zhao (Jing Hua); D. Absher (Devin); E. Albrecht (Eva); J. Baron (Jeffrey); M. Beekman (Marian); A. Demirkan (Ayşe); G.B. Ehret (Georg); B. Feenstra; M.F. Feitosa (Mary Furlan); K. Fischer (Krista); R.M. Fraser (Ross); A. Goel (Anuj); J. Gong (Jian); A.E. Justice (Anne); S. Kanoni (Stavroula); M.E. Kleber (Marcus); K. Kristiansson (Kati); U. Lim (Unhee); V. Lotay (Vaneet); J.C. Lui (Julian C); M. Mangino (Massimo); I.M. Leach (Irene Mateo); M.C. Medina-Gomez (Carolina); M.A. Nalls (Michael); A.S. Dimas (Antigone); C. Palmer (Cameron); D. Pasko (Dorota); S. Pechlivanis (Sonali); I. Prokopenko (Inga); J.S. Ried (Janina); S. Ripke (Stephan); D. Shungin (Dmitry); A. Stancáková (Alena); R.J. Strawbridge (Rona); Y.J. Sung (Yun Ju); T. Tanaka (Toshiko); A. Teumer (Alexander); S. Trompet (Stella); S.W. Van Der Laan (Sander W.); J. van Setten (Jessica); J.V. van Vliet-Ostaptchouk (Jana); Z. Wang (Zhaoming); L. Yengo (Loic); W. Zhang (Weihua); U. Afzal (Uzma); J. Ärnlöv (Johan); G.M. Arscott (Gillian M.); S. Bandinelli (Stefania); A. Barrett (Angela); C. Bellis (Claire); A.J. Bennett (Amanda); C. Berne (Christian); M. Blüher (Matthias); J.L. Bolton (Jennifer); Y. Böttcher (Yvonne); H.A. Boyd; M. Bruinenberg (M.); B.M. Buckley (Brendan M.); S. Buyske (Steven); I.H. Caspersen (Ida H.); P.S. Chines (Peter); R. Clarke (Robert); S. Claudi-Boehm (Simone); M.N. Cooper (Matthew); E.W. Daw (E Warwick); P.A. De Jong (Pim A); J. Deelen (Joris); G. Delgado; J.C. Denny (Josh C); R.A.M. Dhonukshe-Rutten (Rosalie); M. Dimitriou (Maria); A.S.F. Doney (Alex); M. Dörr (Marcus); N. Eklund (Niina); E. Eury (Elodie); L. Folkersen (Lasse); M. Garcia (Melissa); F. Geller (Frank); V. Giedraitis (Vilmantas); A. Go (Attie); H. Grallert (Harald); T.B. Grammer (Tanja B); J. Gräßler (Jürgen); H. Grönberg (Henrik); L.C.P.G.M. de Groot (Lisette); C.J. Groves (Christopher J.); J. Haessler (Jeff); P. Hall (Per); T. Haller (Toomas); G. Hallmans (Göran); M. Hannemann (Mario); C.A. Hartman (Catharina); M. Hassinen (Maija); C. Hayward (Caroline); N.L. Heard-Costa (Nancy); Q. Helmer (Quinta); G. Hemani; A.K. Henders (Anjali); H.L. Hillege (Hans); M.A. Hlatky (Mark); W. Hoffmann (Wolfgang); P. Hoffmann (Per); O.L. Holmen (Oddgeir); J.J. Houwing-Duistermaat (Jeanine); T. Illig (Thomas); A. Isaacs (Aaron); A.L. James (Alan); J. Jeff (Janina); B. Johansen (Berit); A. Johansson (Åsa); G.J. Jolley (Jason); T. Juliusdottir (Thorhildur); M.J. Junttila (Juhani); M.M.L. Kho (Marcia); L. Kinnunen (Leena); N. Klopp (Norman); T. Kocher; W. Kratzer (Wolfgang); P. Lichtner (Peter); L. Lind (Lars); J. Lindström (Jaana); S. Lobbens (Stéphane); M. Lorentzon (Mattias); Y. Lu (Yingchang); V. Lyssenko (Valeriya); P.K. Magnusson (Patrik); A. Mahajan (Anubha); M. Maillard (Marc); W.L. McArdle (Wendy); C.A. McKenzie (Colin A.); S. McLachlan (Stela); P.J. McLaren (Paul J); C. Menni (Cristina); S. Merger (Sigrun); L. Milani (Lili); A. Moayyeri (Alireza); K.L. Monda (Keri); M.A. Morken (Mario); G. Müller (Gabriele); M. Müller-Nurasyid (Martina); A.W. Musk (Arthur); N. Narisu (Narisu); M. Nauck (Matthias); I.M. Nolte (Ilja M.); M.M. Nöthen (Markus); L. Oozageer (Laticia); S. Pilz (Stefan); N.W. Rayner (Nigel William); F. Renström (Frida); N.R. Robertson (Neil R.); L.M. Rose (Lynda M.); R. Roussel (Ronan); S. Sanna (Serena); H. Scharnagl (Hubert); S. Scholtens (Salome); F.R. Schumacher (Fredrick R); H. Schunkert (Heribert); R.A. Scott (Robert); J.S. Sehmi (Joban); T. Seufferlein (Thomas); J. Shi (Jianxin); K. Silventoinen (Karri); J.H. Smit (Johannes); G.D. Smith; J. Smolonska (Joanna); A. Stanton (Alice); K. Stirrups (Kathy); D.J. Stott (David J); H.M. Stringham (Heather); J. Sundstrom (Johan); M. Swertz (Morris); A.C. Syvanen; B. Tayo (Bamidele); G. Thorleifsson (Gudmar); J.P. Tyrer (Jonathan); S. Van Dijk (Suzanne); N.M. van Schoor (Natasja); N. van der Velde (Nathalie); D. van Heemst (Diana); F.V.A. Van Oort (Floor V A); S.H.H.M. Vermeulen (Sita); N. Verweij (Niek); J.M. Vonk (Judith M); L. Waite (Lindsay); M. Waldenberger (Melanie); R. Wennauer (Roman); L.R. Wilkens (Lynne R.); C. Willenborg (Christina); T. Wilsgaard (Tom); M.K. Wojczynski (Mary ); A. Wong (Andrew); A. Wright (Alan); Q. Zhang (Qunyuan); D. Arveiler (Dominique); S.J.L. Bakker (Stephan); J. Beilby (John); R.N. Bergman (Richard); S.M. Bergmann (Sven); R. Biffar; J. Blangero (John); D.I. Boomsma (Dorret); S.R. Bornstein (Stefan R.); P. Bovet (Pascal); P. Brambilla (Paolo); M.J. Brown (Morris); H. Campbell (Harry); M. Caulfield (Mark); A. Chakravarti (Aravinda); F.S. Collins (Francis); D.C. Crawford (Dana); L.A. Cupples (Adrienne); J. Danesh (John); U. de Faire (Ulf); H.M. den Ruijter (Hester ); R. Erbel (Raimund); J. Erdmann (Jeanette); J. Eriksson; M. Farrall (Martin); E. Ferrannini (Ele); J. Ferrieres (Jean); I. Ford; N.G. Forouhi (Nita); T. Forrester (Terrence); R.T. Gansevoort (Ron); P.V. Gejman (Pablo); C. Gieger (Christian); A. Golay (Alain); R.F. Gottesman (Rebecca); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); U. Gyllensten (Ulf); D.W. Haas (David W); A.S. Hall (Alistair); T.B. Harris (Tamara); A.T. Hattersley (Andrew); A.C. Heath (Andrew C); C. Hengstenberg (Christian); A.A. Hicks (Andrew); L.A. Hindorff (Lucia A); A. Hingorani (Aroon); A. Hofman (Albert); G.K. Hovingh (Kees); S.E. Humphries (Steve E.); S.C. Hunt (Steven); E. Hypponen (Elina); K.B. Jacobs (Kevin); M.-R. Jarvelin (Marjo-Riitta); P. Jousilahti (Pekka); A. Jula (Antti); J. Kaprio (Jaakko); J.J.P. Kastelein (John); M.H. Kayser (Manfred); F. Kee (Frank); S. Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi (Sirkka); L.A.L.M. Kiemeney (Bart); J.S. Kooner (Jaspal S.); C. Kooperberg (Charles); S. Koskinen (Seppo); P. Kovacs (Peter); A. Kraja (Aldi); M. Kumari (Meena); J. Kuusisto (Johanna); T.A. Lakka (Timo); C. Langenberg (Claudia); L. Le Marchand (Loic); T. Lehtimäki (Terho); S. Lupoli (Sara); P.A. Madden; S. Männistö (Satu); P. Manunta (Paolo); A. Marette (Andre'); T.C. Matise (Tara C.); B. McKnight (Barbara); T. Meitinger (Thomas); F.L. Moll (Frans); G.W. Montgomery (Grant W.); A.D. Morris (Andrew); A.P. Morris (Andrew); J.C. Murray (Jeffrey); M. Nelis (Mari); C. Ohlsson (Claes); A.J. Oldehinkel (Albertine); K.K. Ong (Ken K.); W.H. Ouwehand (Willem); G. Pasterkamp (Gerard); A. Peters (Annette); P.P. Pramstaller (Peter Paul); J.F. Price (Jackie F.); L. Qi (Lu); O. Raitakari (Olli); T. Rankinen (Tuomo); D.C. Rao (Dabeeru C.); T.K. Rice (Treva K.); M.D. Ritchie (Marylyn D.); I. Rudan (Igor); V. Salomaa (Veikko); N.J. Samani (Nilesh); J. Saramies (Jouko); M.A. Sarzynski (Mark A.); P.E.H. Schwarz (Peter E. H.); S. Sebert (Sylvain); P. Sever (Peter); A.R. Shuldiner (Alan); J. Sinisalo (Juha); V. Steinthorsdottir (Valgerdur); R.P. Stolk; J.-C. Tardif (Jean-Claude); A. Tönjes (Anke); A. Tremblay (Angelo); E. Tremoli (Elena); J. Virtamo (Jarmo); M.-C. Vohl (Marie-Claude); P. Amouyel (Philippe); F.W. Asselbergs (Folkert W.); T.L. Assimes (Themistocles); M. Bochud (Murielle); B.O. Boehm (Bernhard); E.A. Boerwinkle (Eric); E.P. Bottinger (Erwin P.); C. Bouchard (Claude); S. Cauchi (Stéphane); J.C. Chambers (John C.); S.J. Chanock (Stephen); R.S. Cooper (Richard S.); P.I.W. de Bakker (Paul); G.V. Dedoussis (George); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); P.W. Franks; P. Froguel (Philippe); L. Groop (Leif); C.A. Haiman (Christopher); A. Hamsten (Anders); M.G. Hayes (M. Geoffrey); J. Hui (Jennie); D. Hunter (David); K. Hveem (Kristian); J.W. Jukema (Jan Wouter); R.C. Kaplan (Robert); M. Kivimaki (Mika); D. Kuh (Diana); M. Laakso (Markku); Y. Liu (YongMei); N.G. Martin (Nicholas); W. März (Winfried); M. Melbye (Mads); S. Moebus (Susanne); P. Munroe (Patricia); I. Njølstad (Inger); B.A. Oostra (Ben); C.N.A. Palmer (Colin); N.L. Pedersen (Nancy L.); M. Perola (Markus); L. Perusse (Louis); U. Peters (Ulrike); J.E. Powell (Joseph); C. Power (Christine); T. Quertermous (Thomas); R. Rauramaa (Rainer); E. Reinmaa (Eva); P.M. Ridker (Paul); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); J.I. Rotter (Jerome I.); T. Saaristo (Timo); D. Saleheen; D. Schlessinger (David); P.E. Slagboom (P Eline); H. Snieder (Harold); T.D. Spector (Timothy); K. Strauch (Konstantin); M. Stumvoll (Michael); J. Tuomilehto (Jaakko); M. Uusitupa (Matti); P. van der Harst (Pim); H. Völzke (Henry); M. Walker (Mark); N.J. Wareham (Nick); H. Watkins (Hugh); H.E. Wichmann (Heinz Erich); J.F. Wilson (James F); P. Zanen (Pieter); P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); I.M. Heid (Iris); C.M. Lindgren (Cecilia); K.L. Mohlke (Karen); E.K. Speliotes (Elizabeth); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); I. Barroso (Inês); C.S. Fox (Caroline S.); K.E. North (Kari); D.P. Strachan (David P.); J.S. Beckmann (Jacques); S.I. Berndt (Sonja); M. Boehnke (Michael); I.B. Borecki (Ingrid); M.I. McCarthy (Mark); A. Metspalu (Andres); J-A. Zwart (John-Anker); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia); L. Franke (Lude); C.J. Willer (Cristen); A. Price (Alkes); G. Lettre (Guillaume); R.J.F. Loos (Ruth); M.N. Weedon (Michael); E. Ingelsson (Erik); J.R. O´Connell; G.R. Abecasis (Gonçalo); D.I. Chasman (Daniel); D. Anderson (Denise); M.E. Goddard (Michael); P.M. Visscher (Peter); J.N. Hirschhorn (Joel); T.M. Frayling (Timothy)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractUsing genome-wide data from 253,288 individuals, we identified 697 variants at genome-wide significance that together explained one-fifth of the heritability for adult height. By testing different numbers of variants in independent studies, we show that the most strongly associated

  11. Defining the role of common variation in the genomic and biological architecture of adult human height

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wood, Andrew R.; Esko, Tonu; Yang, Jian; Vedantam, Sailaja; Pers, Tune H.; Gustafsson, Stefan; Chu, Audrey Y.; Estrada, Karol; Luan, Jian'an; Kutalik, Zoltán; Amin, Najaf; Buchkovich, Martin L.; Croteau-Chonka, Damien C.; Day, Felix R.; Duan, Yanan; Fall, Tove; Fehrmann, Rudolf; Ferreira, Teresa; Jackson, Anne U.; Karjalainen, Juha; Lo, Ken Sin; Locke, Adam E.; Mägi, Reedik; Mihailov, Evelin; Porcu, Eleonora; Randall, Joshua C.; Scherag, André; Vinkhuyzen, Anna A. E.; Westra, Harm-Jan; Winkler, Thomas W.; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Zhao, Jing Hua; Absher, Devin; Albrecht, Eva; Anderson, Denise; Baron, Jeffrey; Beekman, Marian; Demirkan, Ayse; Ehret, Georg B.; Feenstra, Bjarke; Feitosa, Mary F.; Fischer, Krista; Fraser, Ross M.; Goel, Anuj; Gong, Jian; Justice, Anne E.; Kanoni, Stavroula; Kleber, Marcus E.; Kristiansson, Kati; Lim, Unhee; Lotay, Vaneet; Lui, Julian C.; Mangino, Massimo; Mateo Leach, Irene; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Nalls, Michael A.; Nyholt, Dale R.; Palmer, Cameron D.; Pasko, Dorota; Pechlivanis, Sonali; Prokopenko, Inga; Ried, Janina S.; Ripke, Stephan; Shungin, Dmitry; Stancáková, Alena; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Sung, Yun Ju; Tanaka, Toshiko; Teumer, Alexander; Trompet, Stella; van der Laan, Sander W.; van Setten, Jessica; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V.; Wang, Zhaoming; Yengo, Loïc; Zhang, Weihua; Afzal, Uzma; Arnlöv, Johan; Arscott, Gillian M.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Barrett, Amy; Bellis, Claire; Bennett, Amanda J.; Berne, Christian; Blüher, Matthias; Bolton, Jennifer L.; Böttcher, Yvonne; Boyd, Heather A.; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Buckley, Brendan M.; Buyske, Steven; Caspersen, Ida H.; Chines, Peter S.; Clarke, Robert; Claudi-Boehm, Simone; Cooper, Matthew; Daw, E. Warwick; de Jong, Pim A.; Deelen, Joris; Delgado, Graciela; Denny, Josh C.; Dhonukshe-Rutten, Rosalie; Dimitriou, Maria; Doney, Alex S. F.; Dörr, Marcus; Eklund, Niina; Eury, Elodie; Folkersen, Lasse; Garcia, Melissa E.; Geller, Frank; Giedraitis, Vilmantas; Go, Alan S.; Grallert, Harald; Grammer, Tanja B.; Gräßler, Jürgen; Grönberg, Henrik; de Groot, Lisette C. P. G. M.; Groves, Christopher J.; Haessler, Jeffrey; Hall, Per; Haller, Toomas; Hallmans, Goran; Hannemann, Anke; Hartman, Catharina A.; Hassinen, Maija; Hayward, Caroline; Heard-Costa, Nancy L.; Helmer, Quinta; Hemani, Gibran; Henders, Anjali K.; Hillege, Hans L.; Hlatky, Mark A.; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hoffmann, Per; Holmen, Oddgeir; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J.; Illig, Thomas; Isaacs, Aaron; James, Alan L.; Jeff, Janina; Johansen, Berit; Johansson, Åsa; Jolley, Jennifer; Juliusdottir, Thorhildur; Junttila, Juhani; Kho, Abel N.; Kinnunen, Leena; Klopp, Norman; Kocher, Thomas; Kratzer, Wolfgang; Lichtner, Peter; Lind, Lars; Lindström, Jaana; Lobbens, Stéphane; Lorentzon, Mattias; Lu, Yingchang; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Magnusson, Patrik K. E.; Mahajan, Anubha; Maillard, Marc; McArdle, Wendy L.; McKenzie, Colin A.; McLachlan, Stela; McLaren, Paul J.; Menni, Cristina; Merger, Sigrun; Milani, Lili; Moayyeri, Alireza; Monda, Keri L.; Morken, Mario A.; Müller, Gabriele; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Musk, Arthur W.; Narisu, Narisu; Nauck, Matthias; Nolte, Ilja M.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Oozageer, Laticia; Pilz, Stefan; Rayner, Nigel W.; Renstrom, Frida; Robertson, Neil R.; Rose, Lynda M.; Roussel, Ronan; Sanna, Serena; Scharnagl, Hubert; Scholtens, Salome; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Schunkert, Heribert; Scott, Robert A.; Sehmi, Joban; Seufferlein, Thomas; Shi, Jianxin; Silventoinen, Karri; Smit, Johannes H.; Smith, Albert Vernon; Smolonska, Joanna; Stanton, Alice V.; Stirrups, Kathleen; Stott, David J.; Stringham, Heather M.; Sundström, Johan; Swertz, Morris A.; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Tayo, Bamidele O.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; van Dijk, Suzanne; van Schoor, Natasja M.; van der Velde, Nathalie; van Heemst, Diana; van Oort, Floor V. A.; Vermeulen, Sita H.; Verweij, Niek; Vonk, Judith M.; Waite, Lindsay L.; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wennauer, Roman; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Willenborg, Christina; Wilsgaard, Tom; Wojczynski, Mary K.; Wong, Andrew; Wright, Alan F.; Zhang, Qunyuan; Arveiler, Dominique; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Beilby, John; Bergman, Richard N.; Bergmann, Sven; Biffar, Reiner; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Bovet, Pascal; Brambilla, Paolo; Brown, Morris J.; Campbell, Harry; Caulfield, Mark J.; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Collins, Rory; Collins, Francis S.; Crawford, Dana C.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Danesh, John; de Faire, Ulf; den Ruijter, Hester M.; Erbel, Raimund; Erdmann, Jeanette; Eriksson, Johan G.; Farrall, Martin; Ferrannini, Ele; Ferrières, Jean; Ford, Ian; Forouhi, Nita G.; Forrester, Terrence; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Gejman, Pablo V.; Gieger, Christian; Golay, Alain; Gottesman, Omri; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gyllensten, Ulf; Haas, David W.; Hall, Alistair S.; Harris, Tamara B.; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Heath, Andrew C.; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hicks, Andrew A.; Hindorff, Lucia A.; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Hofman, Albert; Hovingh, G. Kees; Humphries, Steve E.; Hunt, Steven C.; Hypponen, Elina; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jousilahti, Pekka; Jula, Antti M.; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kastelein, John J. P.; Kayser, Manfred; Kee, Frank; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Kooperberg, Charles; Koskinen, Seppo; Kovacs, Peter; Kraja, Aldi T.; Kumari, Meena; Kuusisto, Johanna; Lakka, Timo A.; Langenberg, Claudia; Le Marchand, Loic; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lupoli, Sara; Madden, Pamela A. F.; Männistö, Satu; Manunta, Paolo; Marette, André; Matise, Tara C.; McKnight, Barbara; Meitinger, Thomas; Moll, Frans L.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Morris, Andrew D.; Morris, Andrew P.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Nelis, Mari; Ohlsson, Claes; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; Ong, Ken K.; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Peters, Annette; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Price, Jackie F.; Qi, Lu; Raitakari, Olli T.; Rankinen, Tuomo; Rao, D. C.; Rice, Treva K.; Ritchie, Marylyn; Rudan, Igor; Salomaa, Veikko; Samani, Nilesh J.; Saramies, Jouko; Sarzynski, Mark A.; Schwarz, Peter E. H.; Sebert, Sylvain; Sever, Peter; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Sinisalo, Juha; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Stolk, Ronald P.; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Tönjes, Anke; Tremblay, Angelo; Tremoli, Elena; Virtamo, Jarmo; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Amouyel, Philippe; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Bochud, Murielle; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bottinger, Erwin P.; Bouchard, Claude; Cauchi, Stéphane; Chambers, John C.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Cooper, Richard S.; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; Dedoussis, George; Ferrucci, Luigi; Franks, Paul W.; Froguel, Philippe; Groop, Leif C.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hamsten, Anders; Hayes, M. Geoffrey; Hui, Jennie; Hunter, David J.; Hveem, Kristian; Jukema, J. Wouter; Kaplan, Robert C.; Kivimaki, Mika; Kuh, Diana; Laakso, Markku; Liu, Yongmei; Martin, Nicholas G.; März, Winfried; Melbye, Mads; Moebus, Susanne; Munroe, Patricia B.; Njølstad, Inger; Oostra, Ben A.; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Perola, Markus; Pérusse, Louis; Peters, Ulrike; Powell, Joseph E.; Power, Chris; Quertermous, Thomas; Rauramaa, Rainer; Reinmaa, Eva; Ridker, Paul M.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rotter, Jerome I.; Saaristo, Timo E.; Saleheen, Danish; Schlessinger, David; Slagboom, P. Eline; Snieder, Harold; Spector, Tim D.; Strauch, Konstantin; Stumvoll, Michael; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uusitupa, Matti; van der Harst, Pim; Völzke, Henry; Walker, Mark; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Watkins, Hugh; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Wilson, James F.; Zanen, Pieter; Deloukas, Panos; Heid, Iris M.; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Mohlke, Karen L.; Speliotes, Elizabeth K.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Barroso, Inês; Fox, Caroline S.; North, Kari E.; Strachan, David P.; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Boehnke, Michael; Borecki, Ingrid B.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Metspalu, Andres; Stefansson, Kari; Uitterlinden, André G.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Franke, Lude; Willer, Cristen J.; Price, Alkes L.; Lettre, Guillaume; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Weedon, Michael N.; Ingelsson, Erik; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Goddard, Michael E.; Visscher, Peter M.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Frayling, Timothy M.; McCarty, Catherine A.; Starren, Justin; Peissig, Peggy; Berg, Richard; Rasmussen, Luke; Linneman, James; Miller, Aaron; Choudary, Vidhu; Chen, Lin; Waudby, Carol; Kitchner, Terrie; Reeser, Jonathan; Fost, Norman; Wilke, Russell A.; Chisholm, Rex L.; Avila, Pedro C.; Greenland, Philip; Hayes, M. Geoff; Kho, Abel; Kibbe, Warren A.; Lemke, Amy A.; Lowe, William L.; Smith, Maureen E.; Wolf, Wendy A.; Pacheco, Jennifer A.; Thompson, William K.; Humowiecki, Joel; Law, May; Chute, Christopher; Kullo, Iftikar; Koenig, Barbara; de Andrade, Mariza; Bielinski, Suzette; Pathak, Jyotishman; Savova, Guergana; Wu, Joel; Henriksen, Joan; Ding, Keyue; Hart, Lacey; Palbicki, Jeremy; Larson, Eric B.; Newton, Katherine; Ludman, Evette; Spangler, Leslie; Hart, Gene; Carrell, David; Jarvik, Gail; Crane, Paul; Burke, Wylie; Fullerton, Stephanie Malia; Trinidad, Susan Brown; Carlson, Chris; Hutchinson, Fred; McDavid, Andrew; Roden, Dan M.; Clayton, Ellen; Haines, Jonathan L.; Masys, Daniel R.; Churchill, Larry R.; Cornfield, Daniel; Crawford, Dana; Darbar, Dawood; Denny, Joshua C.; Malin, Bradley A.; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Schildcrout, Jonathan S.; Xu, Hua; Ramirez, Andrea Havens; Basford, Melissa; Pulley, Jill; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z.; de Boer, Rudolf A.; Boezen, H. Marike; van der Klauw, Melanie M.; Navis, Gerjan; Ormel, Johan; Postma, Dirkje S.; Rosmalen, Judith G. M.; Slaets, Joris P.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Kathiresan, Sekar; Voight, Benjamin F.; Purcell, Shaun; Musunuru, Kiran; Ardissino, Diego; Mannucci, Pier M.; Anand, Sonia; Engert, James C.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Rader, Daniel J.; Morgan, Thomas; Spertus, John A.; Stoll, Monika; Girelli, Domenico; McKeown, Pascal P.; Patterson, Chris C.; Siscovick, David S.; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Elosua, Roberto; Peltonen, Leena; Schwartz, Stephen M.; Melander, Olle; Altshuler, David; Merlini, Pier Angelica; Berzuini, Carlo; Bernardinelli, Luisa; Peyvandi, Flora; Tubaro, Marco; Celli, Patrizia; Ferrario, Maurizio; Fetiveau, Raffaela; Marziliano, Nicola; Casari, Giorgio; Galli, Michele; Ribichini, Flavio; Rossi, Marco; Bernardi, Francesco; Zonzin, Pietro; Piazza, Alberto; Yee, Jean; Friedlander, Yechiel; Marrugat, Jaume; Lucas, Gavin; Subirana, Isaac; Sala, Joan; Ramos, Rafael; Meigs, James B.; Williams, Gordon; Nathan, David M.; MacRae, Calum A.; Havulinna, Aki S.; Berglund, Goran; Asselta, Rosanna; Duga, Stefano; Spreafico, Marta; Daly, Mark J.; Nemesh, James; Korn, Joshua M.; McCarroll, Steven A.; Surti, Aarti; Guiducci, Candace; Gianniny, Lauren; Mirel, Daniel; Parkin, Melissa; Burtt, Noel; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Thompson, John R.; Braund, Peter S.; Wright, Benjamin J.; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Ball, Stephen G.; Schunkert, I. Heribert; Linsel-Nitschke, Patrick; Lieb, Wolfgang; Ziegler, Andreas; König, Inke R.; Fischer, Marcus; Stark, Klaus; Grosshennig, Anika; Preuss, Michael; Schreiber, Stefan; Ouwehand, Willem; Scholz, Michael; Cambien, Francois; Goodall, Alison; Li, Mingyao; Chen, Zhen; Wilensky, Robert; Matthai, William; Qasim, Atif; Hakonarson, Hakon H.; Devaney, Joe; Burnett, Mary-Susan; Pichard, Augusto D.; Kent, Kenneth M.; Satler, Lowell; Lindsay, Joseph M.; Waksman, Ron; Knouff, Christopher W.; Waterworth, Dawn M.; Walker, Max C.; Mooser, Vincent; Epstein, Stephen E.; Scheffold, Thomas; Berger, Klaus; Huge, Andreas; Martinelli, Nicola; Olivieri, Oliviero; Corrocher, Roberto; Hólm, Hilma; Do, Ron; Xie, Changchun; Siscovick, David; Matise, Tara; Buyske, Steve; Higashio, Julia; Williams, Rasheeda; Nato, Andrew; Ambite, Jose Luis; Deelman, Ewa; Manolio, Teri; Hindorff, Lucia; Heiss, Gerardo; Taylor, Kira; Franceschini, Nora; Avery, Christy; Graff, Misa; Lin, Danyu; Quibrera, Miguel; Cochran, Barbara; Kao, Linda; Umans, Jason; Cole, Shelley; MacCluer, Jean; Person, Sharina; Pankow, James; Gross, Myron; Fornage, Myriam; Durda, Peter; Jenny, Nancy; Patsy, Bruce; Arnold, Alice; Buzkova, Petra; Haines, Jonathan; Murdock, Deborah; Glenn, Kim; Brown-Gentry, Kristin; Thornton-Wells, Tricia; Dumitrescu, Logan; Bush, William S.; Mitchell, Sabrina L.; Goodloe, Robert; Wilson, Sarah; Boston, Jonathan; Malinowski, Jennifer; Restrepo, Nicole; Oetjens, Matthew; Fowke, Jay; Zheng, Wei; Spencer, Kylee; Pendergrass, Sarah; Le Marchand, Loïc; Wilkens, Lynne; Park, Lani; Tiirikainen, Maarit; Kolonel, Laurence; Cheng, Iona; Wang, Hansong; Shohet, Ralph; Haiman, Christopher; Stram, Daniel; Henderson, Brian; Monroe, Kristine; Schumacher, Fredrick; Anderson, Garnet; Prentice, Ross; LaCroix, Andrea; Wu, Chunyuan; Carty, Cara; Rosse, Stephanie; Young, Alicia; Haessler, Jeff; Kocarnik, Jonathan; Lin, Yi; Jackson, Rebecca; Duggan, David; Kuller, Lew

    2014-01-01

    Using genome-wide data from 253,288 individuals, we identified 697 variants at genome-wide significance that together explained one-fifth of the heritability for adult height. By testing different numbers of variants in independent studies, we show that the most strongly associated ∼2,000, ∼3,700

  12. Defining the role of common variation in the genomic and biological architecture of adult human height

    OpenAIRE

    Wood, Andrew; Esko, Tõnu; Yang, Jian; Vedantam, Sailaja; Pers, Tune; Gustafsson, Stefan; Chu, Audrey Y; Estrada Gil, Karol; Luan, J.; Kutalik, Z.; Amin, Najaf; Buchkovich, Martin; Croteau-Chonka, Damien; Day, Felix; Duan, Yanan

    2014-01-01

    textabstractUsing genome-wide data from 253,288 individuals, we identified 697 variants at genome-wide significance that together explained one-fifth of the heritability for adult height. By testing different numbers of variants in independent studies, we show that the most strongly associated 1/42,000, 1/43,700 and 1/49,500 SNPs explained 1/421%, 1/424% and 1/429% of phenotypic variance. Furthermore, all common variants together captured 60% of heritability. The 697 variants clustered in 423...

  13. Impaired Interoceptive Accuracy in Semantic Variant Primary Progressive Aphasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles R. Marshall

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundInteroception (the perception of internal bodily sensations is strongly linked to emotional experience and sensitivity to the emotions of others in healthy subjects. Interoceptive impairment may contribute to the profound socioemotional symptoms that characterize frontotemporal dementia (FTD syndromes, but remains poorly defined.MethodsPatients representing all major FTD syndromes and healthy age-matched controls performed a heartbeat counting task as a measure of interoceptive accuracy. In addition, patients had volumetric MRI for voxel-based morphometric analysis, and their caregivers completed a questionnaire assessing patients’ daily-life sensitivity to the emotions of others.ResultsInteroceptive accuracy was impaired in patients with semantic variant primary progressive aphasia relative to healthy age-matched individuals, but not in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia and nonfluent variant primary progressive aphasia. Impaired interoceptive accuracy correlated with reduced daily-life emotional sensitivity across the patient cohort, and with atrophy of right insula, cingulate, and amygdala on voxel-based morphometry in the impaired semantic variant group, delineating a network previously shown to support interoceptive processing in the healthy brain.ConclusionInteroception is a promising novel paradigm for defining mechanisms of reduced emotional reactivity, empathy, and self-awareness in neurodegenerative syndromes and may yield objective measures for these complex symptoms.

  14. A look-ahead variant of TFQMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freund, R.W. [AT& T Bell Labs., Murray Hill, NJ (United States); Nachtigal, N.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Recently, Freund proposed a Krylov subspace iteration, the transpose-free quasi-minimal residual method (TFQMR), for solving general nonsingular non-Hermitian linear systems. The algorithm relies on a version of the squared Lanczos process to generate the basis vectors for the underlying Krylov subspace. It then constructs iterates defined by a quasi-minimization property, which leads to a smooth and nearly monotone convergence behavior. The authors investigate a variant of TFQMR that uses look-ahead to avoid some of the problems associated with breakdowns in the underlying squared Lanczos procedure. They also present some numerical examples that illustrate the properties of the new method, as compared to the original TFQMR algorithm.

  15. Data-variant kernel analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Motai, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    Describes and discusses the variants of kernel analysis methods for data types that have been intensely studied in recent years This book covers kernel analysis topics ranging from the fundamental theory of kernel functions to its applications. The book surveys the current status, popular trends, and developments in kernel analysis studies. The author discusses multiple kernel learning algorithms and how to choose the appropriate kernels during the learning phase. Data-Variant Kernel Analysis is a new pattern analysis framework for different types of data configurations. The chapters include

  16. Miniature EVA Software Defined Radio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozhidaev, Aleksey

    2012-01-01

    As NASA embarks upon developing the Next-Generation Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) Radio for deep space exploration, the demands on EVA battery life will substantially increase. The number of modes and frequency bands required will continue to grow in order to enable efficient and complex multi-mode operations including communications, navigation, and tracking applications. Whether conducting astronaut excursions, communicating to soldiers, or first responders responding to emergency hazards, NASA has developed an innovative, affordable, miniaturized, power-efficient software defined radio that offers unprecedented power-efficient flexibility. This lightweight, programmable, S-band, multi-service, frequency- agile EVA software defined radio (SDR) supports data, telemetry, voice, and both standard and high-definition video. Features include a modular design, an easily scalable architecture, and the EVA SDR allows for both stationary and mobile battery powered handheld operations. Currently, the radio is equipped with an S-band RF section. However, its scalable architecture can accommodate multiple RF sections simultaneously to cover multiple frequency bands. The EVA SDR also supports multiple network protocols. It currently implements a Hybrid Mesh Network based on the 802.11s open standard protocol. The radio targets RF channel data rates up to 20 Mbps and can be equipped with a real-time operating system (RTOS) that can be switched off for power-aware applications. The EVA SDR's modular design permits implementation of the same hardware at all Network Nodes concept. This approach assures the portability of the same software into any radio in the system. It also brings several benefits to the entire system including reducing system maintenance, system complexity, and development cost.

  17. Smooth Pursuit of Flicker-Defined Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Jeffrey B.; Stevenson, Scott B.

    2014-01-01

    We examined the pursuit response to stimuli defined by space-variant flicker of a dense random dot carrier pattern. On each frame, every element of the pattern could change polarity, with a probability given by a two-dimensional Gaussian distribution. A normal distribution produces a circular region of twinkle, while inverting the distribution results in a spot of static texture in a twinkling surround. In this latter case, the carrier texture could be stationary, or could move with the twinkle modulator, thereby producing first-order motion in the region of the spot. While the twinkle-defined spot produces a strong sensation of motion, the complementary stimulus defined by the absence of twinkle does not, when viewed peripherally, it appears to move in steps even when the generating distribution moves smoothly. We examined pursuit responses to these stimuli using two techniques: 1) the eye movement correlogram, obtained by cross-correlating eye velocity with the velocity of a randomly-moving stimulus; and 2) delayed visual feedback, where transient stabilization of a target can produce spontaneous oscillations of the eye, with a period empirically observed to vary linearly with the applied delay. Both techniques provide an estimate of the internal processing time, which can be as short as 100 milliseconds for a first-order target. Assessed by the correlogram method, the response to flicker-defined motion is delayed by more than 100 milliseconds, and significantly weaker (especially in the vertical dimension). When initially presented in the delayed feedback condition, purely saccadic oscillation is observed. One subject eventually developed smooth oscillations (albeit with significant saccadic intrusions), showing a period-versus-delay slope similar to that observed for first-order targets. This result is somewhat surprising, given that we interpret the slope of the period-versus-delay-function as reflecting the balance between position- and velocity

  18. Discovering Reference Process Models by Mining Process Variants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, C.; Reichert, M.U.; Wombacher, Andreas

    Recently, a new generation of adaptive Process-Aware Information Systems (PAIS) has emerged, which allows for dynamic process and service changes (e.g., to insert, delete, and move activities and service executions in a running process). This, in turn, has led to a large number of process variants

  19. Physical localization of NORs and ITS length variants in old ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    No variation at the number of Ag-NORs per metaphase was found among the 51 durum wheat cultivars, but the PCR-RFLP technique carried out with the restriction enzyme HpaII, allowed the detection of ITS length variants among them. The molecular data was used in order to establish the genetic relationships among ...

  20. Copy number variations in affective disorders and meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Line; Hansen, Thomas; Djurovic, Srdjan

    2011-01-01

    In two recent studies 10 copy number variants (CNV) were found to be overrepresented either among patients suffering from affective disorders in an Amish family or in the Wellcome Trust Case-Control Consortium study. Here, we investigate if these variants are associated with affective disorders i...

  1. Copy number variation of KIR genes influences HIV-1 control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pelak, Kimberly; Need, Anna C; Fellay, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    A genome-wide screen for large structural variants showed that a copy number variant (CNV) in the region encoding killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) associates with HIV-1 control as measured by plasma viral load at set point in individuals of European ancestry. This CNV encompasses t...

  2. Determining the pathogenicity of genetic variants associated with cardiac channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campuzano, Oscar; Allegue, Catarina; Fernandez, Anna; Iglesias, Anna; Brugada, Ramon

    2015-01-22

    Advancements in genetic screening have generated massive amounts of data on genetic variation; however, a lack of clear pathogenic stratification has left most variants classified as being of unknown significance. This is a critical limitation for translating genetic data into clinical practice. Genetic screening is currently recommended in the guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of cardiac channelopathies, which are major contributors to sudden cardiac death in young people. We propose to characterize the pathogenicity of genetic variants associated with cardiac channelopathies using a stratified scoring system. The development of this system was considered by using all of the tools currently available to define pathogenicity. The use of this scoring system could help clinicians to understand the limitations of genetic associations with a disease, and help them better define the role that genetics can have in their clinical routine.

  3. Extension twin variant selection during uniaxial compression of a magnesium alloy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pei, Y.; Godfrey, A.; Jiang, J.

    2012-01-01

    is also observed in that smaller grains are less likely to contain lower ranked twin variants. For both 5% and 10% compression no clear relationship exists between the volume fraction of each twin variant in a given grain population and the Schmid factor for the twin variant. A positive linear......Samples of the magnesium alloy AZ31 have been deformed by compression to strains of 5% and 10% and microstructural observations made to investigate the activation of specific {1 0 1¯ 2} extension twin variants. The twinning has been analyzed on a grain-by-grain basis for more than 260 grains...... to determine both the number of extension twin variants in each grain, and the volume fraction of each. At 5% strain approx. 30% of the grains contain twins corresponding to variants with the third or lower ranked Schmid factor, with the fraction increasing to 40% after 10% compression. A grain size effect...

  4. GCPII Variants, Paralogs and Orthologs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hlouchová, Klára; Navrátil, Václav; Tykvart, Jan; Šácha, Pavel; Konvalinka, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 9 (2012), s. 1316-1322 ISSN 0929-8673 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP304/12/0847 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : PSMA * GCPIII * NAALADase L * splice variants * homologs * PSMAL Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 4.070, year: 2012

  5. Delta Semantics Defined By Petri Nets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kurt; Kyng, Morten; Madsen, Ole Lehrmann

    and the possibility of using predicates to specify state changes. In this paper a formal semantics for Delta is defined and analysed using Petri nets. Petri nets was chosen because the ideas behind Petri nets and Delta concide on several points. A number of proposals for changes in Delta, which resulted from...

  6. Functionally Significant, Rare Transcription Factor Variants in Tetralogy of Fallot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Töpf, Ana; Griffin, Helen R.; Glen, Elise; Soemedi, Rachel; Brown, Danielle L.; Hall, Darroch; Rahman, Thahira J.; Eloranta, Jyrki J.; Jüngst, Christoph; Stuart, A. Graham; O'Sullivan, John; Keavney, Bernard D.; Goodship, Judith A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Rare variants in certain transcription factors involved in cardiac development cause Mendelian forms of congenital heart disease. The purpose of this study was to systematically assess the frequency of rare transcription factor variants in sporadic patients with the cardiac outflow tract malformation tetralogy of Fallot (TOF). Methods and Results We sequenced the coding, 5′UTR, and 3′UTR regions of twelve transcription factor genes implicated in cardiac outflow tract development (NKX2.5, GATA4, ISL1, TBX20, MEF2C, BOP/SMYD1, HAND2, FOXC1, FOXC2, FOXH, FOXA2 and TBX1) in 93 non-syndromic, non-Mendelian TOF cases. We also analysed Illumina Human 660W-Quad SNP Array data for copy number variants in these genes; none were detected. Four of the rare variants detected have previously been shown to affect transactivation in in vitro reporter assays: FOXC1 p.P297S, FOXC2 p.Q444R, FOXH1 p.S113T and TBX1 p.P43_G61del PPPPRYDPCAAAAPGAPGP. Two further rare variants, HAND2 p.A25_A26insAA and FOXC1 p.G378_G380delGGG, A488_491delAAAA, affected transactivation in in vitro reporter assays. Each of these six functionally significant variants was present in a single patient in the heterozygous state; each of the four for which parental samples were available were maternally inherited. Thus in the 93 TOF cases we identified six functionally significant mutations in the secondary heart field transcriptional network. Significance This study indicates that rare genetic variants in the secondary heart field transcriptional network with functional effects on protein function occur in 3–13% of patients with TOF. This is the first report of a functionally significant HAND2 mutation in a patient with congenital heart disease. PMID:25093829

  7. Functionally significant, rare transcription factor variants in tetralogy of Fallot.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Töpf

    Full Text Available Rare variants in certain transcription factors involved in cardiac development cause Mendelian forms of congenital heart disease. The purpose of this study was to systematically assess the frequency of rare transcription factor variants in sporadic patients with the cardiac outflow tract malformation tetralogy of Fallot (TOF.We sequenced the coding, 5'UTR, and 3'UTR regions of twelve transcription factor genes implicated in cardiac outflow tract development (NKX2.5, GATA4, ISL1, TBX20, MEF2C, BOP/SMYD1, HAND2, FOXC1, FOXC2, FOXH, FOXA2 and TBX1 in 93 non-syndromic, non-Mendelian TOF cases. We also analysed Illumina Human 660W-Quad SNP Array data for copy number variants in these genes; none were detected. Four of the rare variants detected have previously been shown to affect transactivation in in vitro reporter assays: FOXC1 p.P297S, FOXC2 p.Q444R, FOXH1 p.S113T and TBX1 p.P43_G61del PPPPRYDPCAAAAPGAPGP. Two further rare variants, HAND2 p.A25_A26insAA and FOXC1 p.G378_G380delGGG, A488_491delAAAA, affected transactivation in in vitro reporter assays. Each of these six functionally significant variants was present in a single patient in the heterozygous state; each of the four for which parental samples were available were maternally inherited. Thus in the 93 TOF cases we identified six functionally significant mutations in the secondary heart field transcriptional network.This study indicates that rare genetic variants in the secondary heart field transcriptional network with functional effects on protein function occur in 3-13% of patients with TOF. This is the first report of a functionally significant HAND2 mutation in a patient with congenital heart disease.

  8. Likelihood ratio tests in rare variant detection for continuous phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Ping; Zhao, Yang; Liu, Jin; Liu, Liya; Zhang, Liwei; Wang, Ting; Huang, Shuiping; Chen, Feng

    2014-09-01

    It is believed that rare variants play an important role in human phenotypes; however, the detection of rare variants is extremely challenging due to their very low minor allele frequency. In this paper, the likelihood ratio test (LRT) and restricted likelihood ratio test (ReLRT) are proposed to test the association of rare variants based on the linear mixed effects model, where a group of rare variants are treated as random effects. Like the sequence kernel association test (SKAT), a state-of-the-art method for rare variant detection, LRT and ReLRT can effectively overcome the problem of directionality of effect inherent in the burden test in practice. By taking full advantage of the spectral decomposition, exact finite sample null distributions for LRT and ReLRT are obtained by simulation. We perform extensive numerical studies to evaluate the performance of LRT and ReLRT, and compare to the burden test, SKAT and SKAT-O. The simulations have shown that LRT and ReLRT can correctly control the type I error, and the controls are robust to the weights chosen and the number of rare variants under study. LRT and ReLRT behave similarly to the burden test when all the causal rare variants share the same direction of effect, and outperform SKAT across various situations. When both positive and negative effects exist, LRT and ReLRT suffer from few power reductions compared to the other two competing methods; under this case, an additional finding from our simulations is that SKAT-O is no longer the optimal test, and its power is even lower than that of SKAT. The exome sequencing SNP data from Genetic Analysis Workshop 17 were employed to illustrate the proposed methods, and interesting results are described. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/University College London.

  9. Computational Approach to Annotating Variants of Unknown Significance in Clinical Next Generation Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Wade L; Tormey, Christopher A; Torres, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) has become a common technology in the clinical laboratory, particularly for the analysis of malignant neoplasms. However, most mutations identified by NGS are variants of unknown clinical significance (VOUS). Although the approach to define these variants differs by institution, software algorithms that predict variant effect on protein function may be used. However, these algorithms commonly generate conflicting results, potentially adding uncertainty to interpretation. In this review, we examine several computational tools used to predict whether a variant has clinical significance. In addition to describing the role of these tools in clinical diagnostics, we assess their efficacy in analyzing known pathogenic and benign variants in hematologic malignancies. Copyright© by the American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP).

  10. Copy Number Variation in Fungi and Its Implications for Wine Yeast Genetic Diversity and Adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob L. Steenwyk

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, copy number (CN variation has emerged as a new and significant source of genetic polymorphisms contributing to the phenotypic diversity of populations. CN variants are defined as genetic loci that, due to duplication and deletion, vary in their number of copies across individuals in a population. CN variants range in size from 50 base pairs to whole chromosomes, can influence gene activity, and are associated with a wide range of phenotypes in diverse organisms, including the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this review, we introduce CN variation, discuss the genetic and molecular mechanisms implicated in its generation, how they can contribute to genetic and phenotypic diversity in fungal populations, and consider how CN variants may influence wine yeast adaptation in fermentation-related processes. In particular, we focus on reviewing recent work investigating the contribution of changes in CN of fermentation-related genes in yeast wine strains and offer notable illustrations of such changes, including the high levels of CN variation among the CUP genes, which confer resistance to copper, a metal with fungicidal properties, and the preferential deletion and duplication of the MAL1 and MAL3 loci, respectively, which are responsible for metabolizing maltose and sucrose. Based on the available data, we propose that CN variation is a substantial dimension of yeast genetic diversity that occurs largely independent of single nucleotide polymorphisms. As such, CN variation harbors considerable potential for understanding and manipulating yeast strains in the wine fermentation environment and beyond.

  11. Integrated analysis of unclassified variants in mismatch repair genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastrello, Chiara; Pin, Elisa; Marroni, Fabio; Bedin, Chiara; Fornasarig, Mara; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Oliani, Cristina; Ponz de Leon, Maurizio; Urso, Emanuele Damiano; Della Puppa, Lara; Agostini, Marco; Viel, Alessandra

    2011-02-01

    Lynch syndrome is a genetic disease that predisposes to colorectal tumors, caused by mutation in mismatch repair genes. The use of genetic tests to identify mutation carriers does not always give perfectly clear results, as happens when an unclassified variant is found. This study aimed to define the pathogenic role of 35 variants present in MSH2, MLH1, MSH6, and PMS2 genes identified in our 15-year case study. We collected clinical and molecular data of all carriers, and then we analyzed the variants pathogenic role with web tools and molecular analyses. Using a Bayesian approach, we derived a posterior probability of pathogenicity and classified each variant according to a standardized five-class system. The MSH2 p.Pro349Arg, p.Met688Arg, the MLH1 p.Gly67Arg, p.Thr82Ala, p.Lys618Ala, the MSH6 p.Ala1236Pro, and the PMS2 p.Arg20Gln were classified as pathogenic, and the MSH2 p.Cys697Arg and the PMS2 p.Ser46Ile were classified as likely pathogenic. Seven variants were likely nonpathogenic, 3 were nonpathogenic, and 16 remained uncertain. Quantitative assessment of several parameters and their integration in a multifactorial likelihood model is the method of choice for classifying the variants. As such classifications can be associated with surveillance and testing recommendations, the results and the method developed in our study can be useful for helping laboratory geneticists in evaluation of genetic tests and clinicians in the management of carriers.

  12. Swine Influenza/Variant Influenza Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Humans Key Facts about Human Infections with Variant Viruses Interim Guidance for Clinicians on Human Infections Background, Risk Assessment & Reporting Reported Infections with Variant Influenza Viruses in the United States since 2005 Past Outbreaks ...

  13. Clinical Implications of HIV-1 Minority Variants

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Jonathan Z.; Kuritzkes, Daniel R.

    2013-01-01

    Low-frequency HIV variants are increasingly recognized as a key factor that increases the risk of HIV treatment failure. This article will provide a review of HIV minority variants, including their demonstrated clinical impact and areas of controversy.

  14. Variant Humicola grisea CBH1.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goedegebuur, Frits; Gualfetti, Peter; Mitchinson, Colin; Larenas, Edmund

    2017-05-09

    Disclosed are variants of Humicola grisea CeI7A (CBH1.1), H. jecorina CBH1 variant or S. thermophilium CBH1, nucleic acids encoding the same and methods for producing the same. The variant cellulases have the amino acid sequence of a glycosyl hydrolase of family 7A wherein one or more amino acid residues are substituted.

  15. A global evolutionary and metabolic analysis of human obesity gene risk variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Joseph J; Hazlett, Zachary S; Orlando, Robert A; Garver, William S

    2017-09-05

    It is generally accepted that the selection of gene variants during human evolution optimized energy metabolism that now interacts with our obesogenic environment to increase the prevalence of obesity. The purpose of this study was to perform a global evolutionary and metabolic analysis of human obesity gene risk variants (110 human obesity genes with 127 nearest gene risk variants) identified using genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to enhance our knowledge of early and late genotypes. As a result of determining the mean frequency of these obesity gene risk variants in 13 available populations from around the world our results provide evidence for the early selection of ancestral risk variants (defined as selection before migration from Africa) and late selection of derived risk variants (defined as selection after migration from Africa). Our results also provide novel information for association of these obesity genes or encoded proteins with diverse metabolic pathways and other human diseases. The overall results indicate a significant differential evolutionary pattern for the selection of obesity gene ancestral and derived risk variants proposed to optimize energy metabolism in varying global environments and complex association with metabolic pathways and other human diseases. These results are consistent with obesity genes that encode proteins possessing a fundamental role in maintaining energy metabolism and survival during the course of human evolution. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Clinicopathologic Variants of Mycosis Fungoides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-González, H; Molina-Ruiz, A M; Requena, L

    2017-04-01

    Mycosis fungoides (MF) is the most common primary cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. The clinical course of the disease is typically characterized by progression from a nonspecific phase of erythematous macules to the appearance of plaques and ultimately, in some patients, tumors. However, numerous clinical and histopathologic variants of MF with specific therapeutic and prognostic implications have been described in recent decades. Clarification of the differential diagnosis can be frustrated by the wide range of clinical manifestations and histopathologic patterns of cutaneous infiltration, particularly in the early phases of the disease. In this paper, we review the main clinical, histopathologic, and immunohistochemical characteristics of the variants of MF described in the literature in order to facilitate early diagnosis of the disease. Copyright © 2016 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Plug-and-Play Pairing via Defined Divalent Streptavidins☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairhead, Michael; Krndija, Denis; Lowe, Ed D.; Howarth, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Streptavidin is one of the most important hubs for molecular biology, either multimerizing biomolecules, bridging one molecule to another, or anchoring to a biotinylated surface/nanoparticle. Streptavidin has the advantage of rapid ultra-stable binding to biotin. However, the ability of streptavidin to bind four biotinylated molecules in a heterogeneous manner is often limiting. Here, we present an efficient approach to isolate streptavidin tetramers with two biotin-binding sites in a precise arrangement, cis or trans. We genetically modified specific subunits with negatively charged tags, refolded a mixture of monomers, and used ion-exchange chromatography to resolve tetramers according to the number and orientation of tags. We solved the crystal structures of cis-divalent streptavidin to 1.4 Å resolution and trans-divalent streptavidin to 1.6 Å resolution, validating the isolation strategy and explaining the behavior of the Dead streptavidin variant. cis- and trans-divalent streptavidins retained tetravalent streptavidin's high thermostability and low off-rate. These defined divalent streptavidins enabled us to uncover how streptavidin binding depends on the nature of the biotin ligand. Biotinylated DNA showed strong negative cooperativity of binding to cis-divalent but not trans-divalent streptavidin. A small biotinylated protein bound readily to cis and trans binding sites. We also solved the structure of trans-divalent streptavidin bound to biotin-4-fluorescein, showing how one ligand obstructs binding to an adjacent biotin-binding site. Using a hexaglutamate tag proved a more powerful way to isolate monovalent streptavidin, for ultra-stable labeling without undesired clustering. These forms of streptavidin allow this key hub to be used with a new level of precision, for homogeneous molecular assembly. PMID:24056174

  18. Challenges in assessing pathogenicity based on frequency of variants in mismatch repair genes: an extreme case of a MSH2 variant and a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Hye In; Woo, Young Min; Kim, Sollip; Lee, Seung-Tae; Ki, Chang-Seok; Kim, Jong-Won

    2014-08-10

    The clinical interpretation of variants in mismatch repair (MMR) genes associated with Lynch syndrome can be confusing when the functional nature of the variant is not clearly defined. We report an extreme case where a polymorphism in the MSH2 gene which had a low minor allele frequency, was misclassified as a mutation based on low evidential methods in the database and previous publications. We expanded this experience to perform a systematic meta-analysis in order to investigate other variants that have potentially been misclassified. Our results suggested that the interpretation of pathogenicity should be more cautious and emphasized the need for solid validation through multiple analyses including functional analysis for variants in MMR genes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Microcystic Variant of Urothelial Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Kodzo-Grey Venyo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Microcystic variant of urothelial carcinoma is one of the new variants of urothelial carcinoma that was added to the WHO classification in 2004. Aims. To review the literature on microcystic variant of urothelial carcinoma. Methods. Various internet search engines were used to identify reported cases of the tumour. Results. Microscopic features of the tumour include: (i Conspicuous intracellular and intercellular lumina/microcysts encompassed by malignant urothelial or squamous cells. (ii The lumina are usually empty; may contain granular eosinophilic debris, mucin, or necrotic cells. (iii The cysts may be variable in size; round, or oval, up to 2 mm; lined by urothelium which are either flattened cells or low columnar cells however, they do not contain colonic epithelium or goblet cells; are infiltrative; invade the muscularis propria; mimic cystitis cystica and cystitis glandularis; occasionally exhibit neuroendocrine differentiation. (iv Elongated and irregular branching spaces are usually seen. About 17 cases of the tumour have been reported with only 2 patients who have survived. The tumour tends to be of high-grade and high-stage. There is no consensus opinion on the best option of treatment of the tumour. Conclusions. It would prove difficult at the moment to be dogmatic regarding its prognosis but it is a highly aggressive tumour. New cases of the tumour should be reported in order to document its biological behaviour.

  20. Germline Variants in Targeted Tumor Sequencing Using Matched Normal DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, Kasmintan A; Cheng, Donavan T; Joseph, Vijai; Prasad, Meera; Walsh, Michael; Zehir, Ahmet; Ni, Ai; Thomas, Tinu; Benayed, Ryma; Ashraf, Asad; Lincoln, Annie; Arcila, Maria; Stadler, Zsofia; Solit, David; Hyman, David M; Hyman, David; Zhang, Liying; Klimstra, David; Ladanyi, Marc; Offit, Kenneth; Berger, Michael; Robson, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Tumor genetic sequencing identifies potentially targetable genetic alterations with therapeutic implications. Analysis has concentrated on detecting tumor-specific variants, but recognition of germline variants may prove valuable as well. To estimate the burden of germline variants identified through routine clinical tumor sequencing. Patients with advanced cancer diagnoses eligible for studies of targeted agents at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center are offered tumor-normal sequencing with MSK-IMPACT, a 341-gene panel. We surveyed the germline variants seen in 187 overlapping genes with Mendelian disease associations in 1566 patients who had undergone tumor profiling between March and October 2014. The number of presumed pathogenic germline variants (PPGVs) and variants of uncertain significance per person in 187 genes associated with single-gene disorders and the proportions of individuals with PPGVs in clinically relevant gene subsets, in genes consistent with known tumor phenotypes, and in genes with evidence of second somatic hits in their tumors. The mean age of the 1566 patients was 58 years, and 54% were women. Presumed pathogenic germline variants in known Mendelian disease-associated genes were identified in 246 of 1566 patients (15.7%; 95% CI, 14.0%-17.6%), including 198 individuals with mutations in genes associated with cancer susceptibility. Germline findings in cancer susceptibility genes were concordant with the individual's cancer type in only 81 of 198 cases (40.9%; 95% CI, 34.3%-47.9%). In individuals with PPGVs retained in the tumor, somatic alteration of the other allele was seen in 39 of 182 cases (21.4%; 95% CI, 16.1%-28.0%), of which 13 cases did not show a known correlation of the germline mutation and a known syndrome. Mutations in non-cancer-related Mendelian disease genes were seen in 55 of 1566 cases (3.5%; 95% CI, 27.1%-45.4%). Almost every individual had more than 1 variant of uncertain significance (1565 of 1566 patients; 99

  1. Defining asthma in genetic studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppelman, GH; Postma, DS; Meijer, G.

    1999-01-01

    Genetic studies have been hampered by the lack of a gold standard to diagnose asthma. The complex nature of asthma makes it more difficult to identify asthma genes. Therefore, approaches to define phenotypes, which have been successful in other genetically complex diseases, may be applied to define

  2. Prevalence of ATM Sequence Variants in Northern Plains American Indian Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Grant Petereit

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To identify sequence variants of the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM gene and establish their prevalence rate among American Indian (AI as compared with non-AI cancer patients. Materials and Methods: DNA was isolated from blood samples collected from 100 AI and 100 non-AI cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy, and a blinded assessment of the ATM sequence was conducted. Quantitative PCR assessment of copy number for each exon was also performed. The main outcome measure was the prevalence of ATM variants in the two patient populations. Results: No statistically significant differences for total prevalence of ATM variants among AI and non-AI patients were found. Of the 25 variants identified, five variants had a prevalence of >2%, of which 4 occurred at a rate of >5% in one or both groups. The prevalence of these four variants could meaningfully be compared between the two groups. The only statistically significant difference among the groups was the c.4138C>T variant which is predicted not to affect protein function, seen in 8% of AI versus 0% of non-AI patients (P=0.007. No exonic copy number changes were found in these patients. Conclusions: This study is the first to determine the prevalence of ATM variants in AIs.

  3. Identifying genetic variants that affect viability in large cohorts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakhamanesh Mostafavi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A number of open questions in human evolutionary genetics would become tractable if we were able to directly measure evolutionary fitness. As a step towards this goal, we developed a method to examine whether individual genetic variants, or sets of genetic variants, currently influence viability. The approach consists in testing whether the frequency of an allele varies across ages, accounting for variation in ancestry. We applied it to the Genetic Epidemiology Research on Adult Health and Aging (GERA cohort and to the parents of participants in the UK Biobank. Across the genome, we found only a few common variants with large effects on age-specific mortality: tagging the APOE ε4 allele and near CHRNA3. These results suggest that when large, even late-onset effects are kept at low frequency by purifying selection. Testing viability effects of sets of genetic variants that jointly influence 1 of 42 traits, we detected a number of strong signals. In participants of the UK Biobank of British ancestry, we found that variants that delay puberty timing are associated with a longer parental life span (P~6.2 × 10-6 for fathers and P~2.0 × 10-3 for mothers, consistent with epidemiological studies. Similarly, variants associated with later age at first birth are associated with a longer maternal life span (P~1.4 × 10-3. Signals are also observed for variants influencing cholesterol levels, risk of coronary artery disease (CAD, body mass index, as well as risk of asthma. These signals exhibit consistent effects in the GERA cohort and among participants of the UK Biobank of non-British ancestry. We also found marked differences between males and females, most notably at the CHRNA3 locus, and variants associated with risk of CAD and cholesterol levels. Beyond our findings, the analysis serves as a proof of principle for how upcoming biomedical data sets can be used to learn about selection effects in contemporary humans.

  4. Generalized r-Lah numbers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    generalize earlier identities given for the r-Lah and r-Stirling numbers. We also pro- vide combinatorial proofs of some earlier identities involving the r-Lah numbers by defining appropriate sign-changing involutions. Generalizing these arguments yields orthogonality-type relations that are satisfied by Ga,b(n, k; r). Keywords.

  5. The development of the number field sieve

    CERN Document Server

    Lenstra, Hendrik

    1993-01-01

    The number field sieve is an algorithm for finding the prime factors of large integers. It depends on algebraic number theory. Proposed by John Pollard in 1988, the method was used in 1990 to factor the ninth Fermat number, a 155-digit integer. The algorithm is most suited to numbers of a special form, but there is a promising variant that applies in general. This volume contains six research papers that describe the operation of the number field sieve, from both theoretical and practical perspectives. Pollard's original manuscript is included. In addition, there is an annotated bibliography of directly related literature.

  6. Ancient mtDNA genetic variants modulate mtDNA transcription and replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarit Suissa

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Although the functional consequences of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA genetic backgrounds (haplotypes, haplogroups have been demonstrated by both disease association studies and cell culture experiments, it is not clear which of the mutations within the haplogroup carry functional implications and which are "evolutionary silent hitchhikers". We set forth to study the functionality of haplogroup-defining mutations within the mtDNA transcription/replication regulatory region by in vitro transcription, hypothesizing that haplogroup-defining mutations occurring within regulatory motifs of mtDNA could affect these processes. We thus screened >2500 complete human mtDNAs representing all major populations worldwide for natural variation in experimentally established protein binding sites and regulatory regions comprising a total of 241 bp in each mtDNA. Our screen revealed 77/241 sites showing point mutations that could be divided into non-fixed (57/77, 74% and haplogroup/sub-haplogroup-defining changes (i.e., population fixed changes, 20/77, 26%. The variant defining Caucasian haplogroup J (C295T increased the binding of TFAM (Electro Mobility Shift Assay and the capacity of in vitro L-strand transcription, especially of a shorter transcript that maps immediately upstream of conserved sequence block 1 (CSB1, a region associated with RNA priming of mtDNA replication. Consistent with this finding, cybrids (i.e., cells sharing the same nuclear genetic background but differing in their mtDNA backgrounds harboring haplogroup J mtDNA had a >2 fold increase in mtDNA copy number, as compared to cybrids containing haplogroup H, with no apparent differences in steady state levels of mtDNA-encoded transcripts. Hence, a haplogroup J regulatory region mutation affects mtDNA replication or stability, which may partially account for the phenotypic impact of this haplogroup. Our analysis thus demonstrates, for the first time, the functional impact of particular mt

  7. Genetic Load of Loss-of-Function Polymorphic Variants in Great Apes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Valles-Ibáñez, Guillem; Hernandez-Rodriguez, Jessica; Prado-Martinez, Javier; Luisi, Pierre; Marquès-Bonet, Tomàs; Casals, Ferran

    2016-03-26

    Loss of function (LoF) genetic variants are predicted to disrupt gene function, and are therefore expected to substantially reduce individual's viability. Knowing the genetic burden of LoF variants in endangered species is of interest for a better understanding of the effects of declining population sizes on species viability. In this study, we have estimated the number of LoF polymorphic variants in six great ape populations, based on whole-genome sequencing data in 79 individuals. Our results show that although the number of functional variants per individual is conditioned by the effective population size, the number of variants with a drastic phenotypic effect is very similar across species. We hypothesize that for those variants with high selection coefficients, differences in effective population size are not important enough to affect the efficiency of natural selection to remove them. We also describe that mostly CpG LoF mutations are shared across species, and an accumulation of LoF variants at olfactory receptor genes in agreement with its pseudogenization in humans and other primate species. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  8. TYK2 protein-coding variants protect against rheumatoid arthritis and autoimmunity, with no evidence of major pleiotropic effects on non-autoimmune complex traits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothée Diogo

    Full Text Available Despite the success of genome-wide association studies (GWAS in detecting a large number of loci for complex phenotypes such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA susceptibility, the lack of information on the causal genes leaves important challenges to interpret GWAS results in the context of the disease biology. Here, we genetically fine-map the RA risk locus at 19p13 to define causal variants, and explore the pleiotropic effects of these same variants in other complex traits. First, we combined Immunochip dense genotyping (n = 23,092 case/control samples, Exomechip genotyping (n = 18,409 case/control samples and targeted exon-sequencing (n = 2,236 case/controls samples to demonstrate that three protein-coding variants in TYK2 (tyrosine kinase 2 independently protect against RA: P1104A (rs34536443, OR = 0.66, P = 2.3 x 10(-21, A928V (rs35018800, OR = 0.53, P = 1.2 x 10(-9, and I684S (rs12720356, OR = 0.86, P = 4.6 x 10(-7. Second, we show that the same three TYK2 variants protect against systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, Pomnibus = 6 x 10(-18, and provide suggestive evidence that two of the TYK2 variants (P1104A and A928V may also protect against inflammatory bowel disease (IBD; P(omnibus = 0.005. Finally, in a phenome-wide association study (PheWAS assessing >500 phenotypes using electronic medical records (EMR in >29,000 subjects, we found no convincing evidence for association of P1104A and A928V with complex phenotypes other than autoimmune diseases such as RA, SLE and IBD. Together, our results demonstrate the role of TYK2 in the pathogenesis of RA, SLE and IBD, and provide supporting evidence for TYK2 as a promising drug target for the treatment of autoimmune diseases.

  9. A Standardized DNA Variant Scoring System for Pathogenicity Assessments in Mendelian Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbassi, Izabela; Maston, Glenn A; Love, Angela; DiVincenzo, Christina; Braastad, Corey D; Elzinga, Christopher D; Bright, Alison R; Previte, Domenic; Zhang, Ke; Rowland, Charles M; McCarthy, Michele; Lapierre, Jennifer L; Dubois, Felicita; Medeiros, Katelyn A; Batish, Sat Dev; Jones, Jeffrey; Liaquat, Khalida; Hoffman, Carol A; Jaremko, Malgorzata; Wang, Zhenyuan; Sun, Weimin; Buller-Burckle, Arlene; Strom, Charles M; Keiles, Steven B; Higgins, Joseph J

    2016-01-01

    We developed a rules-based scoring system to classify DNA variants into five categories including pathogenic, likely pathogenic, variant of uncertain significance (VUS), likely benign, and benign. Over 16,500 pathogenicity assessments on 11,894 variants from 338 genes were analyzed for pathogenicity based on prediction tools, population frequency, co-occurrence, segregation, and functional studies collected from internal and external sources. Scores were calculated by trained scientists using a quantitative framework that assigned differential weighting to these five types of data. We performed descriptive and comparative statistics on the dataset and tested interobserver concordance among the trained scientists. Private variants defined as variants found within single families (n = 5,182), were either VUS (80.5%; n = 4,169) or likely pathogenic (19.5%; n = 1,013). The remaining variants (n = 6,712) were VUS (38.4%; n = 2,577) or likely benign/benign (34.7%; n = 2,327) or likely pathogenic/pathogenic (26.9%, n = 1,808). Exact agreement between the trained scientists on the final variant score was 98.5% [95% confidence interval (CI) (98.0, 98.9)] with an interobserver consistency of 97% [95% CI (91.5, 99.4)]. Variant scores were stable and showed increasing odds of being in agreement with new data when re-evaluated periodically. This carefully curated, standardized variant pathogenicity scoring system provides reliable pathogenicity scores for DNA variants encountered in a clinical laboratory setting. © 2015 The Authors. **Human Mutation published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Large-scale analysis of peptide sequence variants: the case for high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creese, Andrew J; Smart, Jade; Cooper, Helen J

    2013-05-21

    Large scale analysis of proteins by mass spectrometry is becoming increasingly routine; however, the presence of peptide isomers remains a significant challenge for both identification and quantitation in proteomics. Classes of isomers include sequence inversions, structural isomers, and localization variants. In many cases, liquid chromatography is inadequate for separation of peptide isomers. The resulting tandem mass spectra are composite, containing fragments from multiple precursor ions. The benefits of high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) for proteomics have been demonstrated by a number of groups, but previously work has focused on extending proteome coverage generally. Here, we present a systematic study of the benefits of FAIMS for a key challenge in proteomics, that of peptide isomers. We have applied FAIMS to the analysis of a phosphopeptide library comprising the sequences GPSGXVpSXAQLX(K/R) and SXPFKXpSPLXFG(K/R), where X = ADEFGLSTVY. The library has defined limits enabling us to make valid conclusions regarding FAIMS performance. The library contains numerous sequence inversions and structural isomers. In addition, there are large numbers of theoretical localization variants, allowing false localization rates to be determined. The FAIMS approach is compared with reversed-phase liquid chromatography and strong cation exchange chromatography. The FAIMS approach identified 35% of the peptide library, whereas LC-MS/MS alone identified 8% and LC-MS/MS with strong cation exchange chromatography prefractionation identified 17.3% of the library.

  11. Quantitative group testing-based overlapping pool sequencing to identify rare variant carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chang-Chang; Li, Cheng; Sun, Xiao

    2014-06-17

    Genome-wide association studies have revealed that rare variants are responsible for a large portion of the heritability of some complex human diseases. This highlights the increasing importance of detecting and screening for rare variants. Although the massively parallel sequencing technologies have greatly reduced the cost of DNA sequencing, the identification of rare variant carriers by large-scale re-sequencing remains prohibitively expensive because of the huge challenge of constructing libraries for thousands of samples. Recently, several studies have reported that techniques from group testing theory and compressed sensing could help identify rare variant carriers in large-scale samples with few pooled sequencing experiments and a dramatically reduced cost. Based on quantitative group testing, we propose an efficient overlapping pool sequencing strategy that allows the efficient recovery of variant carriers in numerous individuals with much lower costs than conventional methods. We used random k-set pool designs to mix samples, and optimized the design parameters according to an indicative probability. Based on a mathematical model of sequencing depth distribution, an optimal threshold was selected to declare a pool positive or negative. Then, using the quantitative information contained in the sequencing results, we designed a heuristic Bayesian probability decoding algorithm to identify variant carriers. Finally, we conducted in silico experiments to find variant carriers among 200 simulated Escherichia coli strains. With the simulated pools and publicly available Illumina sequencing data, our method correctly identified the variant carriers for 91.5-97.9% variants with the variant frequency ranging from 0.5 to 1.5%. Using the number of reads, variant carriers could be identified precisely even though samples were randomly selected and pooled. Our method performed better than the published DNA Sudoku design and compressed sequencing, especially in reducing

  12. A proposed number system for the 107 cortical areas of Economo and Koskinas, and Brodmann area correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triarhou, Lazaros C

    2007-01-01

    In their Atlas of Cytoarchitectonics of the Adult Human Cerebral Cortex, Economo and Koskinas defined 54 'ground,' 76 'variant,' and 107 'modification' areas. The 107 modifications are topographically distributed as 35 frontal, 13 superior limbic, 6 insular, 18 parietal, 7 occipital, 14 temporal and 14 inferior limbic (or hippocampal). One way to make the Economo-Koskinas system more practical is to encode the complex symbol notations of the 107 cortical areas with numbers EK 1 through EK 107. The present study does that, and it further correlates Economo-Koskinas areas with Brodmann areas, based on an overview of the classical and modern neurohistological literature. Copyright (c) 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Evaluation of in silico algorithms for use with ACMG/AMP clinical variant interpretation guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Rajarshi; Oak, Ninad; Plon, Sharon E

    2017-11-28

    The American College of Medical Genetics and American College of Pathologists (ACMG/AMP) variant classification guidelines for clinical reporting are widely used in diagnostic laboratories for variant interpretation. The ACMG/AMP guidelines recommend complete concordance of predictions among all in silico algorithms used without specifying the number or types of algorithms. The subjective nature of this recommendation contributes to discordance of variant classification among clinical laboratories and prevents definitive classification of variants. Using 14,819 benign or pathogenic missense variants from the ClinVar database, we compared performance of 25 algorithms across datasets differing in distinct biological and technical variables. There was wide variability in concordance among different combinations of algorithms with particularly low concordance for benign variants. We also identify a previously unreported source of error in variant interpretation (false concordance) where concordant in silico predictions are opposite to the evidence provided by other sources. We identified recently developed algorithms with high predictive power and robust to variables such as disease mechanism, gene constraint, and mode of inheritance, although poorer performing algorithms are more frequently used based on review of the clinical genetics literature (2011-2017). Our analyses identify algorithms with high performance characteristics independent of underlying disease mechanisms. We describe combinations of algorithms with increased concordance that should improve in silico algorithm usage during assessment of clinically relevant variants using the ACMG/AMP guidelines.

  14. Localized structural frustration for evaluating the impact of sequence variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sushant; Clarke, Declan; Gerstein, Mark

    2016-12-01

    Population-scale sequencing is increasingly uncovering large numbers of rare single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) in coding regions of the genome. The rarity of these variants makes it challenging to evaluate their deleteriousness with conventional phenotype-genotype associations. Protein structures provide a way of addressing this challenge. Previous efforts have focused on globally quantifying the impact of SNVs on protein stability. However, local perturbations may severely impact protein functionality without strongly disrupting global stability (e.g. in relation to catalysis or allostery). Here, we describe a workflow in which localized frustration, quantifying unfavorable local interactions, is employed as a metric to investigate such effects. Using this workflow on the Protein Databank, we find that frustration produces many immediately intuitive results: for instance, disease-related SNVs create stronger changes in localized frustration than non-disease related variants, and rare SNVs tend to disrupt local interactions to a larger extent than common variants. Less obviously, we observe that somatic SNVs associated with oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) induce very different changes in frustration. In particular, those associated with TSGs change the frustration more in the core than the surface (by introducing loss-of-function events), whereas those associated with oncogenes manifest the opposite pattern, creating gain-of-function events. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  15. Localized structural frustration for evaluating the impact of sequence variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sushant; Clarke, Declan; Gerstein, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Population-scale sequencing is increasingly uncovering large numbers of rare single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) in coding regions of the genome. The rarity of these variants makes it challenging to evaluate their deleteriousness with conventional phenotype–genotype associations. Protein structures provide a way of addressing this challenge. Previous efforts have focused on globally quantifying the impact of SNVs on protein stability. However, local perturbations may severely impact protein functionality without strongly disrupting global stability (e.g. in relation to catalysis or allostery). Here, we describe a workflow in which localized frustration, quantifying unfavorable local interactions, is employed as a metric to investigate such effects. Using this workflow on the Protein Databank, we find that frustration produces many immediately intuitive results: for instance, disease-related SNVs create stronger changes in localized frustration than non-disease related variants, and rare SNVs tend to disrupt local interactions to a larger extent than common variants. Less obviously, we observe that somatic SNVs associated with oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) induce very different changes in frustration. In particular, those associated with TSGs change the frustration more in the core than the surface (by introducing loss-of-function events), whereas those associated with oncogenes manifest the opposite pattern, creating gain-of-function events. PMID:27915290

  16. Antigen Loss Variants: Catching Hold of Escaping Foes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Maulik; Müller, Rolf; Pogge von Strandmann, Elke

    2017-01-01

    Since mid-1990s, the field of cancer immunotherapy has seen steady growth and selected immunotherapies are now a routine and preferred therapeutic option of certain malignancies. Both active and passive cancer immunotherapies exploit the fact that tumor cells express specific antigens on the cell surface, thereby mounting an immune response specifically against malignant cells. It is well established that cancer cells typically lose surface antigens following natural or therapy-induced selective pressure and these antigen-loss variants are often the population that causes therapy-resistant relapse. CD19 and CD20 antigen loss in acute lymphocytic leukemia and chronic lymphocytic leukemia, respectively, and lineage switching in leukemia associated with mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) gene rearrangements are well-documented evidences in this regard. Although increasing number of novel immunotherapies are being developed, majority of these do not address the control of antigen loss variants. Here, we review the occurrence of antigen loss variants in leukemia and discuss the therapeutic strategies to tackle the same. We also present an approach of dual-targeting immunoligand effectively retargeting NK cells against antigen loss variants in MLL-associated leukemia. Novel immunotherapies simultaneously targeting more than one tumor antigen certainly hold promise to completely eradicate tumor and prevent therapy-resistant relapses.

  17. Modeling and Selection of Software Service Variants

    OpenAIRE

    Wittern, John Erik

    2015-01-01

    Providers and consumers have to deal with variants, meaning alternative instances of a service?s design, implementation, deployment, or operation, when developing or delivering software services. This work presents service feature modeling to deal with associated challenges, comprising a language to represent software service variants and a set of methods for modeling and subsequent variant selection. This work?s evaluation includes a POC implementation and two real-life use cases.

  18. Distribution and medical impact of loss-of-function variants in the Finnish founder population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine T Lim

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Exome sequencing studies in complex diseases are challenged by the allelic heterogeneity, large number and modest effect sizes of associated variants on disease risk and the presence of large numbers of neutral variants, even in phenotypically relevant genes. Isolated populations with recent bottlenecks offer advantages for studying rare variants in complex diseases as they have deleterious variants that are present at higher frequencies as well as a substantial reduction in rare neutral variation. To explore the potential of the Finnish founder population for studying low-frequency (0.5-5% variants in complex diseases, we compared exome sequence data on 3,000 Finns to the same number of non-Finnish Europeans and discovered that, despite having fewer variable sites overall, the average Finn has more low-frequency loss-of-function variants and complete gene knockouts. We then used several well-characterized Finnish population cohorts to study the phenotypic effects of 83 enriched loss-of-function variants across 60 phenotypes in 36,262 Finns. Using a deep set of quantitative traits collected on these cohorts, we show 5 associations (p<5×10⁻⁸ including splice variants in LPA that lowered plasma lipoprotein(a levels (P = 1.5×10⁻¹¹⁷. Through accessing the national medical records of these participants, we evaluate the LPA finding via Mendelian randomization and confirm that these splice variants confer protection from cardiovascular disease (OR = 0.84, P = 3×10⁻⁴, demonstrating for the first time the correlation between very low levels of LPA in humans with potential therapeutic implications for cardiovascular diseases. More generally, this study articulates substantial advantages for studying the role of rare variation in complex phenotypes in founder populations like the Finns and by combining a unique population genetic history with data from large population cohorts and centralized research access to National Health

  19. Defining and Selecting Independent Directors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Pichet

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Drawing from the Enlightened Shareholder Theory that the author first developed in 2011, this theoretical paper with practical and normative ambitions achieves a better definition of independent director, while improving the understanding of the roles he fulfils on boards of directors. The first part defines constructs like firms, Governance system and Corporate governance, offering a clear distinction between the latter two concepts before explaining the four main missions of a board. The second part defines the ideal independent director by outlining the objective qualities that are necessary and adding those subjective aspects that have turned this into a veritable profession. The third part defines the ideal process for selecting independent directors, based on nominating committees that should themselves be independent. It also includes ways of assessing directors who are currently in function, as well as modalities for renewing their mandates. The paper’s conclusion presents the Paradox of the Independent Director.

  20. Modular Software-Defined Radio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhiemeier Arnd-Ragnar

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In view of the technical and commercial boundary conditions for software-defined radio (SDR, it is suggestive to reconsider the concept anew from an unconventional point of view. The organizational principles of signal processing (rather than the signal processing algorithms themselves are the main focus of this work on modular software-defined radio. Modularity and flexibility are just two key characteristics of the SDR environment which extend smoothly into the modeling of hardware and software. In particular, the proposed model of signal processing software includes irregular, connected, directed, acyclic graphs with random node weights and random edges. Several approaches for mapping such software to a given hardware are discussed. Taking into account previous findings as well as new results from system simulations presented here, the paper finally concludes with the utility of pipelining as a general design guideline for modular software-defined radio.

  1. Modeling disease risk through analysis of physical interactions between genetic variants within chromatin regulatory circuitry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corradin, Olivia; Cohen, Andrea J; Luppino, Jennifer M; Bayles, Ian M; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Scacheri, Peter C

    2016-11-01

    SNPs associated with disease susceptibility often reside in enhancer clusters, or super-enhancers. Constituents of these enhancer clusters cooperate to regulate target genes and often extend beyond the linkage disequilibrium (LD) blocks containing risk SNPs identified in genome-wide association studies (GWAS). We identified 'outside variants', defined as SNPs in weak LD with GWAS risk SNPs that physically interact with risk SNPs as part of a target gene's regulatory circuitry. These outside variants further explain variation in target gene expression beyond that explained by GWAS-associated SNPs. Additionally, the clinical risk associated with GWAS SNPs is considerably modified by the genotype of outside variants. Collectively, these findings suggest a potential model in which outside variants and GWAS SNPs that physically interact in 3D chromatin collude to influence target transcript levels as well as clinical risk. This model offers an additional hypothesis for the source of missing heritability for complex traits.

  2. ON DEFINING S-SPACES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Strati

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The present work is intended to be an introduction to the Superposition Theory of David Carfì. In particular I shall depict the meaning of his brand new theory, on the one hand in an informal fashion and on the other hand by giving a formal approach of the algebraic structure of the theory: the S-linear algebra. This kind of structure underpins the notion of S-spaces (or Carfì-spaces by defining both its properties and its nature. Thus I shall define the S-triple as the fundamental principle upon which the S-linear algebra is built up.

  3. Defining the Internet of Things

    OpenAIRE

    Benghozi, Pierre-Jean; Bureau, Sylvain; Massit-Folléa, Françoise

    2012-01-01

    How can a definition be given to what does not yet exist ? The Internet of Things, as it is conceptualized by researchers or imagined by science-fiction writers such as Bruce Sterling, is not yet reality and if we try to define it accurately we risk rash predictions. In order to better comprehend this notion, let us first define the main principles of the IoT as given in research papers and reports on the subject. Definitions gradually established Almost all agree that the Internet of Things...

  4. Identificação de variantes de hemoglobina em doadores de sangue Identification of hemoglobin variants in blood donor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana C. Bonini-Domingos

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Hemoglobinopathies are the most common genetic diseases and affect a great number of individuals in the world, with diverse clinical complications ranging from the almost unnoticeable to lethal consequences. In Brazil the occurrence of hemoglobinopathies is very frequent and influenced by the ethnical groups that are the basis of populations in different regions. The phenotype may be influenced by environmental and genetic factors and by migration. An understanding of these genetic diseases is important for the health and quality of life of the population. In this work we assessed the presence of Hb variants in blood donors from São José do Rio Preto and region, and we observed the occurrence of variants including Hb S and Hb C but in particular the so-called "S-Like" variants. Good determination of the forms of variant hemoglobins is very important to give better guidance to blood donors and their families, and to improve the quality of blood transfusion.

  5. Gene variants associated with age at menopause are also associated with polycystic ovary syndrome, gonadotrophins and ovarian volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, R; Bjonnes, A C; Georgopoulos, N A; Koika, V; Panidis, D; Welt, C K

    2015-07-01

    Is there a relationship between the genetic risk for polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and genetic variants that influence timing of menopause? The genetic risk score, which sums the contribution of variants at all menopause loci, was associated with PCOS. Ovarian parameters and anti-Mullerian hormone levels suggest that women with PCOS should have a later age at menopause. The study was a case-control examination of genetic variants associated with age at menopause in a discovery cohort of women with PCOS (n = 485) and controls (n = 407) from Boston recruited from 2003 to 2012. Replication was performed in women from Greece (cases, n = 884 and controls, n = 311). PCOS was defined by the National Institutes of Health criteria in Boston and Greece (n = 783), with additional subjects fulfilling the Rotterdam criteria (hyperandrogenism, polycystic ovary morphology and regular menses) in Greece (n = 101). Controls in Boston and Greece had regular menstrual cycles and no hyperandrogenism. Allele frequencies for variants previously associated with age at menopause were examined in PCOS cases and controls, along with the relationship to quantitative traits. The variant rs11668344-G was associated with decreased risk of PCOS (odds ratio: 0.77 [0.59-0.93]; P = 0.004). There was a strong relationship between the late menopause allele rs12294104-T and increased LH levels (β ± SE; 0.26 ± 0.06; P = 5.2 × 10(-5)) and the LH:FSH ratio (0.28 ± 0.06; P = 2.7 × 10(-6)). The minor allele at rs10852344-T was associated with smaller ovarian volume (-0.16 ± 0.05; P = 0.0012). A genetic risk score calculated from 16 independent variants associated with age at menopause was also associated with PCOS (P menopause are also associated with risk for PCOS. Further, our data suggest that the relationship between age at menopause and PCOS may be explained, at least in part, by effects on LH levels and follicle number. The data point to opposing influences of the genetic variants on both

  6. In Patients with an α-Galactosidase A Variant, Small Nerve Fibre Assessment Cannot Confirm a Diagnosis of Fabry Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Tol, Linda; Verhamme, Camiel; van Schaik, Ivo N.; van der Kooi, Anneke J.; Hollak, Carla E. M.; Biegstraaten, Marieke

    2016-01-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by an α-galactosidase A enzyme deficiency due to pathogenic variants in the α-galactosidase A gene (GLA). An increasing number of individuals with a GLA variant, but without characteristic FD features, are identified. A definite

  7. Defining ‘good health’

    OpenAIRE

    Erdman, Susan E

    2016-01-01

    We all want to live a long life with ‘good health’. But what does that really mean? Clinicians often define ‘good health’ as the absence of disease. Indeed, modern biomedical research focuses on finding remedies for specific ailments, that, when absent, will yield ‘good health’.

  8. Defined medium for Moraxella bovis.

    OpenAIRE

    Juni, E; Heym, G A

    1986-01-01

    A defined medium (medium MB) for Moraxella bovis was formulated. Nineteen strains grew well on medium MB. One strain was auxotrophic for asparagine, and another was auxotrophic for methionine. Strains of M. equi and M. lacunata also grew on medium MB. All strains had an absolute requirement for thiamine and were stimulated by or actually required the other growth factors in the medium.

  9. Defining and Differentiating the Makerspace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dousay, Tonia A.

    2017-01-01

    Many resources now punctuate the maker movement landscape. However, some schools and communities still struggle to understand this burgeoning movement. How do we define these spaces and differentiate them from previous labs and shops? Through a multidimensional framework, stakeholders should consider how the structure, access, staffing, and tools…

  10. Indico CONFERENCE: Define the Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Ferreira, Pedro

    2017-01-01

    In this tutorial you are going to learn how to define the programme of a conference in Indico. The program of your conference is divided in different “tracks”. Tracks represent the subject matter of the conference, such as “Online Computing”, “Offline Computing”, and so on.

  11. Defined by Word and Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisco, Nicole D.

    2010-01-01

    In the author's art class, she found that many of her students in an intro art class have some technical skill, but lack the ability to think conceptually. Her goal was to create an innovative project that combined design, painting, and sculpture into a compact unit that asked students how they define themselves. In the process of answering this…

  12. Defining poverty as distinctively human

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    p1243322

    eradicate poverty. 117 heads of state or government attended the World. Summit for Social Development in 1995. At that event the “largest gathering yet of world ..... ostracized or marginalized for whatever reason – as poor people often are – ..... kind of poverty that causes social exclusion only be defined in terms of the.

  13. Defining fitness in evolutionary models

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2008-12-23

    Dec 23, 2008 ... The analysis of evolutionary models requires an appropriate definition for fitness. ..... of dimorphism for dormancy in plants (Cohen 1966). .... yses have assumed nonoverlapping generations (i.e. no age- structure). The solution to defining fitness when the environ- ment is spatially variable and there is a ...

  14. Detection of an Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 2 lipopolysaccharide (LPS) variant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenbaek, E.I.; HovindHaugen, K.

    1996-01-01

    Until now 12 serotypes of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae have been recognized. The specificity of the serotypes reside in the carbohydrate composition of the capsular polysaccharides and lipopolysaccharides (LPS). The LPS of A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 2 is a smooth type LPS with O......-PAGE). The MAI, 102-G02 was directed against an epitope on the O-chain of the LPS and was used to define a new LPS variant of A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 2 (referred to as A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 2X). Investigation of the reactivity of the MAb 102-G02 against an A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 2X field...

  15. Association of Arrhythmia-Related Genetic Variants With Phenotypes Documented in Electronic Medical Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Driest, Sara L; Wells, Quinn S; Stallings, Sarah; Bush, William S; Gordon, Adam; Nickerson, Deborah A; Kim, Jerry H; Crosslin, David R; Jarvik, Gail P; Carrell, David S; Ralston, James D; Larson, Eric B; Bielinski, Suzette J; Olson, Janet E; Ye, Zi; Kullo, Iftikhar J; Abul-Husn, Noura S; Scott, Stuart A; Bottinger, Erwin; Almoguera, Berta; Connolly, John; Chiavacci, Rosetta; Hakonarson, Hakon; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J; Pan, Vivian; Persell, Stephen D; Smith, Maureen; Chisholm, Rex L; Kitchner, Terrie E; He, Max M; Brilliant, Murray H; Wallace, John R; Doheny, Kimberly F; Shoemaker, M Benjamin; Li, Rongling; Manolio, Teri A; Callis, Thomas E; Macaya, Daniela; Williams, Marc S; Carey, David; Kapplinger, Jamie D; Ackerman, Michael J; Ritchie, Marylyn D; Denny, Joshua C; Roden, Dan M

    2016-01-05

    Large-scale DNA sequencing identifies incidental rare variants in established Mendelian disease genes, but the frequency of related clinical phenotypes in unselected patient populations is not well established. Phenotype data from electronic medical records (EMRs) may provide a resource to assess the clinical relevance of rare variants. To determine the clinical phenotypes from EMRs for individuals with variants designated as pathogenic by expert review in arrhythmia susceptibility genes. This prospective cohort study included 2022 individuals recruited for nonantiarrhythmic drug exposure phenotypes from October 5, 2012, to September 30, 2013, for the Electronic Medical Records and Genomics Network Pharmacogenomics project from 7 US academic medical centers. Variants in SCN5A and KCNH2, disease genes for long QT and Brugada syndromes, were assessed for potential pathogenicity by 3 laboratories with ion channel expertise and by comparison with the ClinVar database. Relevant phenotypes were determined from EMRs, with data available from 2002 (or earlier for some sites) through September 10, 2014. One or more variants designated as pathogenic in SCN5A or KCNH2. Arrhythmia or electrocardiographic (ECG) phenotypes defined by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) codes, ECG data, and manual EMR review. Among 2022 study participants (median age, 61 years [interquartile range, 56-65 years]; 1118 [55%] female; 1491 [74%] white), a total of 122 rare (minor allele frequency <0.5%) nonsynonymous and splice-site variants in 2 arrhythmia susceptibility genes were identified in 223 individuals (11% of the study cohort). Forty-two variants in 63 participants were designated potentially pathogenic by at least 1 laboratory or ClinVar, with low concordance across laboratories (Cohen κ = 0.26). An ICD-9 code for arrhythmia was found in 11 of 63 (17%) variant carriers vs 264 of 1959 (13%) of those without variants (difference, +4%; 95% CI, -5% to +13

  16. Association of arrhythmia-related genetic variants with phenotypes documented in electronic medical records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Driest, Sara L.; Wells, Quinn S.; Stallings, Sarah; Bush, William S.; Gordon, Adam; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Kim, Jerry H.; Crosslin, David R.; Jarvik, Gail P.; Carrell, David S.; Ralston, James; Larson, Eric B.; Bielinski, Suzette J.; Olson, Janet E.; Ye, Zi; Kullo, Iftikhar J.; Abul-Husn, Noura S.; Scott, Stuart A.; Bottinger, Erwin; Almoguera, Berta; Connolly, John; Chiavacci, Rosetta; Hakonarson, Hakon; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J.; Pan, Vivian; Persell, Stephen D.; Smith, Maureen; Chisholm, Rex L.; Kitchner, Terrie E.; He, Max M.; Brilliant, Murray H.; Wallace, John R.; Doheny, Kimberly F.; Shoemaker, M. Benjamin; Li, Rongling; Manolio, Teri A.; Callis, Thomas E.; Macaya, Daniela; Williams, Marc S.; Carey, David; Kapplinger, Jamie D.; Ackerman, Michael J.; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Denny, Joshua C.; Roden, Dan M.

    2016-01-01

    Importance Large-scale DNA sequencing identifies incidental rare variants in established Mendelian disease genes, but the frequency of related clinical phenotypes in unselected patient populations is not well established. Phenotype data from electronic medical records may provide a resource to assess the clinical relevance of rare variants. Objective To determine the clinical phenotypes from electronic medical records in individuals with variants designated as pathogenic by expert review in arrhythmia susceptibility genes. Design, Setting and Participants This prospective cohort study included 2022 individuals recruited for non-antiarrhythmic drug exposure phenotypes from 10/5/2012 to 9/30/2013 for the Electronic Medical Records and Genomics Network Pharmacogenomics project from seven US academic medical centers. Variants in SCN5A and KCNH2, disease genes for long QT and Brugada Syndromes, were assessed for potential pathogenicity by three laboratories with ion channel expertise and the ClinVar database. Relevant phenotypes were determined from electronic medical records, with data available through 9/10/2014. Exposure One or more variants designated as pathogenic in SCN5A or KCNH2. Main Outcome Measures Arrhythmia or electrocardiographic (ECG) phenotypes defined by ICD9 codes, ECG data, and manual electronic medical record review. Results Among 2022 study participants (median age, 61 years [interquartile range, 56–65 years]; 1118 [55%] female; 1491 [74%] white), a total of 122 rare (minor allele frequency <0.5%) nonsynonymous and splice-site variants in 2 arrhythmia susceptibility genes were identified in 223 individuals (11% of the study cohort). Forty-two variants in 63 participants were designated potentially pathogenic by at least 1 laboratory or ClinVar, with low concordance across laboratories (Cohen κ = 0.26). An ICD-9 code for arrhythmia was found in 11 of 63 (17%) variant carriers vs 264 of 1959 (13%) of those without variants (difference, +4%; 95% CI

  17. Linear analysis of rotationally invariant, radially variant tomographic imaging systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huesmann, R.H.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a method to analyze the linear imaging characteristics of rotationally invariant, radially variant tomographic imaging systems using singular value decomposition (SVD). When the projection measurements from such a system are assumed to be samples from independent and identically distributed multi-normal random variables, the best estimate of the emission intensity is given by the unweighted least squares estimator. The noise amplification of this estimator is inversely proportional to the singular values of the normal matrix used to model projection and backprojection. After choosing an acceptable noise amplification, the new method can determine the number of parameters and hence the number of pixels that should be estimated from data acquired from an existing system with a fixed number of angles and projection bins. Conversely, for the design of a new system, the number of angles and projection bins necessary for a given number of pixels and noise amplification can be determined. In general, computing the SVD of the projection normal matrix has cubic computational complexity. However, the projection normal matrix for this class of rotationally invariant, radially variant systems has a block circulant form. A fast parallel algorithm to compute the SVD of this block circulant matrix makes the singular value analysis practical by asymptotically reducing the computation complexity of the method by a multiplicative factor equal to the number of angles squared

  18. Common and rare gene variants affecting plasma LDL cholesterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, John R; Hooper, Amanda J

    2008-02-01

    The plasma level of LDL cholesterol is clinically important and genetically complex. LDL cholesterol levels are in large part determined by the activity of LDL receptors (LDLR) in the liver. Autosomal dominant familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH) - with its high LDL cholesterol levels, xanthomas, and premature atherosclerosis - is caused by mutations in either the LDLR or in APOB - the protein in LDL recognised by the LDLR. A third, rare form - autosomal recessive hypercholesterolaemia - arises from mutations in the gene encoding an adaptor protein involved in the internalisation of the LDLR. A fourth variant of inherited hypercholesterolaemia was recently found to be associated with missense mutations in PCSK9, which encodes a serine protease that degrades LDLR. Whereas the gain-of-function mutations in PCSK9 are rare, a spectrum of more frequent loss-of-function mutations in PCSK9 associated with low LDL cholesterol levels has been identified in selected populations and could protect against coronary heart disease. Heterozygous familial hypobetalipoproteinaemia (FHBL) - with its low LDL cholesterol levels and resistance to atherosclerosis - is caused by mutations in APOB. In contrast to other inherited forms of severe hypocholesterolaemia such as abetalipoproteinaemia - caused by mutations in MTP - and homozygous FHBL, a deficiency of PCSK9 appears to be benign. Rare variants of NPC1L1, the gene encoding the putative intestinal cholesterol receptor, have shown more modest effects on plasma LDL cholesterol than PCSK9 variants, similar in magnitude to the effect of common APOE variants. Taken together, these findings indicate that heritable variation in plasma LDL cholesterol is conferred by sequence variation in various loci, with a small number of common and multiple rare gene variants contributing to the phenotype.

  19. Detecting rare variants for quantitative traits using nuclear families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wei; Shugart, Yin Yao

    2012-01-01

    With the advent of sequencing technology opening up a new era of personal genome sequencing, huge amounts of rare variant data have suddenly become available to researchers seeking genetic variants related to human complex disorders. There is an urgent need for the development of novel statistical methods to analyze rare variants in a statistically powerful manner. While a number of statistical tests have already been developed to analyze collapsed rare variants identified by association tests in case-control studies, to date, only two FBAT tests-for-rare (described in the updated FBAT version v2.0.4) have applied collapsing methods analogously in family-based designs. For further research in this area, this study aims to introduce three new beta-determined weight tests for detecting rare variants for quantitative traits in nuclear families. In addition to evaluating the performance of these new methods, it also evaluates that of the two FBAT tests-for-rare, using extensive simulations of situations with and without linkage disequilibrium. Results from these simulations suggest that the four tests using beta-determined weights outperform the two collapsing methods used in FBAT (-v0 and -v1). In addition, both the linear combination method (detailed in the FBAT menu v2.0.4) and the multiple regression method (mixing LASSO and Ridge penalties) performed better than the other two beta-determined weight tests we proposed. Following testing and evaluation, we submitted four new beta-determined weight methods of statistical analysis in a computer program to the Comprehensive R Archive Network (CRAN) for general use. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. IEEE Standard for Floating Point Numbers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    This is a conservative definition used by industry. In MATLAB, machine epsilon is as defined above. However, academics define machine epsilon as the upper bound of the relative error when numbers are rounded. Thus, for 32-bit floating point numbers, the machine epsilon is 2–23/2. 5.96 ×10–8. The machine epsilon is ...

  1. Biomarkers: a new approach to behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Matarrubia, M; Matías-Guiu, J A; Moreno-Ramos, T; Matías-Guiu, J

    2015-01-01

    Lobar frontotemporal degeneration (FTLD) encompasses a group of molecular disease defined by the deposition of an abnormal protein in the central nervous system. Behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) is the most frequent clinical presentation of FTLD. The past two decades of research have contributed to a better understanding of this entity, which may be the first manifestation in many different neurodegenerative disorders. We reviewed correlations between clinical, pathological, and genetic findings and the main disease biomarkers of FTLD, with particular interest in bvFTD. Anatomical pathology findings in FTLD are heterogeneous and the syndrome is not associated with any one specific histopathological type. Promising available biomarkers include structural and functional neuroimaging techniques and biochemical and genetic biomarkers. Disease-modifying drugs designed for specific molecular targets that are implicated in FTLD pathogenesis are being developed. BvFTD is a frequent cause of dementia. Of all the clinical variants of FTLD, behavioural variant is the one in which establishing a correlation between clinical and pathological signs is the most problematic. A biomarker evaluation may help predict the underlying pathology; this approach, in conjunction with the development of disease-modifying drugs, offers new therapeutic possibilities. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. Defining mental disorder. Exploring the 'natural function' approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varga Somogy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Due to several socio-political factors, to many psychiatrists only a strictly objective definition of mental disorder, free of value components, seems really acceptable. In this paper, I will explore a variant of such an objectivist approach to defining metal disorder, natural function objectivism. Proponents of this approach make recourse to the notion of natural function in order to reach a value-free definition of mental disorder. The exploration of Christopher Boorse's 'biostatistical' account of natural function (1 will be followed an investigation of the 'hybrid naturalism' approach to natural functions by Jerome Wakefield (2. In the third part, I will explore two proposals that call into question the whole attempt to define mental disorder (3. I will conclude that while 'natural function objectivism' accounts fail to provide the backdrop for a reliable definition of mental disorder, there is no compelling reason to conclude that a definition cannot be achieved.

  3. Defining mental disorder. Exploring the 'natural function' approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, Somogy

    2011-01-21

    Due to several socio-political factors, to many psychiatrists only a strictly objective definition of mental disorder, free of value components, seems really acceptable. In this paper, I will explore a variant of such an objectivist approach to defining metal disorder, natural function objectivism. Proponents of this approach make recourse to the notion of natural function in order to reach a value-free definition of mental disorder. The exploration of Christopher Boorse's 'biostatistical' account of natural function (1) will be followed an investigation of the 'hybrid naturalism' approach to natural functions by Jerome Wakefield (2). In the third part, I will explore two proposals that call into question the whole attempt to define mental disorder (3). I will conclude that while 'natural function objectivism' accounts fail to provide the backdrop for a reliable definition of mental disorder, there is no compelling reason to conclude that a definition cannot be achieved.

  4. Conditionally replicating HIV and SIV variants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Das, Atze T.; Berkhout, Ben

    2016-01-01

    Conditionally replicating human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) variants that can be switched on and off at will are attractive tools for HIV and SIV research. We constructed HIV and SIV variants in which the natural transcription control mechanism was replaced

  5. Adaptive ridge regression for rare variant detection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haimao Zhan

    Full Text Available It is widely believed that both common and rare variants contribute to the risks of common diseases or complex traits and the cumulative effects of multiple rare variants can explain a significant proportion of trait variances. Advances in high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies allow us to genotype rare causal variants and investigate the effects of such rare variants on complex traits. We developed an adaptive ridge regression method to analyze the collective effects of multiple variants in the same gene or the same functional unit. Our model focuses on continuous trait and incorporates covariate factors to remove potential confounding effects. The proposed method estimates and tests multiple rare variants collectively but does not depend on the assumption of same direction of each rare variant effect. Compared with the Bayesian hierarchical generalized linear model approach, the state-of-the-art method of rare variant detection, the proposed new method is easy to implement, yet it has higher statistical power. Application of the new method is demonstrated using the well-known data from the Dallas Heart Study.

  6. Adaptive ridge regression for rare variant detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Haimao; Xu, Shizhong

    2012-01-01

    It is widely believed that both common and rare variants contribute to the risks of common diseases or complex traits and the cumulative effects of multiple rare variants can explain a significant proportion of trait variances. Advances in high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies allow us to genotype rare causal variants and investigate the effects of such rare variants on complex traits. We developed an adaptive ridge regression method to analyze the collective effects of multiple variants in the same gene or the same functional unit. Our model focuses on continuous trait and incorporates covariate factors to remove potential confounding effects. The proposed method estimates and tests multiple rare variants collectively but does not depend on the assumption of same direction of each rare variant effect. Compared with the Bayesian hierarchical generalized linear model approach, the state-of-the-art method of rare variant detection, the proposed new method is easy to implement, yet it has higher statistical power. Application of the new method is demonstrated using the well-known data from the Dallas Heart Study.

  7. Criteria to define HLA haplotype loss in human solid tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramal, LM; van der Zwan, AW; Collado, A; Lopez-Nevot, MA; Tilanus, M; Garrido, F

    Short tandem repeat (STR) markers are currently used to define loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of genes and chromosomes in tumors. Chromosome 6 and chromosome 15 STR markers are applied to define loss of HLA and related genes (e.g. TAP and beta(2)m) The number of STR identified in the HLA region is

  8. Local binary patterns new variants and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Jain, Lakhmi; Nanni, Loris; Lumini, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    This book introduces Local Binary Patterns (LBP), arguably one of the most powerful texture descriptors, and LBP variants. This volume provides the latest reviews of the literature and a presentation of some of the best LBP variants by researchers at the forefront of textual analysis research and research on LBP descriptors and variants. The value of LBP variants is illustrated with reported experiments using many databases representing a diversity of computer vision applications in medicine, biometrics, and other areas. There is also a chapter that provides an excellent theoretical foundation for texture analysis and LBP in particular. A special section focuses on LBP and LBP variants in the area of face recognition, including thermal face recognition. This book will be of value to anyone already in the field as well as to those interested in learning more about this powerful family of texture descriptors.

  9. Minority Variants of Drug-Resistant HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianella, Sara; Richman, Douglas D.

    2010-01-01

    Minor drug-resistant variants exist in every HIV-infected patient. Since these minority variants are usually present at very low levels, they cannot be detected and quantified using conventional genotypic and phenotypic tests. Recently, several assays have been developed to characterize these low-abundance drug-resistant variants in the large genetically complex population present in every HIV-infected individual. The most important issue is, what results generated by these assays can predict clinical or treatment outcomes and might guide patient management in clinical practice. Cutoff-values for the detection of these low-abundance viral variants that predict increased risk of treatment failure should be determined. These thresholds may be specific for each mutation and treatment regimen. In this review we summarize the attributes and limitations of the currently available detection assays and review the existing information about both acquired and transmitted drug resistant minority variants. PMID:20649427

  10. Fundamental Characteristics of Industrial Variant Specification Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Benjamin Loer; Hvam, Lars

    2004-01-01

    This paper focuses on the operational task of creating customised variants of industrial specifications (e.g. drawings, routings and bill-of-materials). Rooted in a lack of existing literature on the subject the paper describes the nature of variant specification systems. It introduces some...... fundamental concepts related to this task, which are relevant to understand for academia and practitioners working with the subject. This is done through a description of variant specification tasks and typical aspects of system solutions. To support the description of variant specification tasks and systems...... examples. In general the paper discusses an important focus area within mass customization and build-to-order production: the nature of industrial variant specification systems....

  11. AIDS defining disease: Disseminated cryptococcosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roshan Anupama

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Disseminated cryptococcosis is one of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome defining criteria and the most common cause of life threatening meningitis. Disseminated lesions in the skin manifest as papules or nodules that mimic molluscum contagiosum (MC. We report here a human immunodeficiency virus positive patient who presented with MC like lesions. Disseminated cryptococcosis was confirmed by India ink preparation and histopathology. The condition of the patient improved with amphotercin B.

  12. How to define green adjuvants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Bert; Steurbaut, Walter; Spanoghe, Pieter

    2012-08-01

    The concept 'green adjuvants' is difficult to define. This paper formulates an answer based on two approaches. Starting from the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) definition for green chemistry, production-based and environmental-impact-based definitions for green adjuvants are proposed. According to the production-based approach, adjuvants are defined as green if they are manufactured using renewable raw materials as much as possible while making efficient use of energy, preferably renewable energy. According to the environmental impact approach, adjuvants are defined as green (1) if they have a low human and environmental impact, (2) if they do not increase active ingredient environmental mobility and/or toxicity to humans and non-target organisms, (3) if they do not increase the exposure to these active substances and (4) if they lower the impact of formulated pesticides by enhancing the performance of active ingredients, thus potentially lowering the required dosage of active ingredients. Based on both approaches, a tentative definition for 'green adjuvants' is given, and future research and legislation directions are set out. Copyright © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. What Defines the "Kingdom" Fungi?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Thomas A; Leonard, Guy; Wideman, Jeremy G

    2017-06-01

    The application of environmental DNA techniques and increased genome sequencing of microbial diversity, combined with detailed study of cellular characters, has consistently led to the reexamination of our understanding of the tree of life. This has challenged many of the definitions of taxonomic groups, especially higher taxonomic ranks such as eukaryotic kingdoms. The Fungi is an example of a kingdom which, together with the features that define it and the taxa that are grouped within it, has been in a continual state of flux. In this article we aim to summarize multiple lines of data pertinent to understanding the early evolution and definition of the Fungi. These include ongoing cellular and genomic comparisons that, we will argue, have generally undermined all attempts to identify a synapomorphic trait that defines the Fungi. This article will also summarize ongoing work focusing on taxon discovery, combined with phylogenomic analysis, which has identified novel groups that lie proximate/adjacent to the fungal clade-wherever the boundary that defines the Fungi may be. Our hope is that, by summarizing these data in the form of a discussion, we can illustrate the ongoing efforts to understand what drove the evolutionary diversification of fungi.

  14. Impact of type 2 diabetes susceptibility variants on quantitative glycemic traits reveals mechanistic heterogeneity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimas, Antigone S; Lagou, Vasiliki; Barker, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Patients with established type 2 diabetes display both beta-cell dysfunction and insulin resistance. To define fundamental processes leading to the diabetic state, we examined the relationship between type 2 diabetes risk variants at 37 established susceptibility loci and indices of proinsulin pr...

  15. Systematic comparison of variant calling pipelines using gold standard personal exome variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Sohyun; Kim, Eiru; Lee, Insuk; Marcotte, Edward M

    2015-12-07

    The success of clinical genomics using next generation sequencing (NGS) requires the accurate and consistent identification of personal genome variants. Assorted variant calling methods have been developed, which show low concordance between their calls. Hence, a systematic comparison of the variant callers could give important guidance to NGS-based clinical genomics. Recently, a set of high-confident variant calls for one individual (NA12878) has been published by the Genome in a Bottle (GIAB) consortium, enabling performance benchmarking of different variant calling pipelines. Based on the gold standard reference variant calls from GIAB, we compared the performance of thirteen variant calling pipelines, testing combinations of three read aligners--BWA-MEM, Bowtie2, and Novoalign--and four variant callers--Genome Analysis Tool Kit HaplotypeCaller (GATK-HC), Samtools mpileup, Freebayes and Ion Proton Variant Caller (TVC), for twelve data sets for the NA12878 genome sequenced by different platforms including Illumina2000, Illumina2500, and Ion Proton, with various exome capture systems and exome coverage. We observed different biases toward specific types of SNP genotyping errors by the different variant callers. The results of our study provide useful guidelines for reliable variant identification from deep sequencing of personal genomes.

  16. Binary morphology with spatially variant structuring elements: algorithm and architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedberg, Hugo; Dokladal, Petr; Owall, Viktor

    2009-03-01

    Mathematical morphology with spatially variant structuring elements outperforms translation-invariant structuring elements in various applications and has been studied in the literature over the years. However, supporting a variable structuring element shape imposes an overwhelming computational complexity, dramatically increasing with the size of the structuring element. Limiting the supported class of structuring elements to rectangles has allowed for a fast algorithm to be developed, which is efficient in terms of number of operations per pixel, has a low memory requirement, and a low latency. These properties make this algorithm useful in both software and hardware implementations, not only for spatially variant, but also translation-invariant morphology. This paper also presents a dedicated hardware architecture intended to be used as an accelerator in embedded system applications, with corresponding implementation results when targeted for both field programmable gate arrays and application specific integrated circuits.

  17. The role of common genetic variants in atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paludan-Muller, Christian; Svendsen, Jesper H.; Olesen, Morten S.

    2016-01-01

    . The pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for AF are still far from completely understood, and it is assumed that this arrhythmia represents a complex interplay of genetic predispositions, arrhythmogenic contributors such as electrolytes and inflammatory stimuli as well as contributions from concomitant cardiac......This review focuses on the genetic basis of atrial fibrillation (AF) and the role of variants in the susceptibility of developing the disease. AF is the most common cardiac arrhythmia affecting 1-2% of the general population. Studies in the last decade have demonstrated that AF, and in particular...... lone AF, has a substantial genetic component. A number of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have indicated that common genetic variants, more precisely the so called single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are associated with AF. Presently more than 10 genomic regions have been identified using...

  18. Somatic cancer variant curation and harmonization through consensus minimum variant level data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah I. Ritter

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To truly achieve personalized medicine in oncology, it is critical to catalog and curate cancer sequence variants for their clinical relevance. The Somatic Working Group (WG of the Clinical Genome Resource (ClinGen, in cooperation with ClinVar and multiple cancer variant curation stakeholders, has developed a consensus set of minimal variant level data (MVLD. MVLD is a framework of standardized data elements to curate cancer variants for clinical utility. With implementation of MVLD standards, and in a working partnership with ClinVar, we aim to streamline the somatic variant curation efforts in the community and reduce redundancy and time burden for the interpretation of cancer variants in clinical practice. Methods We developed MVLD through a consensus approach by i reviewing clinical actionability interpretations from institutions participating in the WG, ii conducting extensive literature search of clinical somatic interpretation schemas, and iii survey of cancer variant web portals. A forthcoming guideline on cancer variant interpretation, from the Association of Molecular Pathology (AMP, can be incorporated into MVLD. Results Along with harmonizing standardized terminology for allele interpretive and descriptive fields that are collected by many databases, the MVLD includes unique fields for cancer variants such as Biomarker Class, Therapeutic Context and Effect. In addition, MVLD includes recommendations for controlled semantics and ontologies. The Somatic WG is collaborating with ClinVar to evaluate MVLD use for somatic variant submissions. ClinVar is an open and centralized repository where sequencing laboratories can report summary-level variant data with clinical significance, and ClinVar accepts cancer variant data. Conclusions We expect the use of the MVLD to streamline clinical interpretation of cancer variants, enhance interoperability among multiple redundant curation efforts, and increase submission of

  19. Number-unconstrained quantum sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Morgan W.

    2017-12-01

    Quantum sensing is commonly described as a constrained optimization problem: maximize the information gained about an unknown quantity using a limited number of particles. Important sensors including gravitational wave interferometers and some atomic sensors do not appear to fit this description, because there is no external constraint on particle number. Here, we develop the theory of particle-number-unconstrained quantum sensing, and describe how optimal particle numbers emerge from the competition of particle-environment and particle-particle interactions. We apply the theory to optical probing of an atomic medium modeled as a resonant, saturable absorber, and observe the emergence of well-defined finite optima without external constraints. The results contradict some expectations from number-constrained quantum sensing and show that probing with squeezed beams can give a large sensitivity advantage over classical strategies when each is optimized for particle number.

  20. Large-scale analyses of common and rare variants identify 12 new loci associated with atrial fibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christophersen, Ingrid E.; Rienstra, Michiel; Roselli, Carolina; Yin, Xiaoyan; Geelhoed, Bastiaan; Barnard, John; Lin, Honghuang; Arking, Dan E.; Smith, Albert V.; Albert, Christine M.; Chaffin, Mark; Tucker, Nathan R.; Li, Molong; Klarin, Derek; Bihlmeyer, Nathan A; Low, Siew-Kee; Weeke, Peter E.; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Smith, J. Gustav; Brody, Jennifer A.; Niemeijer, Maartje N.; Dörr, Marcus; Trompet, Stella; Huffman, Jennifer; Gustafsson, Stefan; Schurman, Claudia; Kleber, Marcus E.; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Seppälä, Ilkka; Malik, Rainer; Horimoto, Andrea R. V. R.; Perez, Marco; Sinisalo, Juha; Aeschbacher, Stefanie; Thériault, Sébastien; Yao, Jie; Radmanesh, Farid; Weiss, Stefan; Teumer, Alexander; Choi, Seung Hoan; Weng, Lu-Chen; Clauss, Sebastian; Deo, Rajat; Rader, Daniel J.; Shah, Svati; Sun, Albert; Hopewell, Jemma C.; Debette, Stephanie; Chauhan, Ganesh; Yang, Qiong; Worrall, Bradford B.; Paré, Guillaume; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Hagemeijer, Yanick P.; Verweij, Niek; Siland, Joylene E.; Kubo, Michiaki; Smith, Jonathan D.; Van Wagoner, David R.; Bis, Joshua C.; Perz, Siegfried; Psaty, Bruce M.; Ridker, Paul M.; Magnani, Jared W.; Harris, Tamara B.; Launer, Lenore J.; Shoemaker, M. Benjamin; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Haessler, Jeffrey; Bartz, Traci M.; Waldenberger, Melanie; Lichtner, Peter; Arendt, Marina; Krieger, Jose E.; Kähönen, Mika; Risch, Lorenz; Mansur, Alfredo J.; Peters, Annette; Smith, Blair H.; Lind, Lars; Scott, Stuart A.; Lu, Yingchang; Bottinger, Erwin B.; Hernesniemi, Jussi; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Wong, Jorge; Huang, Jie; Eskola, Markku; Morris, Andrew P.; Ford, Ian; Reiner, Alex P.; Delgado, Graciela; Chen, Lin Y.; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Sandhu, Roopinder K.; Li, Man; Boerwinkle, Eric; Eisele, Lewin; Lannfelt, Lars; Rost, Natalia; Anderson, Christopher D.; Taylor, Kent D.; Campbell, Archie; Magnusson, Patrik K.; Porteous, David; Hocking, Lynne J.; Vlachopoulou, Efthymia; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Nikus, Kjell; Orho-Melander, Marju; Hamsten, Anders; Heeringa, Jan; Denny, Joshua C.; Kriebel, Jennifer; Darbar, Dawood; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Shaffer, Christian; Macfarlane, Peter W.; Heilmann, Stefanie; Almgren, Peter; Huang, Paul L.; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Soliman, Elsayed Z.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Hofman, Albert; Franco, Oscar H.; Völker, Uwe; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Sinner, Moritz F.; Lin, Henry J.; Guo, Xiuqing; Dichgans, Martin; Ingelsson, Erik; Kooperberg, Charles; Melander, Olle; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Laurikka, Jari; Conen, David; Rosand, Jonathan; van der Harst, Pim; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Kathiresan, Sekar; Pereira, Alexandre; Jukema, J. Wouter; Hayward, Caroline; Rotter, Jerome I.; März, Winfried; Lehtimäki, Terho; Stricker, Bruno H.; Chung, Mina K.; Felix, Stephan B.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Alonso, Alvaro; Roden, Dan M.; Kääb, Stefan; Chasman, Daniel I.; Heckbert, Susan R.; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Lubitz, Steven A.; Ellinor, Patrick T.

    2017-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation affects more than 33 million people worldwide and increases the risk of stroke, heart failure, and death.1,2 Fourteen genetic loci have been associated with atrial fibrillation in European and Asian ancestry groups.3–7 To further define the genetic basis of atrial fibrillation, we performed large-scale, multi-racial meta-analyses of common and rare variant association studies. The genome-wide association studies (GWAS) included 18,398 individuals with atrial fibrillation and 91,536 referents; the exome-wide association studies (ExWAS) and rare variant association studies (RVAS) involved 22,806 cases and 132,612 referents. We identified 12 novel genetic loci that exceeded genome-wide significance, implicating genes involved in cardiac electrical and structural remodeling. Our results nearly double the number of known genetic loci for atrial fibrillation, provide insights into the molecular basis of atrial fibrillation, and may facilitate new potential targets for drug discovery.8 PMID:28416818

  1. Defining and Measuring User Experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stage, Jan

    2006-01-01

    User experience is being used to denote what a user goes through while using a computerized system. The concept has gained momentum as a means to distinguish new types of applications such as games and entertainment software from more traditional work-related applications. This paper focuses...... definition of usability to develop the notion of user experience....... on the intrinsic relation between definition and measurement. In the area of usability, this relation has been developed over several years. It is described how usability is defined and measured in contemporary approaches. Based on that, it is discussed to what extent we can employ experience from the conceptual...

  2. Defining Usability of PN Services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolajsen, Hanne Westh; Ahola, Titta; Fleury, Alexandre

    In this deliverable usability and user experience are defined in relation to MAGNET Beyond technologies, and it is described how the main MAGNET Beyond concepts can be evaluated through the involvement of users. The concepts include the new "Activity based communication approach" for interacting...... with the MAGNET Beyond system, as well as the core concepts: Personal Network, Personal Network-Federation, Service Discovery, User Profile Management, Personal Network Management, Privacy and Security and Context Awareness. The overall plans for the final usability evaluation are documented based on the present...

  3. (Re)Defining Salesperson Motivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khusainova, Rushana; de Jong, Ad; Lee, Nick

    2018-01-01

    The construct of motivation is one of the central themes in selling and sales management research. Yet, to-date no review article exists that surveys the construct (both from an extrinsic and intrinsic motivation context), critically evaluates its current status, examines various key challenges...... apparent from the extant research, and suggests new research opportunities based on a thorough review of past work. The authors explore how motivation is defined, major theories underpinning motivation, how motivation has historically been measured, and key methodologies used over time. In addition...

  4. Synthesis of spatially variant lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumpf, Raymond C; Pazos, Javier

    2012-07-02

    It is often desired to functionally grade and/or spatially vary a periodic structure like a photonic crystal or metamaterial, yet no general method for doing this has been offered in the literature. A straightforward procedure is described here that allows many properties of the lattice to be spatially varied at the same time while producing a final lattice that is still smooth and continuous. Properties include unit cell orientation, lattice spacing, fill fraction, and more. This adds many degrees of freedom to a design such as spatially varying the orientation to exploit directional phenomena. The method is not a coordinate transformation technique so it can more easily produce complicated and arbitrary spatial variance. To demonstrate, the algorithm is used to synthesize a spatially variant self-collimating photonic crystal to flow a Gaussian beam around a 90° bend. The performance of the structure was confirmed through simulation and it showed virtually no scattering around the bend that would have arisen if the lattice had defects or discontinuities.

  5. Gauged baryon and lepton numbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foot, R.; Joshi, G.C.; Lew, H.

    1989-01-01

    A possible extension of the Standard Model can be defined by gauging the global baryon and lepton number U(1) symmetries. Gauging baryon and lepton numbers provide a natural framework for the see-saw mechanism in the lepton sector, and the Peccei-Quinn mechanism in the quark sector. Another consequence of this extension is that the usual three generations of fermions are not anomaly free. However the authors consider a wider framework involving the existence of generations with exotic SU(2) L tensor product U(1) Y quantum numbers. This allows them to derive a minimal spectrum of fermions which contain the known quarks and leptons. 12 refs

  6. Number Sense on the Number Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Dawn Marie; Ketterlin Geller, Leanne; Basaraba, Deni

    2018-01-01

    A strong foundation in early number concepts is critical for students' future success in mathematics. Research suggests that visual representations, like a number line, support students' development of number sense by helping them create a mental representation of the order and magnitude of numbers. In addition, explicitly sequencing instruction…

  7. A platform for functional assessment of large variant libraries in mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephany, Jason J.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Sequencing-based, massively parallel genetic assays have revolutionized our ability to quantify the relationship between many genotypes and a phenotype of interest. Unfortunately, variant library expression platforms in mammalian cells are far from ideal, hindering the study of human gene variants in their physiologically relevant cellular contexts. Here, we describe a platform for phenotyping variant libraries in transfectable mammalian cell lines in two steps. First, a landing pad cell line with a genomically integrated, Tet-inducible cassette containing a Bxb1 recombination site is created. Second, a single variant from a library of transfected, promoter-less plasmids is recombined into the landing pad in each cell. Thus, every cell in the recombined pool expresses a single variant, allowing for parallel, sequencing-based assessment of variant effect. We describe a method for incorporating a single landing pad into a defined site of a cell line of interest, and show that our approach can be used generate more than 20 000 recombinant cells in a single experiment. Finally, we use our platform in combination with a sequencing-based assay to explore the N-end rule by simultaneously measuring the effects of all possible N-terminal amino acids on protein expression. PMID:28335006

  8. Certain variants of multipermutohedron ideals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Multipermutohedron ideals have rich combinatorial properties. An explicit combinatorial formula for the multigraded Betti numbers of a multipermutohedron ideal and their Alexander duals are known. Also, the dimension of the Artinian quotient of an Alexander dual of a multipermutohedron ideal is the number of generalized ...

  9. Ultrasonographic imaging of papillary thyroid carcinoma variants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Jung Hee [Dept. of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Ultrasonography (US) is routinely used to evaluate thyroid nodules. The US features of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC), the most common thyroid malignancy, include hypoechogenicity, spiculated/microlobulated margins, microcalcifications, and a nonparallel orientation. However, many PTC variants have been identified, some of which differ from the classic type of PTC in terms of biological behavior and clinical outcomes. This review describes the US features and clinical implications of the variants of PTC. With the introduction of active surveillance replacing immediate biopsy or surgical treatment of indolent, small PTCs, an understanding of the US characteristics of PTC variants will facilitate the individualized management of patients with PTC.

  10. Histological variants of cutaneous Kaposi sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pantanowitz Liron

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This review provides a comprehensive overview of the broad clinicopathologic spectrum of cutaneous Kaposi sarcoma (KS lesions. Variants discussed include: usual KS lesions associated with disease progression (i.e. patch, plaque and nodular stage; morphologic subtypes alluded to in the older literature such as anaplastic and telangiectatic KS, as well as several lymphedematous variants; and numerous recently described variants including hyperkeratotic, keloidal, micronodular, pyogenic granuloma-like, ecchymotic, and intravascular KS. Involuting lesions as a result of treatment related regression are also presented.

  11. Isolation and characterization of variant clones of Chinese hamster cells after treatment with irradiated 5-iodouridine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroda, Y.; Yokoiyama, A.; Kada, T.

    1975-01-01

    Variant clones were isolated from cultured Chinese hamster Don cells after treatment with irradiated 5-iodouridine. The following characters of a primary variant clone, C-11 and a secondary variant clone, C-24 were compared with those of the original clone C-1: colony-forming activity, growth rate in the presence of irradiated and unirradiated 5-iodouridine, distribution of chromosome numbers and cell cohesion. The variant clones C-11 and C-24 were partially resistant to unirradiated 5-iodouridine at lower concentration and C-24 cells were slightly resistant to short-term treatment with irradiated 5-iodouridine. Unlike clones C-1 and C-11, the variant clone C-24 showed no lag phase on growth in 5-iodouridine medium. The modal numbers of the chromosomes of all three clones were 22, like that of normal Chinese hamster diploid cells. Of the three clones, the variant C-24 cells showed the least mutual cohesion and the original C-1 cells showed the most. The possibility that an alteration in cellular membrane might be related to an increase in the resistance to radiosensitizing agents was discussed

  12. Rare-variant association tests in longitudinal studies, with an application to the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zihuai; Lee, Seunggeun; Zhang, Min; Smith, Jennifer A; Guo, Xiuqing; Palmas, Walter; Kardia, Sharon L R; Ionita-Laza, Iuliana; Mukherjee, Bhramar

    2017-12-01

    Over the past few years, an increasing number of studies have identified rare variants that contribute to trait heritability. Due to the extreme rarity of some individual variants, gene-based association tests have been proposed to aggregate the genetic variants within a gene, pathway, or specific genomic region as opposed to a one-at-a-time single variant analysis. In addition, in longitudinal studies, statistical power to detect disease susceptibility rare variants can be improved through jointly testing repeatedly measured outcomes, which better describes the temporal development of the trait of interest. However, usual sandwich/model-based inference for sequencing studies with longitudinal outcomes and rare variants can produce deflated/inflated type I error rate without further corrections. In this paper, we develop a group of tests for rare-variant association based on outcomes with repeated measures. We propose new perturbation methods such that the type I error rate of the new tests is not only robust to misspecification of within-subject correlation, but also significantly improved for variants with extreme rarity in a study with small or moderate sample size. Through extensive simulation studies, we illustrate that substantially higher power can be achieved by utilizing longitudinal outcomes and our proposed finite sample adjustment. We illustrate our methods using data from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis for exploring association of repeated measures of blood pressure with rare and common variants based on exome sequencing data on 6,361 individuals. © 2017 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  13. Generalizability of Established Prostate Cancer Risk Variants in Men of African Ancestry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ying; Signorello, Lisa B.; Strom, Sara S.; Kittles, Rick A.; Rybicki, Benjamin A.; Stanford, Janet L.; Goodman, Phyllis J.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Carpten, John; Casey, Graham; Chu, Lisa; Conti, David V.; Rand, Kristin A.; Diver, W. Ryan; Hennis, Anselm JM; John, Esther M.; Kibel, Adam S.; Klein, Eric A.; Kolb, Suzanne; Le Marchand, Loic; Leske, M. Cristina; Murphy, Adam B.; Neslund-Dudas, Christine; Park, Jong Y.; Pettaway, Curtis; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Gapstur, Susan M.; Zheng, S. Lilly; Wu, Suh-Yuh; Witte, John S.; Xu, Jianfeng; Isaacs, William; Ingles, Sue A.; Hsing, Ann; Easton, Douglas F.; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Chanock, Stephen; Nemesure, Barbara; Blot, William J.; Stram, Daniel O.; Henderson, Brian E.; Haiman, Christopher A.

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified more than eighty risk variants for prostate cancer, mainly in European or Asian populations. The generalizability of these variants in other racial/ethnic populations needs to be understood before the loci can be utilized widely in risk modeling. In this study, we examined 82 previously reported risk variants in 4,853 prostate cancer cases and 4,678 controls of African ancestry. We performed association testing for each variant using logistic regression adjusted for age, study, and global ancestry. Of the 82 known risk variants, 68 (83%) had effects that were directionally consistent in their association with prostate cancer risk and 30 (37%) were significantly associated with risk at p<0.05, with the most statistically significant variants being rs116041037 (p=3.7×10-26) and rs6983561 (p=1.1×10-16) at 8q24, as well as rs7210100 (p=5.4×10-8) at 17q21. By exploring each locus in search of better markers, the number of variants that captured risk in men of African ancestry (p<0.05) increased from 30 (37%) to 44 (54%). An aggregate score comprised of these 44 markers was strongly associated with prostate cancer risk (per-allele odds ratio (OR)=1.12, p=7.3×10-98). In summary, the consistent directions of effects for the vast majority of variants in men of African ancestry indicate common functional alleles that are shared across populations. Further exploration of these susceptibility loci is needed to identify the underlying biologically relevant variants to improve prostate cancer risk modeling in populations of African ancestry. PMID:25044450

  14. Pseudomonas aeruginosa induces pigment production and enhances virulence in a white phenotypic variant of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonic, Vlado; Stojadinovic, Alexander; Zhang, Binxue; Izadjoo, Mina J; Alavi, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Staphyloxanthin is a virulence factor which protects Staphylococcus aureus in stress conditions. We isolated two pigment variants of S. aureus and one strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from a single wound infection. S. aureus variants displayed white and yellow colony phenotypes. The sequence of the operons for staphyloxanthin synthesis indicated that coding and promoter regions were identical between the two pigment variants. Quorum sensing controls pigment synthesis in some bacteria. It is also shown that P. aeruginosa quorum-sensing molecules affect S. aureus transcription. We explored whether the co-infecting P. aeruginosa can affect pigment production in the white S. aureus variant. In co-culture experiments between the white variants and a selected number of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, only P. aeruginosa induced pigment production in the white variant. Gene expression analysis of the white variant did not indicate upregulation of the crtM and other genes known to be involved in pigment production (sigB, sarA, farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase gene [FPP-synthase], hfq). In contrast, transcription of the catalase gene was significantly upregulated after co-culture. P. aeruginosa-induced pigment synthesis and catalase upregulation correlated with increased resistance to polymyxin B, hydrogen peroxide, and the intracellular environment of macrophages. Our data indicate the presence of silent but functional staphyloxanthin synthesis machinery in a white phenotypic variant of S. aureus which is activated by a co-infecting P. aeruginosa via inter-species communication. Another S. aureus virulence factor, catalase is also induced by this co-infecting bacterium. The resulting phenotypic changes are directly correlated with resistance of the white variant to stressful conditions.

  15. Defining Life: Synthesis and Conclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayon, Jean

    2010-04-01

    The first part of the paper offers philosophical landmarks on the general issue of defining life. §1 defends that the recognition of “life” has always been and remains primarily an intuitive process, for the scientist as for the layperson. However we should not expect, then, to be able to draw a definition from this original experience, because our cognitive apparatus has not been primarily designed for this. §2 is about definitions in general. Two kinds of definition should be carefully distinguished: lexical definitions (based upon current uses of a word), and stipulative or legislative definitions, which deliberately assign a meaning to a word, for the purpose of clarifying scientific or philosophical arguments. The present volume provides examples of these two kinds of definitions. §3 examines three traditional philosophical definitions of life, all of which have been elaborated prior to the emergence of biology as a specific scientific discipline: life as animation (Aristotle), life as mechanism, and life as organization (Kant). All three concepts constitute a common heritage that structures in depth a good deal of our cultural intuitions and vocabulary any time we try to think about “life”. The present volume offers examples of these three concepts in contemporary scientific discourse. The second part of the paper proposes a synthesis of the major debates developed in this volume. Three major questions have been discussed. A first issue (§4) is whether we should define life or not, and why. Most authors are skeptical about the possibility of defining life in a strong way, although all admit that criteria are useful in contexts such as exobiology, artificial life and the origins of life. §5 examines the possible kinds of definitions of life presented in the volume. Those authors who have explicitly defended that a definition of life is needed, can be classified into two categories. The first category (or standard view) refers to two conditions

  16. Detection of inferred CCR5- and CXCR4-using HIV-1 variants and evolutionary intermediates using ultra-deep pyrosequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelien M Bunnik

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of CXCR4-using human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 variants is associated with accelerated disease progression. CXCR4-using variants are believed to evolve from CCR5-using variants, but due to the extremely low frequency at which transitional intermediate variants are often present, the kinetics and mutational pathways involved in this process have been difficult to study and are therefore poorly understood. Here, we used ultra-deep sequencing of the V3 loop of the viral envelope in combination with the V3-based coreceptor prediction tools PSSM(NSI/SI and geno2pheno([coreceptor] to detect HIV-1 variants during the transition from CCR5- to CXCR4-usage. We analyzed PBMC and serum samples obtained from eight HIV-1-infected individuals at three-month intervals up to one year prior to the first phenotypic detection of CXCR4-using variants in the MT-2 assay. Between 3,482 and 10,521 reads were generated from each sample. In all individuals, V3 sequences of predicted CXCR4-using HIV-1 were detected at least three months prior to phenotypic detection of CXCR4-using variants in the MT-2 assay. Subsequent analysis of the genetic relationships of these V3 sequences using minimum spanning trees revealed that the transition in coreceptor usage followed a stepwise mutational pathway involving sequential intermediate variants, which were generally present at relatively low frequencies compared to the major predicted CCR5- and CXCR4-using variants. In addition, we observed differences between individuals with respect to the number of predicted CXCR4-using variants, the diversity among major predicted CCR5-using variants, and the presence or absence of intermediate variants with discordant phenotype predictions. These results provide the first detailed description of the mutational pathways in V3 during the transition from CCR5- to CXCR4-usage in natural HIV-1 infection.

  17. RAGE splicing variants in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterenczak, Katharina Anna; Nolte, Ingo; Murua Escobar, Hugo

    2013-01-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a multiligand receptor of environmental stressors which plays key roles in pathophysiological processes, including immune/inflammatory disorders, Alzheimer's disease, diabetic arteriosclerosis, tumorigenesis, and metastasis. Besides the full-length RAGE protein in humans nearly 20 natural occurring RAGE splicing variants were described on mRNA and protein level. These naturally occurring isoforms are characterized by either N-terminally or C-terminally truncations and are discussed as possible regulators of the full-length RAGE receptor either by competitive ligand binding or by displacing the full-length protein in the membrane. Accordingly, expression deregulations of the naturally occurring isoforms were supposed to have significant effect on RAGE-mediated disorders. Thereby the soluble C-truncated RAGE isoforms present in plasma and tissues are the mostly focused isoforms in research and clinics. Deregulations of the circulating levels of soluble RAGE forms were reported in several RAGE-associated pathological disorders including for example atherosclerosis, diabetes, renal failure, Alzheimer's disease, and several cancer types. Regarding other mammalian species, the canine RAGE gene showed high similarities to the corresponding human structures indicating RAGE to be evolutionary highly conserved between both species. Similar to humans the canine RAGE showed a complex and extensive splicing activity leading to a manifold pattern of RAGE isoforms. Due to the similarities seen in several canine and human diseases-including cancer-comparative structural and functional analyses allow the development of RAGE and ligand-specific therapeutic approaches beneficial for human and veterinary medicine.

  18. Network Coded Software Defined Networking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krigslund, Jeppe; Hansen, Jonas; Roetter, Daniel Enrique Lucani

    2015-01-01

    incorporate content caching and storage, all of which are key challenges of the future Internet and the upcoming 5G networks. This paper proposes some of the keys behind this intersection and supports it with use cases as well as a an implementation that integrated the Kodo library (NC) into OpenFlow (SDN......Software Defined Networking (SDN) and Network Coding (NC) are two key concepts in networking that have garnered a large attention in recent years. On the one hand, SDN's potential to virtualize services in the Internet allows a large flexibility not only for routing data, but also to manage...... buffering, scheduling, and processing over the network. On the other hand, NC has shown great potential for increasing robustness and performance when deployed on intermediate nodes in the network. This new paradigm changes the dynamics of network protocols, requiring new designs that exploit its potential...

  19. Network Coded Software Defined Networking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jonas; Roetter, Daniel Enrique Lucani; Krigslund, Jeppe

    2015-01-01

    Software defined networking has garnered large attention due to its potential to virtualize services in the Internet, introducing flexibility in the buffering, scheduling, processing, and routing of data in network routers. SDN breaks the deadlock that has kept Internet network protocols stagnant...... for decades, while applications and physical links have evolved. This article advocates for the use of SDN to bring about 5G network services by incorporating network coding (NC) functionalities. The latter constitutes a major leap forward compared to the state-of-the- art store and forward Internet paradigm....... The inherent flexibility of both SDN and NC provides fertile ground to envision more efficient, robust, and secure networking designs, which may also incorporate content caching and storage, all of which are key challenges of the upcoming 5G networks. This article not only proposes the fundamentals...

  20. Defining groundwater age. Chapter 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torgersen, T.; Purtschert, R.; Phillips, F.M.; Plummer, L.N.; Sanford, W.E.; Suckow, A.

    2013-01-01

    This book investigates applications of selected chemical and isotopic substances that can be used to recognize and interpret age information pertaining to ‘old’ groundwater (defined as water that was recharged on a timescale from approximately 1000 to more than 1 000 000 a). However, as discussed below, only estimates of the ‘age’ of water extracted from wells can be inferred. These groundwater age estimates are interpreted from measured concentrations of chemical and isotopic substances in the groundwater. Even then, there are many complicating factors, as discussed in this book. In spite of these limitations, much can be learned about the physics of groundwater flow and about the temporal aspects of groundwater systems from age interpretations of measured concentrations of environmental tracers in groundwater systems. This chapter puts the concept of ‘age’ into context, including its meaning and interpretation, and attempts to provide a unifying usage for the rest of the book.

  1. Inactivation of DNA mismatch repair by variants of uncertain significance in the PMS2 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drost, Mark; Koppejan, Hester; de Wind, Niels

    2013-11-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS) is a common cancer predisposition caused by an inactivating mutation in one of four DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes. Frequently a variant of uncertain significance (VUS), rather than an obviously pathogenic mutation, is identified in one of these genes. The inability to define pathogenicity of such variants precludes targeted healthcare. Here, we have modified a cell-free assay to test VUS in the MMR gene PMS2 for functional activity. We have analyzed nearly all VUS in PMS2 found thus far and describe loss of MMR activity for five, suggesting the applicability of the assay for diagnosis of LS. © 2013 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  2. TREM2 Variants in Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerreiro, Rita; Wojtas, Aleksandra; Bras, Jose; Carrasquillo, Minerva; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Majounie, Elisa; Cruchaga, Carlos; Sassi, Celeste; Kauwe, John S.K.; Younkin, Steven; Hazrati, Lilinaz; Collinge, John; Pocock, Jennifer; Lashley, Tammaryn; Williams, Julie; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Amouyel, Philippe; Goate, Alison; Rademakers, Rosa; Morgan, Kevin; Powell, John; St. George-Hyslop, Peter; Singleton, Andrew; Hardy, John

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Homozygous loss-of-function mutations in TREM2, encoding the triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 2 protein, have previously been associated with an autosomal recessive form of early-onset dementia. METHODS We used genome, exome, and Sanger sequencing to analyze the genetic variability in TREM2 in a series of 1092 patients with Alzheimer's disease and 1107 controls (the discovery set). We then performed a meta-analysis on imputed data for the TREM2 variant rs75932628 (predicted to cause a R47H substitution) from three genomewide association studies of Alzheimer's disease and tested for the association of the variant with disease. We genotyped the R47H variant in an additional 1887 cases and 4061 controls. We then assayed the expression of TREM2 across different regions of the human brain and identified genes that are differentially expressed in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease and in control mice. RESULTS We found significantly more variants in exon 2 of TREM2 in patients with Alzheimer's disease than in controls in the discovery set (P = 0.02). There were 22 variant alleles in 1092 patients with Alzheimer's disease and 5 variant alleles in 1107 controls (P<0.001). The most commonly associated variant, rs75932628 (encoding R47H), showed highly significant association with Alzheimer's disease (P<0.001). Meta-analysis of rs75932628 genotypes imputed from genomewide association studies confirmed this association (P = 0.002), as did direct genotyping of an additional series of 1887 patients with Alzheimer's disease and 4061 controls (P<0.001). Trem2 expression differed between control mice and a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. CONCLUSIONS Heterozygous rare variants in TREM2 are associated with a significant increase in the risk of Alzheimer's disease. (Funded by Alzheimer's Research UK and others.) PMID:23150934

  3. Molecular Characterization of Attenuated Junin Virus Variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-07-14

    AD-A260 128 AD____ MOLECULAR CHARACTERIZATION OF ATTENUATED JUNIN VIRUS VARIANTS FINAL REPORT VICTOR ROMANOWSKI PABLO D. GHIRINGHELLI CESAR G...Virus Variants 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Victor Romanowski , Pablo D. Ghiringhelli, Cesar G. Albarino, & Mariel Piboul 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME... Romanowski and Bishop, 1985; Clegg and Oram, 1985; Franze-Fern ndez et al., 1987). The GPC protein (ca. 57 kDa in the unglycosylated form) is translated from a

  4. A framework for the definition of variants of high-level Petri nets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kindler, Ekkart; Petrucci, Laure

    2009-01-01

    analysis algorithms for symmetric nets. During the standardisation of high-level nets and some of their variations, it turned out that defining the legal data types and the operations on them is the most difficult part. In particular, these definitions become lengthy and mix Petri net specific issues...... with data-type specific issues, which often blocks the view for the really relevant parts. Even worse, supposedly simpler versions of high-level nets often are more difficult to define than high-level nets in general. This paper introduces the concepts and the mathematical tools to ease the definition...... of new variants and versions of high-level Petri nets: a framework for defining variants of high-level nets. The main ingredient of this framework is the concept of generators, which we recently introduced for formalising modular PNML, and the newly introduced concept of constructs....

  5. Características morfoanatômicas da epiderme foliar de plantas variantes e não variantes somaclonais de bananeiras (Musa sp. Colla cv. Prata-anã cultivadas in vitro Morphoanatomical characteristics of the leaf epidermis of variant plants and somaclonal non-variants of banana trees (Musa sp. Colla cv. Prata-anã cultivated in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Araújo Lacerda

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available A variação somaclonal corresponde ao aparecimento de plantas anormais durante o processo de multiplicação in vitro, principalmente relacionada à estatura, no caso o gigantismo. O objetivo deste trabalho foi averiguar as diferenças morfoanatômicas da epiderme foliar na tentativa de diferenciar as plantas de 'Prata-anã' em relação aos seus variantes somaclonais. A análise por microscopia eletrônica de varredura mostrou uma diferença significativa entre o diâmetro polar dos estômatos da 'Prata-anã' não variante e suas variantes, ambas em condições in vitro, observando-se que o mesmo não ocorre para as plantas in vivo. O número médio de estômatos é menor nas plantas variantes somaclonais, porém sem diferenças significativas a não ser para a planta PIII. A descamação de cera é evidente somente nas plantas variantes de ambos os materiais (in vitro e in vivo. Conclui-se que os caracteres morfoanatômicos da epiderme foliar, como densidade estomática, diâmetro estomático polar e a uniformidade da cera atuam como marcadores morfológicos para caracterizar as plantas micropropagadas de 'Prata-anã' em relação aos seus variantes somaclonais para a característica gigantismo.Somaclonal variation corresponds to the emergence of abnormal plants during the process of multiplication in vitro, mainly related to stature, in the case the gigantism. The aim of this work was to discover morphoanatomical differences of the leaf epidermis in an attempt to differentiate plants of "Prata-anã" from their somaclonal variants. Analysis by scanning electronic microscopy showed significant difference between the polar diameter of the stomata of the "Prata-anã" non-variant and its variants, both in vitro. The same does not happen for plants in vivo. The average number of stomata is lower in the somaclonal variant plants, but without significant differences except for plant PIII. Wax peeling is only evident in the variant plants of both the

  6. Defining and Classifying Interest Groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baroni, Laura; Carroll, Brendan; Chalmers, Adam

    2014-01-01

    of lobbying actors coded according to different coding schemes. We systematically assess the performance of different schemes by comparing how actor types in the different schemes differ with respect to a number of background characteristics. This is done in a two-stage approach where we first cluster actors...... in the organizational attributes of specific interest group types. As expected, our comparison of coding schemes reveals a closer link between group attributes and group type in narrower classification schemes based on group organizational characteristics than those based on a behavioral definition of lobbying....

  7. Assessment of polymorphic variants in the melanocortin-1 receptor gene with cutaneous pigmentation using an evolutionary approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanetsky, Peter A; Ge, Fan; Najarian, Derek; Swoyer, Jennifer; Panossian, Saarene; Schuchter, Lynn; Holmes, Robin; Guerry, DuPont; Rebbeck, Timothy R

    2004-05-01

    The melanocortin-1 receptor gene (MC1R) encodes a membrane-bound receptor protein that is central to melanin synthesis. The coding region of MC1R is highly polymorphic and associations of variants with pigmentation phenotypes and risk for cutaneous neoplasms have been reported. We sought to determine the distribution and frequency of MC1R variants and their relationship to pigmentation characteristics in 179 Caucasian controls from the United States. One hundred thirty-five (75.4%) subjects carried one or more variants, and we determined that carriage of the previously designated "red hair color" (RHC) alleles, R151C, R160W, and D294H was strongly associated with fair pigmentation phenotypes including light hair and eye color, tendency to burn, decreased tendency to tan, and freckling. We used SIFT software to define MC1R protein positions that were predicted intolerant to amino acid substitutions; detected variants that corresponded to intolerant substitutions were D84E, R142H, R151C, I155T, R160W, and D294H. Carriage of one or more of these putative functionally important variants or the frameshift variant ins86A was significantly associated with fair pigmentation phenotypes. Analyses limited to carriage of ins86A and the three non-RHC alleles identified by SIFT were attenuated and no longer reached statistical significance. This is the first study to describe MC1R variants among control subjects from the U.S. Our results indicate that the frequency of variants is similar to that previously observed among non-U.S. Caucasians. Risk variants defined by either the published literature or by evolutionary criteria are strongly and significantly associated with all fair pigmentation phenotypes that were measured.

  8. Defining active progressive multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellebjerg, Finn; Börnsen, Lars; Ammitzbøll, Cecilie; Nielsen, Jørgen Erik; Vinther-Jensen, Tua; Hjermind, Lena Elisabeth; von Essen, Marina; Ratzer, Rikke Lenhard; Soelberg Sørensen, Per; Romme Christensen, Jeppe

    2017-11-01

    It is unknown whether disease activity according to consensus criteria (magnetic resonance imaging activity or clinical relapses) associate with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) changes in progressive multiple sclerosis (MS). To compare CSF biomarkers in active and inactive progressive MS according to consensus criteria. Neurofilament light chain (NFL), myelin basic protein (MBP), IgG-index, chitinase-3-like-1 (CHI3L1), matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), chemokine CXCL13, terminal complement complex, leukocyte counts and nitric oxide metabolites were measured in primary ( n = 26) and secondary progressive MS ( n = 26) and healthy controls ( n = 24). Progressive MS patients had higher CSF cell counts, IgG-index, CHI3L1, MMP-9, CXCL13, NFL and MBP concentrations. Active patients were younger and had higher NFL, CXCL13 and MMP-9 concentrations than inactive patients. Patients with active disease according to consensus criteria or detectable CXCL13 or MMP-9 in CSF were defined as having combined active progressive MS. These patients had increased CSF cell counts, IgG-index and MBP, NFL and CHI3L1 concentrations. Combined inactive patients only had increased IgG-index and MBP concentrations. Patients with combined active progressive MS show evidence of inflammation, demyelination and neuronal/axonal damage, whereas the remaining patients mainly show evidence of active demyelination. This challenges the idea that neurodegeneration independent of inflammation is crucial in disease progression.

  9. NUDT15 variant is the most common variant associated with thiopurine-induced early leukopenia and alopecia in Korean pediatric patients with Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yeoun Joo; Hwang, Eun Ha; Park, Jae Hong; Shin, Jin-Hong; Kang, Boram; Kim, Sun-Young

    2016-04-01

    Thiopurine-induced leukopenia is a relatively common adverse event related to thiopurine medication in Korean pediatric Crohn's disease. In addition to the mutations of TPMT gene, the NUDT15 c.415C>T variant was recently identified to have a strong association with thiopurine-induced early leukopenia. We conducted this study to define the incidence of azathioprine (AZA)-related leukopenia and to determine the incidence and characteristics of their genetic variants in Korean pediatric Crohn's disease patients. Patients diagnosed with pediatric Crohn's disease who had used AZA for more than 3 months were recruited. The dose and duration of medication and data regarding adverse events including leukopenia were collected. TPMT and NUDT15 gene sequencing was performed for patients who had experienced AZA-induced leukopenia. A total of 81 patients had used AZA as a maintenance therapy of Crohn's disease. The mean dose of AZA was 1.88±0.39 mg/kg/day. Nine patients (11.1%) experienced AZA-induced leukopenia, and eight patients (9.9%) experienced AZA-induced early leukopenia. Among the eight early leukopenia patients, six patients (75.0%) harbored the NUDT15 c.415C>T variant and one patient (12.5%) had the TPMT c.719A>G (TPMT*3C) variant. All the three patients with NUDT15 c.415C>T homozygous variant suffered from alopecia totalis, and two of them experienced severe systemic infection. Three patients with the NUDT15 heterozygous variant are currently treated with AZA at a dose of 0.76 mg/kg/day. Mutations of the NUDT15 and TPMT gene accounted for ∼88% of cases with thiopurine-induced early leukopenia. Extensive hair loss was a recognizable early symptom in patients with the homozygous NUDT15 c.415C>T variant. Sequencing of the NUDT15 genes can guide the clinicians before thiopurine medication. An alternative immunosuppressive medication is recommended for patients with homozygous NUDT15 c.415C>T variant. For those with the heterozygous variant, half the usual dose of

  10. Defining safety goals. 2. Basic Consideration on Defining Safety Goals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakata, T.

    2001-01-01

    cancer and severe hereditary effects are 10 x 10 -2 /Sv and 1.3 x10 -2 /Sv, respectively. The basic safety goals can be expressed by the complementary accumulative distribution function (CCDF) of dose versus frequencies of events: Pc(C > Cp) 5 (Cp/Co) -α . The aversion factor a is here expressed by the following arbitrary equation, which gives a polynomial curve of the order of m on a logarithmic plane: α = a+b(log(Cp/Co)) m , where: Pc = CCDF frequency for Cp (/yr), Cp = dose (mSv), Co = Cp for Pc =1, a, b, m = constants. Figure 1 shows a typical tolerable risk profile (risk limit curve), which is drawn so that all the points obtained in the previous discussions are above the curve (Co=1, a=1, b=0.0772, and m = 2). Safety criteria by ANS (Ref. 2) and SHE (Ref. 3) are shown in Fig. 1 for comparison. An aversion of a factor of 2 is resulted between 1 mSv and 1 Sv. No ALARA is included, which must be considered in defining specific safety goals. The frequency of a single class of events must be lower than the CCDF profile, and a curve lower by a factor of 10 is drawn in Fig. 1. The doses referenced in the current Japanese safety guidelines and site criteria are shown in Fig. 1. The referenced doses seem reasonable, considering the conservatism in the analysis of design-basis accidents. Specific safety goals for each sort of facility can be defined based on the basic safety goals, reflecting the characteristics of the facilities and considering ALARA. The indexes of engineering terms, such as CMF and LERF, are preferable for nuclear power plants, although interpretation from dose to the engineering terms is needed. Other indexes may be used (such as frequency of criticality accidents, etc.) for facilities except for power plants. The applicability of safety goals will thus be improved. Figure 2 shows the relative risk factors (1, 1%, and 0.1%) versus the severity of radiation effects. This might indicate the adequacy of the risk factors. The absolute risk limits, which

  11. Beta-glucosidase variants and polynucleotides encoding same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wogulis, Mark; Harris, Paul; Osborn, David

    2017-06-27

    The present invention relates to beta-glucosidase variants, e.g. beta-glucosidase variants of a parent Family GH3A beta-glucosidase from Aspergillus fumigatus. The present invention also relates to polynucleotides encoding the beta-glucosidase variants; nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides; and methods of using the beta-glucosidase variants.

  12. Engineering defined motor ensembles with DNA origami.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Brian S; Reck-Peterson, Samara L

    2014-01-01

    Many cytoskeletal motors function in groups to coordinate the spatial and temporal positioning of cellular cargo. While methods to study the biophysical properties of single motors are well established, methods to understand how multiple motors work synergistically or antagonistically are less well developed. Here, we describe a three-dimensional synthetic cargo structure made using DNA origami, which can be used to template defined numbers and types of cytoskeletal motors with programmable geometries and spacing. We describe methods for building the DNA origami structure, covalently attaching motors to DNA, forming the motor-DNA origami structure complex, and single-molecule assays to examine the motile properties of motor ensembles. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Certain variants of multipermutohedron ideals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This sequence is called the reduced Mayer–. Vietoris sequence. Since the multigraded Betti numbers of a monomial ideal are given in terms of the dimension of reduced homology groups of the upper Koszul simplicial complex with coefficients in the field k, the Mayer–Vietoris sequence can be used to compute ˜Hi(Kb(I ...

  14. Defining Tobacco Regulatory Science Competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wipfli, Heather L; Berman, Micah; Hanson, Kacey; Kelder, Steven; Solis, Amy; Villanti, Andrea C; Ribeiro, Carla M P; Meissner, Helen I; Anderson, Roger

    2017-02-01

    In 2013, the National Institutes of Health and the Food and Drug Administration funded a network of 14 Tobacco Centers of Regulatory Science (TCORS) with a mission that included research and training. A cross-TCORS Panel was established to define tobacco regulatory science (TRS) competencies to help harmonize and guide their emerging educational programs. The purpose of this paper is to describe the Panel's work to develop core TRS domains and competencies. The Panel developed the list of domains and competencies using a semistructured Delphi method divided into four phases occurring between November 2013 and August 2015. The final proposed list included a total of 51 competencies across six core domains and 28 competencies across five specialized domains. There is a need for continued discussion to establish the utility of the proposed set of competencies for emerging TRS curricula and to identify the best strategies for incorporating these competencies into TRS training programs. Given the field's broad multidisciplinary nature, further experience is needed to refine the core domains that should be covered in TRS training programs versus knowledge obtained in more specialized programs. Regulatory science to inform the regulation of tobacco products is an emerging field. The paper provides an initial list of core and specialized domains and competencies to be used in developing curricula for new and emerging training programs aimed at preparing a new cohort of scientists to conduct critical TRS research. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Phytophthora alni sp. nov. and its variants: designation of emerging heteroploid hybrid pathogens spreading on Alnus trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasier, Clive M; Kirk, Susan A; Delcan, Jose; Cooke, David E L; Jung, Thomas; Man in't Veld, Willem A

    2004-10-01

    In 1993 a destructive new Phytophthora pathogen of riparian Alnus trees was discovered in the UK and subsequently shown to be present in other parts of Europe. The new Phytophthora comprised a group of emergent heteroploid hybrids, probably between P. cambivora and a species related to P. fragariae. These included a common, near tetraploid standard hybrid, the presumptive allopolyploid; and four scarcer major variant types with chromosome numbers intermediate between diploid and tetraploid, named the Swedish, Dutch, German and UK variants. The standard hybrid type is formally designated here as Phytophthora alni subsp. alni. The Swedish variant is designated as P. alni subsp. uniformis; and the Dutch, German and UK variants collectively as P. alni subsp. multiformis. The properties of the Dutch, German and UK variants within subsp. multiformis are informally described. The problems of designating emergent species hybrids under the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature and the reasons for the taxonomic choices made are discussed.

  16. Generalized r-Lah numbers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    themselves the smallest element of a block. Let nrec(λ) denote the number of elements of. [n] which are not record lows of λ. To illustrate, if λ is as above, then rec. ∗. (λ) = 2 (for the 8 and 4) and nrec(λ) = 4 (for. 5, 3, 7 and 9). We now consider the restriction of the rec. ∗ and nrec statistics to Lr(n, k) and define the distribution ...

  17. ALS Regional Variants (Brachial Amyotrophic Diplpegia, Leg Amyotrophic Diplegia, and Isolated Bulbar ALS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawdat, Omar; Statland, Jeffrey M.; Barohn, Richard J.; Katz, Jonathan; Dimachkie, Mazen M.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a rapidly progressive, invariably fatal disease, comprised of mixed upper and lower motor neuron involvement in different spinal cord regions. Characteristic initial presentations have implications for prognosis. Bulbar onset patients progress more rapidly than limb-onset patients, or patients with a pure lower motor neuron presentation. Other regional variants have been described where disease is restricted to one spinal region at presentation, including a flail arm or flail leg, and restricted respiratory or bulbar disease. More recent descriptions of regional variants suggest some ALS patients have disease isolated to a single spinal region for many years, including: brachial amyotrophic diplegia; leg amyotrophic diplegia; and isolated bulbar palsy. More clearly defining regional variants will have implications for prognosis, but also for understanding the pathophysiology of ALS, for identifying genetic factors related to slower disease progression, and for future clinical trial planning. PMID:26515621

  18. De Novo Truncating Variants in SON Cause Intellectual Disability, Congenital Malformations, and Failure to Thrive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokita, Mari J; Braxton, Alicia A; Shao, Yunru; Lewis, Andrea M; Vincent, Marie; Küry, Sébastien; Besnard, Thomas; Isidor, Bertrand; Latypova, Xénia; Bézieau, Stéphane; Liu, Pengfei; Motter, Connie S; Melver, Catherine Ward; Robin, Nathaniel H; Infante, Elena M; McGuire, Marianne; El-Gharbawy, Areeg; Littlejohn, Rebecca O; McLean, Scott D; Bi, Weimin; Bacino, Carlos A; Lalani, Seema R; Scott, Daryl A; Eng, Christine M; Yang, Yaping; Schaaf, Christian P; Walkiewicz, Magdalena A

    2016-09-01

    SON is a key component of the spliceosomal complex and a critical mediator of constitutive and alternative splicing. Additionally, SON has been shown to influence cell-cycle progression, genomic integrity, and maintenance of pluripotency in stem cell populations. The clear functional relevance of SON in coordinating essential cellular processes and its presence in diverse human tissues suggests that intact SON might be crucial for normal growth and development. However, the phenotypic effects of deleterious germline variants in SON have not been clearly defined. Herein, we describe seven unrelated individuals with de novo variants in SON and propose that deleterious variants in SON are associated with a severe multisystem disorder characterized by developmental delay, persistent feeding difficulties, and congenital malformations, including brain anomalies. Copyright © 2016 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. MC1R variants increase risk of melanomas harboring BRAF mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fargnoli, Maria Concetta; Fargnoli, Maria Concetia; Pike, Kris; Pfeiffer, Ruth M; Tsang, Shirley; Rozenblum, Ester; Munroe, David J; Golubeva, Yelena; Calista, Donato; Seidenari, Stefania; Massi, Daniela; Carli, Paolo; Bauer, Juergen; Elder, David E; Bastian, Boris C; Peris, Ketty; Landi, Maria T

    2008-10-01

    Melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R) variants have been associated with BRAF (v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B1) mutations in non-CSD (chronic solar-damaged) melanomas in an Italian and an American population. We studied an independent Italian population of 330 subjects (165 melanoma patients and 165 controls) to verify and estimate the magnitude of this association and to explore possible effect modifiers. We sequenced MC1R in all subjects and exon 15 of BRAF in 92/165 melanoma patients. Patients with MC1R variants had a high risk of carrying BRAF mutations in melanomas (odds ratio (OR)=7.0, 95% confidence interval (CI)=2.1-23.8) that increased with the number of MC1R variants and variants associated with red hair color. Combining these subjects with the originally reported Italian population (513 subjects overall), MC1R variant carriers had a 5- to 15-fold increased risk of BRAF-mutant melanomas based on carrying one or two variants (PMC1R-melanoma risk association is confined to subjects whose melanomas harbor BRAF mutations.

  20. Locus Reference Genomic sequences: An improved basis for describing human DNA variants

    KAUST Repository

    Dalgleish, Raymond

    2010-04-15

    As our knowledge of the complexity of gene architecture grows, and we increase our understanding of the subtleties of gene expression, the process of accurately describing disease-causing gene variants has become increasingly problematic. In part, this is due to current reference DNA sequence formats that do not fully meet present needs. Here we present the Locus Reference Genomic (LRG) sequence format, which has been designed for the specifi c purpose of gene variant reporting. The format builds on the successful National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) RefSeqGene project and provides a single-fi le record containing a uniquely stable reference DNA sequence along with all relevant transcript and protein sequences essential to the description of gene variants. In principle, LRGs can be created for any organism, not just human. In addition, we recognize the need to respect legacy numbering systems for exons and amino acids and the LRG format takes account of these. We hope that widespread adoption of LRGs - which will be created and maintained by the NCBI and the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI) - along with consistent use of the Human Genome Variation Society (HGVS)- approved variant nomenclature will reduce errors in the reporting of variants in the literature and improve communication about variants aff ecting human health. Further information can be found on the LRG web site (http://www.lrg-sequence.org). 2010 Dalgleish et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  1. Ryanodine receptor type 1 gene variants in the malignant hyperthermia-susceptible population of the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandom, Barbara W; Bina, Saiid; Wong, Cynthia A; Wallace, Tarina; Visoiu, Mihaela; Isackson, Paul J; Vladutiu, Georgirene D; Sambuughin, Nyamkhishig; Muldoon, Sheila M

    2013-05-01

    Mutations in the ryanodine receptor type 1 gene (RYR1) that encodes the skeletal muscle-specific intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) release channel are a cause of malignant hyperthermia (MH). In this study, we examined RYR1 mutations in a large number of North American MH-susceptible (MHS) subjects without prior genetic diagnosis. RYR1 was examined in 120 unrelated MHS subjects from the United States in a tiered manner. The α-1 subunit of the dihydropyridine receptor gene (CACNA1S) was screened for 4 variants in subjects in whom no abnormality was found in ≥ 100 exons of RYR1. Ten known causative MH mutations were found in 26 subjects. Variants of uncertain significance in RYR1 were found in 36 subjects, 16 of which are novel. Novel variants in both RYR1 and CACNA1S were found in the 1 subject who died of MH. Two RYR1 variants were found in 4 subjects. Variants of uncertain significance were found outside and inside the hotspots of RYR1. Maximal contractures in the caffeine-halothane contracture test were greater in those who had a known MH mutation or variant of uncertain significance in RYR1 than in those who did not. The identification of novel RYR1 variants and previously observed RYR1 variants of uncertain significance in independent MHS families is necessary for demonstrating the significance of these variants for MH susceptibility and supports the need for functional studies of these variants. Continued reporting of the clinical phenotypes of MH is necessary for interpretation of genetic findings, especially because the pathogenicity of most of these genetic variants associated with MHS remains to be elucidated.

  2. Expression of CD44 variants in human inflammatory synovitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hale, L.P. [Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Haynes, B.F.; McCachren, S. [Duke Univ. Arthritis Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    1995-11-01

    The cell surface hyaluronate receptor CD44 has previously been shown to have immunomodulatory activity and to be upregulated in inflammatory synovitis. Since these findings were reported, the genomic structure of CD44 has been delineated, and multiple splice variants have been described. Therefore, we determined which CD44 variant exons are present during inflammatory synovitis by a combination of Northern blot analysis and reverse transcription followed by polymerase chain reaction amplification of synovial RNA. Immunohistochemical staining was used to define the sites of expression of individual v6 and v9 exons in synovial tissue. The standard (S) or hematopoietic isoform, CD44S, was the predominant form of CD44 expressed in synovium and was expressed by most cell types. Other isoforms, containing alternatively spliced exons in the proximal extracellular domain, were found by RT-PCR, but at lower levels than CD44S. The second most prevalent form was CD44E, which has an insertion of three exons (v8-v10) in the proximal extracellular domain. Immunohistochemical studies showed that reactivity with v9-specific antibodies was primarily in macrophages, particularly those in the synovial lining layer. CD44 exon v6, previously reported to be important in immune activation and in epithelial tumor metastasis, was also expressed in synovial lining cells and in occasional synovial interstitial cells. The presence of CD44 variants containing v9 in rheumatoid synovial macrophages may be important in the adhesion and activation of mononuclear phagocytes in the synovium and, thus, may be a target for novel antiinflammatory therapies in the future. The role of CD44 isoforms in cellular adhesion, immune activation, and joint erosion in inflammatory synovitis deserves further study. 7 figs., 2 tabs., 56 refs.

  3. Defining the role of common variation in the genomic and biological architecture of adult human height

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Audrey Y; Estrada, Karol; Luan, Jian’an; Kutalik, Zoltán; Amin, Najaf; Buchkovich, Martin L; Croteau-Chonka, Damien C; Day, Felix R; Duan, Yanan; Fall, Tove; Fehrmann, Rudolf; Ferreira, Teresa; Jackson, Anne U; Karjalainen, Juha; Lo, Ken Sin; Locke, Adam E; Mägi, Reedik; Mihailov, Evelin; Porcu, Eleonora; Randall, Joshua C; Scherag, André; Vinkhuyzen, Anna AE; Westra, Harm-Jan; Winkler, Thomas W; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Zhao, Jing Hua; Absher, Devin; Albrecht, Eva; Anderson, Denise; Baron, Jeffrey; Beekman, Marian; Demirkan, Ayse; Ehret, Georg B; Feenstra, Bjarke; Feitosa, Mary F; Fischer, Krista; Fraser, Ross M; Goel, Anuj; Gong, Jian; Justice, Anne E; Kanoni, Stavroula; Kleber, Marcus E; Kristiansson, Kati; Lim, Unhee; Lotay, Vaneet; Lui, Julian C; Mangino, Massimo; Leach, Irene Mateo; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Nalls, Michael A; Nyholt, Dale R; Palmer, Cameron D; Pasko, Dorota; Pechlivanis, Sonali; Prokopenko, Inga; Ried, Janina S; Ripke, Stephan; Shungin, Dmitry; Stancáková, Alena; Strawbridge, Rona J; Sung, Yun Ju; Tanaka, Toshiko; Teumer, Alexander; Trompet, Stella; van der Laan, Sander W; van Setten, Jessica; Van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V; Wang, Zhaoming; Yengo, Loïc; Zhang, Weihua; Afzal, Uzma; Ärnlöv, Johan; Arscott, Gillian M; Bandinelli, Stefania; Barrett, Amy; Bellis, Claire; Bennett, Amanda J; Berne, Christian; Blüher, Matthias; Bolton, Jennifer L; Böttcher, Yvonne; Boyd, Heather A; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Buckley, Brendan M; Buyske, Steven; Caspersen, Ida H; Chines, Peter S; Clarke, Robert; Claudi-Boehm, Simone; Cooper, Matthew; Daw, E Warwick; De Jong, Pim A; Deelen, Joris; Delgado, Graciela; Denny, Josh C; Dhonukshe-Rutten, Rosalie; Dimitriou, Maria; Doney, Alex SF; Dörr, Marcus; Eklund, Niina; Eury, Elodie; Folkersen, Lasse; Garcia, Melissa E; Geller, Frank; Giedraitis, Vilmantas; Go, Alan S; Grallert, Harald; Grammer, Tanja B; Gräßler, Jürgen; Grönberg, Henrik; de Groot, Lisette C.P.G.M.; Groves, Christopher J; Haessler, Jeffrey; Hall, Per; Haller, Toomas; Hallmans, Goran; Hannemann, Anke; Hartman, Catharina A; Hassinen, Maija; Hayward, Caroline; Heard-Costa, Nancy L; Helmer, Quinta; Hemani, Gibran; Henders, Anjali K; Hillege, Hans L; Hlatky, Mark A; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hoffmann, Per; Holmen, Oddgeir; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J; Illig, Thomas; Isaacs, Aaron; James, Alan L; Jeff, Janina; Johansen, Berit; Johansson, Åsa; Jolley, Jennifer; Juliusdottir, Thorhildur; Junttila, Juhani; Kho, Abel N; Kinnunen, Leena; Klopp, Norman; Kocher, Thomas; Kratzer, Wolfgang; Lichtner, Peter; Lind, Lars; Lindström, Jaana; Lobbens, Stéphane; Lorentzon, Mattias; Lu, Yingchang; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Magnusson, Patrik KE; Mahajan, Anubha; Maillard, Marc; McArdle, Wendy L; McKenzie, Colin A; McLachlan, Stela; McLaren, Paul J; Menni, Cristina; Merger, Sigrun; Milani, Lili; Moayyeri, Alireza; Monda, Keri L; Morken, Mario A; Müller, Gabriele; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Musk, Arthur W; Narisu, Narisu; Nauck, Matthias; Nolte, Ilja M; Nöthen, Markus M; Oozageer, Laticia; Pilz, Stefan; Rayner, Nigel W; Renstrom, Frida; Robertson, Neil R; Rose, Lynda M; Roussel, Ronan; Sanna, Serena; Scharnagl, Hubert; Scholtens, Salome; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Schunkert, Heribert; Scott, Robert A; Sehmi, Joban; Seufferlein, Thomas; Shi, Jianxin; Silventoinen, Karri; Smit, Johannes H; Smith, Albert Vernon; Smolonska, Joanna; Stanton, Alice V; Stirrups, Kathleen; Stott, David J; Stringham, Heather M; Sundström, Johan; Swertz, Morris A; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Tayo, Bamidele O; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Tyrer, Jonathan P; van Dijk, Suzanne; van Schoor, Natasja M; van der Velde, Nathalie; van Heemst, Diana; van Oort, Floor VA; Vermeulen, Sita H; Verweij, Niek; Vonk, Judith M; Waite, Lindsay L; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wennauer, Roman; Wilkens, Lynne R; Willenborg, Christina; Wilsgaard, Tom; Wojczynski, Mary K; Wong, Andrew; Wright, Alan F; Zhang, Qunyuan; Arveiler, Dominique; Bakker, Stephan JL; Beilby, John; Bergman, Richard N; Bergmann, Sven; Biffar, Reiner; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I; Bornstein, Stefan R; Bovet, Pascal; Brambilla, Paolo; Brown, Morris J; Campbell, Harry; Caulfield, Mark J; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Collins, Rory; Collins, Francis S; Crawford, Dana C; Cupples, L Adrienne; Danesh, John; de Faire, Ulf; den Ruijter, Hester M; Erbel, Raimund; Erdmann, Jeanette; Eriksson, Johan G; Farrall, Martin; Ferrannini, Ele; Ferrières, Jean; Ford, Ian; Forouhi, Nita G; Forrester, Terrence; Gansevoort, Ron T; Gejman, Pablo V; Gieger, Christian; Golay, Alain; Gottesman, Omri; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gyllensten, Ulf; Haas, David W; Hall, Alistair S; Harris, Tamara B; Hattersley, Andrew T; Heath, Andrew C; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hicks, Andrew A; Hindorff, Lucia A; Hingorani, Aroon D; Hofman, Albert; Hovingh, G Kees; Humphries, Steve E; Hunt, Steven C; Hypponen, Elina; Jacobs, Kevin B; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jousilahti, Pekka; Jula, Antti M; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kastelein, John JP; Kayser, Manfred; Kee, Frank; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Kooner, Jaspal S; Kooperberg, Charles; Koskinen, Seppo; Kovacs, Peter; Kraja, Aldi T; Kumari, Meena; Kuusisto, Johanna; Lakka, Timo A; Langenberg, Claudia; Le Marchand, Loic; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lupoli, Sara; Madden, Pamela AF; Männistö, Satu; Manunta, Paolo; Marette, André; Matise, Tara C; McKnight, Barbara; Meitinger, Thomas; Moll, Frans L; Montgomery, Grant W; Morris, Andrew D; Morris, Andrew P; Murray, Jeffrey C; Nelis, Mari; Ohlsson, Claes; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Ong, Ken K; Ouwehand, Willem H; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Peters, Annette; Pramstaller, Peter P; Price, Jackie F; Qi, Lu; Raitakari, Olli T; Rankinen, Tuomo; Rao, DC; Rice, Treva K; Ritchie, Marylyn; Rudan, Igor; Salomaa, Veikko; Samani, Nilesh J; Saramies, Jouko; Sarzynski, Mark A; Schwarz, Peter EH; Sebert, Sylvain; Sever, Peter; Shuldiner, Alan R; Sinisalo, Juha; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Stolk, Ronald P; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Tönjes, Anke; Tremblay, Angelo; Tremoli, Elena; Virtamo, Jarmo; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Amouyel, Philippe; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Assimes, Themistocles L; Bochud, Murielle; Boehm, Bernhard O; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bottinger, Erwin P; Bouchard, Claude; Cauchi, Stéphane; Chambers, John C; Chanock, Stephen J; Cooper, Richard S; de Bakker, Paul IW; Dedoussis, George; Ferrucci, Luigi; Franks, Paul W; Froguel, Philippe; Groop, Leif C; Haiman, Christopher A; Hamsten, Anders; Hayes, M Geoffrey; Hui, Jennie; Hunter, David J.; Hveem, Kristian; Jukema, J Wouter; Kaplan, Robert C; Kivimaki, Mika; Kuh, Diana; Laakso, Markku; Liu, Yongmei; Martin, Nicholas G; März, Winfried; Melbye, Mads; Moebus, Susanne; Munroe, Patricia B; Njølstad, Inger; Oostra, Ben A; Palmer, Colin NA; Pedersen, Nancy L; Perola, Markus; Pérusse, Louis; Peters, Ulrike; Powell, Joseph E; Power, Chris; Quertermous, Thomas; Rauramaa, Rainer; Reinmaa, Eva; Ridker, Paul M; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rotter, Jerome I; Saaristo, Timo E; Saleheen, Danish; Schlessinger, David; Slagboom, P Eline; Snieder, Harold; Spector, Tim D; Strauch, Konstantin; Stumvoll, Michael; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uusitupa, Matti; van der Harst, Pim; Völzke, Henry; Walker, Mark; Wareham, Nicholas J; Watkins, Hugh; Wichmann, H-Erich; Wilson, James F; Zanen, Pieter; Deloukas, Panos; Heid, Iris M; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Mohlke, Karen L; Speliotes, Elizabeth K; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Barroso, Inês; Fox, Caroline S; North, Kari E; Strachan, David P; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Berndt, Sonja I; Boehnke, Michael; Borecki, Ingrid B; McCarthy, Mark I; Metspalu, Andres; Stefansson, Kari; Uitterlinden, André G; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Franke, Lude; Willer, Cristen J; Price, Alkes L.; Lettre, Guillaume; Loos, Ruth JF; Weedon, Michael N; Ingelsson, Erik; O’Connell, Jeffrey R; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Chasman, Daniel I; Goddard, Michael E

    2014-01-01

    Using genome-wide data from 253,288 individuals, we identified 697 variants at genome-wide significance that together explain one-fifth of heritability for adult height. By testing different numbers of variants in independent studies, we show that the most strongly associated ~2,000, ~3,700 and ~9,500 SNPs explained ~21%, ~24% and ~29% of phenotypic variance. Furthermore, all common variants together captured the majority (60%) of heritability. The 697 variants clustered in 423 loci enriched for genes, pathways, and tissue-types known to be involved in growth and together implicated genes and pathways not highlighted in earlier efforts, such as signaling by fibroblast growth factors, WNT/beta-catenin, and chondroitin sulfate-related genes. We identified several genes and pathways not previously connected with human skeletal growth, including mTOR, osteoglycin and binding of hyaluronic acid. Our results indicate a genetic architecture for human height that is characterized by a very large but finite number (thousands) of causal variants. PMID:25282103

  4. Clinical and Functional Characterization of a Missense ELF2 Variant in a CANVAS Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Hena; Requena, Teresa; Frejo, Lidia; Cobo, Marien; Gallego-Martinez, Alvaro; Martin, Francisco; Lopez-Escamez, Jose A; Bronstein, Adolfo M

    2018-01-01

    Cerebellar ataxia with neuropathy and bilateral vestibular areflexia syndrome (CANVAS) is a rare disorder with an unknown etiology. We present a British family with presumed autosomal dominant CANVAS with incomplete penetrance and variable expressivity. Exome sequencing identified a rare missense variant in the ELF2 gene at chr4:g.140058846 C > T, c.10G > A, p.A4T which segregated in all affected patients. By using transduced BE (2)-M17 cells, we found that the mutated ELF2 (mt-ELF2) gene increased ATXN2 and reduced ELOVL5 gene expression, the causal genes of type 2 and type 38 spinocerebellar ataxias. Both, western blot and confocal microscopy confirmed an increase of ataxin-2 in BE(2)-M17 cells transduced with lentivirus expressing mt-ELF2 (CEE-mt- ELF2 ), which was not observed in cells transduced with lentivirus expressing wt-ELF2 (CEE-wt-ELF2). Moreover, we observed a significant decrease in the number and size of lipid droplets in the CEE-mt- ELF2 -transduced BE (2)-M17 cells, but not in the CEE-wt-ELF2-transduced BE (2)-M17. Furthermore, changes in the expression of ELOVL5 could be related with the reduction of lipid droplets in BE (2)-M17 cells. This work supports that ELF2 gene regulates the expression of ATXN2 and ELOVL5 genes, and defines new molecular links in the pathophysiology of cerebellar ataxias.

  5. Frequency of thermostability variants: estimation of total rare variant frequency in human populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohrenweiser, H.W.; Neel, J.V.

    1981-09-01

    Eight erythrocyte enzymes were examine for thermostability in an unselected sample of 100 newborn infants. Three thermolabile variants, one each of lactate dehydrogenase, glucosephosphate isomerase, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, were identified, none of which was detectable as a variant by standard electrophoretic techniques. All were inherited. This frequency of 3.8 heritable thermostability variants per 1000 determinations is to be compared with a frequency of electrophoretically detectable variants of 1.1 per 1000 determinations, a frequency of 2.4 enzyme-deficiency variants per 1000 determinations, and a frequency of individuals with rare enzyme deficiency or electrophoretic or thermostability (or both) variants at these loci is 8.4 per 1000 determinations. A similar distribution and frequency is seen when the comparison is limited to the seven loci studied by all techniques. it is clear that not all of the electrophoretic and thermostability variants present in the population are detected by the techniques used in this study. Accordingly, it is estimated that the true frequency of carriers of a rare variant for each of these enzyme-coding loci averages greater than 10/1000. Some implications of these frequencies for human disease are discussed.

  6. Signatures of natural selection on genetic variants affecting complex human traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ge; Muglia, Louis J; Chakraborty, Ranajit; Akey, Joshua M; Williams, Scott M

    2013-12-01

    It has recently been hypothesized that polygenic adaptation, resulting in modest allele frequency changes at many loci, could be a major mechanism behind the adaptation of complex phenotypes in human populations. Here we leverage the large number of variants that have been identified through genome-wide association (GWA) studies to comprehensively study signatures of natural selection on genetic variants associated with complex traits. Using population differentiation based methods, such as F ST and phylogenetic branch length analyses, we systematically examined nearly 1300 SNPs associated with 38 complex phenotypes. Instead of detecting selection signatures at individual variants, we aimed to identify combined evidence of natural selection by aggregating signals across many trait associated SNPs. Our results have revealed some general features of polygenic selection on complex traits associated variants. First, natural selection acting on standing variants associated with complex traits is a common phenomenon. Second, characteristics of selection for different polygenic traits vary both temporarily and geographically. Third, some studied traits (e.g. height and urate level) could have been the primary targets of selection, as indicated by the significant correlation between the effect sizes and the estimated strength of selection in the trait associated variants; however, for most traits, the allele frequency changes in trait associated variants might have been driven by the selection on other correlated phenotypes. Fourth, the changes in allele frequencies as a result of selection can be highly stochastic, such that, polygenic adaptation may accelerate differentiation in allele frequencies among populations, but generally does not produce predictable directional changes. Fifth, multiple mechanisms (pleiotropy, hitchhiking, etc) may act together to govern the changes in allele frequencies of genetic variants associated with complex traits.

  7. Identification of Potentially Pathogenic Variants in the Posterior Polymorphous Corneal Dystrophy 1 Locus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek J Le

    Full Text Available Posterior polymorphous corneal dystrophy 1 (PPCD1 is a genetic disorder that affects corneal endothelial cell function and leads to loss of visual acuity. PPCD1 has been linked to a locus on chromosome 20 in multiple families; however, Sanger sequencing of protein-coding genes in the consensus region failed to identify any causative missense mutations. In this study, custom capture probes were utilized for targeted next-generation sequencing of the linked region in a previously reported family with PPCD1. Variants were detected through two bioinformatics pipelines and filtered according to multiple criteria. Additionally, a high-resolution microarray was used to detect copy number variations. No non-synonymous variants in the protein-coding region of annotated genes were identified. However, 12 single nucleotide variants in 10 genes, and 9 indels in 7 genes met the filtering criteria and were considered candidate variants for PPCD1. Eleven single nucleotide variants were confirmed by Sanger sequencing, including 2 synonymous variants and 9 non-coding variants, in 9 genes. One microdeletion was detected in an intron of OVOL2 by microarray but was subsequently not identified by PCR. Using a comprehensive next-generation sequencing approach, a total of 16 genes containing single nucleotide variants or indels that segregated with the affected phenotype in an affected family previously mapped to the PPCD1 locus were identified. Screening of these candidate genes in other families previously mapped to the PPCD1 locus will likely result in the identification of the genetic basis of PPCD1.

  8. Whole-genome sequencing and genetic variant analysis of a Quarter Horse mare.

    KAUST Repository

    Doan, Ryan

    2012-02-17

    BACKGROUND: The catalog of genetic variants in the horse genome originates from a few select animals, the majority originating from the Thoroughbred mare used for the equine genome sequencing project. The purpose of this study was to identify genetic variants, including single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), insertion/deletion polymorphisms (INDELs), and copy number variants (CNVs) in the genome of an individual Quarter Horse mare sequenced by next-generation sequencing. RESULTS: Using massively parallel paired-end sequencing, we generated 59.6 Gb of DNA sequence from a Quarter Horse mare resulting in an average of 24.7X sequence coverage. Reads were mapped to approximately 97% of the reference Thoroughbred genome. Unmapped reads were de novo assembled resulting in 19.1 Mb of new genomic sequence in the horse. Using a stringent filtering method, we identified 3.1 million SNPs, 193 thousand INDELs, and 282 CNVs. Genetic variants were annotated to determine their impact on gene structure and function. Additionally, we genotyped this Quarter Horse for mutations of known diseases and for variants associated with particular traits. Functional clustering analysis of genetic variants revealed that most of the genetic variation in the horse\\'s genome was enriched in sensory perception, signal transduction, and immunity and defense pathways. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first sequencing of a horse genome by next-generation sequencing and the first genomic sequence of an individual Quarter Horse mare. We have increased the catalog of genetic variants for use in equine genomics by the addition of novel SNPs, INDELs, and CNVs. The genetic variants described here will be a useful resource for future studies of genetic variation regulating performance traits and diseases in equids.

  9. Detection of Genomic Structural Variants from Next-Generation Sequencing Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo eTattini

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Structural variants are genomic rearrangements larger than 50 bp accounting for around1% of the variation among human genomes. They impact on phenotypic diversityand play a role in various diseases including neurological/neurocognitive disordersand cancer development and progression. Dissecting structural variants from next-generation sequencing data presents several challenges and a number of approacheshave been proposed in the literature. In this mini review we describe and summarisethe latest tools – and their underlying algorithms – designed for the analysis ofwhole-genome sequencing, whole-exome sequencing, custom captures and ampliconsequencing data, pointing out the major advantages/drawbacks. We also report asummary of the most recent applications of third-generation sequencing platforms.This assessment provides a guided indication – with particular emphasis on humangenetics and copy number variants – for researchers involved in the investigation of thesegenomic events.

  10. On the number of special numbers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... factorizaton for all exponents. Let V ( x ) be the number of special numbers ≤ x . We will prove that there is a constant c > 1 such that V ( x ) ∼ c x l o g x . We will make some remarks on determining the error term at the end. Using the explicit abc conjecture, we will study the existence of 23 consecutive special integers.

  11. Identification of sequence variants influencing immunoglobulin levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsson, Stefan; Sveinbjornsson, Gardar; de Lapuente Portilla, Aitzkoa Lopez; Swaminathan, Bhairavi; Plomp, Rosina; Dekkers, Gillian; Ajore, Ram; Ali, Mina; Bentlage, Arthur E H; Elmér, Evelina; Eyjolfsson, Gudmundur I; Gudjonsson, Sigurjon A; Gullberg, Urban; Gylfason, Arnaldur; Halldorsson, Bjarni V; Hansson, Markus; Holm, Hilma; Johansson, Åsa; Johnsson, Ellinor; Jonasdottir, Aslaug; Ludviksson, Bjorn R; Oddsson, Asmundur; Olafsson, Isleifur; Olafsson, Sigurgeir; Sigurdardottir, Olof; Sigurdsson, Asgeir; Stefansdottir, Lilja; Masson, Gisli; Sulem, Patrick; Wuhrer, Manfred; Wihlborg, Anna-Karin; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Vidarsson, Gestur; Jonsdottir, Ingileif; Nilsson, Björn; Stefansson, Kari

    2017-08-01

    Immunoglobulins are the effector molecules of the adaptive humoral immune system. In a genome-wide association study of 19,219 individuals, we found 38 new variants and replicated 5 known variants associating with IgA, IgG or IgM levels or with composite immunoglobulin traits, accounted for by 32 loci. Variants at these loci also affect the risk of autoimmune diseases and blood malignancies and influence blood cell development. Notable associations include a rare variant at RUNX3 decreasing IgA levels by shifting isoform proportions (rs188468174[C>T]: P = 8.3 × 10 -55 , β = -0.90 s.d.), a rare in-frame deletion in FCGR2B abolishing IgG binding to the encoded receptor (p.Asn106del: P = 4.2 × 10 -8 , β = 1.03 s.d.), four IGH locus variants influencing class switching, and ten new associations with the HLA region. Our results provide new insight into the regulation of humoral immunity.

  12. Visualizing the geography of genetic variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Joseph H; Novembre, John

    2017-02-15

    One of the key characteristics of any genetic variant is its geographic distribution. The geographic distribution can shed light on where an allele first arose, what populations it has spread to, and in turn on how migration, genetic drift, and natural selection have acted. The geographic distribution of a genetic variant can also be of great utility for medical/clinical geneticists and collectively many genetic variants can reveal population structure. Here we develop an interactive visualization tool for rapidly displaying the geographic distribution of genetic variants. Through a REST API and dynamic front-end, the Geography of Genetic Variants (GGV) browser ( http://popgen.uchicago.edu/ggv/ ) provides maps of allele frequencies in populations distributed across the globe. GGV is implemented as a website ( http://popgen.uchicago.edu/ggv/ ) which employs an API to access frequency data ( http://popgen.uchicago.edu/freq_api/ ). Python and javascript source code for the website and the API are available at: http://github.com/NovembreLab/ggv/ and http://github.com/NovembreLab/ggv-api/ . jnovembre@uchicago.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  13. Rare genetic variants: making the connection with breast cancer susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tú Nguyen-Dumont

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The practice of clinical genetics in the context of breast cancer predisposition has reached another critical point in its evolution. For the past two decades, genetic testing offered to women attending clinics has been limited to BRCA1 and BRCA2 unless other syndromic indicators have been evident (e.g. PTEN and TP53 for Cowden and Li-Fraumeni syndrome, respectively. Women (and their families who are concerned about their personal and/or family history of breast and ovarian cancer have enthusiastically engaged with clinical genetics services, anticipating a genetic cause for their cancer predisposition will be identified and to receive clinical guidance for their risk management and treatment options. Genetic testing laboratories have demonstrated similar enthusiasm for transitioning from single gene to gene panel testing that now provide opportunities for the large number of women found not to carry mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2, enabling them to undergo additional genetic testing. However, these panel tests have limited clinical utility until more is understood about the cancer risks (if any associated with the genetic variation observed in the genes included on these panels. New data is urgently needed to improve the interpretation of the genetic variation data that is already reported from these panels and to inform the selection of genes included in gene panel tests in the future. To address this issue, large internationally coordinated research studies are required to provide the evidence-base from which clinical genetics for breast cancer susceptibility can be practiced in the era of gene panel testing and oncogenetic practice.Two significant steps associated with this process include i validating the genes on these panels (and those likely to be added in the future as bona fide breast cancer predisposition genes and ii interpreting the variation, on a variant-by-variant basis in terms of their likely “pathogenicity” ― a process

  14. Variant Effect Prediction Analysis Using Resources Available at Gramene Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naithani, Sushma; Geniza, Matthew; Jaiswal, Pankaj

    2017-01-01

    The goal of Gramene database ( www.gramene.org ) is to empower the plant research community in conducting comparative genomics studies across model plants and crops by employing a phylogenetic framework and orthology-based projections. Gramene database (release #49) provides resources for comparative plant genomics including well-annotated plant genomes (39 complete reference genomes and six partial genomes), genetic or structural variation data for 14 plant species, pathways for 58 plant species, and gene expression data for 14 species including Arabidopsis, rice, maize, soybean, wheat, etc. (fetched from EBI-EMBL Gene Expression Atlas database). Gramene also facilitates visualization and analysis of user-defined data in the context of species-specific Genome Browsers or pathways. This chapter describes basic navigation for Gramene users and illustrates how they can use the genome section to analyze the gene expression and nucleotide variation data generated in their labs. This includes (1) upload and display of genomic data onto a Genome Browser track, (2) analysis of variation data using online Variant Effect Predictor (VEP) tool for smaller data sets, and (3) the use of the stand-alone Perl scripts and command line protocols for variant effect prediction on larger data sets.

  15. Cell milieu significantly affects the fate of AApoAI amyloidogenic variants: predestination or serendipity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaglione, Rosa; Smaldone, Giovanni; Di Girolamo, Rocco; Piccoli, Renata; Pedone, Emilia; Arciello, Angela

    2018-03-01

    Specific apolipoprotein A-I variants are associated to severe hereditary amyloidoses. The organ distribution of AApoAI amyloidosis seems to depend on the position of the mutation, since mutations in residues from 1 to 75 are mainly associated to hepatic and renal amyloidosis, while mutations in residues from 173 to 178 are mostly responsible for cardiac, laryngeal, and cutaneous amyloidosis. Molecular bases of this tissue specificity are still poorly understood, but it is increasingly emerging that protein destabilization induced by amyloidogenic mutations is neither necessary nor sufficient for amyloidosis development. By using a multidisciplinary approach, including circular dichroism, dynamic light scattering, spectrofluorometric and atomic force microscopy analyses, the effect of target cells on the conformation and fibrillogenic pathway of the two AApoAI amyloidogenic variants AApoAI L75P and AApoAI L174S has been monitored. Our data show that specific cell milieus selectively affect conformation, aggregation propensity and fibrillogenesis of the two AApoAI amyloidogenic variants. An intriguing picture emerged indicating that defined cell contexts selectively induce fibrillogenesis of specific AApoAI variants. An innovative methodological approach, based on the use of whole intact cells to monitor the effects of cell context on AApoAI variants fibrillogenic pathway, has been set up. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Annotating DNA variants is the next major goal for human genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutting, Garry R

    2014-01-02

    Clinical genetic testing has undergone a dramatic transformation in the past two decades. Diagnostic laboratories that previously tested for well-established disease-causing DNA variants in a handful of genes have evolved into sequencing factories identifying thousands of variants of known and unknown medical consequence. Sorting out what does and does not cause disease in our genomes is the next great challenge in making genetics a central feature of healthcare. I propose that closing the gap in our ability to interpret variation responsible for Mendelian disorders provides a grand and unprecedented opportunity for geneticists. Human geneticists are well placed to coordinate a systematic evaluation of variants in collaboration with basic scientists and clinicians. Sharing of knowledge, data, methods, and tools will aid both researchers and healthcare workers in achieving their common goal of defining the pathogenic potential of variants. Generation of variant annotations will inform genetic testing and will deepen our understanding of gene and protein function, thereby aiding the search for molecular targeted therapies. Copyright © 2014 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Sociometabolic transitions defining the Anthropocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer-Kowalski, Prof; Krausmann, Prof; Pallua, Mag

    2014-05-01

    We search for a valid and quantifiable description of how and when humans acquire the ability to dominate major features of the Earth system. While common approaches (such as Kaplan et al. 2011 for example) seek to quantify the human impact upon the carbon cycle by identifying the area of land cleared by humans, we choose a more comprehensive path. Our point of departure is different human modes of subsistence, and we base our analysis on their social metabolism, in particular their energy metabolism. As a starting point, we use Ehrlich's classical IPAT formula, and give it a specific interpretation: human impact on Earth equals population size times affluence (interpreted as energy available per person) times technology - for each mode of subsistence. The overall impact (or rather human pressure) then equals the composite sum of these. We qualitatively describe the functional characteristics of hunter gatherers, agrarian and industrial modes of subsistence such as population dynamics, energy regime and the technologies by which they interact with their environment. In a 'toy' model, we translate these considerations into global numbers for the past millennia: we estimate the respective population sizes and affluence (energy), and finally also technology concerning its impact on the carbon cycle. Along this path, there are a number of findings: that it is reasonably possible to cross-check the size of pre-industrial agrarian populations from the size of urban populations; that it was in the last centuries BC that the size of agrarian populations exceeded those of hunter gatherers; that there seems to be a loglinear function of increasing average energetic metabolic rate from human basic metabolism across hunter gatherers and the agrarian mode to the industrial regime; and that from AD 1500 onwards, there is a very close relation between the urban population and fossil fuel use. We see a major historical dividing line around AD 1500: up to then, human population

  18. Number words and number symbols a cultural history of numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Menninger, Karl

    1992-01-01

    Classic study discusses number sequence and language and explores written numerals and computations in many cultures. "The historian of mathematics will find much to interest him here both in the contents and viewpoint, while the casual reader is likely to be intrigued by the author's superior narrative ability.

  19. Genetics in psychiatry: common variant association studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buxbaum Joseph D

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many psychiatric conditions and traits are associated with significant heritability. Genetic risk for psychiatric conditions encompass rare variants, identified due to major effect, as well as common variants, the latter analyzed by association analyses. We review guidelines for common variant association analyses, undertaking after assessing evidence of heritability. We highlight the importance of: suitably large sample sizes; an experimental design that controls for ancestry; careful data cleaning; correction for multiple testing; small P values for positive findings; assessment of effect size for positive findings; and, inclusion of an independent replication sample. We also note the importance of a critical discussion of any prior findings, biological follow-up where possible, and a means of accessing the raw data.

  20. Splicing variants of porcine synphilin-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Knud Erik; Madsen, Lone Bruhn; Farajzadeh, Leila

    2015-01-01

    %) and to mouse (84%) synphilin-1. Three shorter transcript variants of the synphilin-1 gene were identified, all lacking one or more exons. SNCAIP transcripts were detected in most examined organs and tissues and the highest expression was found in brain tissues and lung. Conserved splicing variants and a novel...... splice form of synhilin-1 were found in this study. All synphilin-1 isoforms encoded by the identified transcript variants lack functional domains important for protein degradation....... with α-synuclein in LBs. The aim of this study was to isolate and characterize porcine synphilin-1 and isoforms hereof with the future perspective to use the pig as a model for Parkinson's disease. The porcine SNCAIP cDNA was cloned by reverse transcriptase PCR. The spatial expression of SNCAIP mRNA...

  1. Hemoglobin Variants: Biochemical Properties and Clinical Correlates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thom, Christopher S.; Dickson, Claire F.; Gell, David A.; Weiss, Mitchell J.

    2013-01-01

    Diseases affecting hemoglobin synthesis and function are extremely common worldwide. More than 1000 naturally occurring human hemoglobin variants with single amino acid substitutions throughout the molecule have been discovered, mainly through their clinical and/or laboratory manifestations. These variants alter hemoglobin structure and biochemical properties with physiological effects ranging from insignificant to severe. Studies of these mutations in patients and in the laboratory have produced a wealth of information on hemoglobin biochemistry and biology with significant implications for hematology practice. More generally, landmark studies of hemoglobin performed over the past 60 years have established important paradigms for the disciplines of structural biology, genetics, biochemistry, and medicine. Here we review the major classes of hemoglobin variants, emphasizing general concepts and illustrative examples. PMID:23388674

  2. A Longitudinal Study of a Chinese Man Presenting with Non-Fluent/Agrammatic Variant of Primary Progressive Aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoyan; He, Fangping; Chen, Zhongqin; Liu, Ping; Peng, Guoping

    2018-01-01

    Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by declining language ability. However, the difficulty in defining the central clinical features in its earliest stage and establishing the dynamics of its progression has led to controversy. We report a 71-year-old man with Han language suffering from non-fluent/agrammatic variant of PPA but presenting as typical Alzheimer's disease (AD) and confused with logopenic variant of PPA in its early stage, longitudinally describing his clinical characteristics, neuroanatomical basis, and genetic associations, and exploring the underlying pathology. This case highlights a longitudinal data for reliably discriminating among AD and PPA variants and helps to deepen our understanding of Han language non-fluent/agrammatic variant of PPA.

  3. Screening for Structural Hemoglobin Variants in Bahia, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Wellington Santos; de Oliveira, Roberto Ferreira; Ribeiro, Sanzia Bezerra; da Silva, Isabel Batista; de Araújo, Edna Maria; Baptista, Abrahão Fontes

    2016-01-01

    Brazil was the country that received the largest number of Africans during the time of colonization, and Bahia was the Brazilian state that received the largest number of slaves from Africa. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the coverage of the newborn screening program for sickle cell disease in the Recôncavo Baiano region of the state of Bahia, and to show the frequency of the subjects with hemoglobin variants in the 2006–2009 period. Blood samples from neonates in twelve cities in the Recôncavo Baiano region were analyzed by High Performance Liquid Chromatography. A total of 16,402 children were born in this period, 14,773 of which underwent newborn screening. In this period 1416 children were born carrying hemoglobin variants HbS and HbC. Forty-seven patients—20 HbSS genotype and 27 HbSC genotype—were diagnosed in eleven of the twelve cities surveyed. The proportion of children born with sickle cell disease in the Recôncavo Baiano region was 1/314, which was higher than the 1/650 rate for the state of Bahia. The data presented in this study confirm the high frequency of sickle cell disease in Recôncavo Baiano, demonstrating the need to create a referral center for the care of patients with sickle cell diseases in the region. PMID:26901212

  4. Identifying pathogenicity of human variants via paralog-based yeast complementation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Yang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available To better understand the health implications of personal genomes, we now face a largely unmet challenge to identify functional variants within disease-associated genes. Functional variants can be identified by trans-species complementation, e.g., by failure to rescue a yeast strain bearing a mutation in an orthologous human gene. Although orthologous complementation assays are powerful predictors of pathogenic variation, they are available for only a few percent of human disease genes. Here we systematically examine the question of whether complementation assays based on paralogy relationships can expand the number of human disease genes with functional variant detection assays. We tested over 1,000 paralogous human-yeast gene pairs for complementation, yielding 34 complementation relationships, of which 33 (97% were novel. We found that paralog-based assays identified disease variants with success on par with that of orthology-based assays. Combining all homology-based assay results, we found that complementation can often identify pathogenic variants outside the homologous sequence region, presumably because of global effects on protein folding or stability. Within our search space, paralogy-based complementation more than doubled the number of human disease genes with a yeast-based complementation assay for disease variation.

  5. [Clinico-pathogenetic variants of chronic gastritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernin, V V; Dzhulaĭ, G S

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate specific features of the course of chronic gastritis (CG), morphofunctional condition of gastric mucosa, vegetative regulation, adrenergic and cholinergic shifts, histamine metabolism and effects of exogenic and endogenic risk factors in CG patients; to study clinicopathogenetic variants of CG. A total of 311 CG patients aged from 16 to 72 years were studied. They were divided into three groups by their gastric mucosa condition. The control group consisted of 30 healthy donors. The following parameters were studied: visual and histological condition of gastric mucosa, total acidity, the levels of free hydrochloric acid, pepsin, bioelectric gastric activity, general autonomic tonicity, cholinesterase activity. Three clinicopathogenetic variants of the disease have been identified. Variant 1 was characterized by a recurrent course, subjective manifestation of the disease only in exacerbation, surface (primarily antral) mucosal affection, normal or enhanced secretory and motor functions of the stomach, adequate reaction of acid production to caffeine and histamine stimulation, parasympathicotonia, absolute hyperhistaminemia, relative hypoacetylcholinemia, subnormal urinary excretion of adrenalin. Variant 2 manifested with rare recurrences, longer and more severe exacerbations, frequent spontaneous and provoked aggravations, moderate focal atrophy of the mucosa, secretory insufficiency with adequate reaction to histamine and minor to caffeine stimuli, hypomotor gastric dyskinesia, vegetative eutonia, normohistaminemia, absolute hypoacetylcholinemia, subnormal urinary excretion of noradrenaline. Variant 3 runs without definite remissions and exacerbations, with continuous abdominal pain and dyspepsia, frequent spontaneous aggravations, marked extended mucosal atrophy with secretory insufficiency up to achlorhydria, no stimulation of acid production in response to caffeine and histamine, gastric hypomotility, sympathicotonia, absolute hypohistaminemia

  6. Desmoplastic variant of ameloblastoma of the maxilla: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Kwang Joon; Park, Ha Na; Kim, Kyoung A [Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry and Institute of Oral Bioscience, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    The desmoplastic variant of ameloblastoma is a rare form of ameloblastoma characterized by unique radiographic and histologic features. A 46-year-old female was referred to our hospital, complaining of swelling in the left upper lip area. Radiographic findings revealed an ill-defined multilocular lesion with a large cystic lesion and thick sclerotic trabeculae on the left anterior maxilla. After the patient underwent partial osteotomy, histologic analysis revealed a desmoplastic ameloblastoma with no evidence of a hybrid lesion or cyst formation. The radiographic findings in the present case were different from those described in previous case reports. These findings are of special importance due to the unfamiliar radiographic and histologic features of this lesion.

  7. Desmoplastic variant of ameloblastoma of the maxilla: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koh, Kwang Joon; Park, Ha Na; Kim, Kyoung A

    2015-01-01

    The desmoplastic variant of ameloblastoma is a rare form of ameloblastoma characterized by unique radiographic and histologic features. A 46-year-old female was referred to our hospital, complaining of swelling in the left upper lip area. Radiographic findings revealed an ill-defined multilocular lesion with a large cystic lesion and thick sclerotic trabeculae on the left anterior maxilla. After the patient underwent partial osteotomy, histologic analysis revealed a desmoplastic ameloblastoma with no evidence of a hybrid lesion or cyst formation. The radiographic findings in the present case were different from those described in previous case reports. These findings are of special importance due to the unfamiliar radiographic and histologic features of this lesion

  8. Normal variants of skin in neonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulkarni M

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available 2221 consecutive live births taking place between March 1994 and February 1995 were evaluated for a minimum period of 5 days to note for the occurrence of various normal anatomical variants specially those of skin. Birth weight, gestational age, maternal age, socio-economic status and consanguinity were carefully recorded in all the cases. Mongolian spots (72%, Epstein pearls (43.8%, Milia (26.2% and Erythema toxicum (25.2%, were the common dermatological variants noted. Maturity of the babies and possibly genetic factors (consanguinity are important factors in their causation as ordered in our study.

  9. Variant profiling of evolving prokaryotic populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Zojer

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Genomic heterogeneity of bacterial species is observed and studied in experimental evolution experiments and clinical diagnostics, and occurs as micro-diversity of natural habitats. The challenge for genome research is to accurately capture this heterogeneity with the currently used short sequencing reads. Recent advances in NGS technologies improved the speed and coverage and thus allowed for deep sequencing of bacterial populations. This facilitates the quantitative assessment of genomic heterogeneity, including low frequency alleles or haplotypes. However, false positive variant predictions due to sequencing errors and mapping artifacts of short reads need to be prevented. We therefore created VarCap, a workflow for the reliable prediction of different types of variants even at low frequencies. In order to predict SNPs, InDels and structural variations, we evaluated the sensitivity and accuracy of different software tools using synthetic read data. The results suggested that the best sensitivity could be reached by a union of different tools, however at the price of increased false positives. We identified possible reasons for false predictions and used this knowledge to improve the accuracy by post-filtering the predicted variants according to properties such as frequency, coverage, genomic environment/localization and co-localization with other variants. We observed that best precision was achieved by using an intersection of at least two tools per variant. This resulted in the reliable prediction of variants above a minimum relative abundance of 2%. VarCap is designed for being routinely used within experimental evolution experiments or for clinical diagnostics. The detected variants are reported as frequencies within a VCF file and as a graphical overview of the distribution of the different variant/allele/haplotype frequencies. The source code of VarCap is available at https://github.com/ma2o/VarCap. In order to provide this workflow to

  10. Variants of Modeling Dwelling Market Value

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barańska Anna

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The object of this paper is to determine real estate market value on the basis of a multidimensional function model in different variants: A - directly from the model estimated on the basis of a big database, B - from the same model form, but estimated on the basis of a reduced database consisting of dwellings most similar to the estimated one, and C - based on modeled prices corrected by random correction, calculated from random deviations for dwellings most similar to the assessed one. In the framework of statistical inference procedures, the resulting comparison was carried out by parametric significance tests. They were applied to draw conclusions on the analyzed variants

  11. Those fascinating numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Koninck, Jean-Marie De

    2009-01-01

    Who would have thought that listing the positive integers along with their most remarkable properties could end up being such an engaging and stimulating adventure? The author uses this approach to explore elementary and advanced topics in classical number theory. A large variety of numbers are contemplated: Fermat numbers, Mersenne primes, powerful numbers, sublime numbers, Wieferich primes, insolite numbers, Sastry numbers, voracious numbers, to name only a few. The author also presents short proofs of miscellaneous results and constantly challenges the reader with a variety of old and new n

  12. The interaction of glutathione S-transferase M1-null variants with tobacco smoke exposure and the development of childhood asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rogers, A J; Brasch-Andersen, C; Ionita-Laza, I

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The glutathione S-transferase M1 (GSTM1)-null variant is a common copy number variant associated with adverse pulmonary outcomes, including asthma and airflow obstruction, with evidence of important gene-by-environment interactions with exposures to oxidative stress. OBJECTIVE: To exp...

  13. Determination of variants in the 3'-region of the Tyrosinase gene requires locus specific amplification.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chaki, M.; Mukhopadhyay, A.; Ray, K.

    2005-01-01

    Mutations in the Tyrosinase gene (TYR, 11q14-q21) cause oculocutaneous albinism type 1 (OCA1). The 3'-region of the TYR shows 98.55% sequence identity with a pseudogene, known as Tyrosinase-Like Gene (TYRL, 11p11.2-cen). A large number of publicly available nucleotide variants of TYR in this region

  14. A guide for functional analysis of BRCA1 variants of uncertain significance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Millot, Gaël A; Carvalho, Marcelo A; Caputo, Sandrine M

    2012-01-01

    Germline mutations in the tumor suppressor gene BRCA1 confer an estimated lifetime risk of 56-80% for breast cancer and 15-60% for ovarian cancer. Since the mid 1990s when BRCA1 was identified, genetic testing has revealed over 1,500 unique germline variants. However, for a significant number of ...

  15. Expression of CD44 splice variants in human primary brain tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaaijk, P.; Troost, D.; Morsink, F.; Keehnen, R. M.; Leenstra, S.; Bosch, D. A.; Pals, S. T.

    1995-01-01

    Expression of CD44, particularly of certain splice variants, has been linked to tumor progression and metastatic potential in a number of different animal and human cancers. Although differential expression of CD44 standard epitopes (CD44s) in human brain tumors has been reported, the expression of

  16. A Heuristic Approach for Discovering Reference Models by Mining Process Model Variants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, C.; Reichert, M.U.; Wombacher, Andreas

    Recently, a new generation of adaptive Process-Aware Information Systems (PAISs) has emerged, which enables structural process changes during runtime while preserving PAIS robustness and consistency. Such flexibility, in turn, leads to a large number of process variants derived from the same model,

  17. Implementing "Marketing Me": A Simulation Enhanced Variant for a Student Self-Marketing Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flostrand, Andrew; Ho, Jason Y. C.; Krider, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    The use of student self-branding exercises in introductory marketing courses for undergraduate business programs has been growing in popularity due to a number of advantages for students. This article introduces implementation of the "Marketing Me" variant developed and used since 2013 by the authors, wherein alumni are brought in to…

  18. Rare GABRA3 variants are associated with epileptic seizures, encephalopathy and dysmorphic features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niturad, Cristina Elena; Lev, Dorit; Kalscheuer, Vera M; Charzewska, Agnieszka; Schubert, Julian; Lerman-Sagie, Tally; Kroes, Hester Y.; Oegema, Renske; Traverso, Monica; Specchio, Nicola; Lassota, Maria; Chelly, Jamel; Bennett-Back, Odeya; Carmi, Nirit; Koffler-Brill, Tal; Iacomino, Michele; Trivisano, Marina; Capovilla, Giuseppe; Striano, Pasquale; Nawara, Magdalena; Rzoca, Sylwia; Fischer, Ute; Bienek, Melanie; Jensen, Corinna; Hu, Hao; Thiele, Holger; Altmüller, Janine; Krause, Roland; May, Patrick; Becker, Felicitas; Balling, Rudi; Biskup, Saskia; Haas, Stefan A.; Nürnberg, Peter; Van Gassen, Koen L.I.; Lerche, Holger; Zara, Federico; Maljevic, Snezana; Leshinsky-Silver, Esther

    2017-01-01

    Genetic epilepsies are caused by mutations in a range of different genes, many of them encoding ion channels, receptors or transporters. While the number of detected variants and genes increased dramatically in the recent years, pleiotropic effects have also been recognized, revealing that clinical

  19. Exposing the Myths, Defining the Future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slavov, S.

    2013-01-01

    With this official statement, the WEC calls for policymakers and industry leaders to ''get real'' as the World Energy Council as a global energy body exposes the myths by informing the energy debate and defines a path to a more sustainable energy future. The World Energy Council urged stakeholders to take urgent and incisive actions, to develop and transform the global energy system. Failure to do so could put aspirations on the triple challenge of WEC Energy Trilemma defined by affordability, accessibility and environmental sustainability at serious risk. Through its multi-year in-depth global studies and issue-mapping the WEC has found that challenges that energy sector is facing today are much more crucial than previously envisaged. The WEC's analysis has exposed a number of myths which influence our understanding of important aspects of the global energy landscape. If not challenged, these misconceptions will lead us down a path of complacency and missed opportunities. Much has, and still is, being done to secure energy future, but the WEC' s studies reveal that current pathways fall short of delivering on global aspirations of energy access, energy security and environmental improvements. If we are to derive the full economic and social benefits from energy resources, then we must take incisive and urgent action to modify our steps to energy solutions. The usual business approaches are not effective, the business as usual is not longer a solution. The focus has moved from large universal solutions to an appreciation of regional and national contexts and sharply differentiated consumer expectations.(author)

  20. The Translated Dowling Polynomials and Numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangontarum, Mahid M; Macodi-Ringia, Amila P; Abdulcarim, Normalah S

    2014-01-01

    More properties for the translated Whitney numbers of the second kind such as horizontal generating function, explicit formula, and exponential generating function are proposed. Using the translated Whitney numbers of the second kind, we will define the translated Dowling polynomials and numbers. Basic properties such as exponential generating functions and explicit formula for the translated Dowling polynomials and numbers are obtained. Convexity, integral representation, and other interesting identities are also investigated and presented. We show that the properties obtained are generalizations of some of the known results involving the classical Bell polynomials and numbers. Lastly, we established the Hankel transform of the translated Dowling numbers.

  1. A method to reduce ancestry related germline false positives in tumor only somatic variant calling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca F. Halperin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Significant clinical and research applications are driving large scale adoption of individualized tumor sequencing in cancer in order to identify tumors-specific mutations. When a matched germline sample is available, somatic mutations may be identified using comparative callers. However, matched germline samples are frequently not available such as with archival tissues, which makes it difficult to distinguish somatic from germline variants. While population databases may be used to filter out known germline variants, recent studies have shown private germline variants result in an inflated false positive rate in unmatched tumor samples, and the number germline false positives in an individual may be related to ancestry. Methods First, we examined the relationship between the germline false positives and ancestry. Then we developed and implemented a tumor only caller (LumosVar that leverages differences in allelic frequency between somatic and germline variants in impure tumors. We used simulated data to systematically examine how copy number alterations, tumor purity, and sequencing depth should affect the sensitivity of our caller. Finally, we evaluated the caller on real data. Results We find the germline false-positive rate is significantly higher for individuals of non-European Ancestry largely due to the limited diversity in public polymorphism databases and due to population-specific characteristics such as admixture or recent expansions. Our Bayesian tumor only caller (LumosVar is able to greatly reduce false positives from private germline variants, and our sensitivity is similar to predictions based on simulated data. Conclusions Taken together, our results suggest that studies of individuals of non-European ancestry would most benefit from our approach. However, high sensitivity requires sufficiently impure tumors and adequate sequencing depth. Even in impure tumors, there are copy number alterations that result

  2. Defining the genetic basis of early onset hereditary spastic paraplegia using whole genome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Kishore R; Wali, G M; Kamate, Mahesh; Wali, Gautam; Minoche, André E; Puttick, Clare; Pinese, Mark; Gayevskiy, Velimir; Dinger, Marcel E; Roscioli, Tony; Sue, Carolyn M; Cowley, Mark J

    2016-10-01

    We performed whole genome sequencing (WGS) in nine families from India with early-onset hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP). We obtained a genetic diagnosis in 4/9 (44 %) families within known HSP genes (DDHD2 and CYP2U1), as well as perixosomal biogenesis disorders (PEX16) and GM1 gangliosidosis (GLB1). In the remaining patients, no candidate structural variants, copy number variants or predicted splice variants affecting an extended candidate gene list were identified. Our findings demonstrate the efficacy of using WGS for diagnosing early-onset HSP, particularly in consanguineous families (4/6 diagnosed), highlighting that two of the diagnoses would not have been made using a targeted approach.

  3. Topological properties of some sequences defined over 2-normed spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Hemen; Kilicman, Adem; Altun, Omer

    2016-01-01

    The paper investigates some classes of real number sequences over 2-normed spaces defined by means of Orlicz functions, a bounded sequence of strictly positive real numbers, a multiplier and a normal paranormed sequence space. Relevant properties of such classes have been investigated. Moreover, relationships among different such classes of sequences have also been studied under various parameters and conditions. Finally, the spaces are investigated for some other useful properties. The conclusion section provides many interesting facts for further research.

  4. Guidelines for investigating causality of sequence variants in human disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacArthur, D. G.; Manolio, T. A.; Dimmock, D. P.; Rehm, H. L.; Shendure, J.; Abecasis, G. R.; Adams, D. R.; Altman, R. B.; Antonarakis, S. E.; Ashley, E. A.; Barrett, J. C.; Biesecker, L. G.; Conrad, D. F.; Cooper, G. M.; Cox, N. J.; Daly, M. J.; Gerstein, M. B.; Goldstein, D. B.; Hirschhorn, J. N.; Leal, S. M.; Pennacchio, L. A.; Stamatoyannopoulos, J. A.; Sunyaev, S. R.; Valle, D.; Voight, B. F.; Winckler, W.; Gunter, C.

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of rare genetic variants is accelerating, and clear guidelines for distinguishing disease-causing sequence variants from the many potentially functional variants present in any human genome are urgently needed. Without rigorous standards we risk an acceleration of false-positive reports of causality, which would impede the translation of genomic research findings into the clinical diagnostic setting and hinder biological understanding of disease. Here we discuss the key challenges of assessing sequence variants in human disease, integrating both gene-level and variant-level support for causality. We propose guidelines for summarizing confidence in variant pathogenicity and highlight several areas that require further resource development. PMID:24759409

  5. Targeted Genetic Screen in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Reveals Novel Genetic Variants with Synergistic Effect on Clinical Phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnathan Cooper-Knock

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is underpinned by an oligogenic rare variant architecture. Identified genetic variants of ALS include RNA-binding proteins containing prion-like domains (PrLDs. We hypothesized that screening genes encoding additional similar proteins will yield novel genetic causes of ALS. The most common genetic variant of ALS patients is a G4C2-repeat expansion within C9ORF72. We have shown that G4C2-repeat RNA sequesters RNA-binding proteins. A logical consequence of this is that loss-of-function mutations in G4C2-binding partners might contribute to ALS pathogenesis independently of and/or synergistically with C9ORF72 expansions. Targeted sequencing of genomic DNA encoding either RNA-binding proteins or known ALS genes (n = 274 genes was performed in ALS patients to identify rare deleterious genetic variants and explore genotype-phenotype relationships. Genomic DNA was extracted from 103 ALS patients including 42 familial ALS patients and 61 young-onset (average age of onset 41 years sporadic ALS patients; patients were chosen to maximize the probability of identifying genetic causes of ALS. Thirteen patients carried a G4C2-repeat expansion of C9ORF72. We identified 42 patients with rare deleterious variants; 6 patients carried more than one variant. Twelve mutations were discovered in known ALS genes which served as a validation of our strategy. Rare deleterious variants in RNA-binding proteins were significantly enriched in ALS patients compared to control frequencies (p = 5.31E-18. Nineteen patients featured at least one variant in a RNA-binding protein containing a PrLD. The number of variants per patient correlated with rate of disease progression (t-test, p = 0.033. We identified eighteen patients with a single variant in a G4C2-repeat binding protein. Patients with a G4C2-binding protein variant in combination with a C9ORF72 expansion had a significantly faster disease course (t-test, p = 0.025. Our data are

  6. Molecular genetic and clinical characterization of myotonic dystrophy type 1 patients carrying variant repeats within DMPK expansions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pešović, Jovan; Perić, S; Brkušanin, M; Brajušković, G; Rakočević-Stojanović, V; Savić-Pavićević, Dušanka

    2017-12-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is caused by a highly unstable expansion of CTG repeats in the DMPK gene. Its huge phenotypic variability cannot be explained solely by the repeat number. Recently, variant repeats within the DMPK expansions have emerged as potential disease modifiers. The frequency of variant expanded alleles was estimated in 242 DM1 patients from 174 Serbian families using repeat-primed PCR (RP-PCR). The patterns of variant repeats were determined by direct sequencing of RP-PCR or PCR products. PCR-based southern blot was performed to get insight into the intergenerational mutational dynamics of variant expanded alleles. All patients carrying variant repeats were clinically re-examined. Variant repeats were observed in eight patients from five families (2.9%). They were detected only at the 3' end of DMPK expansions. CCG variant repeats were present in seven patients, either as a part of regular runs of CCGCTG hexamer, individual repeats, or CCG blocks. Analyses of three intergenerational transmissions revealed a considerable stability or likely a contraction of variant expanded alleles. Intriguingly, a decrease in age at onset accompanied these transmissions. Overall, patients were characterized by a milder phenotype and/or some atypical symptoms that could be rather clinically suggestive of myotonic dystrophy type 2. In addition, the first case of de novo CTC variant repeat was observed. Variant repeats might explain a part of the phenotypic variability in a small percent of DM1 patients and likely display a stabilizing effect on the meiotic instability of DMPK expanded alleles.

  7. Introduction to number theory

    CERN Document Server

    Vazzana, Anthony; Garth, David

    2007-01-01

    One of the oldest branches of mathematics, number theory is a vast field devoted to studying the properties of whole numbers. Offering a flexible format for a one- or two-semester course, Introduction to Number Theory uses worked examples, numerous exercises, and two popular software packages to describe a diverse array of number theory topics.

  8. Building Numbers from Primes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhart, Jerry

    2009-01-01

    Prime numbers are often described as the "building blocks" of natural numbers. This article shows how the author and his students took this idea literally by using prime factorizations to build numbers with blocks. In this activity, students explore many concepts of number theory, including the relationship between greatest common factors and…

  9. Cellular Automata Rules and Linear Numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Nayak, Birendra Kumar; Sahoo, Sudhakar; Biswal, Sagarika

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, linear Cellular Automta (CA) rules are recursively generated using a binary tree rooted at "0". Some mathematical results on linear as well as non-linear CA rules are derived. Integers associated with linear CA rules are defined as linear numbers and the properties of these linear numbers are studied.

  10. Impact of Type 2 Diabetes Susceptibility Variants on Quantitative Glycemic Traits Reveals Mechanistic Heterogeneity

    OpenAIRE

    Dimas, Antigone S.; Lagou, Vasiliki; Barker, Adam; Knowles, Joshua W.; M?gi, Reedik; Hivert, Marie-France; Benazzo, Andrea; Rybin, Denis; Jackson, Anne U.; Stringham, Heather M.; Song, Ci; Fischer-Rosinsky, Antje; Boesgaard, Trine Well?v; Grarup, Niels; Abbasi, Fahim A.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with established type 2 diabetes display both ?-cell dysfunction and insulin resistance. To define fundamental processes leading to the diabetic state, we examined the relationship between type 2 diabetes risk variants at 37 established susceptibility loci, and indices of proinsulin processing, insulin secretion, and insulin sensitivity. We included data from up to 58,614 nondiabetic subjects with basal measures and 17,327 with dynamic measures. We used additive genetic models with a...

  11. A comparison between three variants of factorial analysis on biological data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amiard, J.-C.; Pages, Jerome.

    1976-12-01

    Starting from biological data concerning radiocontamination of 32 fishes through strontium 85, a comparison is made between results given out by three factorial analysis variants: principal components analysis, ranks analysis, correspondences analysis. They especially dwell on differences obtained, precisely in this case, between principal components analysis and ranks analysis on one hand, and on the other correspondences analysis. Type of analysis to be used shall be defined according to the purpose of biologists [fr

  12. Comparison Criteria and Performance Levels for Soundproofing Panels Made in Different Constructive Variants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Gheorghe

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an analysis of the performance lavels and comparison criteria for panels made from different soundproofing materials, in different constructive variants. Setting the performance level, on the basis of normative and regulatory documents, for soundproofing materials contained inside of noise reduction devices, is determined so that it can be defined, tested and established feasible technical solutions for sound absorbing protection, through a dissemination of obtained results as well for ensuring requirements for implementing the technology transfer for manufacturing.

  13. Probabilistic Transcriptome Assembly and Variant Graph Genotyping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sibbesen, Jonas Andreas

    that this approach outperforms existing state-of-the-art methods measured using sensitivity and precision on both simulated and real data. The second is a novel probabilistic method that uses exact alignment of k-mers to a set of variants graphs to provide unbiased estimates of genotypes in a population...

  14. HLogo: a parallel Haskell variant of Netlogo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Bezirgiannis (Nikolaos); Prasetya, I.S.W.B.; Sakellariou, I.

    2016-01-01

    textabstractAgent-based Modeling (ABM) has become quite popular to the simulation community for its usability and wide area of applicability. However, speed is not usually a trait that ABM tools are characterized of attaining. This paper presents HLogo, a parallel variant of the NetLogo ABM

  15. XVCL: XML-based Variant Configuration Language

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jarzabek, Stan; Basset, Paul; Zhang, Hongyu

    2003-01-01

    XVCL (XML-based Variant Configuration Language) is a meta-programming technique and tool that provides effective reuse mechanisms. XVCL is an open source software developed at the National University of Singapore. Being a modern and versatile version of Bassett's frames, a technology that has...

  16. Analysis of the energy development variants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsvetanov, P.

    1990-01-01

    Analysis of the variants of energy development is made as the third stage of a procedure of energy-economy interrelations dynamics study, the other two stages being the scenarios description and the formulation of the variants. This stage includes a research on the dimensions and the dynamics of the resources demands, the general features and the trends of the national energy development. There is a presentation of a comparative analysis of the variants in terms of economic indices and energy values, computed by the model IMPACT-B. A resource evaluation of the development variants is given in terms of investments, requirements (direct, indirect and total) and limited national resources demands of the energy system. The trends of the national energy development discussed are: trends characterizing the changes in the structure of the energy consumption, resulting from changes in the economy; trends of the energy system impact on the productivity of labor; general trends of the proportionality in the industrial, the household and services sector development. 16 refs., 16 figs., 4 tabs. (R.Ts.)

  17. Report of a rare anatomic variant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Brucker, Y; Ilsen, B; Muylaert, C

    2015-01-01

    We report the CT findings in a case of partial anomalous pulmonary venous return (PAPVR) from the left upper lobe in an adult. PAPVR is an anatomic variant in which one to three pulmonary veins drain into the right atrium or its tributaries, rather than into the left atrium. This results in a lef...

  18. New genetic variants associated with prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Researchers have newly identified 23 common genetic variants -- one-letter changes in DNA known as single-nucleotide polymorphisms or SNPs -- that are associated with risk of prostate cancer. These results come from an analysis of more than 10 million SNP

  19. Genetic variants influencing phenotypic variance heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ek, Weronica E; Rask-Andersen, Mathias; Karlsson, Torgny; Enroth, Stefan; Gyllensten, Ulf; Johansson, Åsa

    2018-03-01

    Most genetic studies identify genetic variants associated with disease risk or with the mean value of a quantitative trait. More rarely, genetic variants associated with variance heterogeneity are considered. In this study, we have identified such variance single-nucleotide polymorphisms (vSNPs) and examined if these represent biological gene × gene or gene × environment interactions or statistical artifacts caused by multiple linked genetic variants influencing the same phenotype. We have performed a genome-wide study, to identify vSNPs associated with variance heterogeneity in DNA methylation levels. Genotype data from over 10 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and DNA methylation levels at over 430 000 CpG sites, were analyzed in 729 individuals. We identified vSNPs for 7195 CpG sites (P mean DNA methylation levels. We further showed that variance heterogeneity between genotypes mainly represents additional, often rare, SNPs in linkage disequilibrium (LD) with the respective vSNP and for some vSNPs, multiple low frequency variants co-segregating with one of the vSNP alleles. Therefore, our results suggest that variance heterogeneity of DNA methylation mainly represents phenotypic effects by multiple SNPs, rather than biological interactions. Such effects may also be important for interpreting variance heterogeneity of more complex clinical phenotypes.

  20. Apolipoprotein gene variants and susceptibility to essential ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Apolipoprotein gene variants and susceptibility to essential hypertension in Cameroon. ... Results: Whereas advanced age, SBP, DBP, lack of exercise and family history constituted risk factors of EH, sex, body mass index (BMI), Fasting blood sugar (FBS), lipid profile, smoking, excessive alcohol consumption did not.

  1. Developing consistent pronunciation models for phonemic variants

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Davel, M

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available from a lexicon containing variants. In this paper we (the authors) address both these issues by creating ‘pseudo-phonemes’ associated with sets of ‘generation restriction rules’ to model those pronunciations that are consistently realised as two or more...

  2. Extracting pronunciation rules for phonemic variants

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Davel, M

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available that occur in the training lexicon. In this paper authors propose an approach for the incorporation of phonemic variants in a typical instance based learning algorithm, Default and Refine. Authors investigate the use of a combined ‘pseudo-phoneme’ associated...

  3. Variants of the left aortic arch branches

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Type C (Courtesy of Rutherford. Vascular. Surgery. 4th ed. Philadelphia: Saunders, 19954). Fig. 1. Type A. Abstract. The normal aorta has three branches from its arch, but variations in this pattern are not uncommon. Our interest was to correlate the docu- mented statistics to the variants observed in our patients. This was.

  4. DROUGHT RESISTANT SELECTION ON SOYBEAN SOMACLONAL VARIANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Basuki

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This research was conducted to evaluate the yield potential of 19 somaclonal variants resulting from in vitro selection when planted under drought stress condition in the field. Field test was done by planting the variants, the parents, and checked varieties in the field during dry season, and was irrigated once a week for non-stress and once two weeks for drought stress treatment. Split-plot design arranged in a factorial (2 x 28 with three replications was used in this research. Obser-vations were done on yield and yield components. Analysis of variance was used to see the difference between treatments and then it was continued with analysis using Honestly Significant Difference test to find out the best treatments. There was no interaction between genotype and drought stress on seed yield. Different genotypes showed a significant difference on this character. It indicated that the yield potential of selected variants was not affected by drought stress treatment. This research gave 10 variants having the potential to be developed as drought resistant genotypes. However, these ten potential geno-types need to be tested further in field trial to find out the yield adaptability and stability and their resistance to drought stress.

  5. Molecular Screening of Keratoconus Susceptibility Sequence Variants in VSX1, TGFBI, DOCK9, STK24, and IPO5 Genes in Polish Patients and Novel TGFBI Variant Identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karolak, Justyna A; Polakowski, Piotr; Szaflik, Jerzy; Szaflik, Jacek P; Gajecka, Marzena

    2016-01-01

    Keratoconus (KTCN) is a degenerative disorder of the eye that results in the conical shape and thinning of the cornea and is a leading cause for corneal transplantations. A number of studies suggest that genetic factors play a role in KTCN etiology. Some candidate gene variants have recently been shown to be associated with KTCN. The purpose of our study was to verify the role of VSX1, TGFBI, DOCK9, IPO5, and STK24 sequence variants in Polish KTCN patients. Forty-two Polish patients with sporadic KTCN and 50 control individuals were enrolled into this study. Both affected and unaffected individuals underwent detailed ophthalmic examination. The mutations screening in the candidate genes was performed by the direct sequencing method. Analysis of VSX1, TGFBI, DOCK9, IPO5, and STK24 genes identified numerous sequence variants. Variants c.-264_-255delGGGGTGGGGT, c.627 + 23G > A, c.809-6_809-5insT, and c.*200G > T in the VSX1 gene, and heterozygous c.1598G > A mutation (Arg533Gln) in exon 12 of TGFBI were detected for the first time in KTCN patients. Two known sequence variants of TGFBI c.1620T > C (Phe540Phe) and c.1678 + 23G > A were observed in KTCN patients and control individuals. The newly reported c.717 + 43A > G substitution in intron 7 of DOCK9 was identified in both KTCN patients and healthy individuals. Our investigation showed that KTCN-related sequence variants of analyzed genes were found in a very small proportion of the studied patients indicating that genes other than VSX1, TGFBI, DOCK9, IPO5, and STK24 are involved in the development and progression of KTCN in Polish patients. Our results support the hypothesis about the genetic heterogeneity of KTCN.

  6. Indico CONFERENCE: Define the Call for Abstracts

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Ferreira, Pedro

    2017-01-01

    In this tutorial, you will learn how to define and open a call for abstracts. When defining a call for abstracts, you will be able to define settings related to the type of questions asked during a review of an abstract, select the users who will review the abstracts, decide when to open the call for abstracts, and more.

  7. On defining semantics of extended attribute grammars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Ole Lehrmann

    1980-01-01

    Knuth has introduced attribute grammars (AGs) as a tool to define the semanitcs of context-free languages. The use of AGs in connection with programming language definitions has mostly been to define the context-sensitive syntax of the language and to define a translation in code for a hypothetical...

  8. Rare Copy Number Variants in NRXN1 and CNTN6 Increase Risk for Tourette Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, Alden Y; Yu, Dongmei; Davis, Lea K; Sul, Jae Hoon; Tsetsos, Fotis; Ramensky, Vasily; Zelaya, Ivette; Ramos, Eliana Marisa; Osiecki, Lisa; Chen, Jason A; McGrath, Lauren M; Illmann, Cornelia; Sandor, Paul; Barr, Cathy L; Grados, Marco; Singer, Harvey S; Nöthen, Markus M; Hebebrand, Johannes; King, Robert A; Dion, Yves; Rouleau, Guy; Budman, Cathy L; Depienne, Christel; Worbe, Yulia; Hartmann, Andreas; Müller-Vahl, Kirsten R; Stuhrmann, Manfred; Aschauer, Harald; Stamenkovic, Mara; Schloegelhofer, Monika; Konstantinidis, Anastasios; Lyon, Gholson J; McMahon, William M; Barta, Csaba; Tarnok, Zsanett; Nagy, Peter; Batterson, James R; Rizzo, Renata; Cath, Danielle C; Wolanczyk, Tomasz; Berlin, Cheston; Malaty, Irene A; Okun, Michael S; Woods, Douglas W; Rees, Elliott; Pato, Carlos N; Pato, Michele T; Knowles, James A; Posthuma, Danielle; Pauls, David L; Cox, Nancy J; Neale, Benjamin M; Freimer, Nelson B; Paschou, Peristera; Mathews, Carol A; Scharf, Jeremiah M; Coppola, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a model neuropsychiatric disorder thought to arise from abnormal development and/or maintenance of cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical circuits. TS is highly heritable, but its underlying genetic causes are still elusive, and no genome-wide significant loci have been

  9. dnAGEnetics: genomic copy number variants and parental age as risk factors for psychiatric disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buizer - Voskamp, J.E.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Schizophrenia is a debilitating psychiatric disorder with a life-time risk of 0.46 – 1% in the general population. It is characterized by psychotic symptoms, including delusions and hallucinations. Its predisposition is influenced by a complex interaction of genetic and environmental

  10. Variant Philadelphia translocations with different breakpoints in six chronic myeloid leukemia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilhan Kuru

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The Philadelphia (Ph chromosome, consisting of the t(9;22(q34;q11 translocation, is observed in ~90% of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML. Variant Ph translocations are observed in 5%-10% of CML patients. In variant translocations 3 and possibly more chromosomes are involved. Herein we report 6 CML patients with variant Ph translocations.Materials and Methods: Bone marrow samples were examined using conventional cytogenetic meth ods. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH with whole-chromosome paints and BCR-ABL 1D probes were used to confirm and/or complement the findings, and identify rearrangements beyond the resolution of conventional cytogenetic methods. Results: Variant Ph translocations in the 6 patients were as follows: t(7;22(p22;q11, t(9;22;15(q34;q11;q22, t(15;22(p11;q11, t(1;9;22;3(q24;q34;q11;q21, t(12;22(p13;q11, and t(4;8;9;22(q11;q13;q34;q11.Conclusion: Among the patients, 3 had simple and 3 had complex variant Ph translocations. Two of the presented cases had variant Ph chromosomes not previously described, 1 of which had a new complex Ph translocation involving chromosomes 1, 3, 9, 22, and t(1;9;22;3(q24;q34;q11;q21 apart from a clone with a classical Ph, and the other case had variant Ph translocation with chromosomes 4, 8, 9, and 22, and t(4;8;9;22(q11;q13;q34;q11 full complex translocation. Number of studies reported that some patients with variant Ph translocation were poor responders to imatinib. All of our patients with variant Ph translocations had suboptimal responses to imatinib, denoting a poor prognosis also. Variant Ph translocations may be important as they are associated with prognosis and therapy for CML patients.

  11. A Critique of the Controlled Defining Vocabulary in Longman ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article critically analyses the Longman Defining Vocabulary (LDV) in relation to its size, range and frequency, senses, parts of speech, affixes, and multiword expressions. The recent versions of the LDV contain a relatively fixed number of items. Over 85% of those items were found to be highly frequent, and for the ...

  12. Frameworks for defining and managing the wilderness experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert E. Manning

    2012-01-01

    A large and growing body of research on outdoor recreation and the wilderness experience has been conducted over the nearly 50 years since passage of the Wilderness Act of 1964. A number of conceptual and empirical frameworks have emerged from this body of knowledge that can be used to help define and manage the wilderness experience.

  13. Implicity Defined Neural Networks for Sequence Labeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-13

    hid- den states of the network to coupled together, allowing potential improvement on problems with complex, long-distance dependencies. Initial...popularity of the Long Short- Term Memory (LSTM) (Hochreiter and Schmidhuber, 1997) and variants such as the Gated Recurrent Unit (GRU) (Cho et al., 2014...of the “switch” vari- ables for various sentences. The switch is made up of many features, and it does not necessarily always cor- respond to human

  14. Discovery and functional annotation of SIX6 variants in primary open-angle glaucoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Ulmer Carnes

    Full Text Available Glaucoma is a leading cause of blindness worldwide. Primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG is the most common subtype and is a complex trait with multigenic inheritance. Genome-wide association studies have previously identified a significant association between POAG and the SIX6 locus (rs10483727, odds ratio (OR = 1.32, p = 3.87×10(-11. SIX6 plays a role in ocular development and has been associated with the morphology of the optic nerve. We sequenced the SIX6 coding and regulatory regions in 262 POAG cases and 256 controls and identified six nonsynonymous coding variants, including five rare and one common variant, Asn141His (rs33912345, which was associated significantly with POAG (OR = 1.27, p = 4.2×10(-10 in the NEIGHBOR/GLAUGEN datasets. These variants were tested in an in vivo Danio rerio (zebrafish complementation assay to evaluate ocular metrics such as eye size and optic nerve structure. Five variants, found primarily in POAG cases, were hypomorphic or null, while the sixth variant, found only in controls, was benign. One variant in the SIX6 enhancer increased expression of SIX6 and disrupted its regulation. Finally, to our knowledge for the first time, we have identified a clinical feature in POAG patients that appears to be dependent upon SIX6 genotype: patients who are homozygous for the SIX6 risk allele (His141 have a statistically thinner retinal nerve fiber layer than patients homozygous for the SIX6 non-risk allele (Asn141. Our results, in combination with previous SIX6 work, lead us to hypothesize that SIX6 risk variants disrupt the development of the neural retina, leading to a reduced number of retinal ganglion cells, thereby increasing the risk of glaucoma-associated vision loss.

  15. Splicing analysis of 14 BRCA1 missense variants classifies nine variants as pathogenic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlborn, Lise B; Dandanell, Mette; Steffensen, Ane Y

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenic germline mutations in the BRCA1 gene predispose carriers to early onset breast and ovarian cancer. Clinical genetic screening of BRCA1 often reveals variants with uncertain clinical significance, complicating patient and family management. Therefore, functional examinations are urgently...

  16. Modelling the number of olive groves in Spanish municipalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huete, M.D.; Marmolejo, J.A.

    2016-11-01

    The univariate generalized Waring distribution (UGWD) is presented as a new model to describe the goodness of fit, applicable in the context of agriculture. In this paper, it was used to model the number of olive groves recorded in Spain in the 8,091 municipalities recorded in the 2009 Agricultural Census, according to which the production of oil olives accounted for 94% of total output, while that of table olives represented 6% (with an average of 44.84 and 4.06 holdings per Spanish municipality, respectively). UGWD is suitable for fitting this type of discrete data, with strong left-sided asymmetry. This novel use of UGWD can provide the foundation for future research in agriculture, with the advantage over other discrete distributions that enables the analyst to split the variance. After defining the distribution, we analysed various methods for fitting the parameters associated with it, namely estimation by maximum likelihood, estimation by the method of moments and a variant of the latter, estimation by the method of frequencies and moments. For oil olives, the chi-square goodness of fit test gives p-values of 0.9992, 0.9967 and 0.9977, respectively. However, a poor fit was obtained for the table olive distribution. Finally, the variance was split, following Irwin, into three components related to random factors, external factors and internal differences. For the distribution of the number of olive grove holdings, this splitting showed that random and external factors only account about 0.22% and 0.05%. Therefore, internal differences within municipalities play an important role in determining total variability. (Author)

  17. Modelling the number of olive groves in Spanish municipalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María-Dolores Huete

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The univariate generalized Waring distribution (UGWD is presented as a new model to describe the goodness of fit, applicable in the context of agriculture. In this paper, it was used to model the number of olive groves recorded in Spain in the 8,091 municipalities recorded in the 2009 Agricultural Census, according to which the production of oil olives accounted for 94% of total output, while that of table olives represented 6% (with an average of 44.84 and 4.06 holdings per Spanish municipality, respectively. UGWD is suitable for fitting this type of discrete data, with strong left-sided asymmetry. This novel use of UGWD can provide the foundation for future research in agriculture, with the advantage over other discrete distributions that enables the analyst to split the variance. After defining the distribution, we analysed various methods for fitting the parameters associated with it, namely estimation by maximum likelihood, estimation by the method of moments and a variant of the latter, estimation by the method of frequencies and moments. For oil olives, the chi-square goodness of fit test gives p-values of 0.9992, 0.9967 and 0.9977, respectively. However, a poor fit was obtained for the table olive distribution. Finally, the variance was split, following Irwin, into three components related to random factors, external factors and internal differences. For the distribution of the number of olive grove holdings, this splitting showed that random and external factors only account about 0.22% and 0.05%. Therefore, internal differences within municipalities play an important role in determining total variability.

  18. Defining the genetics of thrombotic microangiopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira-Martins, Paula; El Sissy, Carine; Bordereau, Pauline; Gruber, Aurelia; Rosain, Jeremie; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique

    2016-04-01

    The spectrum of the thrombotic microangiopathies (TMA) encompasses a heterogeneous group of disorders with hereditary and acquired forms. Endothelial cell injury in the microvasculature is common to all TMAs, whatever the pathophysiological process. In this review we describe genetic mutations characteristic of certain TMAs and review their contributions to disease. Recent identification of novel pathologic mutations has been enabled by exome studies. The monogenic forms of TMA are more frequently caused by recessive alterations in von Willebrand factor cleaving protease ADAMST13, leading to congenital thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, or cobalamine C and DGKE genes, leading to an atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome (aHUS)-like TMA. aHUS, whether idiopathic or linked to a known complement amplifying condition, is a TMA that primarily affects kidney function. It often results from a combination of an underlying genetic susceptibility with environmental factors activating the alternative complement pathway. Pathogenic variants in at least five complement genes coding for complement factor H (CFH) complement factor I (CFI), MCP (CD46), C3 and complement factor B (CFB) have been demonstrated to increase the risk of developing aHUS, but several more genes have been implicated. A new challenge is to separate disease-associated genetic variants from the broader background of variants or polymorphisms present in all human genomes that are rare, potentially functional, but may or may not be pathogenic. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Algebraic number theory

    CERN Document Server

    Jarvis, Frazer

    2014-01-01

    The technical difficulties of algebraic number theory often make this subject appear difficult to beginners. This undergraduate textbook provides a welcome solution to these problems as it provides an approachable and thorough introduction to the topic. Algebraic Number Theory takes the reader from unique factorisation in the integers through to the modern-day number field sieve. The first few chapters consider the importance of arithmetic in fields larger than the rational numbers. Whilst some results generalise well, the unique factorisation of the integers in these more general number fields often fail. Algebraic number theory aims to overcome this problem. Most examples are taken from quadratic fields, for which calculations are easy to perform. The middle section considers more general theory and results for number fields, and the book concludes with some topics which are more likely to be suitable for advanced students, namely, the analytic class number formula and the number field sieve. This is the fi...

  20. Homeostasis in defined genotypes of Matthiola incana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyffert, W

    1983-02-01

    Based on 256 defined genotypes of the Brassicaceae Matthiola incana the influence of the alleles at four different loci and of their combinations on homeostasis was investigated against an isogenic background. The measured character was the anthocyanin content of the flowers. There are significant maternal and paternal influences on homeostasis. Moreover the extent of heterozygosity as well as the number of wildtype alleles, summarized over all loci, are positively correlated with the increase of homeostasis. The analysis of individual gene effects shows distinct graduations between the contributions of the particular loci. In principle, the wild-type allele proved to be more homeostatic when compared to the mutant; in some cases monogenic heterosis was indicated. Nonallelic interactions of first and second order do considerably modify the degree of expression of homeostasis; they are neither strongly correlated with the individual gene effects nor with the interactions of lower order, and hence they are not predictable. This means also that it is not possible to formulate a general hypothesis as to the causes of homeostasis. We have to assume rather that homeostasis depends on specific gene combinations which enable the organism to stabilize its phenotype by means of certain physiological conditions.

  1. For the edition of Jorge Manrique’s Coplas: stemma and selection of variants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Ángel Pérez Priego

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new proposition for the critical edition of the Coplas sobre la muerte de su padre, de Jorge Manrique. Based on the collation of the most comprehensive and complete number of copies, a new stemma codicum with prevalence of ? (ALFA tradition and LB3 is established. This stemma should guide the selection of variants, which reveal a large number of expressions and words so far rarely taken into account by the editors of the poem.

  2. p-adic numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Grešak, Rozalija

    2015-01-01

    The field of real numbers is usually constructed using Dedekind cuts. In these thesis we focus on the construction of the field of real numbers using metric completion of rational numbers using Cauchy sequences. In a similar manner we construct the field of p-adic numbers, describe some of their basic and topological properties. We follow by a construction of complex p-adic numbers and we compare them with the ordinary complex numbers. We conclude the thesis by giving a motivation for the int...

  3. Influenza A (H3N2) Variant Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Swine Variant Pandemic Other Influenza A (H3N2) Variant Virus Language: English (US) Español Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Influenza viruses that normally circulate in pigs are called “variant” ...

  4. Mitochondrial DNA variants in colorectal carcinogenesis: Drivers or passengers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Errichiello, Edoardo; Venesio, Tiziana

    2017-10-01

    Mitochondrial DNA alterations have widely been reported in many age-related degenerative diseases and tumors, including colorectal cancer. In the past few years, the discovery of inter-genomic crosstalk between nucleus and mitochondria has reinforced the role of mitochondrial DNA variants in perturbing this essential signaling pathway and thus indirectly targeting nuclear genes involved in tumorigenic and invasive phenotype. Mitochondrial dysfunction is currently considered a crucial hallmark of carcinogenesis as well as a promising target for anticancer therapy. Mitochondrial DNA alterations include point mutations, deletions, inversions, and copy number variations, but numerous studies investigating their pathogenic role in cancer have provided inconsistent evidence. Furthermore, the biological impact of mitochondrial DNA variants may vary tremendously, depending on the proportion of mutant DNA molecules carried by the neoplastic cells (heteroplasmy). In this review, we discuss the role of different type of mitochondrial DNA alterations in colorectal carcinogenesis and, in particular, we revisit the issue of whether they may be considered as causative driver or simply genuine passenger events. The advent of high-throughput techniques as well as the development of genetic and pharmaceutical interventions for the treatment of mitochondrial dysfunction in colorectal cancer are also explored.

  5. Detonation Synthesis of Alpha-Variant Silicon Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenderfer, Martin; Johnson, Catherine; Fahrenholtz, William; Mochalin, Vadym

    2017-06-01

    A recent research study has been undertaken to develop facilities for conducting detonation synthesis of nanomaterials. This process involves a familiar technique that has been utilized for the industrial synthesis of nanodiamonds. Developments through this study have allowed for experimentation with the concept of modifying explosive compositions to induce synthesis of new nanomaterials. Initial experimentation has been conducted with the end goal being synthesis of alpha variant silicon carbide (α-SiC) in the nano-scale. The α-SiC that can be produced through detonation synthesis methods is critical to the ceramics industry because of a number of unique properties of the material. Conventional synthesis of α-SiC results in formation of crystals greater than 100 nm in diameter, outside nano-scale. It has been theorized that the high temperature and pressure of an explosive detonation can be used for the formation of α-SiC in the sub 100 nm range. This paper will discuss in detail the process development for detonation nanomaterial synthesis facilities, optimization of explosive charge parameters to maximize nanomaterial yield, and introduction of silicon to the detonation reaction environment to achieve first synthesis of nano-sized alpha variant silicon carbide.

  6. On the number of special numbers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We now apply the theory of the Thue equation to obtain an effective bound on m. Indeed, by Lemma 3.2, we can write m2 = ba3 and m2 − 4 = cd3 with b, c cubefree. By the above, both b, c are bounded since they are cubefree and all their prime factors are less than e63727. Now we have a finite number of. Thue equations:.

  7. Effect of BRCA2 sequence variants predicted to disrupt exonic splice enhancers on BRCA2 transcripts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brewster Brooke L

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic screening of breast cancer patients and their families have identified a number of variants of unknown clinical significance in the breast cancer susceptibility genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2. Evaluation of such unclassified variants may be assisted by web-based bioinformatic prediction tools, although accurate prediction of aberrant splicing by unclassified variants affecting exonic splice enhancers (ESEs remains a challenge. Methods This study used a combination of RT-PCR analysis and splicing reporter minigene assays to assess five unclassified variants in the BRCA2 gene that we had previously predicted to disrupt an ESE using bioinformatic approaches. Results Analysis of BRCA2 c.8308 G > A (p.Ala2770Thr by mRNA analysis, and BRCA2 c.8962A > G (p.Ser2988Gly, BRCA2 c.8972G > A (p.Arg2991His, BRCA2 c.9172A > G (p.Ser3058Gly, and BRCA2 c.9213G > T (p.Glu3071Asp by a minigene assay, revealed no evidence for aberrant splicing. Conclusions These results illustrate the need for improved methods for predicting functional ESEs and the potential consequences of sequence variants contained therein.

  8. VIPER: a web application for rapid expert review of variant calls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wöste, Marius; Dugas, Martin

    2018-01-15

    With the rapid development in next-generation sequencing, cost and time requirements for genomic sequencing are decreasing, enabling applications in many areas such as cancer research. Many tools have been developed to analyze genomic variation ranging from single nucleotide variants to whole chromosomal aberrations. As sequencing throughput increases, the number of variants called by such tools also grows. Often employed manual inspection of such calls is thus becoming a time-consuming procedure. We developed the Variant InsPector and Expert Rating tool (VIPER) to speed up this process by integrating the Integrative Genomics Viewer into a web application. Analysts can then quickly iterate through variants, apply filters and make decisions based on the generated images and variant metadata. VIPER was successfully employed in analyses with manual inspection of more than 10,000 calls. VIPER is implemented in Java and Javascript and is freely available at https://github.com/MarWoes/viper. Marius.Woeste@uni-muenster.de. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author (2018). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  9. Pervasive within-Mitochondrion Single-Nucleotide Variant Heteroplasmy as Revealed by Single-Mitochondrion Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Morris

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary: A number of mitochondrial diseases arise from single-nucleotide variant (SNV accumulation in multiple mitochondria. Here, we present a method for identification of variants present at the single-mitochondrion level in individual mouse and human neuronal cells, allowing for extremely high-resolution study of mitochondrial mutation dynamics. We identified extensive heteroplasmy between individual mitochondrion, along with three high-confidence variants in mouse and one in human that were present in multiple mitochondria across cells. The pattern of variation revealed by single-mitochondrion data shows surprisingly pervasive levels of heteroplasmy in inbred mice. Distribution of SNV loci suggests inheritance of variants across generations, resulting in Poisson jackpot lines with large SNV load. Comparison of human and mouse variants suggests that the two species might employ distinct modes of somatic segregation. Single-mitochondrion resolution revealed mitochondria mutational dynamics that we hypothesize to affect risk probabilities for mutations reaching disease thresholds. : Morris et al. use independent sequencing of multiple individual mitochondria from mouse and human brain cells to show high pervasiveness of mutations. The mutations are heteroplasmic within single mitochondria and within and between cells. These findings suggest mechanisms by which mutations accumulate over time, resulting in mitochondrial dysfunction and disease. Keywords: single mitochondrion, single cell, human neuron, mouse neuron, single-nucleotide variation

  10. Neuroligin 2 nonsense variant associated with anxiety, autism, intellectual disability, hyperphagia, and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parente, Daniel J; Garriga, Caryn; Baskin, Berivan; Douglas, Ganka; Cho, Megan T; Araujo, Gabriel C; Shinawi, Marwan

    2017-01-01

    Neuroligins are post-synaptic, cellular adhesion molecules implicated in synaptic formation and function. NLGN2 is strongly linked to inhibitory, GABAergic signaling and is crucial for maintaining the excitation-inhibition balance in the brain. Disruption of the excitation-inhibition balance is associated with neuropsychiatric disease. In animal models, altered NLGN2 expression causes anxiety, developmental delay, motor discoordination, social impairment, aggression, and sensory processing defects. In humans, mutations in NLGN3 and NLGN4 are linked to autism and schizophrenia; NLGN2 missense variants are implicated in schizophrenia. Copy number variants encompassing NLGN2 on 17p13.1 are associated with autism, intellectual disability, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and dysmorphic features, but an isolated NLGN2 nonsense variant has not yet been described in humans. Here, we describe a 15-year-old male with severe anxiety, obsessive-compulsive behaviors, developmental delay, autism, obesity, macrocephaly, and some dysmorphic features. Exome sequencing identified a heterozygous, de novo, c.441C>A p.(Tyr147Ter) variant in NLGN2 that is predicted to cause loss of normal protein function. This is the first report of an NLGN2 nonsense variant in humans, adding to the accumulating evidence that links synaptic proteins with a spectrum of neurodevelopmental phenotypes. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. DANN: a deep learning approach for annotating the pathogenicity of genetic variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quang, Daniel; Chen, Yifei; Xie, Xiaohui

    2015-03-01

    Annotating genetic variants, especially non-coding variants, for the purpose of identifying pathogenic variants remains a challenge. Combined annotation-dependent depletion (CADD) is an algorithm designed to annotate both coding and non-coding variants, and has been shown to outperform other annotation algorithms. CADD trains a linear kernel support vector machine (SVM) to differentiate evolutionarily derived, likely benign, alleles from simulated, likely deleterious, variants. However, SVMs cannot capture non-linear relationships among the features, which can limit performance. To address this issue, we have developed DANN. DANN uses the same feature set and training data as CADD to train a deep neural network (DNN). DNNs can capture non-linear relationships among features and are better suited than SVMs for problems with a large number of samples and features. We exploit Compute Unified Device Architecture-compatible graphics processing units and deep learning techniques such as dropout and momentum training to accelerate the DNN training. DANN achieves about a 19% relative reduction in the error rate and about a 14% relative increase in the area under the curve (AUC) metric over CADD's SVM methodology. All data and source code are available at https://cbcl.ics.uci.edu/public_data/DANN/. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. A Genome-Wide Association Study of Type 2 Diabetes in Finns Detects Multiple Susceptibility Variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Laura J.; Mohlke, Karen L.; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Willer, Cristen J.; Li, Yun; Duren, William L.; Erdos, Michael R.; Stringham, Heather M.; Chines, Peter S.; Jackson, Anne U.; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Ding, Chia-Jen; Swift, Amy J.; Narisu, Narisu; Hu, Tianle; Pruim, Randall; Xiao, Rui; Li, Xiao-Yi; Conneely, Karen N.; Riebow, Nancy L.; Sprau, Andrew G.; Tong, Maurine; White, Peggy P.; Hetrick, Kurt N.; Barnhart, Michael W.; Bark, Craig W.; Goldstein, Janet L.; Watkins, Lee; Xiang, Fang; Saramies, Jouko; Buchanan, Thomas A.; Watanabe, Richard M.; Valle, Timo T.; Kinnunen, Leena; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Pugh, Elizabeth W.; Doheny, Kimberly F.; Bergman, Richard N.; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Collins, Francis S.; Boehnke, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Identifying the genetic variants that increase the risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D) in humans has been a formidable challenge. Adopting a genome-wide association strategy, we genotyped 1161 Finnish T2D cases and 1174 Finnish normal glucose-tolerant (NGT) controls with >315,000 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and imputed genotypes for an additional >2 million autosomal SNPs. We carried out association analysis with these SNPs to identify genetic variants that predispose to T2D, compared our T2D association results with the results of two similar studies, and genotyped 80 SNPs in an additional 1215 Finnish T2D cases and 1258 Finnish NGT controls. We identify T2D-associated variants in an intergenic region of chromosome 11p12, contribute to the identification of T2D-associated variants near the genes IGF2BP2 and CDKAL1 and the region of CDKN2A and CDKN2B, and confirm that variants near TCF7L2, SLC30A8, HHEX, FTO, PPARG, and KCNJ11 are associated with T2D risk. This brings the number of T2D loci now confidently identified to at least 10. PMID:17463248

  13. Interference between variants of peach latent mosaic viroid reveals novel features of its fitness landscape: implications for detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, Pedro; Bertolini, Edson; Martínez, M Carmen; Cambra, Mariano; Flores, Ricardo

    2017-02-17

    Natural populations of peach latent mosaic viroid (PLMVd) are complex mixtures of variants. During routine testing, TaqMan rtRT-PCR and RNA gel-blot hybridization produced discordant results with some PLMVd isolates. Analysis of the corresponding populations showed that they were exclusively composed of variants (of class II) with a structural domain different from that of the reference and many other variants (of class I) targeted by the TaqMan rtRT-PCR probe. Bioassays in peach revealed that a representative PLMVd variant of class II replicated without symptoms, generated a progeny with low nucleotide diversity, and, intriguingly, outcompeted a representative symptomatic variant of class I when co-inoculated in equimolecular amounts. A number of informative positions associated with the higher fitness of variants of class II have been identified, and novel sets of primers and probes for universal or specific TaqMan rtRT-PCR detection of PLMVd variants have been designed and tested.

  14. Combined analyses of 20 common obesity susceptibility variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandholt, Camilla Helene; Sparsø, Thomas; Grarup, Niels

    2010-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies and linkage studies have identified 20 validated genetic variants associated with obesity and/or related phenotypes. The variants are common, and they individually exhibit small-to-modest effect sizes.......Genome-wide association studies and linkage studies have identified 20 validated genetic variants associated with obesity and/or related phenotypes. The variants are common, and they individually exhibit small-to-modest effect sizes....

  15. Hawaiian Number Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Barnabas

    1982-01-01

    The history of Hawaiian number systems is examined, and answers to questions regarding Hawaiian number words, including their origin and factors that influenced their development, are covered. A brief guide for pronouncing Hawaiian words is also provided. (MP)

  16. Splice variants of perlucin from Haliotis laevigata modulate the crystallisation of CaCO3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Dodenhof

    Full Text Available Perlucin is one of the proteins of the organic matrix of nacre (mother of pearl playing an important role in biomineralisation. This nacreous layer can be predominately found in the mollusc lineages and is most intensively studied as a compound of the shell of the marine Australian abalone Haliotis laevigata. A more detailed analysis of Perlucin will elucidate some of the still unknown processes in the complex interplay of the organic/inorganic compounds involved in the formation of nacre as a very interesting composite material not only from a life science-based point of view. Within this study we discovered three unknown Perlucin splice variants of the Australian abalone H. laevigata. The amplified cDNAs vary from 562 to 815 base pairs and the resulting translation products differ predominantly in the absence or presence of a varying number of a 10 mer peptide C-terminal repeat. The splice variants could further be confirmed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-ToF MS analysis as endogenous Perlucin, purified from decalcified abalone shell. Interestingly, we observed that the different variants expressed as maltose-binding protein (MBP fusion proteins in E. coli showed strong differences in their influence on precipitating CaCO3 and that these differences might be due to a splice variant-specific formation of large protein aggregates influenced by the number of the 10 mer peptide repeats. Our results are evidence for a more complex situation with respect to Perlucin functional regulation by demonstrating that Perlucin splice variants modulate the crystallisation of calcium carbonate. The identification of differentially behaving Perlucin variants may open a completely new perspective for the field of nacre biomineralisation.

  17. Making decisions from numbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somers, E.

    1987-03-01

    Regulatory agencies require numbers to provide health protection. The manner in which these numbers are derived from animal experiments and human epidemiology is considered together with the limitations and inadequacies of these numbers. Some recent examples of risk assessment in Canada are given including asbestos, drinking water, and indoor air quality. The value of these numbers in providing a measure of the hazard in a wider perspective is stressed, although they can never be the sole determinant of public policy.

  18. Alternative analysis: the prime numbers theory and an extension of the real numbers set

    OpenAIRE

    Sukhotin A.; Zvyagin M.

    2016-01-01

    Here we consider the theory of prime numbers at a new methodology. The theory of prime numbers is one of the most ancient mathematical branches. We found an estimate of the all prime numbers sum using the notions of infinite lager numbers and infinitely small numbers, farther we estimated the value of the maximal prime number. We proved that Hardy–Littlewood Hypothesis has the positive decision too. The infinite small numbers define a new methodology of the well–known function o(x) applicatio...

  19. Bernoulli-Carlitz and Cauchy-Carlitz numbers with Stirling-Carlitz numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Kaneko, Hajime; Komatsu, Takao

    2017-01-01

    Recently, the Cauchy-Carlitz number was defined as the counterpart of the Bernoulli-Carlitz number. Both numbers can be expressed explicitly in terms of so-called Stirling-Carlitz numbers. In this paper, we study the second analogue of Stirling-Carlitz numbers and give some general formulae, including Bernoulli and Cauchy numbers in formal power series with complex coefficients, and Bernoulli-Carlitz and Cauchy-Carlitz numbers in function fields. We also give some applications of Hasse-Teichm...

  20. Analytic number theory

    CERN Document Server

    Matsumoto, Kohji

    2002-01-01

    The book includes several survey articles on prime numbers, divisor problems, and Diophantine equations, as well as research papers on various aspects of analytic number theory such as additive problems, Diophantine approximations and the theory of zeta and L-function Audience Researchers and graduate students interested in recent development of number theory

  1. Safety-in-numbers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elvik, Rune; Bjørnskau, Torkel

    2017-01-01

    Highlights •26 studies of the safety-in-numbers effect are reviewed. •The existence of a safety-in-numbers effect is confirmed. •Results are consistent. •Causes of the safety-in-numbers effect are incompletely known....

  2. GenOVa: a computer program to generate orientational variants

    OpenAIRE

    Cayron, Cyril

    2007-01-01

    A computer program called GenOVa, written in Python, calculates the orientational variants, the operators (special types of misorientations between variants) and the composition table associated with a groupoid structure. The variants can be represented by three-dimensional shapes or by pole figures.

  3. variant formula for predicting peak expiratory flow rate in pregnant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    The graph illustrates close association of variant formula with the observed values of PEFR obtained from the study. Variant formula may be useful in clinical setting to assess people with respiratory disorders especially asthma. Key words: Variant formula, Peak expiratory flow rate, Pregnancy, Kura local government area.

  4. Characterization of coding synonymous and non-synonymous variants in ADAMTS13 using ex vivo and in silico approaches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan C Edwards

    Full Text Available Synonymous variations, which are defined as codon substitutions that do not change the encoded amino acid, were previously thought to have no effect on the properties of the synthesized protein(s. However, mounting evidence shows that these "silent" variations can have a significant impact on protein expression and function and should no longer be considered "silent". Here, the effects of six synonymous and six non-synonymous variations, previously found in the gene of ADAMTS13, the von Willebrand Factor (VWF cleaving hemostatic protease, have been investigated using a variety of approaches. The ADAMTS13 mRNA and protein expression levels, as well as the conformation and activity of the variants have been compared to that of wild-type ADAMTS13. Interestingly, not only the non-synonymous variants but also the synonymous variants have been found to change the protein expression levels, conformation and function. Bioinformatic analysis of ADAMTS13 mRNA structure, amino acid conservation and codon usage allowed us to establish correlations between mRNA stability, RSCU, and intracellular protein expression. This study demonstrates that variants and more specifically, synonymous variants can have a substantial and definite effect on ADAMTS13 function and that bioinformatic analysis may allow development of predictive tools to identify variants that will have significant effects on the encoded protein.

  5. Pathway analysis of complex diseases for GWAS, extending to consider rare variants, multi-omics and interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Patrick Y P; Leung, Kim Hung; Chan, Lawrence W C; Yip, Shea Ping; Yap, Maurice K H

    2017-02-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) is a major method for studying the genetics of complex diseases. Finding all sequence variants to explain fully the aetiology of a disease is difficult because of their small effect sizes. To better explain disease mechanisms, pathway analysis is used to consolidate the effects of multiple variants, and hence increase the power of the study. While pathway analysis has previously been performed within GWAS only, it can now be extended to examining rare variants, other "-omics" and interaction data. 1. Factors to consider in the choice of software for GWAS pathway analysis. 2. Examples of how pathway analysis is used to analyse rare variants, other "-omics" and interaction data. To choose appropriate software tools, factors for consideration include covariate compatibility, null hypothesis, one- or two-step analysis required, curation method of gene sets, size of pathways, and size of flanking regions to define gene boundaries. For rare variants, analysis performance depends on consistency between assumed and actual effect distribution of variants. Integration of other "-omics" data and interaction can better explain gene functions. Pathway analysis methods will be more readily used for integration of multiple sources of data, and enable more accurate prediction of phenotypes. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Spinning top urethra: not a normal variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxton, H M; Borzyskowski, M; Mundy, A R; Vivian, G C

    1988-07-01

    Spinning top urethra (STU) is a term used to describe a widened posterior urethra seen mainly in girls. It is commonly regarded as a normal variant. The authors studied 30 girls with STU using videourodynamics. Twenty-eight showed bladder instability; 21, a congenital wide bladder neck anomaly; and 20, both instability and a wide bladder neck. One patient had a sensitive bladder. All patients had a urodynamic abnormality. The authors believe that the STU is nearly always an indication of bladder instability or wide bladder neck anomaly. The most common mechanism for the dilatation of the posterior urethra is that unstable contractions are resisted by a voluntary increase in distal sphincter tension so as to prevent leakage of urine. The resulting pressure rise produces distention of the posterior urethra, which will be maximal in subjects with a weak bladder neck mechanism as in the congenital wide bladder neck anomaly. The authors believe that STU is seldom if ever a normal variant.

  7. On Variant Reflected Backward SDEs, with Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Ma

    2009-01-01

    Bank and El Karoui (2004, and is hence named the “Variant Reflected BSDEs” (VRBSDE in this paper. The special nature of the Variant Skorohod problem leads to a hidden forward-backward feature of the BSDE, and as a consequence this type of BSDE cannot be treated in a usual way. We shall prove that in a small-time duration most of the well-posedness, comparison, and stability results are still valid, although some extra conditions on the boundary process are needed. We will also provide some possible applications where the VRBSDE can be potentially useful. These applications show that the VRBSDE could become a novel tool for some problems in finance and optimal stopping problems where no existing methods can be easily applicable.

  8. Angiography of histopathologic variants of synovial sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lois, J.F.; Fischer, H.J.; Mirra, J.M.; Gomes, A.S.; California Univ., Los Angeles

    1986-01-01

    Synovial sarcomas are rare soft tissue tumors which histopathologically can be divided into monophasic, biphasic and mixed variants. As part of a protocol for intra-arterial chemotherapy 12 patients with biopsy proven synovial sarcoma underwent angiography. The angiograms on these patients were reviewed to determine whether synovial sarcomas and their variants demonstrated a characteristic angiographic appearance. Synovial sarcomas appeared angiographically as soft tissue masses which showed a fine network of tumor vessels with an inhomogeneous capillary blush. Their degree of vascularity varied according to their histopathology. Monophasic synovial sarcomas demonstrated in general a higher degree of neovascularity than the biphasic form. This finding was also suggested by histopathologic analysis of the vessels in the tumor. Although angiography did not show a distinctive vascular pattern it may be useful to evaluate tumor size and vascularity. (orig.)

  9. Asymptotic numbers: Pt.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todorov, T.D.

    1980-01-01

    The set of asymptotic numbers A as a system of generalized numbers including the system of real numbers R, as well as infinitely small (infinitesimals) and infinitely large numbers, is introduced. The detailed algebraic properties of A, which are unusual as compared with the known algebraic structures, are studied. It is proved that the set of asymptotic numbers A cannot be isomorphically embedded as a subspace in any group, ring or field, but some particular subsets of asymptotic numbers are shown to be groups, rings, and fields. The algebraic operation, additive and multiplicative forms, and the algebraic properties are constructed in an appropriate way. It is shown that the asymptotic numbers give rise to a new type of generalized functions quite analogous to the distributions of Schwartz allowing, however, the operation multiplication. A possible application of these functions to quantum theory is discussed

  10. Applied number theory

    CERN Document Server

    Niederreiter, Harald

    2015-01-01

    This textbook effectively builds a bridge from basic number theory to recent advances in applied number theory. It presents the first unified account of the four major areas of application where number theory plays a fundamental role, namely cryptography, coding theory, quasi-Monte Carlo methods, and pseudorandom number generation, allowing the authors to delineate the manifold links and interrelations between these areas.  Number theory, which Carl-Friedrich Gauss famously dubbed the queen of mathematics, has always been considered a very beautiful field of mathematics, producing lovely results and elegant proofs. While only very few real-life applications were known in the past, today number theory can be found in everyday life: in supermarket bar code scanners, in our cars’ GPS systems, in online banking, etc.  Starting with a brief introductory course on number theory in Chapter 1, which makes the book more accessible for undergraduates, the authors describe the four main application areas in Chapters...

  11. Fine-Mapping of Common Genetic Variants Associated with Colorectal Tumor Risk Identified Potential Functional Variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengmeng Du

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have identified many common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs associated with colorectal cancer risk. These SNPs may tag correlated variants with biological importance. Fine-mapping around GWAS loci can facilitate detection of functional candidates and additional independent risk variants. We analyzed 11,900 cases and 14,311 controls in the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium and the Colon Cancer Family Registry. To fine-map genomic regions containing all known common risk variants, we imputed high-density genetic data from the 1000 Genomes Project. We tested single-variant associations with colorectal tumor risk for all variants spanning genomic regions 250-kb upstream or downstream of 31 GWAS-identified SNPs (index SNPs. We queried the University of California, Santa Cruz Genome Browser to examine evidence for biological function. Index SNPs did not show the strongest association signals with colorectal tumor risk in their respective genomic regions. Bioinformatics analysis of SNPs showing smaller P-values in each region revealed 21 functional candidates in 12 loci (5q31.1, 8q24, 11q13.4, 11q23, 12p13.32, 12q24.21, 14q22.2, 15q13, 18q21, 19q13.1, 20p12.3, and 20q13.33. We did not observe evidence of additional independent association signals in GWAS-identified regions. Our results support the utility of integrating data from comprehensive fine-mapping with expanding publicly available genomic databases to help clarify GWAS associations and identify functional candidates that warrant more onerous laboratory follow-up. Such efforts may aid the eventual discovery of disease-causing variant(s.

  12. Evidence of significant bias in an elementary random number generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borgwaldt, H.; Brandl, V.

    1981-03-01

    An elementary pseudo random number generator for isotropically distributed unit vectors in 3-dimensional space has ben tested for bias. This generator uses the IBM-suplied routine RANDU and a transparent rejection technique. The tests show clearly that non-randomness in the pseudo random numbers generated by the primary IBM generator leads to bias in the order of 1 percent in estimates obtained from the secondary random number generator. FORTRAN listings of 4 variants of the random number generator called by a simple test programme and output listings are included for direct reference. (orig.) [de

  13. Program pseudo-random number generator for microcomputers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ososkov, G.A.

    1980-01-01

    Program pseudo-random number generators (PNG) intended for the test of control equipment and communication channels are considered. In the case of 8-bit microcomputers it is necessary to assign 4 words of storage to allocate one random number. The proposed economical algorithms of the random number generation are based on the idea of the ''mixing'' of such quarters of the preceeding random number to obtain the next one. Test results of the PNG are displayed for two such generators. A FORTRAN variant of the PNG is presented along with a program realizing the PNG made on the base of the INTEL-8080 autocode

  14. Integrative analysis of functional genomic annotations and sequencing data to identify rare causal variants via hierarchical modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinela eCapanu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Identifying the small number of rare causal variants contributing to disease has beena major focus of investigation in recent years, but represents a formidable statisticalchallenge due to the rare frequencies with which these variants are observed. In thiscommentary we draw attention to a formal statistical framework, namely hierarchicalmodeling, to combine functional genomic annotations with sequencing data with theobjective of enhancing our ability to identify rare causal variants. Using simulations weshow that in all configurations studied, the hierarchical modeling approach has superiordiscriminatory ability compared to a recently proposed aggregate measure of deleteriousness,the Combined Annotation-Dependent Depletion (CADD score, supportingour premise that aggregate functional genomic measures can more accurately identifycausal variants when used in conjunction with sequencing data through a hierarchicalmodeling approach

  15. Warty Carcinoma Penis: An Uncommon Variant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushma Thapa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Penile carcinoma frequency varies widely in different parts of the world and comprises 1–10% of all the malignancies in males. Majority of the cases of penile carcinoma are squamous cell carcinoma of penis comprising 60% to 70% of all cases. Warty carcinoma of penis is an unusual neoplasm and a variant of penile squamous cell carcinoma comprising 5%–10% of all the variants. The other histological variants include basaloid, verrucous, papillary, sarcomatous, mixed, and adenosquamous carcinoma. The various histological entities with an exophytic papillary lesions including warty carcinoma are together referred to as the “verruciform” group of neoplasms. The warty carcinoma has to be differentiated from these lesions and is typically distinguished by histological features of hyperkeratosis, arborescent papillomatosis, acanthosis, and prominent koilocytosis with nuclear pleomorphism. We present a case of 65-year-old male with growth measuring 6×4 cm in the penis who underwent total penectomy and was diagnosed as warty carcinoma penis.

  16. Spatially variant periodic structures in electromagnetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumpf, Raymond C.; Pazos, Javier J.; Digaum, Jennefir L.; Kuebler, Stephen M.

    2015-01-01

    Spatial transforms are a popular technique for designing periodic structures that are macroscopically inhomogeneous. The structures are often required to be anisotropic, provide a magnetic response, and to have extreme values for the constitutive parameters in Maxwell's equations. Metamaterials and photonic crystals are capable of providing these, although sometimes only approximately. The problem still remains about how to generate the geometry of the final lattice when it is functionally graded, or spatially varied. This paper describes a simple numerical technique to spatially vary any periodic structure while minimizing deformations to the unit cells that would weaken or destroy the electromagnetic properties. New developments in this algorithm are disclosed that increase efficiency, improve the quality of the lattices and provide the ability to design aplanatic metasurfaces. The ability to spatially vary a lattice in this manner enables new design paradigms that are not possible using spatial transforms, three of which are discussed here. First, spatially variant self-collimating photonic crystals are shown to flow unguided waves around very tight bends using ordinary materials with low refractive index. Second, multi-mode waveguides in spatially variant band gap materials are shown to guide waves around bends without mixing power between the modes. Third, spatially variant anisotropic materials are shown to sculpt the near-field around electric components. This can be used to improve electromagnetic compatibility between components in close proximity. PMID:26217058

  17. Inferring relative proportions of DNA variants from sequencing electropherograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, I M; Robinson, J I; Dimitriou, R; Markham, A F; Morgan, A W; Bonthron, D T

    2009-12-15

    Determination of the relative copy number of single-nucleotide sequence variants (SNVs) within a DNA sample is a frequent experimental goal. Various methods can be applied to this problem, although hybridization-based approaches tend to suffer from high-setup cost and poor adaptability, while others (such as pyrosequencing) may not be accessible to all laboratories. The potential to extract relative copy number information from standard dye-terminator electropherograms has been little explored, yet this technology is cheap and widely accessible. Since several biologically important loci have paralogous copies that interfere with genotyping, and which may also display copy number variation (CNV), there are many situations in which determination of the relative copy number of SNVs is desirable. We have developed a desktop application, QSVanalyzer, which allows high-throughput quantification of the proportions of DNA sequences containing SNVs. In reconstruction experiments, QSVanalyzer accurately estimated the known relative proportions of SNVs. By analyzing a large panel of genomic DNA samples, we demonstrate the ability of the software to analyze not only common biallelic SNVs, but also SNVs within a locus at which gene conversion between four genomic paralogs operates, and within another that is subject to CNV. QSVanalyzer is freely available at http://dna.leeds.ac.uk/qsv/. It requires the Microsoft .NET framework version 2.0, which can be installed on all Microsoft operating systems from Windows 98 onwards. msjimc@leeds.ac.uk Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  18. Family-based studies to identify genetic variants that cause congenital heart defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrington, Cammon B; Bleyl, Steven B; Brunelli, Luca; Bowles, Neil E

    2013-07-01

    Congenital heart defects (CHDs) are the most common congenital abnormalities. Analysis of large multigenerational families has led to the identification of a number of genes for CHDs. However, identifiable variations in these genes are the cause of a small proportion of cases of CHDs, suggesting significant genetic heterogeneity. In addition, large families with CHDs are rare, making the identification of additional genes difficult. Next-generation sequencing technologies will provide an opportunity to identify more genes in the future. However, the significant genetic variation between individuals will present a challenge to distinguish between 'pathogenic' and 'benign' variants. We have demonstrated that the analysis of multiple individuals in small families using combinations of algorithms can reduce the number of candidate variants to a small, manageable number. Thus, the analysis of small nuclear families or even distantly related 'sporadic' cases may begin to uncover the 'dark matter' of CHD genetics.

  19. The Use of Non-Variant Sites to Improve the Clinical Assessment of Whole-Genome Sequence Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Ferrarini

    Full Text Available Genetic testing, which is now a routine part of clinical practice and disease management protocols, is often based on the assessment of small panels of variants or genes. On the other hand, continuous improvements in the speed and per-base costs of sequencing have now made whole exome sequencing (WES and whole genome sequencing (WGS viable strategies for targeted or complete genetic analysis, respectively. Standard WGS/WES data analytical workflows generally rely on calling of sequence variants respect to the reference genome sequence. However, the reference genome sequence contains a large number of sites represented by rare alleles, by known pathogenic alleles and by alleles strongly associated to disease by GWAS. It's thus critical, for clinical applications of WGS and WES, to interpret whether non-variant sites are homozygous for the reference allele or if the corresponding genotype cannot be reliably called. Here we show that an alternative analytical approach based on the analysis of both variant and non-variant sites from WGS data allows to genotype more than 92% of sites corresponding to known SNPs compared to 6% genotyped by standard variant analysis. These include homozygous reference sites of clinical interest, thus leading to a broad and comprehensive characterization of variation necessary to an accurate evaluation of disease risk. Altogether, our findings indicate that characterization of both variant and non-variant clinically informative sites in the genome is necessary to allow an accurate clinical assessment of a personal genome. Finally, we propose a highly efficient extended VCF (eVCF file format which allows to store genotype calls for sites of clinical interest while remaining compatible with current variant interpretation software.

  20. Suspected Lynch syndrome associated MSH6 variants: A functional assay to determine their pathogenicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hellen Houlleberghs

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Lynch syndrome (LS is a hereditary cancer predisposition caused by inactivating mutations in DNA mismatch repair (MMR genes. Mutations in the MSH6 DNA MMR gene account for approximately 18% of LS cases. Many LS-associated sequence variants are nonsense and frameshift mutations that clearly abrogate MMR activity. However, missense mutations whose functional implications are unclear are also frequently seen in suspected-LS patients. To conclusively diagnose LS and enroll patients in appropriate surveillance programs to reduce morbidity as well as mortality, the functional consequences of these variants of uncertain clinical significance (VUS must be defined. We present an oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis screen for the identification of pathogenic MSH6 VUS. In the screen, the MSH6 variant of interest is introduced into mouse embryonic stem cells by site-directed mutagenesis. Subsequent selection for MMR-deficient cells using the DNA damaging agent 6-thioguanine (6TG allows the identification of MMR abrogating VUS because solely MMR-deficient cells survive 6TG exposure. We demonstrate the efficacy of the genetic screen, investigate the phenotype of 26 MSH6 VUS and compare our screening results to clinical data from suspected-LS patients carrying these variant alleles.

  1. Lack of Frank Agrammatism in the Nonfluent Agrammatic Variant of Primary Progressive Aphasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naida L. Graham

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Frank agrammatism, defined as the omission and/or substitution of grammatical morphemes with associated grammatical errors, is variably reported in patients with nonfluent variant primary progressive aphasia (nfPPA. This study addressed whether frank agrammatism is typical in agrammatic nfPPA patients when this feature is not required for diagnosis. Method: We assessed grammatical production in 9 patients who satisfied current diagnostic criteria. Although the focus was agrammatism, motor speech skills were also evaluated to determine whether dysfluency arose primarily from apraxia of speech (AOS, instead of, or in addition to, agrammatism. Volumetric MRI analyses provided impartial imaging-supported diagnosis. Results: The majority of cases exhibited neither frank agrammatism nor AOS. Conclusion: There are nfPPA patients with imaging-supported diagnosis and preserved motor speech skills who do not exhibit frank agrammatism, and this may persist beyond the earliest stages of the illness. Because absence of frank agrammatism is a subsidiary diagnostic feature in the logopenic variant of PPA, this result has implications for differentiation of the nonfluent and logopenic variants, and indicates that PPA patients with nonfluent speech in the absence of frank agrammatism or AOS do not necessarily have the logopenic variant.

  2. Fourier correction for spatially variant collimator blurring in SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia, W.; Lewitt, R.M.; Edholm, P.R.

    1995-01-01

    In single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), projection data are acquired by rotating the photon detector around a patient, either in a circular orbit or in a noncircular orbit. The projection data of the desired spatial distribution of emission activity is blurred by the point-response function of the collimator that is used to define the range of directions of gamma-ray photons reaching the detector. The point-response function of the collimator is not spatially stationary, but depends on the distance from the collimator to the point. Conventional methods for deblurring collimator projection data are based on approximating the actual distance-dependent point-response function by a spatially invariant blurring function, so that deconvolution methods can be applied independently to the data at each angle of view. A method is described in this paper for distance-dependent preprocessing of SPECT projection data prior to image reconstruction. Based on the special distance-dependent characteristics of the Fourier coefficients of the sinogram, a spatially variant inverse filter can be developed to process the projection data in all views simultaneously. The algorithm is first derived from fourier analysis of the projection data from the circular orbit geometry. For circular orbit projection data, experimental results from both simulated data and real phantom data indicate the potential of this method. It is shown that the spatial filtering method can be extended to the projection data from the noncircular orbit geometry. Experiments on simulated projection data from an elliptical orbit demonstrate correction of the spatially variant blurring and distortion in the reconstructed image caused by the noncircular orbit geometry

  3. Proteogenomics analysis reveals specific genomic orientations of distal regulatory regions composed by non-canonical histone variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Kyoung-Jae; Choi, Inchan; LeRoy, Gary; Zee, Barry M; Sidoli, Simone; Gonzales-Cope, Michelle; Garcia, Benjamin A

    2015-01-01

    Histone variants play further important roles in DNA packaging and controlling gene expression. However, our understanding about their composition and their functions is limited. Integrating proteomic and genomic approaches, we performed a comprehensive analysis of the epigenetic landscapes containing the four histone variants H3.1, H3.3, H2A.Z, and macroH2A. These histones were FLAG-tagged in HeLa cells and purified using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). By adopting ChIP followed by mass spectrometry (ChIP-MS), we quantified histone post-translational modifications (PTMs) and histone variant nucleosomal ratios in highly purified mononucleosomes. Subsequent ChIP followed by next-generation sequencing (ChIP-seq) was used to map the genome-wide localization of the analyzed histone variants and define their chromatin domains. Finally, we included in our study large datasets contained in the ENCODE database. We newly identified a group of regulatory regions enriched in H3.1 and the histone variant associated with repressive marks macroH2A. Systematic analysis identified both symmetric and asymmetric patterns of histone variant occupancies at intergenic regulatory regions. Strikingly, these directional patterns were associated with RNA polymerase II (PolII). These asymmetric patterns correlated with the enhancer activities measured using global run-on sequencing (GRO-seq) data. Our studies show that H2A.Z and H3.3 delineate the orientation of transcription at enhancers as observed at promoters. We also showed that enhancers with skewed histone variant patterns well facilitate enhancer activity. Collectively, our study indicates that histone variants are deposited at regulatory regions to assist gene regulation.

  4. Analysis of mitochondrial DNA sequences in childhood encephalomyopathies reveals new disease-associated variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aijaz A Wani

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mitochondrial encephalomyopathies are a heterogeneous group of clinical disorders generally caused due to mutations in either mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA or nuclear genes encoding oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS. We analyzed the mtDNA sequences from a group of 23 pediatric patients with clinical and morphological features of mitochondrial encephalopathies and tried to establish a relationship of identified variants with the disease. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPLE FINDINGS: Complete mitochondrial genomes were amplified by PCR and sequenced by automated DNA sequencing. Sequencing data was analyzed by SeqScape software and also confirmed by BLASTn program. Nucleotide sequences were compared with the revised Cambridge reference sequence (CRS and sequences present in mitochondrial databases. The data obtained shows that a number of known and novel mtDNA variants were associated with the disease. Most of the non-synonymous variants were heteroplasmic (A4136G, A9194G and T11916A suggesting their possibility of being pathogenic in nature. Some of the missense variants although homoplasmic were showing changes in highly conserved amino acids (T3394C, T3866C, and G9804A and were previously identified with diseased conditions. Similarly, two other variants found in tRNA genes (G5783A and C8309T could alter the secondary structure of Cys-tRNA and Lys-tRNA. Most of the variants occurred in single cases; however, a few occurred in more than one case (e.g. G5783A and A10149T. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: The mtDNA variants identified in this study could be the possible cause of mitochondrial encephalomyopathies with childhood onset in the patient group. Our study further strengthens the pathogenic score of known variants previously reported as provisionally pathogenic in mitochondrial diseases. The novel variants found in the present study can be potential candidates for further investigations to establish the relationship between their incidence and role

  5. Pseudomonas aeruginosa induces pigment production and enhances virulence in a white phenotypic variant of Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonic V

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Vlado Antonic,1–3 Alexander Stojadinovic,3–5 Binxue Zhang,1–3 Mina J Izadjoo,1–3,5 Mohammad Alavi1–3 1Henry M Jackson Foundation for the Advancement of Military Medicine, Bethesda, MD, USA; 2Diagnostic and Translational Research Center, Gaithersburg, MD, USA; 3Combat Wound Initiative Program, Bethesda, MD, USA; 4Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, MD, USA; 5Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD, USA Abstract: Staphyloxanthin is a virulence factor which protects Staphylococcus aureus in stress conditions. We isolated two pigment variants of S. aureus and one strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from a single wound infection. S. aureus variants displayed white and yellow colony phenotypes. The sequence of the operons for staphyloxanthin synthesis indicated that coding and promoter regions were identical between the two pigment variants. Quorum sensing controls pigment synthesis in some bacteria. It is also shown that P. aeruginosa quorum-sensing molecules affect S. aureus transcription. We explored whether the co-infecting P. aeruginosa can affect pigment production in the white S. aureus variant. In co-culture experiments between the white variants and a selected number of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, only P. aeruginosa induced pigment production in the white variant. Gene expression analysis of the white variant did not indicate upregulation of the crtM and other genes known to be involved in pigment production (sigB, sarA, farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase gene [FPP-synthase], hfq. In contrast, transcription of the catalase gene was significantly upregulated after co-culture. P. aeruginosa-induced pigment synthesis and catalase upregulation correlated with increased resistance to polymyxin B, hydrogen peroxide, and the intracellular environment of macrophages. Our data indicate the presence of silent but functional staphyloxanthin synthesis machinery in a white phenotypic variant

  6. Defining KIR and HLA Class I Genotypes at Highest Resolution via High-Throughput Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Paul J; Hollenbach, Jill A; Nemat-Gorgani, Neda; Marin, Wesley M; Norberg, Steven J; Ashouri, Elham; Jayaraman, Jyothi; Wroblewski, Emily E; Trowsdale, John; Rajalingam, Raja; Oksenberg, Jorge R; Chiaroni, Jacques; Guethlein, Lisbeth A; Traherne, James A; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Parham, Peter

    2016-08-04

    The physiological functions of natural killer (NK) cells in human immunity and reproduction depend upon diverse interactions between killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) and their HLA class I ligands: HLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA-C. The genomic regions containing the KIR and HLA class I genes are unlinked, structurally complex, and highly polymorphic. They are also strongly associated with a wide spectrum of diseases, including infections, autoimmune disorders, cancers, and pregnancy disorders, as well as the efficacy of transplantation and other immunotherapies. To facilitate study of these extraordinary genes, we developed a method that captures, sequences, and analyzes the 13 KIR genes and HLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA-C from genomic DNA. We also devised a bioinformatics pipeline that attributes sequencing reads to specific KIR genes, determines copy number by read depth, and calls high-resolution genotypes for each KIR gene. We validated this method by using DNA from well-characterized cell lines, comparing it to established methods of HLA and KIR genotyping, and determining KIR genotypes from 1000 Genomes sequence data. This identified 116 previously uncharacterized KIR alleles, which were all demonstrated to be authentic by sequencing from source DNA via standard methods. Analysis of just two KIR genes showed that 22% of the 1000 Genomes individuals have a previously uncharacterized allele or a structural variant. The method we describe is suited to the large-scale analyses that are needed for characterizing human populations and defining the precise HLA and KIR factors associated with disease. The methods are applicable to other highly polymorphic genes. Copyright © 2016 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Variant of Coffin-Siris syndrome or previously undescribed syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun-Quentin, C; Kapferer, L; Kotzot, D

    1996-09-06

    We describe a 23-year-old woman with growth and mental retardation, hypoplasia of the nails and distal phalanges, particularly of the fifth fingers and toes, hirsutism, and a "coarse" face with large mouth and large tongue, and bushy eyebrows. Follow-up from birth to adulthood showed that developmental delay and hypoplasia of nails and distal phalanges are permanent signs. Sparse scalp hair, hypotonia, and feeding difficulties were present in early infancy. Later, growth retardation, hirsutism, and a "coarse" face with midface hypoplasia, broad nose, and large mouth became more impressive. Differential diagnosis includes a number of conditions, particularly Coffin-Siris syndrome, which is the most likely but not completely convincing diagnosis. Therefore, this woman might represent a variant of Coffin-Siris syndrome or a new entity.

  8. 78 FR 18902 - Defining Larger Participants of the Student Loan Servicing Market

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-28

    ... Defining Larger Participants of the Student Loan Servicing Market AGENCY: Bureau of Consumer Financial...]'' of markets for other consumer financial products or services, as the Bureau defines by rule. The.... Do not include sensitive personal information, such as account numbers or Social Security numbers...

  9. Invitation to number theory

    CERN Document Server

    Ore, Oystein

    2017-01-01

    Number theory is the branch of mathematics concerned with the counting numbers, 1, 2, 3, … and their multiples and factors. Of particular importance are odd and even numbers, squares and cubes, and prime numbers. But in spite of their simplicity, you will meet a multitude of topics in this book: magic squares, cryptarithms, finding the day of the week for a given date, constructing regular polygons, pythagorean triples, and many more. In this revised edition, John Watkins and Robin Wilson have updated the text to bring it in line with contemporary developments. They have added new material on Fermat's Last Theorem, the role of computers in number theory, and the use of number theory in cryptography, and have made numerous minor changes in the presentation and layout of the text and the exercises.

  10. Predicting Lotto Numbers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Claus Bjørn; Suetens, Sigrid; Tyran, Jean-Robert

    numbers based on recent drawings. While most players pick the same set of numbers week after week without regards of numbers drawn or anything else, we find that those who do change, act on average in the way predicted by the law of small numbers as formalized in recent behavioral theory. In particular......We investigate the “law of small numbers” using a unique panel data set on lotto gambling. Because we can track individual players over time, we can measure how they react to outcomes of recent lotto drawings. We can therefore test whether they behave as if they believe they can predict lotto......, on average they move away from numbers that have recently been drawn, as suggested by the “gambler’s fallacy”, and move toward numbers that are on streak, i.e. have been drawn several weeks in a row, consistent with the “hot hand fallacy”....

  11. Targeted resequencing of regulatory regions at schizophrenia risk loci: Role of rare functional variants at chromatin repressive states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Peñas, Javier; Amigo, Jorge; Santomé, Luis; Sobrino, Beatriz; Brenlla, Julio; Agra, Santiago; Paz, Eduardo; Páramo, Mario; Carracedo, Ángel; Arrojo, Manuel; Costas, Javier

    2016-07-01

    There is mounting evidence that regulatory variation plays an important role in genetic risk for schizophrenia. Here, we specifically search for regulatory variants at risk by sequencing promoter regions of twenty-three genes implied in schizophrenia by copy number variant or genome-wide association studies. After strict quality control, a total of 55,206bp per sample were analyzed in 526 schizophrenia cases and 516 controls from Galicia, NW Spain, using the Applied Biosystems SOLiD System. Variants were filtered based on frequency from public databases, chromatin states from the RoadMap Epigenomics Consortium at tissues relevant for schizophrenia, such as fetal brain, mid-frontal lobe, and angular gyrus, and prediction of functionality from RegulomeDB. The proportion of rare variants at polycomb repressive chromatin state at relevant tissues was higher in cases than in controls. The proportion of rare variants with predicted regulatory role was significantly higher in cases than in controls (P=0.0028, OR=1.93, 95% C.I.=1.23-3.04). Combination of information from both sources led to the identification of an excess of carriers of rare variants with predicted regulatory role located at polycomb repressive chromatin state at relevant tissues in cases versus controls (P=0.0016, OR=19.34, 95% C.I.=2.45-2495.26). The variants are located at two genes affected by the 17q12 copy number variant, LHX1 and HNF1B. These data strongly suggest that a specific epigenetic mechanism, chromatin remodeling by histone modification during early development, may be impaired in a subset of schizophrenia patients, in agreement with previous data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The simple complex numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Zalesny, Jaroslaw

    2008-01-01

    A new simple geometrical interpretation of complex numbers is presented. It differs from their usual interpretation as points in the complex plane. From the new point of view the complex numbers are rather operations on vectors than points. Moreover, in this approach the real, imaginary and complex numbers have similar interpretation. They are simply some operations on vectors. The presented interpretation is simpler, more natural, and better adjusted to possible applications in geometry and ...

  13. Annotating pathogenic non-coding variants in genic regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelfman, Sahar; Wang, Quanli; McSweeney, K Melodi; Ren, Zhong; La Carpia, Francesca; Halvorsen, Matt; Schoch, Kelly; Ratzon, Fanni; Heinzen, Erin L; Boland, Michael J; Petrovski, Slavé; Goldstein, David B

    2017-08-09

    Identifying the underlying causes of disease requires accurate interpretation of genetic variants. Current methods ineffectively capture pathogenic non-coding variants in genic regions, resulting in overlooking synonymous and intronic variants when searching for disease risk. Here we present the Transcript-inferred Pathogenicity (TraP) score, which uses sequence context alterations to reliably identify non-coding variation that causes disease. High TraP scores single out extremely rare variants with lower minor allele frequencies than missense variants. TraP accurately distinguishes known pathogenic and benign variants in synonymous (AUC = 0.88) and intronic (AUC = 0.83) public datasets, dismissing benign variants with exceptionally high specificity. TraP analysis of 843 exomes from epilepsy family trios identifies synonymous variants in known epilepsy genes, thus pinpointing risk factors of disease from non-coding sequence data. TraP outperforms leading methods in identifying non-coding variants that are pathogenic and is therefore a valuable tool for use in gene discovery and the interpretation of personal genomes.While non-coding synonymous and intronic variants are often not under strong selective constraint, they can be pathogenic through affecting splicing or transcription. Here, the authors develop a score that uses sequence context alterations to predict pathogenicity of synonymous and non-coding genetic variants, and provide a web server of pre-computed scores.

  14. Research Network of Tehran Defined Population: Methodology and Establishment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali-Asghar Kolahi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: We need a defined population for determining prevalence and incidence of diseases, as well as conducting interventional, cohort and longitudinal studies, calculating correct and timely public health indicators, assessing actual health needs of community, performing educational programs and interventions to promote healthy lifestyle, and enhancing quality of primary health services.The objective of this project was to determine a defined population which is representative of Tehran, the Capital of Iran. This article reports the methodology and establishment of the research network of Tehran defined population.Methods: This project started by selecting two urban health centers from each of the five district health centers affiliated to Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences in 2012. Inside each selected urban health center, one defined population research station was established. Two new centers have been added during 2013 and 2014. For the time being, the number of the covered population of the network has reached 40000 individuals. The most important criterion for the defined population has been to be representative of the population of Tehran. For this, we selected two urban health centers from 12 of 22 municipality districts and from each of the five different socioeconomic of Greater Tehran. Merely 80000 individuals in neighborhoods of each defined population research station were considered as control group of the project.Findings: Totally we selected 12 defined population research stations and their under-covered population developed a defined population which is representative of Tehran population.Conclusion: a population lab is ready now in metropolitan of Tehran.

  15. Predicting Lotto Numbers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suetens, Sigrid; Galbo-Jørgensen, Claus B.; Tyran, Jean-Robert Karl

    2016-01-01

    as formalized in recent behavioral theory. In particular, players tend to bet less on numbers that have been drawn in the preceding week, as suggested by the ‘gambler’s fallacy’, and bet more on a number if it was frequently drawn in the recent past, consistent with the ‘hot-hand fallacy’.......We investigate the ‘law of small numbers’ using a data set on lotto gambling that allows us to measure players’ reactions to draws. While most players pick the same set of numbers week after week, we find that those who do change react on average as predicted by the law of small numbers...

  16. Intuitive numbers guide decisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Peters

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Measuring reaction times to number comparisons is thought to reveal a processing stage in elementary numerical cognition linked to internal, imprecise representations of number magnitudes. These intuitive representations of the mental number line have been demonstrated across species and human development but have been little explored in decision making. This paper develops and tests hypotheses about the influence of such evolutionarily ancient, intuitive numbers on human decisions. We demonstrate that individuals with more precise mental-number-line representations are higher in numeracy (number skills consistent with previous research with children. Individuals with more precise representations (compared to those with less precise representations also were more likely to choose larger, later amounts over smaller, immediate amounts, particularly with a larger proportional difference between the two monetary outcomes. In addition, they were more likely to choose an option with a larger proportional but smaller absolute difference compared to those with less precise representations. These results are consistent with intuitive number representations underlying: a perceived differences between numbers, b the extent to which proportional differences are weighed in decisions, and, ultimately, c the valuation of decision options. Human decision processes involving numbers important to health and financial matters may be rooted in elementary, biological processes shared with other species.

  17. Beurling generalized numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Diamond, Harold G; Cheung, Man Ping

    2016-01-01

    "Generalized numbers" is a multiplicative structure introduced by A. Beurling to study how independent prime number theory is from the additivity of the natural numbers. The results and techniques of this theory apply to other systems having the character of prime numbers and integers; for example, it is used in the study of the prime number theorem (PNT) for ideals of algebraic number fields. Using both analytic and elementary methods, this book presents many old and new theorems, including several of the authors' results, and many examples of extremal behavior of g-number systems. Also, the authors give detailed accounts of the L^2 PNT theorem of J. P. Kahane and of the example created with H. L. Montgomery, showing that additive structure is needed for proving the Riemann hypothesis. Other interesting topics discussed are propositions "equivalent" to the PNT, the role of multiplicative convolution and Chebyshev's prime number formula for g-numbers, and how Beurling theory provides an interpretation of the ...

  18. Numbers, sequences and series

    CERN Document Server

    Hirst, Keith

    1994-01-01

    Number and geometry are the foundations upon which mathematics has been built over some 3000 years. This book is concerned with the logical foundations of number systems from integers to complex numbers. The author has chosen to develop the ideas by illustrating the techniques used throughout mathematics rather than using a self-contained logical treatise. The idea of proof has been emphasised, as has the illustration of concepts from a graphical, numerical and algebraic point of view. Having laid the foundations of the number system, the author has then turned to the analysis of infinite proc

  19. The adventure of numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Godefroy, Gilles

    2004-01-01

    Numbers are fascinating. The fascination begins in childhood, when we first learn to count. It continues as we learn arithmetic, algebra, geometry, and so on. Eventually, we learn that numbers not only help us to measure the world, but also to understand it and, to some extent, to control it. In The Adventure of Numbers, Gilles Godefroy follows the thread of our expanding understanding of numbers to lead us through the history of mathematics. His goal is to share the joy of discovering and understanding this great adventure of the mind. The development of mathematics has been punctuated by a n

  20. 7 CFR 29.12 - Terms defined.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Terms defined. 29.12 Section 29.12 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... INSPECTION Regulations Definitions § 29.12 Terms defined. As used in this subpart and in all instructions...

  1. A definability theorem for first order logic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Butz, C.; Moerdijk, I.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we will present a definability theorem for first order logic This theorem is very easy to state and its proof only uses elementary tools To explain the theorem let us first observe that if M is a model of a theory T in a language L then clearly any definable subset S M ie a subset S

  2. Defining and measuring urban sustainability in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijering, Jurian V.; Tobi, Hilde; Kern, Kristine

    2018-01-01

    Urban sustainability rankings may be useful for urban planning. How urban sustainability is defined influences the results of urban sustainability rankings. Various efforts have been made to define the concept and to operationalize it into specific components (e.g. air quality, inequality,

  3. 50 CFR 260.6 - Terms defined.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Products for Human Consumption Definitions § 260.6 Terms defined. Words in the regulations in this part in... Commerce. Deviant. “Deviant” means a sample unit affected by one or more deviations or a sample unit that varies in a specifically defined manner from the requirements of a standard, specification, or other...

  4. Tableau algorithms defined naturally for pictures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A.A. van Leeuwen

    1995-01-01

    textabstractWe consider pictures as defined by Zelevinsky. We elaborate on the generalisation of the Robinson-Schensted correspondence to pictures defined by him, and on the result of Fomin and Greene that shows that this correspondence is natural, i.e., independent of the precise ``reading'' order

  5. Dilution Confusion: Conventions for Defining a Dilution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishel, Laurence A.

    2010-01-01

    Two conventions for preparing dilutions are used in clinical laboratories. The first convention defines an "a:b" dilution as "a" volumes of solution A plus "b" volumes of solution B. The second convention defines an "a:b" dilution as "a" volumes of solution A diluted into a final volume of "b". Use of the incorrect dilution convention could affect…

  6. Who defines the need for fishery reform?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Rikke Becker; Raakjær, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    of discourses and policy networks that come to define the very need for reform. A policy network is identified across state ministries, powerful officials, banks and large scale industry that defined the need for fisheries reform within a ‘grand reform’ discourse. But inertia characterised the actual decision...

  7. Volume 9 Number 2

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OLUWOLE

    Clay content and ratios of exchangeable cations are highly dependent on characteristics of soil parent material and deferential effect of ... capacity (CEC) which is defined as the measure of negatively charged sites on the clay-humus ... properties and lowered infiltration rates compared to similar soils with high Ca content ( ...

  8. Melanoma risk associated with MC1R gene variants in Latvia and the functional analysis of rare variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozola, Aija; Azarjana, Kristīne; Doniņa, Simona; Proboka, Guna; Mandrika, Ilona; Petrovska, Ramona; Cēma, Ingrīda; Heisele, Olita; Eņģele, Ludmila; Streinerte, Baiba; Pjanova, Dace

    2013-03-01

    To evaluate the association of melanocortin 1 receptor gene (MC1R) variants with melanoma risk in a Latvian population, the MC1R gene was sequenced in 200 melanoma patients and 200 control persons. A functional study of previously uncharacterized, rare MC1R variants was also performed. In total, 26 different MC1R variants, including two novel variants Val165Ile and Val188Ile, were detected. The highest risk of melanoma was associated with the Arg151Cys variant (odds ratio (OR) 4.47, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.19-9.14, PLatvia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A new pseudorandom number generator based on a complex number chaotic equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yang; Tong Xiao-Jun

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, various chaotic equation based pseudorandom number generators have been proposed. However, the chaotic equations are all defined in the real number field. In this paper, an equation is proposed and proved to be chaotic in the imaginary axis. And a pseudorandom number generator is constructed based on the chaotic equation. The alteration of the definitional domain of the chaotic equation from the real number field to the complex one provides a new approach to the construction of chaotic equations, and a new method to generate pseudorandom number sequences accordingly. Both theoretical analysis and experimental results show that the sequences generated by the proposed pseudorandom number generator possess many good properties

  10. Computer-aided identification of polymorphism sets diagnostic for groups of bacterial and viral genetic variants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huygens Flavia

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and genes that exhibit presence/absence variation have provided informative marker sets for bacterial and viral genotyping. Identification of marker sets optimised for these purposes has been based on maximal generalized discriminatory power as measured by Simpson's Index of Diversity, or on the ability to identify specific variants. Here we describe the Not-N algorithm, which is designed to identify small sets of genetic markers diagnostic for user-specified subsets of known genetic variants. The algorithm does not treat the user-specified subset and the remaining genetic variants equally. Rather Not-N analysis is designed to underpin assays that provide 0% false negatives, which is very important for e.g. diagnostic procedures for clinically significant subgroups within microbial species. Results The Not-N algorithm has been incorporated into the "Minimum SNPs" computer program and used to derive genetic markers diagnostic for multilocus sequence typing-defined clonal complexes, hepatitis C virus (HCV subtypes, and phylogenetic clades defined by comparative genome hybridization (CGH data for Campylobacter jejuni, Yersinia enterocolitica and Clostridium difficile. Conclusion Not-N analysis is effective for identifying small sets of genetic markers diagnostic for microbial sub-groups. The best results to date have been obtained with CGH data from several bacterial species, and HCV sequence data.

  11. The Class Number Problem

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 3; Issue 7. The Class Number Problem - An Introduction to Algebraic Number Theory. Rajat Tandon. General ... Author Affiliations. Rajat Tandon1. Department of Mathematics, University of Hyderabad, Central University P.O., Hyderabad 500 046, India ...

  12. The Class Number Problem

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 3; Issue 7. The Class Number Problem - An Introduction to Algebraic Number Theory. Rajat Tandon. General Article Volume 3 Issue 7 July 1998 pp 28-37. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  13. The Class Number Problem

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Class Number Problem. 2. An Introduction to Algebraic Number Theory. Rajat Tandon received his PhD from Yale. University, USA. After an initial period as a visiting post-doctoral fellow at. TIFR, he joined the faculty of the North. Eastern Hill University, where he taught for a few years. For about two decades now, he ...

  14. A Numbers Game

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levin, Bruce R; McCall, Ingrid C.; Perrot, Veronique

    2017-01-01

    We postulate that the inhibition of growth and low rates of mortality of bacteria exposed to ribosome-binding antibiotics deemed bacteriostatic can be attributed almost uniquely to these drugs reducing the number of ribosomes contributing to protein synthesis, i.e., the number of effective riboso...

  15. The Congruent Number Problem

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Given a positive integer n, is there a simple criterion which enables us to decide whether or not n is congruent? A few remarks are in order. To start with, if we ..... In other words 1 is a congruent number. Combining Propositions 2 and 3 with the fact that 1 is a non-congruent number, we deduce Fermat's last theorem for n=4.

  16. Templates, Numbers & Watercolors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemesha, David J.

    1990-01-01

    Describes how a second-grade class used large templates to draw and paint five-digit numbers. The lesson integrated artistic knowledge and vocabulary with their mathematics lesson in place value. Students learned how draftspeople use templates, and they studied number paintings by Charles Demuth and Jasper Johns. (KM)

  17. Multiple linear combination (MLC) regression tests for common variants adapted to linkage disequilibrium structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Yun Joo; Sun, Lei; Poirier, Julia G; Paterson, Andrew D; Bull, Shelley B

    2017-02-01

    By jointly analyzing multiple variants within a gene, instead of one at a time, gene-based multiple regression can improve power, robustness, and interpretation in genetic association analysis. We investigate multiple linear combination (MLC) test statistics for analysis of common variants under realistic trait models with linkage disequilibrium (LD) based on HapMap Asian haplotypes. MLC is a directional test that exploits LD structure in a gene to construct clusters of closely correlated variants recoded such that the majority of pairwise correlations are positive. It combines variant effects within the same cluster linearly, and aggregates cluster-specific effects in a quadratic sum of squares and cross-products, producing a test statistic with reduced degrees of freedom (df) equal to the number of clusters. By simulation studies of 1000 genes from across the genome, we demonstrate that MLC is a well-powered and robust choice among existing methods across a broad range of gene structures. Compared to minimum P-value, variance-component, and principal-component methods, the mean power of MLC is never much lower than that of other methods, and can be higher, particularly with multiple causal variants. Moreover, the variation in gene-specific MLC test size and power across 1000 genes is less than that of other methods, suggesting it is a complementary approach for discovery in genome-wide analysis. The cluster construction of the MLC test statistics helps reveal within-gene LD structure, allowing interpretation of clustered variants as haplotypic effects, while multiple regression helps to distinguish direct and indirect associations. © 2016 The Authors Genetic Epidemiology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. A selective splicing variant of hepcidin mRNA in hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toki, Yasumichi [Division of Gastroenterology and Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, Asahikawa Medical University, Hokkaido 078-8510 (Japan); Sasaki, Katsunori, E-mail: k-sasaki@asahikawa-med.ac.jp [Department of Gastrointestinal Immunology and Regenerative Medicine, Asahikawa Medical University, Hokkaido 078-8510 (Japan); Tanaka, Hiroki [Department of Legal Medicine, Asahikawa Medical University, Hokkaido 078-8510 (Japan); Yamamoto, Masayo; Hatayama, Mayumi; Ito, Satoshi; Ikuta, Katsuya; Shindo, Motohiro; Hasebe, Takumu; Nakajima, Shunsuke; Sawada, Koji; Fujiya, Mikihiro [Division of Gastroenterology and Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, Asahikawa Medical University, Hokkaido 078-8510 (Japan); Torimoto, Yoshihiro [Oncology Center, Asahikawa Medical University Hospital, Hokkaido 078-8510 (Japan); Ohtake, Takaaki; Kohgo, Yutaka [Department of Gastroenterology, International University of Health and Welfare Hospital, Tochigi 329-2763 (Japan)

    2016-08-05

    Hepcidin is a main regulator of iron metabolism, of which abnormal expression affects intestinal absorption and reticuloendothelial sequestration of iron by interacting with ferroportin. It is also noted that abnormal iron accumulation is one of the key factors to facilitate promotion and progression of cancer including hepatoma. By RT-PCR/agarose gel electrophoresis of hepcidin mRNA in a hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HLF, a smaller mRNA band was shown in addition to the wild-type hepcidin mRNA. From sequencing analysis, this additional band was a selective splicing variant of hepcidin mRNA lacking exon 2 of HAMP gene, producing the transcript that encodes truncated peptide lacking 20 amino acids at the middle of preprohepcidin. In the present study, we used the digital PCR, because such a small amount of variant mRNA was difficult to quantitate by the conventional RT-PCR amplification. Among seven hepatoma-derived cell lines, six cell lines have significant copy numbers of this variant mRNA, but not in one cell line. In the transient transfection analysis of variant-type hepcidin cDNA, truncated preprohepcidin has a different character comparing with native preprohepcidin: its product is insensitive to digestion, and secreted into the medium as a whole preprohepcidin form without maturation. Loss or reduction of function of HAMP gene by aberrantly splicing may be a suitable phenomenon to obtain the proliferating advantage of hepatoma cells. - Highlights: • An aberrant splicing variant of hepcidin mRNA lacking exon 2 of HAMP gene. • Absolute quantification of hepcidin mRNA by digital PCR amplification. • Hepatoma-derived cell lines have significant copies of variant-type hepcidin mRNA. • Truncated preprohepcidin is secreted from cells without posttranslational cleavage.

  19. RET variants and haplotype analysis in a cohort of Czech patients with Hirschsprung disease.

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    Eliska Vaclavikova

    Full Text Available Hirschsprung disease (HSCR is a congenital aganglionosis of myenteric and submucosal plexuses in variable length of the intestine. This study investigated the influence and a possible modifying function of RET proto-oncogene's single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and haplotypes in the development and phenotype of the disease in Czech patients. Genotyping of 14 SNPs was performed using TaqMan Genotyping Assays and direct sequencing. The frequencies of SNPs and generated haplotypes were statistically evaluated using chi-square test and the association with the risk of HSCR was estimated by odds ratio. SNP analysis revealed significant differences in frequencies of 11 polymorphic RET variants between 162 HSCR patients and 205 unaffected controls. Particularly variant alleles of rs1864410, rs2435357, rs2506004 (intron 1, rs1800858 (exon 2, rs1800861 (exon 13, and rs2565200 (intron 19 were strongly associated with increased risk of HSCR (p<0.00000 and were over-represented in males vs. females. Conversely, variant alleles of rs1800860, rs1799939 and rs1800863 (exons 7, 11, 15 had a protective role. The haploblock comprising variants in intron 1 and exon 2 was constructed. It represented a high risk of HSCR, however, the influence of other variants was also found after pruning from effect of this haploblock. Clustering patients according to genotype status in haploblock revealed a strong co-segregation with several SNPs and pointed out the differences between long and short form of HSCR. This study involved a large number of SNPs along the entire RET proto-oncogene with demonstration of their risk/protective role also in haplotype and diplotype analysis in the Czech population. The influence of some variant alleles on the aggressiveness of the disease and their role in gender manifestation differences was found. These data contribute to worldwide knowledge of the genetics of HSCR.

  20. Splice variants of the relaxin and INSL3 receptors reveal unanticipated molecular complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muda, Marco; He, Chaomei; Martini, Paolo G V; Ferraro, Tania; Layfield, Sharon; Taylor, Deanne; Chevrier, Colette; Schweickhardt, Rene; Kelton, Christie; Ryan, Peter L; Bathgate, Ross A D

    2005-08-01

    LGR7 and LGR8 are G protein-coupled receptors that belong to the leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein coupled receptor (LGR) family, including the thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), LH and FSH receptors. LGR7 and LGR8 stimulate cAMP production upon binding of the cognate ligands, relaxin and insulin-like peptide 3 (INSL3), respectively. We cloned several novel splice variants of both LGR7 and LGR8 and analysed the function of four variants. LGR7.1 is a truncated receptor, including only the N-terminal region of the receptor and two leucine rich repeats. In contrast, LGR7.2, LGR7.10 and LGR 8.1 all contain an intact seven transmembrane domain and most of the extracellular region, lacking only one or two exons in the ectodomain. Our analysis demonstrates that although LGR7.10 and LGR8.1 are expressed at the cell surface, LGR7.2 is predominantly retained within cells and LGR7.1 is partially secreted. mRNA expression analysis revealed that several variants are co-expressed in various tissues. None of these variants were able to stimulate cAMP production following relaxin or INSL3 treatment. Unexpectedly, we did not detect any direct specific relaxin or INSL3 binding on any of the splice variants. The large number of receptor splice variants identified suggests an unforeseen complexity in the physiology of this novel hormone-receptor system.