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Sample records for nules clementine citrus

  1. 7 CFR 319.56-34 - Clementines from Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Clementines from Spain. 319.56-34 Section 319.56-34... Clementines from Spain. Clementines (Citrus reticulata) from Spain may only be imported into the United States... agreement. Clementines from Spain may be imported only if the Government of Spain or its designated...

  2. Características da variedade Fremont quando comparadas com as das tangerinas 'Ponkan' e 'Clementina Nules' Characteristics of Fremont variety compared to Ponkan and Clementina Nules tangerines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose Mary Pio

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available O quadro varietal das tangerinas plantadas comercialmente é bastante restrito, concentrando-se na tangerina 'Ponkan' e no tangor 'Murcott'. Aumentar o número de variedades, assim como ampliar o período de safra são fatores importantes tendo em vista que trarão vantagens ao consumidor e ao produtor desse grupo de citros. No período de 2002 a 2005, foram estudadas as características da variedade Fremont e comparadas com as tangerinas 'Ponkan' e 'Clementina Nules', no município de Capão Bonito-SP. Pode-se concluir, dos resultados obtidos, que as plantas da tangerina Fremont são de porte reduzido (semi-anãs; os frutos apresentam características excepcionais para consumo in natura, maturação de meia-estação e período de colheita, que se estende por até três meses, sendo dessa maneira boa opção para plantios visando à entressafra da 'Ponkan'.Commercial grown tangerines variety are mainly restricted to a few options such as Ponkan tangerine and Murcott tangor. The increasing number of varieties as well as the harvest extending season is important, potentially benefiting consumers and producers of this kind of citrus. Fremont characteristics were compared to Ponkan and Clementina Nules tangerines at Capão Bonito County in São Paulo State from 2002 to 2005. By the results, it was possible to conclude that Fremont trees were semi-dwarfed, the fruits had excellent characteristics for in natura consumption and a harvesting season enlargement of three months, therefore appearing to be a good alternative for orchards, aiming at Ponkan' off-season period.

  3. Inheritance in doubled-diploid clementine and comparative study with SDR unreduced gametes of diploid clementine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleza, P; Cuenca, J; Juárez, J; Navarro, L; Ollitrault, P

    2016-08-01

    Tetraploid clementine displays mainly tetrasomic inheritance. Genetic structures of 2n SDR and 2 × gametes from DD clementine are complementary and will guides triploids citrus breeding strategies. Triploid breeding is developed worldwide to create new seedless cultivars. Citrus triploid hybrids can be recovered from 2x × 2x sexual hybridizations as a consequence of the formation of unreduced gametes (2n), or from 4x × 2x interploid hybridizations in which tetraploid parents used are most often doubled-diploid (DD). Here we have analyzed the inheritance in doubled-diploid clementine and compared the genetic structures of gametes of DD clementine with SDR unreduced gametes of diploid clementine. Parental heterozygosity restitution (PHR) with DD parents depends on the rate of preferential chromosome pairing and thus the proportion of disomic versus tetrasomic segregations. Doubled-diploid clementine largely exhibited tetrasomic segregation. However, three linkage groups had intermediate segregation and one had a tendency for disomy. Significant doubled reduction rates (DR) rates were observed in six of the nine LGs. Differences of PHR between 2n SDR and 2x DD gametes were highest in the centromeric region and progressively decreased toward the distal regions where they were not significant. Over all markers, PHR was lower (two-thirds) in SDR 2n gametes than in DD-derived diploid gametes. The two strategies appear complementary in terms of genotypic variability. Interploid 4x × 2x hybridization is potentially more efficient for developing new cultivars that are phenotypically closer to the diploid parent of the DD than sexual hybridization through SDR 2n gametes. Conversely, 2x × 2x triploidisation has the potential to produce novel products with characteristics for market segmentation strategies.

  4. CLEMENTINE HIRES MOSAIC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This CD contains portions of the Clementine HiRes Lunar Mosaic, a geometrically controlled, calibrated mosaic compiled from non-uniformity corrected, 750 nanometer...

  5. Genome-wide comparative analysis reveals similar types of NBS genes in hybrid Citrus sinensis genome and original Citrus clementine genome and provides new insights into non-TIR NBS genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, we identified and compared nucleotide-binding site (NBS) domain-containing genes from three Citrus genomes (C. clementina, C. sinensis from USA and C. sinensis from China). Phylogenetic analysis of all Citrus NBS genes across these three genomes revealed that there are three approxima...

  6. Genome-wide comparative analysis reveals similar types of NBS genes in hybrid Citrus sinensis genome and original Citrus clementine genome and provides new insights into non-TIR NBS genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunsheng Wang

    Full Text Available In this study, we identified and compared nucleotide-binding site (NBS domain-containing genes from three Citrus genomes (C. clementina, C. sinensis from USA and C. sinensis from China. Phylogenetic analysis of all Citrus NBS genes across these three genomes revealed that there are three approximately evenly numbered groups: one group contains the Toll-Interleukin receptor (TIR domain and two different Non-TIR groups in which most of proteins contain the Coiled Coil (CC domain. Motif analysis confirmed that the two groups of CC-containing NBS genes are from different evolutionary origins. We partitioned NBS genes into clades using NBS domain sequence distances and found most clades include NBS genes from all three Citrus genomes. This suggests that three Citrus genomes have similar numbers and types of NBS genes. We also mapped the re-sequenced reads of three pomelo and three mandarin genomes onto the C. sinensis genome. We found that most NBS genes of the hybrid C. sinensis genome have corresponding homologous genes in both pomelo and mandarin genomes. The homologous NBS genes in pomelo and mandarin suggest that the parental species of C. sinensis may contain similar types of NBS genes. This explains why the hybrid C. sinensis and original C. clementina have similar types of NBS genes in this study. Furthermore, we found that sequence variation amongst Citrus NBS genes were shaped by multiple independent and shared accelerated mutation accumulation events among different groups of NBS genes and in different Citrus genomes. Our comparative analyses yield valuable insight into the structure, organization and evolution of NBS genes in Citrus genomes. Furthermore, our comprehensive analysis showed that the non-TIR NBS genes can be divided into two groups that come from different evolutionary origins. This provides new insights into non-TIR genes, which have not received much attention.

  7. Clementine sensor suite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ledebuhr, A.G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    LLNL designed and built the suite of six miniaturized light-weight space-qualified sensors utilized in the Clementine mission. A major goal of the Clementine program was to demonstrate technologies originally developed for Ballistic Missile Defense Organization Programs. These sensors were modified to gather data from the moon. This overview presents each of these sensors and some preliminary on-orbit performance estimates. The basic subsystems of these sensors include optical baffles to reject off-axis stray light, light-weight ruggedized optical systems, filter wheel assemblies, radiation tolerant focal plane arrays, radiation hardened control and readout electronics and low mass and power mechanical cryogenic coolers for the infrared sensors. Descriptions of each sensor type are given along with design specifications, photographs and on-orbit data collected.

  8. Assessment of Navel Oranges, Clementine Tangerines, and Rutaceous Fruits as Hosts of and (Diptera: Tephritidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant T. Mcquate

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Export of Citrus spp. fruits may require risk mitigation measures if grown in areas with established tephritid fruit fly (Diptera: Tephritidae populations capable of infesting the fruits. The host status of Citrus spp. fruits is unclear for two tephritid fruit fly species whose geographic ranges have expanded in recent years: melon fly, Bactrocera cucurbitae (Cocquillett, and Bactrocera latifrons (Hendel. In no choice cage infestation studies, B. latifrons oviposited into intact and punctured Washington navel oranges ( Citrus sinensis [L.] Osbeck and Clementine tangerines ( C. reticulata L. var. Clementine, but eggs rarely developed to the adult stage. B. cucurbitae readily infested intact and punctured tangerines, and to a lesser extent punctured oranges, but did not infest intact oranges. Limited cage infestation and only a single literature report of field Citrus spp. infestation suggest that risk mitigation of Citrus spp. for B. latifrons is not needed. Risk mitigation options of Citrus spp. for B. cucurbitae , including heat and cold treatments and systems approaches, are discussed.

  9. Shelf-life and quality evaluation of clementine following a combined treatment with γ-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahrouz, M.; Lacroix, M.; D'Aprano, G.; Oufedjikh, H.; Boubekri, C.

    2004-01-01

    In order to enhance the shelf-life of a late variety of Moroccan Citrus clementina (Nour), ionizing treatments were applied at 0.3 kGy, as well as washing (cold water) and waxing treatments. It has been found that, despite the irradiation treatment, the washing and waxing treatment do not improve the quality of C. clementina, but rather result in peel injury. Finally, sensory evaluation confirmed that irradiation had no detrimental effect on the quality of clementines

  10. Clementine auto exposure control software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    The primary mission of the Clementine program was to test technology developed under the auspices of BMDO (the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization). A secondary goal of the program was to provide astronomical data to the scientific and educational community. The mission plan developed to accomplish these goals included complete mapping of the lunar surface and a close fly-by of a near-Earth asteroid, 1620 Geographos. Exposure control for the Clementine mission was driven by mission phase requirements and sensor characteristics. Thus, there were a total of twelve algorithms developed for three primary mission phases and the four imaging sensors (two additional sensors operated as star trackers). The three mission phases in question were lunar mapping, distant observation of the asteroid for the purpose of tracking, and close-up viewing (as close as 100 Km) of Geographos. The four non-star tracker sensors consisted of an Ultra Violet/Visible (UV/Vis) camera, a High Resolution (HiRes) camera with a built-in LIDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) unit, a Near Infrared (NIR) camera, and a Long Wave InfraRed (LWIR) camera. Due to lack of test time and uncertainties about the imaging environment, numerous input parameters were provided in the algorithms to allow extensive tuning of the exposure control during the mission.

  11. Assessment of Navel Oranges, Clementine Tangerines, and Rutaceous Fruits as Hosts of Bactrocera cucurbitae and Bactrocera latifrons (Diptera: Tephritidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuate, Grant T.; Follett, Peter A.; Liquido, Nicanor J.; Sylva, Charmaine D.

    2015-01-01

    Export of Citrus spp. fruits may require risk mitigation measures if grown in areas with established tephritid fruit fly (Diptera: Tephritidae) populations capable of infesting the fruits. The host status of Citrus spp. fruits is unclear for two tephritid fruit fly species whose geographic ranges have expanded in recent years: melon fly, Bactrocera cucurbitae (Cocquillett), and Bactrocera latifrons (Hendel). In no choice cage infestation studies, B. latifrons oviposited into intact and punctured Washington navel oranges (Citrus sinensis [L.] Osbeck) and Clementine tangerines (C. reticulata L. var. Clementine), but eggs rarely developed to the adult stage. B. cucurbitae readily infested intact and punctured tangerines, and to a lesser extent punctured oranges, but did not infest intact oranges. Limited cage infestation and only a single literature report of field Citrus spp. infestation suggest that risk mitigation of Citrus spp. for B. latifrons is not needed. Risk mitigation options of Citrus spp. for B. cucurbitae, including heat and cold treatments and systems approaches, are discussed. PMID:26816484

  12. Taxonomy Icon Data: Clementine [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available s_clementina_S.png Citrus_clementina_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Citrus+clementi...na&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Citrus+clementina&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonom...y_icon/icon.cgi?i=Citrus+clementina&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Citrus+clementina&t=NS ...

  13. Suitability of black currant (Ribes nigrum L. as bred by NULES of Ukraine to machine harvesting of its berries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В. О. Сіленко

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In the article the authors show outcome of three years observation of blackcurrant varieties bred by Study Horticulture Department NULES of Ukraine for their suitabi­ lity to machine harvesting. Blackcurrant is the most common berry crop in Ukraine. When establishing intensive industrial plantations the varieties suitable for machine harvesting should be used. During 2006-2008 limited and unlimited traits of varieties bred by NULES of Ukraine suitability to combine harvesting were studied. All parameters of the examined varieties were compared against the requirements of the «ideal variety”. Simultaneous ripening of berries was observed in varieties Dochka Vorskly – 93,6%, Hovtva, Pamyaty Leonida Myhalevskoho – 92,6%. The pick off effort required to collect berries out of their clusters for all varieties but Yarynka was within acceptable range of 67...129 g. By effort applied for berries crush only Yarynka has failed to meet the necessary requirements. All the varie­ ties but Yarynka have been found suitable by growth habit of their bush (upright and semi-spread. Insufficient number fruits (6-7 pc. in clusters for varieties Narodna and Yarynka was noted. Berries weight for all studied varieties ranged within 1.27-1.84 g, their drop-off was 3-8%, duration of harvesting period ranged from 8 to 10 days, so all the parameters of varieties suggested they were suitable for picking berries by berry harvesters. Varieties Dochka Vorskly, Universitetska, Hovtva, Pamyatna, Premiera, Narodna, Leleka and Pamyaty Leonida Myhalevskoho were selected as suitable for combine harvesting by the complex of positive parameters.

  14. Changes in anthocyanin production during domestication of Citrus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandarin (C. reticulta), citron (C. medica) and pummelo (C. maxima) are important fruit species of the genus Citrus and parents of the interspecific hybirds that constitute the most familar commercial varities of citurs: sweet orange, clementine, lemon, lime and grapefruit. Citron and its hybrids pr...

  15. Inverter Matrix for the Clementine Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buehler, M. G.; Blaes, B. R.; Tardio, G.; Soli, G. A.

    1994-01-01

    An inverter matrix test circuit was designed for the Clementine space mission and is built into the RRELAX (Radiation and Reliability Assurance Experiment). The objective is to develop a circuit that will allow the evaluation of the CMOS FETs using a lean data set in the noisy spacecraft environment.

  16. Citrus Allergy from Pollen to Clinical Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iorio, Rosa Anna; Del Duca, Stefano; Calamelli, Elisabetta; Pula, Chiara; Lodolini, Magda; Scamardella, Fortuna; Pession, Andrea; Ricci, Giampaolo

    2013-01-01

    Allergy to citrus fruits is often associated with pollinosis and sensitization to other plants due to a phenomenon of cross-reactivity. The aims of the present study were to highlight the cross-reactivity among citrus and the major allergenic pollens/fruits, throughout clinical and molecular investigations, and to evaluate the sensitization frequency to citrus fruits in a population of children and adults with pollinosis. We found a relevant percentage of sensitisation (39%) to citrus fruits in the patients recruited and in all of them the IgE-mediated mechanism has been confirmed by the positive response to the prick-to-prick test. RT-PCR experiments showed the expression of Cit s 1, Cit s 3 and a profilin isoform, already described in apple, also in Citrus clementine pollen. Data of multiple sequence alignments demonstrated that Citrus allergens shared high percentage identity values with other clinically relevant species (i.e. Triticum aestivum, Malus domestica), confirming the possible cross-allergenicity citrus/grasses and citrus/apple. Finally, a novelty of the present work has been the expression of two phospholipaseA2 isoforms (PLA2 α and β) in Citrus as well as in Triticum pollens; being PLA2 able to generate pro-inflammatory factors, this enzyme could participate in the activation of the allergenic inflammatory cascade. PMID:23308273

  17. Citrus allergy from pollen to clinical symptoms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Anna Iorio

    Full Text Available Allergy to citrus fruits is often associated with pollinosis and sensitization to other plants due to a phenomenon of cross-reactivity. The aims of the present study were to highlight the cross-reactivity among citrus and the major allergenic pollens/fruits, throughout clinical and molecular investigations, and to evaluate the sensitization frequency to citrus fruits in a population of children and adults with pollinosis. We found a relevant percentage of sensitisation (39% to citrus fruits in the patients recruited and in all of them the IgE-mediated mechanism has been confirmed by the positive response to the prick-to-prick test. RT-PCR experiments showed the expression of Cit s 1, Cit s 3 and a profilin isoform, already described in apple, also in Citrus clementine pollen. Data of multiple sequence alignments demonstrated that Citrus allergens shared high percentage identity values with other clinically relevant species (i.e. Triticum aestivum, Malus domestica, confirming the possible cross-allergenicity citrus/grasses and citrus/apple. Finally, a novelty of the present work has been the expression of two phospholipaseA2 isoforms (PLA2 α and β in Citrus as well as in Triticum pollens; being PLA2 able to generate pro-inflammatory factors, this enzyme could participate in the activation of the allergenic inflammatory cascade.

  18. Comparative analysis of juice volatiles in selected mandarins, mandarin relatives and other citrus genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yuan; Bai, Jinhe; Chen, Chunxian; Plotto, Anne; Baldwin, Elizabeth A; Gmitter, Frederick G

    2018-02-01

    Citrus fruit flavor is an important attribute prioritized in variety improvement. The present study compared juice volatiles compositions from 13 selected citrus genotypes, including six mandarins (Citrus reticulata), three sour oranges (Citrus aurantium), one blood orange (Citrus sinensis), one lime (Citrus limonia), one Clementine (Citrus clementina) and one satsuma (Citrus unshiu). Large differences were observed with respect to volatile compositions among the citrus genotypes. 'Goutou' sour orange contained the greatest number of volatile compounds and the largest volatile production level. 'Ponkan' mandarin had the smallest number of volatiles and 'Owari' satsuma yielded the lowest volatile production level. 'Goutou' sour orange and 'Moro' blood orange were clearly distinguished from other citrus genotypes based on the analysis of volatile compositions, even though they were assigned into one single group with two other sour oranges by the molecular marker profiles. The clustering analysis based on the aroma volatile compositions was able to differentiate mandarin varieties and natural sub-groups, and was also supported by the molecular marker study. The gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of citrus juice aroma volatiles can be used as a tool to distinguish citrus genotypes and assist in the assessment of future citrus breeding programs. The aroma volatile profiles of the different citrus genotypes and inter-relationships detected among volatile compounds and among citrus genotypes will provide fundamental information on the development of marker-assisted selection in citrus breeding. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. Stellar compass for the Clementine Mission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    A CCD sensor with 42 x 28 degrees FOV and 576 x 384 pixels was built by the Advanced Technology Program (ATP) in the Physics Department at LLNL. That sensor, called the StarTracker camera, is used on the Clementine Lunar Mapping mission between January and May, 1994. Together with the Stellar Compass software, the StarTracker camera provided a way of identifying its orientation to within about 150 microradians in camera body pitch and yaw. This presentation will be an overview of basically how the Stellar Compass software works, along with showing some of its performance results.

  20. Carbohydrate control over carotenoid build-up is conditional on fruit ontogeny in clementine fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poiroux-Gonord, Florine; Fanciullino, Anne-Laure; Poggi, Isabelle; Urban, Laurent

    2013-04-01

    The final contents of primary and secondary metabolites of the ripe fruit depend on metabolic processes that are tightly regulated during fruit ontogeny. Carbohydrate supply during fruit development is known to influence these processes but, with respect to secondary metabolites, we do not really know whether this influence is direct or indirect. Here, we hypothesized that the sensitivity of clementine fruit metabolism to carbohydrate supply was conditional on fruit developmental stage. We applied treatments increasing fruit load reversibly or irreversibly at three key stages of clementine (Citrus clementina Hort. ex Tan.) fruit development: early after cell division, at the onset of fruit coloration (color break) and near maturity. The highest fruit load obtained by early defoliation (irreversible) had the highest impact on fruit growth, maturity and metabolism, followed by the highest fruit load obtained by early shading (reversible). Final fruit size decreased by 21 and 18% in these early irreversible and reversible treatments, respectively. Soluble sugars decreased by 18% in the early irreversible treatment, whereas organic acids increased by 46 and 29% in these early irreversible and reversible treatments, respectively. Interestingly, total carotenoids increased by 50 and 18%, respectively. Changes in leaf starch content and photosynthesis supported that these early treatments triggered a carbon starvation in the young fruits, with irreversible effects. Furthermore, our observations on the early treatments challenge the common view that carbohydrate supply influences positively carotenoid accumulation in fruits. We propose that early carbon starvation irreversibly promotes carotenoid accumulation. Copyright © Physiologia Plantarum 2012.

  1. CLEMENTINE LWIR BRIGHTNESS TEMPERATURE V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This volume contains the archive of Lunar brightness temperature data derived from images acquired by the Clementine Long Wavelength Infrared (LWIR) camera. The LWIR...

  2. CLEMENTINE MOON SPICE KERNELS V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes the complete set of Clementine SPICE data files (kernel files''), which can be accessed using SPICE software. The SPICE data contains...

  3. The Clementine Mission science return at the Moon and Geographos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorderbruegge, R. W.; Davies, M. E.; Horan, D. M.; Lucey, P. G.; Pieters, C. M.; Mcewen, A. S.; Nozette, S.; Shoemaker, E. M.; Squyres, S. W.; Thomas, P. C.

    1993-01-01

    The Clementine Mission is being built and flown by the Naval Research Laboratory under the sponsorship of the Strategic Defense Initiative Organization of the United States Department of Defense in joint-cooperation with NASA, and will explore the Moon and the near-Earth asteroid (NEA) 1620 Geographos with lightweight sensors developed by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A NASA Science Team for this mission will be selected by way of a NRA in April 1993. The instrument suite includes imaging cameras that cover a spectral range from the near-ultraviolet to the mid-infrared, a laser ranger, and, potentially, a charged particle telescope. To be launched in early 1994, Clementine will be in lunar orbit from February through May 1994, at which time it will depart the Moon for a flyby of 1620 Geographos in August 1994. This mission represents an outstanding opportunity for scientists interested in the Moon and asteroids. It is anticipated that the data returned from this mission will permit: an assessment of global lunar crustal heterogeneity and a resolution of less than 1 km; an assessment of the lithologic heterogeneity of Geographos at a scale of 100 m or better; and an assessment of surface processes on Geographos on the order of 10 m. The basic mission of Clementine and some of the key scientific questions that will be addressed are described. Additional material on the Clementine mission, its data handling and processing, and its instrument suite is presented elsewhere.

  4. Advances in lunar science from the Clementine mission: A decadal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    e-mail: robinson@earth.northwestern.edu. The Clementine spacecraft orbited the Moon and acquired science data for 10 weeks in the Spring .... parameters to better fit the sample data result- ing in improved fits (Gillis et al 2004). Camp ..... magnetics is protecting the affected area from the solar wind, and that solar wind is a ...

  5. Advances in lunar science from the Clementine mission: A decadal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 114; Issue 6. Advances in lunar science ... Keywords. Clementine; remote sensing; multispectral imaging; lunar surface mineralogy. ... Select areas of the Moon were imaged at 25 m/pixel in visible light and 60 m/pixel in thermal wavelengths. From these datasets a ...

  6. The Clementine mission–A 10-year perspective

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Clementine was a technology demonstration mission jointly sponsored by the Department of Defense (DOD)and NASA that was launched on January 25th, 1994. Its principal objective was to use the Moon, a near-Earth asteroid, and the spacecraft's Interstage Adapter as targets to demonstrate lightweight sensor ...

  7. Clementine Observes the Moon, Solar Corona, and Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    In 1994, during its flight, the Clementine spacecraft returned images of the Moon. In addition to the geologic mapping cameras, the Clementine spacecraft also carried two Star Tracker cameras for navigation. These lightweight (0.3 kg) cameras kept the spacecraft on track by constantly observing the positions of stars, reminiscent of the age-old seafaring tradition of sextant/star navigation. These navigation cameras were also to take some spectacular wide angle images of the Moon.In this picture the Moon is seen illuminated solely by light reflected from the Earth--Earthshine! The bright glow on the lunar horizon is caused by light from the solar corona; the sun is just behind the lunar limb. Caught in this image is the planet Venus at the top of the frame.

  8. South Pole Region of the Moon as Seen by Clementine

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Lunar mosaic of 1500 Clementine images of the south polar region of the moon. The projection is orthographic, centered on the south pole. The Schrodinger Basin (320 km in diameter) is located in the lower right of the mosaic. Amundsen-Ganswindt is the more subdued circular basin between Schrodinger and the pole. The polar regions of the moon are of special interest because of the postulated occurrence of ice in permanently shadowed areas. The south pole is of greater interest because the area that remains in shadow is much larger than that at the north pole.

  9. Citrus Sinensis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT: This study was carried out in Sokoto Metropolis to isolate and identify fungi associated with the deterioration of sweet orange fruits. A total of one hundred samples of fresh sweet Oranges (Citrus sinensis L) were used. First, a total of seventy samples were obtained from the three selected marketing centres in ...

  10. Comprehensive comparative analysis of volatile compounds in citrus fruits of different species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haipeng; Xie, Yunxia; Liu, Cuihua; Chen, Shilin; Hu, Shuangshuang; Xie, Zongzhou; Deng, Xiuxin; Xu, Juan

    2017-09-01

    The volatile profiles of fruit peels and juice sacs from 108 citrus accessions representing seven species were analyzed. Using GC-MS 162 and 107 compounds were determined in the peels and juice sacs, respectively. In the peels, monoterpene alcohols were accumulated in loose-skin mandarins; clementine tangerines and papedas were rich in sesquiterpene alcohols, sesquiterpenes, monoterpene alcohols and monoterpene aldehydes. β-pinene and sabinene were specifically accumulated in 4 of 5 lemon germplasms. Furthermore, concentrations of 34 distinctive compounds were selected to best represent the volatile profiles of seven species for HCA analysis, and the clustering results were in agreement with classic citrus taxonomy. Comparison of profiles from different growing seasons and production areas indicated that environmental factors play important roles in volatile metabolism. In addition, a few citrus germplasms that accumulated certain compounds were determined as promising breeding materials. Notably, volatile biosynthesis via MVA pathway in C. ichangensis 'Huaihua' was enhanced. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. The clementine mission to the moon: scientific overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozette, S; Rustan, P; Pleasance, L P; Kordas, J F; Lewis, I T; Park, H S; Priest, R E; Horan, D M; Regeon, P; Lichtenberg, C L; Shoemaker, E M; Eliason, E M; McEwen, A S; Robinson, M S; Spudis, P D; Acton, C H; Buratti, B J; Duxbury, T C; Baker, D N; Jakosky, B M; Blamont, J E; Corson, M P; Resnick, J H; Rollins, C J; Davies, M E; Lucey, P G; Malaret, E; Massie, M A; Pieters, C M; Reisse, R A; Simpson, R A; Smith, D E; Sorenson, T C; Breugge, R W; Zuber, M T

    1994-12-16

    In the course of 71 days in lunar orbit, from 19 February to 3 May 1994, the Clementine spacecraft acquired just under two million digital images of the moon at visible and infrared wavelengths. These data are enabling the global mapping of the rock types of the lunar crust and the first detailed investigation of the geology of the lunar polar regions and the lunar far side. In addition, laser-ranging measurements provided the first view of the global topographic figure of the moon. The topography of many ancient impact basins has been measured, and a global map of the thickness of the lunar crust has been derived from the topography and gravity.

  12. Production of tetraploid plants of some citrus genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berken ÇİMEN

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Improving new seedless citrus varieties is currently the main aspect of citrus breeding programs for both our country and the world. Triploid plants can be recovered directly from artificial and spontaneous mutations as well as crosses between two diploid genotypes resulting from the fertilization of 2n megagametophyte or by hybridization between diploid and tetraploid parents. Thus, production of tetraploid plants which are not naturally found in citrus germplasm has a great importance in terms of seedlessness breeding studies. This study covers production of tetraploid plants for parental usage in order to improve new varieties by ploidy manipulation. Buds of Clementine 22D, W. Murcott and Moro blood orange were used as plant material and effects of colchicine treatments on production of tetraploid forms of these genotypes were investigated. In this purpose, scion buds were treated with colchicine at concentration levels of 0.0%, 0.2%, 0.4%, 0.6% and 0.8% for 4, 6 and 8 hours. After treatments, survival rate (% of plants was recorded and ploidy levels of the plants were determined by flow cytometry analysis. In addition, stomatal observations were recorded such as stomata density, length, width, size and index on the leaves of tetraploid plants in order to compare them with the observations of diploid plants. As a result of the study one tetraploid plant of Clementine 22D mandarin was recovered from the 0.4% colchicine treatment for 6 hours. Besides, mixoploid (2x+4x forms of W. Murcott mandarin and Moro blood orange were recovered.

  13. Automated identification of basalt spectra in Clementine lunar data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonenko, I.; Osinski, G. R.

    2011-06-01

    The identification of fresh basalt spectra plays an important role in lunar stratigraphic studies; however, the process can be time consuming and labor intensive. Thus motivated, we developed an empirically derived algorithm for the automated identification of fresh basalt spectra from Clememtine UVVIS data. This algorithm has the following four parameters and limits: BC Ratio=3(R950-R900)/(R900-R750)0.003 and 0.1, where R750 represents the unnormalized reflectance of the 750 nm Clementine band, and so on. Algorithm results were found to be accurate to within an error of 4.5% with respect to visual classification, though olivine spectra may be under-represented. Overall, fresh basalts identified by the algorithm are consistent with expectations and previous work in the Mare Humorum area, though accuracy in other areas has not yet been tested. Great potential exists in using this algorithm for identifying craters that have excavated basalts, estimating the thickness of mare and cryptomare deposits, and other applications.

  14. Clementine observations of the aristarchus region of the moon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwen, A S; Robinson, M S; Eliason, E M; Lucey, P G; Duxbury, T C; Spudis, P D

    1994-12-16

    Multispectral and topographic data acquired by the Clementine spacecraft provide information on the composition and geologic history of the Aristarchus region of the moon. Altimetry profiles show the Aristarchus plateau dipping about 1 degrees to the north-northwest and rising about 2 kilometers above the surrounding lavas of Oceanus Procellarum to the south. Dark, reddish pyroclastic glass covers the plateau to average depths of 10 to 30 meters, as determined from the estimated excavation depths of 100- to 1000-meter-diameter craters that have exposed materials below the pyroclastics. These craters and the walls of sinuous rilles also show that mare basalts underlie the pyroclastics across much of the plateau. Near-infrared images of Aristarchus crater reveal olivine-rich materials and two kilometer-sized outcrops of anorthosite in the central peaks. The anorthosite could be either a derivative of local magnesium-suite magmatism or a remnant of the ferroan anorthosite crust that formed over the primordial magma ocean.

  15. (HLB) infected citrus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ONOS

    2010-09-06

    Sep 6, 2010 ... Citrus grown in Malaysia have been infected since 1990 and large areas of citrus orchards had to be eradicated. The pathogen belongs to the genus Candi- datus Liberibacter. It is a phloem limited and fastidious bacteria. HLB pathogen is transmitted by citrus psyllid. Diaphorina citri in Asia and America, ...

  16. Clementine Star Tracker Stellar Compass: Final report part 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Priest, R.E.; Kordas, J.F.; Lewis, I.T. [and others

    1995-07-01

    The Clementine mission provided the first ever complete, systematic surface mapping of the moon from the ultra-violet to the near-infrared regions. More than 1.7 million images of the moon, earth and space were returned from this mission. Two star stracker stellar compasses (star tracker camera + stellar compass software) were included on the spacecraft, serving a primary function of providing angle updates to the guidance and navigation system. These cameras served a secondary function by providing a wide field of view imaging capability for lunar horizon glow and other dark-side imaging data. This 290 g camera using a 576 x 384 focal plane array and a 17 mm entrance pupil, detected and centroided stars as dim and dimmer than 4.5 m{sub v}, providing rms pointing accuracy of better than 100 {mu}rad pitch and yaw and 450 {mu}rad roll. A description of this light-weight, low power star tracker camera along with a summary of lessons learned is presented. Design goals and preliminary on-orbit performance estimates are addressed in terms of meeting the mission`s primary objective for flight qualifying the sensors for future Department of Defense flights. Documentation generated during the design, analysis, build, test and characterization of the star tracker cameras are presented. Collectively, this documentation represents a small library of information for this camera, and may be used as a framework for producing copy units by commercial enterprises, and therefore satisfies a Department of Defense and Department of Energy goal to transfer technology to industry. However, the considerable knowledge gained from the experience of the individuals involved in the system trades, design, analysis, production, testing and characterization of the star tracker stellar compass is not contained in this documentation.

  17. Genetic Transformation in Citrus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dicle Donmez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Citrus is one of the world’s important fruit crops. Recently, citrus molecular genetics and biotechnology work have been accelerated in the world. Genetic transformation, a biotechnological tool, allows the release of improved cultivars with desirable characteristics in a shorter period of time and therefore may be useful in citrus breeding programs. Citrus transformation has now been achieved in a number of laboratories by various methods. Agrobacterium tumefaciens is used mainly in citrus transformation studies. Particle bombardment, electroporation, A. rhizogenes, and a new method called RNA interference are used in citrus transformation studies in addition to A. tumefaciens. In this review, we illustrate how different gene transformation methods can be employed in different citrus species.

  18. Assessment of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV incidence in Calabria, southern Italy: results of a three-year survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuliana Renata Albanese

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Since 2006 a survey on Citrus tristeza virus (CTV has been carried out in Calabria, southern Italy, to determine the occurrence of the virus, to evaluate its incidence, to identify and characterize the virus strains, and to monitor the aphid vector populations. Citrus samples were collected from nurseries and orchards located in the five provinces of the region. The virus was not detected in the citrus-growing areas of Catanzaro (CZ or Crotone (KR, whereas it was found in three orchards in Cosenza (CS, three in Vibo Valentia (VV and twelve citrus plantings in Reggio Calabria (RC. The highest infection percentages occurred in citrus orchards close to fields already infected with CTV. Infections were detected not only in foreign cultivars, but also in local cultivars such as ‘Comune’ clementine, ‘Moro’, ‘Ovale’ and ‘Tarocco’ sweet orange, suggesting that CTV was transmitted by aphids. CTV occurred in only a few plantlets sampled in two citrus nurseries located near the main areas already infected. Serological differentiation of several CTV field isolates revealed that the mild strains were prevalent. Aphis gossypii (Glover and A. spiraecola Patch (= A. citricola Van der Goot were the most frequent aphids in the orchards, whereas Toxoptera aurantii (Boyer de Foscoulombe and Myzus persicae (Sulzer occurred with low incidence. The absence of T. citricidus (Kirkaldy was confirmed.

  19. 77 FR 22463 - Importation of Clementines From Spain; Amendment to Inspection Provisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-16

    ... (44 U.S.C. 3501 et seq.). List of Subjects in 7 CFR Part 319 Coffee, Cotton, Fruits, Imports, Logs... 44 U.S.C. 1510. #0; #0;The Code of Federal Regulations is sold by the Superintendent of Documents. #0... clementines per consignment intended for export to the United States that are required to be sampled by...

  20. 75 FR 17289 - Citrus Seed Imports; Citrus Greening and Citrus Variegated Chlorosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-06

    ..., Bergera, Calodendrum, Citrofortunella, xCitroncirus, Citrus, Clausena, Fortunella, Limonia, Microcitrus..., Balsamocitrus, Bergera, Calodendrum, Citrofortunella, Citrus, xCitroncirus, Clausena, Fortunella, Limonia...) or (x). Citrus greening). * * * * * * * Limonia spp. seed not meeting the All Candidatus Liberibacter...

  1. Citrus Waste Biomass Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karel Grohman; Scott Stevenson

    2007-01-30

    Renewable Spirits is developing an innovative pilot plant bio-refinery to establish the commercial viability of ehtanol production utilizing a processing waste from citrus juice production. A novel process based on enzymatic hydrolysis of citrus processing waste and fermentation of resulting sugars to ethanol by yeasts was successfully developed in collaboration with a CRADA partner, USDA/ARS Citrus and Subtropical Products Laboratory. The process was also successfully scaled up from laboratory scale to 10,000 gal fermentor level.

  2. Citrus limon L.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    30 juin 2013 ... harvest pattern remodeling of 'Eureka' lemon tree (Citrus limon L.) produced for Tunisian (local) market supply in spring and summer . ... Conclusion and Application: This study remodel the fruiting cycle of Eureka lemon by using gibberellic acid to fulfill the ..... ABA in the peel of Satsuma mandarin (Citrus.

  3. Development of genomic resources for Citrus clementina: Characterization of three deep-coverage BAC libraries and analysis of 46,000 BAC end sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talon Manuel

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Citrus species constitute one of the major tree fruit crops of the subtropical regions with great economic importance. However, their peculiar reproductive characteristics, low genetic diversity and the long-term nature of tree breeding mostly impair citrus variety improvement. In woody plants, genomic science holds promise of improvements and in the Citrus genera the development of genomic tools may be crucial for further crop improvements. In this work we report the characterization of three BAC libraries from Clementine (Citrus clementina, one of the most relevant citrus fresh fruit market cultivars, and the analyses of 46.000 BAC end sequences. Clementine is a diploid plant with an estimated haploid genome size of 367 Mb and 2n = 18 chromosomes, which makes feasible the use of genomics tools to boost genetic improvement. Results Three genomic BAC libraries of Citrus clementina were constructed through EcoRI, MboI and HindIII digestions and 56,000 clones, representing an estimated genomic coverage of 19.5 haploid genome-equivalents, were picked. BAC end sequencing (BES of 28,000 clones produced 28.1 Mb of genomic sequence that allowed the identification of the repetitive fraction (12.5% of the genome and estimation of gene content (31,000 genes of this species. BES analyses identified 3,800 SSRs and 6,617 putative SNPs. Comparative genomic studies showed that citrus gene homology and microsyntheny with Populus trichocarpa was rather higher than with Arabidopsis thaliana, a species phylogenetically closer to citrus. Conclusion In this work, we report the characterization of three BAC libraries from C. clementina, and a new set of genomic resources that may be useful for isolation of genes underlying economically important traits, physical mapping and eventually crop improvement in Citrus species. In addition, BAC end sequencing has provided a first insight on the basic structure and organization of the citrus genome and has

  4. Influence of Tangelo ( Citrus reticulata X Citrus paradisi ) varieties ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rough lemon (Citrus jambhiri Lush.) rootstocks were planted in citrus nursery at Ibadan to determine the best population density and the most compatible scion for good citrus nursery management practices. Rough lemon rootstock seedlings were planted at population densities of 62,500plants/ha (40cmX40cm), ...

  5. The south pole region of the moon as seen by Clementine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, E.M.; Robinson, M.S.; Eliason, E.M.

    1994-01-01

    The Clementine mission has provided the first comprehensive set of high-resolution images of the south pole region of the moon. Within 5?? of latitude of the pole, an area of an estimated 30,000 square kilometers remained in shadow during a full lunar rotation and is a promising target for future exploration for ice deposits. The Schrodinger Basin (320 kilometers in diameter), centered at 75??S, is one of the two youngest, least modified, great multiring impact basins on the moon. A large maar-type volcano localized along a graben within the Schrodinger Basin probably erupted between 1 and 2 billion years ago.

  6. The shape and internal structure of the moon from the clementine mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuber, M T; Smith, D E; Lemoine, F G; Neumann, G A

    1994-12-16

    Global topographic and gravitational field models derived from data collected by the Clementine spacecraft reveal a new picture of the shape and internal structure of the moon. The moon exhibits a 16-kilometer range of elevation, with the greatest topographic excursions occurring on the far side. Lunar highlands are in a state of near-isostatic compensation, whereas impact basins display a wide range of compensation states that do not correlate simply with basin size or age. A global crustal thickness map reveals crustal thinning under all resolvable lunar basins. The results indicate that the structure and thermal history of the moon are more complex than was previously believed.

  7. Microjets of citrus fruit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nicholas; Dickerson, Andrew

    2017-11-01

    The rupture of oil glands in the citrus exocarp is a common experience to the discerning citrus consumer. When peeled, oil cavities housed with the citrus exocarp often rupture outwardly in response to externally applied bending stresses. Bending of the peel compresses the soft material surrounding the glands, the albedo, increasing fluid pressure. Ultimately, the fluid pressure exceeds the failure strength of the outermost membrane, the flavedo. The ensuing high-velocity discharge of oil and exhaustive emptying of oil glands creates a novel method for jetting small quantities of the aromatic and volatile oil. We compare the jetting behavior across five citrus hybrids through high-speed videography and material testing of exocarps. The jetting oil undergoes an initial acceleration surpassing 5,000 gravities, reaching velocities in excess of 10 m/s. Film of citrus jets and mimicking jets in the lab reveal their high level of instability is caused by irregular and non-circular orifice geometry. Through material characterization and bending simulations, we rationalize the combination of material properties necessary to generate the internal gland pressures required for explosive dispersal.

  8. Complex history of admixture during citrus domestication revealed by genome analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, G. Albert; Prochnik, Simon; Jenkins, Jerry; Salse, Jerome; Hellsten, Uffe; Murat, Florent; Perrier, Xavier; Ruiz, Manuel; Scalabrin, Simone; Terol, Javier; Takita, Marco Aur& #233; lio,; Labadie, Karine; Poulain, Julie; Couloux, Arnaud; Jabbari, Kamel; Cattonaro, Federica; Fabbro, Cristian Del; Pinosio, Sara; Zuccolo, Andrea; Chapman, Jarrod; Grimwood, Jane; Tadeo, Francisco; Estornell, Leandro H.; Mu?oz-Sanz, Juan V.; Ibanez, Victoria; Herrero-Ortega, Amparo; Aleza, Pablo; P& #233; rez, Juli& #225; n P& #233; rez,; Ramon, Daniel; Brunel, Dominique; Luro, Francois; Chen, Chunxian; Farmerie, William G.; Desany, Brian; Kodira, Chinnappa; Mohiuddin, Mohammed; Harkins, Tim; Fredrikson, Karin; Burns, Paul; Lomsadze, Alexandre; Borodovsky, Mark; Reforgiato, Giuseppe; Freitas-Astua, Juliana; Quetier, Francis; Navarro, Luis; Roose, Mikeal; Wincker, Patrick; Schmutz, Jeremy; Morgante, Michele; Machado, Marcos Antonio; Talon, Manuel; Jaillon, Olivier; Ollitrault, Patrick; Gmitter, Frederick; Rokhsar, Daniel

    2014-06-30

    Although Citrus is the most globally significant tree fruit, its domestication history is poorly understood. Cultivated citrus types are believed to comprise selections from and/or hybrids of several wild progenitor species, but the identities of these progenitors, and their contribution to modern cultivars, remain controversial. Here we report the genomes of a collection of mandarins, pummelos, and oranges, including a high quality reference sequence from a haploid Clementine mandarin. By comparative genome analysis we show that these cultivated types can be derived from two progenitor species. Cultivated pummelos represent selections from a single progenitor species C. maxima. Unexpectedly, however, we find that cultivated mandarins are introgressions of C. maxima into a distinct second population that we identify with the ancestral wild mandarin species C. reticulata. Sweet and sour oranges are found to be interspecific hybrids. Sweet orange, the most widely cultivated citrus, arose as the offspring of previously admixed individuals. In contrast, sour (or Seville) orange is an F1 hybrid of pure C. maxima and C. reticulata parents, implying that wild mandarins were part of the early breeding germplasm. Surprisingly, we also find that a wild Chinese mandarin from Mangshan, China shows substantial sequence divergence from C. reticulata and appears to represent a distinct taxon. Understanding the relationships and phylogeny of cultivated citrus through genome analysis will clarify taxonomic relationships and enable previously inconceivable opportunities for sequence-directed genetic improvement. Citrus are widely consumed worldwide as juice or fresh fruit, providing important sources of vitamin C and other health-promoting compounds. Global production in 2012 exceeded 86 million metric tons, with an estimated value of US$9 billion (http://www.fas.usda.gov/psdonline/circulars/citrus.pdf). The very narrow genetic diversity of cultivated citrus makes it highly

  9. 76 FR 23449 - Citrus Canker, Citrus Greening, and Asian Citrus Psyllid; Interstate Movement of Regulated...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-27

    ..., the Asian citrus psyllid (ACP), and Trioza erytreae (del Guercio), the African citrus psyllid. ACP can...-producing areas indicate that the African citrus psyllid is not present in the United States. \\1\\ An... to respond to these comments and requests, we first reviewed the ] relevant scientific literature. In...

  10. Potential Nutritional Benefits of Current Citrus Consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tami Turner

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Citrus contains nutrients and phytochemicals that may be beneficial for health. We collected citrus production and consumption data and estimated the amount of these compounds that are consumed. We then compared the amounts of citrus and citrus-derived compounds used in studies that suggest a health benefit to the amounts typically found in citrus. Data is scarce, but suggests that citrus consumption might improve indices of antioxidant status, and possibly cardiovascular health and insulin sensitivity.

  11. HiRes camera and LIDAR ranging system for the Clementine mission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ledebuhr, A.G.; Kordas, J.F.; Lewis, I.T. [and others

    1995-04-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory developed a space-qualified High Resolution (HiRes) imaging LIDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) system for use on the DoD Clementine mission. The Clementine mission provided more than 1.7 million images of the moon, earth, and stars, including the first ever complete systematic surface mapping of the moon from the ultra-violet to near-infrared spectral regions. This article describes the Clementine HiRes/LIDAR system, discusses design goals and preliminary estimates of on-orbit performance, and summarizes lessons learned in building and using the sensor. The LIDAR receiver system consists of a High Resolution (HiRes) imaging channel which incorporates an intensified multi-spectral visible camera combined with a Laser ranging channel which uses an avalanche photo-diode for laser pulse detection and timing. The receiver was bore sighted to a light-weight McDonnell-Douglas diode-pumped ND:YAG laser transmitter that emmitted 1.06 {micro}m wavelength pulses of 200 mJ/pulse and 10 ns pulse-width, The LIDAR receiver uses a common F/9.5 Cassegrain telescope assembly. The optical path of the telescope is split using a color-separating beamsplitter. The imaging channel incorporates a filter wheel assembly which spectrally selects the light which is imaged onto a custom 12 mm gated image intensifier fiber-optically-coupled into a 384 x 276 pixel frame transfer CCD FPA. The image intensifier was spectrally sensitive over the 0.4 to 0.8 {micro}m wavelength region. The six-position filter wheel contained 4 narrow spectral filters, one broadband and one blocking filter. At periselene (400 km) the HiRes/LIDAR imaged a 2.8 km swath width at 20-meter resolution. The LIDAR function detected differential signal return with a 40-meter range accuracy, with a maximum range capability of 640 km, limited by the bit counter in the range return counting clock.

  12. Effect of Nigerian citrus ( Citrus sinensis Osbeck) honey on ethanol ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of Nigerian citrus (Citrus sinensis Osbeck) honey on ethanol metabolism was tested using 45 consenting individuals in apparent good health and between the ages of 25 and 35 years. The subjects were moderate social drinkers matched in terms of body weight and build. The results obtained showed that on ...

  13. The potential for citrus cryotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citrus collections of pathogen-free plants are needed for breeding, research, and distribution to the user community. The Citrus Research Board funded research project “Development of cryotherapy as an improved method of eliminating graft transmissible pathogens in Citrus” sought to use cryotherapy,...

  14. Widespread applications of citrus cryopreservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citrus genetic resources can now be successfully cryopreserved, which means that they can be placed into long-term storage at liquid nitrogen temperatures. This cryopreservation technology was specifically developed to address the immediate need to have secure long-term back-up storage for citrus co...

  15. Induced mutations in citrus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiegel-Roy, P.; Vardi, Aliza

    1990-01-01

    Full text: Parthenocarpic tendency is an important prerequisite for successful induction of seedlessness in breeding and especially in mutation breeding. A gene for asynapsis and accompanying seedless fruit has been found by us in inbred progeny of cv. 'Wilking'. Using budwood irradiation by gamma rays, seedless mutants of 'Eureka' and 'Villafranca' lemon (original clone of the latter has 25 seeds) and 'Minneola' tangelo have been obtained. Ovule sterility of the three mutants is nearly complete, with some pollen fertility still remaining. A semi-compact mutant of Shamouti orange has been obtained by irradiation. A programme for inducing seedlessness in easy peeling citrus varieties and selections has been initiated. (author)

  16. Reanalysis of Clementine Bistatic Radar Data from the Lunar South Pole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Richard A.; Tyler, G. Leonard

    1998-01-01

    On 9 April 1994 the Clementine spacecraft high-gain antenna was aimed toward the Moon's surface and the resulting 13-cm wavelength radio echoes were received on Earth. Using these data, we have found that the lunar surface generally follows a Lambertian bistatic scattering function sigma(sub 0) = K(sub D)cos(theta(sub i) with K(sub D) approx. 0.003 for the opposite (expected) sense of circular polarization and K(sub D) approx. 0.001 for the same (unexpected) sense. But there are important deviations-of up to 50% in some parts of the echo spectrum-from this simple form. Based on an earlier analysis of these same data, Nozette et al. claimed detection of an enhancement in echoes with right circular polarization from regions near the South Pole in a near-backscatter geometry. Such behavior would be consistent with presence of perhaps large quantities of water ice near the Pole. We have been unable to reproduce that result. Although we find weak suggestions of enhanced echoes at the time of South Pole backscatter, similar features are present at earlier and later times, adjacent frequencies, and in left circular polarization. If enhanced backscatter is present, it is not unique to the South Pole; if not unique to the Pole, then ice is less likely as an explanation for the enhancement.

  17. Citrus Grove Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    Citrus growers have long used aerial photography to inventory the number of groves in production. A new development at Kennedy Space Center, aerial mapping of groves with color infrared (CIR) film, affords an important advance in grove management by detecting and locating unhealthy trees long before they could be detected by ground survey methods. Aerial CIR photography picks up light reflected from foliage-- light not visible to the human eye--and enables differentiation between healthy and "stressed" (diseased) trees of a Florida orange/grapefruit grove. Computer aided photo interpretation techniques permit grading diseased trees lightly, moderately or severely stressed or dead. Method of grove mapping has offered advantage to growers in early disease warning, possible savings through water regulation and provision of a permanent record of grove growth patterns.

  18. 78 FR 63369 - Citrus Canker, Citrus Greening, and Asian Citrus Psyllid; Interstate Movement of Regulated...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-24

    .... Once infected, there is no cure for a tree with citrus greening. In areas of the world where the... required personnel to disinfect their hands and arms and spray clothing and footwear with a product...

  19. Evaluation of Antibacterial Activities of Citrus limon, Citrus reticulata, and Citrus grandis Against Pathogenic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sholeh Saeb

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Microorganisms resistant to most antibiotics are rapidly spreading, and there is an urgent and continuous need for novel antimicrobial compounds. The genus Citrus belongs to the family Rutaceae has many biologically active secondary metabolites. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate antimicrobial activity of essential oil and extract of Lemon (Citrus limon, Mandarin (Citrus reticulata and Pummelo (Citrus grandis against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and Salmonella typhi. Materials and Methods: The fresh Citrus leaves were shade-dried and powdered. Antimicrobial metabolites were extracted from them by 80% methanol for extract and using a Clevenger-type apparatus for essential oil. Eight different concentrations of the each leaf extract and essential oil were prepared. The antimicrobial susceptibility assay of Citrus leaves metabolites were subjected against four bacterial strains by agar disc diffusion and E-test method. Results: In this study, minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC of different Citrus leaf extracts were determined against all four food-borne pathogens. The C. grandis leaf essential oil had potent antimicrobial activity against all four pathogens, and the C. limon leaf essential oil was effective on Gram-positive bacteria. S. typhi was resistant against two leaves essential oils. Conclusions: The results showed that there was no antimicrobial activity effect in all extracts on tested bacteria. In this study, the antibacterial effect of essential oil of Citrus leaves on four strains of pathogenic microorganisms was confirmed. The C. grandis leaf essential oil had the most powerful antimicrobial properties, suggesting its potential application as natural preservative in foods or an effective medicine against different pathogenic microbes. Key words: Antibacterial activity, E-test, Citr

  20. ORIGINAL ARTICLES Effect of Nigerian citrus (Citrus sinensis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    average room temperature of 29°C (range 28 - 30°C) for about 4 months. This storage period is important because evolution of sugars during the first 3 months after harvest has been reported for citrus honey.' Thereafter the sugar profile was determined using a previously .... to behavioural and/ or speech disorders.

  1. Compositional analyses of small lunar pyroclastic deposits using Clementine multispectral data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaddis, L.R.; Hawke, B.R.; Robinson, M.S.; Coombs, C.

    2000-01-01

    Clementine ultraviolet-visible (UVVIS) data are used to examine the compositions of 18 pyroclastic deposits (15 small, three large) at 13 sites on the Moon. Compositional variations among pyroclastic deposits largely result from differing amounts of new basaltic (or juvenile) material and reworked local material entrained in their ejecta upon eruption. Characterization of pyroclastic deposit compositions allows us to understand the mechanisms of lunar explosive volcanism. Evidence for compositional differences between small pyroclastic deposits at a single site is observed at Atlas crater. At all sites, compositional variation among the small pyroclastic deposits is consistent with earlier classification based on Earth-based spectra: three compositional groups can be observed, and the trend of increasing mafic absorption band strength from Group 1 to Group 2 to Group 3 is noted. As redefined here, Group 1 deposits include those of Alphonsus West, Alphonsus Southeast, Alphonsus Northeast 2, Atlas South, Crüger, Franklin, Grimaldi, Lavoisier, Oppenheimer, Orientale, and Riccioli. Group 1 deposits resemble lunar highlands, with weak mafic bands and relatively high UV/VIS ratios. Group 2 deposits include those of Alphonsus Northeast 1, Atlas North, Eastern Frigoris East and West, and Aristarchus Plateau; Group 2 deposits are similar to mature lunar maria, with moderate mafic band depths and intermediate UV/VIS ratios. The single Group 3 deposit, J. Herschel, has a relatively strong mafic band and a low UV/VIS ratio, and olivine is a likely juvenile component. Two of the deposits in these groups, Orientale and Aristarchus, are large pyroclastic deposits. The third large pyroclastic deposit, Apollo 17/Taurus Littrow, has a very weak mafic band and a high UV/VIS ratio and it does not belong to any of the compositional groups for small pyroclastic deposits. The observed compositional variations indicate that highland and mare materials are also present in many large and

  2. Evaluation of resistance to asiatic citrus canker among selections of pera sweet orange (Citrus sinensis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asiatic citrus canker (ACC, caused by the bacterium Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri) is a destructive disease of citrus in Brazil and in several other citrus-producing countries. ACC management is problematic, and bactericides such as copper can be reasonably efficacious but do not completely control...

  3. 78 FR 8435 - Importation of Fresh Citrus Fruit From Uruguay, Including Citrus Hybrids and Fortunella

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-06

    ... the Citrus-related genus Fortunella, from Uruguay into the continental United States. As a condition of entry, the fruit would have to be produced in accordance with a systems approach that would... approach. This action would allow for the importation of fresh citrus fruit, including Citrus hybrids and...

  4. Photographic Remote Sensing of Sick Citrus Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gausman, H. W.

    1971-01-01

    Remote sensing with infrared color aerial photography (Kodak Ektachrome Infrared Aero 8443 film) for detecting citrus tree anomalies is described. Illustrations and discussions are given for detecting nutrient toxicity symptoms, for detecting foot rot and sooty mold fungal diseases, and for distinguishing among citrus species. Also, the influence of internal leaf structure on light reflectance, transmittance, and absorptance are considered; and physiological and environmental factors that affect citrus leaf light reflectance are reviewed briefly and illustrated.

  5. Citrus water use in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Vahrmeijer, JT

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available International Citrus Congress, Spain, Valencia, 18-23 September 2012 Citrus water use in South Africa J. Teunis Vahrmeijer1,2,*, John G. Annandale2, Mark B. Gush3 and Nicolette J. Taylor2 1Citrus Research International (CRI), Nelspruit, South Africa 2...Department of Plant Production and Soil Science, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa 3Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), Natural Resources and the Environment, Stellenbosch, South Africa *Corresponding author: jtv...

  6. Green synthesis of gold nanoparticles using Citrus fruits (Citrus limon, Citrus reticulata and Citrus sinensis) aqueous extract and its characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sujitha, Mohanan V.; Kannan, Soundarapandian

    2013-02-01

    This study reports the biological synthesis of gold nanoparticles by the reduction of HAuCl4 by using citrus fruits (Citrus limon, Citrus reticulata and Citrus sinensis) juice extract as the reducing and stabilizing agent. A various shape and size of gold nanoparticles were formed when the ratio of the reactants were altered with respect to 1.0 mM chloroauric acid solution. The gold nanoparticles obtained were characterized by UV-visible spectra, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). TEM studies showed the particles to be of various shapes and sizes and particle size ranges from 15 to 80 nm. Selected-area electron diffraction (SAED) pattern confirmed fcc phase and crystallinity of the particles. The X-ray diffraction analysis revealed the distinctive facets (1 1 1, 2 0 0, 2 2 0 and 2 2 2 planes) of gold nanoparticles. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) studies revealed that the average size for colloid gp3 of C. limon, C. reticulata and C. sinensis are 32.2 nm, 43.4 nm and 56.7 nm respectively. The DLS graph showed that the particles size was larger and more polydispersed compared to the one observed by TEM due to the fact that the measured size also includes the bio-organic compounds enveloping the core of the Au NPs. Zeta potential value for gold nanoparticles obtained from colloid gp3 of C. limon, C. reticulata and C. sinensis are -45.9, -37.9 and -31.4 respectively indicating the stability of the synthesized nanoparticles. Herein we propose a novel, previously unexploited method for the biological syntheses of polymorphic gold nanoparticles with potent biological applications.

  7. Comparative transcriptome analysis of stylar canal cells identifies novel candidate genes implicated in the self-incompatibility response of Citrus clementina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caruso Marco

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reproductive biology in citrus is still poorly understood. Although in recent years several efforts have been made to study pollen-pistil interaction and self-incompatibility, little information is available about the molecular mechanisms regulating these processes. Here we report the identification of candidate genes involved in pollen-pistil interaction and self-incompatibility in clementine (Citrus clementina Hort. ex Tan.. These genes have been identified comparing the transcriptomes of laser-microdissected stylar canal cells (SCC isolated from two genotypes differing for self-incompatibility response ('Comune', a self-incompatible cultivar and 'Monreal', a self- compatible mutation of 'Comune'. Results The transcriptome profiling of SCC indicated that the differential regulation of few specific, mostly uncharacterized transcripts is associated with the breakdown of self-incompatibility in 'Monreal'. Among them, a novel F-box gene showed a drastic up-regulation both in laser microdissected stylar canal cells and in self-pollinated whole styles with stigmas of 'Comune' in concomitance with the arrest of pollen tube growth. Moreover, we identify a non-characterized gene family as closely associated to the self-incompatibility genetic program activated in 'Comune'. Three different aspartic-acid rich (Asp-rich protein genes, located in tandem in the clementine genome, were over-represented in the transcriptome of 'Comune'. These genes are tightly linked to a DELLA gene, previously found to be up-regulated in the self-incompatible genotype during pollen-pistil interaction. Conclusion The highly specific transcriptome survey of the stylar canal cells identified novel genes which have not been previously associated with self-pollen rejection in citrus and in other plant species. Bioinformatic and transcriptional analyses suggested that the mutation leading to self-compatibility in 'Monreal' affected the expression of non

  8. Effect of saline conditions on the maturation process of Clementine clemenules fruits on two different rootstocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro, J. M.; Gomez-Gomez, A.; Perez-Perez, J. G.; Botia, P.

    2010-07-01

    The production of mandarins is important in the Mediterranean area, where the continued use of saline water reduces fruit yield and modifies fruit quality. Grafted trees of Clemenules mandarin scion on Carrizo citrange and Cleopatra mandarin rootstocks, two of the most common citrus rootstocks employed in this area, were irrigated with two saline treatments (control and 30 mM NaCl). The fruit quality was studied through the last two months before the fruit harvest. Salinity reduced both the fruit number and the mean fruit weight on Carrizo trees whereas no fruit weight reduction was observed on Cleopatra. The decrease of fruit weight on Carrizo trees is probably due to the lower water content and consequently the lower juice percentage. Although the saline treatment produced significant differences in some fruit quality variables (shape and thickness indices) throughout the maturation process, they were minimal at the harvest time. Total soluble solids (TSS) were significantly higher in fruits from the saline treatments, probably due to a passive dehydration. It is also possible that de novo synthesis of sugars occurred, since fruits from Cleopatra trees receiving the saline treatment had similar water contents but higher TSS than control fruits. The external fruit colour indicated that the saline treatment accelerated the maturation process; however, the maturity index showed that the high acidity of these fruits delayed the internal maturation with respect to the control fruits. (Author) 41 refs.

  9. Understanding the dynamics of citrus water use

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Taylor

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The quantification of water use of citrus orchards is important in order to prevent stress developing in the orchard and to avoid wasting precious water resources. Measurement of citrus orchard water use is not possible under all environ...

  10. Cryopreservation and Cryotherapy of Citrus Cultivars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long-term conservation of Citrus clones can be accomplished by cryopreservation. Shoot tips will survive liquid nitrogen exposure and storage when appropriately desiccated and treated with cryoprotectant solutions. In our research, vegetative Citrus budwood is shipped from Riverside to Fort Collin...

  11. Effect of Varieties and Budder Efficiency on Citrus scion ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In an effort to boost the availability of budded citrus seedlings, the effect of varieties and budder efficiency were evaluated to improve the performance of scion development. Three scions namely: Tangelo (Citrus paradisi x Citrus reticulata), Lemon (C. limon) and Valencia Sweet orange (Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbecks) were ...

  12. Assessment of Navel oranges, Clementine tangerines and Rutaceous fruits as hosts of Bactrocera cucurbitae and Bactrocera latifrons (Diptera: Tephritidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Export of Citrus spp., widely cultivated throughout the tropics and subtropics, may require risk mitigation measures if grown in areas with established tephritid fruit fly (Diptera: Tephritidae) populations capable of infesting the fruits. Two tephritid fruit fly species whose geographic ranges have...

  13. Lipids in citrus sinensis seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamid, S.; Liaquat, L.; Khalid, B.; Khan, J.I.

    2003-01-01

    The seed oil of citrus sinensis when subjected to different physicochemical tests showed moisture 13.2%, ash 7.5%, ester value 1.29%, free fatty acid 0.4%. iodine value 65.0% and protein value 6.0%. According to lipid analysis. the oil was classified into hydrocarbons. wax esters, sterol esters, triglycerides. free fatty acids, 1,3 and 1,2 diglycerides, alcohols, sterols, monoglycerides, phosphatidylethanolamines, phosphatidylcholines and lysophosphatidylethanolamines. The fatty acid (C/sub 12.0/ - C/sub 21.0/) composition of all lipid classes was determined with the help of thin layer and gas liquid chromatography. (author)

  14. Accumulation of the sesquiterpenes nootkatone and valencene by callus cultures of Citrus paradisi, Citrus limonia and Citrus aurantium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Río, J A; Ortuño, A; Puig, D G; Iborra, J L; Sabater, F

    1991-10-01

    The production of the sesquiterpenes nootkatone and valencene by callus cultures of Citrus species is described. The levels of these compounds were examined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and their yields were compared with the amounts found in mature fruits. A simultaneous increase and decrease in the levels of nootkatone and valencene, respectively, were observed with the aging of callus cultures of Citrus paradisi. These results suggest that valencene might be a possible precursor of nootkatone in this species. The high level of nootkatone detected in 9-month-old callus cultures of Citrus paradisi might be associated with the corresponding cell morphological changes observed.

  15. Investigation of peel and leaf essential oils of Citrus clementina Hort. ex Tan. growing in the south of Vietnam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Thao-Tran Thi; Thi Tran, Thanh-Tram; Hua, Tra-My

    2016-01-01

    The essential oils from peels and leaves of Citrus clementine Hort. ex Tan. were extracted via two methods: conventional hydrodistillation (CHD) and microwave-assisted hydrodistillation (MAHD). Their physicochemical properties were investigated. Their chemical compositions of the oils were...... determined by GC/FID and GC/MS. A total of forty-one and seventy-seven compounds of the total essential oil composition of the peels and leaves respectively were identified. The peel oils were dominated by monoterpene hydrocarbons in which limonene was the main component (95.48% [CHD], and 95.03% [MAHD......]). The leaf oils were also dominated by sesquiterpene hydrocarbons with sabinene (26.02% [CHD], and 19.52% [MAHD]), β-elemene (10.50% [CHD], and 18.04% [MAHD]), linalool (9.88% [CHD], and 7.51% [MAHD]), (E)-β-ocimene (5.87% [CHD], and 5.00% [MAHD]), β-caryophyllene (4.04% [CHD], and 7.49% [MAHD]), and δ...

  16. Annotation of the Asian citrus psyllid genome reveals a reduced innate immune system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citrus production worldwide is currently facing significant losses due to citrus greening disease, also known as huanglongbing. The citrus greening bacteria, Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas), is a persistent propagative pathogen transmitted by the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuway...

  17. Improved annotation of the insect vector of citrus greening disease: Biocuration by a diverse genomics community

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri Kuwayama) is the insect vector of the bacterium Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas), the pathogen associated with citrus Huanglongbing (HLB, citrus greening). HLB threatens citrus production worldwide. Suppression or reduction of the insect vector usin...

  18. Signaling pathways in a Citrus EST database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Mehta

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Citrus spp. are economically important crops, which in Brazil are grown mainly in the State of São Paulo. Citrus cultures are attacked by several pathogens, causing severe yield losses. In order to better understand this culture, the Millenium Project (IAC Cordeirópolis was launched in order to sequence Citrus ESTs (expressed sequence tags from different tissues, including leaf, bark, fruit, root and flower. Plants were submitted to biotic and abiotic stresses and investigated under different development stages (adult vs. juvenile. Several cDNA libraries were constructed and the sequences obtained formed the Citrus ESTs database with almost 200,000 sequences. Searches were performed in the Citrus database to investigate the presence of different signaling pathway components. Several of the genes involved in the signaling of sugar, calcium, cytokinin, plant hormones, inositol phosphate, MAPKinase and COP9 were found in the citrus genome and are discussed in this paper. The results obtained may indicate that similar mechanisms described in other plants, such as Arabidopsis, occur in citrus. Further experimental studies must be conducted in order to understand the different signaling pathways present.

  19. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of Citrus sinensis and Citrus limonia epicotyl segments

    OpenAIRE

    Almeida,Weliton Antonio Bastos de; Mourão Filho,Francisco de Assis Alves; Mendes,Beatriz Madalena Januzzi; Pavan,Alexandra; Rodriguez,Adriana Pinheiro Martinelli

    2003-01-01

    Genetic transformation allows the release of improved cultivars with desirable characteristics in a shorter period of time and therefore may be useful in citrus breeding programs. The objective of this research was to establish a protocol for genetic transformation of Valencia and Natal sweet oranges (Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck) and Rangpur lime (Citrus limonia L. Osbeck). Epicotyl segments of germinated in vitro plantlets (three weeks in darkness and two weeks in a 16-h photoperiod) were used...

  20. Green Synthesis and Biological Activities of Gold Nanoparticles Functionalized with Citrus reticulata, Citrus aurantium, Citrus sinensis and Citrus grandis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Islam, N. U.; Shahid, M.; Ahsan, F.; Khan, I.; Shah, M. R.; Khan, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, gold nanoparticles (GNPs) were prepared at boiling temperature (90-95 degree C) by treating gold ions with Citrus fruit extracts. The effect of mixing ratios of the reactants and concentration of gold hydrochloride was studied. In the standardization process, 10/sup -3/ M solution of HAuCl/sub 4/.3H/sub 2/O was reacted with fruit extracts for half an hour at 90-95 degree C in different ratios. GNPs were characterized by UV-Vis spectroscopy (UV-Vis) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Their stability was evaluated against varying pH solutions and volumes of sodium chloride along with metals and antibiotics sensing ability. The gold nanoparticles were tested for antibacterial and antifungal activities against various pathogenic strains. The UV-Vis spectra of gold nanoparticles gave surface plasmon resonance at about 540 nm while the AFM images revealed the particle size within the range of 70-100 nm. GNPs showed remarkable stability in varying pH solutions and salt volumes as well as high detection ability towards cobalt, copper, ceftriaxone and penicillin. Moreover, the GNPs possessed moderate antibacterial and good antifungal activity. These results concluded that the Citrus fruit extracts can be utilized for large scale synthesis of cost-effective nanoparticles which may have compatibility for biomedical and pharmaceutical applications. (author)

  1. Mapping and compositional analysis of mare basalts in the Aristarchus region of the Moon using Clementine data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Feng; Zou Yong-Liao; Zheng Yong-Chun; Fu Xiao-Hui; Zhu Yong-Chao

    2014-01-01

    The process of accurately defining and outlining mare basalt units is necessary for constraining the stratigraphy and ages of basalt units, which are used to determine the duration and the flux of lunar volcanism. We use a combination of Clementine's five-band ultraviolet/visible data and TiO 2 and FeO abundance distribution maps to define homogenous mare basalt units and characterize their compositional variations (with maturity) in the Aristarchus region. With 20 groups of distinct mare basaltic soils identified using the method in this paper, six additional spectrally defined areas and five basaltic units are constructed, and their mineralogic quantization values provide new constraints on their temporal and spatial evolution. Our results indicate that the Aristarchus region has diverse basalt units and a complex history of volcanic evolution. We also demonstrate that the techniques, from which spectrally distinct mare basalts can be mapped, performed well in this study and can be confidently expanded to other mare regions of the Moon. (research papers)

  2. The aconitate hydratase family from Citrus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cercos Manuel

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research on citrus fruit ripening has received considerable attention because of the importance of citrus fruits for the human diet. Organic acids are among the main determinants of taste and organoleptic quality of fruits and hence the control of fruit acidity loss has a strong economical relevance. In citrus, organic acids accumulate in the juice sac cells of developing fruits and are catabolized thereafter during ripening. Aconitase, that transforms citrate to isocitrate, is the first step of citric acid catabolism and a major component of the citrate utilization machinery. In this work, the citrus aconitase gene family was first characterized and a phylogenetic analysis was then carried out in order to understand the evolutionary history of this family in plants. Gene expression analyses of the citrus aconitase family were subsequently performed in several acidic and acidless genotypes to elucidate their involvement in acid homeostasis. Results Analysis of 460,000 citrus ESTs, followed by sequencing of complete cDNA clones, identified in citrus 3 transcription units coding for putatively active aconitate hydratase proteins, named as CcAco1, CcAco2 and CcAco3. A phylogenetic study carried on the Aco family in 14 plant species, shows the presence of 5 Aco subfamilies, and that the ancestor of monocot and dicot species shared at least one Aco gene. Real-time RT-PCR expression analyses of the three aconitase citrus genes were performed in pulp tissues along fruit development in acidic and acidless citrus varieties such as mandarins, oranges and lemons. While CcAco3 expression was always low, CcAco1 and CcAco2 genes were generally induced during the rapid phase of fruit growth along with the maximum in acidity and the beginning of the acid reduction. Two exceptions to this general pattern were found: 1 Clemenules mandarin failed inducing CcAco2 although acid levels were rapidly reduced; and 2 the acidless "Sucreña" orange

  3. Citrus leprosis transmission by Brevipalpus yothersi mites through non citrus hosts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo León M.

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Citrus leprosis virus (C i LV was detected in Colombia at the eastern plains in 2004; it is a threat the disease spreads to other regions of the country. The main vector is Brevipalpus yothersi Baker (formerly identified as Brevipalpus phoenicis. This research determined the viability of B. yothersi to transmit C i LV to citrus plants, after been hosted in non-citrus plants. To virus acquisition, mites spent three days on symptomatic orange (Citrus x sinensis leaves positives to C i LV-C2; then mites were placed on six non-citrus plants (Dieffenbachia sp., Hibiscus rosa-sinensis,Codiaeum variegatum, Swinglea glutinosa, Sida acutaand Stachytarpheta cayennensis. A randomized design with 6 treatments and 4 replicates was carried out. After scheduled time in non-citrus plants, mites were three days relocated on C. x sinensis healthy plants. Leaves of receptor plants, were evaluated to the occurrence or absence of symptoms and collected for RT-PCR tests. B. yothersi mites were able to transmit the C i LV virus over 85 % of Valencia orange plants (Citrus x sinensis L., after feeding from 2-20 days on non-citrus host plants. The first leprosis symptoms on C. x sinensis leaves was confirmed from 14 to 51 days after transmission. The present research work further established that C i LV-C2 is a persistently transmitted virus. The implement quarantine diagnostic measures to prevent spread of CiLV to disease-free zones is suggested.

  4. 78 FR 41259 - Importation of Fresh Citrus Fruit From Uruguay, Including Citrus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-10

    .... The fruit must be safeguarded by an insect- proof screen or plastic tarpaulin while in transit to the...-0060] RIN 0579-AD59 Importation of Fresh Citrus Fruit From Uruguay, Including Citrus Hybrids and.... ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: We are amending the fruits and vegetables regulations to allow the...

  5. Interrelations between citrus rust mite, Hirsutella thompsonii and greasy spot on citrus in Surinam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brussel, van E.W.

    1975-01-01

    Counts of citrus rust mite (Phyllocoptruta oleivora (Ashm.)) on leaves and fruit of citrus rose to a peak in the two dry seasons, the build up taking 4-5 weeks. It then decreased partly through infection by the entomogenous fungus

  6. Phyllosticta citriasiana sp nov., the cause of Citrus tan spot of Citrus maxima in Asia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wulandari, N.F.; To-anun, C.; Hyde, K.D.; Duong, L.M.; de Gruyter, J.; Meffert, J.P.; Groenewald, J.Z.; Crous, P.W.

    2009-01-01

    Guignardia citricarpa, the causal agent of Citrus Black Spot, is subject to phytosanitary legislation in the European Union and the U.S.A. This species is frequently confused with G. mangiferae, which is a non-pathogenic, and is commonly isolated as an endophyte from citrus fruits and a wide range

  7. Phyllosticta citriasiana sp. nov., the cause of Citrus tan spot of Citrus maxima in Asia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wulandari, N.F.; To-anun, C.; Hyde, K.D.; Duong, L.M.; Gruyter, de J.; Meffert, J.P.; Groenewald, J.Z.; Crous, P.W.

    2009-01-01

    Guignardia citricarpa, the causal agent of Citrus Black Spot, is subject to phytosanitary legislation in the European Union and the U.S.A. This species is frequently confused with G. mangiferae, which is a non-pathogenic, and is commonly isolated as an endophyte from citrus fruits and a wide range

  8. 75 FR 34322 - Citrus Greening and Asian Citrus Psyllid; Quarantine and Interstate Movement Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-17

    ... Trioza erytreae (del Guercio), the African citrus psyllid. ACP can also cause economic damage to citrus... commercial sale in a box or container, the statement may be printed on the box or container, or printed on a label permanently affixed to the box or container, provided that, in either case, the statement is...

  9. 77 FR 59709 - Citrus Greening and Asian Citrus Psyllid; Quarantine and Interstate Movement Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    ... (del Guercio), the African citrus psyllid. ACP can also cause economic damage to citrus in groves and..., if the article is sold in a box or container, we allowed the statement to be printed on the box or container. We stated that the operator of the site of propagation of the nursery stock and the person...

  10. Proximity to citrus influences Pierce's disease in Temecula Valley vineyards

    OpenAIRE

    Perring, Thomas M.; Farrar, Charles A.; Blua, Matthew

    2001-01-01

    Pierce's disease has caused extensive losses to grapes in the Temecula Valley. The primary vector of Pierce's disease in the region is the glassy-winged sharpshooter (GWSS), which has been found in large numbers in citrus trees. We examined the role of citrus in the Temecula Valley Pierce's disease epidemic and found that citrus groves have influenced the incidence and severity of Pierce's disease in grapes. Because GWSS inhabit citrus in large numbers, California grape growers should take ad...

  11. The Role of Image Enhancement in Citrus Canker Disease Detection

    OpenAIRE

    K. Padmavathi; K. Thangadurai

    2016-01-01

    Digital image processing is employed in numerous areas of biology to identify and analyse problems. This approach aims to use image processing techniques for citrus canker disease detection through leaf inspection. Citrus canker is a severe bacterium-based citrus plant disease. The symptoms of citrus canker disease typically occur in the leaves, branches, fruits and thorns. The leaf images show the health status of the plant and facilitate the observation and detection of the disease level at...

  12. Huanglongbing increases Diplodia Stem End Rot in Citrus sinensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huanglongbing (HLB), one of the most devastating diseases of citrus is caused by the a-Proteobacteria Candidatus Liberibacter. Diplodia natalensis Pole-Evans is a fungal pathogen which has been known to cause a postharvest stem-end rot of citrus, the pathogen infects citrus fruit under the calyx, an...

  13. Citrus Tristeza Virus: An Increasing Trend in the Virus Occurrence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Citrus tristeza clostervirus (CTV) is one of the most damaging fruit viruses playing havoc in citrus orchards around the world. Here, we report, an ELISA-based indexing of citrus trees over a period of eight years (2002 to 2010) in Northwest Pakistan, revealing that the incidence of CTV is increasing mainly with the distribution ...

  14. Cryopreservation of Citrus shoot tips using micrografting for recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    The USDA-ARS National Plant Germplasm System (NPGS) and the University of California Citrus Variety Collection maintain more than 888 unique accessions representing 132 taxa of Citrus, Fortunella, and Citrus wild species relatives within field, screenhouse, and greenhouse collections. We have ident...

  15. Insect pest situation and farmers' cultural practices in citrus orchards ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A survey was conducted in the major citrus producing areas located in Southern Guinea savannah agroecological zone of Nigeria to identify major insect pest and assess the effects of farmers' citricultural practices on citrus production and pest control. Various species of insect pests were identified attacking citrus.

  16. Relative population levels of citrus thrips Scirtothrips aurantii on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Citrus thrips Scirtothrips aurantii Faure is a serious economic pest in southern Africa. It is indigenous, breeding on many wild hosts as well as on citrus. In this northern Transvaal lowveld study, bush containing known host plants of S. aurantii was not the source of early infestation of a navel orange orchard by adult citrus ...

  17. (JASR) VOL. 10, No. 2, 2010 69 CITRUS FARMERS PRODUCTION

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    oma

    coat removal and scarification for accelerated rootstock seed germinating, intercropping models of citrus, production of bottled citrus juice, jams and marmalades. Although a lot of work has been done in development of improved technologies for citrus production,little has been done to find out the attitude of farmers towards ...

  18. First report of citrus leprosis virus nuclear type in Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citrus leprosis is a difficult viral disease causing significant damage to citrus fruit in South America and Central America. The disease is marked by dramatic lesions on fruit, leaves and stems resulting in unmarketable product. Citrus leprosis virus cytoplasmic types (CiLV-C and CiLV-C2) wer edete...

  19. IDENTIFICATION AND QUANTIFICATION OF DIFFERENTIALLY EXPRESSED GENES ASSOCIATED WITH CITRUS BLIGHT (Citrus spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Renato de Abreu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Brazil is the largest citrus producer in the world, being responsible for more than 20% of its production, which is, however still low due to phytosanitary issues such as citrus blight. Citrus blight is an anomaly whose causes still have not yet been determined, therefore there are no efficient control measures to minimize the production losses with the use of resistant varieties being considered the most appropriate method. However, little is known about the genes involved in the defense response of the plants to this anomaly. Considering that many physiological alterations associated with plant stress responses are controlled at a transcriptional level, in this study we sought the identification and characterization of the gene expression products differentially expressed in the response to the citrus blight. Through the suppressive subtractive hybridization technique, expressed cDNA libraries were built using mRNAs isolated from "Cravo" lemon tree roots (Citrus limonia L. Osbeck under "Pera" orange (Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck of healthy and sick plants. 129 clones were obtained by subtraction and their sequences were compared in databases. 34 of them linked to proteins associated to stress processes, while the others were similar to sequences of unknown functions or did not present similarity with sequences deposited in the databases. 3 genes were selected and their expressions were studied by RT - qPCR in real-time. Plants with citrus blight presented an increase of the expression level in two of those genes, suggesting that these can be directly involved with this anomaly.

  20. Overexpression of a modified plant thionin enhances disease resistance to citrus canker and huanglongbing (HLB, citrus greening)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huanglongbing (HLB or citrus greening disease) caused by Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (Las) is a great threat to the United States citrus industry. Citrus canker is also an economically important disease associated with a bacterial pathogen (Xanthomonas citri). In this study, we characterized e...

  1. A novel citrus viroid found in Australia, tentatively named citrus viroid VII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, G A; Donovan, N J; Bodaghi, S; Jelinek, S M; Vidalakis, G

    2018-01-01

    A novel citrus viroid was discovered in a non-symptomatic Lisbon lemon (Citrus x limon L. Burm.f.) tree in New South Wales, Australia. Bioindexing, molecular detection and characterization involving sequencing combined with in silico analysis for the identification of the viroid-RNA hallmark properties of transmissibility and autonomous replication as well as specific sequence and structural motifs suggest that this viroid is a member of a new species in the genus Apscaviroid, family Pospiviroidae, which we have tentatively named "citrus viroid VII" (CVd-VII).

  2. Identification of a GCC transcription factor responding to fruit colour change events in citrus through the transcriptomic analyses of two mutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cercós Manuel

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background External ripening in Citrus fruits is morphologically characterized by a colour shift from green to orange due to the degradation of chlorophylls and the accumulation of carotenoid pigments. Although numerous genes coding for enzymes involved in such biochemical pathways have been identified, the molecular control of this process has been scarcely studied. In this work we used the Citrus clementina mutants 39B3 and 39E7, showing delayed colour break, to isolate genes potentially related to the regulation of peel ripening and its physiological or biochemical effects. Results Pigment analyses revealed different profiles of carotenoid and chlorophyll modification in 39B3 and 39E7 mutants. Flavedo from 39B3 fruits showed an overall delay in carotenoid accumulation and chlorophyll degradation, while the flavedo of 39E7 was devoid of the apocarotenoid β-citraurin among other carotenoid alterations. A Citrus microarray containing about 20,000 cDNA fragments was used to identify genes that were differentially expressed during colour change in the flavedo of 39B3 and 39E7 mutants respect to the parental variety. The results highlighted 73 and 90 genes that were respectively up- and down-regulated in both mutants. CcGCC1 gene, coding for a GCC type transcriptional factor, was found to be down-regulated. CcGCC1 expression was strongly induced at the onset of colour change in the flavedo of parental clementine fruit. Moreover, treatment of fruits with gibberellins, a retardant of external ripening, delayed both colour break and CcGCC1 overexpression. Conclusions In this work, the citrus fruit ripening mutants 39B3 and 39E7 have been characterized at the phenotypic, biochemical and transcriptomic level. A defective synthesis of the apocarotenoid β-citraurin has been proposed to cause the yellowish colour of fully ripe 39E7 flavedo. The analyses of the mutant transcriptomes revealed that colour change during peel ripening was strongly

  3. ENZYMATIC KINETIC STUDY HYDROLASE FROM CITRUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Israel Hernández

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the degrading activity of enzymes derived from orange peels (Citrus x sinensis, grapefruit (Citrus paradise and pineapple (Ananas comosus on the organic matter in wastewater is evaluated. This activity is measured indirectly by quantifying the biochemical oxygen demand (COD before and after degradation process based on a period of time using the HACH DR / 2010, and then the kinetic study was performed by the differential method and integral with the experimental data, obtaining a reaction order of 1 to pectinase (orange, and order 2 for bromelain (pineapple.

  4. Profiles of free and bound phenolics extracted from Citrus fruits and their roles in biological systems: content, and antioxidant, anti-diabetic and anti-hypertensive properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alu'datt, Muhammad H; Rababah, Taha; Alhamad, Mohammad N; Al-Mahasneh, Majdi A; Ereifej, Khalil; Al-Karaki, Ghazi; Al-Duais, Mohammed; Andrade, Juan E; Tranchant, Carole C; Kubow, Stan; Ghozlan, Kawther A

    2017-09-20

    This study of selected plants of the Rutaceae family was carried out to investigate their phenolic content, antioxidant activity, and the in vitro inhibitory potential of extracted phenolics towards enzymes relevant for hyperglycemia and hypertension. The phenolic content, antioxidant activity and phenolic extract-mediated inhibitory activities for α-glucosidase and α-amylase were evaluated by spectrophotometry. The content of individual phenolics and the angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity of the phenolic extracts were evaluated by LC/MS-MS and RP-HPLC methods, respectively. A higher percentage of free phenolic content was seen for all the selected plants of the Rutaceae family (85.43-92.82% of the total phenolic content) than of the bound form (7.18-14.57% of total phenolic content). The major predominant bound phenolic in lemon and red blood orange was hesperidin. The major predominant bound phenolic in pummelo, shamouti and clementine was ferulic acid. The highest ACE and α-glucosidase inhibitory activity of the extracted phenolics from lemon was associated with free phenolic extracts obtained at 30 °C with values of 100% inhibition. Red blood orange free phenolic extract (30 °C) elicited the highest α-amylase inhibition activity (32.3%). In contrast, extracted bound phenolics after acid and base hydrolysis from all selected plants from the Citrus species were shown to induce activation of the ACE and α-amylase enzymes.

  5. The Types of Essentials Oil Components Isolated From the Leaves of Citrus Aurantifolia and Citrus Nobilis

    OpenAIRE

    Wulandari, Mutiara Juni; Mohammad Anwar Jamaludin,, Lailatul Riska, Agustin Laela Prunama; Mumun Nurmilawati, Indra Fauzi

    2015-01-01

    Essential oil or known as the eteris oil (etheric oil) was result from secondary metabolism of a plant. In general essential oil contains of citronellal, Citronelal, Citronelol, Limonen, β-Pinene dan sabinene. The components essential oil derived from citrus plants commonly used by perfume industry, on other hand it is used as essentials oil orange flavour addition in some drinks and food, and also as an antioxidant and anti cancer. One of the essential oil is produced by Citrus aurantifolia ...

  6. Chemical composition, antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of citrus jambhiri lush and citrus reticulata blanco essential oils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadaf, S.; Shahid, M.; Iqbal, Z.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the time interval in which we can get maximum concentration of essential oil from the peels of Citrus jambhiri Lush and Citrus reticulata Blanco, to determine the composition of peel oils and to evaluate the antioxidant and antimicrobial activity of extracted oils. It was observed that in case of Citrus jambhiri Lush maximum oil yield (I %) was obtained when fruits were immature (during October). As the fruit samples got matured, the oil yield decreased. In December the oil yield decreased to 0.2 %. In case of Citrus reticulata Blanco maximum oil yield (0.189 %) was obtained during the last week of January. Chemical analysis of essential oils showed that limonene was the most abundant compound (86 %-93 %) followed by alpha terpinene (2 %-4.5 %), beta-pinene(1 0/0-2 %) and nerol (0.5 %-1.5 %). The radical scavenging and antioxidant activities of essential oils were determined by DPPH and linoleic acid test. The essential oil of Citrus jambhiri Lush inhibited the oxidation of linoleic acid by 54.98 % and that of Citrus reticulata Blanco inhibited by 49.98 %. Moreover, the essential oils also showed antimicrobial activities against the tested microorganisms. (author)

  7. Nutritional deficiency in citrus with symptoms of citrus variegated chlorosis disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ME. Silva-Stenico

    Full Text Available It is well known that citrus plants that have been infected by Xylella fastidiosa display nutritional deficiencies, probably caused by production of extracellular polymers by the bacteria that block normal nutrient flow through the xylem. The aim of this work was to study the mineral composition of specific foliar areas in different stages of infection in citrus. Thus, the concentrations of macro and micronutrients in leaves of citrus infected by X. fastidiosa were measured. Samples from four infected citrus orchards in the State of São Paulo, Brazil, were respectively collected from Santa Rita do Passa Quatro, Neves Paulista, Gavião Peixoto and Paraíso counties. The presence of X. fastidiosa in leaves was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR using specific PCR primers. To understand the variation in leaf-nutrient content in citrus plants, we used foliar nutrient values from control (non-symptomatic plants as a reference. Chemometric analysis showed that the deficiency of P and K in symptomatic trees for all orchards and high concentrations of Fe, Mn and Zn were observed in chlorotic areas, although other studies revealed deficiency of zinc in leaves. This is the first report showing that a correlation between chlorotic citrus leaf and higher concentrations of Fe, Mn and Zn are observed when infected and healthy plants were compared.

  8. Rheology and composition of processed citrus fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    While fibrous byproducts are abundant in supply, using them in food products in such a way to not degrade taste or texture can be challenging. Citrus fibers have been shown to have high water holding and viscous properties. However, to better incorporate dried orange pulp into foods, their propert...

  9. ENERGY USE IN CITRUS PRODUCTION OF MAZANDARAN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Adipala Ekwamu

    3.65 and 2.4% total energy use, respectively. Diesel fuel was mainly consumed for land preparation, pruning practices, orchard spraying with tractor and transportation; and gasoline was mainly consumed for gasoline engine for. TABLE 1. Energy equivalents for different inputs and outputs in citrus production in Iran. Input.

  10. Citrus aurantium blossom and preoperative anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhlaghi, Mahmood; Shabanian, Gholamreza; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud; Parvin, Neda; Saadat, Mitra; Akhlaghi, Mohsen

    2011-01-01

    Reducing anxiety is very important before operation. Preoperative visit and use of premedication are popular methods to achieve this goal, but the role of anxiolytic premedication remains unclear and postoperative side-effects may result from routine premedication. Citrus aurantium is used as an alternative medicine in some countries to treat anxiety, and recently the anxiolytic role of this medicinal plant was established in an animal model study. The aim of this study was to assess the anxiolytic effect of Citrus aurantium blossomon preoperative anxiety. We studied 60 ASA I patients undergoing minor operation. In a randomized double-blind design, two groups of 30 patients received one of the following oral premedication two hours before induction of anesthesia: 1) Citrus aurantium blossom distillate 1mL.kg(-1) (C-group); 2) Saline solution 1mL.kg(-1) as placebo (P-group). Anxiety was measured before and after premedication using the Spielberger state-trait anxiety inventory (STAI-state) and the Amsterdam preoperative anxiety and information scale (APAIS) before operation. After premedication, both the STAI-state and the APAIS scales were decreased in C-group (pCitrus aurantium blossom may be effective in terms of reduction in preoperative anxiety before minor operation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  11. Founder lines for improved citrus biotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    This article discusses the research needed to develop the RMCE strategy and molecular assays for site-specific recombinases as tools for genome manipulation. Explanation of genetic engineering used to generate transgenic citrus plants to exhibit a novel phenotype, but not to contain the recombinase...

  12. Detection of Citrus Trees from Uav Dsms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ok, A. O.; Ozdarici-Ok, A.

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents an automated approach to detect citrus trees from digitals surface models (DSMs) as a single source. The DSMs in this study are generated from Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), and the proposed approach first considers the symmetric nature of the citrus trees, and it computes the orientation-based radial symmetry in an efficient way. The approach also takes into account the local maxima (LM) information to verify the output of the radial symmetry. Our contributions in this study are twofold: (i) Such an integrated approach (symmetry + LM) has not been tested to detect (citrus) trees (in orchards), and (ii) the validity of such an integrated approach has not been experienced for an input, e.g. a single DSM. Experiments are performed on five test patches. The results reveal that our approach is capable of counting most of the citrus trees without manual intervention. Comparison to the state-of-the-art reveals that the proposed approach provides notable detection performance by providing the best balance between precision and recall measures.

  13. Diversity of endophytic bacterial populations and their interaction with Xylella fastidiosa in citrus plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Araujo, W.L.; Marcon, J.; jr. Maccheroni, W.; Elsas, van J.D.; Vuurde, van J.W.L.; Azevedo, de J.L.

    2002-01-01

    Citrus variegated chlorosis (CVC) is caused by Xylella fastidiosa, a phytopathogenic bacterium that can infect all Citrus sinensis cultivars. The endophytic bacterial communities of healthy, resistant, and CVC-affected citrus plants were studied by using cultivation as well as

  14. Citrus tissue culture employing vegetative explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, H C; Singh, S K; Sharma, A K; Agnihotri, S

    2001-11-01

    Citrus being a number one fruit of the world due to its high nutritional value, huge production of fruits and fruit products, the citrus industry may be considered a major fruit industry. Though citrus orchard area in India is comparable to USA, the produce is far less, while its export is nil. Biotechnology has played an outstanding role in boosting the citrus industry, e.g., in Spain, which is now the biggest exporter of citrus fruit with the application of micrografting. Amongst the fruit trees, perhaps the maximum tissue culture research has been done in citrus during the past four decades, however, the results of practical value are meagre. The shortfalls in citrus tissue culture research and some advancements made in this direction along with bright prospects are highlighted, restricting the review to vegetative explants only. Whilst utilization of nucellar embryogenesis is limited to rootstocks, the other aspects, like, regeneration and proliferation of shoot meristems measuring 200 microm in length--a global breakthrough--of two commercially important scion species, Citrus aurantifolia and C. sinensis and an important rootstock, C. limonia, improvement of micrografting technique, cloning of the same two scion species as well as some Indian rootstock species, employing nodal stem segments of mature trees, of immense practical value have been elaborated. A rare phenomenon of shift in the morphogenetic pattern of differentiation from shoot bud differentiation to embryoid formation occurred during the long-term culture of stem callus of C. grandis. Stem callus-regenerated plants of C. aurantifolia, C. sinensis and C. grandis showed variation in their ploidy levels and a somaclonal variant of C. sinensis, which produced seedless fruits was isolated. Tailoring of rooting in microshoots to a tap root-like system by changing the inorganic salt composition of the rooting medium, resulting in 100% transplant success, and germplasm preservation through normal growth

  15. Production of aromatic acids during anaerobic digestion of citrus peel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lane, A.G.

    1980-06-01

    Commercially prepared citrus oils, distilled citrus oils, limonene and the non-volatile fraction of lemon oils were all found to be toxic to the anaerobic digestion process for conversion of citrus waste to methane. Toxicity was characterised by appearance of benzoic, phenylacetic and phenylpropionic acids in the digestion liquors, though these acids were not in themselves toxic. The bulk of the phenylpropionic acid was derived from flavonoids.

  16. Induction and selection of citrus mutant by gamma-irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, In Jung; Oh, Seung Kyu; Lee, Hyo Yeon [Jeju National University, Jeju (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-09-15

    We have subjected to gamma-irradiation to citrus buds and then grafted onto mature citrus tree. Mutant citrus branch lines have been induced. As a result of first selection, we found the several mutant lines showing interesting phenotypes such as higher sugar content. We have selected several branches showing good qualities such as higher sweetness and/or lower acidity. Some branch lines showed over 13 .deg. Brix sugar content and below 0.9% acidity. Other mutant branch lines showed the changes of shape, size, peel thickness, and fiber contents or distribution of fruits. The results suggest that gamma-irradiation is an effective tool for induction of citrus mutant lines.

  17. Citrus Flavonoids as Regulators of Lipoprotein Metabolism and Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulvihill, Erin E; Burke, Amy C; Huff, Murray W

    2016-07-17

    Citrus flavonoids are polyphenolic compounds with significant biological properties. This review summarizes recent advances in understanding the ability of citrus flavonoids to modulate lipid metabolism, other metabolic parameters related to the metabolic syndrome, and atherosclerosis. Citrus flavonoids, including naringenin, hesperitin, nobiletin, and tangeretin, have emerged as potential therapeutics for the treatment of metabolic dysregulation. Epidemiological studies reveal an association between the intake of citrus flavonoid-containing foods and a decreased incidence of cardiovascular disease. Studies in cell culture and animal models, as well as a limited number of clinical studies, reveal the lipid-lowering, insulin-sensitizing, antihypertensive, and anti-inflammatory properties of citrus flavonoids. In animal models, supplementation of rodent diets with citrus flavonoids prevents hepatic steatosis, dyslipidemia, and insulin resistance primarily through inhibition of hepatic fatty acid synthesis and increased fatty acid oxidation. Citrus flavonoids blunt the inflammatory response in metabolically important tissues including liver, adipose, kidney, and the aorta. The mechanisms underlying flavonoid-induced metabolic regulation have not been completely established, although several potential targets have been identified. In mouse models, citrus flavonoids show marked suppression of atherogenesis through improved metabolic parameters as well as through direct impact on the vessel wall. Recent studies support a role for citrus flavonoids in the treatment of dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, hepatic steatosis, obesity, and atherosclerosis. Larger human studies examining dose, bioavailability, efficacy, and safety are required to promote the development of these promising therapeutic agents.

  18. Estimation of Fluoride Concentration of Various Citrus and Non-Citrus Fruits Commonly Consumed and Commercially Available in Mathura City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navin Anand Ingle

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Since fluoride is available from various sources, the total ingestion of fluoride by a person should be estimated taking into consideration the fluoride consumed from all the sources including fruits. There are very few epidemiological studies carried out associated with fluoride estimation in fruit samplesand especially in the Indian scenario Objective: To estimate and compare the fluoride concentration of different commercially available citrus and non-citrus fruits in Mathura city. Materials & Method: Fifteen different types of fruits commercially available and consumed by people ofMathura City were collected. Out of the 15 fruit samples 5 were citrus fruits and 10 were non-citrus fruits. The fluoride estimation of fruit samples was done at Central Laboratory,Lucknow. Juices of all 15 fruit samples were prepared, from each sample 10 ml of juice was measured and fluoride testing of each sample was carried out by using Orion 4 star -ion electrode analyzer. The collected data was analyzed using the statistical software program SPSS, version 17. Results: The fluoride concentration in citrus fruits ranged from 0.04ppm (Orange to 0.08 ppm (Tomato while in non-citrus fruits it ranged from 0.04ppm (chikoo to 0.18 ppm (Guava. No significant difference was observed between the mean fluoride concentration of citrus and non citrus fruits. Conclusions: Both citrus and non citrus fruits have fluorides. Guava was found to have the maximumamount of fluoridecontent (0.18 ppm among both the citrus and non citrus fruits.

  19. The Chemistry and Pharmacology of Citrus Limonoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualdani, Roberta; Cavalluzzi, Maria Maddalena; Lentini, Giovanni; Habtemariam, Solomon

    2016-11-13

    Citrus limonoids (CLs) are a group of highly oxygenated terpenoid secondary metabolites found mostly in the seeds, fruits and peel tissues of citrus fruits such as lemons, limes, oranges, pumellos, grapefruits, bergamots, and mandarins. Represented by limonin, the aglycones and glycosides of CLs have shown to display numerous pharmacological activities including anticancer, antimicrobial, antioxidant, antidiabetic and insecticidal among others. In this review, the chemistry and pharmacology of CLs are systematically scrutinised through the use of medicinal chemistry tools and structure-activity relationship approach. Synthetic derivatives and other structurally-related limonoids from other sources are include in the analysis. With the focus on literature in the past decade, the chemical classification of CLs, their physico-chemical properties as drugs, their biosynthesis and enzymatic modifications, possible ways of enhancing their biological activities through structural modifications, their ligand efficiency metrics and systematic graphical radar plot analysis to assess their developability as drugs are among those discussed in detail.

  20. Citrus peel extract incorporated ice cubes to protect the quality of common pandora: Fish storage in ice with citrus

    OpenAIRE

    Yerlikaya, Pinar; Ucak, Ilknur; Gumus, Bahar; Gokoglu, Nalan

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of ice with albedo and flavedo fragments of Citrus (Grapefruit (Citrus paradisi) and Bitter orange (Citrus aurantium L.)) extracts on the quality of common pandora (Pagellus erythrinus). Concentrated citrus extracts were diluted with distilled water (1/100 w/v) before making of ice. The ice cubes were spread on each layer of fishes and stored at 0 °C for 15 days. The pH value showed a regular increase in all samples. TVB-N levels of b...

  1. Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase activity and Fe2+-induced lipid peroxidation in rat brain in vitro by some citrus fruit juices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ademosun, Ayokunle O; Oboh, Ganiyu

    2012-05-01

    This study sought to characterize the effects of some citrus fruit juices (shaddock [Citrus maxima], grapefruit [Citrus paradisii], lemon [Citrus limoni], orange [Citrus sinensis], and tangerine [Citrus reticulata]) on acetylcholinesterase activity in vitro. The total phenolic content, radical scavenging abilities, and inhibition of Fe(2+)-induced malondialdehyde (MDA) production in rats brain homogenate in vitro were also assessed. Orange had significantly (Pproperties of the citrus juices could make them a good dietary means for the management of Alzheimer's disease.

  2. Assessing genetic variability in male sterile and low fertile citrus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Understanding phylogenetic relationships and genetic diversity in citrus are important in clarifying genetic relationships, characterizing germplasm and the registration of new cultivars. In this study, the genetic diversity of 28 accessions of citrus including male sterile, sterile, low fertile and fertile cultivars were investigated ...

  3. Citrus Tristeza Virus on the Island of Crete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shegani, M.; Tsikou, D.; Velimirovic, A.

    2012-01-01

    Over a period of two years, more than 5,000 citrus trees were tested for the presence of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) on the island of Crete, resulting in thirty eight positives. Comparisons of the relative transcript levels of CTV p23, coat protein (CP), polymerase (POL) and an intergenic (POL/p3...

  4. Efficient somatic embryo production of Limau madu (Citrus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    fbn

    concentrations for producing cell suspension and somatic embryos of Limau madu (Citrus suhuiensis ... Citrus. The successful performance of all the stages of somatic embryogenesis has been reported, from the growth of embryogenic cells to embryo maturation in ..... line I and Cleopatra, line II and C. limonia L. Osbeck, cv.

  5. Utilization of founder lines for improved Citrus biotechnology via RMCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    On October 1st 2011 the CRB chose to fund a unique research project, the development of citrus cultivars specifically for genetic engineering (GE). The objective of this research was to develop GE citrus ‘Founder Lines’ containing DNA sequences that will allow the precise insertion of genes for de...

  6. Penicillium digitatum metabolites on synthetic media and citrus fruits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ariza, M.R.; Larsen, Thomas Ostenfeld; Petersen, Bent O.

    2002-01-01

    Penicillium digitatum has been cultured on citrus fruits and yeast extract sucrose agar media (YES).Cultivation of fungal cultures on solid medium allowed the isolation of two novel tryptoquivaline-like metabolites, tryptoquialanine A (1) and tryptoquialanine B (2), also biosynthesized on citrus...

  7. 7 CFR 319.56-41 - Citrus from Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Citrus from Peru. 319.56-41 Section 319.56-41... from Peru. Grapefruit (Citrus paradisi), limes (C. aurantiifolia), mandarins or tangerines (C... States from Peru under the following conditions: (a) The fruit must be accompanied by a permit issued in...

  8. Developing cryotherapy to eliminate graft-transmissible pathogens in citrus

    Science.gov (United States)

    This article summarizes research being conducted as part of a project funded by the California Citrus Research Board to develop cryotherapy (freezing buds in liquid nitrogen, and then recovering them) as a viable method for elimination of graft transmissible pathogens from Citrus. There are current...

  9. Development of sparse-seeded mutant kinnow (Citrus reticulata ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... crops like citrus, induced mutation for seedlessness in Kinnow with gamma irradiation of dormant bud which was attempted at the Nuclear Institute for Agriculture and Biology (NIAB), Faisalabad. Dormant bud irradiation-cum-grafting technique was employed, using the Citrus jambhiri rootstock for propagation of the scion.

  10. Priming against Asiatic citrus canker and monitoring of PR genes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Plant activators provide an appealing management option for Asiatic citrus canker. The ability of β- aminobutyric acid (BABA) and green tea extract (GTE) to induce resistance in lime (Citrus aurantifolia) plants against Xanthomonas citri subsp. Citri (Xcc) was investigated. Green house experiments showed that BABA (250 ...

  11. Consideration for alternative outlet for new citrus hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citrus sinensis (sweet orange, ex. Hamlin, Midsweet, Valencia) is the source of “orange juice” and juice must contain no less than 90% C. sinensis to be marketed as such. Juice produced from Citrus reticulata (mandarins) and C. reticulata hybrids (Orlando, Murcott, Fallglo, Sunburst, Minneola) can b...

  12. Citrus Seed Oils Efficacy against Larvae of Aedes aegypti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilal, Hazrat; Akram, Waseem; Hassan, Soaib Ali; Din, Sadrud

    2017-09-01

    Dengue fever is a serious public health issue in Pakistan for many years. Globally plants have been reported to contain compounds with insecticidal properties. These properties have been demonstrated more recently on the larval stages of mosquitoes. Therefore, Citrus cultivar seeds were evaluated for larvicidal potential against the primary dengue vector Aedes aegypti . Extraction of oil was done by a steam distillation method and oils were evaluated according to WHO guidelines for larvicides 2005 for evaluation of insecticidal properties of citrus seed extracts against mosquito larvae. Among the Citrus cultivar seed oil, rough lemon ( Citrus jambhiri ) had the lowest LC 50 value (200.79ppm), while musambi ( C. sinensis var musambi ) had the highest LC 50 value (457.30ppm) after 24 h of exposure. Citrus cultivars have some larvicidal potential but C. jambhiri had the greatest potential against A. aegypti larvae. Further small-scale field trials using the extracts of C. jambhiri will be conducted to determine operational feasibility.

  13. Mini Review: Innovation technology cultivaion of Citrus Tangerines Borneo Prima in East Kalimantan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AFRILIA TRI WIDYAWATI

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Widyawati AT, Nurbani. 2017. Mini Review: Innovation technology cultivaion of Citrus Tangerines Borneo Prima in East Kalimantan. Pros Sem Nas Masy Biodiv Indon 3: 127-131. The demand for high-value commodities such as oranges continues to increase every year. One of the qualities of orange that can not be met by domestic manufacturers is the color of a citrus peel. Most consumers like citrus orange, like mandarin oranges and other citrus imports. Efforts to reduce the national citrus imports is to improve the productivity and quality of citrus orange in Indonesia. Citrus Tangerines Borneo Prima is one of the featured horticultural commodities in East Kalimantan, which has the advantage of being low lying tangerine with orange rind. It Is indispensable citrus cultivation technique is good and right, so that the citrus plant can develop optimally so that later can produce citrus fruit both in quality and quantity.

  14. Evaluation of Chemical Composition and Biological Activities of Citrus pseudolimon and Citrus grandis Peel Essential Oils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajid, A.; Hanif, M.A.; Shahid, M.

    2016-01-01

    Essential oils and their volatile constituents are used extensively to prevent and treat human diseases. In the past decades, worldwide demand for citrus essential oils has greatly increased. Citrus essential oils containing 85-99 percent volatile and 1-15 percent non-volatile components. Essential oils from Citrus pseudolimon and Citrus grandis peels were extracted through steam distillation and characterized by GC-MS. C. pseudolimon has thirty six and C. grandis has thirty three total components; limonene 47.07 percent and 71.48 percent was the major component in both oils respectively. Antioxidant activity was checked by 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical assay and β-carotene/linoleic acid bleaching test. Both oils have modest activity. The antimicrobial potential was assessed against different bacterial and fungus strains. C. pseudolimon oil possessed strong activity against all tested strains while C. grandis has moderate activity. The antitumor activity was evaluated by potato disc assay, C. pseudolimon showed 81.25 inhibition. Hence the essential oils could have a great potential in pharmaceutical industry. (author)

  15. Resistance evaluation of Pera (Citrus sinensis) genotypes to citrus canker in greenhouse conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citrus canker, caused by the bacterium Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri results in serious yield losses and phytoregulation penalties. The use of resistant genotypes is recognized as an important tool to facilitate control of the pathogen. Studies have show that artificial inoculation results in typic...

  16. Citrus leaf blotch virus invades meristematic regions in Nicotiana benthamiana and citrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agüero, Jesús; Vives, María Carmen; Velázquez, Karelia; Ruiz-Ruiz, Susana; Juárez, Jose; Navarro, Luis; Moreno, Pedro; Guerri, José

    2013-08-01

    To invade systemically host plants, viruses need to replicate in the infected cells, spread to neighbouring cells through plasmodesmata and move to distal parts of the plant via sieve tubes to start new infection foci. To monitor the infection of Nicotiana benthamiana plants by Citrus leaf blotch virus (CLBV), leaves were agroinoculated with an infectious cDNA clone of the CLBV genomic RNA expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the transcriptional control of a duplicate promoter of the coat protein subgenomic RNA. Fluorescent spots first appeared in agroinfiltrated leaves 11-12 days after infiltration, indicating CLBV replication. Then, after entering the phloem vascular system, CLBV was unloaded in the upper parts of the plant and invaded all tissues, including flower organs and meristems. GFP fluorescence was not visible in citrus plants infected with CLBV-GFP. Therefore, to detect CLBV in meristematic regions, Mexican lime (Citrus aurantifolia) plants were graft inoculated with CLBV, with Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), a virus readily eliminated by shoot-tip grafting in vitro, or with both simultaneously. Although CLBV was detected by hybridization and real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in 0.2-mm shoot tips in all CLBV-inoculated plants, CTV was not detected. These results explain the difficulty in eliminating CLBV by shoot-tip grafting in vitro. © 2013 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  17. Transmission of Citrus leprosis virus C by Brevipalpus phoenicis (Geijskes) to Alternative Host Plants Found in Citrus Orchards

    Science.gov (United States)

    The equivalent of US$ 75 million is spent each year in Brazil to control Brevipalpus phoenicis, a mite vector of Citrus leprosis virus C (CiLV-C). In this study we investigated the possibility that hedgerows, windbreaks, and weeds normally found in citrus orchards could host CiLV-C. Mites reared on ...

  18. SCREENING FITOKIMIA, AKTIVITAS ANTIOKSIDAN DAN ANTIMIKROBA PADA BUAH JERUK LEMON(Citrus limon DAN JERUK NIPIS (Citrus aurantiifolia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anindya Nirmala Permata

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The desire to live healthy by eating natural foods and drinks into the lifestyle of the community. Orange becomes one of the fruits that become functional food to maintain and maintain health. The purpose of this research is to know the difference of antioxidant and antimicrobial activity on Citrus limon and Citrus aurantiifolia. The research method is laboratory experimental research with descriptive analysis. This research was conducted in February-April 2017 at the Laboratory of Plant Biological Microbiology and Plant Chemistry Department of Biology State University of Malang. Phytochemical screening by color reaction method, total phenol with Folin Ciocalteu method, antioxidant activity with DPPH method and antimicrobial activity with disc method. Screening results show the presence of saponins and alkaloids but there are no flavonoids, terpenoids and tannins. Total phenol test showed total phenol content in Lemon (Citrus limon of 110,25 mg GAE / 100ml while in Lime (Citrus aurantiifolia 116,5 mg GAE / 100ml. The antioxidant activity of Lemon Citrus (Citrus limon 49.593 g / ml and Lime (Citrus aurantiifolia 49.589g / ml. Antimicrobial activity test obtained the highest zone of resistance at 100% concentration of each citrus fruit. The conclusion of this study is that there is a difference of antioxidant and antimicrobial activity in both oranges, where the lemon fruits (C.limon antioxidant activity is higher than and Lime (C. aurantiifolia, while the antimicrobial activity of lemon (C. aurantiifolia is higher Rather than lemon (C.limon.

  19. POTENTIAL ENTOMOPATHOGENIC FUNGI TO CONTROL SCALE INSECT PEST ON CITRUS TANGERINE (CITRUS SUHUIENSIS TAN.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Triwiratno A.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Achiving of food self-sufficiency can be done by using of local potential that is by agribusiness in Indonesia. One potential locally owned citrus agribusiness was the use of entomopathogenic fungi to improve the productivity of citrus. Reports showed decrease in productivity due to infestation of scale insect. The experiment was conducted at the Integrated Laboratory of Indonesian Citrus and Subtropical Fruit Research Institute in October 2013 to October 2014. The study began with a survey for scale insect infestation on citrus crops in high land, medium land and low in dry and rainy seasons. Taken from a collection of entomopathogenic fungi associated with scale insect in the field. Collection of fungi isolated from single conidia and its ability to infect selected scale insect. Entomopathogenic fungi were further tested for the viability and pathogenicity against scale insect. The results showed that the sclae insects attacked citrus were types of L.beckii and A.Aurantii. The highest attack occurred at low land during the dry season by L.beckii with population of 4.2 heads increased to 5.5 individuals per 10 cm in the rainy season. Viability test results showed that the isolates had viability above 50% were SKB4K, SKD1K and SBB3K for 73.6, 61.6 and 53% respectively, which were collected during the dry season. While isolates obtained in the rainy season were SBWD2H and SBWD3BH, each with aviability of 77.3 and 78.3% respectively. Pathogenicity test results showed that there were 6 isolates known to have potential as entomopathogenic fungi for controlling scale insect, namely, SBWB2H, SBWD2H, SBWD3BH, SKD1K, SBWD1K and SBB3K which had pathogenicity over 50% up to 14 days.

  20. Chemical modification of citrus pectin: Structural, physical and rheologial implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fracasso, Aline Francielle; Perussello, Camila Augusto; Carpiné, Danielle; Petkowicz, Carmen Lúcia de Oliveira; Haminiuk, Charles Windson Isidoro

    2018-04-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the physical, structural and rheological modifications caused by the chemical modification process of citrus pectin. Therefore, three commercial citrus pectins with different degree of esterification were chemically modified by sequential alkali and acidic hydrolytic process to produce modified citrus pectins (MCP) with special properties. The molar mass (M w ), degree of esterification (DE), monosaccharide composition, 13 C NMR spectra, homogeneity, morphology (SEM) and rheological behavior of both native and modified citrus pectins (MCP) were investigated. The chemical modification reduced the acid uronic content (up to 28.3%) and molar mass (up to 29.98%), however, showed little influence on the degree of esterification of native pectins. Modified citrus pectins presented higher amounts of neutral monosaccharides, mainly galactose, arabinose and rhamnose, typical of the Ramnogalacturonana-I (RG-I) region. Rheological tests indicated that the native and modified citrus pectins presented pseudoplastic behavior, however, the MCP samples were less viscous, compared to the native ones. Modified samples presented better dissolution in water and less strong gels, with good stability during oscillatory shearing at 25°C. This study aims to better understand the implications that chemical modifications may impose on the structure of citrus pectins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Radiosensitivity of protoplasts of orange (Citrus sinensis)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldman, M.H.S.; Ando, A.

    1990-01-01

    Full text: The Radiation Genetics Section of the Centre for Nuclear Energy in Agriculture (CENA), University of Sao Paulo, is utilising both ''in vivo'' and ''in vitro'' methods for mutation induction in Citrus, cv. ''Pera'', aiming at resistance to citrus canker. The experiments carried out so far determined the methodology to isolate protoplasts and their sensitivity to gamma-rays. Regarding the culture of protoplasts from embryogenic callus, the best experimental conditions were: enzymatic digestion for 5 h on a medium containing cellulase (307.6 mg/10 ml), macerozyme (30.3 mg/10 ml), mannitol (328.0 mM) and sucrose (336.2 mM) as osmotic stabilisers. The isolation efficiency of 1.2x10 6 viable protoplasts/g will make it possible to use protoplasts in mutation breeding. To determine radiosensitivity of protoplasts, gamma-irradiation from 60 Co source was conducted 42 h after their isolation. This time interval is recommended because during this period protoplasts will reach the stage prior to or at the first mitotic division. Survivals were determined by metylen-blue dyeing, and the LD 50 was found to be around 37.5 Gy. Any difference compared with other authors might be due to different genotypes used or different methods of calculation of survival. (author)

  2. Somatic hybridization for citrus rootstock breeding: an effective tool to solve some important issues of the Mediterranean citrus industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dambier, Dominique; Benyahia, Hamid; Pensabene-Bellavia, Giovanni; Aka Kaçar, Yildiz; Froelicher, Yann; Belfalah, Zina; Lhou, Beniken; Handaji, Najat; Printz, Bruno; Morillon, Raphael; Yesiloglu, Turgut; Navarro, Luis; Ollitrault, Patrick

    2011-05-01

    The prevalence of sour orange rootstock in the southern and eastern part of the Mediterranean Basin is presently threatened by the spread of Citrus Tristeza Virus (CTV) and its main vector Toxoptera citricida, combined with abiotic constraints such as drought, salinity and alkalinity. The search for alternative CTV-resistant rootstocks that also withstand the other constraints is now considered an urgent priority for a sustainable citrus industry in the area. Complementary progenitors can be found in citrus germplasm to combine the desired traits, particularly between Poncirus and Citrus genera. The production of somatic hybrids allows cumulating all dominant traits irrespective of their heterozygosity level, and would appear to be an effective way to solve the rootstock challenge facing the Mediterranean citrus industry. This paper presents the results obtained during a regional collaborative effort between five countries, to develop new rootstocks by somatic hybridization. New embryogenic callus lines to be used for somatic hybridization have been created. Protoplast fusions have been performed at CIRAD and IVIA laboratories, focusing on intergeneric combinations. Analysis of ploidy level by flow cytometry and molecular markers confirmed the acquisition of new interesting tetraploid somatic hybrids for six combinations. Diploid cybrids with intergeneric (Citrus × Poncirus) nucleus and C. reticulata or C. aurantifolia mitochondria were also identified for four combinations. The agronomical performance of a pre-existing somatic hybrid between Poncirus trifoliata and Citrus reticulata was validated in calcareous soils in Morocco. Somatic hybridization is now integrated into the breeding programs of the five Mediterranean countries.

  3. Field validation of a system for autodissemination of an entomopathogenic fungus, Isaria fumosorosea, to control the Asian citrus psyllid on residential citrus

    Science.gov (United States)

    The citrus industries of California and Texas share a pressing problem with the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Liviidae) and huanglongbing (HLB) spreading in residential citrus near commercial groves. Insecticidal treatment of residential trees for the psyllid is problem...

  4. The antimicrobial effects of Citrus limonum and Citrus aurantium essential oils on multi-species biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Almeida Coelho Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of Citrus limonum and Citrus aurantium essential oils (EOs compared to 0.2% chlorhexidine (CHX and 1% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl on multi-species biofilms formed by Candida albicans, Enterococcus faecalis and Escherichia coli. The biofilms were grown in acrylic disks immersed in broth, inoculated with microbial suspension (106 cells/mL and incubated at 37°C / 48 h. After the biofilms were formed, they were exposed for 5 minutes to the solutions (n = 10: C. aurantium EO, C. limonum EO, 0.2% CHX, 1% NaOCl or sterile saline solution [0.9% sodium chloride (NaCl]. Next, the discs were placed in sterile 0.9% NaCl and sonicated to disperse the biofilms. Tenfold serial dilutions were performed and the aliquots were seeded onto selective agar and incubated at 37°C / 48 h. Next, the number of colony-forming units per milliliter was counted and analyzed statistically (Tukey test, p ≤ 0.05. C. aurantium EO and NaOCl inhibited the growth of all microorganisms in multi-species biofilms. C. limonum EO promoted a 100% reduction of C. albicans and E. coli, and 49.3% of E. faecalis. CHX was less effective against C. albicans and E. coli, yielding a reduction of 68.8% and 86.7%, respectively. However, the reduction of E. faecalis using CHX (81.7% was greater than that obtained using C. limonum EO. Both Citrus limonum and Citrus aurantium EOs are effective in controlling multi-species biofilms; the microbial reductions achieved by EOs were not only similar to those of NaOCl, but even higher than those achieved by CHX, in some cases.

  5. The antimicrobial effects of Citrus limonum and Citrus aurantium essential oils on multi-species biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Sarah Almeida Coelho; Zambrana, Jéssica Rabelo Mina; Iorio, Fernanda Bispo Reis Di; Pereira, Cristiane Aparecida; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of Citrus limonum and Citrus aurantium essential oils (EOs) compared to 0.2% chlorhexidine (CHX) and 1% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) on multispecies biofilms formed by Candida albicans, Enterococcus faecalis and Escherichia coli. The biofilms were grown in acrylic disks immersed in broth, inoculated with microbial suspension (106 cells/mL) and incubated at 37°C / 48 h. After the biofilms were formed, they were exposed for 5 minutes to the solutions (n = 10): C. aurantium EO, C. limonum EO, 0.2% CHX, 1% NaOCl or sterile saline solution [0.9% sodium chloride NaCl)]. Next, the discs were placed in sterile 0.9% NaCl and sonicated to disperse the biofilms. Tenfold serial dilutions were performed and the aliquots were seeded onto selective agar and incubated at 37°C / 48 h. , the number of colony-forming units per milliliter was counted and analyzed statistically (Tukey test, p ≤ 0.05). C. aurantium EO and NaOCl inhibited the growth of all microorganisms in multi-species biofilms. C. limonum EO promoted a 100% reduction of C. albicans and E. coli, 49.3% of E. faecalis. CHX was less effective against C. albicans and E. coli, yielding a reduction of 68.8% and 86.7%, respectively. However, the reduction of E. faecalis using CHX (81.7%) was greater than that obtained using C. limonum EO. Both Citrus limonum and Citrus aurantium EOs are effective in controlling multi-species biofilms; the microbial reductions achieved by EOs were not only similar to those of NaOCl, but even higher than those achieved by CHX, in some cases.

  6. 2004 SWFWMD Citrus County Bare-Earth Lidar Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This metadata record describes the ortho & LIDAR mapping of Citrus County, FL. The mapping consists of LIDAR data collection, contour generation, and production...

  7. Effect of Aqueous Extracts of Eucalyptus Globulus, Citrus Sinensis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eucalyptus), Citrus sinensis (Sweet orange) and Musa sapientium (Banana) on the cowpea bruchid, Callosobruchus maculatus was investigated in the laboratory. There were four treatments namely aqueous extracts of Eucalyptus, Orange, Banana, ...

  8. Evaluation of citrus, butternut and sprouting potato as mass rearing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    P. burnerae required 666.7 degree-days on citrus and 434.8 degree-days on sprouting potatoes which is above lower developmental thresholds of 7.6 and 10.4°C, respectively, to complete one generation. The mean number of eggs per female was higher on sprouting potatoes (121.3) than on citrus (68), but declined with ...

  9. Micro-irrigation systems, automation and fertigation in citrus

    OpenAIRE

    Parameshwar Sidramappa Shirgure

    2012-01-01

    Citrus is number one group of fruits grown in more than 140 countries in the world. Micro-irrigation systems and fertigation management is one of the main concerns of the modem citrus fruit production irrespective of availability of soil, water and fertilizer resources. A variety of recommendations have emerged world over on irrigation systems and fertigation based on soil and leaf analysis of the nutrients, evapo-transpiration and water use pattern. The research review of literature has reve...

  10. In vitro organogenesis in some citrus species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evandro Henrique Schinor

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In vitro organogenesis of Citrus was studied for the genotypes Citrus sinensis cv. 'Natal', C. limonia, C. volkameriana, and C. aurantium, with the use of epicotyl segments-derived explants, cultured in MT salts and vitamins medium supplemented with different concentrations of 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP - 0.0; 0.5; 1.0; 1.5 or 2.0 mg L-1. For the recalcitrant genotypes C. limonia and C. aurantium the in vitro organogenesis was also studied with internodal segments-derived explants, cultured in MT salts and vitamins medium supplemented with 0; 0.5; 1.0; 2.0, or 4.0 mg L-1 of BAP. The efficiency of culture medium supplementation with the combination of BAP (0.0; 1.0, or 2.0 mg L-1 and NAA (1-naphthaleneacetic acid - 0.0; 0.3, or 0.5 mg L-1 in the development of adventitious shoots was evaluated for C. aurantium. Culture medium supplementation with BAP is not essential for the adventitious shoots development in the four genotypes studied when epicotyl segments-derived explants are used. In general, culture media supplementation with BAP decreased the percentage of responsive explants excepted for C. sinensis cv. 'Natal' and C. limonia when the concentrations of 1.5 and 2.0 mg/L were used. The presence of cytokinin, in concentrations up to 2 mg/L, stimulated the in vitro organogenesis when internodal segments-derived explants were used for C. limonia and C. aurantium. For C. aurantium no adventitious shoots developed in explants (internodal segments cultured in basal culture medium, without BAP supplementation. Although no statistic differences could be detected, culture media supplementation with the combination of BAP and NAA favored the development of adventitious shoots in C. aurantium. The best concentration of NAA varied according to BAP concentration. The results presented herein, show that Citrus in vitro organogenesis depends on the interaction of culture medium composition, explant differentiation level, and genotype.

  11. Physicochemical Characteristics of Citrus Seed Oils from Kerman, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reazai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, there has been a great deal of attention on usage, byproducts, and wastes of the food industry. There have been many studies on the properties of citrus seeds and extracted oil from citrus grown in Kerman, Iran. The rate of oil content of citrus seeds varies between 33.4% and 41.9%. Linoleic acid (33.2% to 36.3% is the key fatty acid found in citrus seeds oil and oleic (24.8% to 29.3% and palmitic acids (23.5% to 29.4% are the next main fatty acids, respectively. There are also other acids found at trivial rates such as stearic, palmitoleic, and linolenic. With variation between 0.54 meg/kg and 0.77 mgq/kg in peroxide values of citrus seed oils, acidity value of the oil varies between 0.44% and 0.72%. The results of the study showed that citrus seeds under study (orange and sour lemon grown in Kerman province and the extracted oil have the potential of being used as the source of edible oil.

  12. Pharmacognostical evaluation of Citrus jambhiri Lush. fruit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapnil Y Chaudhari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Citrus jambhiri Lush., commonly known as Jambīra Nimbū in Sanskrit is medium to large indigenous tree with spreading habit, less spiny than lemon and belonging to the family Rutaceae. In Ayurveda, it is used in many pharmaceutical procedures of purification (Śodhana, calcination (Māraṇa etc., Though it is an important plant, till date, no pharmacognostical reports have been available on its fruit. Materials and Methods: Study of fruit and its powder, histochemical tests and preliminary physicochemical investigations were done. Results and Conclusion: Results showed prismatic crystals of calcium oxalate, aerenchyma cells, oil globules, pitted vessels, scalariform vessels, juicy sac, etc., Preliminary physicochemical analysis revealed loss on drying (1.1%, ash value (1.4%, alcohol soluble extract (28.6%, and water soluble extract (53.3%. These observations can be of use in future studies.

  13. Pharmacognostical evaluation of Citrus jambhiri Lush. fruit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Swapnil Y.; Harisha, C. R.; Galib, Ruknuddin; Prajapati, P. K.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Citrus jambhiri Lush., commonly known as Jambīra Nimbū in Sanskrit is medium to large indigenous tree with spreading habit, less spiny than lemon and belonging to the family Rutaceae. In Ayurveda, it is used in many pharmaceutical procedures of purification (Śodhana), calcination (Māraṇa) etc., Though it is an important plant, till date, no pharmacognostical reports have been available on its fruit. Materials and Methods: Study of fruit and its powder, histochemical tests and preliminary physicochemical investigations were done. Results and Conclusion: Results showed prismatic crystals of calcium oxalate, aerenchyma cells, oil globules, pitted vessels, scalariform vessels, juicy sac, etc., Preliminary physicochemical analysis revealed loss on drying (1.1%), ash value (1.4%), alcohol soluble extract (28.6%), and water soluble extract (53.3%). These observations can be of use in future studies. PMID:25861144

  14. Pharmacognostical evaluation of Citrus jambhiri Lush. fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Swapnil Y; Harisha, C R; Galib, Ruknuddin; Prajapati, P K

    2014-01-01

    Citrus jambhiri Lush., commonly known as Jambīra Nimbū in Sanskrit is medium to large indigenous tree with spreading habit, less spiny than lemon and belonging to the family Rutaceae. In Ayurveda, it is used in many pharmaceutical procedures of purification (Śodhana), calcination (Māraṇa) etc., Though it is an important plant, till date, no pharmacognostical reports have been available on its fruit. Study of fruit and its powder, histochemical tests and preliminary physicochemical investigations were done. Results showed prismatic crystals of calcium oxalate, aerenchyma cells, oil globules, pitted vessels, scalariform vessels, juicy sac, etc., Preliminary physicochemical analysis revealed loss on drying (1.1%), ash value (1.4%), alcohol soluble extract (28.6%), and water soluble extract (53.3%). These observations can be of use in future studies.

  15. Isolation, characterization and modification of citrus pectins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIA KRATCHANOVA

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Orange and lemon peels were used for obtaining pectic polysaccharides. Citrus peels were previously treated with 96% ethanol, and the obtained alcohol-insoluble solids (AIS were subjected to a sequential extraction with hot distilled water and hot 0.5% HCl. Water- and acid-extracted orange (WEOP and AEOP and lemon (WELP and AELP pectins were obtained. Acid extraction gave higher yields of pectin than water extraction and lemon peels were richer in pectin. Comparative investigations were carried out with chromatographically purified commercial citrus pectin (CPCP. Chemical and physicochemical characterization of all pectins was accomplished. It was found that pectins were similar in anhydrouronic acid content (AUАC, 69-81%, but differed in their degree of methylesterification (DM, 55-81%. Generally water-extracted pectins were with higher DM. Both orange pectins were with higher DM and degree of acetylation (DA, 2%, in comparison with the corresponding lemon pectins. Water-extracted pectins were with higher degree of feruloylation (DF, 0.12-0.34%. To our knowledge this is the first report on the estimation of ester-linked ferulic acid in orange and lemon peel pectins. Pectic polysaccharides differed in molecular weight and homogeneity. WELP was with the highest molecular weight and homogeneity. The pectins contained D-galacturonic and D-glucuronic acids, L-arabinose, D-galactose, L-fucose, L-rhamnose and D-xylose. All investigated pectins showed immunostimulating activity by complement activation in the classical pathway at 1.25 and 2.5 mg/mL. Pectic polysaccharides were modified with endopolygalacturonase. Enzyme-modified CPCP and WEOP had higher anti-complementary activity than the corresponding initial pectins.

  16. 7 CFR 457.107 - Florida citrus fruit crop insurance provisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... a fresh fruit basis, and late oranges fresh; (8) Citrus VIII—Navel Oranges; and (9) Citrus IX—Any... Provisions, is: (i) February 7 for early and navel oranges, Orlando tangelos and tangerines; (ii) February 28...

  17. Descriptions of new varieties recently distributed from the Citrus Clonal Protection Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Citrus Clonal Protection Program (CCPP) is operated through the Department of Plant Pathology and Microbiology at University of California (UC) Riverside and is funded in large part by The California Citrus Research Board (CRB). The CCPP processes citrus propagative material in two phases. First...

  18. Saving Citrus: Does the Next Generation See GM Science as a Solution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumble, Joy N.; Ruth, Taylor K.; Owens, Courtney T.; Lamm, Alexa J.; Taylor, Melissa R.; Ellis, Jason D.

    2016-01-01

    Citrus is one of Florida's most prominent commodities, providing 66% of the total United States' value for oranges. Florida's citrus production decreased 21% in 2014 from the previous season, partly due to the disease citrus greening. The science of genetic modification (GM) is one of the most promising solutions to the problem. However, a…

  19. Repellency of Selected Psidium guajava cultivars to the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asiatic huanglongbing (HLB)(also known as citrus greening disease) is the most devastating disease of citrus worldwide. It is caused by a bacterium ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ and transmitted by the Asian citrus psyllid (ACP), Diaphorina citri. Considerable research has been conducted toward...

  20. Protocol for introducing new and licensed citrus varieties into California. A Florida case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the light of the current Huanglongbing (HLB) threat to the California (CA) citrus industry, and preliminary data indicating that some citrus varieties in Florida (FL) may possess some degree of tolerance to HLB, the California citrus growers indicated a strong interest in proactively introducing ...

  1. Mitigating citrus huanglongbing via effective application of antimicrobial compounds and thermotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huanglongbing (HLB) is a serious citrus disease that threatens the citrus industry worldwide. HLB is a systemic, infectious disease and the putative causal bacterium Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (Las) resides in citrus phloem. In this study, the effects of heat treatment, chemical formulations,...

  2. Dietary citrus pulp improves protein stability in lamb meat stored under aerobic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravador, Rufielyn Sungcaya; Jongberg, Sisse; Andersen, Mogens Larsen

    2014-01-01

    . The citrus pulp groups, Cp24 and Cp35, significantly decreased protein radicals and carbonyls, and preserved more thiols within six days of storage compared to the Control group. The citrus pulp groups significantly slowed down the rate of protein oxidation, indicating that dietary citrus pulp reduced...

  3. Overexpression of a citrus NDR1 ortholog increases disease resistance in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerging devastating diseases, such as Huanglongbing (HLB) and citrus canker, have caused tremendous losses to the citrus industry worldwide. Genetic engineering is a powerful approach that could allow us to increase citrus resistance against these diseases. The key to the success of this approach r...

  4. Overexpression of a modified plant thionin enhances disease resistance to citrus canker and Huanglongbing (HLB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huanglongbing (HLB or citrus greening disease) caused by Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (Las) is a great threat to the United States citrus industry. There are no proven strategies to eliminate HLB disease and no cultivar has been identified with strong HLB resistance. Citrus canker is also an ec...

  5. Vigour and behaviour of fifteen citrus varieties against tristeza in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fifteen varieties or combinations of citrus (lime, grapefruit, lemons, oranges, mandarin and hybrids) were characterized in the forest zone of Cameroon. Characterization was carried out based on the behaviour of these citrus varieties against citrus tristeza virus (CTV). Foliar and cortical symptoms were evaluated. Six years ...

  6. Expression patterns of flowering genes in leaves of 'Pineapple' sweet orange [Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck] and pummelo (Citrus grandis Osbeck).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajon, Melanie; Febres, Vicente J; Moore, Gloria A

    2017-08-30

    In citrus the transition from juvenility to mature phase is marked by the capability of a tree to flower and fruit consistently. The long period of juvenility in citrus severely impedes the use of genetic based strategies to improve fruit quality, disease resistance, and responses to abiotic environmental factors. One of the genes whose expression signals flower development in many plant species is FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT). In this study, gene expression levels of flowering genes CiFT1, CiFT2 and CiFT3 were determined using reverse-transcription quantitative real-time PCR in citrus trees over a 1 year period in Florida. Distinct genotypes of citrus trees of different ages were used. In mature trees of pummelo (Citrus grandis Osbeck) and 'Pineapple' sweet orange (Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck) the expression of all three CiFT genes was coordinated and significantly higher in April, after flowering was over, regardless of whether they were in the greenhouse or in the field. Interestingly, immature 'Pineapple' seedlings showed significantly high levels of CiFT3 expression in April and June, while CiFT1 and CiFT2 were highest in June, and hence their expression induction was not simultaneous as in mature plants. In mature citrus trees the induction of CiFTs expression in leaves occurs at the end of spring and after flowering has taken place suggesting it is not associated with dormancy interruption and further flower bud development but is probably involved with shoot apex differentiation and flower bud determination. CiFTs were also seasonally induced in immature seedlings, indicating that additional factors must be suppressing flowering induction and their expression has other functions.

  7. Resistance of citrus genotypes to Phyllocnitis citrella Stainton (Lepidoptera: Gracillariidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, M S; Vendramim, J D; Lourenção, A L; Pitta, R M; Martins, E S

    2011-01-01

    The development and reproduction of the citrus leafminer (CLM), Phyllocnistis citrella Stainton, were evaluated in six citrus genotypes in order to identify genotypes with resistance traits that could be applied in a program for the development of citrus varieties resistant to the citrus leafminer. Tests were conducted under controlled laboratory conditions (25 ± 1ºC, 70 ± 10% RH, and 14h photophase). Seedlings of each genotype tested were infested with eggs obtained from a stock colony of CLM maintained on 'Cravo' lemon (Citrus limonia L. Osbeck), and the duration and survival of the eggs, larval and pupal stages, pupal size and weight, fecundity and longevity of adults, and sex ratio were evaluated. No influence was observed on the duration and survival of eggs, larvae and pupae of P. citrella. However, pupae obtained in the hybrid C x R(4) were significantly smaller and lighter than pupae from the remaining treatments. Adult females from the hybrids C x R(4) and C x R(315) were the least fecund. However, the lowest value for the corrected reproductive potential (CRP) was recorded in the hybrid C x R(315), suggesting that this genotype is the least favorable for the development and reproduction of CLM. On the other hand, the highest CRP value obtained in the 'Rugoso' lemon confirms the susceptibility of this genotype, indicating it as the most suitable for CLM.

  8. Inhibition of spoiling yeasts of fruit juices through citrus extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevilacqua, Antonio; Speranza, Barbara; Campaniello, Daniela; Corbo, Maria Rosaria; Sinigaglia, Milena

    2013-10-01

    This article reports on the bioactivities of citrus extracts (citrus extract, lemon extract, and neroli) toward Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Zygosaccharomyces bailii, Zygosaccharomyces rouxii, Pichia membranifaciens, and Rhodotorula bacarum. The bioactivities of the extracts (from 10 to 100 ppm) were evaluated through a microdilution method; thereafter, citrus extracts (0 to 80 ppm) were tested in combination with either pH (3.0 to 5.0) or temperature (5 to 25°C). Finally, a confirmatory experiment was run in a commercial drink (referred to as red fruit juice) containing citrus extract (40 ppm) that was inoculated with either S. cerevisiae or Z. bailii (5 log CFU/ml) and stored at 4 and 25°C. Yeasts increased to 7 log CFU/ml (Z. bailii) or 8 log CFU/ml (S. cerevisiae) in the control at 25°C, but the citrus extract addition controlled yeast growth for at least 3 days; under refrigeration, the effect was significant for 10 days.

  9. Citrus Seed Oils Efficacy against Larvae of Aedes aegypti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hazrat Bilal

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dengue fever is a serious public health issue in Pakistan for many years. Globally plants have been reported to contain compounds with insecticidal properties. These properties have been demonstrated more recently on the larval stages of mosquitoes. Therefore, Citrus cultivar seeds were evaluated for larvicidal potential against the primary dengue vector Aedes aegypti.Methods: Extraction of oil was done by a steam distillation method and oils were evaluated according to WHO guidelines for larvicides 2005 for evaluation of insecticidal properties of citrus seed extracts against mosquito larvae.Result: Among the Citrus cultivar seed oil, rough lemon (Citrus jambhiri had the lowest LC50 value (200.79ppm, while musambi (C. sinensis var musambi had the highest LC50 value (457.30ppm after 24 h of exposure.Conclusion: Citrus cultivars have some larvicidal potential but C. jambhiri had the greatest potential against A. ae­gypti larvae. Further small-scale field trials using the extracts of C. jambhiri will be conducted to determine opera­tional feasibility.

  10. Chlorophyll Fluorescence Imaging Uncovers Photosynthetic Fingerprint of Citrus Huanglongbing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyan Cen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Huanglongbing (HLB is one of the most destructive diseases of citrus, which has posed a serious threat to the global citrus production. This research was aimed to explore the use of chlorophyll fluorescence imaging combined with feature selection to characterize and detect the HLB disease. Chlorophyll fluorescence images of citrus leaf samples were measured by an in-house chlorophyll fluorescence imaging system. The commonly used chlorophyll fluorescence parameters provided the first screening of HLB disease. To further explore the photosynthetic fingerprint of HLB infected leaves, three feature selection methods combined with the supervised classifiers were employed to identify the unique fluorescence signature of HLB and perform the three-class classification (i.e., healthy, HLB infected, and nutrient deficient leaves. Unlike the commonly used fluorescence parameters, this novel data-driven approach by using the combination of the mean fluorescence parameters and image features gave the best classification performance with the accuracy of 97%, and presented a better interpretation for the spatial heterogeneity of photochemical and non-photochemical components in HLB infected citrus leaves. These results imply the potential of the proposed approach for the citrus HLB disease diagnosis, and also provide a valuable insight for the photosynthetic response to the HLB disease.

  11. Ecology and behavior of Pezothrips kellyanus (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) on citrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassiliou, V A

    2010-02-01

    The most common thrips species found in Cyprus citrus orchards between 2003 and 2008 were Pezothrips kellyanus (Bagnall) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), and Thrips tabaci (Lindeman) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae). Only Pezothrips kellyanus, Kelly's citrus thrips (KCT) causes feeding damage on citrus fruits in Cyprus. KCT adults prefer to concentrate mostly in the northern and eastern sides of both lemon and grapefruit canopies. The attractiveness of white, sky blue, marine blue, and yellow color to KCT was evaluated. White was found to be the most attractive color to adults of KCT, F. occidentalis, and T. tabaci. A range of incidental and breeding host plants grown within and outside citrus orchards in Cyprus were identified. KCT adults were found on flowers of all citrus varieties, and various other flowering plants including Malva nicaeensis, Malva silvestris, Sinapis alba, Oxalis pes-caprae, Calendula arvensis, Urospermum picroides, Jasminum officinale, Gardenia jasminoides, Jasminum sambac, Prunus dulcis, Mangifera indica, Persea americana, and Eriobotrya japonica. KCT larvae were found only on lemon, grapefruit, Jasmine spp., and Gardenia flowers.

  12. Study of the thermal degradation of citrus seeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez-Montoya, V. [Centro de Quimica, Instituto de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Apdo. Postal J-55, Puebla 72570, Pue (Mexico); Instituto Nacional del Carbon, CSIC, Apartado 73, E-33080 Oviedo (Spain); Montes-Moran, M.A. [Instituto Nacional del Carbon, CSIC, Apartado 73, E-33080 Oviedo (Spain); Elizalde-Gonzalez, M.P. [Centro de Quimica, Instituto de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Apdo. Postal J-55, Puebla 72570, Pue (Mexico)

    2009-09-15

    The citrus seeds are one of the principal residues in the juice industry and their utilization can decrease significantly the problems of their final disposal. In this work the thermal degradation of three Mexican citrus seeds: orange (Citrus sinensis), lemon (Citrus Limon) and grapefruit (Citrus paradisi) was studied in nitrogen atmosphere. The two components (embryo and husk) of the seeds were characterized separately. The results showed that the thermal effects are very similar between the three embryos and the three husks. The embryos show higher degradability, superior content of nitrogen and higher heating value than the husks. The thermal degradation of the components of the three seeds is completed at 600 C and it is considered to be a global process derived from the decomposition of their principal components (cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin). The results suggest that mixing the three entire seeds will not lead to a severe deviation from their individual thermal behavior and that the industry could apply them for carbonization purposes. (author)

  13. Antimycotic Activity and Genotoxic Evaluation of Citrus sinensis and Citrus latifolia Essential Oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Pérez, Nancy J; González-Ávila, Marisela; Sánchez-Navarrete, Jaime; Toscano-Garibay, Julia D; Moreno-Eutimio, Mario A; Sandoval-Hernández, Teresa; Arriaga-Alba, Myriam

    2016-05-03

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antifungal activity of essential oils (EOs) of Citrus sinensis (C. sinensis) and Citrus latifolia (C. latifolia) against five Candida species: Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis, Candida glabrata, Candida lusitaniae and Candida guilliermondii; and perform its genotoxic evaluation. The EOs of C. sinensis and C. latifolia were obtained from the peel by hydro-distillation. The major components determined by GC-MS were in C. sinensis, d-limonene (96%) and α-myrcene (2.79%); and in C. latifolia, d-limonene (51.64%), β-thujene (14.85%), β-pinene (12.79%) and γ-terpinene (12.8%). Antifungal properties were studied by agar diffusion method, where C. sinensis presented low activity and C. latifolia essential oil was effective to inhibit growing of C. lusitaniae and C. guilliermondii with IC50 of 6.90 and 2.92 μg respectively. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) for C. sinensis were in a range of 0.42-3.71 μg and for C. latifolia of 0.22-1.30 μg. Genotoxic evaluation was done by Ames test where none of the oils induced point mutations. Flow cytometry was used to measure toxicity in human oral epithelial cells, C. sinensis was not cytotoxic and C. latifolia was toxic at 21.8 μg. These properties might bestow different odontological applications to each essential oil.

  14. Volatile constituents of redblush grapefruit (Citrus paradisi) and pummelo (Citrus grandis) peel essential oils from Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njoroge, Simon Muhoho; Koaze, Hiroshi; Karanja, Paul Nyota; Sawamura, Masayoshi

    2005-12-14

    The volatile constituents of cold-pressed peel essential oils of redblush grapefruit (Citrus paradisi Macfadyen forma Redblush) and pummelo (Citrus grandis Osbeck) from the same locality in Kenya were determined by GC and GC-MS. A total of 67 and 52 compounds, amounting to 97.9 and 98.8% of the two oils, respectively, were identified. Monoterpene hydrocarbons constituted 93.3 and 97.5% in the oils, respectively, with limonene (91.1 and 94.8%), alpha-terpinene (1.3 and 1.8%), and alpha-pinene (0.5%) as the main compounds. Sesquiterpene hydrocarbons constituted 0.4% in each oil. The notable compounds were beta-caryophyllene, alpha-cubebene, and (E,E)-alpha-farnesene. Oxygenated compounds constituted 4.2 and 2.0% of the redblush grapefruit and pummelo oils, respectively, out of which carbonyl compounds (2.0 and 1.3%), alcohols (1.4 and 0.3%), and esters (0.7 and 0.4%) were the major groups. Heptyl acetate, octanal, decanal, citronellal, and (Z)-carvone were the main constituents (0.1-0.5%). Perillene, (E)-carveol, and perillyl acetate occurred in the redblush grapefruit but were absent from the pummelo oil. Nootkatone, alpha- and beta-sinensal, methyl-N-methylanthranilate, and (Z,E)-farnesol were prominent in both oils.

  15. Determination of limonin and nomilin contents in different citrus cultivars using high performance liquid chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilal, H.; Hassan, S.; Sahar, S.; Akram, W.; Sahar, S.

    2013-01-01

    High perlorrnance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis was done to quantify the amount of limonoids (nomilin and nomilin) in seven selected citrus cultivars. According to the HPLC analysis red blood orange (Citrus sinensis var red blood orange) had maximum amount of limonin (479.77 ug/rnl.), while rough lemon (Citrus jambhiri) had no limonin content. in case of nomonin, rough lemon (Citrus jambhir) had maximum amount of nomilin (54.23 micro g/ML)) while succari (citrus sinensis var succari) had very low amount of nomilin (0.37 micro g/Ml). (author)

  16. Metalized polyethylene mulch to repel Asian citrus psyllid, slow spread of huanglongbing and improve growth of new citrus plantings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croxton, Scott D; Stansly, Philip A

    2014-02-01

    Greening or huanglongbing (HLB) is a debilitating disease of citrus caused by Candidatus Liberibactor asiaticus and transmitted by the Asian citrus psyllid (ACP), Diaphorina citri. HLB now occurs worldwide in all major citrus growing regions except the Mediterranean and Australia. Management relies principally on insecticidal control of the ACP vector, but is insufficient, even for young trees which are most susceptible to the disease. We tested the ability of metalized polyethylene mulch to repel adult ACP as well as effects on incidence of HLB and early tree growth. Metalized mulch significantly reduced ACP populations and HLB incidence compared to whiteface mulch or bare ground. In addition, metalized mulch, together with the associated drip irrigation and fertigation system, increased soil moisture, reduced weed pressure, and increased tree growth rate. Metalized mulch slows spread of ACP and therefore HLB pressure on young citrus trees. Metalized mulch can thereby augment current control measures for young trees based primarily on systemic insecticides. Additional costs could be compensated for by increased tree growth rate which would shorten time to crop profitability. These advantages make a compelling case for large-scale trials using metalized mulch in young citrus plantings threatened by HLB. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. Developmental toxicity of Citrus aurantium in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Deborah K; Juliar, Beth E; White, Gene E; Pellicore, Linda S

    2011-06-01

    Ephedra was commonly used in herbal products marketed for weight loss until safety concerns forced its removal from products. Even before the ban, manufacturers had begun to replace ephedra with other compounds, including Citrus aurantium, or bitter orange. The major component in the bitter orange extract is synephrine which is chemically similar to ephedrine. The purpose of this study was to determine if relatively pure synephrine or synephrine present as a constituent of a bitter orange extract produced developmental toxicity in rats. Sprague-Dawley rats were dosed daily by gavage with one of several different doses of synephrine from one of two different extracts. Caffeine was added to some doses. Animals were sacrificed on GD 21, and fetuses were examined for the presence of various developmental toxic endpoints. At doses up to 100 mg synephrine/kg body weight, there were no adverse effects on embryolethality, fetal weight, or incidences of gross, visceral, or skeletal abnormalities. There was a decrease in maternal weight at 50 mg synephrine/kg body weight when given as the 6% synephrine extract with 25 mg caffeine/kg body weight; there was also a decrease in maternal weight in the caffeine only group. This decrease in body weight may have been due to decreased food consumption which was also observed in these two groups. Overall, doses of up to 100 mg synephrine/kg body weight did not produce developmental toxicity in Sprague-Dawley rats. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. In vitro pollen germination of five citrus species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, S.A.; Perveen, A.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of present study is In vitro germination of the pollen grains of five Citrus species belonging to the family Rutaceae viz., Citrus aurantium L. var., aurantium Hook.f., C. limon (L.) Brum. f., C. paradisii Macfad, C. reticulata Blanco and C. sinensis (L.) Osbeck. using hanging drop technique. The germination was checked up to 48 weeks, for the pollen stored at different temperatures like 4 degree C, -20 degree C, -30 degree C and -60 degree C. The study indicates that low temperature and low relative humidity is better than high temperature and humidity with respect to pollen germination capacity and viability. Freeze dryer (-60 degree C) seems to be the best method to maintain pollen viability of stored pollen grains for a long period of time. Among five species Citrus aurantium, C. limon and C. sinensis showed high percentage of germination as compared to C. reticulata and C. paradisii. (author)

  19. Natural bioactive compounds of Citrus limon for food and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Molina, E; Domínguez-Perles, R; Moreno, D A; García-Viguera, C

    2010-01-20

    Citrus genus is the most important fruit tree crop in the world and lemon is the third most important Citrus species. Several studies highlighted lemon as an important health-promoting fruit rich in phenolic compounds as well as vitamins, minerals, dietary fiber, essential oils and carotenoids. Lemon fruit has a strong commercial value for the fresh products market and food industry. Moreover, lemon productive networks generate high amounts of wastes and by-products that constitute an important source of bioactive compounds with potential for animal feed, manufactured foods, and health care. This review focuses on the phytochemistry and the analytical aspects of lemon compounds as well as on the importance for food industry and the relevance of Citrus limon for nutrition and health, bringing an overview of what is published on the bioactive compounds of this fruit.

  20. Juice components and antioxidant capacity of four Tunisian Citrus varieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tounsi, Moufida Saidani; Wannes, Wissem Aidi; Ouerghemmi, Ines; Jegham, Sabrine; Ben Njima, Yosra; Hamdaoui, Ghaith; Zemni, Hassene; Marzouk, Brahim

    2011-01-15

    Juices from four Citrus species of Tunisia were investigated mainly for quality parameters and antioxidant capacity. Citrus reticulata (mandarin) juice had the highest content of total flavonoids (85.33 mg CE L(-1)). The latter also occurred in high quantity (82.01 mg CE L(-1)) in Citrus lemon (lemon) juice which was also marked by its richness in total aroma (70.16 µg mL(-1)) and in total fatty acids (48.10 µg mL(-1)). Mandarin and lemon juices had the highest antioxidant activity, as determined b the β-carotene bleaching assay (26.67% and 22.67%, respectively). Citrus aurantium (bitter orange) juice was characterised by the highest content of total polyphenols (784.67 mg GAE L(-1)) and by the greatest inhibition of DPPH (96.10%). Citrus sinensis (blood orange) juice was only marked by the high quantity of ascorbic acid (36.90 mg mL(-1)). GC/MS analysis of juice aroma showed the predominance of limonene (48.85-69.59%) in mandarin and in bitter and blood oranges, but of camphene (89.05%) in lemon. GC analysis of juice fatty acids revealed their richness in oleic acid (23.13-39.52%). HPLC analysis of juice phenolics indicated the predominance of phenolic acids (73.13-86.40%). The Citrus species used in this study were considered valuable varieties from the point of view of antioxidant capacity and nutrition. Copyright © 2010 Society of Chemical Industry.

  1. Citrus orchards management and soil water repellency in Eastern Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerdà, A.; González Peñaloza, F. A.; Jordán, A.; Zavala, L. M.

    2012-04-01

    Water repellent soils are found around the world, although originally was found on fire affected soil (DeBano, 1981). However, for decades, water repellency was found to be a rare soil property. One of the pioneer research that shown that water repellency was a common soil property is the Wander (1949) publication in Science. Wander researched the water repellency on citrus groves, and since then, no information is available about the water repellency on citrus plantations. The Mediterranean soils are prone to water repellency due to the summer dry conditions (Cerdà and Doerr, 2007). And Land Use and Land Management are key factors (Harper et al., 2000; Urbanek et al., 2007) to understand the water repellency behaviour of agriculture soils. Valencia region (Eastern Spain) is the largest exporter in the world and citrus plantations located in the alluvial plains and fluvial terraces are moving to alluvial fans and slopes where the surface wash is very active (Cerdà et al., 2009). This research aims to show the water repellency on citrus orchards located on the sloping terrain (treatment induced slight water repellency in citrus-cropped soils compared to other treatments. Small but significant soil water repellency was observed under NT and HNT treatments (mean WDTP 4 ± 4 s and 2 ± 2 s, respectively), which may be regarded as subcritical soil water repellency. Slight water repellency observed in soils under MNT treatment may be attributed to the input of hydrophobic organic compounds as a consequence of the addition of plant residues and organic manure. A further issue to be achieved is the study of geomorphological processes associated to sub-critical soil water repellency. The experimental setup within the citrus plantation is being supported by the research project CGL2008-02879/BTE

  2. Pharmacological properties of citrus and their ancient and medieval uses in the Mediterranean region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, Beatriz Alvarez; Ramón-Laca, Luis

    2005-02-10

    This paper reviews the pharmacological properties of Mediterranean-grown citrus species (Citrus L., Rutaceae), including citron (Citrus medica L.), lime (Citrus xauantiifolia [Christm.] Swingle), lemon (Citrus xlimon [L.] Osbeck), bitter orange (Citrus xaurantium L.) and pomelo (Citrus maxima [Burm.] Merr.), as referred to in ancient, medieval and 16th century sources. The virtues of the species reported in these texts were compared to those known to modern science. A much broader spectrum of pharmacological properties was recorded by these early writers than one might expect. The use of the citron and lemon as antidotes for 'poison and venom' is recorded in the very earliest material. According to modern scientific literature the citron and the bitter orange may possess anti-cancer activity, lime may have an immunomodulatory effect in humans, and the pomelo may be useful for treating circulatory problems. Lemons might even ease hangover symptoms. Research is required to confirm these properties.

  3. Learning to fight a fly : developing citrus IPM in Bhutan

    OpenAIRE

    Schoubroeck, van, F.

    1999-01-01

    The chinese citrus fly is one of the key pests in Bhutanese mandarin orchards that lays eggs in developing fruit that cause pre-mature fruit drop. In this study it is used as a "model subject" to explore the integration of technical, social and administrative domains of knowledge. The confinement of the study to control of the fly leads to the study addressing a broad set of issues that are linked through their relevance to control the pest. Citrus fly control and its consequent doub...

  4. Weed Biomass and Weed Species Diversity of Juvenile Citrus Trees Intercrop with some Arable Crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patience Mojibade OLORUNMAIYE

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available A preliminary study was carried out to evaluate the performances of eight crops in the intercrop of citrus with arable crops at the National Horticultural Research Institute (NIHORT Ibadan, Nigeria. Eight arable crops: maize, cucumber, sweet potato, Corchorus olitorius, large green, grain amaranth, Mucuna pruriens var. utilis, and groundnut were intercropped with young citrus trees in the early planting season of 2010 with sole citrus as control. The experiment was laid out in a completely randomized block design with three replicates. Data were collected on weed flora, weed density and weed dry weight. Results showed that the relative frequencies of weeds in all the plots were less than 4% at both 6 and 9WAP. Gomphrena celosoides, Oldenlandia corymbosa and Tridax procumbens were most preponderant in appearing in all the plots. Tridax procumbens had a consistent relative frequency (2.34% in all the plots except in citrus/maize plot (0.78% at 9 WAP. Significantly lower broadleaf weed densities were obtained in citrus/sweet potato, citrus/large green, control plot and citrus/cucumber (28.67, 45.00, 50.00 and 76.33 m-2 respectively than in citrus/groundnut plot (143.00 m-2. Similarly, significantly lower grass weed densities were produced in citrus/Mucuna and citrus/sweet potato (0.33 m-2 each plots than the control plot (11.33 m-2. Whereas citrus/corchorus plot produced significantly lower broadleaf weed dry weight (37.59 g m-2 than citrus/Mucuna plot (126.47 g m-2 at 3WAP, citrus/large green plot (16.15 g m-2 and citrus/groundnut plot (123.25 g m-2 followed the same trend at 6 WAP. Sedges dry weights were less than 7 g m-2 in all the plots compared with control plot.

  5. Identificação de espécies de citros mediante polimorfismo enzimático Identification of citrus species by means of enzymatic polymorphism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiko Enok Sawazaki

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Estudou-se, mediante polimorfismo enzimático em gel de poliacrilamida, a variabilidade genética das espécies de laranja-doce (Citrus sinensis; laranja-azeda (C. aurantium; tangerinas clementina (C. clementina, sunki (C. sunki, cleópatra (C. reshni e poncã (C. rsticulata; lima-da-pérsia (C. limettioides; limão-galego (C. aurantifolia; limão-cravo (C. limonia e trifoliata (Poncirus trifoliata. Extratos de folhas foram analisados para as isoenzimas de malato deidrogenase (MDH, enzima málica (ME, leucino amino peptidase (LAP, glutamato oxaloacetato transaminase (GOT, fosfoglucoisomerase (PGI, fosfoglucomutase (PGM e isocitrato deidrogenase (IDH. Verificou-se grande variabilidade genética interespecífica, porém nenhuma entre os cultivares de laranja-doce. Foram encontradas algumas aloenzimas, além das referidas pela literatura em gel de amido, como aquelas de uma região próxima ao loco conhecido por Pgm-1, responsável por proteínas monoméricas. Este sistema, denominado PGM, revelou a maior diferenciação entre as espécies, tendo apresentado duas regiões distintas com 9 alelos. No sistema MDH, foram considerados dois locas codificando para proteínas diméricas com 7 alelos; no ME, um loco com 3 alelos; no LAP, possivelmente dois locos responsáveis por proteínas monoméricas com 4 alelos; no GOT, dois focos com 7 alelos; no PGI, um loco com 3 alelos e no IDH, um loco com 4 alelos.The genetic diversity of citrus cultivars was studied by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis on sweet orange (C. sinensis; tangerines (C. clementine, C. sunki, C. reshni, C. reticulata; Palestine lime (C. Iimettioides; West Indian lime (C. aurantifolia; Rangpur lime (C. limonia, Sour orange (C. aurantium and Poncirus trifoliata. Citrus leaf extracts were analysed for isozymes of malato dehidrogenase (MDH, malic enzyme (ME, leucine aminopeptidase (LAP, glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT, phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI, phosphoglucose mutase (PGM and

  6. In vitro mutant obtainment by irradiation of nucellar tissue of citrus (Citrus Sinensis Osb.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasqual, M.; Ando, A.; Tulmann Neto, A.; Menten, J.O.M.

    1984-01-01

    Nucellus of cultivar Valencia (Citrus Sinensis, Osb.) extracted from fruits 12 weeks after fertilization, were gamma irradiated (0.1, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0, 8.0 and 12.0 kR) before inoculation in culture media (pH 5.7) which comprised of macro and micronutrients of medium MS to which were added (in mg/l): mesoinusitol, 100; pyroxidin HCl, 1; nicotinic acid, 1; thiamine HCl, 0.2; malt extract, 500; sacarose, 50,000; agar-agar, 8,000. They were then Kept under 16 h light and 8h dark at a temperature of 27 0 C. (M.A.C.) [pt

  7. Detection of a new variant of Citrus tristeza virus in Greek citrus crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisavet K. CHATZIVASSILIOU

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Citrus tristeza virus (CTV, the most destructive virus of citrus, is a quarantine pathogen in Greece. Since 2000, several accidental imports of infected propagation material have been detected in the country, and while eradication measures were applied, a few disease foci still remain. CTV isolates were collected from Chania (Crete and the “lemonwood” of Poros (Peloponnese, and their genetic variability was studied using single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP. One previously characterized isolate from Argolida grafted on a Mexican lime (GR3 and two Italian isolates from Calamondin were also included in the study. ELISA and RT-PCR tests confirmed CTV presence, and SSCP analysis of the virus amplified coat protein (CP gene was used to separate either distinct virus isolates for cloning the CP gene or variants (haplotypes for sequencing. Analyses showed that selected variants of four representative isolates clustered into three of the seven defined phylogenetic groups: groups 3b and 5 (severe isolates and group M (mild isolates. The prevalent haplotypes detected in the CTV from lemonwood of Poros (GR9 were in group 3b, confirming previous results. However, one sequence variant was identified as a recombinant between haplotypes from groups 3b and 5. Variants of these two groups were also detected in the Italian Calamondin isolate. In the grafted Mexican lime isolate (GR3 from Argolida, only one haplotype was found which belonged to group M, while in the field isolate from Chania (GR6 the only haplotype detected was in group 5. This is the first report of variants of group 5 in Greece, suggesting an unknown virus introduction. The prevalence of severe isolates in the area is of particular concern, and implications for the future of the CTV epidemics are discussed.

  8. Study of entomophatogenic fungus to control vector insect of citrus tristeza virus on citrus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwiastuti M.E.

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Citrus Tristeza Virus (CTV disease is a silent killer, which threatens to decrease productivity, quality and even death of citrus plants and the erosion of genetic resources. Spreading in the field very quickly by the intermediate insect vector pest, aphid (Toxoptera citricida, T. Aurantii and A. Gosypii. The microbes studied for potential biopesticide candidates are: Beauveria bassiana and Hirsutella citriformis, and Metarhizium anisopliae (Metch Sorokin previously reported to control Diaphorina citri pests resulting effectiveness of > 25% and was able to suppress yield loss up to 10%. The objectives of the study examined the effectiveness of entomopathogen in controlling the pest of CTV vector, Toxoptera citricida, in the laboratory and screen house, to findout the physiological, biochemical and molecular physiology of entomopathogen. The results showed that the best entomopathogen suspension concentration was B.bassiana 106 followed by H. citriformis 106 and M. anisopliae 106. Entomopatogen B. bassiana and H. citriformis effectively controled the CTV vector pest in the laboratory. In the semi-field experiments at the screen house, the most effective result was H.citriformis 106 and the combination of H.citriformis 106 + B.bassiana 106, killing up to 50% and 100% on day 7th H.citriformis had the most physiological character, was able to develop optimally at a temperature of 20-400C and humidity between 60-80%. The biochemical character of the entomopathogenic fungus B.bassiana contained cellulase enzyme and phosphate solvent and IAA hormone, at most compared to the others. H.citriformis had not been found to contain enzymes and hormones. The molecular biochemical characterization of entomopathogenic fungi using FS1 and NS2 primers more clearly distinguished isolates and entomopathogenic species.

  9. Comparison of some biochemical characteristics of different citrus fruits

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gorinstein, S.; Martín-Belloso, O.; Park, Y. S.; Haruenkit, R.; Lojek, Antonín; Číž, Milan; Caspi, A.; Libman, I.; Trakhtenberg, S.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 74, č. 3 (2001), s. 309-315 ISSN 0308-8146 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5004920 Keywords : citrus fruits * dietary fiber * total polyphenols Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.156, year: 2001

  10. Growth of citrus rootstocks under aluminium stress in hydroponics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira Walter Esfrain

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Plants present different degrees of adaptation to aluminium (Al concentrations in the soil, and the understanding of this characteristic can lead to a viable option for the utilization of acid soils. The objective of this experiment was to evaluate the effects of five Al concentrations (0, 50, 100, 200, and 400 mumol L-1 on the growth of 'Rangpur' lime (Citrus limonia Osbeck and 'Volkamer' lemon (Citrus volkameriana Hort. ex Tan., and tangerine rootstocks 'Cleópatra' (Citrus reshni Hort. ex Tan and 'Sunki' (Citrus sunki Hort. ex Tan., in hydroponic culture. The treatments were arranged in a randomized block design, with four replications. For all rootstocks, the relative growth rate in terms of plant total fresh matter increased under low and, decreased under large Al concentrations. Growth of the shoot, leaf area ratio and leaf weight ratio decreased for all rootstocks in the presence of Al. The 'Rangpur' lime had a decrease of the root system growth, starting from 23 mumol L-1 of Al. For the remaining rootstocks, this growth reached maximum values at 91 to 117 mumol L-1 of Al, respectively. Considering all the evaluated characteristics of plant growth, the 'Rangpur' lime was the most susceptible to Al.

  11. Relative population levels of citrus thrips Scirtothrips aurantii on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1989-03-15

    Mar 15, 1989 ... sth. Afr. 49: 159--161. MOUND, L.A. & PITKIN, B.R. 1972. Microscopic whole mounts of thrips (Thysanoptera). Entomologist's Gaz. 23: 121-125. SAMWAYS, M.J. 1986. Spatial distribution of Scirtothrips aurantii Faure (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) and threshold levels for one per cent damage on citrus fruit ...

  12. Dough Rising Ability of Tamarindus Indica, Citrus Limon and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MASANAWA

    Flowers are red to yellow with a dark center containing short peduncles. The flowers have both male and female organs. Seedpods are enclosed in their red, fleshy calyces which are commonly used for making food and tea. 6 . The current study sets to determine dough rising ability of ;. Tamarindus Indica, Citrus limon and.

  13. potential use of mangifera indica seed kernel and citrus aurantiifolia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HOD

    *Corresponding author tel: + 234 – 803 – 823 – 1628, currently a doctoral student at the Department of Civil. Engineering, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, GHANA. POTENTIAL USE OF MANGIFERA INDICA SEED KERNEL AND CITRUS. AURANTIIFOLIA SEED IN WATER DISINFECTION.

  14. Weed population in citrus based cropping system as affected by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sole plots of Sweet orange (sct), maize (sm), cowpea (scp), cassava (sca) and pineapple (sp) were planted as control. Weed control efficiency of the intercrops was evaluated by 1m x 1m permanent quadrat technique. Sole citrus recorded a significantly higher (P<0.05) weed biomass in the three years of cropping than other ...

  15. Comparative efficacy of sweet orange, Citrus sinensis (l) rind ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sweet orange, Citrus sinensis((L.) rind powder and oil were evaluated for the control of maize weevil, Sitophilus zeamais(Mot.) under ambient laboratory conditions (28 ± 2o C and 75 ± 20% R.H.). Experiments consisted of exposing adult S. zeamais to both the powder and oil for 42 days. Mortality counts were taken from the ...

  16. Citrus Production, Constraints and Management Practices in Ethiopia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    home

    2014-05-16

    May 16, 2014 ... Citrus is economically important fruit crop in Ethiopia. However, its .... water. Sterilized leaves or fruit peels were cut, and four to six leaf discs or peel pieces were placed on each Petri dish containing potato dextrose agar (PDA) in five replicates ... banana, avocado and papaya), vegetable crops (primarily.

  17. Understanding Social Learning Processes in a Citrus Farming ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Linda Downsborough, Rhodes University, South Africa. Abstract. This paper ... also pointed to the significance of policy and market-based changes in farmer learning, and their attachment to the land, which is ... took place in a citrus farming community in the small town of Patensie in the Eastern Cape, which forms part of the ...

  18. Learning to fight a fly : developing citrus IPM in Bhutan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoubroeck, van F.

    1999-01-01

    The chinese citrus fly is one of the key pests in Bhutanese mandarin orchards that lays eggs in developing fruit that cause pre-mature fruit drop. In this study it is used as a "model subject" to explore the integration of technical, social and administrative domains of knowledge. The

  19. Understanding Social Learning Processes in a Citrus Farming ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper focuses on what would traditionally be termed 'non-formal' learning processes in the context of a case study examining how citrus farming communities in the Patensie Valley in the Eastern Cape in South Africa were learning conservation practices. Communities of Practice theory was used to provide a ...

  20. Identification of zygotic and nucellar seedlings in citrus interspecific ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-12-19

    Dec 19, 2011 ... Department of Plant Breeding and Improvement, Iran Citrus Research Institute, Mottahari Street, Ramsar, Mazandaran. Province, Iran. .... selection. The white arrowheads indicate the confirmed polymorphic markers N1, N4, N9 and N10, specific for pollen progenitor (Page). ..... Genome fingerprinting by.

  1. Evaluating the effect of some botanical insecticides on the citrus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of tondexir (pepper extract) and palizin (eucalyptus extract) using five doses (500, 1000, 1500, 2000 and 3000 ppm) and sirinol (garlic extract) with five doses (1000, 1500, 2000, 2500 and 3500 ppm) on citrus mealybug was investigated. The effect of barter (a botanical synergist) using a single dose (1000 ppm) ...

  2. Variation of Citrus cultivars in Egypt assessed by RAPDs, cluster ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR-Seham

    2012-11-13

    Nov 13, 2012 ... (lemon), and sour orange (Citrus aurantium L.). Ollitrault et al. (2010) stated that Citus is a .... water, rinsed twice in sterile distilled water and ground with liquid nitrogen in a sterile mortar and pestle. The powder ... Samples were incubated for 45 min at 65°C water bath and then 300 ml M KCl was added.

  3. Assessing genetic variability in male sterile and low fertile citrus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-01-24

    Jan 24, 2012 ... male sterile types, with old scattered resources; Iran has obvious diversity of citrus materials. ..... sexual reproduction and recombination are disabled in detecting such mutations in asexually propagated species. Therefore, it seems that in plants with asexual propagation system, inclusion of dominant ...

  4. A stable RNA virus-based vector for citrus trees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Folimonov, Alexey S.; Folimonova, Svetlana Y.; Bar-Joseph, Moshe; Dawson, William O.

    2007-01-01

    Virus-based vectors are important tools in plant molecular biology and plant genomics. A number of vectors based on viruses that infect herbaceous plants are in use for expression or silencing of genes in plants as well as screening unknown sequences for function. Yet there is a need for useful virus-based vectors for woody plants, which demand much greater stability because of the longer time required for systemic infection and analysis. We examined several strategies to develop a Citrus tristeza virus (CTV)-based vector for transient expression of foreign genes in citrus trees using a green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a reporter. These strategies included substitution of the p13 open reading frame (ORF) by the ORF of GFP, construction of a self-processing fusion of GFP in-frame with the major coat protein (CP), or expression of the GFP ORF as an extra gene from a subgenomic (sg) mRNA controlled either by a duplicated CTV CP sgRNA controller element (CE) or an introduced heterologous CE of Beet yellows virus. Engineered vector constructs were examined for replication, encapsidation, GFP expression during multiple passages in protoplasts, and for their ability to infect, move, express GFP, and be maintained in citrus plants. The most successful vectors based on the 'add-a-gene' strategy have been unusually stable, continuing to produce GFP fluorescence after more than 4 years in citrus trees

  5. Efficient somatic embryo production of Limau madu ( Citrus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of N6-benzylaminopurine (BAP) concentration, initial cell density and carbon sources and concentrations for producing cell suspension and somatic embryos of Limau madu (Citrus suhuiensis Hort. ex Tanaka) were investigated using cell suspension culture. Cells were first inoculated into Murashige and Skoog (MS) ...

  6. Evaluation of sweet orange peel aqueous extract ( citrus sinensis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The toxic effect of sweet orange peel (Citrus sinensis) was compared with that of carbofuran, a synthetic nematicide, for the suppression of soil and root population of root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita on tomato. Field and laboratory experiments were conducted in year 2002 and repeated in the same period in year ...

  7. Efficiency of chemotherapy coupled with thermotherapy against citrus HLB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Six independent experiments were carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of the chemotherapy coupled with the thermotherapy on pot-contained HLB-affected plants based on our previous results from graft-based methods. Three-year old potted HLB-affected citrus plants were exposed to 4 thermotherapy ...

  8. Emerging citrus diseases in Europe caused by species of Diaporthe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guarnaccia, Vladimiro; Crous, P.W.

    2017-01-01

    Species of Diaporthe are considered important plant pathogens, saprobes, and endophytes on a wide range of plant hosts. Several species are well-known on citrus, either as agents of pre- or post-harvest infections, such as dieback, melanose and stem-end rot on fruit. In this study we explored the

  9. Fermentation Potentials of Citrus Limon and Hibiscus Sabdariffa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MASANAWA

    power. 2 . Alcoholic fermentation occurs when yeast cells convert carbohydrate sources to ethanol and carbon dioxide. Fermentation reactions are common in muscle cells, yeast, some bacteria, and plants. 3 . Citrus limon (aka lemon) belongs to .... using Bunsen burner. It was allowed to cool and subsequently sieved using ...

  10. Discrimination of citrus tristeza virus (CTV) strains using Mexican ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two strains of citrus tristeza virus (CTV) were studied for six years in Yaounde in the forest zone of Cameroon. These strains, SNCL2 and SNCL4, were characterized on Lisbon lemon in Nyombe in the littoral zone of Cameroon. They were inoculated onto combinations of Mexican lime/citrange Troyer. The virulent strain ...

  11. Extraction of low molecular weight RNA from Citrus trifolita tissues ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We employed a simple and quick method involving trizol for total RNA extraction from citrus tissues, then generation of LMW RNA using 4M LiCl, which have been successfully utilized in studies in our laboratory. Compared with traditional methods, this method is less expensive and produced high RNA yields while avoiding ...

  12. Recovery of naringin from kinnow (Citrus reticulata Blanco) peels by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    citrus) peels,which is a waste. The kinnow peels were boiled with water to extract naringin into water. It was adsorbed on an indigenous macroporous resin, Indion PA-500. Naringin was recovered from the saturated resin by desorption with ...

  13. Expression and purification of coat protein of citrus tristeza virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) polyclonal antibodies produced either from the recombinant coat protein (CP) of CTV or extracted virus from midrib used for the detection of virus. Compared with intact virion procedure, the use of CP antigen resulted in highly specific polyclonal antibodies. CTV coat protein gene (CTV-cp) cloned ...

  14. Diplodia natalensis , Pole Evans: a causal agent of citrus gummosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Isolations were made from the barks of gummosis-infected citrus trees from orchards of the University of Ghana Agricultural Research Station at Kade. The isolation media used were 1.5% water agar, 1.5% water agar + nystatin and 1.5% water agar + benomyl. Four isolates including Diplodia natalensis Pole Evans, ...

  15. Extraction of low molecular weight RNA from Citrus trifolita tissues ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2010-12-20

    Dec 20, 2010 ... reaction (RT-PCR) and Northern blotting. Key words: Citrus, low molecular weight RNA, trizol reagent, 4 M LiCl, microRNAs. INTRODUCTION. Low molecular weight RNA (LMW RNA) consists of several components with microRNAs (miRNAs) being among the important ones. miRNAs are endogenous 19-.

  16. Apoptotic properties of Citrus sudachi Hort, ex Shirai (Rutaceae ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) and annexin V/propidium iodidle assay were used to test the antiproliferative activity and apoptosis of methanol extract of Citrus sudachi, respectively. Griess reaction and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were carried ...

  17. Volatile flavour components of grapefruit juice (Citrus paradisi Macfadyen)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nunez, A.J.; Maarse, H.; Bemelmans, J.M.H.

    1985-01-01

    The qualitative analysis of volatile flavour components in grapefruit juice (Citrus paradisi Macfadyen) was performed using a gas chromatography/mass spectro‐metry/computer system which allowed the identification of 58 components, 25 of them being reported for the first time. The aroma concentrates

  18. efficacy of rehabilitation methods on citrus canker disease in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    transmitted light. Other peculiar symptoms have been ably described by Gottwald et al., 2002; Graham et al., 2003. When citrus canker disease was initially detected in Northern Uganda, several measures were recommended, e.g. nursery and orchard inspections, quarantines, protective copper sprays and the on-site ...

  19. Essential Oils from the Malaysian Citrus (Rutaceae Medicinal Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Nur Atiqah Md Othman

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This review article appraises the extraction methods, compositions, and bioactivities of the essential oils from the Citrus species (family: Rutaceae endemic to Malaysia including C. aurantifolia, C. grandis, C. hystrix, and C. microcarpa. Generally, the fresh peels and leaves of the Citrus species were extracted using different methods such as steam and water distillation, Likens-Nikerson extraction, solvent extraction, and headspace solid-phase micro-extraction (HS-SPME. Most of the Citrus oils were found to be rich in monoterpene hydrocarbons with limonene (1 as the major component identified in the peels of C. aurantifolia (39.3%, C. grandis (81.6%–96.9%, and C. microcarpa (94.0%, while sabinene (19 was the major component in the peels of C. hystrix (36.4%–48.5%. In addition, citronellal (20 (61.7%–72.5%, linalool (18 (56.5%, and hedycaryol (23 (19.0% were identified as the major components in the oil of C. hystrix leaves, C. grandis blossom and C. microcarpa leaves, respectively. The C. hystrix essential oil has been experimentally shown to have antimicrobial and antifeedant activities, while no bioactivity study has been reported on the essential oils of other Malaysian Citrus species.

  20. Apoptotic properties of Citrus sudachi Hort, ex Shirai (Rutaceae ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ISSN: 1596-5996 (print); 1596-9827 (electronic). © Pharmacotherapy Group, Faculty of Pharmacy, ... beverages in Japanese cuisine but also used in other Asian food. Citrus sudachi is harvested before the fruit is ... acceptance of the fruit by consumers is gradually reduced. When fully ripe, the fruit turns yellowish, but it is ...

  1. Toxin production by Fusarium solani from declining citrus plants and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The highest Fusarium sp. followed by Aspergillus, Phytophthora, Pythium, Penicillium and Alternaria species were remote from the collected samples of roots and soil from the four tehsils of Sargodha district of Pakistan. The maximum Fusarium sp. was isolated from the roots of declining citrus trees from tehsil Bhalwal ...

  2. Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase activity by essential oil from Citrus paradisi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazawa, M; Tougo, H; Ishihara, M

    2001-01-01

    Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity by essential oils of Citrus paradisi (grapefruit pink in USA) was studied. Inhibition of AChE was measured by the colorimetric method. Nootkatone and auraptene were isolated from C. paradisi oil and showed 17-24% inhibition of AChE activity at the concentration of 1.62 microg/mL.

  3. Fermentation potentials of Citrus limon and Hibiscus sabdariffa juice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study aimed to determine the fermentation potentials of yeast isolates from Citrus limon and Hibiscus sabdariffa for the fermentation of juice extracts of C. limon and H. sabdariffa. Isolation and morphological studies of yeast cells were carried out by standard protocols. Fourier Transform Infra-red (FT-IR) ...

  4. Development of direct somatic embryogenesis and regeneration on citrus sinesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chong Saw Peng; Alvina Lindsay Mijen; Rusli Ibrahim

    2004-01-01

    The plant regeneration processes in Citrus sinensis involves direct somatic embryogenesis. Culture medium used was MS basal supplemented with 50 mg/L sucrose, 0.27% agar and 0.1% vitamin at pH 5.8. Sucrose is the major carbon source for the induction of somatic embryo and also the maturation and germination of somatic embryo. (Author)

  5. Stellar and Solar Positions in 1701-1703 Observed by Francesco Bianchini at the Clementine Meridian Line in the Basilica of Santa Maria degli Angeli in Rome, and its Calibration Curve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigismondi, Costantino

    2008-09-01

    Stellar aberration is the largest special relativistic effect discovered in astronomy (in 1727 by James Bradley), involving the speed of light when composed with Earth orbital motion. This effect with nutation affected the measurement of latitude with Polaris uppper and lower transits in the first week of January, 1701 made by Francesco Bianchini (1662-1729). Equinoxes and Solstices of 1703 were measured by timing solar and stellar transits at the Meridian Line of Pope Clement XI built in the Basilica of S. Maria degli Angeli in Rome. Original Eastward 4' 28.8" ± 0.6" deviation of the Line affects all measurements. The calibration curve of Clementine Line -here firstly published after 2 years of measurements- includes also local deviations of the Line, and it is used to correct solar and lunar ephemerides at 0.3 s level of accuracy, when meridian transits are there observed and timed.

  6. Citrus peel extract incorporated ice cubes to protect the quality of common pandora: Fish storage in ice with citrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yerlikaya, Pinar; Ucak, Ilknur; Gumus, Bahar; Gokoglu, Nalan

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of ice with albedo and flavedo fragments of Citrus (Grapefruit (Citrus paradisi) and Bitter orange (Citrus aurantium L.)) extracts on the quality of common pandora (Pagellus erythrinus). Concentrated citrus extracts were diluted with distilled water (1/100 w/v) before making of ice. The ice cubes were spread on each layer of fishes and stored at 0 °C for 15 days. The pH value showed a regular increase in all samples. TVB-N levels of bitter orange treatment groups were recorded lower than the other groups reaching to 25.11 ± 0.02 mg/100 g at the end of the storage. The TMA-N values of bitter orange treatment groups were lower than that of control and grapefruit treatment groups. In terms of TBARS value, alteration was observed in the control samples and this value significantly (p bitter orange flavedo treatment. The results showed the bitter orange albedo and bitter orange flavedo extracts in combination with ice storage have more effectiveness in controlling the biochemical indices in common pandora.

  7. Xcc-facilitated agroinfiltration of citrus leaves: a tool for rapid functional analysis of transgenes in citrus leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Hongge; Wang, Nian

    2014-12-01

    Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri pretreatment before agroinfiltration could significantly promote transient expression in citrus leaves which were previously recalcitrant to agroinfiltration. Transient expression via agroinfiltration is widely used in biotechnology but remains problematic in many economically important plants. Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xcc)-facilitated agroinfiltration was employed to promote transient protein expression in Valencia sweet orange leaves, which are recalcitrant to agroinfiltration. However, it is unclear whether Xcc-facilitated agroinfiltration has broad application, i.e., whether Xcc-facilitated agroinfiltration could be used on other citrus varieties. In addition, we intended to investigate whether Xcc-facilitated agroinfiltration could be used to hasten transgene function assays, e.g., Cre/lox system and Cas9/sgRNA system. In this report, Xcc-facilitated agroinfiltration was further exploited to enhance β-glucuronidase (GUS) expression in five citrus varieties. Xcc-facilitated agroinfiltration also significantly increased GFP expression in six citrus varieties tested. Both GUS and GFP assays indicated that Xcc-facilitated agroinfiltration had the best performance in grapefruit. After Xcc-facilitated agroinfiltration was carried out in grapefruit, protoplast analysis of the transformed cells indicated that there were more than 20 % leaf cells expressing GFP. In grapefruit, usefulness of Xcc-facilitated agroinfiltration was assayed in three case studies: (1) fast functional analysis of Cre/lox system, (2) the heat shock regulation of HSP70B promoter derived from Arabidopsis, and (3) Cas9/sgRNA-mediated genome modification.

  8. Living on the Edges: Spatial Niche Occupation of Asian Citrus Psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Liviidae, in Citrus Groves.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamoudou Sétamou

    Full Text Available The spatial niche occupation of the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama, 1908, was evaluated to determine its field colonization and food resource exploitation strategies in citrus groves. Mature grapefruit and sweet orange groves were surveyed as part of an area-wide program in 2009-2010 to determine D. citri population densities and between-tree distribution. In both cultivars, significantly more psyllids were found on perimeter trees throughout the study period suggesting a strong edge effect in D. citri distribution in the groves. D. citri densities and infestation levels gradually declined from the edge to the center of grove. Higher numbers of D. citri were recorded on trees located on the east and south sides of the groves than those on the west and north sides. Citrus groves located at the outer edge of the study with at least one side non-surrounded to other citrus groves harbored significantly more D. citri than groves located within the block cluster and entirely surrounded by other groves. In detailed field studies during 2012, infestation of D. citri started from border trees in the grove where possibly one generation is completed before inner trees become infested. In addition, psyllid densities decreased significantly with increasing distance from the grove edge. Using the selection index, D citri exhibited a strong niche occupation preference for border trees.

  9. Transgenic expression in citrus of single-chain antibody fragments specific to Citrus tristeza virus confers virus resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervera, Magdalena; Esteban, Olga; Gil, Maite; Gorris, M Teresa; Martínez, M Carmen; Peña, Leandro; Cambra, Mariano

    2010-12-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) causes one of the most destructive viral diseases of citrus worldwide. Generation of resistant citrus genotypes through genetic engineering could be a good alternative to control CTV. To study whether production of single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibodies in citrus could interfere and immunomodulate CTV infection, transgenic Mexican lime plants expressing two different scFv constructs, separately and simultaneously, were generated. These constructs derived from the well-referenced monoclonal antibodies 3DF1 and 3CA5, specific against CTV p25 major coat protein, whose mixture is able to detect all CTV isolates characterized so far. ScFv accumulation levels were low and could be readily detected just in four transgenic lines. Twelve homogeneous and vigorous lines were propagated and CTV-challenged by graft inoculation with an aggressive CTV strain. A clear protective effect was observed in most transgenic lines, which showed resistance in up to 40-60% of propagations. Besides, both a delay in symptom appearance and attenuation of symptom intensity were observed in infected transgenic plants compared with control plants. This effect was more evident in lines carrying the 3DF1scFv transgene, being probably related to the biological functions of the epitope recognized by this antibody. This is the first report describing successful protection against a pathogen in woody transgenic plants by ectopic expression of scFv recombinant antibodies.

  10. Correlation of electronic monitoring and stylet pathways elucidate the role of sclerenchymatous ring as a barrier to phloem feeding on citrus leaves by Asian citrus psyllid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asian citrus psyllid (ACP, Diaphorina. citri) feeding behaviors play a significant role in the transmission of the phloem-limited Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas) bacterium that causes the economically devastating citrus greening disease. Recent studies have shown a fibrous ring of thick-wal...

  11. Deep Sequencing Analysis of RNAs from Citrus Plants Grown in a Citrus Sudden Death-Affected Area Reveals Diverse Known and Putative Novel Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Emilyn E; Coletta-Filho, Helvecio D; Nouri, Shahideh; Falk, Bryce W; Nerva, Luca; Oliveira, Tiago S; Dorta, Silvia O; Machado, Marcos A

    2017-04-24

    Citrus sudden death (CSD) has caused the death of approximately four million orange trees in a very important citrus region in Brazil. Although its etiology is still not completely clear, symptoms and distribution of affected plants indicate a viral disease. In a search for viruses associated with CSD, we have performed a comparative high-throughput sequencing analysis of the transcriptome and small RNAs from CSD-symptomatic and -asymptomatic plants using the Illumina platform. The data revealed mixed infections that included Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) as the most predominant virus, followed by the Citrus sudden death-associated virus (CSDaV), Citrus endogenous pararetrovirus (CitPRV) and two putative novel viruses tentatively named Citrus jingmen-like virus (CJLV), and Citrus virga-like virus (CVLV). The deep sequencing analyses were sensitive enough to differentiate two genotypes of both viruses previously associated with CSD-affected plants: CTV and CSDaV. Our data also showed a putative association of the CSD-symptomatic plants with a specific CSDaV genotype and a likely association with CitPRV as well, whereas the two putative novel viruses showed to be more associated with CSD-asymptomatic plants. This is the first high-throughput sequencing-based study of the viral sequences present in CSD-affected citrus plants, and generated valuable information for further CSD studies.

  12. β-Cryptoxanthin and Zeaxanthin Pigments Accumulation to Induce Orange Color on Citrus Fruits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidayati Sumiasih, Inanpi; Poerwanto, Roedhy; Efendi, Darda; Agusta, Andria; Yuliani, Sri

    2018-01-01

    Degreening, a transformation process of green color on citrus peel to be orange color on tropical low-land citrus fruits often fails. Orange color of the citrus peel comes from the mixture carotenoid pigments, such as zeaxanthine and mainly β-cryptoxanthin and β-citraurin. The accumulation of β-citraurin occurs when the fruits are exposed to low temperature, and otherwise, it will fail to occur. Precooling treatment on lowland tropical citrus fruits is expected to stimulate the accumulation of β-citraurin. The results showed the most favorable color obtained from precooling and 24-hour ethylene exposure duration. This treatment could decrease total chlorophyll and β-carotene content as well as proven to increase 3 times the accumulation of β-cryptoxanthin in accelerating the appearance of bright orange color on citrus peel. Degreening gave no significant effect to internal quality of Citrus reticulata.

  13. Authenticity analysis of citrus essential oils by HPLC-UV-MS on oxygenated heterocyclic components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Fan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Citrus essential oils are widely applied in food industry as the backbone of citrus flavors. Unfortunately, due to relatively simple chemical composition and tremendous price differences among citrus species, adulteration has been plaguing the industry since its inception. Skilled blenders are capable of making blends that are almost indistinguishable from authentic oils through conventional gas chromatography analysis. A reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC method was developed for compositional study of nonvolatile constituents in essential oils from major citrus species. The nonvolatile oxygenated heterocyclic components identified in citrus oils were proved to be more effective as markers in adulteration detection than the volatile components. Authors are hoping such an analysis procedure can be served as a routine quality control test for authenticity evaluation in citrus essential oils.

  14. In vitro Propagation of Citrus limonia Osbeck Through Nucellar Embryo Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Alka Jajoo

    2010-01-01

    Citrus limonia Osbeck is a promising rootsctock for commercial citrus species with sturdy anddisease and drought resistant characters. A n efficient and highly reproducible plant regeneration protocol hasbeen developed from nucellar embryo of Citrus limonia. Murashige and Skoogs medium was used for plantregeneration from nucellar embryos. It was noted that 6-benzylaminopurine at a concentration of 2.22 mMinduced highest number of multiple shoots as 18.26 shoots per explant. O n transfer of in...

  15. Observation of Climacteric-Like Behavior of Citrus Leaves Using Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caio B. Wetterich

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Observation of climacteric-like behavior in citrus leaves depends on the detection of ethylene. However, such detection requires a gas chromatographer and complex sample preparation procedures. In this work, fluorescence spectroscopy was investigated as a diagnostic technique for climacteric-like behavior in citrus leaves. Our results indicate that the chlorophyll fluorescence presents a time evolution consistent with the ethylene evolution. Therefore, fluorescence spectroscopy may be used to observe the climacteric-like behavior in citrus leaves.

  16. Citrus pulp pellets as an additive for orange bagasse silage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. K. Grizotto

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the fermentation profile of orange bagasse ensiled with three levels of dry matter (DM using citrus pulp pellets as a moisture-absorbing additive. Thirty experimental silos (3 treatments, 5 storage times, 2 replicates were prepared using 25-liter plastic buckets containing orange bagasse and three levels of pelleted citrus pulp (0, 6% and 20% as additive. A completely randomized design with repeated measures over time was used. The periods of anaerobic storage were 3, 7, 14, 28 and 56 days. Natural orange bagasse contained 13.9% DM, which increased to 19.1% and 25.5% with the inclusion of 6% and 20% citrus pulp pellets, respectively. The apparent density was inversely correlated with DM content and a higher level of compaction (982 kg/m3 was observed in the mass ensiled with the lowest DM level (13.9%. Additionally, lower compaction (910 kg/m3 was found in the mass ensiled with the additive. The chemical composition of the mass ensiled with or without citrus pulp pellets did not differ significantly in terms of protein, ether extract, neutral detergent fiber, lignin or in vitro DM digestibility (P≥0.05, as expected. Thus, it was possible to analyze only the effect of the inclusion of citrus pulp pellets on the increase in DM content. The inclusion of 20% of the additive reduced (P<0.01 losses due to effluent (98% less and gas production (81% less compared to the control treatment at the end of the anaerobic storage period. In this treatment, a higher (P≤0.05 log number of lactic acid bacteria (4.61 log CFU/g was also observed compared to the other treatments, indicating that the increase in DM favored the growth of these bacteria. In addition, the low yeast count (about 1 log CFU/g sample and the pH below 4.0, which were probably due to the production of lactic and acetic acids, show that the orange bagasse is rich in fermentable soluble carbohydrates and is indicated for ensiling. In conclusion, orange bagasse can be

  17. First Record of Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) in Ecuador Infesting Urban Citrus and Orange Jasmine Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornejo, J.F.; Chica, E.J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Adults and nymphs of the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae), were collected in the Guayaquil, Samborondón, and Durán cantons in coastal Ecuador. Psyllids were found in high numbers in citrus ( Citrus spp., Sapindales: Rutaceae) and orange jasmine ( Murraya exotica [L.] Jack, Sapindales: Rutaceae) trees within the Guayaquil-Samborondon-Duran conurbation; however, none was found during scoutings in the main citrus producing areas in coastal Ecuador. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of D. citri in Ecuador and the Pacific coastal plain of South America. PMID:25527601

  18. Citrus peel extract and powder attenuate hypercholesterolemia and hyperglycemia using rodent experimental modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humaira Ashraf

    2017-10-01

    Conclusions: Conclusively, inclusion of citrus peel bioflavonoids in dietary therapies is a promising strategy to modulate lipidemic and glycemic attributes without imparting any deleterious effect on hematological parameters.

  19. Land cover classification and economic assessment of citrus groves using remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Rahul J.; Gebelein, Jennifer L.

    The citrus industry has the second largest impact on Florida's economy, following tourism. Estimation of citrus area coverage and annual forecasts of Florida's citrus production are currently dependent on labor-intensive interpretation of aerial photographs. Remotely sensed data from satellites has been widely applied in agricultural yield estimation and cropland management. Satellite data can potentially be obtained throughout the year, making it especially suitable for the detection of land cover change in agriculture and horticulture, plant health status, soil and moisture conditions, and effects of crop management practices. In this study, we analyzed land cover of citrus crops in Florida using Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) imagery from the University of Maryland Global Land Cover Facility (GLCF). We hypothesized that an interdisciplinary approach combining citrus production (economic) data with citrus land cover area per county would yield a correlation between observable spectral reflectance throughout the year, and the fiscal impact of citrus on local economies. While the data from official sources based on aerial photography were positively correlated, there were serious discrepancies between agriculture census data and satellite-derived cropland area using medium-resolution satellite imagery. If these discrepancies can be resolved by using imagery of higher spatial resolution, a stronger correlation would be observed for citrus production based on satellite data. This would allow us to predict the economic impact of citrus from satellite-derived spectral data analysis to determine final crop harvests.

  20. Taxonomy and phylogeny of the genus citrus based on the nuclear ribosomal dna its region sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Y.L.

    2015-01-01

    The genus Citrus (Aurantioideae, Rutaceae) is the sole source of the citrus fruits of commerce showing high economic values. In this study, the taxonomy and phylogeny of Citrus species is evaluated using sequence analysis of the ITS region of nrDNA. This study is based on 26 plants materials belonging to 22 Citrus species having wild, domesticated, and cultivated species. Through DNA alignment of the ITS sequence, ITS1 and ITS2 regions showed relatively high variations of sequence length and nucleotide among these Citrus species. According to previous six-tribe discrimination theory by Swingle and Reece, the grouping in our ITS phylogenetic tree reconstructed by ITS sequences was not related to tribe discrimination but species discrimination. However, the molecular analysis could provide more information on citrus taxonomy. Combined with ITS sequences of other subgenera in then true citrus fruit tree group, the ITS phylogenetic tree indicated subgenera Citrus was monophyletic and nearer to Fortunella, Poncirus, and Clymenia compared to Microcitrus and Eremocitrus. Abundant sequence variations of the ITS region shown in this study would help species identification and tribe differentiation of the genus Citrus. (author)

  1. Differentiation between Flavors of Sweet Orange (Citrus sinensis) and Mandarin (Citrus reticulata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Shi; Suh, Joon Hyuk; Gmitter, Frederick G; Wang, Yu

    2018-01-10

    Pioneering investigations referring to citrus flavor have been intensively conducted. However, the characteristic flavor difference between sweet orange and mandarin has not been defined. In this study, sensory analysis illustrated the crucial role of aroma in the differentiation between orange flavor and mandarin flavor. To study aroma, Valencia orange and LB8-9 mandarin were used. Their most aroma-active compounds were preliminarily identified by aroma extract dilution analysis (AEDA). Quantitation of key volatiles followed by calculation of odor activity values (OAVs) further detected potent components (OAV ≥ 1) impacting the overall aromatic profile of orange/mandarin. Follow-up aroma profile analysis revealed that ethyl butanoate, ethyl 2-methylbutanoate, octanal, decanal, and acetaldehyde were essential for orange-like aroma, whereas linalool, octanal, α-pinene, limonene, and (E,E)-2,4-decadienal were considered key components for mandarin-like aroma. Furthermore, an unreleased mandarin hybrid producing fruit with orange-like flavor was used to validate the identification of characteristic volatiles in orange-like aroma.

  2. Citrus bergamia essential oil: from basic research to clinical application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele eNavarra

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Citrus bergamia Risso et Poiteau, also known as Bergamot, is a plant belonging to the Rutaceae family, defined as a hybrid of bitter orange and lemon. It is an endemic plant of the Calabria region (Italy. Bergamot fruit is primarily used for the extraction of its essential oil (bergamot essential oil: BEO, employed in perfume, cosmetics, food and confections.The aim of this review was to collect recent data from the literature on Citrus bergamia essential oil and, through a critical analysis, focus on safety and the beneficial effects on human health. Clinical studies on the therapeutic applications of BEO exclusively focus on the field of aromatherapy, suggesting that its use can be useful for reducing anxiety and stress.

  3. Citrus juice extraction for the production of natural repellents

    OpenAIRE

    García, Ricardo; González, Vivian; Madrid, Adaluz; Ureña, Jorge; Tejedor De León, Alexis

    2017-01-01

    Repellents are those who defend us from insects, especially mosquitoes. It is necessary to protect their bites, this is why, this research has as general objective the development of a repellent base don juice extracted from citrus fruits and verify, through direct observation in the field, on their effectiveness to keep away mosquitoes from human skin under different conditions. In laboratory tests they were weighed 252g orange peel and placed in maceration for 5 days in a solution of 325ml ...

  4. Determination of Ascorbic Acid in Oman Citrus Fruits

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    KS.M.Z. Al-Kindi

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Omani citrus fruits were analyzed for their Vitamin C (ascorbic and AA content by a titration method involving  N-bromosuccinimide (NBS as an oxidizing  agent and by high performance liquid  chromatography. Vitamin C content was also determined after storage at different temperatures. Vitamin C contents of the fruits were found to lie within  the values reported in the literature.

  5. Citrus Flavonoid Supplementation Improves Exercise Performance in Trained Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvera Overdevest, Jeroen A. Wouters, Kevin H.M. Wolfs, Job J.M. van Leeuwen, Sam Possemiers

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that polyphenol supplementation may be an effective strategy to improve exercise performance, due to their antioxidant character and ability to stimulate NO production. These properties may contribute to exercise performance, yet no conclusive research has been performed in exploring the direct effects of citrus flavonoids on human exercise performance. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to assess whether supplementation of a customized citrus flavonoid (CF extract for 4 weeks improves cycling time-trial performance in trained male athletes. In a double-blind, randomized, parallel study, 39 healthy, trained males were given a daily dose of either 500 mg of a customized citrus flavonoid extract (CF or a placebo for 4 weeks. Exercise performance was tested by means of a time-trial test on a cycle ergometer, during which participants had to generate as much power as possible for duration of 10 minutes. Absolute power output significantly increased with 14.9 ± 3.9 W after 4 weeks of CF supplementation, corresponding with a 5.0% increase, compared to 3.8 ± 3.2 W (1.3% increase in placebo (p < 0.05. In addition, oxygen consumption/power ratio significantly decreased in the CF group compared to placebo (p = 0.001, and a trend was found in the change in peak power output in CF (18.2 ± 23.2 W versus placebo (-28.4 ± 17.6 W; p = 0.116. The current study is the first convincing report that citrus flavonoid supplementation can improve exercise performance, as shown by a significant increase in power output during the exercise test.

  6. Energy use in citrus production of Mazandaran province in Iran ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The total energy requirement under citrus farming was 17,112.2 MJ ha-1, whereas 36.3 and 33.62% was consumed due to fertilisers and pesticides, respectively. Renewable energy was about 12% of total energy input. The energy ratio, productivities, specific and net energy gain were 1.71, 0.905, 1.104 and 12,251.4 MJ ...

  7. Evaluation of antioxidant potential of citrus peel extracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatha, S.A.S.; Hussain, A.I.; Asi, M.R.

    2011-01-01

    The antioxidant potential of different solvent extracts of three different locally grown citrus varieties; grape fruit, lemon and mussambi, was assessed using some antioxidant assays like estimation of total phenolic contents (TPC), total flavonoids contents (TFC), percentage inhibition of linoleic acid oxidation and DPPH free radical scavenging capacity. The yield of extracts was found in the range of 17.92-30.8%. TPC, TFC, percent inhibition of linoleic acid oxidation and DPPH radical scavenging capacity of different citrus peel extracts were found in range of 2.72 - 3.77 g/100g as Gallic Acid Equivalent (GAE), 2.20-2.98 g/100g as Catechine Equivalent (CE), 68.20 - 91.78% and 19.53 - 41.88 mg/mL, respectively. Statistical analysis showed significant (p < 0.05) variations in the yield and antioxidant potentials of the extracts with respect to different species and solvent systems. From the results it is reasonable to say that methanolic extracts of citrus peels have exhibited varying degree of antioxidant potentials. (author)

  8. The genetics of tolerance to tristeza disease in citrus rootstocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Bordignon

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Controlled pollinations between four elite citrus rootstocks, Citrus limonia - 'Limeira' rangpur lime (Cravo, C. sunki - 'Sunki' mandarin (Sunki, C. aurantium - 'São Paulo' sour orange (Azeda and Poncirus trifoliata - 'Davis A' trifoliate orange (Trifoliata, resulted in 1614 nucelar and 1938 hybrid plants identified by the isozyme loci Pgi-1, Pgm-1, Got-1, Got-2, Aps-1, Me-1, Prxa-1 and or by the morphological markers broadness of leaf petiole wing or trifoliolate leaves. Tolerance to the citrus tristeza virus (CTV was evaluated under nursery and field conditions for several years by the reaction of Valencia orange infected with a severe strain of CTV and grafted onto the hybrids and nucellar clones. Genetic analyses indicated that tolerance was controlled by at least two loci designated here as Az and t interacting in dominant-recessive epistasis. Genotypes Az__ __ __ and __ __ tt were tolerant while azaz T__ was intolerant. The intolerant Azeda was azaz TT, the tolerant rootstocks Sunki and Cravo were Azaz tt and the Trifoliata was Azaz TT. The different degrees of intolerance seen in some hybrids may reflect the inability of segregating modifiers from parental clones to overcome the epistatic interaction that controls the major tolerance reaction.

  9. Inheritance and heritability of resistance to citrus leprosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastianel, Marinês; de Oliveira, Antonio Carlos; Cristofani, Mariângela; Filho, Oliveiro Guerreiro; Freitas-Astúa, Juliana; Rodrigues, Vandeclei; Astúa-Monge, Gustavo; Machado, Marcos Antônio

    2006-10-01

    ABSTRACT The genetic inheritance of resistance to leprosis, the most important viral disease of citrus in Brazil, was characterized through the phenotypic assessment of 143 hybrids resulting from crosses between tangor 'Murcott' (Citrus sinensis x C. reticulata) and sweet orange 'Pêra' (C. sinensis), considered to be resistant and susceptible to the disease, respectively. All plants were grafted onto Rangpur lime (C. limonia) and inoculated with Citrus leprosis virus, cytoplasmic type through the infestation with viruliferous mites, Brevipalpus phoenicis. The experiments were arranged in a completely randomized block design with 10 replicates. Incidence and severity of the disease in leaves and stems as well as plant growth parameters (plant height and stem diameter) were recorded for 3 years after the infestation with the viruliferous mites. The average values of all variables were analyzed using principal component analysis, discriminant factorial analysis, estimation of the clonal repeatability coefficients, and frequency of the distributions of the average values for each measured variable. The principal component analysis resulted in the identification of at least two groups with resistance and susceptibility to leprosis, respectively. About 99% of all hybrids were correctly classified according to the discriminant factorial analysis. The broad-sense heritability coefficients for characteristics associated with incidence and severity of leprosis ranged from 0.88 to 0.96. The data suggest that the inheritance of resistance to leprosis may be controlled by only a few genes.

  10. Antifungal Edible Coatings for Fresh Citrus Fruit: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lluís Palou

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available According to their origin, major postharvest losses of citrus fruit are caused by weight loss, fungal diseases, physiological disorders, and quarantine pests. Cold storage and postharvest treatments with conventional chemical fungicides, synthetic waxes, or combinations of them are commonly used to minimize postharvest losses. However, the repeated application of these treatments has led to important problems such as health and environmental issues associated with fungicide residues or waxes containing ammoniacal compounds, or the proliferation of resistant pathogenic fungal strains. There is, therefore, an increasing need to find non-polluting alternatives to be used as part of integrated disease management (IDM programs for preservation of fresh citrus fruit. Among them, the development of novel natural edible films and coatings with antimicrobial properties is a technological challenge for the industry and a very active research field worldwide. Chitosan and other edible coatings formulated by adding antifungal agents to composite emulsions based on polysaccharides or proteins and lipids are reviewed in this article. The most important antifungal ingredients are selected for their ability to control major citrus postharvest diseases like green and blue molds, caused by Penicillium digitatum and Penicillium italicum, respectively, and include low-toxicity or natural chemicals such as food additives, generally recognized as safe (GRAS compounds, plant extracts, or essential oils, and biological control agents such as some antagonistic strains of yeasts or bacteria.

  11. Shallow irradiation of Citrus Unshiu by cathod ray, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takano, Hiroyuki; Kawashima, Koji; Umeda, Keiji

    1978-01-01

    The effect of 150 Krad cathode ray irradiation on the shelf life and quality of ''Citrus Unshiu'' was investigated. Citrus Unshiu (Japanese mandarin orange ''Satsuma'') were kept at 5 0 C for 2 months without pretreatment and irradiated. Both irradiated and non-irradiated samples were stored in the special storage boxes in which temperature, humidity and sterile air circulation were controlled. After 44 days, the percentage of spoiled oranges in irradiated and non-irradiated samples stored at 8 0 C were 57.5% and 64% respectively, on the other hand when stored at 3 0 C the percentage were 26% and 51% respectively. Rate of spoilage was significantly lower in the irradiated samples than non-irradiated ones. Irradiated effect on the shelf life extension was more conspicuous when the storage temperature was kept at 3 0 C. By the sensory examination, any difference for taste and flavor between irradiated and non-irradiated samples was not detected. The taste and flavor of the oranges stored at 8 0 C changed worse after long time storage but when stored at 3 0 C, such tendency was not observed. Undesirable odor and flavor were not detected by the panel with the irradiated samples in this experiment. The results showed that shelf life of the ''Citrus Unshiu'' could be extended by the combination of irradiation with 150 Krad cathode ray and storage at 3 0 C. (auth.)

  12. RESISTANCE TO ALTERNARIA BROWN SPOT OF NEW CITRUS HYBRIDS

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    KELLY APARECIDA FERNANDES DE CAMPOS

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Alternaria brown spot (ABS disease is caused by the fungus of Alternaria alternata f. sp. citri, which causes injury in leaves, branches and fruits of citrus. The action of the pathogen is directly related to the presence of toxin receptors in susceptible genotypes. The objective of this study was to characterize a population of citrus hybrids obtained from controlled crosses between Pêra de Abril sweet orange and the hybrid of Murcott tangor x Pêra sweet orange (TM x LP 163 for response to ABS through the in vitro inoculation of fungal spores in young detached leaves. The fungus was isolated from the lesions of Murcott tangor fruits that exhibited ABS symptoms. Two hundred thirty-five hybrids were evaluated, and 70 (30% showed different levels of disease symptoms on detached leaves after 72 hours of inoculation with the fungus, and 165 (70% were asymptomatic. The frequency of segregation observed (165R:70S and high level of heritability (h2g = 0.91 suggest that few genes may be involved in controlling the inheritance of ABS resistance in citrus.

  13. Synergy and Other Interactions between Polymethoxyflavones from Citrus Byproducts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benito F. García

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The citrus by-products released from citrus processing plants may contain high levels of potentially bioactive compounds such as flavonoids, which are a widely distributed group of polyphenolic compounds with health-related properties based on their antioxidant activity. In the study reported here, the potential bioactivities and antioxidant activities of extracts, fractions and compounds from citrus by-products were evaluated along with the chemical interactions of binary mixtures of compounds and complex mixtures. The bioactivities and interactions were evaluated in wheat coleoptile bioassays and the antioxidant activity was evaluated by the al DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhdrazyl radical radical scavenging assay. The extracts, fractions and most of the isolated compounds (mainly polymethoxyflavones showed high activity in the wheat coleoptile bioassay. However, the antioxidant activity was not consistently high, except in the acetone extract fractions. Moreover, a study of the interactions with binary mixtures of polymethoxyflavones showed the occurrence of synergistic effects. The complex mixtures of fractions composed mainly of polymethoxyflavones caused a synergistic effect when it was added to a bioactive compound such as anethole. The results reported here highlight a new application for the wheat coleoptile bioassay as a quick tool to detect potential synergistic effects in compounds or mixtures.

  14. Effect of irradiation as quarantine treatment on citrus fruit quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betancurt, Pablo; Montalban, Antonio; Arcia, Patricia; Borthagaray, Maria D.; Curutchet, Ana; Pica, Leticia; Soria, Alejandra; Abreu, Anibal V.; Ares, M. Ines

    2009-01-01

    Gamma radiations have been used to improve sanitation treatments without significant effects on fresh fruit quality. The objective of this work was to evaluate the fruit quality characteristics of citrus variety Valencia (Valencia Late), main variety produced and exported in Uruguay. All samples were stored at 3-5 deg C, 80% RH, for 20 and 40 days. Irradiation doses used were 0,35 kGy min. and 0,80 kGy max. (doses that also eliminate the fruit fly). Irradiation experiments were conducted using irradiation equipment from Atomic Center (CAE), year 1968, Co60 source, 800.000 Ci. The effects of irradiation on sensory qualities and physical characteristics were studied. The attributes evaluated were visual appearance (1- 4 hedonic scale, expert), overall acceptance (1-9 hedonic scale, consumers), texture (TAB Stevens, speed: 2m/s, distance: 2mm), yield of juice and colour (Hunter values). In general, no significant changes in these parameters were observed after irradiation. Quality was not significantly affected by doses usually applied to decrease the viability of pathogen that cause citrus Scab. This is an important contribution for the protocols that would allow citrus fruit exportation. (author)

  15. In silico prediction of gene expression patterns in Citrus flavedo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irving J. Berger

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Out of the 18,942 flavedo expressed sequences (clusters plus singletons in Citrus sinensis from the Citrus EST Project (CitEST, 25 were statistically supported to be differentially expressed in this tissue after a double in silico hybridization strategy against leaf-, flower-, and bark-derived ESTs. Five of them, two terpene synthases and three O-methyltransferases, are absent in the other citrus tissues with concomitant 2x2 statistics, supporting the hypothesis that they are putative flavedo-specific expressed sequences. The pattern of these differentially expressed sequences during fruit development suggests that most of them are developmentally regulated. Some expressed gene products, including a putative germin-like protein highly expressed in flavedo, are shown to be promising candidates for further characterization. In addition to promoter seeking, this kind of analysis can lead to gene discovery, tissue-specific and tissue-enriched expression pattern predictions (as shown herein and can also be adopted as an in silico first, and probably reliable approach, for detecting expression profiles from EST sequencing efforts before experimental validation is available or for heuristically guiding that validation.

  16. [Biological characteristics of the egg phase of citrus root weevils].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guedes, Jerson V C; Parra, José R P

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this work was to study some characteristics of the egg phase of three species of citrus root weevils. The insects were collected from citrus plants in Itapetininga, SP, and brought to the Laboratório de Biologia de Insetos of ESALQ/USP, in Piracicaba, SP, where the species Naupactus cervinus (Boheman), Naupactus versatilis (Hustache) and Parapantomorus fluctuosus (Boheman) were kept. Duration and viability of the egg phase were evaluated, and the lower temperature threshold and thermal constant (K) were calculated for these species. The species of citrus root weevils showed different duration of egg phases. The egg phase ranged from 40.4 to 13.8 N. cervinus, from 38.7 to 20.0 days for N. versatilis, and from 35.0 to 13.8 days for P. fluctuosus, depending upon temperature. The temperature thresholds of this stage were 8.1, 8.3, and 9.9 masculineC at thermal constant was 385.7, 397.7 and 294.1 degree-days, for N. cervinus, N. versatilis and P. fluctuosus respectively. The duration of the egg phases of N. cervinus and N. versatilis were similar at the same temperatures and P. fluctuosus had a faster development than Naupactus spp. in all temperatures tested.

  17. Risk assessment of repetitive movements in the citrus fruit industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proto, A R; Zimbalatti, G

    2010-10-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders are injuries of the muscles, nerves, tendons, ligaments, joints, cartilage, or spinal discs and are often classified as soft tissue injuries. They are the result of chronic or gradual development and are not caused by acute incidents such as slips, trips, or falls. The significance of this phenomenon prompted us to carry out a broader study of pathologies attributable to repetitive movements in the upper limbs within the citrus growing industry. Calabria, a very important region for citrus fruit growing in Italy, was chosen as the study area. The study analyzed the risks of repetitive movements for 180 workers on 35 different farms using the OCRA (Occupational Repetitive Actions) checklist method By analyzing the scores obtained in the different work phases, it was possible to determine the tasks that incur more risk in the citrus fruit industry. The OCRA checklist considers all the repetitive tasks involved in a complex job and estimates the level of exposure to each worker. In support of the specific aims of the present study, it is possible to identify a series of working conditions for which the level of risk may be reasonably estimated and for which it is possible to adopt a checklist system. The results of this study suggest that there must be a significant increase in the use of effective ergonomic interventions in the workplace in order to attain reductions in the number of local musculoskeletal complaints.

  18. CITRUS AS A COMPONENT OF THE MEDITERRANEAN DIET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amilcar Duarte

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Citrus are native to southeastern Asia, but are present in the Mediterranean basin for centuries. This group of species has reached great importance in some of the Mediterranean countries and, in the case of orange, mandarin and lemon trees, they found here soil and climatic conditions which allows them to achieve a high level of fruit quality, even better than in the regions where they came from. Citrus fruits are present in the diet of the peoples living on the Mediterranean basin, at least since the time of the Roman Empire. In the 20th century they became the main crop in various agricultural areas of the Mediterranean, playing an important role in the landscape, in the diet of the overall population, and also in international trade. They are present in the gardens of palaces and monasteries, but also in the courtyards and orchards of the poorest families. Their fruits are not only a refreshing dessert, but also a condiment, or even a major component of many dishes. Citrus fruits have well-documented nutritional and health benefits. They can actually help prevent and cure some diseases and, above all, they are essential in a balanced and tasty diet.

  19. Rapid screening and quantification of major organic acids in citrus fruits and their bioactivity studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ranjana; Verma, Sarika; Rana, Shalika; Rana, Ajay

    2018-04-01

    Organic acids (OAs) are small non-volatile molecules with widespread usage in processed foods, feeds and instant beverages. The prime aim of this study was to explore major OAs in local citrus fruits ( Citrus limetta , Citrus aurantifolia , Citrus nobilis , Citrus karna , Citrus medica , Citrus ichangensis and Citrus aurantium ) and assessment of their bioactivities. A RP-HPLC-DAD method was developed using buffer free solvent system for rapid detection and quantification of major OAs from citrus fruits and derived products. Method validation studies showed good linear calibration curve (0.985-0.998) for all OAs. The values of %RSD ranged between 0.0001-1.129 and 0.142-1.941 for interday and intraday variability respectively. The limit of detection and limit of quantification values for different OAs were ranged between 1.5-12 and 5-40 µg mL -1 . The juice of above mentioned citrus fruit cultivars were assessed for OAs, total phenolics, free radical scavenging antioxidants and their antimicrobial potential against selected bacterial and fungal strains. The results showed variable contents of phenolics [0.28 ± 0.001-1.17 ± 0.014 mg (GAE) mL -1 ] and antioxidant compounds (1.26 ± 0.009-2.84 ± 0.006 mg of trolox equivalents mL -1 ) in all juice samples besides significant antifungal activity against C. albicans and A. niger strains. However, in case of antibacterial activity, only C. aurantifolia showed inhibitory effects against selected strains. It was found that citrus fruits have immense potential for their utilization as economic source of natural OAs and development of value added products, beverages and bio-preservatives.

  20. Expression of Bacillus thuringiensis cytolytic toxin (Cyt2Ca1) in citrus roots to control Diaprepes abbreviatus larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaprepes abbreviatus (L.) is an important pest of citrus in the USA. Currently, no effective management strategies of Diaprepes abbreviatus exist in citriculture. To protect citrus against Diaprepes abbreviatus a transgenic citrus rootstock expressing Bacillus thuringiensis Cyt2Ca1, an insect toxin...

  1. Behavioral responses of male Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae) to mating communication signals from vibration traps in citrus (Sapindales: Rutaceae) trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama, vectors the bacterium causing citrus greening disease, which has devastated citrus production worldwide wherever it has been introduced. To help monitor and target D citri populations in commercial groves, thereby facilitating more effective manag...

  2. Proteomics analysis reveals novel host molecular mechanisms associated with thermotherapy of ‘Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus’-infected citrus plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citrus huanglongbing (HLB) is the most devastating disease of citrus plants, and longer-term measures for controlling the disease via breeding or genetic engineering are hampered by the fact that all cultivated citrus species are susceptible to the disease. However, the degree of HLB susceptibility ...

  3. Temporal occurrence and niche preferences of Phytophthora species causing brown rot of citrus in the Central Valley of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown rot of citrus fruits is caused by several species of Phytophthora and is currently of serious concern for the California citrus industry. Two species, P. syringae and P. hibernalis, are quarantine pathogens in China, a major export market for California citrus. To maintain trade and estimate t...

  4. Localized autoinoculation and dissemination of Isaria fumosorosea for control of the Asian citrus psyllid in South Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama, vectors the causal organism of citrus greening disease. Integrated strategies are needed to control D. citri in south Texas. Control approaches involving entomopathogenic fungi may be useful on ornamental and abandoned citrus and other rutaceous...

  5. Citrus Essential Oil of Nigeria Part IV: Volatile Constituents of Leaf Oils of Mandarins (Citrus Reticulata Blanco) From Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Adeleke A. Kasali; Oladipupo A. Lawal; Olatunji T. F. Abanikannda; Abayomi A. Olaniyan; William N. Setzer

    2010-01-01

    The chemical composition of hydrodistilled oils obtained from the leaves of six Citrus reticulata Blanco (mandarin) cultivars grown in Nigeria were examined by GC and GC/MS, the result of their chemical composition were further submitted to cluster analysis. Fifty seven constituents were characterized accounting for 88.2 - 96.7% of the total oils. Sabinene, g -terpinene, P-cymene, d -3-carene and (E)- b -ocimene were observed in great variability in all the oils. Other constituents include li...

  6. Phenolic Compounds Characterization and Biological Activities of Citrus aurantium Bloom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armin Oskoueian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Citrus plants are known to possess beneficial biological activities for human health. In addition, ethnopharmacological application of plants is a good tool to explore their bioactivities and active compounds. This research was carried out to evaluate the phenolic and flavonoid analysis, antioxidant properties, anti inflammatory and anti cancer activity of Citrus aurantium bloom. The total phenolics and flavonoids results revealed that methanolic extract contained high total phenolics and flavonoids compared to ethanolic and boiling water extracts. The obtained total phenolics value for methanolic Citrus aurantium bloom extract was 4.55 ± 0.05 mg gallic acid equivalent (GAE/g dry weight (DW, and for total flavonoids it was 3.83 ± 0.05 mg rutin equivalent/g DW. In addition, the RP-HPLC analyses of phenolics and flavonoids indicated the presence of gallic acid, pyrogallol, syringic acid, caffeic acid, rutin, quercetin and naringin as bioactive compounds. The antioxidant activity of Citrus aurantium bloom were examined by the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH assay and the ferric reducing/antioxidant potential (FRAP. The free radical scavenging and ferric reducing power activities were higher for the methanolic extract of Citrus aurantium bloom at a concentration of 300 μg/mL, with values of 55.3% and 51.7%, respectively, as compared to the corresponding boiling water and ethanolic extracts, but the activities were lower than those of antioxidant standards such as BHT and α-tocopherol. Furthermore, the anti-inflammatory result of methanolic extract showed appreciable reduction in nitric oxide production of stimulated RAW 264.7 cells at the presence of plant extract. Apart from that, the anticancer activity of the methanolic extract was investigated in vitro against human cancer cell lines (MCF-7; MDA-MB-231, human colon adenocarcinoma (HT-29 and Chang cell as a normal human hepatocyte. The obtained result demonstrated the moderate to

  7. Breeding, genetic and genomic of citrus for disease resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos A. Machado

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Although the citriculture is one of the most important economic activities in Brazil, it is based on a small number of varieties. This fact has contributed for the vulnerability of the culture regarding the phytosanitary problems. A higher number of varieties/genotypes with potential for commercial growing, either for the industry or fresh market, has been one of the main objectives of citrus breeding programs. The genetic breeding of citrus has improved, in the last decades, due to the possibility of an association between biotechnological tools and classical methods of breeding. The use of molecular markers for early selection of zygotic seedlings from controlled crosses resulted in the possibility of selection of a high number of new combination and, as a consequence, the establishment of a great number of hybrids in field experiments. The faster new tools are incorporated in the program, the faster is possibility to reach new genotypes that can be tested as a new variety. Good traits should be kept or incorporate, whereas bad traits have to be excluded or minimized in the new genotype. Scion and rootstock can not be considered separately, and graft compatibility, fruit quality and productivity are essential traits to be evaluated in the last stages of the program. The mapping of QTLs has favored breeding programs of several perennial species and in citrus it was possible to map several characteristics with qualitative and quantitative inheritance. The existence of linkage maps and QTLs already mapped, the development of EST and BAC library and the sequencing of the Citrus complete genome altogether make very demanding and urgent the exploration of such data to launch a wider genetic study of citrus. The rising of information on genome of several organisms has opened new approaches looking for integration between breeding, genetic and genome. Genome assisted selection (GAS involves more than gene or complete genome sequencing and is becoming

  8. Phenolic compounds characterization and biological activities of Citrus aurantium bloom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Ehsan; Oskoueian, Ehsan; Hendra, Rudi; Oskoueian, Armin; Jaafar, Hawa Z E

    2012-01-30

    Citrus plants are known to possess beneficial biological activities for human health. In addition, ethnopharmacological application of plants is a good tool to explore their bioactivities and active compounds. This research was carried out to evaluate the phenolic and flavonoid analysis, antioxidant properties, anti inflammatory and anti cancer activity of Citrus aurantium bloom. The total phenolics and flavonoids results revealed that methanolic extract contained high total phenolics and flavonoids compared to ethanolic and boiling water extracts. The obtained total phenolics value for methanolic Citrus aurantium bloom extract was 4.55 ± 0.05 mg gallic acid equivalent (GAE)/g dry weight (DW), and for total flavonoids it was 3.83 ± 0.05 mg rutin equivalent/g DW. In addition, the RP-HPLC analyses of phenolics and flavonoids indicated the presence of gallic acid, pyrogallol, syringic acid, caffeic acid, rutin, quercetin and naringin as bioactive compounds. The antioxidant activity of Citrus aurantium bloom were examined by the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH) assay and the ferric reducing/antioxidant potential (FRAP). The free radical scavenging and ferric reducing power activities were higher for the methanolic extract of Citrus aurantium bloom at a concentration of 300 μg/mL, with values of 55.3% and 51.7%, respectively, as compared to the corresponding boiling water and ethanolic extracts, but the activities were lower than those of antioxidant standards such as BHT and α-tocopherol. Furthermore, the anti-inflammatory result of methanolic extract showed appreciable reduction in nitric oxide production of stimulated RAW 264.7 cells at the presence of plant extract. Apart from that, the anticancer activity of the methanolic extract was investigated in vitro against human cancer cell lines (MCF-7; MDA-MB-231), human colon adenocarcinoma (HT-29) and Chang cell as a normal human hepatocyte. The obtained result demonstrated the moderate to appreciable

  9. Molecular Detection of Spiroplasma Citri Associated with Stubborn Disease in Citrus Orchards in Syria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiroplasma citri, a phloem-limited pathogen, causes citrus stubborn disease (CSD) and can be transmitted from plant to plant by several species of phloem-feeding leafhoppers. CSD is an important disorder in certain warm and arid citrus-growing areas, and its agent has been recorded from several Med...

  10. Greenhouse investigations on the effect of guava on infestations of Asian citrus psyllid in grapefruit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reports from Vietnam indicate interplanting guava with citrus dramatically reduces infestations of Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri). We therefore conducted greenhouse studies to assess the effect of different guava cultivars on adult psyllids. The effects of cotton and tomato were also evalu...

  11. Deciphering the bacterial microbiome in huanglongbing-affected citrus treated with thermotherapy and sulfonamide antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huanglongbing (HLB) is a serious citrus disease that threatens the citrus industry. In previous studies, sulfonamide antibiotics and heat treatment suppressed ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ (Las), but did not completely eliminate the Las. Furthermore, there are few reports studying the bacteria...

  12. Endophytic and pathogenic Phyllosticta species, with reference to those associated with Citrus Black Spot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glienke, C.; Pereira, O.L.; Stringari, D.; Fabris, J.; Kava-Cordeiro, V.; Galli-Terasawa, L.; Cunnington, J.; Shivas, R.G.; Groenewald, J.Z.; Crous, P.W.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the identity and genetic diversity of more than 100 isolates belonging to Phyllosticta (teleomorph Guignardia), with particular emphasis on Phyllosticta citricarpa and Guignardia mangiferae s.l. occurring on Citrus. Phyllosticta citricarpa is the causal agent of Citrus Black Spot and

  13. Resistance of sweet orange Pera (Citrus sinensis) genotypes to Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri under field conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citrus canker control is based on protection measures and eradication of plants infected with Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri. Although these measures show satisfactory results, the use of resistant genotypes is an important alternative for citrus canker control. The aim of this study was to evaluate...

  14. Systemic translocation and metabolism of 14C-metalaxyl in citrus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musumeci, M.R.; Ruegg, E.F.

    1984-01-01

    Systemic uptake and translocation of 14 C-metalaxyl to citrus seedlings from soils (Humic Gley and Yellow Red Latosol) with different physical - chemical properties are studied. Seedlings of Citrus limonia are treated with 14 C-metalaxyl. (M.A.C.) [pt

  15. Citrus (Rutaceae): a review of recent advances in etymology, systematics and medical applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mabberley, D.J.

    2004-01-01

    The naming, introduction and classification of citrus crops and their allies is outlined. Traditional medicinal use and ‘Western’ applications in the treatment of scurvy and obesity, the prevention of AIDS, and in contraception is reviewed. Names for the commercially significant citrangequat (Citrus

  16. Volatile composition of the peel and leaf essential oils of Citrus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    enoh

    2012-03-20

    Mar 20, 2012 ... perfume and household cleaners for its fragrance. Recently, interest has shifted from volatile oil of the fruit to that of the Citrus leaves that are rich in limonene, and leaf oil has become a new source of Citrus essential oil because the leaves grow much faster than the fruits and are available all year long ...

  17. Monitoring Citrus Soil Moisture and Nutrients Using an IoT Based System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueyan Zhang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Chongqing mountain citrus orchard is one of the main origins of Chinese citrus. Its planting terrain is complex and soil parent material is diverse. Currently, the citrus fertilization, irrigation and other management processes still have great blindness. They usually use the same pattern and the same formula rather than considering the orchard terrain features, soil differences, species characteristics and the state of tree growth. With the help of the ZigBee technology, artificial intelligence and decision support technology, this paper has developed the research on the application technology of agricultural Internet of Things for real-time monitoring of citrus soil moisture and nutrients as well as the research on the integration of fertilization and irrigation decision support system. Some achievements were obtained including single-point multi-layer citrus soil temperature and humidity detection wireless sensor nodes and citrus precision fertilization and irrigation management decision support system. They were applied in citrus base in the Three Gorges Reservoir Area. The results showed that the system could help the grower to scientifically fertilize or irrigate, improve the precision operation level of citrus production, reduce the labor cost and reduce the pollution caused by chemical fertilizer.

  18. Monitoring Citrus Soil Moisture and Nutrients Using an IoT Based System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xueyan; Zhang, Jianwu; Li, Lin; Zhang, Yuzhu; Yang, Guocai

    2017-01-01

    Chongqing mountain citrus orchard is one of the main origins of Chinese citrus. Its planting terrain is complex and soil parent material is diverse. Currently, the citrus fertilization, irrigation and other management processes still have great blindness. They usually use the same pattern and the same formula rather than considering the orchard terrain features, soil differences, species characteristics and the state of tree growth. With the help of the ZigBee technology, artificial intelligence and decision support technology, this paper has developed the research on the application technology of agricultural Internet of Things for real-time monitoring of citrus soil moisture and nutrients as well as the research on the integration of fertilization and irrigation decision support system. Some achievements were obtained including single-point multi-layer citrus soil temperature and humidity detection wireless sensor nodes and citrus precision fertilization and irrigation management decision support system. They were applied in citrus base in the Three Gorges Reservoir Area. The results showed that the system could help the grower to scientifically fertilize or irrigate, improve the precision operation level of citrus production, reduce the labor cost and reduce the pollution caused by chemical fertilizer. PMID:28241488

  19. The impact of agricultural management on selected soil properties in citrus orchards in Eastern Spain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hondebrink, M.A.; Cammeraat, L.H.; Cerda Bolinches, Artemio

    2017-01-01

    The agricultural management of citrus orchards is changing from flood irrigated managed orchards to drip irrigated organic managed orchards. Eastern Spain is the oldest and largest European producer of citrus, and is representative of the environmental changes triggered by innovations in orchard

  20. Insecticide sprays, natural enemy assemblages and predation on Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monzo, C; Qureshi, J A; Stansly, P A

    2014-10-01

    The Asian citrus psyllid (ACP), Diaphorina citri Kuwayama is considered a key citrus pest due to its role as vector of 'huanglongbing' (HLB) or citrus greening, probably the most economically damaging disease of citrus. Insecticidal control of the vector is still considered a cornerstone of HLB management to prevent infection and to reduce reinoculation of infected trees. The severity of HLB has driven implementation of intensive insecticide programs against ACP with unknown side effects on beneficial arthropod fauna in citrus agroecosystems. We evaluated effects of calendar sprays directed against this pest on natural enemy assemblages and used exclusion to estimate mortality they imposed on ACP populations in citrus groves. Predator exclusion techniques were used on nascent colonies of D. citri in replicated large untreated and sprayed plots of citrus during the four major flushing periods over 2 years. Population of spiders, arboreal ants and ladybeetles were independently assessed. Monthly sprays of recommended insecticides for control of ACP, adversely affected natural enemy populations resulting in reduced predation on ACP immature stages, especially during the critical late winter/early spring flush. Consequently, projected growth rates of the ACP population were greatest where natural enemies had been adversely affected by insecticides. Whereas, this result does not obviate the need for insecticidal control of ACP, it does indicate that even a selective regimen of sprays can impose as yet undetermined costs in terms of reduced biological control of this and probably other citrus pests.

  1. Citrus genebank collections: International collaboration opportunities between the U.S. and Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citrus germplasm is conserved in genebanks at sites around the world to provide genetic resources for breeding and research programs. The value of genebank collections is particularly evident as diseases and climate change threaten citrus production areas. We provide historical, inventory, and maint...

  2. Citric acid compounds of tangerines peel extract (Citrus reticulata) as potential materials teeth whitening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratiwi, F.; Tinata, J. K.; Prakasa, A. W.; Istiqomah; Hartini, E.; Isworo, S.

    2017-04-01

    Peel of citrus fruit (Citrus reticulata) has a variety of possible chemical compounds that may serve as a potential whitening teeth. This research is conducted on a laboratory scale; therefore, it needs to be developed on an application scale. A quasi-experimental was employed in this study. Citric acid extraction was carried out on the type of Sweet Orange (Citrus Aurantium L), Tangerine (Citrus Reticulata Blanco or Citrus Nobilis), Pomelo (Citrus Maxima Merr, Citrus grandis Osbeck), and Lemon (Citrus Limon Linn). Citric acid’s ability test as teeth whitener was performed on premolar teeth with concentrations of 2.5%, 5%, and 10%. The experiments were replicated in 3 times, and teeth whiteness level was measured using Shade Guide VITA Classical. The result of this research showed that citric acid in every kind of orange peel with various concentration has different abilities on whitening teeth. The highest colour level obtained from Tangerine peel’s citric acid concentration of 5%. Orange peel extract has the best teeth whitening abilities tested by the method of Gass Chromatography to know the active ingredients.

  3. Disease stress detection on citrus using a leaf optical model and field spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badnakhe, Mrunalini R.; Durbha, Surya; Adinarayana, J.

    2015-10-01

    As citrus is progressively contributing to horticultural production, wealth and economy of a country, it is necessary to understand the factors impacting citrus production. Gummosis is one of the most serious diseases causing considerable loss of overall citrus production and yield quality. A qualitative and quantitative analysis of citrus leaf biochemical properties are necessary to monitor the crop health, disease /pest stress and production. Total leaf chlorophyll content (Cab) represents one of the key biochemical factors which contributes in water, carbon, and energy exchange processes. Photosynthesis process in citrus will be disturbed as gummosis disease life cycle progresses. It is important to study Cab to evaluate the photosynthesis rate and disease stress. In this study the potential of Radiative Transfer (RT) PROSPECT model to retrieve Cab in citrus orchards was undertaken at different sites. The main goal is to evaluate the relationship between Cab and gummosis disease stress for citrus at various phenological stages. Inversion of PROSPECT model on measured hyperspectral data is carried out to extract the leaf level parameters influencing the disease. This model was inverted with the ground truth hyperspectral reading. The testing was separately initiated for healthy and infected plant leaves. This can lead to understand the disease stress on citrus leaves. For accuracy, raw spectra are filtered and processed which is an input parameter for Inversion PROSPECT model. Here, retrieved Cab content was correlated with gummosis disease stress in terms of oozing with R2 = 0.6021 and RMSE= 0.481272.

  4. Cryopreservation of Citrus seeds via dehydration and direct immersion in liquid nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citrus germplasm is conventionally conserved in clonal orchards and greenhouses, where it is subjected to potential losses due to pests, diseases and climatic hazards. In recent years, many studies reported preservation of germplasm in the genus Citrus. As a result, effective freezing protocols have...

  5. A comparison of the constituents of essential oils of Citrus limon peel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Essential oils of lime (Citrus aurantifolia) whole fruits and lemon (Citrus limon) peel from Nigeria have been analysed by combined GC and GC-MS. Both oils were of similar composition, but with differences in yields of components. The oils are composed largely of monoterpene hydrocarbons (C. aurantifolia 71.6 %; C.

  6. In vitro plant regeneration in rough lemon ( Citrus jambhiri Lush) by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was aimed to optimize the organogenesis in rough lemon (Citrus jambhiri Lush), an important citrus rootstock of India. Organogenesis was induced in epicotyl segments of rough lemon seedlings. Three important factors influencing organogenesis in vitro viz. hormone combination, cut modes and photoperiod ...

  7. Novel development of a lateral flow immunoassay for rapid field detection of citrus tristeza virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maintenance of virus-free citrus in nurseries and orchards is essential to control spread of aphid-borne Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) in California. A lateral flow assay (LFA) test strip with a polyclonal antiserum made from virus particles produced in Nicotiana benthamiana plants inoculated with an ...

  8. Reduced susceptibility to Xanthomonas citri in transgenic citrus expressing the FLS2 receptor from Nicotiana benthamiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overexpression of plant pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) by genetic engineering provides a novel approach to enhance plant immunity and broad-spectrum disease resistance. The citrus canker disease associated with Xanthomonas citri is one of the important diseases damaging citrus production world...

  9. Broad sprectrum potential of Isaria fumosorosea on insect pests of citrus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Use of entomopathogenic fungi, Isaria fumosorosea, Ifr, =Paecilomyces fumosoroseus, successfully increased insect pest mortality. Spraying the Ifr containing product, PFR97 TM, on citrus seedlings was used to screen efficacy for the management of Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri; glassy-winge...

  10. Flutuação populacional de Phyllocnistis citrella Stainton em Citrus deliciosa e no híbrido Murcott Citrus sinensis x Citrus reticulata Phyllocnistis citrella Stainton population fluctuation in Citrus deliciosa and Murcott hybrid Citrus sinensis x Citrus reticulata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Ramos de Jesus

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo desta pesquisa foi avaliar a dinâmica populacional de Phyllocnistis citrella Stainton, (Lepidoptera: Gracillariidae, o minador-dos-citros, em pomares de tangerineira Citrus deliciosa Tenore variedade Montenegrina e de tangoreiro híbrido "Murcott" Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck X Citrus reticulata Blanco, com manejo orgânico, em Montenegro (29° 68'S e 51° 46'O, Rio Grande do Sul. Foram realizadas amostragens quinzenais de julho de 2001 a junho de 2003. Os brotos coletados foram examinados em laboratório e submetidos à análise do número de folhas por broto, a da presença ou ausência de minas, do número de minas, dos ovos, das larvas e das pupas de P. citrella. Em ambos os pomares não houve registro de minas de P. citrella no primeiro fluxo de brotação, de agosto a outubro. No ano I, as maiores densidades de minas foram registradas em meados de novembro, início de janeiro e início de abril, em ambos os pomares. No ano II, constataram-se as maiores densidades de minas e larvas em janeiro e em abril, em C. deliciosa, e de dezembro a março em "Murcott". Embora o número médio de brotos registrado tenha sido sempre maior em C. deliciosa, a colonização e o estabelecimento do minador-dos-citros seguiram o mesmo padrão em ambos os pomares. A temperatura mínima e média e a umidade relativa do ar foram os fatores abióticos que apresentaram maior influência no número de minas e de larvas de P. citrella.To evaluate the population dynamics of Phyllocnistis citrella Stainton, (Lepidoptera: Gracillariidae, the citrus leafminer, in tangerine Citrus deliciosa Tenore var. Montenegrina and tangor 'Murcott' Citrus sinensis L Osbeck X Citrus reticulata Blanco in organically managed orchards, in Montenegro (29° 68'S e 51° 46'W, RS, fortnightly samples were carried out from July 2001 to June 2003. Sampled shoots were examined in the lab and the number of leaves, presence or absence of mines and the number of mines, eggs, larvae and

  11. Schistosomicidal Effects of the Essential Oils of Citrus limonia and Citrus reticulata Against Schistosoma mansoni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Moara H G; Fracarolli, Letícia; Vieira, Tatiana M; Dias, Herbert J; Cruz, Michele G; Deus, Cássia C H; Nicolella, Heloiza D; Stefani, Ricardo; Rodrigues, Vanderlei; Tavares, Denise C; Magalhães, Lizandra G; Crotti, Antônio E M

    2017-01-01

    We report the in vitro schistosomicidal effects of the essential oil obtained from Citrus limonia leaves (CL-EO) and C. reticulata fruit peels (CR-EO), cultivated in Brazil, against Schistosoma mansoni worms. Limonene (29.9%), β-pinene (12.0%), sabinene (9.0%), citronellal (9.0%), and citronellol (5.8%) are the major constituents of CL-EO; limonene (26.5%), γ-terpinene (17.2%), linalool (11.1%), octanal (8.0%), myrcene (6.2%), and capraldehyde (3.9%) predominate in CR-EO. CL-EO displayed moderate lethal concentration 50% (LC 50 ) of 81.7 and 38.9 μg/ml against male and female worms at 24 and 72 h, respectively. At concentrations of 25 and 100 μg/ml, CL-EO separated between 50 and 75% of the coupled worm pairs during the evaluated period. CR-EO presented moderate LC 50 of 81.7 μg/ml against male and female worms at 24 and 72 h. However, this oil separated coupled worm pairs more effectively than CL-EO and displayed lower cytotoxicity to GM07492-A cells (IC 50 = 987.7 ± 88.9 μg/ml) as compared to CL-EO (IC 50 = 187.8 ± 2.9 μg/ml). The enantiomers (+)-(R)-limonene and (-)-(S)-limonene did not affect S. mansoni adult worm pairs significantly. Taken together, these data indicate that CL-EO and CR-EO exhibit moderate in vitro schistosomicidal activity against adult S. mansoni worms. © 2017 Wiley-VHCA AG, Zurich, Switzerland.

  12. [Study on heavy metals in growing area soils and young fruit of Citrus grandis 'Tomentosa'].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jihongi; Lin, Lanwen; Tan, Jun; Lin, Li; Huang, Lanzhen; Liao, Guanrong

    2005-05-01

    To determine the status of heavy metals contamination in growing area soils and young fruits of Citrus grandis. Application of Nemerow's index for heavy metals assessment of soil and young fruit of Citrus grandis, as well as according to national environmental quality standard for soils and green trade standards of importing & exporting medicinal plants & preparations. The heavy metals content of most of the growing area soils of Citrus grandis rates as first, and of the rest ones rates as second. The heavy metals content in young fruits of Citrus grandis is within the limitation of quantity of criteria. The environmental quality of growing area soils of Citrus grandis in Huazhou City is totally in good.

  13. Occurrence of free fatty acids in the phloem sap of different citrus varieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valim, Maria Filomena; Killiny, Nabil

    2017-06-03

    Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus is a phloem restricted bacterium that causes citrus greening disease or huanglongbing (HLB), a major treat to commercial citrus production in Florida. It is transmitted by the Asian citrus psyllid, a phloem sap-feeding insect. Studies conducted on the composition of citrus phloem sap revealed the presence amino acids, organic acids and sugars and of low amounts of free fatty acids. In the present study, the phloem sap of 12 citrus varieties with different degrees of tolerance to HLB were extracted with ethyl acetate and analyzed by GC-MS after derivatization with boron trifluoride, a fatty acid-specific reagent. Nine free fatty acids were detected in all varieties. Of the 9 fatty acids detected, only capric acid was significantly different among varieties.

  14. Citrus paradisi: An Effective bio-adsorbent for Arsenic (V Remediation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazhar I. Khaskheli

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present study As (V was removed by citrus paradisi (grape fruit peel. Kinetics of the adsorption reaction was analyzed by the Pseudo second order and Morris-weber equations. Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm models were utilized for understanding of the relationship between the arsenic ions and citrus paradisi peel adsorbent. The maximum measured uptake capacity of citrus paradisi was 37.76 mg.g-1 at pH 4. FT-IR characterization of unloaded and As (V loaded citrus paradisi peel adsorbent showed the participation of carbonyl (CO and hydroxyl (OH groups in adsorption process. The proposed citrus paradisi peel adsorbent with optimized parameters was used for the removal of arsenic from arsenic contaminated real water samples.

  15. Inactivation of Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri and Effect on Infection of Citrus Canker by Gamma Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung Nam Kim

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Citrus canker caused by Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xcc has been quarantined by many countries in the world. Recently, the usage of methyl bromide should be limited, application by gamma irradiation on the agricultural production is raised as an alternative method. In this study, the level of gamma irradiation which could decrease of population of Xcc in the suspension or on the surface of citrus fruit was investigated. The D10 value of Xcc, which is radiation dose required to reduce the number of the microorganism, was 55 and 28 Gy in the suspension and on the surface of citrus fruit, respectively. Furthermore, disease severity was suppressed on the citrus leaves inoculated with Xcc suspension pre-treated with gamma irradiation. Based on this study, it is suggested that Xcc on the citrus fruit could be eradicated by gamma irradiation and the results of this study may be valuable for application of gamma ray in quarantine activity

  16. Citrus paradisi: an effective bio-adsorbent for arsenic (v) remediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaskheli, M.I.; Memon, S.Q.; Parveen, S.

    2014-01-01

    In the present study As(V) was removed by citrus paradise (grape fruit) peel. Kinetics of the adsorption reaction was analyzed by the Pseudo second order and Morris-weber equations. Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm models were utilized for understanding of the relationship between the arsenic ions and citrus paradise peel adsorbent. The maximum measured uptake capacity of citrus paradise was 37.76 mg.g/sup -1/ at pH 4. FT-IR characterization of unloaded and As (V) loaded citrus paradisi peel adsorbent showed the participation of carbonyl (CO) and hydroxyl (OH) groups in adsorption process. The proposed citrus paradis peel adsorbent with optimized parameters was used for the removal of arsenic from arsenic contaminated real water samples. (author)

  17. Induction of apoptosis by Citrus paradisi essential oil in human leukemic (HL-60) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, Tomona; Sakaguchi, Ikuyo; Mori, Masahiro; Ikeda, Norikazu; Kato, Yoshiko; Minamino, Miki; Watabe, Kazuhito

    2003-01-01

    Limonene is a primary component of citrus essential oils (EOs) and has been reported to induce apoptosis on tumor cells. Little is known about induction of apoptosis by citrus EOs. In this study, we examined induction of apoptosis by Citrus aurantium var. dulcis (sweet orange) EO, Citrus paradisi (grapefruit) EO and Citrus limon (lemon) EO. These EOs induced apoptosis in HL-60 cells and the apoptosis activities were related to the limonene content of the EOs. Moreover, sweet orange EO and grapefruit EO may contain components besides limonene that have apoptotic activity. To identify the components with apoptotic activity, grapefruit EO was fractionated using silica gel columns, and the components were analyzed by GC-MS. The n-hexane fraction contained limonene, and the dichloromethane fraction (DF) contained aldehyde compounds and nootkatone. Decanal, octanal and citral in the DF showed strong apoptotic activity, suggesting that the aldehyde compounds induced apoptosis strongly in HL-60 cells.

  18. Alternative oxidase (AOX constitutes a small family of proteins in Citrus clementina and Citrus sinensis L. Osb.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Araújo Castro

    Full Text Available The alternative oxidase (AOX protein is present in plants, fungi, protozoa and some invertebrates. It is involved in the mitochondrial respiratory chain, providing an alternative route for the transport of electrons, leading to the reduction of oxygen to form water. The present study aimed to characterize the family of AOX genes in mandarin (Citrus clementina and sweet orange (Citrus sinensis at nucleotide and protein levels, including promoter analysis, phylogenetic analysis and C. sinensis gene expression. This study also aimed to do the homology modeling of one AOX isoform (CcAOXd. Moreover, the molecular docking of the CcAOXd protein with the ubiquinone (UQ was performed. Four AOX genes were identified in each citrus species. These genes have an open reading frame (ORF ranging from 852 bp to 1150 bp and a number of exons ranging from 4 to 9. The 1500 bp-upstream region of each AOX gene contained regulatory cis-elements related to internal and external response factors. CsAOX genes showed a differential expression in citrus tissues. All AOX proteins were predicted to be located in mitochondria. They contained the conserved motifs LET, NERMHL, LEEEA and RADE-H as well as several putative post-translational modification sites. The CcAOXd protein was modeled by homology to the AOX of Trypanosona brucei (45% of identity. The 3-D structure of CcAOXd showed the presence of two hydrophobic helices that could be involved in the anchoring of the protein in the inner mitochondrial membrane. The active site of the protein is located in a hydrophobic environment deep inside the AOX structure and contains a diiron center. The molecular docking of CcAOXd with UQ showed that the binding site is a recessed pocket formed by the helices and submerged in the membrane. These data are important for future functional studies of citrus AOX genes and/or proteins, as well as for biotechnological approaches leading to AOX inhibition using UQ homologs.

  19. Multiplexed lateral flow microarray assay for detection of citrus pathogens Xylella fastidiosa and Xanthomonas axonopodis pv citri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cary,; Bruce, R [Santa Fe, NM; Stubben, Christopher J [Los Alamos, NM

    2011-03-22

    The invention provides highly sensitive and specific assays for the major citrus pathogens Xylella fastidiosa and Xanthomonas axonopodis, including a field deployable multiplexed assay capable of rapidly assaying for both pathogens simultaneously. The assays are directed at particular gene targets derived from pathogenic strains that specifically cause the major citrus diseases of citrus variegated chlorosis (Xylella fastidiosa 9a5c) and citrus canker (Xanthomonas axonopodis pv citri). The citrus pathogen assays of the invention offer femtomole sensitivity, excellent linear dynamic range, and rapid and specific detection.

  20. Soil organic matter on citrus plantation in Eastern Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerdà, Artemi; Pereira, Paulo; Novara, Agata; Prosdocimi, Massimo

    2015-04-01

    Citrus plantations in Eastern Spain are the main crop and Valencia region is the largest world exporter. The traditional plantation are located on flood irrigated areas and the new plantation are located on slopes were drip irrigation is the source of the wetting. It has been demonstrate that the citrus plantations contribute to high erosion rates on slopes (Cerdà et al., 2009b) as it is usual on agriculture land (Cerdà et al., 2009a), but when organic farming is present the soil erosion is much lower (Cerdà and Jurgensen, 2008; Cerdà et al., 2009; Cerdà and Jurgensen, 2011). This is a worldwide phenomenon (Wu et al., 2007; Wu et al., 2011; Xu et al., 2010; Xu et al., 2012a; Xu et al., 2012b), which are a key factor of the high erosion rates in rural areas (García Orenes et al., 2009: García Orenes et al., 20010; García Orenes et al., 2012; Haregewyn et al., 2013; Zhao et al., 2013). The key factor of the contrasted response of soils to the rain in citrus is the organic matter cover. This is why the Soil Erosion and Degradation Research Team developed a survey to determine the soil erosion rates on citrus orchards under different managements. A hundred of samples were collected in a citrus plantation on slope under conventional management (Chemical management), one on organic farming, one on traditional flood irrigated organic farming and one on traditional chemical flooding farm. The organic farming soils were treated with 10000 Kg ha-1 of manure yearly. The results show that the mean soil organic matter content was 1.24 %, 3.54%, 5,43% and 2.1% respectively, which show a clear impact of organic farming in the recovery of the soil organic matter. meanwhile the on the slopes and the flood-irrigated soils are Acknowledgements The research projects GL2008-02879/BTE, LEDDRA 243857 and PREVENTING AND REMEDIATING DEGRADATION OF SOILS IN EUROPE THROUGH LAND CARE (RECARE)FP7- ENV-2013- supported this research. References Cerdà, A., Flanagan, D.C., le Bissonnais

  1. Transcriptome profiling of citrus fruit response to huanglongbing disease.

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    Federico Martinelli

    Full Text Available Huanglongbing (HLB or "citrus greening" is the most destructive citrus disease worldwide. In this work, we studied host responses of citrus to infection with Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CaLas using next-generation sequencing technologies. A deep mRNA profile was obtained from peel of healthy and HLB-affected fruit. It was followed by pathway and protein-protein network analysis and quantitative real time PCR analysis of highly regulated genes. We identified differentially regulated pathways and constructed networks that provide a deep insight into the metabolism of affected fruit. Data mining revealed that HLB enhanced transcription of genes involved in the light reactions of photosynthesis and in ATP synthesis. Activation of protein degradation and misfolding processes were observed at the transcriptomic level. Transcripts for heat shock proteins were down-regulated at all disease stages, resulting in further protein misfolding. HLB strongly affected pathways involved in source-sink communication, including sucrose and starch metabolism and hormone synthesis and signaling. Transcription of several genes involved in the synthesis and signal transduction of cytokinins and gibberellins was repressed while that of genes involved in ethylene pathways was induced. CaLas infection triggered a response via both the salicylic acid and jasmonic acid pathways and increased the transcript abundance of several members of the WRKY family of transcription factors. Findings focused on the fruit provide valuable insight to understanding the mechanisms of the HLB-induced fruit disorder and eventually developing methods based on small molecule applications to mitigate its devastating effects on fruit production.

  2. Socio-economic determinants of the awareness and adoption of citrus production practices in Pakistan

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    Saleem Ashraf

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Citrus is the leading fruit of Pakistan and famous worldwide especially kinnow cultivar because of its pleasant taste and remarkable quality. The yield of citrus per hectare in Pakistan is almost half of potential due to non-adoption of recommended horticultural practices by citrus growers. Adopting a decision regarding the improvement of practices is usually influenced by various factors including farmers' socio-economic attributes. In order to determine the relationship between socio-economic aspects and the awareness and adoption of recommended citrus production practices the present study was carried out in Sargodha district from central Punjab, Pakistan. The Study was based upon cross sectional survey research design due to availability of sampling frame, probability (random sampling was applied for sample selection. Through random sampling, 120 citrus growers were selected as sample. Structured questionnaire administered through interview was used as a research instrument. Analysis of the data collected from the targeted citrus growers revealed a highly significant influence of education on awareness and adoption. Moreover, significant association was found between citrus cultivation area and awareness and adoption of improved practices. Age also showed significant association with awareness and adoption. Moreover, dominancy of middle aged farmers and illiteracyin the study area strongly point the need of provision of formal and non-formal education and training program for farmers. Young generation needs to be focused and reorientation of youth clubs may help in better way to gain the utmost outcome.

  3. Exposure to Guava Affects Citrus Olfactory Cues and Attractiveness to Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae).

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    Barman, Jagadish Chandra; Campbell, Stuart A; Zeng, Xinnian

    2016-06-01

    Intercropping can reduce agricultural pest incidence, and represents an important sustainable alternative to conventional pest control methods. Understanding the ecological mechanisms for intercropping could help optimize its use, particularly in tropical systems which present a large number of intercropping possibilities. Citrus is threatened worldwide by greening disease (huanglongbing, HLB) vectored by the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae). Control of HLB and citrus psyllid can be partially achieved through intercropping with guava, Psidium guajava L., but the mechanisms remain unclear. We tested the hypothesis that guava olfactory cues affect psyllid behavior by altering the attractiveness of citrus through plant-plant interactions. In choice and no-choice cage experiments, psyllid settlement was reduced on citrus shoots that had been exposed to guava shoot odors for at least 2 h. In Y-tube olfactometer experiments, psyllids oriented to odors of unexposed, compared with guava-exposed, citrus shoots. These behavioral results indicate that a mechanism for the success of guava intercropping for sustainable, ecological disease management may be the indirect effect of guava on citrus attractiveness. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Citrus plastid-related gene profiling based on expressed sequence tag analyses

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    Tercilio Calsa Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Plastid-related sequences, derived from putative nuclear or plastome genes, were searched in a large collection of expressed sequence tags (ESTs and genomic sequences from the Citrus Biotechnology initiative in Brazil. The identified putative Citrus chloroplast gene sequences were compared to those from Arabidopsis, Eucalyptus and Pinus. Differential expression profiling for plastid-directed nuclear-encoded proteins and photosynthesis-related gene expression variation between Citrus sinensis and Citrus reticulata, when inoculated or not with Xylella fastidiosa, were also analyzed. Presumed Citrus plastome regions were more similar to Eucalyptus. Some putative genes appeared to be preferentially expressed in vegetative tissues (leaves and bark or in reproductive organs (flowers and fruits. Genes preferentially expressed in fruit and flower may be associated with hypothetical physiological functions. Expression pattern clustering analysis suggested that photosynthesis- and carbon fixation-related genes appeared to be up- or down-regulated in a resistant or susceptible Citrus species after Xylella inoculation in comparison to non-infected controls, generating novel information which may be helpful to develop novel genetic manipulation strategies to control Citrus variegated chlorosis (CVC.

  5. Evaluation of systemic neonicotinoid insecticides for the management of the Asian citrus psyllid Diaphorina citri on containerized citrus.

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    Byrne, Frank J; Daugherty, Matthew P; Grafton-Cardwell, Elizabeth E; Bethke, James A; Morse, Joseph G

    2017-03-01

    Studies were conducted to evaluate uptake and retention of three systemic neonicotinoid insecticides, dinotefuran, imidacloprid and thiamethoxam, in potted citrus nursery plants treated at standard label rates. Infestation of these plants placed at a field site with moderate levels of Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) was monitored for 14 weeks following treatments, and insecticide residues in leaf tissue were quantified using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Bioassays were conducted using leaves harvested on various dates post-treatment to compare the efficacies of residues against adult ACP. Residues of the three neonicotinoids were detected in leaf tissues within 1 week after treatment. Peak concentrations established at 1 week for imidacloprid and dinotefuran and at 2 weeks for thiamethoxam. Imidacloprid and thiamethoxam outperformed the control and dinotefuran treatments at protecting trees from infestations by ACP eggs and nymphs. For a given insecticide concentration in leaf tissue, thiamethoxam induced the highest mortality of the three insecticides, and dinotefuran was the least toxic. If the time needed to achieve effective thresholds of a systemic neonicotinoid is known, treatments at production facilities could be scheduled that would minimize unnecessary post-treatment holding periods and ensure maximum retention of effective concentrations after the plants have shipped to retail outlets. The rapid uptake of the insecticides and retention at effective concentrations in containerized citrus suggest that the current 30 day post-treatment shipping restriction from production facilities to retail outlets outside of quarantine could be shortened to 14 days. Thiamethoxam should be added to the list of approved nursery treatments. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. Quality Matters: Influences of Citrus Flush Physicochemical Characteristics on Population Dynamics of the Asian Citrus Psyllid (Hemiptera: Liviidae.

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    Mamoudou Sétamou

    Full Text Available Studies were conducted to relate the influence of the physical characteristics, leaf nutrient content and phloem sap amino acid concentration of citrus flush shoots on the densities of various Diaphorina citri life stages. Adult D. citri preferentially selected young shoots for feeding and numbers of D. citri immatures were positively correlated with flush shoot softness. Young flush shoots had higher concentrations of macro and micro nutrients relative to mature ones and this was associated with higher densities of all D. citri life stages. All D. citri life stages were positively correlated with higher nitrogen-carbon (N:C, nitrogen:sulfur (N:S and nitrogen:calcium (N:Ca ratios in leaf tissue, while densities of adults were negatively related to calcium, manganese and boron levels. Concentrations of total and essential amino acids were highest in phloem sap of young expanding flush shoots in both grapefruit and lemon, but dramatically declined as flush shoots matured. The sulfur-containing amino acids cystine, methionine and taurine occurred only in younger flush shoots. In contrast, cystathionine was only present in phloem sap of mature shoots. These results clearly indicate that young citrus flush shoots are a nutritionally richer diet relative to mature shoots, thus explaining their preference by D. citri for feeding and reproduction. Conversely, tissue hardness and the lower nutritional quality of mature flush shoots may limit oviposition and immature development. The data suggest that both physical characteristics and nutritional composition of flush shoots and their phloem sap are important factors regulating host colonization and behavior of D. citri, and this interaction can impact the dynamics and spread of HLB in citrus groves.

  7. Phylogenetic relationships of citrus and its relatives based on matK gene sequences.

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    Tshering Penjor

    Full Text Available The genus Citrus includes mandarin, orange, lemon, grapefruit and lime, which have high economic and nutritional value. The family Rutaceae can be divided into 7 subfamilies, including Aurantioideae. The genus Citrus belongs to the subfamily Aurantioideae. In this study, we sequenced the chloroplast matK genes of 135 accessions from 22 genera of Aurantioideae and analyzed them phylogenetically. Our study includes many accessions that have not been examined in other studies. The subfamily Aurantioideae has been classified into 2 tribes, Clauseneae and Citreae, and our current molecular analysis clearly discriminate Citreae from Clauseneae by using only 1 chloroplast DNA sequence. Our study confirms previous observations on the molecular phylogeny of Aurantioideae in many aspects. However, we have provided novel information on these genetic relationships. For example, inconsistent with the previous observation, and consistent with our preliminary study using the chloroplast rbcL genes, our analysis showed that Feroniella oblata is not nested in Citrus species and is closely related with Feronia limonia. Furthermore, we have shown that Murraya paniculata is similar to Merrillia caloxylon and is dissimilar to Murraya koenigii. We found that "true citrus fruit trees" could be divided into 2 subclusters. One subcluster included Citrus, Fortunella, and Poncirus, while the other cluster included Microcitrus and Eremocitrus. Compared to previous studies, our current study is the most extensive phylogenetic study of Citrus species since it includes 93 accessions. The results indicate that Citrus species can be classified into 3 clusters: a citron cluster, a pummelo cluster, and a mandarin cluster. Although most mandarin accessions belonged to the mandarin cluster, we found some exceptions. We also obtained the information on the genetic background of various species of acid citrus grown in Japan. Because the genus Citrus contains many important accessions

  8. Phylogenetic relationships of citrus and its relatives based on matK gene sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penjor, Tshering; Yamamoto, Masashi; Uehara, Miki; Ide, Manami; Matsumoto, Natsumi; Matsumoto, Ryoji; Nagano, Yukio

    2013-01-01

    The genus Citrus includes mandarin, orange, lemon, grapefruit and lime, which have high economic and nutritional value. The family Rutaceae can be divided into 7 subfamilies, including Aurantioideae. The genus Citrus belongs to the subfamily Aurantioideae. In this study, we sequenced the chloroplast matK genes of 135 accessions from 22 genera of Aurantioideae and analyzed them phylogenetically. Our study includes many accessions that have not been examined in other studies. The subfamily Aurantioideae has been classified into 2 tribes, Clauseneae and Citreae, and our current molecular analysis clearly discriminate Citreae from Clauseneae by using only 1 chloroplast DNA sequence. Our study confirms previous observations on the molecular phylogeny of Aurantioideae in many aspects. However, we have provided novel information on these genetic relationships. For example, inconsistent with the previous observation, and consistent with our preliminary study using the chloroplast rbcL genes, our analysis showed that Feroniella oblata is not nested in Citrus species and is closely related with Feronia limonia. Furthermore, we have shown that Murraya paniculata is similar to Merrillia caloxylon and is dissimilar to Murraya koenigii. We found that "true citrus fruit trees" could be divided into 2 subclusters. One subcluster included Citrus, Fortunella, and Poncirus, while the other cluster included Microcitrus and Eremocitrus. Compared to previous studies, our current study is the most extensive phylogenetic study of Citrus species since it includes 93 accessions. The results indicate that Citrus species can be classified into 3 clusters: a citron cluster, a pummelo cluster, and a mandarin cluster. Although most mandarin accessions belonged to the mandarin cluster, we found some exceptions. We also obtained the information on the genetic background of various species of acid citrus grown in Japan. Because the genus Citrus contains many important accessions, we have

  9. Host susceptibility of citrus cultivars to Queensland fruit fly (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, A C; Hamacek, E L; Smith, D; Kopittke, R A; Gu, H

    2013-04-01

    Citrus crops are considered to be relatively poor hosts for Queensland fruit fly, Bactrocera tryoni (Froggatt), as for other tephritid species. Australian citrus growers and crop consultants have reported observable differences in susceptibility of different citrus cultivars under commercial growing conditions. In this study we conducted laboratory tests and field surveys to determine susceptibility to B. tryoni of six citrus cultivars [(Eureka lemon (Citrus limon (L.) Osbeck); Navel and Valencia oranges (C. sinensis (L.) Osbeck); and Imperial, Ellendale, and Murcott mandarins (C. reticulata Blanco). The host susceptibility of these citrus cultivars was quantified by a Host Susceptibility Index, which is defined as the number of adult flies produced per gram of fruit infested at a calculated rate of one egg per gram of fruit. The HSI was ranked as Murcott (0.083) > Imperial (0.052) > Navel (0.026) - Ellendale (0.020) > Valencia (0.008) > Eureka (yellow) (0.002) > Eureka (green) (0). Results of the laboratory study were in agreement with the level of field infestation in the four citrus cultivars (Eureka lemon, Imperial, Ellendale, and Murcott mandarins) that were surveyed from commercial orchards under baiting treatments against fruit flies in the Central Burnett district of Queensland. Field surveys of citrus hosts from the habitats not subject to fruit fly management showed that the numbers of fruit flies produced per gram of fruit were much lower, compared with the more susceptible noncitrus hosts, such as guava (Psidium guajava L.), cherry guava (P. littorale Raddi), mulberry (Morus nigra L.), loquat (Eriobotrya japonica (Thunb.) Lindl.), and pear (Pyrus communis L.). Therefore, the major citrus crops commercially cultivated in Australia have a relatively low susceptibility to B. tryoni, with Eureka lemons being a particularly poor host for this tephritid fruit fly.

  10. Two previously unknown Phytophthora species associated with brown rot of Pomelo (Citrus grandis fruits in Vietnam.

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    Ivana Puglisi

    Full Text Available Two distinct Phytophthora taxa were found to be associated with brown rot of pomelo (Citrus grandis, a new disease of this ancestral Citrus species, in the Vinh Long province, Mekong River Delta area, southern Vietnam. On the basis of morphological characters and using the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region of the rDNA and the cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI as barcode genes, one of the two taxa was provisionally named as Phytophthora sp. prodigiosa, being closely related to but distinct from P. insolita, a species in Phytophthora Clade 9, while the other one, was closely related to but distinct from the Clade 2 species P. meadii and was informally designated as Phytophthora sp. mekongensis. Isolates of P. sp. prodigiosa and P. sp. mekongensis were also obtained from necrotic fibrous roots of Volkamer lemon (C. volkameriana rootstocks grafted with 'King' mandarin (Citrus nobilis and from trees of pomelo, respectively, in other provinces of the Mekong River Delta, indicating a widespread occurrence of both Phytophthora species in this citrus-growing area. Koch's postulates were fulfilled via pathogenicity tests on fruits of various Citrus species, including pomelo, grapefruit (Citrus x paradisi, sweet orange (Citrus x sinensis and bergamot (Citrus x bergamia as well as on the rootstock of 2-year-old trees of pomelo and sweet orange on 'Carrizo' citrange (C. sinensis 'Washington Navel' x Poncirus trifoliata. This is the first report of a Phytophthora species from Clade 2 other than P. citricola and P. citrophthora as causal agent of fruit brown rot of Citrus worldwide and the first report of P. insolita complex in Vietnam. Results indicate that likely Vietnam is still an unexplored reservoir of Phytophthora diversity.

  11. Temporal responses of peak citrus flowering to climate change in Iran: 1960-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitchett, Jennifer; Grab, Stefan; Thompson, Dave; Roshan, GholamReza

    2014-05-01

    Recent studies investigating floral and faunal phenological responses to climate change have highlighted the extent to which these relationships are species and location specific. This study investigates temporal responses of citrus peak flowering to climate change in the cities of Kerman, Shiraz and Gorgan, Iran. Phenological data comprise peak flowering dates of five citrus types: orange (Citrus x sinensis), tangerine (Citrus x tangerine), sweet lemon (Citrus limetta), sour lemon (Citrus x limon) and sour orange (Citrus x aurantium). These were collected daily from government heritage gardens located within each of the three cities, and archived by a private Iranian company, for the period 1960-2010. For the same period, daily Tmax, Tmin, rainfall and sunshine hour data were acquired from the Iranian Meteorological Organization. Time trend analyses were undertaken for both the phenological and meteorological data, followed by linear regression to determine the nature and extent of any relationships between these variables. We find that the mean peak flowering dates, and their long-term trends over the 51-year period, are very similar amongst the five citrus types within each city, but demonstrate significant differences between cities. Flowering date advances of 0.12-0.17d/yr are recorded for Kerman, and more rapid advances of 0.56-0.65d/yr for Shiraz. Notable progressive delays in flowering dates occur in Gorgan (0.05-0.1d/yr). The peak flowering dates of citrus in the former two cities demonstrate strong relationships with mean annual Tmin, ranging from r = 0.46-0.61 (p = 0002; p international markets.

  12. Palatability and digestibility of horse diets containing increasing levels of citrus pulp

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    Camilla G Moreira

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective. To evaluate the impact of citrus pulp on the palatability and digestibility of horse diets and the physicochemical characteristics of the feces. Materials and methods. The diets were composed of 60% of the energy from the forage and 40% from the concentrate, with increasing levels of citrus pulp. Two different tests were performed. The first test assessed the palatability of concentrates. Using a randomized experimental design, 15 horses were observed for 10 days. The variables recorded were first action, first choice and intake ratio (IR. Five horses were arranged in 5x5 Latin Square design for the test assessing digestibility and fecal physicochemical characteristics. The apparent digestibility of the nutrients and the color, consistency, pH and buffering capacity (BC of the feces were evaluated. Results. The addition of increasing levels of citrus pulp had an effect (p≤0.001 on first action. A difference was also observed in first choice, and the addition of 0, 7 or 14% of citrus pulp was preferred. A difference between treatments (p≤0.001 was also observed for IR, and the control concentrate was consumed the most. The amount of citrus pulp included had no effect (p>0.05 on the digestibility of nutrients, fecal consistency and color, and there was no effect (p>0.05 on fecal pH and BC. Conclusions. Horses can identify the presence of citrus pulp in concentrates but prefer concentrates without added citrus pulp. Citrus pulp does not negatively affect the digestibility of concentrates or the physicochemical characteristics of the feces; thus, citrus pulp is a viable alternative ingredient in the formulation of horse diets.

  13. Two previously unknown Phytophthora species associated with brown rot of Pomelo (Citrus grandis) fruits in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puglisi, Ivana; De Patrizio, Alessandro; Schena, Leonardo; Jung, Thomas; Evoli, Maria; Pane, Antonella; Van Hoa, Nguyen; Van Tri, Mai; Wright, Sandra; Ramstedt, Mauritz; Olsson, Christer; Faedda, Roberto; Magnano di San Lio, Gaetano; Cacciola, Santa Olga

    2017-01-01

    Two distinct Phytophthora taxa were found to be associated with brown rot of pomelo (Citrus grandis), a new disease of this ancestral Citrus species, in the Vinh Long province, Mekong River Delta area, southern Vietnam. On the basis of morphological characters and using the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region of the rDNA and the cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI) as barcode genes, one of the two taxa was provisionally named as Phytophthora sp. prodigiosa, being closely related to but distinct from P. insolita, a species in Phytophthora Clade 9, while the other one, was closely related to but distinct from the Clade 2 species P. meadii and was informally designated as Phytophthora sp. mekongensis. Isolates of P. sp. prodigiosa and P. sp. mekongensis were also obtained from necrotic fibrous roots of Volkamer lemon (C. volkameriana) rootstocks grafted with 'King' mandarin (Citrus nobilis) and from trees of pomelo, respectively, in other provinces of the Mekong River Delta, indicating a widespread occurrence of both Phytophthora species in this citrus-growing area. Koch's postulates were fulfilled via pathogenicity tests on fruits of various Citrus species, including pomelo, grapefruit (Citrus x paradisi), sweet orange (Citrus x sinensis) and bergamot (Citrus x bergamia) as well as on the rootstock of 2-year-old trees of pomelo and sweet orange on 'Carrizo' citrange (C. sinensis 'Washington Navel' x Poncirus trifoliata). This is the first report of a Phytophthora species from Clade 2 other than P. citricola and P. citrophthora as causal agent of fruit brown rot of Citrus worldwide and the first report of P. insolita complex in Vietnam. Results indicate that likely Vietnam is still an unexplored reservoir of Phytophthora diversity.

  14. Biogas production from citrus waste by membrane bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikandari, Rachma; Millati, Ria; Cahyanto, Muhammad Nur; Taherzadeh, Mohammad J

    2014-08-27

    Rapid acidification and inhibition by d-limonene are major challenges of biogas production from citrus waste. As limonene is a hydrophobic chemical, this challenge was encountered using hydrophilic polyvinylidine difluoride (PVDF) membranes in a biogas reactor. The more sensitive methane-producing archaea were encapsulated in the membranes, while freely suspended digesting bacteria were present in the culture as well. In this membrane bioreactor (MBR), the free digesting bacteria digested the citrus wastes and produced soluble compounds, which could pass through the membrane and converted to biogas by the encapsulated cell. As a control experiment, similar digestions were carried out in bioreactors containing the identical amount of just free cells. The experiments were carried out in thermophilic conditions at 55 °C, and hydraulic retention time of 30 days. The organic loading rate (OLR) was started with 0.3 kg VS/m3/day and gradually increased to 3 kg VS/m3/day. The results show that at the highest OLR, MBR was successful to produce methane at 0.33 Nm3/kg VS, while the traditional free cell reactor reduced its methane production to 0.05 Nm3/kg VS. Approximately 73% of the theoretical methane yield was achieved using the membrane bioreactor.

  15. Neurodegenerative Diseases: Might Citrus Flavonoids Play a Protective Role?

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    Santa Cirmi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases (ND result from the gradual and progressive degeneration of the structure and function of the central nervous system or the peripheral nervous system or both. They are characterized by deterioration of neurons and/or myelin sheath, disruption of sensory information transmission and loss of movement control. There is no effective treatment for ND, and the drugs currently marketed are symptom-oriented, albeit with several side effects. Within the past decades, several natural remedies have gained attention as potential neuroprotective drugs. Moreover, an increasing number of studies have suggested that dietary intake of vegetables and fruits can prevent or delay the onset of ND. These properties are mainly due to the presence of polyphenols, an important group of phytochemicals that are abundantly present in fruits, vegetables, cereals and beverages. The main class of polyphenols is flavonoids, abundant in Citrus fruits. Our review is an overview on the scientific literature concerning the neuroprotective effects of the Citrus flavonoids in the prevention or treatment of ND. This review may be used as scientific basis for the development of nutraceuticals, food supplements or complementary and alternative drugs to maintain and improve the neurophysiological status.

  16. Biogas Production from Citrus Waste by Membrane Bioreactor

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    Rachma Wikandari

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Rapid acidification and inhibition by d-limonene are major challenges of biogas production from citrus waste. As limonene is a hydrophobic chemical, this challenge was encountered using hydrophilic polyvinylidine difluoride (PVDF membranes in a biogas reactor. The more sensitive methane-producing archaea were encapsulated in the membranes, while freely suspended digesting bacteria were present in the culture as well. In this membrane bioreactor (MBR, the free digesting bacteria digested the citrus wastes and produced soluble compounds, which could pass through the membrane and converted to biogas by the encapsulated cell. As a control experiment, similar digestions were carried out in bioreactors containing the identical amount of just free cells. The experiments were carried out in thermophilic conditions at 55 °C, and hydraulic retention time of 30 days. The organic loading rate (OLR was started with 0.3 kg VS/m3/day and gradually increased to 3 kg VS/m3/day. The results show that at the highest OLR, MBR was successful to produce methane at 0.33 Nm3/kg VS, while the traditional free cell reactor reduced its methane production to 0.05 Nm3/kg VS. Approximately 73% of the theoretical methane yield was achieved using the membrane bioreactor.

  17. Anxiolytic Effect of Citrus aurantium L. in Crack Users

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    Gabriel Chaves Neto

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the anxiolytic effects of the essential oil (EO of Citrus aurantium L. in patients experiencing crack withdrawal. This was developed with internal users in therapeutic communities in Paraíba, Brazil. The test population consisted of 51 volunteers, subdivided into three groups. To elicit anxiety, the Simulated Public Speaking (SPS method was used. Physiological measures were assessed at specific phases during the experiment using appropriate equipment. Psychological measures of anxiety were assessed using the Trait-State Anxiety Inventory (IDATE and the Analog Smoke Scale (HAS. EO was administered by nebulization. The experiment was developed in individual sessions and consolidated to four phases. The results demonstrated that the test subjects in the groups that were given the EO maintained controlled anxiety levels during SPS, when compared to the Control Group (no treatment. Subjects who used the EO also maintained levels of “discomfort” and “cognitive impairment” during SPS. It was concluded that individuals who are experiencing internal crack cocaine withdrawal present high anxiety traits and that nebulization of the EO of Citrus aurantium L. provided an acute anxiolytic effect in crack cocaine users exposed to SPS.

  18. Phytochemistry and biological activity of Spanish Citrus fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gironés-Vilaplana, Amadeo; Moreno, Diego A; García-Viguera, Cristina

    2014-04-01

    The evaluation of the potential inhibitory activity on α-glucosidase and pancreatic lipase by Citrus spp. fruits of Spanish origin (lemon, orange, grapefruit, lime, and mandarin) together with the evaluation of their phytochemical content and antioxidant capacity (DPPH˙, ORACFL, ABTS(+), FRAP and O2˙(-)) aiming for new applications of the fruits in nutrition and health was carried out. As far as we are aware, the presence of 3-O-caffeoylferuoylquinic acid and two hydrated feruloylquinic acids in orange and the presence of 3,5-diferuoylquinic acid in grapefruit have been reported for the first time. Although grapefruit showed higher contents of phytochemicals such as flavanones and vitamin C, lemon and lime showed higher potential for inhibitory effects on lipase, and lime also showed the best results for in vitro α-glucosidase inhibition. On the other hand, higher antioxidant capacity was reported for grapefruit, lemon and lime, which correlated well with their phytochemical composition. Based on the results, it could be concluded that Citrus fruits are of great value for nutrition and treatment of diet-related diseases such as obesity and diabetes, and consequently, a new field of interest in the food industry regarding new bioactive ingredients would be considered.

  19. Evaluation of the prebiotic effects of citrus pectin hydrolysate

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    Yen-Yi Ho

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Citrus pectin enzyme hydrolysate (PEH of different hydrolysis time intervals (6 hours, PEH-6; 12 hours, PEH-12; 24 hours, PEH-24; or 48 hours, PEH-48 or concentrations (1%, 2%, and 4% was tested for its growth stimulation effect on two probiotics, Bifidobacterium bifidum and Lactobacillus acidophilus. Higher monosaccharide concentrations and smaller molecular weights of PEHs were obtained by prolonging the hydrolysis time. In addition, higher PEH concentrations resulted in significantly higher (p < 0.05 probiotic populations, pH reduction, and increase in total titratable acidity than the glucose-free MRS negative control. Furthermore, significantly higher populations in the low pH environment and longer survival time in nonfat milk (p < 0.05 were observed when the two probiotics were incubated in media supplemented with 2% PEH-24, than in glucose and the negative control. In comparison with other prebiotics, addition of 2% PEH-24 resulted in a more significant increase in the probiotic population (p < 0.05 than in the commercial prebiotics. This study demonstrated that PEH derived from citrus pectin could be an effective prebiotic to enhance the growth, fermentation, acid tolerance, and survival in nonfat milk for the tested probiotics.

  20. Anxiolytic Effect of Citrus aurantium L. in Crack Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves Neto, Gabriel; Braga, João Euclides Fernandes; de Morais Pordeus, Liana Clébia; dos Santos, Sócrates Golzio; Almeida, Reinaldo N.; Diniz, Margareth de Fátima Formiga Melo

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the anxiolytic effects of the essential oil (EO) of Citrus aurantium L. in patients experiencing crack withdrawal. This was developed with internal users in therapeutic communities in Paraíba, Brazil. The test population consisted of 51 volunteers, subdivided into three groups. To elicit anxiety, the Simulated Public Speaking (SPS) method was used. Physiological measures were assessed at specific phases during the experiment using appropriate equipment. Psychological measures of anxiety were assessed using the Trait-State Anxiety Inventory (IDATE) and the Analog Smoke Scale (HAS). EO was administered by nebulization. The experiment was developed in individual sessions and consolidated to four phases. The results demonstrated that the test subjects in the groups that were given the EO maintained controlled anxiety levels during SPS, when compared to the Control Group (no treatment). Subjects who used the EO also maintained levels of “discomfort” and “cognitive impairment” during SPS. It was concluded that individuals who are experiencing internal crack cocaine withdrawal present high anxiety traits and that nebulization of the EO of Citrus aurantium L. provided an acute anxiolytic effect in crack cocaine users exposed to SPS. PMID:29234424

  1. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of Citrus sinensis and Citrus limonia epicotyl segments Transformação genética em Citrus sinensis e Citrus limonia mediada por Agrobacterium tumefaciens a partir de segmentos de epicótilo

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    Weliton Antonio Bastos de Almeida

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Genetic transformation allows the release of improved cultivars with desirable characteristics in a shorter period of time and therefore may be useful in citrus breeding programs. The objective of this research was to establish a protocol for genetic transformation of Valencia and Natal sweet oranges (Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck and Rangpur lime (Citrus limonia L. Osbeck. Epicotyl segments of germinated in vitro plantlets (three weeks in darkness and two weeks in a 16-h photoperiod were used as explants. These were co-cultivated with Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain EHA-105 and different experiments were done to evaluate the transformation efficiency: explants were co-cultivated with Agrobacterium for one, three or five days; explants were incubated with Agrobacterium suspension for 5, 10, 20 or 40 minutes; co-cultivation medium was supplemented with acetosyringone at 0, 100 or 200 µmol L-1; Explants ends had a longitudinal terminal incision (2-3 mm; co-cultivation temperatures of 19, 23 or 27°C were imposed. The experimental design was completely randomized in all experiments with five replications, each consisted of a Petri dish (100 x 15 mm with 30 explants and resulted in a total of 150 explants per treatment. Longitudinal terminal incision in the explant ends did not improve shoot regeneration. However, transgenic plants of all three cultivars were confirmed from explants that had been subjected to inoculation time of 20 minutes, co-culture of three days at 23-27°C, in the absence of acetosyringone.A transformação genética permite produzir cultivares com características específicas e pode, dessa forma ser associada a programas de melhoramento de citros. O objetivo deste trabalho foi estabelecer protocolos de transformação genética para as laranjas doce 'Valência' e 'Natal' (Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck, bem como para o limão 'Cravo'(Citrus limonia L. Osbeck. Segmentos de epicótilo de plântulas germinadas in vitro (três semanas no

  2. Embryogenic calli induction from nucellar tissue of Citrus cultivars Indução de calos embriogênicos a partir de nucelos de variedades de Citrus

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    Fernanda Januzzi Mendes-da-Glória

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Nucellar tissues of seven Citrus varieties were introduced onto three growth media to produce embryogenic callus. The media tested were: EME [MT, modified, with the addition of malt extract (500 mg.L-1]; 1/2-EME [half concentration of MT macronutrients + half concentration of BH3 macronutrients + 500 mg.L-1 malt extract + 1.55 g.L-1 of glutamine]; and EBA [EME + 0.44 muM 6-benzyladenine + 0.04 muM 2,4 D]. Soft friable calli were obtained from 'Cravo' and 'Ponkan' mandarins (Citrus reticulata, Blanco, 'Murcott' tangor (Citrus reticulata Blanco x Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck, 'Serra d'água' and 'Valencia' sweet oranges (Citrus sinensis, L. Osbeck 120 days after callus induction. 'Natal' and 'Pera' sweet oranges (Citrus sinensis, L. Osbeck produced hard non-friable calli in this period. EME and 1/2-EME media had the best results for 'Cravo' mandarin, 'Ponkan' mandarin and 'Serra d'água' sweet orange, whereas EBA was the best media composition to induce soft friable calli on 'Murcott' tangor and 'Valencia' sweet orange. Friable callus cultures of 'Cravo' and 'Ponkan' mandarins, and 'Murcott' tangor yielded high quality protoplasts after isolation. Abbreviations: a.c. - activated charcoal; BA - 6-benzyladenine; IAA - indole-acetic acid; 2,4-D - 2,4-diclorophenoxyacetic acid; MT - Murashige & Tucker basal medium.Nucelos de sete variedades de Citrus foram introduzidos em três meios de cultura para produção de calos embriogênicos. Os meios de cultura testados foram: EME [MT, modificado pela adição de extrato de malte (500 mg.L-1]; 1/2-EME [1/2 concentração de macronutrientes no meio MT + 1/2 concentração de macronutrientes no meio BH3 + 500 mg.L-1 extrato de malte + 1,55 g.L-1 de glutamina]; e EBA [EME + 0,44 miM 6-benziladenina + 0,04 miM 2,4 D]. Calos friáveis foram obtidos nas variedades tangerinas 'Cravo' e 'Ponkan' (Citrus reticulata, Blanco, tangor 'Murcote' (Citrus reticulata Blanco x Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck, laranja 'Valencia

  3. Hypocholesterolemic properties of grapefruit (Citrus paradisii and shaddock (Citrus maxima juices and inhibition of angiotensin-1-converting enzyme activity

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    Ganiyu Oboh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Grapefruit (Citrus paradisii and shaddock (Citrus maxima juices are used in folk medicine for the management of hypertension and other cardiovascular diseases, but the mechanism of action by which they exert their therapeutic action is unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of grapefruit and shaddock juices on angiotensin-1-converting enzyme (ACE activity in vitro and the hypocholesterolemic properties of the juices in rats fed a high-cholesterol diet. Grapefruit juice had higher total phenol and flavonoid contents than shaddock juice, while both juices inhibited ACE activity in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, administration of the juices to rats fed a high-cholesterol diet caused a significant reduction in plasma total cholesterol, triglyceride, and low-density lipoprotein–cholesterol levels and an increase in high-density lipoprotein–cholesterol levels. The inhibition of ACE activity in vitro and in vivo hypocholesterolemic effect of the juices could explain the use of the juices in the management of cardiovascular diseases.

  4. Efficacy of mint (Mentha arvensis) leaf and citrus (Citrus aurantium) peel extracts as natural preservatives for shelf life extension of chill stored Indian mackerel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viji, Pankyamma; Binsi, Puthanpurakkal Kizhakkathil; Visnuvinayagam, Sivam; Bindu, Jaganath; Ravishankar, Chandragiri Nagarajarao; Srinivasa Gopal, Teralandur Krishnaswamy

    2015-10-01

    Efficacy of mint (Mentha arvensis) leaf and citrus (Citrus aurantium) peel extracts in retarding the quality changes in Indian mackerel during chilled storage was investigated. Mint leaf extract showed higher quantity of phenolics and superior in-vitro antioxidant activities than citrus peel extract. Gutted mackerel were given a dip treatment in mint extract (0.5 %, w/v) and citrus extract (1 % w/v), packed in LDPE pouches and stored at 0-2 °C. The biochemical quality indices viz. total volatile base nitrogen (TVB-N), trimethylamine nitrogen (TMA-N), free fattyacids (FFA) were significantly (p citrus extract (CE) treated and control fishes (C) without any treatment. Plant extract treatment significantly inhibited lipid oxidation in mackerel as indicated by peroxide value (PV) and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS). Aerobic plate count (APC) was markedly higher in C group followed by CE group throughout the storage period. As per sensory evaluation, shelf life of Indian mackerel was determined to be 11-13 days for C group, 13-15 days for CE group and 16-17 days for ME group, during storage at 0-2 °C.

  5. Detection of mechanical and disease stresses in citrus plants by fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belasque, J., Jr.; Gasparoto, M. C. G.; Marcassa, L. G.

    2008-04-01

    We have investigated the detection of mechanical and disease stresses in citrus plants (Citrus limonia [L.] Osbeck) using laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. Due to its economic importance we have chosen to investigate the citrus canker disease, which is caused by the Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri bacteria. Mechanical stress was also studied because it plays an important role in the plant's infection by such bacteria. A laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy system, composed of a spectrometer and a 532 nm10 mW excitation laser was used to perform fluorescence spectroscopy. The ratio of two chlorophyll fluorescence bands allows us to detect and discriminate between mechanical and disease stresses. This ability to discriminate may have an important application in the field to detect citrus canker infected trees.

  6. An evaluation of sequence tagged microsatellite site markers for genetic analysis within Citrus and related species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kijas, J M; Fowler, J C; Thomas, M R

    1995-04-01

    Microsatellites, also called sequence tagged microsatellite sites (STMSs), have become important markers for genome analysis but are currently little studied in plants. To assess the value of STMSs for analysis within the Citrus plant species, two example STMSs were isolated from an intergeneric cross between rangpur lime (Citrus x limonia Osbeck) and trifoliate orange (Poncirus trifoliata (L.) Raf.). Unique flanking primers were constructed for polymerase chain reaction amplification both within the test cross and across a broad range of citrus and related species. Both loci showed length variation between test cross parents with alleles segregating in a Mendelian fashion to progeny. Amplification across species showed the STMS flanking primers to be conserved in every genome tested. The traits of polymorphism, inheritance, and conservation across species mean that STMS markers are ideal for genome mapping within Citrus, which contains high levels of genetic variability.

  7. Use of the heat dissipation method for sap flow measurement in citrus nursery trees1

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    Eduardo Augusto Girardi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Sap flow could be used as physiological parameter to assist irrigation of screen house citrus nursery trees by continuous water consumption estimation. Herein we report a first set of results indicating the potential use of the heat dissipation method for sap flow measurement in containerized citrus nursery trees. 'Valencia' sweet orange [Citrus sinensis (L. Osbeck] budded on 'Rangpur' lime (Citrus limonia Osbeck was evaluated for 30 days during summer. Heat dissipation probes and thermocouple sensors were constructed with low-cost and easily available materials in order to improve accessibility of the method. Sap flow showed high correlation to air temperature inside the screen house. However, errors due to natural thermal gradient and plant tissue injuries affected measurement precision. Transpiration estimated by sap flow measurement was four times higher than gravimetric measurement. Improved micro-probes, adequate method calibration, and non-toxic insulating materials should be further investigated.

  8. Straw mulching reduces the harmful effects of extreme hydrological and temperature conditions in citrus orchards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Wang, Jing; Liu, Dongbi; Li, Zhiguo; Zhang, Guoshi; Tao, Yong; Xie, Juan; Pan, Junfeng; Chen, Fang

    2014-01-01

    Extreme weather conditions with negative impacts can strongly affect agricultural production. In the Danjiangkou reservoir area, citrus yields were greatly influenced by cold weather conditions and drought stress in 2011. Soil straw mulching (SM) practices have a major effect on soil water and thermal regimes. A two-year field experiment was conducted to evaluate whether the SM practices can help achieve favorable citrus fruit yields. Results showed that the annual total runoff was significantly (Pmulch probably acted as an insulator, resulting in smaller fluctuations in soil temperature in the SM than in the CK treatment. The results suggested that the small effects on soil water and temperature changes created by surface mulch had limited impact on citrus fruit yield in a normal year (e.g., in 2010). However, SM practices can positively impact citrus fruit yield in extreme weather conditions.

  9. The Evolutionary History and Spatiotemporal Dynamics of the NC Lineage of Citrus Tristeza Virus

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    María José Benítez-Galeano

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Citrus tristeza virus (CTV is a major pathogen affecting citrus trees worldwide. However, few studies have focused on CTV’s evolutionary history and geographic behavior. CTV is locally dispersed by an aphid vector and long distance dispersion due to transportation of contaminated material. With the aim to delve deeper into the CTV-NC (New Clade genotype evolution, we estimated an evolution rate of 1.19 × 10−3 subs/site/year and the most common recent ancestor in 1977. Furthermore, the place of origin of the genotype was in the United States, and a great expansion of the population was observed in Uruguay. This expansion phase could be a consequence of the increment in the number of naïve citrus trees in Uruguayan orchards encompassing citrus industry growth in the past years.

  10. Targeting excessive free radicals with peels and juices of citrus fruits: grapefruit, lemon, lime and orange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Rafaela; Barros, Lillian; Barreira, João C M; Sousa, M João; Carvalho, Ana Maria; Ferreira, Isabel C F R

    2010-01-01

    A comparative study between the antioxidant properties of peel (flavedo and albedo) and juice of some commercially grown citrus fruit (Rutaceae), grapefruit (Citrus paradisi), lemon (Citrus limon), lime (Citrusxaurantiifolia) and sweet orange (Citrus sinensis) was performed. Different in vitro assays were applied to the volatile and polar fractions of peels and to crude and polar fraction of juices: 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging capacity, reducing power and inhibition of lipid peroxidation using beta-carotene-linoleate model system in liposomes and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) assay in brain homogenates. Reducing sugars and phenolics were the main antioxidant compounds found in all the extracts. Peels polar fractions revealed the highest contents in phenolics, flavonoids, ascorbic acid, carotenoids and reducing sugars, which certainly contribute to the highest antioxidant potential found in these fractions. Peels volatile fractions were clearly separated using discriminant analysis, which is in agreement with their lowest antioxidant potential. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Space-time variability of citrus leprosis as strategic planning for crop management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Daniel J; Lorençon, José R; Siqueira, Diego S; Novelli, Valdenice M; Bassanezi, Renato B

    2018-01-31

    Citrus leprosis is the most important viral disease of citrus. Knowledge of its spatiotemporal structure is fundamental to a representative sampling plan focused on the disease control approach. Such a well-crafted sampling design helps to reduce pesticide use in agriculture to control pests and diseases. Despite the use of acaricides to control citrus leprosis vector (Brevipalpus spp.) populations, the disease has spread rapidly through experimental areas. Citrus leprosis has an aggregate spatial distribution, with high dependence among symptomatic plants. Temporal variation in disease incidence increased among symptomatic plants by 4% per month. Use of acaricides alone to control the vector of leprosis is insufficient to avoid its incidence in healthy plants. Preliminary investigation into the time and space variation in the incidence of the disease is fundamental to select a sampling plan and determine effective strategies for disease management. © 2018 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2018 Society of Chemical Industry.

  12. 77 FR 40076 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Use of the Citrus Flavanones Hesperetin, Hesperidin, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-06

    ... entitled ``Treatment of Metabolic Syndrome and Insulin Resistance with Citrus Flavanones.'' The patent... treatment of diabetes, obesity, metabolic syndrome, dyslipidemias, and their cardiovascular complications... administration of oral hesperidin to patients with metabolic syndrome attenuates biomarkers of inflammation and...

  13. Inactivation of Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri and Effect on Infection of Citrus Canker by Gamma Irradiation

    OpenAIRE

    Kyung Nam Kim; Min A Song; Yong Chull Jeun; Sang Heon Han; Seong Joon Song

    2015-01-01

    Citrus canker caused by Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xcc) has been quarantined by many countries in the world. Recently, the usage of methyl bromide should be limited, application by gamma irradiation on the agricultural production is raised as an alternative method. In this study, the level of gamma irradiation which could decrease of population of Xcc in the suspension or on the surface of citrus fruit was investigated. The D10 value of Xcc, which is radiation dose required t...

  14. Antispasmodic effects of Citrus aurantium flowers aqueous extract on uterus of non-pregnant rats

    OpenAIRE

    Akram Ahangarpour; Ali Akbar Oroojan; Ashraf Amirzargar; Maryam Ghanavati

    2011-01-01

    Background: Citrus aurantium is a small citrus tree, with scented white flowers. The C. aurantium is used in Asian herbal medicine primarily to treat digestive problems.Objective: The goal of this study is to investigate the effect of C. aurantium flower's aqueous extract on uterine contraction in presence of some known uterus stimulants.Materials and Methods: In experimental study 30 virgin Wistar rats 200-300gr were obtained. After laparatomy, a piece of Uterus was dissected out and mounted...

  15. Monitoring the viability of citrus rootstocks seeds stored under refrigeration

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    Sérgio Alves de Carvalho

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The citrus nursery tree is produced through the bud grafting process, in which rootstock is usually grown from seed germination. The objective of this research was to evaluate, in two dissimilar environmental conditions, the viability and polyembryony expression of five citrus rootstocks seeds stored in different periods under refrigeration. The rootstock varieties evaluated were: Rangpur lime (Citrus limonia Osb. cv. Limeira, Trifoliate orange (Poncirus trifoliata Raf. cv. Limeira, Citrumelo (P. trifoliata x C. paradisi Macf. cv. Swingle, Sunki mandarin (C. sunki Hort. ex Tanaka and Volkamer lemon (C. volkameriana Ten. & Pasq. cv. Catania 2. The experimental design was the randomized blocks in a 11 x 5 x 2 factorial scheme, evaluating from time zero to the tenth month of storage, the five varieties of rootstock in two environments: germination and growth B.O.D type chamber (Biological Oxygen Demand - Eletrolab Brand Model FC 122 at 25 °C; and greenhouse seedbed with partial temperature control (22 °C to 36 °C and humidity control (75-85%. The plot had 24 seeds in four replicates, using trays with substrate in greenhouse and Petri dishes with filter paper in B.O.D. chamber. The seed germination rate and polyembryony expression were evaluated monthly. It was concluded that Trifoliate and Citrumelo Swingle seeds can be stored for up to seven months, while Volkamer lemon, Rangpur lime and Sunki seeds can be stored for up to ten months. The polyembryony expression rate was slightly higher when measured in greenhouse than in B.O.D. chamber and remained stable in both environments until the seventh month, from which dropped sharply. Citrumelo Swingle seeds expressed the highest polyembryony rate (18.8%, followed by Rangpur lime and Volkamer lemon (average value of 13.7%, Sunki (9.4% and Trifoliate (3.2%. Despite some differences among varieties, the viability of rootstock stored seeds can be monitored either in the greenhouse or in B

  16. Changes of peel essential oil composition of four Tunisian citrus during fruit maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgou, Soumaya; Rahali, Fatma Zohra; Ourghemmi, Iness; Saïdani Tounsi, Moufida

    2012-01-01

    The present work investigates the effect of ripening stage on the chemical composition of essential oil extracted from peel of four citrus: bitter orange (Citrus aurantium), lemon (Citrus limon), orange maltaise (Citrus sinensis), and mandarin (Citrus reticulate) and on their antibacterial activity. Essential oils yields varied during ripening from 0.46 to 2.70%, where mandarin was found to be the richest. Forty volatile compounds were identified. Limonene (67.90-90.95%) and 1,8-cineole (tr-14.72%) were the most represented compounds in bitter orange oil while limonene (37.63-69.71%), β-pinene (0.63-31.49%), γ-terpinene (0.04-9.96%), and p-cymene (0.23-9.84%) were the highest ones in lemon. In the case of mandarin, the predominant compounds were limonene (51.81-69.00%), 1,8-cineole (0.01-26.43%), and γ-terpinene (2.53-14.06%). However, results showed that orange peel oil was dominated mainly by limonene (81.52-86.43%) during ripening. The results showed that ripening stage influenced significantly the antibacterial activity of the oils against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This knowledge could help establish the optimum harvest date ensuring the maximum essential oil, limonene, as well as antibacterial compounds yields of citrus.

  17. Changes of Peel Essential Oil Composition of Four Tunisian Citrus during Fruit Maturation

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    Soumaya Bourgou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work investigates the effect of ripening stage on the chemical composition of essential oil extracted from peel of four citrus: bitter orange (Citrus aurantium, lemon (Citrus limon, orange maltaise (Citrus sinensis, and mandarin (Citrus reticulate and on their antibacterial activity. Essential oils yields varied during ripening from 0.46 to 2.70%, where mandarin was found to be the richest. Forty volatile compounds were identified. Limonene (67.90–90.95% and 1,8-cineole (tr-14.72% were the most represented compounds in bitter orange oil while limonene (37.63–69.71%, β-pinene (0.63–31.49%, γ-terpinene (0.04–9.96%, and p-cymene (0.23–9.84% were the highest ones in lemon. In the case of mandarin, the predominant compounds were limonene (51.81–69.00%, 1,8-cineole (0.01–26.43%, and γ-terpinene (2.53–14.06%. However, results showed that orange peel oil was dominated mainly by limonene (81.52–86.43% during ripening. The results showed that ripening stage influenced significantly the antibacterial activity of the oils against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This knowledge could help establish the optimum harvest date ensuring the maximum essential oil, limonene, as well as antibacterial compounds yields of citrus.

  18. In vitro antiallergic effects of aqueous fermented preparations from Citrus and Cydonia fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Roman; Stintzing, Florian Conrad; Briemle, Daniel; Beckmann, Christiane; Meyer, Ulrich; Gründemann, Carsten

    2012-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate the immunomodulatory and antiallergic properties of preparations from lemon, Citrus medica L. (citrus), and quince, Cydonia oblonga Mill. (Cydonia), which are used in pharmaceutical products to treat patients suffering from allergic disorders. Preparations were analyzed with respect to their impact on the degranulation capacity from basophilic cells as well as mediator release from activated human mast cells in vitro, including IL-8 and TNF- α secretion. The results show that the degranulation of basophilic cells was diminished only in the presence of Citrus, and this effect was compared to the synthetic drug azelastine. Furthermore, Citrus and Cydonia both inhibited the production of IL-8 and TNF- α from human mast cells, and at low concentrations additive effects were observed. As a positive inhibition control, dexamethasone was used. LC-MS analyses showed that the major phenolic components in extracts from Citrus and Cydonia are eriocitrin and neochlorogenic acid, respectively. Nevertheless, these compounds do not show biological effects at concentration levels detected in their corresponding extracts. In conclusion, the present data provide a rational base for the use of the single pharmaceutical preparations from Citrus and Cydonia in a differentiated treatment of allergic disorders in part by the regulation of soluble allergic mediators from basophilic cells and mast cells. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Towards the identification of flower-specific genes in Citrus spp

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    Marcelo Carnier Dornelas

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Citrus sinensis is a perennial woody species, for which genetic approaches to the study of reproductive development are not readily amenable. Here, the usefulness of the CitEST Expressed Sequence Tag (EST database is demonstrated as a reliable new resource for identifying novel genes exclusively related to Citrus reproductive biology. We performed the analysis of an EST dataset of the CitEST Project containing 4,330 flower-derived cDNA sequences. Relying on bioinformatics tools, sequences exclusively present in this flower-derived sequence collection were selected and used for the identification of Citrus putative flower-specific genes. Our analysis revealed several Citrus sequences showing significant similarity to conserved genes known to have flower-specific expression and possessing functions related to flower metabolism and/or reproductive development in diverse plant species. Comparison of the Citrus flower-specific sequences with all available plant peptide sequences unraveled 247 unique transcripts not identified elsewhere within the plant kingdom. Additionally, 49 transcripts, for which no biological function could be attributed by means of sequence comparisons, were found to be conserved among plant species. These results allow further gene expression analysis and possibly novel approaches to the understanding of reproductive development in Citrus.

  20. Metabolic changes in Citrus leaf volatiles in response to environmental stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asai, Tomonori; Matsukawa, Tetsuya; Kajiyama, Shin'ichiro

    2016-02-01

    Citrus plants are well known as a rich source of VOCs, and several have important roles in defense responses. However, how VOCs are regulated in response to environmental stress is not yet well understood. In this study, we investigated dynamic changes of VOCs present in leaves of seven Citrus species (Citrus sinensis, C. limon, C. paradisi, C. unshiu, C. kinokuni, C. grandis, and C. hassaku) in response to mechanical wounding, jasmonic acid (JA), and salicylic acid (SA) as determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometric analysis followed by multivariate analysis (principal component analysis, PCA, and orthogonal partial least squares-discriminant analysis, OPLS-DA). PCA and OPLS-DA suggested that changes in VOC profiles against stress stimuli were much diverse among Citrus species. OPLS-DA showed that C6 volatiles, such as hexanal and trans-2-hexenal, were induced in response to JA and SA stimuli in C. sinensis and C. grandis, while the other VOCs were decreased under all tested stress conditions. α-Farnesene was induced in all species except C. hassaku after wounding or JA treatment. In addition, α-farnesene was also induced in response to SA stimuli in C. unshiu and C. kinokuni. Therefore these volatiles can be candidates of the common stress biomarkers in Citrus. Our results will give a new insight into defense mechanisms in Citrus species. Copyright © 2015 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Citrus species and hybrids depicted by near- and mid-infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Páscoa, Ricardo Nmj; Moreira, Silvana; Lopes, João A; Sousa, Clara

    2018-01-31

    Citrus trees are among the most cultivated plants in the world, with a high economic impact. The wide sexual compatibility among relatives gave rise to a large number of hybrids that are difficult to discriminate. This work sought to explore the ability of infrared spectroscopy to discriminate among Citrus species and/or hybrids and to contribute to the elucidation of its relatedness. Adult leaves of 18 distinct Citrus plants were included in this work. Near- and mid-infrared (NIR and FTIR) spectra were acquired from leaves after harvesting and a drying period of 1 month. Spectra were modelled by principal component analysis and partial least squares discriminant analysis. Both techniques revealed a high discrimination potential (78.5-95.9%), being the best results achieved with NIR spectroscopy and air-dried leaves (95.9%). Infrared spectroscopy was able to successfully discriminate several Citrus species and/or hybrids. Our results contributed also to enhance insights regarding the studied Citrus species and/or hybrids. Despite the benefit of including additional samples, the results herein obtained clearly pointed infrared spectroscopy as a reliable technique for Citrus species and/or hybrid discrimination. © 2018 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2018 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. History and Diversity of Citrus leprosis virus Recorded in Herbarium Specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartung, John S; Roy, Avijit; Fu, Shimin; Shao, Jonathan; Schneider, William L; Brlansky, Ronald H

    2015-09-01

    Leprosis refers to two diseases of citrus that present similar necrotic local lesions, often surrounded by chlorotic haloes on citrus. Two distinct viruses are associated with this disease, one that produces particles primarily in the nucleus of infected plant cells (Citrus leprosis virus nuclear type [CiLV-N]; Dichorhavirus) and another type that produces particles in the cytoplasm of infected plant cells (Citrus leprosis virus cytoplasmic type [CiLV-C]; Cilevirus). Both forms are transmitted by Brevipalpid mites and have bipartite, single-stranded, RNA genomes. CiLV-C and CiLV-N are present in South and Central America and as far north as parts of Mexico. Although leprosis disease was originally described from Florida, it disappeared from there in the 1960s. The United States Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service maintains preserved citrus specimens identified at inspection stations 50 or more years ago with symptoms of citrus leprosis. We isolated RNA from these samples and performed degradome sequencing. We obtained nearly full-length genome sequences of both a typical CiLV-C isolate intercepted from Argentina in 1967 and a distinct CiLV-N isolate obtained in Florida in 1948. The latter is a novel form of CiLV-N, not known to exist anywhere in the world today. We have also documented the previously unreported presence of CiLV-N in Mexico in the mid-20th century.

  3. Changes in Peroxidase Activity in the Peel of Unshiub Mandarin (Citrus unshiu Marc.) Fruit with Different Storage Treatments

    OpenAIRE

    Lepeduš, Hrvoje; Jozić, Marko; Štolfa, Ivna; Pavičić, Nikola; Hackenberger, Branimir K.; Cesar, Vera

    2005-01-01

    The Unshiu mandarin (Citrus unshiu Marc.) is the major Citrus crop in Croatia. Limiting factors for longer consumption of Unshiu mandarin are low storage performance and the appearance of chilling injuries during storage. Previous studies indicated that oxidative stress might be involved in cold-induced peel damage of harvested Citrus fruit. The aim of the present study was to investigate peroxidase distribution, isoenzyme pattern and activity in the peel of Unshiu mandarin fruit. Special goa...

  4. Bacillus subtilis QST 713, copper hydroxide, and their tank mixes for control of bacterial citrus canker in Saudi Arabia

    OpenAIRE

    Ibrahim, Yasser E; Saleh, Amagad A; El Komy, Mahammod H; Al Saleh, Mohammed A

    2016-01-01

    Citrus Bacterial Canker (CBC) is a serious disease that affects production of almost all commercial citrus cultivars in subtropical citrus growing regions worldwide. In this study, the effectiveness of monthly foliar sprays of wettable powder formulation Serenade MAX of Bacillus subtilis QST 713, alone or as tank mixes with copper hydroxide on CBC disease development was evaluated under greenhouse and uncovered nursery conditions. The QST 713 as a tank mix with copper hydroxide reduced signif...

  5. Anticancer Potential ofCitrusJuices and Their Extracts: A Systematic Review of Both Preclinical and Clinical Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirmi, Santa; Maugeri, Alessandro; Ferlazzo, Nadia; Gangemi, Sebastiano; Calapai, Gioacchino; Schumacher, Udo; Navarra, Michele

    2017-01-01

    Background: During the last decades, a huge body of evidence has been accumulated suggesting that Citrus fruits and their juices might have a role in preventing many diseases including cancer. Objective: To summarize the numerous evidences on the potential of Citrus juices and their extracts as anticancer agents. Data sources: A systematic review of articles written in English using MEDLINE (1946-present), EMBASE (1974-present) and Web of Sciences (1970-present) was performed independently by two reviewers. Search terms included Citrus, Citrus aurantifolia, Citrus sinensis, Citrus paradisi, Citrus fruits, Citrus fruits extract, cancer, neoplasm, neoplasia, tumor, metastasis, carcinogenesis, proliferation. The last search was performed on March 16th, 2017. Study selection: Study selection and systematic review were carried out in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement. Prior to the beginning of the review, Authors defined a checklist for inclusion criteria, thus including articles which meet the following: (i) published on peer-reviewed scientific journals; (ii) Citrus juice used alone; (iii) extracts derived from Citrus juice; (iii) for preclinical studies, an exposure time to Citrus juices and their extracts more than 24 h. Reviews, meta-analyses, conference abstracts and book chapters were excluded. Data extraction: Three reviewers independently performed the extraction of articles. Data synthesis: 22 papers met our inclusion criteria and were eligible for inclusion in the final review. According to the kind of study, the selected ones were further divided in preclinical ( n = 20) and observational ( n = 2) studies. Conclusion: The studies discussed in this review strongly corroborate the role of Citrus juices and their derivatives as potential resource against cancer.

  6. Anticancer Potential of Citrus Juices and Their Extracts: A Systematic Review of Both Preclinical and Clinical Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santa Cirmi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: During the last decades, a huge body of evidence has been accumulated suggesting that Citrus fruits and their juices might have a role in preventing many diseases including cancer.Objective: To summarize the numerous evidences on the potential of Citrus juices and their extracts as anticancer agents.Data sources: A systematic review of articles written in English using MEDLINE (1946-present, EMBASE (1974-present and Web of Sciences (1970-present was performed independently by two reviewers. Search terms included Citrus, Citrus aurantifolia, Citrus sinensis, Citrus paradisi, Citrus fruits, Citrus fruits extract, cancer, neoplasm, neoplasia, tumor, metastasis, carcinogenesis, proliferation. The last search was performed on March 16th, 2017.Study selection: Study selection and systematic review were carried out in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA statement. Prior to the beginning of the review, Authors defined a checklist for inclusion criteria, thus including articles which meet the following: (i published on peer-reviewed scientific journals; (ii Citrus juice used alone; (iii extracts derived from Citrus juice; (iii for preclinical studies, an exposure time to Citrus juices and their extracts more than 24 h. Reviews, meta-analyses, conference abstracts and book chapters were excluded.Data extraction: Three reviewers independently performed the extraction of articles.Data synthesis: 22 papers met our inclusion criteria and were eligible for inclusion in the final review. According to the kind of study, the selected ones were further divided in preclinical (n = 20 and observational (n = 2 studies.Conclusion: The studies discussed in this review strongly corroborate the role of Citrus juices and their derivatives as potential resource against cancer.

  7. Risk assessment of various insecticides used for management of Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri in Florida citrus, against honey bee, Apis mellifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xue Dong; Gill, Torrence A; Pelz-Stelinski, Kirsten S; Stelinski, Lukasz L

    2017-04-01

    The Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Liviidae), is a major pest of citrus trees worldwide. A wide variety of insecticides are used to manage D. citri populations within citrus groves in Florida. However, in areas shared by citrus growers and beekeepers the use of insecticides may increase the risks of Apis mellifera  L. (Hymenoptera: Apidae) loss and contaminated honey. The objective of this research was to determine the environmental toxicity of insecticides, spanning five different modes of action used to control D. citri, to A. mellifera. The insecticides investigated were imidacloprid, fenpropathrin, dimethoate, spinetoram and diflubenzuron. In laboratory experiments, LD 50 values were determined and ranged from 0.10 to 0.53 ng/μl for imidacloprid, fenpropathrin, dimethoate and spinetoram. LD 50 values for diflubenzuron were >1000 ng/μl. Also, a hazard quotient was determined and ranged from 1130.43 to 10893.27 for imidacloprid, fenpropathrin, dimethoate, and spinetoram. This quotient was mellifera 3 and 7 days after application. Spinetoram and imidacloprid were moderately toxic to A. mellifera at the recommended rates for D. citri. Diflubenzuron was not toxic to A. mellifera in the field as compared with untreated control plots. Phenoloxidase (PO) activity of A. mellifera was higher than in untreated controls when A. mellifera were exposed to 14 days old residues. The results indicate that diflubenzuron may be safe to apply in citrus when A. mellifera are foraging, while most insecticides used for management of D. citri in citrus are likely hazardous under various exposure scenarios.

  8. Changes in the Composition of Aromatherapeutic Citrus Oils during Evaporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George W. Francis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The composition of some commercial Citrus oils, lemon, sweet orange, and tangerine, designated for aromatherapy, was examined before and after partial evaporation in a stream of nitrogen. The intact oils contained the expected mixtures of mono- and sesquiterpenes, with hydrocarbons dominating and lesser amounts of oxygenated analogues making up the remainder. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to follow alterations in the relative amounts of the various components present as evaporation proceeded. Changes were marked, and in particular more volatile components present in the intact oils rapidly disappeared. Thus the balance of content was shifted away from monoterpene hydrocarbons towards the analogous alcohols and carbonyl compounds. The results of this differential evaporation are discussed and possible consequences for aromatherapy use are noted. The case of lemon oil was especially interesting as the relative amount of citral, a known sensitizer, remaining as time elapsed represented an increasing percentage of the total oil.

  9. Positive relationship between citrus leaf miner and alternaria brown spot

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    Fernando Alves de Azevedo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Alternaria brown spot, or ABS (Alternaria alternata, is the most prevalent fungal disease of tangerines in the world. Field observations have revealed ABS lesions on leaves wounded by the citrus leaf miner (CLM. Thus, the objective of this study was to assess the relationship between CLM and ABS. Leaves from young Murcott tangor plants and detached leaves from 16 different varieties of tangerines with and without lesions caused by CLM were inoculated with A. alternata. The symptoms of the plants were subsequently quantified by counting the number of lesions, and the lesion area was estimated using a diagrammatic scale. The presence of CLM damage aggravates the severity of Alternaria alternata fungus infections in susceptible tangerine varieties.

  10. [Progress in research of traditional Chinese medicine Citrus aurantium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-xiao; Li, Zheng-yong; Ma, Yu-ling; Ma, Shuang-cheng

    2015-01-01

    Citrus aurantium is one of the most common traditional Chinese medicines. In this paper, the chemical components, content determination and pharmacological actions of C. aurantium were summarized for the comprehensive utilization of its resources. Because of the complicated resources of C. aurantium, only one single component as index couldn't reflect the quality and effects and comprehensive evaluation which concluding multiple components should be established in the future quality control. In recent years, the pharmacological effects research of C. aurantium has made tremendous progress, and it is important to explore new drugs from the development and utilization of the active ingredient of C. aurantium. In recent years, the pharmacological effects research of C. aurantium has made tremendous progress, and it is important to explore new drugs from the development and utilization of the active ingredient of C. aurantium.

  11. Laguna Madre Water Purification using Biochar from Citrus Peels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, C.; Al-Qudah, O. M.

    2017-12-01

    Laguna Madre is an important lagoon in the coast of Texas. It is one of the seven hypersaline lagoons in the world. Due to inflow of water with extreme amounts of phosphorus and nitrates and the low inflow of freshwater, the lagoon has high amount of phosphorus and nitrates which can be harmful for fish and plants situated in the lagoon. The goal is to be able to perform a filtration method with citrus peels biochar, and then to evaluate and compare the produced biochar, zeolite, and activated carbon as an infiltration filter by assessing reductions of nitrogen and phosphorus compounds, as well as sum selected trace elements. Furthermore, the current research will investigate how long the cleaning capacity of biochar lasts and how the performance of the filter changes under an increased load of contaminants. The performance of biochar from different parent materials and recycling options for the used filter materials are also included in this research.

  12. Enantiomeric distribution of key volatile components in Citrus essential oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Bonaccorsi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Citrus as many other plants present characteristic distribution of some enantiomers, thus it is often possible to use this parameter for identification, characterization, genuineness, and pharmacological activity assessment. In particular, it is possible to reveal adulteration of different nature, such as addition of synthetic compounds, or natural components of different botanical origin, with drastic changes in the biological and olfactory properties. This study is focused on the evaluation of the enantiomeric excesses of numerous samples of different Citrus species: C. deliciosa Ten., C. limon (L. Burm., C. bergamia, C. aurantifolia (Christm. Swing., C. latifolia Tan., C. sinensis (L. Osbeck, and C. aurantium L. The enantiomeric distribution is determined by direct esGC and, depending on the complexity of the essential oil, by MDGC with a chiral column in the second dimension. The research is focused on the determination of fourteen chiral components which present specific distribution in the essential oils investigated. Particular attention is given to the trend of the enantiomeric distribution during the productive season, so to identify useful parameters for quality assessment also in consideration of the wide range of variability often reported in literature. The components investigated were the following: α-thujene, α-pinene, camphene, β-pinene, sabinene, α-phellandrene, β-phellandrene, limonene, linalool, camphor, citronellal, linalyl acetate, terpinen-4-ol, α-terpineol. The use of MDGC allowed the separation of the enantiomers of camphor and citronellal, otherwise not separated by conventional esGC; however for the separation of the enantiomers of α-pinene it was preferable to use conventional esGC. The MDGC system allowed to determine the enantiomeric distribution of camphene, α- and β-phellandrene in lime essential oil for the first time. The results are discussed in function of seasonal variation and, when possible, in

  13. Characterization of Citrus-Associated Alternaria Species in Mediterranean Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garganese, Francesca; Schena, Leonardo; Siciliano, Ilenia; Prigigallo, Maria Isabella; Spadaro, Davide; De Grassi, Anna; Ippolito, Antonio; Sanzani, Simona Marianna

    2016-01-01

    Alternaria brown spot is one of the most important diseases of tangerines and their hybrids worldwide. Recently, outbreaks in Mediterranean areas related to susceptible cultivars, refocused attention on the disease. Twenty representatives were selected from a collection of 180 isolates of Alternaria spp. from citrus leaves and fruit. They were characterized along with reference strains of Alternaria spp. Micro- and macroscopic characteristics separated most Alternaria isolates into six morphotypes referable to A. alternata (5) and A. arborescens (1). Phylogenetic analyses, based on endopolygalacturonase (endopg) and internal transcribed spacer (ITS), confirmed this finding. Moreover, a five-gene phylogeny including two anonymous genomics regions (OPA 1-3 and OPA 2-1), and the beta-tubulin gene (ß-tub), produced a further clustering of A. alternata into three clades. This analysis suggested the existence of intra-species molecular variability. Investigated isolates showed different levels of virulence on leaves and fruit. In particular, the pathogenicity on fruit seemed to be correlated with the tissue of isolation and the clade. The toxigenic behavior of Alternaria isolates was also investigated, with tenuazonic acid (TeA) being the most abundant mycotoxin (0.2-20 mg/L). Isolates also synthesized the mycotoxins alternariol (AOH), its derivate alternariol monomethyl ether (AME), and altenuene (ALT), although to a lesser extent. AME production significantly varied among the six morphotypes. The expression of pksJ/pksH, biosynthetic genes of AOH/AME, was not correlated with actual toxin production, but it was significantly different between the two genotypes and among the four clades. Finally, ten isolates proved to express the biosynthetic genes of ACTT1 phytotoxin, and thus to be included in the Alternaria pathotype tangerine. A significant correlation between pathogenicity on leaves and ACTT1 gene expression was recorded. The latter was significantly dependent on

  14. Molecular mechanisms of citrus flavanones on hepatic gluconeogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantin, Rodrigo Polimeni; Constantin, Renato Polimeni; Bracht, Adelar; Yamamoto, Nair Seiko; Ishii-Iwamoto, Emy Luiza; Constantin, Jorgete

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that hyperglycaemia is the initiating cause of tissue damage associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus and that enhanced hepatic gluconeogenesis may account for the increase in blood glucose levels. The purpose of this work was to investigate the possible actions and mechanisms of three related citrus flavanones, namely hesperidin, hesperetin and naringenin, on hepatic gluconeogenesis and related parameters using isolated perfused rat liver. Hesperetin and naringenin (but not hesperidin) inhibited gluconeogenesis from lactate plus pyruvate, alanine and dihydroxyacetone. The inhibitory effects of these flavanones on gluconeogenesis from lactate and pyruvate (hesperetin IC50 75.6 μM; naringenin IC50 85.5 μM) as well as from alanine were considerably more pronounced than those from dihydroxyacetone. The main cause of gluconeogenesis inhibition is the reduction of pyruvate carboxylation by hesperetin (IC50 134.2 μM) and naringenin (IC50 143.5 μM) via inhibition of pyruvate transport into the mitochondria. Secondary causes are likely inhibition of energy metabolism, diversion of glucose 6-phosphate for glucuronidation reactions and oxidation of NADH by flavanone phenoxyl radicals. The influence of the structural differences between hesperetin and naringenin on their metabolic effects was negligible. Analytical evidence indicated that the presence of a rutinoside moiety in hesperidin noticeably decreases its metabolic effects, confirming that hesperetin and naringenin interact with intracellular enzymes and mitochondrial or cellular membranes better than hesperidin. Thus, the inhibition of the gluconeogenic pathway by citrus flavanones, which was similar to that of the drug metformin, may represent an attractive novel treatment strategy for type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Financial Analysis Of Citrus “Keprok 55” In Coventional Way and Using Sprinkler Irrigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambang Suharto

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Batu-Malang Government area is one of central production of citrus ”Keprok 55” in East Java. In dry season, citrus produce low production level, because there is unsufficient water inside the soil. Based on this facts, some efforts is needed in order to increase the citrus production especially to face the dry season, through sprinkle irrigation system to increase citrus production. Sprinkle irrigation system has been installed on citrus plantation in Selorejo Village, Batu. Citrus is one of the horticultural commodities which have priority to be developed. One type of citrus that favored consumers are mandarin (tangerine. During the period 2005-2009 tangerine imports reached 504,063 tonnes, or about 100,813 tonnes per year with a value of US $ 80,569,300. Management of commodity Citrus 55 in Selorejo village, subdistrict Dau, Malang not get maximum benefit due to the limitations of the use of technological innovation as well as the lack of capital. The experiment calculated HPP, BEP, NPV, R/C ratio, IRR and PP. This study was to compare the effect of management changes Citrus 55 between conventional and sprinkler irrigation. The financial viability of commodity management Citrus 55 in Selorejo Village declared eligible to run either conventionally or with sprinkler irrigation. Age commodity management business is ten years. Conventional management NVP value is IDR 1,234,468,408 and the value of NVP management with the use of sprinkler irrigation is IDR 5,200,599,957. PP value of conventional management is 5 years 2 months and sprinkler irrigation is 2 years and 5 months. Conventional management IRR value is 59.47% and value of management use sprinkle is 68.08%. R/C Ratio with conventional management is 1.4 and value R/C Ratio with sprinkle is 5.7. BEP value with management conventional is 5,719 kilograms and with sprinkle is 16,059 Kilograms. HPP value with management conventional is IDR 784 and with sprinkle is IDR 191.

  16. Citrus Essential Oil of Nigeria Part IV: Volatile Constituents of Leaf Oils of Mandarins (Citrus Reticulata Blanco From Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeleke A. Kasali

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The chemical composition of hydrodistilled oils obtained from the leaves of six Citrus reticulata Blanco (mandarin cultivars grown in Nigeria were examined by GC and GC/MS, the result of their chemical composition were further submitted to cluster analysis. Fifty seven constituents were characterized accounting for 88.2 - 96.7% of the total oils. Sabinene, g -terpinene, P-cymene, d -3-carene and (E- b -ocimene were observed in great variability in all the oils. Other constituents include linalool, myrcene, terpinen-4-ol and cis-sabinenehydrate. In addition, limonene, terpinolene, b -pinene, and a -pinene were also detected in appreciable concentrations. b -sinensal and a -sinensal were isolated by preparative GC and characterized by one- and two-dimensional NMR techniques.

  17. Sexual Competitiveness of Anastrepha ludens (Diptera: Tephritidae) Males Exposed to Citrus aurantium and Citrus paradisi Essential Oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morató, Santiago; Shelly, Todd; Rull, Juan; Aluja, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Males of the Mediterranean fruit fly (Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann)) display increased mating competitiveness following exposure to the odor of certain host and nonhost plants, and this phenomenon has been used in the sterile insect technique to boost the mating success of released, sterile males. Here, we aimed to establish whether males of the Mexican fruit fly (Anastrepha ludens (Loew)) gain a mating advantage when exposed to the aroma of two preferred hosts, grapefruit (Citrus paradisi Macfadyen) and bitter orange (Citrus aurantium L.). Under seminatural conditions, we observed that, in trials using wildish males (from a young laboratory colony started with wild flies) exclusively, exposure to the aroma of bitter orange had no effect on male mating success but exposure to the odor grapefruit oil increased male mating success significantly. In a separate test involving both exposed and nonexposed wildish and mass-reared, sterile males, although wildish males were clearly more competitive than sterile males, exposure to grapefruit oil had no detectable effect on either male type. Exposure to oils had no effect on copulation duration in any of the experiments. We discuss the possibility that the positive effect of grapefruit essential oils on wildish male competitiveness may have been linked to exposure of females to grapefruit as a larval food, which may have imprinted them with grapefruit odors during pupal eclosion and biased their response as adults to odors of their maternal host. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Thermal degradation of antioxidant micronutrients in citrus juice: kinetics and newly formed compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhuique-Mayer, Claudie; Tbatou, Manal; Carail, Michel; Caris-Veyrat, Catherine; Dornier, Manuel; Amiot, Marie Josephe

    2007-05-16

    The thermal degradation kinetics of vitamin C, two carotenoids (beta-carotene and beta-cryptoxanthin), and hesperidin, as a function of temperature, were determined for Citrus juice [Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck and Citrus clementina Hort. ex Tan]. The influence of dissolved oxygen on the rate of ascorbic acid degradation was also assessed. Analysis of kinetic data suggested a first-order reaction for the degradation of vitamin C and carotenoids. The kinetics parameters Dtheta, z, and Ea have been calculated. Following the Arrhenius relationship, the activation energy of ascorbic acid was 35.9 kJ mol-1 and agreed with the range of literature reported value. The results on vitamin C and carotenoids from citrus juice made it possible to validate the predicting model. Thermal degradation of carotenoids revealed differences in stability among the main provitamin A carotenoids and between these and other carotenoids belonging to the xanthophyll family. The activation energies for the two provitamin A carotenoids were 110 and 156 kJ mol-1 for beta-carotene and beta-cryptoxanthin, respectively. On the other hand, no degradation of hesperidin was observed during thermal treatment. Finally, the vitamin C in citrus juice was not as heat sensitive as expected and the main provitamin A carotenoids present in citrus juice displayed a relative heat stability. The high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection-mass spectrometry analysis of degradation products showed that the isomerization of the epoxide function in position 5,6 into a furanoxide function in position 5,8 was a common reaction for several xanthophylls. These findings will help determine optimal processing conditions for minimizing the degradation of important quality factors such as vitamin C and carotenoid in citrus juice.

  19. A genome-wide 20 K citrus microarray for gene expression analysis

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    Gadea Jose

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding of genetic elements that contribute to key aspects of citrus biology will impact future improvements in this economically important crop. Global gene expression analysis demands microarray platforms with a high genome coverage. In the last years, genome-wide EST collections have been generated in citrus, opening the possibility to create new tools for functional genomics in this crop plant. Results We have designed and constructed a publicly available genome-wide cDNA microarray that include 21,081 putative unigenes of citrus. As a functional companion to the microarray, a web-browsable database 1 was created and populated with information about the unigenes represented in the microarray, including cDNA libraries, isolated clones, raw and processed nucleotide and protein sequences, and results of all the structural and functional annotation of the unigenes, like general description, BLAST hits, putative Arabidopsis orthologs, microsatellites, putative SNPs, GO classification and PFAM domains. We have performed a Gene Ontology comparison with the full set of Arabidopsis proteins to estimate the genome coverage of the microarray. We have also performed microarray hybridizations to check its usability. Conclusion This new cDNA microarray replaces the first 7K microarray generated two years ago and allows gene expression analysis at a more global scale. We have followed a rational design to minimize cross-hybridization while maintaining its utility for different citrus species. Furthermore, we also provide access to a website with full structural and functional annotation of the unigenes represented in the microarray, along with the ability to use this site to directly perform gene expression analysis using standard tools at different publicly available servers. Furthermore, we show how this microarray offers a good representation of the citrus genome and present the usefulness of this genomic tool for global

  20. Comparative Analysis of Flower Volatiles from Nine Citrus at Three Blooming Stages

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    Muhammad Azam

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Volatiles from flowers at three blooming stages of nine citrus cultivars were analyzed by headspace-solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME-GC-MS. Up to 110 volatiles were detected, with 42 tentatively identified from citrus flowers for the first time. Highest amounts of volatiles were present in fully opened flowers of most citrus, except for pomelos. All cultivars were characterized by a high percentage of either oxygenated monoterpenes or monoterpene hydrocarbons, and the presence of a high percentage of nitrogen containing compounds was also observed. Flower volatiles varied qualitatively and quantitatively among citrus types during blooming. Limonene was the most abundant flower volatile only in citrons; α-citral and β-citral ranked 2nd and 3rd only for Bergamot, and unopened flowers of Ponkan had a higher amount of linalool and β-pinene while much lower amount of γ-terpinene and p-cymene than Satsuma. Taking the average of all cultivars, linalool and limonene were the top two volatiles for all blooming stages; β-pinene ranked 3rd in unopened flowers, while indole ranked 3rd for half opened and fully opened flower volatiles. As flowers bloomed, methyl anthranilate increased while 2-hexenal and p-cymene decreased. In some cases, a volatile could be high in both unopened and fully opened flowers but low in half opened ones. Through multivariate analysis, the nine citrus cultivars were clustered into three groups, consistent with the three true citrus types. Furthermore, an influence of blooming stages on clustering was observed, especially with hybrids Satsuma and Huyou. Altogether, it was suggested that flower volatiles can be suitable markers for revealing the genetic relationships between citrus cultivars but the same blooming stage needs to be strictly controlled.

  1. A novel carotenoid cleavage activity involved in the biosynthesis of Citrus fruit-specific apocarotenoid pigments

    KAUST Repository

    Rodrigo, María J.

    2013-09-04

    Citrus is the first tree crop in terms of fruit production. The colour of Citrus fruit is one of the main quality attributes, caused by the accumulation of carotenoids and their derivative C30 apocarotenoids, mainly ?-citraurin (3-hydroxy-?-apo-8?-carotenal), which provide an attractive orange-reddish tint to the peel of oranges and mandarins. Though carotenoid biosynthesis and its regulation have been extensively studied in Citrus fruits, little is known about the formation of C30 apocarotenoids. The aim of this study was to the identify carotenoid cleavage enzyme(s) [CCD(s)] involved in the peel-specific C30 apocarotenoids. In silico data mining revealed a new family of five CCD4-type genes in Citrus. One gene of this family, CCD4b1, was expressed in reproductive and vegetative tissues of different Citrus species in a pattern correlating with the accumulation of C30 apocarotenoids. Moreover, developmental processes and treatments which alter Citrus fruit peel pigmentation led to changes of ?-citraurin content and CCD4b1 transcript levels. These results point to the involvement of CCD4b1 in ?-citraurin formation and indicate that the accumulation of this compound is determined by the availability of the presumed precursors zeaxanthin and ?-cryptoxanthin. Functional analysis of CCD4b1 by in vitro assays unequivocally demonstrated the asymmetric cleavage activity at the 7?,8? double bond in zeaxanthin and ?-cryptoxanthin, confrming its role in C30 apocarotenoid biosynthesis. Thus, a novel plant carotenoid cleavage activity targeting the 7?,8? double bond of cyclic C40 carotenoids has been identified. These results suggest that the presented enzyme is responsible for the biosynthesis of C30 apocarotenoids in Citrus which are key pigments in fruit coloration. The Author 2013.

  2. Visualization of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ cells in citrus seed coats with fluorescence in situ hybridization and transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ is bacterium implicated as the causal agent of the economically damaging disease of citrus called huanglongbing (HLB). The bacterium is spread by movement of infected citrus propagation material and by the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama. Seed tr...

  3. Zinc treatment increases the titre of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ in Huanglongbing-affected citrus plants while affecting the bacterial microbiomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huanglongbing (HLB)-affected citrus often display zinc deficiency symptoms. In this study, supplemental zinc was applied to citrus to determine its effect on Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (Las) titer, HLB symptoms, and leaf microbiome. HLB-affected citrus were treated with various amounts of zi...

  4. High incidence of preharvest colonization of huanglongbing-symptomatic Citrus sinensis fruit by Lasiodiplodia theobromae (Diplodia natalensis) and exacerbation of postharvest fruit decay by that fungus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huanglongbing (HLB), presumably caused by bacterium Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas), is a devastating citrus disease associated with excessive pre-harvest fruit drop. Lasiodiplodia theobromae (Diplodia) is the causal organism of citrus stem end rot (SER). The pathogen infects citrus fruit ...

  5. 'Psyllid purple’: evidence of behavior-based utilization by the Asian citrus psyllid of a combination of short and long wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri, is the vector of huanglongbing, the most serious disease affecting citrus globally. In Florida alone, D. citri has resulted in billions of dollars of damage and has spread to all the citrus growing regions of North America. The visual behavior of D. citri ...

  6. Combining 'omics and microscopy to visualize interactions between the Asian citrus psyllid vector and the Huanglongbing pathogen Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus in the insect gut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huanglongbing, or citrus greening disease, is an economically devastating bacterial disease of citrus. It is associated with infection by the gram-negative bacterium Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas). CLas is transmitted by Diaphorina citri, the Asian citrus psyllid (ACP). For insect transmis...

  7. The Composition, Antioxidant and Antibacterial Activities of Cold-Pressed and Distilled Essential Oils of Citrus paradisi and Citrus grandis (L. Osbeck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Chiu Ou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The chemical composition and functional activities of cold-pressed and water distilled peel essential oils of Citrus paradisi (C. paradisi and Citrus grandis (L. Osbeck (C. grandis were investigated in present study. Yields of cold-pressed oils were much higher than those of distilled oils. Limonene was the primary ingredient of essential oils of C. paradisi (cold 92.83%; distilled 96.06% and C. grandis (cold 32.63%; distilled 55.74%. In addition, C. grandis oils obtained were rich in oxygenated or nitrogenated compounds which may be involved in reducing cardiovascular diseases or enhancing sleep effectiveness. The order of free radical scavenging activities of 4 citrus oils was distilled C. paradisi oil > cold-pressed C. paradisi oil > distilled C. grandis oil > cold-pressed C. grandis oil. Cold-pressed C. grandis oil exhibited the lowest activity in all antioxidative assays. The order of antimicrobial activities of 4 citrus oils was distilled C. grandis oil, cold-pressed C. paradisi oil > distilled C. paradisi oil > cold-pressed C. paradisi oil. Surprisingly, distilled C. grandis oil exhibited better antimicrobial activities than distilled C. paradisi oil, especially against Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica subsp. The results also indicated that the antimicrobial activities of essential oils may not relate to their antioxidative activities.

  8. Efficacy of indigenous predatory mites (Acari: Phytoseiidae) against the citrus rust mite Phyllocoptruta oleivora (Acari: Eriophyidae): augmentation and conservation biological control in Israeli citrus orchards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maoz, Yonatan; Gal, Shira; Argov, Yael; Domeratzky, Sylvie; Melamed, Eti; Gan-Mor, Samuel; Coll, Moshe; Palevsky, Eric

    2014-07-01

    The citrus rust mite (CRM), Phyllocoptruta oleivora (Acari: Eriophyidae) is a cosmopolitan key pest of citrus, inflicting severe economic damage if not controlled. In Israel, CRM damages all citrus cultivars. International regulation and increasing control failures of CRM led growers to seek sustainable biological control solutions such as acarine biological control agents. Laboratory studies conducted in Israel have indicated that the indigenous predator species Amblyseius swirskii, Iphiseius degenerans, Typhlodromus athiasae and Euseius scutalis (all Acari: Phytoseiidae) can potentially control CRM. Our general objective in the present study was to bridge the gap of knowledge between laboratory studies and the lack of control efficacy of these species in commercial orchards. Predator augmentation in the field showed that although predator populations increased immediately following releases they later decreased and did not affect CRM populations. When A. swirskii augmentation was combined with a series of maize pollen applications, A. swirskii populations were enhanced substantially and continuously but again CRM populations were not affected. Growth chamber studies with CRM-infested seedlings, with or without a maize pollen supplement, indicated that pollen provisioning led to population increase of E. scutalis and A. swirskii but only E. scutalis significantly lowered CRM populations. Control with E. scutalis was confirmed in the field on CRM infested seedlings with pollen provisioned by adjacent flowering Rhodes grass. While experiments in mature citrus orchard showed that pollen supplement usually increased predator populations they also indicated that other factors such as intraguild interactions and pesticide treatments should be taken into account when devising CRM biological control programs.

  9. Analysis of 13000 unique Citrus clusters associated with fruit quality, production and salinity tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dossat Carole

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Improvement of Citrus, the most economically important fruit crop in the world, is extremely slow and inherently costly because of the long-term nature of tree breeding and an unusual combination of reproductive characteristics. Aside from disease resistance, major commercial traits in Citrus are improved fruit quality, higher yield and tolerance to environmental stresses, especially salinity. Results A normalized full length and 9 standard cDNA libraries were generated, representing particular treatments and tissues from selected varieties (Citrus clementina and C. sinensis and rootstocks (C. reshni, and C. sinenis × Poncirus trifoliata differing in fruit quality, resistance to abscission, and tolerance to salinity. The goal of this work was to provide a large expressed sequence tag (EST collection enriched with transcripts related to these well appreciated agronomical traits. Towards this end, more than 54000 ESTs derived from these libraries were analyzed and annotated. Assembly of 52626 useful sequences generated 15664 putative transcription units distributed in 7120 contigs, and 8544 singletons. BLAST annotation produced significant hits for more than 80% of the hypothetical transcription units and suggested that 647 of these might be Citrus specific unigenes. The unigene set, composed of ~13000 putative different transcripts, including more than 5000 novel Citrus genes, was assigned with putative functions based on similarity, GO annotations and protein domains Conclusion Comparative genomics with Arabidopsis revealed the presence of putative conserved orthologs and single copy genes in Citrus and also the occurrence of both gene duplication events and increased number of genes for specific pathways. In addition, phylogenetic analysis performed on the ammonium transporter family and glycosyl transferase family 20 suggested the existence of Citrus paralogs. Analysis of the Citrus gene space showed that the most

  10. Transcriptome analysis of citrus sinensis in response to dual infection by Citrius tristeza virus and ’Candidatus liberibacter asiaticus'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huanglongbing (HLB) and Tristeza are destructive and globally distributed citrus diseases, and are responsible for the tremendous economic losses to the citrus industries worldwide. HLB is caused by a gram-negative and phloem-limited member of the a-Proteobacteria, Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus...

  11. Structural characterization of the thermally-tolerant pectin methylesterase purified from Citrus sinensis fruit and its gene sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despite the longstanding importance for the thermally-tolerant pectin methylesterase (TT-PME) activity in citrus juice processing and product quality, unequivocal identification of the protein and its corresponding gene has remained elusive. We purified TT-PME from sweet orange [Citrus sinensis (L.)...

  12. Conversing about Citrus Greening: Extension's Role in Educating about Genetic Modification Science as a Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruth, Taylor K.; Lamm, Alexa J.; Rumble, Joy N.; Ellis, Jason D.

    2017-01-01

    Extension agents across the nation will need to facilitate difficult conversations with the public if genetic modification (GM) science is used to combat citrus greening disease. This study used the innovation characteristics described by Rogers to explore if using GM science as a solution to citrus greening had diffused amongst US residents. An…

  13. Influence of limiting and regulating factors on populations of Asian citrus psyllid and the risk of insect and disease outbreaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Data from long term monitoring programs in two Florida citrus groves were used to assess Asian citrus psyllid demography and population ecology, which is needed to implement more effective management strategies for huanglongbing. We describe and interpret seasonal patterns and correlations between A...

  14. Orchard and nursery dynamics of the effect of interplanting citrus with guava for Huanglongbing, vector, and disease management

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Asian citrus psyllid (ACP), Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Liviidae), is an important pest of citrus in the United States of America primarily because it vectors ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’, the bacterium putatively responsible for Asiatic huanglongbing (HLB). Asiatic HLB is con...

  15. Increased infestation of Asian citrus psyllids on cold treated sour orange seedlings: Its possible relation to biochemical changes in leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cold-stressed sour orange seedling (Citrus aurantium L.) attracted significantly more Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) (Diaphorina citri Kuwayama) during 5h and 24h recovery periods compared to control plants in choice test experiment. Cold stressed plants were held/ placed at 6 ± 1°C for 6 days and then ...

  16. The distribution and biology of potential vectors of Xylella fastidiosa on coffee and citrus in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant diseases caused by Xylella fastidiosa (Wells et al.) (Xf) surround the Caribbean Basin. Two major commodities of Puerto Rico, coffee and citrus, are highly susceptible to Xf. We surveyed potential vectors of Xf in coffee and citrus farms in western Puerto Rico over an 18 month period. Cicadel...

  17. Efficacy of three citrus oil formulations against solenopsis invicta buren (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), the red imported fire ant1,2

    Science.gov (United States)

    James T. Vogt; Thormas G. Shelton; Michael E. Merchant; Scott A. Russell; Marla J. Tanley; Arthur G. Appel

    2002-01-01

    Experiments were conducted in Alabama, Oklahoma, and Texas to assess efficacy of raw citrus peel extract (orange oil) and a commercial citrus oil formulation for control of Solenopsis invicta Buren, the red imported fire ant. A recipe containing orange oil (equal parts orange oil, cattlemen's molasses, and compost tea at 47 mL L1 water),...

  18. Citrus essential oils and four enantiomeric pinenes against Culex pipiens (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelakis, Antonios; Papachristos, Dimitrios; Kimbaris, Athanasios; Koliopoulos, George; Giatropoulos, Athanasios; Polissiou, Moschos G

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the toxicity of pinenes (enantiomers of alpha- and beta-) and essential oils from Greek plants of the Rutaceae family against the mosquito larvae of Culex pipiens (Diptera: Culicidae). Essential oils were isolated by hydrodistillation from fruit peel of orange (Citrus sinensis L.), lemon (Citrus limon L.), and bitter orange (Citrus aurantium L.). The chemical composition was determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis. Citrus essential oils contained in high proportion limonene and in lower quantities p-menthane molecules and pinenes. The insecticidal action of these essential oils and enantiomers of their pinenes on mosquito larvae was evaluated. Plant essential oils exhibited strong toxicity against larvae with the LC(50) values ranging from 30.1 (lemon) to 51.5 mg/L (orange) depending on Citrus species and their composition. Finally, the LC(50) value of pinenes ranging from 36.53 to 66.52 mg/L indicated an enantioselective toxicity only for the beta-pinene enantiomer.

  19. Sustainable Use of Pesticide Applications in Citrus: A Support Tool for Volume Rate Adjustment

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    Cruz Garcerá

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Rational application of pesticides by properly adjusting the amount of product to the actual needs and specific conditions for application is a key factor for sustainable plant protection. However, current plant protection product (PPP labels registered for citrus in EU are usually expressed as concentration (%; rate/hl and/or as the maximum dose of product per unit of ground surface, without taking into account those conditions. In this work, the fundamentals of a support tool, called CitrusVol, developed to recommend mix volume rates in PPP applications in citrus orchards using airblast sprayers, are presented. This tool takes into consideration crop characteristics (geometry, leaf area density, pests, and product and application efficiency, and it is based on scientific data obtained previously regarding the minimum deposit required to achieve maximum efficacy, efficiency of airblast sprayers in citrus orchards, and characterization of the crop. The use of this tool in several commercial orchards allowed a reduction of the volume rate and the PPPs used in comparison with the commonly used by farmers of between 11% and 74%, with an average of 31%, without affecting the efficacy. CitrusVol is freely available on a website and in an app for smartphones.

  20. Gamma irradiation as a quarantine treatment against eggs of Citrus black fly (Aleurocanthus woglumi Ashby)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villavicencio, Anna Lucia C.H.; Araujo, Michel M.; Fanaro, Gustavo B.; Costa, Helbert H.S.F.; Silva, Priscila P.V.; Arthur, Valter

    2009-01-01

    The citrus black fruit fly (Aleurocanthus woglumi Ashby) is an important pest of citrus originated in Southeast Asia and its first record in the new world was in Jamaica in 1913. In Brazil, it was detected in 2001 in the state of Para and more recently it was detected in Sao Paulo in 2008. This pest that attacks over 300 species of plants, but its main host are citrus. It is an A2 quarantine pest, because it is not spread throughout the country. The objective of this study was to test doses of 0 (control), 25, 50, 75, 100, 125, 150, 175 and 200 Gy of gamma irradiation for disinfection of eggs of the citrus black fruit fly in leaves of citrus plants. Treatment consisted of 5 replicates with 60 eggs each. Evaluations were performed in the following periods: 1, 3, 5, 7 and 10 days after irradiation. Under the conditions assayed, it could be concluded that a dose of 200 Gy caused 100% mortality of Aleurocanthus woglumi Ashby eggs and could be recommended as a successful quarantine processing against infested plants. (author)

  1. Exogenous nitric oxide-induced postharvest disease resistance in citrus fruit to Colletotrichum gloeosporioides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yahan; Li, Shunmin; Zeng, Kaifang

    2016-01-30

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important signaling molecule involved in numerous plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. To investigate the effects of NO on the control of postharvest anthracnose caused by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides in citrus fruit and its possible mechanisms, citrus fruit were treated with an NO donor. The results showed that exogenous NO released from 50 µmol L(-1) sodium nitroprusside aqueous solution could effectively reduce the disease incidence and lesion diameter of citrus fruit inoculated with C. gloeosporioides during storage at 20 °C. Exogenous NO could regulate hydrogen peroxide levels, stimulate the synthesis of phenolic compounds, and induce phenylalanine ammonia-lyase, peroxidase, polyphenol oxidase, catalase activities, and the ascorbate-glutathione cycle. Furthermore, exogenous NO could inhibit weight loss, improve the ascorbic acid and titratable acidity content, and delay the increase in total soluble solids content in citrus fruit during storage at 20 °C. The results suggest that the use of exogenous NO is a potential method for inducing the disease resistance of fruit to fungal pathogens and for extending the postharvest life of citrus fruit. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. Description of the airflow produced by an air-assisted sprayer during pesticide applications to citrus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon Salcedo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric drift of plant protection products is considered a major source of air pollution during pesticide applications. Citrus protection against pests and diseases usually requires application of these products using air-blast sprayers. Many authors have emphasized the influence of vegetation on the risk of spray drift. The aim of this work was to describe in detail how the airflow from an air-blast sprayer behaves when it reaches citrus trees and, in particular, the effect that the tree canopy has on this flow. Tests were conducted at a commercial citrus orchard with conventional machinery, placed parallel to a row of trees. Air velocity and direction was measured using a 3D ultrasonic anemometer in 225 points situated in three parallel planes perpendicular to the equipment. The stability of the airflow at each measuring point was studied and the mean velocities were graphically represented. Two vortexes, one behind the canopy, and another over the tree, have been deducted and never been reported before. Both may have an important influence on the trajectories of the sprayed droplets and, as a consequence, on the way in which plant protection products are diffused into the atmosphere. Observed turbulence intensities were higher than in similar experiments conducted in other tree crops, which may be attributable to the higher air volume generated by the machinery used for citrus protection and to the higher foliage density of citrus orchards.

  3. Description of the airflow produced by an air-assisted sprayer during pesticide applications to citrus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salcedo, R.; Garcera, C.; Granell, R.; Molto, E.; Chueca, P.

    2015-07-01

    Atmospheric drift of plant protection products is considered a major source of air pollution during pesticide applications. Citrus protection against pests and diseases usually requires application of these products using air-blast sprayers. Many authors have emphasized the influence of vegetation on the risk of spray drift. The aim of this work was to describe in detail how the airflow from an air-blast sprayer behaves when it reaches citrus trees and, in particular, the effect that the tree canopy has on this flow. Tests were conducted at a commercial citrus orchard with conventional machinery, placed parallel to a row of trees. Air velocity and direction was measured using a 3D ultrasonic anemometer in 225 points situated in three parallel planes perpendicular to the equipment. The stability of the airflow at each measuring point was studied and the mean velocities were graphically represented. Two vortexes, one behind the canopy, and another over the tree, have been deducted and never been reported before. Both may have an important influence on the trajectories of the sprayed droplets and, as a consequence, on the way in which plant protection products are diffused into the atmosphere. Observed turbulence intensities were higher than in similar experiments conducted in other tree crops, which may be attributable to the higher air volume generated by the machinery used for citrus protection and to the higher foliage density of citrus orchards. (Author)

  4. The Effect of Citrus Essential Oils and Their Constituents on Growth of Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaei-Najafgholi, Hossein; Tarighi, Saeed; Golmohammadi, Morteza; Taheri, Parissa

    2017-04-14

    Citrus bacterial canker (CBC) caused by Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri ( Xcc ), is the most devastating of the citrus diseases worldwide. During our study, we found that Essential oils (EOs) of some citrus cultivars are effective on Xcc . Therefore, it prompted us to determine the plant metabolites responsible for the antibacterial properties. We obtained EOs from some locally cultivated citrus by using a Clevenger apparatus and their major constituents were identified by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The effect of Citrus aurantium , C. aurantifolia , Fortunella sp. EOs and their major constituents were evaluated against Xcc -KVXCC1 using a disk diffusion assay. Minimal inhibitory and bactericidal concentration of the EOs and their constituents were determined using the broth microdilution method. C. aurantium , C. aurantifolia Eos, and their major constituents including citral, linalool, citronellal, geraniol, α-terpineol, and linalyl acetate indicated antibacterial effects against Xcc . The C. aurantifolia EO and citral showed the highest antibacterial activity among the tested EOs and constituents with inhibition zones of 15 ± 0.33 mm and 16.67 ± 0.88 mm, respectively. Synergistic effects of the constituents were observed between α-terpineol-citral, citral-citronellal, citral-geraniol, and citronellal-geraniol by using a microdilution checkerboard assay. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that exposure of Xcc cells to citral caused cell wall damage and altered cytoplasmic density. We introduced C. aurantifolia and C. aurantium EOs, and their constituents citral, α-terpineol, citronellal, geraniol, and linalool as possible control agents for CBC.

  5. Regulation of ascorbic acid metabolism by blue LED light irradiation in citrus juice sacs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lancui; Ma, Gang; Yamawaki, Kazuki; Ikoma, Yoshinori; Matsumoto, Hikaru; Yoshioka, Terutaka; Ohta, Satoshi; Kato, Masaya

    2015-04-01

    In the present study, the effects of red and blue LED lights on the accumulation of ascorbic acid (AsA) were investigated in the juice sacs of three citrus varieties, Satsuma mandarin, Valencia orange, and Lisbon lemon. The results showed that the blue LED light treatment effectively increased the AsA content in the juice sacs of the three citrus varieties, whereas the red LED light treatment did not. By increasing the blue LED light intensity, the juice sacs of the three citrus varieties accumulated more AsA. Moreover, continuous irradiation with blue LED light was more effective than pulsed irradiation for increasing the AsA content in the juice sacs of the three citrus varieties. Gene expression results showed that the modulation of AsA accumulation by blue LED light was highly regulated at the transcription level. The up-regulation of AsA biosynthetic genes (CitVTC1, CitVTC2, CitVTC4, and CitGLDH), AsA regeneration genes (CitMDAR1, CitMDAR2, and CitDHAR) and two GSH-producing genes (CitGR and CitchGR) contributed to these increases in the AsA content in the three citrus varieties. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Anticholinesterase and antioxidative properties of water-extractable phytochemicals from some citrus peels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ademosun, Ayokunle Olubode; Oboh, Ganiyu

    2014-05-01

    Aqueous extracts from citrus peels are used in many rural communities in Nigeria in treating various degenerative conditions, although the scientific basis for its use has not been well established. This study sought to investigate the anticholinesterase and antioxidant properties of aqueous extracts from some citrus peels [orange (Citrus sinensis), grapefruit (Citrus paradisii), and shaddock (Citrus maxima)]. The effects of the extracts on acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity, as well as Fe2+-induced malondialdehyde (MDA) production in vitro, were investigated. The total phenolic, flavonoid content, and antioxidant activities as typified by 1,1-diphenyl-2 picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging ability and hydroxyl (OH) radicals scavenging abilities were also investigated. The results revealed that orange peels had the highest total phenol content followed by grapefruit peels, whereas shaddock peels had the least. The extracts inhibited AChE activity in a dose-dependent manner, although there is no significant difference (p>0.05) in their inhibitory abilities of the peels. The extracts exhibited antioxidant activities as typified by their radical (DPPH· and OH·) scavenging abilities as well as the inhibition of Fe2+-induced lipid peroxidation in rat's brain in vitro. The anticholinesterase activity and inhibition of MDA production by the aqueous extracts of the peels, as well as other antioxidant activities, could make the peels a good dietary means for the management of oxidative-mediated neurodegenerative disorders.

  7. Differential expression of genes of Xylella fastidiosa in xylem fluid of citrus and grapevine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiangyang; Bi, Jianlong; Morse, Joseph G; Toscano, Nick C; Cooksey, Donald A

    2010-03-01

    Xylella fastidiosa causes a serious Pierce's disease (PD) in grapevine. Xylella fastidiosa cells from a PD strain were grown in a pure xylem fluid of a susceptible grapevine cultivar vs. xylem fluid from citrus, which is not a host for this strain of X. fastidiosa. When grown in grapevine xylem fluid, cells of the PD strain formed clumps and biofilm formed to a greater extent than in citrus xylem fluid, although the PD strain did grow in xylem fluid of three citrus varieties. The differential expression of selected genes of a PD X. fastidiosa strain cultured in the two xylem fluids was analyzed using a DNA macroarray. Compared with citrus xylem fluid, grapevine xylem fluid stimulated the expression of X. fastidiosa genes involved in virulence regulation, such as gacA, algU, xrvA, and hsq, and also genes involved in the biogenesis of pili and twitching motility, such as fimT, pilI, pilU, and pilY1. Increased gene expression likely contributes to PD expression in grapevine, whereas citrus xylem fluid did not support or possibly suppressed the expression of these virulence genes.

  8. Modeling the incidence of citrus canker in leaves of the sweet orange variety ‘Pera’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle da Silva Pompeu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Citrus canker, caused by the bacterium Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri, is one of the most important diseases of citrus. The use of resistant genotypes plays an important role in the management and control of the disease and is the most environmentally sustainable approach to disease control. Citrus canker incidence was recorded in an experiment on nine genotypes of the sweet orange variety ‘Pera’ grafted on four rootstocks. The experiment was started in 2010 and the incidence of citrus canker on the leaves was recorded on a quarterly basis. The incidence data from the experiment were analyzed using a zero-inflated Beta regression model (RBIZ, which is the appropriate method to describe data with large numbers of zeros. Based on the residual analysis, the data fit the model well. The discrete component of the explanatory variable, rootstock, was not significant as a factor affecting the onset of disease, in contrast with the continuous component, genotype, which was significant in explaining the incidence of citrus canker.

  9. The citrus leprosis pathosystem O patossistema leprose dos citros

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinês Bastianel

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Citrus leprosis is considered the main viral disease for the Brazilian citrus production, particularly for the State of São Paulo, due to the high costs spent for the chemical control of its vector, the tenuipalpid mite Brevipalpus phoenicis. In addition, its global importance has significantly increased in the last years, with the dissemination of the virus to new countries in South and Central America. In Brazil, despite its economical importance and occurrence for more than seven decades, the most significant advances towards understanding the pathosystem interactions have been obtained only in the last ten years. This review focuses on various aspects of the disease, beginning with a historical view, its main characteristics, alternatives for its control, its increasing economical importance in Brazil and abroad, and the new data on the search for understanding the interactions amongst the mite vector, the virus, and the plant host.A leprose dos citros é considerada a principal virose na citricultura brasileira, com maior destaque no Estado de São Paulo, principalmente pelos altos custos demandados para o controle químico do vetor, o ácaro Brevipalpus phoenicis. Além da relevância dessa virose para a citricultura local, sua importância mundial vem sendo ampliada consideravelmente nos últimos anos, principalmente com a disseminação do vírus em novos países da América do Sul e Central. No Brasil, apesar da sua importância econômica e ocorrência por mais de sete décadas, os mais importantes avanços no entendimento das interações do patossistema leprose têm sido obtidos apenas nos últimos dez anos. Essa revisão aborda os diferentes aspectos dessa doença, trazendo um breve histórico da doença, principais características da leprose, alternativas de controle, sua crescente importância econômica na cadeia citrícola nacional, os mais recentes relatos de sua ocorrência em outros países e os novos resultados obtidos

  10. [Visible-NIR spectral feature of citrus greening disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiu-hua; Li, Min-zan; Won Suk, Lee; Reza, Ehsani; Ashish, Ratn Mishra

    2014-06-01

    Citrus greening (Huanglongbing, or HLB) is a devastating disease caused by Candidatus liberibacter which uses psyllids as vectors. It has no cure till now, and poses a huge threat to citrus industry around the world. In order to diagnose, assess and further control this disease, it is of great importance to first find a quick and effective way to detect it. Spectroscopy method, which was widely considered as a fast and nondestructive way, was adopted here to conduct a preliminary exploration of disease characteristics. In order to explore the spectral differences between the healthy and HLB infected leaves and canopies, this study measured the visible-NIR spectral reflectance of their leaves and canopies under lab and field conditions, respectively. The original spectral data were firstly preprocessed with smoothing (or moving average) and cluster average procedures, and then the first derivatives were also calculated to determine the red edge position (REP). In order to solve the multi-peak phenomenon problem, two interpolation methods (three-point Lagrangian interpolation and four-point linear extrapolation) were adopted to calculate the REP for each sample. The results showed that there were, obvious differences at the visible & NIR spectral reflectance between the healthy and HLB infected classes. Comparing with the healthy reflectance, the HLB reflectance was higher at the visible bands because of the yellowish symptoms on the infected leaves, and lower at NIR bands because the disease blocked water transportation to leaves. But the feature at NIR bands was easily affected by environmental factors such as light, background, etc. The REP was also a potential indicator to distinguish those two classes. The average REP was slowly moving toward red bands while the infection level was getting higher. The gap of the average REPs between the healthy and HLB classes reached to a maximum of 20 nm. Even in the dataset with relatively lower variation, the classification

  11. Comparative genomic characterization of citrus-associated Xylella fastidiosa strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nunes Luiz R

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The xylem-inhabiting bacterium Xylella fastidiosa (Xf is the causal agent of Pierce's disease (PD in vineyards and citrus variegated chlorosis (CVC in orange trees. Both of these economically-devastating diseases are caused by distinct strains of this complex group of microorganisms, which has motivated researchers to conduct extensive genomic sequencing projects with Xf strains. This sequence information, along with other molecular tools, have been used to estimate the evolutionary history of the group and provide clues to understand the capacity of Xf to infect different hosts, causing a variety of symptoms. Nonetheless, although significant amounts of information have been generated from Xf strains, a large proportion of these efforts has concentrated on the study of North American strains, limiting our understanding about the genomic composition of South American strains – which is particularly important for CVC-associated strains. Results This paper describes the first genome-wide comparison among South American Xf strains, involving 6 distinct citrus-associated bacteria. Comparative analyses performed through a microarray-based approach allowed identification and characterization of large mobile genetic elements that seem to be exclusive to South American strains. Moreover, a large-scale sequencing effort, based on Suppressive Subtraction Hybridization (SSH, identified 290 new ORFs, distributed in 135 Groups of Orthologous Elements, throughout the genomes of these bacteria. Conclusion Results from microarray-based comparisons provide further evidence concerning activity of horizontally transferred elements, reinforcing their importance as major mediators in the evolution of Xf. Moreover, the microarray-based genomic profiles showed similarity between Xf strains 9a5c and Fb7, which is unexpected, given the geographical and chronological differences associated with the isolation of these microorganisms. The newly

  12. Misturas de herbicidas para o controle de plantas daninhas anuais na cultura de citrus (Citrus sinensis (L. Osbeck Herbicides mixtures for the control of annual weeds in citrus crop (Citrus sinensis (L, Osbeck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.J.B. Galli

    1985-12-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de se avaliar a eficiência das misturas de glyphosate com diuron ou simazine para o controle de plantas daninhas anuais na cultura de citrus, foram conduzidos dois experimentos durante o ano agrícola 83/84, sendo um em Jaguariúna e outro em Catanduva, ambos no estado de São Paulo. Os resultados obtidos mostraram que, embora todos os tratamentos tenham sido altamente eficientes, o controle de Digitaria horizontalis, Brachiaria plantaginea e portulaca oleracea aos 10 DAT foi um pouco inferior quando se aplicou as misturas de tanque (glyphosate + diuron ou simazine, em relação à aplicação seqüencial desses mesmos produtos. A adição do sulfato de amônio nas misturas de tanque minimizou esse problema, o qual não foi observado na avaliação realizada aos 30 DAT. Ainda com relação às misturas, o controle das gramíneas foi superior quando se utilizou diuron em relação à simazine. As misturas de herbicidas residuais com glyphosate proporcionaram melhor controle aos 60 DAT quando comparados às aplicações de glyphosate isoladamente.With the aim of evaluating the efficiency of glyphosate mixtures with diuron and simazine, in the control of annual weeds in citrus, two experiments were conducted in Catanduva and Jaguariúna, SP, during the 83/84 season. The results showed high efficiency of all treatments, but the control of Digitaria horizontalis, Brachiaria plantaginea and Portulaca oleracea at 10 DAT, has been slightly inferior when tank mistures were applied, in contrast with the sequencial application of these products. The addition of ammonium sulphate to the tank mixtures minimized the problem which was not observed at 30 DAT. Concerning mixtures, grass control was better with diuron than simazine. The use of glyphosate in mixtures with residuals offered better control at 60 DAT when compared to Glyphosate alone.

  13. Citrus fruits as a treasure trove of active natural metabolites that potentially provide benefits for human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Xinmiao; Zhao, Siyu; Ning, Zhangchi; Zeng, Honglian; Shu, Yisong; Tao, Ou; Xiao, Cheng; Lu, Cheng; Liu, Yuanyan

    2015-01-01

    Citrus fruits, which are cultivated worldwide, have been recognized as some of the most high-consumption fruits in terms of energy, nutrients and health supplements. What is more, a number of these fruits have been used as traditional medicinal herbs to cure diseases in several Asian countries. Numerous studies have focused on Citrus secondary metabolites as well as bioactivities and have been intended to develop new chemotherapeutic or complementary medicine in recent decades. Citrus-derived secondary metabolites, including flavonoids, alkaloids, limonoids, coumarins, carotenoids, phenolic acids and essential oils, are of vital importance to human health due to their active properties. These characteristics include anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, as well as cardiovascular protective effects, neuroprotective effects, etc. This review summarizes the global distribution and taxonomy, numerous secondary metabolites and bioactivities of Citrus fruits to provide a reference for further study. Flavonoids as characteristic bioactive metabolites in Citrus fruits are mainly introduced.

  14. Caracterização química e atividade antifúngica dos óleos essenciais de cinco espécies do gênero Citrus

    OpenAIRE

    Gomes, Marcos de Souza

    2014-01-01

    Os óleos essenciais do gênero Citrus estão entre os mais consumidos e comercializados no mundo, sendo o Brasil um dos principais produtores. No presente estudo, caracterizaram-se e quantificaram-se quimicamente os óleos essenciais das cascas de frutas de cinco espécies do gênero Citrus; laranja (Citrus sinensis), tangerina ponkan (Citrus reticulata), limão-rosa (Citrus limonia), limão-taiti (Citrus aurantifolia) e cidra (Citrus medica), bem como avaliou-se a atividade antifúngica deles sobre ...

  15. Expression of Bacillus thuringiensis cytolytic toxin (Cyt2Ca1) in citrus roots to control Diaprepes abbreviatus larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Sulley Ben; Ramos, John E; Shatters, Robert G; Hall, David G; Lapointe, Stephen L; Niedz, Randall P; Rougé, Pierre; Cave, Ronald D; Borovsky, Dov

    2017-03-01

    Diaprepes abbreviatus (L.) is an important pest of citrus in the USA. Currently, no effective management strategies of D. abbreviatus exist in citriculture, and new methods of control are desperately sought. To protect citrus against D. abbreviatus a transgenic citrus rootstock expressing Bacillus thuringiensis Cyt2Ca1, an insect toxin protein, was developed using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of 'Carrizo' citrange [Citrus sinensis (L) Osbeck Poncirus trifoliate (L) Raf]. The transgenic citrus root stock expressed the cytolytic toxin Cyt2Ca1 constitutively under the control of a 35S promoter in the transgenic Carrizo citrange trifoliate hybrid including the roots that are the food source of larval D. abbreviatus. The engineered citrus was screened by Western blot and RT-qPCR analyses for cyt2Ca1 and positive citrus identified. Citrus trees expressing different levels of cyt2Ca1 transcripts were identified (Groups A-C). High expression of the toxin in the leaves (10 9 transcripts/ng RNA), however, retarded plant growth. The transgenic plants were grown in pots and the roots exposed to 3week old D. abbreviatus larvae using no-choice plant bioassays. Three cyt2Ca1 transgenic plants were identified that sustained less root damage belonging to Group B and C. One plant caused death to 43% of the larvae that fed on its roots expressed 8×10 6 cyt2Ca1 transcripts/ng RNA. These results show, for the first time, that Cyt2Ca1 expressed in moderate amounts by the roots of citrus does not retard citrus growth and can protect it from larval D. abbreviatus. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Exactly which synephrine alkaloids does Citrus aurantium (bitter orange) contain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, D B; Cutter, G; Poehlman, E T; Moore, D R; Barnes, S

    2005-04-01

    Following the withdrawal of ephedrine from the dietary supplement marketplace sales of products containing Citrus aurantium (CA) (bitter orange) for weight loss are believed to have increased dramatically. CA contains a number of constituents speculated to lead to weight loss, of which the most frequently cited constituent is synephrine. Concerns have been raised about the safety of products containing synephrine. To develop an adequate basis for clinical and public health recommendations, it is necessary to understand the nature of the synephrine alkaloids in CA. There are six possible isomers of synephrine (para, meta, ortho; and for each a d or l form). Some authors have stated that CA contains only p-synephrine, whereas other authors have stated that CA contains m-synephrine. This is an important distinction because the two molecules have different pharmacologic properties, which may differentially affect safety and efficacy. We are unable to identify published data that explicitly show whether CA contains p-synephrine, m-synephrine, or both. In this brief report, we show that at least one product purportedly containing synephrine alkaloids from CA contains both p-synephrine and m-synephrine. We believe this justifies further investigation into which synephrine alkaloids are present in CA and products purportedly containing synephrine alkaloids from CA and the relative quantities of each of the different isomers.

  17. Microbes Associated with Freshly Prepared Juices of Citrus and Carrots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal Rai Aneja

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fruit juices are popular drinks as they contain antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals that are essential for human being and play important role in the prevention of heart diseases, cancer, and diabetes. They contain essential nutrients which support the growth of acid tolerant bacteria, yeasts, and moulds. In the present study, we have conducted a microbiological examination of freshly prepared juices (sweet lime, orange, and carrot by serial dilution agar plate technique. A total of 30 juice samples were examined for their microbiological quality. Twenty-five microbial species including 9 bacterial isolates, 5 yeast isolates, and 11 mould isolates were isolated from juices. Yeasts and moulds were the main cause of spoilage of juices. Aspergillus flavus and Rhodotorula mucilaginosa were observed in the maximum number of juice samples. Among bacteria Bacillus cereus and Serratia were dominant. Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus were detected in few samples. Candida sp., Curvularia, Colletotrichum, and Acetobacter were observed only in citrus juice samples. Alternaria, Aspergillus terreus, A. niger, Cladosporium, and Fusarium were also observed in tested juice samples. Some of the microorganisms detected in these juice samples can cause disease in human beings, so there is need for some guidelines that can improve the quality of fruit juices.

  18. Air pollution effects on the structure of Citrus aurantium leaves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Psaras, G.K.; Christodoulakis, N.S.

    1987-09-01

    Individual air pollutants cause acute and chronic plant injury, act on stomata and affect carbon dioxide exchange as well as plant growth and development. Inhibition of photosynthesis by several air pollutants has been reported repeatedly. Besides, structural modifications of cell organelles have been reported after fumigation by SO/sub 2/. Although chlorosis and subsequent necrosis are common phenomena caused by artificial treatment with pollutants, fine structural leaf characteristics of plants exposed to long-term air pollution in natural conditions are little explored. Light microscope examination of air pollution affected leaves of plants common in natural ecosystems of Athens' metropolitan area revealed chlorosis phenomena. Electron microscope examination of the leaves of a common subshrub of greek phryganic formations grown in a heavily air polluted natural ecosystem of Athens metropolitan area revealed pronounced ultrastructural anomalies of chloroplasts, mitochondria and microbodies of the mesophyll cells. This organelle destruction of the photosynthesizing tissue as well as the minimization of the ecosystem primary productivity are attributed to the compound action of several toxic air pollutants of the photochemical smog of Athens. This work describes the long-term air pollution effects on the structural features of the leaves of Citrus aurantium, a decorative species planted throughout the heavily air polluted city of Athens.

  19. Peel Ultrastructure During Developmental Stages of Citrus Sinensis (L. Osbeck.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indira Prabasari

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The peel structureof Valencia orange (Citrus sinensis (L. Osbeck was examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM and showed the distinct regions of the peel: the outer-yellowish part that was called the flavedo and the inner part of the peel that was called the albedo.  The flavedo has compact cells with oil glands embedded in it whereas the albedo contains of spongy cells with vascular bundles embedded in it. The ultrastructural examination of the albedo during development revealed the changes of albedo morphology from compact tissue to the loosely arranged tissue. In addition, the distribution of polysaccharide cell walls was observed with histochemical staining and later the distribution of peptic polysaccharide was conducted using anti-pectin monoclonal antibodies (mAbs. Histochemical staining during development demonstrated the difference of abundance of polysaccharide at the tissue level.  Furthermore, the distribution of homogalacturonan (HG was studied with mAb JIM5 that recognizes low methyl-esterified HG and JJM7 which labels high methyl-esterified HG. The observation at the fruit level was conducted using tissue printing and the result showed that low and high methyl-esterified HG was distributed almost similar at the fruit level. Further experiment at the tissue level was performed using Light Microscopy (LM and revealed that HG was found more abundant in the albedo and vascular bundle followed by the flavedo and oil gland.

  20. Experiências de cavalos para citrus II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. G. Brieger

    1945-01-01

    Full Text Available The English resumé is given in a different form from the Portuguese "conclusões". In the former we gave mainly the results which may be of general interest, explaining the tables (quadros and the procedure of statistical analysis, while in the other the properties of the different rootstocks are discussed in detail since they are of immediate local interest. 1. In a previous publication, Moreira (19 explained the layout and the first results of an experiment, under way since 1936 in the Limeira Exp. Sta., on the influence of twelve different types of Citrus rootstocks on three scion varieties : the oranges "Baianinha" and "Pera" and the grape-fruit "Marsh Seedless". We report here three main results obtained during the first six years of the experiment: a all plants budded on sour and bitter-sweet oranges (C. aurantium, showed definite signs of the new disease "tristeza" ; b other rootstocks such as citron (C. medica, ponderosa lemon (C. lemon had such disadvantageous effect that they could be eliminated as suitable stocks ; c the data of the first four crops permit to determine certain particularities of some rootstocks varieties used in the experiment. The present paper deals with the complete

  1. Optimization of aqueous pectin extraction from Citrus medica peel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasandide, Bahare; Khodaiyan, Faramarz; Mousavi, Zeinab E; Hosseini, Seyed Saeid

    2017-12-15

    In this study, the effect of aqueous extraction conditions (temperature of 70-90°C, time of 60-180min, and liquid/solid ratio (LSR) of 20-40v/w) on the yield and degree of esterification (DE) of Citrus medica peel pectin was studied using a Box-Behnken design. The highest production yield of pectin (21.85±0.35%) was obtained at temperature of 90°C, extraction time of 180min and LSR of 40v/w as optimum extraction conditions which was close to the predicted value (24.13%). In these extraction conditions, the DE and the emulsifying activity were 77.2 and 46.5%, respectively. Also, the emulsions were 90.30 and 90% stable at 4°C, and 83.87 and 83.50% at 25°C after 1 and 30days, respectively. The determination of flow behavior showed that the pectin solutions had a Newtonian behavior at low concentrations (0.1, 0.5 and 1.0%w/v), while in higher concentration (2.0%w/v), the pseudoplastic flow behavior became dominant. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Antioxidant properties of fresh and processed Citrus aurantium fruit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash J. Divya

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Edible components of Citrus aurantium (bitter orange fruit i.e. whole fruit, separated peel and pulp, and processed preserved products, namely salt pickle, chilli pickle, and sweet preserve were analyzed for antioxidant potential by various in vitro assays. The antioxidants components were extracted in different media and freeze dried. Methanol and aqueous media were comparatively more effective in extracting the antioxidant components. The total phenol content of the extracts ranged from 2.5 to 22.5 mg/g and 5.0 to 45.0 mg/g of pulp and peel fragments, respectively. The fruit components exhibited proton radical, oxyradical, and hydroxyl radical scavenging abilities and were effective in preventing lipid peroxidation. Regression analysis showed positive association between total phenolics and different antioxidant assays. In processed products, there was an initial decrease in antioxidant capacity, which showed an increase on storage. In conclusion, bitter orange exhibited high antioxidant capacity which was retained even in processed and stored products.

  3. Cardiovascular toxicity of Citrus aurantium in exercised rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Deborah K; George, Nysia I; White, Gene E; Abdel-Rahman, Ali; Pellicore, Linda S; Fabricant, Daniel

    2013-09-01

    When safety concerns forced the removal of ephedra from the market, other botanicals, including Citrus aurantium or bitter orange (BO) were used as replacements. A major component of the BO extract is synephrine, a chemical that is structurally similar to ephedrine. Because ephedrine has cardiovascular effects that may be exacerbated during physical exercise, the purpose of this study was to determine whether extracts containing synephrine produced adverse effects on the cardiovascular system in exercising rats. Sprague-Dawley rats were dosed daily by gavage for 28 days with 10 or 50 mg of synephrine/kg body weight from one of two different extracts; caffeine was added to some doses. The rats ran on a treadmill for 30 min/day, 3 days/week. Heart rate, blood pressure, body temperature, and QT interval were monitored. Both doses of both extracts significantly increased systolic and diastolic blood pressure for up to 8 h after dosing. Effects on heart rate and body temperature appeared to be due primarily to the effects of caffeine. These data suggest that the combination of synephrine, caffeine, and exercise can have significant effects on blood pressure and do not appear to be effective in decreasing food consumption or body weight.

  4. Effectiveness of Phenolic Compounds against Citrus Green Mould

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona M. Sanzani

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Stored citrus fruit suffer huge losses because of the development of green mould caused by Penicillium digitatum. Usually synthetic fungicides are employed to control this disease, but their use is facing some obstacles, such public concern about possible adverse effects on human and environmental health and the development of resistant pathogen populations. In the present study quercetin, scopoletin and scoparone—phenolic compounds present in several agricultural commodities and associated with response to stresses—were firstly tested in vitro against P. digitatum and then applied in vivo on oranges cv. Navelina. Fruits were wound-treated (100 µg, pathogen-inoculated, stored and surveyed for disease incidence and severity. Although only a minor (≤13% control effect on P. digitatum growth was recorded in vitro, the in vivo trial results were encouraging. In fact, on phenolic-treated oranges, symptoms appeared at 6 days post-inoculation (DPI, i.e., with a 2 day-delay as compared to the untreated control. Moreover, at 8 DPI, quercetin, scopoletin, and scoparone significantly reduced disease incidence and severity by 69%–40% and 85%–70%, respectively, as compared to the control. At 14 DPI, scoparone was the most active molecule. Based on the results, these compounds might represent an interesting alternative to synthetic fungicides.

  5. Enhanced Materials from Nature: Nanocellulose from Citrus Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayra Mariño

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Nanocellulose is a relatively inexpensive, highly versatile bio-based renewable material with advantageous properties, including biodegradability and nontoxicity. Numerous potential applications of nanocellulose, such as its use for the preparation of high-performance composites, have attracted much attention from industry. Owing to the low energy consumption and the addition of significant value, nanocellulose extraction from agricultural waste is one of the best alternatives for waste treatment. Different techniques for the isolation and purification of nanocellulose have been reported, and combining these techniques influences the morphology of the resultant fibers. Herein, some of the extraction routes for obtaining nanocellulose from citrus waste are addressed. The morphology of nanocellulose was determined by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM, while cellulose crystallinity indexes (CI from lyophilized samples were determined using solid-state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD measurements. The resultant nanofibers had 55% crystallinity, an average diameter of 10 nm and a length of 458 nm.

  6. Enhanced materials from nature: nanocellulose from citrus waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariño, Mayra; Lopes da Silva, Lucimara; Durán, Nelson; Tasic, Ljubica

    2015-04-03

    Nanocellulose is a relatively inexpensive, highly versatile bio-based renewable material with advantageous properties, including biodegradability and nontoxicity. Numerous potential applications of nanocellulose, such as its use for the preparation of high-performance composites, have attracted much attention from industry. Owing to the low energy consumption and the addition of significant value, nanocellulose extraction from agricultural waste is one of the best alternatives for waste treatment. Different techniques for the isolation and purification of nanocellulose have been reported, and combining these techniques influences the morphology of the resultant fibers. Herein, some of the extraction routes for obtaining nanocellulose from citrus waste are addressed. The morphology of nanocellulose was determined by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM), while cellulose crystallinity indexes (CI) from lyophilized samples were determined using solid-state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) measurements. The resultant nanofibers had 55% crystallinity, an average diameter of 10 nm and a length of 458 nm.

  7. TENACITY AND PERSISTENCE OF COPPER FUNGICIDES IN CITRUS SEEDLINGS UNDER SIMULATED RAINFALL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANTONIO EDUARDO FONSECA

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The amount of fungicide that adheres to the leaf during spraying and the amount that remain on the leaf after weathering are the main factors that defines the amount of active residue on the leaf surface to effectively control plant pathogens. Thus, the objective of this work was to evaluate the tenacity and persistence of copper in citrus seedling leaves under simulated rainfall in Jaboticabal, State of São Paulo, Brazil. The evaluated variables were copper content, solution retention, surface tension and drop spectrum. A significant and inversely proportional linear relationship to drops <100 μm was found. The percentage of copper retained in leaves of citrus seedlings with copper fungicides of suspension concentrate (SC formulations after simulated rainfall was greater than 80%. Copper fungicides of SC formulations presented the lowest surface tension, allowing greater tenacity and persistence of copper on seedlings of citrus leaves after simulated rainfall and increased contact between the drops and leaf surface.

  8. Low glyphosate rates do not affect Citrus limonia (L.) Osbeck seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravena, Renan; Victoria Filho, Ricardo; Alves, Pedro Luis Ca; Mazzafera, Paulo; Gravena, Adriana R

    2009-04-01

    Glyphosate is used to control weeds in citrus orchards, and accidental spraying or wind drift onto the seedlings may cause growth arrest owing to metabolism disturbance. Two experiments were carried out to investigate the effect of non-lethal rates (0, 180, 360 and 720 g AI ha(-1)) of glyphosate on four-month-old 'Cravo' lime, Citrus limonia (L.) Osbeck, seedlings. Photosynthesis and the concentrations of shikimic acid, total free amino acids and phenolic acids were evaluated. Only transitory effects were observed in the contents of shikimate and total free amino acids. No visual effects were observed. The present study showed that glyphosate at non-lethal rates, which is very usual when accidental spraying or wind drift occurs in citrus orchard, did not cause severe metabolic damage in 'Cravo' lime seedlings. Copyright (c) 2009 Society of Chemical Industry.

  9. Ultrasound-assisted extraction of Ca, K and Mg from in vitro citrus culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arruda Sandra C. C.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available An ultrasound extraction procedure for Ca, K and Mg from in vitro plant cultures is proposed, comparing cultures of different embryogenic levels of Citrus sinensis and Citrus limonia, employing ultrasound energy. Parameters related to metals extraction, such as plant material sampling, acid concentration and sonication time were investigated. For accuracy check, the proposed ultrasound extraction procedure was compared with a microwave-assisted digestion procedure and no differences in the results were verified at 95% of the confidence level. With this simple and accurate extraction procedure, it was possible to determine differences in Ca, K and Mg concentrations during Citrus embryo formation/development and between cultures (embryogenic and non-embryogenic. Finally, the ultrasound extraction method demonstrated to be an excellent alternative for handless sampling and operational costs.

  10. Characterization of coumarin-specific prenyltransferase activities in Citrus limon peel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munakata, Ryosuke; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Koeduka, Takao; Sasaki, Kanako; Tsurumaru, Yusuke; Sugiyama, Akifumi; Uto, Yoshihiro; Hori, Hitoshi; Azuma, Jun-Ichi; Yazaki, Kazufumi

    2012-01-01

    Coumarins, a large group of polyphenols, play important roles in the defense mechanisms of plants, and they also exhibit various biological activities beneficial to human health, often enhanced by prenylation. Despite the high abundance of prenylated coumarins in citrus fruits, there has been no report on coumarin-specific prenyltransferase activity in citrus. In this study, we detected both O- and C-prenyltransferase activities of coumarin substrates in a microsome fraction prepared from lemon (Citrus limon) peel, where large amounts of prenylated coumarins accumulate. Bergaptol was the most preferred substrate out of various coumarin derivatives tested, and geranyl diphosphate (GPP) was accepted exclusively as prenyl donor substrate. Further enzymatic characterization of bergaptol 5-O-geranyltransferase activity revealed its unique properties: apparent K(m) values for GPP (9 µM) and bergaptol (140 µM) and a broad divalent cation requirement. These findings provide information towards the discovery of a yet unidentified coumarin-specific prenyltransferase gene.

  11. Energy conservation in citrus processing. Technical progress report, October 1, 1979-March 31, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-06-15

    The principal objective of the work is to identify an economically viable alternative to the existing method of meeting the energy requirements of citrus fruit processing that will substantially reduce the overall energy usage of citrus processing plants. The components which will make up the alternative systems include: evaporators, dryers, refrigeration units, heat pumps, heat engines, heat exchangers, thermal storage units, and ancillary components. These components will be used to form the five operational units of the citrus processing plant. These operational units are: evaporation, drying, refrigeration, pasteurizing and canning, and the plant electrical load that consists of operations such as conveying and juice extraction. The five operational units are then interrelated to varying degrees with respect to energy exchange to form different types of alternative systems. The approach, work plan, and progress of technical work are summarized. (MCW)

  12. Citrus pectin derived porous carbons as a superior adsorbent toward removal of methylene blue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wenlin [College of Horticulture and landscape Architecture, Southwest University, Chongqing 400716 (China); Zhang, Lian Ying [Institute for Clean Energy & Advanced Materials, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Zhao, Xi Juan [College of Horticulture and landscape Architecture, Southwest University, Chongqing 400716 (China); Key Laboratory of Horticulture Science for Southern Mountainous Regions, Ministry of Education, Chongqing 400715 (China); Zhou, Zhiqin, E-mail: zhouzhiqin@swu.edu.cn [College of Horticulture and landscape Architecture, Southwest University, Chongqing 400716 (China); Key Laboratory of Horticulture Science for Southern Mountainous Regions, Ministry of Education, Chongqing 400715 (China)

    2016-11-15

    An adsorbent, citrus pectin derived porous carbons with ultra-high adsorption capacity, rapid adsorption rate and good reusability toward removal of methylene blue, was synthesized by a facile zinc chloride activation approach in this study. The materials hold a great potential for treatment of dye wastewater. - Graphical abstract: Citrus pectin derived porous carbons with ultra-high adsorption capacity, rapid adsorption rate and good reusability toward methylene blue removal. - Highlights: • Citrus pectin derived porous carbons (CPPCs) were synthesized a facile zinc chloride activation approach. • CPPCs had abundant macro/meso/micropores for trapping MB molecules. • CPPCs exhibited ultrahigh adsorption capacity, rapid adsorption rate and good reusability toward removal of MB.

  13. Quantification of total pigments in citrus essential oils by thermal wave resonant cavity photopyroelectric spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Muñoz, Gerardo A; Antonio-Pérez, Aurora; Díaz-Reyes, J

    2015-05-01

    A general theory of thermal wave resonant cavity photopyroelectric spectroscopy (TWRC-PPE) was recently proposed by Balderas-López (2012) for the thermo-optical characterisation of substances in a condensed phase. This theory is used to quantify the total carotenoids and chlorophylls in several folded and un-folded citrus essential oils to demonstrate the viability of using this technique as an alternative analytical method for the quantification of total pigments in citrus oils. An analysis of variance (ANOVA) reveals significant differences (p spectroscopy can be used to quantify concentrations up to five times higher of total carotenoids and chlorophylls in citrus oils than UV-Vis spectroscopy without sample preparation or dilution. The optical limits of this technique and possible interference are also described. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Caracterização de genótipos de Citrus spp. através de marcadores RAPD Characterization of citrus genotypes (Citrus spp using RAPDs markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinês Bastianel

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Em programas de melhoramento de citros, a caracterização adequada dos recursos genéticos disponíveis é de grande importância, principalmente devido às características biológicas da cultura, como a heterozigosidade, a embrionia nucelar e o longo ciclo reprodutivo. A facilidade com que ocorrem hibridações (interespecíficas e intergenéricas e a embrionia nucelar favoreceram a formação e a preservação de novas combinações, classificadas como espécies. Neste estudo, marcadores RAPDs foram utilizados para analisar 15 acessos de Citrus spp., sendo quatro variedades de laranjeiras doce (C. sinensis Osbeck, quatro tangerineiras (C. reticulata Blanco, C. nobilis Loureiro, C. sunki Loureiro e C. deliciosa Tenore, uma laranjeira azeda (C. aurantium L., um pomeleiro (C. paradisi Macf., uma torangeira (C. grandis Osbeck, uma cidreira (C. medica L., uma limeira ácida (C. latifolia e dois híbridos (Citrus clementina T. x (C. tangerina T. x C. paradisi Macf.. Doze sequências iniciadoras aleatórias foram utilizadas para estudar os 15 genótipos, encontrando-se um grau de similaridade mínimio de 0,81 ("Simple Matching" entre as tangerineiras. Os menores graus de similaridade foram encontrados entre as espécies de Citrus menos aparentadas (C. medica, C. grandis e C. latifolia. As quatro cultivares de laranjeiras doces não puderam ser diferenciadas pelos marcadores RAPD utilizados, apresentando similaridade máxima.In citrus improvement programs the characterization of the available genetic resources is of great importance, mainly concerning biological characteristics of the culture, as the heterozigosity, nucellar the embriony and long reproductive cycle. Favored by nucellar embriony interespecific and intergeneric hybridizations and genotypes preservation happen easily. RAPDs markers were used to analyze 15 Citrus spp., four sweet orange (C. sinensis Osbeck, (C. medica, C. grandis e C. latifolia, four mandarins (C. reticulata Blanco, C

  15. Citrus nobiletin suppresses inducible nitric oxide synthase gene expression in interleukin-1β-treated hepatocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshigai, Emi [Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Life Sciences, Kusatsu, Shiga (Japan); Ritsumeikan Global Innovation Research Organization (R-GIRO), Kusatsu, Shiga (Japan); Machida, Toru [Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Life Sciences, Kusatsu, Shiga (Japan); Okuyama, Tetsuya [Ritsumeikan Global Innovation Research Organization (R-GIRO), Kusatsu, Shiga (Japan); Mori, Masatoshi; Murase, Hiromitsu; Yamanishi, Ryota [Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Life Sciences, Kusatsu, Shiga (Japan); Okumura, Tadayoshi [Research Organization of Science and Technology, Ritsumeikan University, Kusatsu, Shiga (Japan); Department of Surgery, Kansai Medical University, Hirakata, Osaka (Japan); Ikeya, Yukinobu [Department of Pharmacy, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Ritsumeikan University, Kusatsu, Shiga (Japan); Nishino, Hoyoku [Ritsumeikan Global Innovation Research Organization (R-GIRO), Kusatsu, Shiga (Japan); Department of Biochemistry, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Nishizawa, Mikio, E-mail: nishizaw@sk.ritsumei.ac.jp [Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Life Sciences, Kusatsu, Shiga (Japan)

    2013-09-13

    Highlights: •Nobiletin is a polymethoxylated flavone that is abundant in citrus peels. •Nobiletin is a major constituent of the Citrus unshiu peel extract. •Nobiletin suppresses induction of NO and reduces iNOS expression in hepatocytes. •Nobiletin reduces the iNOS promoter activity and the DNA-binding activity of NF-κB. -- Abstract: Background: Nobiletin is a polymethoxylated flavone that is abundant in the peels of citrus fruits, such as Citrus unshiu (Satsuma mandarin) and Citrus sinensis. The dried peels of C. unshiu (chinpi) have been included in several formulae of Japanese Kampo medicines. Nobiletin may suppress the induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), which synthesizes the inflammatory mediator nitric oxide (NO) in hepatocytes. Methods: A C. unshiu peel (CUP) extract was prepared. Primary cultured rat hepatocytes were treated with the CUP extract or nobiletin in the presence of interleukin 1β (IL-1β), which induces iNOS expression. NO production and iNOS gene expression were analyzed. Results: High-performance liquid chromatography analyses revealed that the nobiletin content in the CUP extract was 0.14%. Nobiletin dose-dependently reduced the NO levels and decreased iNOS expression at the protein, mRNA and antisense transcript levels. Flavone, which does not contain any methoxy groups, also suppressed iNOS induction. Nobiletin reduced the transcriptional activity of iNOS promoter-luciferase constructs and the DNA-binding activity of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) in the nuclei. Conclusions: The suppression of iNOS induction by nobiletin suggests that nobiletin may be responsible for the anti-inflammatory effects of citrus peels and have a therapeutic potential for liver diseases.

  16. Purified cellulose, soybean hulls and citrus pulp as a source of fiber for weaned piglets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Augusto Fonseca Pascoal

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Dietary fiber is an important component, which has a direct effect on intake, digestion, and absorption of nutrients; and also alters intestinal microbiota and morphology according to solubility. One digestibility trial and one performance experiment were performed to evaluate the effects of sources of fiber in diets for 21 day weaned piglets. The experimental diets used in both trials consisted of a control diet and diets with purified cellulose, soybean hulls or citrus pulp as a main source of dietary fiber. To evaluate the digestibility of nutrients (Assay 1, the total feces and urine collection method was used. The fiber sources did not affect nutrient digestibility, except for soluble fiber, which increased with the inclusion of citrus (Citrus sinensisL. pulp. To evaluate performance, morphophysiology and microbiology of the digestive tract of weaned piglets, a total of 32 castrated male piglets was used. Slaughter of animals was implemented at 35 and 50 days of age. The use of soybean (Glycine max L. hulls and citrus pulp in diets increased the number of goblet cells and the density of villi in the jejunum. The viscosities of stomach and cecum contents increased due to the addition of citrus pulp. Soybean hulls and the citrus pulp included in diets reduced the occurrence of E. coli in the small intestines of piglets slaughtered at 35 days of age. Among the fiber sources, purified cellulose in piglet diets promotes better performance of animals, due to the modulation of the small intestine microbiota, with lower E. coli occurrence resulting in higher villus density.

  17. Health Assessment of Heavy Metal Pollution (Cadmium, Lead, Arsenic in Citrus Marketed in Tehran, Iran, 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razieh Saleh

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims of the Study: Today, the environment pollution with heavy metals has increased. It is important to study various types of pollutions specially those regarding fruits. The effect of pollutions on food safety for human consumption is a global concern.  This study was conducted for health assessment of heavy metals pollution (cadmium, lead, and arsenic in citrus marketed in Tehran, Iran in 2015. Materials & Methods: After collecting and preparing 2 samples from each citrus species (tangerine, grapefruit, sweet lime, sour orange, orange with acid digestion method, the citrus pulp and peel were surveyed. Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES was used to determine the concentrations of heavy metals with three replications. Moreover, SPSS version 19 was employed to perform statistical analysis. Results: The results showed that the concentration average of Cadmium, Lead and Arsenic in citrus samples of the pulp parts were 19.73, 42.95 and 2.30 mg/kg and in peel parts were 20.09, 42.71 and 2.12 mg/kg, respectively. The average concentrations of heavy metals were higher than WHO maximum permissible limits. Conclusions: Based on these results, consumption of citrus species has no adverse effect on the consumers’ health (except Sweet lime, Orange, Tangerine and Grapefruit in lead is risky for adults and Sweet lime and Orange that Health Index in Lead and Arsenic and Sour Orange, Tangerine and Grapefruit that Health Index in Lead is more than 1 and is risky for children. Thus, individuals living in Tehran should be cautious about using these citrus fruits and researchers should try to obtain national standards in the field of entering these metals to food in environmental conditions that are in Iran.

  18. Deciphering the Bacterial Microbiome in Huanglongbing-Affected Citrus Treated with Thermotherapy and Sulfonamide Antibiotics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanyu Yang

    Full Text Available Huanglongbing (HLB is a serious citrus disease that threatens the citrus industry. In previous studies, sulfonamide antibiotics and heat treatment suppressed 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' (Las, but did not completely eliminate the Las. Furthermore, there are few reports studying the bacterial microbiome of HLB-affected citrus treated by heat and sulfonamide antibiotics. In this study, combinations of heat (45°C or 40°C and sulfonamide treatment (sulfathiazole sodium-STZ, or sulfadimethoxine sodium-SDX were applied to HLB-affected citrus. The bacterial microbiome of HLB-affected citrus following thermotherapy and/or chemotherapy was characterized by PhyloChipTMG3-based metagenomics. Our results showed that the combination of thermotherapy at 45°C and chemotherapy with STZ and SDX was more effective against HLB than thermotherapy alone, chemotherapy alone, or a combination of thermotherapy at 40°C and chemotherapy. The PhyloChipTMG3-based results indicated that 311 empirical Operational Taxonomic Units (eOTUs were detected in 26 phyla. Cyanobacteria (18.01% were dominant after thermo-chemotherapy. Thermotherapy at 45°C decreased eOTUs (64.43% in leaf samples, compared with thermotherapy at 40°C (73.96% or without thermotherapy (90.68% and it also reduced bacterial family biodiversity. The eOTU in phylum Proteobacteria was reduced significantly and eOTU_28, representing "Candidatus Liberibacter," was not detected following thermotherapy at 45°C. Following antibiotic treatment with SDX and STZ, there was enhanced abundance of specific eOTUs belonging to the families Streptomycetaceae, Desulfobacteraceae, Chitinophagaceae, and Xanthomonadaceae, which may be implicated in increased resistance to plant pathogens. Our study further develops an integrated strategy for combating HLB, and also provides new insight into the bacterial microbiome of HLB-affected citrus treated by heat and sulfonamide antibiotics.

  19. Deciphering the Bacterial Microbiome in Huanglongbing-Affected Citrus Treated with Thermotherapy and Sulfonamide Antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chuanyu; Powell, Charles A; Duan, Yongping; Shatters, Robert; Fang, Jingping; Zhang, Muqing

    2016-01-01

    Huanglongbing (HLB) is a serious citrus disease that threatens the citrus industry. In previous studies, sulfonamide antibiotics and heat treatment suppressed 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' (Las), but did not completely eliminate the Las. Furthermore, there are few reports studying the bacterial microbiome of HLB-affected citrus treated by heat and sulfonamide antibiotics. In this study, combinations of heat (45°C or 40°C) and sulfonamide treatment (sulfathiazole sodium-STZ, or sulfadimethoxine sodium-SDX) were applied to HLB-affected citrus. The bacterial microbiome of HLB-affected citrus following thermotherapy and/or chemotherapy was characterized by PhyloChipTMG3-based metagenomics. Our results showed that the combination of thermotherapy at 45°C and chemotherapy with STZ and SDX was more effective against HLB than thermotherapy alone, chemotherapy alone, or a combination of thermotherapy at 40°C and chemotherapy. The PhyloChipTMG3-based results indicated that 311 empirical Operational Taxonomic Units (eOTUs) were detected in 26 phyla. Cyanobacteria (18.01%) were dominant after thermo-chemotherapy. Thermotherapy at 45°C decreased eOTUs (64.43%) in leaf samples, compared with thermotherapy at 40°C (73.96%) or without thermotherapy (90.68%) and it also reduced bacterial family biodiversity. The eOTU in phylum Proteobacteria was reduced significantly and eOTU_28, representing "Candidatus Liberibacter," was not detected following thermotherapy at 45°C. Following antibiotic treatment with SDX and STZ, there was enhanced abundance of specific eOTUs belonging to the families Streptomycetaceae, Desulfobacteraceae, Chitinophagaceae, and Xanthomonadaceae, which may be implicated in increased resistance to plant pathogens. Our study further develops an integrated strategy for combating HLB, and also provides new insight into the bacterial microbiome of HLB-affected citrus treated by heat and sulfonamide antibiotics.

  20. Characterization of Antimicrobial-Producing Beneficial Bacteria Isolated from Huanglongbing Escape Citrus Trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Riera

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The microbiome associated with crop plants has a strong impact on their health and productivity. Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (Las, the bacterial pathogen responsible for Huanglongbing (HLB disease, lives inside the phloem of citrus plants including the root system. It has been suggested that Las negatively affects citrus microbiome. On the other hand, members of citrus microbiome also influence the interaction between Las and citrus. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of multiple putative beneficial bacteria from healthy citrus rhizosphere. Firstly, six bacterial strains showing antibacterial activity against two bacteria closely related to Las: Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Sinorhizobium meliloti were selected. Among them, Burkholderia metallica strain A53 and Burkholderia territorii strain A63 are within the β-proteobacteria class, whereas Pseudomonas granadensis strain 100 and Pseudomonas geniculata strain 95 are within the γ-proteobacteria class. Additionally, two gram-positive bacteria Rhodococcus jialingiae strain 108 and Bacillus pumilus strain 104 were also identified. Secondly, antimicrobial activity against three fungal pathogens: Alternaria alternata, Colletotrichum acutatum, Phyllosticta citricarpa, and two oomycetes: Phytophthora nicotianae and Phytophthora palmivora. Four bacterial strains Burkholderia territorii A63, Burkholderia metallica A53, Pseudomonas geniculata 95, and Bacillus pumilus 104 were shown to have antagonistic activity against the citrus root pathogen Phytophthora nicotianae based on dual culture antagonist assays and compartmentalized petri dish assays. The four selected bacteria were sequenced. Genes involved in phosphate solubilization, siderophore production and iron acquisition, volatile organic compound production, osmoprotection and osmotic tolerance, phytohormone production, antagonism, and nutrient competition were predicted and discussed related to the beneficial traits.

  1. Structure and biological activity of xanthyletin : a new phytoalexin of CITRUS

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Akhtar; Kunesch, G.; Chuilon, S.; Ravisé, André

    1985-01-01

    Une coumarine, la xanthylétine, a été identifiée dans les tissus de CITRUS infectés par des PHYTOPHTHORA spp. Cette substance est déterminée par son spectre dans l'infra rouge, par spectrométrie de masse et par résonance magnétique nucléaire. Cette phytoalexine manifeste in vitro une importante toxicité pour le PHYTOPHTHORA CITROPHTHORA et une synergie avec les autres composés phénoliques des CITRUS. (Résumé d'auteur)

  2. Pengaruh Pengeringan Dan Suhu Penyimpanan Terhadap Daya Hidup Bui Citrus Amblycarpa

    OpenAIRE

    WULIJARNI, N; SOETJIPTO, SOETJIPTO

    1985-01-01

    N. WULIJARNI - SOETJIPTO, 1985. Effect of desiccation and storage temperature on the viability of seeds of Citrus amblycarpa. Berita Biologi 3 (3): 95- 100. Seeds of Citrus amblycarpa (Hassk.) Ochse were dried using several methods. The seeds remained fully viable when the moisture content were reduced to around 5%. Upon storage, those seeds stored at 28°, 10° and 4°C were still viable after 287 days. Further observation showed that storage at 10°, 4° and - 10°C enabled seeds to maintain thei...

  3. Chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of the essential oils from New Caledonian Citrus macroptera and Citrus hystrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waikedre, Jean; Dugay, Annabelle; Barrachina, Isabel; Herrenknecht, Christine; Cabalion, Pierre; Fournet, Alain

    2010-04-01

    The essential oils from the leaves of Citrus macroptera and C. hystrix, collected in New Caledonia, have been analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and evaluated for their antimicrobial activity. A total of 35 and 38 constituents were identified, representing 99.1 and 89.0% of the essential oils, respectively. Both essential oils were rich in monoterpenes (96.1 and 87.0%, resp.), with beta-pinene as major component (33.3 and 10.9%, resp.), and poor in limonene (2.4 and 4.7%, resp.). Other main components of C. macroptera oil were alpha-pinene (25.3%), p-cimene (17.6%), (E)-beta-ocimene (6.7%), and sabinene (4.8%). The essential oil of C. hystrix was characterized by high contents of terpinen-4-ol (13.0%), alpha-terpineol (7.6%), 1,8-cineole (6.4%), and citronellol (6.0%). The antimicrobial activity was evaluated against five bacteria and five fungi strains. Both oils were inactive against bacteria. However, the C. macroptera leaf oil exhibited a pronounced activity against Trichophyton mentagrophytes var. interdigitale, with a minimal-inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 12.5 microg/ml.

  4. Investigation of the effects of irradiation for quarantine treatment purposes on food quality and hygiene in citrus fruits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    Mediterranean fruit fly (Ceratitis capitata) is a major problem in citrus production sector in Turkey. In order to overcome this problem, required irradiation doses were investigated for the quarantine treatment for 'Yafa' orange (Citrus sinensis (L) Osb.), 'Star ruby' grapefruit (Citrus paradisi Macf.); 'Satsuma' tangerine (Citrus reticulata Blanco) in this project. Chemical, physical and microbiological properties of unirradiated and irradiated (0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 kGy) fruits were determined in terms of weight loss, water soluble dry matter, pH, titratable acidity, alcohol insoluble pectin, apparent color of fruits, reducing sugar, total carotenoid, flavonoid, vitamin C contents, sensory properties of fruits, total aerob mesophilic bacteria and total yeast and mould counts of fruits. Results showed that, 0.1 kGy gamma irradiation dose is sufficient for effective quarantine treatment against the Mediterranean fruit fly in citrus fruits, low dose irradiation (≤1.0 kGy) applications had no detrimental effects on citrus fruits' quality except tangerines, microbial load of fruits were seriously affected by irradiation at 1.0 kGy. In addition, under this work we noticed that, irradiated citrus fruits could be detected by using DNA comet analysis method.

  5. Comparative transcriptome analysis unveils the tolerance mechanisms of Citrus hystrix in response to 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Hu

    Full Text Available Citrus Huanglongbing (HLB, a highly devastating citrus disease, is associated with 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiacitus' (CLas, a member of phloem-inhabiting α-proteobacteria. HLB can affect all cultivated citrus and no cure is currently available. Previous studies showed that Kaffir lime (Citrus hystrix, primarily grown in South Asia and Southeast Asia, was tolerant to HLB but the molecular mechanism remains unknown. In this study, gene expression profiling experiments were performed on HLB-tolerant C. hystrix and HLB-susceptible C. sinensis three months after inoculation with CLas using RNA-seq data. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs in the two citrus cultivars were mainly involved in diverse cellular functions including carbohydrate metabolism, photosynthesis, cell wall metabolism, secondary metabolism, hormone metabolism and oxidation/reduction processes. Notably, starch synthesis and photosynthesis process were not disturbed in CLas-infected C. hystrix. Most of the DEGs involved in cell wall metabolism and secondary metabolism were up-regulated in C. hystrix. In addition, the activation of peroxidases, Cu/Zn-SOD and POD4, may also enhance the tolerance of C. hystrix to CLas. This study provides an insight into the host response of HLB-tolerant citrus cultivar to CLas. C. hystrix is potentially useful for HLB-tolerant/resistant citrus breeding in the future.

  6. Regulation of Vacuolar pH in Citrus limon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lincoln Taiz

    2005-06-22

    The primary objective of this grant was to characterize the vacuolar V-ATPase of lemon fruits. Lemon fruit vacuoles have an internal pH of about 2.5. Since a typical plant vacuole has a luminal pH of around 5.5, the lemon fruit V-APTase must have special properties which allow it to acidify the lumen to such a low pH: (1) it might have a different structure; (2) it might have a different H{sup +}/ATP stoichiometry; and (3) it might be regulated differently. During the course of the investigations (which began in 1996) they characterized these aspects of the V-ATPases of both lemon fruits and lime fruits. They examined lime fruits because of the availability of both acidic limes with a low vacuolar pH and sweet limes, which have a much higher vacuolar pH. The existence of two types of lime fruits allowed a comparison of the V-ATPases of the two varieties. In this report they are including two publications from 1996 and 1997 as background for the later publications. A review article with Heven Sze on V-ATPase nomenclature was also generated during the funding period. In addition to the studies on citrus fruit vacuoles, they also initiated studies in two new areas: polar auxin transport and the regulation of stomatal opening by UV-B irradiation. These studies were intended to serve as a basis of future separate grants, but the proposals they submitted on these topics were not funded.

  7. Larvicidal activity of essential oils of Citrus sinensis and Citrus aurantium (Rutaceae cultivated in Morocco against the malaria vector Anopheles labranchiae (Diptera: Culicidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fouad El-Akhal

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the larvicidal activity of essential oils of two aromatic and medicinal plants, Citrus aurantium (C. aurantium and Citrus sinensis (C. sinensis (Rutaceae cultivated in North Eastern Morocco, against the larvae of the malaria vector Anopheles labranchiae (An. labranchiae (Diptera: Culicidae. Methods: Biological tests were realized according to a methodology inspired from standard World Health Organization protocol. The mortality counts were made after 24 h and LC50 and LC 90 values were calculated. Results: Bioassays revealed that these oils had remarkable larvicidal properties. The minimum levels necessary to achieve 100% mortality of An. labranchiae larvae were evaluated at 160 mg/L for C. aurantium and 640 mg/L for C. sinensis. Essential oil of C. aurantium remained the most efficient (LC50 = 22.64 mg/L, LC90 = 83.77 mg/L, while those of C. sinensis was the least (LC50 = 77.55 mg/L, LC90 = 351.36 mg/L. Conclusions: These results suggest that the essential oils isolated from Citrus plants have the potential to be used as an ideal ecofriendly approach for the control An. labranchiae.

  8. Chemotaxonomic study of Citrus, Poncirus and Fortunella genotypes based on peel oil volatile compounds--deciphering the genetic origin of Mangshanyegan (Citrus nobilis Lauriro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuihua Liu

    Full Text Available Volatile profiles yielded from gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS analysis provide abundant information not only for metabolism-related research, but also for chemotaxonomy. To study the chemotaxonomy of Mangshanyegan, its volatile profiles of fruit and leaf and those of 29 other genotypes of Citrus, Poncirus, and Fortunella were subjected to phylogenetic analyses. Results showed that 145 identified (including 64 tentatively identified and 15 unidentified volatile compounds were detected from their peel oils. The phylogenetic analysis of peel oils based on hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA demonstrated a good agreement with the Swingle taxonomy system, in which the three genera of Citrus, Poncirus, and Fortunella were almost completely separated. As to Citrus, HCA indicated that Citrophorum, Cephalocitrus, and Sinocitrus fell into three subgroups, respectively. Also, it revealed that Mangshanyegan contain volatile compounds similar to those from pummelo, though it is genetically believed to be a mandarin. These results were further supported by the principal component analysis of the peel oils and the HCA results of volatile profiles of leaves in the study.

  9. Chemotaxonomic Study of Citrus, Poncirus and Fortunella Genotypes Based on Peel Oil Volatile Compounds - Deciphering the Genetic Origin of Mangshanyegan (Citrus nobilis Lauriro)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cuihua; Jiang, Dong; Cheng, Yunjiang; Deng, Xiuxin; Chen, Feng; Fang, Liu; Ma, Zhaocheng; Xu, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Volatile profiles yielded from gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis provide abundant information not only for metabolism-related research, but also for chemotaxonomy. To study the chemotaxonomy of Mangshanyegan, its volatile profiles of fruit and leaf and those of 29 other genotypes of Citrus, Poncirus, and Fortunella were subjected to phylogenetic analyses. Results showed that 145 identified (including 64 tentatively identified) and 15 unidentified volatile compounds were detected from their peel oils. The phylogenetic analysis of peel oils based on hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) demonstrated a good agreement with the Swingle taxonomy system, in which the three genera of Citrus, Poncirus, and Fortunella were almost completely separated. As to Citrus, HCA indicated that Citrophorum, Cephalocitrus, and Sinocitrus fell into three subgroups, respectively. Also, it revealed that Mangshanyegan contain volatile compounds similar to those from pummelo, though it is genetically believed to be a mandarin. These results were further supported by the principal component analysis of the peel oils and the HCA results of volatile profiles of leaves in the study. PMID:23516475

  10. Scientific Opinion on the request from the USA regarding export of Florida citrus fruit to the EU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, R.; Candresse, T.; Dormannsné Simon, E.

    2011-01-01

    Following a request from the EU Commission, the EFSA PLH Panel conducted a scientific opinion on risk analysis and supporting documents provided by APHIS/USDA in support of the request to remove the Union's plant health import requirement that citrus fruit imported into the EU be sourced from...... host is rare. But the withdrawal of the current EU requirement that citrus fruit imported into the EU be sourced from groves where no symptoms of citrus canker have been observed in the field of production and in its immediate vicinity since the beginning of the last cycle of vegetation, will increase...

  11. Extreme soil erosion rates in citrus slope plantations and control strategies. A literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerdà, Artemi; Ángel González Peñaloza, Félix; Pereira, Paulo; Reyes Ruiz Gallardo, José; García Orenes, Fuensanta; Burguet, María

    2013-04-01

    Soil Erosion is a natural process that shapes the Earth. Due to the impact of agriculture, soil erosion rates increase, landforms show gullies and rills, and soils are depleted. In the Mediterranean, wheat, olive and vineyards were the main agriculture products, but new plantations are being found in sloping terrain due to the drip-irrigation. This new strategy results in the removal of the traditional terraces in order to make suitable for mechanization the agriculture plantation. Citrus is a clear example of the impact of the new chemical agriculture with a high investment in herbicides, pesticides, mechanisation, land levelling and drip computer controlled irrigation systems. The new plantation of citrus orchards is found in the Mediterranean, but also in California, Florida, China and Brazil. Chile, Argentina, and South Africa are other producers that are moving to an industrial production of citrus. This paper shows how the citrus plantations are found as one of the most aggressive plantation due to the increase in soil erosion, and how we can apply successful control strategies. The research into the high erosion rates of citrus orchard built on the slopes are mainly found in China (Wu et al., 1997; Xu et al., 2010; Wang et al., 2011; Wu et al., 2011; Liu et al., 2011; Lü et al., 2011; Xu et al., 2012) and in the Mediterranean (Cerdà and Jurgensen, 2008; 2009; Cerdà et al., 2009a; 2009b; Cerdà et al., 2011; 2012) Most of the research done devoted to the measurements of the soil losses but also some research is done related to the soil properties (Lu et al., 1997; Lü et al., 2012; Xu et al., 2012) and the impact of cover crops to reduce the soil losses (Lavigne et al., 2012; Le Bellec et al., 2012) and the use of residues such as dried citrus peel in order to reduce the soil losses. There are 116 million tonnes of citrus produced yearly, and this affects a large surface of the best land. The citrus orchards are moving from flood irrigated to drip

  12. Evaluation of Orange Peel Citrus Sinensis (L) As a Source of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Different levels of the extracts and essential oil of Citrus sinensis was tested. Conventional synthetic insecticide, Pirimiphos-methyl, was used as a standard check. Toxicity potential of different extracts of C. sinensis was tested against Z. subfasciatus. Extracts prepared using different solvents against the beetles were not ...

  13. Comparative transcriptional survey between self-incompatibility and self-compatibility in Citrus reticulata Blanco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yuewen; Li, Qiulei; Hu, Guibing; Qin, Yonghua

    2017-04-20

    Seedlessness is an excellent economical trait, and self-incompatibility (SI) is one of important factors resulting in seedless fruit in Citrus. However, SI molecular mechanism in Citrus is still unclear. In this study, RNA-Seq technology was used to identify differentially expressed genes related to SI reaction of 'Wuzishatangju' (Citrus reticulata Blanco). A total of 35.67GB raw RNA-Seq data was generated and was de novo assembled into 50,364 unigenes with an average length of 897bp and N50 value of 1549. Twenty-three candidate unigenes related to SI were analyzed using qPCR at different tissues and stages after self- and cross-pollination. Seven pollen S genes (Unigene0050323, Unigene0001060, Unigene0004230, Unigene0004222, Unigene0012037, Unigene0048889 and Unigene0004272), three pistil S genes (Unigene0019191, Unigene0040115, Unigene0036542) and three genes (Unigene0038751, Unigene0031435 and Unigene0029897) associated with the pathway of ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis were identified. Unigene0031435, Unigene0038751 and Unigene0029897 are probably involved in SI reaction of 'Wuzishatangju' based on expression analyses. The present study provides a new insight into the molecular mechanism of SI in Citrus at the transcriptional level. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Resistance of Citrus and Related Genera to Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Liviidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgoni, P C; Vendramim, J D; Lourencão, A L; Machado, M A

    2014-10-01

    The present study was developed to evaluate the resistance of the following genotypes of Citrus and related genera to this pest: 'Pera,' 'Natal', and 'Washington Navel' oranges (Citrus sinensis), 'Marsh Seedless' grapefruit (Citrus paradisi), hardy orange 'Rubidoux' (Poncirus trifoliata), kumquat (Fortunella margarita Swingle), citrumelo 'Swingle' (C. paradisi x P. trifoliata), and citrange 'Troyer' (P. trifoliata x C. sinensis). The experiments were performed in greenhouses with plants grafted onto 'Rangpur' lime (Citrus limonia) and placed individually in voile cages. The preference for oviposition in a no-choice test, and the effect of genotype were evaluated. The egg-adult cycle was monitored to determine the effect of genotype on the biology of the insect. Poncirus 'Rubidoux' was the least preferred genotype for oviposition; reduced number of eggs was also found to occur on citrange 'Troyer', and 'Marsh Seedless' was the genotype with the most eggs. No significant variation in the duration of the embryonic period was observed; however, a difference in the viability of eggs was found, with the lowest egg viabilities on 'Swingle.' Kumquat and 'Marsh Seedless' genotypes were correlated with increased durations of the nymphal phase, however, there was no difference in the survival of this phase. Fecundity of females on 'Troyer', 'Swingle', and kumquat was reduced. Considering all of the evaluated parameters, it was concluded that cultivars of sweet orange are the most susceptible genotypes to Diaphorina citri. Regarding oviposition, P. trifoliata 'Rubidoux' showed resistance of the antixenosis type.

  15. Observações citológicas em citrus: ll. variedades triplóides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Krug

    1944-01-01

    Full Text Available No presente trabalho apresenta-se um breve resumo dos conhecimentos atuais sôbre a citologia do gênero Citrus; descrevem-se, a seguir, duas variedades triplóides de interêsse econômico. Admite-se que uma delas se tenha derivado da outra por meio de um "seedling" nucelar. Os caracteres morfológicos e citológicos dêstes triplóides são apresentados em detalhes. Chama-se a atenção para a importância da triploidia nos trabalhos de melhoramento das plantas cítricas.A review is presented of citrus cytology and account is given of the author's investigations of this subject. Two triploid citrus varieties are described which are of economic importance. It appears probable that one of these is a nucellar seedling derived from the other. The morphological and cytological characteristics of these triploids are given in detail. Attention is called to the importance of triploidy in citrus breeding.

  16. Deep-sequencing revealed Citrus bark cracking viroid (CBCVd) as a highly aggressive pathogen on hop

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jakše, J.; Radišek, S.; Pokorn, T.; Matoušek, Jaroslav; Javornik, B.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 4 (2015), s. 831-842 ISSN 0032-0862 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH14255 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Bioinformatic * Citrus bark cracking viroid * Hop * Next-generation sequencing Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.383, year: 2015

  17. 78 FR 22411 - Common Crop Insurance Regulations; Florida Citrus Fruit Crop Insurance Provisions; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-16

    ... / Tuesday, April 16, 2013 / Rules and Regulations#0;#0; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Federal Crop Insurance Corporation 7 CFR Part 457 RIN 0563-AC39 Common Crop Insurance Regulations; Florida Citrus Fruit Crop Insurance Provisions; Correction AGENCY: Federal Crop Insurance Corporation, USDA. ACTION: Final rule...

  18. Clarification of orange juice by crude fungal pectinase from citrus peel

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fungal pectinase enzyme was produced by Rhizopus oryzae on a solid culture containing citrus peel of orange (35% w/v). The crude extract with maximum pectinase activity of 1, 360 u/ml was used to clarify orange juice. The yield, turbidity and viscosity as well as pH, total soluble solids, ascorbic acids and total titratable ...

  19. Paraleyrodes minei Iaccarino 1990 (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae, new specie for Italy, on Citrus aurantium L., 1758

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio M. Iaccarino

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The nesting whitefly Paraleyrodes minei Iaccarino 1990 (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae was found on leaves of sour orange tree Citrus aurantium L., 1758, in the Gussone Park of the Faculty of Agriculture, of the U niversity of N aples “Federico II”, at Portici, Italy.

  20. Vigour and behaviour of fifteen citrus varieties against tristeza in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-06-18

    Jun 18, 2007 ... Fifteen varieties or combinations of citrus (lime, grapefruit, lemons, oranges, mandarin and hybrids) were characterized in the forest ... Satsuma mandarin, Lisbon lemon, Eureka lemon and in some aspects Tahiti lime showed a ... are abnormally gorged with water (Aubert, 1982). The notation scale includes ...

  1. Root respiration in citrus acclimates to temperature and slows during drought

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bryla, D.R.; Bouma, T.J.; Eissenstat, D.M.

    1997-01-01

    Citrus seedlings were grown in soil columns in which the root system was hydraulically separated into tyro equal layers; this enabled us to maintain roots in the upper layer without water for 110 d, The columns were placed into waterbaths modified so that soil temperatures in the top layer could be

  2. In vitro plant regeneration in rough lemon (Citrus jambhiri Lush) by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-10-17

    Oct 17, 2011 ... Seeds were extracted from ripe fruits of rough lemon. Fruits were collected from a citrus germplasm collection of Punjab Agricultural. University, Ludhiana. Seed integuments were removed and disinfestation was done with 1% Mercuric Chloride for 5 min. Three washes in distilled and sterilized water were ...

  3. Guava SSR analysis: Diversity assessment and similarity to accessions associated with reducing citrus greening in Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    The guava (Psidium guajava) is an evergreen tree in the Myrtaceae, native to tropical America. It is grown throughout the tropics and subtropics of the world, and is used as a fresh fruit and processed into juice, jelly and paste. Recent introduction of citrus greening (huanglongbing) into Florida...

  4. Seasonal nitrogen budgets of mature citrus trees on a sandy entisol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morgan, K.; Scholberg, J.M.S.; Obreza, T.; Wheaton, T.

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 30% of Florida citrus is grown on well-drained Entisols with low nutrient-holding capacity, which are prone to high nitrogen (N) leaching losses. However, increasing application frequency of N-fertilizer via multiple fertigations does not increase crop yield, whereas in agronomic

  5. Detecting aphid predation by earwigs in organic citrus orchards using molecular markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeu-Dalmau, C; Piñol, J; Agustí, N

    2012-10-01

    Aphids (Hemiptera: Aphidoidea) can damage citrus trees via direct damage to leaves and flowers or via the indirect transmission of viruses. Predators such as the European earwig, Forficula auricularia Linnaeus (Dermaptera: Forficulidae), may assist in keeping aphid populations under control in citrus orchards. Group-specific primers were developed to detect aphid DNA in earwigs, in order to determine earwig predation rates in aphids in Mediterranean organic citrus trees. These primers were designed in accordance with the alignment of comparable sequences of aphids and earwigs, and they amplified a 224 bp fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) region. Following the consumption of three to five Aphis spiraecola Patch, aphid DNA was still detectable in 50% of earwigs one day after the ingestion. When predation was evaluated in the field, aphid DNA was detected in earwigs in May, June and July but not in April and August. The most interesting result is that of May, when aphid abundance was very low but 30% of the earwigs tested positive for aphid DNA. This finding suggests that earwigs are important aphid predators in citrus orchards, as they probably alter aphid dynamics as a result of early seasonal pressure on this pest.

  6. Citrus-derived flavonoid naringenin exerts uterotrophic effects in female mice at human relevant doses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breinholt, Vibeke Miller; Svendsen, Gitte Winkel; Dragsted, Lars Ove

    2004-01-01

    ingestion of 400-760 ml of orange juice (Erlund et al. 2001). This could be taken to suggests that ingestion of orange juice and other citrus fruits and juices may give rise to sufficiently high tissue levels of naringenin in man to exert a biological effect....

  7. Citrus sinensis annotation project (CAP: a comprehensive database for sweet orange genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Wang

    Full Text Available Citrus is one of the most important and widely grown fruit crop with global production ranking firstly among all the fruit crops in the world. Sweet orange accounts for more than half of the Citrus production both in fresh fruit and processed juice. We have sequenced the draft genome of a double-haploid sweet orange (C. sinensis cv. Valencia, and constructed the Citrus sinensis annotation project (CAP to store and visualize the sequenced genomic and transcriptome data. CAP provides GBrowse-based organization of sweet orange genomic data, which integrates ab initio gene prediction, EST, RNA-seq and RNA-paired end tag (RNA-PET evidence-based gene annotation. Furthermore, we provide a user-friendly web interface to show the predicted protein-protein interactions (PPIs and metabolic pathways in sweet orange. CAP provides comprehensive information beneficial to the researchers of sweet orange and other woody plants, which is freely available at http://citrus.hzau.edu.cn/.

  8. Citrus plant nutritional profile in relation to huanglongbing prevalence in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razi, M.F.U.D.; Khan, I.A.; Jaskani, M.J.

    2011-01-01

    Citrus is an important fruit crop in Pakistan that requires proper crop nutrition and disease management strategies as it is a tree crop and withstands harsh seasonal conditions for decades. Huanglongbing (HLB) is a century old, devastating disease of citrus caused by phloem limiting bacteria of the alpha-proteobacteria subdivision. As disease has no known cure, so, effective prevention methods are useful in crop management. Improper crop nutrition impairs plant genetic resistance to invasive pathogens, decreases yield and reduces productive life of the plant. In this study we selected 116 citrus trees from 43 orchard of Punjab for a nutritional assessment. All the trees were showing HLB symptoms and were subjected to NPK and Zn analysis as well as molecular detection of Candidatus L. asiaticus, the pathogen associated with HLB. Nitrogen and Zn were significantly higher (P=0.05) in HLB infected trees. Out of 48 diseased trees, 19, 43 and 27 were deficient in nitrogen, phosphorous and potash, respectively. Our study concludes that there is no relationship between nutritional deficiency status and HLB incidence in citrus; however, nutritional treatments may help in stress relief to infected plants. (author)

  9. Optimization of an efficient transcuticular delivery system for control of citrus huanglongbing

    Science.gov (United States)

    We experimentally develop and optimize a transcuticular nano-delivery system for enhancing permeation of effective compound against HLB disease through citrus cuticle into the phloem by foliar spray or bark application. The results showed that two kinds of nanoemulsions (W/O and O/W) with the smalle...

  10. The physico-chemical properties of some citrus seeds and seed oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhaimi, Fahad A L; Matthäus, Bertrand; Özcan, Mehmet Musa; Ghafoor, Kashif

    2016-03-01

    The chemical properties, mineral contents, fatty acid and tocopherol contents of seed and seed oils of some citrus genus provided from several locations in Turkey and Saudi Arabia were determined. While Ca contents of seeds were between 5018 mg/kg (Kütdiken lemon) and 7619 mg/kg (kinnow mandarin), K contents of seeds varied between 7007 mg/kg (Orlando orange) and 10334 mg/kg (kinnow mandarin). Glucose and fructose contents of citrus seed samples varied between 3.75 g/kg and 5.75 g/kg, and 4.09 g/kg and 6.03 g/kg. Palmitic, oleic and linoleic acids were established as dominant fatty acids. Palmitic, oleic and linoleic acid contents of citrus seed oils varied between 19.6% (Kütdiken lemon) and 26.2% (pineapple orange), 21.3% (kinnow mandarin) and 31.4% (Kütdiken lemon) and 32.3% (Kütdiken lemon) and 43.7% (kinnow mandarin), respectively. The total amount of tocopherols of Turkish citrus oil varied between 0.5 mg/100 g (Fremont mandarin) and 18.8 mg/100 g (bitter orange).

  11. Symptomatic Citrus trees reveal a new pathogenic lineage in Fusarium and two new Neocosmospora species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sandoval-Denis, M.; Guarnaccia, V.; Polizzi, G.; Crous, P.W.

    2018-01-01

    The diversity of fusaria in symptomatic Citrus trees in Greece, Italy and Spain was evaluated using morphological and molecular multi-locus analyses based on fragments of the calmodulin (CAM), intergenic spacer region of the rDNA (IGS), internal transcribed spacer region of the rDNA (ITS), large

  12. Effect of phytosanitary irradiation on the postharvest quality of Seedless Kishu mandarins (Citrus kinokuni mukakukishu)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ‘Seedless Kishu’ mandarins (Citrus kinokuni mukakukishu) were treated with gamma irradiation at 150, 400, or 1000 Gy and stored for three weeks at 6°C and then for one week at 20°C to simulate commercial handling and marketing. The quality of the fruit was then evaluated following storage using non-...

  13. Effect of applying cinnamaldehyde incorporated in wax on green mould decay in citrus fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Xiaofang; OuYang, Qiuli; Tao, Nengguo

    2018-01-01

    Green mould caused by Penicillium digitatum is the most damaging postharvest diseases of citrus fruit. Cinnamaldehyde (CA) is a food additive that has potential use in controlling postharvest disease of fruits and vegetables. In this study, the effectiveness of wax with CA (WCA) in controlling Ponkan (Citrus reticulata Blanco) green mould was investigated. The mycelial growth of P. digitatum was inhibited by CA in a dose-dependent manner. The minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC) were both 0.50 mL L -1 . In vivo tests demonstrated that WCA (1 × and 10 × MFC) applied to Ponkan fruits inoculated with P. digitatum could significantly decrease the incidence of green mould for up to 5 days. The WCA treatment increased the activities of catalase, superoxide dismutase, peroxidase, phenylalanine ammonia lyase, polyphenol oxidase, as well as the total phenols and flavonoids contents. Meanwhile, the treatment remarkably decreased the weight loss rate of fruits and maintained fruit quality. These results indicated that WCA treatment might induce defence responses against green mould in citrus fruit. Our findings suggest that WCA might be a promising approach in controlling green mould of citrus fruits. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. Gender differences and effect of photophase on Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri Kuwayama) feeding behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae), thought to be primarily a phloem-feeding insect, transmits the presumptive pathogen for Huanglongbing, ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’. Because this bacterium is restricted to the phloem and bacterial transmission is the res...

  15. Volatile composition of the peel and leaf essential oils of Citrus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    %) and γ-terpinene (6.1%), while the major constituents of the leaf oil were linalool (32.8%), sabinene (28.8), (E)-β-ocimene (6.2%) and limonene (5.2%). Key words: Citrus nobilis Lour., chemical composition, essential oils, class composition.

  16. High species diversity in Colletotrichum associated with citrus diseases in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guarnaccia, Vladimiro; Groenewald, J.Z.; Polizzi, Giancarlo; Crous, P.W.

    2017-01-01

    Species of Colletotrichum are considered important plant pathogens, saprobes, and endophytes on a wide range of plant hosts. Several species are well-known on citrus, either as agents of pre- or post-harvest infections, such as anthracnose, postbloom fruit drop, tear stain and stem-end rot on fruit,

  17. Symptomatic Citrus trees reveal a new pathogenic lineage in Fusarium and two new Neocosmospora species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sandoval-Denis, Marcelo; Guarnaccia, Vladimiro; Polizzi, Giancarlo; Crous, P.W.

    The diversity of fusaria in symptomatic Citrus trees in Greece, Italy and Spain was evaluated using morphological and molecular multi-locus analyses based on fragments of the calmodulin (CAM), intergenic spacer region of the rDNA (IGS), internal transcribed spacer region of the rDNA (ITS), large

  18. Citrus limon extract: possible inhibitory mechanisms affecting testicular functions and fertility in male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nidhi; Singh, Shio Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The effect of oral administration of 50% ethanolic leaf extract of Citrus limon (500 and 1,000 mg/kg body weight/day) for 35 days on fertility and various male reproductive endpoints was evaluated in Parkes strain of mice. Testicular indices such as histology, 3β- and 17β-HSD enzymes activity, immunoblot expression of StAR and P450scc, and germ cell apoptosis by TUNEL and CASP- 3 expression were assessed. Motility, viability, and number of spermatozoa in the cauda epididymidis, level of serum testosterone, fertility indices, and toxicological parameters were also evaluated. Histologically, testes in extract-treated mice showed nonuniform degenerative changes in the seminiferous tubules. Treatment had adverse effects on steroidogenic markers in the testis and induced germ cell apoptosis. Significant reductions were noted in epididymal sperm parameters and serum level of testosterone in Citrus-treated mice compared to controls. Fertility of the extract-treated males was also suppressed, but libido remained unaffected. By 56 days of treatment withdrawal, alterations induced in the above parameters returned to control levels suggesting that Citrus treatment causes reversible suppression of spermatogenesis and fertility in Parkes mice. Suppression of spermatogenesis may result from germ cell apoptosis because of decreased production of testosterone. The present work indicated that Citrus leaves can affect male reproduction.

  19. Citrus Quality Control: An NMR/MRI Problem-Based Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhart, Sarah E.; McCarrick, Robert M.; Lorigan, Gary A.; Yezierski, Ellen J.

    2016-01-01

    An experiment seated in an industrial context can provide an engaging framework and unique learning opportunity for an upper-division physical chemistry laboratory. An experiment that teaches NMR/MRI through a problem-based quality control of citrus products was developed. In this experiment, using a problem-based learning (PBL) approach, students…

  20. The effects of citrus rootstocks on Valencia Late and Rhode Red ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    For N, K, Mg, Mn and Cu, Carrizo citrange has the highest means while Troyer and sour orange have the highest concentrations for P and. Fe, and Ca, Zn and Na, respectively. We recommend utilizations of Carrizo and Troyer citrange rootstocks for eastern Mediterranean region citrus production as they had higher ability to ...

  1. Parasitoids and hyperparasitoids (Hymenoptera) on aphids (Hemiptera) infesting citrus in east Mediterranean region of Turkey

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Satar, S.; Satar, G.; Karacaoglu, M.; Uygun, N.; Kavallieratos, N. G.; Starý, Petr; Athanassiou, CH. G.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 14, article no. 178 (2014) ISSN 1536-2442 Grant - others:Turkish Scientific and Technical Research Council(TR) 105-0-581 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : citrus * aphid * Aphidiinae Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.025, year: 2014 http://jinsectscience.oxfordjournals.org/content/jis/14/1/178.full.pdf

  2. Hepatoprotective Effect of Citrus limon Fruit Extract against Carbofuran Induced Toxicity in Wistar Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Kumar Jaiswal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbofuran (2,3-dihydro-2,2-dimethyl-7-benzofuranol methylcarbamate, is known to induce oxidative stress and to cause inhibition of acetylcholinesterase activity. The present work was envisaged to evaluate the effect of carbofuran on redox indices and its interactions with hepatic markers in rat. The ameliorating effect of Citrus limon fruit extract on carbofuran induced toxicity was also monitored. The results indicated that carbofuran treatment caused significant alterations in the levels of activities of AST, ALT, and LDH in liver tissues and serum. The levels of enzymatic oxidative stress markers such as SOD and catalase and nonenzymatic redox molecules such as total thiol, GSH, and protein thiol also showed significant perturbations in rat liver due to carbofuran treatment. The administration of Citrus limon fruit extract, however, was able to markedly ameliorate the toxicity of carbofuran by protecting the levels of aforesaid biomarkers to near normal levels. The ameliorative effect of Citrus limon fruit extract may be due to the presence of different antioxidants in it which may neutralize the ROS and RNS generated in the body tissue due to pesticide stress. These results suggested that Citrus limon fruit extract may be utilized as a potential supplement in proper management of pesticide intoxication in association with relevant therapeutics.

  3. Growth of Lemon ( Citrus Limon L. Buru) in response to Water Stress ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of young leaves and whole plant. Since total dry matter accumulation is a very important growth index, the effects of water stress and shade on the vegetative growth of lemon are considered interactive. Keywords: Citrus, 'Eureka', lemon, shade, water stress, vegetative growth. Nigerian Journal of Horticultural Science Vol.

  4. Anti-giardia activity of hexane extract of Citrus aurantifolia (Christim ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Giardia lamblia is a parasite that causes giardiasis in humans and other mammals. The common treatment includes different drugs, which were described to produce unpleasant side effects. Citrus aurantifolia, popularly known as “lima”, is a plant used in traditional medicine to treat gastrointestinal symptoms.

  5. 77 FR 41709 - Common Crop Insurance Regulations; Florida Citrus Fruit Crop Insurance Provisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-16

    ... type, intended use, and age of trees within a citrus fruit commodity, times the coverage level percent... changes, to clarify existing policy provisions to better meet the needs of policyholders, and to reduce... Administration and Standards Division, Risk Management Agency, United States Department of Agriculture, Beacon...

  6. 76 FR 17617 - Changes to Treatments for Citrus Fruit From Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-30

    ... Inspection Service [Docket No. APHIS-2008-0140] Changes to Treatments for Citrus Fruit From Australia AGENCY... Australia into the United States. These new treatments will continue to prevent the introduction or... from Australia into the United States. We also proposed to establish an approved irradiation dose for...

  7. Assessment of citrus marketing in Benue and Kano states of Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines the organization, structure and conduct of the citrus marketing system between Benue and Kano States of Nigeria. Market concentration measures were applied to a cross sectional data of sampled wholesalers and retailers. Gini coefficient of 0.43 and 0.22 and Herfindal index of 0.0158 and 0.0036 ...

  8. Effect of Different Cultivation Periods on Soil Stable Organic Carbon Pool in Citrus Orchard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Yi-xiang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Effect of different cultivation periods on soil stable organic carbon pools and fractions in citrus orchard was investigated to provide scientific basis on the study of orchard soil carbon sequestration by the temporal-spatial substitution method and physical and chemical fractionation method. The results showed that the citrus orchard planted in 1954 compared with the citrus orchard planted in 1980, the content of total organic carbon increased by 27.16%, organic carbon content in macro-aggregates increased by 13.59%, organic carbon content in micro-aggregates increased by 80.19%, organic carbon content of heavy fraction increased by 29.25%, resistant organic carbon content increased by 32.00%, black carbon content increased by 4.01%. Organic carbon which combined with micro-aggregates was protected, and resistant organic carbon and black carbon were recalcitrant organic carbon in soil, this indicated that the stable organic carbon fractions gradually enriched in soil with the increase of growing periods, which was conducive to improve carbon sink in citrus orchard soil.

  9. Lateral flow immunoassay for the rapid detection of citrus tristeza virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    A lateral flow methodology was developed using gold nanoparticles for rapid detection of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV). The test strip was based on a sandwich immunoassay and could be accomplished within 10 minutes. A sample was considered negative for CTV when only the control line appeared; whereas,...

  10. Domain swapping of Citrus limon monoterpene synthases: impact on enzymatic activity and product specifity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamer, el M.K.; Lucker, J.; Bosch, D.; Verhoeven, H.A.; Verstappen, F.W.A.; Schwab, W.; Tunen, van A.J.; Voragen, A.G.J.; Maagd, de R.A.; Bouwmeester, H.J.

    2003-01-01

    Monoterpene cyclases are the key enzymes in the monoterpene biosynthetic pathway, as they catalyze the cyclization of the ubiquitous geranyl diphosphate (GDP) to the specific monoterpene skeletons. From Citrus limon, four monoterpene synthase-encoding cDNAs for a P-pinene synthase named

  11. PEMANFAATAN PEKTIN KULIT BUAH JERUK SIAM (Citrus nobilis var. microcarpa) SEBAGAI ADSORBEN LOGAM TEMBAGA (Cu)

    OpenAIRE

    Ina, Anita Tamu

    2014-01-01

    Tembaga merupakan salah satu logam berat yang dapat mencemari lingkungan perairan. Tembaga biasanya dihasilkan dari industri tekstil maupun industri penyamakan kulit. Pemanfaatan biomaterial sebagai penyerap logam berat menjadi salah satu alternatif pengolahan limbah cair logam berat. Biomaterial yang digunakan adalah pektin yang diekstrak dari kulit Jeruk Siam (Citrus nobilis var. microcarpa). Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui kemampuan pektin kulit Jeruk Siam dalam...

  12. Phytophthora parasitica transcriptome, a new concept in the understanding of the citrus gummosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel D. Rosa

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the economic importance of gummosis disease for the citriculture, studies on P. parasitica-Citrus interaction comprise a significant part in the Brazilian Citrus genome data bank (CitEST. Among them, two cDNA libraries constructed from two different growth conditions of the P. parasitica pathogen are included which has generated the PP/CitEST database (CitEST - Center APTA Citros Sylvio Moreira/IAC- Millennium Institute. Through this genomic approach and clustering analyses the following has been observed: out of a total of 13,285 available in the Phytophthora parasitica database, a group of 4,567 clusters was formed, comprising 2,649 singlets and 1,918 contigs. Out of a total of 4,567 possible genes, only 2,651 clusters were categorized; among them, only 4.3% shared sequence similarities with pathogenicity factors and defense. Some of these possible genes (103 corresponding to 421 ESTs, were characterized by phylogenetic analysis and discussed. A comparison made with the COGEME database has shown homology which may be part of an evolutionary pathogenicity pathway present in Phytophthora and also in other fungi. Many of the genes which were identified here, which may encode proteins associated to mechanisms of citrus gummosis pathogenicity, represent only one facet of the pathogen-host Phytophthora - Citrus interaction.

  13. Biotransformation of the citrus flavone tangeretin in rats. Identification of metabolites with intact flavane nucleus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S. E.; Breinholt, V.; Cornett, Claus

    2000-01-01

    The present study mas carried out in order to investigate the in vivo biotransformation and excretion of the flavone, tangeretin, found in citrus fruits, by analysing urine and faeces samples from rats after repeated administration of 100 mg/kg body weight/day tangeretin. The formed metabolites...

  14. Citrus phenylpropanoids and defence against pathogens. Part I: Metabolic profiling in elicited fruits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ballester, A.R.; Lafuente, M.T.; Vos, de R.C.H.; Bovy, A.G.; González-Candelas, L.

    2013-01-01

    Penicillium spp. are among the major postharvest pathogens of citrus fruit. Induction of natural resistance in fruits constitutes one of the alternatives to chemical fungicides. Here, we investigated the involvement of the phenylpropanoid pathway in the induction of resistance in Navelate oranges by

  15. Novel expression patterns of carotenoid pathway-related gene in citrus leaves and maturing fruits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotenoids are abundant in citrus fruits and vary among cultivars and species. In the present study, HPLC and real-time PCR were used to investigate the expression patterns of 23 carotenoid biosynthesis gene family members and their possible relation with carotenoid accumulation in flavedo, juice s...

  16. In vitro and in vivo effect of Citrus limon essential oil against sarcoptic mange in rabbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effect of lemon oil (Citrus limon) on Sarcoptes scabiei var. cuniculi was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The mite samples were collected from naturally infected rabbits. The lemon oil was prepared in six concentrations by dilution with distilled water (2.5, 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 %). In vitro a...

  17. Effect of Salinity Stress on Physiological and Biochemical Traits in Citrus Genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Golein

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Citrus (L. is a large genus that covers several major cultivatedspecies, including Citrussinensis (sweet orange, C.reticulata (tangerine and mandarin, C. limon (lemon, C.grandis (pummelo, and C. paradisi (grapefruit.Citrus is one of the world’s important fruit crops and grown inmost areas with suitable climates between latitude 35◦N–35◦S. InIran, citrus industry is of paramount importance. Citrus species have been classified as salt-sensitive crops, although their relative tolerance can be influenced by climate, fertilization, soil type, irrigation method and rootstock. Citrus rootstocks differ in their ability to exclude Cl−and/or Na+from the scion. Many authors have contrasted the relative abilities of rootstocks to restrict movement of salts to the scions. The rootstocks Cleopatra mandarin (C. reshni, Rangpur lime (C. limonia and Severiniabuxifolia (Poir Tenore were relatively effective in restricting Cl−transport to scions, whereas the rootstocks Swingle citrumelo and Carrizo citrange were found to be less restrictive. Although the mechanism by which some rootstocks reduce concentrations of ions in the scion is still unknown, it seems to depend on the vigor of the scion and on water requirements. There are a number of reports demonstrating that both scion and rootstock may influence Cl−accumulation in leaves. Several papers reported that accumulation of Na+ in shoots seemed to be more dependent on rootstock–scion combinations. Since, citrus species are different in salt tolerance and use of tolerant rootstocks can decrease salinity damages, sothis study was conducted to identify tolerant genotypes among unknown types from the Kotra Citrus Research Station, Citrus and Sub-Tropical Fruits Research Center (Ramsar. Materials and Methods: The experiment was –arrangedin afactorial, based on completely randomized design in three replications with two plantsin each experimental unit in Iran Citrus Research Institute

  18. Water Quality and Evaluation of Pesticides in Lakes in the Ridge Citrus Region of Central Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choquette, Anne F.; Kroening, Sharon E.

    2009-01-01

    Water chemistry, including major inorganic constituents, nutrients, and pesticide compounds, was compared between seven lakes surrounded by citrus agriculture and an undeveloped lake on the Lake Wales Ridge (herein referred to as the Ridge) in central Florida. The region has been recognized for its vulnerability to the leaching of agricultural chemicals into the subsurface due to factors including soils, climate, and land use. About 40 percent of Florida's citrus cultivation occurs in 'ridge citrus' areas characterized by sandy well drained soils, with the remainder in 'flatwoods citrus' characterized by high water tables and poorly drained soils. The lakes on the Ridge are typically flow-through lakes that exchange water with adjacent and underlying aquifer systems. This study is the first to evaluate the occurrence of pesticides in lakes on the Ridge, and also represents one of the first monitoring efforts nationally to focus on regional-scale assessment of current-use pesticides in small- to moderate-sized lakes (5 to 393 acres). The samples were collected between December 2003 and September 2005. The lakes in citrus areas contained elevated concentrations of major inorganic constituents (including alkalinity, total dissolved solids, calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, chloride, and sulfate), total nitrogen, pH, and pesticides compared to the undeveloped lake. Nitrate (as N) and total nitrogen concentrations were typically elevated in the citrus lakes, with maximum values of 4.70 and 5.19 mg/L (milligrams per liter), respectively. Elevated concentrations of potassium, nitrate, and other inorganic constituents in the citrus lakes likely reflect inputs from the surficial ground-water system that originated predominantly from agricultural fertilizers, soil amendments, and inorganic pesticides. A total of 20 pesticide compounds were detected in the lakes, of which 12 compounds exceeded the standardized reporting level of 0.06 ug/L (microgram per liter). Those

  19. The effect of pomelo citrus (Citrus maxima var. Nambangan), vitamin C and lycopene towards the number reduction of mice (Mus musculus) apoptotic hepatocyte caused of ochratoxin A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badriyah, Hastuti, Utami Sri

    2017-06-01

    Foods can contaminated by some mycotoxin produced by molds. Ochratoxin A is a sort of mycotoxin that cause structural damage on hepatocytes. Pomelo citrus (Citrus maxima var. Nambangan) contain vitamin C and lycopene that have antioxidant character. This research is done to: 1)examine the effect of pomelo citrus juice, vitamin C, and lycopene treatment towards the number reduction of mice apoptotic hepatocytes caused by ochratoxin A exposure, 2)examine the effect of vitamin C mixed with lycopene treatment towards the number reduction of mice apoptotic hepatocytes caused by ochratoxin A exposure. The experimental group used male mice strain BALB-C in the age of three month and bodyweight 20-30 grams devided in 4 experiment group and control group. The experiment group I were administered pomelo citrus juice 0,5 ml/30 grams BW/day orally during 2 weeks and then administered with ochratoxin in the dose of 1 mg/kg BW during 1 week. The experiment group II were administered with vitamin C in the dose of 5,85 µg/30g BW with the same methods. The experiment group III were administered with lycopene in the dose of 0,1025 µg/30 g BW with the same methods. The experiment group IV were administered with vitamin C mixed with lycopene with the same methods. The control group were administered with ochratoxin A in the dose of 1 mg/kg BW per oral during 1 week. The apoptotic hepatocyte number were count by microscopic observation of hepatocyte slides from experiment group as well as control group with cytochemical staining. The research result shows that: 1) the pomelo citrus juice, vitamin C as well as lycopene administration could reduce the mice apoptotic hepatocyte number caused by ochratoxin A exposure, compared with the mice apoptotic hepatocyte number caused by ochratoxin A exposure only; 2) the vitamin C mixed with lycopene could reduce the mice apoptotic hepatocyte number caused by ochratoxin A exposure compared with the mice apoptotic hepatocyte number caused by

  20. Transcriptome Profiling to Understand the Effect of Citrus Rootstocks on the Growth of 'Shatangju' Mandarin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiang-Yu; Li, Juan; Liu, Meng-Meng; Yao, Qing; Chen, Jie-Zhong

    2017-01-01

    To obtain insight into potential mechanisms underlying the influence of rootstock on scion growth, we performed a comparative analysis of 'Shatangju' mandarin grafted onto 5 rootstocks: Fragrant orange (Citrus junons Sieb. ex. Tanaka), Red tangerine (Citrus reticulata Blanco), 'Shatangju' mandarin (Citrus reticulata Blanco), Rough lemon (Citrus jambhiri Lush) and Canton lemon (Citrus limonia Osbeck). The tree size of 'Shatangju' mandarin grafted onto Canton lemon and Rough lemon were the largest, followed by self-rooted rootstock trees, and the lowest tree sizes correspond to ones grafted on Red tangerine and Fragrant orange rootstocks. The levels of indoleacetic acid (IAA) and gibberellin (GA) were significantly and positively related to growth vigor. The differences of gene expression in leaves of trees grafted onto Red tangerine, Canton lemon and 'Shatangju' mandarin were analyzed by RNA-Seq. Results showed that more differentially expressed genes involved in oxidoreductase function, hormonal signal transduction and the glycolytic pathway were enriched in 'Red tangerine vs Canton lemon'. qRT-PCR analysis showed that expression levels of ARF1, ARF8, GH3 and IAA4 were negatively correlated with the growth vigor and IAA content. The metabolism of GA was influenced by the differential expression of KO1 and GA2OX1 in grafted trees. In addition, most of antioxidant enzyme genes were up-regulated in leaves of trees grafted onto Red tangerine, resulting in a higher peroxidase activity. We concluded that different rootstocks significantly affected the expression of genes involved in auxin signal transduction pathway and GA biosynthesis pathway in the grafted plants, and then regulated the hormone levels and their signal pathways.

  1. Novel diagnosis for citrus stubborn disease by detection of a spiroplasma citri-secreted protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jinxia; Pagliaccia, Deborah; Morgan, Robyn; Qiao, Yongli; Pan, Songqin; Vidalakis, Georgios; Ma, Wenbo

    2014-02-01

    Citrus stubborn disease (CSD), first identified in California, is a widespread bacterial disease found in most arid citrus-producing regions in the United States and the Mediterranean Region. The disease is caused by Spiroplasma citri, an insect-transmitted and phloem-colonizing bacterium. CSD causes significant tree damage resulting in loss of fruit production and quality. Detection of CSD is challenging due to low and fluctuating titer and sporadic distribution of the pathogen in infected trees. In this study, we report the development of a novel diagnostic method for CSD using an S. citri-secreted protein as the detection marker. Microbial pathogens secrete a variety of proteins during infection that can potentially disperse systemically in infected plants with the vascular flow. Therefore, their distribution may not be restricted to the pathogen infection sites and could be used as a biological marker for infection. Using mass spectrometry analysis, we identified a unique secreted protein from S. citri that is highly expressed in the presence of citrus phloem extract. ScCCPP1, an antibody generated against this protein, was able to distinguish S. citri-infected citrus and periwinkle from healthy plants. In addition, the antiserum could be used to detect CSD using a simple direct tissue print assay without the need for sample processing or specialized lab equipment and may be suitable for field surveys. This study provides proof of a novel concept of using pathogen-secreted protein as a marker for diagnosis of a citrus bacterial disease and can probably be applied to other plant diseases.

  2. Reduction of Legionella spp. in Water and in Soil by a Citrus Plant Extract Vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurzbach, Elena; Score, Jodie; Tejpal, Jyoti; Chi Tangyie, George; Phillips, Carol

    2014-01-01

    Legionnaires' disease is a severe form of pneumonia caused by Legionella spp., organisms often isolated from environmental sources, including soil and water. Legionella spp. are capable of replicating intracellularly within free-living protozoa, and once this has occurred, Legionella is particularly resistant to disinfectants. Citrus essential oil (EO) vapors are effective antimicrobials against a range of microorganisms, with reductions of 5 log cells ml−1 on a variety of surfaces. The aim of this investigation was to assess the efficacy of a citrus EO vapor against Legionella spp. in water and in soil systems. Reductions of viable cells of Legionella pneumophila, Legionella longbeachae, Legionella bozemanii, and an intra-amoebal culture of Legionella pneumophila (water system only) were assessed in soil and in water after exposure to a citrus EO vapor at concentrations ranging from 3.75 mg/liter air to 15g/liter air. Antimicrobial efficacy via different delivery systems (passive and active sintering of the vapor) was determined in water, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of the antimicrobial components (linalool, citral, and β-pinene) was conducted. There was up to a 5-log cells ml−1 reduction in Legionella spp. in soil after exposure to the citrus EO vapors (15 mg/liter air). The most susceptible strain in water was L. pneumophila, with a 4-log cells ml−1 reduction after 24 h via sintering (15 g/liter air). Sintering the vapor through water increased the presence of the antimicrobial components, with a 61% increase of linalool. Therefore, the appropriate method of delivery of an antimicrobial citrus EO vapor may go some way in controlling Legionella spp. from environmental sources. PMID:25063652

  3. CHEMICAL COMPOSITION AND TOXICITY OF CITRUS ESSENTIAL OILS ON Dysmicoccus brevipes (HEMIPTERA: PSEUDOCOCCIDAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GISELE DOS SANTOS OLIVEIRA MARTINS

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The insect Dysmicoccus brevipes (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae has been reported as an important pest for several crops, especially coffee. The citrus essential oils can be obtained as by-products of the citrus-processing industry and have been tested as an alternative to control different insect groups. Therefore, the objective of this work was to determine the chemical composition and evaluate the toxicity of commercial sweet orange (Citrus sinensis, bitter orange (Citrus aurantium and Sicilian lemon (Citrus limon essential oils and pure monoterpene D-limonene on D. brevipes. The essential oils were analyzed by gas chromatography. Two bioassays were conducted; the first assessing the insect mortality in all oils and the second assessing the lethal concentrations (LC50 and LC95 of the most effective oils. The main components of the oils were D-limonene (83.33% and Linalool (8.91% (sweet orange; D-limonene (78.53% and γ-terpinene (12.65% (bitter orange; D-limonene (59.78%, beta-pinene (14.71% and γ-terpinene (10.19% (Sicilian lemon and the compound D-limonene had 97% of purity. The highest mortalities were found with the use of the Sicilian lemon (98.68% and sweet orange (94.11%oils. The sweet orange oil presented lethal concentrations at 2.21% (LC50 and 3.55% (LC95, and the Sicilian lemon oil at 0.72% (LC50 and 2.91% (LC95. The main component of the sweet orange and Sicilian lemon essential oils was the D-limonene, and the Sicilian lemon oil was most effective oil to control D. brevipes.

  4. Rock fragment cover controls the sediment detachment in citrus plantations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerdà, Artemi; Keesstra, Saskia; Hamidreza Sadeghi, Seyed; Brevik, Eric; Giménez Morera, Antonio; Novara, Agata; Masto, Reginald E.; Jordán, Antonio; Wang, Juan

    2016-04-01

    Citrus orchards are seen as a source of sediments and water due to the lack of vegetation cover, the widespread use of herbicides, the compaction due to the use of heavy machinery, the lack of organic amendments and the removal of the pruned branches (Cerdà and Jurgensen, 2008; Cerdà et al., 2009; Cerdà and Jurgensen, 2011; Li et al, 2011). This is not unusual in agriculture, where high soil erosion losses are found in the orchards (Dai et al., 2015; Erkossa et al., 2015; Ochoa-Cueva et al., 2015). Therefore, there is a need to reduce the sediment delivery, and to achieve a sustainable situation with lower and renewable soil erosion rates (Cerdà et al., 2015; Nanko et al., 2015; Mwango et al., 2016). Vegetation cover is the most efficient strategy to control soil and water losses at different scales (Cerdà, 1999; Keesstra, 2007; Zhao et al., 2014), but farmers in the Mediterranean Regions prefer bare soils as this reduces the amount of water used by the plants, and also because of aesthetic concerns, as bare soils are perceived as tidy and therefore seen by farmers as the way their orchards should look. So therefore, there is a need to find an efficient strategy that reduces soil losses and will be accepted by the farmers also. One potential option for this may be to use rock fragments (stones) as a mulch to reduce the soil losses. Other researchers already found rock fragments to be an effective tool to reduce erosion (Poesen et al., 1994; Poesen and Lavee, 1994; Cerdà, 2001; Jomaa et al., 2012; Martínez Zavala and Jordán, 2008; Jordán and Martínez Zavala, 2008; Jordán et al., 2009; Zavala et al., 2010). Furthermore, rock fragments can improve soil quality and contribute to the restoration of ecosystems (Jiménez et al., 2015). However, most previous research on soil erosion and rock fragment cover was done under laboratory conditions or in forest soils. Meanwhile, little is known about the role of rock fragments in agriculture land under field

  5. Characterization of a Proposed Dichorhavirus Associated with the Citrus Leprosis Disease and Analysis of the Host Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Jaramillo, José Luis; Ruiz-Medrano, Roberto; Rojas-Morales, Lourdes; López-Buenfil, José Abel; Morales-Galván, Oscar; Chavarín-Palacio, Claudio; Ramírez-Pool, José Abrahán; Xoconostle-Cázares, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    The causal agents of Citrus leprosis are viruses; however, extant diagnostic methods to identify them have failed to detect known viruses in orange, mandarin, lime and bitter orange trees with severe leprosis symptoms in Mexico, an important citrus producer. Using high throughput sequencing, a virus associated with citrus leprosis was identified, belonging to the proposed Dichorhavirus genus. The virus was termed Citrus Necrotic Spot Virus (CNSV) and contains two negative-strand RNA components; virions accumulate in the cytoplasm and are associated with plasmodesmata—channels interconnecting neighboring cells—suggesting a mode of spread within the plant. The present study provides insights into the nature of this pathogen and the corresponding plant response, which is likely similar to other pathogens that do not spread systemically in plants. PMID:25004279

  6. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of Mexican lime (Citrus aurantifolia Swingle) using optimized systems for epicotyls and cotelydons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epicotyl and internodal stem segments provide the predominantly used explants for regeneration of transgenic citrus plants following co-cultivation with Agrobacterium. Previous reports using epicotyls segments from Mexican lime have shown low affinity for Agrobacterium tumefaciens infection which re...

  7. Label-free shotgun proteomics and metabolite analysis reveal a significant metabolic shift during citrus fruit development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Ehud; Boo, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Ho Youn; Eigenheer, Richard A; Phinney, Brett S; Shulaev, Vladimir; Negre-Zakharov, Florence; Sadka, Avi; Blumwald, Eduardo

    2011-11-01

    Label-free LC-MS/MS-based shot-gun proteomics was used to quantify the differential protein synthesis and metabolite profiling in order to assess metabolic changes during the development of citrus fruits. Our results suggested the occurrence of a metabolic change during citrus fruit maturation, where the organic acid and amino acid accumulation seen during the early stages of development shifted into sugar synthesis during the later stage of citrus fruit development. The expression of invertases remained unchanged, while an invertase inhibitor was up-regulated towards maturation. The increased expression of sucrose-phosphate synthase and sucrose-6-phosphate phosphatase and the rapid sugar accumulation suggest that sucrose is also being synthesized in citrus juice sac cells during the later stage of fruit development.

  8. 75 FR 34419 - Notice of Revision and Request for Extension of Approval of an Information Collection; Citrus...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-17

    ... quarantined areas to prevent the spread of citrus canker, contact Ms. Lynn Evans-Goldner, National Program... quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; and (4) Minimize the burden of the...

  9. Characterization of a Proposed Dichorhavirus Associated with the Citrus Leprosis Disease and Analysis of the Host Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Cruz-Jaramillo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The causal agents of Citrus leprosis are viruses; however, extant diagnostic methods to identify them have failed to detect known viruses in orange, mandarin, lime and bitter orange trees with severe leprosis symptoms in Mexico, an important citrus producer. Using high throughput sequencing, a virus associated with citrus leprosis was identified, belonging to the proposed Dichorhavirus genus. The virus was termed Citrus Necrotic Spot Virus (CNSV and contains two negative-strand RNA components; virions accumulate in the cytoplasm and are associated with plasmodesmata—channels interconnecting neighboring cells—suggesting a mode of spread within the plant. The present study provides insights into the nature of this pathogen and the corresponding plant response, which is likely similar to other pathogens that do not spread systemically in plants.

  10. Uji Kinerja Mesin Sortasi Jeruk Sistem Rotasi untuk Penyortiran Jeruk Siam Pontianak (Citrus nobilis var. microcarpa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budi Setiawan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak. Salah satu kegiatan pascapanen yang cukup menyita waktu adalah proses sortasi jeruk siam pontianak (Citrus nobilis var. microcarpa di Kabupaten Sambas. Selama ini proses sortasi ditingkat petani masih dilakukan secara manual dimana tingkat keseragaman ukuran dan tingkat kematangan rendah, standar mutu berubah-ubah dan kapasitas penyortiran rendah. Untuk mengatasi permasalahan tersebut melalui penelitian ini dikembangkan rancang bangun mesin sortasi jeruk sistem rotasi. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk melakukan uji kinerja pada mesin sortasi jeruk sistem rotasi untuk mengetahui pengaruh kecepatan linier bidang sortasi, kemiringan bidang sortasi dan massa input buah pada mesin. Pengujian mesin dilakukan dengan 4 perlakuan kecepatan linier bidang sortasi (0,54 m/s, 0,70 m/s, 0,82 m/s dan 1,09 m/s, 3 perlakuan kemiringan bidang sortasi (10o, 20o, dan 30o dan 3 perlakuan massa input buah jeruk (2 kg, 3 kg dan 4 kg. Hasil pengujian menunjukkan bahwa massa input buah jeruk dan kecepatan linier bidang sortasi memberikan pengaruh yang signifikan terhadap kinerja mesin sortasi ini, sedangkan kemiringan bidang sortasi berpengaruh tetapi tidak signifikan. Hasil uji kinerja terbaik diperoleh pada perlakuan massa input 2 kg, kemiringan bidang sortasi 10o dan kecepatan linier bidang sortasi 1,09 m/s dengan nilai kapasitas penyortiran 1,84 kg/menit atau 110,4 kg/jam dan efisiensi penyortiran 68 %.   Performance Testing of Citrus Sorting Machine with Rotation System to Sorting Pontianak Siam Citrus (Citrus nobilis var. microcarpa Abstract. One of postharvest  activities that required much time are sorting in Sambas district. The sorting process is still done manually, where the level of uniformity of size and currently their maturity level are including the low of the quality standard fickle and sorting capacity. To overcome these problems, a study was developed to design citrus sorting machine with rotation system. This study aims to test the

  11. Incidence of fruit flies on coffee and citrus and quarantine treatment of citrus fruits by gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raga, Adalton

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the fruit fly infestation on coffee and citrus, and also to determine gamma radiation doses for immature stages of Ceratitis capitata and Anastrepha fraterculus, in order to satisfy quarantine regulations. Coffee arabica varieties Icatu Vermelho, Catuai Amarelo, Mundo Novo and Sarchimor showed the highest infestation indices (pupa/berry): 0.53; 0,41; 0.33 and 0.36. respectively Icatu Vermelho and Catuai Vermelho showed the highest values of pupa/berry weight (0.49 and 0.39, respectively), and Robusta (Coffea canephora) presented the lowest index (0.01). The following fruit flies were found in coffee berries: C. capitata (76.6%) Anastrepha spp. (7.4%) and Lonchaeidae (17.0%). In area near coffee plantation, fruit fly infestation indices in sweet oranges were of 4.77 larvae/kg and 0.55 larva/fruit. The infestation indices for sweet orange, collected from five regions of the State of Sao Paulo ranged from 0.73 to 7.60 pupa/kg and 0.12 to 1.27 pupa/fruit. The same species of fruit flies were found in oranges. In the case of C. capitata eggs with 24-48 hours old, 20 Gy prevented completely adult emergence (artificial diet and orange). No emergence of adult occurred when C. capitata larvae of third instar were irradiated at 20 Gy in their rearing medium. But at 25 Gy, the number of adults was reduced by 54% and 97% from larval infestation in oranges and grapefruit, respectively. A dose of 30 Gy was required to prevent medfly emergence from third instar larvae in grapefruit. A dose of 15 Gy was required for third instar, to prevent adult emergence of A. fraterculus. No adult emerged from C third instar, to prevent adult emergence of A. fraterculus. No adult emerged from C capitata pre-pupa irradiated at 30 Gy. One medfly adult emerged from pupa (3-4 days after pupating) irradiated at 120 Gy. At the same dose, sixteen A. fraterculus adults emergency from irradiated pupa with 5-6 days old. (author)

  12. Performance and carcass traits of goat kids fed high-concentrate diets containing citrus pulp or soybean hulls

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    Daniel Montanher Polizel

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The objective in this trial was to determine the effects of partial replacement of ground corn by citrus pulp or soybean hulls on performance and carcass characteristics of feedlot goat kids. Twenty one Boer x Saanen kids (initial BW 15.8 ± 0.7kg, nine males and 12 females, were distributed in a complete randomized block design, according to sex and initial body weight. Treatments were set by replacing 50% of ground corn (DM basis for citrus pulp or soybean hulls; whereas, forage concentrate ratio was of 10:90. Partial replacement of corn by citrus pulp or soybean hulls increased dry matter intake, average daily gain and final body weight, but feed efficiency was not affected. There was no difference between citrus pulp or soybean hulls. Inclusion of coproducts increased slaughter weight, hot and cold carcass weight and longissimus muscle area, with no difference between citrus pulp and soybean hulls. Subcutaneous fat thickness, hot and cold carcass yields, shrink after chilling and body wall thickness were not affected by treatments. Citrus pulp and soybean hulls can replace 50% of ground corn (DM basis increasing dry matter intake and weight gain in goat kids enabling higher slaughter weight at earlier age.

  13. Mapping the sensitivity of citrus crops to freeze stress using a geographical information system in Ramsar, Iran

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    Hasan Zabihi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Citrus, a cold-sensitive plant, often suffers from low temperature, which seriously affects citrus productivity. Environmental constraint factors have mixed impacts on horticulture that differ among the areas, periods and crops. This study presents a statistical analysis to investigate the freeze stress (FS conditions and morphometry, especially altitude and minimum temperature on citriculture at a regional scale. Based on the temperature isolines map and topography, this paper highlights the impact of altitude and minimum temperature on the citrus crop production using geographic information system (GIS techniques, statistical analysis and climatic data in Ramsar, Iran over a period of 30 years from 1980 to 2010. This study shows that the suitability varies in relation to the critical temperature and concludes that both minimum temperature and altitude have significant negative impact on citrus crop production. Climate change, in particular, occurring cold fronts in recent years during the citrus harvest time have been complicating this issue and increased the importance of freezes stress (FS. The results highlight that citrus crop orchards were more strongly affected by the minimum temperature, and along with the elevation ranges theses are major challenging factors.

  14. Residual toxicity of insecticides used in Tunisian citrus orchards on the imported parasitoid Diachasmimorpha longicaudata (Hymenoptera: Braconidae): Implications for IPM program of Ceratitis capitata (Diptera: Tephritidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Ahlem Harbi; Khaled Abbes; Beatriz Sabater-Muñoz; Francisco Beitia; Brahim Chermiti

    2017-01-01

    Citrus agro-industry is globally harshened mainly by Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann), the most worldwide destructive tephritid fruit fly species. Citrus agro-industry is one of the pillars of Tunisia economy, and by hence, harshened by this species. Tunisia has established an Integrated Pest Management (IPM) programme against citrus pests, including C. capitata, that rely on the structured use of pesticides, on the application several trapping protocols, along with pilot-scale sterile insect t...

  15. Assessment of the genetic diversity of the Tunisian citrus rootstock germplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snoussi Hager

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Citrus represents a substantial income for farmers in the Mediterranean Basin. However, the Mediterranean citrus industry faces increasing biotic and abiotic constraints. Therefore the breeding and selection of new rootstocks are now of the utmost importance. In Tunisia, in addition to sour orange, the most widespread traditional rootstock of the Mediterranean area, other citrus rootstocks and well adapted to local environmental conditions, are traditionally used and should be important genetic resources for breeding. To characterize the diversity of Tunisian citrus rootstocks, two hundred and one local accessions belonging to four facultative apomictic species (C. aurantium, sour orange; C. sinensis, orange; C. limon, lemon; and C. aurantifolia, lime were collected and genotyped using 20 nuclear SSR markers and four indel mitochondrial markers. Multi-locus genotypes (MLGs were compared to references from French and Spanish collections. Results The differentiation of the four varietal groups was well-marked. The groups displayed a relatively high allelic diversity, primarily due to very high heterozygosity. Sixteen distinct MLGs were identified. Ten of these were noted in sour oranges. However, the majority of the analysed sour orange accessions corresponded with only two MLGs, differentiated by a single allele, likely due to a mutation. The most frequent MLG is shared with the reference sour oranges. No polymorphism was found within the sweet orange group. Two MLGs, differentiated by a single locus, were noted in lemon. The predominant MLG was shared with the reference lemons. Limes were represented by three genotypes. Two corresponded to the 'Mexican lime' and 'limonette de Marrakech' references. The MLG of 'Chiiri' lime was unique. Conclusions The Tunisian citrus rootstock genetic diversity is predominantly due to high heterozygosity and differentiation between the four varietal groups. The phenotypic diversity within the

  16. Assessment of the genetic diversity of the Tunisian citrus rootstock germplasm

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Citrus represents a substantial income for farmers in the Mediterranean Basin. However, the Mediterranean citrus industry faces increasing biotic and abiotic constraints. Therefore the breeding and selection of new rootstocks are now of the utmost importance. In Tunisia, in addition to sour orange, the most widespread traditional rootstock of the Mediterranean area, other citrus rootstocks and well adapted to local environmental conditions, are traditionally used and should be important genetic resources for breeding. To characterize the diversity of Tunisian citrus rootstocks, two hundred and one local accessions belonging to four facultative apomictic species (C. aurantium, sour orange; C. sinensis, orange; C. limon, lemon; and C. aurantifolia, lime) were collected and genotyped using 20 nuclear SSR markers and four indel mitochondrial markers. Multi-locus genotypes (MLGs) were compared to references from French and Spanish collections. Results The differentiation of the four varietal groups was well-marked. The groups displayed a relatively high allelic diversity, primarily due to very high heterozygosity. Sixteen distinct MLGs were identified. Ten of these were noted in sour oranges. However, the majority of the analysed sour orange accessions corresponded with only two MLGs, differentiated by a single allele, likely due to a mutation. The most frequent MLG is shared with the reference sour oranges. No polymorphism was found within the sweet orange group. Two MLGs, differentiated by a single locus, were noted in lemon. The predominant MLG was shared with the reference lemons. Limes were represented by three genotypes. Two corresponded to the 'Mexican lime' and 'limonette de Marrakech' references. The MLG of 'Chiiri' lime was unique. Conclusions The Tunisian citrus rootstock genetic diversity is predominantly due to high heterozygosity and differentiation between the four varietal groups. The phenotypic diversity within the varietal groups has

  17. Huanglongbing impairs the rhizosphere-to-rhizoplane enrichment process of the citrus root-associated microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunzeng; Xu, Jin; Riera, Nadia; Jin, Tao; Li, Jinyun; Wang, Nian

    2017-08-10

    Roots are the primary site for plant-microbe interactions. Among the three root-associated layers (i.e., rhizosphere, rhizoplane, and endorhiza), the rhizoplane is a key component serving a critical gating role that controls microbial entry into plant roots. The microbial communities colonizing the three layers are believed to be gradually enriched from the bulk soil inoculum. However, it is unknown how this enrichment process, particularly the rhizosphere to rhizoplane step, is affected by biotic stresses, such as disease. In this study, we address this question using the citrus root-associated microbiome as a model. We identified the rhizosphere-to-rhizoplane-enriched taxonomic and functional properties of the citrus root-associated microbiome and determined how they were affected by Huanglongbing (HLB), a severe systemic disease caused by Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus, using metagenomic and metatranscriptomic approaches. Multiple rhizoplane-enriched genera were identified, with Bradyrhizobium and Burkholderia being the most dominant. Plant-derived carbon sources are an important driving force for the enrichment process. The enrichment of functional attributes, such as motility, chemotaxis, secretion systems, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) synthesis, demonstrated more active microbe-plant interactions on the rhizoplane than the rhizosphere. We observed that HLB impaired the rhizosphere-to-rhizoplane enrichment process of the citrus root-associated microbiome in three ways: (1) by decreasing the relative abundance of most rhizoplane-enriched genera; (2) by reducing the relative abundance and/or expression activity of the functional attributes involved in microbe-plant interactions; and (3) by recruiting more functional features involved in autotrophic life cycle adaptation, such as carbon fixation and nitrogen nitrification in the HLB rhizoplane microbiome. Finally, our data showed that inoculation of Burkholderia strains isolated from the healthy citrus root

  18. Life cycle greenhouse gas impacts of ethanol, biomethane and limonene production from citrus waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourbafrani, Mohammad; McKechnie, Jon; MacLean, Heather L.; Saville, Bradley A.

    2013-03-01

    The production of biofuel from cellulosic residues can have both environmental and financial benefits. A particular benefit is that it can alleviate competition for land conventionally used for food and feed production. In this research, we investigate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with the production of ethanol, biomethane, limonene and digestate from citrus waste, a byproduct of the citrus processing industry. The study represents the first life cycle-based evaluations of citrus waste biorefineries. Two biorefinery configurations are studied—a large biorefinery that converts citrus waste into ethanol, biomethane, limonene and digestate, and a small biorefinery that converts citrus waste into biomethane, limonene and digestate. Ethanol is assumed to be used as E85, displacing gasoline as a light-duty vehicle fuel; biomethane displaces natural gas for electricity generation, limonene displaces acetone in solvents, and digestate from the anaerobic digestion process displaces synthetic fertilizer. System expansion and two allocation methods (energy, market value) are considered to determine emissions of co-products. Considerable GHG reductions would be achieved by producing and utilizing the citrus waste-based products in place of the petroleum-based or other non-renewable products. For the large biorefinery, ethanol used as E85 in light-duty vehicles results in a 134% reduction in GHG emissions compared to gasoline-fueled vehicles when applying a system expansion approach. For the small biorefinery, when electricity is generated from biomethane rather than natural gas, GHG emissions are reduced by 77% when applying system expansion. The life cycle GHG emissions vary substantially depending upon biomethane leakage rate, feedstock GHG emissions and the method to determine emissions assigned to co-products. Among the process design parameters, the biomethane leakage rate is critical, and the ethanol produced in the large biorefinery would not meet EISA

  19. Spatial Genetic Structure of Coffee-Associated Xylella fastidiosa Populations Indicates that Cross Infection Does Not Occur with Sympatric Citrus Orchards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco, Carolina S; Ceresini, Paulo C; Almeida, Rodrigo P P; Coletta-Filho, Helvécio D

    2017-04-01

    Xylella fastidiosa, an economically important plant-pathogenic bacterium, infects both coffee and citrus trees in Brazil. Although X. fastidiosa in citrus is well studied, knowledge about the population structure of this bacterium infecting coffee remains unknown. Here, we studied the population structure of X. fastidiosa infecting coffee trees in São Paulo State, Brazil, in four regions where citrus is also widely cultivated. Genotyping of over 500 isolates from coffee plants using 14 genomic microsatellite markers indicated that populations were largely geographically isolated, as previously found with populations of X. fastidiosa infecting citrus. These results were supported by a clustering analysis, which indicated three major genetic groups among the four sampled regions. Overall, approximately 38% of isolates showed significant membership coefficients not related to their original geographical populations (i.e., migrants), characterizing a significant degree of genotype flow among populations. To determine whether admixture occurred between isolates infecting citrus and coffee plants, one site with citrus and coffee orchards adjacent to each other was selected; over 100 isolates were typed from each host plant. No signal of natural admixture between citrus- and coffee-infecting isolates was found; artificial cross-infection assays with representative isolates also yielded no successful cross infection. A comparison determined that X. fastidiosa populations from coffee have higher genetic diversity and allelic richness compared with citrus. The results showed that coffee and citrus X. fastidiosa populations are effectively isolated from each other and, although coffee populations are spatially structured, migration has an important role in shaping diversity.

  20. Inducible expression of Bs2 R gene from Capsicum chacoense in sweet orange (Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck) confers enhanced resistance to citrus canker disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sendín, Lorena Noelia; Orce, Ingrid Georgina; Gómez, Rocío Liliana; Enrique, Ramón; Grellet Bournonville, Carlos Froilán; Noguera, Aldo Sergio; Vojnov, Adrián Alberto; Marano, María Rosa; Castagnaro, Atilio Pedro; Filippone, María Paula

    2017-04-01

    Transgenic expression of the pepper Bs2 gene confers resistance to Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv) pathogenic strains which contain the avrBs2 avirulence gene in susceptible pepper and tomato varieties. The avrBs2 gene is highly conserved among members of the Xanthomonas genus, and the avrBs2 of Xcv shares 96% homology with the avrBs2 of Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xcc), the causal agent of citrus canker disease. A previous study showed that the transient expression of pepper Bs2 in lemon leaves reduced canker formation and induced plant defence mechanisms. In this work, the effect of the stable expression of Bs2 gene on citrus canker resistance was evaluated in transgenic plants of Citrus sinensis cv. Pineapple. Interestingly, Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of epicotyls was unsuccessful when a constitutive promoter (2× CaMV 35S) was used in the plasmid construction, but seven transgenic lines were obtained with a genetic construction harbouring Bs2 under the control of a pathogen-inducible promoter, from glutathione S-transferase gene from potato. A reduction of disease symptoms of up to 70% was observed in transgenic lines expressing Bs2 with respect to non-transformed control plants. This reduction was directly dependent on the Xcc avrBs2 gene since no effect was observed when a mutant strain of Xcc with a disruption in avrBs2 gene was used for inoculations. Additionally, a canker symptom reduction was correlated with levels of the Bs2 expression in transgenic plants, as assessed by real-time qPCR, and accompanied by the production of reactive oxygen species. These results indicate that the pepper Bs2 resistance gene is also functional in a family other than the Solanaceae, and could be considered for canker control.