WorldWideScience

Sample records for nucleotide binding pocket

  1. Rasp21 sequences opposite the nucleotide binding pocket are required for GRF-mediated nucleotide release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leonardsen, L; DeClue, J E; Lybaek, H

    1996-01-01

    The substrate requirements for the catalytic activity of the mouse Cdc25 homolog Guanine nucleotide Release Factor, GRF, were determined using the catalytic domain of GRF expressed in insect cells and E. coli expressed H-Ras mutants. We found a requirement for the loop 7 residues in Ras (amino ac...... and the human Ras like proteins RhoA, Rap1A, Rac1 and G25K revealed a strict Ras specificity; of these only S. pombe Ras was GRF sensitive....

  2. Mutations in the nucleotide binding pocket of MreB can alter cell curvature and polar morphology in Caulobacter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, Natalie A; Pincus, Zachary; Fisher, Isabelle C; Shapiro, Lucy; Theriot, Julie A

    2011-07-01

    The maintenance of cell shape in Caulobacter crescentus requires the essential gene mreB, which encodes a member of the actin superfamily and the target of the antibiotic, A22. We isolated 35 unique A22-resistant Caulobacter strains with single amino acid substitutions near the nucleotide binding site of MreB. Mutations that alter cell curvature and mislocalize the intermediate filament crescentin cluster on the back surface of MreB's structure. Another subset have variable cell widths, with wide cell bodies and actively growing thin extensions of the cell poles that concentrate fluorescent MreB. We found that the extent to which MreB localization is perturbed is linearly correlated with the development of pointed cell poles and variable cell widths. Further, we find that a mutation to glycine of two conserved aspartic acid residues that are important for nucleotide hydrolysis in other members of the actin superfamily abolishes robust midcell recruitment of MreB but supports a normal rate of growth. These mutant strains provide novel insight into how MreB's protein structure, subcellular localization, and activity contribute to its function in bacterial cell shape. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Random mutagenesis of the nucleotide-binding domain of NRC1 (NB-LRR Required for Hypersensitive Response-Associated Cell Death-1), a downstream signalling nucleotide-binding, leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) protein, identifies gain-of-function mutations in the nucleotide-binding pocket

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sueldo, D.J.; Shimels, M.Z.; Spiridon, L.N.; Caldararu, O.; Petrescu, A.J.; Joosten, M.H.A.J.; Tameling, W.I.L.

    2015-01-01

    •Plant nucleotide-binding, leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) proteins confer immunity to pathogens possessing the corresponding avirulence proteins. Activation of NB-LRR proteins is often associated with induction of the hypersensitive response (HR), a form of programmed cell death. •NRC1 (NB-LRR

  4. Structure of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase Q151M mutant: insights into the inhibitor resistance of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and the structure of the nucleotide-binding pocket of Hepatitis B virus polymerase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Akiyoshi; Tamura, Noriko; Yasutake, Yoshiaki

    2015-01-01

    The structure of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase Q151M mutant was determined at a resolution of 2.6 Å in space group P321. Hepatitis B virus polymerase (HBV Pol) is an important target for anti-HBV drug development; however, its low solubility and stability in vitro has hindered detailed structural studies. Certain nucleotide reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors (NRTIs) such as tenofovir and lamivudine can inhibit both HBV Pol and Human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) RT, leading to speculation on structural and mechanistic analogies between the deoxynucleotide triphosphate (dNTP)-binding sites of these enzymes. The Q151M mutation in HIV-1 RT, located at the dNTP-binding site, confers resistance to various NRTIs, while maintaining sensitivity to tenofovir and lamivudine. The residue corresponding to Gln151 is strictly conserved as a methionine in HBV Pol. Therefore, the structure of the dNTP-binding pocket of the HIV-1 RT Q151M mutant may reflect that of HBV Pol. Here, the crystal structure of HIV-1 RT Q151M, determined at 2.6 Å resolution, in a new crystal form with space group P321 is presented. Although the structure of HIV-1 RT Q151M superimposes well onto that of HIV-1 RT in a closed conformation, a slight movement of the β-strands (β2–β3) that partially create the dNTP-binding pocket was observed. This movement might be caused by the introduction of the bulky thioether group of Met151. The structure also highlighted the possibility that the hydrogen-bonding network among amino acids and NRTIs is rearranged by the Q151M mutation, leading to a difference in the affinity of NRTIs for HIV-1 RT and HBV Pol

  5. Structure of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase Q151M mutant: insights into the inhibitor resistance of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and the structure of the nucleotide-binding pocket of Hepatitis B virus polymerase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Akiyoshi; Tamura, Noriko; Yasutake, Yoshiaki, E-mail: y-yasutake@aist.go.jp [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 2-17-2-1 Tsukisamu-Higashi, Toyohira, Sapporo, Hokkaido 062-8517 (Japan)

    2015-10-23

    The structure of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase Q151M mutant was determined at a resolution of 2.6 Å in space group P321. Hepatitis B virus polymerase (HBV Pol) is an important target for anti-HBV drug development; however, its low solubility and stability in vitro has hindered detailed structural studies. Certain nucleotide reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors (NRTIs) such as tenofovir and lamivudine can inhibit both HBV Pol and Human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) RT, leading to speculation on structural and mechanistic analogies between the deoxynucleotide triphosphate (dNTP)-binding sites of these enzymes. The Q151M mutation in HIV-1 RT, located at the dNTP-binding site, confers resistance to various NRTIs, while maintaining sensitivity to tenofovir and lamivudine. The residue corresponding to Gln151 is strictly conserved as a methionine in HBV Pol. Therefore, the structure of the dNTP-binding pocket of the HIV-1 RT Q151M mutant may reflect that of HBV Pol. Here, the crystal structure of HIV-1 RT Q151M, determined at 2.6 Å resolution, in a new crystal form with space group P321 is presented. Although the structure of HIV-1 RT Q151M superimposes well onto that of HIV-1 RT in a closed conformation, a slight movement of the β-strands (β2–β3) that partially create the dNTP-binding pocket was observed. This movement might be caused by the introduction of the bulky thioether group of Met151. The structure also highlighted the possibility that the hydrogen-bonding network among amino acids and NRTIs is rearranged by the Q151M mutation, leading to a difference in the affinity of NRTIs for HIV-1 RT and HBV Pol.

  6. Cavity Versus Ligand Shape Descriptors: Application to Urokinase Binding Pockets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerisier, Natacha; Regad, Leslie; Triki, Dhoha; Camproux, Anne-Claude; Petitjean, Michel

    2017-11-01

    We analyzed 78 binding pockets of the human urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) catalytic domain extracted from a data set of crystallized uPA-ligand complexes. These binding pockets were computed with an original geometric method that does NOT involve any arbitrary parameter, such as cutoff distances, angles, and so on. We measured the deviation from convexity of each pocket shape with the pocket convexity index (PCI). We defined a new pocket descriptor called distributional sphericity coefficient (DISC), which indicates to which extent the protein atoms of a given pocket lie on the surface of a sphere. The DISC values were computed with the freeware PCI. The pocket descriptors and their high correspondences with ligand descriptors are crucial for polypharmacology prediction. We found that the protein heavy atoms lining the urokinases binding pockets are either located on the surface of their convex hull or lie close to this surface. We also found that the radii of the urokinases binding pockets and the radii of their ligands are highly correlated (r = 0.9).

  7. Identification of potential small molecule binding pockets on Rho family GTPases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Manuel Ortiz-Sanchez

    Full Text Available Rho GTPases are conformational switches that control a wide variety of signaling pathways critical for eukaryotic cell development and proliferation. They represent attractive targets for drug design as their aberrant function and deregulated activity is associated with many human diseases including cancer. Extensive high-resolution structures (>100 and recent mutagenesis studies have laid the foundation for the design of new structure-based chemotherapeutic strategies. Although the inhibition of Rho signaling with drug-like compounds is an active area of current research, very little attention has been devoted to directly inhibiting Rho by targeting potential allosteric non-nucleotide binding sites. By avoiding the nucleotide binding site, compounds may minimize the potential for undesirable off-target interactions with other ubiquitous GTP and ATP binding proteins. Here we describe the application of molecular dynamics simulations, principal component analysis, sequence conservation analysis, and ensemble small-molecule fragment mapping to provide an extensive mapping of potential small-molecule binding pockets on Rho family members. Characterized sites include novel pockets in the vicinity of the conformationaly responsive switch regions as well as distal sites that appear to be related to the conformations of the nucleotide binding region. Furthermore the use of accelerated molecular dynamics simulation, an advanced sampling method that extends the accessible time-scale of conventional simulations, is found to enhance the characterization of novel binding sites when conformational changes are important for the protein mechanism.

  8. Druggable pockets and binding site centric chemical space: a paradigm shift in drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérot, Stéphanie; Sperandio, Olivier; Miteva, Maria A; Camproux, Anne-Claude; Villoutreix, Bruno O

    2010-08-01

    Detection, comparison and analyses of binding pockets are pivotal to structure-based drug design endeavors, from hit identification, screening of exosites and de-orphanization of protein functions to the anticipation of specific and non-specific binding to off- and anti-targets. Here, we analyze protein-ligand complexes and discuss methods that assist binding site identification, prediction of druggability and binding site comparison. The full potential of pockets is yet to be harnessed, and we envision that better understanding of the pocket space will have far-reaching implications in the field of drug discovery, such as the design of pocket-specific compound libraries and scoring functions.

  9. A Nucleotide Phosphatase Activity in the Nucleotide Binding Domain of an Orphan Resistance Protein from Rice*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenyk, Stepan; de San Eustaquio Campillo, Alba; Pohl, Ehmke; Hussey, Patrick J.; Cann, Martin J.

    2012-01-01

    Plant resistance proteins (R-proteins) are key components of the plant immune system activated in response to a plethora of different pathogens. R-proteins are P-loop NTPase superfamily members, and current models describe their main function as ATPases in defense signaling pathways. Here we show that a subset of R-proteins have evolved a new function to combat pathogen infection. This subset of R-proteins possesses a nucleotide phosphatase activity in the nucleotide-binding domain. Related R-proteins that fall in the same phylogenetic clade all show the same nucleotide phosphatase activity indicating a conserved function within at least a subset of R-proteins. R-protein nucleotide phosphatases catalyze the production of nucleoside from nucleotide with the nucleotide monophosphate as the preferred substrate. Mutation of conserved catalytic residues substantially reduced activity consistent with the biochemistry of P-loop NTPases. Kinetic analysis, analytical gel filtration, and chemical cross-linking demonstrated that the nucleotide-binding domain was active as a multimer. Nuclear magnetic resonance and nucleotide analogues identified the terminal phosphate bond as the target of a reaction that utilized a metal-mediated nucleophilic attack by water on the phosphoester. In conclusion, we have identified a group of R-proteins with a unique function. This biochemical activity appears to have co-evolved with plants in signaling pathways designed to resist pathogen attack. PMID:22157756

  10. A nucleotide phosphatase activity in the nucleotide binding domain of an orphan resistance protein from rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenyk, Stepan; Campillo, Alba de San Eustaquio; Pohl, Ehmke; Hussey, Patrick J; Cann, Martin J

    2012-02-03

    Plant resistance proteins (R-proteins) are key components of the plant immune system activated in response to a plethora of different pathogens. R-proteins are P-loop NTPase superfamily members, and current models describe their main function as ATPases in defense signaling pathways. Here we show that a subset of R-proteins have evolved a new function to combat pathogen infection. This subset of R-proteins possesses a nucleotide phosphatase activity in the nucleotide-binding domain. Related R-proteins that fall in the same phylogenetic clade all show the same nucleotide phosphatase activity indicating a conserved function within at least a subset of R-proteins. R-protein nucleotide phosphatases catalyze the production of nucleoside from nucleotide with the nucleotide monophosphate as the preferred substrate. Mutation of conserved catalytic residues substantially reduced activity consistent with the biochemistry of P-loop NTPases. Kinetic analysis, analytical gel filtration, and chemical cross-linking demonstrated that the nucleotide-binding domain was active as a multimer. Nuclear magnetic resonance and nucleotide analogues identified the terminal phosphate bond as the target of a reaction that utilized a metal-mediated nucleophilic attack by water on the phosphoester. In conclusion, we have identified a group of R-proteins with a unique function. This biochemical activity appears to have co-evolved with plants in signaling pathways designed to resist pathogen attack.

  11. The Tomato Nucleotide-binding Leucine-rich Repeat Immune Receptor I-2 Couples DNA-binding to Nucleotide-binding Domain Nucleotide Exchange*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenyk, Stepan; Dixon, Christopher H.; Gittens, William H.; Townsend, Philip D.; Sharples, Gary J.; Pålsson, Lars-Olof; Takken, Frank L. W.; Cann, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    Plant nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins enable plants to recognize and respond to pathogen attack. Previously, we demonstrated that the Rx1 NLR of potato is able to bind and bend DNA in vitro. DNA binding in situ requires its genuine activation following pathogen perception. However, it is unknown whether other NLR proteins are also able to bind DNA. Nor is it known how DNA binding relates to the ATPase activity intrinsic to NLR switch function required to immune activation. Here we investigate these issues using a recombinant protein corresponding to the N-terminal coiled-coil and nucleotide-binding domain regions of the I-2 NLR of tomato. Wild type I-2 protein bound nucleic acids with a preference of ssDNA ≈ dsDNA > ssRNA, which is distinct from Rx1. I-2 induced bending and melting of DNA. Notably, ATP enhanced DNA binding relative to ADP in the wild type protein, the null P-loop mutant K207R, and the autoactive mutant S233F. DNA binding was found to activate the intrinsic ATPase activity of I-2. Because DNA binding by I-2 was decreased in the presence of ADP when compared with ATP, a cyclic mechanism emerges; activated ATP-associated I-2 binds to DNA, which enhances ATP hydrolysis, releasing ADP-bound I-2 from the DNA. Thus DNA binding is a general property of at least a subset of NLR proteins, and NLR activation is directly linked to its activity at DNA. PMID:26601946

  12. The Tomato Nucleotide-binding Leucine-rich Repeat Immune Receptor I-2 Couples DNA-binding to Nucleotide-binding Domain Nucleotide Exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenyk, Stepan; Dixon, Christopher H; Gittens, William H; Townsend, Philip D; Sharples, Gary J; Pålsson, Lars-Olof; Takken, Frank L W; Cann, Martin J

    2016-01-15

    Plant nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins enable plants to recognize and respond to pathogen attack. Previously, we demonstrated that the Rx1 NLR of potato is able to bind and bend DNA in vitro. DNA binding in situ requires its genuine activation following pathogen perception. However, it is unknown whether other NLR proteins are also able to bind DNA. Nor is it known how DNA binding relates to the ATPase activity intrinsic to NLR switch function required to immune activation. Here we investigate these issues using a recombinant protein corresponding to the N-terminal coiled-coil and nucleotide-binding domain regions of the I-2 NLR of tomato. Wild type I-2 protein bound nucleic acids with a preference of ssDNA ≈ dsDNA > ssRNA, which is distinct from Rx1. I-2 induced bending and melting of DNA. Notably, ATP enhanced DNA binding relative to ADP in the wild type protein, the null P-loop mutant K207R, and the autoactive mutant S233F. DNA binding was found to activate the intrinsic ATPase activity of I-2. Because DNA binding by I-2 was decreased in the presence of ADP when compared with ATP, a cyclic mechanism emerges; activated ATP-associated I-2 binds to DNA, which enhances ATP hydrolysis, releasing ADP-bound I-2 from the DNA. Thus DNA binding is a general property of at least a subset of NLR proteins, and NLR activation is directly linked to its activity at DNA. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Nucleotide binding to Na+/K+-ATPase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kubala, Martin; Lánský, Zdeněk; Ettrich, R.; Plášek, J.; Teisinger, Jan; Amler, Evžen

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 272, č. S1 (2005), s. 191-191 E-ISSN 1742-4658. [FEBS Congress /30./ and IUBMB Conference /9./. 02.07.2005-07.07.2005, Budapest] Keywords : Na+/K+- ATPase * ATP binding * TNP-ATP Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  14. Visualisation of variable binding pockets on protein surfaces by probabilistic analysis of related structure sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashford Paul

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein structures provide a valuable resource for rational drug design. For a protein with no known ligand, computational tools can predict surface pockets that are of suitable size and shape to accommodate a complementary small-molecule drug. However, pocket prediction against single static structures may miss features of pockets that arise from proteins' dynamic behaviour. In particular, ligand-binding conformations can be observed as transiently populated states of the apo protein, so it is possible to gain insight into ligand-bound forms by considering conformational variation in apo proteins. This variation can be explored by considering sets of related structures: computationally generated conformers, solution NMR ensembles, multiple crystal structures, homologues or homology models. It is non-trivial to compare pockets, either from different programs or across sets of structures. For a single structure, difficulties arise in defining particular pocket's boundaries. For a set of conformationally distinct structures the challenge is how to make reasonable comparisons between them given that a perfect structural alignment is not possible. Results We have developed a computational method, Provar, that provides a consistent representation of predicted binding pockets across sets of related protein structures. The outputs are probabilities that each atom or residue of the protein borders a predicted pocket. These probabilities can be readily visualised on a protein using existing molecular graphics software. We show how Provar simplifies comparison of the outputs of different pocket prediction algorithms, of pockets across multiple simulated conformations and between homologous structures. We demonstrate the benefits of use of multiple structures for protein-ligand and protein-protein interface analysis on a set of complexes and consider three case studies in detail: i analysis of a kinase superfamily highlights the

  15. Visualisation of variable binding pockets on protein surfaces by probabilistic analysis of related structure sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashford, Paul; Moss, David S; Alex, Alexander; Yeap, Siew K; Povia, Alice; Nobeli, Irene; Williams, Mark A

    2012-03-14

    Protein structures provide a valuable resource for rational drug design. For a protein with no known ligand, computational tools can predict surface pockets that are of suitable size and shape to accommodate a complementary small-molecule drug. However, pocket prediction against single static structures may miss features of pockets that arise from proteins' dynamic behaviour. In particular, ligand-binding conformations can be observed as transiently populated states of the apo protein, so it is possible to gain insight into ligand-bound forms by considering conformational variation in apo proteins. This variation can be explored by considering sets of related structures: computationally generated conformers, solution NMR ensembles, multiple crystal structures, homologues or homology models. It is non-trivial to compare pockets, either from different programs or across sets of structures. For a single structure, difficulties arise in defining particular pocket's boundaries. For a set of conformationally distinct structures the challenge is how to make reasonable comparisons between them given that a perfect structural alignment is not possible. We have developed a computational method, Provar, that provides a consistent representation of predicted binding pockets across sets of related protein structures. The outputs are probabilities that each atom or residue of the protein borders a predicted pocket. These probabilities can be readily visualised on a protein using existing molecular graphics software. We show how Provar simplifies comparison of the outputs of different pocket prediction algorithms, of pockets across multiple simulated conformations and between homologous structures. We demonstrate the benefits of use of multiple structures for protein-ligand and protein-protein interface analysis on a set of complexes and consider three case studies in detail: i) analysis of a kinase superfamily highlights the conserved occurrence of surface pockets at the active

  16. Real-Time Ligand Binding Pocket Database Search Using Local Surface Descriptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikhi, Rayan; Sael, Lee; Kihara, Daisuke

    2010-01-01

    Due to the increasing number of structures of unknown function accumulated by ongoing structural genomics projects, there is an urgent need for computational methods for characterizing protein tertiary structures. As functions of many of these proteins are not easily predicted by conventional sequence database searches, a legitimate strategy is to utilize structure information in function characterization. Of a particular interest is prediction of ligand binding to a protein, as ligand molecule recognition is a major part of molecular function of proteins. Predicting whether a ligand molecule binds a protein is a complex problem due to the physical nature of protein-ligand interactions and the flexibility of both binding sites and ligand molecules. However, geometric and physicochemical complementarity is observed between the ligand and its binding site in many cases. Therefore, ligand molecules which bind to a local surface site in a protein can be predicted by finding similar local pockets of known binding ligands in the structure database. Here, we present two representations of ligand binding pockets and utilize them for ligand binding prediction by pocket shape comparison. These representations are based on mapping of surface properties of binding pockets, which are compactly described either by the two dimensional pseudo-Zernike moments or the 3D Zernike descriptors. These compact representations allow a fast real-time pocket searching against a database. Thorough benchmark study employing two different datasets show that our representations are competitive with the other existing methods. Limitations and potentials of the shape-based methods as well as possible improvements are discussed. PMID:20455259

  17. 2-Oxoglutarate levels control adenosine nucleotide binding by Herbaspirillum seropedicae PII proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Marco A S; Gerhardt, Edileusa C M; Huergo, Luciano F; Souza, Emanuel M; Pedrosa, Fábio O; Chubatsu, Leda S

    2015-12-01

    Nitrogen metabolism in Proteobacteria is controlled by the Ntr system, in which PII proteins play a pivotal role, controlling the activity of target proteins in response to the metabolic state of the cell. Characterization of the binding of molecular effectors to these proteins can provide information about their regulation. Here, the binding of ATP, ADP and 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG) to the Herbaspirillum seropedicae PII proteins, GlnB and GlnK, was characterized using isothermal titration calorimetry. Results show that these proteins can bind three molecules of ATP, ADP and 2-OG with homotropic negative cooperativity, and 2-OG binding stabilizes the binding of ATP. Results also show that the affinity of uridylylated forms of GlnB and GlnK for nucleotides is significantly lower than that of the nonuridylylated proteins. Furthermore, fluctuations in the intracellular concentration of 2-OG in response to nitrogen availability are shown. Results suggest that under nitrogen-limiting conditions, PII proteins tend to bind ATP and 2-OG. By contrast, after an ammonium shock, a decrease in the 2-OG concentration is observed causing a decrease in the affinity of PII proteins for ATP. This phenomenon may facilitate the exchange of ATP for ADP on the ligand-binding pocket of PII proteins, thus it is likely that under low ammonium, low 2-OG levels would favor the ADP-bound state. © 2015 FEBS.

  18. Structural determinants of a conserved enantiomer-selective carvone binding pocket in the human odorant receptor OR1A1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geithe, Christiane; Protze, Jonas; Kreuchwig, Franziska; Krause, Gerd; Krautwurst, Dietmar

    2017-11-01

    Chirality is a common phenomenon within odorants. Most pairs of enantiomers show only moderate differences in odor quality. One example for enantiomers that are easily discriminated by their odor quality is the carvones: humans significantly distinguish between the spearmint-like (R)-(-)-carvone and caraway-like (S)-(+)-carvone enantiomers. Moreover, for the (R)-(-)-carvone, an anosmia is observed in about 8% of the population, suggesting enantioselective odorant receptors (ORs). With only about 15% de-orphaned human ORs, the lack of OR crystal structures, and few comprehensive studies combining in silico and experimental approaches to elucidate structure-function relations of ORs, knowledge on cognate odorant/OR interactions is still sparse. An adjusted homology modeling approach considering OR-specific proline-caused conformations, odorant docking studies, single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis, site-directed mutagenesis, and subsequent functional studies with recombinant ORs in a cell-based, real-time luminescence assay revealed 11 amino acid positions to constitute an enantioselective binding pocket necessary for a carvone function in human OR1A1 and murine Olfr43, respectively. Here, we identified enantioselective molecular determinants in both ORs that discriminate between minty and caraway odor. Comparison with orthologs from 36 mammalian species demonstrated a hominid-specific carvone binding pocket with about 100% conservation. Moreover, we identified loss-of-function SNPs associated with the carvone binding pocket of OR1A1. Given carvone enantiomer-specific receptor activation patterns including OR1A1, our data suggest OR1A1 as a candidate receptor for constituting a carvone enantioselective phenotype, which may help to explain mechanisms underlying a (R)-(-)-carvone-specific anosmia in humans.

  19. The minor binding pocket: a major player in 7TM receptor activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Mette Marie; Benned-Jensen, Tau; Frimurer, Thomas M.

    2010-01-01

    residue located in one of two adjacent positions. Here we argue that this minor binding pocket is important for receptor activation. Functional coupling of the receptors seems to be mediated through the hydrogen bond network located between the intracellular segments of these TMs, with the allosteric...... targeted in the development of functionally biased drugs....

  20. Prediction of Nucleotide Binding Peptides Using Star Graph Topological Indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yong; Munteanu, Cristian R; Fernández Blanco, Enrique; Tan, Zhiliang; Santos Del Riego, Antonino; Pazos, Alejandro

    2015-11-01

    The nucleotide binding proteins are involved in many important cellular processes, such as transmission of genetic information or energy transfer and storage. Therefore, the screening of new peptides for this biological function is an important research topic. The current study proposes a mixed methodology to obtain the first classification model that is able to predict new nucleotide binding peptides, using only the amino acid sequence. Thus, the methodology uses a Star graph molecular descriptor of the peptide sequences and the Machine Learning technique for the best classifier. The best model represents a Random Forest classifier based on two features of the embedded and non-embedded graphs. The performance of the model is excellent, considering similar models in the field, with an Area Under the Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve (AUROC) value of 0.938 and true positive rate (TPR) of 0.886 (test subset). The prediction of new nucleotide binding peptides with this model could be useful for drug target studies in drug development. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Identification of distant drug off-targets by direct superposition of binding pocket surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Marcel; Armen, Roger S

    2013-01-01

    Correctly predicting off-targets for a given molecular structure, which would have the ability to bind a large range of ligands, is both particularly difficult and important if they share no significant sequence or fold similarity with the respective molecular target ("distant off-targets"). A novel approach for identification of off-targets by direct superposition of protein binding pocket surfaces is presented and applied to a set of well-studied and highly relevant drug targets, including representative kinases and nuclear hormone receptors. The entire Protein Data Bank is searched for similar binding pockets and convincing distant off-target candidates were identified that share no significant sequence or fold similarity with the respective target structure. These putative target off-target pairs are further supported by the existence of compounds that bind strongly to both with high topological similarity, and in some cases, literature examples of individual compounds that bind to both. Also, our results clearly show that it is possible for binding pockets to exhibit a striking surface similarity, while the respective off-target shares neither significant sequence nor significant fold similarity with the respective molecular target ("distant off-target").

  2. Assessment of Drug Binding Potential of Pockets in the NS2B/NS3 Dengue Virus Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amelia, F.; Iryani; Sari, P. Y.; Parikesit, A. A.; Bakri, R.; Toepak, E. P.; Tambunan, U. S. F.

    2018-04-01

    Every year an endemic dengue fever estimated to affect over 390 million cases in over 128 countries occurs. However, the antigen types which stimulate the human immune response are variable, as a result, neither effective vaccines nor antiviral treatments have been successfully developed for this disease. The NS2B/NS3 protease of the dengue virus (DENV) responsible for viral replication is a potential drug target. The ligand-enzyme binding site determination is a key role in the success of virtual screening of new inhibitors. The NS2B/NS3 protease of DENV (PDB ID: 2FOM) has two pockets consisting of 37 (Pocket 1) and 27 (Pocket 2) amino acid residues in each pocket. In this research, we characterized the amino acid residues for binding sites in NS3/NS2B based on the hydrophobicity, the percentage of charged residues, volume, depth, ΔGbinding, hydrogen bonding and bond length. The hydrophobic percentages of both pockets are high, 59 % (Pocket 1) and 41% (Pocket 2) and the percentage of charged residues in Pocket 1 and 2 are 22% and 48%, and the pocket volume is less than 700 Å3. An interaction analysis using molecular docking showed that interaction between the ligand complex and protein in Pocket 1 is more negative than Pocket 2. As a result, Pocket 1 is the better potential target for a ligand to inhibit the action of NS2B/NS3 DENV.

  3. Glutamate Water Gates in the Ion Binding Pocket of Na(+) Bound Na(+), K(+)-ATPase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Minwoo; Kopec, Wojciech; Solov'yov, Ilia A

    2017-01-01

    III is always protonated. Glutamic acid residues in the three binding sites act as water gates, and their deprotonation triggers water entry to the binding sites. From DFT calculations of Na(+) binding energies, we conclude that three protons in the binding site are needed to effectively bind Na......The dynamically changing protonation states of the six acidic amino acid residues in the ion binding pocket of the Na(+), K(+) -ATPase (NKA) during the ion transport cycle are proposed to drive ion binding, release and possibly determine Na(+) or K(+) selectivity. We use molecular dynamics (MD......(+) from water and four are needed to release them in the next step. Protonation of Asp926 in site III will induce Na(+) release, and Glu327, Glu954 and Glu779 are all likely to be protonated in the Na(+) bound occluded conformation. Our data provides key insights into the role of protons in the Na...

  4. Spatial Decomposition of Translational Water–Water Correlation Entropy in Binding Pockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    A number of computational tools available today compute the thermodynamic properties of water at surfaces and in binding pockets by using inhomogeneous solvation theory (IST) to analyze explicit-solvent simulations. Such methods enable qualitative spatial mappings of both energy and entropy around a solute of interest and can also be applied quantitatively. However, the entropy estimates of existing methods have, to date, been almost entirely limited to the first-order terms in the IST’s entropy expansion. These first-order terms account for localization and orientation of water molecules in the field of the solute but not for the modification of water–water correlations by the solute. Here, we present an extension of the Grid Inhomogeneous Solvation Theory (GIST) approach which accounts for water–water translational correlations. The method involves rewriting the two-point density of water in terms of a conditional density and utilizes the efficient nearest-neighbor entropy estimation approach. Spatial maps of this second order term, for water in and around the synthetic host cucurbit[7]uril and in the binding pocket of the enzyme Factor Xa, reveal mainly negative contributions, indicating solute-induced water–water correlations relative to bulk water; particularly strong signals are obtained for sites at the entrances of cavities or pockets. This second-order term thus enters with the same, negative, sign as the first order translational and orientational terms. Numerical and convergence properties of the methodology are examined. PMID:26636620

  5. Myristoylated α subunits of guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buss, J.E.; Mumby, S.M.; Casey, P.J.; Gilman, A.G.; Sefton, B.M.

    1987-01-01

    Antisera directed against specific subunits of guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (G proteins) were used to immunoprecipitate these polypeptides from metabolically labeled cells. This technique detects, in extracts of a human astrocytoma cell line, the α subunits of G/sub s/ (stimulatory) (α 45 and α 52 ), a 41-kDa subunit of G/sub i/ (inhibitory) (α 41 ), a 40-kDa protein (α 40 ), and the 36-kDa β subunit. No protein that comigrated with the α subunit of G 0 (unknown function) (α 39 ) was detected. In cells grown in the presence of [ 3 H]myristic acid, α 41 and α 40 contained 3 H label, while the β subunit did not. Chemical analysis of lipids attached covalently to purified α 41 and α 39 from bovine brain also revealed myristic acid. Similar analysis of brain G protein β and γ subunits and of G/sub t/ (Transducin) subunits (α, β, and γ) failed to reveal fatty acids. The fatty acid associated with α 41 , α 40 , and α 39 was stable to treatment with base, suggesting that the lipid is linked to the polypeptide via an amide bond. These GTP binding proteins are thus identified as members of a select group of proteins that contains myristic acid covalently attached to the peptide backbone. Myristate may play an important role in stabilizing interactions of G proteins with phospholipid or with membrane-bound proteins

  6. An Augmented Pocketome: Detection and Analysis of Small-Molecule Binding Pockets in Proteins of Known 3D Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagavat, Raghu; Sankar, Santhosh; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy; Chandra, Nagasuma

    2018-03-06

    Protein-ligand interactions form the basis of most cellular events. Identifying ligand binding pockets in proteins will greatly facilitate rationalizing and predicting protein function. Ligand binding sites are unknown for many proteins of known three-dimensional (3D) structure, creating a gap in our understanding of protein structure-function relationships. To bridge this gap, we detect pockets in proteins of known 3D structures, using computational techniques. This augmented pocketome (PocketDB) consists of 249,096 pockets, which is about seven times larger than what is currently known. We deduce possible ligand associations for about 46% of the newly identified pockets. The augmented pocketome, when subjected to clustering based on similarities among pockets, yielded 2,161 site types, which are associated with 1,037 ligand types, together providing fold-site-type-ligand-type associations. The PocketDB resource facilitates a structure-based function annotation, delineation of the structural basis of ligand recognition, and provides functional clues for domains of unknown functions, allosteric proteins, and druggable pockets. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Differential recognition of syk-binding sites by each of the two phosphotyrosine-binding pockets of the Vav SH2 domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Hong; Piraner, Dan; Gorenstein, Nina M; Geahlen, Robert L; Beth Post, Carol

    2013-11-01

    The association of spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk), a central tyrosine kinase in B cell signaling, with Vav SH2 domain is controlled by phosphorylation of two closely spaced tyrosines in Syk linker B: Y342 and Y346. Previous studies established both singly phosphorylated and doubly phosphorylated forms play a role in signaling. The structure of the doubly phosphorylated form identified a new recognition of phosphotyrosine whereby two phosphotyrosines bind simultaneously to the Vav SH2 domain, one in the canonical pTyr pocket and one in the specificity pocket on the opposite side of the central β-sheet. It is unknown if the specificity pocket can bind phosphotyrosine independent of phosphotyrosine binding the pTyr pocket. To address this gap in knowledge, we determined the structure of the complex between Vav1 SH2 and a peptide (SykLB-YpY) modeling the singly phosphorylated-Y346 form of Syk with unphosphorylated Y342. The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data conclusively establish that recognition of phosphotyrosine is swapped between the two pockets; phosphorylated pY346 binds the specificity pocket of Vav1 SH2, and unphosphorylated Y342 occupies what is normally the pTyr binding pocket. Nearly identical changes in chemical shifts occurred upon binding all three forms of singly and doubly phosphorylated peptides; however, somewhat smaller shift perturbations for SykLB-YpY from residues in regions of high internal mobility suggest that internal motions are coupled to binding affinity. The differential recognition that includes this swapped binding of phosphotyrosine to the specificity pocket of Vav SH2 increases the repertoire of possible phosphotyrosine binding by SH2 domains in regulating protein-protein interactions in cellular signaling. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Exploration of the effect of sequence variations located inside the binding pocket of HIV-1 and HIV-2 proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triki, Dhoha; Billot, Telli; Visseaux, Benoit; Descamps, Diane; Flatters, Delphine; Camproux, Anne-Claude; Regad, Leslie

    2018-04-10

    HIV-2 protease (PR2) is naturally resistant to most FDA (Food and Drug Administration)-approved HIV-1 protease inhibitors (PIs), a major antiretroviral class. In this study, we compared the PR1 and PR2 binding pockets extracted from structures complexed with 12 ligands. The comparison of PR1 and PR2 pocket properties showed that bound PR2 pockets were more hydrophobic with more oxygen atoms and fewer nitrogen atoms than PR1 pockets. The structural comparison of PR1 and PR2 pockets highlighted structural changes induced by their sequence variations and that were consistent with these property changes. Specifically, substitutions at residues 31, 46, and 82 induced structural changes in their main-chain atoms that could affect PI binding in PR2. In addition, the modelling of PR1 mutant structures containing V32I and L76M substitutions revealed a cooperative mechanism leading to structural deformation of flap-residue 45 that could modify PR2 flexibility. Our results suggest that substitutions in the PR1 and PR2 pockets can modify PI binding and flap flexibility, which could underlie PR2 resistance against PIs. These results provide new insights concerning the structural changes induced by PR1 and PR2 pocket variation changes, improving the understanding of the atomic mechanism of PR2 resistance to PIs.

  9. Predicting protein-binding RNA nucleotides with consideration of binding partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuvshinjargal, Narankhuu; Lee, Wook; Park, Byungkyu; Han, Kyungsook

    2015-06-01

    In recent years several computational methods have been developed to predict RNA-binding sites in protein. Most of these methods do not consider interacting partners of a protein, so they predict the same RNA-binding sites for a given protein sequence even if the protein binds to different RNAs. Unlike the problem of predicting RNA-binding sites in protein, the problem of predicting protein-binding sites in RNA has received little attention mainly because it is much more difficult and shows a lower accuracy on average. In our previous study, we developed a method that predicts protein-binding nucleotides from an RNA sequence. In an effort to improve the prediction accuracy and usefulness of the previous method, we developed a new method that uses both RNA and protein sequence data. In this study, we identified effective features of RNA and protein molecules and developed a new support vector machine (SVM) model to predict protein-binding nucleotides from RNA and protein sequence data. The new model that used both protein and RNA sequence data achieved a sensitivity of 86.5%, a specificity of 86.2%, a positive predictive value (PPV) of 72.6%, a negative predictive value (NPV) of 93.8% and Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC) of 0.69 in a 10-fold cross validation; it achieved a sensitivity of 58.8%, a specificity of 87.4%, a PPV of 65.1%, a NPV of 84.2% and MCC of 0.48 in independent testing. For comparative purpose, we built another prediction model that used RNA sequence data alone and ran it on the same dataset. In a 10 fold-cross validation it achieved a sensitivity of 85.7%, a specificity of 80.5%, a PPV of 67.7%, a NPV of 92.2% and MCC of 0.63; in independent testing it achieved a sensitivity of 67.7%, a specificity of 78.8%, a PPV of 57.6%, a NPV of 85.2% and MCC of 0.45. In both cross-validations and independent testing, the new model that used both RNA and protein sequences showed a better performance than the model that used RNA sequence data alone in

  10. Nucleos: a web server for the identification of nucleotide-binding sites in protein structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parca, Luca; Ferré, Fabrizio; Ausiello, Gabriele; Helmer-Citterich, Manuela

    2013-07-01

    Nucleos is a web server for the identification of nucleotide-binding sites in protein structures. Nucleos compares the structure of a query protein against a set of known template 3D binding sites representing nucleotide modules, namely the nucleobase, carbohydrate and phosphate. Structural features, clustering and conservation are used to filter and score the predictions. The predicted nucleotide modules are then joined to build whole nucleotide-binding sites, which are ranked by their score. The server takes as input either the PDB code of the query protein structure or a user-submitted structure in PDB format. The output of Nucleos is composed of ranked lists of predicted nucleotide-binding sites divided by nucleotide type (e.g. ATP-like). For each ranked prediction, Nucleos provides detailed information about the score, the template structure and the structural match for each nucleotide module composing the nucleotide-binding site. The predictions on the query structure and the template-binding sites can be viewed directly on the web through a graphical applet. In 98% of the cases, the modules composing correct predictions belong to proteins with no homology relationship between each other, meaning that the identification of brand-new nucleotide-binding sites is possible using information from non-homologous proteins. Nucleos is available at http://nucleos.bio.uniroma2.it/nucleos/.

  11. Catalytic Efficiency of Basidiomycete Laccases: Redox Potential versus Substrate-Binding Pocket Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga A. Glazunova

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Laccases are copper-containing oxidases that catalyze a one-electron abstraction from various phenolic and non-phenolic compounds with concomitant reduction of molecular oxygen to water. It is well-known that laccases from various sources have different substrate specificities, but it is not completely clear what exactly provides these differences. The purpose of this work was to study the features of the substrate specificity of four laccases from basidiomycete fungi Trametes hirsuta, Coriolopsis caperata, Antrodiella faginea, and Steccherinum murashkinskyi, which have different redox potentials of the T1 copper center and a different structure of substrate-binding pockets. Enzyme activity toward 20 monophenolic substances and 4 phenolic dyes was measured spectrophotometrically. The kinetic parameters of oxidation of four lignans and lignan-like substrates were determined by monitoring of the oxygen consumption. For the oxidation of the high redox potential (>700 mV monophenolic substrates and almost all large substrates, such as phenolic dyes and lignans, the redox potential difference between the enzyme and the substrate (ΔE played the defining role. For the low redox potential monophenolic substrates, ΔE did not directly influence the laccase activity. Also, in the special cases, the structure of the large substrates, such as dyes and lignans, as well as some structural features of the laccases (flexibility of the substrate-binding pocket loops and some amino acid residues in the key positions affected the resulting catalytic efficiency.

  12. Chlamydial entry involves TARP binding of guanine nucleotide exchange factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Josh Lane

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Chlamydia trachomatis attachment to cells induces the secretion of the elementary body-associated protein TARP (Translocated Actin Recruiting Protein. TARP crosses the plasma membrane where it is immediately phosphorylated at tyrosine residues by unknown host kinases. The Rac GTPase is also activated, resulting in WAVE2 and Arp2/3-dependent recruitment of actin to the sites of chlamydia attachment. We show that TARP participates directly in chlamydial invasion activating the Rac-dependent signaling cascade to recruit actin. TARP functions by binding two distinct Rac guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs, Sos1 and Vav2, in a phosphotyrosine-dependent manner. The tyrosine phosphorylation profile of the sequence YEPISTENIYESI within TARP, as well as the transient activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K, appears to determine which GEF is utilized to activate Rac. The first and second tyrosine residues, when phosphorylated, are utilized by the Sos1/Abi1/Eps8 and Vav2, respectively, with the latter requiring the lipid phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-triphosphate. Depletion of these critical signaling molecules by siRNA resulted in inhibition of chlamydial invasion to varying degrees, owing to a possible functional redundancy of the two pathways. Collectively, these data implicate TARP in signaling to the actin cytoskeleton remodeling machinery, demonstrating a mechanism by which C.trachomatis invades non-phagocytic cells.

  13. The same pocket in menin binds both MLL and JUND but has opposite effects on transcription

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Jing; Gurung, Buddha; Wan, Bingbing; Matkar, Smita; Veniaminova, Natalia A.; Wan, Ke; Merchant, Juanita L.; Hua, Xianxin; Lei, Ming (Michigan); (Michigan-Med); (UPENN-MED)

    2013-04-08

    Menin is a tumour suppressor protein whose loss or inactivation causes multiple endocrine neoplasia 1 (MEN1), a hereditary autosomal dominant tumour syndrome that is characterized by tumorigenesis in multiple endocrine organs. Menin interacts with many proteins and is involved in a variety of cellular processes. Menin binds the JUN family transcription factor JUND and inhibits its transcriptional activity. Several MEN1 missense mutations disrupt the menin-JUND interaction, suggesting a correlation between the tumour-suppressor function of menin and its suppression of JUND-activated transcription. Menin also interacts with mixed lineage leukaemia protein 1 (MLL1), a histone H3 lysine 4 methyltransferase, and functions as an oncogenic cofactor to upregulate gene transcription and promote MLL1-fusion-protein-induced leukaemogenesis. A recent report on the tethering of MLL1 to chromatin binding factor lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF) by menin indicates that menin is a molecular adaptor coordinating the functions of multiple proteins. Despite its importance, how menin interacts with many distinct partners and regulates their functions remains poorly understood. Here we present the crystal structures of human menin in its free form and in complexes with MLL1 or with JUND, or with an MLL1-LEDGF heterodimer. These structures show that menin contains a deep pocket that binds short peptides of MLL1 or JUND in the same manner, but that it can have opposite effects on transcription. The menin-JUND interaction blocks JUN N-terminal kinase (JNK)-mediated JUND phosphorylation and suppresses JUND-induced transcription. In contrast, menin promotes gene transcription by binding the transcription activator MLL1 through the peptide pocket while still interacting with the chromatin-anchoring protein LEDGF at a distinct surface formed by both menin and MLL1.

  14. Specificity of anion-binding in the substrate-pocket ofbacteriorhodopsin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Facciotti, Marc T.; Cheung, Vincent S.; Lunde, Christopher S.; Rouhani, Shahab; Baliga, Nitin S.; Glaeser, Robert M.

    2003-08-30

    The structure of the D85S mutant of bacteriorhodopsin with a nitrate anion bound in the Schiff-base binding site, and the structure of the anion-free protein have been obtained in the same crystal form. Together with the previously solved structures of this anion pump, in both the anion-free state and bromide-bound state, these new structures provide insight into how this mutant of bacteriorhodopsin is able to bind a variety of different anions in the same binding pocket. The structural analysis reveals that the main structural change that accommodates different anions is the repositioning of the polar side-chain of S85. On the basis of these x-ray crystal structures, the prediction is then made that the D85S/D212N double mutant might bind similar anions and do so over a broader pH range than does the single mutant. Experimental comparison of the dissociation constants, K{sub d}, for a variety of anions confirms this prediction and demonstrates, in addition, that the binding affinity is dramatically improved by the D212N substitution.

  15. PocketMatch: A new algorithm to compare binding sites in protein structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra Nagasuma

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recognizing similarities and deriving relationships among protein molecules is a fundamental requirement in present-day biology. Similarities can be present at various levels which can be detected through comparison of protein sequences or their structural folds. In some cases similarities obscure at these levels could be present merely in the substructures at their binding sites. Inferring functional similarities between protein molecules by comparing their binding sites is still largely exploratory and not as yet a routine protocol. One of the main reasons for this is the limitation in the choice of appropriate analytical tools that can compare binding sites with high sensitivity. To benefit from the enormous amount of structural data that is being rapidly accumulated, it is essential to have high throughput tools that enable large scale binding site comparison. Results Here we present a new algorithm PocketMatch for comparison of binding sites in a frame invariant manner. Each binding site is represented by 90 lists of sorted distances capturing shape and chemical nature of the site. The sorted arrays are then aligned using an incremental alignment method and scored to obtain PMScores for pairs of sites. A comprehensive sensitivity analysis and an extensive validation of the algorithm have been carried out. A comparison with other site matching algorithms is also presented. Perturbation studies where the geometry of a given site was retained but the residue types were changed randomly, indicated that chance similarities were virtually non-existent. Our analysis also demonstrates that shape information alone is insufficient to discriminate between diverse binding sites, unless combined with chemical nature of amino acids. Conclusion A new algorithm has been developed to compare binding sites in accurate, efficient and high-throughput manner. Though the representation used is conceptually simplistic, we demonstrate that

  16. Exploring the water-binding pocket of the type II dehydroquinase enzyme in the structure-based design of inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Beatriz; Sedes, Antía; Peón, Antonio; Otero, José M; van Raaij, Mark J; Thompson, Paul; Hawkins, Alastair R; González-Bello, Concepción

    2014-04-24

    Structural and computational studies to explore the WAT1 binding pocket in the structure-based design of inhibitors against the type II dehydroquinase (DHQ2) enzyme are reported. The crystal structures of DHQ2 from M. tuberculosis in complex with four of the reported compounds are described. The electrostatic interaction observed between the guanidinium group of the essential arginine and the carboxylate group of one of the inhibitors in the reported crystal structures supports the recently suggested role of this arginine as the residue that triggers the release of the product from the active site. The results of the structural and molecular dynamics simulation studies revealed that the inhibitory potency is favored by promoting interactions with WAT1 and the residues located within this pocket and, more importantly, by avoiding situations where the ligands occupy the WAT1 binding pocket. The new insights can be used to advantage in the structure-based design of inhibitors.

  17. Structures of BmrR-Drug Complexes Reveal a Rigid Multidrug Binding Pocket And Transcription Activation Through Tyrosine Expulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newberry, K.J.; Huffman, J.L.; Miller, M.C.; Vazquez-Laslop, N.; Neyfakh, A.A.; Brennan, R.G.

    2009-05-22

    BmrR is a member of the MerR family and a multidrug binding transcription factor that up-regulates the expression of the bmr multidrug efflux transporter gene in response to myriad lipophilic cationic compounds. The structural mechanism by which BmrR binds these chemically and structurally different drugs and subsequently activates transcription is poorly understood. Here, we describe the crystal structures of BmrR bound to rhodamine 6G (R6G) or berberine (Ber) and cognate DNA. These structures reveal each drug stacks against multiple aromatic residues with their positive charges most proximal to the carboxylate group of Glu-253 and that, unlike other multidrug binding pockets, that of BmrR is rigid. Substitution of Glu-253 with either alanine (E253A) or glutamine (E253Q) results in unpredictable binding affinities for R6G, Ber, and tetraphenylphosphonium. Moreover, these drug binding studies reveal that the negative charge of Glu-253 is not important for high affinity binding to Ber and tetraphenylphosphonium but plays a more significant, but unpredictable, role in R6G binding. In vitro transcription data show that E253A and E253Q are constitutively active, and structures of the drug-free E253A-DNA and E253Q-DNA complexes support a transcription activation mechanism requiring the expulsion of Tyr-152 from the multidrug binding pocket. In sum, these data delineate the mechanism by which BmrR binds lipophilic, monovalent cationic compounds and suggest the importance of the redundant negative electrostatic nature of this rigid drug binding pocket that can be used to discriminate against molecules that are not substrates of the Bmr multidrug efflux pump.

  18. An induced pocket for the binding of potent fusion inhibitor CL-385319 with H5N1 influenza virus hemagglutinin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Runming Li

    Full Text Available The influenza glycoprotein hemagglutinin (HA plays crucial roles in the early stage of virus infection, including receptor binding and membrane fusion. Therefore, HA is a potential target for developing anti-influenza drugs. Recently, we characterized a novel inhibitor of highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza virus, CL-385319, which specifically inhibits HA-mediated viral entry. Studies presented here identified the critical binding residues for CL-385319, which clustered in the stem region of the HA trimer by site-directed mutagenesis. Extensive computational simulations, including molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulations, molecular mechanics generalized Born surface area (MM_GBSA calculations, charge density and Laplacian calculations, have been carried out to uncover the detailed molecular mechanism that underlies the binding of CL-385319 to H5N1 influenza virus HA. It was found that the recognition and binding of CL-385319 to HA proceeds by a process of "induced fit" whereby the binding pocket is formed during their interaction. Occupation of this pocket by CL-385319 stabilizes the neutral pH structure of hemagglutinin, thus inhibiting the conformational rearrangements required for membrane fusion. This "induced fit" pocket may be a target for structure-based design of more potent influenza fusion inhibitors.

  19. C-terminal β9-strand of the cyclic nucleotide-binding homology domain stabilizes activated states of Kv11.1 channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chai Ann Ng

    Full Text Available Kv11.1 potassium channels are important for regulation of the normal rhythm of the heartbeat. Reduced activity of Kv11.1 channels causes long QT syndrome type 2, a disorder that increases the risk of cardiac arrhythmias and sudden cardiac arrest. Kv11.1 channels are members of the KCNH subfamily of voltage-gated K(+ channels. However, they also share many similarities with the cyclic nucleotide gated ion channel family, including having a cyclic nucleotide-binding homology (cNBH domain. Kv11.1 channels, however, are not directly regulated by cyclic nucleotides. Recently, crystal structures of the cNBH domain from mEAG and zELK channels, both members of the KCNH family of voltage-gated potassium channels, revealed that a C-terminal β9-strand in the cNBH domain occupied the putative cyclic nucleotide-binding site thereby precluding binding of cyclic nucleotides. Here we show that mutations to residues in the β9-strand affect the stability of the open state relative to the closed state of Kv11.1 channels. We also show that disrupting the structure of the β9-strand reduces the stability of the inactivated state relative to the open state. Clinical mutations located in this β9-strand result in reduced trafficking efficiency, which suggests that binding of the C-terminal β9-strand to the putative cyclic nucleotide-binding pocket is also important for assembly and trafficking of Kv11.1 channels.

  20. Nucleotide Interdependency in Transcription Factor Binding Sites in the Drosophila Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dresch, Jacqueline M; Zellers, Rowan G; Bork, Daniel K; Drewell, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    A long-standing objective in modern biology is to characterize the molecular components that drive the development of an organism. At the heart of eukaryotic development lies gene regulation. On the molecular level, much of the research in this field has focused on the binding of transcription factors (TFs) to regulatory regions in the genome known as cis-regulatory modules (CRMs). However, relatively little is known about the sequence-specific binding preferences of many TFs, especially with respect to the possible interdependencies between the nucleotides that make up binding sites. A particular limitation of many existing algorithms that aim to predict binding site sequences is that they do not allow for dependencies between nonadjacent nucleotides. In this study, we use a recently developed computational algorithm, MARZ, to compare binding site sequences using 32 distinct models in a systematic and unbiased approach to explore nucleotide dependencies within binding sites for 15 distinct TFs known to be critical to Drosophila development. Our results indicate that many of these proteins have varying levels of nucleotide interdependencies within their DNA recognition sequences, and that, in some cases, models that account for these dependencies greatly outperform traditional models that are used to predict binding sites. We also directly compare the ability of different models to identify the known KRUPPEL TF binding sites in CRMs and demonstrate that a more complex model that accounts for nucleotide interdependencies performs better when compared with simple models. This ability to identify TFs with critical nucleotide interdependencies in their binding sites will lead to a deeper understanding of how these molecular characteristics contribute to the architecture of CRMs and the precise regulation of transcription during organismal development.

  1. Molecular sampling of the allosteric binding pocket of the TSH receptor provides discriminative pharmacophores for antagonist and agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyer, Inna; Haas, Ann-Karin; Kreuchwig, Annika; Schülein, Ralf; Krause, Gerd

    2013-02-01

    The TSHR (thyrotropin receptor) is activated endogenously by the large hormone thyrotropin and activated pathologically by auto-antibodies. Both activate and bind at the extracellular domain. Recently, SMLs (small-molecule ligands) have been identified, which bind in an allosteric binding pocket within the transmembrane domain. Modelling driven site-directed mutagenesis of amino acids lining this pocket led to the delineation of activation and inactivation sensitive residues. Modified residues showing CAMs (constitutively activating mutations) indicate signalling-sensitive positions and mark potential trigger points for agonists. Silencing mutations lead to an impairment of basal activity and mark contact points for antagonists. Mapping these residues on to a structural model of TSHR indicates locations where an SML may switch the receptor to an inactive or active conformation. In the present article, we report the effects of SMLs on these signalling-sensitive amino acids at the TSHR. Surprisingly, the antagonistic effect of SML compound 52 was reversed to an agonistic effect, when tested at the CAM Y667A. Switching agonism to antagonism and the reverse by changing either SMLs or residues covering the binding pocket provides detailed knowledge about discriminative pharmacophores. It prepares the basis for rational optimization of new high-affinity antagonists to interfere with the pathogenic activation of the TSHR.

  2. G protein-coupled receptor transmembrane binding pockets and their applications in GPCR research and drug discovery: a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratochwil, Nicole A; Gatti-McArthur, Silvia; Hoener, Marius C; Lindemann, Lothar; Christ, Andreas D; Green, Luke G; Guba, Wolfgang; Martin, Rainer E; Malherbe, Pari; Porter, Richard H P; Slack, Jay P; Winnig, Marcel; Dehmlow, Henrietta; Grether, Uwe; Hertel, Cornelia; Narquizian, Robert; Panousis, Constantinos G; Kolczewski, Sabine; Steward, Lucinda

    2011-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) share a common architecture consisting of seven transmembrane (TM) domains. Various lines of evidence suggest that this fold provides a generic binding pocket within the TM region for hosting agonists, antagonists, and allosteric modulators. Hence, an automated method was developed that allows a fast analysis and comparison of these generic ligand binding pockets across the entire GPCR family by providing the relevant information for all GPCRs in the same format. This methodology compiles amino acids lining the TM binding pocket including parts of the ECL2 loop in a so-called 1D ligand binding pocket vector and translates these 1D vectors in a second step into 3D receptor pharmacophore models. It aims to support various aspects of GPCR drug discovery in the pharmaceutical industry. Applications of pharmacophore similarity analysis of these 1D LPVs include definition of receptor subfamilies, prediction of species differences within subfamilies in regard to in vitro pharmacology and identification of nearest neighbors for GPCRs of interest to generate starting points for GPCR lead identification programs. These aspects of GPCR research are exemplified in the field of melanopsins, trace amine-associated receptors and somatostatin receptor subtype 5. In addition, it is demonstrated how 3D pharmacophore models of the LPVs can support the prediction of amino acids involved in ligand recognition, the understanding of mutational data in a 3D context and the elucidation of binding modes for GPCR ligands and their evaluation. Furthermore, guidance through 3D receptor pharmacophore modeling for the synthesis of subtype-specific GPCR ligands will be reported. Illustrative examples are taken from the GPCR family class C, metabotropic glutamate receptors 1 and 5 and sweet taste receptors, and from the GPCR class A, e.g. nicotinic acid and 5-hydroxytryptamine 5A receptor. © 2011 Bentham Science Publishers

  3. Recurrent De Novo Mutations Disturbing the GTP/GDP Binding Pocket of RAB11B Cause Intellectual Disability and a Distinctive Brain Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamers, Ideke J C; Reijnders, Margot R F; Venselaar, Hanka; Kraus, Alison; Jansen, Sandra; de Vries, Bert B A; Houge, Gunnar; Gradek, Gyri Aasland; Seo, Jieun; Choi, Murim; Chae, Jong-Hee; van der Burgt, Ineke; Pfundt, Rolph; Letteboer, Stef J F; van Beersum, Sylvia E C; Dusseljee, Simone; Brunner, Han G; Doherty, Dan; Kleefstra, Tjitske; Roepman, Ronald

    2017-11-02

    The Rab GTPase family comprises ∼70 GTP-binding proteins, functioning in vesicle formation, transport and fusion. They are activated by a conformational change induced by GTP-binding, allowing interactions with downstream effectors. Here, we report five individuals with two recurrent de novo missense mutations in RAB11B; c.64G>A; p.Val22Met in three individuals and c.202G>A; p.Ala68Thr in two individuals. An overlapping neurodevelopmental phenotype, including severe intellectual disability with absent speech, epilepsy, and hypotonia was observed in all affected individuals. Additionally, visual problems, musculoskeletal abnormalities, and microcephaly were present in the majority of cases. Re-evaluation of brain MRI images of four individuals showed a shared distinct brain phenotype, consisting of abnormal white matter (severely decreased volume and abnormal signal), thin corpus callosum, cerebellar vermis hypoplasia, optic nerve hypoplasia and mild ventriculomegaly. To compare the effects of both variants with known inactive GDP- and active GTP-bound RAB11B mutants, we modeled the variants on the three-dimensional protein structure and performed subcellular localization studies. We predicted that both variants alter the GTP/GDP binding pocket and show that they both have localization patterns similar to inactive RAB11B. Evaluation of their influence on the affinity of RAB11B to a series of binary interactors, both effectors and guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), showed induction of RAB11B binding to the GEF SH3BP5, again similar to inactive RAB11B. In conclusion, we report two recurrent dominant mutations in RAB11B leading to a neurodevelopmental syndrome, likely caused by altered GDP/GTP binding that inactivate the protein and induce GEF binding and protein mislocalization. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Human Genetics. All rights reserved.

  4. Identification of transmembrane domain 6 & 7 residues that contribute to the binding pocket of the urotensin II receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holleran, Brian J; Domazet, Ivana; Beaulieu, Marie-Eve; Yan, Li Ping; Guillemette, Gaétan; Lavigne, Pierre; Escher, Emanuel; Leduc, Richard

    2009-04-15

    Urotensin II (U-II), a cyclic undecapeptide, is the natural ligand of the urotensin II (UT) receptor, a G protein-coupled receptor. In the present study, we used the substituted-cysteine accessibility method to identify specific residues in transmembrane domains (TMDs) six and seven of the rat urotensin II receptor (rUT) that contribute to the formation of the binding pocket of the receptor. Each residue in the R256(6.32)-Q283(6.59) fragment of TMD6 and the A295(7.31)-T321(7.57) fragment of TMD7 was mutated, individually, to a cysteine. The resulting mutants were expressed in COS-7 cells, which were subsequently treated with the positively charged methanethiosulfonate-ethylammonium (MTSEA) or the negatively charged methanethiosulfonate-ethylsulfonate (MTSES) sulfhydryl-specific alkylating agents. MTSEA treatment resulted in a significant reduction in the binding of TMD6 mutants F268C(6.44) and W278C(6.54) and TMD7 mutants L298C(7.34), T302C(7.38), and T303C(7.39) to (125)I-U-II. MTSES treatment resulted in a significant reduction in the binding of two additional mutants, namely L282C(6.58) in TMD6 and Y300C(7.36) in TMD7. These results suggest that specific residues orient themselves within the water-accessible binding pocket of the rUT receptor. This approach, which allowed us to identify key determinants in TMD6 and TMD7 that contribute to the UT receptor binding pocket, enabled us to further refine our homology-based model of how U-II interacts with its cognate receptor.

  5. Different characteristics and nucleotide binding properties of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH isoforms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine C Thomas

    Full Text Available We recently reported that Inosine Monophosphate Dehydrogenase (IMPDH, a rate-limiting enzyme in de novo guanine nucleotide biosynthesis, clustered into macrostructures in response to decreased nucleotide levels and that there were differences between the IMPDH isoforms, IMPDH1 and IMPDH2. We hypothesised that the Bateman domains, which are present in both isoforms and serve as energy-sensing/allosteric modules in unrelated proteins, would contribute to isoform-specific differences and that mutations situated in and around this domain in IMPDH1 which give rise to retinitis pigmentosa (RP would compromise regulation. We employed immuno-electron microscopy to investigate the ultrastructure of IMPDH macrostructures and live-cell imaging to follow clustering of an IMPDH2-GFP chimera in real-time. Using a series of IMPDH1/IMPDH2 chimera we demonstrated that the propensity to cluster was conferred by the N-terminal 244 amino acids, which includes the Bateman domain. A protease protection assay suggested isoform-specific purine nucleotide binding characteristics, with ATP protecting IMPDH1 and AMP protecting IMPDH2, via a mechanism involving conformational changes upon nucleotide binding to the Bateman domain without affecting IMPDH catalytic activity. ATP binding to IMPDH1 was confirmed in a nucleotide binding assay. The RP-causing mutation, R224P, abolished ATP binding and nucleotide protection and this correlated with an altered propensity to cluster. Collectively these data demonstrate that (i the isoforms are differentially regulated by AMP and ATP by a mechanism involving the Bateman domain, (ii communication occurs between the Bateman and catalytic domains and (iii the RP-causing mutations compromise such regulation. These findings support the idea that the IMPDH isoforms are subject to distinct regulation and that regulatory defects contribute to human disease.

  6. Alkylated hydroxylamine derivatives eliminate peripheral retinylidene Schiff bases but cannot enter the retinal binding pocket of light-activated rhodopsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piechnick, Ronny; Heck, Martin; Sommer, Martha E

    2011-08-23

    Besides Lys-296 in the binding pocket of opsin, all-trans-retinal forms adducts with peripheral lysine residues and phospholipids, thereby mimicking the spectral and chemical properties of metarhodopsin species. These pseudophotoproducts composed of nonspecific retinylidene Schiff bases have long plagued the investigation of rhodopsin deactivation and identification of decay products. We discovered that, while hydroxylamine can enter the retinal binding pocket of light-activated rhodopsin, the modified hydroxylamine compounds o-methylhydroxylamine (mHA), o-ethylhydroxylamine (eHA), o-tert-butylhydroxylamine (t-bHA), and o-(carboxymethyl)hydroxylamine (cmHA) are excluded. However, the alkylated hydroxylamines react quickly and efficiently with exposed retinylidene Schiff bases to form their respective retinal oximes. We further investigated how t-bHA affects light-activated rhodopsin and its interaction with binding partners. We found that both metarhodopsin II (Meta II) and Meta III are resistant to t-bHA, and neither arrestin nor transducin binding is affected by t-bHA. This discovery suggests that the hypothetical solvent channel that opens in light-activated rhodopsin is extremely stringent with regard to size and/or polarity. We believe that alkylated hydroxylamines will prove to be extremely useful reagents for the investigation of rhodopsin activation and decay mechanisms. Furthermore, the use of alkylated hydroxylamines should not be limited to in vitro studies and could help elucidate visual signal transduction mechanisms in the living cells of the retina. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  7. Disruption of key NADH-binding pocket residues of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis InhA affects DD-CoA binding ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Daniel J; Robb, Kirsty; Vetter, Beatrice V; Tong, Madeline; Molle, Virginie; Hunt, Neil T; Hoskisson, Paul A

    2017-07-05

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a global health problem that affects over 10 million people. There is an urgent need to develop novel antimicrobial therapies to combat TB. To achieve this, a thorough understanding of key validated drug targets is required. The enoyl reductase InhA, responsible for synthesis of essential mycolic acids in the mycobacterial cell wall, is the target for the frontline anti-TB drug isoniazid. To better understand the activity of this protein a series of mutants, targeted to the NADH co-factor binding pocket were created. Residues P193 and W222 comprise a series of hydrophobic residues surrounding the cofactor binding site and mutation of both residues negatively affect InhA function. Construction of an M155A mutant of InhA results in increased affinity for NADH and DD-CoA turnover but with a reduction in V max for DD-CoA, impairing overall activity. This suggests that NADH-binding geometry of InhA likely permits long-range interactions between residues in the NADH-binding pocket to facilitate substrate turnover in the DD-CoA binding region of the protein. Understanding the precise details of substrate binding and turnover in InhA and how this may affect protein-protein interactions may facilitate the development of improved inhibitors enabling the development of novel anti-TB drugs.

  8. Guanine nucleotide binding to the Bateman domain mediates the allosteric inhibition of eukaryotic IMP dehydrogenases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buey, Rubén M.; Ledesma-Amaro, Rodrigo; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Balsera, Mónica; Chagoyen, Mónica; de Pereda, José M.; Revuelta, José L.

    2015-11-01

    Inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) plays key roles in purine nucleotide metabolism and cell proliferation. Although IMPDH is a widely studied therapeutic target, there is limited information about its physiological regulation. Using Ashbya gossypii as a model, we describe the molecular mechanism and the structural basis for the allosteric regulation of IMPDH by guanine nucleotides. We report that GTP and GDP bind to the regulatory Bateman domain, inducing octamers with compromised catalytic activity. Our data suggest that eukaryotic and prokaryotic IMPDHs might have developed different regulatory mechanisms, with GTP/GDP inhibiting only eukaryotic IMPDHs. Interestingly, mutations associated with human retinopathies map into the guanine nucleotide-binding sites including a previously undescribed non-canonical site and disrupt allosteric inhibition. Together, our results shed light on the mechanisms of the allosteric regulation of enzymes mediated by Bateman domains and provide a molecular basis for certain retinopathies, opening the door to new therapeutic approaches.

  9. Identification of the functional binding pocket for compounds targeting small-conductance Ca²⁺-activated potassium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Miao; Pascal, John M; Schumann, Marcel; Armen, Roger S; Zhang, Ji-Fang

    2012-01-01

    Small- and intermediate-conductance Ca(2+)-activated potassium channels, activated by Ca(2+)-bound calmodulin, have an important role in regulating membrane excitability. These channels are also linked to clinical abnormalities. A tremendous amount of effort has been devoted to developing small molecule compounds targeting these channels. However, these compounds often suffer from low potency and lack of selectivity, hindering their potential for clinical use. A key contributing factor is the lack of knowledge of the binding site(s) for these compounds. Here we demonstrate by X-ray crystallography that the binding pocket for the compounds of the 1-ethyl-2-benzimidazolinone (1-EBIO) class is located at the calmodulin-channel interface. We show that, based on structure data and molecular docking, mutations of the channel can effectively change the potency of these compounds. Our results provide insight into the molecular nature of the binding pocket and its contribution to the potency and selectivity of the compounds of the 1-EBIO class.

  10. Identification of the functional binding pocket for compounds targeting small-conductance Ca2+-activated potassium channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Miao; Pascal, John M.; Schumann, Marcel; Armen, Roger S.; Zhang, Ji-fang

    2012-01-01

    Small- and intermediate-conductance Ca2+-activated potassium channels, activated by Ca2+-bound calmodulin, play an important role in regulating membrane excitability. These channels are also linked to clinical abnormalities. A tremendous amount of effort has been devoted to developing small molecule compounds targeting these channels. However, these compounds often suffer from low potency and lack of selectivity, hindering their potentials for clinical use. A key contributing factor is the lack of knowledge of the binding site(s) for these compounds. Here we demonstrate by X-ray crystallography that the binding pocket for the compounds of the 1-EBIO class is located at the calmodulin-channel interface. We show that, based on structure data and molecular docking, mutations of the channel can effectively change the potency of these compounds. Our results provide insight into the molecular nature of the binding pocket and its contribution to the potency and selectivity of the compounds of the 1-EBIO class. PMID:22929778

  11. Simulation of the coupling between nucleotide binding and transmembrane domains in the ABC transporter BtuCD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne, Jacob; Kandt, C.; Peters, Günther H.j.

    2007-01-01

    The nucleotide-induced structural rearrangements in ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters, leading to substrate translocation, are largely unknown. We have modeled nucleotide binding and release in the vitamin B12 importer BtuCD using perturbed elastic network calculations and biased molecular...

  12. Characterization of the Raf kinase inhibitory protein (RKIP) binding pocket: NMR-based screening identifies small-molecule ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemon, Anne N; Heil, Gary L; Granovsky, Alexey E; Clark, Mathew M; McElheny, Dan; Chimon, Alexander; Rosner, Marsha R; Koide, Shohei

    2010-05-05

    Raf kinase inhibitory protein (RKIP), also known as phoshaptidylethanolamine binding protein (PEBP), has been shown to inhibit Raf and thereby negatively regulate growth factor signaling by the Raf/MAP kinase pathway. RKIP has also been shown to suppress metastasis. We have previously demonstrated that RKIP/Raf interaction is regulated by two mechanisms: phosphorylation of RKIP at Ser-153, and occupation of RKIP's conserved ligand binding domain with a phospholipid (2-dihexanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine; DHPE). In addition to phospholipids, other ligands have been reported to bind this domain; however their binding properties remain uncharacterized. In this study, we used high-resolution heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy to screen a chemical library and assay a number of potential RKIP ligands for binding to the protein. Surprisingly, many compounds previously postulated as RKIP ligands showed no detectable binding in near-physiological solution conditions even at millimolar concentrations. In contrast, we found three novel ligands for RKIP that specifically bind to the RKIP pocket. Interestingly, unlike the phospholipid, DHPE, these newly identified ligands did not affect RKIP binding to Raf-1 or RKIP phosphorylation. One out of the three ligands displayed off target biological effects, impairing EGF-induced MAPK and metabolic activity. This work defines the binding properties of RKIP ligands under near physiological conditions, establishing RKIP's affinity for hydrophobic ligands and the importance of bulky aliphatic chains for inhibiting its function. The common structural elements of these compounds defines a minimal requirement for RKIP binding and thus they can be used as lead compounds for future design of RKIP ligands with therapeutic potential.

  13. Characterization of the Raf kinase inhibitory protein (RKIP binding pocket: NMR-based screening identifies small-molecule ligands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne N Shemon

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Raf kinase inhibitory protein (RKIP, also known as phoshaptidylethanolamine binding protein (PEBP, has been shown to inhibit Raf and thereby negatively regulate growth factor signaling by the Raf/MAP kinase pathway. RKIP has also been shown to suppress metastasis. We have previously demonstrated that RKIP/Raf interaction is regulated by two mechanisms: phosphorylation of RKIP at Ser-153, and occupation of RKIP's conserved ligand binding domain with a phospholipid (2-dihexanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine; DHPE. In addition to phospholipids, other ligands have been reported to bind this domain; however their binding properties remain uncharacterized.In this study, we used high-resolution heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy to screen a chemical library and assay a number of potential RKIP ligands for binding to the protein. Surprisingly, many compounds previously postulated as RKIP ligands showed no detectable binding in near-physiological solution conditions even at millimolar concentrations. In contrast, we found three novel ligands for RKIP that specifically bind to the RKIP pocket. Interestingly, unlike the phospholipid, DHPE, these newly identified ligands did not affect RKIP binding to Raf-1 or RKIP phosphorylation. One out of the three ligands displayed off target biological effects, impairing EGF-induced MAPK and metabolic activity.This work defines the binding properties of RKIP ligands under near physiological conditions, establishing RKIP's affinity for hydrophobic ligands and the importance of bulky aliphatic chains for inhibiting its function. The common structural elements of these compounds defines a minimal requirement for RKIP binding and thus they can be used as lead compounds for future design of RKIP ligands with therapeutic potential.

  14. Spectroscopic investigations of the B12-binding subunit of glutamate mutase: refined solution structure of the complex with the B12-nucleotide, dynamics and binding studies with two corrinoid cofactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichmueller, C.

    2002-06-01

    Glutamate mutase is an enzyme isolated from Clostridium tetanomorphum and Clostridium cochlearum. It catalyses the reversible rearrangement of (2S)-glutamate to (2S,3S)-3-methylaspartate. Coenzyme B12 is required as cofactor for an active enzyme, as the first step of the catalytic cycle is the homolytic cleavage of the cobalt-carbon bond. The rearrangement itself follows a radical mechanism. The holoenzyme is an alpha2beta2 heterotetramer containing two identical catalytic and two B12 binding domains, as well as two coenzyme B12 molecules. The smaller B12 binding domain from Clostridium tetanomorphum, MutS, is known to bind coenzyme B12 in its unusual 'base-off' form. A conserved histidine residue coordinates to the cobalt atom instead of the normally coordinated dimethlybenzimidole in free coenzyme B12. In the present work a refined solution structure of the B12 binding subunit from Clostridium tetanomorphum (MutS) in complex with the detached nucleotide loop of coenzyme B12 has been determined using nuclear magnetic resonance. The found topology is almost identical to the crystal structure of glutamate mutase from C.cochlearum [Reitzer et al., 1999], in contrast to the solution structures obtained for apo-MutS [Hoffmann et al., 2001; Tollinger et al., 1998] and apo-GlmS [Hoffmann et al., 1999]. In these two structures a helix at one side of the B12 nucleotide loop binding pocket is mostly unstructured and shows motions on a microsecond to millisecond timescale. The previously found stabilization of this helix upon B12-nucleotide binding [Tollinger et al., 2001] was confirmed using 13C and 15N labeled MutS. Some differences are found in the structure of the binding pocket and the bound nucleotide loop compared to the crystal structure. This indicates that additional conformational changes occur upon binding of the corrin ring of coenzyme B12. NMR-relaxation measurements performed on apo-MutS showed interesting slow molecular motions not only in the mainly

  15. eMatchSite: sequence order-independent structure alignments of ligand binding pockets in protein models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Brylinski

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Detecting similarities between ligand binding sites in the absence of global homology between target proteins has been recognized as one of the critical components of modern drug discovery. Local binding site alignments can be constructed using sequence order-independent techniques, however, to achieve a high accuracy, many current algorithms for binding site comparison require high-quality experimental protein structures, preferably in the bound conformational state. This, in turn, complicates proteome scale applications, where only various quality structure models are available for the majority of gene products. To improve the state-of-the-art, we developed eMatchSite, a new method for constructing sequence order-independent alignments of ligand binding sites in protein models. Large-scale benchmarking calculations using adenine-binding pockets in crystal structures demonstrate that eMatchSite generates accurate alignments for almost three times more protein pairs than SOIPPA. More importantly, eMatchSite offers a high tolerance to structural distortions in ligand binding regions in protein models. For example, the percentage of correctly aligned pairs of adenine-binding sites in weakly homologous protein models is only 4-9% lower than those aligned using crystal structures. This represents a significant improvement over other algorithms, e.g. the performance of eMatchSite in recognizing similar binding sites is 6% and 13% higher than that of SiteEngine using high- and moderate-quality protein models, respectively. Constructing biologically correct alignments using predicted ligand binding sites in protein models opens up the possibility to investigate drug-protein interaction networks for complete proteomes with prospective systems-level applications in polypharmacology and rational drug repositioning. eMatchSite is freely available to the academic community as a web-server and a stand-alone software distribution at http://www.brylinski.org/ematchsite.

  16. Identification and Characterization of Botulinum Neurotoxin A Substrate Binding Pockets and Their Re-Engineering for Human SNAP-23.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikorra, Stefan; Litschko, Christa; Müller, Carina; Thiel, Nadine; Galli, Thierry; Eichner, Timo; Binz, Thomas

    2016-01-29

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are highly potent bacterial proteins that block neurotransmitter release at the neuromuscular junction by cleaving SNAREs (soluble N-ethyl maleimide sensitive factor attachment protein receptors). However, their serotype A (BoNT/A) that cleaves SNAP-25 (synaptosomal-associated protein of 25 kDa) has also been an established pharmaceutical for treatment of medical conditions that rely on hyperactivity of cholinergic nerve terminals for 25 years. The expansion of its use to a variety of further medical conditions associated with hypersecretion components is prevented partly because the involved SNARE isoforms are not cleaved. Therefore, we examined by mutational analyses the reason for the resistance of human SNAP-23, an isoform of SNAP-25. We show that replacement of 10 SNAP-23 residues with their SNAP-25 counterparts effects SNAP-25-like cleavability. Conversely, transfer of each of the replaced SNAP-23 residues to SNAP-25 drastically decreased the cleavability of SNAP-25. By means of the existing SNAP-25-toxin co-crystal structure, molecular dynamics simulations, and corroborative mutagenesis studies, the appropriate binding pockets for these residues in BoNT/A were characterized. Systematic mutagenesis of two major BoNT/A binding pockets was conducted in order to adapt these pockets to corresponding amino acids of human SNAP-23. Human SNAP-23 cleaving mutants were isolated using a newly established yeast-based screening system. This method may be useful for engineering novel BoNT/A pharmaceuticals for the treatment of diseases that rely on SNAP-23-mediated hypersecretion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Unveiling a novel transient druggable pocket in BACE-1 through molecular simulations: Conformational analysis and binding mode of multisite inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pietro, Ornella; Laughton, Charles A.

    2017-01-01

    The critical role of BACE-1 in the formation of neurotoxic ß-amyloid peptides in the brain makes it an attractive target for an efficacious treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. However, the development of clinically useful BACE-1 inhibitors has proven to be extremely challenging. In this study we examine the binding mode of a novel potent inhibitor (compound 1, with IC50 80 nM) designed by synergistic combination of two fragments—huprine and rhein—that individually are endowed with very low activity against BACE-1. Examination of crystal structures reveals no appropriate binding site large enough to accommodate 1. Therefore we have examined the conformational flexibility of BACE-1 through extended molecular dynamics simulations, paying attention to the highly flexible region shaped by loops 8–14, 154–169 and 307–318. The analysis of the protein dynamics, together with studies of pocket druggability, has allowed us to detect the transient formation of a secondary binding site, which contains Arg307 as a key residue for the interaction with small molecules, at the edge of the catalytic cleft. The formation of this druggable “floppy” pocket would enable the binding of multisite inhibitors targeting both catalytic and secondary sites. Molecular dynamics simulations of BACE-1 bound to huprine-rhein hybrid compounds support the feasibility of this hypothesis. The results provide a basis to explain the high inhibitory potency of the two enantiomeric forms of 1, together with the large dependence on the length of the oligomethylenic linker. Furthermore, the multisite hypothesis has allowed us to rationalize the inhibitory potency of a series of tacrine-chromene hybrid compounds, specifically regarding the apparent lack of sensitivity of the inhibition constant to the chemical modifications introduced in the chromene unit. Overall, these findings pave the way for the exploration of novel functionalities in the design of optimized BACE-1 multisite inhibitors

  18. Roles of phosphorylation and nucleotide binding domains in calcium transport by sarcoplasmic reticulum adenosinetriphosphatase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teruel, J.A.; Inesi, G.

    1988-01-01

    The roles of the phosphorylation (phosphorylated enzyme intermediate) and nucleotide binding domains in calcium transport were studied by comparing acetyl phosphate and ATP as substrates for the Ca 2+ -ATPase of sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles. The authors found that the maximal level of phosphoenzyme obtained with either substrate is approximately 4 nmol/mg of protein, corresponding to the stoichiometry of catalytic sites in their preparation. The initial burst of phosphoenzyme formation observed in the transient state, following addition of either substrate, is accompanied by internalization of 2 mol of calcium per mole of phosphoenzyme. The internalized calcium is then translocated with a sequential pattern, independent of the substrate used. Following a rate-limiting step, the phosphoenzyme undergoes hydrolytic cleavage and proceeds to the steady-state activity which is soon back inhibited by the rise of Ca 2+ concentration in the lumen of the vesicles. When the back inhibition is released by the addition of oxalate, substrate utilization and calcium transport occur with a ratio of 1:2, independent of the substrate and its concentration. When the nucleotide binding site is derivatized with FITP, the enzyme can still utilize acetyl phosphate (but not ATP) for calcium transport. These observations demonstrate that the basic coupling mechanism of catalysis and calcium transport involves the phosphorylation and calcium binding domains, and not the nucleotide binding domain. On the other hand, occupancy of the FITC-sensitive nucleotide site is involved in kinetic regulation not only with respect to utilization of substrate for the phosphoryl transfer reaction but also for subsequent steps related to calcium translocation and phosphoenzyme turnover

  19. The nucleotide-binding domain of NLRC5 is critical for nuclear import and transactivation activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meissner, Torsten B.; Li, Amy; Liu, Yuen-Joyce; Gagnon, Etienne; Kobayashi, Koichi S.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► NLRC5 requires an intact NLS for its function as MHC class I transactivator. ► Nuclear presence of NLRC5 is required for MHC class I induction. ► Nucleotide-binding controls nuclear import and transactivation activity of NLRC5. -- Abstract: Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and class II are crucial for the function of the human adaptive immune system. A member of the NLR (nucleotide-binding domain, leucine-rich repeat) protein family, NLRC5, has recently been identified as a transcriptional regulator of MHC class I and related genes. While a ‘master regulator’ of MHC class II genes, CIITA, has long been known, NLRC5 specifically associates with and transactivates the proximal promoters of MHC class I genes. In this study, we analyzed the molecular requirements of NLRC5 nuclear import and transactivation activity. We show that NLRC5-mediated MHC class I gene induction requires an intact nuclear localization signal and nuclear distribution of NLRC5. In addition, we find that the nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) of NLRC5 is critical not only for nuclear translocation but also for the transactivation of MHC class I genes. Changing the cellular localization of NLRC5 is likely to immediately impact MHC class I expression as well as MHC class I-mediated antigen presentation. NLRC5 may thus provide a promising target for the modulation of MHC class I antigen presentation, especially in the setting of transplant medicine.

  20. In silico screening for inhibitors of p-glycoprotein that target the nucleotide binding domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Frances K; Follit, Courtney A; Vogel, Pia D; Wise, John G

    2014-12-01

    Multidrug resistances and the failure of chemotherapies are often caused by the expression or overexpression of ATP-binding cassette transporter proteins such as the multidrug resistance protein, P-glycoprotein (P-gp). P-gp is expressed in the plasma membrane of many cell types and protects cells from accumulation of toxins. P-gp uses ATP hydrolysis to catalyze the transport of a broad range of mostly hydrophobic compounds across the plasma membrane and out of the cell. During cancer chemotherapy, the administration of therapeutics often selects for cells which overexpress P-gp, thereby creating populations of cancer cells resistant to a variety of chemically unrelated chemotherapeutics. The present study describes extremely high-throughput, massively parallel in silico ligand docking studies aimed at identifying reversible inhibitors of ATP hydrolysis that target the nucleotide-binding domains of P-gp. We used a structural model of human P-gp that we obtained from molecular dynamics experiments as the protein target for ligand docking. We employed a novel approach of subtractive docking experiments that identified ligands that bound predominantly to the nucleotide-binding domains but not the drug-binding domains of P-gp. Four compounds were found that inhibit ATP hydrolysis by P-gp. Using electron spin resonance spectroscopy, we showed that at least three of these compounds affected nucleotide binding to the transporter. These studies represent a successful proof of principle demonstrating the potential of targeted approaches for identifying specific inhibitors of P-gp. Copyright © 2014 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  1. The binding of glucose and nucleotides to hexokinase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolfitt, A R; Kellett, G L; Hoggett, J G

    1988-01-29

    The binding of glucose, ADP and AdoPP[NH]P, to the native PII dimer and PII monomer and the proteolytically-modified SII monomer of hexokinase (ATP:D-hexose 6-phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.1.1) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae was monitored at pH 6.7 by the concomitant quenching of protein fluorescence. The data were analysed in terms of Qmax, the maximal quenching of fluorescence at saturating concentrations of ligand, and [L]0.5, the concentration of ligand at half-maximal quenching. No changes in fluorescence were observed with free enzyme and nucleotide alone. In the presence of saturating levels of glucose, Qmax induced by nucleotide was between 2 and 7%, and [L]0.5 was between 0.12 and 0.56 mM, depending on the nucleotide and enzyme species. Qmax induced by glucose alone was between 22 and 25%, while [L]0.5 was approx. 0.4 mM for either of the monomeric hexokinase forms and 3.4 for PII dimer. In the presence of 6 mM ADP or 2 mM AdoPP[NH]P, Qmax for glucose was increased by up to 4% and [L]0.5 was diminished 3-fold for hexokinase PII monomer, 6-fold for SII monomer, and 15-fold for PII dimer. The results are interpreted in terms of nucleotide-induced conformational change of hexokinase in the presence of glucose and synergistic binding interactions between glucose and nucleotide.

  2. A statistical model for investigating binding probabilities of DNA nucleotide sequences using microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mei-Ling Ting; Bulyk, Martha L; Whitmore, G A; Church, George M

    2002-12-01

    There is considerable scientific interest in knowing the probability that a site-specific transcription factor will bind to a given DNA sequence. Microarray methods provide an effective means for assessing the binding affinities of a large number of DNA sequences as demonstrated by Bulyk et al. (2001, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, USA 98, 7158-7163) in their study of the DNA-binding specificities of Zif268 zinc fingers using microarray technology. In a follow-up investigation, Bulyk, Johnson, and Church (2002, Nucleic Acid Research 30, 1255-1261) studied the interdependence of nucleotides on the binding affinities of transcription proteins. Our article is motivated by this pair of studies. We present a general statistical methodology for analyzing microarray intensity measurements reflecting DNA-protein interactions. The log probability of a protein binding to a DNA sequence on an array is modeled using a linear ANOVA model. This model is convenient because it employs familiar statistical concepts and procedures and also because it is effective for investigating the probability structure of the binding mechanism.

  3. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD18 gene encodes a protein that contains potential zinc finger domains for nucleic acid binding and a putative nucleotide binding sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, J.S.; Prakash, L. (Univ. of Rochester School of Medicine, NY (USA)); Weber, S. (Kodak Research Park, Rochester, NY (USA))

    1988-07-25

    The RAD18 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is required for postreplication repair of UV damaged DNA. The authors have isolated the RAD18 gene, determined its nucleotide sequence and examined if deletion mutations of this gene show different or more pronounced phenotypic effects than the previously described point mutations. The RAD18 gene open reading frame encodes a protein of 487 amino acids, with a calculated molecular weight of 55,512. The RAD18 protein contains three potential zinc finger domains for nucleic acid binding, and a putative nucleotide binding sequence that is present in many proteins that bind and hydrolyze ATP. The DNA binding and nucleotide binding activities could enable the RAD18 protein to bind damaged sites in the template DNA with high affinity. Alternatively, or in addition, RAD18 protein may be a transcriptional regulator. The RAD18 deletion mutation resembles the previously described point mutations in its effects on viability, DNA repair, UV mutagenesis, and sporulation.

  4. Probing the diphosphoglycerate binding pocket of HbA and HbPresbyterian (beta 108Asn --> Lys).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottfried, D S; Manjula, B N; Malavalli, A; Acharya, A S; Friedman, J M

    1999-08-31

    HbPresbyterian (beta 108Asn --> Lys, HbP) contains an additional positive charge (per alpha beta dimer) in the middle of the central cavity and exhibits a lower oxygen affinity than wild-type HbA in the presence of chloride. However, very little is known about the molecular origins of its altered functional properties. In this study, we have focused on the beta beta cleft of the Hb tetramer. Recently, we developed an approach for quantifying the ligand binding affinity to the beta-end of the Hb central cavity using fluorescent analogues of the natural allosteric effector 2, 3-diphosphoglycerate (DPG) [Gottfried, D. S., et al. (1997) J. Biol. Chem. 272, 1571-1578]. Time-correlated single-photon counting fluorescence lifetime studies were used to assess the binding of pyrenetetrasulfonate to both HbA and HbP in the deoxy and CO ligation states under acidic and neutral pH conditions. Both the native and mutant proteins bind the probe at a weak binding site and a strong binding site; in all cases, the binding to HbP was stronger than to HbA. The most striking finding was that for HbA the binding affinity varies as follows: deoxy (pH 6.35) > deoxy (pH 7.20) > CO (pH 6.35); however, the binding to HbP is independent of ligation or pH. The mutant oxy protein also hydrolyzes p-nitrophenyl acetate, through a reversible acyl-imidazole pathway linked to the His residues of the beta beta cleft, at a considerably higher rate than does HbA. This implies a perturbation of the microenvironment of these residues at the DPG binding pocket. Structural consequences due to the presence of the new positive charge in the middle of the central cavity have been transmitted to the beta beta cleft of the protein, even in its liganded conformation. This is consistent with a newly described quaternary state (B) for liganded HbPresbyterian and an associated change in the allosteric control mechanism.

  5. A generalized allosteric mechanism for cis-regulated cyclic nucleotide binding domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandr P Kornev

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic nucleotides (cAMP and cGMP regulate multiple intracellular processes and are thus of a great general interest for molecular and structural biologists. To study the allosteric mechanism of different cyclic nucleotide binding (CNB domains, we compared cAMP-bound and cAMP-free structures (PKA, Epac, and two ionic channels using a new bioinformatics method: local spatial pattern alignment. Our analysis highlights four major conserved structural motifs: 1 the phosphate binding cassette (PBC, which binds the cAMP ribose-phosphate, 2 the "hinge," a flexible helix, which contacts the PBC, 3 the beta(2,3 loop, which provides precise positioning of an invariant arginine from the PBC, and 4 a conserved structural element consisting of an N-terminal helix, an eight residue loop and the A-helix (N3A-motif. The PBC and the hinge were included in the previously reported allosteric model, whereas the definition of the beta(2,3 loop and the N3A-motif as conserved elements is novel. The N3A-motif is found in all cis-regulated CNB domains, and we present a model for an allosteric mechanism in these domains. Catabolite gene activator protein (CAP represents a trans-regulated CNB domain family: it does not contain the N3A-motif, and its long range allosteric interactions are substantially different from the cis-regulated CNB domains.

  6. Characterization of the allosteric binding pocket of human liver fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase by protein crystallography and inhibitor activity studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iversen, L F; Brzozowski, M; Hastrup, S; Hubbard, R; Kastrup, J S; Larsen, I K; Naerum, L; Nørskov-Lauridsen, L; Rasmussen, P B; Thim, L; Wiberg, F C; Lundgren, K

    1997-05-01

    The structures of three complexes of human fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FB) with the allosteric inhibitor AMP and two AMP analogues have been determined and all fully refined. The data used for structure determination were collected at cryogenic temperature (110 K), and with the use of synchrotron radiation. The structures reveal a common mode of binding for AMP and formycine monophosphate (FMP). 5-Amino-4-carboxamido-1 beta-D-5-phosphate-ribofuranosyl-1H-imidazole (AICAR-P) shows an unexpected mode of binding to FB, different from that of the other two ligands. The imidazole ring of AICAR-P is rotated 180 degrees compared to the AMP and FMP bases. This rotation results in a slightly different hydrogen bonding pattern and minor changes in the water structure in the binding pocket. Common features of binding are seen for the ribose and phosphate moieties of all three compounds. Although binding in a different mode, AICAR-P is still capable of making all the important interactions with the residues building the allosteric binding pocket. The IC50 values of AMP, FMP, and AICAR-P were determined to be 1.7, 1.4, and 20.9 microM, respectively. Thus, the approximately 10 times lower potency of AICAR-P is difficult to explain solely from the variations observed in the binding pocket. Only one water molecule in the allosteric binding pocket was found to be conserved in all four subunits in all three structures. This water molecule coordinates to a phosphate oxygen atom and the N7 atom of the AMP molecule, and to similarly situated atoms in the FMP and AICAR-P complexes. This implies an important role of the conserved water molecule in binding of the ligand.

  7. DNA-binding polarity of human replication protein A positions nucleases in nucleotide excision repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Laat, W L; Appeldoorn, E; Sugasawa, K; Weterings, E; Jaspers, N G; Hoeijmakers, J H

    1998-08-15

    The human single-stranded DNA-binding replication A protein (RPA) is involved in various DNA-processing events. By comparing the affinity of hRPA for artificial DNA hairpin structures with 3'- or 5'-protruding single-stranded arms, we found that hRPA binds ssDNA with a defined polarity; a strong ssDNA interaction domain of hRPA is positioned at the 5' side of its binding region, a weak ssDNA-binding domain resides at the 3' side. Polarity appears crucial for positioning of the excision repair nucleases XPG and ERCC1-XPF on the DNA. With the 3'-oriented side of hRPA facing a duplex ssDNA junction, hRPA interacts with and stimulates ERCC1-XPF, whereas the 5'-oriented side of hRPA at a DNA junction allows stable binding of XPG to hRPA. Our data pinpoint hRPA to the undamaged strand during nucleotide excision repair. Polarity of hRPA on ssDNA is likely to contribute to the directionality of other hRPA-dependent processes as well.

  8. Inhibition of the acetyl lysine-binding pocket of bromodomain and extraterminal domain proteins interferes with adipogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goupille, Olivier [CEA, Institute of Emerging Diseases and Innovative Therapies (IMETI), Fontenay-aux-Roses and Université Paris-Saclay, UMR-E 007 (France); Penglong, Tipparat [CEA, Institute of Emerging Diseases and Innovative Therapies (IMETI), Fontenay-aux-Roses and Université Paris-Saclay, UMR-E 007 (France); Thalassemia Research Center, Mahidol University (Thailand); Kadri, Zahra; Granger-Locatelli, Marine [CEA, Institute of Emerging Diseases and Innovative Therapies (IMETI), Fontenay-aux-Roses and Université Paris-Saclay, UMR-E 007 (France); Fucharoen, Suthat [Thalassemia Research Center, Mahidol University (Thailand); Maouche-Chrétien, Leila [CEA, Institute of Emerging Diseases and Innovative Therapies (IMETI), Fontenay-aux-Roses and Université Paris-Saclay, UMR-E 007 (France); INSERM, Paris (France); Prost, Stéphane [CEA, Institute of Emerging Diseases and Innovative Therapies (IMETI), Fontenay-aux-Roses and Université Paris-Saclay, UMR-E 007 (France); Leboulch, Philippe [CEA, Institute of Emerging Diseases and Innovative Therapies (IMETI), Fontenay-aux-Roses and Université Paris-Saclay, UMR-E 007 (France); Thalassemia Research Center, Mahidol University (Thailand); Chrétien, Stany, E-mail: stany.chretien@cea.fr [CEA, Institute of Emerging Diseases and Innovative Therapies (IMETI), Fontenay-aux-Roses and Université Paris-Saclay, UMR-E 007 (France); INSERM, Paris (France)

    2016-04-15

    The bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) domain family proteins are epigenetic modulators involved in the reading of acetylated lysine residues. The first BET protein inhibitor to be identified, (+)-JQ1, a thienotriazolo-1, 4-diazapine, binds selectively to the acetyl lysine-binding pocket of BET proteins. We evaluated the impact on adipogenesis of this druggable targeting of chromatin epigenetic readers, by investigating the physiological consequences of epigenetic modifications through targeting proteins binding to chromatin. JQ1 significantly inhibited the differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes into white and brown adipocytes by down-regulating the expression of genes involved in adipogenesis, particularly those encoding the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR-γ), the CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBPα) and, STAT5A and B. The expression of a constitutively activated STAT5B mutant did not prevent inhibition by JQ1. Thus, the association of BET/STAT5 is required for adipogenesis but STAT5 transcription activity is not the only target of JQ1. Treatment with JQ1 did not lead to the conversion of white adipose tissue into brown adipose tissue (BAT). BET protein inhibition thus interferes with generation of adipose tissue from progenitors, confirming the importance of the connections between epigenetic mechanisms and specific adipogenic transcription factors. - Highlights: • JQ1 prevented the differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes into white adipocytes. • JQ1 affected clonal cell expansion and abolished lipid accumulation. • JQ1 prevented the differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes into brown adipocytes. • JQ1 treatment did not lead to the conversion of white adipose tissue into brown adipose tissue. • JQ1 decreased STAT5 expression, but STAT5B{sup ca} expression did not restore adipogenesis.

  9. Inhibition of the acetyl lysine-binding pocket of bromodomain and extraterminal domain proteins interferes with adipogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goupille, Olivier; Penglong, Tipparat; Kadri, Zahra; Granger-Locatelli, Marine; Fucharoen, Suthat; Maouche-Chrétien, Leila; Prost, Stéphane; Leboulch, Philippe; Chrétien, Stany

    2016-01-01

    The bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) domain family proteins are epigenetic modulators involved in the reading of acetylated lysine residues. The first BET protein inhibitor to be identified, (+)-JQ1, a thienotriazolo-1, 4-diazapine, binds selectively to the acetyl lysine-binding pocket of BET proteins. We evaluated the impact on adipogenesis of this druggable targeting of chromatin epigenetic readers, by investigating the physiological consequences of epigenetic modifications through targeting proteins binding to chromatin. JQ1 significantly inhibited the differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes into white and brown adipocytes by down-regulating the expression of genes involved in adipogenesis, particularly those encoding the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR-γ), the CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBPα) and, STAT5A and B. The expression of a constitutively activated STAT5B mutant did not prevent inhibition by JQ1. Thus, the association of BET/STAT5 is required for adipogenesis but STAT5 transcription activity is not the only target of JQ1. Treatment with JQ1 did not lead to the conversion of white adipose tissue into brown adipose tissue (BAT). BET protein inhibition thus interferes with generation of adipose tissue from progenitors, confirming the importance of the connections between epigenetic mechanisms and specific adipogenic transcription factors. - Highlights: • JQ1 prevented the differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes into white adipocytes. • JQ1 affected clonal cell expansion and abolished lipid accumulation. • JQ1 prevented the differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes into brown adipocytes. • JQ1 treatment did not lead to the conversion of white adipose tissue into brown adipose tissue. • JQ1 decreased STAT5 expression, but STAT5B"c"a expression did not restore adipogenesis.

  10. A conserved NAD+ binding pocket that regulates protein-protein interactions during aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Bonkowski, Michael S; Moniot, Sébastien; Zhang, Dapeng; Hubbard, Basil P; Ling, Alvin J Y; Rajman, Luis A; Qin, Bo; Lou, Zhenkun; Gorbunova, Vera; Aravind, L; Steegborn, Clemens; Sinclair, David A

    2017-03-24

    DNA repair is essential for life, yet its efficiency declines with age for reasons that are unclear. Numerous proteins possess Nudix homology domains (NHDs) that have no known function. We show that NHDs are NAD + (oxidized form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) binding domains that regulate protein-protein interactions. The binding of NAD + to the NHD domain of DBC1 (deleted in breast cancer 1) prevents it from inhibiting PARP1 [poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase], a critical DNA repair protein. As mice age and NAD + concentrations decline, DBC1 is increasingly bound to PARP1, causing DNA damage to accumulate, a process rapidly reversed by restoring the abundance of NAD + Thus, NAD + directly regulates protein-protein interactions, the modulation of which may protect against cancer, radiation, and aging. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  11. Role of the Ectodomain Serine 275 in Shaping the Binding Pocket of the ATP-Gated P2X3 Receptor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Petrenko, N.; Khafizov, K.; Tvrdoňová, Vendula; Skorinkin, A.; Giniatullin, R.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 39 (2011), s. 8427-8436 ISSN 0006-2960 Grant - others:Univerzita Karlova(CZ) 3446/2011 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : P2X3 * purinergic * ATP * ATP-binding pocket * receptor Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.422, year: 2011

  12. An automated system for the analysis of G protein-coupled receptor transmembrane binding pockets: alignment, receptor-based pharmacophores, and their application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratochwil, Nicole A; Malherbe, Pari; Lindemann, Lothar; Ebeling, Martin; Hoener, Marius C; Mühlemann, Andreas; Porter, Richard H P; Stahl, Martin; Gerber, Paul R

    2005-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) share a common architecture consisting of seven transmembrane (TM) domains. Various lines of evidence suggest that this fold provides a generic binding pocket within the TM region for hosting agonists, antagonists, and allosteric modulators. Here, a comprehensive and automated method allowing fast analysis and comparison of these putative binding pockets across the entire GPCR family is presented. The method relies on a robust alignment algorithm based on conservation indices, focusing on pharmacophore-like relationships between amino acids. Analysis of conservation patterns across the GPCR family and alignment to the rhodopsin X-ray structure allows the extraction of the amino acids lining the TM binding pocket in a so-called ligand binding pocket vector (LPV). In a second step, LPVs are translated to simple 3D receptor pharmacophore models, where each amino acid is represented by a single spherical pharmacophore feature and all atomic detail is omitted. Applications of the method include the assessment of selectivity issues, support of mutagenesis studies, and the derivation of rules for focused screening to identify chemical starting points in early drug discovery projects. Because of the coarseness of this 3D receptor pharmacophore model, however, meaningful scoring and ranking procedures of large sets of molecules are not justified. The LPV analysis of the trace amine-associated receptor family and its experimental validation is discussed as an example. The value of the 3D receptor model is demonstrated for a class C GPCR family, the metabotropic glutamate receptors.

  13. Residues remote from the binding pocket control the antagonist selectivity towards the corticotropin-releasing factor receptor-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xianqiang; Cheng, Jianxin; Wang, Xu; Tang, Yun; Ågren, Hans; Tu, Yaoquan

    2015-01-01

    The corticotropin releasing factors receptor-1 and receptor-2 (CRF1R and CRF2R) are therapeutic targets for treating neurological diseases. Antagonists targeting CRF1R have been developed for the potential treatment of anxiety disorders and alcohol addiction. It has been found that antagonists targeting CRF1R always show high selectivity, although CRF1R and CRF2R share a very high rate of sequence identity. This has inspired us to study the origin of the selectivity of the antagonists. We have therefore built a homology model for CRF2R and carried out unbiased molecular dynamics and well-tempered metadynamics simulations for systems with the antagonist CP-376395 in CRF1R or CRF2R to address this issue. We found that the side chain of Tyr6.63 forms a hydrogen bond with the residue remote from the binding pocket, which allows Tyr6.63 to adopt different conformations in the two receptors and results in the presence or absence of a bottleneck controlling the antagonist binding to or dissociation from the receptors. The rotameric switch of the side chain of Tyr3566.63 allows the breaking down of the bottleneck and is a perquisite for the dissociation of CP-376395 from CRF1R.

  14. Interaction between the flagellar pocket collar and the hook complex via a novel microtubule-binding protein in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Albisetti

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma brucei belongs to a group of unicellular, flagellated parasites that are responsible for human African trypanosomiasis. An essential aspect of parasite pathogenicity is cytoskeleton remodelling, which occurs during the life cycle of the parasite and is accompanied by major changes in morphology and organelle positioning. The flagellum originates from the basal bodies and exits the cell body through the flagellar pocket (FP but remains attached to the cell body via the flagellum attachment zone (FAZ. The FP is an invagination of the pellicular membrane and is the sole site for endo- and exocytosis. The FAZ is a large complex of cytoskeletal proteins, plus an intracellular set of four specialised microtubules (MtQ that elongate from the basal bodies to the anterior end of the cell. At the distal end of the FP, an essential, intracellular, cytoskeletal structure called the flagellar pocket collar (FPC circumvents the flagellum. Overlapping the FPC is the hook complex (HC (a sub-structure of the previously named bilobe that is also essential and is thought to be involved in protein FP entry. BILBO1 is the only functionally characterised FPC protein and is necessary for FPC and FP biogenesis. Here, we used a combination of in vitro and in vivo approaches to identify and characterize a new BILBO1 partner protein-FPC4. We demonstrate that FPC4 localises to the FPC, the HC, and possibly to a proximal portion of the MtQ. We found that the C-terminal domain of FPC4 interacts with the BILBO1 N-terminal domain, and we identified the key amino acids required for this interaction. Interestingly, the FPC4 N-terminal domain was found to bind microtubules. Over-expression studies highlight the role of FPC4 in its association with the FPC, HC and FPC segregation. Our data suggest a tripartite association between the FPC, the HC and the MtQ.

  15. A Novel Protein Interaction between Nucleotide Binding Domain of Hsp70 and p53 Motif

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asita Elengoe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, protein interaction of Homo sapiens nucleotide binding domain (NBD of heat shock 70 kDa protein (PDB: 1HJO with p53 motif remains to be elucidated. The NBD-p53 motif complex enhances the p53 stabilization, thereby increasing the tumor suppression activity in cancer treatment. Therefore, we identified the interaction between NBD and p53 using STRING version 9.1 program. Then, we modeled the three-dimensional structure of p53 motif through homology modeling and determined the binding affinity and stability of NBD-p53 motif complex structure via molecular docking and dynamics (MD simulation. Human DNA binding domain of p53 motif (SCMGGMNR retrieved from UniProt (UniProtKB: P04637 was docked with the NBD protein, using the Autodock version 4.2 program. The binding energy and intermolecular energy for the NBD-p53 motif complex were −0.44 Kcal/mol and −9.90 Kcal/mol, respectively. Moreover, RMSD, RMSF, hydrogen bonds, salt bridge, and secondary structure analyses revealed that the NBD protein had a strong bond with p53 motif and the protein-ligand complex was stable. Thus, the current data would be highly encouraging for designing Hsp70 structure based drug in cancer therapy.

  16. Site-specific fab fragment biotinylation at the conserved nucleotide binding site for enhanced Ebola detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafaoglu, Nur; Alves, Nathan J; Bilgicer, Basar

    2015-07-01

    The nucleotide binding site (NBS) is a highly conserved region between the variable light and heavy chains at the Fab domains of all antibodies, and a small molecule that we identified, indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), binds specifically to this site. Fab fragment, with its small size and simple production methods compared to intact antibody, is good candidate for use in miniaturized diagnostic devices and targeted therapeutic applications. However, commonly used modification techniques are not well suited for Fab fragments as they are often more delicate than intact antibodies. Fab fragments are of particular interest for sensor surface functionalization but immobilization results in damage to the antigen binding site and greatly reduced activity due to their truncated size that allows only a small area that can bind to surfaces without impeding antigen binding. In this study, we describe an NBS-UV photocrosslinking functionalization method (UV-NBS(Biotin) in which a Fab fragment is site-specifically biotinylated with an IBA-EG11-Biotin linker via UV energy exposure (1 J/cm(2)) without affecting its antigen binding activity. This study demonstrates successful immobilization of biotinylated Ebola detecting Fab fragment (KZ52 Fab fragment) via the UV-NBS(Biotin) method yielding 1031-fold and 2-fold better antigen detection sensitivity compared to commonly used immobilization methods: direct physical adsorption and NHS-Biotin functionalization, respectively. Utilization of the UV-NBS(Biotin) method for site-specific conjugation to Fab fragment represents a proof of concept use of Fab fragment for various diagnostic and therapeutic applications with numerous fluorescent probes, affinity molecules and peptides. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Identification of Critical Residues for the Tight Binding of Both Correct and Incorrect Nucleotides to Human DNA Polymerase λ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jessica A.; Pack, Lindsey R.; Sherrer, Shanen M.; Kshetry, Ajay K.; Newmister, Sean A.; Fowler, Jason D.; Taylor, John-Stephen; Suo, Zucai

    2010-01-01

    DNA polymerase λ (Pol λ) is a novel X-family DNA polymerase that shares 34% sequence identity with DNA polymerase β (Pol β). Pre-steady state kinetic studies have shown that the Pol λ•DNA complex binds both correct and incorrect nucleotides 130-fold tighter on average than the Pol β•DNA complex, although, the base substitution fidelity of both polymerases is 10−4 to 10−5. To better understand Pol λ’s tight nucleotide binding affinity, we created single- and double-substitution mutants of Pol λ to disrupt interactions between active site residues and an incoming nucleotide or a template base. Single-turnover kinetic assays showed that Pol λ binds to an incoming nucleotide via cooperative interactions with active site residues (R386, R420, K422, Y505, F506, A510, and R514). Disrupting protein interactions with an incoming correct or incorrect nucleotide impacted binding with each of the common structural moieties in the following order: triphosphate ≫ base > ribose. In addition, the loss of Watson-Crick hydrogen bonding between the nucleotide and template base led to a moderate increase in the Kd. The fidelity of Pol λ was maintained predominantly by a single residue, R517, which has minor groove interactions with the DNA template. PMID:20851705

  18. Targeting of nucleotide-binding proteins by HAMLET--a conserved tumor cell death mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, J C S; Nadeem, A; Rydström, A; Puthia, M; Svanborg, C

    2016-02-18

    HAMLET (Human Alpha-lactalbumin Made LEthal to Tumor cells) kills tumor cells broadly suggesting that conserved survival pathways are perturbed. We now identify nucleotide-binding proteins as HAMLET binding partners, accounting for about 35% of all HAMLET targets in a protein microarray comprising 8000 human proteins. Target kinases were present in all branches of the Kinome tree, including 26 tyrosine kinases, 10 tyrosine kinase-like kinases, 13 homologs of yeast sterile kinases, 4 casein kinase 1 kinases, 15 containing PKA, PKG, PKC family kinases, 15 calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinases and 13 kinases from CDK, MAPK, GSK3, CLK families. HAMLET acted as a broad kinase inhibitor in vitro, as defined in a screen of 347 wild-type, 93 mutant, 19 atypical and 17 lipid kinases. Inhibition of phosphorylation was also detected in extracts from HAMLET-treated lung carcinoma cells. In addition, HAMLET recognized 24 Ras family proteins and bound to Ras, RasL11B and Rap1B on the cytoplasmic face of the plasma membrane. Direct cellular interactions between HAMLET and activated Ras family members including Braf were confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation. As a consequence, oncogenic Ras and Braf activity was inhibited and HAMLET and Braf inhibitors synergistically increased tumor cell death in response to HAMLET. Unlike most small molecule kinase inhibitors, HAMLET showed selectivity for tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. The results identify nucleotide-binding proteins as HAMLET targets and suggest that dysregulation of the ATPase/kinase/GTPase machinery contributes to cell death, following the initial, selective recognition of HAMLET by tumor cells. The findings thus provide a molecular basis for the conserved tumoricidal effect of HAMLET, through dysregulation of kinases and oncogenic GTPases, to which tumor cells are addicted.

  19. Structural Basis for Nucleotide Binding and Reaction Catalysis in Mevalonate Diphosphate Decarboxylase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barta, Michael L.; McWhorter, William J.; Miziorko, Henry M.; Geisbrecht, Brian V. (UMKC)

    2012-09-17

    Mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase (MDD) catalyzes the final step of the mevalonate pathway, the Mg{sup 2+}-ATP dependent decarboxylation of mevalonate 5-diphosphate (MVAPP), producing isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP). Synthesis of IPP, an isoprenoid precursor molecule that is a critical intermediate in peptidoglycan and polyisoprenoid biosynthesis, is essential in Gram-positive bacteria (e.g., Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, and Enterococcus spp.), and thus the enzymes of the mevalonate pathway are ideal antimicrobial targets. MDD belongs to the GHMP superfamily of metabolite kinases that have been extensively studied for the past 50 years, yet the crystallization of GHMP kinase ternary complexes has proven to be difficult. To further our understanding of the catalytic mechanism of GHMP kinases with the purpose of developing broad spectrum antimicrobial agents that target the substrate and nucleotide binding sites, we report the crystal structures of wild-type and mutant (S192A and D283A) ternary complexes of Staphylococcus epidermidis MDD. Comparison of apo, MVAPP-bound, and ternary complex wild-type MDD provides structural information about the mode of substrate binding and the catalytic mechanism. Structural characterization of ternary complexes of catalytically deficient MDD S192A and D283A (k{sub cat} decreased 10{sup 3}- and 10{sup 5}-fold, respectively) provides insight into MDD function. The carboxylate side chain of invariant Asp{sup 283} functions as a catalytic base and is essential for the proper orientation of the MVAPP C3-hydroxyl group within the active site funnel. Several MDD amino acids within the conserved phosphate binding loop ('P-loop') provide key interactions, stabilizing the nucleotide triphosphoryl moiety. The crystal structures presented here provide a useful foundation for structure-based drug design.

  20. Importance of Residues Outside the Cation Binding Pocket for Na+ and K+ Binding to the Na+/K+-ATPase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Line; Toustrup-Jensen, Mads Schak; Einholm, Anja P.

    Mutagenesis studies have identified several oxygen-containing residues in the transmembrane region which are important for the coordination of Na+ and/or K+. These were later confirmed by the high-resolution crystal structures of the Na+/K+-ATPase with bound Na+ or K+. However, more information...... aromatic ring, while Arg882 and Asp886 were mutated to leucine and alanine, respectively, to investigate the importance of charge and size of the residues. All three mutants could sustain growth and proliferation under ouabain pressure. However, the mutants exhibited a reduced turnover number. All three...... mutants displayed an increased apparent K+ affinity at the external binding sites in measurements of ATPase activity: for Phe318Trp, Arg882Leu, and Asp886Ala 2.2-, 5.1-, and 1.8-fold increases compared to the wild type, respectively. Similarly the three mutants exhibited 10-, 6.4-, and 4.1-fold decreases...

  1. Immunization with influenza virus hemagglutinin globular region containing the receptor-binding pocket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Sung Ho; Arnon, Ruth

    2002-01-01

    The globular region of hemagglutinin (residues 91-261) membrane glycoprotein of influenza virus that encompasses the binding zone to the oligosaccharide receptor of target cells has been cloned by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). This protein segment (denoted HA91-261 peptide) induced significant immune response in mice. The serum antibodies and lung homogenates from the immunized mice cross-reacted with native virus particles. The cellular immunity was manifested by proliferative splenocyte responses and cytokine release indicating T helper type 1 activity. The plasmid DNA containing this segment (denoted pHA91-261) provoked, in addition, a significant cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response, whereas the HA91-261 protein fragment led to no such response. Both the DNA and the protein fragment of HA91-261 induced significant protection against viral challenge, although the immune response they induce might be along different pathways. Interestingly, the combined DNA priming-protein boosting immunization regimen did not induce protection against viral challenges even though it led to significant humoral immune responses similar to that induced by the peptide vaccine.

  2. Guanine nucleotide-binding protein regulation of melatonin receptors in lizard brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivkees, S.A.; Carlson, L.L.; Reppert, S.M.

    1989-01-01

    Melatonin receptors were identified and characterized in crude membrane preparations from lizard brain by using 125 I-labeled melatonin ( 125 I-Mel), a potent melatonin agonist. 125 I-Mel binding sites were saturable; Scatchard analysis revealed high-affinity and lower affinity binding sites, with apparent K d of 2.3 ± 1.0 x 10 -11 M and 2.06 ± 0.43 x 10 -10 M, respectively. Binding was reversible and inhibited by melatonin and closely related analogs but not by serotonin or norepinephrine. Treatment of crude membranes with the nonhydrolyzable GTP analog guanosine 5'-[γ-thio]triphosphate (GTP[γS]), significantly reduced the number of high-affinity receptors and increased the dissociation rate of 125 I-Mel from its receptor. Furthermore, GTP[γS] treatment of ligand-receptor complexes solubilized by Triton X-100 also led to a rapid dissociation of 125 I-Mel from solubilized ligand-receptor complexes. Gel filtration chromatography of solubilized ligand-receptor complexes revealed two major peaks of radioactivity corresponding to M r > 400,000 and M r ca. 110,000. This elution profile was markedly altered by pretreatment with GTP[γS] before solubilization; only the M r 110,000 peak was present in GTP[γS]-pretreated membranes. The results strongly suggest that 125 I-mel binding sites in lizard brain are melatonin receptors, with agonist-promoted guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein) coupling and that the apparent molecular size of receptors uncoupled from G proteins is about 110,000

  3. pocketZebra: a web-server for automated selection and classification of subfamily-specific binding sites by bioinformatic analysis of diverse protein families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suplatov, Dmitry; Kirilin, Eugeny; Arbatsky, Mikhail; Takhaveev, Vakil; Svedas, Vytas

    2014-07-01

    The new web-server pocketZebra implements the power of bioinformatics and geometry-based structural approaches to identify and rank subfamily-specific binding sites in proteins by functional significance, and select particular positions in the structure that determine selective accommodation of ligands. A new scoring function has been developed to annotate binding sites by the presence of the subfamily-specific positions in diverse protein families. pocketZebra web-server has multiple input modes to meet the needs of users with different experience in bioinformatics. The server provides on-site visualization of the results as well as off-line version of the output in annotated text format and as PyMol sessions ready for structural analysis. pocketZebra can be used to study structure-function relationship and regulation in large protein superfamilies, classify functionally important binding sites and annotate proteins with unknown function. The server can be used to engineer ligand-binding sites and allosteric regulation of enzymes, or implemented in a drug discovery process to search for potential molecular targets and novel selective inhibitors/effectors. The server, documentation and examples are freely available at http://biokinet.belozersky.msu.ru/pocketzebra and there are no login requirements. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  4. The thermodynamic signature of ligand binding to histone deacetylase-like amidohydrolases is most sensitive to the flexibility in the L2-loop lining the active site pocket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyners, Christian; Krämer, Andreas; Yildiz, Özkan; Meyer-Almes, Franz-Josef

    2017-07-01

    The analysis of the thermodynamic driving forces of ligand-protein binding has been suggested to be a key component for the selection and optimization of active compounds into drug candidates. The binding enthalpy as deduced from isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is usually interpreted assuming single-step binding of a ligand to one conformation of the target protein. Although successful in many cases, these assumptions are oversimplified approximations of the reality with flexible proteins and complicated binding mechanism in many if not most cases. The relationship between protein flexibility and thermodynamic signature of ligand binding is largely understudied. Directed mutagenesis, X-ray crystallography, enzyme kinetics and ITC methods were combined to dissect the influence of loop flexibility on the thermodynamics and mechanism of ligand binding to histone deacetylase (HDAC)-like amidohydrolases. The general ligand-protein binding mechanism comprises an energetically demanding gate opening step followed by physical binding. Increased flexibility of the L2-loop in HDAC-like amidohydrolases facilitates access of ligands to the binding pocket resulting in predominantly enthalpy-driven complex formation. The study provides evidence for the great importance of flexibility adjacent to the active site channel for the mechanism and observed thermodynamic driving forces of molecular recognition in HDAC like enzymes. The flexibility or malleability in regions adjacent to binding pockets should be given more attention when designing better drug candidates. The presented case study also suggests that the observed binding enthalpy of protein-ligand systems should be interpreted with caution, since more complicated binding mechanisms may obscure the significance regarding potential drug likeness. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Guanine nucleotide binding protein-like 3 is a potential prognosis indicator of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Dong, Shuang; Hu, Jiangfeng; Duan, Bensong; Yao, Jian; Zhang, Ruiyun; Zhou, Hongmei; Sheng, Haihui; Gao, Hengjun; Li, Shunlong; Zhang, Xianwen

    2015-01-01

    Guanine nucleotide binding protein-like 3 (GNL3) is a GIP-binding nuclear protein that has been reported to be involved in various biological processes, including cell proliferation, cellular senescence and tumorigenesis. This study aimed to investigate the expression level of GNL3 in gastric cancer and to evaluate the relationship between its expression and clinical variables and overall survival of gastric cancer patients. The expression level of GNL3 was examined in 89 human gastric cancer samples using immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining. GNL3 in gastric cancer tissues was significantly upregulated compared with paracancerous tissues. GNL3 expression in adjacent non-cancerous tissues was associated with sex and tumor size. Survival analyses showed that GNL3 expression in both gastric cancer and adjacent non-cancerous tissues were not related to overall survival. However, in the subgroup of patients with larger tumor size (≥ 6 cm), a close association was found between GNL3 expression in gastric cancer tissues and overall survival. GNL3-positive patients had a shorter survival than GNL3-negative patients. Our study suggests that GNL3 might play an important role in the progression of gastric cancer and serve as a biomarker for poor prognosis in gastric cancer patients.

  6. Switch control pocket inhibitors of p38-MAP kinase. Durable type II inhibitors that do not require binding into the canonical ATP hinge region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Yu Mi; Clare, Michael; Ensinger, Carol L; Hood, Molly M; Lord, John W; Lu, Wei-Ping; Miller, David F; Patt, William C; Smith, Bryan D; Vogeti, Lakshminarayana; Kaufman, Michael D; Petillo, Peter A; Wise, Scott C; Abendroth, Jan; Chun, Lawrence; Clark, Robin; Feese, Michael; Kim, Hidong; Stewart, Lance; Flynn, Daniel L

    2010-10-01

    Switch control pocket inhibitors of p38-alpha kinase are described. Durable type II inhibitors were designed which bind to arginines (Arg67 or Arg70) that function as key residues for mediating phospho-threonine 180 dependant conformational fluxing of p38-alpha from an inactive type II state to an active type I state. Binding to Arg70 in particular led to potent inhibitors, exemplified by DP-802, which also exhibited high kinase selectivity. Binding to Arg70 obviated the requirement for binding into the ATP Hinge region. X-ray crystallography revealed that DP-802 and analogs induce an enhanced type II conformation upon binding to either the unphosphorylated or the doubly phosphorylated form of p38-alpha kinase. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Structural and functional studies of conserved nucleotide-binding protein LptB in lipopolysaccharide transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhongshan [Biomedical Research Centre, Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia, Norwich Research Park, NR4 7TJ (United Kingdom); College of Life Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Biomedical Sciences Research Complex, School of Chemistry, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews KY16 9ST (United Kingdom); Xiang, Quanju [College of Life Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Biomedical Sciences Research Complex, School of Chemistry, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews KY16 9ST (United Kingdom); Department of Microbiology, College of Resource and Environment Science, Sichuan Agriculture University, Yaan 625000 (China); Zhu, Xiaofeng [College of Life Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Dong, Haohao [Biomedical Sciences Research Complex, School of Chemistry, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews KY16 9ST (United Kingdom); He, Chuan [School of Electronics and Information, Wuhan Technical College of Communications, No. 6 Huangjiahu West Road, Hongshan District, Wuhan, Hubei 430065 (China); Wang, Haiyan; Zhang, Yizheng [College of Life Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Wang, Wenjian, E-mail: Wenjian166@gmail.com [Laboratory of Department of Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, 58 Zhongshan Road II, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510080 (China); Dong, Changjiang, E-mail: C.Dong@uea.ac.uk [Biomedical Research Centre, Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia, Norwich Research Park, NR4 7TJ (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • Determination of the structure of the wild-type LptB in complex with ATP and Mg{sup 2+}. • Demonstrated that ATP binding residues are essential for LptB’s ATPase activity and LPS transport. • Dimerization is required for the LptB’s function and LPS transport. • Revealed relationship between activity of the LptB and the vitality of E. coli cells. - Abstract: Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is the main component of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, which plays an essential role in protecting the bacteria from harsh conditions and antibiotics. LPS molecules are transported from the inner membrane to the outer membrane by seven LPS transport proteins. LptB is vital in hydrolyzing ATP to provide energy for LPS transport, however this mechanism is not very clear. Here we report wild-type LptB crystal structure in complex with ATP and Mg{sup 2+}, which reveals that its structure is conserved with other nucleotide-binding proteins (NBD). Structural, functional and electron microscopic studies demonstrated that the ATP binding residues, including K42 and T43, are crucial for LptB’s ATPase activity, LPS transport and the vitality of Escherichia coli cells with the exceptions of H195A and Q85A; the H195A mutation does not lower its ATPase activity but impairs LPS transport, and Q85A does not alter ATPase activity but causes cell death. Our data also suggest that two protomers of LptB have to work together for ATP hydrolysis and LPS transport. These results have significant impacts in understanding the LPS transport mechanism and developing new antibiotics.

  8. Structural and functional studies of conserved nucleotide-binding protein LptB in lipopolysaccharide transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zhongshan; Xiang, Quanju; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Dong, Haohao; He, Chuan; Wang, Haiyan; Zhang, Yizheng; Wang, Wenjian; Dong, Changjiang

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Determination of the structure of the wild-type LptB in complex with ATP and Mg 2+ . • Demonstrated that ATP binding residues are essential for LptB’s ATPase activity and LPS transport. • Dimerization is required for the LptB’s function and LPS transport. • Revealed relationship between activity of the LptB and the vitality of E. coli cells. - Abstract: Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is the main component of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, which plays an essential role in protecting the bacteria from harsh conditions and antibiotics. LPS molecules are transported from the inner membrane to the outer membrane by seven LPS transport proteins. LptB is vital in hydrolyzing ATP to provide energy for LPS transport, however this mechanism is not very clear. Here we report wild-type LptB crystal structure in complex with ATP and Mg 2+ , which reveals that its structure is conserved with other nucleotide-binding proteins (NBD). Structural, functional and electron microscopic studies demonstrated that the ATP binding residues, including K42 and T43, are crucial for LptB’s ATPase activity, LPS transport and the vitality of Escherichia coli cells with the exceptions of H195A and Q85A; the H195A mutation does not lower its ATPase activity but impairs LPS transport, and Q85A does not alter ATPase activity but causes cell death. Our data also suggest that two protomers of LptB have to work together for ATP hydrolysis and LPS transport. These results have significant impacts in understanding the LPS transport mechanism and developing new antibiotics

  9. FRET-based binding assay between a fluorescent cAMP analogue and a cyclic nucleotide-binding domain tagged with a CFP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Francisco; Santana-Calvo, Carmen; Sánchez-Guevara, Yoloxochitl; Nishigaki, Takuya

    2017-09-01

    The cyclic nucleotide-binding domain (CNBD) functions as a regulatory domain of many proteins involved in cyclic nucleotide signalling. We developed a straightforward and reliable binding assay based on intermolecular fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between an adenosine-3', 5'-cyclic monophosphate analogue labelled with fluorescein and a recombinant CNBD of human EPAC1 tagged with a cyan fluorescence protein (CFP). The high FRET efficiency of this method (~ 80%) allowed us to perform several types of binding experiments with nanomolar range of sample using conventional equipment. In addition, the CFP tag on the CNBD enabled us to perform a specific binding experiment using an unpurified protein. Considering these advantages, this technique is useful to study poorly characterized CNBDs. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  10. Interaction between nucleotide binding sites on chloroplast coupling factor 1 during ATP hydrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leckband, D.; Hammes, G.G.

    1987-04-21

    The initial hydrolysis of radioactively-labelled CaATP by chloroplast coupling factor 1 was studied with the quenched-flow method. The time course of hydrolysis can be described as a first-order conversion of the enzyme to an active form followed by steady-state formation of product. The rate constant for the first-order process is independent of substrate concentration but increased hyperbolically to a limiting value of 0.43 s/sup -1/ with increasing concentrations of free Ca/sup 2 +/. A mechanism involving a Ca/sup 2 +/-triggered conversion to an active form of the enzyme is consistent with the data. The steady-state rate varied sigmoidally with the CaATP concentration. Initial exchange of tightly bound ADP is complex: approx. 50% of the bound nucleotide is lost within 30 s, with complete exchange requiring several minutes. The first-order rate constant characterizing the rapid phase of the reaction increases hyperbolically to a limiting value of 0.26 s/sup -1/ as the concentration of CaATP is increased, indicating that the binding of CaATP to the enzyme promotes the exchange process. Modification of the quenched-flow apparatus permitted measurement of the rate of nucleotide exchange during steady-state catalysis. The value of the first-order rate constant characterizing this process is similar to the catalytic rate constant determined under identical conditions. When MgATP is tightly bound to the enzyme, none of the kinetic properties of the enzyme described above were significantly changes. The results obtained suggest a mechanism in which two sites on the enzyme participate in catalysis. Several possible mechanisms consistent with the data are discussed.

  11. Structural determination of functional units of the nucleotide binding domain (NBD94 of the reticulocyte binding protein Py235 of Plasmodium yoelii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ardina Grüber

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Invasion of the red blood cells (RBC by the merozoite of malaria parasites involves a large number of receptor ligand interactions. The reticulocyte binding protein homologue family (RH plays an important role in erythrocyte recognition as well as virulence. Recently, it has been shown that members of RH in addition to receptor binding may also have a role as ATP/ADP sensor. A 94 kDa region named Nucleotide-Binding Domain 94 (NBD94 of Plasmodium yoelii YM, representative of the putative nucleotide binding region of RH, has been demonstrated to bind ATP and ADP selectively. Binding of ATP or ADP induced nucleotide-dependent structural changes in the C-terminal hinge-region of NBD94, and directly impacted on the RBC binding ability of RH.In order to find the smallest structural unit, able to bind nucleotides, and its coupling module, the hinge region, three truncated domains of NBD94 have been generated, termed NBD94(444-547, NBD94(566-663 and NBD94(674-793, respectively. Using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy NBD94(444-547 has been identified to form the smallest nucleotide binding segment, sensitive for ATP and ADP, which became inhibited by 4-Chloro-7-nitrobenzofurazan. The shape of NBD94(444-547 in solution was calculated from small-angle X-ray scattering data, revealing an elongated molecule, comprised of two globular domains, connected by a spiral segment of about 73.1 A in length. The high quality of the constructs, forming the hinge-region, NBD94(566-663 and NBD94(674-793 enabled to determine the first crystallographic and solution structure, respectively. The crystal structure of NBD94(566-663 consists of two helices with 97.8 A and 48.6 A in length, linked by a loop. By comparison, the low resolution structure of NBD94(674-793 in solution represents a chair-like shape with three architectural segments.These structures give the first insight into how nucleotide binding impacts on the overall structure of RH and demonstrates the

  12. Supramolecular Properties of Triazole-containing Two Armed Peptidomimetics: From Organogelators to Nucleotide-binding Tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chui, Tin Ki

    obtain a clearer picture on the mode of association of these two series of branched peptidomimetics, the length of the tripeptidomimetic arms was truncated to a dipeptide, and the amino acid, valine, was used for further studies. Both the two new candidates, 88-K-V2 and 89-B-V2, were shown to dimerize in chloroform as shown from vapor pressure osmometry (VPO) studies. 1H NMR titration experiments indicated a better dimerization strength for the latter candidate due to the intermolecular pi-pi interactions offered by its benzene ring in addition to the intermolecular hydrogen bonding by the amides and triazole units. H/D exchange and 2D NMR experiments, and molecular modeling revealed that 88-K-V2 dimerized through the formation of antiparallel beta-strands whereas formation of parallel beta-strands took place in 89-B-V2. Compound 88-K-V2 was found to form 1:1 complexes with chloride (Ka 640 M-1) and monobasic diethyl phosphate (DEP) ion (Ka 810 M-1) in chloroform. Interestingly, 89-B-V 2 was shown to form the usual 1:1 complex with the former ion (Ka 970 M-1) while forming an unexpected 2:1 complex with the latter with positive cooperativity. It was observed that both the amides and triazole protons were involved in anion-binding. In the 88-K-V2-DEP complex, the host formed a helix-like structure that wrapped around the anion located at the center of the complex as determined by 2D NMR and molecular modeling studies. Finally, further structural modification of 88-K-V2 gave a water-soluble nucleotide-binding tweezer 93-K-R2·4TFA . This tweezer consisted of four arginines (R), two triazole units, two pyrene probes and a small hydrophilic ethanolamine tail. Fluorescence study showed that this tweezer was able to form 1:1 complexes with different nucleotides in water with similar binding strength regardless of the number of phosphate groups present in the nucleotides. Moleular modeling suggested that such a charge-independent binding behavior was due to the similar number

  13. The Fifth Transmembrane Domain of Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Participates in the Formation of the Ligand-binding Pocket and Undergoes a Counterclockwise Rotation upon Receptor Activation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domazet, Ivana; Martin, Stéphane S.; Holleran, Brian J.; Morin, Marie-Ève; Lacasse, Patrick; Lavigne, Pierre; Escher, Emanuel; Leduc, Richard; Guillemette, Gaétan

    2009-01-01

    The octapeptide hormone angiotensin II exerts a wide variety of cardiovascular effects through the activation of the angiotensin II Type 1 (AT1) receptor, which belongs to the G protein-coupled receptor superfamily. Like other G protein- coupled receptors, the AT1 receptor possesses seven transmembrane domains that provide structural support for the formation of the ligand-binding pocket. The role of the fifth transmembrane domain (TMD5) was investigated using the substituted cysteine accessibility method. All of the residues within Thr-190 to Leu-217 region were mutated one at a time to cysteine, and after expression in COS-7 cells, the mutant receptors were treated with the sulfhydryl-specific alkylating agent methanethiosulfonate-ethylammonium (MTSEA). MTSEA reacts selectively with water-accessible, free sulfhydryl groups of endogenous or introduced point mutation cysteines. If a cysteine is found in the binding pocket, the covalent modification will affect the binding kinetics of the ligand. MTSEA substantially decreased the binding affinity of L197C-AT1, N200C-AT1, I201C-AT1, G203C-AT1, and F204C-AT1 mutant receptors, which suggests that these residues orient themselves within the water-accessible binding pocket of the AT1 receptor. Interestingly, this pattern of acquired MTSEA sensitivity was altered for TMD5 reporter cysteines engineered in a constitutively active N111G-AT1 receptor background. Indeed, mutant I201C-N111G-AT1 became more sensitive to MTSEA, whereas mutant G203C-N111G-AT1 lost some sensitivity. Our results suggest that constitutive activation of AT1 receptor causes an apparent counterclockwise rotation of TMD5 as viewed from the extracellular side. PMID:19773549

  14. The fifth transmembrane domain of angiotensin II Type 1 receptor participates in the formation of the ligand-binding pocket and undergoes a counterclockwise rotation upon receptor activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domazet, Ivana; Martin, Stéphane S; Holleran, Brian J; Morin, Marie-Eve; Lacasse, Patrick; Lavigne, Pierre; Escher, Emanuel; Leduc, Richard; Guillemette, Gaétan

    2009-11-13

    The octapeptide hormone angiotensin II exerts a wide variety of cardiovascular effects through the activation of the angiotensin II Type 1 (AT(1)) receptor, which belongs to the G protein-coupled receptor superfamily. Like other G protein- coupled receptors, the AT(1) receptor possesses seven transmembrane domains that provide structural support for the formation of the ligand-binding pocket. The role of the fifth transmembrane domain (TMD5) was investigated using the substituted cysteine accessibility method. All of the residues within Thr-190 to Leu-217 region were mutated one at a time to cysteine, and after expression in COS-7 cells, the mutant receptors were treated with the sulfhydryl-specific alkylating agent methanethiosulfonate-ethylammonium (MTSEA). MTSEA reacts selectively with water-accessible, free sulfhydryl groups of endogenous or introduced point mutation cysteines. If a cysteine is found in the binding pocket, the covalent modification will affect the binding kinetics of the ligand. MTSEA substantially decreased the binding affinity of L197C-AT(1), N200C-AT(1), I201C-AT(1), G203C-AT(1), and F204C-AT(1) mutant receptors, which suggests that these residues orient themselves within the water-accessible binding pocket of the AT(1) receptor. Interestingly, this pattern of acquired MTSEA sensitivity was altered for TMD5 reporter cysteines engineered in a constitutively active N111G-AT(1) receptor background. Indeed, mutant I201C-N111G-AT(1) became more sensitive to MTSEA, whereas mutant G203C-N111G-AT(1) lost some sensitivity. Our results suggest that constitutive activation of AT(1) receptor causes an apparent counterclockwise rotation of TMD5 as viewed from the extracellular side.

  15. Transduction proteins of olfactory receptor cells: identification of guanine nucleotide binding proteins and protein kinase C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anholt, R.R.H.; Mumby, S.M.; Stoffers, D.A.; Girard, P.R.; Kuo, J.F.; Snyder, S.H.

    1987-01-01

    The authors have analyzed guanine nucleotide binding proteins (G-proteins) in the olfactory epithelium of Rana catesbeiana using subunit-specific antisera. The olfactory epithelium contained the α subunits of three G-proteins, migrating on polyacrylamide gels in SDS with apparent molecular weights of 45,000, 42,000, and 40,000, corresponding to G/sub s/, G/sub i/, and G/sub o/, respectively. A single β subunit with an apparent molecular weight of 36,000 was detected. An antiserum against the α subunit of retinal transducin failed to detect immunoreactive proteins in olfactory cilia detached from the epithelium. The olfactory cilia appeared to be enriched in immunoreactive G/sub sα/ relative to G/sub ichemical bond/ and G/sub ochemical bond/ when compared to membranes prepared from the olfactory epithelium after detachment of the cilia. Bound antibody was detected by autoradiography after incubation with [ 125 I]protein. Immunohistochemical studies using an antiserum against the β subunit of G-proteins revealed intense staining of the ciliary surface of the olfactory epithelium and of the axon bundles in the lamina propria. In contrast, an antiserum against a common sequence of the α subunits preferentially stained the cell membranes of the olfactory receptor cells and the acinar cells of Bowman's glands and the deep submucosal glands. In addition to G-proteins, they have identified protein kinase C in olfactory cilia via a protein kinase C specific antiserum and via phorbol ester binding. However, in contrast to the G-proteins, protein kinase C occurred also in cilia isolated from respiratory epithelium

  16. Genome Wide Analysis of Nucleotide-Binding Site Disease Resistance Genes in Brachypodium distachyon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenglong Tan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nucleotide-binding site (NBS disease resistance genes play an important role in defending plants from a variety of pathogens and insect pests. Many R-genes have been identified in various plant species. However, little is known about the NBS-encoding genes in Brachypodium distachyon. In this study, using computational analysis of the B. distachyon genome, we identified 126 regular NBS-encoding genes and characterized them on the bases of structural diversity, conserved protein motifs, chromosomal locations, gene duplications, promoter region, and phylogenetic relationships. EST hits and full-length cDNA sequences (from Brachypodium database of 126 R-like candidates supported their existence. Based on the occurrence of conserved protein motifs such as coiled-coil (CC, NBS, leucine-rich repeat (LRR, these regular NBS-LRR genes were classified into four subgroups: CC-NBS-LRR, NBS-LRR, CC-NBS, and X-NBS. Further expression analysis of the regular NBS-encoding genes in Brachypodium database revealed that these genes are expressed in a wide range of libraries, including those constructed from various developmental stages, tissue types, and drought challenged or nonchallenged tissue.

  17. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of duck nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 1 (NOD1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huilin; Jin, Hui; Li, Yaqian; Liu, Dejian; Foda, Mohamed Frahat; Jiang, Yunbo; Luo, Rui

    2017-09-01

    Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 1 (NOD1) is an imperative cytoplasmic pattern recognition receptor (PRR) and considered as a key member of the NOD-like receptor (NLR) family which plays a critical role in innate immunity through sensing microbial components derived from bacterial peptidoglycan. In the current study, the full-length of duck NOD1 (duNOD1) cDNA from duck embryo fibroblasts (DEFs) was cloned. Multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that duNOD1 exhibited a strong evolutionary relationship with chicken and rock pigeon NOD1. Tissue-specific expression analysis showed that duNOD1 was widely distributed in various organs, with the highest expression observed in the liver. Furthermore, duNOD1 overexpression induced NF-κB activation in DEFs and the CARD domain is crucial for duNOD1-mediated NF-κB activation. In addition, silencing the duNOD1 decreased the activity of NF-κB in DEFs stimulated by iE-DAP. Overexpression of duNOD1 significantly increased the expression of TNF-α, IL-6, and RANTES in DEFs. These findings highlight the crucial role of duNOD1 as an intracellular sensor in duck innate immune system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The selective phosphorylation of a guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, K.E.

    1989-01-01

    Receptor-activated signal transduction pathways regulate the responsiveness of cells to external stimuli. These transduction pathways themselves are subject to regulation, most commonly by phosphorylation. Guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (G Proteins), as requisite signal transducing elements for many plasma membrane receptors, are considered likely targets for regulation by phosphorylation. Protein kinase C (PKC) has been shown to phosphorylate the α subunit of G i and other G proteins in solution. However, the occurrence of the phosphorylation of G 1 within intact cells in response to activation of PKC has not been rigorously demonstrated. In this thesis, the extent to which the α subunits of G i undergo phosphorylation within human platelets in response to activation of PKC was examined by means of radiolabeling and immunoprecipitation. Incubation of platelets with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA), a potent activator of PKC, promoted the phosphorylation of several proteins within saponin-permeabilized and intact platelets incubated with [γ 32 P]ATP and [ 32 P]H 3 PO 4 , respectively. None of the phosphoproteins, however, were precipitated by either of two antisera containing antibodies differing in specificities for epitopes within G iα -despite precipitation of a substantial fraction of the subunit itself. In contrast, other antisera, containing antibodies specific for the recently describe G zα , or antibodies for both G zα and G iα , precipitated a 40-kDa phosphoprotein

  19. Five Fatty Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Enzymes from Marinobacter and Acinetobacter spp. and Structural Insights into the Aldehyde Binding Pocket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertram, Jonathan H.; Mulliner, Kalene M.; Shi, Ke; Plunkett, Mary H.; Nixon, Peter; Serratore, Nicholas A.; Douglas, Christopher J.; Aihara, Hideki; Barney, Brett M.; Parales, Rebecca E.

    2017-04-07

    ABSTRACT

    Enzymes involved in lipid biosynthesis and metabolism play an important role in energy conversion and storage and in the function of structural components such as cell membranes. The fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase (FAldDH) plays a central function in the metabolism of lipid intermediates, oxidizing fatty aldehydes to the corresponding fatty acid and competing with pathways that would further reduce the fatty aldehydes to fatty alcohols or require the fatty aldehydes to produce alkanes. In this report, the genes for four putative FAldDH enzymes fromMarinobacter aquaeoleiVT8 and an additional enzyme fromAcinetobacter baylyiwere heterologously expressed inEscherichia coliand shown to display FAldDH activity. Five enzymes (Maqu_0438, Maqu_3316, Maqu_3410, Maqu_3572, and the enzyme reported under RefSeq accession no.WP_004927398) were found to act on aldehydes ranging from acetaldehyde to hexadecanal and also acted on the unsaturated long-chain palmitoleyl and oleyl aldehydes. A comparison of the specificities of these enzymes with various aldehydes is presented. Crystallization trials yielded diffraction-quality crystals of one particular FAldDH (Maqu_3316) fromM. aquaeoleiVT8. Crystals were independently treated with both the NAD+cofactor and the aldehyde substrate decanal, revealing specific details of the likely substrate binding pocket for this class of enzymes. A likely model for how catalysis by the enzyme is accomplished is also provided.

    IMPORTANCEThis study provides a comparison of multiple enzymes with the ability

  20. Pocket Money

    OpenAIRE

    Larsen, Laura Perregård

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This is a paper studying, the negotiations and expectations, appearin through the exchange of ‘pocket money’, between the Danish state and the asylum seekers in Avnstrup asylum Centre. The paper presents, the practices that surround the ‘pocket money’ in Avnstrup Asylum Centre and how there are perceive. Furthermore it reflects upon the ‘pocket money’ as a tool of identification Finally it explores the reasons and rationalities for the states funding of the asylum seekers. The analys...

  1. Apolar Distal Pocket Mutants of Yeast Cytochrome c Peroxidase: Hydrogen Peroxide Reactivity and Cyanide Binding of the TriAla, TriVal, and TriLeu Variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidwai, Anil K.; Meyen, Cassandra; Kilheeney, Heather; Wroblewski, Damian; Vitello, Lidia B.; Erman, James E.

    2012-01-01

    Three yeast cytochrome c peroxidase (CcP) variants with apolar distal heme pockets have been constructed. The CcP variants have Arg48, Trp51, and His52 mutated to either all alanines, CcP(triAla), all valines, CcP(triVal), or all leucines, CcP(triLeu). The triple mutants have detectable enzymatic activity at pH 6 but the activity is less than 0.02% that of wild-type CcP. The activity loss is primarily due to the decreased rate of reaction between the triple mutants and H2O2 compared to wild-type CcP. Spectroscopic properties and cyanide binding characteristics of the triple mutants have been investigated over the pH stability region of CcP, pH 4 to 8. The absorption spectra indicate that the CcP triple mutants have hemes that are predominantly five-coordinate, high-spin at pH 5 and six-coordinate, low-spin at pH 8. Cyanide binding to the triple mutants is biphasic indicating that the triple mutants have two slowly-exchanging conformational states with different cyanide affinities. The binding affinity for cyanide is reduced at least two orders of magnitude in the triple mutants compared to wild-type CcP and the rate of cyanide binding is reduced by four to five orders of magnitude. Correlation of the reaction rates of CcP and 12 distal pocket mutants with H2O2 and HCN suggests that both reactions require ionization of the reactants within the distal heme pocket allowing the anion to bind the heme iron. Distal pocket features that promote substrate ionization (basic residues involved in base-catalyzed substrate ionization or polar residues that can stabilize substrate anions) increase the overall rate of reaction with H2O2 and HCN while features that inhibit substrate ionization slow the reactions. PMID:23022490

  2. Receptor binding of somatostatin-14 and somatostatin-28 in rat brain: differential modulation by nucleotides and ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srikant, C B; Dahan, A; Craig, C

    1990-02-04

    The tissue-selective binding of the two principal bioactive forms of somatostatin, somatostatin-14 (SS-14) and somatostatin-28 (SS-28), their ability to modulate cAMP-dependent and -independent regulation of post-receptor events to different degrees and the documentation of specific labelling of SS receptor subtypes with SS-28 but not SS-14 in discrete regions of rat brain suggest the existence of distinct SS-14 and SS-28 binding sites. Receptor binding of SS-14 ligands has been shown to be modulated by nucleotides and ions, but the effect of these agents on SS-28 binding has not been studied. In the present study we investigated the effects of adenine and guanine nucleotides as well as monovalent and divalent cations on rat brain SS receptors quantitated with radioiodinated analogs of SS-14 ([125I-Tyr11]SS14, referred to in this paper as SS-14) and SS-28 ([Leu8, D-Trp22, 125I-Tyr25] SS-28, referred to as LTT* SS-28) in order to determine if distinct receptor sites for SS-14 and SS-28 could be distinguished on the basis of their modulation by nucleotides and ions. GTP as well as ATP exerted a dose-dependent inhibition (over a concentration range of 10(-7)-10(-3) M) of the binding of the two radioligands. The nucleotide inhibition of binding resulted in a decrease the Bmax of the SS receptors, the binding affinity remaining unaltered. GTP (10(-4) M) decreased the Bmax of LTT* SS-28 binding sites to a greater extent than ATP (145 +/- 10 and 228 +/- 16 respectively, compared to control value of 320 +/- 20 pmol mg-1). Under identical conditions GTP was less effective than ATP in reducing the number of T* SS-14 binding sites (Bmax = 227 +/- 8 and 182 +/- 15, respectively, compared to 340 +/- 15 pmol mg-1 in the absence of nucleotides). Monovalent cations inhibited the binding of both radioligands, Li+ and Na+ inhibited the binding of T* SS-14 to a greater extent than K+. The effect of divalent cations on the other hand was varied. At low concentration (2 mM) Mg2+, Ba2

  3. Association of Nucleotide-binding Oligomerization Domain Receptors with Peptic Ulcer and Gastric Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadian Amiri, Rajeeh; Tehrani, Mohsen; Taghizadeh, Shirin; Shokri-Shirvani, Javad; Fakheri, Hafez; Ajami, Abolghasem

    2016-10-01

    Host innate immunity can affect the clinical outcomes of Helicobacter pylori infection, including gastritis, gastric ulcer, gastric adenocarcinoma, and MALT lymphoma. Nucleotide binding oligomerization domain (NOD)-1 and -2 are two molecules of innate immunity which are involved in the host defense against H. pylori. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of the expression level of NOD1 and NOD2 on the susceptibility to gastric cancer as well as peptic ulcer in individuals with H. pylori infection. The gene expression levels of these molecules were compared in three groups of non-ulcer dyspepsia (NUD) as a control group (n=52); peptic ulcer disease (PUD), (n=53); and gastric cancer (GC), (n=39). Relative expression levels of NOD1 in patients with GC were higher than those of NUD and PUD (p<0.001 and P<0.001, respectively). Similarly in case of NOD1, PUD group showed higher level of expression than NUD group (p<0.01). However, there was no significant difference between H. pylori -positive and -negative patients in NUD, PUD, or GC groups. Moreover, the expression levels of NOD2 showed no significant difference among NUD, PUD, or GC groups, while among H. pylori-positive patients, it was higher in GC group than NUD  and PUD groups (p<0.05 and p<0.01, respectively). In addition, positive correlation coefficients were attained between NOD1 and NOD2 expressions in patients with NUD (R2 Linear=0.349, p<0.001), PUD (R2 Linear=0.695, p<0.001), and GC (R2 Linear=0.385, p<0.001). Collectively, the results suggest that the chronic activation of NOD1 and NOD2 receptors might play a role in the development of gastric cancer.

  4. Cross-Neutralising Nanobodies Bind to a Conserved Pocket in the Hemagglutinin Stem Region Identified Using Yeast Display and Deep Mutational Scanning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziano Gaiotto

    Full Text Available Cross-neutralising monoclonal antibodies against influenza hemagglutinin (HA are of considerable interest as both therapeutics and diagnostic tools. We have recently described five different single domain antibodies (nanobodies which share this cross-neutralising activity and suggest their small size, high stability, and cleft binding properties may present distinct advantages over equivalent conventional antibodies. We have used yeast display in combination with deep mutational scanning to give residue level resolution of positions in the antibody-HA interface which are crucial for binding. In addition, we have mapped positions within HA predicted to have minimal effect on antibody binding when mutated. Our cross-neutralising nanobodies were shown to bind to a highly conserved pocket in the HA2 domain of A(H1N1pdm09 influenza virus overlapping with the fusion peptide suggesting their mechanism of action is through the inhibition of viral membrane fusion. We also note that the epitope overlaps with that of CR6261 and F10 which are human monoclonal antibodies in clinical development as immunotherapeutics. Although all five nanobodies mapped to the same highly conserved binding pocket we observed differences in the size of the epitope footprint which has implications in comparing the relative genetic barrier each nanobody presents to a rapidly evolving influenza virus. To further refine our epitope map, we have re-created naturally occurring mutations within this HA stem epitope and tested their effect on binding using yeast display. We have shown that a D46N mutation in the HA2 stem domain uniquely interferes with binding of R2b-E8. Further testing of this substitution in the context of full length purified HA from 1918 H1N1 pandemic (Spanish flu, 2009 H1N1 pandemic (swine flu and highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 demonstrated binding which correlated with D46 whereas binding to seasonal H1N1 strains carrying N46 was absent. In addition, our

  5. Decipher the mechanisms of protein conformational changes induced by nucleotide binding through free-energy landscape analysis: ATP binding to Hsp70.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrien Nicolaï

    Full Text Available ATP regulates the function of many proteins in the cell by transducing its binding and hydrolysis energies into protein conformational changes by mechanisms which are challenging to identify at the atomic scale. Based on molecular dynamics (MD simulations, a method is proposed to analyze the structural changes induced by ATP binding to a protein by computing the effective free-energy landscape (FEL of a subset of its coordinates along its amino-acid sequence. The method is applied to characterize the mechanism by which the binding of ATP to the nucleotide-binding domain (NBD of Hsp70 propagates a signal to its substrate-binding domain (SBD. Unbiased MD simulations were performed for Hsp70-DnaK chaperone in nucleotide-free, ADP-bound and ATP-bound states. The simulations revealed that the SBD does not interact with the NBD for DnaK in its nucleotide-free and ADP-bound states whereas the docking of the SBD was found in the ATP-bound state. The docked state induced by ATP binding found in MD is an intermediate state between the initial nucleotide-free and final ATP-bound states of Hsp70. The analysis of the FEL projected along the amino-acid sequence permitted to identify a subset of 27 protein internal coordinates corresponding to a network of 91 key residues involved in the conformational change induced by ATP binding. Among the 91 residues, 26 are identified for the first time, whereas the others were shown relevant for the allosteric communication of Hsp70 s in several experiments and bioinformatics analysis. The FEL analysis revealed also the origin of the ATP-induced structural modifications of the SBD recently measured by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance. The pathway between the nucleotide-free and the intermediate state of DnaK was extracted by applying principal component analysis to the subset of internal coordinates describing the transition. The methodology proposed is general and could be applied to analyze allosteric communication in

  6. Structural and mechanistic investigations on Salmonella typhimurium acetate kinase (AckA: identification of a putative ligand binding pocket at the dimeric interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chittori Sagar

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacteria such as Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium can utilize acetate as the sole source of carbon and energy. Acetate kinase (AckA and phosphotransacetylase (Pta, key enzymes of acetate utilization pathway, regulate flux of metabolites in glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, TCA cycle, glyoxylate bypass and fatty acid metabolism. Results Here we report kinetic characterization of S. typhimurium AckA (StAckA and structures of its unliganded (Form-I, 2.70 Å resolution and citrate-bound (Form-II, 1.90 Å resolution forms. The enzyme showed broad substrate specificity with kcat/Km in the order of acetate > propionate > formate. Further, the Km for acetyl-phosphate was significantly lower than for acetate and the enzyme could catalyze the reverse reaction (i.e. ATP synthesis more efficiently. ATP and Mg2+ could be substituted by other nucleoside 5′-triphosphates (GTP, UTP and CTP and divalent cations (Mn2+ and Co2+, respectively. Form-I StAckA represents the first structural report of an unliganded AckA. StAckA protomer consists of two domains with characteristic βββαβαβα topology of ASKHA superfamily of proteins. These domains adopt an intermediate conformation compared to that of open and closed forms of ligand-bound Methanosarcina thermophila AckA (MtAckA. Spectroscopic and structural analyses of StAckA further suggested occurrence of inter-domain motion upon ligand-binding. Unexpectedly, Form-II StAckA structure showed a drastic change in the conformation of residues 230–300 compared to that of Form-I. Further investigation revealed electron density corresponding to a citrate molecule in a pocket located at the dimeric interface of Form-II StAckA. Interestingly, a similar dimeric interface pocket lined with largely conserved residues could be identified in Form-I StAckA as well as in other enzymes homologous to AckA suggesting that ligand binding at this pocket may influence the function of these

  7. Structural and kinetic insights into binding and incorporation of L-nucleotide analogs by a Y-family DNA polymerase

    OpenAIRE

    Gaur, Vineet; Vyas, Rajan; Fowler, Jason D.; Efthimiopoulos, Georgia; Feng, Joy Y.; Suo, Zucai

    2014-01-01

    Considering that all natural nucleotides (D-dNTPs) and the building blocks (D-dNMPs) of DNA chains possess D-stereochemistry, DNA polymerases and reverse transcriptases (RTs) likely possess strongD-stereoselectivity by preferably binding and incorporating D-dNTPs over unnatural L-dNTPs during DNA synthesis. Surprisingly, a structural basis for the discrimination against L-dNTPs by DNA polymerases or RTs has not been established although L-deoxycytidine analogs (lamivudine and emtricitabine) a...

  8. Host-Primed Ebola Virus GP Exposes a Hydrophobic NPC1 Receptor-Binding Pocket, Revealing a Target for Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornholdt, Zachary A; Ndungo, Esther; Fusco, Marnie L; Bale, Shridhar; Flyak, Andrew I; Crowe, James E; Chandran, Kartik; Saphire, Erica Ollmann

    2016-02-23

    The filovirus surface glycoprotein (GP) mediates viral entry into host cells. Following viral internalization into endosomes, GP is cleaved by host cysteine proteases to expose a receptor-binding site (RBS) that is otherwise hidden from immune surveillance. Here, we present the crystal structure of proteolytically cleaved Ebola virus GP to a resolution of 3.3 Å. We use this structure in conjunction with functional analysis of a large panel of pseudotyped viruses bearing mutant GP proteins to map the Ebola virus GP endosomal RBS at molecular resolution. Our studies indicate that binding of GP to its endosomal receptor Niemann-Pick C1 occurs in two distinct stages: the initial electrostatic interactions are followed by specific interactions with a hydrophobic trough that is exposed on the endosomally cleaved GP1 subunit. Finally, we demonstrate that monoclonal antibodies targeting the filovirus RBS neutralize all known filovirus GPs, making this conserved pocket a promising target for the development of panfilovirus therapeutics. Ebola virus uses its glycoprotein (GP) to enter new host cells. During entry, GP must be cleaved by human enzymes in order for receptor binding to occur. Here, we provide the crystal structure of the cleaved form of Ebola virus GP. We demonstrate that cleavage exposes a site at the top of GP and that this site binds the critical domain C of the receptor, termed Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1). We perform mutagenesis to find parts of the site essential for binding NPC1 and map distinct roles for an upper, charged crest and lower, hydrophobic trough in cleaved GP. We find that this 3-dimensional site is conserved across the filovirus family and that antibody directed against this site is able to bind cleaved GP from every filovirus tested and neutralize viruses bearing those GPs. Copyright © 2016 Bornholdt et al.

  9. Calcium-binding capacity of centrin2 is required for linear POC5 assembly but not for nucleotide excision repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago J Dantas

    Full Text Available Centrosomes, the principal microtubule-organising centres in animal cells, contain centrins, small, conserved calcium-binding proteins unique to eukaryotes. Centrin2 binds to xeroderma pigmentosum group C protein (XPC, stabilising it, and its presence slightly increases nucleotide excision repair (NER activity in vitro. In previous work, we deleted all three centrin isoforms present in chicken DT40 cells and observed delayed repair of UV-induced DNA lesions, but no centrosome abnormalities. Here, we explore how centrin2 controls NER. In the centrin null cells, we expressed centrin2 mutants that cannot bind calcium or that lack sites for phosphorylation by regulatory kinases. Expression of any of these mutants restored the UV sensitivity of centrin null cells to normal as effectively as expression of wild-type centrin. However, calcium-binding-deficient and T118A mutants showed greatly compromised localisation to centrosomes. XPC recruitment to laser-induced UV-like lesions was only slightly slower in centrin-deficient cells than in controls, and levels of XPC and its partner HRAD23B were unaffected by centrin deficiency. Interestingly, we found that overexpression of the centrin interactor POC5 leads to the assembly of linear, centrin-dependent structures that recruit other centrosomal proteins such as PCM-1 and NEDD1. Together, these observations suggest that assembly of centrins into complex structures requires calcium binding capacity, but that such assembly is not required for centrin activity in NER.

  10. Auxin-binding pocket of ABP1 is crucial for its gain-of-function cellular and developmental roles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grones, P.; Chen, X.; Simon, S.; Kaufmann, W.A.; De Rycke, R.; Nodzyński, T.; Zažímalová, Eva; Friml, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 66, č. 16 (2015), s. 5055-5065 ISSN 0022-0957 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Auxin * ABP1 * Auxin binding Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.677, year: 2015

  11. Guanine nucleotide binding proteins in zucchini seedlings: Characterization and interactions with the NPA receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindeberg, M.; Jacobs, M.

    1989-01-01

    A microsomal membrane preparation from hypocotyls of dark-grown Cucurbita pepo L. seedlings contains specific high-affinity binding sites for the non-hydrolyzable GTP analog guanosine 5'-[γ-thio] triphosphate (GTP-γ-S). Both the binding affinity and the pattern of binding specificity for GTP and GTP analogs are similar to animal G-proteins, and two zucchini membrane proteins are recognized in western blots by antiserum specific for the σ subunit of platelet G s protein. GTP-γ-S can increase specific naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) binding in zucchini microsomal membrane preparations, with its stimulation increasing with large tissue age. Al +3 and F - agents known to activate G-proteins - decreased NPA specific binding by ca. 15%. In tests of in vitro auxin transport employing zucchini plasma membrane vesicles, AlF - 4 strongly inhibited 3 H-indoleacetic acid nor accumulation; GTP-γ-S effects on this system will be discussed

  12. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic characterization of a cyclic nucleotide-binding homology domain from the mouse EAG potassium channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques-Carvalho, Maria João; Morais-Cabral, João Henrique

    2012-01-01

    The crystallization conditions and preliminary crystal characterization of the cytoplasmic cyclic nucleotide-binding homology domain from the mouse EAG potassium channel are reported. The members of the family of voltage-gated KCNH potassium channels play important roles in cardiac and neuronal repolarization, tumour proliferation and hormone secretion. These channels have a C-terminal cytoplasmic domain which is homologous to cyclic nucleotide-binding domains (CNB-homology domains), but it has been demonstrated that channel function is not affected by cyclic nucleotides and that the domain does not bind nucleotides in vitro. Here, the crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of a CNB-homology domain from a member of the KCNH family, the mouse EAG channel, is reported. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.2 Å resolution and the crystal belonged to the hexagonal space group P3 1 21

  13. Single nucleotide polymorphism in Egyptian cattle insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Othman E. Othman

    2014-12-01

    It is concluded that the IGFBP-3/HaeIII polymorphism may be utilized as a good marker for genetic differentiation between cattle animals for different body functions such as growth, metabolism, reproduction, immunity and energy balance. The nucleotide sequences of Egyptian cattle IGFBP-3 A and C alleles were submitted to GenBank with the accession numbers KF899893 and KF899894, respectively.

  14. Three-dimensional structures of the mammalian multidrug resistance P-glycoprotein demonstrate major conformational changes in the transmembrane domains upon nucleotide binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Mark F; Kamis, Alhaji Bukar; Callaghan, Richard; Higgins, Christopher F; Ford, Robert C

    2003-03-07

    P-glycoprotein is an ATP-binding cassette transporter that is associated with multidrug resistance and the failure of chemotherapy in human patients. We have previously shown, based on two-dimensional projection maps, that P-glycoprotein undergoes conformational changes upon binding of nucleotide to the intracellular nucleotide binding domains. Here we present the three-dimensional structures of P-glycoprotein in the presence and absence of nucleotide, at a resolution limit of approximately 2 nm, determined by electron crystallography of negatively stained crystals. The data reveal a major reorganization of the transmembrane domains throughout the entire depth of the membrane upon binding of nucleotide. In the absence of nucleotide, the two transmembrane domains form a single barrel 5-6 nm in diameter and about 5 nm deep with a central pore that is open to the extracellular surface and spans much of the membrane depth. Upon binding nucleotide, the transmembrane domains reorganize into three compact domains that are each 2-3 nm in diameter and 5-6 nm deep. This reorganization opens the central pore along its length in a manner that could allow access of hydrophobic drugs (transport substrates) directly from the lipid bilayer to the central pore of the transporter.

  15. Cyclic AMP Inhibits the Activity and Promotes the Acetylation of Acetyl-CoA Synthetase through Competitive Binding to the ATP/AMP Pocket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiaobiao; Shen, Liqiang; Wang, Qijun; Cen, Xufeng; Wang, Jin; Wu, Meng; Li, Peng; Zhao, Wei; Zhang, Yu; Zhao, Guoping

    2017-01-27

    The high-affinity biosynthetic pathway for converting acetate to acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) is catalyzed by the central metabolic enzyme acetyl-coenzyme A synthetase (Acs), which is finely regulated both at the transcriptional level via cyclic AMP (cAMP)-driven trans-activation and at the post-translational level via acetylation inhibition. In this study, we discovered that cAMP directly binds to Salmonella enterica Acs (SeAcs) and inhibits its activity in a substrate-competitive manner. In addition, cAMP binding increases SeAcs acetylation by simultaneously promoting Pat-dependent acetylation and inhibiting CobB-dependent deacetylation, resulting in enhanced SeAcs inhibition. A crystal structure study and site-directed mutagenesis analyses confirmed that cAMP binds to the ATP/AMP pocket of SeAcs, and restrains SeAcs in an open conformation. The cAMP contact residues are well conserved from prokaryotes to eukaryotes, suggesting a general regulatory mechanism of cAMP on Acs. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Cyanide binding to hexacoordinate cyanobacterial hemoglobins: hydrogen-bonding network and heme pocket rearrangement in ferric H117A Synechocystis hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, B Christie; Nothnagel, Henry J; Vuletich, David A; Falzone, Christopher J; Lecomte, Juliette T J

    2004-10-05

    The truncated hemoglobin (Hb) from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is a bis-histidyl hexacoordinate complex in the absence of exogenous ligands. This protein can form a covalent cross-link between His117 in the H-helix and the heme 2-vinyl group. Cross-linking, the physiological importance of which has not been established, is avoided with the His117Ala substitution. In the present work, H117A Hb was used to explore exogenous ligand binding to the heme group. NMR and thermal denaturation data showed that the replacement was of little consequence to the structural and thermodynamic properties of ferric Synechocystis Hb. It did, however, decelerate the association of cyanide ions with the heme iron. Full complexation required hours, instead of minutes, of incubation at optical and NMR concentrations. At neutral pH and in the presence of excess cyanide, binding occurred with a first-order dependence on cyanide concentration, eliminating distal histidine decoordination as the rate-limiting step. The cyanide complex of the H117A variant was characterized for the conformational changes occurring as the histidine on the distal side, His46 (E10), was displaced. Extensive rearrangement allowed Tyr22 (B10) to insert in the heme pocket and Gln43 (E7) and Gln47 (E11) to come in contact with it. H-bond formation to the bound cyanide was identified in solution with the use of (1)H(2)O/(2)H(2)O mixtures. Cyanide binding also resulted in a change in the ratio of heme orientational isomers, in a likely manifestation of heme environment reshaping. Similar observations were made with the related Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 H117A Hb, except that cyanide binding was rapid in this protein. In both cases, the (15)N chemical shift of bound cyanide was reminiscent of that in peroxidases and the orientation of the proximal histidine was as in other truncated Hbs. The ensemble of the data provided insight into the structural cooperativity of the heme pocket scaffold and pointed

  17. Definition of the G protein-coupled receptor transmembrane bundle binding pocket and calculation of receptor similarities for drug design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gloriam, David Erik Immanuel; Foord, Steven M; Blaney, Frank E

    2009-01-01

    currently available crystal structures. This was used to characterize pharmacological relationships of Family A/Rhodopsin family GPCRs, minimizing evolutionary influence from parts of the receptor that do not generally affect ligand binding. The resultant dendogram tended to group receptors according...

  18. Structure of the nucleotide-binding domain of a dipeptide ABC transporter reveals a novel iron-sulfur cluster-binding domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaolu; Zhuo, Wei; Yu, Jie; Ge, Jingpeng; Gu, Jinke; Feng, Yue; Yang, Maojun; Wang, Linfang; Wang, Na

    2013-02-01

    Dipeptide permease (Dpp), which belongs to an ABC transport system, imports peptides consisting of two or three L-amino acids from the matrix to the cytoplasm in microbes. Previous studies have indicated that haem competes with dipeptides to bind DppA in vitro and in vivo and that the Dpp system can also translocate haem. Here, the crystal structure of DppD, the nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) of the ABC-type dipeptide/oligopeptide/nickel-transport system from Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis, bound with ATP, Mg(2+) and a [4Fe-4S] iron-sulfur cluster is reported. The N-terminal domain of DppD shares a similar structural fold with the NBDs of other ABC transporters. Interestingly, the C-terminal domain of DppD contains a [4Fe-4S] cluster. The UV-visible absorbance spectrum of DppD was consistent with the presence of a [4Fe-4S] cluster. A search with DALI revealed that the [4Fe-4S] cluster-binding domain is a novel structural fold. Structural analysis and comparisons with other ABC transporters revealed that this iron-sulfur cluster may act as a mediator in substrate (dipeptide or haem) binding by electron transfer and may regulate the transport process in Dpp ABC transport systems. The crystal structure provides a basis for understanding the properties of ABC transporters and will be helpful in investigating the functions of NBDs in the regulation of ABC transporter activity.

  19. Asn792 participates in the hydrogen bond network around the K+-binding pocket of gastric H,K-ATPase.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swarts, H.G.P.; Koenderink, J.B.; Willems, P.H.G.M.; Krieger, E.; Pont, J.J.H.H.M. de

    2005-01-01

    Asn792 present in M5 of gastric H,K-ATPase is highly conserved within the P-type ATPase family. A direct role in K+ binding was postulated for Na,K-ATPase but was not found in a recent model for gastric H,K-ATPase (Koenderink, J. B., Swarts, H. G. P., Willems, P. H. G. M., Krieger, E., and De Pont,

  20. Host-Primed Ebola Virus GP Exposes a Hydrophobic NPC1 Receptor-Binding Pocket, Revealing a Target for Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary A. Bornholdt

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The filovirus surface glycoprotein (GP mediates viral entry into host cells. Following viral internalization into endosomes, GP is cleaved by host cysteine proteases to expose a receptor-binding site (RBS that is otherwise hidden from immune surveillance. Here, we present the crystal structure of proteolytically cleaved Ebola virus GP to a resolution of 3.3 Å. We use this structure in conjunction with functional analysis of a large panel of pseudotyped viruses bearing mutant GP proteins to map the Ebola virus GP endosomal RBS at molecular resolution. Our studies indicate that binding of GP to its endosomal receptor Niemann-Pick C1 occurs in two distinct stages: the initial electrostatic interactions are followed by specific interactions with a hydrophobic trough that is exposed on the endosomally cleaved GP1 subunit. Finally, we demonstrate that monoclonal antibodies targeting the filovirus RBS neutralize all known filovirus GPs, making this conserved pocket a promising target for the development of panfilovirus therapeutics.

  1. Mutational analysis of the nucleotide binding site of Escherichia coli dCTP deaminase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thymark, Majbritt; Johansson, Eva; Larsen, Sine

    2007-01-01

    detectable activity with a 30- and 140-fold reduction in k(cat), respectively. Furthermore, S111T and E138D both showed altered dTTP inhibition compared to wild-type enzyme. S111T was almost insensitive to the presence of dTTP. With the E138D enzyme the dTTP dependent increase in cooperativity of d...... of E138D in complex with dUTP showed a hydrogen bonding network in the active site similar to wild-type enzyme. However, changes in the hydrogen bond lengths between the carboxylate and a catalytic water molecule as well as a slightly different orientation of the pyrimidine ring of the bound nucleotide...

  2. Nucleotide fluctuation of radiation-resistant Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 single-stranded DNA-binding protein (RPA) genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Todd; Tremberger, G., Jr.; Cheung, E.; Subramaniam, R.; Gadura, N.; Schneider, P.; Sullivan, R.; Flamholz, A.; Lieberman, D.; Cheung, T. D.

    2009-08-01

    The Single-Stranded DNA-Binding Protein (RPA) Genes in gamma ray radiation-resistant halophilic archaeon Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 were analyzed in terms of their nucleotide fluctuations. In an ATCG sequence, each base was assigned a number equal to its atomic number. The resulting numerical sequence was the basis of the statistical analysis in this study. Fractal analysis using the Higuchi method gave fractal dimensions of 2.04 and 2.06 for the gene sequences VNG2160 and VNG2162, respectively. The 16S rRNA sequence has a fractal dimension of 1.99. The di-nucleotide Shannon entropy values were found to be negatively correlated with the observed fractal dimensions (R2~ 0.992, N=3). Inclusion of Deinococcus radiodurans Rad-A in the regression analysis decreases the R2 slightly to 0.98 (N=4). A third VNG2163 RPA gene of unknown function but with upregulation activity under irradiation was found to have a fractal dimension of 2.05 and a Shannon entropy of 3.77 bits. The above results are similar to those found in bacterial Deinococcus radiodurans and suggest that their high radiation resistance property would have favored selection of CG di-nucleotide pairs. The two transcription factors TbpD (VNG7114) and TfbA (VNG 2184) were also studied. Using VNG7114, VNG2184, and VNG2163; the regression analysis of fractal dimension versus Shannon entropy shows that R2 ~ 0.997 for N =3. The VNG2163 unknown function may be related to the pathways with transcriptions closely regulated to sequences VNG7114 and VNG2184.

  3. Investigating the Importance of the Pocket-estimation Method in Pocket-based Approaches: An Illustration Using Pocket-ligand Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caumes, Géraldine; Borrel, Alexandre; Abi Hussein, Hiba; Camproux, Anne-Claude; Regad, Leslie

    2017-09-01

    Small molecules interact with their protein target on surface cavities known as binding pockets. Pocket-based approaches are very useful in all of the phases of drug design. Their first step is estimating the binding pocket based on protein structure. The available pocket-estimation methods produce different pockets for the same target. The aim of this work is to investigate the effects of different pocket-estimation methods on the results of pocket-based approaches. We focused on the effect of three pocket-estimation methods on a pocket-ligand (PL) classification. This pocket-based approach is useful for understanding the correspondence between the pocket and ligand spaces and to develop pharmacological profiling models. We found pocket-estimation methods yield different binding pockets in terms of boundaries and properties. These differences are responsible for the variation in the PL classification results that can have an impact on the detected correspondence between pocket and ligand profiles. Thus, we highlighted the importance of the pocket-estimation method choice in pocket-based approaches. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Functional reconstitution of prostaglandin E receptor from bovine adrenal medulla with guanine nucleotide binding proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negishi, M.; Ito, S.; Yokohama, H.; Hayashi, H.; Katada, T.; Ui, M.; Hayaishi, O.

    1988-01-01

    Prostaglandin E 2 (PEG 2 ) was found to bind specifically to a 100,000 x g pellet prepared from bovine adrenal medulla. The PGE receptor was associated with a GTP-binding protein (G-protein) and could be covalently cross-linked with this G-protein by dithiobis(succinimidyl propionate) in the 100,000 x g pellet. In order to characterize the G-protein associated with the PGE receptor and reconstitute these proteins in phospholipid vesicles, the authors purified the G-protein to apparent homogeneity from the 100,000 x g pellet. The G-protein served as a substrate of pertussis toxin but differed in its α subunit from two known pertussis toxin substrate G-proteins (G/sub i/ and G 0 ) purified from bovine brain. The molecular weight of the α subunit was 40,000, which is between those of G/sub i/ and G 0 . The purified protein was also distinguished immunologically from G/sub i/ and G 0 and was referred to as G/sub am/. Reconstitution of the PGE receptor with pure C/sub am/, G/sub i/, or G 0 in phospholipid vesicles resulted in a remarkable restoration of [ 3 H]PGE 2 binding activity in a GTP-dependent manner. The efficiency of these three G-proteins in this capacity was roughly equal. When pertussis toxin- or N-ethylmaleimide-treated G-proteins, instead of the native ones, were reconstituted into vesicles, the restoration of binding activity was no longer observed. These results indicate that the PGE receptor can couple functionally with G/sub am/, G/sub i/, or G 0 in phospholipid vesicles and suggest that G/sub am/ may be involved in signal transduction of the PGE receptor in bovine adrenal medulla

  5. Polymorphisms in miRNA binding sites of nucleotide excision repair genes and colorectal cancer risk

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Naccarati, Alessio; Pardini, Barbara; Landi, S.; Landi, D.; Slyšková, Jana; Novotný, J.; Levý, M.; Poláková, Veronika; Lipská, L.; Vodička, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 7 (2012), s. 1346-1351 ISSN 0143-3334 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP304/10/1286; GA ČR GP305/09/P194 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : DNA repair * polymorphisms * miRNA binding sites Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.635, year: 2012

  6. Novel Nucleotide Variations, Haplotypes Structure and Associations with Growth Related Traits of Goat AT Motif-Binding Factor ( Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyan Zhang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The AT motif-binding factor (ATBF1 not only interacts with protein inhibitor of activated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 (PIAS3 to suppress STAT3 signaling regulating embryo early development and cell differentiation, but is required for early activation of the pituitary specific transcription factor 1 (Pit1 gene (also known as POU1F1 critically affecting mammalian growth and development. The goal of this study was to detect novel nucleotide variations and haplotypes structure of the ATBF1 gene, as well as to test their associations with growth-related traits in goats. Herein, a total of seven novel single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs (SNP 1-7 within this gene were found in two well-known Chinese native goat breeds. Haplotypes structure analysis demonstrated that there were four haplotypes in Hainan black goat while seventeen haplotypes in Xinong Saanen dairy goat, and both breeds only shared one haplotype (hap1. Association testing revealed that the SNP2, SNP5, SNP6, and SNP7 loci were also found to significantly associate with growth-related traits in goats, respectively. Moreover, one diplotype in Xinong Saanen dairy goats significantly linked to growth related traits. These preliminary findings not only would extend the spectrum of genetic variations of the goat ATBF1 gene, but also would contribute to implementing marker-assisted selection in genetics and breeding in goats.

  7. Homology modeling, molecular docking and DNA binding studies of nucleotide excision repair UvrC protein from M. tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parulekar, Rishikesh S; Barage, Sagar H; Jalkute, Chidambar B; Dhanavade, Maruti J; Fandilolu, Prayagraj M; Sonawane, Kailas D

    2013-08-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a Gram positive, acid-fast bacteria belonging to genus Mycobacterium, is the leading causative agent of most cases of tuberculosis. The pathogenicity of the bacteria is enhanced by its developed DNA repair mechanism which consists of machineries such as nucleotide excision repair. Nucleotide excision repair consists of excinuclease protein UvrABC endonuclease, multi-enzymatic complex which carries out repair of damaged DNA in sequential manner. UvrC protein is a part of this complex and thus helps to repair the damaged DNA of M. tuberculosis. Hence, structural bioinformatics study of UvrC protein from M. tuberculosis was carried out using homology modeling and molecular docking techniques. Assessment of the reliability of the homology model was carried out by predicting its secondary structure along with its model validation. The predicted structure was docked with the ATP and the interacting amino acid residues of UvrC protein with the ATP were found to be TRP539, PHE89, GLU536, ILE402 and ARG575. The binding of UvrC protein with the DNA showed two different domains. The residues from domain I of the protein VAL526, THR524 and LEU521 interact with the DNA whereas, amino acids interacting from the domain II of the UvrC protein included ARG597, GLU595, GLY594 and GLY592 residues. This predicted model could be useful to design new inhibitors of UvrC enzyme to prevent pathogenesis of Mycobacterium and so the tuberculosis.

  8. The PDZ domain of the guanine nucleotide exchange factor PDZGEF directs binding to phosphatidic acid during brush border formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah V Consonni

    Full Text Available PDZGEF is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the small G protein Rap. It was recently found that PDZGEF contributes to establishment of intestinal epithelial polarity downstream of the kinase Lkb1. By binding to phosphatidic acid enriched at the apical membrane, PDZGEF locally activates Rap2a resulting in induction of brush border formation via a pathway that includes the polarity players TNIK, Mst4 and Ezrin. Here we show that the PDZ domain of PDZGEF is essential and sufficient for targeting PDZGEF to the apical membrane of polarized intestinal epithelial cells. Inhibition of PLD and consequently production of phosphatidic acid inhibitis targeting of PDZGEF to the plasma membrane. Furthermore, localization requires specific positively charged residues within the PDZ domain. We conclude that local accumulation of PDZGEF at the apical membrane during establishment of epithelial polarity is mediated by electrostatic interactions between positively charged side chains in the PDZ domain and negatively charged phosphatidic acid.

  9. The Potato Nucleotide-binding Leucine-rich Repeat (NLR) Immune Receptor Rx1 Is a Pathogen-dependent DNA-deforming Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenyk, Stepan; Townsend, Philip D; Dixon, Christopher H; Spies, Gerhard B; de San Eustaquio Campillo, Alba; Slootweg, Erik J; Westerhof, Lotte B; Gawehns, Fleur K K; Knight, Marc R; Sharples, Gary J; Goverse, Aska; Pålsson, Lars-Olof; Takken, Frank L W; Cann, Martin J

    2015-10-09

    Plant nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins enable cells to respond to pathogen attack. Several NLRs act in the nucleus; however, conserved nuclear targets that support their role in immunity are unknown. Previously, we noted a structural homology between the nucleotide-binding domain of NLRs and DNA replication origin-binding Cdc6/Orc1 proteins. Here we show that the NB-ARC (nucleotide-binding, Apaf-1, R-proteins, and CED-4) domain of the Rx1 NLR of potato binds nucleic acids. Rx1 induces ATP-dependent bending and melting of DNA in vitro, dependent upon a functional P-loop. In situ full-length Rx1 binds nuclear DNA following activation by its cognate pathogen-derived effector protein, the coat protein of potato virus X. In line with its obligatory nucleocytoplasmic distribution, DNA binding was only observed when Rx1 was allowed to freely translocate between both compartments and was activated in the cytoplasm. Immune activation induced by an unrelated NLR-effector pair did not trigger an Rx1-DNA interaction. DNA binding is therefore not merely a consequence of immune activation. These data establish a role for DNA distortion in Rx1 immune signaling and define DNA as a molecular target of an activated NLR. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. The Potato Nucleotide-binding Leucine-rich Repeat (NLR) Immune Receptor Rx1 Is a Pathogen-dependent DNA-deforming Protein*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenyk, Stepan; Townsend, Philip D.; Dixon, Christopher H.; Spies, Gerhard B.; de San Eustaquio Campillo, Alba; Slootweg, Erik J.; Westerhof, Lotte B.; Gawehns, Fleur K. K.; Knight, Marc R.; Sharples, Gary J.; Goverse, Aska; Pålsson, Lars-Olof; Takken, Frank L. W.; Cann, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    Plant nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins enable cells to respond to pathogen attack. Several NLRs act in the nucleus; however, conserved nuclear targets that support their role in immunity are unknown. Previously, we noted a structural homology between the nucleotide-binding domain of NLRs and DNA replication origin-binding Cdc6/Orc1 proteins. Here we show that the NB-ARC (nucleotide-binding, Apaf-1, R-proteins, and CED-4) domain of the Rx1 NLR of potato binds nucleic acids. Rx1 induces ATP-dependent bending and melting of DNA in vitro, dependent upon a functional P-loop. In situ full-length Rx1 binds nuclear DNA following activation by its cognate pathogen-derived effector protein, the coat protein of potato virus X. In line with its obligatory nucleocytoplasmic distribution, DNA binding was only observed when Rx1 was allowed to freely translocate between both compartments and was activated in the cytoplasm. Immune activation induced by an unrelated NLR-effector pair did not trigger an Rx1-DNA interaction. DNA binding is therefore not merely a consequence of immune activation. These data establish a role for DNA distortion in Rx1 immune signaling and define DNA as a molecular target of an activated NLR. PMID:26306038

  11. The Second Transmembrane Domain of the Human Type 1 Angiotensin II Receptor Participates in the Formation of the Ligand Binding Pocket and Undergoes Integral Pivoting Movement during the Process of Receptor Activation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domazet, Ivana; Holleran, Brian J.; Martin, Stéphane S.; Lavigne, Pierre; Leduc, Richard; Escher, Emanuel; Guillemette, Gaétan

    2009-01-01

    The octapeptide hormone angiotensin II (AngII) exerts a wide variety of cardiovascular effects through the activation of the angiotensin II type-1 (AT1) receptor, which belongs to the G protein-coupled receptor superfamily. Like other G protein-coupled receptors, the AT1 receptor possesses seven transmembrane domains that provide structural support for the formation of the ligand-binding pocket. In order to identify those residues in the second transmembrane domain (TMD2) that contribute to the formation of the binding pocket of the AT1 receptor, we used the substituted cysteine accessibility method. All of the residues within the Leu-70 to Trp-94 region were mutated one at a time to a cysteine, and, after expression in COS-7 cells, the mutant receptors were treated with the sulfhydryl-specific alkylating agent methanethiosulfonate-ethylammonium (MTSEA). MTSEA reacts selectively with water-accessible, free sulfhydryl groups of endogenous or introduced point mutation cysteines. If a cysteine is found in the binding pocket, the covalent modification will affect the binding kinetics of the ligand. MTSEA substantially decreased the binding affinity of D74C-AT1, L81C-AT1, A85C-AT1, T88C-AT1, and A89C-AT1 mutant receptors, which suggests that these residues orient themselves within the water-accessible binding pocket of the AT1 receptor. Interestingly, this pattern of acquired MTSEA sensitivity was altered for TMD2 reporter cysteines engineered in a constitutively active N111G-AT1 receptor background. Indeed, mutant D74C-N111G-AT1 became insensitive to MTSEA, whereas mutant L81C-N111G-AT1 lost some sensitivity and mutant V86C-N111G-AT1 became sensitive to MTSEA. Our results suggest that constitutive activation of the AT1 receptor causes TMD2 to pivot, bringing the top of TMD2 closer to the binding pocket and pushing the bottom of TMD2 away from the binding pocket. PMID:19276075

  12. The second transmembrane domain of the human type 1 angiotensin II receptor participates in the formation of the ligand binding pocket and undergoes integral pivoting movement during the process of receptor activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domazet, Ivana; Holleran, Brian J; Martin, Stéphane S; Lavigne, Pierre; Leduc, Richard; Escher, Emanuel; Guillemette, Gaétan

    2009-05-01

    The octapeptide hormone angiotensin II (AngII) exerts a wide variety of cardiovascular effects through the activation of the angiotensin II type-1 (AT(1)) receptor, which belongs to the G protein-coupled receptor superfamily. Like other G protein-coupled receptors, the AT(1) receptor possesses seven transmembrane domains that provide structural support for the formation of the ligand-binding pocket. In order to identify those residues in the second transmembrane domain (TMD2) that contribute to the formation of the binding pocket of the AT(1) receptor, we used the substituted cysteine accessibility method. All of the residues within the Leu-70 to Trp-94 region were mutated one at a time to a cysteine, and, after expression in COS-7 cells, the mutant receptors were treated with the sulfhydryl-specific alkylating agent methanethiosulfonate-ethylammonium (MTSEA). MTSEA reacts selectively with water-accessible, free sulfhydryl groups of endogenous or introduced point mutation cysteines. If a cysteine is found in the binding pocket, the covalent modification will affect the binding kinetics of the ligand. MTSEA substantially decreased the binding affinity of D74C-AT(1), L81C-AT(1), A85C-AT(1), T88C-AT(1), and A89C-AT(1) mutant receptors, which suggests that these residues orient themselves within the water-accessible binding pocket of the AT(1) receptor. Interestingly, this pattern of acquired MTSEA sensitivity was altered for TMD2 reporter cysteines engineered in a constitutively active N111G-AT(1) receptor background. Indeed, mutant D74C-N111G-AT(1) became insensitive to MTSEA, whereas mutant L81C-N111G-AT(1) lost some sensitivity and mutant V86C-N111G-AT(1) became sensitive to MTSEA. Our results suggest that constitutive activation of the AT(1) receptor causes TMD2 to pivot, bringing the top of TMD2 closer to the binding pocket and pushing the bottom of TMD2 away from the binding pocket.

  13. Oriented Immobilization of Fab Fragments by Site-Specific Biotinylation at the Conserved Nucleotide Binding Site for Enhanced Antigen Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafaoglu, Nur; Alves, Nathan J; Bilgicer, Basar

    2015-09-08

    Oriented immobilization of antibodies and antibody fragments has become increasingly important as a result of the efforts to reduce the size of diagnostic and sensor devices to miniaturized dimensions for improved accessibility to the end-user. Reduced dimensions of sensor devices necessitate the immobilized antibodies to conserve their antigen binding activity for proper operation. Fab fragments are becoming more commonly used in small-scaled diagnostic devices due to their small size and ease of manufacture. In this study, we used the previously described UV-NBS(Biotin) method to functionalize Fab fragments with IBA-EG11-Biotin linker utilizing UV energy to initiate a photo-cross-linking reaction between the nucleotide binding site (NBS) on the Fab fragment and IBA-Biotin molecule. Our results demonstrate that immobilization of biotinylated Fab fragments via UV-NBS(Biotin) method generated the highest level of immobilized Fab on surfaces when compared to other typical immobilization methods while preserving antigen binding activity. UV-NBS(Biotin) method provided 432-fold, 114-fold, and 29-fold improved antigen detection sensitivity than physical adsorption, NHS-Biotin, and ε-NH3(+), methods, respectively. Additionally, the limit of detection (LOD) for PSA utilizing Fab fragments immobilized via UV-NBS(Biotin) method was significantly lower than that of the other immobilization methods, with an LOD of 0.4 pM PSA. In summary, site-specific biotinylation of Fab fragments without structural damage or loss in antigen binding activity provides a wide range of application potential for UV-NBS immobilization technique across numerous diagnostic devices and nanotechnologies.

  14. Nucleotide binding induces conformational changes apparent on the Na+/K+ -ATPase large cytoplasmic loop

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šimunová, Lenka; Kubala, M.; Lánský, Zdeněk; Teisinger, Jan; Amler, Evžen

    Roč.13, č.1 (2006), s. 37-37 ISSN 1211-5894. [Discussions on Structural Molecular Biology /5./. 16.03.2006-18.03.2006, Nové Hrady] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC554; GA AV ČR 1ET400110403; GA ČR GD305/03/H148 Grant - others:Grantová agentura UK(CZ) 200053 Keywords : Na+/K+ - ATPase * ATP binding * TNP-ATP Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  15. Guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins in retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, M; Pandey, S; Tran, V T; Fong, H K

    1991-01-01

    The expression of GTP-binding regulatory proteins (G proteins) in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells was analyzed by RNA blot hybridization and cDNA amplification. Both adult and fetal human RPE cells contain mRNA for multiple G protein alpha subunits (G alpha) including Gs alpha, Gi-1 alpha, Gi-2 alpha, Gi-3 alpha, and Gz alpha (or Gx alpha), where Gs and Gi are proteins that stimulate or inhibit adenylyl cyclase, respectively, and Gz is a protein that may mediate pertussis toxin-insensi...

  16. A KAS2 cDNA complements the phenotypes of the Arabidopsis fab1 mutant that differs in a single residue bordering the substrate binding pocket

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsson, A.S.; LaBrie, S.T.; Kinney, A.J.

    2002-01-01

    The fab1 mutant of Arabidopsis is partially deficient in activity of ß-ketoacyl-[acyl carrier protein] synthase II (KAS II). This defect results in increased levels of 16 : 0 fatty acid and is associated with damage and death of the mutants at low temperature. Transformation of fab1 plants with a c......DNA from Brassica napus encoding a KAS II enzyme resulted in complementation of both mutant phenotypes. The dual complementation by expression of the single gene proves that low-temperature damage is a consequence of altered membrane unsaturation. The fab1 mutation is a single nucleotide change...... chain to bend. For functional analysis the equivalent Leu207Phe mutation was introduced into the fabB gene encoding the E. coli KAS I enzyme. Compared to wild-type, the Leu207Phe protein showed a 10-fold decrease in binding affinity for the fatty acid substrate, exhibited a modified behavior during size...

  17. Navigating into the binding pockets of the HER family protein kinases: discovery of novel EGFR inhibitor as antitumor agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Ning, Jin-Feng; Meng, Qing-Wei; Hu, Jing; Zhao, Yan-Bin; Liu, Chao; Cai, Li

    2015-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family has been validated as a successful antitumor drug target for decades. Known EGFR inhibitors were exposed to distinct drug resistance against the various EGFR mutants within non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), particularly the T790M mutation. Although so far a number of studies have been reported on the development of third-generation EGFR inhibitors for overcoming the resistance issue, the design procedure largely depends on the intuition of medicinal chemists. Here we retrospectively make a detailed analysis of the 42 EGFR family protein crystal complexes deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). Based on the analysis of inhibitor binding modes in the kinase catalytic cleft, we identified a potent EGFR inhibitor (compound A-10) against drug-resistant EGFR through fragment-based drug design. This compound showed at least 30-fold more potency against EGFR T790M than the two control molecules erlotinib and gefitinib in vitro. Moreover, it could exhibit potent HER2 inhibitory activities as well as tumor growth inhibitory activity. Molecular docking studies revealed a structural basis for the increased potency and mutant selectivity of this compound. Compound A-10 may be selected as a promising candidate in further preclinical studies. In addition, our findings could provide a powerful strategy to identify novel selective kinase inhibitors on the basis of detailed kinase-ligand interaction space in the PDB.

  18. Active-site modification of mammalian DNA polymerase β with pyridoxal 5'-phosphate: Mechanism of inhibition and identification of lysine 71 in the deoxynucleoside triphosphate binding pocket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basu, A.; Kedar, P.; Wilson, S.H.; Modak, M.J.

    1989-01-01

    Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate is a potent inhibitor of the DNA polymerase activity of recombinant rat DNA polymerase β. Kinetic studies indicate that the mechanism of PLP inhibition is complex. In a lower range of PLP concentration, inhibition is competitive with respect to substrate dNTP, whereas at higher levels of PLP several forms of enzyme combine with PLP and are involved in the overall inhibition, and a possible model for these interactions during the catalytic process is suggested. Reduction of the PLP-treated enzyme with sodium [ 3 H]borohydride results in covalent incorporation of about 4 mol of PLP/mol of enzyme, and the modified enzyme is not capable of DNA polymerase activity. The presence of dNTP during the modification reaction blocks incorporation of 1 mol of PLP/mol of enzyme, and the enzyme so modified is almost fully active. This protective effect is not observed in the absence of template-primer. Tryptic peptide mapping of the PLP-modified enzyme reveals four major sites of modification. Of these four sites, only one is protected by dNTP from pyridoxylation. Sequence analysis of the tryptic peptide corresponding to the protected site reveals that it spans residues 68-80 in the amino acid sequence of the enzyme, with Lys 71 as the site of pyridoxylation. These results indicate that Lys 71 is at or near the binding pocket for the dNTP substrate

  19. Navigating into the binding pockets of the HER family protein kinases: discovery of novel EGFR inhibitor as antitumor agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu W

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Wei Liu,1,* Jin-Feng Ning,2,* Qing-Wei Meng,1 Jing Hu,1 Yan-Bin Zhao,1 Chao Liu,3 Li Cai11The Fourth Department of Medical Oncology, Harbin Medical University Cancer Hospital, 2The Thoracic Surgery Department, Harbin Medical University Cancer Hospital, Harbin, People’s Republic of China; 3General Surgery Department, Mudanjiang Guanliju Central Hospital, Mishan, Heilongjiang Province, People’s Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR family has been validated as a successful antitumor drug target for decades. Known EGFR inhibitors were exposed to distinct drug resistance against the various EGFR mutants within non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC, particularly the T790M mutation. Although so far a number of studies have been reported on the development of third-generation EGFR inhibitors for overcoming the resistance issue, the design procedure largely depends on the intuition of medicinal chemists. Here we retrospectively make a detailed analysis of the 42 EGFR family protein crystal complexes deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB. Based on the analysis of inhibitor binding modes in the kinase catalytic cleft, we identified a potent EGFR inhibitor (compound A-10 against drug-resistant EGFR through fragment-based drug design. This compound showed at least 30-fold more potency against EGFR T790M than the two control molecules erlotinib and gefitinib in vitro. Moreover, it could exhibit potent HER2 inhibitory activities as well as tumor growth inhibitory activity. Molecular docking studies revealed a structural basis for the increased potency and mutant selectivity of this compound. Compound A-10 may be selected as a promising candidate in further preclinical studies. In addition, our findings could provide a powerful strategy to identify novel selective kinase inhibitors on the basis of detailed kinase–ligand interaction space in the PDB.Keywords: EGFR, kinase

  20. Structure of an odorant-binding protein from the mosquito Aedes aegypti suggests a binding pocket covered by a pH-sensitive "Lid".

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ney Ribeiro Leite

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti, is the primary vector for the viruses that cause yellow fever, mostly in tropical regions of Africa and in parts of South America, and human dengue, which infects 100 million people yearly in the tropics and subtropics. A better understanding of the structural biology of olfactory proteins may pave the way for the development of environmentally-friendly mosquito attractants and repellents, which may ultimately contribute to reduction of mosquito biting and disease transmission. METHODOLOGY: Previously, we isolated and cloned a major, female-enriched odorant-binding protein (OBP from the yellow fever mosquito, AaegOBP1, which was later inadvertently renamed AaegOBP39. We prepared recombinant samples of AaegOBP1 by using an expression system that allows proper formation of disulfide bridges and generates functional OBPs, which are indistinguishable from native OBPs. We crystallized AaegOBP1 and determined its three-dimensional structure at 1.85 A resolution by molecular replacement based on the structure of the malaria mosquito OBP, AgamOBP1, the only mosquito OBP structure known to date. CONCLUSION: The structure of AaegOBP1 ( = AaegOBP39 shares the common fold of insect OBPs with six alpha-helices knitted by three disulfide bonds. A long molecule of polyethylene glycol (PEG was built into the electron-density maps identified in a long tunnel formed by a crystallographic dimer of AaegOBP1. Circular dichroism analysis indicated that delipidated AaegOBP1 undergoes a pH-dependent conformational change, which may lead to release of odorant at low pH (as in the environment in the vicinity of odorant receptors. A C-terminal loop covers the binding cavity and this "lid" may be opened by disruption of an array of acid-labile hydrogen bonds thus explaining reduced or no binding affinity at low pH.

  1. Guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins in retinal pigment epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Meisheng; Tran, V.T.; Fong, H.K.W. (Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles (United States)); Pandey, S. (Doheny Eye Inst., Los Angeles, CA (United States))

    1991-05-01

    The expression of GTP-binding regulatory proteins (G proteins) in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells was analyzed by RNA blot hybridization and cDNA amplification. Both adult and fetal human RPE cells contain mRNA for multiple G protein {alpha} subunits (G{alpha}) including G{sub s}{alpha}, G{sub i-1}{alpha}, G{sub i-2}{alpha}, G{sub i-3}{alpha}, and G{sub z}{alpha} (or G{sub x}{alpha}), where G{sub s} and G{sub i} are proteins that stimulate or inhibit adenylyl cyclase, respectively, and G{sub z} is a protein that may mediate pertussis toxin-insensitive events. Other G{alpha}-related mRNA transcripts were detected in fetal RPE cells by low-stringency hybridization to G{sub i-2}{alpha} and G{sub s}{alpha} protein-coding cDNA probes. The diversity of G proteins in RPE cells was further studied by cDNA amplification with reverse transcriptase and the polymerase chain reaction. This approach revealed that, besides the above mentioned members of the G{alpha} gene family, at least two other G{alpha} subunits are expressed in RPE cells. Human retinal cDNA clones that encode one of the additional G{alpha} subunits were isolated and characterized. The results indicate that this G{alpha} subunit belongs to a separate subfamily of G proteins that may be insensitive to inhibition by pertussis toxin.

  2. Mutation analysis of inhibitory guanine nucleotide binding protein alpha (GNAI) loci in young and familial pituitary adenomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Hande; Donner, Iikki; Kivipelto, Leena; Kuismin, Outi; Schalin-Jäntti, Camilla; De Menis, Ernesto; Karhu, Auli

    2014-01-01

    Pituitary adenomas are neoplasms of the anterior pituitary lobe and account for 15-20% of all intracranial tumors. Although most pituitary tumors are benign they can cause severe symptoms related to tumor size as well as hypopituitarism and/or hypersecretion of one or more pituitary hormones. Most pituitary adenomas are sporadic, but it has been estimated that 5% of patients have a familial background. Germline mutations of the tumor suppressor gene aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP) predispose to hereditary pituitary neoplasia. Recently, it has been demonstrated that AIP mutations predispose to pituitary tumorigenesis through defective inhibitory GTP binding protein (Gαi) signaling. This finding prompted us to examine whether germline loss-of-function mutations in inhibitory guanine nucleotide (GTP) binding protein alpha (GNAI) loci are involved in genetic predisposition of pituitary tumors. To our knowledge, this is the first time GNAI genes are sequenced in order to examine the occurrence of inactivating germline mutations. Thus far, only somatic gain-of-function hot-spot mutations have been studied in these loci. Here, we have analyzed the coding regions of GNAI1, GNAI2, and GNAI3 in a set of young sporadic somatotropinoma patients (n = 32; mean age of diagnosis 32 years) and familial index cases (n = 14), thus in patients with a disease phenotype similar to that observed in AIP mutation carriers. In addition, expression of Gαi proteins was studied in human growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL), adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-secreting and non-functional pituitary tumors. No pathogenic germline mutations affecting the Gαi proteins were detected. The result suggests that loss-of-function mutations of GNAI loci are rare or nonexistent in familial pituitary adenomas.

  3. Nucleotide-Binding Oligomerization Domain-1 and -2 Play No Role in Controlling Brucella abortus Infection in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda S. Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain proteins (NODs are modular cytoplasmic proteins implicated in the recognition of peptidoglycan-derived molecules. Further, several in vivo studies have demonstrated a role for Nod1 and Nod2 in host defense against bacterial pathogens. Here, we demonstrated that macrophages from NOD1-, NOD2-, and Rip2-deficient mice produced lower levels of TNF-α following infection with live Brucella abortus compared to wild-type mice. Similar reduction on cytokine synthesis was not observed for IL-12 and IL-6. However, NOD1, NOD2, and Rip2 knockout mice were no more susceptible to infection with virulent B. abortus than wild-type mice. Additionally, spleen cells from NOD1-, NOD2-, and Rip2-deficient mice showed unaltered production of IFN-γ compared to C57BL/6 mice. Taken together, this study demonstrates that NOD1, NOD2 and Rip2 are dispensable for the control of B. abortus during in vivo infection.

  4. Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2) activation induces apoptosis of human oral squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hyo-Eun; Ahn, Mee-Young; Kwon, Seong-Min; Kim, Dong-Jae; Lee, Jun; Yoon, Jung-Hoon

    2016-04-01

    Microbial Pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs), such as nucleotide-binding oligomerization domains (NODs), are essential for mammalian innate immune response. This study was designed to determine the effect of NOD1 and NOD2 agonist on innate immune responses and antitumor activity in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells. NODs expression was examined by RT-PCR, and IL-8 production by NODs agonist was examined by ELISA. Western blot analysis was performed to determine the MAPK activation in response to their agonist. Cell proliferation was determined by MTT assay. Flow cytometry and Western blot analysis were performed to determine the MDP-induced cell death. The levels of NODs were apparently expressed in OSCC cells. NODs agonist, Tri-DAP and MDP, led to the production of IL-8 and MAPK activation. NOD2 agonist, MDP, inhibited the proliferation of YD-10B cells in a dose-dependent manner. Also, the ratio of Annexin V-positive cells and cleaved PARP was increased by MDP treatment in YD-10B cells, suggesting that MDP-induced cell death in YD-10B cells may be owing to apoptosis. Our results indicate that NODs are functionally expressed in OSCC cells and can trigger innate immune responses. In addition, NOD2 agonist inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis. These findings provide the potential value of MDP as novel candidates for antitumor agents of OSCC. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Role of Nucleotide-Binding Oligomerization Domain-Containing (NOD 2 in Host Defense during Pneumococcal Pneumonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tijmen J Hommes

    Full Text Available Streptococcus (S. pneumoniae is the most common causative pathogen in community-acquired pneumonia. Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing (NOD 2 is a pattern recognition receptor located in the cytosol of myeloid cells that is able to detect peptidoglycan fragments of S. pneumoniae. We here aimed to investigate the role of NOD2 in the host response during pneumococcal pneumonia. Phagocytosis of S. pneumoniae was studied in NOD2 deficient (Nod2-/- and wild-type (Wt alveolar macrophages and neutrophils in vitro. In subsequent in vivo experiments Nod2-/- and Wt mice were inoculated with serotype 2 S. pneumoniae (D39, an isogenic capsule locus deletion mutant (D39Δcps or serotype 3 S. pneumoniae (6303 via the airways, and bacterial growth and dissemination and the lung inflammatory response were evaluated. Nod2-/- alveolar macrophages and blood neutrophils displayed a reduced capacity to internalize pneumococci in vitro. During pneumonia caused by S. pneumoniae D39 Nod2-/- mice were indistinguishable from Wt mice with regard to bacterial loads in lungs and distant organs, lung pathology and neutrophil recruitment. While Nod2-/- and Wt mice also had similar bacterial loads after infection with the more virulent S. pneumoniae 6303 strain, Nod2-/- mice displayed a reduced bacterial clearance of the normally avirulent unencapsulated D39Δcps strain. These results suggest that NOD2 does not contribute to host defense during pneumococcal pneumonia and that the pneumococcal capsule impairs recognition of S. pneumoniae by NOD2.

  6. The Nucleotide-Free State of the Multidrug Resistance ABC Transporter LmrA: Sulfhydryl Cross-Linking Supports a Constant Contact, Head-to-Tail Configuration of the Nucleotide-Binding Domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter M Jones

    Full Text Available ABC transporters are integral membrane pumps that are responsible for the import or export of a diverse range of molecules across cell membranes. ABC transporters have been implicated in many phenomena of medical importance, including cystic fibrosis and multidrug resistance in humans. The molecular architecture of ABC transporters comprises two transmembrane domains and two ATP-binding cassettes, or nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs, which are highly conserved and contain motifs that are crucial to ATP binding and hydrolysis. Despite the improved clarity of recent structural, biophysical, and biochemical data, the seemingly simple process of ATP binding and hydrolysis remains controversial, with a major unresolved issue being whether the NBD protomers separate during the catalytic cycle. Here chemical cross-linking data is presented for the bacterial ABC multidrug resistance (MDR transporter LmrA. These indicate that in the absence of nucleotide or substrate, the NBDs come into contact to a significant extent, even at 4°C, where ATPase activity is abrogated. The data are clearly not in accord with an inward-closed conformation akin to that observed in a crystal structure of V. cholerae MsbA. Rather, they suggest a head-to-tail configuration 'sandwich' dimer similar to that observed in crystal structures of nucleotide-bound ABC NBDs. We argue the data are more readily reconciled with the notion that the NBDs are in proximity while undergoing intra-domain motions, than with an NBD 'Switch' mechanism in which the NBD monomers separate in between ATP hydrolysis cycles.

  7. Regulation of formyl peptide receptor binding to rabbit neutrophil plasma membranes. Use of monovalent cations, guanine nucleotides, and bacterial toxins to discriminate among different states of the receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feltner, D.E.; Marasco, W.A.

    1989-01-01

    The regulation by monovalent cations, guanine nucleotides, and bacterial toxins of [3H]FMLP binding to rabbit neutrophil plasma membranes was studied by using dissociation techniques to identify regulatory effects on separate receptor states. Under conditions of low receptor occupancy (1 nM [3H]FMLP) and in both Na+ and K+ buffers, dissociation is heterogenous, displaying two distinct, statistically significant off rates. [3H]FMLP binding was enhanced by substituting other monovalent cations for Na+. In particular, enhanced binding in the presence of K+ relative to Na+ was caused by additional binding to both rapidly and slowly dissociating receptors. Three receptor dissociation rates, two of which appear to correspond to the two affinity states detected in equilibrium binding studies, were defined by specific GTP and pertussis toxin (PT) treatments. Neither GTP, nor PT or cholera toxins (CT) had an effect on the rate of dissociation of [3H]FMLP from the rapidly dissociating form of the receptor. Both 100 microM GTP and PT treatments increased the percentage of rapidly dissociating receptors, correspondingly decreasing the percentage of slowly dissociating receptors. The observed changes in the rapidly and slowly dissociating receptors after GTP, PT, and CT treatments were caused by an absolute decrease in the amount of binding to the slowly dissociating receptors. However, complete inhibition of slowly dissociating receptor binding by GTP, PT, or both was never observed. Both GTP and PT treatments, but not CT treatment, increased by two-fold the rate of dissociation of 1 nM [3H]FMLP from the slowly dissociating form of the receptor, resulting in a third dissociation rate. Thus, slowly dissociating receptors comprise two different receptor states, a G protein-associated guanine nucleotide and PT-sensitive state and a guanine nucleotide-insensitive state

  8. Global alteration of the drug-binding pocket of human P-glycoprotein (ABCB1) by substitution of fifteen conserved residues reveals a negative correlation between substrate size and transport efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahedi, Shahrooz; Chufan, Eduardo E; Ambudkar, Suresh V

    2017-11-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp), an ATP-dependent efflux pump, is linked to the development of multidrug resistance in cancer cells. However, the drug-binding sites and translocation pathways of this transporter are not yet well-characterized. We recently demonstrated the important role of tyrosine residues in regulating P-gp ATP hydrolysis via hydrogen bond formations with high affinity modulators. Since tyrosine is both a hydrogen bond donor and acceptor, and non-covalent interactions are key in drug transport, in this study we investigated the global effect of enrichment of tyrosine residues in the drug-binding pocket on the drug binding and transport function of P-gp. By employing computational analysis, 15 conserved residues in the drug-binding pocket of human P-gp that interact with substrates were identified and then substituted with tyrosine, including 11 phenylalanine (F72, F303, F314, F336, F732, F759, F770, F938, F942, F983, F994), two leucine (L339, L975), one isoleucine (I306), and one methionine (M949). Characterization of the tyrosine-rich P-gp mutant in HeLa cells demonstrated that this major alteration in the drug-binding pocket by introducing fifteen additional tyrosine residues is well tolerated and has no measurable effect on total or cell surface expression of this mutant. Although the tyrosine-enriched mutant P-gp could transport small to moderate size (transport large (>1000 Daltons) substrates such as NBD-cyclosporine A, Bodipy-paclitaxel and Bodipy-vinblastine was significantly decreased. This was further supported by the physico-chemical characterization of seventeen tested substrates, which revealed a negative correlation between drug transport and molecular size for the tyrosine-enriched P-gp mutant. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Systematic Analysis and Comparison of Nucleotide-Binding Site Disease Resistance Genes in a Diploid Cotton Gossypium raimondii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hengling; Li, Wei; Sun, Xiwei; Zhu, Shuijin; Zhu, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Plant disease resistance genes are a key component of defending plants from a range of pathogens. The majority of these resistance genes belong to the super-family that harbors a Nucleotide-binding site (NBS). A number of studies have focused on NBS-encoding genes in disease resistant breeding programs for diverse plants. However, little information has been reported with an emphasis on systematic analysis and comparison of NBS-encoding genes in cotton. To fill this gap of knowledge, in this study, we identified and investigated the NBS-encoding resistance genes in cotton using the whole genome sequence information of Gossypium raimondii. Totally, 355 NBS-encoding resistance genes were identified. Analyses of the conserved motifs and structural diversity showed that the most two distinct features for these genes are the high proportion of non-regular NBS genes and the high diversity of N-termini domains. Analyses of the physical locations and duplications of NBS-encoding genes showed that gene duplication of disease resistance genes could play an important role in cotton by leading to an increase in the functional diversity of the cotton NBS-encoding genes. Analyses of phylogenetic comparisons indicated that, in cotton, the NBS-encoding genes with TIR domain not only have their own evolution pattern different from those of genes without TIR domain, but also have their own species-specific pattern that differs from those of TIR genes in other plants. Analyses of the correlation between disease resistance QTL and NBS-encoding resistance genes showed that there could be more than half of the disease resistance QTL associated to the NBS-encoding genes in cotton, which agrees with previous studies establishing that more than half of plant resistance genes are NBS-encoding genes. PMID:23936305

  10. A primary survey on bryophyte species reveals two novel classes of nucleotide-binding site (NBS genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Yu Xue

    Full Text Available Due to their potential roles in pathogen defense, genes encoding nucleotide-binding site (NBS domain have been particularly surveyed in many angiosperm genomes. Two typical classes were found: one is the TIR-NBS-LRR (TNL class and the other is the CC-NBS-LRR (CNL class. It is seldom known, however, what kind of NBS-encoding genes are mainly present in other plant groups, especially the most ancient groups of land plants, that is, bryophytes. To fill this gap of knowledge, in this study, we mainly focused on two bryophyte species: the moss Physcomitrella patens and the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha, to survey their NBS-encoding genes. Surprisingly, two novel classes of NBS-encoding genes were discovered. The first novel class is identified from the P. patens genome and a typical member of this class has a protein kinase (PK domain at the N-terminus and a LRR domain at the C-terminus, forming a complete structure of PK-NBS-LRR (PNL, reminiscent of TNL and CNL classes in angiosperms. The second class is found from the liverwort genome and a typical member of this class possesses an α/β-hydrolase domain at the N-terminus and also a LRR domain at the C-terminus (Hydrolase-NBS-LRR, HNL. Analysis on intron positions and phases also confirmed the novelty of HNL and PNL classes, as reflected by their specific intron locations or phase characteristics. Phylogenetic analysis covering all four classes of NBS-encoding genes revealed a closer relationship among the HNL, PNL and TNL classes, suggesting the CNL class having a more divergent status from the others. The presence of specific introns highlights the chimerical structures of HNL, PNL and TNL genes, and implies their possible origin via exon-shuffling during the quick lineage separation processes of early land plants.

  11. Efficacy of the nucleotide-binding oligomerzation domain 1 inhibitor Nodinhibit-1 on corneal alkali burns in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Huang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To evaluate the therapeutic effect of Nodinhibit-1 on alkali-burn-induced corneal neovascularization (CNV and inflammation.The nucleotide-binding oligomerzation domain 1 (NOD1 is a potent angiogenic gene.METHODS:The alkali-burned rat corneas (32 right eyes were treated with eye drops containing Nodinhibit-1 or phosphate buffered solution (PBS, PH 7.4 only, four times per day. CNV and inflammation were monitored using slit lamp microscopy, and the area of CNV was measured by formula. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF was determined by Western blot analysis. The TUNEL assay was used to assess the corneal apoptosis cells.RESULTS:Alkali-burn-induced progressive CNV and inflammation in the cornea. After treatment for 7d and 14d, there were statistically significant differences in the CNV areas and inflammatory index on that between two group(P<0.05, respectively. Epithelial defect quantification showed a significant difference between the two groups at days 4 and 7 after the alkali burns (P<0.05. The apoptotic cells on days 1, 4, and 7 between the two groups showed significant differences at all time points (P<0.05, respectively. Compared to that in control group, the protein level of VEGF expression was significantly reduced whereas the PEDF expression was increase in the Nodinhibit-1 groups on day 14 (P<0.05, respectively=.CONCLUSION:Topical application of 10.0 μg/mL Nodinhibit-1 may have potential effect for the alkali burn-induced CNV and inflammation. The effect of Nodinhibit-1 on CNV may be by regulation the equilibrium of VEGF and PEDF in the wounded cornea.

  12. Bioinformatic analysis of the nucleotide binding site-encoding disease-resistance genes in foxtail millet (Setaria italica (L.) Beauv.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Y B; Xie, X Q; Li, Z Y; Bai, H; Dong, L; Dong, Z P; Dong, J G

    2014-08-28

    The nucleotide-binding site (NBS) disease-resistance genes are the largest category of plant disease-resistance gene analogs. The complete set of disease-resistant candidate genes, which encode the NBS sequence, was filtered in the genomes of two varieties of foxtail millet (Yugu1 and 'Zhang gu'). This study investigated a number of characteristics of the putative NBS genes, such as structural diversity and phylogenetic relationships. A total of 269 and 281 NBS-coding sequences were identified in Yugu1 and 'Zhang gu', respectively. When the two databases were compared, 72 genes were found to be identical and 164 genes showed more than 90% similarity. Physical positioning and gene family analysis of the NBS disease-resistance genes in the genome revealed that the number of genes on each chromosome was similar in both varieties. The eighth chromosome contained the largest number of genes and the ninth chromosome contained the lowest number of genes. Exactly 34 gene clusters containing the 161 genes were found in the Yugu1 genome, with each cluster containing 4.7 genes on average. In comparison, the 'Zhang gu' genome possessed 28 gene clusters, which had 151 genes, with an average of 5.4 genes in each cluster. The largest gene cluster, located on the eighth chromosome, contained 12 genes in the Yugu1 database, whereas it contained 16 genes in the 'Zhang gu' database. The classification results showed that the CC-NBS-LRR gene made up the largest part of each chromosome in the two databases. Two TIR-NBS genes were also found in the Yugu1 genome.

  13. Guanine nucleotide-binding protein subunit beta-2-like 1, a new Annexin A7 interacting protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, Yue; Meng, Jinyi; Huang, Yuhong; Wu, Jun; Wang, Bo; Ibrahim, Mohammed M.; Tang, Jianwu

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • RACK1 formed a complex with Annexin A7. • Depletion of RACK1 inhibited the proliferation, migration and invasion. • RACK1 RNAi abolished RACK1-Annexin A7 interaction. • RACK1-Annexin A7 may play a role in regulating the metastatic potentials. - Abstract: We report for the first time that Guanine nucleotide-binding protein subunit beta-2-like 1 (RACK1) formed a complex with Annexin A7. Hca-F and Hca-P are a pair of syngeneic mouse hepatocarcinoma cell lines established and maintained in our laboratory. Our previous study showed that both Annexin A7 and RACK1 were expressed higher in Hca-F (lymph node metastasis >70%) than Hca-P (lymph node metastasis <30%). Suppression of Annexin A7 expression in Hca-F cells induced decreased migration and invasion ability. In this study, knockdown of RACK1 by RNA interference (RNAi) had the same impact on metastasis potential of Hca-F cells as Annexin A7 down-regulation. Furthermore, by co-immunoprecipitation and double immunofluorescence confocal imaging, we found that RACK1 was in complex with Annexin A7 in control cells, but not in the RACK1-down-regulated cells, indicating the abolishment of RACK1-Annexin A7 interaction in Hca-F cells by RACK1 RNAi. Taken together, these results suggest that RACK1-Annexin A7 interaction may be one of the means by which RACK1 and Annexin A7 influence the metastasis potential of mouse hepatocarcinoma cells in vitro

  14. Study of the nucleotide binding site of the yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe plasma membrane H+-ATPase using formycin triphosphate-terbium complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronjat, M.; Lacapere, J.J.; Dufour, J.P.; Dupont, Y.

    1987-01-01

    The plasma membrane of yeasts contains an H+-ATPase similar to the other cation transport ATPases of eukaryotic organisms. This enzyme has been purified and shows H+ transport in reconstituted vesicles. In the presence of Mg2+, formycin triphosphate (FTP) is hydrolyzed by the H+-ATPase and supports H+ transport. When combined with terbium ion, FTP (Tb-FTP) and ATP (Tb-ATP) are no longer hydrolyzed. Competition between Mg-ATP and Tb-FTP for ATP hydrolysis indicates that terbium-associated nucleotides bind to the catalytic site of the H+-ATPase. The fluorescent properties of the Tb-FTP complex were used to study the active site of the H+-ATPase. Fluorescence of Tb-FTP is greatly enhanced upon binding into the nucleotide site of H+-ATPase with a dissociation constant of 1 microM. Tb-ATP, Tb-ADP, and Tb-ITP are competitive inhibitors of Tb-FTP binding with Ki = 4.5, 5.0, and 6.0 microM, respectively. Binding of Tb-FTP is observed only in the presence of an excess of Tb3+ with an activation constant Ka = 25 microM for Tb3+. Analysis of the data reveals that the sites for Tb-FTP and Tb3+ binding are independent entities. In standard conditions these sites would be occupied by Mg-ATP and Mg2+, respectively. These findings suggest an important regulatory role of divalent cations on the activity of H+-ATPase. Replacement of H 2 O by D 2 O in the medium suggests the existence of two types of nucleotide binding sites differing by the hydration state of the Tb3+ ion in the bound Tb-FTP complex

  15. Analysis of DNA binding by human factor xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A (XPA) provides insight into its interactions with nucleotide excision repair substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugitani, Norie; Voehler, Markus W; Roh, Michelle S; Topolska-Woś, Agnieszka M; Chazin, Walter J

    2017-10-13

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) complementation group A (XPA) is an essential scaffolding protein in the multiprotein nucleotide excision repair (NER) machinery. The interaction of XPA with DNA is a core function of this protein; a number of mutations in the DNA-binding domain (DBD) are associated with XP disease. Although structures of the central globular domain of human XPA and data on binding of DNA substrates have been reported, the structural basis for XPA's DNA-binding activity remains unknown. X-ray crystal structures of the central globular domain of yeast XPA (Rad14) with lesion-containing DNA duplexes have provided valuable insights, but the DNA substrates used for this study do not correspond to the substrates of XPA as it functions within the NER machinery. To better understand the DNA-binding activity of human XPA in NER, we used NMR to investigate the interaction of its DBD with a range of DNA substrates. We found that XPA binds different single-stranded/double-stranded junction DNA substrates with a common surface. Comparisons of our NMR-based mapping of binding residues with the previously reported Rad14-DNA crystal structures revealed similarities and differences in substrate binding between XPA and Rad14. This includes direct evidence for DNA contacts to the residues extending C-terminally from the globular core, which are lacking in the Rad14 construct. Moreover, mutation of the XPA residue corresponding to Phe-262 in Rad14, previously reported as being critical for DNA binding, had only a moderate effect on the DNA-binding activity of XPA. The DNA-binding properties of several disease-associated mutations in the DBD were investigated. These results suggest that for XPA mutants exhibiting altered DNA-binding properties, a correlation exists between the extent of reduction in DNA-binding affinity and the severity of symptoms in XP patients. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. A novel thymidylate synthase from the Vibrionales, Alteromonadales, Aeromonadales, and Pasteurellales (VAAP) clade with altered nucleotide and folate binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Zavala, Alonso A; Guevara-Hernandez, Eduardo; Vazquez-Lujan, Luz H; Sanchez-Paz, Arturo; Garcia-Orozco, Karina D; Contreras-Vergara, Carmen A; Lopez-Leal, Gamaliel; Arvizu-Flores, Aldo A; Ochoa-Leyva, Adrian; Sotelo-Mundo, Rogerio R

    2018-01-01

    Thymidylate synthase (TS, E.C. 2.1.1.45) is a crucial enzyme for de novo deoxythymidine monophosphate (dTMP) biosynthesis. The gene for this enzyme is thyA , which encodes the folate-dependent TS that converts deoxyuridine monophosphate group (dUMP) into (dTMP) using the cofactor 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate (mTHF) as a carbon donor. We identified the thyA gene in the genome of the Vibrio parahaemolyticus strain FIM-S1708+ that is innocuous to humans but pathogenic to crustaceans. Surprisingly, we found changes in the residues that bind the substrate dUMP and mTHF, previously postulated as invariant among all TSs known (Finer-Moore, Santi & Stroud, 2003). Interestingly, those amino acid changes were also found in a clade of microorganisms that contains Vibrionales , Alteromonadales , Aeromonadales , and Pasteurellales (VAAP) from the Gammaproteobacteria class. In this work, we studied the biochemical properties of recombinant TS from V. parahemolyticus FIM-S1708+ (VpTS) to address the natural changes in the TS amino acid sequence of the VAAP clade. Interestingly, the K m for dUMP was 27.3 ± 4.3 µM, about one-fold larger compared to other TSs. The K m for mTHF was 96.3 ± 18 µM, about three- to five-fold larger compared to other species, suggesting also loss of affinity. Thus, the catalytic efficiency was between one or two orders of magnitude smaller for both substrates. We used trimethoprim, a common antibiotic that targets both TS and DHFR for inhibition studies. The IC 50 values obtained were high compared to other results in the literature. Nonetheless, this molecule could be a lead for the design antibiotics towards pathogens from the VAAP clade. Overall, the experimental results also suggest that in the VAAP clade the nucleotide salvage pathway is important and should be investigated, since the de novo dTMP synthesis appears to be compromised by a less efficient thymidylate synthase.

  17. A novel thymidylate synthase from the Vibrionales, Alteromonadales, Aeromonadales, and Pasteurellales (VAAP clade with altered nucleotide and folate binding sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alonso A. Lopez-Zavala

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Thymidylate synthase (TS, E.C. 2.1.1.45 is a crucial enzyme for de novo deoxythymidine monophosphate (dTMP biosynthesis. The gene for this enzyme is thyA, which encodes the folate-dependent TS that converts deoxyuridine monophosphate group (dUMP into (dTMP using the cofactor 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate (mTHF as a carbon donor. We identified the thyA gene in the genome of the Vibrio parahaemolyticus strain FIM-S1708+ that is innocuous to humans but pathogenic to crustaceans. Surprisingly, we found changes in the residues that bind the substrate dUMP and mTHF, previously postulated as invariant among all TSs known (Finer-Moore, Santi & Stroud, 2003. Interestingly, those amino acid changes were also found in a clade of microorganisms that contains Vibrionales, Alteromonadales, Aeromonadales, and Pasteurellales (VAAP from the Gammaproteobacteria class. In this work, we studied the biochemical properties of recombinant TS from V. parahemolyticus FIM-S1708+ (VpTS to address the natural changes in the TS amino acid sequence of the VAAP clade. Interestingly, the Km for dUMP was 27.3 ± 4.3 µM, about one-fold larger compared to other TSs. The Km for mTHF was 96.3 ± 18 µM, about three- to five-fold larger compared to other species, suggesting also loss of affinity. Thus, the catalytic efficiency was between one or two orders of magnitude smaller for both substrates. We used trimethoprim, a common antibiotic that targets both TS and DHFR for inhibition studies. The IC50 values obtained were high compared to other results in the literature. Nonetheless, this molecule could be a lead for the design antibiotics towards pathogens from the VAAP clade. Overall, the experimental results also suggest that in the VAAP clade the nucleotide salvage pathway is important and should be investigated, since the de novo dTMP synthesis appears to be compromised by a less efficient thymidylate synthase.

  18. Role of a guanine nucleotide-binding protein in α1-adrenergic receptor-mediated Ca2+ mobilization in DDT1 MF-2 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornett, L.E.; Norris, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    In this study the mechanisms involved in α 1 -adrenergic receptor-mediated Ca 2+ mobilization at the level of the plasma membrane were investigated. Stimulation of 45 Ca 2+ efflux from saponin-permeabilized DDT 1 MF-2 cells was observed with the addition of either the α 1 -adrenergic agonist phenylephrine and guanosine-5'-triphosphate or the nonhydrolyzable guanine nucleotide guanylyl-imidodiphosphate. In the presence of [ 32 P] NAD, pertussis toxin was found to catalyze ADP-ribosylation of a M/sub r/ = 40,500 (n = 8) peptide in membranes prepared from DDT 1 , MF-2 cells, possibly the α-subunit of N/sub i/. However, stimulation of unidirectional 45 Ca 2+ efflux by phenylephrine was not affected by previous treatment of cells with 100 ng/ml pertussis toxin. These data suggest that the putative guanine nucleotide-binding protein which couples the α 1 -adrenergic receptor to Ca 2+ mobilization in DDT 1 MF-2 cells is not a pertussis toxin substrate and may possibly be an additional member of guanine nucleotide binding protein family

  19. Structural basis for the binding and incorporation of nucleotide analogs with L-stereochemistry by human DNA polymerase λ

    OpenAIRE

    Vyas, Rajan; Zahurancik, Walter J.; Suo, Zucai

    2014-01-01

    DNA polymerases are known to select against L-nucleotides, the enantiomers of natural D-nucleotides. However, the structural basis for D-stereoselectivity of a DNA polymerase has not been established, although two L-nucleoside analogs, lamivudine and emtricitabine, have been widely used as anti-HIV and anti-hepatitis B drugs. Here, we report ternary crystal structures of human DNA polymerase λ in complex with DNA and L-deoxycytidine 5′-triphosphate, or its analogs (the triphosphates of lamivu...

  20. KRAS G12C Drug Development: Discrimination between Switch II Pocket Configurations Using Hydrogen/Deuterium-Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Jia; Harrison, Rane A.; Li, Lianbo; Zeng, Mei; Gondi, Sudershan; Scott, David; Gray, Nathanael S.; Engen, John R.; Westover, Kenneth D. (NEU); (DFCI); (UTSMC); (Harvard-Med)

    2017-09-01

    KRAS G12C, the most common RAS mutation found in non-small-cell lung cancer, has been the subject of multiple recent covalent small-molecule inhibitor campaigns including efforts directed at the guanine nucleotide pocket and separate work focused on an inducible pocket adjacent to the switch motifs. Multiple conformations of switch II have been observed, suggesting that switch II pocket (SIIP) binders may be capable of engaging a range of KRAS conformations. Here we report the use of hydrogen/deuterium-exchange mass spectrometry (HDX MS) to discriminate between conformations of switch II induced by two chemical classes of SIIP binders. We investigated the structural basis for differences in HDX MS using X-ray crystallography and discovered a new SIIP configuration in response to binding of a quinazoline chemotype. These results have implications for structure-guided drug design targeting the RAS SIIP.

  1. Structures of a minimal human CFTR first nucleotide-binding domain as a monomer, head-to-tail homodimer, and pathogenic mutant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atwell, Shane; Brouillette, Christie G.; Conners, Kris; Emtage, Spencer; Gheyi, Tarun; Guggino, William B.; Hendle, Jorg; Hunt, John F.; Lewis, Hal A.; Lu, Frances; Protasevich, Irina I.; Rodgers, Logan A.; Romero, Rich; Wasserman, Stephen R.; Weber, Patricia C.; Wetmore, Diana; Zhang, Feiyu F.; Zhao, Xun (Cystic); (UAB); (JHU); (Columbia); (Lilly)

    2010-04-26

    Upon removal of the regulatory insert (RI), the first nucleotide binding domain (NBD1) of human cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) can be heterologously expressed and purified in a form that remains stable without solubilizing mutations, stabilizing agents or the regulatory extension (RE). This protein, NBD1 387-646({Delta}405-436), crystallizes as a homodimer with a head-to-tail association equivalent to the active conformation observed for NBDs from symmetric ATP transporters. The 1.7-{angstrom} resolution X-ray structure shows how ATP occupies the signature LSGGQ half-site in CFTR NBD1. The {Delta}F508 version of this protein also crystallizes as a homodimer and differs from the wild-type structure only in the vicinity of the disease-causing F508 deletion. A slightly longer construct crystallizes as a monomer. Comparisons of the homodimer structure with this and previously published monomeric structures show that the main effect of ATP binding at the signature site is to order the residues immediately preceding the signature sequence, residues 542-547, in a conformation compatible with nucleotide binding. These residues likely interact with a transmembrane domain intracellular loop in the full-length CFTR channel. The experiments described here show that removing the RI from NBD1 converts it into a well-behaved protein amenable to biophysical studies yielding deeper insights into CFTR function.

  2. Heteronuclear multidimensional NMR and homology modelling studies of the C-terminal nucleotide-binding domain of the human mitochondrial ABC transporter ABCB6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurashima-Ito, Kaori [RIKEN, Cellular and Molecular Biology Laboratory (Japan); Ikeya, Teppei [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), (Japan); Senbongi, Hiroshi [Mitochondrial Diseases Group, MRC Dunn Human NutritionUnit (United Kingdom); Tochio, Hidehito [International Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Supramolecular Biology, Yokohama City University, Molecular Biophysics Laboratory (Japan); Mikawa, Tsutomu [RIKEN, Cellular and Molecular Biology Laboratory (Japan); Shibata, Takehiko [RIKEN, Shibata Distinguished Senior Scientist Laboratory (Japan); Ito, Yutaka [RIKEN, Cellular and Molecular Biology Laboratory (Japan)], E-mail: ito-yutaka@center.tmu.ac.jp

    2006-05-15

    Human ATP-binding cassette, sub-family B, member 6 (ABCB6) is a mitochondrial ABC transporter, and presumably contributes to iron homeostasis. Aimed at understanding the structural basis for the conformational changes accompanying the substrate-transportation cycle, we have studied the C-terminal nucleotide-binding domain of ABCB6 (ABCB6-C) in both the nucleotide-free and ADP-bound states by heteronuclear multidimensional NMR and homology modelling. A non-linear sampling scheme was utilised for indirectly acquired {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N dimensions of all 3D triple-resonance NMR experiments, in order to overcome the instability and the low solubility of ABCB6-C. The backbone resonances for approximately 25% of non-proline residues, which are mostly distributed around the functionally important loops and in the Helical domain, were not observed for nucleotide-free form of ABCB6-C. From the pH, temperature and magnetic field strength dependencies of the resonance intensities, we concluded that this incompleteness in the assignments is mainly due to the exchange between multiple conformations at an intermediate rate on the NMR timescale. These localised conformational dynamics remained in ADP-bound ABCB6-C except for the loops responsible for adenine base and {alpha}/{beta}-phosphate binding. These results revealed that the localised dynamic cooperativity, which was recently proposed for a prokaryotic ABC MJ1267, also exists in a higher eukaryotic ABC, and is presumably shared by all members of the ABC family. Since the Helical domain is the putative interface to the transmembrane domain, this cooperativity may explain the coupled functions between domains in the substrate-transportation cycle.

  3. Functional interaction between the two halves of the photoreceptor-specific ATP binding cassette protein ABCR (ABCA4). Evidence for a non-exchangeable ADP in the first nucleotide binding domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jinhi; Beharry, Seelochan; Molday, Laurie L; Molday, Robert S

    2003-10-10

    ABCR, also known as ABCA4, is a member of the superfamily of ATP binding cassette transporters that is believed to transport retinal or retinylidene-phosphatidylethanolamine across photoreceptor disk membranes. Mutations in the ABCR gene are responsible for Stargardt macular dystrophy and related retinal dystrophies that cause severe loss in vision. ABCR consists of two tandemly arranged halves each containing a membrane spanning segment followed by a large extracellular/lumen domain, a multi-spanning membrane domain, and a nucleotide binding domain (NBD). To define the role of each NBD, we examined the nucleotide binding and ATPase activities of the N and C halves of ABCR individually and co-expressed in COS-1 cells and derived from trypsin-cleaved ABCR in disk membranes. When disk membranes or membranes from co-transfected cells were photoaffinity labeled with 8-azido-ATP and 8-azido-ADP, only the NBD2 in the C-half bound and trapped the nucleotide. Co-expressed half-molecules displayed basal and retinal-stimulated ATPase activity similar to full-length ABCR. The individually expressed N-half displayed weak 8-azido-ATP labeling and low basal ATPase activity that was not stimulated by retinal, whereas the C-half did not bind ATP and exhibited little if any ATPase activity. Purified ABCR contained one tightly bound ADP, presumably in NBD1. Our results indicate that only NBD2 of ABCR binds and hydrolyzes ATP in the presence or absence of retinal. NBD1, containing a bound ADP, associates with NBD2 to play a crucial, non-catalytic role in ABCR function.

  4. Acetylcholine-Binding Protein Engineered to Mimic the α4-α4 Binding Pocket in α4β2 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors Reveals Interface Specific Interactions Important for Binding and Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shahsavar, Azadeh; Ahring, Philip K; Olsen, Jeppe A

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are attractive drug targets for psychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders and smoking cessation aids. Recently, a third agonist binding site between two α4 subunits in the (α4)(3)(β2)(2) receptor subpopulation was discovered. In particular, three......-yl)-1,4-diazepane], highlights the roles of the three residues in determining binding affinities and functional properties of ligands at the α4-α4 interface. Confirmed by mutational studies, our structures suggest a unique ligand-specific role of residue H142 on the α4 subunit. In the cocrystal...... that could not be predicted based on wild-type Ls-AChBP structures in complex with the same agonists. The results show that an unprecedented correlation between binding in engineered AChBPs and functional receptors can be obtained and provide new opportunities for structure-based design of drugs targeting...

  5. Measurement of binding of adenine nucleotides and phosphate to cytosolic proteins in permeabilized rat-liver cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gankema, H. S.; Groen, A. K.; Wanders, R. J.; Tager, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    1. A method is described for measuring the binding of metabolites to cytosolic proteins in situ in isolated rat-liver cells treated with filipin to render the plasma membrane permeable to compounds of low molecular weight. 2. There is no binding of ATP or inorganic phosphate to cytosolic proteins,

  6. Insulin: its binding to specific receptors and its stimulation of DNA synthesis and 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide phosphohydrolase in embryonic mouse brain cell cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shanker, G.; Pieringer, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    Previously, the authors demonstrated that ornithine decarboxylase was stimulated by insulin in cultures of embryonic mouse brain cells. In the present work, they have investigated the presence and specificity of insulin receptors in these cultures. A time study showed that maximum binding of 125 [I] labelled insulin was around 75 min. Other studies measured the influence of concentration and age on insulin binding. A displacement study using increasing concentrations of cold insulin, glucagon or growth hormone demonstrated that the specificity of the receptors for insulin was rather high. It was also found that insulin displayed a clear dose-dependent stimulation of thymidine incorporation into the brain cells. Insulin also stimulated the glial enzyme 2':3'-cyclic nucleotide phosphohydrolase (CNP-ase). The results suggest a dual role for insulin; it regulates both cell proliferation as well as differentiation

  7. ABC transporter Cdr1p harbors charged residues in the intracellular loop and nucleotide-binding domain critical for protein trafficking and drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Abdul Haseeb; Banerjee, Atanu; Rawal, Manpreet Kaur; Saxena, Ajay Kumar; Mondal, Alok Kumar; Prasad, Rajendra

    2015-08-01

    The ABC transporter Cdr1 protein of Candida albicans, which plays a major role in antifungal resistance, has two transmembrane domains (TMDs) and two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs). The 12 transmembrane helices of TMDs that are interconnected by extracellular and intracellular loops (ICLs) mainly harbor substrate recognition sites where drugs bind while cytoplasmic NBDs hydrolyze ATP which powers drug efflux. The coupling of ATP hydrolysis to drug transport requires proper communication between NBDs and TMDs typically accomplished by ICLs. This study examines the role of cytoplasmic ICLs of Cdr1p by rationally predicting the critical residues on the basis of their interatomic distances. Among nine pairs that fall within a proximity of trafficking. These results point to a new role for ICL/NBD interacting residues in PDR ABC transporters in protein folding and trafficking. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Absence of zero-temperature transmission rate of a double-chain tight-binding model for DNA with random sequence of nucleotides in thermodynamic limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong Gang; Wang, X.R.

    2005-01-01

    The zero-temperature transmission rate spectrum of a double-chain tight-binding model for real DNA is calculated. It is shown that a band of extended-like states exists only for finite chain length with strong inter-chain coupling. While the whole spectrum tends to zero in thermodynamic limit, regardless of the strength of inter-chain coupling. It is also shown that a more faithful model for real DNA with periodic sugar-phosphate chains in backbone structures can be mapped into the above simple double-chain tight-binding model. Combined with above results, the transmission rate of real DNA with long random sequence of nucleotides is expected to be poor

  9. Identification of a common single nucleotide polymorphism at the primer binding site of D2S1360 that causes heterozygote peak imbalance when using the Investigator HDplex Kit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inokuchi, Shota; Yamashita, Yasuhiro; Nishimura, Kazuma; Nakanishi, Hiroaki; Saito, Kazuyuki

    2017-11-01

    Phenomena known as null alleles and peak imbalance can occur because of mutations in the primer binding sites used for DNA typing. In these cases, an accurate statistical evaluation of DNA typing is difficult. The estimated likelihood ratio is incorrectly calculated because of the null allele and allele dropout caused by mutation-induced peak imbalance. Although a number of studies have attempted to uncover examples of these phenomena, few reports are available on the human identification kit manufactured by Qiagen. In this study, 196 Japanese individuals who were heterozygous at D2S1360 were genotyped using an Investigator HDplex Kit with optimal amounts of DNA. A peak imbalance was frequently observed at the D2S1360 locus. We performed a sequencing analysis of the area surrounding the D2S1360 repeat motif to identify the cause for peak imbalance. A point mutation (G>A transition) 136 nucleotides upstream from the D2S1360 repeat motif was discovered in a number of samples. The allele frequency of the mutation was 0.0566 in the Japanese population. Therefore, human identification or kinship testing using the Investigator HDplex Kit requires caution because of the higher frequency of single nucleotide polymorphisms at the primer binding site of D2S1360 locus in the Japanese population.

  10. Reconstruction of the complete ouabain-binding pocket of Na,K-ATPase in gastric H,K-ATPase by substitution of only seven amino acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qiu, L.Y.; Krieger, E.; Schaftenaar, G.; Swarts, H.G.P.; Willems, P.H.G.M.; Pont, J.J.H.H.M. de; Koenderink, J.B.

    2005-01-01

    Although cardiac glycosides have been used as drugs for more than 2 centuries and their primary target, the sodium pump (Na, K-ATPase), has already been known for 4 decades, their exact binding site is still elusive. In our efforts to define the molecular basis of digitalis glycosides binding we

  11. Reconstruction of the complete ouabain-binding pocket of Na,K-ATPase in gastric H,K-ATPase by substitution of only seven amino acids.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qiu, L.; Krieger, E.; Schaftenaar, G.; Swarts, H.G.P.; Willems, P.H.G.M.; Pont, J.J.H.H.M. de; Koenderink, J.B.

    2005-01-01

    Although cardiac glycosides have been used as drugs for more than 2 centuries and their primary target, the sodium pump (Na,K-ATPase), has already been known for 4 decades, their exact binding site is still elusive. In our efforts to define the molecular basis of digitalis glycosides binding we

  12. The domain architecture of large guanine nucleotide exchange factors for the small GTP-binding protein Arf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geldner Niko

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Small G proteins, which are essential regulators of multiple cellular functions, are activated by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs that stimulate the exchange of the tightly bound GDP nucleotide by GTP. The catalytic domain responsible for nucleotide exchange is in general associated with non-catalytic domains that define the spatio-temporal conditions of activation. In the case of small G proteins of the Arf subfamily, which are major regulators of membrane trafficking, GEFs form a heterogeneous family whose only common characteristic is the well-characterized Sec7 catalytic domain. In contrast, the function of non-catalytic domains and how they regulate/cooperate with the catalytic domain is essentially unknown. Results Based on Sec7-containing sequences from fully-annotated eukaryotic genomes, including our annotation of these sequences from Paramecium, we have investigated the domain architecture of large ArfGEFs of the BIG and GBF subfamilies, which are involved in Golgi traffic. Multiple sequence alignments combined with the analysis of predicted secondary structures, non-structured regions and splicing patterns, identifies five novel non-catalytic structural domains which are common to both subfamilies, revealing that they share a conserved modular organization. We also report a novel ArfGEF subfamily with a domain organization so far unique to alveolates, which we name TBS (TBC-Sec7. Conclusion Our analysis unifies the BIG and GBF subfamilies into a higher order subfamily, which, together with their being the only subfamilies common to all eukaryotes, suggests that they descend from a common ancestor from which species-specific ArfGEFs have subsequently evolved. Our identification of a conserved modular architecture provides a background for future functional investigation of non-catalytic domains.

  13. Pocket Spending Guide

    OpenAIRE

    Poff, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Provides an example for how to set up a pocket spending guide. By filling out the guide and keeping it with you, you can easily see at any time how much money you have available to spend in each category. A pocket spending guide will help you adjust your spending plan to make your money go where you really want it to go.

  14. ATP-induced conformational changes of nucleotide-binding domains in an ABC transporter. Importance of the water-mediated entropic force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Tomohiko; Chiba, Shuntaro; Kaneta, Yusuke; Furuta, Tadaomi; Sakurai, Minoru

    2014-11-06

    ATP binding cassette (ABC) proteins belong to a superfamily of active transporters. Recent experimental and computational studies have shown that binding of ATP to the nucleotide binding domains (NBDs) of ABC proteins drives the dimerization of NBDs, which, in turn, causes large conformational changes within the transmembrane domains (TMDs). To elucidate the active substrate transport mechanism of ABC proteins, it is first necessary to understand how the NBD dimerization is driven by ATP binding. In this study, we selected MalKs (NBDs of a maltose transporter) as a representative NBD and calculated the free-energy change upon dimerization using molecular mechanics calculations combined with a statistical thermodynamic theory of liquids, as well as a method to calculate the translational, rotational, and vibrational entropy change. This combined method is applied to a large number of snapshot structures obtained from molecular dynamics simulations containing explicit water molecules. The results suggest that the NBD dimerization proceeds with a large gain of water entropy when ATP molecules bind to the NBDs. The energetic gain arising from direct NBD-NBD interactions is canceled by the dehydration penalty and the configurational-entropy loss. ATP hydrolysis induces a loss of the shape complementarity between the NBDs, which leads to the dissociation of the dimer, due to a decrease in the water-entropy gain and an increase in the configurational-entropy loss. This interpretation of the NBD dimerization mechanism in concert with ATP, especially focused on the water-mediated entropy force, is potentially applicable to a wide variety of the ABC transporters.

  15. Effect of point substitutions within the minimal DNA-binding domain of xeroderma pigmentosum group A protein on interaction with DNA intermediates of nucleotide excision repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltseva, E A; Krasikova, Y S; Naegeli, H; Lavrik, O I; Rechkunova, N I

    2014-06-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum factor A (XPA) is one of the key proteins in the nucleotide excision repair (NER) process. The effects of point substitutions in the DNA-binding domain of XPA (positively charged lysine residues replaced by negatively charged glutamate residues: XPA K204E, K179E, K141E, and tandem mutant K141E/K179E) on the interaction of the protein with DNA structures modeling intermediates of the damage recognition and pre-incision stages in NER were analyzed. All these mutations decreased the affinity of the protein to DNA, the effect depending on the substitution and the DNA structure. The mutant as well as wild-type proteins bind with highest efficiency partly open damaged DNA duplex, and the affinity of the mutants to this DNA is reduced in the order: K204E > K179E > K141E = K141/179E. For all the mutants, decrease in DNA binding efficiency was more pronounced in the case of full duplex and single-stranded DNA than with bubble-DNA structure, the difference between protein affinities to different DNA structures increasing as DNA binding activity of the mutant decreased. No effect of the studied XPA mutations on the location of the protein on the partially open DNA duplex was observed using photoinduced crosslinking with 5-I-dUMP in different positions of the damaged DNA strand. These results combined with earlier published data suggest no direct correlation between DNA binding and activity in NER for these XPA mutants.

  16. Pocket pumped image analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotov, I.V., E-mail: kotov@bnl.gov [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); O' Connor, P. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Murray, N. [Centre for Electronic Imaging, Open University, Milton Keynes, MK7 6AA (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-01

    The pocket pumping technique is used to detect small electron trap sites. These traps, if present, degrade CCD charge transfer efficiency. To reveal traps in the active area, a CCD is illuminated with a flat field and, before image is read out, accumulated charges are moved back and forth number of times in parallel direction. As charges are moved over a trap, an electron is removed from the original pocket and re-emitted in the following pocket. As process repeats one pocket gets depleted and the neighboring pocket gets excess of charges. As a result a “dipole” signal appears on the otherwise flat background level. The amplitude of the dipole signal depends on the trap pumping efficiency. This paper is focused on trap identification technique and particularly on new methods developed for this purpose. The sensor with bad segments was deliberately chosen for algorithms development and to demonstrate sensitivity and power of new methods in uncovering sensor defects.

  17. Secondary and tertiary structure of nucleotide-binding domain of alpha subunit of Na+/K+-ATPase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hofbauerová, Kateřina; Kopecký ml., Vladimír; Ettrich, Rüdiger; Ettrichová, Olga; Amler, Evžen

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 67, 4-5 (2002), s. 242-246 ISSN 0006-3525 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/01/0254; GA ČR GA204/01/1001 Grant - others:Volkswagen Foundation(DE) I/74 679 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : Na+/K+- ATPase * ATP binding * molecular modeling Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.372, year: 2002

  18. Cap-proximal nucleotides via differential eIF4E binding and alternative promoter usage mediate translational response to energy stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamarkin-Ben-Harush, Ana; Vasseur, Jean-Jacques; Debart, Françoise; Ulitsky, Igor; Dikstein, Rivka

    2017-02-08

    Transcription start-site (TSS) selection and alternative promoter (AP) usage contribute to gene expression complexity but little is known about their impact on translation. Here we performed TSS mapping of the translatome following energy stress. Assessing the contribution of cap-proximal TSS nucleotides, we found dramatic effect on translation only upon stress. As eIF4E levels were reduced, we determined its binding to capped-RNAs with different initiating nucleotides and found the lowest affinity to 5'cytidine in correlation with the translational stress-response. In addition, the number of differentially translated APs was elevated following stress. These include novel glucose starvation-induced downstream transcripts for the translation regulators eIF4A and Pabp, which are also translationally-induced despite general translational inhibition. The resultant eIF4A protein is N-terminally truncated and acts as eIF4A inhibitor. The induced Pabp isoform has shorter 5'UTR removing an auto-inhibitory element. Our findings uncovered several levels of coordination of transcription and translation responses to energy stress.

  19. Curcumin stably interacts with DNA hairpin through minor groove binding and demonstrates enhanced cytotoxicity in combination with FdU nucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Supratim; Mallick, Sumana; Das, Upasana; Verma, Ajay; Pal, Uttam; Chatterjee, Sabyasachi; Nandy, Abhishek; Saha, Krishna D; Maiti, Nakul Chandra; Baishya, Bikash; Suresh Kumar, G; Gmeiner, William H

    2018-03-01

    We report, based on biophysical studies and molecular mechanical calculations that curcumin binds DNA hairpin in the minor groove adjacent to the loop region forming a stable complex. UV-Vis and fluorescence spectroscopy indicated interaction of curcumin with DNA hairpin. In this novel binding motif, two ɣ H of curcumin heptadiene chain are closely positioned to the A 16 -H8 and A 17 -H8, while G 12 -H8 is located in the close proximity of curcumin α H. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations suggest, the complex is stabilized by noncovalent forces including; π-π stacking, H-bonding and hydrophobic interactions. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in combination with molecular dynamics simulations indicated curcumin is bound in the minor groove, while circular dichroism (CD) spectra suggested minute enhancement in base stacking and a little change in DNA helicity, without significant conformational change of DNA hairpin structure. The DNA:curcumin complex formed with FdU nucleotides rather than Thymidine, demonstrated enhanced cytotoxicity towards oral cancer cells relative to the only FdU substituted hairpin. Fluorescence co-localization demonstrated stability of the complex in biologically relevant conditions, including its cellular uptake. Acridine orange/EtBr staining further confirmed the enhanced cytotoxic effects of the complex, suggesting apoptosis as mode of cell death. Thus, curcumin can be noncovalently complexed to small DNA hairpin for cellular delivery and the complex showed increased cytotoxicity in combination with FdU nucleotides, demonstrating its potential for advanced cancer therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Reconstruction of the complete ouabain-binding pocket of Na,K-ATPase in gastric H,K-ATPase by substitution of only seven amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Li Yan; Krieger, Elmar; Schaftenaar, Gijs; Swarts, Herman G P; Willems, Peter H G M; De Pont, Jan Joep H H M; Koenderink, Jan B

    2005-09-16

    Although cardiac glycosides have been used as drugs for more than 2 centuries and their primary target, the sodium pump (Na,K-ATPase), has already been known for 4 decades, their exact binding site is still elusive. In our efforts to define the molecular basis of digitalis glycosides binding we started from the fact that a closely related enzyme, the gastric H,K-ATPase, does not bind glycosides like ouabain. Previously, we showed that a chimera of these two enzymes, in which only the M3-M4 and M5-M6 hairpins were of Na,K-ATPase, bound ouabain with high affinity (Koenderink, J. B., Hermsen, H. P. H., Swarts, H. G. P., Willems, P. H. G. M., and De Pont, J. J. H. H. M. (2000) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 97, 11209-11214). We also demonstrated that only three amino acids (Phe(783), Thr(797), and Asp(804)) present in the M5-M6 hairpin of Na,K-ATPase were sufficient to confer high affinity ouabain binding to a chimera which contained in addition the M3-M4 hairpin of Na,K-ATPase (Qiu, L. Y., Koenderink, J. B., Swarts, H. G., Willems, P. H., and De Pont, J. J. H. H. M. (2003) J. Biol. Chem. 278, 47240-47244). To further pinpoint the ouabain-binding site here we used a chimera-based loss-of-function strategy and identified four amino acids (Glu(312), Val(314), Ile(315), Gly(319)), all present in M4, as being important for ouabain binding. In a final gain-of-function study we showed that a gastric H,K-ATPase that contained Glu(312), Val(314), Ile(315), Gly(319), Phe(783), Thr(797), and Asp(804) of Na,K-ATPase bound ouabain with the same affinity as the native enzyme. Based on the E(2)P crystal structure of Ca(2+)-ATPase we constructed a homology model for the ouabain-binding site of Na,K-ATPase involving all seven amino acids as well as several earlier postulated amino acids.

  1. Identification of an hexapeptide that binds to a surface pocket in cyclin A and inhibits the catalytic activity of the complex cyclin-dependent kinase 2-cyclin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canela, Núria; Orzáez, Mar; Fucho, Raquel; Mateo, Francesca; Gutierrez, Ricardo; Pineda-Lucena, Antonio; Bachs, Oriol; Pérez-Payá, Enrique

    2006-11-24

    The protein-protein complexes formed between different cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are central to cell cycle regulation. These complexes represent interesting points of chemical intervention for the development of antineoplastic molecules. Here we describe the identification of an all d-amino acid hexapeptide, termed NBI1, that inhibits the kinase activity of the cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (cdk2)-cyclin A complex through selective binding to cyclin A. The mechanism of inhibition is non-competitive for ATP and non-competitive for protein substrates. In contrast to the existing CDKs peptide inhibitors, the hexapeptide NBI1 interferes with the formation of the cdk2-cyclin A complex. Furthermore, a cell-permeable derivative of NBI1 induces apoptosis and inhibits proliferation of tumor cell lines. Thus, the NBI1-binding site on cyclin A may represent a new target site for the selective inhibition of activity cdk2-cyclin A complex.

  2. Interaction Pattern of Arg 62 in the A-Pocket of Differentially Disease-Associated HLA-B27 Subtypes Suggests Distinct TCR Binding Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauli, Alberto; Mathieu, Alessandro; Tedeschi, Valentina; Caristi, Silvana; Sorrentino, Rosa; Böckmann, Rainer A.; Fiorillo, Maria Teresa

    2012-01-01

    The single amino acid replacement Asp116His distinguishes the two subtypes HLA-B*2705 and HLA-B*2709 which are, respectively, associated and non-associated with Ankylosing Spondylitis, an autoimmune chronic inflammatory disease. The reason for this differential association is so far poorly understood and might be related to subtype-specific HLA:peptide conformations as well as to subtype/peptide-dependent dynamical properties on the nanoscale. Here, we combine functional experiments with extensive molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the molecular dynamics and function of the conserved Arg62 of the α1-helix for both B27 subtypes in complex with the self-peptides pVIPR (RRKWRRWHL) and TIS (RRLPIFSRL), and the viral peptides pLMP2 (RRRWRRLTV) and NPflu (SRYWAIRTR). Simulations of HLA:peptide systems suggest that peptide-stabilizing interactions of the Arg62 residue observed in crystal structures are metastable for both B27 subtypes under physiological conditions, rendering this arginine solvent-exposed and, probably, a key residue for TCR interaction more than peptide-binding. This view is supported by functional experiments with conservative (R62K) and non-conservative (R62A) B*2705 and B*2709 mutants that showed an overall reduction in their capability to present peptides to CD8+ T cells. Moreover, major subtype-dependent differences in the peptide recognition suggest distinct TCR binding modes for the B*2705 versus the B*2709 subtype. PMID:22403718

  3. Isolation of nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeat and kinase resistance gene analogues from sugarcane (Saccharum spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glynn, Neil C; Comstock, Jack C; Sood, Sushma G; Dang, Phat M; Chaparro, Jose X

    2008-01-01

    Resistance gene analogues (RGAs) have been isolated from many crops and offer potential in breeding for disease resistance through marker-assisted selection, either as closely linked or as perfect markers. Many R-gene sequences contain kinase domains, and indeed kinase genes have been reported as being proximal to R-genes, making kinase analogues an additionally promising target. The first step towards utilizing RGAs as markers for disease resistance is isolation and characterization of the sequences. Sugarcane clone US01-1158 was identified as resistant to yellow leaf caused by the sugarcane yellow leaf virus (SCYLV) and moderately resistant to rust caused by Puccinia melanocephala Sydow & Sydow. Degenerate primers that had previously proved useful for isolating RGAs and kinase analogues in wheat and soybean were used to amplify DNA from sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) clone US-01-1158. Sequences generated from 1512 positive clones were assembled into 134 contigs of between two and 105 sequences. Comparison of the contig consensuses with the NCBI sequence database using BLASTx showed that 20 had sequence homology to nuclear binding site and leucine rich repeat (NBS-LRR) RGAs, and eight to kinase genes. Alignment of the deduced amino acid sequences with similar sequences from the NCBI database allowed the identification of several conserved domains. The alignment and resulting phenetic tree showed that many of the sequences had greater similarity to sequences from other species than to one another. The use of degenerate primers is a useful method for isolating novel sugarcane RGA and kinase gene analogues. Further studies are needed to evaluate the role of these genes in disease resistance.

  4. Synthesis and evaluation of translocator 18 kDa protein (TSPO) positron emission tomography (PET) radioligands with low binding sensitivity to human single nucleotide polymorphism rs6971.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanotti-Fregonara, Paolo; Zhang, Yi; Jenko, Kimberly J; Gladding, Robert L; Zoghbi, Sami S; Fujita, Masahiro; Sbardella, Gianluca; Castellano, Sabrina; Taliani, Sabrina; Martini, Claudia; Innis, Robert B; Da Settimo, Federico; Pike, Victor W

    2014-10-15

    The imaging of translocator 18 kDa protein (TSPO) in living human brain with radioligands by positron emission tomography (PET) has become an important means for the study of neuroinflammatory conditions occurring in several neuropsychiatric disorders. The widely used prototypical PET radioligand [(11)C](R)-PK 11195 ([(11)C](R)-1; [N-methyl-(11)C](R)-N-sec-butyl-1-(2-chlorophenyl)-N-methylisoquinoline-3-carboxamide) gives a low PET signal and is difficult to quantify, whereas later generation radioligands have binding sensitivity to a human single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs6971, which imposes limitations on their utility for comparative quantitative PET studies of normal and diseased subjects. Recently, azaisosteres of 1 have been developed with improved drug-like properties, including enhanced TSPO affinity accompanied by moderated lipophilicity. Here we selected three of these new ligands (7-9) for labeling with carbon-11 and for evaluation in monkey as candidate PET radioligands for imaging brain TSPO. Each radioligand was readily prepared by (11)C-methylation of an N-desmethyl precursor and was found to give a high proportion of TSPO-specific binding in monkey brain. One of these radioligands, [(11)C]7, the direct 4-azaisostere of 1, presents many radioligand properties that are superior to those reported for [(11)C]1, including higher affinity, lower lipophilicity, and stable quantifiable PET signal. Importantly, 7 was also found to show very low sensitivity to the human SNP rs6971 in vitro. Therefore, [(11)C]7 now warrants evaluation in human subjects with PET to assess its utility for imaging TSPO in human brain, irrespective of subject genotype.

  5. Google Pocket Guide

    CERN Document Server

    Calishain, Tara; Adams, DJ

    2003-01-01

    Beneath its deceptively simple search form, Google is a remarkably powerful and flexible search engine that indexes billions of web pages, handling more than 150 million searches a day. You know that what you're looking for must be in there somewhere, but how do you make Google work for you? Crafted from our best-selling Google Hacks title, the Google Pocket Guide provides exactly the information you need to make your searches faster and more effective, right from the start. The Google Pocket Guide unleashes the power behind that blinking cursor by delivering: A thorough but concise tour o

  6. HTML & XHTML Pocket Reference

    CERN Document Server

    Robbins, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    After years of using spacer GIFs, layers of nested tables, and other improvised solutions for building your web sites, getting used to the more stringent standards-compliant design can be intimidating. HTML and XHTML Pocket Reference is the perfect little book when you need answers immediately. Jennifer Niederst-Robbins, author Web Design in a Nutshell, has revised and updated the fourth edition of this pocket guide by taking the top 20% of vital reference information from her Nutshell book, augmenting it judiciously, cross-referencing everything, and organizing it according to the most com

  7. VBScript pocket reference

    CERN Document Server

    Lomax, Paul; Petrusha, Ron

    2008-01-01

    Microsoft's Visual Basic Scripting Edition (VBScript), a subset of Visual Basic for Applications, is a powerful language for Internet application development, where it can serve as a scripting language for server-side, client-side, and system scripting. Whether you're developing code for Active Server Pages, client-side scripts for Internet Explorer, code for Outlook forms, or scripts for Windows Script Host, VBScript Pocket Reference will be your constant companion. Don't let the pocket-friendly format fool you. Based on the bestsellingVBScript in a Nutshell, this small book details every V

  8. Newnes electrical pocket book

    CERN Document Server

    Reeves, E A

    2013-01-01

    Newnes Electrical Pocket Book, Twenty-first Edition, provides engineers with convenient access to various facts, tables, and formulae relating to the particular branch of engineering being dealt with. In the case of electrical engineering, it is essential that the engineer have a clear understanding of the methods by which the various formulae are derived to ensure that any particular formulae is applicable to the conditions being considered. The first section of the Pocket Book is devoted to the theoretical groundwork upon which all the practical applications are based. This covers symbols,

  9. Discovery of Nanomolar Desmuramylpeptide Agonists of the Innate Immune Receptor Nucleotide-Binding Oligomerization Domain-Containing Protein 2 (NOD2) Possessing Immunostimulatory Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobec, Martina; Tomašič, Tihomir; Štimac, Adela; Frkanec, Ruža; Trontelj, Jurij; Anderluh, Marko; Mlinarič-Raščan, Irena; Jakopin, Žiga

    2018-04-12

    Muramyl dipeptide (MDP), a fragment of bacterial peptidoglycan, has long been known as the smallest fragment possessing adjuvant activity, on the basis of its agonistic action on the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 2 (NOD2). There is a pressing need for novel adjuvants, and NOD2 agonists provide an untapped source of potential candidates. Here, we report the design, synthesis, and characterization of a series of novel acyl tripeptides. A pivotal structural element for molecular recognition by NOD2 has been identified, culminating in the discovery of compound 9, the most potent desmuramylpeptide NOD2 agonist to date. Compound 9 augmented pro-inflammatory cytokine release from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in synergy with lipopolysaccharide. Furthermore, it was able to induce ovalbumin-specific IgG titers in a mouse model of adjuvancy. These findings provide deeper insights into the structural requirements of desmuramylpeptides for NOD2-activation and highlight the potential use of NOD2 agonists as adjuvants for vaccines.

  10. Association between single nucleotide polymorphisms of sterol regulatory element binding protein-2 gene and risk of knee osteoarthritis in a Chinese Han population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Xiao-Ming; Jin, Cheng-Tao; Wang, Wei

    2014-04-01

    To investigate associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs2228314 and rs2267443 in the sterol regulatory element binding protein-2 gene (SREBP-2) and knee osteoarthritis (OA) susceptibility in a Chinese Han population. SREBP-2 rs2228314 and rs2267443 polymorphisms were genotyped in patients with knee OA and age- and sex-matched OA-free controls from a Chinese Han population. A total of 402 patients with knee OA and 410 controls were enrolled in the study. GC and CC genotypes of rs2228314, and variant C, were associated with a significantly increased risk of knee OA. On stratification analysis, the association between the risk of OA and rs2228314 GC heterozygotes compared with GG homozygotes was stronger in females and those aged >65 years. In contrast, the GA and AA genotypes of rs2267443 were not significantly associated with the risk of knee OA, even after further stratification analysis according to age or sex. SREBP-2 rs2228314 G to C change and variant C genotype may contribute to knee OA risk in a Chinese Han population.

  11. Stabilization of a nucleotide-binding domain of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator yields insight into disease-causing mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, Robert M; Chong, P Andrew; Lin, Hong; Yang, Zhengrong; Zhou, Qingxian; Aleksandrov, Andrei A; Dawson, Jennifer E; Riordan, John R; Brouillette, Christie G; Thibodeau, Patrick H; Forman-Kay, Julie D

    2017-08-25

    Characterization of the second nucleotide-binding domain (NBD2) of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) has lagged behind research into the NBD1 domain, in part because NBD1 contains the F508del mutation, which is the dominant cause of cystic fibrosis. Research on NBD2 has also been hampered by the overall instability of the domain and the difficulty of producing reagents. Nonetheless, multiple disease-causing mutations reside in NBD2, and the domain is critical for CFTR function, because channel gating involves NBD1/NBD2 dimerization, and NBD2 contains the catalytically active ATPase site in CFTR. Recognizing the paucity of structural and biophysical data on NBD2, here we have defined a bioinformatics-based method for manually identifying stabilizing substitutions in NBD2, and we used an iterative process of screening single substitutions against thermal melting points to both produce minimally mutated stable constructs and individually characterize mutations. We present a range of stable constructs with minimal mutations to help inform further research on NBD2. We have used this stabilized background to study the effects of NBD2 mutations identified in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, demonstrating that mutants such as N1303K and G1349D are characterized by lower stability, as shown previously for some NBD1 mutations, suggesting a potential role for NBD2 instability in the pathology of CF. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. The wheat homolog of putative nucleotide-binding site-leucine-rich repeat resistance gene TaRGA contributes to resistance against powdery mildew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Defu; Wang, Xiaobing; Mei, Yu; Dong, Hansong

    2016-03-01

    Powdery mildew, one of the most destructive wheat diseases worldwide, is caused by Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici (Bgt), a fungal species with a consistently high mutation rate that makes individual resistance (R) genes ineffective. Therefore, effective resistance-related gene cloning is vital for breeding and studying the resistance mechanisms of the disease. In this study, a putative nucleotide-binding site-leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR) R gene (TaRGA) was cloned using a homology-based cloning strategy and analyzed for its effect on powdery mildew disease and wheat defense responses. Real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) analyses revealed that a Bgt isolate 15 and salicylic acid stimulation significantly induced TaRGA in the resistant variety. Furthermore, the silencing of TaRGA in powdery mildew-resistant plants increased susceptibility to Bgt15 and prompted conidia propagation at the infection site. However, the expression of TaRGA in leaf segments after single-cell transient expression assay highly increased the defense responses to Bgt15 by enhancing callose deposition and phenolic autofluorogen accumulation at the pathogen invading sites. Meanwhile, the expression of pathogenesis-related genes decreased in the TaRGA-silenced plants and increased in the TaRGA-transient-overexpressing leaf segments. These results implied that the TaRGA gene positively regulates the defense response to powdery mildew disease in wheat.

  13. Association study of genetic variants at single nucleotide polymorphism rs109231409 of mannose-binding lectins 1 gene with mastitis susceptibility in Vrindavani crossbred cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Muhasin Asaf

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study was undertaken to identify whether single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP rs109231409 located on mannose-binding lectins 1 (MBL1 gene was associated with mastitis tolerance/susceptibility. Materials and Methods: After grouping 100 Vrindavani crossbred cattle as mastitis positive and negative animals, they were genotyped using polymerase chain reaction (PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphisms method. Gene and genotype frequencies of different patterns were estimated by standard procedure (POPGENE version 1.32, (University of Alberta, Canada and statistical analysis was carried out by logistic regression methods using STATA 12 software (StataCorp LP, USA. Results: The 588 bp fragment of MBL1 gene was amplified using PCR. PCR product was digested with ApaI restriction enzyme showed two distinct genotypes viz., GG (311 bp and 272 bp fragments and GA (588 bp, 311 bp and 277 bp fragments. The gene, genotype frequencies, average heterozygosity, polymorphic information content and χ2 values for the locus rs109231409 was ascertained. Conclusions: No significant association between SNP “rs109231409” with mastitis tolerance was found. Although there is a lack of association, further studies have to be undertaken in a large population in order to validate the impact of rs109231409 (g.855G >A on mastitis tolerance.

  14. Activation of nucleotide-binding domain-like receptor containing protein 3 inflammasome in dendritic cells and macrophages by Streptococcus sanguinis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeki, Ayumi; Suzuki, Toshihiko; Hasebe, Akira; Kamezaki, Ryousuke; Fujita, Mari; Nakazawa, Futoshi; Shibata, Ken-Ichiro

    2017-03-01

    Streptococcus sanguinis is frequently isolated from the blood of patients with infective endocarditis and contributes to the pathology of this disease through induction of interleukin (IL)-1β responsible for the development of the disease. However, the mechanism of IL-1β induction remains unknown. In this study, S. sanguinis activated a murine dendritic cell (DC) to induce IL-1β and this activity was attenuated by silencing the mRNAs of nucleotide-binding domain-like receptor containing protein 3 (NLRP3) and caspase-1. S. sanguinis induced IL-1β production in murine bone marrow-derived macrophage, but this activity was significantly reduced in bone marrow-derived macrophages from NLRP3-, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase-recruitment domain-, and caspase-1-deficient mice. DC phagocytosed S. sanguinis cells, followed by the release of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). The ATP-degradating enzyme attenuated the release of ATP and IL-1β. The inhibitors for ATP receptor reduced IL-1β release in DC. These results strongly suggest that S. sanguinis has the activity to induce IL-1β through the NLRP3 inflammasome in macrophage and DC and interaction of purinergic receptors with ATP released is involved in expression of the activity. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Genome-wide identification and tissue-specific expression analysis of nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeat gene family in Cicer arietinum (kabuli chickpea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ranu; Rawat, Vimal; Suresh, C G

    2017-12-01

    The nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeat (NBS-LRR) proteins play an important role in the defense mechanisms against pathogens. Using bioinformatics approach, we identified and annotated 104 NBS-LRR genes in chickpea. Phylogenetic analysis points to their diversification into two families namely TIR-NBS-LRR and non-TIR-NBS-LRR. Gene architecture revealed intron gain/loss events in this resistance gene family during their independent evolution into two families. Comparative genomics analysis elucidated its evolutionary relationship with other fabaceae species. Around 50% NBS-LRRs reside in macro-syntenic blocks underlining positional conservation along with sequence conservation of NBS-LRR genes in chickpea. Transcriptome sequencing data provided evidence for their transcription and tissue-specific expression. Four cis -regulatory elements namely WBOX, DRE, CBF, and GCC boxes, that commonly occur in resistance genes, were present in the promoter regions of these genes. Further, the findings will provide a strong background to use candidate disease resistance NBS-encoding genes and identify their specific roles in chickpea.

  16. Genome-wide Comparative Analyses Reveal the Dynamic Evolution of Nucleotide-Binding Leucine-Rich Repeat Gene Family among Solanaceae Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunyoung Seo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Plants have evolved an elaborate innate immune system against invading pathogens. Within this system, intracellular nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR immune receptors are known play critical roles in effector-triggered immunity (ETI plant defense. We performed genome-wide identification and classification of NLR-coding sequences from the genomes of pepper, tomato, and potato using fixed criteria. We then compared genomic duplication and evolution features. We identified intact 267, 443, and 755 NLR-encoding genes in tomato, potato, and pepper genomes, respectively. Phylogenetic analyses and classification of Solanaceae NLRs revealed that the majority of NLR super family members fell into 14 subgroups, including a TIR-NLR (TNL subgroup and 13 non-TNL subgroups. Specific subgroups have expanded in each genome, with the expansion in pepper showing subgroup-specific physical clusters. Comparative analysis of duplications showed distinct duplication patterns within pepper and among Solanaceae plants suggesting subgroup- or species-specific gene duplication events after speciation, resulting in divergent evolution. Taken together, genome-wide analyses of NLR family members provide insights into their evolutionary history in Solanaceae. These findings also provide important foundational knowledge for understanding NLR evolution and will empower broader characterization of disease resistance genes to be used for crop breeding.

  17. Nucleotide Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, Jan; Willemoës, M.; Kilstrup, Mogens

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic pathways are connected through their utilization of nucleotides as supplier of energy, allosteric effectors, and their role in activation of intermediates. Therefore, any attempt to exploit a given living organism in a biotechnological process will have an impact on nucleotide metabolis...

  18. Pocket total dose meter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Endres, G.W.R.

    1984-10-01

    Laboratory measurements have demonstrated that it is possible to simultaneously measure absorbed dose and dose equivalent using a single tissue equivalent proportional counter. Small, pocket sized instruments are being developed to determine dose equivalent as the worker is exposed to mixed field radiation. This paper describes the electronic circuitry and computer algorithms used to determine dose equivalent in these devices

  19. Data communications pocket book

    CERN Document Server

    Tooley, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Data Communications Pocket Book, Second Edition presents information relevant to data communication. The book provides tabulated reference materials with a brief description and diagrams. The coverage of the text includes abbreviations, terminal control codes, and conversion tables. The text will be of great use to individuals involved in the interconnection of computer systems.

  20. Insights into an original pocket-ligand pair classification: a promising tool for ligand profile prediction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie Pérot

    Full Text Available Pockets are today at the cornerstones of modern drug discovery projects and at the crossroad of several research fields, from structural biology to mathematical modeling. Being able to predict if a small molecule could bind to one or more protein targets or if a protein could bind to some given ligands is very useful for drug discovery endeavors, anticipation of binding to off- and anti-targets. To date, several studies explore such questions from chemogenomic approach to reverse docking methods. Most of these studies have been performed either from the viewpoint of ligands or targets. However it seems valuable to use information from both ligands and target binding pockets. Hence, we present a multivariate approach relating ligand properties with protein pocket properties from the analysis of known ligand-protein interactions. We explored and optimized the pocket-ligand pair space by combining pocket and ligand descriptors using Principal Component Analysis and developed a classification engine on this paired space, revealing five main clusters of pocket-ligand pairs sharing specific and similar structural or physico-chemical properties. These pocket-ligand pair clusters highlight correspondences between pocket and ligand topological and physico-chemical properties and capture relevant information with respect to protein-ligand interactions. Based on these pocket-ligand correspondences, a protocol of prediction of clusters sharing similarity in terms of recognition characteristics is developed for a given pocket-ligand complex and gives high performances. It is then extended to cluster prediction for a given pocket in order to acquire knowledge about its expected ligand profile or to cluster prediction for a given ligand in order to acquire knowledge about its expected pocket profile. This prediction approach shows promising results and could contribute to predict some ligand properties critical for binding to a given pocket, and conversely

  1. Insights into an original pocket-ligand pair classification: a promising tool for ligand profile prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérot, Stéphanie; Regad, Leslie; Reynès, Christelle; Spérandio, Olivier; Miteva, Maria A; Villoutreix, Bruno O; Camproux, Anne-Claude

    2013-01-01

    Pockets are today at the cornerstones of modern drug discovery projects and at the crossroad of several research fields, from structural biology to mathematical modeling. Being able to predict if a small molecule could bind to one or more protein targets or if a protein could bind to some given ligands is very useful for drug discovery endeavors, anticipation of binding to off- and anti-targets. To date, several studies explore such questions from chemogenomic approach to reverse docking methods. Most of these studies have been performed either from the viewpoint of ligands or targets. However it seems valuable to use information from both ligands and target binding pockets. Hence, we present a multivariate approach relating ligand properties with protein pocket properties from the analysis of known ligand-protein interactions. We explored and optimized the pocket-ligand pair space by combining pocket and ligand descriptors using Principal Component Analysis and developed a classification engine on this paired space, revealing five main clusters of pocket-ligand pairs sharing specific and similar structural or physico-chemical properties. These pocket-ligand pair clusters highlight correspondences between pocket and ligand topological and physico-chemical properties and capture relevant information with respect to protein-ligand interactions. Based on these pocket-ligand correspondences, a protocol of prediction of clusters sharing similarity in terms of recognition characteristics is developed for a given pocket-ligand complex and gives high performances. It is then extended to cluster prediction for a given pocket in order to acquire knowledge about its expected ligand profile or to cluster prediction for a given ligand in order to acquire knowledge about its expected pocket profile. This prediction approach shows promising results and could contribute to predict some ligand properties critical for binding to a given pocket, and conversely, some key pocket

  2. Invasive Streptococcus mutans induces inflammatory cytokine production in human aortic endothelial cells via regulation of intracellular toll-like receptor 2 and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, E; Oho, T

    2017-04-01

    Streptococcus mutans, the primary etiologic agent of dental caries, can gain access to the bloodstream and has been associated with cardiovascular disease. However, the roles of S. mutans in inflammation in cardiovascular disease remain unclear. The aim of this study was to examine cytokine production induced by S. mutans in human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) and to evaluate the participation of toll-like receptors (TLRs) and cytoplasmic nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD) -like receptors in HAECs. Cytokine production by HAECs was determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, and the expression of TLRs and NOD-like receptors was evaluated by real-time polymerase chain reaction, flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry. The involvement of TLR2 and NOD2 in cytokine production by invaded HAECs was examined using RNA interference. The invasion efficiencies of S. mutans strains were evaluated by means of antibiotic protection assays. Five of six strains of S. mutans of various serotypes induced interleukin-6, interleukin-8 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 production by HAECs. All S. mutans strains upregulated TLR2 and NOD2 mRNA levels in HAECs. Streptococcus mutans Xc upregulated the intracellular TLR2 and NOD2 protein levels in HAECs. Silencing of the TLR2 and NOD2 genes in HAECs invaded by S. mutans Xc led to a reduction in interleukin-6, interleukin-8 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 production. Cytokine production induced by invasive S. mutans via intracellular TLR2 and NOD2 in HAECs may be associated with inflammation in cardiovascular disease. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Impact of the [delta]F508 Mutation in First Nucleotide-binding Domain of Human Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator on Domain Folding and Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Hal A.; Zhao, Xun; Wang, Chi; Sauder, J. Michael; Rooney, Isabelle; Noland, Brian W.; Lorimer, Don; Kearins, Margaret C.; Conners, Kris; Condon, Brad; Maloney, Peter C.; Guggino, William B.; Hunt, John F.; Emtage, Spencer (SG); (Columbia); (JHU)

    2010-07-19

    Cystic fibrosis is caused by defects in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), commonly the deletion of residue Phe-508 (DeltaF508) in the first nucleotide-binding domain (NBD1), which results in a severe reduction in the population of functional channels at the epithelial cell surface. Previous studies employing incomplete NBD1 domains have attributed this to aberrant folding of DeltaF508 NBD1. We report structural and biophysical studies on complete human NBD1 domains, which fail to demonstrate significant changes of in vitro stability or folding kinetics in the presence or absence of the DeltaF508 mutation. Crystal structures show minimal changes in protein conformation but substantial changes in local surface topography at the site of the mutation, which is located in the region of NBD1 believed to interact with the first membrane spanning domain of CFTR. These results raise the possibility that the primary effect of DeltaF508 is a disruption of proper interdomain interactions at this site in CFTR rather than interference with the folding of NBD1. Interestingly, increases in the stability of NBD1 constructs are observed upon introduction of second-site mutations that suppress the trafficking defect caused by the DeltaF508 mutation, suggesting that these suppressors might function indirectly by improving the folding efficiency of NBD1 in the context of the full-length protein. The human NBD1 structures also solidify the understanding of CFTR regulation by showing that its two protein segments that can be phosphorylated both adopt multiple conformations that modulate access to the ATPase active site and functional interdomain interfaces.

  4. Lack of Both Nucleotide-Binding Oligomerization Domain-Containing Proteins 1 and 2 Primes T Cells for Activation-Induced Cell Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasimsetty, Sashi G; Shigeoka, Alana A; Scheinok, Andrew A; Gavin, Amanda L; Ulevitch, Richard J; McKay, Dianne B

    2017-08-01

    Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (Nod)-containing proteins Nod1 and Nod2 play important roles in the innate immune response to pathogenic microbes, but mounting data suggest these pattern recognition receptors might also play key roles in adaptive immune responses. Targeting Nod1 and Nod2 signaling pathways in T cells is likely to provide a new strategy to modify inflammation in a variety of disease states, particularly those that depend on Ag-induced T cell activation. To better understand how Nod1 and Nod2 proteins contribute to adaptive immunity, this study investigated their role in alloantigen-induced T cell activation and asked whether their absence might impact in vivo alloresponses using a severe acute graft versus host disease model. The study provided several important observations. We found that the simultaneous absence of Nod1 and Nod2 primed T cells for activation-induced cell death. T cells from Nod1 × 2 -/- mice rapidly underwent cell death upon exposure to alloantigen. The Nod1 × 2 -/- T cells had sustained p53 expression that was associated with downregulation of its negative regulator MDM2. In vivo, mice transplanted with an inoculum containing Nod1 × 2 -/- T cells were protected from severe graft versus host disease. The results show that the simultaneous absence of Nod1 and Nod2 is associated with accelerated T cell death upon alloantigen encounter, suggesting these proteins might provide new targets to ameliorate T cell responses in a variety of inflammatory states, including those associated with bone marrow or solid organ transplantation. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  5. LRRK2 kinase activity is dependent on LRRK2 GTP binding capacity but independent of LRRK2 GTP binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Marc Taymans

    Full Text Available Leucine rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2 is a Parkinson's disease (PD gene that encodes a large multidomain protein including both a GTPase and a kinase domain. GTPases often regulate kinases within signal transduction cascades, where GTPases act as molecular switches cycling between a GTP bound "on" state and a GDP bound "off" state. It has been proposed that LRRK2 kinase activity may be increased upon GTP binding at the LRRK2 Ras of complex proteins (ROC GTPase domain. Here we extensively test this hypothesis by measuring LRRK2 phosphorylation activity under influence of GDP, GTP or non-hydrolyzable GTP analogues GTPγS or GMPPCP. We show that autophosphorylation and lrrktide phosphorylation activity of recombinant LRRK2 protein is unaltered by guanine nucleotides, when co-incubated with LRRK2 during phosphorylation reactions. Also phosphorylation activity of LRRK2 is unchanged when the LRRK2 guanine nucleotide binding pocket is previously saturated with various nucleotides, in contrast to the greatly reduced activity measured for the guanine nucleotide binding site mutant T1348N. Interestingly, when nucleotides were incubated with cell lysates prior to purification of LRRK2, kinase activity was slightly enhanced by GTPγS or GMPPCP compared to GDP, pointing to an upstream guanine nucleotide binding protein that may activate LRRK2 in a GTP-dependent manner. Using metabolic labeling, we also found that cellular phosphorylation of LRRK2 was not significantly modulated by nucleotides, although labeling is significantly reduced by guanine nucleotide binding site mutants. We conclude that while kinase activity of LRRK2 requires an intact ROC-GTPase domain, it is independent of GDP or GTP binding to ROC.

  6. SQL Pocket Guide

    CERN Document Server

    Gennick, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    If you're a programmer or database administrator who uses SQL in your day-to-day work, this popular pocket guide is the ideal on-the-job reference. You'll find many examples that address the language's complexity, along with key aspects of SQL used in IBM DB2 Release 9.7, MySQL 5.1, Oracle Database 11g Release 2, PostgreSQL 9.0, and Microsoft SQL Server 2008 Release 2. SQL Pocket Guide describes how these database systems implement SQL syntax for querying, managing transactions, and making changes to data. It also shows how the systems use SQL functions, regular expression syntax, and type c

  7. Approach for targeting Ras with small molecules that activate SOS-mediated nucleotide exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Michael C; Sun, Qi; Daniels, R Nathan; Camper, DeMarco; Kennedy, J Phillip; Phan, Jason; Olejniczak, Edward T; Lee, Taekyu; Waterson, Alex G; Rossanese, Olivia W; Fesik, Stephen W

    2014-03-04

    Aberrant activation of the small GTPase Ras by oncogenic mutation or constitutively active upstream receptor tyrosine kinases results in the deregulation of cellular signals governing growth and survival in ∼30% of all human cancers. However, the discovery of potent inhibitors of Ras has been difficult to achieve. Here, we report the identification of small molecules that bind to a unique pocket on the Ras:Son of Sevenless (SOS):Ras complex, increase the rate of SOS-catalyzed nucleotide exchange in vitro, and modulate Ras signaling pathways in cells. X-ray crystallography of Ras:SOS:Ras in complex with these molecules reveals that the compounds bind in a hydrophobic pocket in the CDC25 domain of SOS adjacent to the Switch II region of Ras. The structure-activity relationships exhibited by these compounds can be rationalized on the basis of multiple X-ray cocrystal structures. Mutational analyses confirmed the functional relevance of this binding site and showed it to be essential for compound activity. These molecules increase Ras-GTP levels and disrupt MAPK and PI3K signaling in cells at low micromolar concentrations. These small molecules represent tools to study the acute activation of Ras and highlight a pocket on SOS that may be exploited to modulate Ras signaling.

  8. Software engineer's pocket book

    CERN Document Server

    Tooley, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Software Engineer's Pocket Book provides a concise discussion on various aspects of software engineering. The book is comprised of six chapters that tackle various areas of concerns in software engineering. Chapter 1 discusses software development, and Chapter 2 covers programming languages. Chapter 3 deals with operating systems. The book also tackles discrete mathematics and numerical computation. Data structures and algorithms are also explained. The text will be of great use to individuals involved in the specification, design, development, implementation, testing, maintenance, and qualit

  9. The arabidopsis cyclic nucleotide interactome

    KAUST Repository

    Donaldson, Lara Elizabeth

    2016-05-11

    Background Cyclic nucleotides have been shown to play important signaling roles in many physiological processes in plants including photosynthesis and defence. Despite this, little is known about cyclic nucleotide-dependent signaling mechanisms in plants since the downstream target proteins remain unknown. This is largely due to the fact that bioinformatics searches fail to identify plant homologs of protein kinases and phosphodiesterases that are the main targets of cyclic nucleotides in animals. Methods An affinity purification technique was used to identify cyclic nucleotide binding proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana. The identified proteins were subjected to a computational analysis that included a sequence, transcriptional co-expression and functional annotation analysis in order to assess their potential role in plant cyclic nucleotide signaling. Results A total of twelve cyclic nucleotide binding proteins were identified experimentally including key enzymes in the Calvin cycle and photorespiration pathway. Importantly, eight of the twelve proteins were shown to contain putative cyclic nucleotide binding domains. Moreover, the identified proteins are post-translationally modified by nitric oxide, transcriptionally co-expressed and annotated to function in hydrogen peroxide signaling and the defence response. The activity of one of these proteins, GLYGOLATE OXIDASE 1, a photorespiratory enzyme that produces hydrogen peroxide in response to Pseudomonas, was shown to be repressed by a combination of cGMP and nitric oxide treatment. Conclusions We propose that the identified proteins function together as points of cross-talk between cyclic nucleotide, nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species signaling during the defence response.

  10. Towards Coleoptera-specific high-throughput screening systems for compounds with ecdysone activity: development of EcR reporter assays using weevil (Anthonomus grandis)-derived cell lines and in silico analysis of ligand binding to A. grandis EcR ligand-binding pocket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soin, Thomas; Iga, Masatoshi; Swevers, Luc; Rougé, Pierre; Janssen, Colin R; Smagghe, Guy

    2009-08-01

    Molting in insects is regulated by ecdysteroids and juvenile hormones. Several synthetic non-steroidal ecdysone agonists are on the market as insecticides. These ecdysone agonists are dibenzoylhydrazine (DBH) analogue compounds that manifest their toxicity via interaction with the ecdysone receptor (EcR). Of the four commercial available ecdysone agonists, three (tebufenozide, methoxyfenozide and chromafenozide) are highly lepidopteran specific, one (halofenozide) is used to control coleopteran and lepidopteran insects in turf and ornamentals. However, compared to the very high binding affinity of these DBH analogues to lepidopteran EcRs, halofenozide has a low binding affinity for coleopteran EcRs. For the discovery of ecdysone agonists that target non-lepidopteran insect groups, efficient screening systems that are based on the activation of the EcR are needed. We report here the development and evaluation of two coleopteran-specific reporter-based screening systems to discover and evaluate ecdysone agonists. The screening systems are based on the cell lines BRL-AG-3A and BRL-AG-3C that are derived from the weevil Anthonomus grandis, which can be efficiently transduced with an EcR reporter cassette for evaluation of induction of reporter activity by ecdysone agonists. We also cloned the almost full length coding sequence of EcR expressed in the cell line BRL-AG-3C and used it to make an initial in silico 3D-model of its ligand-binding pocket docked with ponasterone A and tebufenozide.

  11. DNA sequence polymorphisms within the bovine guanine nucleotide-binding protein Gs subunit alpha (Gsα-encoding (GNAS genomic imprinting domain are associated with performance traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mullen Michael P

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genes which are epigenetically regulated via genomic imprinting can be potential targets for artificial selection during animal breeding. Indeed, imprinted loci have been shown to underlie some important quantitative traits in domestic mammals, most notably muscle mass and fat deposition. In this candidate gene study, we have identified novel associations between six validated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs spanning a 97.6 kb region within the bovine guanine nucleotide-binding protein Gs subunit alpha gene (GNAS domain on bovine chromosome 13 and genetic merit for a range of performance traits in 848 progeny-tested Holstein-Friesian sires. The mammalian GNAS domain consists of a number of reciprocally-imprinted, alternatively-spliced genes which can play a major role in growth, development and disease in mice and humans. Based on the current annotation of the bovine GNAS domain, four of the SNPs analysed (rs43101491, rs43101493, rs43101485 and rs43101486 were located upstream of the GNAS gene, while one SNP (rs41694646 was located in the second intron of the GNAS gene. The final SNP (rs41694656 was located in the first exon of transcripts encoding the putative bovine neuroendocrine-specific protein NESP55, resulting in an aspartic acid-to-asparagine amino acid substitution at amino acid position 192. Results SNP genotype-phenotype association analyses indicate that the single intronic GNAS SNP (rs41694646 is associated (P ≤ 0.05 with a range of performance traits including milk yield, milk protein yield, the content of fat and protein in milk, culled cow carcass weight and progeny carcass conformation, measures of animal body size, direct calving difficulty (i.e. difficulty in calving due to the size of the calf and gestation length. Association (P ≤ 0.01 with direct calving difficulty (i.e. due to calf size and maternal calving difficulty (i.e. due to the maternal pelvic width size was also observed at the rs

  12. In silico docking of forchlorfenuron (FCF to septins suggests that FCF interferes with GTP binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Angelis

    Full Text Available Septins are GTP-binding proteins that form cytoskeleton-like filaments, which are essential for many functions in eukaryotic organisms. Small molecule compounds that disrupt septin filament assembly are valuable tools for dissecting septin functions with high temporal control. To date, forchlorfenuron (FCF is the only compound known to affect septin assembly and functions. FCF dampens the dynamics of septin assembly inducing the formation of enlarged stable polymers, but the underlying mechanism of action is unknown. To investigate how FCF binds and affects septins, we performed in silico simulations of FCF docking to all available crystal structures of septins. Docking of FCF with SEPT2 and SEPT3 indicated that FCF interacts preferentially with the nucleotide-binding pockets of septins. Strikingly, FCF is predicted to form hydrogen bonds with residues involved in GDP-binding, mimicking nucleotide binding. FCF docking with the structure of SEPT2-GppNHp, a nonhydrolyzable GTP analog, and SEPT7 showed that FCF may assume two alternative non-overlapping conformations deeply into and on the outer side of the nucleotide-binding pocket. Surprisingly, FCF was predicted to interact with the P-loop Walker A motif GxxxxGKS/T, which binds the phosphates of GTP, and the GTP specificity motif AKAD, which interacts with the guanine base of GTP, and highly conserved amino acids including a threonine, which is critical for GTP hydrolysis. Thus, in silico FCF exhibits a conserved mechanism of binding, interacting with septin signature motifs and residues involved in GTP binding and hydrolysis. Taken together, our results suggest that FCF stabilizes septins by locking them into a conformation that mimics a nucleotide-bound state, preventing further GTP binding and hydrolysis. Overall, this study provides the first insight into how FCF may bind and stabilize septins, and offers a blueprint for the rational design of FCF derivatives that could target septins with

  13. Linux Desktop Pocket Guide

    CERN Document Server

    Brickner, David

    2005-01-01

    While Mac OS X garners all the praise from pundits, and Windows XP attracts all the viruses, Linux is quietly being installed on millions of desktops every year. For programmers and system administrators, business users, and educators, desktop Linux is a breath of fresh air and a needed alternative to other operating systems. The Linux Desktop Pocket Guide is your introduction to using Linux on five of the most popular distributions: Fedora, Gentoo, Mandriva, SUSE, and Ubuntu. Despite what you may have heard, using Linux is not all that hard. Firefox and Konqueror can handle all your web bro

  14. Python pocket reference

    CERN Document Server

    Lutz, Mark

    2010-01-01

    This is the book to reach for when you're coding on the fly and need an answer now. It's an easy-to-use reference to the core language, with descriptions of commonly used modules and toolkits, and a guide to recent changes, new features, and upgraded built-ins -- all updated to cover Python 3.X as well as version 2.6. You'll also quickly find exactly what you need with the handy index. Written by Mark Lutz -- widely recognized as the world's leading Python trainer -- Python Pocket Reference, Fourth Edition, is the perfect companion to O'Reilly's classic Python tutorials, also written by Mark

  15. STL pocket reference

    CERN Document Server

    Lischner, Ray

    2003-01-01

    The STL Pocket Reference describes the functions, classes, and templates in that part of the C++ standard library often referred to as the Standard Template Library (STL). The STL encompasses containers, iterators, algorithms, and function objects, which collectively represent one of the most important and widely used subsets of standard library functionality. The C++ standard library, even the subset known as the STL, is vast. It's next to impossible to work with the STL without some sort of reference at your side to remind you of template parameters, function invocations, return types--ind

  16. Regular Expression Pocket Reference

    CERN Document Server

    Stubblebine, Tony

    2007-01-01

    This handy little book offers programmers a complete overview of the syntax and semantics of regular expressions that are at the heart of every text-processing application. Ideal as a quick reference, Regular Expression Pocket Reference covers the regular expression APIs for Perl 5.8, Ruby (including some upcoming 1.9 features), Java, PHP, .NET and C#, Python, vi, JavaScript, and the PCRE regular expression libraries. This concise and easy-to-use reference puts a very powerful tool for manipulating text and data right at your fingertips. Composed of a mixture of symbols and text, regular exp

  17. XSLT 10 Pocket Reference

    CERN Document Server

    Lenz, Evan

    2008-01-01

    XSLT is an essential tool for converting XML into other kinds of documents: HTML, PDF file, and many others. It's a critical technology for XML-based platforms such as Microsoft .NET, Sun Microsystems' Sun One, as well as for most web browsers and authoring tools. As useful as XSLT is, however, most people have a difficult time getting used to its peculiar characteristics. The ability to use advanced techniques depends on a clear and exact understanding of how XSLT templates work and interact. The XSLT 1.0 Pocket Reference from O'Reilly wants to make sure you achieve that level of understan

  18. Perl Pocket Reference

    CERN Document Server

    Vromans, Johan

    2011-01-01

    If you have a Perl programming question, you'll find the answer quickly in this handy, easy-to-use quick reference. The Perl Pocket Reference condenses and organizes stacks of documentation down to the most essential facts, so you can find what you need in a heartbeat. Updated for Perl 5.14, the 5th edition provides a summary of Perl syntax rules and a complete list of operators, built-in functions, and other features. It's the perfect companion to O'Reilly's authoritative and in-depth Perl programming books, including Learning Perl, Programming Perl, and the Perl Cookbook..

  19. CSS Pocket Reference

    CERN Document Server

    Meyer, Eric

    2011-01-01

    When you're working with CSS and need a quick answer, CSS Pocket Reference delivers. This handy, concise book provides all of the essential information you need to implement CSS on the fly. Ideal for intermediate to advanced web designers and developers, the 4th edition is revised and updated for CSS3, the latest version of the Cascading Style Sheet specification. Along with a complete alphabetical reference to CSS3 selectors and properties, you'll also find a short introduction to the key concepts of CSS. Based on Cascading Style Sheets: The Definitive Guide, this reference is an easy-to-us

  20. Electronics pocket book

    CERN Document Server

    Parr, E A

    1981-01-01

    Electronics Pocket Book, Fourth Edition is a nonmathematical presentation of the many varied topics covered by electronics. The book tackles electron physics, electronic components (i.e. resistors, capacitors, and conductors), integrated circuits, and the principles of a.c. and d.c. amplifiers. The text also discusses oscillators, digital circuits, digital computers, and optoelectronics (i.e., sensors, emitters, and devices that utilize light). Communications (such as line and radio communications, transmitters, receivers, and digital techniques); the principles and examples of servosystems; a

  1. Newnes microprocessor pocket book

    CERN Document Server

    Money, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Newnes Microprocessor Pocket Book explains the basic hardware operation of a microprocessor and describes the actions of the various types of instruction that can be executed. A summary of the characteristics of many of the popular microprocessors is presented. Apart from the popular 8- and 16-bit microprocessors, some details are also given of the popular single chip microcomputers and of the reduced instruction set computer (RISC) type processors such as the Transputer, Novix FORTH processor, and Acorn ARM processor.Comprised of 15 chapters, this book discusses the principles involved in bot

  2. NUnit Pocket Reference

    CERN Document Server

    Hamilton, Bill

    2009-01-01

    The open source NUnit framework is an excellent way to test .NET code as it is written, saving hundreds of QA hours and headaches. Unfortunately, some of those hours saved can be wasted trying to master this popular but under-documented framework. Proof that good things come in small packages, the NUnit Pocket Reference is everything you need to get NUnit up and working for you. It's the only book you'll need on this popular and practical new open source framework.

  3. LINQ Pocket Reference

    CERN Document Server

    Albahari, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    Ready to take advantage of LINQ with C# 3.0? This guide has the detail you need to grasp Microsoft's new querying technology, and concise explanations to help you learn it quickly. And once you begin to apply LINQ, the book serves as an on-the-job reference when you need immediate reminders. All the examples in the LINQ Pocket Reference are preloaded into LINQPad, the highly praised utility that lets you work with LINQ interactively. Created by the authors and free to download, LINQPad will not only help you learn LINQ, it will have you thinking in LINQ. This reference explains: LINQ's ke

  4. CSS Pocket Reference

    CERN Document Server

    Meyer, Eric A

    2007-01-01

    They say that good things come in small packages, and it's certainly true for this edition of CSS Pocket Reference. Completely revised and updated to reflect the latest Cascading Style Sheet specifications in CSS 2.1, this indispensable little book covers the most essential information that web designers and developers need to implement CSS effectively across all browsers. Inside, you'll find: A short introduction to the key concepts of CSS A complete alphabetical reference to all CSS 2.1 selectors and properties A chart displaying detailed information about CSS support for every style ele

  5. JDBC Pocket Reference

    CERN Document Server

    Bales, Donald

    2003-01-01

    JDBC--the Java Database Connectivity specification--is a complex set of application programming interfaces (APIs) that developers need to understand if they want their Java applications to work with databases. JDBC is so complex that even the most experienced developers need to refresh their memories from time to time on specific methods and details. But, practically speaking, who wants to stop and thumb through a weighty tutorial volume each time a question arises? The answer is the JDBC Pocket Reference, a data-packed quick reference that is both a time-saver and a lifesaver. The JDBC P

  6. RTF Pocket Guide

    CERN Document Server

    Burke, Sean

    2008-01-01

    Rich Text Format, or RTF, is the internal markup language used by Microsoft Word and understood by dozens of other word processors. RTF is a universal file format that pervades practically every desktop. Because RTF is text, it's much easier to generate and process than binary .doc files. Any programmer working with word processing documents needs to learn enough RTF to get around, whether it's to format text for Word (or almost any other word processor), to make global changes to an existing document, or to convert Word files to (or from) another format. RTF Pocket Guide is a concise and e

  7. Substitution of Active Site Tyrosines with Tryptophan Alters the Free Energy for Nucleotide Flipping by Human Alkyladenine DNA Glycosylase†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendershot, Jenna M.; Wolfe, Abigail E.; O'Brien, Patrick J.

    2011-01-01

    Human alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG) locates and excises a wide variety of structurally diverse alkylated and oxidized purine lesions from DNA to initiate the base excision repair pathway. Recognition of a base lesion requires flipping of the damaged nucleotide into a relatively open active site pocket between two conserved tyrosine residues, Y127 and Y159. We have mutated each of these amino acids to tryptophan and measured the kinetic effects on the nucleotide flipping and base excision steps. The Y127W and Y159W mutant proteins have robust glycosylase activity toward DNA containing 1,N6-ethenoadenine (εA), within 4-fold of that of the wildtype enzyme, raising the possibility that tryptophan fluorescence could be used to probe the DNA binding and nucleotide flipping steps. Stopped-flow fluorescence was used to compare the time-dependent changes in tryptophan fluorescence and εA fluorescence. For both mutants, the tryptophan fluorescence exhibited two-step binding with essentially identical rate constants as were observed for the εA fluorescence changes. These results provide evidence that AAG forms an initial recognition complex in which the active site pocket is perturbed and the stacking of the damaged base is disrupted. Upon complete nucleotide flipping, there is further quenching of the tryptophan fluorescence with coincident quenching of the εA fluorescence. Although these mutations do not have large effects on the rate constant for excision of εA, there are dramatic effects on the rate constants for nucleotide flipping that result in 40 to 100-fold decreases in the flipping equilibrium relative to wildtype. Most of this effect is due to an increased rate of unflipping, but surprisingly the Y159W mutation causes a 5-fold increase in the rate constant for flipping. The large effect on the equilibrium for nucleotide flipping explains the greater deleterious effects that these mutations have on the glycosylase activity toward base lesions that are in

  8. Alarm pocket dosimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiraki, H; Kitamura, S [Matsushita Electric Industrial Co. Ltd., Kadoma, Osaka (Japan)

    1975-04-01

    This instrument is a highly reliable pocket dosimeter which has been developed for personal monitoring use. The dosimeter generates an alarm sound when the exposure dose reaches a preset value. Using a tiny GM tube for a radiation detector and measuring the integrated dose by means of a digital counting method, this new pocket dosimeter has high accuracy and stability. Using a sealed alkali storage battery for the power supply, and with an automatic control charger, this dosimetry system is easy and economical to operate and maintain. Detectable radiation by the dosimeter are X and ..gamma.. rays. Standard preset dose values are 30, 50, 80 and 100 mR. Detection accuracy is betwen +10% and -20%. The dosimeter is continuously usable for more than 14 hours after charging for 2 hours. The dosimeter has the following features; good realiability, shock-proof loud and clear alarm sound, the battery charger also serves as a stock container for the dosimeters, and no switching operation required for the power supply due to the internal automatic switch. Therefore, the dosimetry system is very useful for personal monitoring management in many radiation industry establishments.

  9. Nucleotide Excision Repair Lesion-Recognition Protein Rad4 Captures a Pre-Flipped Partner Base in a Benzo[a]pyrene-Derived DNA Lesion: How Structure Impacts the Binding Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Hong; Geacintov, Nicholas E; Min, Jung-Hyun; Zhang, Yingkai; Broyde, Suse

    2017-06-19

    The xeroderma pigmentosum C protein complex (XPC) recognizes a variety of environmentally induced DNA lesions and is the key in initiating their repair by the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway. When bound to a lesion, XPC flips two nucleotide pairs that include the lesion out of the DNA duplex, yielding a productively bound complex that can lead to successful lesion excision. Interestingly, the efficiencies of NER vary greatly among different lesions, influencing their toxicity and mutagenicity in cells. Though differences in XPC binding may influence NER efficiency, it is not understood whether XPC utilizes different mechanisms to achieve productive binding with different lesions. Here, we investigated the well-repaired 10R-(+)-cis-anti-benzo[a]pyrene-N 2 -dG (cis-B[a]P-dG) DNA adduct in a duplex containing normal partner C opposite the lesion. This adduct is derived from the environmental pro-carcinogen benzo[a]pyrene and is likely to be encountered by NER in the cell. We have extensively investigated its binding to the yeast XPC orthologue, Rad4, using umbrella sampling with restrained molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations. The NMR solution structure of this lesion in duplex DNA has shown that the dC complementary to the adducted dG is flipped out of the DNA duplex in the absence of XPC. However, it is not known whether the "pre-flipped" base would play a role in its recognition by XPC. Our results show that Rad4 first captures the displaced dC, which is followed by a tightly coupled lesion-extruding pathway for productive binding. This binding path differs significantly from the one deduced for the small cis-syn cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer lesion opposite mismatched thymines [ Mu , H. , ( 2015 ) Biochemistry , 54 ( 34 ), 5263 - 7 ]. The possibility of multiple paths that lead to productive binding to XPC is consistent with the versatile lesion recognition by XPC that is required for successful NER.

  10. PockDrug-Server: a new web server for predicting pocket druggability on holo and apo proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Hiba Abi; Borrel, Alexandre; Geneix, Colette; Petitjean, Michel; Regad, Leslie; Camproux, Anne-Claude

    2015-07-01

    Predicting protein pocket's ability to bind drug-like molecules with high affinity, i.e. druggability, is of major interest in the target identification phase of drug discovery. Therefore, pocket druggability investigations represent a key step of compound clinical progression projects. Currently computational druggability prediction models are attached to one unique pocket estimation method despite pocket estimation uncertainties. In this paper, we propose 'PockDrug-Server' to predict pocket druggability, efficient on both (i) estimated pockets guided by the ligand proximity (extracted by proximity to a ligand from a holo protein structure) and (ii) estimated pockets based solely on protein structure information (based on amino atoms that form the surface of potential binding cavities). PockDrug-Server provides consistent druggability results using different pocket estimation methods. It is robust with respect to pocket boundary and estimation uncertainties, thus efficient using apo pockets that are challenging to estimate. It clearly distinguishes druggable from less druggable pockets using different estimation methods and outperformed recent druggability models for apo pockets. It can be carried out from one or a set of apo/holo proteins using different pocket estimation methods proposed by our web server or from any pocket previously estimated by the user. PockDrug-Server is publicly available at: http://pockdrug.rpbs.univ-paris-diderot.fr. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  11. Word Pocket Guide

    CERN Document Server

    Glenn, Walter

    2004-01-01

    Millions of people use Microsoft Word every day and, chances are, you're one of them. Like most Word users, you've attained a certain level of proficiency--enough to get by, with a few extra tricks and tips--but don't get the opportunity to probe much further into the real power of Word. And Word is so rich in features that regardless of your level of expertise, there's always more to master. If you've ever wanted a quick answer to a nagging question or had the thought that there must be a better way, then this second edition of Word Pocket Guide is just what you need. Updated for Word 2003

  12. Metal-ion binding properties of (S)-1-[3-hydroxy-2-(phosphonomethoxy)propyl]cytosine (HPMPC, Cidofovir). A nucleotide analogue with activity against DNA viruses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Blindauer, C. A.; Sigel, A.; Operschall, B. P.; Holý, Antonín; Sigel, H.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 472, Mar 1 (2018), s. 283-294 ISSN 0020-1693 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : acyclic nucleoside phosphonates * antivirals * chelates * isomeric equilibria * metal ion complexes * nucleotide analogues Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry OBOR OECD: Organic chemistry Impact factor: 2.002, year: 2016

  13. Phosphorylation- and nucleotide-binding-induced changes to the stability and hydrogen exchange patterns of JNK1ß1 provide insight into its mechanisms of activation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Owen, GR

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available –deuterium exchange (HX) mass spectrometry were used to investigate the changes to the stability and conformation/conformational dynamics of JNK1ß1 induced by phosphorylative activation. Equivalent studies were also employed to determine the effects of nucleotide...

  14. The Bisphenol A analogue Bisphenol S binds to K-Ras4B--implications for 'BPA-free' plastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöpel, Miriam; Herrmann, Christian; Scherkenbeck, Jürgen; Stoll, Raphael

    2016-02-01

    K-Ras4B is a small GTPase that belongs to the Ras superfamily of guanine nucleotide-binding proteins. GTPases function as molecular switches in cells and are key players in intracellular signalling. Ras has been identified as an oncogene and is mutated in more than 20% of human cancers. Here, we report that Bisphenol S binds into a binding pocket of K-Ras4B previously identified for various low molecular weight compounds. Our results advocate for more comprehensive safety studies on the toxicity of Bisphenol S, as it is frequently used for Bisphenol A-free food containers. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  15. Platelet cytosolic 44-kDa protein is a substrate of cholera toxin-induced ADP-ribosylation and is not recognized by antisera against the α subunit of the stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molina Y Vedia, L.M.; Reep, B.R.; Lapetina, E.G.

    1988-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation induced by cholera toxin and pertussis toxin was studied in particulate and cytosolic fractions of human platelets. Platelets were disrupted by a cycle of freezing and thawing in the presence of a hyposmotic buffer containing protease inhibitors. In both fractions, the A subunit of cholera toxin ADP-ribosylates two proteins with molecular masses of 42 and 44 kDa, whereas pertussis toxin ADP-ribosylates a 41-kDa polypeptide. Two antisera against the α subunit of the stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein recognize only the 42-kDa polypeptide. Cholera toxin-induced ADP-ribosylation of the 42- and 44-kDa proteins is reduced by pretreatment of platelets with iloprost, a prostacyclin analog. The 44-kDa protein, which is substrate of cholera toxin, could be extracted completely from the membrane and recovered in the cytosolic fraction when the cells were disrupted by Dounce homogenization and the pellet was extensively washed. A 44-kDa protein can also be labeled with 8-azidoguanosine 5'-[α- 32 P]triphosphate in the cytosol and membranes. These finding indicate that cholera and pertussis toxins produced covalent modifications of proteins present in particulate and cytosolic platelet fractions. Moreover, the 44-kDa protein might be an α subunit of a guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein that is not recognized by available antisera

  16. Pocket Guide to Transportation 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS) of the Research and Innovative Technology Administration produces the Pocket Guide to Transportation as a compact resource that provides snapshots of the U.S. transportation system and highlights major tr...

  17. Pocket Guide to Transportation 2018

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    The 2018 BTS Pocket Guide to Transportation is a quick reference guide that provides transportation statistics at your fingertips. It provides key information and highlights major trends on the U.S. transportation system. This year features a new and...

  18. Identification of cyclic nucleotide gated channels using regular expressions

    KAUST Repository

    Zelman, Alice K.; Dawe, Adam Sean; Berkowitz, Gerald A.

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (CNGCs) are nonselective cation channels found in plants, animals, and some bacteria. They have a six-transmembrane/one- pore structure, a cytosolic cyclic nucleotide-binding domain, and a cytosolic calmodulin

  19. The Potato Nucleotide-Binding Leucine-Rich Repeat (NLR) Immune Receptor Rx1 is a Pathogen Dependent DNA-Deforming Protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fenyk, S.; Townsend, P.D.; Dixon, C.H.; Spies, G.B.; Campillo, A.S.E.; Slootweg, E.J.; Westerhof, L.B.; Gawehns, F.K.K.; Knight, M.R.; Sharples, G.J.; Goverse, A.; Palsson, L.O.; Takken, F.L.W.; Cann, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Plant NLR proteins enable cells to respond to pathogen attack. Several NLRs act in the nucleus, however, conserved nuclear targets that support their role in immunity are unknown. Previously we noted a structural homology between the NB domain of NLRs and DNA replication origin-binding Cdc6/Orc1

  20. The roles of the RIIβ linker and N-terminal cyclic nucleotide-binding domain in determining the unique structures of the type IIβ protein kinase A: a small angle x-ray and neutron scattering study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, Donald K; Copps, Jeffrey; Smith-Nguyen, Eric V; Zhang, Ping; Heller, William T; Taylor, Susan S

    2014-10-10

    Protein kinase A (PKA) is ubiquitously expressed and is responsible for regulating many important cellular functions in response to changes in intracellular cAMP concentrations. The PKA holoenzyme is a tetramer (R2:C2), with a regulatory subunit homodimer (R2) that binds and inhibits two catalytic (C) subunits; binding of cAMP to the regulatory subunit homodimer causes activation of the catalytic subunits. Four different R subunit isoforms exist in mammalian cells, and these confer different structural features, subcellular localization, and biochemical properties upon the PKA holoenzymes they form. The holoenzyme containing RIIβ is structurally unique in that the type IIβ holoenzyme is much more compact than the free RIIβ homodimer. We have used small angle x-ray scattering and small angle neutron scattering to study the solution structure and subunit organization of a holoenzyme containing an RIIβ C-terminal deletion mutant (RIIβ(1-280)), which is missing the C-terminal cAMP-binding domain to better understand the structural organization of the type IIβ holoenzyme and the RIIβ domains that contribute to stabilizing the holoenzyme conformation. Our results demonstrate that compaction of the type IIβ holoenzyme does not require the C-terminal cAMP-binding domain but rather involves large structural rearrangements within the linker and N-terminal cyclic nucleotide-binding domain of the RIIβ homodimer. The structural rearrangements are significantly greater than seen previously with RIIα and are likely to be important in mediating short range and long range interdomain and intersubunit interactions that uniquely regulate the activity of the type IIβ isoform of PKA. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Novel somatic single nucleotide variants within the RNA binding protein hnRNP A1 in multiple sclerosis patients [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/4dh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangmin Lee

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Some somatic single nucleotide variants (SNVs are thought to be pathogenic, leading to neurological disease. We hypothesized that heterogeneous nuclear ribonuclear protein A1 (hnRNP A1, an autoantigen associated with multiple sclerosis (MS would contain SNVs. MS patients develop antibodies to hnRNP A1293-304, an epitope within the M9 domain (AA268-305 of hnRNP A1. M9 is hnRNP A1’s nucleocytoplasmic transport domain, which binds transportin-1 (TPNO-1 and allows for hnRNP A1’s transport into and out of the nucleus. Genomic DNA sequencing of M9 revealed nine novel SNVs that resulted in an amino acid substitution in MS patients that were not present in controls. SNVs occurred within the TPNO-1 binding domain (hnRNP A1268-289 and the MS IgG epitope (hnRNP A1293-304, within M9.  In contrast to the nuclear localization of wild type (WT hnRNP A1, mutant hnRNP A1 mis-localized to the cytoplasm, co-localized with stress granules and caused cellular apoptosis. Whilst WT hnRNP A1 bound TPNO-1, mutant hnRNP A1 showed reduced TPNO-1 binding. These data suggest SNVs in hnRNP A1 might contribute to pathogenesis of MS.

  2. Novel somatic single nucleotide variants within the RNA binding protein hnRNP A1 in multiple sclerosis patients [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/3nv

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangmin Lee

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Some somatic single nucleotide variants (SNVs are thought to be pathogenic, leading to neurological disease. We hypothesized that heterogeneous nuclear ribonuclear protein A1 (hnRNP A1, an autoantigen associated with multiple sclerosis (MS would contain SNVs. MS patients develop antibodies to hnRNP A1293-304, an epitope within the M9 domain (AA268-305 of hnRNP A1. M9 is hnRNP A1’s nucleocytoplasmic transport domain, which binds transportin-1 (TPNO-1 and allows for hnRNP A1’s transport into and out of the nucleus. Genomic DNA sequencing of M9 revealed nine novel SNVs that resulted in an amino acid substitution in MS patients that were not present in controls. SNVs occurred within the TPNO-1 binding domain (hnRNP A1268-289 and the MS IgG epitope (hnRNP A1293-304, within M9.  In contrast to the nuclear localization of wild type (WT hnRNP A1, mutant hnRNP A1 mis-localized to the cytoplasm, co-localized with stress granules and caused cellular apoptosis. Whilst WT hnRNP A1 bound TPNO-1, mutant hnRNP A1 showed reduced TPNO-1 binding. These data suggest SNVs in hnRNP A1 might contribute to pathogenesis of MS.

  3. Reasons not to ''pocket shoot''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarroll, K.A.; Fisher, D.R.; Cawthon, L.A.; Donovan, K.R.; Roszler, M.H.; Kling, G.A.

    1987-01-01

    The authors' large population of intravenous drug abusers (IVDA) has increasingly resorted to supraclavicular central venous injection for vascular access. Few reports of complications associated with the practice of supraclavicular ''pocket'' injection have appeared in the radiologic literature. This exhibit demonstrates the complications associated with this practice, including pneumothorax, mycotic aneurysm, arteriovenous fistual, jugular vein thrombosis, cellulitis, foreign body and neck abscess. In addition, they show examples of sternoclavicular osteomyelities. The anatomy of the ''pocket'' and the pathophysiology and radiographic manifestations of these complications are reviewed

  4. Developmental changes in the role of a pertussis toxin sensitive guanine nucleotide binding protein in the rat cardiac alpha1-adrenergic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, H.M.

    1989-01-01

    During development, the cardiac alpha 1 -adrenergic chronotropic response changes from positive in the neonate to negative in the adult. This thesis examined the possibility of a developmental change in coupling of a PT-sensitive G-protein to the alpha 1 -adrenergic receptor. Radioligand binding experiments performed with the iodinated alpha 1 -selective radioligand [ 125 I]-I-2-[β-(4-hydroxphenyl)ethylaminomethyl]tetralone ([ 125 I]-IBE 2254) demonstrated that the alpha 1 -adrenergic receptor is coupled to a G-protein in both neonatal and adult rat hearts. However, in the neonate the alpha 1 -adrenergic receptor is coupled to a PT-insensitive G-protein, whereas in the adult the alpha 1 -adrenergic receptor is coupled to both a PT-insensitive and a PT-sensitive G-protein. Consistent with the results from binding experiments, PT did not have any effect on the alpha 1 -mediated positive chronotropic response in the neonate, whereas in the adult the alpha 1 -mediated negative chronotropic response was completely converted to a positive one after PT-treatment. This thesis also examined the possibility of an alteration in coupling of the alpha 1 -adrenergic receptor to its effector under certain circumstances such as high potassium (K + ) depolarization in nerve-muscle (NM) co-cultures, a system which has been previously shown to be a convenient in vitro model to study the mature inhibitory alpha 1 -response

  5. In vitro studies of immunoglobulin heavy-chain binding protein (BiP, GRP78). Interactions of BiP with newly synthesized proteins and adenine nucleotides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassenbrock, C.K.

    1988-01-01

    Here we examine the interaction of BiP with newly synthesized polypeptides in an in vitro protein translations-translocation system. We find that BiP forms tight complexes with nonglycosylated yeast invertase and incorrectly disulfide-bonded prolactin but not with glycosylated invertase or correctly disulfide-bonded prolactin. Moreover, BiP associates detectably only with completed chains of prolactin, not with chains undergoing synthesis. We conclude that BiP recognizes and binds with high affinity to aberrantly folded or aberrantly glycosylated polypeptides in vitro, but not to all nascent chains as they are folding. BiP also binds APT and can be purified by APT affinity chromatography. We show that submicromolar levels of ATP or ADP decrease the rate of absorption of 125 I-BiP to nitrocellulose filters coated with protein or nonionic detergents. ATP and ADP also protect portions of BiP from proteolytic degradation. In contrast, micromolar levels of AMP increase the rate of adsorption and the rate of proteolytic degradation of BiP. We also show that an ATPase activity co-purifies with BiP, but its slow turnover number suggests a regulatory, rather than a functional role. The BiP-associated ATPase shares several properties with the related cytoplasmic protein, HSC70/clathrin uncoating ATPase

  6. Pocket dictionary of laboratory equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junge, H.D.

    1987-01-01

    This pocket dictionary contains the 2500 most common terms for scientific and technical equipment in chemical laboratories. It is a useful tool for those who are used to communicating in German and English, but have to learn the special terminology in this field. (orig.) [de

  7. Ecology – A Pocket Guide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 5; Issue 8. Ecology – A Pocket Guide. Renee M Borges. Book Review Volume 5 Issue 8 August 2000 pp 99-102. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/005/08/0099-0102. Author Affiliations.

  8. Newnes electronics assembly pocket book

    CERN Document Server

    Brindley, Keith

    2013-01-01

    Produced in association with the Engineering Training Authority with contributions from dozens of people in the electronics industry. The material covers common skills in electrical and electronic engineering and concentrates mainly on wiring and assembly. 'Newnes Electronics Assembly Pocket Book' is for electronics technicians, students and apprentices.

  9. In Silico Molecular Modeling and Docking Studies on Novel Mutants (E229V, H225P and D230C) of the Nucleotide-Binding Domain of Homo sapiens Hsp70.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elengoe, Asita; Hamdan, Salehhuddin

    2017-12-01

    In this study, we explored the possibility of determining the synergistic interactions between nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) of Homo sapiens heat-shock 70 kDa protein (Hsp70) and E1A 32 kDa of adenovirus serotype 5 motif (PNLVP) in the efficiency of killing of tumor cells in cancer treatment. At present, the protein interaction between NBD and PNLVP motif is still unknown, but believed to enhance the rate of virus replication in tumor cells. Three mutant models (E229V, H225P and D230C) were built and simulated, and their interactions with PNLVP motif were studied. The PNLVP motif showed the binding energy and intermolecular energy values with the novel E229V mutant at -7.32 and -11.2 kcal/mol. The E229V mutant had the highest number of hydrogen bonds (7). Based on the root mean square deviation, root mean square fluctuation, hydrogen bonds, salt bridge, secondary structure, surface-accessible solvent area, potential energy and distance matrices analyses, it was proved that the E229V had the strongest and most stable interaction with the PNLVP motif among all the four protein-ligand complex structures. The knowledge of this protein-ligand complex model would help in designing Hsp70 structure-based drug for cancer therapy.

  10. Mechanisms of haplotype divergence at the RGA08 nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat gene locus in wild banana (Musa balbisiana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baurens, Franc-Christophe; Bocs, Stéphanie; Rouard, Mathieu; Matsumoto, Takashi; Miller, Robert N G; Rodier-Goud, Marguerite; MBéguié-A-MBéguié, Didier; Yahiaoui, Nabila

    2010-07-16

    Comparative sequence analysis of complex loci such as resistance gene analog clusters allows estimating the degree of sequence conservation and mechanisms of divergence at the intraspecies level. In banana (Musa sp.), two diploid wild species Musa acuminata (A genome) and Musa balbisiana (B genome) contribute to the polyploid genome of many cultivars. The M. balbisiana species is associated with vigour and tolerance to pests and disease and little is known on the genome structure and haplotype diversity within this species. Here, we compare two genomic sequences of 253 and 223 kb corresponding to two haplotypes of the RGA08 resistance gene analog locus in M. balbisiana "Pisang Klutuk Wulung" (PKW). Sequence comparison revealed two regions of contrasting features. The first is a highly colinear gene-rich region where the two haplotypes diverge only by single nucleotide polymorphisms and two repetitive element insertions. The second corresponds to a large cluster of RGA08 genes, with 13 and 18 predicted RGA genes and pseudogenes spread over 131 and 152 kb respectively on each haplotype. The RGA08 cluster is enriched in repetitive element insertions, in duplicated non-coding intergenic sequences including low complexity regions and shows structural variations between haplotypes. Although some allelic relationships are retained, a large diversity of RGA08 genes occurs in this single M. balbisiana genotype, with several RGA08 paralogs specific to each haplotype. The RGA08 gene family has evolved by mechanisms of unequal recombination, intragenic sequence exchange and diversifying selection. An unequal recombination event taking place between duplicated non-coding intergenic sequences resulted in a different RGA08 gene content between haplotypes pointing out the role of such duplicated regions in the evolution of RGA clusters. Based on the synonymous substitution rate in coding sequences, we estimated a 1 million year divergence time for these M. balbisiana haplotypes. A

  11. NUCLEOTIDES IN INFANT FEEDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.G. Mamonova

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The article reviews the application of nucleotides-metabolites, playing a key role in many biological processes, for the infant feeding. The researcher provides the date on the nucleotides in the women's milk according to the lactation stages. She also analyzes the foreign experience in feeding newborns with nucleotides-containing milk formulas. The article gives a comparison of nucleotides in the adapted formulas represented in the domestic market of the given products.Key words: children, feeding, nucleotides.

  12. Identification of the SNP (Single Nucleotide Polymorphism for Fatty Acid Composition Associated with Beef Flavor-related FABP4 (Fatty Acid Binding Protein 4 in Korean Cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-yep Oh

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated the relationship between unsaturated fatty acids influencing beef flavor and four types of SNPs (c.280A>G, c.388G>A, c.408G>C and c.456A>G located at exon 2, 3 and 4 of the FABP4 gene, which is a fatty acid binding protein 4 in Korean cattle (n = 513. When analyzing the relationship between single genotype, fatty acids and carcass trait, individuals of GG, GG, CC and GG genotypes that are homozygotes, had a higher content of unsaturated fatty acids and marbling scores than other genotypes (p<0.05. Then, haplotype block showed strong significant relationships not only with unsaturated fatty acids (54.73%, but also with marbling scores (5.82 in ht1×ht1 group (p<0.05. This ht1×ht1 group showed significant differences with unsaturated fatty acids and marbling scores that affected beef flavor in Korean cattle. Therefore, it can be inferred that the ht1×ht1 types might be valuable new markers for use in the improvement of Korean cattle.

  13. TclTk Pocket Reference

    CERN Document Server

    Raines, Paul

    1998-01-01

    The Tcl/Tk combination is increasingly popular because it lets you produce sophisticated graphical interfaces with a few easy commands, develop and change scripts quickly, and conveniently tie together existing utilities or programming libraries. The Tcl/Tk Pocket Reference,a handy reference guide to the basic Tcl language elements, Tcl and Tk commands, and Tk widgets, is a companion volume to Tcl/Tk in a Nutshell.

  14. Raf Kinase Inhibitory Protein Function Is Regulated via a Flexible Pocket and Novel Phosphorylation-Dependent Mechanism▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granovsky, Alexey E.; Clark, Matthew C.; McElheny, Dan; Heil, Gary; Hong, Jia; Liu, Xuedong; Kim, Youngchang; Joachimiak, Grazyna; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Koide, Shohei; Rosner, Marsha Rich

    2009-01-01

    Raf kinase inhibitory protein (RKIP/PEBP1), a member of the phosphatidylethanolamine binding protein family that possesses a conserved ligand-binding pocket, negatively regulates the mammalian mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascade. Mutation of a conserved site (P74L) within the pocket leads to a loss or switch in the function of yeast or plant RKIP homologues. However, the mechanism by which the pocket influences RKIP function is unknown. Here we show that the pocket integrates two regulatory signals, phosphorylation and ligand binding, to control RKIP inhibition of Raf-1. RKIP association with Raf-1 is prevented by RKIP phosphorylation at S153. The P74L mutation increases kinase interaction and RKIP phosphorylation, enhancing Raf-1/MAPK signaling. Conversely, ligand binding to the RKIP pocket inhibits kinase interaction and RKIP phosphorylation by a noncompetitive mechanism. Additionally, ligand binding blocks RKIP association with Raf-1. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies reveal that the pocket is highly dynamic, rationalizing its capacity to interact with distinct partners and be involved in allosteric regulation. Our results show that RKIP uses a flexible pocket to integrate ligand binding- and phosphorylation-dependent interactions and to modulate the MAPK signaling pathway. This mechanism is an example of an emerging theme involving the regulation of signaling proteins and their interaction with effectors at the level of protein dynamics. PMID:19103740

  15. Raf kinase inhibitory protein function is regulated via a flexible pocket and novel phosphorylation-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granovsky, Alexey E; Clark, Matthew C; McElheny, Dan; Heil, Gary; Hong, Jia; Liu, Xuedong; Kim, Youngchang; Joachimiak, Grazyna; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Koide, Shohei; Rosner, Marsha Rich

    2009-03-01

    Raf kinase inhibitory protein (RKIP/PEBP1), a member of the phosphatidylethanolamine binding protein family that possesses a conserved ligand-binding pocket, negatively regulates the mammalian mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascade. Mutation of a conserved site (P74L) within the pocket leads to a loss or switch in the function of yeast or plant RKIP homologues. However, the mechanism by which the pocket influences RKIP function is unknown. Here we show that the pocket integrates two regulatory signals, phosphorylation and ligand binding, to control RKIP inhibition of Raf-1. RKIP association with Raf-1 is prevented by RKIP phosphorylation at S153. The P74L mutation increases kinase interaction and RKIP phosphorylation, enhancing Raf-1/MAPK signaling. Conversely, ligand binding to the RKIP pocket inhibits kinase interaction and RKIP phosphorylation by a noncompetitive mechanism. Additionally, ligand binding blocks RKIP association with Raf-1. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies reveal that the pocket is highly dynamic, rationalizing its capacity to interact with distinct partners and be involved in allosteric regulation. Our results show that RKIP uses a flexible pocket to integrate ligand binding- and phosphorylation-dependent interactions and to modulate the MAPK signaling pathway. This mechanism is an example of an emerging theme involving the regulation of signaling proteins and their interaction with effectors at the level of protein dynamics.

  16. The Type IV Pilus Assembly ATPase PilB of Myxococcus xanthus Interacts with the Inner Membrane Platform Protein PilC and the Nucleotide-binding Protein PilM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischof, Lisa Franziska; Friedrich, Carmen; Harms, Andrea; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte; van der Does, Chris

    2016-03-25

    Type IV pili (T4P) are ubiquitous bacterial cell surface structures, involved in processes such as twitching motility, biofilm formation, bacteriophage infection, surface attachment, virulence, and natural transformation. T4P are assembled by machinery that can be divided into the outer membrane pore complex, the alignment complex that connects components in the inner and outer membrane, and the motor complex in the inner membrane and cytoplasm. Here, we characterize the inner membrane platform protein PilC, the cytosolic assembly ATPase PilB of the motor complex, and the cytosolic nucleotide-binding protein PilM of the alignment complex of the T4P machinery ofMyxococcus xanthus PilC was purified as a dimer and reconstituted into liposomes. PilB was isolated as a monomer and bound ATP in a non-cooperative manner, but PilB fused to Hcp1 ofPseudomonas aeruginosaformed a hexamer and bound ATP in a cooperative manner. Hexameric but not monomeric PilB bound to PilC reconstituted in liposomes, and this binding stimulated PilB ATPase activity. PilM could only be purified when it was stabilized by a fusion with a peptide corresponding to the first 16 amino acids of PilN, supporting an interaction between PilM and PilN(1-16). PilM-N(1-16) was isolated as a monomer that bound but did not hydrolyze ATP. PilM interacted directly with PilB, but only with PilC in the presence of PilB, suggesting an indirect interaction. We propose that PilB interacts with PilC and with PilM, thus establishing the connection between the alignment and the motor complex. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Identification of active pocket and protein druggability within envelope glycoprotein GP2 from Ebola virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beuy Joob

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The drug searching for combating the present outbreak of Ebola virus infection is the urgent activity at present. Finding the new effective drug at present must base on the molecular analysis of the pathogenic virus. The in-depth analysis of the viral protein to find the binding site, active pocket is needed. Here, the authors analyzed the envelope glycoprotein GP2 from Ebola virus. Identification of active pocket and protein druggability within envelope glycoprotein GP2 from Ebola virus was done. According to this assessment, 7 active pockets with varied druggability could be identified.

  18. Newnes electronics engineers pocket book

    CERN Document Server

    Brindley, Keith

    2013-01-01

    This book is packed with information and material which everyone involved in electronics will find indispensable. Now when you need to know a transistor's characteristics, or an integrated circuit's pinout details, simply look it up! The book is full of tables, symbols, formulae, conversions and illustrations.Promotion via the new Newnes Pocket Book catalogue to the electronics trade will drive sales into the book trade Covers component data; encapsulations; pin-outs; symbols & codings Extensive material on conversion factors, formulae; units and relationships

  19. Oracle Data Dictionary Pocket Reference

    CERN Document Server

    Kreines, David

    2003-01-01

    If you work with Oracle, then you don't need to be told that the data dictionary is large and complex, and grows larger with each new Oracle release. It's one of the basic elements of the Oracle database you interact with regularly, but the sheer number of tables and views makes it difficult to remember which view you need, much less the name of the specific column. Want to make it simpler? The Oracle Data Dictionary Pocket Reference puts all the information you need right at your fingertips. Its handy and compact format lets you locate the table and view you need effortlessly without stoppin

  20. Electrical engineering a pocket reference

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt-Walter, Heinz

    2007-01-01

    This essential reference offers you a well-organized resource for accessing the basic electrical engineering knowledge you need for your work. Whether you're an experienced engineer who appreciates an occasional refresher in key areas, or a student preparing to enter the field, Electrical Engineering: A Pocket Reference provides quick and easy access to fundamental principles and their applications. You also find an extensive collection of time-saving equations that help simplify your daily projects.Supported with more than 500 diagrams and figures, 60 tables, and an extensive index, this uniq

  1. Perl/Tk Pocket Reference

    CERN Document Server

    Lidie, Stephen

    1998-01-01

    The Perl/Tk Pocket Reference is a companion volume to Learning Perl/Tk, an O'Reilly Animal Guide. Learning Perl/Tk is a tutorial for Perl/Tk, the extension to Perl for creating graphical user interfaces. With Tk, Perl programs can be window-based rather than command-line based, with buttons, entry fields, listboxes, menus, scrollbars, balloons, tables, dialogs, and more. And Perl/Tk programs run on UNIX and Windows-based computers. This small book is a handy reference guide geared toward the advanced Perl/Tk programmer. Novice Perl/Tk programmers will find that its compact size gives th

  2. JavaScript Pocket Reference

    CERN Document Server

    Flanagan, David

    1998-01-01

    JavaScript is a powerful, object-based scripting language that can be embedded directly in HTML pages. It allows you to create dynamic, interactive Web-based applications that run completely within a Web browser -- JavaScript is the language of choice for developing Dynamic HTML (DHTML) content. JavaScript can be integrated effectively with CGI and Java to produce sophisticated Web applications, although, in many cases, JavaScript eliminates the need for complex CGI scripts and Java applets altogether. The JavaScript Pocket Reference is a companion volume to JavaScript: The Definitive Guide

  3. Windows Vista Administrator's Pocket Guide

    CERN Document Server

    Stanek, William R

    2007-01-01

    Portable and precise, this pocket-sized guide delivers immediate answers for the day-to-day administration of Windows Vista. Zero in on core support and maintenance tasks using quick-reference tables, instructions, and lists. You'll get the precise information you need to solve problems and get the job done-whether you're at your desk or in the field! Get fast facts to: Install and configure Windows Vista-and optimize the user workspaceMaintain operating system components, hardware devices, and driversCreate user and group accounts-and control rights and permissionsAdminister group policy se

  4. Pocket atlas of radiographic anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, T.B.; Reif, E.; Stark, P.

    1993-01-01

    The 'Pocket Atlas of Radiographic Anatomy' presents 170 radiographs of the various body regions of adults, showing only the normal radiographic anatomy. Each radiograph is supplemented on the opposite page by a drawing of the particular body region. There is no commenting text, but the drawings are provided with captions in English. The atlas is a useful guide for interpreting radiographs. The pictures are arranged in chapters entitled as follows: Skeletal Imaging (skull, spine, upper extremity), lower extremity; Miscellaneous Plain Films (chest, mammogram, trachea, lung tomograms); Contrast Examinations (gastrointestinal tract, intravenous contrast examinations, arthrography, angiography); Special Examinations (myelograms, lymphangiograms, bronchograms, sialograms). (UWA). 348 figs [de

  5. Pocket atlas of dental radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasler, F.A. [Geneva Univ. (Switzerland). Dept. of Radiology, Dental Institute; Visser, H. [Goettingen Univ. (Germany). Dental School

    2007-07-01

    In this age of highly specialized medical imaging, an examination of the teeth and alveolar bone is almost unthinkable without the use of radiographs. This highly informative and easy-to-read book with a collection of 798 radiographs, tables, and photos provides a myriad of problem-solving tips concerning the fundamentals of radiographic techniques, quality assurance, image processing, radiographic anatomy, and radiographic diagnosis. Information is easy to find, enabling the reader to literally get a grasp of essential new knowledge in next to no time. The dental practice team now has a pocket 'consultant' at its fingertips, providing practical ways to incorporate new technique into daily practice. (orig.)

  6. A novel cofactor-binding mode in bacterial IMP dehydrogenases explains inhibitor selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Kim, Youngchang; Maltseva, Natalia; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Gu, Minyi; Zhang, Minjia; Mandapati, Kavitha; Gollapalli, Deviprasad R; Gorla, Suresh Kumar; Hedstrom, Lizbeth; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2015-02-27

    The steadily rising frequency of emerging diseases and antibiotic resistance creates an urgent need for new drugs and targets. Inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMP dehydrogenase or IMPDH) is a promising target for the development of new antimicrobial agents. IMPDH catalyzes the oxidation of IMP to XMP with the concomitant reduction of NAD(+), which is the pivotal step in the biosynthesis of guanine nucleotides. Potent inhibitors of bacterial IMPDHs have been identified that bind in a structurally distinct pocket that is absent in eukaryotic IMPDHs. The physiological role of this pocket was not understood. Here, we report the structures of complexes with different classes of inhibitors of Bacillus anthracis, Campylobacter jejuni, and Clostridium perfringens IMPDHs. These structures in combination with inhibition studies provide important insights into the interactions that modulate selectivity and potency. We also present two structures of the Vibrio cholerae IMPDH in complex with IMP/NAD(+) and XMP/NAD(+). In both structures, the cofactor assumes a dramatically different conformation than reported previously for eukaryotic IMPDHs and other dehydrogenases, with the major change observed for the position of the NAD(+) adenosine moiety. More importantly, this new NAD(+)-binding site involves the same pocket that is utilized by the inhibitors. Thus, the bacterial IMPDH-specific NAD(+)-binding mode helps to rationalize the conformation adopted by several classes of prokaryotic IMPDH inhibitors. These findings offer a potential strategy for further ligand optimization. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. A Novel Cofactor-binding Mode in Bacterial IMP Dehydrogenases Explains Inhibitor Selectivity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Kim, Youngchang; Maltseva, Natalia; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Gu, Minyi; Zhang, Minjia; Mandapati, Kavitha; Gollapalli, Deviprasad R.; Gorla, Suresh Kumar; Hedstrom, Lizbeth; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    The steadily rising frequency of emerging diseases and antibiotic resistance creates an urgent need for new drugs and targets. Inosine 5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMP dehydrogenase or IMPDH) is a promising target for the development of new antimicrobial agents. IMPDH catalyzes the oxidation of IMP to XMP with the concomitant reduction of NAD+, which is the pivotal step in the biosynthesis of guanine nucleotides. Potent inhibitors of bacterial IMPDHs have been identified that bind in a structurally distinct pocket that is absent in eukaryotic IMPDHs. The physiological role of this pocket was not understood. Here, we report the structures of complexes with different classes of inhibitors of Bacillus anthracis, Campylobacter jejuni, and Clostridium perfringens IMPDHs. These structures in combination with inhibition studies provide important insights into the interactions that modulate selectivity and potency. We also present two structures of the Vibrio cholerae IMPDH in complex with IMP/NAD+ and XMP/NAD+. In both structures, the cofactor assumes a dramatically different conformation than reported previously for eukaryotic IMPDHs and other dehydrogenases, with the major change observed for the position of the NAD+ adenosine moiety. More importantly, this new NAD+-binding site involves the same pocket that is utilized by the inhibitors. Thus, the bacterial IMPDH-specific NAD+-binding mode helps to rationalize the conformation adopted by several classes of prokaryotic IMPDH inhibitors. These findings offer a potential strategy for further ligand optimization. PMID:25572472

  8. High-throughput screening identifies small molecules that bind to the RAS:SOS:RAS complex and perturb RAS signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Michael C; Howes, Jennifer E; Sun, Qi; Little, Andrew J; Camper, DeMarco V; Abbott, Jason R; Phan, Jason; Lee, Taekyu; Waterson, Alex G; Rossanese, Olivia W; Fesik, Stephen W

    2018-05-01

    K-RAS is mutated in approximately 30% of human cancers, resulting in increased RAS signaling and tumor growth. Thus, RAS is a highly validated therapeutic target, especially in tumors of the pancreas, lung and colon. Although directly targeting RAS has proven to be challenging, it may be possible to target other proteins involved in RAS signaling, such as the guanine nucleotide exchange factor Son of Sevenless (SOS). We have previously reported on the discovery of small molecules that bind to SOS1, activate SOS-mediated nucleotide exchange on RAS, and paradoxically inhibit ERK phosphorylation (Burns et al., PNAS, 2014). Here, we describe the discovery of additional, structurally diverse small molecules that also bind to SOS1 in the same pocket and elicit similar biological effects. We tested >160,000 compounds in a fluorescence-based assay to assess their effects on SOS-mediated nucleotide exchange. X-Ray structures revealed that these small molecules bind to the CDC25 domain of SOS1. Compounds that elicited high levels of nucleotide exchange activity in vitro increased RAS-GTP levels in cells, and inhibited phospho ERK levels at higher treatment concentrations. The identification of structurally diverse SOS1 binding ligands may assist in the discovery of new molecules designed to target RAS-driven tumors. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Visualizing electron pockets in cuprate superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Tanmoy; Markiewicz, R. S.; Bansil, A.; Balatsky, A. V.

    2012-06-01

    Fingerprints of the electron pocket in cuprates have been obtained only in numerous magnetotransport measurements, but its absence in spectroscopic observations poses a long-standing mystery. We develop a theoretical tool to provide ways to detect electron pockets via spectroscopies including scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) spectra, inelastic neutron scattering (INS), and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). We show that the quasiparticle-interference (QPI) pattern, measured by STM, shows an additional seven q vectors associated with the scattering on the electron pocket than that on the hole pocket. Furthermore, the Bogolyubov quasiparticle scatterings of the electron pocket lead to a second magnetic resonance mode in the INS spectra at a higher resonance energy. Finally, we reanalyze some STM, INS, and ARPES experimental data of several cuprates which dictates the direct fingerprints of electron pockets in these systems.

  10. Generating "fragment-based virtual library" using pocket similarity search of ligand-receptor complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khashan, Raed S

    2015-01-01

    As the number of available ligand-receptor complexes is increasing, researchers are becoming more dedicated to mine these complexes to aid in the drug design and development process. We present free software which is developed as a tool for performing similarity search across ligand-receptor complexes for identifying binding pockets which are similar to that of a target receptor. The search is based on 3D-geometric and chemical similarity of the atoms forming the binding pocket. For each match identified, the ligand's fragment(s) corresponding to that binding pocket are extracted, thus forming a virtual library of fragments (FragVLib) that is useful for structure-based drug design. The program provides a very useful tool to explore available databases.

  11. A novel missense variant (Gln220Arg) of GNB4 encoding guanine nucleotide-binding protein, subunit beta-4 in a Japanese family with autosomal dominant motor and sensory neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Shiroh; Morikawa, Takuya; Fujioka, Ryuta; Noda, Kazuhito; Kosaka, Kengo; Taniwaki, Takayuki; Shibata, Hiroki

    2017-09-01

    Dominant intermediate Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease F (CMTDIF) is an autosomal dominant hereditary form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) caused by variations in the guanine nucleotide-binding protein, subunit beta-4 gene (GNB4). We examined two Japanese familial cases with CMT. Case 1 was a 49-year-old male whose chief complaint was slowly progressive gait disturbance and limb dysesthesia that appeared at the age of 47. On neurological examination, he showed hyporeflexia or areflexia, distal limb muscle weakness, and distal sensory impairment with lower dominancy. Nerve conduction studies demonstrated demyelinating sensorimotor neuropathy with reduced action potentials in the lower limbs. Case 2 was an 80-year-old man, Case 1's father, who reported difficulty in riding a bicycle at the age of 76. On neurological examination, he showed areflexia in the upper and lower limbs. Distal sensory impairment in the lower limbs was also observed. Nerve conduction studies revealed mainly axonal involvement. Exome sequencing identified a novel heterozygous nonsynonymous variant (NM_021629.3:c.659T > C [p.Gln220Arg]) in GNB4 exon 8, which is known to be responsible for CMT. Sanger sequencing confirmed that both patients are heterozygous for the variation, which causes an amino acid substitution, Gln220Arg, in the highly conserved region of the WD40 domain of GNB4. The frequency of this variant in the Exome Aggregation Consortium Database was 0.000008247, and we confirmed its absence in 502 Japanese control subjects. We conclude that this novel GNB4 variant is causative for CMTDIF in these patients, who represent the first record of the disease in the Japanese population. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  12. Follicle-stimulating hormone receptor-mediated uptake of 45Ca2+ by cultured rat Sertoli cells does not require activation of cholera toxin- or pertussis toxin-sensitive guanine nucleotide binding proteins or adenylate cyclase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grasso, P.; Reichert, L.E. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    We have previously reported that FSH stimulates flux of 45Ca2+ into cultured Sertoli cells from immature rats via voltage-sensitive and voltage-independent calcium channels. In the present study, we show that this effect of FSH does not require cholera toxin (CT)- or pertussis toxin (PT)-sensitive guanine nucleotide binding (G) protein or activation of adenylate cyclase (AC). Significant stimulation of 45Ca2+ influx was observed within 1 min, and maximal response (3.2-fold over basal levels) was achieved within 2 min after exposure to FSH. FSH-stimulated elevations in cellular cAMP paralleled increases in 45Ca2+ uptake, suggesting a possible coupling of AC activation to 45Ca2+ influx. (Bu)2cAMP, however, was not able to enhance 45Ca2+ uptake over basal levels at a final concentration of 1000 microM, although a concentration-related increase in androstenedione conversion to estradiol was evident. Exposure of Sertoli cells to CT (10 ng/ml) consistently stimulated basal levels of androstenedione conversion to estradiol but had no effect on basal levels of 45Ca2+ uptake. Similarly, CT had no effect on FSH-induced 45Ca2+ uptake, but potentiated FSH-stimulated estradiol synthesis. PT (10 ng/ml) augmented basal and FSH-stimulated estradiol secretion without affecting 45Ca2+ influx. The adenosine analog N6-phenylisopropyladenosine, which binds to Gi-coupled adenosine receptors on Sertoli cells, inhibited FSH-stimulated androgen conversion to estradiol in a dose-related (1-1000 nM) manner, but FSH-stimulated 45Ca2+ influx remained unchanged. Our results show that in contrast to FSH-stimulated estradiol synthesis, the flux of 45Ca2+ into Sertoli cells in response to FSH is not mediated either directly or indirectly by CT- or PT-sensitive G protein, nor does it require activation of AC. Our data further suggest that the FSH receptor itself may function as a calcium channel

  13. Follicle-stimulating hormone receptor-mediated uptake of sup 45 Ca sup 2+ by cultured rat Sertoli cells does not require activation of cholera toxin- or pertussis toxin-sensitive guanine nucleotide binding proteins or adenylate cyclase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grasso, P.; Reichert, L.E. Jr. (Albany Medical College, NY (USA))

    1990-08-01

    We have previously reported that FSH stimulates flux of 45Ca2+ into cultured Sertoli cells from immature rats via voltage-sensitive and voltage-independent calcium channels. In the present study, we show that this effect of FSH does not require cholera toxin (CT)- or pertussis toxin (PT)-sensitive guanine nucleotide binding (G) protein or activation of adenylate cyclase (AC). Significant stimulation of 45Ca2+ influx was observed within 1 min, and maximal response (3.2-fold over basal levels) was achieved within 2 min after exposure to FSH. FSH-stimulated elevations in cellular cAMP paralleled increases in 45Ca2+ uptake, suggesting a possible coupling of AC activation to 45Ca2+ influx. (Bu)2cAMP, however, was not able to enhance 45Ca2+ uptake over basal levels at a final concentration of 1000 microM, although a concentration-related increase in androstenedione conversion to estradiol was evident. Exposure of Sertoli cells to CT (10 ng/ml) consistently stimulated basal levels of androstenedione conversion to estradiol but had no effect on basal levels of 45Ca2+ uptake. Similarly, CT had no effect on FSH-induced 45Ca2+ uptake, but potentiated FSH-stimulated estradiol synthesis. PT (10 ng/ml) augmented basal and FSH-stimulated estradiol secretion without affecting 45Ca2+ influx. The adenosine analog N6-phenylisopropyladenosine, which binds to Gi-coupled adenosine receptors on Sertoli cells, inhibited FSH-stimulated androgen conversion to estradiol in a dose-related (1-1000 nM) manner, but FSH-stimulated 45Ca2+ influx remained unchanged. Our results show that in contrast to FSH-stimulated estradiol synthesis, the flux of 45Ca2+ into Sertoli cells in response to FSH is not mediated either directly or indirectly by CT- or PT-sensitive G protein, nor does it require activation of AC. Our data further suggest that the FSH receptor itself may function as a calcium channel.

  14. GPR17: Molecular modeling and dynamics studies of the 3-D structure and purinergic ligand binding features in comparison with P2Y receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranghino Graziella

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background GPR17 is a G-protein-coupled receptor located at intermediate phylogenetic position between two distinct receptor families: the P2Y and CysLT receptors for extracellular nucleotides and cysteinyl-LTs, respectively. We previously showed that GPR17 can indeed respond to both classes of endogenous ligands and to synthetic compounds active at the above receptor families, thus representing the first fully characterized non-peptide "hybrid" GPCR. In a rat brain focal ischemia model, the selective in vivo knock down of GPR17 by anti-sense technology or P2Y/CysLT antagonists reduced progression of ischemic damage, thus highlighting GPR17 as a novel therapeutic target for stroke. Elucidation of the structure of GPR17 and of ligand binding mechanisms are the necessary steps to obtain selective and potent drugs for this new potential target. On this basis, a 3-D molecular model of GPR17 embedded in a solvated phospholipid bilayer and refined by molecular dynamics simulations has been the first aim of this study. To explore the binding mode of the "purinergic" component of the receptor, the endogenous agonist UDP and two P2Y receptor antagonists demonstrated to be active on GPR17 (MRS2179 and cangrelor were then modeled on the receptor. Results Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that GPR17 nucleotide binding pocket is similar to that described for the other P2Y receptors, although only one of the three basic residues that have been typically involved in ligand recognition is conserved (Arg255. The binding pocket is enclosed between the helical bundle and covered at the top by EL2. Driving interactions are H-bonds and salt bridges between the 6.55 and 6.52 residues and the phosphate moieties of the ligands. An "accessory" binding site in a region formed by the EL2, EL3 and the Nt was also found. Conclusion Nucleotide binding to GPR17 occurs on the same receptor regions identified for already known P2Y receptors. Agonist

  15. The pocket dictionary of energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlhaus, O.; Boldt, G.; Gonsior, B.; Klein, K.; Ziburske, H.

    1981-01-01

    The pocket dictionary of energy does not only address the interested amateur but also students, pupils, teachers, scientists, technicians, and polititcians in like manner. The dictionary contains ca. 900 key-words from the fields of energy, consumption, energy types, energy deposits, energy programmes, energy industry, thermal insulation, governmental aids for energy conservation measures, heating cost calculation, energy utilization and energy conservation. The problems of the costs and efficiency of energy conversion, energy pricing, the promotion of research projects, the rentability of heating devices or insulation, the sanitation of old buildings, governmental aids by subsidies or tax abatement according to the modernization and energy conservation law etc., as well as the problem of pollution and the endangering of the environment by exhaust air, waste heat, ash and litter are emphasized particularly. Considering the space available the criterion for the selection of the key-words was not a scientific completeness but the provision of a fundamental understanding of the matter. (orig.) [de

  16. Effects of polymerization and nucleotide identity on the conformational dynamics of the bacterial actin homolog MreB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colavin, Alexandre; Hsin, Jen; Huang, Kerwyn Casey

    2014-03-04

    The assembly of protein filaments drives many cellular processes, from nucleoid segregation, growth, and division in single cells to muscle contraction in animals. In eukaryotes, shape and motility are regulated through cycles of polymerization and depolymerization of actin cytoskeletal networks. In bacteria, the actin homolog MreB forms filaments that coordinate the cell-wall synthesis machinery to regulate rod-shaped growth and contribute to cellular stiffness through unknown mechanisms. Like actin, MreB is an ATPase and requires ATP to polymerize, and polymerization promotes nucleotide hydrolysis. However, it is unclear whether other similarities exist between MreB and actin because the two proteins share low sequence identity and have distinct cellular roles. Here, we use all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to reveal surprising parallels between MreB and actin structural dynamics. We observe that MreB exhibits actin-like polymerization-dependent structural changes, wherein polymerization induces flattening of MreB subunits, which restructures the nucleotide-binding pocket to favor hydrolysis. MreB filaments exhibited nucleotide-dependent intersubunit bending, with hydrolyzed polymers favoring a straighter conformation. We use steered simulations to demonstrate a coupling between intersubunit bending and the degree of flattening of each subunit, suggesting cooperative bending along a filament. Taken together, our results provide molecular-scale insight into the diversity of structural states of MreB and the relationships among polymerization, hydrolysis, and filament properties, which may be applicable to other members of the broad actin family.

  17. ORNL Pocket Meter Program: internal operating procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, C.D.; Miller, J.H.; Dunsmore, M.R.

    1984-12-01

    The ORNL Pocket Meter Program is designed for auditing the approximate photon radiation exposure of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) radiation workers. Although pocket meters are considered to be a secondary personnel dosimetry system at ORNL, they are valuable indicators of unplanned exposures if proper procedures are followed for testing, calibrating, deploying, wearing, processing, and recording data. 4 figures, 1 table

  18. Air pocket removal from downward sloping pipes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pothof, I.W.M.; Clemens, F.H.L.R.

    2012-01-01

    Air-water flow is an undesired condition in water pipelines and hydropower tunnels. Water pipelines and wastewater pressure mains in particular are subject to air pocket accumulation in downward sloping reaches, such as inverted siphons or terrain slopes. Air pockets cause energy losses and an

  19. Flexibility of the myosin heavy chain: direct evidence that the region containing SH/sub 1/ and SH/sub 2/ can move 10 /Angstrom/ under the influence of nucleotide binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huston, E.E.; Grammer, J.C.; Yount, R.G.

    1988-12-13

    Previous experiments demonstrated that two thiols of skeletal myosin subfragment 1 (SF/sub 1/) could be oxidized to a disulfide bond by treatment with a 2-fold excess of 5,5'-dithiobis (2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB) in the presence of MgADP. The resulting characteristic changes in the ATPase activities of SF/sub 1/ and the fact that MgADP was stably trapped at the active site, suggested that the two thiols cross-linked were SH/sub 1/ (Cys-707) and SH/sub 2/ (Cys-697) from the myosin heavy chain. To verify this suggestion, SF/sub 1/, after DTNB treatment as above, was treated with an excess of N-ethylmaleimide to block all accessible thiols. The single protein disulfide produced by DTNB oxidation was reduced with dithioerythritol and the modified SF/sub 1/ internally cross-linked with equimolar (/sup 14/C)p-phenylenedimaleimide (pPDM) in the presence of MgADP. After extensive trypsinization, the major /sup 14/C-labeled peptide was isolated, characterized, and shown to be Cys-Asn-Gly-Val-Leu-Gly-Ile-Arg-Ile-Cys-Arg, in which the two cysteines were cross-linked by pPDM. This peptide is known to contain SH/sub 2/ and SH/sub 1/ in this order and to come from residues 697-708 in the rabbit skeletal myosin heavy chain. Parallel experiments with (/sup 14/C)pPDM and unmodified SF/sub 1/ similar to those above gave an identical SH/sub 1/, SH/sub 2/ tryptic peptide, verifying earlier labeling results. These combined results demonstrate that SH/sub 1/ and SH/sub 2/ cross-linked by pPDM (12-13 /Angstrom/, S to S) or by oxidation with DTNB (2 /Angstrom/, S to S) can move a minimum of 10 /Angstrom/ under the influence of nucleotide binding. Because these residues are separated by only nine amino acids in the primary sequence, this small section of the heavy chain must possess extraordinary flexibility.

  20. Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 1 regulates Porphyromonas gingivalis-induced vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 expression in endothelial cells through NF-κB pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, M; Liu, J; Ouyang, X

    2015-04-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis has been shown to actively invade endothelial cells and induce vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) overexpression. Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 1 (NOD1) is an intracellular pattern recognition reporter, and its involvement in this process was unknown. This study focused on endothelial cells infected with P. gingivalis, the detection of NOD1 expression and the role that NOD1 plays in the upregulation of VCAM-1 and ICAM-1. The human umbilical vein endothelial cell line (ECV-304) was intruded by P. gingivalis W83, and cells without any treatment were the control group. Expression levels of NOD1, VCAM-1, ICAM-1, phosphorylated P65 between cells with and without treatment on both mRNA and protein levels were compared. Then we examined whether mesodiaminopimelic acid (NOD1 agonist) could increase VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 expression, meanwhile, NOD1 gene silence by RNA interference could reduce VCAM-1, ICAM-1 and phosphorylated P65 release. At last, we examined whether inhibition of NF-κB by Bay117082 could reduce VCAM-1 and ICAM- 1 expression. The mRNA levels were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction, and protein levels by western blot or electrophoretic mobility shift assays (for phosphorylated P65). P. gingivalis invasion showed significant upregulation of NOD1, VCAM-1 and ICAM-1. NOD1 activation by meso-diaminopimelic acid increased VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 expression, and NOD1 gene silence reduced VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 release markedly. The NF-κB signaling pathway was activated by P. gingivalis, while NOD1 gene silence decreased the activation of NF-κB. Moreover, inhibition of NF-κB reduced VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 expression induced by P. gingivalis in endothelial cells. The results revealed that P. gingivalis induced NOD1 overexpression in endothelial cells and that NOD1 played an important role in the process of VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 expression in endothelial cells infected with P

  1. Bay11-7082 attenuates neuropathic pain via inhibition of nuclear factor-kappa B and nucleotide-binding domain-like receptor protein 3 inflammasome activation in dorsal root ganglions in a rat model of lumbar disc herniation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang AL

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Ailiang Zhang, Kun Wang, Lianghua Ding, Xinnan Bao, Xuan Wang, Xubin Qiu, Jinbo Liu Spine Surgery, Third Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Changzhou, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Lumbar disc herniation (LDH is an important cause of radiculopathy, but the underlying mechanisms are incompletely understood. Many studies suggested that local inflammation, rather than mechanical compression, results in radiculopathy induced by LDH. On the molecular and cellular level, nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB and nucleotide-binding domain-like receptor protein 3 (NLRP3 inflammasome have been implicated in the regulation of neuroinflammation formation and progression. In this study, the autologous nucleus pulposus (NP was implanted in the left L5 dorsal root ganglion (DRG to mimic LDH in rats. We investigated the expression of NF-κB and the components of NLRP3 inflammasome in the DRG neurons in rats. Western blotting and immunofluorescence for the related molecules, including NLRP3, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing caspase-1 activator domain (ASC, caspase-1, interleukin (IL-1β, IL-18, IκBα, p-IκBα, p65, p-p65, and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP were examined. In the NP-treated group, the activations of NLRP3, ASC, caspase-1, IL-1β, IL-18, p-IκBα, and p-p65 in DRG neurons in rats were elevated at 1 day after surgery, and the peak occurred at 7 days. Treatment with Bay11-7082, an inhibitor of the actions of IKK-β, was able to inhibit expression and activation of the molecules (NLRP3, ASC, caspase-1, IL-1β, IL-18, p-IκBα, and p-p65 and relieve the pain in rats. Our study shows that NF-κB and NLRP3 inflammasome are involved in the maintenance of NP-induced pain, and that Bay11-7082 could alleviate mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia by inhibiting NF-κB and NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Keywords: pain, NLRP3, NF-κB, dorsal root ganglion, nucleus pulposus

  2. Condensing the information in DNA with double-headed nucleotides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hornum, Mick; Sharma, Pawan K; Reslow-Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    A normal duplex holds as many Watson-Crick base pairs as the number of nucleotides in its constituent strands. Here we establish that single nucleotides can be designed to functionally imitate dinucleotides without compromising binding affinity. This effectively allows sequence information...

  3. Pocket companion to PMI's PMBOK guide

    CERN Document Server

    Snijders, Paul; Zandhuis, Anton

    2010-01-01

    This pocket guide is based on the PMBOK Guide® Fourth Edition.This pocket guide supplies a summary of the PMBOK Guide® , to provide a quick introduction as well as a structured overview of this method for project management.This pocket guide deals with the key issues and themes within project management and PMBOK:A short overview of the activities of PMI Inc., The organization and its standards: PMBOK Guide®, Standard for Project Portfolio Management, Standard for Program Management, OPM3.The essentials of the Project Lifecycle and Organization.What are the key project management knowledge ar

  4. PockDrug: A Model for Predicting Pocket Druggability That Overcomes Pocket Estimation Uncertainties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrel, Alexandre; Regad, Leslie; Xhaard, Henri; Petitjean, Michel; Camproux, Anne-Claude

    2015-04-27

    Predicting protein druggability is a key interest in the target identification phase of drug discovery. Here, we assess the pocket estimation methods' influence on druggability predictions by comparing statistical models constructed from pockets estimated using different pocket estimation methods: a proximity of either 4 or 5.5 Å to a cocrystallized ligand or DoGSite and fpocket estimation methods. We developed PockDrug, a robust pocket druggability model that copes with uncertainties in pocket boundaries. It is based on a linear discriminant analysis from a pool of 52 descriptors combined with a selection of the most stable and efficient models using different pocket estimation methods. PockDrug retains the best combinations of three pocket properties which impact druggability: geometry, hydrophobicity, and aromaticity. It results in an average accuracy of 87.9% ± 4.7% using a test set and exhibits higher accuracy (∼5-10%) than previous studies that used an identical apo set. In conclusion, this study confirms the influence of pocket estimation on pocket druggability prediction and proposes PockDrug as a new model that overcomes pocket estimation variability.

  5. Main: Nucleotide Analysis [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Nucleotide Analysis Japonica genome blast search result Result of blastn search against jap...onica genome sequence kome_japonica_genome_blast_search_result.zip kome_japonica_genome_blast_search_result ...

  6. Pharmacophore Selection and Redesign of Non-nucleotide Inhibitors of Anthrax Edema Factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Estrella Jimenez

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic treatment may fail to protect individuals, if not started early enough, after infection with Bacillus anthracis, due to the continuing activity of toxins that the bacterium produces. Stable and easily stored inhibitors of the edema factor toxin (EF, an adenylyl cyclase, could save lives in the event of an outbreak, due to natural causes or a bioweapon attack. The toxin’s basic activity is to convert ATP to cAMP, and it is thus in principle a simple phosphatase, which means that many mammalian enzymes, including intracellular adenylcyclases, may have a similar activity. While nucleotide based inhibitors, similar to its natural substrate, ATP, were identified early, these compounds had low activity and specificity for EF. We used a combined structural and computational approach to choose small organic molecules in large, web-based compound libraries that would, based on docking scores, bind to residues within the substrate binding pocket of EF. A family of fluorenone-based inhibitors was identified that inhibited the release of cAMP from cells treated with EF. The lead inhibitor was also shown to inhibit the diarrhea caused by enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC in a murine model, perhaps by serving as a quorum sensor. These inhibitors are now being tested for their ability to inhibit Anthrax infection in animal models and may have use against other pathogens that produce toxins similar to EF, such as Bordetella pertussis or Vibrio cholera.

  7. Pharmacophore selection and redesign of non-nucleotide inhibitors of anthrax edema factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schein, Catherine H; Chen, Deliang; Ma, Lili; Kanalas, John J; Gao, Jian; Jimenez, Maria Estrella; Sower, Laurie E; Walter, Mary A; Gilbertson, Scott R; Peterson, Johnny W

    2012-11-08

    Antibiotic treatment may fail to protect individuals, if not started early enough, after infection with Bacillus anthracis, due to the continuing activity of toxins that the bacterium produces. Stable and easily stored inhibitors of the edema factor toxin (EF), an adenylyl cyclase, could save lives in the event of an outbreak, due to natural causes or a bioweapon attack. The toxin's basic activity is to convert ATP to cAMP, and it is thus in principle a simple phosphatase, which means that many mammalian enzymes, including intracellular adenylcyclases, may have a similar activity. While nucleotide based inhibitors, similar to its natural substrate, ATP, were identified early, these compounds had low activity and specificity for EF. We used a combined structural and computational approach to choose small organic molecules in large, web-based compound libraries that would, based on docking scores, bind to residues within the substrate binding pocket of EF. A family of fluorenone-based inhibitors was identified that inhibited the release of cAMP from cells treated with EF. The lead inhibitor was also shown to inhibit the diarrhea caused by enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) in a murine model, perhaps by serving as a quorum sensor. These inhibitors are now being tested for their ability to inhibit Anthrax infection in animal models and may have use against other pathogens that produce toxins similar to EF, such as Bordetella pertussis or Vibrio cholera.

  8. Macintosh Troubleshooting Pocket Guide for Mac OS

    CERN Document Server

    Lerner, David; Corporation, Tekserve

    2009-01-01

    The Macintosh Troubleshooting Pocket Guide covers the most common user hardware and software trouble. It's not just a book for Mac OS X (although it includes tips for OS X and Jaguar), it's for anyone who owns a Mac of any type-- there are software tips going back as far as OS 6. This slim guide distills the answers to the urgent questions that Tekserve's employee's answer every week into a handy guide that fits in your back pocket or alongside your keyboard.

  9. GPCR crystal structures: Medicinal chemistry in the pocket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shonberg, Jeremy; Kling, Ralf C; Gmeiner, Peter; Löber, Stefan

    2015-07-15

    Recent breakthroughs in GPCR structural biology have significantly increased our understanding of drug action at these therapeutically relevant receptors, and this will undoubtedly lead to the design of better therapeutics. In recent years, crystal structures of GPCRs from classes A, B, C and F have been solved, unveiling a precise snapshot of ligand-receptor interactions. Furthermore, some receptors have been crystallized in different functional states in complex with antagonists, partial agonists, full agonists, biased agonists and allosteric modulators, providing further insight into the mechanisms of ligand-induced GPCR activation. It is now obvious that there is enormous diversity in the size, shape and position of the ligand binding pockets in GPCRs. In this review, we summarise the current state of solved GPCR structures, with a particular focus on ligand-receptor interactions in the binding pocket, and how this can contribute to the design of GPCR ligands with better affinity, subtype selectivity or efficacy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Supplementary Material for: The arabidopsis cyclic nucleotide interactome

    KAUST Repository

    Donaldson, Lara; Meier, Stuart; Gehring, Christoph A

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Cyclic nucleotides have been shown to play important signaling roles in many physiological processes in plants including photosynthesis and defence. Despite this, little is known about cyclic nucleotide-dependent signaling mechanisms in plants since the downstream target proteins remain unknown. This is largely due to the fact that bioinformatics searches fail to identify plant homologs of protein kinases and phosphodiesterases that are the main targets of cyclic nucleotides in animals. Methods An affinity purification technique was used to identify cyclic nucleotide binding proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana. The identified proteins were subjected to a computational analysis that included a sequence, transcriptional co-expression and functional annotation analysis in order to assess their potential role in plant cyclic nucleotide signaling. Results A total of twelve cyclic nucleotide binding proteins were identified experimentally including key enzymes in the Calvin cycle and photorespiration pathway. Importantly, eight of the twelve proteins were shown to contain putative cyclic nucleotide binding domains. Moreover, the identified proteins are post-translationally modified by nitric oxide, transcriptionally co-expressed and annotated to function in hydrogen peroxide signaling and the defence response. The activity of one of these proteins, GLYGOLATE OXIDASE 1, a photorespiratory enzyme that produces hydrogen peroxide in response to Pseudomonas, was shown to be repressed by a combination of cGMP and nitric oxide treatment. Conclusions We propose that the identified proteins function together as points of cross-talk between cyclic nucleotide, nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species signaling during the defence response.

  11. Cyclic nucleotides and radioresistnace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulinskij, V.I.; Mikheeva, G.A.; Zel'manovich, B.M.

    1982-01-01

    The addition of glucose to meat-peptone broth does not change the radiosensitizing effect (RSE) of cAMP at the logarithmic phase (LP) and the radioprotective effect (RPE) at the stationary phase (SP), but sensitization, characteristic of cGMP, disappears in SP and turns into RPE in LP. Introduction of glucose into the broth for 20 min eliminates all the effects of both cyclic nucleotides in the cya + strain while cya - mutant exhibits RSE. RSE of both cyclic nucleotides is only manifested on minimal media. These data brought confirmation of the dependence of the influence of cyclic media. These data brought confirmation of the dependence of the influence of cyclic nucleotides on radioresistance upon the metabolic status of the cell [ru

  12. Replantation of multi-level fingertip amputation using the pocket principle (palmar pocket method).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arata, J; Ishikawa, K; Soeda, H; Kitayama, T

    2003-07-01

    Two cases of multi-level fingertip amputation are presented. In each case, replantation was achieved in a two-stage procedure, involving reattachment, de-epithelialisation and insertion into a palmar pocket in stage 1, followed by removal from the palmar pocket 16 days later. The cases are described and the technique is discussed.

  13. Review of Pocket Guide Megaliths [app

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barney Harris

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The Pocket Guide Megaliths app was developed by Senet Mobile UK in collaboration with The Megalithic Portal website. The app was released in 2016 and is currently available for iOS devices, such as iPhone and iPads. Pocket Guide Megaliths presents the Megalithic Portal's burgeoning worldwide database of ancient and prehistoric sites in a variety of innovative and engaging ways. It aims to act primarily as a guide to enjoying and exploring the rich prehistoric heritage of the world, though offers additional functionality for would-be monument explorers too.

  14. Cell-phone interference with pocket dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djajaputra, David; Nehru, Ramasamy; Bruch, Philip M; Ayyangar, Komanduri M; Raman, Natarajan V; Enke, Charles A

    2005-01-01

    Accurate reporting of personal dose is required by regulation for hospital personnel that work with radioactive material. Pocket dosimeters are commonly used for monitoring this personal dose. We show that operating a cell phone in the vicinity of a pocket dosimeter can introduce large and erroneous readings of the dosimeter. This note reports a systematic study of this electromagnetic interference. We found that simple practical measures are enough to mitigate this problem, such as increasing the distance between the cell phone and the dosimeter or shielding the dosimeter, while maintaining its sensitivity to ionizing radiation, by placing it inside a common anti-static bag. (note)

  15. Cell-phone interference with pocket dosimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djajaputra, David; Nehru, Ramasamy; Bruch, Philip M; Ayyangar, Komanduri M; Raman, Natarajan V; Enke, Charles A [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Nebraska Medical Center, 987521 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-7521 (United States)

    2005-05-07

    Accurate reporting of personal dose is required by regulation for hospital personnel that work with radioactive material. Pocket dosimeters are commonly used for monitoring this personal dose. We show that operating a cell phone in the vicinity of a pocket dosimeter can introduce large and erroneous readings of the dosimeter. This note reports a systematic study of this electromagnetic interference. We found that simple practical measures are enough to mitigate this problem, such as increasing the distance between the cell phone and the dosimeter or shielding the dosimeter, while maintaining its sensitivity to ionizing radiation, by placing it inside a common anti-static bag. (note)

  16. Classification of pseudo pairs between nucleotide bases and amino acids by analysis of nucleotide-protein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Jiro; Westhof, Eric

    2011-10-01

    Nucleotide bases are recognized by amino acid residues in a variety of DNA/RNA binding and nucleotide binding proteins. In this study, a total of 446 crystal structures of nucleotide-protein complexes are analyzed manually and pseudo pairs together with single and bifurcated hydrogen bonds observed between bases and amino acids are classified and annotated. Only 5 of the 20 usual amino acid residues, Asn, Gln, Asp, Glu and Arg, are able to orient in a coplanar fashion in order to form pseudo pairs with nucleotide bases through two hydrogen bonds. The peptide backbone can also form pseudo pairs with nucleotide bases and presents a strong bias for binding to the adenine base. The Watson-Crick side of the nucleotide bases is the major interaction edge participating in such pseudo pairs. Pseudo pairs between the Watson-Crick edge of guanine and Asp are frequently observed. The Hoogsteen edge of the purine bases is a good discriminatory element in recognition of nucleotide bases by protein side chains through the pseudo pairing: the Hoogsteen edge of adenine is recognized by various amino acids while the Hoogsteen edge of guanine is only recognized by Arg. The sugar edge is rarely recognized by either the side-chain or peptide backbone of amino acid residues.

  17. E-mail security a pocket guide

    CERN Document Server

    Furnell, Steven

    2010-01-01

    This pocket guide will help businesses to address the most important issues. Its comprehensive approach covers both the technical and the managerial aspects of the subject, offering valuable insights for IT professionals, managers and executives, as well as for individual users of e-mail.

  18. Oracle PL/SQL Language Pocket Reference

    CERN Document Server

    Feuerstein, Steven; Dawes, Chip

    2007-01-01

    The fourth edition of this popular pocket guide provides quick-reference information that will help you use Oracle's PL/SQL language, including the newest Oracle Database 11g features. A companion to Steven Feuerstein and Bill Pribyl's bestselling Oracle PL/SQL Programming, this concise guide boils down the most vital PL/SQL information into an accessible summary

  19. Dermal pocketing following distal finger replantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puhaindran, Mark E; Paavilainen, Pasi; Tan, David M K; Peng, Yeong Pin; Lim, Aymeric Y T

    2010-08-01

    Replantation is an ideal technique for reconstruction following fingertip amputation as it provides 'like for like' total reconstruction of the nail complex, bone pulp tissue and skin with no donor-site morbidity. However, fingertips are often not replanted because veins cannot be found or are thought to be too small to repair. Attempts at 'cap-plasty' or pocketing of replanted tips with and without microvascular anastomosis have been done in the past with varying degrees of success. We prospectively followed up a group of patients who underwent digital replantation and dermal pocketing in the palm to evaluate the outcome of this procedure. There were 10 patients with 14 amputated digits (two thumbs, five index, four middle, two ring and one little) who underwent dermal pocketing of the amputated digit following replantation. Among the 14 digits that were treated with dermal pocketing, 11 survived completely, one had partial atrophy and two were completely lost. Complications encountered included finger stiffness (two patients) and infection of the replanted fingertip with osteomyelitis of the distal phalanx (one patient). We believe that this technique can help increase the chance of survival for distal replantation with an acceptable salvage rate of 85% in our series. Copyright 2009 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Pocket Checklists of Indonesian timber trees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prawira, Soewanda A.; Tantra, I.G.M.; Whitmore, T.C.

    1984-01-01

    Indonesia as yet does not have a comprehensive account of the forest trees which reach timber size (35 cm dbh = 14 inch or 105 cm gbh = 42 inch). A project has been started in August 1983 by the Botany Section of the Forest Research Institute in Bogor, Indonesia, to prepare pocket checklists of the

  1. Fingertip replantation using the subdermal pocket procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tsan-Shiun; Jeng, Seng-Feng; Chiang, Yuan-Cheng

    2004-01-01

    Restoration of finger length and function are the goals of replantation after fingertip amputation. Methods include microsurgical replantation and nonmicrosurgical replantation, such as composite graft techniques. To increase the survival rates for composite grafts, the subcutaneous pocket procedure has been used as a salvage procedure. The subdermal pocket procedure, which is a modification of the subcutaneous pocket procedure, was used for replantation of 17 fingertips in 16 consecutive patients. Eight fingertips experienced guillotine injuries and the other nine fingertips experienced crush injuries. Revascularization of one digital artery without available venous outflow was performed for six fingers, and composite graft techniques were used for the other 11 fingers. The success rate was 16 of 17 cases. The difference in success rates for guillotine versus crush injuries was statistically significant. Comparison of patients with arterial anastomoses and patients without arterial anastomoses also indicated a statistically significant difference. Thirteen fingertips survived completely. One finger, demonstrating complete loss and early termination of the pocketing procedure, was amputated on the eighth postoperative day. Two fingers were partially lost because of severe crushing injuries. One finger demonstrated partial loss of more than one quarter of the fingertip, which required secondary revision, because the patient was a heavy smoker. The pocketing period was 8 +/- 1 days (mean +/- SD, n = 6) for the fingers revascularized with one digital arterial anastomosis and 13.3 +/- 1.9 days (n = 10) for the fingers successfully replanted with composite graft techniques. The mean active range of motion of the interphalangeal joint of the three thumbs was 65 +/- 5 degrees, and that of the distal interphalangeal joint of the other 11 fingers was 51 +/- 11 degrees. The static two-point discrimination result was 6.4 +/- 1.0 mm (n = 14) after an average of 11 +/- 5 months

  2. The Thermodynamics of Anion Complexation to Nonpolar Pockets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Matthew R; Yao, Wei; Tang, Du; Ashbaugh, Henry S; Gibb, Bruce C

    2018-02-08

    The interactions between nonpolar surfaces and polarizable anions lie in a gray area between the hydrophobic and Hofmeister effects. To assess the affinity of these interactions, NMR and ITC were used to probe the thermodynamics of eight anions binding to four different hosts whose pockets each consist primarily of hydrocarbon. Two classes of host were examined: cavitands and cyclodextrins. For all hosts, anion affinity was found to follow the Hofmeister series, with associations ranging from 1.6-5.7 kcal mol -1 . Despite the fact that cavitand hosts 1 and 2 possess intrinsic negative electrostatic fields, it was determined that these more enveloping hosts generally bound anions more strongly. The observation that the four hosts each possess specific anion affinities that cannot be readily explained by their structures, points to the importance of counter cations and the solvation of the "empty" hosts, free guests, and host-guest complexes, in defining the affinity.

  3. Single Nucleotide Polymorphism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Børsting, Claus; Pereira, Vania; Andersen, Jeppe Dyrberg

    2014-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are the most frequent DNA sequence variations in the genome. They have been studied extensively in the last decade with various purposes in mind. In this chapter, we will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of using SNPs for human identification...... of SNPs. This will allow acquisition of more information from the sample materials and open up for new possibilities as well as new challenges....

  4. The arabidopsis cyclic nucleotide interactome

    KAUST Repository

    Donaldson, Lara Elizabeth; Meier, Stuart Kurt; Gehring, Christoph A

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotides have been shown to play important signaling roles in many physiological processes in plants including photosynthesis and defence. Despite this, little is known about cyclic nucleotide-dependent signaling mechanisms

  5. Exploring the correlation between the sequence composition of the nucleotide binding G5 loop of the FeoB GTPase domain (NFeoB) and intrinsic rate of GDP release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilfoyle, Amy P; Deshpande, Chandrika N; Schenk, Gerhard; Maher, Megan J; Jormakka, Mika

    2014-12-12

    GDP release from GTPases is usually extremely slow and is in general assisted by external factors, such as association with guanine exchange factors or membrane-embedded GPCRs (G protein-coupled receptors), which accelerate the release of GDP by several orders of magnitude. Intrinsic factors can also play a significant role; a single amino acid substitution in one of the guanine nucleotide recognition motifs, G5, results in a drastically altered GDP release rate, indicating that the sequence composition of this motif plays an important role in spontaneous GDP release. In the present study, we used the GTPase domain from EcNFeoB (Escherichia coli FeoB) as a model and applied biochemical and structural approaches to evaluate the role of all the individual residues in the G5 loop. Our study confirms that several of the residues in the G5 motif have an important role in the intrinsic affinity and release of GDP. In particular, a T151A mutant (third residue of the G5 loop) leads to a reduced nucleotide affinity and provokes a drastically accelerated dissociation of GDP.

  6. Pengembangan Pocket Mobile Learning Berbasis Android

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dasmo Dasmo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengembangkan media pembelajaran pocket mobile learning berbasis android. Metode penelitian ini menggunakan model pengembangan ADDIE (Analysis, Design, Development, Implementation, dan Evaluation. Penelitian ini telah menghasilkan sebuah luaran berupa media pembelajaran pocket mobile learning berbasis android pada mata kuliah fisika. Media ini layak digunakan berdasarkan validasi dari ahli materi, ahli media dan respon mahasiswa terhadap media pembelajaran yang dibuat. Berdasarkan penilaian validasi ahli materi didapatkan rata-rata skor total sebesar 3,22 pada 14 butir pernyataan, dan termasuk pada kriteria “baik”. Sementara itu, berdasarkan validasi ahli media didapatkan rata-rata skor total sebesar 3,43 pada 15 butir pernyataan, dan termasuk pada kriteria “sangat baik”. Dan berdasarkan hasil analisis respon mahasiswa terhadap media pembelajaran diperoleh rata-rata skor total sebesar 4,0 atau 80%, dengan kategori “kuat”. Dengan demikian dapat disimpulkan bahwa media pembelajaran pocket mobile learning berbasis android layak untuk digunakan dan hampir semua mahasiswa menanggapi respon positif.The current research aims to develop the pocket mobile learning android based. It uses the Research and Development (R&D method with the ADDIE model (analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluating. This research has resulted from an outcome of learning media pocket mobile android based on physics subject. This instructional media is feasible to be used based on validation from material experts, media experts, and student responses. Based on the assessment of material expert, the validation obtains an average total score of 3,22 at 14 statements and considered as "good" criteria. Meanwhile, based on the validation of media experts, the average total score reaches 3,43 at 15 statements and considered as "very good" criteria. And based on the analysis of students’ response to learning media, the

  7. Evaluation of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) in the p53 Binding Protein 1 (TP53BP1) Gene in Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Breast-Conserving Surgery and Whole-Breast Irradiation (BCS + RT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haffty, Bruce G.; Goyal, Sharad; Kulkarni, Diptee; Green, Camille; Vazquez, Alexi; Schiff, Devora; Moran, Meena S.; Yang Qifeng; Ganesan, Shridar; Hirsfield, Kim M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: TP53BP1 is a key component of radiation-induced deoxyribonucleic acid damage repair. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the significance of a known common single nucleotide polymorphism in this gene (rs560191) in patients treated with breast-conserving surgery and whole-breast irradiation (BCS + RT). Methods and Materials: The population consisted of 176 premenopausal women treated with BCS + RT (median follow-up, 12 years). Genomic deoxyribonucleic acid was processed by use of TaqMan assays. Each allele for rs560191 was either C or G, so each patient was therefore classified as CC, CG, or GG. Patients were grouped as GG if they were homozygous for the variant G allele or CC-CG if they carried at least one copy of the common C allele (CC or CG). Results: Of the 176 women, 124 (71%) were CC-CG and 52 (29%) were GG. The mean age was 44 years for GG vs. 38 years for CC-CG (p < 0.001). GG was more common in African-American women than white women (69% vs. 13%, p < 0.001) and more commonly estrogen receptor negative (70% vs. 49%, p = 0.02). There were no significant correlations of rs560191 with other critical variables. Despite the fact that GG patients were older, the 10-year rate of local relapses was higher (22% for GG vs. 12% for CC-CG, p = 0.04). Conclusions: This novel avenue of investigation of polymorphisms in radiation repair/response genes in patients treated with BCS + RT suggests a correlation to local relapse. Additional evaluation is needed to assess the biological and functional significance of these single nucleotide polymorphisms, and larger confirmatory validation studies will be required to determine the clinical implications.

  8. Nucleotide Selectivity at a Preinsertion Checkpoint of T7 RNA Polymerase Transcription Elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    E, Chao; Duan, Baogen; Yu, Jin

    2017-04-20

    Nucleotide selection is crucial for transcription fidelity control, in particular, for viral T7 RNA polymerase (RNAP) lack of proofreading activity. It has been recognized that multiple kinetic checkpoints exist prior to full nucleotide incorporation. In this work, we implemented intensive atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to quantify how strong the nucleotide selection is at the initial checkpoint of an elongation cycle of T7 RNAP. The incoming nucleotides bind into a preinsertion site where a critical tyrosine residue locates nearby to assist the nucleotide selection. We calculated the relative binding free energy between a noncognate nucleotide and a cognate one at a preinsertion configuration via alchemical simulations, showing that a small selection free energy or the binding free energy difference (∼3 k B T) exists between the two nucleotides. Indeed, another preinsertion configuration favored by the noncognate nucleotides was identified, which appears to be off path for further nucleotide insertion and additionally assists the nucleotide selection. By chemical master equation (CME) approach, we show that the small selection free energy at the preinsertion site along with the off-path noncognate nucleotide filtering can help substantially to reduce the error rate and to maintain the elongation rate high in the T7 RNAP transcription.

  9. Pocket money and child effort at school

    OpenAIRE

    François-Charles Wolff; Christine Barnet-Verzat

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we study the relationship between the provision of parental pocket and the level of effort undertaken by the child at school. Under altruism, an increased amount of parental transfer should reduce the child's effort. Our empirical analysis is based on a French data set including about 1,400 parent-child pairs. We find that children do not undertake less effort when their parents are more generous.

  10. Newnes radio and electronics engineer's pocket book

    CERN Document Server

    Moorshead, H W; Perry, J

    1978-01-01

    Newnes Radio and Electronics Engineer's Pocket Book, Fifteenth Edition provides reference of the information relevant in radio and electronics engineering. The book presents tables, illustrations, and diagrams of various data used in radio and electronics engineering. The coverage of the text includes abbreviations and symbols, electrical equations, and code conversions. The text will be useful to engineers, technicians, and other professionals who require a reference about the different aspects of radio and electronics.

  11. A pocket type thermoluminescent personnel dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vora, K.G.; Nagpal, J.S.; Pendurkar, H.K.; Gangadharan, P.

    1979-01-01

    A pocket type thermoluminescent personnel dosemeter using CaSO 4 : Dy phosphor is described. Two glass capillaries containing the phosphor are fitted into a plastic tube and covered by a cylindrical filter. The combination is fitted into an ink barrel of a fountain pen. The response of this Dy glass dosimeter was studied for various incident photon energies. A uniform response over the energy range from 33 keV to 1250 keV is achieved. (A.K.)

  12. ISO27001 / ISO27002 a pocket guide

    CERN Document Server

    Calder, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Information is one of your organisation's most important resources. Keeping it secure is therefore vital to your business. This handy pocket guide is an essential overview of two key information security standards that cover the formal requirements (ISO27001:2013) for creating an Information Security Management System (ISMS), and the best-practice recommendations (ISO27002:2013) for those responsible for initiating, implementing or maintaining it.

  13. Windows® 7 Administrator's Pocket Consultant

    CERN Document Server

    Stanek, William

    2009-01-01

    Portable and precise, this pocket-sized guide delivers immediate answers for the day-to-day administration of Windows 7-from desktop configuration and management to networking and security issues. Zero in on core support and maintenance tasks by using quick-reference tables, instructions, and lists. You'll get the precise information you need to solve problems and get the job done-whether at your desk or in the field!

  14. Thermodynamics of Ligand Binding to a Heterogeneous RNA Population in the Malachite Green Aptamer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokoloski, Joshua E.; Dombrowski, Sarah E.; Bevilacqua, Philip C.

    2011-01-01

    The malachite green aptamer binds two closely related ligands, malachite green (MG) and tetramethylrosamine (TMR), with near equal affinity. The MG ligand consists of three phenyl rings emanating from a central carbon, while TMR has two of the three rings connected by an ether linkage. The binding pockets for MG and TMR in the aptamer, known from high-resolution structure, differ only in the conformation of a few nucleotides. Herein, we applied isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) to compare the thermodynamics for binding of MG and TMR to the aptamer. Binding heat capacities were obtained from ITC titrations over the temperature range of 15 to 60 °C. Two temperature regimes were found for MG binding: one from 15 to 45 °C where MG bound with a large negative heat capacity and an apparent stoichiometry (n) of ~0.4, and another from 50 to 60 °C where MG bound with positive heat capacity and n~1.1. The binding of TMR, on the other hand, revealed only one temperature regime for binding, with a more modest negative heat capacity and n~1.2. The large difference in heat capacity between the two ligands suggests that significantly more conformational rearrangement occurs upon the binding of MG than TMR, which is consistent with differences in solvent accessible surface area calculated for available ligand-bound structures. Lastly, we note that binding stoichiometry of MG was improved not only by raising the temperature, but also by lowering the concentration of Mg2+ or increasing the time between ITC injections. These studies suggest that binding of a dynamical ligand to a functional RNA requires the RNA itself to have significant dynamics. PMID:22192051

  15. Detecting Local Ligand-Binding Site Similarity in Non-Homologous Proteins by Surface Patch Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sael, Lee; Kihara, Daisuke

    2012-01-01

    Functional elucidation of proteins is one of the essential tasks in biology. Function of a protein, specifically, small ligand molecules that bind to a protein, can be predicted by finding similar local surface regions in binding sites of known proteins. Here, we developed an alignment free local surface comparison method for predicting a ligand molecule which binds to a query protein. The algorithm, named Patch-Surfer, represents a binding pocket as a combination of segmented surface patches, each of which is characterized by its geometrical shape, the electrostatic potential, the hydrophobicity, and the concaveness. Representing a pocket by a set of patches is effective to absorb difference of global pocket shape while capturing local similarity of pockets. The shape and the physicochemical properties of surface patches are represented using the 3D Zernike descriptor, which is a series expansion of mathematical 3D function. Two pockets are compared using a modified weighted bipartite matching algorithm, which matches similar patches from the two pockets. Patch-Surfer was benchmarked on three datasets, which consist in total of 390 proteins that bind to one of 21 ligands. Patch-Surfer showed superior performance to existing methods including a global pocket comparison method, Pocket-Surfer, which we have previously introduced. Particularly, as intended, the accuracy showed large improvement for flexible ligand molecules, which bind to pockets in different conformations. PMID:22275074

  16. Detecting local ligand-binding site similarity in nonhomologous proteins by surface patch comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sael, Lee; Kihara, Daisuke

    2012-04-01

    Functional elucidation of proteins is one of the essential tasks in biology. Function of a protein, specifically, small ligand molecules that bind to a protein, can be predicted by finding similar local surface regions in binding sites of known proteins. Here, we developed an alignment free local surface comparison method for predicting a ligand molecule which binds to a query protein. The algorithm, named Patch-Surfer, represents a binding pocket as a combination of segmented surface patches, each of which is characterized by its geometrical shape, the electrostatic potential, the hydrophobicity, and the concaveness. Representing a pocket by a set of patches is effective to absorb difference of global pocket shape while capturing local similarity of pockets. The shape and the physicochemical properties of surface patches are represented using the 3D Zernike descriptor, which is a series expansion of mathematical 3D function. Two pockets are compared using a modified weighted bipartite matching algorithm, which matches similar patches from the two pockets. Patch-Surfer was benchmarked on three datasets, which consist in total of 390 proteins that bind to one of 21 ligands. Patch-Surfer showed superior performance to existing methods including a global pocket comparison method, Pocket-Surfer, which we have previously introduced. Particularly, as intended, the accuracy showed large improvement for flexible ligand molecules, which bind to pockets in different conformations. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Conformational dynamics and role of the acidic pocket in ASIC pH-dependent gating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vullo, Sabrina; Bonifacio, Gaetano; Roy, Sophie; Johner, Niklaus; Bernèche, Simon; Kellenberger, Stephan

    2017-04-04

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are proton-activated Na + channels expressed in the nervous system, where they are involved in learning, fear behaviors, neurodegeneration, and pain sensation. In this work, we study the role in pH sensing of two regions of the ectodomain enriched in acidic residues: the acidic pocket, which faces the outside of the protein and is the binding site of several animal toxins, and the palm, a central channel domain. Using voltage clamp fluorometry, we find that the acidic pocket undergoes conformational changes during both activation and desensitization. Concurrently, we find that, although proton sensing in the acidic pocket is not required for channel function, it does contribute to both activation and desensitization. Furthermore, protonation-mimicking mutations of acidic residues in the palm induce a dramatic acceleration of desensitization followed by the appearance of a sustained current. In summary, this work describes the roles of potential pH sensors in two extracellular domains, and it proposes a model of acidification-induced conformational changes occurring in the acidic pocket of ASIC1a.

  18. Computational learning on specificity-determining residue-nucleotide interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Ka-Chun; Li, Yue; Peng, Chengbin; Moses, Alan M.; Zhang, Zhaolei

    2015-01-01

    The protein–DNA interactions between transcription factors and transcription factor binding sites are essential activities in gene regulation. To decipher the binding codes, it is a long-standing challenge to understand the binding mechanism across different transcription factor DNA binding families. Past computational learning studies usually focus on learning and predicting the DNA binding residues on protein side. Taking into account both sides (protein and DNA), we propose and describe a computational study for learning the specificity-determining residue-nucleotide interactions of different known DNA-binding domain families. The proposed learning models are compared to state-of-the-art models comprehensively, demonstrating its competitive learning performance. In addition, we describe and propose two applications which demonstrate how the learnt models can provide meaningful insights into protein–DNA interactions across different DNA binding families.

  19. Computational learning on specificity-determining residue-nucleotide interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Ka-Chun

    2015-11-02

    The protein–DNA interactions between transcription factors and transcription factor binding sites are essential activities in gene regulation. To decipher the binding codes, it is a long-standing challenge to understand the binding mechanism across different transcription factor DNA binding families. Past computational learning studies usually focus on learning and predicting the DNA binding residues on protein side. Taking into account both sides (protein and DNA), we propose and describe a computational study for learning the specificity-determining residue-nucleotide interactions of different known DNA-binding domain families. The proposed learning models are compared to state-of-the-art models comprehensively, demonstrating its competitive learning performance. In addition, we describe and propose two applications which demonstrate how the learnt models can provide meaningful insights into protein–DNA interactions across different DNA binding families.

  20. Python pocket reference, version 2.4

    CERN Document Server

    Lutz, Mark

    2005-01-01

    Python is optimized for quality, productivity, portability, and integration. Hundreds of thousands of Python developers around the world rely on Python for general-purpose tasks, Internet scripting, systems programming, user interfaces, and product customization. Available on all major computing platforms, including commercial versions of Unix, Linux, Windows, and Mac OS X, Python is portable, powerful and remarkable easy to use. With its convenient, quick-reference format, Python Pocket Reference, 3rd Edition is the perfect on-the-job reference. More importantly, it's now been refreshed

  1. Newnes passive and discrete circuits pocket book

    CERN Document Server

    MARSTON, R M

    2000-01-01

    Newnes Passive and Discrete Circuits Pocket Book is aimed at all engineers, technicians, students and experimenters who can build a design directly from a circuit diagram. In a highly concise form Ray Marston presents a huge compendium of circuits that can be built as they appear, adapted or used as building blocks. The devices used have been carefully chosen for their ease of availability and reasonable price. The selection of devices has been thoroughly updated for the second edition, which has also been expanded to cover the latest ICs.The three sections of the book cover: Moder

  2. Mac OS X Snow Leopard pocket guide

    CERN Document Server

    Seiblod, Chris

    2009-01-01

    Whether you're new to the Mac or a longtime user, this handy book is the quickest way to get up to speed on Snow Leopard. Packed with concise information in an easy-to-read format, Mac OS X Snow Leopard Pocket Guide covers what you need to know and is an ideal resource for problem-solving on the fly. This book goes right to the heart of Snow Leopard, with details on system preferences, built-in applications, and utilities. You'll also find configuration tips, keyboard shortcuts, guides for troubleshooting, lots of step-by-step instructions, and more. Learn about new features and changes s

  3. AIR for Javascript Developers Pocket Guide

    CERN Document Server

    Chambers, Mike; Hoyt, Kevin; Georgita, Dragos

    2009-01-01

    This book is the official guide to Adobe ® AIR[TM], written by members of the AIR team. With Adobe AIR, web developers can use technologies like HTML and JavaScript to build and deploy web applications to the desktop. Packed with examples, this book explains how AIR works and features recipes for performing common runtime tasks. Part of the Adobe Developer Library, this concise pocket guide explains: What Adobe AIR is, and the problems this runtime aims to solveHow to set up your development environmentThe HTML and JavaScript environments within AIRHow to create your first AIR application

  4. Novel structural features drive DNA binding properties of Cmr, a CRP family protein in TB complex mycobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranganathan, Sridevi; Cheung, Jonah; Cassidy, Michael; Ginter, Christopher; Pata, Janice D; McDonough, Kathleen A

    2018-01-09

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) encodes two CRP/FNR family transcription factors (TF) that contribute to virulence, Cmr (Rv1675c) and CRPMt (Rv3676). Prior studies identified distinct chromosomal binding profiles for each TF despite their recognizing overlapping DNA motifs. The present study shows that Cmr binding specificity is determined by discriminator nucleotides at motif positions 4 and 13. X-ray crystallography and targeted mutational analyses identified an arginine-rich loop that expands Cmr's DNA interactions beyond the classical helix-turn-helix contacts common to all CRP/FNR family members and facilitates binding to imperfect DNA sequences. Cmr binding to DNA results in a pronounced asymmetric bending of the DNA and its high level of cooperativity is consistent with DNA-facilitated dimerization. A unique N-terminal extension inserts between the DNA binding and dimerization domains, partially occluding the site where the canonical cAMP binding pocket is found. However, an unstructured region of this N-terminus may help modulate Cmr activity in response to cellular signals. Cmr's multiple levels of DNA interaction likely enhance its ability to integrate diverse gene regulatory signals, while its novel structural features establish Cmr as an atypical CRP/FNR family member. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  5. Molecular recognition of nucleotides in micelles and the development and expansion of a chemistry outreach program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schechinger, Linda Sue

    I. To investigate the delivery of nucleotide-based drugs, we are studying molecular recognition of nucleotide derivatives in environments that are similar to cell membranes. The Nowick group previously discovered that membrane-like surfactant micelles tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide (TTAB) micelle facilitate molecular of adenosine monophosphate (AMP) recognition. The micelles bind nucleotides by means of electrostatic interactions and hydrogen bonding. We observed binding by following 1H NMR chemical shift changes of unique hexylthymine protons upon addition of AMP. Cationic micelles are required for binding. In surfactant-free or sodium dodecylsulfate solutions, no hydrogen bonding is observed. These observations suggest that the cationic surfactant headgroups bind the nucleotide phosphate group, while the intramicellar base binds the nucleotide base. The micellar system was optimized to enhance binding and selectivity for adenosine nucleotides. The selectivity for adenosine and the number of phosphate groups attached to the adenosine were both investigated. Addition of cytidine, guanidine, or uridine monophosphates, results in no significant downfield shifting of the NH resonance. Selectivity for the phosphate is limited, since adenosine mono-, di-, and triphosphates all have similar binding constants. We successfully achieved molecular recognition of adenosine nucleotides in micellar environments. There is significant difference in the binding interactions between the adenosine nucleotides and three other natural nucleotides. II. The UCI Chemistry Outreach Program (UCICOP) addresses the declining interest of the nations youth for science. UCICOP brings fun and exciting chemistry experiments to local high schools, to remind students that science is fun and has many practical uses. Volunteer students and alumni of UCI perform the demonstrations using scripts and material provided by UCICOP. The preparation of scripts and materials is done by two coordinators

  6. Form and deformity: the trouble with Victorian pockets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Christopher Todd

    2010-01-01

    This essay explores the Victorian debate about the place of pockets in men's and women's clothing. By studying the representation of men as naturally pocketed creatures and the general denial of useful pockets to middle-class women, the essay demonstrates the tenacious cultural logic by which men's and women's pockets were imagined to correspond to sexual differences and to index access, or lack thereof, to public mobility and financial agency. Interconnected readings of visual art, essays, and novels show how the common sense about gendered pockets was utilized and promulgated in Victorian narratives. The question of who gets pockets is thus positioned as part of the history of gendered bodies in public space.

  7. Current switching ratio optimization using dual pocket doping engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Sidhartha; Sahoo, Girija Shankar; Mishra, Guru Prasad

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents a smart idea to maximize current switching ratio of cylindrical gate tunnel FET (CGT) by growing pocket layers in both source and channel region. The pocket layers positioned in the source and channel of the device provides significant improvement in ON-state and OFF-state current respectively. The dual pocket doped cylindrical gate TFET (DP-CGT) exhibits much superior performance in term of drain current, transconductance and current ratio as compared to conventional CGT, channel pocket doped CGT (CP-CGT) and source pocket doped CGT (SP-CGT). Further, the current ratio has been optimized w.r.t. width and instantaneous position both the pocket layers. The much improved current ratio and low power consumption makes the proposed device suitable for low-power and high speed application. The simulation work of DP-CGT is done using 3D Sentaurus TCAD device simulator from Synopsys.

  8. Do Danish children and young people receive pocket money?

    OpenAIRE

    Jens Bonke

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the extent to which Danish parents give their children pocket money, including an examination of whether there is a correlation between the amount of pocket money given and children’s income from paid work. We also examine the significance of parents’ income for the amount of pocket money they give to their children, and we consider how children use their income in relation to the amount of their pocket money and earnings. Finally, we examine the relation...

  9. Small organic compounds enhance antigen loading of class II major histocompatibility complex proteins by targeting the polymorphic P1 pocket

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Höpner, Sabine; Dickhaut, Katharina; Hofstätter, Maria

    2006-01-01

    the peptide loading rate. The effect was evident only for an allelic subset and strictly correlated with the presence of glycine at the dimorphic position beta86 of the HLA-DR molecule. The residue forms the floor of the conserved pocket P1, located in the peptide binding site of MHC molecule. Apparently......, transient occupation of this pocket by the organic compound stabilizes the peptide-receptive conformation permitting rapid antigen loading. This interaction appeared restricted to the larger Gly(beta86) pocket and allowed striking enhancements of T cell responses for antigens presented by these "adamantyl......-susceptible" MHC molecules. As catalysts of antigen loading, compounds targeting P1 may be useful molecular tools to amplify the immune response. The observation, however, that the ligand repertoire can be affected through polymorphic sites form the outside may also imply that environmental factors could induce...

  10. Pocket dictionary of energy. Taschenlexikon Energie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlhaus, O; Boldt, G; Gonsior, B; Klein, K; Ziburske, H

    1981-01-01

    The pocket dictionary of energy does not only address the interested amateur but also students, pupils, teachers, scientists, technicians, and polititcians in like manner. The dictionary contains ca. 900 key-words from the fields of energy, consumption, energy types, energy deposits, energy programmes, energy industry, thermal insulation, governmental aids for energy conservation measures, heating cost calculation, energy utilization and energy conservation. The problems of the costs and efficiency of energy conversion, energy pricing, the promotion of research projects, the rentability of heating devices or insulation, the sanitation of old buildings, governmental aids by subsidies or tax abatement according to the modernization and energy conservation law etc., as well as the problem of pollution and the endangering of the environment by exhaust air, waste heat, ash and litter are emphasized particularly. Considering the space available the criterion for the selection of the key-words was not a scientific completeness but the provision of a fundamental understanding of the matter.

  11. Oracle PL/SQL Language Pocket Reference

    CERN Document Server

    Feuerstein, Steven; Dawes, Chip

    2004-01-01

    While it's good to have a book with all the answers--like your trusty copy of Oracle PL/SQL Programming-- how often do you need all the answers? More likely, you just need a reminder, a quick answer to a problem you're up against. For these times, nothing's handier than the new edition of the Oracle PL/SQL Language Pocket Reference by PL/SQL experts Stephen Feuerstein, Bill Pribyl, and Chip Dawes. Newly updated for Oracle10g, this little book is always at the ready for the quick problem solving you need. The 3rd edition of this popular mini-reference boils down the most vital information fr

  12. Pocket Guide to NDCs under the UNFCCC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taibi, Fatima-Zahra; Konrad, Susanne

    2018-01-01

    For over a decade, the European Capacity Building Initiative (ecbi) has adopted a two-pronged strategy to create a more level playing field for developing countries in the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC): training for new negotiators; and opportunities for senior negotiators from...... with global experts to author policy briefs and background papers. This strategy has proven effective over time. “New” negotiators that trained in our early regional and pre-COP workshops have risen not only to become senior negotiators in the process, but also leaders of regional groups and of UNFCCC bodies...... and committees, and ministers and envoys of their countries. These individuals are still part of our growing alumni, now capacity builders themselves, aiding our efforts POCKET GUIDE TO NDCs UNDER THE UNFCCC iv to train and mentor the next generation of negotiators. Their insights from being “new” negotiators...

  13. Neopatrimonialism and Development: Pockets of Effectiveness as Drivers of Change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Hout (Wil)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ This paper focuses on the notion of ‘pockets of effectiveness’ in the light of the theorisation of regulated neopatrimonialism. The attention to pockets of effectiveness – understood as public organisations which deliver public goods and services relatively

  14. Antinociceptive effect of purine nucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello, C F; Begnini, J; De-La-Vega, D D; Lopes, F P; Schwartz, C C; Jimenez-Bernal, R E; Bellot, R G; Frussa-Filho, R

    1996-10-01

    The antinociceptive effect of purine nucleotides administered systematically (sc) was determined using the formalin and writhing tests in adult male albino mice. The mechanisms underlying nucleotide-induced antinociception were investigated by preinjecting the animals (sc) with specific antagonists for opioid (naloxone, 1 mg/kg), purinergic P1 (caffeine, 5, 10, of 30 mg/kg); theophylline, 10 mg/kg) or purinergic P2 receptors (suramin, 100 mg/kg; Coomassie blue, 30-300 mg/kg; quinidine, 10 mg/kg). Adenosine, adenosine monophosphate (AMP), diphosphate (ADP) and triphosphate (ATP) caused a reduction in the number of writhes and in the time of licking the formalin-injected paw. Naloxone had no effect on adenosine- or adenine nucleotide-induced antinociception. Caffeine (30 mg/kg) and theophylline (10 mg/kg) reversed the antinociceptive action of adenosine and adenine nucleotide derivatives in both tests. P2 antagonists did not reverse adenine nucleotide-induced antinociception. These results suggest that antinociceptive effect of adenine nucleotides is mediated by adenosine.

  15. A stochastic pocket model for aluminum agglomeration in solid propellants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallier, Stany [SNPE Materiaux Energetiques, Vert le Petit (France)

    2009-04-15

    A new model is derived to estimate the size and fraction of aluminum agglomerates at the surface of a burning propellant. The basic idea relies on well-known pocket models in which aluminum is supposed to aggregate and melt within pocket volumes imposed by largest oxidizer particles. The proposed model essentially relaxes simple assumptions of previous pocket models on propellant structure by accounting for an actual microstructure obtained by packing. The use of statistical tools from stochastic geometry enables to determine a statistical pocket size volume and hence agglomerate diameter and agglomeration fraction. Application to several AP/Al propellants gives encouraging results that are shown to be superior to former pocket models. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  16. Drug-like density: a method of quantifying the "bindability" of a protein target based on a very large set of pockets and drug-like ligands from the Protein Data Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, Robert P; Maiorov, Vladimir N; Holloway, M Katharine; Cornell, Wendy D; Gao, Ying-Duo

    2010-11-22

    One approach to estimating the "chemical tractability" of a candidate protein target where we know the atomic resolution structure is to examine the physical properties of potential binding sites. A number of other workers have addressed this issue. We characterize ~290,000 "pockets" from ~42,000 protein crystal structures in terms of a three parameter "pocket space": volume, buriedness, and hydrophobicity. A metric DLID (drug-like density) measures how likely a pocket is to bind a drug-like molecule. This is calculated from the count of other pockets in its local neighborhood in pocket space that contain drug-like cocrystallized ligands and the count of total pockets in the neighborhood. Surprisingly, despite being defined locally, a global trend in DLID can be predicted by a simple linear regression on log(volume), buriedness, and hydrophobicity. Two levels of simplification are necessary to relate the DLID of individual pockets to "targets": taking the best DLID per Protein Data Bank (PDB) entry (because any given crystal structure can have many pockets), and taking the median DLID over all PDB entries for the same target (because different crystal structures of the same protein can vary because of artifacts and real conformational changes). We can show that median DLIDs for targets that are detectably homologous in sequence are reasonably similar and that median DLIDs correlate with the "druggability" estimate of Cheng et al. (Nature Biotechnology 2007, 25, 71-75).

  17. A conserved phenylalanine as a relay between the α5 helix and the GDP binding region of heterotrimeric Gi protein α subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Ali I; Lokits, Alyssa D; Gilbert, James A; Iverson, Tina M; Meiler, Jens; Hamm, Heidi E

    2014-08-29

    G protein activation by G protein-coupled receptors is one of the critical steps for many cellular signal transduction pathways. Previously, we and other groups reported that the α5 helix in the G protein α subunit plays a major role during this activation process. However, the precise signaling pathway between the α5 helix and the guanosine diphosphate (GDP) binding pocket remains elusive. Here, using structural, biochemical, and computational techniques, we probed different residues around the α5 helix for their role in signaling. Our data showed that perturbing the Phe-336 residue disturbs hydrophobic interactions with the β2-β3 strands and α1 helix, leading to high basal nucleotide exchange. However, mutations in β strands β5 and β6 do not perturb G protein activation. We have highlighted critical residues that leverage Phe-336 as a relay. Conformational changes are transmitted starting from Phe-336 via β2-β3/α1 to Switch I and the phosphate binding loop, decreasing the stability of the GDP binding pocket and triggering nucleotide release. When the α1 and α5 helices were cross-linked, inhibiting the receptor-mediated displacement of the C-terminal α5 helix, mutation of Phe-336 still leads to high basal exchange rates. This suggests that unlike receptor-mediated activation, helix 5 rotation and translocation are not necessary for GDP release from the α subunit. Rather, destabilization of the backdoor region of the Gα subunit is sufficient for triggering the activation process. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Assessing the structural conservation of protein pockets to study functional and allosteric sites: implications for drug discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daura Xavier

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the classical, active-site oriented drug-development approach reaching its limits, protein ligand-binding sites in general and allosteric sites in particular are increasingly attracting the interest of medicinal chemists in the search for new types of targets and strategies to drug development. Given that allostery represents one of the most common and powerful means to regulate protein function, the traditional drug discovery approach of targeting active sites can be extended by targeting allosteric or regulatory protein pockets that may allow the discovery of not only novel drug-like inhibitors, but activators as well. The wealth of available protein structural data can be exploited to further increase our understanding of allosterism, which in turn may have therapeutic applications. A first step in this direction is to identify and characterize putative effector sites that may be present in already available structural data. Results We performed a large-scale study of protein cavities as potential allosteric and functional sites, by integrating publicly available information on protein sequences, structures and active sites for more than a thousand protein families. By identifying common pockets across different structures of the same protein family we developed a method to measure the pocket's structural conservation. The method was first parameterized using known active sites. We characterized the predicted pockets in terms of sequence and structural conservation, backbone flexibility and electrostatic potential. Although these different measures do not tend to correlate, their combination is useful in selecting functional and regulatory sites, as a detailed analysis of a handful of protein families shows. We finally estimated the numbers of potential allosteric or regulatory pockets that may be present in the data set, finding that pockets with putative functional and effector characteristics are widespread across

  19. A Swiss Pocket Knife for Computability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil D. Jones

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This research is about operational- and complexity-oriented aspects of classical foundations of computability theory. The approach is to re-examine some classical theorems and constructions, but with new criteria for success that are natural from a programming language perspective. Three cornerstones of computability theory are the S-m-ntheorem; Turing's "universal machine''; and Kleene's second recursion theorem. In today's programming language parlance these are respectively partial evaluation, self-interpretation, and reflection. In retrospect it is fascinating that Kleene's 1938 proof is constructive; and in essence builds a self-reproducing program. Computability theory originated in the 1930s, long before the invention of computers and programs. Its emphasis was on delimiting the boundaries of computability. Some milestones include 1936 (Turing, 1938 (Kleene, 1967 (isomorphism of programming languages, 1985 (partial evaluation, 1989 (theory implementation, 1993 (efficient self-interpretation and 2006 (term register machines. The "Swiss pocket knife'' of the title is a programming language that allows efficient computer implementation of all three computability cornerstones, emphasising the third: Kleene's second recursion theorem. We describe experiments with a tree-based computational model aiming for both fast program generation and fast execution of the generated programs.

  20. Improvement of personal dosimetry - Digital pocket dosemeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radalj, Z.; Cerovac, Z.; Cerovac, H.; Brumen, V.; Prlic, I.

    1996-01-01

    Physical dosimetric surveillance of professional groups working with various radiation sources is a regular procedure in Croatia, established almost 40 years ago. Data available point out that the majority of professionals under surveillance are those employed in medical facilities, most of them working with X-ray sources. Depending on the nature of professional activities, personnel occupationally exposed to radiation sources are obliged to wear either film badge, TLD or film+TLD badge. Unfortunately, due to the line of data processing, all standard dosemeters have the same disadvantage i.e. up to 40 days delay in dose reporting, regarding the time of actual exposure. The significance of such a delay raises in cases when radiation dose was received within the short time or when technical failure on the operating unit(s) is suspected. Bearing this in mind, the additional dosimetric monitoring becomes an imperative. Therefore, we decided to introduce a palette of digital pocket dosemeters, meant to be used in different workplaces in the radiation zone, each of them being adjusted to the specificities of a particular workplace

  1. Pocket book of integrals and mathematical formulas

    CERN Document Server

    Tallarida, Ronald J

    2008-01-01

    Convenient Organization of Essential Material so You Can Look up Formulas Fast Containing a careful selection of standard and timely topics, the Pocket Book of Integrals and Mathematical Formulas, Fourth Edition presents many numerical and statistical tables, scores of worked examples, and the most useful mathematical formulas for engineering and scientific applications. This fourth edition of a bestseller provides even more comprehensive coverage with the inclusion of several additional topics, all while maintaining its accessible, clear style and handy size. New to the Fourth Edition           An expanded chapter on series that covers many fascinating properties of the natural numbers that follow from number theory           New applications such as geostationary satellite orbits and drug kinetics           An expanded statistics section that discusses nonlinear regression as well as the normal approximation of the binomial distribution           Revised f...

  2. Nucleotide and Predicted Amino Acid Sequence-Based Analysis of the Avian Metapneumovirus Type C Cell Attachment Glycoprotein Gene: Phylogenetic Analysis and Molecular Epidemiology of U.S. Pneumoviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Rene; Lwamba, Humphrey M.; Kapczynski, Darrell R.; Njenga, M. Kariuki; Seal, Bruce S.

    2003-01-01

    A serologically distinct avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) was isolated in the United States after an outbreak of turkey rhinotracheitis (TRT) in February 1997. The newly recognized U.S. virus was subsequently demonstrated to be genetically distinct from European subtypes and was designated aMPV serotype C (aMPV/C). We have determined the nucleotide sequence of the gene encoding the cell attachment glycoprotein (G) of aMPV/C (Colorado strain and three Minnesota isolates) and predicted amino acid sequence by sequencing cloned cDNAs synthesized from intracellular RNA of aMPV/C-infected cells. The nucleotide sequence comprised 1,321 nucleotides with only one predicted open reading frame encoding a protein of 435 amino acids, with a predicted Mr of 48,840. The structural characteristics of the predicted G protein of aMPV/C were similar to those of the human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) attachment G protein, including two mucin-like regions (heparin-binding domains) flanking both sides of a CX3C chemokine motif present in a conserved hydrophobic pocket. Comparison of the deduced G-protein amino acid sequence of aMPV/C with those of aMPV serotypes A, B, and D, as well as hRSV revealed overall predicted amino acid sequence identities ranging from 4 to 16.5%, suggesting a distant relationship. However, G-protein sequence identities ranged from 72 to 97% when aMPV/C was compared to other members within the aMPV/C subtype or 21% for the recently identified human MPV (hMPV) G protein. Ratios of nonsynonymous to synonymous nucleotide changes were greater than one in the G gene when comparing the more recent Minnesota isolates to the original Colorado isolate. Epidemiologically, this indicates positive selection among U.S. isolates since the first outbreak of TRT in the United States. PMID:12682171

  3. The Role of the Acid Pocket in Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, David R; Derakhshan, Mohammad H; Robertson, Elaine V; McColl, Kenneth E L

    2016-02-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease is one of the commonest chronic conditions in the western world and its prevalence is increasing worldwide. The discovery of the acid pocket explained the paradox of acid reflux occurring more frequently in the postprandial period despite intragastric acidity being low due to the buffering effect of the meal. The acid pocket was first described in 2001 when it was detected as an area of low pH immediately distal to the cardia using dual pH electrode pull-through studies 15 minutes after a meal. It was hypothesized that there was a local pocket of acid close to the gastroesophageal junction that escapes the buffering effect of the meal, and that this is the source of postprandial acidic reflux. The presence of the acid pocket has been confirmed in other studies using different techniques including high-resolution pHmetry, Bravo capsule, magnetic resonance imaging, and scintigraphy. This review aims to describe what we know about the acid pocket including its length, volume, fluid constituents, and its relationship to the lower esophageal sphincter and squamocolumnar junction. We will discuss the possible mechanisms that lead to the formation of the acid pocket and examine what differences exist in patients who suffer from acid reflux. Treatments for reflux disease that affect the acid pocket will also be discussed.

  4. The acid pocket: a target for treatment in reflux disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahrilas, Peter J; McColl, Kenneth; Fox, Mark; O'Rourke, Lisa; Sifrim, Daniel; Smout, Andre J P M; Boeckxstaens, Guy

    2013-07-01

    The nadir esophageal pH of reflux observed during pH monitoring in the postprandial period is often more acidic than the concomitant intragastric pH. This paradox prompted the discovery of the "acid pocket", an area of unbuffered gastric acid that accumulates in the proximal stomach after meals and serves as the reservoir for acid reflux in healthy individuals and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) patients. However, there are differentiating features between these populations in the size and position of the acid pocket, with GERD patients predisposed to upward migration of the proximal margin onto the esophageal mucosa, particularly when supine. This upward migration of acid, sometimes referred to as an "acid film", likely contributes to mucosal pathology in the region of the squamocolumnar junction. Furthermore, movement of the acid pocket itself to a supradiaphragmatic location with hiatus hernia increases the propensity for acid reflux by all conventional mechanisms. Consequently, the acid pocket is an attractive target for GERD therapy. It may be targeted in a global way with proton pump inhibitors that attenuate acid pocket development, or with alginate/antacid combinations that colocalize with the acid pocket and displace it distally, thereby demonstrating the potential for selective targeting of the acid pocket in GERD.

  5. Calibrations of pocket dosemeters using a comparison method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somarriba V, I.

    1996-01-01

    This monograph is dedicated mainly to the calibration of pocket dosemeters. Various types of radiation sources used in hospitals and different radiation detectors with emphasis on ionization chambers are briefly presented. Calibration methods based on the use of a reference dosemeter were developed to calibrate all pocket dosemeters existing at the Radiation Physics and Metrology Laboratory. Some of these dosemeters were used in personnel dosimetry at hospitals. Moreover, a study was realized about factors that affect the measurements with pocket dosemeters in the long term, such as discharges due to cosmic radiation. A DBASE IV program was developed to store the information included in the hospital's registry

  6. Health Promoting Pocket Parks in a Landscape Architectural Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peschardt, Karin Kragsig

    This thesis presents how the health potential of pocket parks can be improved through design from a landscape architectural perspective. In developed countries, the densification of cities is a wide-spread tendency which often results in a compact city planning structure. People who live in dense...... promoting potential of nine pocket parks in Copenhagen. From a landscape architectural perspective the health potential is investigated based on both qualitative and quantitative methods. The study elucidates use, the restorative potential as well as how physical content within the pocket parks can...

  7. Diversity and evolutionary relationship of nucleotide binding site ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    site-encoding disease-resistance gene analogues in sweet potato. (Ipomoea batatas Lam.) ... terminal domain of the protein, this class of R-genes can be subdivided into TIR ... from young leaflets using the modified 2.0% (w/v) cetyl trimethyl ...

  8. Identification of cyclic nucleotide gated channels using regular expressions

    KAUST Repository

    Zelman, Alice K.

    2013-09-03

    Cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (CNGCs) are nonselective cation channels found in plants, animals, and some bacteria. They have a six-transmembrane/one- pore structure, a cytosolic cyclic nucleotide-binding domain, and a cytosolic calmodulin-binding domain. Despite their functional similarities, the plant CNGC family members appear to have different conserved amino acid motifs within corresponding functional domains than animal and bacterial CNGCs do. Here we describe the development and application of methods employing plant CNGC-specific sequence motifs as diagnostic tools to identify novel candidate channels in different plants. These methods are used to evaluate the validity of annotations of putative orthologs of CNGCs from plant genomes. The methods detail how to employ regular expressions of conserved amino acids in functional domains of annotated CNGCs and together with Web tools such as PHI-BLAST and ScanProsite to identify novel candidate CNGCs in species including Physcomitrella patens. © Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013.

  9. Contributions of pocket depth and electrostatic interactions to affinity and selectivity of receptors for methylated lysine in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaver, Joshua E; Peacor, Brendan C; Bain, Julianne V; James, Lindsey I; Waters, Marcey L

    2015-03-21

    Dynamic combinatorial chemistry was used to generate a set of receptors for peptides containing methylated lysine (KMen, n = 0-3) and study the contribution of electrostatic effects and pocket depth to binding affinity and selectivity. We found that changing the location of a carboxylate resulted in an increase in preference for KMe2, presumably based on ability to form a salt bridge with KMe2. The number of charged groups on either the receptor or peptide guest systematically varied the binding affinities to all guests by approximately 1-1.5 kcal mol(-1), with little influence on selectivity. Lastly, formation of a deeper pocket led to both increased affinity and selectivity for KMe3 over the lower methylation states. From these studies, we identified that the tightest binder was a receptor with greater net charge, with a Kd of 0.2 μM, and the receptor with the highest selectivity was the one with the deepest pocket, providing 14-fold selectivity between KMe3 and KMe2 and a Kd for KMe3 of 0.3 μM. This work provides key insights into approaches to improve binding affinity and selectivity in water, while also demonstrating the versatility of dynamic combinatorial chemistry for rapidly exploring the impact of subtle changes in receptor functionality on molecular recognition in water.

  10. A single mutation in Taiwanese H6N1 influenza hemagglutinin switches binding to human-type receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Vries, Robert P.; Tzarum, Netanel; Peng, Wenjie; Thompson, Andrew J.; Ambepitiya Wickramasinghe, Iresha N.; de la Pena, Alba T. Torrents; van Breemen, Marielle J.; Bouwman, Kim M.; Zhu, Xueyong; McBride, Ryan; Yu, Wenli; Sanders, Rogier W.; Verheije, Monique H.; Wilson, Ian A.; Paulson, James C.

    2017-07-10

    In June 2013, the first case of human infection with an avian H6N1 virus was reported in a Taiwanese woman. Although this was a single non-fatal case, the virus continues to circulate in Taiwanese poultry. As with any emerging avian virus that infects humans, there is concern that acquisition of human-type receptor specificity could enable transmission in the human population. Despite mutations in the receptor-binding pocket of the human H6N1 isolate, it has retained avian-type (NeuAcα2-3Gal) receptor specificity. However, we show here that a single nucleotide substitution, resulting in a change from Gly to Asp at position 225 (G225D), completely switches specificity to human-type (NeuAcα2-6Gal) receptors. Significantly, G225D H6 loses binding to chicken trachea epithelium and is now able to bind to human tracheal tissue. Structural analysis reveals that Asp225 directly interacts with the penultimate Gal of the human-type receptor, stabilizing human receptor binding.

  11. Nucleotide excision repair in yeast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijk, Patrick van

    2012-01-01

    Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER) is a conserved DNA repair pathway capable of removing a broad spectrum of DNA damage. In human cells a defect in NER leads to the disorder Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP). The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an excellent model organism to study the mechanism of NER. The

  12. Exploration of pH-dependent behavior of the anion receptor pocket of subdomain IIA of HSA: determination of effective pocket charge using the Debye-Hückel limiting law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolel, Priyanka; Datta, Shubhashis; Mahapatra, Niharendu; Halder, Mintu

    2014-01-09

    Protein-ligand electrostatic interaction can be looked upon as ion receptor-ligand interaction, and the binding cavity of protein can be either an anion or cation receptor depending on the charge of the guest. Here we focus on the exploration of pH-modulated binding of a number of anionic ligands, specific to the subdomain IIA cavity of HSA, such as carmoisine, tartrazine, cochineal red, and warfarin. The logarithm of the binding constant is found to vary linearly with the square-root of ionic strength, indicating applicability of the Debye-Hückel limiting law to protein-ligand electrostatic binding equilibrium, and concludes that the subdomain IIA cavity is an anion receptor. The present approach is very unique that one can calculate the effective charge of the protein-based anion receptor pocket, and the calculated charge has been found to vary between +1 and +3 depending on the pH and ligand itself. The study also indicates that in such cases of specific ligand binding the pocket charge rather than the overall or surface charge of the macromolecule seems to have a paramount role in determining the strength of interaction. For the first time, it is demonstrated that the Debye-Hückel interionic interaction model can be successfully applied to understand the protein-based receptor-ligand electrostatic interaction in general.

  13. Complexes of Escherichia coli adenylate kinase and nucleotides: 1H NMR studies of the nucleotide sites in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vetter, I.R.; Reinstein, J.; Roesch, P.

    1990-01-01

    One- and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies, in particular substrate-protein nuclear Overhauser effect (NOESY) measurements, as well as nucleotide and P 1 ,P 5 -bis-(5'-adenosyl) pentaphosphate (AP 5 A) titrations and studies of the temperature-dependent unfolding of the tertiary structure of Escherichia coli adenylate kinase (AK EC ) were performed. These experiments and comparison with the same type of experiments performed with the porcine enzyme led them to the following conclusions: (1) at pH 8 and concentrations of approximately 2.5-3 mM, AK EC is partially unfolded at 318 K; (2) ATP·Mg 2+ binds to the ATP site with a dissociation constant of approximately 40 μM under the assumption that ATP binds to one nucleotide site only; (3) AP 5 A·Mg 2+ binds to both nucleotide sites and thus simulates the active complex; (4) the ATP·Mg 2+ adenine in the AK EC ·AP 5 A·Mg 2+ complex is located close to His 134 and Phe 19 ; (5) the AK EC G-loop with bound ATP·Mg 2+ is structurally highly homologous to the loop region in the oncogene product p21 with bound GTP·Mg 2+

  14. Binding Ligand Prediction for Proteins Using Partial Matching of Local Surface Patches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Sael

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Functional elucidation of uncharacterized protein structures is an important task in bioinformatics. We report our new approach for structure-based function prediction which captures local surface features of ligand binding pockets. Function of proteins, specifically, binding ligands of proteins, can be predicted by finding similar local surface regions of known proteins. To enable partial comparison of binding sites in proteins, a weighted bipartite matching algorithm is used to match pairs of surface patches. The surface patches are encoded with the 3D Zernike descriptors. Unlike the existing methods which compare global characteristics of the protein fold or the global pocket shape, the local surface patch method can find functional similarity between non-homologous proteins and binding pockets for flexible ligand molecules. The proposed method improves prediction results over global pocket shape-based method which was previously developed by our group.

  15. Binding ligand prediction for proteins using partial matching of local surface patches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sael, Lee; Kihara, Daisuke

    2010-01-01

    Functional elucidation of uncharacterized protein structures is an important task in bioinformatics. We report our new approach for structure-based function prediction which captures local surface features of ligand binding pockets. Function of proteins, specifically, binding ligands of proteins, can be predicted by finding similar local surface regions of known proteins. To enable partial comparison of binding sites in proteins, a weighted bipartite matching algorithm is used to match pairs of surface patches. The surface patches are encoded with the 3D Zernike descriptors. Unlike the existing methods which compare global characteristics of the protein fold or the global pocket shape, the local surface patch method can find functional similarity between non-homologous proteins and binding pockets for flexible ligand molecules. The proposed method improves prediction results over global pocket shape-based method which was previously developed by our group.

  16. Crystal structure of the Candida albicans Kar3 kinesin motor domain fused to maltose-binding protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delorme, Caroline; Joshi, Monika; Allingham, John S.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The Candida albicans Kar3 motor domain structure was solved as a maltose-binding protein fusion. ► The electrostatic surface and part of the ATPase pocket of the motor domain differs markedly from other kinesins. ► The MBP–Kar3 interface highlights a new site for intramolecular or intermolecular interactions. -- Abstract: In the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans, the Kinesin-14 motor protein Kar3 (CaKar3) is critical for normal mitotic division, nuclear fusion during mating, and morphogenic transition from the commensal yeast form to the virulent hyphal form. As a first step towards detailed characterization of this motor of potential medical significance, we have crystallized and determined the X-ray structure of the motor domain of CaKar3 as a maltose-binding protein (MBP) fusion. The structure shows strong conservation of overall motor domain topology to other Kar3 kinesins, but with some prominent differences in one of the motifs that compose the nucleotide-binding pocket and the surface charge distribution. The MBP and Kar3 modules are arranged such that MBP interacts with the Kar3 motor domain core at the same site where the neck linker of conventional kinesins docks during the “ATP state” of the mechanochemical cycle. This site differs from the Kar3 neck–core interface in the recent structure of the ScKar3Vik1 heterodimer. The position of MBP is also completely distinct from the Vik1 subunit in this complex. This may suggest that the site of MBP interaction on the CaKar3 motor domain provides an interface for the neck, or perhaps a partner subunit, at an intermediate state of its motile cycle that has not yet been observed for Kinesin-14 motors.

  17. Crystal structure of the Candida albicans Kar3 kinesin motor domain fused to maltose-binding protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delorme, Caroline; Joshi, Monika [Department of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON, Canada K7L 3N6 (Canada); Allingham, John S., E-mail: allinghj@queensu.ca [Department of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON, Canada K7L 3N6 (Canada)

    2012-11-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Candida albicans Kar3 motor domain structure was solved as a maltose-binding protein fusion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The electrostatic surface and part of the ATPase pocket of the motor domain differs markedly from other kinesins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The MBP-Kar3 interface highlights a new site for intramolecular or intermolecular interactions. -- Abstract: In the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans, the Kinesin-14 motor protein Kar3 (CaKar3) is critical for normal mitotic division, nuclear fusion during mating, and morphogenic transition from the commensal yeast form to the virulent hyphal form. As a first step towards detailed characterization of this motor of potential medical significance, we have crystallized and determined the X-ray structure of the motor domain of CaKar3 as a maltose-binding protein (MBP) fusion. The structure shows strong conservation of overall motor domain topology to other Kar3 kinesins, but with some prominent differences in one of the motifs that compose the nucleotide-binding pocket and the surface charge distribution. The MBP and Kar3 modules are arranged such that MBP interacts with the Kar3 motor domain core at the same site where the neck linker of conventional kinesins docks during the 'ATP state' of the mechanochemical cycle. This site differs from the Kar3 neck-core interface in the recent structure of the ScKar3Vik1 heterodimer. The position of MBP is also completely distinct from the Vik1 subunit in this complex. This may suggest that the site of MBP interaction on the CaKar3 motor domain provides an interface for the neck, or perhaps a partner subunit, at an intermediate state of its motile cycle that has not yet been observed for Kinesin-14 motors.

  18. Inhibition of TLR2 signaling by small molecule inhibitors targeting a pocket within the TLR2 TIR domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistry, Pragnesh; Laird, Michelle H. W.; Schwarz, Ryan S.; Greene, Shannon; Dyson, Tristan; Snyder, Greg A.; Xiao, Tsan Sam; Chauhan, Jay; Fletcher, Steven; Toshchakov, Vladimir Y.; MacKerell, Alexander D.; Vogel, Stefanie N.

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling is initiated by dimerization of intracellular Toll/IL-1 receptor resistance (TIR) domains. For all TLRs except TLR3, recruitment of the adapter, myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88), to TLR TIR domains results in downstream signaling culminating in proinflammatory cytokine production. Therefore, blocking TLR TIR dimerization may ameliorate TLR2-mediated hyperinflammatory states. The BB loop within the TLR TIR domain is critical for mediating certain protein–protein interactions. Examination of the human TLR2 TIR domain crystal structure revealed a pocket adjacent to the highly conserved P681 and G682 BB loop residues. Using computer-aided drug design (CADD), we sought to identify a small molecule inhibitor(s) that would fit within this pocket and potentially disrupt TLR2 signaling. In silico screening identified 149 compounds and 20 US Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs based on their predicted ability to bind in the BB loop pocket. These compounds were screened in HEK293T-TLR2 transfectants for the ability to inhibit TLR2-mediated IL-8 mRNA. C16H15NO4 (C29) was identified as a potential TLR2 inhibitor. C29, and its derivative, ortho-vanillin (o-vanillin), inhibited TLR2/1 and TLR2/6 signaling induced by synthetic and bacterial TLR2 agonists in human HEK-TLR2 and THP-1 cells, but only TLR2/1 signaling in murine macrophages. C29 failed to inhibit signaling induced by other TLR agonists and TNF-α. Mutagenesis of BB loop pocket residues revealed an indispensable role for TLR2/1, but not TLR2/6, signaling, suggesting divergent roles. Mice treated with o-vanillin exhibited reduced TLR2-induced inflammation. Our data provide proof of principle that targeting the BB loop pocket is an effective approach for identification of TLR2 signaling inhibitors. PMID:25870276

  19. Structure-based Understanding of Binding Affinity and Mode of Estrogen Receptor α Agonists and Antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The flexible hydrophobic ligand binding pocket (LBP) of estrogen receptor α (ERα) allows the binding of a wide variety of endocrine disruptors. Upon ligand binding, the LBP reshapes around the contours of the ligand and stabilizes the complex by complementary hydrophobic interact...

  20. Coupling of guanine nucleotide inhibitory protein to somatostatin receptors on pancreatic acinar membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, C.; Matozaki, T.; Nagao, M.; Baba, S.

    1987-01-01

    Guanine nucleotides and pertussis toxin were used to investigate whether somatostatin receptors interact with the guanine nucleotide inhibitory protein (NI) on pancreatic acinar membranes in the rat. Guanine nucleotides reduced 125 I-[Tyr 1 ]somatostatin binding to acinar membranes up to 80%, with rank order of potency being 5'-guanylyl imidodiphosphate [Gpp(NH)p]>GTP>TDP>GMP. Scatchard analysis revealed that the decrease in somatostatin binding caused by Gpp(NH)p was due to the decrease in the maximum binding capacity without a significant change in the binding affinity. The inhibitory effect of Gpp(NH)p was partially abolished in the absence of Mg 2+ . When pancreatic acini were treated with 1 μg/ml pertussis toxin for 4 h, subsequent 125 I-[Tyr 1 ]somatostatin binding to acinar membranes was reduced. Pertussis toxin treatment also abolished the inhibitory effect of somatostatin on vasoactive intestinal peptide-stimulated increase in cellular content of adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) in the acini. The present results suggest that 1) somatostatin probably functions in the pancreas to regulate adenylate cyclase enzyme system via Ni, 2) the extent of modification of Ni is correlated with the ability of somatostatin to inhibit cAMP accumulation in acini, and 3) guanine nucleotides also inhibit somatostatin binding to its receptor

  1. Statistical Profiling of One Promiscuous Protein Binding Site: Illustrated by Urokinase Catalytic Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerisier, Natacha; Regad, Leslie; Triki, Dhoha; Petitjean, Michel; Flatters, Delphine; Camproux, Anne-Claude

    2017-10-01

    While recent literature focuses on drug promiscuity, the characterization of promiscuous binding sites (ability to bind several ligands) remains to be explored. Here, we present a proteochemometric modeling approach to analyze diverse ligands and corresponding multiple binding sub-pockets associated with one promiscuous binding site to characterize protein-ligand recognition. We analyze both geometrical and physicochemical profile correspondences. This approach was applied to examine the well-studied druggable urokinase catalytic domain inhibitor binding site, which results in a large number of complex structures bound to various ligands. This approach emphasizes the importance of jointly characterizing pocket and ligand spaces to explore the impact of ligand diversity on sub-pocket properties and to establish their main profile correspondences. This work supports an interest in mining available 3D holo structures associated with a promiscuous binding site to explore its main protein-ligand recognition tendency. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Guiding periodontal pocket recolonization: a proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teughels, W; Newman, M G; Coucke, W; Haffajee, A D; Van Der Mei, H C; Haake, S Kinder; Schepers, E; Cassiman, J-J; Van Eldere, J; van Steenberghe, D; Quirynen, M

    2007-11-01

    The complexity of the periodontal microbiota resembles that of the gastro-intestinal tract, where infectious diseases are treatable via probiotics. In the oropharyngeal region, probiotic or replacement therapies have shown some benefit in the prevention of dental caries, otitis media, and pharyngitis, but their effectiveness in the treatment of periodontitis is unknown. Therefore, this study addressed the hypothesis that the application of selected beneficial bacteria, as an adjunct to scaling and root planing, would inhibit the periodontopathogen recolonization of periodontal pockets. Analysis of the data showed, in a beagle dog model, that when beneficial bacteria were applied in periodontal pockets adjunctively after root planing, subgingival recolonization of periodontopathogens was delayed and reduced, as was the degree of inflammation, at a clinically significant level. The study confirmed the hypothesis and provides a proof of concept for a guided pocket recolonization (GPR) approach in the treatment of periodontitis.

  3. Structure of calmodulin complexed with an olfactory CNG channel fragment and role of the central linker: Residual dipolar couplings to evaluate calmodulin binding modes outside the kinase family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contessa, Gian Marco; Orsale, Maria; Melino, Sonia; Torre, Vincent; Paci, Maurizio; Desideri, Alessandro; Cicero, Daniel O.

    2005-01-01

    The NMR high-resolution structure of calmodulin complexed with a fragment of the olfactory cyclic-nucleotide gated channel is described. This structure shows features that are unique for this complex, including an active role of the linker connecting the N- and C-lobes of calmodulin upon binding of the peptide. Such linker is not only involved in the formation of an hydrophobic pocket to accommodate a bulky peptide residue, but it also provides a positively charged region complementary to a negative charge of the target. This complex of calmodulin with a target not belonging to the kinase family was used to test the residual dipolar coupling (RDC) approach for the determination of calmodulin binding modes to peptides. Although the complex here characterized belongs to the (1--14) family, high Q values were obtained with all the 1:1 complexes for which crystalline structures are available. Reduction of the RDC data set used for the correlation analysis to structured regions of the complex allowed a clear identification of the binding mode. Excluded regions comprise calcium binding loops and loops connecting the EF-hand motifs

  4. UML 2.0 Pocket Reference UML Syntax and Usage

    CERN Document Server

    Pilone, Dan

    2006-01-01

    Globe-trotting travelers have long resorted to handy, pocket-size dictionaries as an aid to communicating across the language barrier. Dan Pilone's UML 2.0 Pocket Reference is just such an aid for on-the-go developers who need to converse in the Unified Modeling Language (UML). Use this book to decipher the many UML diagrams you'll encounter on the path to delivering a modern software system. Updated to cover the very latest in UML, you'll find coverage of the following UML 2.0 diagram types: Class diagramsComponent diagrams*Sequence diagrams*Communication diagrams*Timing diagrams*Interactio

  5. Apache 2 Pocket Reference For Apache Programmers & Administrators

    CERN Document Server

    Ford, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Even if you know the Apache web server inside and out, you still need an occasional on-the-job reminder -- especially if you're moving to the newer Apache 2.x. Apache 2 Pocket Reference gives you exactly what you need to get the job done without forcing you to plow through a cumbersome, doorstop-sized reference. This Book provides essential information to help you configure and maintain the server quickly, with brief explanations that get directly to the point. It covers Apache 2.x, giving web masters, web administrators, and programmers a quick and easy reference solution. This pocket r

  6. Canvas Pocket Reference Scripted Graphics for HTML5

    CERN Document Server

    Flanagan, David

    2010-01-01

    The Canvas element is a revolutionary feature of HTML5 that enables powerful graphics for rich Internet applications, and this pocket reference provides the essentials you need to put this element to work. If you have working knowledge of JavaScript, this book will help you create detailed, interactive, and animated graphics -- from charts to animations to video games -- whether you're a web designer or a programmer interested in graphics. Canvas Pocket Reference provides both a tutorial that covers all of the element's features with plenty of examples and a definitive reference to each of t

  7. CIED infection with either pocket or systemic infection presentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ihlemann, Nikolaj; Møller-Hansen, Michael; Salado-Rasmussen, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Cardiovascular implantable electronic device (CIED) infections are increasing in numbers. The objective was to review the clinical presentation and outcome in patients affected with CIED infections with either local pocket or systemic presentation. DESIGN: All device removals due to CIED......-up no relapses and two cases of new infections were noted (2.8%). CONCLUSIONS: CIED infection with systemic or pocket infection was difficult to distinguish in clinical presentation and outcome. Complete device removal and antibiotic treatment of long duration was safe and without relapses....

  8. Pocket radar guide key facts, equations, and data

    CERN Document Server

    Curry, G Richard

    2010-01-01

    ThePocket Radar Guideis a concise collection of key radar facts and important radar data that provides you with necessary radar information when you are away from your office or references. It includes statements and comments on radar design, operation, and performance; equations describing the characteristics and performance of radar systems and their components; and tables with data on radar characteristics and key performance issues.It is intended to supplement other radar information sources by providing a pocket companion to refresh memory and provide details whenever you need them such a

  9. Why not to ''pocket shoot'': Radiology of intravenous drug abuse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarroll, K.A.; Fisher, D.R.; Cawthon, L.A.; Donovan, K.R.; Roszler, M.H.; Kling, G.A.

    1987-01-01

    Our large population of intravenous drug abusers has increasingly resorted to supraclavicular central venous injection for vascular access. Few reports of complications associated with the practice of supraclavicular ''pocket'' injection have appeared in the radiologic literature. The authors describe the complications associated with this practice, including pneumothorax, mycotic aneurysm, arteriovenous fistula, jugular vein thrombosis, cellulitis, foreign body reaction, and neck abscess. In addition, the authors provide examples of sternoclavicular osteomyelitis. The anatomy of the ''pocket,'' and the pathophysiology and radiographic manifestations of these complications, are reviewed

  10. Tissue expander infections in children: look beyond the expander pocket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, A C; Davison, S P; Manders, E K

    1999-11-01

    Infection of the expander pocket is the most common complication encountered with soft-tissue expansion. It is usually due to direct inoculation with skin flora either at the time of expander insertion or from extrusion of the device. The authors report two cases of infection of tissue expanders in which the children had concomitant infected sites distant from the prosthesis. Etiological bacteria of common pediatric infections like otitis media and pharyngitis were cultured from the infected expander pocket, raising suspicion that translocation of the organism to the expander had occurred. Aggressive antibiotic treatment, removal of the prosthesis, and flap advancement is advocated.

  11. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Universal Stress Protein Rv2623 Regulates Bacillary Growth by ATP Binding: Requirement for Establishing Chronic Persistent Infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drumm, J.; Mi, K; Bilder, P; Sun, M; Lim, J; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, H; Basaraba, R; So, M; Zhu, G; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    Tuberculous latency and reactivation play a significant role in the pathogenesis of tuberculosis, yet the mechanisms that regulate these processes remain unclear. The Mycobacterium tuberculosisuniversal stress protein (USP) homolog, rv2623, is among the most highly induced genes when the tubercle bacillus is subjected to hypoxia and nitrosative stress, conditions thought to promote latency. Induction of rv2623 also occurs when M. tuberculosis encounters conditions associated with growth arrest, such as the intracellular milieu of macrophages and in the lungs of mice with chronic tuberculosis. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that Rv2623 regulates tuberculosis latency. We observed that an Rv2623-deficient mutant fails to establish chronic tuberculous infection in guinea pigs and mice, exhibiting a hypervirulence phenotype associated with increased bacterial burden and mortality. Consistent with this in vivo growth-regulatory role, constitutive overexpression of rv2623 attenuates mycobacterial growth in vitro. Biochemical analysis of purified Rv2623 suggested that this mycobacterial USP binds ATP, and the 2.9-A-resolution crystal structure revealed that Rv2623 engages ATP in a novel nucleotide-binding pocket. Structure-guided mutagenesis yielded Rv2623 mutants with reduced ATP-binding capacity. Analysis of mycobacteria overexpressing these mutants revealed that the in vitro growth-inhibitory property of Rv2623 correlates with its ability to bind ATP. Together, the results indicate that i M. tuberculosis Rv2623 regulates mycobacterial growth in vitro and in vivo, and ii Rv2623 is required for the entry of the tubercle bacillus into the chronic phase of infection in the host; in addition, iii Rv2623 binds ATP; and iv the growth-regulatory attribute of this USP is dependent on its ATP-binding activity. We propose that Rv2623 may function as an ATP-dependent signaling intermediate in a pathway that promotes persistent infection.

  12. Screening Analogs of β-OG Pocket Binder as Fusion Inhibitor of Dengue Virus 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambunan, Usman Sf; Zahroh, Hilyatuz; Parikesit, Arli A; Idrus, Syarifuddin; Kerami, Djati

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is an infectious disease caused by dengue virus (DENV) and transmitted between human hosts by mosquitoes. Recently, Indonesia was listed as a country with the highest cases of dengue by the Association of Southeast Asian Nations. The current treatment for dengue disease is supportive therapy; there is no antiviral drug available in the market against dengue. Therefore, a research on antiviral drug against dengue is very important, especially to prevent outbreak explosion. In this research, the development of dengue antiviral is performed through the inhibition of n-octyl-β-D-glucoside (β-OG) binding pocket on envelope protein of DENV by using analogs of β-OG pocket binder. There are 828 compounds used in this study, and all of them were screened based on the analysis of molecular docking, pharmacological character prediction of the compounds, and molecular dynamics simulation. The result of these analyses revealed that the compound that can be used as an antiviral candidate against DENV is 5-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-N-[2-(p-tolyl) benzotriazol-5-yl]furan-2-carboxamide.

  13. Application of oxime-diversification to optimize ligand interactions within a cryptic pocket of the polo-like kinase 1 polo-box domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xue Zhi; Hymel, David; Burke, Terrence R

    2016-10-15

    By a process involving initial screening of a set of 87 aldehydes using an oxime ligation-based strategy, we were able to achieve a several-fold affinity enhancement over one of the most potent previously known polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) polo-box domain (PBD) binding inhibitors. This improved binding may result by accessing a newly identified auxiliary region proximal to a key hydrophobic cryptic pocket on the surface of the protein. Our findings could have general applicability to the design of PBD-binding antagonists. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Exploration of the molecular architecture of the orthosteric binding site in the α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor with analogs of 3-(dimethylamino)butyl dimethylcarbamate (DMABC) and 1-(pyridin-3-yl)-1,4-diazepane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, Tinna Brøbech; Jensen, Anders A.; Petersen, Jette G.

    2015-01-01

    X-ray crystal structures of acetylcholine binding proteins (AChBPs) have revealed two different possible extensions to the classical ligand binding pocket known to accommodate various nicotinic agonists. One of the pockets is limited in size while the other is of considerable dimensions and protr...

  15. Football Sticker Markets: An Insight into Pocket Money Budgets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurd, Stephen J.

    1985-01-01

    Formal and informal markets for football stickers and children's pocket money budgets are discussed. Included is a questionnaire that can be used by junior high school students to investigate these topics locally. The materials have been successfully used in the classroom. (Author/RM)

  16. Pocket Electronic Dictionaries for Second Language Learning: Help or Hindrance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Gloria M.

    1997-01-01

    Reports on the concerns of English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) teachers in Canada regarding their students' use of pocket bilingual electronic dictionaries (EDs). The article highlights the ED's features, uses, and effectiveness as a tool for learning ESL at the secondary level and ESL students' perceptions of the ED's usefulness. (nine references)…

  17. Out-of-pocket payment for health services: constraints and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: This study brings to the fore the fact that most government employees and their dependants in Abakaliki have difficulties in accessing quality health care services via paying for them out-of-pocket. Keywords: Health services, payment, constraints, government employees. African Health Sciences 2011; 11(3): 481 ...

  18. Adhesion of Porphyromonas gingivalis serotypes to pocket epithelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dierickx, K; Pauwels, M; Laine, ML; Van Eldere, J; Cassiman, JJ; van Winkelhoff, AJ; van Steenberghe, D; Quirynen, M

    Background: Porphyromonas gingivalis, a key pathogen in periodontitis, is able to adhere to and invade the pocket epithelium. Different capsular antigens of P gingivalis have been identified (K-serotyping). These P gingivalis capsular types show differences in adhesion capacity to human cell lines

  19. Book Review: Nelson Mandela: A Jacana Pocket Biography ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Book Title: Nelson Mandela: A Jacana Pocket Biography. Author: Colin Bundy. Jacana: Auckland Park, 2015. 159 pp. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors ...

  20. Book Review: Chris Hani: A Jacana Pocket Biography | Smith | New ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Book Title: Chris Hani: A Jacana Pocket Biography. Author: Hugh Macmillan. Jacana: Auckland Park, 2014. 152 pp. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's ...

  1. The Use of Pocket Electronic Dictionaries by Thai University Students

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article reports on a small-scale study of Thai-speaking learners using pocket electronic dictionaries (PEDs) to read an English news article. It investigates how the subjects use their PEDs for reading comprehension. Thirty-nine undergraduate students completed a questionnaire survey. Of these, four were chosen to ...

  2. Advanced Geometric Optics on a Programmable Pocket Calculator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nussbaum, Allen

    1979-01-01

    Presents a ray-tracing procedure based on some ideas of Herzberger and the matrix approach to geometrical optics. This method, which can be implemented on a programmable pocket calculator, applies to any conic surface, including paraboloids, spheres, and planes. (Author/GA)

  3. The acid pocket: a target for treatment in reflux disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kahrilas, Peter J.; McColl, Kenneth; Fox, Mark; O'Rourke, Lisa; Sifrim, Daniel; Smout, Andre J. P. M.; Boeckxstaens, Guy

    2013-01-01

    The nadir esophageal pH of reflux observed during pH monitoring in the postprandial period is often more acidic than the concomitant intragastric pH. This paradox prompted the discovery of the "acid pocket", an area of unbuffered gastric acid that accumulates in the proximal stomach after meals and

  4. Equity in out-of-pocket payment in Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondaca, Alicia Lorena Núñez; Chi, Chunhuei

    2017-05-04

    To assess the distribution of financial burden in Chile, with a focus on the burden and progressivity of out-of-pocket payment. Based on the principle of ability to pay, we explore factors that contribute to inequities in the health system finance and issues about the burden of out-of-pocket payment, as well as the progressivity and redistributive effect of out-of-pocket payment in Chile. Our analysis is based on data from the 2006 National Survey on Satisfaction and Out-of-Pocket Payments. Results from this study indicate evidence of inequity, in spite of the progressivity of the healthcare system. Our analysis also identifies relevant policy variables such as education, insurance system, and method of payment that should be taken into consideration in the ongoing debates and research in improving the Chilean system. In order to reduce the detected disparities among income groups, healthcare priorities should target low-income groups. Furthermore, policies should explore changes in the access to education and its impact on equity.

  5. Targeting Ligandable Pockets on Plant Homeodomain (PHD) Zinc Finger Domains by a Fragment-Based Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Anastasia; Lucas, Xavier; Bortoluzzi, Alessio; Wright, David; Ciulli, Alessio

    2018-04-20

    Plant homeodomain (PHD) zinc fingers are histone reader domains that are often associated with human diseases. Despite this, they constitute a poorly targeted class of readers, suggesting low ligandability. Here, we describe a successful fragment-based campaign targeting PHD fingers from the proteins BAZ2A and BAZ2B as model systems. We validated a pool of in silico fragments both biophysically and structurally and solved the first crystal structures of PHD zinc fingers in complex with fragments bound to an anchoring pocket at the histone binding site. The best-validated hits were found to displace a histone H3 tail peptide in competition assays. This work identifies new chemical scaffolds that provide suitable starting points for future ligand optimization using structure-guided approaches. The demonstrated ligandability of the PHD reader domains could pave the way for the development of chemical probes to drug this family of epigenetic readers.

  6. Guanine nucleotide regulation of α1-adrenergic receptors of muscle and kidney eptihelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terman, B.I.; Hughes, R.J.; Slivka, S.R.; Insel, P.A.

    1986-01-01

    The authors have examined the effect of guanine nucleotides on the interaction of adrenergic agents with α 1 -adrenergic receptors of two cell lines, the Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) and BC3H-1 muscle cells. While gaunylylimidodiphosphoate (Gpp(NH)p) had no effect on the affinity or the total number of [ -3 H]prazosin binding sites in membranes prepared from these cells, the nucleotide decreased the apparent affinity of the agonist epinephrine in competing for [ 3 H]prazosin binding sites in both cell types. The EC 50 of Gpp(NH)p was ∼100 μM, and a maximal effect was seen at 500 μM. In contrast, 100 μM Gpp(NH)p yielding maximal shifts in binding of epinephrine to β-adrenergic receptors in BC3H-1 cell membranes. Guanine nucleotides were significantly more effective than adenine nucleotides in shifting agonist affinity for the α 1 -receptor and Mg ++ was required to observe a maximal effect. α 1 -receptor agonists activated phosphatidylinositol (PI) hydrolysis in both cell types, but have no direct effect on membrane adenylate cyclase activity. In intact BC3H-1 cells, α 1 -agonists inhibited β-adrenergic cAMP production, an effect which appears in preliminary studies not to result from enhanced phosphodieterase activity. These results show that agonist binding to α 1 -adrenergic receptors in mammalian kidney and muscle cells is regulated by guanine nucleotides. This regulation and inturn transmembrane signalling (PI hydrolysis) by these receptors appear to involve a guanine nucleotide binding (G) protein, which may be different than G/sub s/ and G/sub i/

  7. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection on a magnetoresistive sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rizzi, Giovanni; Østerberg, Frederik Westergaard; Dufva, Martin

    2013-01-01

    We present a magnetoresistive sensor platform for hybridization assays and demonstrate its applicability on single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping. The sensor relies on anisotropic magnetoresistance in a new geometry with a local negative reference and uses the magnetic field from...... the sensor bias current to magnetize magnetic beads in the vicinity of the sensor. The method allows for real-time measurements of the specific bead binding to the sensor surface during DNA hybridization and washing. Compared to other magnetic biosensing platforms, our approach eliminates the need...... for external electromagnets and thus allows for miniaturization of the sensor platform....

  8. F pocket flexibility influences the tapasin dependence of two differentially disease-associated MHC Class I proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abualrous, Esam T; Fritzsche, Susanne; Hein, Zeynep; Al-Balushi, Mohammed S; Reinink, Peter; Boyle, Louise H; Wellbrock, Ursula; Antoniou, Antony N; Springer, Sebastian

    2015-04-01

    The human MHC class I protein HLA-B*27:05 is statistically associated with ankylosing spondylitis, unlike HLA-B*27:09, which differs in a single amino acid in the F pocket of the peptide-binding groove. To understand how this unique amino acid difference leads to a different behavior of the proteins in the cell, we have investigated the conformational stability of both proteins using a combination of in silico and experimental approaches. Here, we show that the binding site of B*27:05 is conformationally disordered in the absence of peptide due to a charge repulsion at the bottom of the F pocket. In agreement with this, B*27:05 requires the chaperone protein tapasin to a greater extent than the conformationally stable B*27:09 in order to remain structured and to bind peptide. Taken together, our data demonstrate a method to predict tapasin dependence and physiological behavior from the sequence and crystal structure of a particular class I allotype. Also watch the Video Abstract. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Structure-based design, synthesis and crystallization of 2-arylquinazolines as lipid pocket ligands of p38α MAPK.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike Bührmann

    Full Text Available In protein kinase research, identifying and addressing small molecule binding sites other than the highly conserved ATP-pocket are of intense interest because this line of investigation extends our understanding of kinase function beyond the catalytic phosphotransfer. Such alternative binding sites may be involved in altering the activation state through subtle conformational changes, control cellular enzyme localization, or in mediating and disrupting protein-protein interactions. Small organic molecules that target these less conserved regions might serve as tools for chemical biology research and to probe alternative strategies in targeting protein kinases in disease settings. Here, we present the structure-based design and synthesis of a focused library of 2-arylquinazoline derivatives to target the lipophilic C-terminal binding pocket in p38α MAPK, for which a clear biological function has yet to be identified. The interactions of the ligands with p38α MAPK was analyzed by SPR measurements and validated by protein X-ray crystallography.

  10. Monitoring of Entrance Channel Navigation Improvements at Pentwater, Michigan, and Design Guidance for Pocket Wave Absorbers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thompson, Edward F; Myrick, Glenn B; Zager, Nicholas J; Bottin, Jr., Robert R; Sabol, Margaret A; Selegean, James P; McKinney, James P; Demirbilek, Zeki; Acuff, Jr, Hugh F

    2006-01-01

    .... The objectives of the monitoring effort at Pentwater Harbor were to evaluate the design of existing pocket wave absorbers and to develop better design guidance for future pocket wave absorber projects...

  11. Kinetics of the interactions between yeast elongation factors 1A and 1Balpha, guanine nucleotides, and aminoacyl-tRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gromadski, Kirill B; Schümmer, Tobias; Strømgaard, Anne

    2007-01-01

    of guanine nucleotides. At the concentrations of nucleotides and factors prevailing in the cell, the overall exchange rate is expected to be in the range of 6 s(-1), which is compatible with the rate of protein synthesis in the cell. eEF1A.GTP binds Phe-tRNA(Phe) with a K(d) of 3 nm, whereas eEF1A.GDP shows...... no significant binding, indicating that eEF1A has similar tRNA binding properties as its prokaryotic homolog, EF-Tu. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Dec-7...

  12. Nucleotide Selectivity in Abiotic RNA Polymerization Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coari, Kristin M.; Martin, Rebecca C.; Jain, Kopal; McGown, Linda B.

    2017-09-01

    In order to establish an RNA world on early Earth, the nucleotides must form polymers through chemical rather than biochemical reactions. The polymerization products must be long enough to perform catalytic functions, including self-replication, and to preserve genetic information. These functions depend not only on the length of the polymers, but also on their sequences. To date, studies of abiotic RNA polymerization generally have focused on routes to polymerization of a single nucleotide and lengths of the homopolymer products. Less work has been done the selectivity of the reaction toward incorporation of some nucleotides over others in nucleotide mixtures. Such information is an essential step toward understanding the chemical evolution of RNA. To address this question, in the present work RNA polymerization reactions were performed in the presence of montmorillonite clay catalyst. The nucleotides included the monophosphates of adenosine, cytosine, guanosine, uridine and inosine. Experiments included reactions of mixtures of an imidazole-activated nucleotide (ImpX) with one or more unactivated nucleotides (XMP), of two or more ImpX, and of XMP that were activated in situ in the polymerization reaction itself. The reaction products were analyzed using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) to identify the lengths and nucleotide compositions of the polymerization products. The results show that the extent of polymerization, the degree of heteropolymerization vs. homopolymerization, and the composition of the polymeric products all vary among the different nucleotides and depend upon which nucleotides and how many different nucleotides are present in the mixture.

  13. Nucleotide Selectivity in Abiotic RNA Polymerization Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coari, Kristin M; Martin, Rebecca C; Jain, Kopal; McGown, Linda B

    2017-09-01

    In order to establish an RNA world on early Earth, the nucleotides must form polymers through chemical rather than biochemical reactions. The polymerization products must be long enough to perform catalytic functions, including self-replication, and to preserve genetic information. These functions depend not only on the length of the polymers, but also on their sequences. To date, studies of abiotic RNA polymerization generally have focused on routes to polymerization of a single nucleotide and lengths of the homopolymer products. Less work has been done the selectivity of the reaction toward incorporation of some nucleotides over others in nucleotide mixtures. Such information is an essential step toward understanding the chemical evolution of RNA. To address this question, in the present work RNA polymerization reactions were performed in the presence of montmorillonite clay catalyst. The nucleotides included the monophosphates of adenosine, cytosine, guanosine, uridine and inosine. Experiments included reactions of mixtures of an imidazole-activated nucleotide (ImpX) with one or more unactivated nucleotides (XMP), of two or more ImpX, and of XMP that were activated in situ in the polymerization reaction itself. The reaction products were analyzed using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) to identify the lengths and nucleotide compositions of the polymerization products. The results show that the extent of polymerization, the degree of heteropolymerization vs. homopolymerization, and the composition of the polymeric products all vary among the different nucleotides and depend upon which nucleotides and how many different nucleotides are present in the mixture.

  14. Scambio, a novel guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Rho

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Groffen John

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Small GTPases of the Rho family are critical regulators of various cellular functions including actin cytoskeleton organization, activation of kinase cascades and mitogenesis. For this reason, a major objective has been to understand the mechanisms of Rho GTPase regulation. Here, we examine the function of a novel protein, Scambio, which shares homology with the DH-PH domains of several known guanine nucleotide exchange factors for Rho family members. Results Scambio is located on human chromosome 14q11.1, encodes a protein of around 181 kDa, and is highly expressed in both heart and skeletal muscle. In contrast to most DH-PH-domain containing proteins, it binds the activated, GTP-bound forms of Rac and Cdc42. However, it fails to associate with V14RhoA. Immunofluorescence studies indicate that Scambio and activated Rac3 colocalize in membrane ruffles at the cell periphery. In accordance with these findings, Scambio does not activate either Rac or Cdc42 but rather, stimulates guanine nucleotide exchange on RhoA and its close relative, RhoC. Conclusion Scambio associates with Rac in its activated conformation and functions as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Rho.

  15. 24 CFR 570.466 - Additional application submission requirements for Pockets of Poverty-employment opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... requirements for Pockets of Poverty-employment opportunities. 570.466 Section 570.466 Housing and Urban... application submission requirements for Pockets of Poverty—employment opportunities. Applicants for Action Grants under the Pockets of Poverty provision must describe the number and, to the extent possible, the...

  16. Evolutionary and structural perspectives of plant cyclic nucleotide-gated cation channels

    KAUST Repository

    Zelman, Alice K.; Dawe, Adam; Gehring, Christoph A; Berkowitz, Gerald A.

    2012-01-01

    , including Ca2+ and K+. CNGCs are present in both plant and animal cells, typically in the plasma membrane; recent studies have also documented their presence in prokaryotes. All eukaryote CNGC polypeptides have a cyclic nucleotide-binding domain and a

  17. Solubilization and reconstitution of the formylmethionylleucylphenylalanine receptor coupled to guanine nucleotide regulatory protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, K.; Dickey, B.F.; Pyun, H.Y.; Navarro, J.

    1988-01-01

    The authors describe the solubilization, resolution, and reconstitution of the formylmethionylleucylphenylalanine (fMet-Leu-Phe) receptor and guanine nucleotide regulatory proteins (G-proteins). The receptor was solubilized with 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio]-1-propanesulfonate. Guanine nucleotides decreased the number of high-affinity binding sites and accelerated the rate of dissociation of the receptor-ligand complex, suggesting that the solubilized receptor remained coupled to endogenous G-proteins. The solubilized receptor was resolved from endogenous G-proteins by fractionation on a wheat germ agglutinin (WGA)-Sepharose 4B column. High-affinity [ 3 H]fMet-Leu-Phe binding to the WGA-purified receptor was diminished and exhibited reduced guanine nucleotide sensitivity. High-affinity [ 3 H]fMET-Leu-Phe binding and guanine nucleotide sensitivity were reconstituted upon the addition of purified brain G-proteins. Similar results were obtained when the receptor was reconstituted with brain G-proteins into phospholipid vesicles by gel filtration chromatography. In addition, they also demonstrated fMET-Leu-Phe-dependent GTP hydrolysis in the reconstituted vesicles. The results of this work indicate that coupling of the fMet-Leu-Phe receptor to G-proteins converts the receptor to a high-affinity binding state and that agonist produces activation of G-proteins. The resolution and functional reconstitution of this receptor should provide an important step toward the elucidation of the molecular mechanism of the fMet-Leu-Phe transduction system in neutrophils

  18. Case of pacemaker pocket infection caused by Finegoldia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini Dehkordi, Seyed Hamed; Osorio, Georgina

    2017-10-01

    Finegoldia magna (formerly called Peptostreptococcus magnus) is a Gram-positive anaerobic coccus which is increasingly recognized as an opportunistic pathogen. We present a case of F. magna associated non-valvular cardiovascular device-related infection in an 83 year-old male who received a permanent pacemaker for sick sinus syndrome seven weeks prior to his presentation. Five weeks after the implantation, the pacemaker and leads were explanted because of clinical evidence of pacemaker pocket infection. He was initially treated with sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim based on the Gram stain results from the removed pacemaker. However, two weeks later, he was readmitted with sepsis and was successfully treated with ampicillin-sulbactam. Culture results from the pacemaker and pocket as well as blood cultures grew F. magna. Clinicians should be aware of the possibility of F. magna infection when initial gram stain results show "gram positive cocci". Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Pocket PC-based portable gamma-ray spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamontip Ploykrachang

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available A portable gamma-ray spectrometer based on a Pocket PC has been developed. A 12-bit pipeline analog-to-digitalconverter (ADC associated with an implemented pulse height histogram function on field programmable gate array (FPGAoperating at 15 MHz is employed for pulse height analysis from built-in pulse amplifier. The system, which interfaces withthe Pocket PC via an enhanced RS-232 serial port under the microcontroller facilitation, is utilized for spectrum acquisition,display and analysis. The pulse height analysis capability of the system was tested and it was found that the ADC integralnonlinearity of ±0.45% was obtained with the throughput rate at 160 kcps. The overall system performance was tested usinga PIN photodiode-CsI(Tl crystal coupled scintillation detector and gamma standard radioactive sources of Cs-137 andCo-60. Low cost and the compact system size as a result of the implemented logical function are also discussed.

  20. Newnes circuit calculations pocket book with computer programs

    CERN Document Server

    Davies, Thomas J

    2013-01-01

    Newnes Circuit Calculations Pocket Book: With Computer Programs presents equations, examples, and problems in circuit calculations. The text includes 300 computer programs that help solve the problems presented. The book is comprised of 20 chapters that tackle different aspects of circuit calculation. The coverage of the text includes dc voltage, dc circuits, and network theorems. The book also covers oscillators, phasors, and transformers. The text will be useful to electrical engineers and other professionals whose work involves electronic circuitry.

  1. Direct demonstration of guanine nucleotide sensitive receptors for vasoactive intestinal peptide in the anterior lobe of the rat pituitary gland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agui, T.; Matsumoto, K.

    1990-01-01

    The vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) receptors were identified on the membranes from the rat anterior pituitary gland with [ 125 I]VIP. The dissociation constant (Kd) and the maximal binding capacity (Bmax) values were estimated from the competitive inhibition data. The Kd and Bmax values were 1.05 +/- 0.75 nM and 103 +/- 11 fmol/mg protein, respectively. The order of molar potency of related peptides to inhibit [ 125 I]VIP binding was VIP greater than peptide histidine isoleucine (PHI) greater than secretin greater than glucagon. Glucagon was not effective to inhibit the binding. [ 125 I]VIP binding was effectively inhibited by the addition of guanine nucleotides. The order of molar potency to inhibit the binding was Gpp(NH)p greater than GTP greater than GDP greater than GMP greater than ATP. These results directly suggest the coupling of VIP receptors with guanine nucleotide binding proteins in the anterior pituitary gland

  2. Intraperiodontal pocket: An ideal route for local antimicrobial drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreeja C Nair

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Periodontal pockets act as a natural reservoir filled with gingival crevicular fluid for the controlled release delivery of antimicrobials directly. This article reflects the present status of nonsurgical controlled local intrapocket delivery of antimicrobials in the treatment of periodontitis. These sites have specialty in terms of anatomy, permeability, and their ability to retain a delivery system for a desired length of time. A number of antimicrobial products and the composition of the delivery systems, its use, clinical results, and their release are summarized. The goal in using an intrapocket device for the delivery of an antimicrobial agent is the achievement and maintenance of therapeutic drug concentration for the desired period of time. Novel controlled drug delivery system are capable of improving patient compliance as well as therapeutic efficacy with precise control of the rate by which a particular drug dosage is released from a delivery system without the need for frequent administration. These are considered superior drug delivery system because of low cost, greater stability, non-toxicity, biocompatibility, non-immunogenicity, and are biodegradable in nature. This review also focus on the importance and ideal features of periodontal pockets as a drug delivery platform for designing a suitable dosage form along with its potential advantage and limitations. The microbes in the periodontal pocket could destroy periodontal tissues, and a complete knowledge of these as well as an ideal treatment strategy could be helpful in treating this disease.

  3. Single Walled Carbon Nanotube Based Air Pocket Encapsulated Ultraviolet Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun Jin; Han, Jin-Woo; Kim, Beomseok; Meyyappan, M

    2017-11-22

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) is a promising candidate as a sensor material for the sensitive detection of gases/vapors, biomarkers, and even some radiation, as all these external variables affect the resistance and other properties of nanotubes, which forms the basis for sensing. Ultraviolet (UV) radiation does not impact the nanotube properties given the substantial mismatch of bandgaps and therefore, CNTs have never been considered for UV sensing, unlike the popular ZnO and other oxide nanwires. It is well-known that UV assists the adsorption/desorption characteristics of oxygen on carbon nanotubes, which changes the nanotube resistance. Here, we demonstrate a novel sensor structure encapsulated with an air pocket, where the confined air is responsible for the UV sensing mechanism and assures sensor stability and repeatability over time. In addition to the protection from any contamination, the air pocket encapsulated sensor offers negligible baseline drift and fast recovery compared to previously reported sensors. The air pocket isolated from the outside environment can act as a stationary oxygen reservoir, resulting in consistent sensor characteristics. Furthermore, this sensor can be used even in liquid environments.

  4. Film cooling air pocket in a closed loop cooled airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yufeng Phillip; Itzel, Gary Michael; Osgood, Sarah Jane; Bagepalli, Radhakrishna; Webbon, Waylon Willard; Burdgick, Steven Sebastian

    2002-01-01

    Turbine stator vane segments have radially inner and outer walls with vanes extending between them. The inner and outer walls are compartmentalized and have impingement plates. Steam flowing into the outer wall plenum passes through the impingement plate for impingement cooling of the outer wall upper surface. The spent impingement steam flows into cavities of the vane having inserts for impingement cooling the walls of the vane. The steam passes into the inner wall and through the impingement plate for impingement cooling of the inner wall surface and for return through return cavities having inserts for impingement cooling of the vane surfaces. To provide for air film cooing of select portions of the airfoil outer surface, at least one air pocket is defined on a wall of at least one of the cavities. Each air pocket is substantially closed with respect to the cooling medium in the cavity and cooling air pumped to the air pocket flows through outlet apertures in the wall of the airfoil to cool the same.

  5. Nucleotide sequence preservation of human mitochondrial DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monnat, R.J. Jr.; Loeb, L.A.

    1985-01-01

    Recombinant DNA techniques have been used to quantitate the amount of nucleotide sequence divergence in the mitochondrial DNA population of individual normal humans. Mitochondrial DNA was isolated from the peripheral blood lymphocytes of five normal humans and cloned in M13 mp11; 49 kilobases of nucleotide sequence information was obtained from 248 independently isolated clones from the five normal donors. Both between- and within-individual differences were identified. Between-individual differences were identified in approximately = to 1/200 nucleotides. In contrast, only one within-individual difference was identified in 49 kilobases of nucleotide sequence information. This high degree of mitochondrial nucleotide sequence homogeneity in human somatic cells is in marked contrast to the rapid evolutionary divergence of human mitochondrial DNA and suggests the existence of mechanisms for the concerted preservation of mammalian mitochondrial DNA sequences in single organisms

  6. Assay of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase using radiolabeled and fluorescent substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kincaid, R.L.; Manganiello, V.C.

    1988-01-01

    There are four major classes of phosphodiesterase with different specificities for cAMP and cGMP and different allosteric regulators. Type I phosphodiesterase is activated by calmodulin plus Ca/sup 2+/ and has a higher affinity for cGMP than cAMP. Type II phosphodiesterase likewise has a higher affinity for cGMP than cAMP, but the activity toward one substrate is markedly stimulated by low (micromolar) concentrations of the other nucleotide. Type III phosphodiesterase has a higher affinity for cAMP than cGMP; its activity is increased in responsive cells by certain hormones, e.g., insulin, isoproterenol. Type IV phosphodiesterase is the cGMP-specific enzyme, which also has an allosteric binding site for cGMP. An example of this class of enzyme is the one from retinal rod outer segments, which is activated by light via rhodopsin and the guanine nucleotide-binding protein transducin. There appears to be little structural relatedness among these enzymes based on immunologic analysis, consistent with the possibility that divergent forms evolved from an ancestral enzyme. Determination of the amount of a specific form of phosphodiesterase in crude material is often difficult. Modification of assay conditions by judicious choice of substrate and/or inhibitor concentrations may selectively favor (or reduce) the activity of a particular form; in many instances, however, some fractionation of enzymes may be necessary. This is discussed more fully in the final section of this chapter

  7. Electrophysiological analysis of the mutated Na,K-ATPase cation binding pocket.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenderink, J.B.; Geibel, S.; Grabsch, E.; Pont, J.J.H.H.M. de; Bamberg, E.; Friedrich, T.

    2003-01-01

    Na,K-ATPase mediates net electrogenic transport by extruding three Na+ ions and importing two K+ ions across the plasma membrane during each reaction cycle. We mutated putative cation coordinating amino acids in transmembrane hairpin M5-M6 of rat Na,K-ATPase: Asp776 (Gln, Asp, Ala), Glu779 (Asp,

  8. Repurposing metformin: an old drug with new tricks in its binding pockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryor, Rosina; Cabreiro, Filipe

    2015-01-01

    Improvements in healthcare and nutrition have generated remarkable increases in life expectancy worldwide. This is one of the greatest achievements of the modern world yet it also presents a grave challenge: as more people survive into later life, more also experience the diseases of old age, including type 2 diabetes (T2D), cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cancer. Developing new ways to improve health in the elderly is therefore a top priority for biomedical research. Although our understanding of the molecular basis of these morbidities has advanced rapidly, effective novel treatments are still lacking. Alternative drug development strategies are now being explored, such as the repurposing of existing drugs used to treat other diseases. This can save a considerable amount of time and money since the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and safety profiles of these drugs are already established, effectively enabling preclinical studies to be bypassed. Metformin is one such drug currently being investigated for novel applications. The present review provides a thorough and detailed account of our current understanding of the molecular pharmacology and signalling mechanisms underlying biguanide–protein interactions. It also focuses on the key role of the microbiota in regulating age-associated morbidities and a potential role for metformin to modulate its function. Research in this area holds the key to solving many of the mysteries of our current understanding of drug action and concerted effects to provide sustained and long-life health. PMID:26475449

  9. Mapping the isoprenoid binding pocket of PDEδ by a semisynthetic, photoactivatable N-ras lipoprotein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alexander, M.; Gerauer, M.; Pechlivanis, M.; Popkirova, B.; Dvorsky, R.; Brunsveld, L.; Waldmann, H.; Kuhlmann, J.

    2009-01-01

    Biologically functional Ras isoforms undergo post-translational modifications starting with farnesylation of the most C-terminal cysteine. Combined with further processing steps, this isoprenylation allows for the anchoring of these proteins in endomembranes, where signal transduction events take

  10. Ligand binding pocket function of drosophila USP is necessary for metamorphosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    The widely accepted paradigm that epoxidized methyl farnesoates (“juvenile hormones,” JHs) are the principle sesquiterpenoid hormones regulating insect metamorphosis was assessed in Drosophila melanogaster. GC-MS analysis showed that methyl farnesoate, rather than methyl epoxyfarnesoate (= JH III), ...

  11. Identification of amino acid residues in protein SRP72 required for binding to a kinked 5e motif of the human signal recognition particle RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zwieb Christian

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human cells depend critically on the signal recognition particle (SRP for the sorting and delivery of their proteins. The SRP is a ribonucleoprotein complex which binds to signal sequences of secretory polypeptides as they emerge from the ribosome. Among the six proteins of the eukaryotic SRP, the largest protein, SRP72, is essential for protein targeting and possesses a poorly characterized RNA binding domain. Results We delineated the minimal region of SRP72 capable of forming a stable complex with an SRP RNA fragment. The region encompassed residues 545 to 585 of the full-length human SRP72 and contained a lysine-rich cluster (KKKKKKKKGK at postions 552 to 561 as well as a conserved Pfam motif with the sequence PDPXRWLPXXER at positions 572 to 583. We demonstrated by site-directed mutagenesis that both regions participated in the formation of a complex with the RNA. In agreement with biochemical data and results from chymotryptic digestion experiments, molecular modeling of SRP72 implied that the invariant W577 was located inside the predicted structure of an RNA binding domain. The 11-nucleotide 5e motif contained within the SRP RNA fragment was shown by comparative electrophoresis on native polyacrylamide gels to conform to an RNA kink-turn. The model of the complex suggested that the conserved A240 of the K-turn, previously identified as being essential for the binding to SRP72, could protrude into a groove of the SRP72 RNA binding domain, similar but not identical to how other K-turn recognizing proteins interact with RNA. Conclusions The results from the presented experiments provided insights into the molecular details of a functionally important and structurally interesting RNA-protein interaction. A model for how a ligand binding pocket of SRP72 can accommodate a new RNA K-turn in the 5e region of the eukaryotic SRP RNA is proposed.

  12. Identification of amino acid residues in protein SRP72 required for binding to a kinked 5e motif of the human signal recognition particle RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iakhiaeva, Elena; Iakhiaev, Alexei; Zwieb, Christian

    2010-11-13

    Human cells depend critically on the signal recognition particle (SRP) for the sorting and delivery of their proteins. The SRP is a ribonucleoprotein complex which binds to signal sequences of secretory polypeptides as they emerge from the ribosome. Among the six proteins of the eukaryotic SRP, the largest protein, SRP72, is essential for protein targeting and possesses a poorly characterized RNA binding domain. We delineated the minimal region of SRP72 capable of forming a stable complex with an SRP RNA fragment. The region encompassed residues 545 to 585 of the full-length human SRP72 and contained a lysine-rich cluster (KKKKKKKKGK) at postions 552 to 561 as well as a conserved Pfam motif with the sequence PDPXRWLPXXER at positions 572 to 583. We demonstrated by site-directed mutagenesis that both regions participated in the formation of a complex with the RNA. In agreement with biochemical data and results from chymotryptic digestion experiments, molecular modeling of SRP72 implied that the invariant W577 was located inside the predicted structure of an RNA binding domain. The 11-nucleotide 5e motif contained within the SRP RNA fragment was shown by comparative electrophoresis on native polyacrylamide gels to conform to an RNA kink-turn. The model of the complex suggested that the conserved A240 of the K-turn, previously identified as being essential for the binding to SRP72, could protrude into a groove of the SRP72 RNA binding domain, similar but not identical to how other K-turn recognizing proteins interact with RNA. The results from the presented experiments provided insights into the molecular details of a functionally important and structurally interesting RNA-protein interaction. A model for how a ligand binding pocket of SRP72 can accommodate a new RNA K-turn in the 5e region of the eukaryotic SRP RNA is proposed.

  13. Setting the stage for electron transfer: Molecular basis of ABTS-binding to four laccases from Trametes versicolor at variable pH and protein oxidation state

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Niels Johan; Kepp, Kasper Planeta

    2014-01-01

    , very high (R2∼0.99) correlation was observed between logKm (ABTS) and binding-pocket charge due to sites 157, 161, 269, 271, and 333, i.e. laccases optimal for ABTS turnover have positively charged anchor points in their pockets. Our work also demonstrates how activity-constraints can markedly improve...

  14. Non-thiolate ligation of nickel by nucleotide-free UreG of Klebsiella aerogenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin-Diaconescu, Vlad; Joseph, Crisjoe A.; Boer, Jodi L.; Mulrooney, Scott B.; Hausinger, Robert P.; Maroney, Michael J.

    2016-12-21

    Nickel-dependent ureases are activated by a multiprotein complex that includes the GTPase UreG. Prior studies showed that nucleotide-free UreG from Klebsiella aerogenes is monomeric and binds one nickel or zinc ion with near-equivalent affinity using an undefined binding site, whereas nucleotide-free UreG from Helicobacter pylori selectively binds one zinc ion per dimer via a universally conserved Cys-Pro-His motif in each protomer. Iodoacetamide-treated K. aerogenes UreG was nearly unaffected in nickel binding compared to non-treated sample, suggesting the absence of thiolate ligands to the metal. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of nickel-bound UreG showed the metal possessed four-coordinate geometry with all O/N donor ligands including one imidazole, thus confirming the absence of thiolate ligation. The nickel site in Strep-tag II-modified protein possessed six-coordinate geometry, again with all O/N donor ligands, but now including two or three imidazoles. An identical site was noted for the Strep-tag II-modified H74A variant, substituted in the Cys-Pro-His motif, ruling out coordination by this His residue. These results are consistent with metal binding to both His6 and a His residue of the fusion peptide in Strep-tagged K. aerogenes UreG. We conclude that the nickel- and zinc-binding site in nucleotide-free K. aerogenes UreG is distinct from that of nucleotide-free H. pylori UreG and does not involve the Cys-Pro-His motif. Further, we show the Strep-tag II can perturb metal coordination of this protein.

  15. Vγ9Vδ2 T cell activation by strongly agonistic nucleotidic phosphoantigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulin, Morgane; Alguacil, Javier; Gu, Siyi; Mehtougui, Asmaa; Adams, Erin J; Peyrottes, Suzanne; Champagne, Eric

    2017-12-01

    Human Vγ9Vδ2 T cells can sense through their TCR tumor cells producing the weak endogenous phosphorylated antigen isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP), or bacterially infected cells producing the strong agonist hydroxyl dimethylallyl pyrophosphate (HDMAPP). The recognition of the phosphoantigen is dependent on its binding to the intracellular B30.2 domain of butyrophilin BTN3A1. Most studies have focused on pyrophosphate phosphoantigens. As triphosphate nucleotide derivatives are naturally co-produced with IPP and HDMAPP, we analyzed their specific properties using synthetic nucleotides derived from HDMAPP. The adenylated, thymidylated and uridylated triphosphate derivatives were found to activate directly Vγ9Vδ2 cell lines as efficiently as HDMAPP in the absence of accessory cells. These antigens were inherently resistant to terminal phosphatases, but apyrase, when added during a direct stimulation of Vγ9Vδ2 cells, abrogated their stimulating activity, indicating that their activity required transformation into strong pyrophosphate agonists by a nucleotide pyrophosphatase activity which is present in serum. Tumor cells can be sensitized with nucleotide phosphoantigens in the presence of apyrase to become stimulatory, showing that this can occur before their hydrolysis into pyrophosphates. Whereas tumors sensitized with HDMAPP rapidly lost their stimulatory activity, sensitization with nucleotide derivatives, in particular with the thymidine derivative, induced long-lasting stimulating ability. Using isothermal titration calorimetry, binding of some nucleotide derivatives to BTN3A1 intracellular domain was found to occur with an affinity similar to that of IPP, but much lower than that of HDMAPP. Thus, nucleotide phosphoantigens are precursors of pyrophosphate antigens which can deliver strong agonists intracellularly resulting in prolonged and strengthened activity.

  16. Practical Pocket PC Application w/Biometric Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Julian

    2004-01-01

    I work in the Flight Software Engineering Branch, where we provide design and development of embedded real-time software applications for flight and supporting ground systems to support the NASA Aeronautics and Space Programs. In addition, this branch evaluates, develops and implements new technologies for embedded real-time systems, and maintains a laboratory for applications of embedded technology. The majority of microchips that are used in modern society have been programmed using embedded technology. These small chips can be found in microwaves, calculators, home security systems, cell phones and more. My assignment this summer entails working with an iPAQ HP 5500 Pocket PC. This top-of-the-line hand-held device is one of the first mobile PC's to introduce biometric security capabilities. Biometric security, in this case a fingerprint authentication system, is on the edge of technology as far as securing information. The benefits of fingerprint authentication are enormous. The most significant of them are that it is extremely difficult to reproduce someone else's fingerprint, and it is equally difficult to lose or forget your own fingerprint as opposed to a password or pin number. One of my goals for this summer is to integrate this technology with another Pocket PC application. The second task for the summer is to develop a simple application that provides an Astronaut EVA (Extravehicular Activity) Log Book capability. The Astronaut EVA Log Book is what an astronaut would use to report the status of field missions, crew physical health, successes, future plans, etc. My goal is to develop a user interface into which these data fields can be entered and stored. The applications that I am developing are created using eMbedded Visual C++ 4.0 with the Pocket PC 2003 Software Development Kit provided by Microsoft.

  17. Nucleotide diversity and phylogenetic relationships among ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-03-03

    Mar 3, 2017 ... 2Department of Botany, D. S. B. Campus, Kumaun University, Nainital 263 001, India ... Rana T. S. 2017 Nucleotide diversity and phylogenetic relationships ... Anderson and Park 1989). ..... Edgewood Press, Edgewood, USA.

  18. Nucleotide excision repair in the test tube.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.G.J. Jaspers (Nicolaas); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractThe eukaryotic nucleotide excision-repair pathway has been reconstituted in vitro, an achievement that should hasten the full enzymological characterization of this highly complex DNA-repair pathway.

  19. Classification of pseudo pairs between nucleotide bases and amino acids by analysis of nucleotide–protein complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Jiro; Westhof, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Nucleotide bases are recognized by amino acid residues in a variety of DNA/RNA binding and nucleotide binding proteins. In this study, a total of 446 crystal structures of nucleotide–protein complexes are analyzed manually and pseudo pairs together with single and bifurcated hydrogen bonds observed between bases and amino acids are classified and annotated. Only 5 of the 20 usual amino acid residues, Asn, Gln, Asp, Glu and Arg, are able to orient in a coplanar fashion in order to form pseudo pairs with nucleotide bases through two hydrogen bonds. The peptide backbone can also form pseudo pairs with nucleotide bases and presents a strong bias for binding to the adenine base. The Watson–Crick side of the nucleotide bases is the major interaction edge participating in such pseudo pairs. Pseudo pairs between the Watson–Crick edge of guanine and Asp are frequently observed. The Hoogsteen edge of the purine bases is a good discriminatory element in recognition of nucleotide bases by protein side chains through the pseudo pairing: the Hoogsteen edge of adenine is recognized by various amino acids while the Hoogsteen edge of guanine is only recognized by Arg. The sugar edge is rarely recognized by either the side-chain or peptide backbone of amino acid residues. PMID:21737431

  20. Critical role of DNA intercalation in enzyme-catalyzed nucleotide flipping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendershot, Jenna M.; O'Brien, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    Nucleotide flipping is a common feature of DNA-modifying enzymes that allows access to target sites within duplex DNA. Structural studies have identified many intercalating amino acid side chains in a wide variety of enzymes, but the functional contribution of these intercalating residues is poorly understood. We used site-directed mutagenesis and transient kinetic approaches to dissect the energetic contribution of intercalation for human alkyladenine DNA glycosylase, an enzyme that initiates repair of alkylation damage. When AAG flips out a damaged nucleotide, the void in the duplex is filled by a conserved tyrosine (Y162). We find that tyrosine intercalation confers 140-fold stabilization of the extrahelical specific recognition complex, and that Y162 functions as a plug to slow the rate of unflipping by 6000-fold relative to the Y162A mutant. Surprisingly, mutation to the smaller alanine side chain increases the rate of nucleotide flipping by 50-fold relative to the wild-type enzyme. This provides evidence against the popular model that DNA intercalation accelerates nucleotide flipping. In the case of AAG, DNA intercalation contributes to the specific binding of a damaged nucleotide, but this enhanced specificity comes at the cost of reduced speed of nucleotide flipping. PMID:25324304

  1. The Japanese Words Adopted into The Pocket Oxford Dictionary

    OpenAIRE

    今里, 智晃

    1993-01-01

    This paper aims to give a comparative analysis of the six POD editions on the basis of the Japanese words adopted into them. There have been many words borrowed from Japanese into English. For example, bonze and sake2 were naturalized in English a long time ago.The new 1992 edition of The Pocket Oxford Dictionary contains 39 Japanese words, some of which are futon, ikebana and sumo. But, needless to say, karaoke must be one of the latest examples we can see in English dictionaries that are of...

  2. Newnes audio and Hi-Fi engineer's pocket book

    CERN Document Server

    Capel, Vivian

    2013-01-01

    Newnes Audio and Hi-Fi Engineer's Pocket Book, Second Edition provides concise discussion of several audio topics. The book is comprised of 10 chapters that cover different audio equipment. The coverage of the text includes microphones, gramophones, compact discs, and tape recorders. The book also covers high-quality radio, amplifiers, and loudspeakers. The book then reviews the concepts of sound and acoustics, and presents some facts and formulas relevant to audio. The text will be useful to sound engineers and other professionals whose work involves sound systems.

  3. Windows® Small Business Server 2008 Administrator's Pocket Consultant

    CERN Document Server

    Zacker, Craig

    2009-01-01

    Portable and precise, this pocket-sized guide delivers ready answers for administering Windows Small Business Server 2008. Zero in on core support tasks and tools using quick-reference tables, instructions, and lists. You'll get the focused information you need to solve problems and get the job done-whether at your desk or in the field. Get fast facts to: Plan, install, and configure a small business network Navigate the Windows SBS Console toolCreate and administer user and group accounts Manage automatic updates, disk storage, and shared printersConfigure mail settings and customize inte

  4. Windows® Group Policy Administrators Pocket Consultant

    CERN Document Server

    Stanek, William

    2009-01-01

    Portable and precise, this pocket-sized guide delivers ready answers for the day-to-day administration of Group Policy. Zero in on core support and maintenance tasks using quick-reference tables, instructions, and lists. You'll get the focused information you need to solve problems and get the job done-whether at your desk or in the field! Get fast facts to: Configure Local GPOs and Active Directory®-based GPOsManage policy preferences and settingsModel policy changes through the consoleMigrate and maintain the SYSVOLDiagnose and troubleshoot replication issuesKnow when to enforce, block,

  5. Contralateral Abdominal Pocketing in Salvation of Replanted Fingertips with Compromised Circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung-Sup Shim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Abdominal pocketing is one of the most useful methods in salvation of compromised replanted fingertips. Abdominal pocketing has generally been performed in the ipsilateral lower abdominal quadrant, but we have also performed contralateral pocketing at our institute. To determine which approach is more beneficial, a total of 40 patients underwent an abdominal pocketing procedure in either the ipsilateral or contralateral lower abdominal quadrant after fingertip replantation. Dates of abdominal pocketing after initial replantation, detachment after abdominal pocketing, range of motion (ROM before abdominal pocketing, and sequential ROM after the detachment operation and date of full ROM recovery and Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire (DASH score were recorded through medical chart review. Mean detachment date, mean abduction of shoulder after the detachment operation, and mean days to return to full ROM were not significantly different between the ipsilateral and contralateral pocketing groups. However, the mean DASH score was significantly lower in the contralateral group than the ipsilateral group. There were also fewer postoperative wound complications in the contralateral group than in the ipsilateral group. We, therefore, recommend contralateral abdominal pocketing rather than ipsilateral abdominal pocketing to increase patient comfort and reduce pain and complications.

  6. Contralateral Abdominal Pocketing in Salvation of Replanted Fingertips with Compromised Circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Hyung-Sup; Kim, Dong-Hwi; Kwon, Ho; Jung, Sung-No

    2014-01-01

    Abdominal pocketing is one of the most useful methods in salvation of compromised replanted fingertips. Abdominal pocketing has generally been performed in the ipsilateral lower abdominal quadrant, but we have also performed contralateral pocketing at our institute. To determine which approach is more beneficial, a total of 40 patients underwent an abdominal pocketing procedure in either the ipsilateral or contralateral lower abdominal quadrant after fingertip replantation. Dates of abdominal pocketing after initial replantation, detachment after abdominal pocketing, range of motion (ROM) before abdominal pocketing, and sequential ROM after the detachment operation and date of full ROM recovery and Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire (DASH) score were recorded through medical chart review. Mean detachment date, mean abduction of shoulder after the detachment operation, and mean days to return to full ROM were not significantly different between the ipsilateral and contralateral pocketing groups. However, the mean DASH score was significantly lower in the contralateral group than the ipsilateral group. There were also fewer postoperative wound complications in the contralateral group than in the ipsilateral group. We, therefore, recommend contralateral abdominal pocketing rather than ipsilateral abdominal pocketing to increase patient comfort and reduce pain and complications. PMID:25379539

  7. Bacterial periplasmic sialic acid-binding proteins exhibit a conserved binding site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gangi Setty, Thanuja [Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, NCBS Campus, GKVK Post, Bangalore, Karnataka 560 065 (India); Cho, Christine [Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242-1109 (United States); Govindappa, Sowmya [Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, NCBS Campus, GKVK Post, Bangalore, Karnataka 560 065 (India); Apicella, Michael A. [Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242-1109 (United States); Ramaswamy, S., E-mail: ramas@instem.res.in [Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, NCBS Campus, GKVK Post, Bangalore, Karnataka 560 065 (India)

    2014-07-01

    Structure–function studies of sialic acid-binding proteins from F. nucleatum, P. multocida, V. cholerae and H. influenzae reveal a conserved network of hydrogen bonds involved in conformational change on ligand binding. Sialic acids are a family of related nine-carbon sugar acids that play important roles in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. These sialic acids are incorporated/decorated onto lipooligosaccharides as terminal sugars in multiple bacteria to evade the host immune system. Many pathogenic bacteria scavenge sialic acids from their host and use them for molecular mimicry. The first step of this process is the transport of sialic acid to the cytoplasm, which often takes place using a tripartite ATP-independent transport system consisting of a periplasmic binding protein and a membrane transporter. In this paper, the structural characterization of periplasmic binding proteins from the pathogenic bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum, Pasteurella multocida and Vibrio cholerae and their thermodynamic characterization are reported. The binding affinities of several mutations in the Neu5Ac binding site of the Haemophilus influenzae protein are also reported. The structure and the thermodynamics of the binding of sugars suggest that all of these proteins have a very well conserved binding pocket and similar binding affinities. A significant conformational change occurs when these proteins bind the sugar. While the C1 carboxylate has been identified as the primary binding site, a second conserved hydrogen-bonding network is involved in the initiation and stabilization of the conformational states.

  8. Bacterial periplasmic sialic acid-binding proteins exhibit a conserved binding site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gangi Setty, Thanuja; Cho, Christine; Govindappa, Sowmya; Apicella, Michael A.; Ramaswamy, S.

    2014-01-01

    Structure–function studies of sialic acid-binding proteins from F. nucleatum, P. multocida, V. cholerae and H. influenzae reveal a conserved network of hydrogen bonds involved in conformational change on ligand binding. Sialic acids are a family of related nine-carbon sugar acids that play important roles in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. These sialic acids are incorporated/decorated onto lipooligosaccharides as terminal sugars in multiple bacteria to evade the host immune system. Many pathogenic bacteria scavenge sialic acids from their host and use them for molecular mimicry. The first step of this process is the transport of sialic acid to the cytoplasm, which often takes place using a tripartite ATP-independent transport system consisting of a periplasmic binding protein and a membrane transporter. In this paper, the structural characterization of periplasmic binding proteins from the pathogenic bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum, Pasteurella multocida and Vibrio cholerae and their thermodynamic characterization are reported. The binding affinities of several mutations in the Neu5Ac binding site of the Haemophilus influenzae protein are also reported. The structure and the thermodynamics of the binding of sugars suggest that all of these proteins have a very well conserved binding pocket and similar binding affinities. A significant conformational change occurs when these proteins bind the sugar. While the C1 carboxylate has been identified as the primary binding site, a second conserved hydrogen-bonding network is involved in the initiation and stabilization of the conformational states

  9. Discover binding pathways using the sliding binding-box docking approach: application to binding pathways of oseltamivir to avian influenza H5N1 neuraminidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Diem-Trang T.; Le, Ly T.; Truong, Thanh N.

    2013-08-01

    Drug binding and unbinding are transient processes which are hardly observed by experiment and difficult to analyze by computational techniques. In this paper, we employed a cost-effective method called "pathway docking" in which molecular docking was used to screen ligand-receptor binding free energy surface to reveal possible paths of ligand approaching protein binding pocket. A case study was applied on oseltamivir, the key drug against influenza a virus. The equilibrium pathways identified by this method are found to be similar to those identified in prior studies using highly expensive computational approaches.

  10. Design and Implementation of Accurate and Efficient Pocket Dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shehata, S.A.; Abdelkhalek, K.L.

    2005-01-01

    It is so important in the field of radiation therapy and radiation protection to have dosimeters to determine the absorbed dose, which is transferred to human body by ionizing radiation. In this paper the design and implementation of a wide-range pocket dosimeter (PKD-1) with high accuracy to measure personal equivalent dose and dose rate of gamma radiation will be presented. This pocket dosimeter is micro controller-based and powered from 9 V rechargeable battery. The overall power consumption is significantly reduced by smart software and hardware design allowing longer time intervals between recharging. The integrated alphanumerical LCD displays not only of the accumulated dose and current dose rate, but also displays alarm messages such as low battery. For reasons of power saving the LCD is activated on demand by pressing the push button or automatically when an alarm occurs. Audible and visual alarms have been added to PKD-1 in order that they cannot be accidentally overlooked or ignored. PKD-1 can be connected to any PC through its serial port (RS232) and User Interface software has been developed for easy displaying and recording of radiation readings over any time period

  11. Results on Laplacian spectra of graphs with pockets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasmita Barik

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Let F , H v be simple connected graphs on n and m + 1 vertices, respectively. Let v be a specified vertex of H v and u 1 , … , u k ∈ F . Then the graph G = G [ F , u 1 , … , u k , H v ] obtained by taking one copy of F and k copies of H v , and then attaching the i th copy of H v to the vertex u i , i = 1 , … , k , at the vertex v of H v (identify u i with the vertex v of the i th copy is called a graph with k pockets. In 2008, Barik raised the question that ‘how far can the Laplacian spectrum of G be described by using the Laplacian spectra of F and H v ?’ and discussed the case when deg ( v = m in H v . In this article, we study the problem for more general cases and describe the Laplacian spectrum. As an application, we construct new nonisomorphic Laplacian cospectral graphs from the known ones. Keywords: Laplacian matrix, Laplacian spectrum, Join, Pockets

  12. Design of electronic pen pocket dosimeter with wireless battery charger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelwahab, S.A.; Abdelkhalek, K.L.

    2009-01-01

    this paper presents the design of pen-thin electronic pocket dosimeter with high accuracy to measure personal accumulated quantities of gamma rays and the strength of the radiation field and display them on the integrated alphanumerical liquid crystal display (LCD). to overcome the need of removing the micro controller from the PCB to reprogram it , we use in circuit serial programming (ICSP) method which enhances the flexibility of the pocket dosimeter design as it reduces costs of field upgrades, reduces time to market, allows easy calibration of our system during manufacturing and allows adding a unique identification code (ID) to each instrument. the design of this device is based on the PIC16F876 micro controller and powered from two AAA size, 250 m Ah rechargeable batteries. recharging of these batteries is done using wireless charger which is the new trend now in charging devices. the design of this charger is based on the principle of magnetic inductive power transfer by sending the power through an air gap between a transmitting circuit in the attached docking station and receiving circuit which is built in the instrument

  13. Breakdown of air pockets in downwardly inclined sewerage pressure mains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubbers, C L; Clemens, F H L R

    2006-01-01

    In the Netherlands, wastewater is collected in municipal areas and transported to centralised WWTPs by an extensive system of pressure mains. Over the last decades these pressure mains did not receive much attention in terms of monitoring of performance or maintenance. A recent inventory showed that half of the pressure mains show an increased pressure loss for no directly obvious reason. One of the many causes that account for the reduction of the flow capacity is the occurrence of free gas in the pipeline. During dry weather periods with low flow velocities, gas may accumulate at high points in the system. Once the velocity increases during storm weather flow, the air pockets may be broken down and transported to the end of the system. A research study is started focussing on the description of the gas-water phenomena in wastewater pressure mains with respect to transportation of gas. An experimental facility is constructed for the study of multi-phase flow. This paper describes the preliminary results of experiments on breakdown rates of gas pockets as a function of inclination angle and water flow rate. The results show an increasing breakdown rate with increasing inclination angle.

  14. A Novel Regulator of Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase/APOBECs in Immunity and Cancer: Schrödinger’s CATalytic Pocket

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mani Larijani

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID and its relative APOBEC3 cytidine deaminases boost immune response by mutating immune or viral genes. Because of their genome-mutating activities, AID/APOBECs are also drivers of tumorigenesis. Due to highly charged surfaces, extensive non-specific protein–protein/nucleic acid interactions, formation of polydisperse oligomers, and general insolubility, structure elucidation of these proteins by X-ray crystallography and NMR has been challenging. Hence, almost all available AID/APOBEC structures are of mutated and/or truncated versions. In 2015, we reported a functional structure for AID using a combined computational–biochemical approach. In so doing, we described a new regulatory mechanism that is a first for human DNA/RNA-editing enzymes. This mechanism involves dynamic closure of the catalytic pocket. Subsequent X-ray and NMR studies confirmed our discovery by showing that other APOBEC3s also close their catalytic pockets. Here, we highlight catalytic pocket closure as an emerging and important regulatory mechanism of AID/APOBEC3s. We focus on three sub-topics: first, we propose that variable pocket closure rates across AID/APOBEC3s underlie differential activity in immunity and cancer and review supporting evidence. Second, we discuss dynamic pocket closure as an ever-present internal regulator, in contrast to other proposed regulatory mechanisms that involve extrinsic binding partners. Third, we compare the merits of classical approaches of X-ray and NMR, with that of emerging computational–biochemical approaches, for structural elucidation specifically for AID/APOBEC3s.

  15. Conserved residues in the coiled-coil pocket of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp41 are essential for viral replication and interhelical interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mo Hongmei; Konstantinidis, Alex K.; Stewart, Kent D.; Dekhtyar, Tatyana; Ng, Teresa; Swift, Kerry; Matayoshi, Edmund D.; Kati, Warren; Kohlbrenner, William; Molla, Akhteruzzaman

    2004-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gp41 plays an important role in mediating the fusion of HIV with host cells. During the fusion process, three N-terminal helices and three C-terminal helices pack in an anti-parallel direction to form a six-helix bundle. X-ray crystallographic analysis of the gp41 core demonstrated that within each coiled-coil interface, there is a deep and large pocket, formed by a cluster of residues in the N-helix coiled-coil. In this report, we systematically analyzed the role of seven conserved residues that are either lining or packing this pocket on the infectivity and interhelical interaction using novel approaches. Our results show that residues L568, V570, W571, and K574 of the N-helix that are lining the side chain and right wall of the pocket are important for establishing a productive infection. Mutations V570A and W571A completely abolished replication, while replication of the L568A and K574A mutants was significantly attenuated relative to wild type. Similarly, residues W628, W631, and I635 of the C-helix that insert into the pocket are essential for infectivity. The impaired infectivity of these seven mutants is in part attributed to the loss in binding affinity of the interhelical interaction. Molecular modeling of the crystal structure of the coiled-coil further shows that alanine substitution of those residues disrupts the hydrophobic interaction between the N- and C-helix. These results suggest that the conserved residues in the coiled-coil domain play a key role in HIV infection and this coiled-coil pocket is a good target for development of inhibitors against HIV. In addition, our data indicate that the novel fluorescence polarization assay described in this study could be valuable in screening for inhibitors that block the interhelical interaction and HIV entry

  16. Probing the structural basis of oxygen binding in a cofactor-independent dioxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kunhua; Fielding, Elisha N; Condurso, Heather L; Bruner, Steven D

    2017-07-01

    The enzyme DpgC is included in the small family of cofactor-independent dioxygenases. The chemistry of DpgC is uncommon as the protein binds and utilizes dioxygen without the aid of a metal or organic cofactor. Previous structural and biochemical studies identified the substrate-binding mode and the components of the active site that are important in the catalytic mechanism. In addition, the results delineated a putative binding pocket and migration pathway for the co-substrate dioxygen. Here, structural biology is utilized, along with site-directed mutagenesis, to probe the assigned dioxygen-binding pocket. The key residues implicated in dioxygen trafficking were studied to probe the process of binding, activation and chemistry. The results support the proposed chemistry and provide insight into the general mechanism of dioxygen binding and activation.

  17. Dosimetric Effects of Air Pockets Around High-Dose Rate Brachytherapy Vaginal Cylinders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, Susan; Palaniswaamy, Geethpriya; Grigsby, Perry W.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Most physicians use a single-channel vaginal cylinder for postoperative endometrial cancer brachytherapy. Recent published data have identified air pockets between the vaginal cylinders and the vaginal mucosa. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the incidence, size, and dosimetric effects of these air pockets. Methods and Materials: 25 patients receiving postoperative vaginal cuff brachytherapy with a high-dose rate vaginal cylinders were enrolled in this prospective data collection study. Patients were treated with 6 fractions of 200 to 400 cGy per fraction prescribed at 5 mm depth. Computed tomography simulation for brachytherapy treatment planning was performed for each fraction. The quantity, volume, and dosimetric impact of the air pockets surrounding the cylinder were quantified. Results: In 25 patients, a total of 90 air pockets were present in 150 procedures (60%). Five patients had no air pockets present during any of their treatments. The average number of air pockets per patient was 3.6, with the average total air pocket volume being 0.34 cm 3 (range, 0.01-1.32 cm 3 ). The average dose reduction to the vaginal mucosa at the air pocket was 27% (range, 9-58%). Ten patients had no air pockets on their first fraction but air pockets occurred in subsequent fractions. Conclusion: Air pockets between high-dose rate vaginal cylinder applicators and the vaginal mucosa are present in the majority of fractions of therapy, and their presence varies from patient to patient and fraction to fraction. The existence of air pockets results in reduced radiation dose to the vaginal mucosa.

  18. Kinetic mechanism and nucleotide specificity of NADH peroxidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoll, V.S.; Blanchard, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    NADH peroxidase is a flavoprotein isolated from Streptococcus faecalis which catalyzes the pyridine nucleotide-dependent reduction of hydrogen peroxide to water. Initial velocity, product, and dead-end inhibition studies have been performed at pH 7.5 and support a ping-pong kinetic mechanism. In the absence of hydrogen peroxide, both transhydrogenation between NADH and thioNAD, and isotope exchange between [ 14 C]NADH and NAD, have been demonstrated, although in both these experiments, the maximal velocity of nucleotide exchange was less than 1.5% the maximal velocity of the peroxidatic reaction. We propose that NADH binds tightly to both oxidized and two-electron reduced enzyme. NADH oxidation proceeds stereospecifically with the transfer of the 4S hydrogen to enzyme, and then, via exchange, to water. No primary tritium kinetic isotope effect was observed, and no statistically significant primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects on V/K were determined, although primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects on V were observed in the presence and absence of sodium acetate. NADH peroxidase thus shares with other flavoprotein reductases striking kinetic, spectroscopic, and stereochemical similarities. On this basis, we propose a chemical mechanism for the peroxide cleaving reaction catalyzed by NADH peroxidase which involves the obligate formation of a flavinperoxide, and peroxo bond cleavage by nucleophilic attack by enzymatic dithiols

  19. Retinal Cyclic Nucleotide-Gated Channels: From Pathophysiology to Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stylianos Michalakis

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The first step in vision is the absorption of photons by the photopigments in cone and rod photoreceptors. After initial amplification within the phototransduction cascade the signal is translated into an electrical signal by the action of cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG channels. CNG channels are ligand-gated ion channels that are activated by the binding of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP or cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP. Retinal CNG channels transduce changes in intracellular concentrations of cGMP into changes of the membrane potential and the Ca2+ concentration. Structurally, the CNG channels belong to the superfamily of pore-loop cation channels and share a common gross structure with hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN channels and voltage-gated potassium channels (KCN. In this review, we provide an overview on the molecular properties of CNG channels and describe their physiological role in the phototransduction pathways. We also discuss insights into the pathophysiological role of CNG channel proteins that have emerged from the analysis of CNG channel-deficient animal models and human CNG channelopathies. Finally, we summarize recent gene therapy activities and provide an outlook for future clinical application.

  20. Cyclic Nucleotide Monophosphates and Their Cyclases in Plant Signaling

    KAUST Repository

    Gehring, Christoph A.

    2017-10-04

    The cyclic nucleotide monophosphates (cNMPs), and notably 3′,5′-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) and 3′,5′-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) are now accepted as key signaling molecules in many processes in plants including growth and differentiation, photosynthesis, and biotic and abiotic defense. At the single molecule level, we are now beginning to understand how cNMPs modify specific target molecules such as cyclic nucleotide-gated channels, while at the systems level, a recent study of the Arabidopsis cNMP interactome has identified novel target molecules with specific cNMP-binding domains. A major advance came with the discovery and characterization of a steadily increasing number of guanylate cyclases (GCs) and adenylate cyclases (ACs). Several of the GCs are receptor kinases and include the brassinosteroid receptor, the phytosulfokine receptor, the Pep receptor, the plant natriuretic peptide receptor as well as a nitric oxide sensor. We foresee that in the near future many more molecular mechanisms and biological roles of GCs and ACs and their catalytic products will be discovered and further establish cNMPs as a key component of plant responses to the environment.

  1. Cyclic Nucleotide Monophosphates and Their Cyclases in Plant Signaling

    KAUST Repository

    Gehring, Christoph A; Turek, Ilona S.

    2017-01-01

    The cyclic nucleotide monophosphates (cNMPs), and notably 3′,5′-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) and 3′,5′-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) are now accepted as key signaling molecules in many processes in plants including growth and differentiation, photosynthesis, and biotic and abiotic defense. At the single molecule level, we are now beginning to understand how cNMPs modify specific target molecules such as cyclic nucleotide-gated channels, while at the systems level, a recent study of the Arabidopsis cNMP interactome has identified novel target molecules with specific cNMP-binding domains. A major advance came with the discovery and characterization of a steadily increasing number of guanylate cyclases (GCs) and adenylate cyclases (ACs). Several of the GCs are receptor kinases and include the brassinosteroid receptor, the phytosulfokine receptor, the Pep receptor, the plant natriuretic peptide receptor as well as a nitric oxide sensor. We foresee that in the near future many more molecular mechanisms and biological roles of GCs and ACs and their catalytic products will be discovered and further establish cNMPs as a key component of plant responses to the environment.

  2. Nucleobases, nucleosides, and nucleotides: versatile biomolecules for generating functional nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Fang; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2018-02-21

    The incorporation of biomolecules into nanomaterials generates functional nanosystems with novel and advanced properties, presenting great potential for applications in various fields. Nucleobases, nucleosides and nucleotides, as building blocks of nucleic acids and biological coenzymes, constitute necessary components of the foundation of life. In recent years, as versatile biomolecules for the construction or regulation of functional nanomaterials, they have stimulated interest in researchers, due to their unique properties such as structural diversity, multiplex binding sites, self-assembly ability, stability, biocompatibility, and chirality. In this review, strategies for the synthesis of nanomaterials and the regulation of their morphologies and functions using nucleobases, nucleosides, and nucleotides as building blocks, templates or modulators are summarized alongside selected applications. The diverse applications range from sensing, bioimaging, and drug delivery to mimicking light-harvesting antenna, the construction of logic gates, and beyond. Furthermore, some perspectives and challenges in this emerging field are proposed. This review is directed toward the broader scientific community interested in biomolecule-based functional nanomaterials.

  3. Exploitation of pocket gophers and their food caches by grizzly bears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattson, D.J.

    2004-01-01

    I investigated the exploitation of pocket gophers (Thomomys talpoides) by grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis) in the Yellowstone region of the United States with the use of data collected during a study of radiomarked bears in 1977-1992. My analysis focused on the importance of pocket gophers as a source of energy and nutrients, effects of weather and site features, and importance of pocket gophers to grizzly bears in the western contiguous United States prior to historical extirpations. Pocket gophers and their food caches were infrequent in grizzly bear feces, although foraging for pocket gophers accounted for about 20-25% of all grizzly bear feeding activity during April and May. Compared with roots individually excavated by bears, pocket gopher food caches were less digestible but more easily dug out. Exploitation of gopher food caches by grizzly bears was highly sensitive to site and weather conditions and peaked during and shortly after snowmelt. This peak coincided with maximum success by bears in finding pocket gopher food caches. Exploitation was most frequent and extensive on gently sloping nonforested sites with abundant spring beauty (Claytonia lanceolata) and yampah (Perdieridia gairdneri). Pocket gophers are rare in forests, and spring beauty and yampah roots are known to be important foods of both grizzly bears and burrowing rodents. Although grizzly bears commonly exploit pocket gophers only in the Yellowstone region, this behavior was probably widespread in mountainous areas of the western contiguous United States prior to extirpations of grizzly bears within the last 150 years.

  4. Pocket rocket: An electrothermal plasma micro-thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greig, Amelia Diane

    Recently, an increase in use of micro-satellites constructed from commercial off the shelf (COTS) components has developed, to address the large costs associated with designing, testing and launching satellites. One particular type of micro-satellite of interest are CubeSats, which are modular 10 cm cubic satellites with total weight less than 1.33 kg. To assist with orbit boosting and attitude control of CubeSats, micro-propulsion systems are required, but are currently limited. A potential electrothermal plasma micro-thruster for use with CubeSats or other micro-satellites is under development at The Australian National University and forms the basis for this work. The thruster, known as ‘Pocket Rocket’, utilises neutral gas heating from ion-neutral collisions within a weakly ionised asymmetric plasma discharge, increasing the exhaust thermal velocity of the propellant gas, thereby producing higher thrust than if the propellant was emitted cold. In this work, neutral gas temperature of the Pocket Rocket discharge is studied in depth using rovibrational spectroscopy of the nitrogen (N2) second positive system (C3Πu → B3Πg), using both pure N2 and argon/N2 mixtures as the operating gas. Volume averaged steady state gas temperatures are measured for a range of operating conditions, with an analytical collisional model developed to verify experimental results. Results show that neutral gas heating is occurring with volume averaged steady state temperatures reaching 430 K in N2 and 1060 K for argon with 1% N2 at standard operating conditions of 1.5 Torr pressure and 10 W power input, demonstrating proof of concept for the Pocket Rocket thruster. Spatiotemporal profiles of gas temperature identify that the dominant heating mechanisms are ion-neutral collisions within the discharge and wall heating from ion bombardment of the thruster walls. To complement the experimental results, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations using the commercial CFD

  5. PatchSurfers: Two methods for local molecular property-based binding ligand prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Woong-Hee; Bures, Mark Gregory; Kihara, Daisuke

    2016-01-15

    Protein function prediction is an active area of research in computational biology. Function prediction can help biologists make hypotheses for characterization of genes and help interpret biological assays, and thus is a productive area for collaboration between experimental and computational biologists. Among various function prediction methods, predicting binding ligand molecules for a target protein is an important class because ligand binding events for a protein are usually closely intertwined with the proteins' biological function, and also because predicted binding ligands can often be directly tested by biochemical assays. Binding ligand prediction methods can be classified into two types: those which are based on protein-protein (or pocket-pocket) comparison, and those that compare a target pocket directly to ligands. Recently, our group proposed two computational binding ligand prediction methods, Patch-Surfer, which is a pocket-pocket comparison method, and PL-PatchSurfer, which compares a pocket to ligand molecules. The two programs apply surface patch-based descriptions to calculate similarity or complementarity between molecules. A surface patch is characterized by physicochemical properties such as shape, hydrophobicity, and electrostatic potentials. These properties on the surface are represented using three-dimensional Zernike descriptors (3DZD), which are based on a series expansion of a 3 dimensional function. Utilizing 3DZD for describing the physicochemical properties has two main advantages: (1) rotational invariance and (2) fast comparison. Here, we introduce Patch-Surfer and PL-PatchSurfer with an emphasis on PL-PatchSurfer, which is more recently developed. Illustrative examples of PL-PatchSurfer performance on binding ligand prediction as well as virtual drug screening are also provided. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A pocket warning γ-dosimeter with numerical display

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, A.R.

    1980-09-01

    A pocket warning dosimeter is described. It provides alarms (continuous tone and a flashing red light) when a presettable dose has been accumulated in the range .064 - 16.4 rads (0.64 - 164 μGy). This warning level can be selected in nine steps of 2 with a switch inside the dosimeter. The dose rate is indicated by a series of sound pulses whose repetition rate is proportional to the dose rate. At 1 rad/h (10 mGy/h) about 17 pluses/minute are emitted. The accumulated dose up to 20 rads (0.2 Gy) is displayed in steps of 1 mrad (10 μGy) with a liquid crystal display. A red LED lights before battery failure occurs. The effects of changes in temperature, battery voltage, dose rate and photon energy upon dosimeter sensitivity are presented. Finally, the applications of the dosimeter are discussed. (auth)

  7. Ductal carcinoma of the breast in the pacemaker generator's pocket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zonca, P; Herokova, J; Cambal, M; Jacobi, C A

    2009-01-01

    Authors present a case of a 78-year-old female patient with invasive ductal adenocarcinoma in the pacemaker, s pocket. A decubitus-like tumor had developed in this place, and has been missinterpretated as a benign lesion for 5 months. Diagnosis was done with a time delay. An excisional biopsy revealed annvasive ductal adenocarcinoma. The first step was the implantation of a new pacemaker generator performed on the opposite side. The second step was a modified radical mastectomy, according to Madden, and the removal of the originally implanted pacemaker generator. Radiotherapy and hormonal adjuvant therapy were applied after surgery. The patient was followed-up at an out-patient clinic, and died 25 months after diagnosis because of generalization of the disease (Fig. 2, Ref. 35). Full Text (Free, PDF) www.bmj.sk.

  8. Pocket data mining big data on small devices

    CERN Document Server

    Gaber, Mohamed Medhat; Gomes, Joao Bartolo

    2014-01-01

    Owing to continuous advances in the computational power of handheld devices like smartphones and tablet computers, it has become possible to perform Big Data operations including modern data mining processes onboard these small devices. A decade of research has proved the feasibility of what has been termed as Mobile Data Mining, with a focus on one mobile device running data mining processes. However, it is not before 2010 until the authors of this book initiated the Pocket Data Mining (PDM) project exploiting the seamless communication among handheld devices performing data analysis tasks that were infeasible until recently. PDM is the process of collaboratively extracting knowledge from distributed data streams in a mobile computing environment. This book provides the reader with an in-depth treatment on this emerging area of research. Details of techniques used and thorough experimental studies are given. More importantly and exclusive to this book, the authors provide detailed practical guide on the depl...

  9. Modeling of arylamide helix mimetics in the p53 peptide binding site of hDM2 suggests parallel and anti-parallel conformations are both stable.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan C Fuller

    Full Text Available The design of novel α-helix mimetic inhibitors of protein-protein interactions is of interest to pharmaceuticals and chemical genetics researchers as these inhibitors provide a chemical scaffold presenting side chains in the same geometry as an α-helix. This conformational arrangement allows the design of high affinity inhibitors mimicking known peptide sequences binding specific protein substrates. We show that GAFF and AutoDock potentials do not properly capture the conformational preferences of α-helix mimetics based on arylamide oligomers and identify alternate parameters matching solution NMR data and suitable for molecular dynamics simulation of arylamide compounds. Results from both docking and molecular dynamics simulations are consistent with the arylamides binding in the p53 peptide binding pocket. Simulations of arylamides in the p53 binding pocket of hDM2 are consistent with binding, exhibiting similar structural dynamics in the pocket as simulations of known hDM2 binders Nutlin-2 and a benzodiazepinedione compound. Arylamide conformations converge towards the same region of the binding pocket on the 20 ns time scale, and most, though not all dihedrals in the binding pocket are well sampled on this timescale. We show that there are two putative classes of binding modes for arylamide compounds supported equally by the modeling evidence. In the first, the arylamide compound lies parallel to the observed p53 helix. In the second class, not previously identified or proposed, the arylamide compound lies anti-parallel to the p53 helix.

  10. Structural Insights into the Mechanisms of Action of Short-Peptide HIV-1 Fusion Inhibitors Targeting the Gp41 Pocket

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiujuan Zhang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The deep hydrophobic pocket of HIV-1 gp41 has been considered a drug target, but short-peptides targeting this site usually lack potent antiviral activity. By applying the M-T hook structure, we previously generated highly potent short-peptide fusion inhibitors that specifically targeted the pocket site, such as MT-SC22EK, HP23L, and LP-11. Here, the crystal structures of HP23L and LP-11 bound to the target mimic peptide N36 demonstrated the critical intrahelical and interhelical interactions, especially verifying that the hook-like conformation was finely adopted while the methionine residue was replaced by the oxidation-less prone residue leucine, and that addition of an extra glutamic acid significantly enhanced the binding and inhibitory activities. The structure of HP23L bound to N36 with two mutations (E49K and L57R revealed the critical residues and motifs mediating drug resistance and provided new insights into the mechanism of action of inhibitors. Therefore, the present data help our understanding for the structure-activity relationship (SAR of HIV-1 fusion inhibitors and facilitate the development of novel antiviral drugs.

  11. Proton pump inhibitors reduce the size and acidity of the acid pocket in the stomach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohof, Wout O; Bennink, Roelof J; Boeckxstaens, Guy E

    2014-07-01

    The gastric acid pocket is believed to be the reservoir from which acid reflux events originate. Little is known about how changes in position, size, and acidity of the acid pocket contribute to the therapeutic effect of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Thirty-six patients with GERD (18 not taking PPIs, 18 taking PPIs; 19 men; age, 55 ± 2.1 y) were analyzed by concurrent high-resolution manometry and pH-impedance monitoring after a standardized meal. The acid pocket was visualized using scintigraphy after intravenous administration of (99m)technetium-pertechnetate. The size of the acid pocket was measured and its position was determined, relative to the diaphragm, using radionuclide markers on a high-resolution manometry catheter. At the end of the study, the acid pocket was aspirated, and its pH level was measured. The number of reflux episodes was comparable between patients on and off PPIs, but the number of acid reflux episodes was reduced significantly in patients on PPIs. In patients on PPIs, the acid pocket was smaller and more frequently located below the diaphragm. The mean pH of the acid pocket was significantly lower in patients not taking PPIs (n = 6) than in those who were (n = 16) (0.9; range, 0.7-1.2 vs 4.0; range, 1.6-5.9; P pH of acid pockets correlated significantly with the lowest pH values measured for refluxate (r = 0.72; P < .01). Based on analyses of acid pockets in patients with GERD, the acid pocket appears to be a reservoir from which reflux occurs when patients are receiving PPIs. PPIs might affect the size, acidity, or position of the acid pocket, which contributes to the efficacy in patients with GERD. Copyright © 2014 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Understanding the physical and chemical nature of the warfarin drug binding site in human serum albumin: experimental and theoretical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Zied, Osama K

    2015-01-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) is one of the major carrier proteins in the body and constitutes approximately half of the protein found in blood plasma. It plays an important role in lipid metabolism, and its ability to reversibly bind a large variety of pharmaceutical compounds makes it a crucial determinant of drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. This review deals with one of the protein's major binding sites "Sudlow I" which includes a binding pocket for the drug warfarin (WAR). The binding nature of this important site can be characterized by measuring the spectroscopic changes when a ligand is bound. Using several drugs, including WAR, and other drug-like molecules as ligands, the results emphasize the nature of Sudlow I as a flexible binding site, capable of binding a variety of ligands by adapting its binding pockets. The high affinity of the WAR pocket for binding versatile molecular structures stems from the flexibility of the amino acids forming the pocket. The binding site is shown to have an ionization ability which is important to consider when using drugs that are known to bind in Sudlow I. Several studies point to the important role of water molecules trapped inside the binding site in molecular recognition and ligand binding. Water inside the protein's cavity is crucial in maintaining the balance between the hydrophobic and hydrophilic nature of the binding site. Upon the unfolding and refolding of HSA, more water molecules are trapped inside the binding site which cause some swelling that prevents a full recovery from the denatured state. Better understanding of the mechanism of binding in macromolecules such as HSA and other proteins can be achieved by combining experimental and theoretical studies which produce significant synergies in studying complex biochemical phenomena.

  13. Nucleotide-induced conformational dynamics in ABC transporters from structure-based coarse grained modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flechsig, Holger

    2016-02-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are integral membrane proteins which mediate the exchange of diverse substrates across membranes powered by ATP molecules. Our understanding of their activity is still hampered since the conformational dynamics underlying the operation of such proteins cannot yet be resolved in detailed molecular dynamics studies. Here a coarse grained model which allows to mimic binding of nucleotides and follow subsequent conformational motions of full-length transporter structures in computer simulations is proposed and implemented. To justify its explanatory quality, the model is first applied to the maltose transporter system for which multiple conformations are known and we find that the model predictions agree remarkably well with the experimental data. For the MalK subunit the switching from open to the closed dimer configuration upon ATP binding is reproduced and, moreover, for the full-length maltose transporter, progression from inward-facing to the outward-facing state is correctly obtained. For the heme transporter HmuUV, for which only the free structure could yet be determined, the model was then applied to predict nucleotide-induced conformational motions. Upon binding of ATP-mimicking ligands the structure changed from a conformation in which the nucleotide-binding domains formed an open shape, to a conformation in which they were found in tight contact, while, at the same time, a pronounced rotation of the transmembrane domains was observed. This finding is supported by normal mode analysis, and, comparison with structural data of the homologous vitamin B12 transporter BtuCD suggests that the observed rotation mechanism may contribute a common functional aspect for this class of ABC transporters. Although in HmuuV noticeable rearrangement of essential transmembrane helices was detected, there are no indications from our simulations that ATP binding alone may facilitate propagation of substrate molecules in this transporter

  14. Analysis of 3D models of octopus estrogen receptor with estradiol: evidence for steric clashes that prevent estrogen binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Michael E; Chandsawangbhuwana, Charlie

    2007-09-28

    Relatives of the vertebrate estrogen receptor (ER) are found in Aplysia californica, Octopus vulgaris, Thais clavigera, and Marisa cornuarietis. Unlike vertebrate ERs, invertebrate ERs are constitutively active and do not bind estradiol. To investigate the molecular basis of the absence of estrogen binding, we constructed a 3D model of the putative steroid-binding domain on octopus ER. Our 3D model indicates that binding of estradiol to octopus ER is prevented by steric clashes between estradiol and amino acids in the steroid-binding pocket. In this respect, octopus ER resembles vertebrate estrogen-related receptors (ERR), which have a ligand-binding pocket that cannot accommodate estradiol. Like ERR, octopus ER also may have the activation function 2 domain (AF2) in a configuration that can bind to coactivators in the absence of estrogens, which would explain constitutive activity of octopus ER.

  15. A single nucleotide change affects fur-dependent regulation of sodB in H. pylori.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beth M Carpenter

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori is a significant human pathogen that has adapted to survive the many stresses found within the gastric environment. Superoxide Dismutase (SodB is an important factor that helps H. pylori combat oxidative stress. sodB was previously shown to be repressed by the Ferric Uptake Regulator (Fur in the absence of iron (apo-Fur regulation [1]. Herein, we show that apo regulation is not fully conserved among all strains of H. pylori. apo-Fur dependent changes in sodB expression are not observed under iron deplete conditions in H. pylori strains G27, HPAG1, or J99. However, Fur regulation of pfr and amiE occurs as expected. Comparative analysis of the Fur coding sequence between G27 and 26695 revealed a single amino acid difference, which was not responsible for the altered sodB regulation. Comparison of the sodB promoters from G27 and 26695 also revealed a single nucleotide difference within the predicted Fur binding site. Alteration of this nucleotide in G27 to that of 26695 restored apo-Fur dependent sodB regulation, indicating that a single base difference is at least partially responsible for the difference in sodB regulation observed among these H. pylori strains. Fur binding studies revealed that alteration of this single nucleotide in G27 increased the affinity of Fur for the sodB promoter. Additionally, the single base change in G27 enabled the sodB promoter to bind to apo-Fur with affinities similar to the 26695 sodB promoter. Taken together these data indicate that this nucleotide residue is important for direct apo-Fur binding to the sodB promoter.

  16. GDP-bound and nucleotide-free intermediates of the guanine nucleotide exchange in the Rab5·Vps9 system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uejima, Tamami; Ihara, Kentaro; Goh, Tatsuaki; Ito, Emi; Sunada, Mariko; Ueda, Takashi; Nakano, Akihiko; Wakatsuki, Soichi

    2010-11-19

    Many GTPases regulate intracellular transport and signaling in eukaryotes. Guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) activate GTPases by catalyzing the exchange of their GDP for GTP. Here we present crystallographic and biochemical studies of a GEF reaction with four crystal structures of Arabidopsis thaliana ARA7, a plant homolog of Rab5 GTPase, in complex with its GEF, VPS9a, in the nucleotide-free and GDP-bound forms, as well as a complex with aminophosphonic acid-guanylate ester and ARA7·VPS9a(D185N) with GDP. Upon complex formation with ARA7, VPS9 wedges into the interswitch region of ARA7, inhibiting the coordination of Mg(2+) and decreasing the stability of GDP binding. The aspartate finger of VPS9a recognizes GDP β-phosphate directly and pulls the P-loop lysine of ARA7 away from GDP β-phosphate toward switch II to further destabilize GDP for its release during the transition from the GDP-bound to nucleotide-free intermediates in the nucleotide exchange reaction.

  17. Resveratrol Directly Binds to Mitochondrial Complex I and Increases Oxidative Stress in Brain Mitochondria of Aged Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naïg Gueguen

    Full Text Available Resveratrol is often described as a promising therapeutic molecule for numerous diseases, especially in metabolic and neurodegenerative disorders. While the mechanism of action is still debated, an increasing literature reports that resveratrol regulates the mitochondrial respiratory chain function. In a recent study we have identified mitochondrial complex I as a direct target of this molecule. Nevertheless, the mechanisms and consequences of such an interaction still require further investigation. In this study, we identified in silico by docking study a binding site for resveratrol at the nucleotide pocket of complex I. In vitro, using solubilized complex I, we demonstrated a competition between NAD+ and resveratrol. At low doses (<5μM, resveratrol stimulated complex I activity, whereas at high dose (50 μM it rather decreased it. In vivo, in brain mitochondria from resveratrol treated young mice, we showed that complex I activity was increased, whereas the respiration rate was not improved. Moreover, in old mice with low antioxidant defenses, we demonstrated that complex I activation by resveratrol led to oxidative stress. These results bring new insights into the mechanism of action of resveratrol on mitochondria and highlight the importance of the balance between pro- and antioxidant effects of resveratrol depending on its dose and age. These parameters should be taken into account when clinical trials using resveratrol or analogues have to be designed.

  18. Proton pump inhibitors reduce the size and acidity of the acid pocket in the stomach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rohof, Wout O.; Bennink, Roelof J.; Boeckxstaens, Guy E.

    2014-01-01

    The gastric acid pocket is believed to be the reservoir from which acid reflux events originate. Little is known about how changes in position, size, and acidity of the acid pocket contribute to the therapeutic effect of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease

  19. The Role of Electronic Pocket Dictionaries as an English Learning Tool among Chinese Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Hua-Li; Sandnes, Frode Eika; Law, Kris M. Y.; Huang, Yo-Ping; Huang, Yueh-Min

    2009-01-01

    This study addressed the role of electronic pocket dictionaries as a language learning tool among university students in Hong Kong and Taiwan. The target groups included engineering and humanities students at both undergraduate and graduate level. Speed of reference was found to be the main motivator for using an electronic pocket dictionary.…

  20. Effect of azithromycin on acid reflux, hiatus hernia and proximal acid pocket in the postprandial period

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rohof, W. O.; Bennink, R. J.; de Ruigh, A. A.; Hirsch, D. P.; Zwinderman, A. H.; Boeckxstaens, G. E.

    2012-01-01

    Background The risk for acidic reflux is mainly determined by the position of the gastric acid pocket. It was hypothesised that compounds affecting proximal stomach tone might reduce gastro-oesophageal reflux by changing the acid pocket position. Objective To study the effect of azithromycin (Azi)

  1. Missing Fragments: Detecting Cooperative Binding in Fragment-Based Drug Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The aim of fragment-based drug design (FBDD) is to identify molecular fragments that bind to alternate subsites within a given binding pocket leading to cooperative binding when linked. In this study, the binding of fragments to human phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase is used to illustrate how (a) current protocols may fail to detect fragments that bind cooperatively, (b) theoretical approaches can be used to validate potential hits, and (c) apparent false positives obtained when screening against cocktails of fragments may in fact indicate promising leads. PMID:24900472

  2. A GTPase chimera illustrates an uncoupled nucleotide affinity and release rate, Providing insight into the activation mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guilfoyle, Amy P.; Deshpande, Chandrika N.; Font Sadurni, Josep

    2014-01-01

    , biophysical studies on both the eukaryotic Gα proteins and the GTPase domain (NFeoB) of prokaryotic FeoB proteins have revealed conformational changes in the G5 loop that accompany nucleotide binding and release. However, it is unclear whether this conformational change in the G5 loop is a prerequisite...

  3. Exploring the binding sites and binding mechanism for hydrotrope encapsulated griseofulvin drug on γ-tubulin protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shubhadip Das

    Full Text Available The protein γ-tubulin plays an important role in centrosomal clustering and this makes it an attractive therapeutic target for treating cancers. Griseofulvin, an antifungal drug, has recently been used to inhibit proliferation of various types of cancer cells. It can also affect the microtubule dynamics by targeting the γ-tubulin protein. So far, the binding pockets of γ-tubulin protein are not properly identified and the exact mechanism by which the drug binds to it is an area of intense speculation and research. The aim of the present study is to investigate the binding mechanism and binding affinity of griseofulvin on γ-tubulin protein using classical molecular dynamics simulations. Since the drug griseofulvin is sparingly soluble in water, here we also present a promising approach for formulating and achieving delivery of hydrophobic griseofulvin drug via hydrotrope sodium cumene sulfonate (SCS cluster. We observe that the binding pockets of γ-tubulin protein are mainly formed by the H8, H9 helices and S7, S8, S14 strands and the hydrophobic interactions between the drug and γ-tubulin protein drive the binding process. The release of the drug griseofulvin from the SCS cluster is confirmed by the coordination number analysis. We also find hydrotrope-induced alteration of the binding sites of γ-tubulin protein and the weakening of the drug-protein interactions.

  4. Crystal Structures and Binding Dynamics of Odorant-Binding Protein 3 from two aphid species Megoura viciae and Nasonovia ribisnigri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northey, Tom; Venthur, Herbert; De Biasio, Filomena; Chauviac, Francois-Xavier; Cole, Ambrose; Ribeiro, Karlos Antonio Lisboa; Grossi, Gerarda; Falabella, Patrizia; Field, Linda M; Keep, Nicholas H; Zhou, Jing-Jiang

    2016-04-22

    Aphids use chemical cues to locate hosts and find mates. The vetch aphid Megoura viciae feeds exclusively on the Fabaceae, whereas the currant-lettuce aphid Nasonovia ribisnigri alternates hosts between the Grossulariaceae and Asteraceae. Both species use alarm pheromones to warn of dangers. For N. ribisnigri this pheromone is a single component (E)-β-farnesene but M. viciae uses a mixture of (E)-β-farnesene, (-)-α-pinene, β-pinene, and limonene. Odorant-binding proteins (OBP) are believed to capture and transport such semiochemicals to their receptors. Here, we report the first aphid OBP crystal structures and examine their molecular interactions with the alarm pheromone components. Our study reveals some unique structural features: 1) the lack of an internal ligand binding site; 2) a striking groove in the surface of the proteins as a putative binding site; 3) the N-terminus rather than the C-terminus occupies the site closing off the conventional OBP pocket. The results from fluorescent binding assays, molecular docking and dynamics demonstrate that OBP3 from M. viciae can bind to all four alarm pheromone components and the differential ligand binding between these very similar OBP3s from the two aphid species is determined mainly by the direct π-π interactions between ligands and the aromatic residues of OBP3s in the binding pocket.

  5. Adaptive evolution of transcription factor binding sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berg Johannes

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The regulation of a gene depends on the binding of transcription factors to specific sites located in the regulatory region of the gene. The generation of these binding sites and of cooperativity between them are essential building blocks in the evolution of complex regulatory networks. We study a theoretical model for the sequence evolution of binding sites by point mutations. The approach is based on biophysical models for the binding of transcription factors to DNA. Hence we derive empirically grounded fitness landscapes, which enter a population genetics model including mutations, genetic drift, and selection. Results We show that the selection for factor binding generically leads to specific correlations between nucleotide frequencies at different positions of a binding site. We demonstrate the possibility of rapid adaptive evolution generating a new binding site for a given transcription factor by point mutations. The evolutionary time required is estimated in terms of the neutral (background mutation rate, the selection coefficient, and the effective population size. Conclusions The efficiency of binding site formation is seen to depend on two joint conditions: the binding site motif must be short enough and the promoter region must be long enough. These constraints on promoter architecture are indeed seen in eukaryotic systems. Furthermore, we analyse the adaptive evolution of genetic switches and of signal integration through binding cooperativity between different sites. Experimental tests of this picture involving the statistics of polymorphisms and phylogenies of sites are discussed.

  6. Pharmacophore screening of the protein data bank for specific binding site chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campagna-Slater, Valérie; Arrowsmith, Andrew G; Zhao, Yong; Schapira, Matthieu

    2010-03-22

    A simple computational approach was developed to screen the Protein Data Bank (PDB) for putative pockets possessing a specific binding site chemistry and geometry. The method employs two commonly used 3D screening technologies, namely identification of cavities in protein structures and pharmacophore screening of chemical libraries. For each protein structure, a pocket finding algorithm is used to extract potential binding sites containing the correct types of residues, which are then stored in a large SDF-formatted virtual library; pharmacophore filters describing the desired binding site chemistry and geometry are then applied to screen this virtual library and identify pockets matching the specified structural chemistry. As an example, this approach was used to screen all human protein structures in the PDB and identify sites having chemistry similar to that of known methyl-lysine binding domains that recognize chromatin methylation marks. The selected genes include known readers of the histone code as well as novel binding pockets that may be involved in epigenetic signaling. Putative allosteric sites were identified on the structures of TP53BP1, L3MBTL3, CHEK1, KDM4A, and CREBBP.

  7. The hydrogen bonds between Arg423 and Glu472 and other key residues, Asp443, Ser477, and Pro489, are responsible for the formation and a different positioning of TNP-ATP and ATP within the nucleotide-binding site of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lánský, Zdeněk; Kubala, Martin; Ettrich, Rüdiger; Kutý, Michal; Plášek, J.; Teisinger, Jan; Schoner, W.; Amler, Evžen

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 26 (2004), s. 8303-8311 ISSN 0006-2960 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A141; GA ČR GP206/03/D082; GA ČR GA309/02/1479; GA ČR GD305/03/H148 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922; CEZ:MSM 113100001; CEZ:MSM 111300002 Keywords : sodium pump * ATP-binding site * TNP-ATP Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 4.008, year: 2004

  8. Sonographic assessment of predictors of depth of the corner pocket for ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Yadav

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Prescanning of supraclavicular region for estimating depth of corner pocket should be done before choosing an appropriate size needle. Furthermore, the needle should not be advanced more than the predicted corner pocket depth.

  9. Ras conformational switching: simulating nucleotide-dependent conformational transitions with accelerated molecular dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry J Grant

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Ras mediates signaling pathways controlling cell proliferation and development by cycling between GTP- and GDP-bound active and inactive conformational states. Understanding the complete reaction path of this conformational change and its intermediary structures is critical to understanding Ras signaling. We characterize nucleotide-dependent conformational transition using multiple-barrier-crossing accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD simulations. These transitions, achieved for the first time for wild-type Ras, are impossible to observe with classical molecular dynamics (cMD simulations due to the large energetic barrier between end states. Mapping the reaction path onto a conformer plot describing the distribution of the crystallographic structures enabled identification of highly populated intermediate structures. These structures have unique switch orientations (residues 25-40 and 57-75 intermediate between GTP and GDP states, or distinct loop3 (46-49, loop7 (105-110, and alpha5 C-terminus (159-166 conformations distal from the nucleotide-binding site. In addition, these barrier-crossing trajectories predict novel nucleotide-dependent correlated motions, including correlations of alpha2 (residues 66-74 with alpha3-loop7 (93-110, loop2 (26-37 with loop10 (145-151, and loop3 (46-49 with alpha5 (152-167. The interconversion between newly identified Ras conformations revealed by this study advances our mechanistic understanding of Ras function. In addition, the pattern of correlated motions provides new evidence for a dynamic linkage between the nucleotide-binding site and the membrane interacting C-terminus critical for the signaling function of Ras. Furthermore, normal mode analysis indicates that the dominant collective motion that occurs during nucleotide-dependent conformational exchange, and captured in aMD (but absent in cMD simulations, is a low-frequency motion intrinsic to the structure.

  10. Inertial Pocket Navigation System: Unaided 3D Positioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estefania Munoz Diaz

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Inertial navigation systems use dead-reckoning to estimate the pedestrian’s position. There are two types of pedestrian dead-reckoning, the strapdown algorithm and the step-and-heading approach. Unlike the strapdown algorithm, which consists of the double integration of the three orthogonal accelerometer readings, the step-and-heading approach lacks the vertical displacement estimation. We propose the first step-and-heading approach based on unaided inertial data solving 3D positioning. We present a step detector for steps up and down and a novel vertical displacement estimator. Our navigation system uses the sensor introduced in the front pocket of the trousers, a likely location of a smartphone. The proposed algorithms are based on the opening angle of the leg or pitch angle. We analyzed our step detector and compared it with the state-of-the-art, as well as our already proposed step length estimator. Lastly, we assessed our vertical displacement estimator in a real-world scenario. We found that our algorithms outperform the literature step and heading algorithms and solve 3D positioning using unaided inertial data. Additionally, we found that with the pitch angle, five activities are distinguishable: standing, sitting, walking, walking up stairs and walking down stairs. This information complements the pedestrian location and is of interest for applications, such as elderly care.

  11. Inertial Pocket Navigation System: Unaided 3D Positioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz Diaz, Estefania

    2015-01-01

    Inertial navigation systems use dead-reckoning to estimate the pedestrian's position. There are two types of pedestrian dead-reckoning, the strapdown algorithm and the step-and-heading approach. Unlike the strapdown algorithm, which consists of the double integration of the three orthogonal accelerometer readings, the step-and-heading approach lacks the vertical displacement estimation. We propose the first step-and-heading approach based on unaided inertial data solving 3D positioning. We present a step detector for steps up and down and a novel vertical displacement estimator. Our navigation system uses the sensor introduced in the front pocket of the trousers, a likely location of a smartphone. The proposed algorithms are based on the opening angle of the leg or pitch angle. We analyzed our step detector and compared it with the state-of-the-art, as well as our already proposed step length estimator. Lastly, we assessed our vertical displacement estimator in a real-world scenario. We found that our algorithms outperform the literature step and heading algorithms and solve 3D positioning using unaided inertial data. Additionally, we found that with the pitch angle, five activities are distinguishable: standing, sitting, walking, walking up stairs and walking down stairs. This information complements the pedestrian location and is of interest for applications, such as elderly care. PMID:25897501

  12. The Use of Pocket Electronic Dictionaries by Thai University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atipat Boonmoh

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available

    ABSTRACT: This article reports on a small-scale study of Thai-speaking learners using pocket electronic dictionaries (PEDs to read an English news article. It investigates how the subjects use their PEDs for reading comprehension. Thirty-nine undergraduate students completed a questionnaire survey. Of these, four were chosen to participate in the experiment. Observations and interviews were utilized to ascertain how the subjects used their PEDs. The findings showed superficial and partial reading of the dictionary entries. It also revealed several factors that may hinder dictionary look-up success. On the basis of this research, guidelines for buying PEDs and for teaching PED skills are proposed.

    OPSOMMING: Die gebruik van sak- elektroniese woordeboeke deur Thaise universiteitstudente. Hierdie artikel doen verslag van 'n kleinskaalse studie van Thaisprekende aanleerders wat sak- elektroniese woordeboeke (SEW's gebruik om 'n Engelse nuusartikel te lees. Dit ondersoek hoe die proefpersone hul SAW's gebruik vir leesbegrip. Nege-en-dertig voorgraadse studente het 'n vraelysopname voltooi. Uit hulle is vier gekies om aan die eksperiment deel te neem. Waarnemings en onderhoude is aangewend om te bepaal hoe die proefpersone hul SEW's gebruik het. Die bevindings het oppervlakkige en gedeeltelike lees van die woordeboekinskrywings getoon. Dit het ook verskeie faktore uitgewys wat woordeboekopsoeksukses mag belemmer. Op grond van hierdie navorsing word riglyne vir die koop van SEW's en vir die onderrig van SEWvaardighede voorgestel.

    Sleutelwoorde: WOORDEBOEKGEBRUIK, SAK- ELEKTRONIESE WOORDEBOEK, WOORDEBOEKRAADPLEGING, EENTALIGE WOORDEBOEK, TWEETALIGE WOORDEBOEK

  13. The International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, Guy; Karsch-Mizrachi, Ilene; Nakamura, Yasukazu

    2011-01-01

    Under the International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration (INSDC; http://www.insdc.org), globally comprehensive public domain nucleotide sequence is captured, preserved and presented. The partners of this long-standing collaboration work closely together to provide data formats and conventions that enable consistent data submission to their databases and support regular data exchange around the globe. Clearly defined policy and governance in relation to free access to data and relationships with journal publishers have positioned INSDC databases as a key provider of the scientific record and a core foundation for the global bioinformatics data infrastructure. While growth in sequence data volumes comes no longer as a surprise to INSDC partners, the uptake of next-generation sequencing technology by mainstream science that we have witnessed in recent years brings a step-change to growth, necessarily making a clear mark on INSDC strategy. In this article, we introduce the INSDC, outline data growth patterns and comment on the challenges of increased growth.

  14. Bacterial nucleotide-based second messengers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesavento, Christina; Hengge, Regine

    2009-04-01

    In all domains of life nucleotide-based second messengers transduce signals originating from changes in the environment or in intracellular conditions into appropriate cellular responses. In prokaryotes cyclic di-GMP has emerged as an important and ubiquitous second messenger regulating bacterial life-style transitions relevant for biofilm formation, virulence, and many other bacterial functions. This review describes similarities and differences in the architecture of the cAMP, (p)ppGpp, and c-di-GMP signaling systems and their underlying signaling principles. Moreover, recent advances in c-di-GMP-mediated signaling will be presented and the integration of c-di-GMP signaling with other nucleotide-based signaling systems will be discussed.

  15. Cigarette smoking in Chinese adolescents: importance of controlling the amount of pocket money.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, J; Zhu, J; Li, N; He, Y; Cai, Y; Qiao, Y; Redmon, P; Wang, Z

    2013-07-01

    To estimate the proportion of smokers that could potentially have been prevented from smoking by limiting the amount of pocket money received by Chinese adolescents. Cross-sectional study. Current smoking, ever smoking and the amount of pocket money were determined through self-administered questionnaires among 12,708 adolescents (aged 12-18 years) from 21 schools in Shanghai, China. Adjusted odds ratios for current smoking ranged from 2.0 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.5-2.7] for adolescents receiving 200-399 Reminbin (RMB)/month as pocket money to 6.5 (95% CI 3.3-12.7) for those receiving ≥1000 RMB/month, compared with those receiving pocket money (≥200 RMB/month) for current smoking was 50.4% (95% CI 42.2-57.4), and adjusted PAR% was 43.3% (95% CI 30.7-53.1). Approximately half of current smokers may have been prevented from smoking if pocket money was limited to pocket money was reduced further. It is recommended that future intervention programmes should target parents to reduce the amount of pocket money in China. Copyright © 2013 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. PENGEMBANGAN ECONOMICS POCKET BOOK BERBASIS QUANTUM LEARNING UNTUK SISWA SEKOLAH MENENGAH ATAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Wayan Ayu Santi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to produce and know the quality of quantum learning based economics pocket book. In developing economics pocket book the research uses design based research. The result of study show that the matter experts, education and education practtioners provide ratings that economics is a very decent to be used without revision. Besides design experts provide decent ratings with the revition. The result of the field test showed positive responses from students with the acquistion of a persentage of 90% in addition to the field tes results II also earn a percentage of 87,4%.  Based on the result above, economics pocket book is very decend for be used without revision.  Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk menghasilkan dan mengetahui kualitas economics pocket book berbasis quantum learning. Peneliti dalam mengembangkan economics pocket book menggunakan model pengembangan Design Based Research. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan ahli materi, pendidikan dan praktisi pendidikan memberikan penilaian bahwa economics pocket book sangat layak digunakan tanpa revisi, selain itu ahli desain memberikan penilaian bahwa layak digunakan dengan revisi. Hasil dari uji lapangan I menunjukkan tanggapan positif dari siswa dengan perolehan persentase 90%, selain itu hasil uji lapangan II juga memperoleh persentase sebesar 87,4%. Berdasarkan hasil tersebut maka economics pocket book berbasis quantum learning termasuk kualifikasi sangat layak digunakan tanpa revisi.

  17. Nucleotide Manipulatives to Illustrate the Central Dogma

    OpenAIRE

    Sonja B. Yung; Todd P. Primm

    2015-01-01

    The central dogma is a core concept that is critical for introductory biology and microbiology students to master. However, students often struggle to conceptualize the processes involved, and fail to move beyond simply memorizing the basic facts. To encourage critical thinking, we have designed a set of magnetic nucleotide manipulatives that allow students to model DNA structure, along with the processes of replication, transcription, and translation.

  18. Nucleotide Manipulatives to Illustrate the Central Dogma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja B. Yung

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The central dogma is a core concept that is critical for introductory biology and microbiology students to master. However, students often struggle to conceptualize the processes involved, and fail to move beyond simply memorizing the basic facts. To encourage critical thinking, we have designed a set of magnetic nucleotide manipulatives that allow students to model DNA structure, along with the processes of replication, transcription, and translation.

  19. Histone displacement during nucleotide excision repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dinant, C.; Bartek, J.; Bekker-Jensen, S.

    2012-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is an important DNA repair mechanism required for cellular resistance against UV light and toxic chemicals such as those found in tobacco smoke. In living cells, NER efficiently detects and removes DNA lesions within the large nuclear macromolecular complex called...... of histone variants and histone displacement (including nucleosome sliding). Here we review current knowledge, and speculate about current unknowns, regarding those chromatin remodeling activities that physically displace histones before, during and after NER....

  20. Pyrrolidine nucleotide analogs with a tunable conformation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Poštová Slavětínská, Lenka; Rejman, Dominik; Pohl, Radek

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 10, Aug 22 (2014), s. 1967-1980 ISSN 1860-5397 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-24880S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : conformation * NMR * nucleic acids * nucleotide analog * phosphonic acid * pseudorotation * pyrrolidine Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.762, year: 2014 http://www.beilstein-journals.org/bjoc/single/articleFullText.htm?publicId=1860-5397-10-205

  1. Pocket money, eating behaviors, and weight status among Chinese children : The Childhood Obesity Study in China mega-cities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Miao; Xue, Hong; Jia, Peng; Zhao, Yaling; Wang, Zhiyong; Xu, Fei; Wang, Youfa

    2017-01-01

    Both the obesity rate and pocket money are rising among children in China. This study examined family correlates of children's pocket money, associations of pocket money with eating behaviors and weight status, and how the associations may be modified by schools' unhealthy food restrictions in urban

  2. Periodontal Pocket Depth, Hyperglycemia, and Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease: A Population-Based Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jia-Feng; Yeh, Jih-Chen; Chiu, Ya-Lin; Liou, Jian-Chiun; Hsiung, Jing-Ru; Tung, Tao-Hsin

    2017-01-01

    No large epidemiological study has been conducted to investigate the interaction and joint effects of periodontal pocket depth and hyperglycemia on progression of chronic kidney disease in patients with periodontal diseases. Periodontal pocket depth was utilized for the grading severity of periodontal disease in 2831 patients from January 2002 to June 2013. Progression of chronic kidney disease was defined as progression of color intensity in glomerular filtration rate and albuminuria grid of updated Kidney Disease-Improving Global Outcomes guidelines. Multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (aHR) in various models were presented across different levels of periodontal pocket depth and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) in forest plots and 3-dimensional histograms. During 7621 person-years of follow-up, periodontal pocket depth and HbA1C levels were robustly associated with incremental risks for progression of chronic kidney disease (aHR 3.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.0-4.6 for periodontal pocket depth >4.5 mm, and 2.5; 95% CI, 1.1-5.4 for HbA1C >6.5%, respectively). The interaction between periodontal pocket depth and HbA1C on progression of chronic kidney disease was strong (P periodontal pocket depth (>4.5 mm) and higher HbA1C (>6.5%) had the greatest risk (aHR 4.2; 95% CI, 1.7-6.8) compared with the lowest aHR group (periodontal pocket depth ≤3.8 mm and HbA1C ≤6%). Our study identified combined periodontal pocket depth and HbA1C as a valuable predictor of progression of chronic kidney disease in patients with periodontal diseases. While considering the interaction between periodontal diseases and hyperglycemia, periodontal survey and optimizing glycemic control are warranted to minimize the risk of worsening renal function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Ondansetron and granisetron binding orientation in the 5-HT(3) receptor determined by unnatural amino acid mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Noah H; Lester, Henry A; Dougherty, Dennis A

    2012-10-19

    The serotonin type 3 receptor (5-HT(3)R) is a ligand-gated ion channel found in the central and peripheral nervous systems. The 5-HT(3)R is a therapeutic target, and the clinically available drugs ondansetron and granisetron inhibit receptor activity. Their inhibitory action is through competitive binding to the native ligand binding site, although the binding orientation of the drugs at the receptor has been a matter of debate. Here we heterologously express mouse 5-HT(3)A receptors in Xenopus oocytes and use unnatural amino acid mutagenesis to establish a cation-π interaction for both ondansetron and granisetron to tryptophan 183 in the ligand binding pocket. This cation-π interaction establishes a binding orientation for both ondansetron and granisetron within the binding pocket.

  4. Ondansetron and Granisetron Binding Orientation in the 5-HT3 Receptor Determined by Unnatural Amino Acid Mutagenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Noah H.; Lester, Henry A.; Dougherty, Dennis A.

    2012-01-01

    The serotonin type 3 receptor (5-HT3R) is a ligand-gated ion channel that mediates fast synaptic transmission in the central and peripheral nervous systems. The 5-HT3R is a therapeutic target, and the clinically available drugs ondansetron and granisetron inhibit receptor activity. Their inhibitory action is through competitive binding to the native ligand binding site, although the binding orientation of the drugs at the receptor has been a matter of debate. Here we heterologously express mouse 5-HT3A receptors in Xenopus oocytes and use unnatural amino acid mutagenesis to establish a cation-π interaction for both ondansetron and granisetron to tryptophan 183 in the ligand binding pocket. This cation-π interaction establishes a binding orientation for both ondansetron and granisetron within the binding pocket. PMID:22873819

  5. Vacuum ultraviolet photoionization of carbohydrates and nucleotides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Joong-Won, E-mail: jshin@govst.edu [Division of Science, Governors State University, University Park, Illinois 60484-0975 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523-1872 (United States); Bernstein, Elliot R., E-mail: erb@lamar.colostate.edu [Department of Chemistry, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523-1872 (United States)

    2014-01-28

    Carbohydrates (2-deoxyribose, ribose, and xylose) and nucleotides (adenosine-, cytidine-, guanosine-, and uridine-5{sup ′}-monophosphate) are generated in the gas phase, and ionized with vacuum ultraviolet photons (VUV, 118.2 nm). The observed time of flight mass spectra of the carbohydrate fragmentation are similar to those observed [J.-W. Shin, F. Dong, M. Grisham, J. J. Rocca, and E. R. Bernstein, Chem. Phys. Lett. 506, 161 (2011)] for 46.9 nm photon ionization, but with more intensity in higher mass fragment ions. The tendency of carbohydrate ions to fragment extensively following ionization seemingly suggests that nucleic acids might undergo radiation damage as a result of carbohydrate, rather than nucleobase fragmentation. VUV photoionization of nucleotides (monophosphate-carbohydrate-nucleobase), however, shows that the carbohydrate-nucleobase bond is the primary fragmentation site for these species. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicate that the removed carbohydrate electrons by the 118.2 nm photons are associated with endocyclic C–C and C–O ring centered orbitals: loss of electron density in the ring bonds of the nascent ion can thus account for the observed fragmentation patterns following carbohydrate ionization. DFT calculations also indicate that electrons removed from nucleotides under these same conditions are associated with orbitals involved with the nucleobase-saccharide linkage electron density. The calculations give a general mechanism and explanation of the experimental results.

  6. Vacuum ultraviolet photoionization of carbohydrates and nucleotides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Joong-Won; Bernstein, Elliot R.

    2014-01-01

    Carbohydrates (2-deoxyribose, ribose, and xylose) and nucleotides (adenosine-, cytidine-, guanosine-, and uridine-5 ′ -monophosphate) are generated in the gas phase, and ionized with vacuum ultraviolet photons (VUV, 118.2 nm). The observed time of flight mass spectra of the carbohydrate fragmentation are similar to those observed [J.-W. Shin, F. Dong, M. Grisham, J. J. Rocca, and E. R. Bernstein, Chem. Phys. Lett. 506, 161 (2011)] for 46.9 nm photon ionization, but with more intensity in higher mass fragment ions. The tendency of carbohydrate ions to fragment extensively following ionization seemingly suggests that nucleic acids might undergo radiation damage as a result of carbohydrate, rather than nucleobase fragmentation. VUV photoionization of nucleotides (monophosphate-carbohydrate-nucleobase), however, shows that the carbohydrate-nucleobase bond is the primary fragmentation site for these species. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicate that the removed carbohydrate electrons by the 118.2 nm photons are associated with endocyclic C–C and C–O ring centered orbitals: loss of electron density in the ring bonds of the nascent ion can thus account for the observed fragmentation patterns following carbohydrate ionization. DFT calculations also indicate that electrons removed from nucleotides under these same conditions are associated with orbitals involved with the nucleobase-saccharide linkage electron density. The calculations give a general mechanism and explanation of the experimental results

  7. Effects of hypokinesia on cyclic nucleotides and hormonal regulation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PTH), calcitonin (CT), cyclic nucleotides (cAMP, cGMP) and calcium in the blood of rats, while in urine - phosphate, calcium and cyclic nucleotides. Design: Laboratory based experiment. Setting: Laboratory in the Department of Biochemistry, ...

  8. Guanine nucleotide regulatory protein co-purifies with the D2-dopamine receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senogles, S.E.; Caron, M.G.

    1986-01-01

    The D 2 -dopamine receptor from bovine anterior pituitary was purified ∼1000 fold by affinity chromatography on CMOS-Sepharose. Reconstitution of the affinity-purified receptor into phospholipid vesicles revealed the presence of high and low affinity agonist sites as detected by N-n-propylnorapomorphine (NPA) competition experiments with 3 H-spiperone. High affinity agonist binding could be converted to the low affinity form by guanine nucleotides, indicating the presence of an endogenous guanine nucleotide binding protein (N protein) in the affinity-purified D 2 receptor preparations. Furthermore, this preparation contained an agonist-sensitive GTPase activity which was stimulated 2-3 fold over basal by 10 μM NPA. 35 S-GTPγS binding to these preparations revealed a stoichiometry of 0.4-0.7 mole N protein/mole receptor, suggesting the N protein may be specifically coupled with the purified D 2 -dopamine receptor and not present as a contaminant. Pertussis toxin treatment of the affinity purified receptor preparations prevented high affinity agonist binding, as well as agonist stimulation of the GTPase activity, presumably by inactivating the associated N protein. Pertussis toxin lead to the ADP-ribosylation of a protein of 39-40K on SDS-PAGE. These findings indicate that an endogenous N protein, N/sub i/ or N/sub o/, co-purifies with the D 2 -dopamine receptor which may reflect a precoupling of this receptor with an N protein within the membranes

  9. Frequency of "Pocket" Hematoma in Patients Receiving Vitamin K Antagonist and Antiplatelet Therapy at the Time of Pacemaker or Cardioverter Defibrillator Implantation (from the POCKET Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malagù, Michele; Trevisan, Filippo; Scalone, Antonella; Marcantoni, Lina; Sammarco, Giuseppe; Bertini, Matteo

    2017-04-01

    In patients undergoing cardiac device implantation, anticoagulant and antiplatelet therapy are associated with an increased risk of pocket hematoma. In case of vitamin K antagonist therapy, a strategy of continued warfarin with no heparin bridge showed a reduction of pocket hematoma. Evidence regarding antiplatelet therapy management is limited. This is a single-center observational study which reflects our systematic approach to the problem. In 2012, we proposed an improved management protocol for anticoagulant and antiplatelet therapy (no-bridge protocol) based on individual thromboembolic risk stratification, noninterruption of oral anticoagulation, no bridge with heparin and elastic adherence compression bandage. The primary end point was the incidence of clinically significant pocket hematoma in the first 30 days after implantation. A total of 1,035 patients were enrolled, of whom 522 received the standard management and 513 the new protocol. The primary end point occurred in 34 patients of the standard management group and 8 patients of the no-bridge protocol group (6.5% vs 1.6%, p hematoma (relative risk [RR] 3.48, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.55 to 7.83 and RR 2.43, 95% CI 1.25 to 4.76, respectively), whereas the no-bridge protocol was associated with a reduction of pocket hematoma (RR 0.33, 95% CI 0.14 to 0.76). New anticoagulant and antiplatelet therapy management protocol was associated with a reduced incidence of clinically significant pocket hematomas, thromboembolic events, pocket infections, and lead dislodgements. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A pocket device for high-throughput optofluidic holographic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandracchia, B.; Bianco, V.; Wang, Z.; Paturzo, M.; Bramanti, A.; Pioggia, G.; Ferraro, P.

    2017-06-01

    Here we introduce a compact holographic microscope embedded onboard a Lab-on-a-Chip (LoC) platform. A wavefront division interferometer is realized by writing a polymer grating onto the channel to extract a reference wave from the object wave impinging the LoC. A portion of the beam reaches the samples flowing along the channel path, carrying their information content to the recording device, while one of the diffraction orders from the grating acts as an off-axis reference wave. Polymeric micro-lenses are delivered forward the chip by Pyro-ElectroHydroDynamic (Pyro-EHD) inkjet printing techniques. Thus, all the required optical components are embedded onboard a pocket device, and fast, non-iterative, reconstruction algorithms can be used. We use our device in combination with a novel high-throughput technique, named Space-Time Digital Holography (STDH). STDH exploits the samples motion inside microfluidic channels to obtain a synthetic hologram, mapped in a hybrid space-time domain, and with intrinsic useful features. Indeed, a single Linear Sensor Array (LSA) is sufficient to build up a synthetic representation of the entire experiment (i.e. the STDH) with unlimited Field of View (FoV) along the scanning direction, independently from the magnification factor. The throughput of the imaging system is dramatically increased as STDH provides unlimited FoV, refocusable imaging of samples inside the liquid volume with no need for hologram stitching. To test our embedded STDH microscopy module, we counted, imaged and tracked in 3D with high-throughput red blood cells moving inside the channel volume under non ideal flow conditions.

  11. Out-of-pocket expenditure on institutional delivery in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Sanjay K; Srivastava, Akanksha

    2013-05-01

    Though promotion of institutional delivery is used as a strategy to reduce maternal and neonatal mortality, about half of the deliveries in India are conducted at home without any medical care. Among women who deliver at home, one in four cites cost as barrier to facility-based care. The relative share of deliveries in private health centres has increased over time and the associated costs are often catastrophic for poor households. Though research has identified socio-economic, demographic and geographic barriers to the utilization of maternal care, little is known on the cost differentials in delivery care in India. The objective of this paper is to understand the regional pattern and socio-economic differentials in out-of-pocket (OOP) expenditure on institutional delivery by source of provider in India. The study utilizes unit data from the District Level Household and Facility Survey (DLHS-3), conducted in India during 2007-08. Descriptive statistics, principal component analyses and a two-part model are used in the analyses. During 2004-08, the mean OOP expenditure for a delivery in a public health centre in India was US$39 compared with US$139 in a private health centre. The predicted expenditure for a caesarean delivery was six times higher than for a normal delivery. With an increase in the economic status and educational attainment of mothers, the propensity and rate of OOP expenditure increases, linking higher OOP expenditure to quality of care. The OOP expenditure in public health centres, adjusting for inflation, has declined over time, possibly due to increased spending under the National Rural Health Mission. Based on these findings, we recommend that facilities in public health centres of poorly performing states are improved and that public-private partnership models are developed to reduce the economic burden for households of maternal care in India.

  12. Kinetically inert lanthanide complexes as reporter groups for binding of potassium by 18-crown-6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junker, Anne Kathrine Ravnsborg; Tropiano, Manuel; Faulkner, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    in a copper(I)-catalyzed alkyne-azide cycloaddition (CuAAC) “click” reaction with azide-functionalized crown ethers. The resulting complexes were investigated using NMR and optical methods. Titrations with potassium chloride in methanol observing the sensititzed europium- and terbium-centered emissions were......-centered emission to report on the binding of potassium in an 18-crown-6 binding pocket. The responsive systems were made by linking a crown ether to a kinetically inert lanthanide binding pocket using a molecular building block approach. Specifically, an alkyne-appended Ln.DO3A was used as a building block...... used to investigate the response of the systems. The molecular reporters based on aliphatic crown ethers were found to have strongly inhibited binding of potassium, while the benzo-18-crown-6 derived systems had essentially the same association constants as the native crown ethers. The shape...

  13. Large-scale binding ligand prediction by improved patch-based method Patch-Surfer2.0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaolei; Xiong, Yi; Kihara, Daisuke

    2015-03-01

    Ligand binding is a key aspect of the function of many proteins. Thus, binding ligand prediction provides important insight in understanding the biological function of proteins. Binding ligand prediction is also useful for drug design and examining potential drug side effects. We present a computational method named Patch-Surfer2.0, which predicts binding ligands for a protein pocket. By representing and comparing pockets at the level of small local surface patches that characterize physicochemical properties of the local regions, the method can identify binding pockets of the same ligand even if they do not share globally similar shapes. Properties of local patches are represented by an efficient mathematical representation, 3D Zernike Descriptor. Patch-Surfer2.0 has significant technical improvements over our previous prototype, which includes a new feature that captures approximate patch position with a geodesic distance histogram. Moreover, we constructed a large comprehensive database of ligand binding pockets that will be searched against by a query. The benchmark shows better performance of Patch-Surfer2.0 over existing methods. http://kiharalab.org/patchsurfer2.0/ CONTACT: dkihara@purdue.edu Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Interaction of organophosphorus pesticides with DNA nucleotides on a Boron-doped diamond electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garbellini, Gustavo S.; Uliana, Carolina V.; Yamanaka, Hideko, E-mail: gustgarb@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Bauru, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica Analitica

    2013-12-01

    Diamond electrode was used to evaluate the interaction of the nucleotides guanosine monophosphate (GMP) and adenosine monophosphate (AMP) with the pesticides chlorpyrifos, methamidophos and monocrotophos. Changes were observed in the currents and peak potentials of the nucleotide voltammograms in the presence of the pesticides, with dependence on the pesticide concentration (from 5.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} to 5.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} mol L{sup -1}) and the interaction time (from 1 min to 4 h). This is probably due to binding of the pesticides to the nitrogenous bases present in the nucleotides, which could lead to problems in the DNA replication and biological functions of nucleotides. The pesticides showed stronger interaction with AMP than with GMP. Studies of the interaction of 50 Micro-Sign g mL{sup -1} DNA with the pesticides (from 30 min to 4 h and from 1.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} to 6.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} mol L{sup -1}) did not reveal any peaks relating to double helix opening or DNA unwinding. (author)

  15. Is there foul play in the leaf pocket? The metagenome of floating fern

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkhuizen, L.W.; Brouwer, P.; Bolhuis, H.; Reichart, G.-J.; Koppers, N.; Huettel, B.; Bolger, A.M.; Li, F.-W.; Cheng, S.; Liu, X.; Wong, G.K.-S.; Pryer, K.; Weber, A.; Bräutigam, A.; Schluepmann, H.

    2018-01-01

    Dinitrogen fixation by Nostoc azollae residing in specialized leaf pockets supports prolific growth of the floating fern Azolla filiculoides. To evaluate contributions by further microorganisms, the A. filiculoides microbiome and nitrogen metabolism in bacteria persistently associated with Azolla

  16. Compensated electron and hole pockets in an underdoped high- Tc superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian, Suchitra E.; Harrison, N.; Goddard, P. A.; Altarawneh, M. M.; Mielke, C. H.; Liang, Ruixing; Bonn, D. A.; Hardy, W. N.; Andersen, O. K.; Lonzarich, G. G.

    2010-06-01

    We report quantum oscillations in the underdoped high-temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3O6+x over a wide range in magnetic field 28≤μ0H≤85T corresponding to ≈12 oscillations, enabling the Fermi surface topology to be mapped to high resolution. As earlier reported by Sebastian [Nature (London) 454, 200 (2008)10.1038/nature07095], we find a Fermi surface comprising multiple pockets, as revealed by the additional distinct quantum oscillation frequencies and harmonics reported in this work. We find the originally reported broad low-frequency Fourier peak at ≈535T to be clearly resolved into three separate peaks at ≈460 , ≈532 , and ≈602T , in reasonable agreement with the reported frequencies of Audouard [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 157003 (2009)10.1103/PhysRevLett.103.157003]. However, our increased resolution and angle-resolved measurements identify these frequencies to originate from two similarly sized pockets with greatly contrasting degrees of interlayer corrugation. The spectrally dominant frequency originates from a pocket (denoted α ) that is almost ideally two-dimensional in form (exhibiting negligible interlayer corrugation). In contrast, the newly resolved weaker adjacent spectral features originate from a deeply corrugated pocket (denoted γ ). On comparison with band structure, the d -wave symmetry of the interlayer dispersion locates the minimally corrugated α pocket at the “nodal” point knodal=(π/2,π/2) , and the significantly corrugated γ pocket at the “antinodal” point kantinodal=(π,0) within the Brillouin zone. The differently corrugated pockets at different locations indicate creation by translational symmetry breaking—a spin-density wave has been suggested from the suppression of Zeeman splitting for the spectrally dominant pocket. In a broken-translational symmetry scenario, symmetry points to the nodal (α) pocket corresponding to holes, with the weaker antinodal (γ) pocket corresponding to electrons—likely responsible

  17. LIGAND-BINDING SITES ON THE MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCULOSIS UREASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisnyak Yu. V.

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the causative agent of tuberculosis that remains a serious medical and social health problem. Despite intensive efforts have been made in the past decade, there are no new efficient anti-tuberculosis drugs today, and that need is growing due to the spread of drug-resistant strains of M.tuberculosis. M. tuberculosis urease (MTU, being an important factor of the bacterium viability and virulence, is an attractive target for anti-tuberculosis drugs acting by inhibition of urease activity. However, the commercially available urease inhibitors are toxic and unstable, that prevent their clinical use. Therefore, new more potent anti-tuberculosis drugs inhibiting new targets are urgently needed. A useful tool for the search of novel inhibitors is a computational drug design. The inhibitor design is significantly easier if binding sites on the enzyme are identified in advance. This paper aimed to determine the probable ligand binding sites on the surface of M. tuberculosis urease. Methods. To identify ligand binding sites on MTU surface, сomputational solvent mapping method FTSite was applied by the use of MTU homology model we have built earlier. The method places molecular probes (small organic molecules containing various functional groups on a dense grid defined around the enzyme, and for each probe finds favorable positions. The selected poses are refined by free energy minimization, the low energy conformations are clustered, and the clusters are ranked on the basis of the average free energy. FTSite server outputs the protein residues delineating a binding sites and the probe molecules representing each cluster. To predict allosteric pockets on MTU, AlloPred and AlloSite servers were applied. AlloPred uses the normal mode analysis (NMA and models how the dynamics of a protein would be altered in the presence of a modulator at a specific pocket. Pockets on the enzyme are predicted using the Fpocket

  18. An in silico analysis of the binding modes and binding affinities of small molecule modulators of PDZ-peptide interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garima Tiwari

    Full Text Available Inhibitors of PDZ-peptide interactions have important implications in a variety of biological processes including treatment of cancer and Parkinson's disease. Even though experimental studies have reported characterization of peptidomimetic inhibitors of PDZ-peptide interactions, the binding modes for most of them have not been characterized by structural studies. In this study we have attempted to understand the structural basis of the small molecule-PDZ interactions by in silico analysis of the binding modes and binding affinities of a set of 38 small molecules with known K(i or K(d values for PDZ2 and PDZ3 domains of PSD-95 protein. These two PDZ domains show differential selectivity for these compounds despite having a high degree of sequence similarity and almost identical peptide binding pockets. Optimum binding modes for these ligands for PDZ2 and PDZ3 domains were identified by using a novel combination of semi-flexible docking and explicit solvent molecular dynamics (MD simulations. Analysis of the binding modes revealed most of the peptidomimectic ligands which had high K(i or K(d moved away from the peptide binding pocket, while ligands with high binding affinities remained in the peptide binding pocket. The differential specificities of the PDZ2 and PDZ3 domains primarily arise from differences in the conformation of the loop connecting βB and βC strands, because this loop interacts with the N-terminal chemical moieties of the ligands. We have also computed the MM/PBSA binding free energy values for these 38 compounds with both the PDZ domains from multiple 5 ns MD trajectories on each complex i.e. a total of 228 MD trajectories of 5 ns length each. Interestingly, computational binding free energies show good agreement with experimental binding free energies with a correlation coefficient of approximately 0.6. Thus our study demonstrates that combined use of docking and MD simulations can help in identification of potent inhibitors

  19. Method for cleaning the filter pockets of dust gas filter systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margraf, A

    1975-05-07

    The invention deals with a method to clean filter pockets filled with dust gas. By a periodic to and fro air jet attached to a scavenging blower, a pulsed fluttering movement of the filter surface is obtained which releases the outer layers of dust. The charging of the filter pockets with scavenging air to clean the filter material can be carried out immediately on the pulsed admission with suitable time control.

  20. Nitrile in the Hole: Discovery of a Small Auxiliary Pocket in Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase Leading to the Development of Potent and Selective 2-Aminoquinoline Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinelli, Maris A; Li, Huiying; Chreifi, Georges; Poulos, Thomas L; Silverman, Richard B

    2017-05-11

    Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) inhibition is a promising strategy to treat neurodegenerative disorders, but the development of nNOS inhibitors is often hindered by poor pharmacokinetics. We previously developed a class of membrane-permeable 2-aminoquinoline inhibitors and later rearranged the scaffold to decrease off-target binding. However, the resulting compounds had decreased permeability, low human nNOS activity, and low selectivity versus human eNOS. In this study, 5-substituted phenyl ether-linked aminoquinolines and derivatives were synthesized and assayed against purified NOS isoforms. 5-Cyano compounds are especially potent and selective rat and human nNOS inhibitors. Activity and selectivity are mediated by the binding of the cyano group to a new auxiliary pocket in nNOS. Potency was enhanced by methylation of the quinoline and by introduction of simple chiral moieties, resulting in a combination of hydrophobic and auxiliary pocket effects that yielded high (∼500-fold) n/e selectivity. Importantly, the Caco-2 assay also revealed improved membrane permeability over previous compounds.