WorldWideScience

Sample records for nucleosome positioning signals

  1. An in vitro-identified high-affinity nucleosome-positioning signal is capable of transiently positioning a nucleosome in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gracey Lia E

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The physiological function of eukaryotic DNA occurs in the context of nucleosomal arrays that can expose or obscure defined segments of the genome. Certain DNA sequences are capable of strongly positioning a nucleosome in vitro, suggesting the possibility that favorable intrinsic signals might reproducibly structure chromatin segments. As high-throughput sequencing analyses of nucleosome coverage in vitro and in vivo have become possible, a vigorous debate has arisen over the degree to which intrinsic DNA:nucleosome affinities orchestrate the in vivo positions of nucleosomes, thereby controlling physical accessibility of specific sequences in DNA. Results We describe here the in vivo consequences of placing a synthetic high-affinity nucleosome-positioning signal, the 601 sequence, into a DNA plasmid vector in mice. Strikingly, the 601 sequence was sufficient to position nucleosomes during an early phase after introduction of the DNA into the mice (when the plasmid vector transgene was active. This positioning capability was transient, with a loss of strong positioning at a later time point when the transgenes had become silent. Conclusions These results demonstrate an ability of DNA sequences selected solely for nucleosome affinity to organize chromatin in vivo, and the ability of other mechanisms to overcome these interactions in a dynamic nuclear environment.

  2. Nucleosome Positioning and Epigenetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, David; Bruinsma, Robijn

    2008-03-01

    The role of chromatin structure in gene regulation has recently taken center stage in the field of epigenetics, phenomena that change the phenotype without changing the DNA sequence. Recent work has also shown that nucleosomes, a complex of DNA wrapped around a histone octamer, experience a sequence dependent energy landscape due to the variation in DNA bend stiffness with sequence composition. In this talk, we consider the role nucleosome positioning might play in the formation of heterochromatin, a compact form of DNA generically responsible for gene silencing. In particular, we discuss how different patterns of nucleosome positions, periodic or random, could either facilitate or suppress heterochromatin stability and formation.

  3. Physics behind the mechanical nucleosome positioning code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuiddam, Martijn; Everaers, Ralf; Schiessel, Helmut

    2017-11-01

    The positions along DNA molecules of nucleosomes, the most abundant DNA-protein complexes in cells, are influenced by the sequence-dependent DNA mechanics and geometry. This leads to the "nucleosome positioning code", a preference of nucleosomes for certain sequence motives. Here we introduce a simplified model of the nucleosome where a coarse-grained DNA molecule is frozen into an idealized superhelical shape. We calculate the exact sequence preferences of our nucleosome model and find it to reproduce qualitatively all the main features known to influence nucleosome positions. Moreover, using well-controlled approximations to this model allows us to come to a detailed understanding of the physics behind the sequence preferences of nucleosomes.

  4. DNA methylation, nucleosome formation and positioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennings, Sari; Allan, James; Davey, Colin S

    2005-02-01

    Recent mapping of nucleosome positioning on several long gene regions subject to DNA methylation has identified instances of nucleosome repositioning by this base modification. The evidence for an effect of CpG methylation on nucleosome formation and positioning in chromatin is reviewed here in the context of the complex sequence-structure requirements of DNA wrapping around the histone octamer and the role of this epigenetic mark in gene repression.

  5. Genome wide nucleosome mapping for HSV-1 shows nucleosomes are deposited at preferred positions during lytic infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jaewook; Sanders, Iryna F; Chen, Eric Z; Li, Hongzhe; Tobias, John W; Isett, R Benjamin; Penubarthi, Sindura; Sun, Hao; Baldwin, Don A; Fraser, Nigel W

    2015-01-01

    HSV is a large double stranded DNA virus, capable of causing a variety of diseases from the common cold sore to devastating encephalitis. Although DNA within the HSV virion does not contain any histone protein, within 1 h of infecting a cell and entering its nucleus the viral genome acquires some histone protein (nucleosomes). During lytic infection, partial micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digestion does not give the classic ladder band pattern, seen on digestion of cell DNA or latent viral DNA. However, complete digestion does give a mono-nucleosome band, strongly suggesting that there are some nucleosomes present on the viral genome during the lytic infection, but that they are not evenly positioned, with a 200 bp repeat pattern, like cell DNA. Where then are the nucleosomes positioned? Here we perform HSV-1 genome wide nucleosome mapping, at a time when viral replication is in full swing (6 hr PI), using a microarray consisting of 50mer oligonucleotides, covering the whole viral genome (152 kb). Arrays were probed with MNase-protected fragments of DNA from infected cells. Cells were not treated with crosslinking agents, thus we are only mapping tightly bound nucleosomes. The data show that nucleosome deposition is not random. The distribution of signal on the arrays suggest that nucleosomes are located at preferred positions on the genome, and that there are some positions that are not occupied (nucleosome free regions -NFR or Nucleosome depleted regions -NDR), or occupied at frequency below our limit of detection in the population of genomes. Occupancy of only a fraction of the possible sites may explain the lack of a typical MNase partial digestion band ladder pattern for HSV DNA during lytic infection. On average, DNA encoding Immediate Early (IE), Early (E) and Late (L) genes appear to have a similar density of nucleosomes.

  6. Genome wide nucleosome mapping for HSV-1 shows nucleosomes are deposited at preferred positions during lytic infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaewook Oh

    Full Text Available HSV is a large double stranded DNA virus, capable of causing a variety of diseases from the common cold sore to devastating encephalitis. Although DNA within the HSV virion does not contain any histone protein, within 1 h of infecting a cell and entering its nucleus the viral genome acquires some histone protein (nucleosomes. During lytic infection, partial micrococcal nuclease (MNase digestion does not give the classic ladder band pattern, seen on digestion of cell DNA or latent viral DNA. However, complete digestion does give a mono-nucleosome band, strongly suggesting that there are some nucleosomes present on the viral genome during the lytic infection, but that they are not evenly positioned, with a 200 bp repeat pattern, like cell DNA. Where then are the nucleosomes positioned? Here we perform HSV-1 genome wide nucleosome mapping, at a time when viral replication is in full swing (6 hr PI, using a microarray consisting of 50mer oligonucleotides, covering the whole viral genome (152 kb. Arrays were probed with MNase-protected fragments of DNA from infected cells. Cells were not treated with crosslinking agents, thus we are only mapping tightly bound nucleosomes. The data show that nucleosome deposition is not random. The distribution of signal on the arrays suggest that nucleosomes are located at preferred positions on the genome, and that there are some positions that are not occupied (nucleosome free regions -NFR or Nucleosome depleted regions -NDR, or occupied at frequency below our limit of detection in the population of genomes. Occupancy of only a fraction of the possible sites may explain the lack of a typical MNase partial digestion band ladder pattern for HSV DNA during lytic infection. On average, DNA encoding Immediate Early (IE, Early (E and Late (L genes appear to have a similar density of nucleosomes.

  7. Painting a perspective on the landscape of nucleosome positioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Steven M

    2010-06-01

    DNA sequence influences the position of nucleosomes and chromatin architecture. The extent to which underlying DNA sequence affects nucleosome positioning is currently a topic of considerable discussion and active experimentation. To contribute to the discussion, I will outline a few of the methods, data and arguments that I find compelling and believe will ultimately resolve the question of what positions nucleosomes. Basically, I will give a portrait of my current perspective on what influences the landscape of nucleosome positioning and chromatin architecture.

  8. A positioned +1 nucleosome enhances promoter-proximal pausing

    OpenAIRE

    Jimeno-Gonz?lez, Silvia; Ceballos-Ch?vez, Mar?a; Reyes, Jos? C.

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin distribution is not uniform along the human genome. In most genes there is a promoter-associated nucleosome free region (NFR) followed by an array of nucleosomes towards the gene body in which the first (+1) nucleosome is strongly positioned. The function of this characteristic chromatin distribution in transcription is not fully understood. Here we show in vivo that the +1 nucleosome plays a role in modulating RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) promoter-proximal pausing. When a +1 nucleoso...

  9. Weakly positioned nucleosomes enhance the transcriptional competency of chromatin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaakov Belch

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Transcription is affected by nucleosomal resistance against polymerase passage. In turn, nucleosomal resistance is determined by DNA sequence, histone chaperones and remodeling enzymes. The contributions of these factors are widely debated: one recent title claims "… DNA-encoded nucleosome organization…" while another title states that "histone-DNA interactions are not the major determinant of nucleosome positions." These opposing conclusions were drawn from similar experiments analyzed by idealized methods. We attempt to resolve this controversy to reveal nucleosomal competency for transcription.To this end, we analyzed 26 in vivo, nonlinked, and in vitro genome-wide nucleosome maps/replicates by new, rigorous methods. Individual H2A nucleosomes are reconstituted inaccurately by transcription, chaperones and remodeling enzymes. At gene centers, weakly positioned nucleosome arrays facilitate rapid histone eviction and remodeling, easing polymerase passage. Fuzzy positioning is not due to artefacts. At the regional level, transcriptional competency is strongly influenced by intrinsic histone-DNA affinities. This is confirmed by reproducing the high in vivo occupancy of translated regions and the low occupancy of intergenic regions in reconstitutions from purified DNA and histones. Regional level occupancy patterns are protected from invading histones by nucleosome excluding sequences and barrier nucleosomes at gene boundaries and within genes.Dense arrays of weakly positioned nucleosomes appear to be necessary for transcription. Weak positioning at exons facilitates temporary remodeling, polymerase passage and hence the competency for transcription. At regional levels, the DNA sequence plays a major role in determining these features but positions of individual nucleosomes are typically modified by transcription, chaperones and enzymes. This competency is reduced at intergenic regions by sequence features, barrier nucleosomes, and proteins

  10. Cracking the chromatin code: Precise rule of nucleosome positioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifonov, Edward N.

    2011-03-01

    Various aspects of packaging DNA in eukaryotic cells are outlined in physical rather than biological terms. The informational and physical nature of packaging instructions encoded in DNA sequences is discussed with the emphasis on signal processing difficulties - very low signal-to-noise ratio and high degeneracy of the nucleosome positioning signal. As the author has been contributing to the field from its very onset in 1980, the review is mostly focused at the works of the author and his colleagues. The leading concept of the overview is the role of deformational properties of DNA in the nucleosome positioning. The target of the studies is to derive the DNA bendability matrix describing where along the DNA various dinucleotide elements should be positioned, to facilitate its bending in the nucleosome. Three different approaches are described leading to derivation of the DNA deformability sequence pattern, which is a simplified linear presentation of the bendability matrix. All three approaches converge to the same unique sequence motif CGRAAATTTYCG or, in binary form, YRRRRRYYYYYR, both representing the chromatin code.

  11. Statistical physics of nucleosome positioning and chromatin structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, Alexandre

    2012-02-01

    Genomic DNA is packaged into chromatin in eukaryotic cells. The fundamental building block of chromatin is the nucleosome, a 147 bp-long DNA molecule wrapped around the surface of a histone octamer. Arrays of nucleosomes are positioned along DNA according to their sequence preferences and folded into higher-order chromatin fibers whose structure is poorly understood. We have developed a framework for predicting sequence-specific histone-DNA interactions and the effective two-body potential responsible for ordering nucleosomes into regular higher-order structures. Our approach is based on the analogy between nucleosomal arrays and a one-dimensional fluid of finite-size particles with nearest-neighbor interactions. We derive simple rules which allow us to predict nucleosome occupancy solely from the dinucleotide content of the underlying DNA sequences.Dinucleotide content determines the degree of stiffness of the DNA polymer and thus defines its ability to bend into the nucleosomal superhelix. As expected, the nucleosome positioning rules are universal for chromatin assembled in vitro on genomic DNA from baker's yeast and from the nematode worm C.elegans, where nucleosome placement follows intrinsic sequence preferences and steric exclusion. However, the positioning rules inferred from in vivo C.elegans chromatin are affected by global nucleosome depletion from chromosome arms relative to central domains, likely caused by the attachment of the chromosome arms to the nuclear membrane. Furthermore, intrinsic nucleosome positioning rules are overwritten in transcribed regions, indicating that chromatin organization is actively managed by the transcriptional and splicing machinery.

  12. Nucleosome Positioning and NDR Structure at RNA Polymerase III Promoters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helbo, Alexandra Søgaard; Lay, Fides D; Jones, Peter A

    2017-01-01

    Chromatin is structurally involved in the transcriptional regulation of all genes. While the nucleosome positioning at RNA polymerase II (pol II) promoters has been extensively studied, less is known about the chromatin structure at pol III promoters in human cells. We use a high-resolution analy......Chromatin is structurally involved in the transcriptional regulation of all genes. While the nucleosome positioning at RNA polymerase II (pol II) promoters has been extensively studied, less is known about the chromatin structure at pol III promoters in human cells. We use a high....... The +1 nucleosome is located further downstream than at pol II genes and furthermore displays weak positioning. The variable position of the +1 location is seen not only within individual cell populations and between cell types, but also between different pol III promoter subtypes, suggesting that the +1...... the first high-resolution map of nucleosome positioning and occupancy at human pol III promoters at specific loci and genome wide....

  13. Understanding the connection between epigenetic DNA methylation and nucleosome positioning from computer simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillem Portella

    Full Text Available Cytosine methylation is one of the most important epigenetic marks that regulate the process of gene expression. Here, we have examined the effect of epigenetic DNA methylation on nucleosomal stability using molecular dynamics simulations and elastic deformation models. We found that methylation of CpG steps destabilizes nucleosomes, especially when these are placed in sites where the DNA minor groove faces the histone core. The larger stiffness of methylated CpG steps is a crucial factor behind the decrease in nucleosome stability. Methylation changes the positioning and phasing of the nucleosomal DNA, altering the accessibility of DNA to regulatory proteins, and accordingly gene functionality. Our theoretical calculations highlight a simple physical-based explanation on the foundations of epigenetic signaling.

  14. Physical properties of naked DNA influence nucleosome positioning and correlate with transcription start and termination sites in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soler-López Montserrat

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In eukaryotic organisms, DNA is packaged into chromatin structure, where most of DNA is wrapped into nucleosomes. DNA compaction and nucleosome positioning have clear functional implications, since they modulate the accessibility of genomic regions to regulatory proteins. Despite the intensive research effort focused in this area, the rules defining nucleosome positioning and the location of DNA regulatory regions still remain elusive. Results Naked (histone-free and nucleosomal DNA from yeast were digested by microccocal nuclease (MNase and sequenced genome-wide. MNase cutting preferences were determined for both naked and nucleosomal DNAs. Integration of their sequencing profiles with DNA conformational descriptors derived from atomistic molecular dynamic simulations enabled us to extract the physical properties of DNA on a genomic scale and to correlate them with chromatin structure and gene regulation. The local structure of DNA around regulatory regions was found to be unusually flexible and to display a unique pattern of nucleosome positioning. Ab initio physical descriptors derived from molecular dynamics were used to develop a computational method that accurately predicts nucleosome enriched and depleted regions. Conclusions Our experimental and computational analyses jointly demonstrate a clear correlation between sequence-dependent physical properties of naked DNA and regulatory signals in the chromatin structure. These results demonstrate that nucleosome positioning around TSS (Transcription Start Site and TTS (Transcription Termination Site (at least in yeast is strongly dependent on DNA physical properties, which can define a basal regulatory mechanism of gene expression.

  15. The Effects of Nucleosome Positioning and Chromatin Architecture on Transgene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempton, Colton E.

    2017-01-01

    Eukaryotes use proteins to carefully package and compact their genomes to fit into the nuclei of their individual cells. Nucleosomes are the primary level of compaction. Nucleosomes are formed when DNA wraps around an octamer of histone proteins and a nucleosome's position can limit access to genetic regulatory elements. Therefore, nucleosomes…

  16. Periodic Distribution of a Putative Nucleosome Positioning Motif in Human, Nonhuman Primates, and Archaea: Mutual Information Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa, Daniela; Miramontes, Pedro; Li, Wentian; Mireles, Víctor; Bobadilla, Juan R.; José, Marco V.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, Trifonov's group proposed a 10-mer DNA motif YYYYYRRRRR as a solution of the long-standing problem of sequence-based nucleosome positioning. To test whether this generic decamer represents a biological meaningful signal, we compare the distribution of this motif in primates and Archaea, which are known to contain nucleosomes, and in Eubacteria, which do not possess nucleosomes. The distribution of the motif is analyzed by the mutual information function (MIF) with a shifted version of itself (MIF profile). We found common features in the patterns of this generic decamer on MIF profiles among primate species, and interestingly we found conspicuous but dissimilar MIF profiles for each Archaea tested. The overall MIF profiles for each chromosome in each primate species also follow a similar pattern. Trifonov's generic decamer may be a highly conserved motif for the nucleosome positioning, but we argue that this is not the only motif. The distribution of this generic decamer exhibits previously unidentified periodicities, which are associated to highly repetitive sequences in the genome. Alu repetitive elements contribute to the most fundamental structure of nucleosome positioning in higher Eukaryotes. In some regions of primate chromosomes, the distribution of the decamer shows symmetrical patterns including inverted repeats. PMID:23841049

  17. The Effects of Nucleosome Positioning and Chromatin Architecture on Transgene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempton, Colton E.

    Eukaryotes use proteins to carefully package and compact their genomes to fit into the nuclei of their individual cells. Nucleosomes are the primary level of compaction. Nucleosomes are formed when DNA wraps around an octamer of histone proteins and a nucleosome's position can limit access to genetic regulatory elements. Therefore, nucleosomes represent a basic level of gene regulation. DNA and its associated proteins, called chromatin, is usually classified as euchromatin or heterochromatin. Euchromatin is transcriptionally active with loosely packed nucleosomes while heterochromatin is condensed with tightly packed nucleosomes and is transcriptionally silent. In order to become active, heterochromatin must first be remodeled. We have studied the effects of nucleosome positioning on transgene expression in vivo using Caenorhabditis elegans as a model. We show that both location and polarity of the DNA sequence can influence transgene expression. We also discuss some considerations for working with CRISPR/Cas9. A major reason for doing in vitro nucleosome reconstitutions is to determine the effects of DNA sequence on nucleosome formation and position. It has previously been implied that nucleosome reconstitutions are stochastic and not very reproducible. We show that nucleosome reconstitutions are highly reproducible under our reaction conditions. Our results also indicate that a minimum depth of 35X sequencing coverage be maintained for maximal gains in Pearson's correlation coefficients. Communicating science with others is an important skill for any researcher. The rising generation of scientists need mentors who can teach them how to be independent thinkers who can carry out scientific experiments and communicate their finding to others. With this goal in mind, we have devised a scaffolding pedagogical method to help transform undergraduates into confident independent thinkers and researchers.

  18. LeNup: Learning Nucleosome positioning from DNA sequences with improved convolutional neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Juhua; Peng, Wenbo; Wang, Lei

    2018-01-10

    Nucleosome positioning plays significant roles in proper genome packing and its accessibility to execute transcription regulation. Despite a multitude of nucleosome positioning resources available on line including experimental datasets of genome-wide nucleosome occupancy profiles and computational tools to the analysis on these data, the complex language of eukaryotic Nucleosome positioning remains incompletely understood. Here, we address this challenge using an approach based on a state-of-the-art machine learning method. We present a novel convolutional neural network (CNN) to understand nucleosome positioning. We combined Inception-like networks with a gating mechanism for the response of multiple patterns and long term association in DNA sequences. We developed the open-source package LeNup based on the CNN to predict nucleosome positioning in Homo sapiens, Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster as well as Saccharomyces cerevisiae genomes. We trained LeNup on four benchmark datasets. LeNup achieved greater predictive accuracy than previously published methods. LeNup is freely available as Python and Lua script source code under a BSD style license from https://github.com/biomedBit/LeNup. jhzhang@bit.edu.cn. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author (2018). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  19. Replication-Coupled Nucleosome Assembly and Positioning by ATP-Dependent Chromatin-Remodeling Enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tejas Yadav

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available During DNA replication, chromatin must be disassembled and faithfully reassembled on newly synthesized genomes. The mechanisms that govern the assembly of chromatin structures following DNA replication are poorly understood. Here, we exploited Okazaki fragment synthesis and other assays to study how nucleosomes are deposited and become organized in S. cerevisiae. We observe that global nucleosome positioning is quickly established on newly synthesized DNA in vivo. Importantly, we find that ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling enzymes, Isw1 and Chd1, collaborate with histone chaperones to remodel nucleosomes as they are loaded behind a replication fork. Using a whole-genome sequencing approach, we determine that the positioning of newly deposited nucleosomes in vivo is specified by the combined actions of ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling enzymes and select DNA-binding proteins. Altogether, our data provide in vivo evidence for coordinated “loading and remodeling” of nucleosomes behind the replication fork, allowing for rapid organization of chromatin during S phase.

  20. Probabilistic inference for nucleosome positioning with MNase-based or sonicated short-read data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuekui Zhang

    Full Text Available We describe a model-based method, PING, for predicting nucleosome positions in MNase-Seq and MNase- or sonicated-ChIP-Seq data. PING compares favorably to NPS and TemplateFilter in scalability, accuracy and robustness to low read density. To demonstrate that PING predictions from widely available sonicated data can have sufficient spatial resolution to be to be useful for biological inference, we use Illumina H3K4me1 ChIP-seq data to detect changes in nucleosome positioning around transcription factor binding sites due to tamoxifen stimulation, to discriminate functional and non-functional transcription factor binding sites more effectively than with enrichment profiles, and to confirm that the pioneer transcription factor Foxa2 associates with the accessible major groove of nucleosomal DNA.

  1. Designing nucleosomal force sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tompitak, M.; de Bruin, L.; Eslami-Mossallam, B.; Schiessel, H.

    2017-05-01

    About three quarters of our DNA is wrapped into nucleosomes: DNA spools with a protein core. It is well known that the affinity of a given DNA stretch to be incorporated into a nucleosome depends on the geometry and elasticity of the basepair sequence involved, causing the positioning of nucleosomes. Here we show that DNA elasticity can have a much deeper effect on nucleosomes than just their positioning: it affects their "identities". Employing a recently developed computational algorithm, the mutation Monte Carlo method, we design nucleosomes with surprising physical characteristics. Unlike any other nucleosomes studied so far, these nucleosomes are short-lived when put under mechanical tension whereas other physical properties are largely unaffected. This suggests that the nucleosome, the most abundant DNA-protein complex in our cells, might more properly be considered a class of complexes with a wide array of physical properties, and raises the possibility that evolution has shaped various nucleosome species according to their genomic context.

  2. Dynamic nucleosome organization at hox promoters during zebrafish embryogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven E Weicksel

    Full Text Available Nucleosome organization at promoter regions plays an important role in regulating gene activity. Genome-wide studies in yeast, flies, worms, mammalian embryonic stem cells and transformed cell lines have found well-positioned nucleosomes flanking a nucleosome depleted region (NDR at transcription start sites. This nucleosome arrangement depends on DNA sequence (cis-elements as well as DNA binding factors and ATP-dependent chromatin modifiers (trans-factors. However, little is understood about how the nascent embryonic genome positions nucleosomes during development. This is particularly intriguing since the embryonic genome must undergo a broad reprogramming event upon fusion of sperm and oocyte. Using four stages of early embryonic zebrafish development, we map nucleosome positions at the promoter region of 37 zebrafish hox genes. We find that nucleosome arrangement at the hox promoters is a progressive process that takes place over several stages. At stages immediately after fertilization, nucleosomes appear to be largely disordered at hox promoter regions. At stages after activation of the embryonic genome, nucleosomes are detectable at hox promoters, with positions becoming more uniform and more highly occupied. Since the genomic sequence is invariant during embryogenesis, this progressive change in nucleosome arrangement suggests that trans-factors play an important role in organizing nucleosomes during embryogenesis. Separating hox genes into expressed and non-expressed groups shows that expressed promoters have better positioned and occupied nucleosomes, as well as distinct NDRs, than non-expressed promoters. Finally, by blocking the retinoic acid-signaling pathway, we disrupt early hox gene transcription, but observe no effect on nucleosome positions, suggesting that active hox transcription is not a driving force behind the arrangement of nucleosomes at the promoters of hox genes during early development.

  3. PING 2.0: an R/Bioconductor package for nucleosome positioning using next-generation sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Sangsoon; Zhang, Xuekui; Sauteraud, Renan; Robert, François; Gottardo, Raphael

    2013-08-15

    MNase-Seq and ChIP-Seq have evolved as popular techniques to study chromatin and histone modification. Although many tools have been developed to identify enriched regions, software tools for nucleosome positioning are still limited. We introduce a flexible and powerful open-source R package, PING 2.0, for nucleosome positioning using MNase-Seq data or MNase- or sonicated- ChIP-Seq data combined with either single-end or paired-end sequencing. PING uses a model-based approach, which enables nucleosome predictions even in the presence of low read counts. We illustrate PING using two paired-end datasets from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and compare its performance with nucleR and ChIPseqR. PING 2.0 is available from the Bioconductor website at http://bioconductor.org. It can run on Linux, Mac and Windows.

  4. Naturally occuring nucleosome positioning signals in human exons and introns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baldi, Pierre; Brunak, Søren; Chauvin, Yves

    1996-01-01

    We describe the structural implications of a periodic pattern found in human exons and introns by hidden Markov models. We show that exons (besides the reading frame) have a specific sequential structure in the form of a pattern with triplet consensus non-T(A/T)G, and a minimal periodicity...

  5. Nucleosome acidic patch promotes RNF168- and RING1B/BMI1-dependent H2AX and H2A ubiquitination and DNA damage signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin W Leung

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Histone ubiquitinations are critical for the activation of the DNA damage response (DDR. In particular, RNF168 and RING1B/BMI1 function in the DDR by ubiquitinating H2A/H2AX on Lys-13/15 and Lys-118/119, respectively. However, it remains to be defined how the ubiquitin pathway engages chromatin to provide regulation of ubiquitin targeting of specific histone residues. Here we identify the nucleosome acid patch as a critical chromatin mediator of H2A/H2AX ubiquitination (ub. The acidic patch is required for RNF168- and RING1B/BMI1-dependent H2A/H2AXub in vivo. The acidic patch functions within the nucleosome as nucleosomes containing a mutated acidic patch exhibit defective H2A/H2AXub by RNF168 and RING1B/BMI1 in vitro. Furthermore, direct perturbation of the nucleosome acidic patch in vivo by the expression of an engineered acidic patch interacting viral peptide, LANA, results in defective H2AXub and RNF168-dependent DNA damage responses including 53BP1 and BRCA1 recruitment to DNA damage. The acidic patch therefore is a critical nucleosome feature that may serve as a scaffold to integrate multiple ubiquitin signals on chromatin to compose selective ubiquitinations on histones for DNA damage signaling.

  6. Regulation of BAZ1A and nucleosome positioning in the nucleus accumbens in response to cocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, HaoSheng; Damez-Werno, Diane M; Scobie, Kimberly N; Shao, Ning-Yi; Dias, Caroline; Rabkin, Jacqui; Wright, Katherine N; Mouzon, Ezekiell; Kabbaj, Mohamed; Neve, Rachael; Turecki, Gustavo; Shen, Li; Nestler, Eric J

    2017-06-14

    Chromatin regulation, in particular ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers, have previously been shown to be important in the regulation of reward-related behaviors in animal models of mental illnesses. Here we demonstrate that BAZ1A, an accessory subunit of the ISWI family of chromatin remodeling complexes, is downregulated in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) of mice exposed repeatedly to cocaine and of cocaine-addicted humans. Viral-mediated overexpression of BAZ1A in mouse NAc reduces cocaine reward as assessed by conditioned place preference (CPP), but increases cocaine-induced locomotor activation. Furthermore, we investigate nucleosome repositioning genome-wide by conducting chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-sequencing for total H3 in NAc of control mice and after repeated cocaine administration, and find extensive nucleosome occupancy and shift changes across the genome in response to cocaine exposure. These findings implicate BAZ1A in molecular and behavioral plasticity to cocaine and offer new insight into the pathophysiology of cocaine addiction. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Nucleosome Organization in Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puya G Yazdi

    Full Text Available The fundamental repeating unit of eukaryotic chromatin is the nucleosome. Besides being involved in packaging DNA, nucleosome organization plays an important role in transcriptional regulation and cellular identity. Currently, there is much debate about the major determinants of the nucleosome architecture of a genome and its significance with little being known about its role in stem cells. To address these questions, we performed ultra-deep sequencing of nucleosomal DNA in two human embryonic stem cell lines and integrated our data with numerous epigenomic maps. Our analyses have revealed that the genome is a determinant of nucleosome organization with transcriptionally inactive regions characterized by a "ground state" of nucleosome profiles driven by underlying DNA sequences. DNA sequence preferences are associated with heterogeneous chromatin organization around transcription start sites. Transcription, histone modifications, and DNA methylation alter this "ground state" by having distinct effects on both nucleosome positioning and occupancy. As the transcriptional rate increases, nucleosomes become better positioned. Exons transcribed and included in the final spliced mRNA have distinct nucleosome profiles in comparison to exons not included at exon-exon junctions. Genes marked by the active modification H3K4m3 are characterized by lower nucleosome occupancy before the transcription start site compared to genes marked by the inactive modification H3K27m3, while bivalent domains, genes associated with both marks, lie exactly in the middle. Combinatorial patterns of epigenetic marks (chromatin states are associated with unique nucleosome profiles. Nucleosome organization varies around transcription factor binding in enhancers versus promoters. DNA methylation is associated with increasing nucleosome occupancy and different types of methylations have distinct location preferences within the nucleosome core particle. Finally, computational

  8. Plasticity and epigenetic inheritance of centromere-specific histone H3 (CENP-A)-containing nucleosome positioning in the fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jianhui; Liu, Xingkun; Sakuno, Takeshi; Li, Wenzhu; Xi, Yuanxin; Aravamudhan, Pavithra; Joglekar, Ajit; Li, Wei; Watanabe, Yoshinori; He, Xiangwei

    2013-06-28

    Nucleosomes containing the specific histone H3 variant CENP-A mark the centromere locus on each chromatin and initiate kinetochore assembly. For the common type of regional centromeres, little is known in molecular detail of centromeric chromatin organization, its propagation through cell division, and how distinct organization patterns may facilitate kinetochore assembly. Here, we show that in the fission yeast S. pombe, a relatively small number of CENP-A/Cnp1 nucleosomes are found within the centromeric core and that their positioning relative to underlying DNA varies among genetically homogenous cells. Consistent with the flexible positioning of Cnp1 nucleosomes, a large portion of the endogenous centromere is dispensable for its essential activity in mediating chromosome segregation. We present biochemical evidence that Cnp1 occupancy directly correlates with silencing of the underlying reporter genes. Furthermore, using a newly developed pedigree analysis assay, we demonstrated the epigenetic inheritance of Cnp1 positioning and quantified the rate of occasional repositioning of Cnp1 nucleosomes throughout cell generations. Together, our results reveal the plasticity and the epigenetically inheritable nature of centromeric chromatin organization.

  9. Nucleosomal TATA-switch: competing orientations of TATA on the nucleosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hapala, Jan; Trifonov, Edward N

    2013-09-15

    Transcription is known to be affected by the rotational setting of the transcription response elements within nucleosomes. We studied the rotational positioning of the TATA box, the most universal promoter motif. We applied a bioinformatic high-resolution nucleosome mapping technique to eukaryotic promoters. Our results show that the nucleosome DNA sequence harboring the TATA box encodes alternative rotational positions for the same piece of DNA. This may serve for switching the gene activity on and off. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Exploring the Link between Nucleosome Occupancy and DNA Methylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Lövkvist

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Near promoters, both nucleosomes and CpG sites form characteristic spatial patterns. Previously, nucleosome depleted regions were observed upstream of transcription start sites and nucleosome occupancy was reported to correlate both with CpG density and the level of CpG methylation. Several studies imply a causal link where CpG methylation might induce nucleosome formation, whereas others argue the opposite, i.e., that nucleosome occupancy might influence CpG methylation. Correlations are indeed evident between nucleosomes, CpG density and CpG methylation—at least near promoter sites. It is however less established whether there is an immediate causal relation between nucleosome occupancy and the presence of CpG sites—or if nucleosome occupancy could be influenced by other factors. In this work, we test for such causality in human genomes by analyzing the three quantities both near and away from promoter sites. For data from the human genome we compare promoter regions with given CpG densities with genomic regions without promoters but of similar CpG densities. We find the observed correlation between nucleosome occupancy and CpG density, respectively CpG methylation, to be specific to promoter regions. In other regions along the genome nucleosome occupancy is statistically independent of the positioning of CpGs or their methylation levels. Anti-correlation between CpG density and methylation level is however similarly strong in both regions. On promoters, nucleosome occupancy is more strongly affected by the level of gene expression than CpG density or CpG methylation—calling into question any direct causal relation between nucleosome occupancy and CpG organization. Rather, our results suggest that for organisms with cytosine methylation nucleosome occupancy might be primarily linked to gene expression, with no strong impact on methylation.

  11. Baculoviruses and nucleosome management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkman, Loy E., E-mail: lvolkman@berkeley.edu

    2015-02-15

    Negatively-supercoiled-ds DNA molecules, including the genomes of baculoviruses, spontaneously wrap around cores of histones to form nucleosomes when present within eukaryotic nuclei. Hence, nucleosome management should be essential for baculovirus genome replication and temporal regulation of transcription, but this has not been documented. Nucleosome mobilization is the dominion of ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complexes. SWI/SNF and INO80, two of the best-studied complexes, as well as chromatin modifier TIP60, all contain actin as a subunit. Retrospective analysis of results of AcMNPV time course experiments wherein actin polymerization was blocked by cytochalasin D drug treatment implicate actin-containing chromatin modifying complexes in decatenating baculovirus genomes, shutting down host transcription, and regulating late and very late phases of viral transcription. Moreover, virus-mediated nuclear localization of actin early during infection may contribute to nucleosome management. - Highlights: • Baculoviruses have negatively-supercoiled, circular ds DNA. • Negatively-supercoiled DNA spontaneously forms nucleosomes in the nucleus. • Nucleosomes must be mobilized for replication and transcription to proceed. • Actin-containing chromatin modifiers participate in baculovirus replication.

  12. Nature of the Nucleosomal Barrier to RNA Polymerase II | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the cell, RNA polymerase II (pol II) efficiently transcribes DNA packaged into nucleosomes, but in vitro encounters with the nucleosomes induce catalytic inactivation (arrest) of the pol II core enzyme. To determine potential mechanisms making nucleosomes transparent to transcription in vivo, we analyzed the nature of the nucleosome-induced arrest. We found that the arrests have been detected mostly at positions of strong intrinsic pause sites of DNA.

  13. The size of the nucleosome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Jakob; Olsen, Kasper

    2011-01-01

    The structural origin of the size of the 11 nm nucleosomal disc is addressed. On the nanometer length-scale the organization of DNA as chromatin in the chromosomes involves a coiling of DNA around the histone core of the nucleosome. We suggest that the size of the nucleosome core particle......-pairs of the linker-DNA is included the estimate of the size of an ideal nucleosome is in close agreement with the experimental numbers. Interestingly, the size of the nucleosome is shown to be a consequence of intrinsic properties of the DNA double helix....

  14. ISWI chromatin remodellers sense nucleosome modifications to determine substrate preference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dann, Geoffrey P.; Liszczak, Glen P.; Bagert, John D.; Müller, Manuel M.; Nguyen, Uyen T. T.; Wojcik, Felix; Brown, Zachary Z.; Bos, Jeffrey; Panchenko, Tatyana; Pihl, Rasmus; Pollock, Samuel B.; Diehl, Katharine L.; Allis, C. David; Muir, Tom W.

    2018-01-01

    ATP-dependent chromatin remodellers regulate access to genetic information by controlling nucleosome positions in vivo1. However, the mechanism by which remodellers discriminate between different nucleosome substrates is poorly understood. Many chromatin remodelling proteins possess conserved protein domains that interact with nucleosomal features2. Here we used a quantitative high-throughput approach, based on the use of a DNA-barcoded mononucleosome library, to profile the biochemical activity of human ISWI family remodellers in response to a diverse set of nucleosome modifications. We show that accessory (non-ATPase) subunits of ISWI remodellers can distinguish between differentially modified nucleosomes, directing remodelling activity towards specific nucleosome substrates according to their modification state. Unexpectedly, we show that the nucleosome acidic patch3 is necessary for maximum activity of all ISWI remodellers evaluated. This dependence also extends to CHD and SWI/SNF family remodellers, suggesting that the acidic patch may be generally required for chromatin remodelling. Critically, remodelling activity can be regulated by modifications neighbouring the acidic patch, signifying that it may act as a tunable interaction hotspot for ATP-dependent chromatin remodellers and, by extension, many other chromatin effectors that engage this region of the nucleosome surface4–9. PMID:28767641

  15. Genomic sequence is highly predictive of local nucleosome depletion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Cheng Yuan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The regulation of DNA accessibility through nucleosome positioning is important for transcription control. Computational models have been developed to predict genome-wide nucleosome positions from DNA sequences, but these models consider only nucleosome sequences, which may have limited their power. We developed a statistical multi-resolution approach to identify a sequence signature, called the N-score, that distinguishes nucleosome binding DNA from non-nucleosome DNA. This new approach has significantly improved the prediction accuracy. The sequence information is highly predictive for local nucleosome enrichment or depletion, whereas predictions of the exact positions are only modestly more accurate than a null model, suggesting the importance of other regulatory factors in fine-tuning the nucleosome positions. The N-score in promoter regions is negatively correlated with gene expression levels. Regulatory elements are enriched in low N-score regions. While our model is derived from yeast data, the N-score pattern computed from this model agrees well with recent high-resolution protein-binding data in human.

  16. Structural features based genome-wide characterization and prediction of nucleosome organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gan Yanglan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nucleosome distribution along chromatin dictates genomic DNA accessibility and thus profoundly influences gene expression. However, the underlying mechanism of nucleosome formation remains elusive. Here, taking a structural perspective, we systematically explored nucleosome formation potential of genomic sequences and the effect on chromatin organization and gene expression in S. cerevisiae. Results We analyzed twelve structural features related to flexibility, curvature and energy of DNA sequences. The results showed that some structural features such as DNA denaturation, DNA-bending stiffness, Stacking energy, Z-DNA, Propeller twist and free energy, were highly correlated with in vitro and in vivo nucleosome occupancy. Specifically, they can be classified into two classes, one positively and the other negatively correlated with nucleosome occupancy. These two kinds of structural features facilitated nucleosome binding in centromere regions and repressed nucleosome formation in the promoter regions of protein-coding genes to mediate transcriptional regulation. Based on these analyses, we integrated all twelve structural features in a model to predict more accurately nucleosome occupancy in vivo than the existing methods that mainly depend on sequence compositional features. Furthermore, we developed a novel approach, named DLaNe, that located nucleosomes by detecting peaks of structural profiles, and built a meta predictor to integrate information from different structural features. As a comparison, we also constructed a hidden Markov model (HMM to locate nucleosomes based on the profiles of these structural features. The result showed that the meta DLaNe and HMM-based method performed better than the existing methods, demonstrating the power of these structural features in predicting nucleosome positions. Conclusions Our analysis revealed that DNA structures significantly contribute to nucleosome organization and influence

  17. Nucleosome fragility is associated with future transcriptional response to developmental cues and stress in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffers, Tess E; Lieb, Jason D

    2017-01-01

    Nucleosomes have structural and regulatory functions in all eukaryotic DNA-templated processes. The position of nucleosomes on DNA and the stability of the underlying histone-DNA interactions affect the access of regulatory proteins to DNA. Both stability and position are regulated through DNA sequence, histone post-translational modifications, histone variants, chromatin remodelers, and transcription factors. Here, we explored the functional implications of nucleosome properties on gene expression and development in Caenorhabditis elegans embryos. We performed a time-course of micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digestion and measured the relative sensitivity or resistance of nucleosomes throughout the genome. Fragile nucleosomes were defined by nucleosomal DNA fragments that were recovered preferentially in early MNase-digestion time points. Nucleosome fragility was strongly and positively correlated with the AT content of the underlying DNA sequence. There was no correlation between promoter nucleosome fragility and the levels of histone modifications or histone variants. Genes with fragile nucleosomes in their promoters tended to be lowly expressed and expressed in a context-specific way, operating in neuronal response, the immune system, and stress response. In addition to DNA-encoded nucleosome fragility, we also found fragile nucleosomes at locations where we expected to find destabilized nucleosomes, for example, at transcription factor binding sites where nucleosomes compete with DNA-binding factors. Our data suggest that in C. elegans promoters, nucleosome fragility is in large part DNA-encoded and that it poises genes for future context-specific activation in response to environmental stress and developmental cues. © 2017 Jeffers and Lieb; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  18. The Chd1 Chromatin Remodeler Shifts Nucleosomal DNA Bidirectionally as a Monomer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, Yupeng; Levendosky, Robert F.; Chakravarthy, Srinivas; Patel, Ashok; Bowman, Gregory D.; Myong, Sua

    2017-10-01

    Chromatin remodelers catalyze dynamic packaging of the genome by carrying out nucleosome assembly/disassembly, histone exchange, and nucleosome repositioning. Remodeling results in evenly spaced nucleosomes, which requires probing both sides of the nucleosome, yet the way remodelers organize sliding activity to achieve this task is not understood. Here, we show that the monomeric Chd1 remodeler shifts DNA back and forth by dynamically alternating between different segments of the nucleosome. During sliding, Chd1 generates unstable remodeling intermediates that spontaneously relax to a pre-remodeled position. We demonstrate that nucleosome sliding is tightly controlled by two regulatory domains: the DNA-binding domain, which interferes with sliding when its range is limited by a truncated linking segment, and the chromodomains, which play a key role in substrate discrimination. We propose that active interplay of the ATPase motor with the regulatory domains may promote dynamic nucleosome structures uniquely suited for histone exchange and chromatin reorganization during transcription.

  19. The nucleosome landscape of Plasmodium falciparum reveals chromatin architecture and dynamics of regulatory sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kensche, Philip Reiner; Hoeijmakers, Wieteke Anna Maria; Toenhake, Christa Geeke; Bras, Maaike; Chappell, Lia; Berriman, Matthew; Bártfai, Richárd

    2016-03-18

    In eukaryotes, the chromatin architecture has a pivotal role in regulating all DNA-associated processes and it is central to the control of gene expression. For Plasmodium falciparum, a causative agent of human malaria, the nucleosome positioning profile of regulatory regions deserves particular attention because of their extreme AT-content. With the aid of a highly controlled MNase-seq procedure we reveal how positioning of nucleosomes provides a structural and regulatory framework to the transcriptional unit by demarcating landmark sites (transcription/translation start and end sites). In addition, our analysis provides strong indications for the function of positioned nucleosomes in splice site recognition. Transcription start sites (TSSs) are bordered by a small nucleosome-depleted region, but lack the stereotypic downstream nucleosome arrays, highlighting a key difference in chromatin organization compared to model organisms. Furthermore, we observe transcription-coupled eviction of nucleosomes on strong TSSs during intraerythrocytic development and demonstrate that nucleosome positioning and dynamics can be predictive for the functionality of regulatory DNA elements. Collectively, the strong nucleosome positioning over splice sites and surrounding putative transcription factor binding sites highlights the regulatory capacity of the nucleosome landscape in this deadly human pathogen. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  20. G+C content dominates intrinsic nucleosome occupancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hughes Timothy R

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The relative preference of nucleosomes to form on individual DNA sequences plays a major role in genome packaging. A wide variety of DNA sequence features are believed to influence nucleosome formation, including periodic dinucleotide signals, poly-A stretches and other short motifs, and sequence properties that influence DNA structure, including base content. It was recently shown by Kaplan et al. that a probabilistic model using composition of all 5-mers within a nucleosome-sized tiling window accurately predicts intrinsic nucleosome occupancy across an entire genome in vitro. However, the model is complicated, and it is not clear which specific DNA sequence properties are most important for intrinsic nucleosome-forming preferences. Results We find that a simple linear combination of only 14 simple DNA sequence attributes (G+C content, two transformations of dinucleotide composition, and the frequency of eleven 4-bp sequences explains nucleosome occupancy in vitro and in vivo in a manner comparable to the Kaplan model. G+C content and frequency of AAAA are the most important features. G+C content is dominant, alone explaining ~50% of the variation in nucleosome occupancy in vitro. Conclusions Our findings provide a dramatically simplified means to predict and understand intrinsic nucleosome occupancy. G+C content may dominate because it both reduces frequency of poly-A-like stretches and correlates with many other DNA structural characteristics. Since G+C content is enriched or depleted at many types of features in diverse eukaryotic genomes, our results suggest that variation in nucleotide composition may have a widespread and direct influence on chromatin structure.

  1. Role of nucleosome remodeling in neurodevelopmental and intellectual disability disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Alberto J; Wood, Marcelo A

    2015-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly important to understand how epigenetic mechanisms control gene expression during neurodevelopment. Two epigenetic mechanisms that have received considerable attention are DNA methylation and histone acetylation. Human exome sequencing and genome-wide association studies have linked several neurobiological disorders to genes whose products actively regulate DNA methylation and histone acetylation. More recently, a third major epigenetic mechanism, nucleosome remodeling, has been implicated in human developmental and intellectual disability (ID) disorders. Nucleosome remodeling is driven primarily through nucleosome remodeling complexes with specialized ATP-dependent enzymes. These enzymes directly interact with DNA or chromatin structure, as well as histone subunits, to restructure the shape and organization of nucleosome positioning to ultimately regulate gene expression. Of particular interest is the neuron-specific Brg1/hBrm Associated Factor (nBAF) complex. Mutations in nBAF subunit genes have so far been linked to Coffin-Siris syndrome (CSS), Nicolaides-Baraitser syndrome (NBS), schizophrenia, and Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Together, these human developmental and ID disorders are powerful examples of the impact of epigenetic modulation on gene expression. This review focuses on the new and emerging role of nucleosome remodeling in neurodevelopmental and ID disorders and whether nucleosome remodeling affects gene expression required for cognition independently of its role in regulating gene expression required for development.

  2. Role of nucleosome remodeling in neurodevelopmental and intellectual disability disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto J Lopez

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available It is becoming increasingly important to understand how epigenetic mechanisms control gene expression during neurodevelopment. Two epigenetic mechanisms that have received considerable attention are DNA methylation and histone acetylation. Human exome sequencing and genome-wide association studies have linked several neurobiological disorders to genes whose products actively regulate DNA methylation and histone acetylation. More recently, a third major epigenetic mechanism, nucleosome remodeling, has been implicated in human developmental and intellectual disability disorders. Nucleosome remodeling is driven primarily through nucleosome remodeling complexes with specialized ATP-dependent enzymes. These enzymes directly interact with DNA or chromatin structure, as well as histone subunits, to restructure the shape and organization of nucleosome positioning to ultimately regulate gene expression. Of particular interest is the neuron-specific Brg1/hBrm Associated Factor (nBAF complex. Mutations in nBAF subunit genes have so far been linked to Coffin-Siris syndrome, Nicolaides-Baraitser syndrome, schizophrenia, and Autism Spectrum Disorder. Together, these human developmental and intellectual disability disorders are powerful examples of the impact of epigenetic modulation on gene expression. This review focuses on the new and emerging role of nucleosome remodeling in neurodevelopmental and intellectual disability disorders and whether nucleosome remodeling affects gene expression required for cognition independently of its role in regulating gene expression required for development.

  3. Signal Processing for Beam Position Monitors

    CERN Document Server

    Vismara, Giuseppe

    2000-01-01

    At the first sight the problem to determine the beam position from the ratio of the induced charges of the opposite electrodes of a beam monitor seems trivial, but up to now no unique solution has been found that fits the various demands of all particle accelerators. The purpose of this paper is to help "instrumentalists" to choose the best processing system for their particular application, depending on the machine size, the input dynamic range, the required resolution and the acquisition speed. After a general introduction and an analysis of the electrical signals to be treated (frequency and time domain), the definition of the electronic specifications will be reviewed. The tutorial will present the different families in which the processing systems can be grouped. A general description of the operating principles with relative advantages and disadvantages for the most employed processing systems is presented. Special emphasis will be put on recent technological developments based on telecommunication circ...

  4. Dynamic and selective nucleosome repositioning during endotoxin tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Gazzar, Mohamed; Liu, Tiefu; Yoza, Barbara K; McCall, Charles E

    2010-01-08

    Sepsis is encoded by a sequel of transcription activation and repression events that initiate, sustain, and resolve severe systemic inflammation. The repression/silencing phase occurs in blood leukocytes of animals and humans following the initiation of systemic inflammation due to developing endotoxin tolerance. We previously reported that NF-kappaB transcription factor RelB and histone H3 lysine methyltransferase G9a directly interact to induce facultative heterochromatin assembly and regulate epigenetic silencing during endotoxin tolerance, which is a major feature of sepsis. The general objective of this study was to assess whether dynamic temporal, structural, and positional changes of nucleosomes influence the sepsis phenotype. We used the THP-1 sepsis cell model to isolate mononucleosomes by rapid cell permeabilization and digestion of chromatin with micrococcal nuclease and then compared tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) proximal promoter nucleosome alignment in endotoxin-responsive and -tolerant phenotypes. We found differential and dynamic repositioning of nucleosomes from permissive to repressive locations during the activation and silencing phases of transcription reprogramming and identified the following mechanisms that may participate in the process. 1) Two proximal nucleosomes repositioned to expose the primary NF-kappaB DNA binding site in endotoxin-responsive cells, and this "promoter opening" required the ATP-independent chaperone NAP1 to replace the core histone H2A with the H2A.Z variant. 2) During RelB-dependent endotoxin tolerance, the two nucleosomes repositioned and masked the primary NF-kappaB DNA binding site. 3) Small interfering RNA-mediated inhibition of RelB expression prevented repressive nucleosome repositioning and tolerance induction, but the "open" promoter required endotoxin-induced NF-kappaB p65 promoter binding to initiate transcription, supporting the known requirement of p65 posttranslational modifications for

  5. Multiple distinct stimuli increase measured nucleosome occupancy around human promoters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuong D Pham

    Full Text Available Nucleosomes can block access to transcription factors. Thus the precise localization of nucleosomes relative to transcription start sites and other factor binding sites is expected to be a critical component of transcriptional regulation. Recently developed microarray approaches have allowed the rapid mapping of nucleosome positions over hundreds of kilobases (kb of human genomic DNA, although these approaches have not yet been widely used to measure chromatin changes associated with changes in transcription. Here, we use custom tiling microarrays to reveal changes in nucleosome positions and abundance that occur when hormone-bound glucocorticoid receptor (GR binds to sites near target gene promoters in human osteosarcoma cells. The most striking change is an increase in measured nucleosome occupancy at sites spanning ∼1 kb upstream and downstream of transcription start sites, which occurs one hour after addition of hormone, but is lost at 4 hours. Unexpectedly, this increase was seen both on GR-regulated and GR-non-regulated genes. In addition, the human SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling factor (a GR co-activator was found to be important for increased occupancy upon hormone treatment and also for low nucleosome occupancy without hormone. Most surprisingly, similar increases in nucleosome occupancy were also seen on both regulated and non-regulated promoters during differentiation of human myeloid leukemia cells and upon activation of human CD4+ T-cells. These results indicate that dramatic changes in chromatin structure over ∼2 kb of human promoters may occur genomewide and in response to a variety of stimuli, and suggest novel models for transcriptional regulation.

  6. Deposition of nucleosomal antigens (histones and DNA) in the epidermal basement membrane in human lupus nephritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grootscholten, C.; Bruggen, M.C.J. van; Pijl, J.W. van der; Jong, E.M.G.J. de; Ligtenberg, G.; Derksen, R.H.W.M.; Berden, J.H.M.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Antinuclear autoantibodies complexed to nucleosomes can bind to heparan sulfate (HS) in the glomerular basement membrane. This binding is due to the binding of the positively charged histones to the strongly anionic HS. Nucleosomes and histones have been identified in glomerular deposits

  7. Consequences of cisplatin binding on nucleosome structure and dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Ryan C; Lippard, Stephen J

    2010-12-22

    The effects of cisplatin binding to DNA were explored at the nucleosome level to incorporate key features of the eukaryotic nuclear environment. An X-ray crystal structure of a site-specifically platinated nucleosome carrying a 1,3-cis-{Pt(NH₃)₂}²+-d(GpTpG) intrastrand cross-link reveals the details of how this adduct dictates the rotational positioning of DNA in the nucleosome. Results from in vitro nucleosome mobility assays indicate that a single platinum adduct interferes with ATP-independent sliding of DNA around the octamer core. Data from in vitro transcription experiments suggest that RNA polymerases can successfully navigate along cisplatin-damaged DNA templates that contain nucleosomes, but stall when the transcription elongation complex physically contacts a platinum cross-link located on the template strand. These results provide information about the effects of cisplatin binding to nuclear DNA and enhance our understanding of the mechanism of transcription inhibition by platinum anticancer compounds. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Genome-wide nucleosome specificity and function of chromatin remodellers in ES cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Dieuleveult, Maud; Yen, Kuangyu; Hmitou, Isabelle; Depaux, Arnaud; Boussouar, Fayçal; Dargham, Daria Bou; Jounier, Sylvie; Humbertclaude, Hélène; Ribierre, Florence; Baulard, Céline; Farrell, Nina P.; Park, Bongsoo; Keime, Céline; Carrière, Lucie; Berlivet, Soizick; Gut, Marta; Gut, Ivo; Werner, Michel; Deleuze, Jean-François; Olaso, Robert; Aude, Jean-Christophe; Chantalat, Sophie; Pugh, B. Franklin; Gérard, Matthieu

    2015-01-01

    Summary ATP-dependent chromatin remodellers allow access to DNA for transcription factors and the general transcription machinery, but whether mammalian chromatin remodellers1–3 target specific nucleosomes to regulate transcription is unclear. Here, we present genome-wide remodeller-nucleosome interaction profiles for Chd1, Chd2, Chd4, Chd6, Chd8, Chd9, Brg1 and Ep400 in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. These remodellers bind one or both full nucleosomes that flank MNase-defined nucleosome-free promoter regions (NFRs), where they separate divergent transcription. Surprisingly, large CpG-rich NFRs that extend downstream of annotated transcriptional start sites (TSSs) are nevertheless chromatinized with non-nucleosomal or subnucleosomal histone variants (H3.3 and H2A.Z) and modifications (H3K4me3 and H3K27ac). RNA polymerase (pol) II therefore navigates hundreds of bp of altered chromatin in the sense direction before encountering an MNase-resistant nucleosome at the 3′ end of the NFR. Transcriptome analysis upon remodeller depletion reveals reciprocal mechanisms of transcriptional regulation by remodellers. Whereas at active genes individual remodellers play either positive or negative roles via altering nucleosome stability, at polycomb-enriched bivalent genes the same remodellers act in an opposite manner. These findings indicate that remodellers target specific nucleosomes at the edge of NFRs, where they regulate ES cell transcriptional programs. PMID:26814966

  9. Multivalent Interactions by the Set8 Histone Methyltransferase With Its Nucleosome Substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girish, Taverekere S; McGinty, Robert K; Tan, Song

    2016-04-24

    Set8 is the only mammalian monomethyltransferase responsible for H4K20me1, a methyl mark critical for genomic integrity of eukaryotic cells. We present here a structural model for how Set8 uses multivalent interactions to bind and methylate the nucleosome based on crystallographic and solution studies of the Set8/nucleosome complex. Our studies indicate that Set8 employs its i-SET and c-SET domains to engage nucleosomal DNA 1 to 1.5 turns from the nucleosomal dyad and in doing so, it positions the SET domain for catalysis with H4 Lys20. Surprisingly, we find that a basic N-terminal extension to the SET domain plays an even more prominent role in nucleosome binding, possibly by making an arginine anchor interaction with the nucleosome H2A/H2B acidic patch. We further show that proliferating cell nuclear antigen and the nucleosome compete for binding to Set8 through this basic extension, suggesting a mechanism for how nucleosome binding protects Set8 from proliferating cell nuclear antigen-dependent degradation during the cell cycle. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Positive trigonometric polynomials and signal processing applications

    CERN Document Server

    Dumitrescu, Bogdan

    2007-01-01

    Presents the results on positive trigonometric polynomials within a unitary framework; the theoretical results obtained partly from the general theory of real polynomials, partly from self-sustained developments. This book provides information on the theory of sum-of-squares trigonometric polynomials in two parts: theory and applications.

  11. The impact of the nucleosome code on protein-coding sequence evolution in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Warnecke

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Coding sequence evolution was once thought to be the result of selection on optimal protein function alone. Selection can, however, also act at the RNA level, for example, to facilitate rapid translation or ensure correct splicing. Here, we ask whether the way DNA works also imposes constraints on coding sequence evolution. We identify nucleosome positioning as a likely candidate to set up such a DNA-level selective regime and use high-resolution microarray data in yeast to compare the evolution of coding sequence bound to or free from nucleosomes. Controlling for gene expression and intra-gene location, we find a nucleosome-free "linker" sequence to evolve on average 5-6% slower at synonymous sites. A reduced rate of evolution in linker is especially evident at the 5' end of genes, where the effect extends to non-synonymous substitution rates. This is consistent with regular nucleosome architecture in this region being important in the context of gene expression control. As predicted, codons likely to generate a sequence unfavourable to nucleosome formation are enriched in linker sequence. Amino acid content is likewise skewed as a function of nucleosome occupancy. We conclude that selection operating on DNA to maintain correct positioning of nucleosomes impacts codon choice, amino acid choice, and synonymous and non-synonymous rates of evolution in coding sequence. The results support the exclusion model for nucleosome positioning and provide an alternative interpretation for runs of rare codons. As the intimate association of histones and DNA is a universal characteristic of genic sequence in eukaryotes, selection on coding sequence composition imposed by nucleosome positioning should be phylogenetically widespread.

  12. Signal processors for position-sensitive detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, Ken-ichi [Hosei Univ., Koganei, Tokyo (Japan). Coll. of Engineering

    1996-07-01

    Position-sensitive detectors (PSD) are widely used in following various fields: condensed matter studies, material engineering, medical radiology particle physics, astrophysics and industrial applications. X-ray diffraction analysis is one of the field where PSDs are the most important instruments. In this field, many types of PSAs are employed: position-sensitive proportional counters (PSPC), multi-wire proportional chambers (MWPC), imaging plates, image intensifiers combined CCD cameras and semiconductor array devices. Two readout systems used for PSDs, where one is a charge-division type with high stability and the other is an encoder with multiple delay, line readout circuits useful for fast counting, were reported in this paper. The multiple delay line encoding system can be applicable to high counting rate 1D and 2D gas proportional detectors. (G.K.)

  13. Nucleosomes shape DNA polymorphism and divergence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasha A Langley

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available An estimated 80% of genomic DNA in eukaryotes is packaged as nucleosomes, which, together with the remaining interstitial linker regions, generate higher order chromatin structures [1]. Nucleosome sequences isolated from diverse organisms exhibit ∼10 bp periodic variations in AA, TT and GC dinucleotide frequencies. These sequence elements generate intrinsically curved DNA and help establish the histone-DNA interface. We investigated an important unanswered question concerning the interplay between chromatin organization and genome evolution: do the DNA sequence preferences inherent to the highly conserved histone core exert detectable natural selection on genomic divergence and polymorphism? To address this hypothesis, we isolated nucleosomal DNA sequences from Drosophila melanogaster embryos and examined the underlying genomic variation within and between species. We found that divergence along the D. melanogaster lineage is periodic across nucleosome regions with base changes following preferred nucleotides, providing new evidence for systematic evolutionary forces in the generation and maintenance of nucleosome-associated dinucleotide periodicities. Further, Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP frequency spectra show striking periodicities across nucleosomal regions, paralleling divergence patterns. Preferred alleles occur at higher frequencies in natural populations, consistent with a central role for natural selection. These patterns are stronger for nucleosomes in introns than in intergenic regions, suggesting selection is stronger in transcribed regions where nucleosomes undergo more displacement, remodeling and functional modification. In addition, we observe a large-scale (∼180 bp periodic enrichment of AA/TT dinucleotides associated with nucleosome occupancy, while GC dinucleotide frequency peaks in linker regions. Divergence and polymorphism data also support a role for natural selection in the generation and maintenance of these

  14. Comparative analysis of methods for genome-wide nucleosome cartography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintales, Luis; Vázquez, Enrique; Antequera, Francisco

    2015-07-01

    Nucleosomes contribute to compacting the genome into the nucleus and regulate the physical access of regulatory proteins to DNA either directly or through the epigenetic modifications of the histone tails. Precise mapping of nucleosome positioning across the genome is, therefore, essential to understanding the genome regulation. In recent years, several experimental protocols have been developed for this purpose that include the enzymatic digestion, chemical cleavage or immunoprecipitation of chromatin followed by next-generation sequencing of the resulting DNA fragments. Here, we compare the performance and resolution of these methods from the initial biochemical steps through the alignment of the millions of short-sequence reads to a reference genome to the final computational analysis to generate genome-wide maps of nucleosome occupancy. Because of the lack of a unified protocol to process data sets obtained through the different approaches, we have developed a new computational tool (NUCwave), which facilitates their analysis, comparison and assessment and will enable researchers to choose the most suitable method for any particular purpose. NUCwave is freely available at http://nucleosome.usal.es/nucwave along with a step-by-step protocol for its use. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Unbiased chromatin accessibility profiling by RED-seq uncovers unique features of nucleosome variants in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Poshen B; Zhu, Lihua J; Hainer, Sarah J; McCannell, Kurtis N; Fazzio, Thomas G

    2014-12-15

    Differential accessibility of DNA to nuclear proteins underlies the regulation of numerous cellular processes. Although DNA accessibility is primarily determined by the presence or absence of nucleosomes, differences in nucleosome composition or dynamics may also regulate accessibility. Methods for mapping nucleosome positions and occupancies genome-wide (MNase-seq) have uncovered the nucleosome landscapes of many different cell types and organisms. Conversely, methods specialized for the detection of large nucleosome-free regions of chromatin (DNase-seq, FAIRE-seq) have uncovered numerous gene regulatory elements. However, these methods are less successful in measuring the accessibility of DNA sequences within nucelosome arrays. Here we probe the genome-wide accessibility of multiple cell types in an unbiased manner using restriction endonuclease digestion of chromatin coupled to deep sequencing (RED-seq). Using this method, we identified differences in chromatin accessibility between populations of cells, not only in nucleosome-depleted regions of the genome (e.g., enhancers and promoters), but also within the majority of the genome that is packaged into nucleosome arrays. Furthermore, we identified both large differences in chromatin accessibility in distinct cell lineages and subtle but significant changes during differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Most significantly, using RED-seq, we identified differences in accessibility among nucleosomes harboring well-studied histone variants, and show that these differences depend on factors required for their deposition. Using an unbiased method to probe chromatin accessibility genome-wide, we uncover unique features of chromatin structure that are not observed using more widely-utilized methods. We demonstrate that different types of nucleosomes within mammalian cells exhibit different degrees of accessibility. These findings provide significant insight into the regulation of DNA accessibility.

  16. Detection test of wireless network signal strength and GPS positioning signal in underground pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Zhang, Yunwei; Chen, Ling

    2018-03-01

    In order to solve the problem of selecting positioning technology for inspection robot in underground pipeline environment, the wireless network signal strength and GPS positioning signal testing are carried out in the actual underground pipeline environment. Firstly, the strength variation of the 3G wireless network signal and Wi-Fi wireless signal provided by China Telecom and China Unicom ground base stations are tested, and the attenuation law of these wireless signals along the pipeline is analyzed quantitatively and described. Then, the receiving data of the GPS satellite signal in the pipeline are tested, and the attenuation of GPS satellite signal under underground pipeline is analyzed. The testing results may be reference for other related research which need to consider positioning in pipeline.

  17. Tuning positive feedback for signal detection in noisy dynamic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Anders; Ramsch, Kai; Middendorf, Martin; Sumpter, David J T

    2012-09-21

    Learning from previous actions is a key feature of decision-making. Diverse biological systems, from neuronal assemblies to insect societies, use a combination of positive feedback and forgetting of stored memories to process and respond to input signals. Here we look how these systems deal with a dynamic two-armed bandit problem of detecting a very weak signal in the presence of a high degree of noise. We show that by tuning the form of positive feedback and the decay rate to appropriate values, a single tracking variable can effectively detect dynamic inputs even in the presence of a large degree of noise. In particular, we show that when tuned appropriately a simple positive feedback algorithm is Fisher efficient, in that it can track changes in a signal on a time of order L(h)=(|h|/σ)(-2), where |h| is the magnitude of the signal and σ the magnitude of the noise. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Generation of Native Chromatin Immunoprecipitation Sequencing Libraries for Nucleosome Density Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorzadeh, Alireza; Lopez Gutierrez, Rodrigo; Jackson, Linda; Moksa, Michelle; Hirst, Martin

    2017-12-12

    We present a modified native chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) experimental protocol compatible with a Gaussian mixture distribution based analysis methodology (nucleosome density ChIP-seq; ndChIP-seq) that enables the generation of combined measurements of micrococcal nuclease (MNase) accessibility with histone modification genome-wide. Nucleosome position and local density, and the posttranslational modification of their histone subunits, act in concert to regulate local transcription states. Combinatorial measurements of nucleosome accessibility with histone modification generated by ndChIP-seq allows for the simultaneous interrogation of these features. The ndChIP-seq methodology is applicable to small numbers of primary cells inaccessible to cross-linking based ChIP-seq protocols. Taken together, ndChIP-seq enables the measurement of histone modification in combination with local nucleosome density to obtain new insights into shared mechanisms that regulate RNA transcription within rare primary cell populations.

  19. Characterization of Dnmt1 Binding and DNA Methylation on Nucleosomes and Nucleosomal Arrays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Schrader

    Full Text Available The packaging of DNA into nucleosomes and the organisation into higher order structures of chromatin limits the access of sequence specific DNA binding factors to DNA. In cells, DNA methylation is preferentially occuring in the linker region of nucleosomes, suggesting a structural impact of chromatin on DNA methylation. These observations raise the question whether DNA methyltransferases are capable to recognize the nucleosomal substrates and to modify the packaged DNA. Here, we performed a detailed analysis of nucleosome binding and nucleosomal DNA methylation by the maintenance DNA methyltransferase Dnmt1. Our binding studies show that Dnmt1 has a DNA length sensing activity, binding cooperatively to DNA, and requiring a minimal DNA length of 20 bp. Dnmt1 needs linker DNA to bind to nucleosomes and most efficiently recognizes nucleosomes with symmetric DNA linkers. Footprinting experiments reveal that Dnmt1 binds to both DNA linkers exiting the nucleosome core. The binding pattern correlates with the efficient methylation of DNA linkers. However, the enzyme lacks the ability to methylate nucleosomal CpG sites on mononucleosomes and nucleosomal arrays, unless chromatin remodeling enzymes create a dynamic chromatin state. In addition, our results show that Dnmt1 functionally interacts with specific chromatin remodeling enzymes to enable complete methylation of hemi-methylated DNA in chromatin.

  20. Nucleosome Repositioning: A Novel Mechanism for Nicotine- and Cocaine-Induced Epigenetic Changes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amber N Brown

    Full Text Available Drugs of abuse modify behavior by altering gene expression in the brain. Gene expression can be regulated by changes in DNA methylation as well as by histone modifications, which alter chromatin structure, DNA compaction and DNA accessibility. In order to better understand the molecular mechanisms directing drug-induced changes in chromatin structure, we examined DNA-nucleosome interactions within promoter regions of 858 genes in human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y exposed to nicotine or cocaine. Widespread, drug- and time-resolved repositioning of nucleosomes was identified at the transcription start site and promoter region of multiple genes. Nicotine and cocaine produced unique and shared changes in terms of the numbers and types of genes affected, as well as repositioning of nucleosomes at sites which could increase or decrease the probability of gene expression based on DNA accessibility. Half of the drug-induced nucleosome positions approximated a theoretical model of nucleosome occupancy based on physical and chemical characteristics of the DNA sequence, whereas the basal or drug naïve positions were generally DNA sequence independent. Thus we suggest that nucleosome repositioning represents an initial dynamic genome-wide alteration of the transcriptional landscape preceding more selective downstream transcriptional reprogramming, which ultimately characterizes the cell- and tissue-specific responses to drugs of abuse.

  1. Nucleosome Repositioning: A Novel Mechanism for Nicotine- and Cocaine-Induced Epigenetic Changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Amber N; Vied, Cynthia; Dennis, Jonathan H; Bhide, Pradeep G

    2015-01-01

    Drugs of abuse modify behavior by altering gene expression in the brain. Gene expression can be regulated by changes in DNA methylation as well as by histone modifications, which alter chromatin structure, DNA compaction and DNA accessibility. In order to better understand the molecular mechanisms directing drug-induced changes in chromatin structure, we examined DNA-nucleosome interactions within promoter regions of 858 genes in human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y) exposed to nicotine or cocaine. Widespread, drug- and time-resolved repositioning of nucleosomes was identified at the transcription start site and promoter region of multiple genes. Nicotine and cocaine produced unique and shared changes in terms of the numbers and types of genes affected, as well as repositioning of nucleosomes at sites which could increase or decrease the probability of gene expression based on DNA accessibility. Half of the drug-induced nucleosome positions approximated a theoretical model of nucleosome occupancy based on physical and chemical characteristics of the DNA sequence, whereas the basal or drug naïve positions were generally DNA sequence independent. Thus we suggest that nucleosome repositioning represents an initial dynamic genome-wide alteration of the transcriptional landscape preceding more selective downstream transcriptional reprogramming, which ultimately characterizes the cell- and tissue-specific responses to drugs of abuse.

  2. Signal differentiation in position tracking control of dc motors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beltran-Carbajal, F; Valderrabano-Gonzalez, A; Rosas-Caro, J C

    2015-01-01

    An asymptotic differentiation approach with respect to time is used for on-line estimation of velocity and acceleration signals in controlled dc motors. The attractive feature of this differentiator of signals is that it does not require any system mathematical model, which allows its use in engineering systems that require the signal differentiation for its control, identification, fault detection, among other applications. Moreover, it is shown that the differentiation approach can be applied for output signals showing a chaotic behavior. In addition a differential flatness control scheme with additional integral compensation of the output error is proposed for tracking tasks of position reference trajectories for direct current electric motors using angular position measurements only

  3. Translation efficiency in yeasts correlates with nucleosome formation in promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matushkin, Yu G; Levitsky, V G; Orlov, Yu L; Likhoshvai, V A; Kolchanov, N A

    2013-01-01

    Elongation efficiency index (EEI) was suggested earlier to estimate gene expression efficiency by nucleotide context of coding sequence in unicellular organisms. We have analyzed association between EEI and nucleosome formation potential (NFP) in 5' regulatory regions upstream translation initiation site (TIS) from two yeast species. Theoretical estimations of NFP based on DNA sequence were obtained by Recon method. Experimental estimation of nucleosome occupancy was obtained by high-throughput sequencing data of nucleosomal DNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae . For the sample of all genes correlation coefficient was calculated between two vectors: vector of NFP values for fixed position relative to TIS and vector of EEI values. Profiles of correlation coefficients of NFP and EEI were counted in (-600; +600) regions relative to TIS for gene sequences extracted from GenBank. We found regions of strong negative dependence between NFP and EEI for all genes as well as for 10% highly expressed genes in Schizosaccharomyces pombe (10% of EEI-highest genes). At the same time, we found positive dependence between NFP and EEI for all genes and for low expressed genes in S. cerevisiae (10% of EEI-lowest genes). The association between NFP and EEI could be explained by evolutionary selection of context characteristics of nucleotide sequences for gene expression optimization.

  4. Automated Astrophysical False Positive Analysis of Transiting Planet Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Timothy

    2015-08-01

    Beginning with Kepler, but continuing with K2 and TESS, transiting planet candidates are now found at a much faster rate than follow-up observations can be obtained. Thus, distinguishing true planet candidates from astrophysical false positives has become primarily a statistical exercise. I will describe a new publicly available open-source Python package for analyzing the astrophysical false positive probabilities of transiting exoplanet signals. In addition, I will present results of applying this analysis to both Kepler and K2 planet candidates, resulting in the probabilistic validation of thousands of exoplanets, as well as identifying many likely false positives.

  5. Nucleosomes in serum as a marker for cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdenrieder, S; Stieber, P; Bodenmüller, H; Fertig, G; Fürst, H; Schmeller, N; Untch, M; Seidel, D

    2001-07-01

    The concentration of nucleosomes is elevated in blood of patients with diseases which are associated with enhanced cell death. In order to detect these circulating nucleosomes, we used the Cell Death Detection-ELISAplus (CDDE) from Roche Diagnostics (Mannheim, Germany) (details at http:\\\\biochem.roche.com). For its application in liquid materials we performed various modifications: we introduced a standard curve with nucleosome-rich material, which enabled direct quantification and improved comparability of the values within (CVintraassay:3.0-4.11%) and between several runs (CVinterassay:8.6-13.5%), and tested the analytical specificity of the ELISA. Because of the fast elimination of nucleosomes from circulation and their limited stability, we compared plasma and serum matrix and investigated in detail the pre-analytical handling of serum samples which can considerably influence the test results. Careless venipuncture producing hemolysis, delayed centrifugation and bacterial contamination of the blood samples led to false-positive results; delayed stabilization with EDTA and insufficient storage conditions resulted in false-negative values. At temperatures of -20 degrees C, serum samples which were treated with 10 mM EDTA were stable for at least 6 months. In order to avoid possible interfering factors, we recommend a schedule for the pre-analytical handling of the samples. As the first stage, the possible clinical application was investigated in the sera of 310 persons. Patients with solid tumors (n=220; mean=361 Arbitrary Units (AU)) had considerably higher values than healthy persons (n=50; mean=30 AU; p=0.0001) and patients with inflammatory diseases (n=40; mean= 296 AU; p=0.096). Within the group of patients with tumors, those in advanced stages (UICC 4) showed significantly higher values than those in early stages (UICC 1-3) (p=0.0004).

  6. Spatial signals link exit from mitosis to spindle position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Jill Elaine; Tsuchiya, Dai; Verdaasdonk, Jolien; Lacefield, Soni; Bloom, Kerry; Amon, Angelika

    2016-05-11

    In budding yeast, if the spindle becomes mispositioned, cells prevent exit from mitosis by inhibiting the mitotic exit network (MEN). The MEN is a signaling cascade that localizes to spindle pole bodies (SPBs) and activates the phosphatase Cdc14. There are two competing models that explain MEN regulation by spindle position. In the 'zone model', exit from mitosis occurs when a MEN-bearing SPB enters the bud. The 'cMT-bud neck model' posits that cytoplasmic microtubule (cMT)-bud neck interactions prevent MEN activity. Here we find that 1) eliminating cMT- bud neck interactions does not trigger exit from mitosis and 2) loss of these interactions does not precede Cdc14 activation. Furthermore, using binucleate cells, we show that exit from mitosis occurs when one SPB enters the bud despite the presence of a mispositioned spindle. We conclude that exit from mitosis is triggered by a correctly positioned spindle rather than inhibited by improper spindle position.

  7. DMPD: When signaling pathways collide: positive and negative regulation of toll-likereceptor signal transduction. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18631453 When signaling pathways collide: positive and negative regulation of toll-...uction. PubmedID 18631453 Title When signaling pathways collide: positive and neg...l) Show When signaling pathways collide: positive and negative regulation of toll-likereceptor signal transd...likereceptor signal transduction. O'Neill LA. Immunity. 2008 Jul 18;29(1):12-20. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csm

  8. An advanced coarse-grained nucleosome core particle model for computer simulations of nucleosome-nucleosome interactions under varying ionic conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanping Fan

    Full Text Available In the eukaryotic cell nucleus, DNA exists as chromatin, a compact but dynamic complex with histone proteins. The first level of DNA organization is the linear array of nucleosome core particles (NCPs. The NCP is a well-defined complex of 147 bp DNA with an octamer of histones. Interactions between NCPs are of paramount importance for higher levels of chromatin compaction. The polyelectrolyte nature of the NCP implies that nucleosome-nucleosome interactions must exhibit a great influence from both the ionic environment as well as the positively charged and highly flexible N-terminal histone tails, protruding out from the NCP. The large size of the system precludes a modelling analysis of chromatin at an all-atom level and calls for coarse-grained approximations. Here, a model of the NCP that include the globular histone core and the flexible histone tails described by one particle per each amino acid and taking into account their net charge is proposed. DNA wrapped around the histone core was approximated at the level of two base pairs represented by one bead (bases and sugar plus four beads of charged phosphate groups. Computer simulations, using a Langevin thermostat, in a dielectric continuum with explicit monovalent (K(+, divalent (Mg(2+ or trivalent (Co(NH(3(6 (3+ cations were performed for systems with one or ten NCPs. Increase of the counterion charge results in a switch from repulsive NCP-NCP interaction in the presence of K(+, to partial aggregation with Mg(2+ and to strong mutual attraction of all 10 NCPs in the presence of CoHex(3+. The new model reproduced experimental results and the structure of the NCP-NCP contacts is in agreement with available data. Cation screening, ion-ion correlations and tail bridging contribute to the NCP-NCP attraction and the new NCP model accounts for these interactions.

  9. From nucleosome to chromosome: a dynamic organization of genetic information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fransz, P.F.; Jong, de J.H.S.G.M.

    2011-01-01

    Gene activity is controlled at different levels of chromatin organization, which involve genomic sequences, nucleosome structure, chromatin folding and chromosome arrangement. These levels are interconnected and influence each other. At the basic level nucleosomes generally occlude the DNA sequence

  10. From nucleosome to chromosome : a dynamic organization of genetic information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fransz, P.; de Jong, H.

    2011-01-01

    Gene activity is controlled at different levels of chromatin organization, which involve genomic sequences, nucleosome structure, chromatin folding and chromosome arrangement. These levels are interconnected and influence each other. At the basic level nucleosomes generally occlude the DNA sequence

  11. Nucleosome dynamics: HMGB1 facilitates nucleosome restructuring and collaborates in estrogen-responsive gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William M. Scovell

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The genome in the human cell is extraordinarily compacted in the nucleus. As a result, much of the DNA is inaccessible and functionally inert. Notwithstanding the highly efficient packaging, mechanisms have evolved to render DNA sites accessible that then enable a multitude of factors to carry out ongoing and vital functions. The compaction is derived from DNA complexation within nucleosomes, which can further consolidate into a higher-order chromatin structure. The nucleosome and nucleosomal DNA are not static in nature, but are dynamic, undergoing structural and functional changes as the cell responds to stresses and/or metabolic or environmental cues. We are only beginning to understand the forces and the complexes that engage the nucleosome to unearth the tightly bound and inaccessible DNA sequences and provide an opening to more accessible target sites. In many cases, current findings support a major role for the action of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes (CRCs in providing an avenue to factor accessibility that leads to the activation of transcription. The estrogen receptor α (ERα does not bind to the estrogen response element (ERE in the canonical nucleosome. However, evidence will be presented that HMGB1 restructures the nucleosome in an ATP-independent manner and also facilitates access and strong binding of ERα to ERE. The features that appear important in the mechanism of action for HMGB1 will be highlighted, in addition to the characteristic features of the restructured nucleosome. These findings, together with previous evidence, suggest a collaborative role for HMGB1 in the step-wise transcription of estrogen-responsive genes. In addition, alternate mechanistic pathways will be discussed, with consideration that “HMGB1 restructuring” of the nucleosome may generally be viewed as a perturbation of the equilibrium of an ensemble of nearly isoenergetic nucleosome states in an energy landscape that is driven by

  12. Optimization of signal processing algorithm for digital beam position monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai Longwei; Yi Xing; Leng Yongbin; Yan Yingbing; Chen Zhichu

    2013-01-01

    Based on turn-by-turn (TBT) signal processing, the paper emphasizes on the optimization of system timing and implementation of digital automatic gain control, slow application (SA) modules. Beam position including TBT, fast application (FA) and SA data can be acquired. On-line evaluation on Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF) shows that the processor is able to get the multi-rate position data which contain true beam movements. When the storage ring is 174 mA and 500 bunches filled, the resolutions of TBT data, FA data and SA data achieve 0.84, 0.44 and 0.23 μm respectively. The above results prove that the design could meet the performance requirements. (authors)

  13. Hunger neurons drive feeding through a sustained, positive reinforcement signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yiming; Lin, Yen-Chu; Zimmerman, Christopher A; Essner, Rachel A; Knight, Zachary A

    2016-08-24

    The neural mechanisms underlying hunger are poorly understood. AgRP neurons are activated by energy deficit and promote voracious food consumption, suggesting these cells may supply the fundamental hunger drive that motivates feeding. However recent in vivo recording experiments revealed that AgRP neurons are inhibited within seconds by the sensory detection of food, raising the question of how these cells can promote feeding at all. Here we resolve this paradox by showing that brief optogenetic stimulation of AgRP neurons before food availability promotes intense appetitive and consummatory behaviors that persist for tens of minutes in the absence of continued AgRP neuron activation. We show that these sustained behavioral responses are mediated by a long-lasting potentiation of the rewarding properties of food and that AgRP neuron activity is positively reinforcing. These findings reveal that hunger neurons drive feeding by transmitting a positive valence signal that triggers a stable transition between behavioral states.

  14. Regulation of Nucleosome Stacking and Chromatin Compaction by the Histone H4 N-Terminal Tail-H2A Acidic Patch Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qinming; Yang, Renliang; Korolev, Nikolay; Liu, Chuan Fa; Nordenskiöld, Lars

    2017-06-30

    Chromatin folding and dynamics are critically dependent on nucleosome-nucleosome interactions with important contributions from internucleosome binding of the histone H4 N-terminal tail K16-R23 domain to the surface of the H2A/H2B dimer. The H4 Lys16 plays a pivotal role in this regard. Using in vitro reconstituted 12-mer nucleosome arrays, we have investigated the mechanism of the H4 N-terminal tail in maintaining nucleosome-nucleosome stacking and mediating intra- and inter-array chromatin compaction, with emphasis on the role of K16 and the positive charge region, R17-R23. Analytical ultracentrifugation sedimentation velocity experiments and precipitation assays were employed to analyze effects on chromatin folding and self-association, respectively. Effects on chromatin folding caused by various mutations and modifications at position K16 in the H4 histone were studied. Additionally, using charge-quenching mutations, we characterized the importance of the interaction of the residues within the H4 positive charge region R17-R23 with the H2A acidic patch of the adjacent nucleosome. Furthermore, crosslinking experiments were conducted to establish the proximity of the basic tail region to the acidic patch. Our data indicate that the positive charge and length of the side chain of H4 K16 are important for its access to the adjacent nucleosome in the process of nucleosome-nucleosome stacking and array folding. The location and orientation of the H4 R17-R23 domain on the H2A/H2B dimer surface of the neighboring nucleosome core particle (NCP) in the compacted chromatin fiber were established. The dominance of electrostatic interactions in maintaining intra-array interaction was demonstrated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Extracellular histones, cell-free DNA, or nucleosomes: differences in immunostimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsman, Gerben; Zeerleder, Sacha; Luken, Brenda M

    2016-12-08

    In inflammation, extensive cell death may occur, which results in the release of chromatin components into the extracellular environment. Individually, the purified chromatin components double stranded (ds)DNA and histones have been demonstrated, both in vitro and in vivo, to display various immunostimulatory effects, for example, histones induce cytotoxicity and proinflammatory signaling through toll-like receptor (TLR)2 and 4, while DNA induces signaling through TLR9 and intracellular nucleic acid sensing mechanisms. However, DNA and histones are organized in nucleosomes in the nucleus, and evidence suggests that nucleosomes are released as such in inflammation. The cytotoxicity and proinflammatory signaling induced by nucleosomes have not been studied as extensively as the separate effects brought about by histones and dsDNA, and there appear to be some marked differences. Remarkably, little distinction between the different forms in which histones circulate has been made throughout literature. This is partly due to the limitations of existing techniques to differentiate between histones in their free or DNA-bound form. Here we review the current understanding of immunostimulation induced by extracellular histones, dsDNA and nucleosomes, and discuss the importance of techniques that in their detection differentiate between these different chromatin components.

  16. Transcription factor binding sites prediction based on modified nucleosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Talebzadeh

    Full Text Available In computational methods, position weight matrices (PWMs are commonly applied for transcription factor binding site (TFBS prediction. Although these matrices are more accurate than simple consensus sequences to predict actual binding sites, they usually produce a large number of false positive (FP predictions and so are impoverished sources of information. Several studies have employed additional sources of information such as sequence conservation or the vicinity to transcription start sites to distinguish true binding regions from random ones. Recently, the spatial distribution of modified nucleosomes has been shown to be associated with different promoter architectures. These aligned patterns can facilitate DNA accessibility for transcription factors. We hypothesize that using data from these aligned and periodic patterns can improve the performance of binding region prediction. In this study, we propose two effective features, "modified nucleosomes neighboring" and "modified nucleosomes occupancy", to decrease FP in binding site discovery. Based on these features, we designed a logistic regression classifier which estimates the probability of a region as a TFBS. Our model learned each feature based on Sp1 binding sites on Chromosome 1 and was tested on the other chromosomes in human CD4+T cells. In this work, we investigated 21 histone modifications and found that only 8 out of 21 marks are strongly correlated with transcription factor binding regions. To prove that these features are not specific to Sp1, we combined the logistic regression classifier with the PWM, and created a new model to search TFBSs on the genome. We tested the model using transcription factors MAZ, PU.1 and ELF1 and compared the results to those using only the PWM. The results show that our model can predict Transcription factor binding regions more successfully. The relative simplicity of the model and capability of integrating other features make it a superior method

  17. Nucleosomal DNA fragments in autoimmune diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holdenrieder, Stefan; Eichhorn, Peter; Beuers, Ulrich; Samtleben, Walter; Schoenermarck, Ulf; Zachoval, Reinhart; Nagel, Dorothea; Stieber, Petra

    2006-01-01

    The inadequate response of immune cells to circulating apoptotic products, such as nucleosomal DNA fragments, is assumed to be a potent stimulus for the production of autoantibodies during the pathogenesis and progression of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Here, we analyzed the levels of

  18. A T9G mutation in the prototype TATA-box TCACTATATATAG determines nucleosome formation and synergy with upstream activator sequences in plant promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, Amol; Ansari, Suraiya A; Srivastava, Rakesh; Mantri, Shrikant; Asif, Mehar H; Sawant, Samir V; Tuli, Rakesh

    2009-12-01

    We had earlier reported that mutations to G and C at the seventh and eighth positions in the prototype TATA-box TCACTATATATAG inhibited light-dependent activation of transcription from the promoter. In this study, we characterized mutations at the ninth position of the prototype TATA-box. Substitution of T at the ninth position with G or C enhanced transcription from the promoter in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants. The effect of T9G/C mutations was not light dependent, although the 9G/C TATA-box showed synergy with the light-responsive element (lre). However, the 9G/C mutants in the presence of lre failed to respond to phytochromes, sugar, and calcium signaling, in contrast to the prototype TATA-box with lre. The 9G/C mutation shifted the point of initiation of transcription, and transcription activation was dependent upon the type of activating element present upstream. The synergy in activation was noticed with lre and legumin activators but not with rbcS, Pcec, and PR-1a activators. The 9G mutation resulted in a micrococcal nuclease-sensitive region over the TATA-box, suggesting a nucleosome-free region, in contrast to the prototype promoter, which had a distinct nucleosome on the TATA-box. Thus, the transcriptional augmentation with mutation at the ninth position might be because of the loss of a repressive nucleosomal structure on the TATA-box. In agreement with our findings, the promoters containing TATAGATA as identified by genome-wide analysis of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) are not tightly repressed.

  19. Interaction of influenza virus proteins with nucleosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Robles, Inmaculada; Akarsu, Hatice; Mueller, Christoph W.; Ruigrok, Rob W.H.; Baudin, Florence

    2005-01-01

    During influenza virus infection, transcription and replication of the viral RNA take place in the cell nucleus. Directly after entry in the nucleus the viral ribonucleoproteins (RNPs, the viral subunits containing vRNA, nucleoprotein and the viral polymerase) are tightly associated with the nuclear matrix. Here, we have analysed the binding of RNPs, M1 and NS2/NEP proteins to purified nucleosomes, reconstituted histone octamers and purified single histones. RNPs and M1 both bind to the chromatin components but at two different sites, RNP to the histone tails and M1 to the globular domain of the histone octamer. NS2/NEP did not bind to nucleosomes at all. The possible consequences of these findings for nuclear release of newly made RNPs and for other processes during the infection cycle are discussed

  20. Nucleosome breathing and remodeling constrain CRISPR-Cas9 function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, R Stefan; Jiang, Fuguo; Doudna, Jennifer A; Lim, Wendell A; Narlikar, Geeta J; Almeida, Ricardo

    2016-04-28

    The CRISPR-Cas9 bacterial surveillance system has become a versatile tool for genome editing and gene regulation in eukaryotic cells, yet how CRISPR-Cas9 contends with the barriers presented by eukaryotic chromatin is poorly understood. Here we investigate how the smallest unit of chromatin, a nucleosome, constrains the activity of the CRISPR-Cas9 system. We find that nucleosomes assembled on native DNA sequences are permissive to Cas9 action. However, the accessibility of nucleosomal DNA to Cas9 is variable over several orders of magnitude depending on dynamic properties of the DNA sequence and the distance of the PAM site from the nucleosome dyad. We further find that chromatin remodeling enzymes stimulate Cas9 activity on nucleosomal templates. Our findings imply that the spontaneous breathing of nucleosomal DNA together with the action of chromatin remodelers allow Cas9 to effectively act on chromatin in vivo.

  1. Positional information generated by spatially distributed signaling cascades.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Muñoz-García

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The temporal and stationary behavior of protein modification cascades has been extensively studied, yet little is known about the spatial aspects of signal propagation. We have previously shown that the spatial separation of opposing enzymes, such as a kinase and a phosphatase, creates signaling activity gradients. Here we show under what conditions signals stall in the space or robustly propagate through spatially distributed signaling cascades. Robust signal propagation results in activity gradients with long plateaus, which abruptly decay at successive spatial locations. We derive an approximate analytical solution that relates the maximal amplitude and propagation length of each activation profile with the cascade level, protein diffusivity, and the ratio of the opposing enzyme activities. The control of the spatial signal propagation appears to be very different from the control of transient temporal responses for spatially homogenous cascades. For spatially distributed cascades where activating and deactivating enzymes operate far from saturation, the ratio of the opposing enzyme activities is shown to be a key parameter controlling signal propagation. The signaling gradients characteristic for robust signal propagation exemplify a pattern formation mechanism that generates precise spatial guidance for multiple cellular processes and conveys information about the cell size to the nucleus.

  2. Genome-wide chromatin mapping with size resolution reveals a dynamic sub-nucleosomal landscape in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pass, Daniel Antony; Sornay, Emily; Marchbank, Angela; Crawford, Margaret R; Paszkiewicz, Konrad; Kent, Nicholas A; Murray, James A H

    2017-09-01

    All eukaryotic genomes are packaged as chromatin, with DNA interlaced with both regularly patterned nucleosomes and sub-nucleosomal-sized protein structures such as mobile and labile transcription factors (TF) and initiation complexes, together forming a dynamic chromatin landscape. Whilst details of nucleosome position in Arabidopsis have been previously analysed, there is less understanding of their relationship to more dynamic sub-nucleosomal particles (subNSPs) defined as protected regions shorter than the ~150bp typical of nucleosomes. The genome-wide profile of these subNSPs has not been previously analysed in plants and this study investigates the relationship of dynamic bound particles with transcriptional control. Here we combine differential micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digestion and a modified paired-end sequencing protocol to reveal the chromatin structure landscape of Arabidopsis cells across a wide particle size range. Linking this data to RNAseq expression analysis provides detailed insight into the relationship of identified DNA-bound particles with transcriptional activity. The use of differential digestion reveals sensitive positions, including a labile -1 nucleosome positioned upstream of the transcription start site (TSS) of active genes. We investigated the response of the chromatin landscape to changes in environmental conditions using light and dark growth, given the large transcriptional changes resulting from this simple alteration. The resulting shifts in the suites of expressed and repressed genes show little correspondence to changes in nucleosome positioning, but led to significant alterations in the profile of subNSPs upstream of TSS both globally and locally. We examined previously mapped positions for the TFs PIF3, PIF4 and CCA1, which regulate light responses, and found that changes in subNSPs co-localized with these binding sites. This small particle structure is detected only under low levels of MNase digestion and is lost on more

  3. NUCKS Is a Positive Transcriptional Regulator of Insulin Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beiying Qiu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Although much is known about the molecular players in insulin signaling, there is scant information about transcriptional regulation of its key components. We now find that NUCKS is a transcriptional regulator of the insulin signaling components, including the insulin receptor (IR. Knockdown of NUCKS leads to impaired insulin signaling in endocrine cells. NUCKS knockout mice exhibit decreased insulin signaling and increased body weight/fat mass along with impaired glucose tolerance and reduced insulin sensitivity, all of which are further exacerbated by a high-fat diet (HFD. Genome-wide ChIP-seq identifies metabolism and insulin signaling as NUCKS targets. Importantly, NUCKS is downregulated in individuals with a high body mass index and in HFD-fed mice, and conversely, its levels increase upon starvation. Altogether, NUCKS is a physiological regulator of energy homeostasis and glucose metabolism that works by regulating chromatin accessibility and RNA polymerase II recruitment to the promoters of IR and other insulin pathway modulators.

  4. Staphylococcus aureus protease: a probe of exposed, non-basic histone sequences in nucleosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rill, R.L.; Oosterhof, D.K.

    1980-01-01

    The digestion of histones in chicken erythrocyte nucleosome cores and chromatin by Staphylococcus aureus protease was examined. This protease cleaves specifically at acidic residues and prefers glu-X bonds under the conditions used. Only 1 of 24 glutamic and 2 of 13 aspartic acids among all four core histones are located in basic, amino-terminal tails, hence staph. protease is a highly specific probe of exposed non-basic sequences. Staph. protease readily degraded H1, H5, and H3; moderately degraded H2b, and only slightly degraded H2a and H4 in nucleosomes and nucleosome cores. Electrophoresis of core histone fragments from limited digests showed that most glutamic acids were inaccessible, but at least five sites in non-basic sequences were readily cleaved. Tentative assignments of these fragments based on comparisons with products from limited digests of pure histones suggested that most accessible sites in nucleosome cores occur in H3. The most probable sites of H3 cutting are glutamic acids at positions 51, 60, 73, 94, and 97. At least one site in H2b, probably the equivalent of glu-105 in the calf H2b sequence, was accessible. No sites in H2a and H4 appeared highly accessible. H5 was readily cleaved at a site near the amino-terminus. These data substantiate the other evidence that non-basic core histone sequences are located primarily in the nucleosome interior, but that H3 binds to the ends of core DNA and thereby is partly exposed as the upper and lower surfaces of the disk-shaped core.

  5. Nucleosome structure of the yeast CHA1 promoter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moreira, José Manuel Alfonso; Holmberg, S

    1998-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae CHA1 gene encodes the catabolic L-serine (L-threonine) dehydratase. We have previously shown that the transcriptional activator protein Cha4p mediates serine/threonine induction of CHA1 expression. We used accessibility to micrococcal nuclease and DNase I to determine...... the in vivo chromatin structure of the CHA1 chromosomal locus, both in the non-induced state and upon induction. Upon activation, a precisely positioned nucleosome (nuc-1) occluding the TATA box and the transcription start site is removed. A strain devoid of Cha4p showed no chromatin alteration under inducing......, in a sir4 deletion strain, repression of CHA1 is partly lost and activator-independent remodeling of nuc-1 is observed. We propose a model for CHA1 activation based on promoter remodeling through interactions of Cha4p with chromatin components other than basal factors and associated proteins....

  6. Nucleosomal arrangement affects single-molecule transcription dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitz, Veronika; Shin, Jaeoh; Ehrlich, Christoph; Farnung, Lucas; Cramer, Patrick; Zaburdaev, Vasily; Grill, Stephan W

    2016-10-24

    In eukaryotes, gene expression depends on chromatin organization. However, how chromatin affects the transcription dynamics of individual RNA polymerases has remained elusive. Here, we use dual trap optical tweezers to study single yeast RNA polymerase II (Pol II) molecules transcribing along a DNA template with two nucleosomes. The slowdown and the changes in pausing behavior within the nucleosomal region allow us to determine a drift coefficient, χ, which characterizes the ability of the enzyme to recover from a nucleosomal backtrack. Notably, χ can be used to predict the probability to pass the first nucleosome. Importantly, the presence of a second nucleosome changes χ in a manner that depends on the spacing between the two nucleosomes, as well as on their rotational arrangement on the helical DNA molecule. Our results indicate that the ability of Pol II to pass the first nucleosome is increased when the next nucleosome is turned away from the first one to face the opposite side of the DNA template. These findings help to rationalize how chromatin arrangement affects Pol II transcription dynamics.

  7. Hinge and chromoshadow of HP1α participate in recognition of K9 methylated histone H3 in nucleosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishima, Yuichi; Watanabe, Makoto; Kawakami, Toru; Jayasinghe, Chanika D; Otani, Junji; Kikugawa, Yusuke; Shirakawa, Masahiro; Kimura, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Osamu; Aimoto, Saburo; Tajima, Shoji; Suetake, Isao

    2013-01-09

    The majority of the genome in eukaryotes is packaged into transcriptionally inactive chromatin. Heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) is a major player in the establishment and maintenance of heterochromatin. HP1 specifically recognizes a methylated lysine residue at position 9 in histone H3 through its N-terminal chromo domain (CD). To elucidate the binding properties of HP1α to nucleosomes in vitro, we reconstituted nucleosomes containing histone H3 trimethylated at lysine 9. HP1α exhibited high-affinity binding to nucleosomes containing methylated histone H3 in a nucleosome core-number-dependent manner. The hinge region (HR) connecting the CD and C-terminal chromoshadow domain (CSD), and the CSD contributed to the selective binding of HP1α to histone H3 with trimethylated lysine 9 through weak DNA binding and by suppressing the DNA binding, respectively. We propose that not only the specific recognition of lysine 9 methylation of histone H3 by the CD but also the HR and the CSD cooperatively contribute to the selective binding of HP1α to histone H3 lysine 9 methylated nucleosomes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Cell-free DNA Comprises an In Vivo Nucleosome Footprint that Informs Its Tissues-Of-Origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Matthew W; Kircher, Martin; Hill, Andrew J; Daza, Riza M; Shendure, Jay

    2016-01-14

    Nucleosome positioning varies between cell types. By deep sequencing cell-free DNA (cfDNA), isolated from circulating blood plasma, we generated maps of genome-wide in vivo nucleosome occupancy and found that short cfDNA fragments harbor footprints of transcription factors. The cfDNA nucleosome occupancies correlate well with the nuclear architecture, gene structure, and expression observed in cells, suggesting that they could inform the cell type of origin. Nucleosome spacing inferred from cfDNA in healthy individuals correlates most strongly with epigenetic features of lymphoid and myeloid cells, consistent with hematopoietic cell death as the normal source of cfDNA. We build on this observation to show how nucleosome footprints can be used to infer cell types contributing to cfDNA in pathological states such as cancer. Since this strategy does not rely on genetic differences to distinguish between contributing tissues, it may enable the noninvasive monitoring of a much broader set of clinical conditions than currently possible. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Plasma levels of nucleosomes and nucleosome-autoantibody complexes in murine lupus: effects of disease progression and lipopolyssacharide administration.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Licht, R.; Bruggen, M.C.J. van; Oppers-Walgreen, B.; Rijke, T.P.M.; Berden, J.H.M.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of disease progression and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration on the presence of nucleosomes, antinucleosome reactivity, and nucleosome-Ig complexes in the circulation of MRL and control mice. METHODS: Plasma samples from lupus-prone (MRL/lpr and MRL/+) and

  10. Genome-wide signals of positive selection in human evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enard, David; Messer, Philipp W; Petrov, Dmitri A

    2014-06-01

    The role of positive selection in human evolution remains controversial. On the one hand, scans for positive selection have identified hundreds of candidate loci, and the genome-wide patterns of polymorphism show signatures consistent with frequent positive selection. On the other hand, recent studies have argued that many of the candidate loci are false positives and that most genome-wide signatures of adaptation are in fact due to reduction of neutral diversity by linked deleterious mutations, known as background selection. Here we analyze human polymorphism data from the 1000 Genomes Project and detect signatures of positive selection once we correct for the effects of background selection. We show that levels of neutral polymorphism are lower near amino acid substitutions, with the strongest reduction observed specifically near functionally consequential amino acid substitutions. Furthermore, amino acid substitutions are associated with signatures of recent adaptation that should not be generated by background selection, such as unusually long and frequent haplotypes and specific distortions in the site frequency spectrum. We use forward simulations to argue that the observed signatures require a high rate of strongly adaptive substitutions near amino acid changes. We further demonstrate that the observed signatures of positive selection correlate better with the presence of regulatory sequences, as predicted by the ENCODE Project Consortium, than with the positions of amino acid substitutions. Our results suggest that adaptation was frequent in human evolution and provide support for the hypothesis of King and Wilson that adaptive divergence is primarily driven by regulatory changes. © 2014 Enard et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  11. Algorithms for Indoor Positioning Systems Using Ultra-Wideband Signals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yan, J.

    2010-01-01

    Positioning systems and techniques have attracted more and more attention in recent years, in particular with satellite navigation technology as a tremendous enabler, and developments in indoor navigation. The work presented in this thesis has been conducted within the research project: \\HERE:

  12. Inductive Loops for Sensing Position as Signature Signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larbani, Sofiane; Malik, Noreha Abdul; Nordin, Anis Norashikin; Khan, Sheroz; Shobaki, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, an inductive sensing technique made of a special shaped inductive loop is proposed. The inductive loop has an inner turn fitted within an outer turn, making a total inductance value 100μH. This loop is made to be shown with balanced response using three capacitance values of 0.068μF each when a sinusoidal voltage source of 5V peak-to-peak is applied. The variation of the relative permeability of the inductance of the inductive loop (AL) results in a variation of the overall inductance value (L+AL), that causes the output signal to change in term of shape and amplitude for variation of total inductance sweep over a given period of time. As a result of change in inductance value (lμH) there is a correspondence increase of 300mV. Theoretical derivations have showed in close agreement with the simulation plots obtained using Multisim software

  13. Inductive Loops for Sensing Position as Signature Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larbani, Sofiane; Malik, Noreha Abdul; Norashikin Nordin, Anis; Khan, Sheroz; Shobaki, Mohammad

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, an inductive sensing technique made of a special shaped inductive loop is proposed. The inductive loop has an inner turn fitted within an outer turn, making a total inductance value 100μH. This loop is made to be shown with balanced response using three capacitance values of 0.068μF each when a sinusoidal voltage source of 5V peak-to-peak is applied. The variation of the relative permeability of the inductance of the inductive loop (AL) results in a variation of the overall inductance value (L+AL), that causes the output signal to change in term of shape and amplitude for variation of total inductance sweep over a given period of time. As a result of change in inductance value (lμH) there is a correspondence increase of 300mV. Theoretical derivations have showed in close agreement with the simulation plots obtained using Multisim software.

  14. Wnt signaling positively regulates endothelial cell fate specification in the Fli1a-positive progenitor population via Lef1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hübner, Kathleen; Grassme, Kathrin S; Rao, Jyoti; Wenke, Nina K; Zimmer, Cordula L; Korte, Laura; Mu Ller, Katja; Sumanas, Saulius; Greber, Boris; Herzog, Wiebke

    2017-10-01

    During vertebrate embryogenesis, vascular endothelial cells (ECs) and primitive erythrocytes become specified within close proximity in the posterior lateral plate mesoderm (LPM) from a common progenitor. However, the signaling cascades regulating the specification into either lineage remain largely elusive. Here, we analyze the contribution of β-catenin dependent Wnt signaling to EC and erythrocyte specification during zebrafish embryogenesis. We generated novel β-catenin dependent Wnt signaling reporters which, by using destabilized fluorophores (Venus-Pest, dGFP), specifically allow us to detect Wnt signaling responses in narrow time windows as well as in spatially restricted domains, defined by Cre recombinase expression (Tg(axin2 BAC :Venus-Pest) mu288 ; Tg(14TCF:loxP-STOP-loxP-dGFP) mu202 ). We therefore can detect β-catenin dependent Wnt signaling activity in a subset of the Fli1a-positive progenitor population. Additionally, we show that mesodermal Wnt3a-mediated signaling via the transcription factor Lef1 positively regulates EC specification (defined by kdrl expression) at the expense of primitive erythrocyte specification (defined by gata1 expression) in zebrafish embryos. Using mesoderm derived from human embryonic stem cells, we identified the same principle of Wnt signaling dependent EC specification in conjunction with auto-upregulation of LEF1. Our data indicate a novel role of β-catenin dependent Wnt signaling in regulating EC specification during vasculogenesis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Distinct transcriptional programs in thymocytes responding to T cell receptor, Notch, and positive selection signals

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Yina H.; Li, Dongling; Winoto, Astar; Robey, Ellen A.

    2004-01-01

    T cell antigen receptor (TCR) signaling is necessary but not sufficient to promote the positive selection of CD4+CD8+ thymocytes into CD4+ or CD8+ mature T cells. Notch signaling has also been implicated as a potential regulator of both CD4/CD8 T cell development and TCR signaling. However, the relationship between positive selection, TCR signaling, and Notch remains unclear. Here we use DNA microarray analysis to compare gene expression changes in CD4+CD8+ double-positive thymocytes undergoi...

  16. A D53 repression motif induces oligomerization of TOPLESS corepressors and promotes assembly of a corepressor-nucleosome complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Honglei; Duan, Jingbo; Ke, Jiyuan; He, Yuanzheng; Gu, Xin; Xu, Ting-Hai; Yu, Hong; Wang, Yonghong; Brunzelle, Joseph S; Jiang, Yi; Rothbart, Scott B; Xu, H Eric; Li, Jiayang; Melcher, Karsten

    2017-06-01

    TOPLESS are tetrameric plant corepressors of the conserved Tup1/Groucho/TLE (transducin-like enhancer of split) family. We show that they interact through their TOPLESS domains (TPDs) with two functionally important ethylene response factor-associated amphiphilic repression (EAR) motifs of the rice strigolactone signaling repressor D53: the universally conserved EAR-3 and the monocot-specific EAR-2. We present the crystal structure of the monocot-specific EAR-2 peptide in complex with the TOPLESS-related protein 2 (TPR2) TPD, in which the EAR-2 motif binds the same TPD groove as jasmonate and auxin signaling repressors but makes additional contacts with a second TPD site to mediate TPD tetramer-tetramer interaction. We validated the functional relevance of the two TPD binding sites in reporter gene assays and in transgenic rice and demonstrate that EAR-2 binding induces TPD oligomerization. Moreover, we demonstrate that the TPD directly binds nucleosomes and the tails of histones H3 and H4. Higher-order assembly of TPD complexes induced by EAR-2 binding markedly stabilizes the nucleosome-TPD interaction. These results establish a new TPD-repressor binding mode that promotes TPD oligomerization and TPD-nucleosome interaction, thus illustrating the initial assembly of a repressor-corepressor-nucleosome complex.

  17. Nucleosome fragility reveals novel functional states of chromatin and poises genes for activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Yuanxin; Yao, Jianhui; Chen, Rui; Li, Wei; He, Xiangwei

    2011-05-01

    The structural complexity of nucleosomes underlies their functional versatility. Here we report a new type of complexity-nucleosome fragility, manifested as high sensitivity to micrococcal nuclease, in contrast to the common presumption that nucleosomes are similar in resistance to MNase digestion. Using differential MNase digestion of chromatin and high-throughput sequencing, we have identified a special group of nucleosomes termed "fragile nucleosomes" throughout the yeast genome, nearly 1000 of which were at previously determined "nucleosome-free" loci. Nucleosome fragility is broadly implicated in multiple chromatin processes, including transcription, translocation, and replication, in correspondence to specific physiological states of cells. In the environmental-stress-response genes, the presence of fragile nucleosomes prior to the occurrence of environmental changes suggests that nucleosome fragility poises genes for swift up-regulation in response to the environmental changes. We propose that nucleosome fragility underscores distinct functional statuses of the chromatin and provides a new dimension for portraying the landscape of genome organization.

  18. Satellite and terrestrial radio positioning techniques a signal processing perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Dardari, Davide; Falletti, Emanuela

    2014-01-01

    * The first book to combine satellite and terrestrial positioning techniques - vital for the understanding and development of new technologies * Written and edited by leading experts in the field, with contributors belonging to the European Commission's FP7 Network of Excellence NEWCOM++ Applications to a wide range of fields, including sensor networks, emergency services, military use, location-based billing, location-based advertising, intelligent transportation, and leisure Location-aware personal devices and location-based services have become ever more prominent in the past few years

  19. Early positivity signals changes in an abstract linguistic pattern.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlia Monte-Ordoño

    Full Text Available The extraction of abstract structures from speech (or from gestures in the case of sign languages has been claimed to be a fundamental mechanism for language acquisition. In the present study we registered the neural responses that are triggered when a violation of an abstract, token-independent rule is detected. We registered ERPs while presenting participants with trisyllabic CVCVCV nonsense words in an oddball paradigm. Standard stimuli followed an ABB rule (where A and B are different syllables. Importantly, to distinguish neural responses triggered by changes in surface information from responses triggered by changes in the underlying abstract structure, we used two types of deviant stimuli. Phoneme deviants differed from standards only in their phonemes. Rule deviants differed from standards in both their phonemes and their composing rule. We observed a significant positivity as early as 300 ms after the presentation of deviant stimuli that violated the abstract rule (Rule deviants. The amplitude of this neural response was correlated with participants' performance in a behavioral rule learning test. Differences in electrophysiological responses observed between learners and non-learners suggest that individual differences in an abstract rule learning task might be related to how listeners select relevant sources of information.

  20. Multiscale modelling of nucleosome core particle aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyubartsev, Alexander P.; Korolev, Nikolay; Fan, Yanping; Nordenskiöld, Lars

    2015-02-01

    The nucleosome core particle (NCP) is the basic building block of chromatin. Under the influence of multivalent cations, isolated mononucleosomes exhibit a rich phase behaviour forming various columnar phases with characteristic NCP-NCP stacking. NCP stacking is also a regular element of chromatin structure in vivo. Understanding the mechanism of nucleosome stacking and the conditions leading to self-assembly of NCPs is still incomplete. Due to the complexity of the system and the need to describe electrostatics properly by including the explicit mobile ions, novel modelling approaches based on coarse-grained (CG) methods at the multiscale level becomes a necessity. In this work we present a multiscale CG computer simulation approach to modelling interactions and self-assembly of solutions of NCPs induced by the presence of multivalent cations. Starting from continuum simulations including explicit three-valent cobalt(III)hexammine (CoHex3+) counterions and 20 NCPs, based on a previously developed advanced CG NCP model with one bead per amino acid and five beads per two DNA base pair unit (Fan et al 2013 PLoS One 8 e54228), we use the inverse Monte Carlo method to calculate effective interaction potentials for a ‘super-CG’ NCP model consisting of seven beads for each NCP. These interaction potentials are used in large-scale simulations of up to 5000 NCPs, modelling self-assembly induced by CoHex3+. The systems of ‘super-CG’ NCPs form a single large cluster of stacked NCPs without long-range order in agreement with experimental data for NCPs precipitated by the three-valent polyamine, spermidine3+.

  1. Nucleosome Density ChIP-Seq Identifies Distinct Chromatin Modification Signatures Associated with MNase Accessibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorzadeh, Alireza; Bilenky, Misha; Hammond, Colin; Knapp, David J H F; Li, Luolan; Miller, Paul H; Carles, Annaick; Heravi-Moussavi, Alireza; Gakkhar, Sitanshu; Moksa, Michelle; Eaves, Connie J; Hirst, Martin

    2016-11-15

    Nucleosome position, density, and post-translational modification are widely accepted components of mechanisms regulating DNA transcription but still incompletely understood. We present a modified native ChIP-seq method combined with an analytical framework that allows MNase accessibility to be integrated with histone modification profiles. Application of this methodology to the primitive (CD34+) subset of normal human cord blood cells enabled genomic regions enriched in one versus two nucleosomes marked by histone 3 lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3) and/or histone 3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3) to be associated with their transcriptional and DNA methylation states. From this analysis, we defined four classes of promoter-specific profiles and demonstrated that a majority of bivalent marked promoters are heterogeneously marked at a single-cell level in this primitive cell type. Interestingly, extension of this approach to human embryonic stem cells revealed an altered relationship between chromatin modification state and nucleosome content at promoters, suggesting developmental stage-specific organization of histone methylation states. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Global Positioning System (GPS) civil signal monitoring (CSM) trade study report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-07

    This GPS Civil Signal Monitoring (CSM) Trade Study has been performed at the direction of DOT/FAA Navigation Programs as the agency of reference for consolidating civil monitoring requirements on the Global Positioning System (GPS). The objective of ...

  3. Probing Enhanced Double-Strand Break Formation at Abasic Sites within Clustered Lesions in Nucleosome Core Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Samya; Chakraborty, Supratim; Jacinto, Marco Paolo; Paul, Michael D; Balster, Morgan V; Greenberg, Marc M

    2017-01-10

    DNA is rapidly cleaved under mild alkaline conditions at apyrimidinic/apurinic sites, but the half-life is several weeks in phosphate buffer (pH 7.5). However, abasic sites are ∼100-fold more reactive within nucleosome core particles (NCPs). Histone proteins catalyze the strand scission, and at superhelical location 1.5, the histone H4 tail is largely responsible for the accelerated cleavage. The rate constant for strand scission at an abasic site is enhanced further in a nucleosome core particle when it is part of a bistranded lesion containing a proximal strand break. Cleavage of this form results in a highly deleterious double-strand break. This acceleration is dependent upon the position of the abasic lesion in the NCP and its structure. The enhancement in cleavage rate at an apurinic/apyrimidinic site rapidly drops off as the distance between the strand break and abasic site increases and is negligible once the two forms of damage are separated by 7 bp. However, the enhancement of the rate of double-strand break formation increases when the size of the gap is increased from one to two nucleotides. In contrast, the cleavage rate enhancement at 2-deoxyribonolactone within bistranded lesions is more modest, and it is similar in free DNA and nucleosome core particles. We postulate that the enhanced rate of double-strand break formation at bistranded lesions containing apurinic/apyrimidinic sites within nucleosome core particles is a general phenomenon and is due to increased DNA flexibility.

  4. ER-α36-Mediated Rapid Estrogen Signaling Positively Regulates ER-Positive Breast Cancer Stem/Progenitor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Hao; Zhang, Xin-Tian; Wang, Mo-Lin; Zheng, Hong-Yan; Liu, Li-Jiang; Wang, Zhao-Yi

    2014-01-01

    The breast cancer stem cells (BCSC) play important roles in breast cancer occurrence, recurrence and metastasis. However, the role of estrogen signaling, a signaling pathway important in development and progression of breast cancer, in regulation of BCSC has not been well established. Previously, we identified and cloned a variant of estrogen receptor α, ER-α36, with a molecular weight of 36 kDa. ER-α36 lacks both transactivation domains AF-1 and AF-2 of the 66 kDa full-length ER-α (ER-α66) and mediates rapid estrogen signaling to promote proliferation of breast cancer cells. In this study, we aim to investigate the function and the underlying mechanism of ER-α36-mediated rapid estrogen signaling in growth regulation of the ER-positive breast cancer stem/progenitor cells. ER-positive breast cancer cells MCF7 and T47D as well as the variants with different levels of ER-α36 expression were used. The effects of estrogen on BCSC's abilities of growth, self-renewal, differentiation and tumor-seeding were examined using tumorsphere formation, flow cytometry, indirect immunofluorence staining and in vivo xenograft assays. The underlying mechanisms were also studied with Western-blot analysis. We found that 17-β-estradiol (E2β) treatment increased the population of ER-positive breast cancer stem/progenitor cells while failed to do so in the cells with knocked-down levels of ER-α36 expression. Cells with forced expression of recombinant ER-α36, however, responded strongly to E2β treatment by increasing growth in vitro and tumor-seeding efficiency in vivo. The rapid estrogen signaling via the AKT/GSK3β pathway is involved in estrogen-stimulated growth of ER-positive breast cancer stem/progenitor cells. We concluded that ER-α36-mediated rapid estrogen signaling plays an important role in regulation and maintenance of ER-positive breast cancer stem/progenitor cells. PMID:24558373

  5. A New Position Location System Using DTV Transmitter Identification Watermark Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chouinard Jean-Yves

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A new position location technique using the transmitter identification (TxID RF watermark in the digital TV (DTV signals is proposed in this paper. Conventional global positioning system (GPS usually does not work well inside buildings due to the high frequency and weak field strength of the signal. In contrast to the GPS, the DTV signals are received from transmitters at relatively short distance, while the broadcast transmitters operate at levels up to the megawatts effective radiated power (ERP. Also the RF frequency of the DTV signal is much lower than the GPS, which makes it easier for the signal to penetrate buildings and other objects. The proposed position location system based on DTV TxID signal is presented in this paper. Practical receiver implementation issues including nonideal correlation and synchronization are analyzed and discussed. Performance of the proposed technique is evaluated through Monte Carlo simulations and compared with other existing position location systems. Possible ways to improve the accuracy of the new position location system is discussed.

  6. Nucleosome structure incorporated histone acetylation site prediction in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chen; Liu, Hui; Li, Jiang; Deng, Youping; Shi, Tieliu

    2010-11-02

    Acetylation is a crucial post-translational modification for histones, and plays a key role in gene expression regulation. Due to limited data and lack of a clear acetylation consensus sequence, a few researches have focused on prediction of lysine acetylation sites. Several systematic prediction studies have been conducted for human and yeast, but less for Arabidopsis thaliana. Concerning the insufficient observation on acetylation site, we analyzed contributions of the peptide-alignment-based distance definition and 3D structure factors in acetylation prediction. We found that traditional structure contributes little to acetylation site prediction. Identified acetylation sites of histones in Arabidopsis thaliana are conserved and cross predictable with that of human by peptide based methods. However, the predicted specificity is overestimated, because of the existence of non-observed acetylable site. Here, by performing a complete exploration on the factors that affect the acetylability of lysines in histones, we focused on the relative position of lysine at nucleosome level, and defined a new structure feature to promote the performance in predicting the acetylability of all the histone lysines in A. thaliana. We found a new spacial correlated acetylation factor, and defined a ε-N spacial location based feature, which contains five core spacial ellipsoid wired areas. By incorporating the new feature, the performance of predicting the acetylability of all the histone lysines in A. Thaliana was promoted, in which the previous mispredicted acetylable lysines were corrected by comparing to the peptide-based prediction.

  7. Structural Mechanisms of Nucleosome Recognition by Linker Histones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bing-Rui; Jiang, Jiansheng; Feng, Hanqiao; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Xiao, T Sam; Bai, Yawen

    2015-08-20

    Linker histones bind to the nucleosome and regulate the structure of chromatin and gene expression. Despite more than three decades of effort, the structural basis of nucleosome recognition by linker histones remains elusive. Here, we report the crystal structure of the globular domain of chicken linker histone H5 in complex with the nucleosome at 3.5 Å resolution, which is validated using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The globular domain sits on the dyad of the nucleosome and interacts with both DNA linkers. Our structure integrates results from mutation analyses and previous cross-linking and fluorescence recovery after photobleach experiments, and it helps resolve the long debate on structural mechanisms of nucleosome recognition by linker histones. The on-dyad binding mode of the H5 globular domain is different from the recently reported off-dyad binding mode of Drosophila linker histone H1. We demonstrate that linker histones with different binding modes could fold chromatin to form distinct higher-order structures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Reconstitution of Nucleosomes with Differentially Isotope-labeled Sister Histones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liokatis, Stamatios

    2017-03-26

    Asymmetrically modified nucleosomes contain the two copies of a histone (sister histones) decorated with distinct sets of Post-translational Modifications (PTMs). They are newly identified species with unknown means of establishment and functional implications. Current analytical methods are inadequate to detect the copy-specific occurrence of PTMs on the nucleosomal sister histones. This protocol presents a biochemical method for the in vitro reconstitution of nucleosomes containing differentially isotope-labeled sister histones. The generated complex can be also asymmetrically modified, after including a premodified histone pool during refolding of histone subcomplexes. These asymmetric nucleosome preparations can be readily reacted with histone-modifying enzymes to study modification cross-talk mechanisms imposed by the asymmetrically pre-incorporated PTM using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Particularly, the modification reactions in real-time can be mapped independently on the two sister histones by performing different types of NMR correlation experiments, tailored for the respective isotope type. This methodology provides the means to study crosstalk mechanisms that contribute to the formation and propagation of asymmetric PTM patterns on nucleosomal complexes.

  9. Nucleosome Assembly Dynamics Involve Spontaneous Fluctuations in the Handedness of Tetrasomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlijm, R.; Lee, M.; Lipfert, J.; Lusser, A.; Dekker, C.; Dekker, N.H.

    2015-01-01

    DNA wrapping around histone octamers generates nucleosomes, the basic compaction unit of eukaryotic chromatin. Nucleosome stability is carefully tuned to maintain DNA accessibility in transcription, replication, and repair. Using freely orbiting magnetic tweezers, which measure the twist and length

  10. Structure of the CENP-A nucleosome and its implications for centromeric chromatin architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachiwana, Hiroaki; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2011-01-01

    Centromeres are dictated by the epigenetic inheritance of the centromeric nucleosome containing the centromere-specific histone H3 variant, CENP-A. The structure of the CENP-A nucleosome has been considered to be the fundamental architecture of the centromeric chromatin. Controversy exists in the literature regarding the CENP-A nucleosome structures, with octasome, hemisome, compact octasome, hexasome, and tetrasome models being reported. Some of these CENP-A nucleosome models may correspond to transient intermediates for the assembly of the mature CENP-A nucleosome; however, their significances are still unclear. Therefore, the structure of the mature CENP-A nucleosome has been eagerly awaited. We reconstituted the human CENP-A nucleosome with its cognate centromeric DNA fragment, and determined its crystal structure. In this review, we describe the structure and the physical properties of the CENP-A nucleosome, and discuss their implications for centromeric chromatin architecture.

  11. Nucleosome fragility reveals novel functional states of chromatin and poises genes for activation

    OpenAIRE

    Xi, Yuanxin; Yao, Jianhui; Chen, Rui; Li, Wei; He, Xiangwei

    2011-01-01

    The structural complexity of nucleosomes underlies their functional versatility. Here we report a new type of complexity—nucleosome fragility, manifested as high sensitivity to micrococcal nuclease, in contrast to the common presumption that nucleosomes are similar in resistance to MNase digestion. Using differential MNase digestion of chromatin and high-throughput sequencing, we have identified a special group of nucleosomes termed “fragile nucleosomes” throughout the yeast genome, nearly 10...

  12. A high precision position sensor design and its signal processing algorithm for a maglev train.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Song; Long, Zhiqiang; He, Ning; Chang, Wensen

    2012-01-01

    High precision positioning technology for a kind of high speed maglev train with an electromagnetic suspension (EMS) system is studied. At first, the basic structure and functions of the position sensor are introduced and some key techniques to enhance the positioning precision are designed. Then, in order to further improve the positioning signal quality and the fault-tolerant ability of the sensor, a new kind of discrete-time tracking differentiator (TD) is proposed based on nonlinear optimal control theory. This new TD has good filtering and differentiating performances and a small calculation load. It is suitable for real-time signal processing. The stability, convergence property and frequency characteristics of the TD are studied and analyzed thoroughly. The delay constant of the TD is figured out and an effective time delay compensation algorithm is proposed. Based on the TD technology, a filtering process is introduced in to improve the positioning signal waveform when the sensor is under bad working conditions, and a two-sensor switching algorithm is designed to eliminate the positioning errors caused by the joint gaps of the long stator. The effectiveness and stability of the sensor and its signal processing algorithms are proved by the experiments on a test train during a long-term test run.

  13. A High Precision Position Sensor Design and Its Signal Processing Algorithm for a Maglev Train

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wensen Chang

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available High precision positioning technology for a kind of high speed maglev train with an electromagnetic suspension (EMS system is studied. At first, the basic structure and functions of the position sensor are introduced and some key techniques to enhance the positioning precision are designed. Then, in order to further improve the positioning signal quality and the fault-tolerant ability of the sensor, a new kind of discrete-time tracking differentiator (TD is proposed based on nonlinear optimal control theory. This new TD has good filtering and differentiating performances and a small calculation load. It is suitable for real-time signal processing. The stability, convergence property and frequency characteristics of the TD are studied and analyzed thoroughly. The delay constant of the TD is figured out and an effective time delay compensation algorithm is proposed. Based on the TD technology, a filtering process is introduced in to improve the positioning signal waveform when the sensor is under bad working conditions, and a two-sensor switching algorithm is designed to eliminate the positioning errors caused by the joint gaps of the long stator. The effectiveness and stability of the sensor and its signal processing algorithms are proved by the experiments on a test train during a long-term test run.

  14. Implementation of Wi-Fi Signal Sampling on an Android Smartphone for Indoor Positioning Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hung-Huan; Liu, Chun

    2017-12-21

    Collecting and maintaining radio fingerprint for wireless indoor positioning systems involves considerable time and labor. We have proposed the quick radio fingerprint collection (QRFC) algorithm which employed the built-in accelerometer of Android smartphones to implement step detection in order to assist in collecting radio fingerprints. In the present study, we divided the algorithm into moving sampling (MS) and stepped MS (SMS), and describe the implementation of both algorithms and their comparison. Technical details and common errors concerning the use of Android smartphones to collect Wi-Fi radio beacons were surveyed and discussed. The results of signal sampling experiments performed in a hallway measuring 54 m in length showed that in terms of the amount of time required to complete collection of access point (AP) signals, static sampling (SS; a traditional procedure for collecting Wi-Fi signals) took at least 2 h, whereas MS and SMS took approximately 150 and 300 s, respectively. Notably, AP signals obtained through MS and SMS were comparable to those obtained through SS in terms of the distribution of received signal strength indicator (RSSI) and positioning accuracy. Therefore, MS and SMS are recommended instead of SS as signal sampling procedures for indoor positioning algorithms.

  15. Received Signal Strength Database Interpolation by Kriging for a Wi-Fi Indoor Positioning System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, Shau-Shiun; Yeh, Shuo-Ju; Liu, Ya-Wen

    2015-08-28

    The main approach for a Wi-Fi indoor positioning system is based on the received signal strength (RSS) measurements, and the fingerprinting method is utilized to determine the user position by matching the RSS values with the pre-surveyed RSS database. To build a RSS fingerprint database is essential for an RSS based indoor positioning system, and building such a RSS fingerprint database requires lots of time and effort. As the range of the indoor environment becomes larger, labor is increased. To provide better indoor positioning services and to reduce the labor required for the establishment of the positioning system at the same time, an indoor positioning system with an appropriate spatial interpolation method is needed. In addition, the advantage of the RSS approach is that the signal strength decays as the transmission distance increases, and this signal propagation characteristic is applied to an interpolated database with the Kriging algorithm in this paper. Using the distribution of reference points (RPs) at measured points, the signal propagation model of the Wi-Fi access point (AP) in the building can be built and expressed as a function. The function, as the spatial structure of the environment, can create the RSS database quickly in different indoor environments. Thus, in this paper, a Wi-Fi indoor positioning system based on the Kriging fingerprinting method is developed. As shown in the experiment results, with a 72.2% probability, the error of the extended RSS database with Kriging is less than 3 dBm compared to the surveyed RSS database. Importantly, the positioning error of the developed Wi-Fi indoor positioning system with Kriging is reduced by 17.9% in average than that without Kriging.

  16. Theoretical analysis of epigenetic cell memory by nucleosome modification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dodd, Ian B; Micheelsen, Mille A; Sneppen, Kim

    2007-01-01

    Chromosomal regions can adopt stable and heritable alternative states resulting in bistable gene expression without changes to the DNA sequence. Such epigenetic control is often associated with alternative covalent modifications of histones. The stability and heritability of the states are thought...... strong bistability that is resistant both to high noise due to random gain or loss of nucleosome modifications and to random partitioning upon DNA replication. However, robust bistability required: (1) cooperativity, the activity of more than one modified nucleosome, in the modification reactions and (2...

  17. Simulation of GNSS reflected signals and estimation of position accuracy in GNSS-challenged environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Jakob; Jensen, Anna B. O.; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg

    2015-01-01

    The paper describes the development and testing of a simulation tool, called QualiSIM. The tool estimates GNSS-based position accuracy based on a simulation of the environment surrounding the GNSS antenna, with a special focus on city-scape environments with large amounts of signal reflections from...

  18. On stochastic modeling of the modernized global positioning system (GPS) L2C signal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsobeiey, Mohamed; El-Rabbany, Ahmed

    2010-01-01

    In order to take full advantage of the modernized GPS L2C signal, it is essential that its stochastic characteristics and code bias be rigorously determined. In this paper, long sessions of GPS measurements are used to study the stochastic characteristics of the modernized GPS L2C signal. As a byproduct, the stochastic characteristics of the legacy GPS signals, namely C/A and P2 codes, are also determined, which are used to verify the developed stochastic model of the modernized signal. The differential code biases between P2 and C2, DCB P2-C2 , are also estimated using the Bernese GPS software. It is shown that the developed models improved the precise point positioning (PPP) solution and convergence time

  19. GNSS related periodic signals in coordinate time-series from Precise Point Positioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraha, K. E.; Teferle, F. N.; Hunegnaw, A.; Dach, R.

    2017-03-01

    In Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) coordinate time-series unrecognized errors and unmodelled (periodic) effects may bias nonlinear motions induced by geophysical signals. Hence, understanding and mitigating these errors is vital to reducing biases and on revealing subtle geophysical signals. To assess the nature of periodic signals in coordinate time-series Precise Point Positioning (PPP) solutions for the period 2008-2015 are generated. The solutions consider Global Positioning System (GPS), GLObalnaya NAvigatsionnaya Sputnikovaya Sistema (GLONASS) or combined GPS+GLONASS (GNSS) observations. We assess the periodic signals of station coordinates computed using the combined International GNSS Service (IGS) and four of its Analysis Centers (ACs) products. Furthermore, we make use of different filtering methods to investigate the sources of the periodic signals. A faint fortnightly signal in our PPP solution based on Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) products and the existence of an 8 d period for those ACs generating combined GPS+GLONASS products are the main features in the GPS-only solutions. The existence of the 8 d period in the GPS-only solution indicates that GPS orbits computed in a combined GNSS solution contain GLONASS-specific signals. The GLONASS-only solution shows highly elevated powers at the third draconitic harmonic (∼120 d period), at the 8 d period and its harmonics (4 d, 2.67 d) besides the well-known annual, semi-annual and other draconitic harmonics. We show that the GLONASS constellation gaps before December 2011 contribute to the power at some of the frequencies. However, the well-known fortnightly signal in GPS-only solutions is not discernible in the GLONASS-only solution. The combined GNSS solution contains periodic signals from both systems, with most of the powers being reduced when compared to the single-GNSS solutions. A 52 per cent reduction for the horizontal components and a 36 per cent reduction for the vertical component

  20. Nitrated nucleosome levels and neuropsychiatric events in systemic lupus erythematosus;

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferreira, Isabel; Croca, Sara; Raimondo, Maria Gabriella

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) there is no serological test that will reliably distinguish neuropsychiatric (NP) events due to active SLE from those due to other causes. Previously we showed that serum levels of nitrated nucleosomes (NN) were elevated in a small n...

  1. The histone deacetylase HDAC1 positively regulates Notch signaling during Drosophila wing development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zehua Wang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The Notch signaling pathway is highly conserved across different animal species and plays crucial roles in development and physiology. Regulation of Notch signaling occurs at multiple levels in different tissues and cell types. Here, we show that the histone deacetylase HDAC1 acts as a positive regulator of Notch signaling during Drosophila wing development. Depletion of HDAC1 causes wing notches on the margin of adult wing. Consistently, the expression of Notch target genes is reduced in the absence of HDAC1 during wing margin formation. We further provide evidence that HDAC1 acts upstream of Notch activation. Mechanistically, we show that HDAC1 regulates Notch protein levels by promoting Notch transcription. Consistent with this, the HDAC1-associated transcriptional co-repressor Atrophin (Atro is also required for transcriptional activation of Notch in the wing disc. In summary, our results demonstrate that HDAC1 positively regulates Notch signaling and reveal a previously unidentified function of HDAC1 in Notch signaling.

  2. Genome-wide signals of positive selection in strongylocentrotid sea urchins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kober, Kord M; Pogson, Grant H

    2017-07-21

    Comparative genomics studies investigating the signals of positive selection among groups of closely related species are still rare and limited in taxonomic breadth. Such studies show great promise in advancing our knowledge about the proportion and the identity of genes experiencing diversifying selection. However, methodological challenges have led to high levels of false positives in past studies. Here, we use the well-annotated genome of the purple sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, as a reference to investigate the signals of positive selection at 6520 single-copy orthologs from nine sea urchin species belonging to the family Strongylocentrotidae paying careful attention to minimizing false positives. We identified 1008 (15.5%) candidate positive selection genes (PSGs). Tests for positive selection along the nine terminal branches of the phylogeny identified 824 genes that showed lineage-specific adaptive diversification (1.67% of branch-sites tests performed). Positively selected codons were not enriched at exon borders or near regions containing missing data, suggesting a limited contribution of false positives caused by alignment or annotation errors. Alignments were validated at 10 loci with re-sequencing using Sanger methods. No differences were observed in the rates of synonymous substitution (d S ), GC content, and codon bias between the candidate PSGs and those not showing positive selection. However, the candidate PSGs had 68% higher rates of nonsynonymous substitution (d N ) and 33% lower levels of heterozygosity, consistent with selective sweeps and opposite to that expected by a relaxation of selective constraint. Although positive selection was identified at reproductive proteins and innate immunity genes, the strongest signals of adaptive diversification were observed at extracellular matrix proteins, cell adhesion molecules, membrane receptors, and ion channels. Many candidate PSGs have been widely implicated as targets of pathogen

  3. Human ventromedial prefrontal cortex and the positive affective processing of safety signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Ben J; Fullana, Miquel Angel; Via, Esther; Soriano-Mas, Carles; Vervliet, Bram; Martínez-Zalacaín, Ignacio; Pujol, Jesus; Davey, Christopher G; Kircher, Tilo; Straube, Benjamin; Cardoner, Narcís

    2017-05-15

    Human functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies suggest that the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) contributes to the learned discrimination of threat and safety signals, although its precise contribution to these processes remains unclear. One hypothesis is that the vmPFC supports the positive affective processing of safety signals linked to their implicit stress-relieving properties. We set out to test this hypothesis and to examine the specificity of vmPFC responses to safety signal processing versus its high level of 'default mode' activity. Sixty participants completed an fMRI conditioning task that involved the generation of a conditioned threat (CS+) and safety (CS-) signal following the completion of a pre-conditioning baseline. Confirming past findings, activation of the vmPFC and other midline cortical and parietal areas - broadly resembling the default mode network - robustly discriminated between the CS- and CS+. However, when adjusting for this network's characteristic 'baseline' activity, only a subset of regions, including the vmPFC, was activated by the CS-. Regional selectivity for safety signal processing was confirmed by demonstrating a significant correlation between the magnitude of vmPFC responses and self-rated positive affect evoked by the CS-. Taken together, our current findings confirm a link between human vmPFC activity and the positive affective processing of safety signals. We discuss these findings with regards a broader model of human vmPFC function and its suggested higher-order contribution to emotionally adaptive behavior. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Carotenoid supplementation positively affects the expression of a non-visual sexual signal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain J-M Van Hout

    Full Text Available Carotenoids are a class of pigments which are widely used by animals for the expression of yellow-to-red colour signals, such as bill or plumage colour. Since they also have been shown to promote immunocompetence and to function as antioxidants, many studies have investigated a potential allocation trade-off with respect to carotenoid-based signals within the context of sexual selection. Although an effect of carotenoids on non-visual (e.g. acoustic signals involved in sexual selection has been hypothesized, this has to date not been investigated. First, we examined a potential effect of dietary carotenoid supplementation on overall song rate during the non-breeding season in captive male European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris. After only 3-7 days, we found a significant (body-mass independent positive effect of carotenoid availability on overall song rate. Secondly, as a number of studies suggest that carotenoids could affect the modulation of sexual signals by plasma levels of the steroid hormone testosterone (T, we used the same birds to subsequently investigate whether carotenoid availability affects the increase in (nestbox-oriented song rate induced by experimentally elevated plasma T levels. Our results suggest that carotenoids may enhance the positive effect of elevated plasma T levels on nestbox-oriented song rate. Moreover, while non-supplemented starlings responded to T-implantation with an increase in both overall song rate and nestbox-oriented song, carotenoid-supplemented starlings instead shifted song production towards (reproductively relevant nestbox-oriented song, without increasing overall song rate. Given that song rate is an acoustic signal rather than a visual signal, our findings therefore indicate that the role of carotenoids in (sexual signalling need not be dependent on their function as pigments.

  5. Determining inter-system bias of GNSS signals with narrowly spaced frequencies for GNSS positioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yumiao; Liu, Zhizhao; Ge, Maorong; Neitzel, Frank

    2017-12-01

    Relative positioning using multi-GNSS (global navigation satellite systems) can improve accuracy, reliability, and availability compared to the use of a single constellation system. Intra-system double-difference (DD) ambiguities (ISDDAs) refer to the DD ambiguities between satellites of a single constellation system and can be fixed to an integer to derive the precise fixed solution. Inter-system ambiguities, which denote the DD ambiguities between different constellation systems, can also be fixed to integers on overlapping frequencies, once the inter-system bias (ISB) is removed. Compared with fixing ISDDAs, fixing both integer intra- and inter-system DD ambiguities (IIDDAs) means an increase of positioning precision through an integration of multiple GNSS constellations. Previously, researchers have studied IIDDA fixing with systems of the same frequencies, but not with systems of different frequencies. Integer IIDDAs can be determined from single-difference (SD) ambiguities, even if the frequencies of multi-GNSS signals used in the positioning are different. In this study, we investigated IIDDA fixing for multi-GNSS signals of narrowly spaced frequencies. First, the inter-system DD models of multi-GNSS signals of different frequencies are introduced, and the strategy for compensating for ISB is presented. The ISB is decomposed into three parts: 1) a float approximate ISB number that can be considered equal to the ISB of code pseudorange observations and thus can be estimated through single point positioning (SPP); 2) a number that is a multiple of the GNSS signal wavelength; and 3) a fractional ISB part, with a magnitude smaller than a single wavelength. Then, the relationship between intra- and inter-system DD ambiguity RATIO values and ISB was investigated by integrating GPS L1 and GLONASS L1 signals. In our numerical analyses with short baselines, the ISB parameter and IIDDA were successfully fixed, even if the number of observed satellites in each system

  6. Detection of coherent beam-beam modes with digitized beam position monitor signals

    CERN Document Server

    Stancari, G.; White, S.M.

    2014-01-01

    A system for bunch-by-bunch detection of transverse proton and antiproton coherent oscillations in the Fermilab Tevatron collider is described. It is based on the signal from a single beam-position monitor located in a region of the ring with large amplitude functions. The signal is digitized over a large number of turns and Fourier-analyzed offline with a dedicated algorithm. To enhance the signal, band-limited noise is applied to the beam for about 1 s. This excitation does not adversely affect the circulating beams even at high luminosities. The device has a response time of a few seconds, a frequency resolution of $1.6\\times 10^{-5}$ in fractional tune, and it is sensitive to oscillation amplitudes of 60 nm. It complements Schottky detectors as a diagnostic tool for tunes, tune spreads, and beam-beam effects. Measurements of coherent mode spectra are presented and compared with models of beam-beam oscillations.

  7. Venous pooling and drainage affects photoplethysmographic signals at different vertical hand positions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Michelle; Phillips, Justin P.; Kyriacou, Panayiotis

    2015-03-01

    The aim of the current work is to investigate the possibility of augmenting pulse oximetry algorithms to enable the estimation of venous parameters in peripheral tissues. In order to further understand the contribution of venous blood to the photoplethysmographic (PPG) signal, recordings were made from six healthy volunteer subjects during an exercise in which the right hand was placed in various positions above and below heart level. The left hand was kept at heart level as a control while the right hand was moved. A custom-made two-channel dual wavelength PPG instrumentation system was used to obtain the red and infrared plethysmographic signals from both the right and left index fingers simultaneously using identical sensors. Laser Doppler flowmetry signals were also recorded from an adjacent fingertip on the right hand. Analysis of all acquired PPG signals indicated changes in both ac and dc amplitude of the right hand when the position was changed, while those obtained from the left (control) hand remained relatively constant. Most clearly, in the change from heart level to 50cm below heart level there is a substantial decrease in both dc and ac amplitudes. This decrease in dc amplitude most likely corresponds to increased venous pooling, and hence increased absorption of light. It is speculated that the decrease in ac PPG amplitude is due to reduced arterial emptying during diastole due to increased downstream resistance due to venous pooling.

  8. POSITION CONTROL OF BRUSHLESS DC MOTOR BASED ON DIGITAL SIGNAL PROCESSING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Çetin GENÇER

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Brushless DC Motors (BLDC have been used widely high performance control systems which are depended on to development of power electronic and control technology. In these motors to fed commutated supply, the control of position without oscilation has been required. In this study, position control of BLDC with digital signal processing has been implemented by a proportional-derivative (PD controller because of its simple structure. It has been seen that the controller which is proposed from simulation and experimental studies, has a quick dynamic responce with nonoscillation.

  9. A design of a valid signal selecting and position decoding ASIC for PET using silicon photomultipliers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, M.; Lim, K.-t.; Kim, H.; Yeom, J.-y.; Kim, J.; Lee, C.; Choi, H.; Cho, G.

    2017-01-01

    In most cases, a PET system has numerous electrical components and channel circuits and thus it would rather be a bulky product. Also, most existing systems receive analog signals from detectors which make them vulnerable to signal distortions. For these reasons, channel reduction techniques are important. In this work, an ASIC for PET module is being proposed. An ASIC chip for 16 PET detector channels, VSSPDC, has been designed and simulated. The main function of the chip is 16-to-1 channel reduction, i.e., finding the position of only the valid signals, signal timing, and magnitudes in all 16 channels at every recorded event. The ASIC comprises four of 4-channel modules and a 2nd 4-to-1 router. A single channel module comprises a transimpedance amplifier for the silicon photomultipliers, dual comparators with high and low level references, and a logic circuitry. While the high level reference was used to test the validity of the signal, the low level reference was used for the timing. The 1-channel module of the ASIC produced an energy pulse by time-over-threshold method and it also produced a time pulse with a fixed delayed time. Since the ASIC chip outputs only a few digital pulses and does not require an external clock, it has an advantage over noise properties. The cadence simulation showed the good performance of the chip as designed.

  10. A design of a valid signal selecting and position decoding ASIC for PET using silicon photomultipliers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, M.; Lim, K.-T.; Kim, J.; Lee, C.; Cho, G.; Kim, H.; Yeom, J.-Y.; Choi, H.

    2017-01-01

    In most cases, a PET system has numerous electrical components and channel circuits and thus it would rather be a bulky product. Also, most existing systems receive analog signals from detectors which make them vulnerable to signal distortions. For these reasons, channel reduction techniques are important. In this work, an ASIC for PET module is being proposed. An ASIC chip for 16 PET detector channels, VSSPDC, has been designed and simulated. The main function of the chip is 16-to-1 channel reduction, i.e., finding the position of only the valid signals, signal timing, and magnitudes in all 16 channels at every recorded event. The ASIC comprises four of 4-channel modules and a 2 nd 4-to-1 router. A single channel module comprises a transimpedance amplifier for the silicon photomultipliers, dual comparators with high and low level references, and a logic circuitry. While the high level reference was used to test the validity of the signal, the low level reference was used for the timing. The 1-channel module of the ASIC produced an energy pulse by time-over-threshold method and it also produced a time pulse with a fixed delayed time. Since the ASIC chip outputs only a few digital pulses and does not require an external clock, it has an advantage over noise properties. The cadence simulation showed the good performance of the chip as designed.

  11. Genome-scale identification of nucleosome organization by using 1000 porcine oocytes at different developmental stages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenyu Tao

    Full Text Available The nucleosome is the basic structural unit of chromosomes, and its occupancy and distribution in promoters are crucial for the regulation of gene expression. During the growth process of porcine oocytes, the "growing" oocytes (SF have a much higher transcriptional activity than the "fully grown" oocytes (BF. However, the chromosome status of the two kinds of oocytes remains poorly understood. In this study, we profiled the nucleosome distributions of SF and BF with as few as 1000 oocytes. By comparing the altered regions, we found that SF tended toward nucleosome loss and more open chromosome architecture than BF did. BF had decreased nucleosome occupancy in the coding region and increased nucleosome occupancy in the promoter compared to SF. The nucleosome occupancy of SF was higher than that of BF in the GC-poor regions, but lower than that of BF in the GC-rich regions. The nucleosome distribution around the transcriptional start site (TSS of all the genes of the two samples was basically the same, but the nucleosome occupancy around the TSS of SF was lower than that of BF. GO functional annotation of genes with different nucleosome occupancy in promoter showed the genes were mainly involved in cell, cellular process, and metabolic process biological process. The results of this study revealed the dynamic reorganization of porcine oocytes in different developmental stages and the critical role of nucleosome arrangement during the oocyte growth process.

  12. Cryo-EM structure of the nucleosome containing the ALB1 enhancer DNA sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takizawa, Yoshimasa; Tanaka, Hiroki; Machida, Shinichi; Koyama, Masako; Maehara, Kazumitsu; Wade, Paul A.; Wolf, Matthias

    2018-01-01

    Pioneer transcription factors specifically target their recognition DNA sequences within nucleosomes. FoxA is the pioneer transcription factor that binds to the ALB1 gene enhancer in liver precursor cells, and is required for liver differentiation in embryos. The ALB1 enhancer DNA sequence is reportedly incorporated into nucleosomes in cells, although the nucleosome structure containing the targeting sites for FoxA has not been clarified yet. In this study, we determined the nucleosome structure containing the ALB1 enhancer (N1) sequence, by cryogenic electron microscopy at 4.0 Å resolution. The nucleosome structure with the ALB1 enhancer DNA is not significantly different from the previously reported nucleosome structure with the Widom 601 DNA. Interestingly, in the nucleosomes, the ALB1 enhancer DNA contains local flexible regions, as compared to the Widom 601 DNA. Consistently, DNaseI treatments revealed that, in the nucleosome, the ALB1 enhancer (N1) DNA is more accessible than the Widom 601 sequence. The histones also associated less strongly with the ALB1 enhancer (N1) DNA than the Widom 601 DNA in the nucleosome. Therefore, the local histone–DNA contacts may be responsible for the enhanced DNA accessibility in the nucleosome with the ALB1 enhancer DNA. PMID:29563192

  13. Arginine-phosphate salt bridges between histones and DNA: Intermolecular actuators that control nucleosome architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusufaly, Tahir I.; Li, Yun; Singh, Gautam; Olson, Wilma K.

    2014-10-01

    Structural bioinformatics and van der Waals density functional theory are combined to investigate the mechanochemical impact of a major class of histone-DNA interactions, namely, the formation of salt bridges between arginine residues in histones and phosphate groups on the DNA backbone. Principal component analysis reveals that the configurational fluctuations of the sugar-phosphate backbone display sequence-specific directionality and variability, and clustering of nucleosome crystal structures identifies two major salt-bridge configurations: a monodentate form in which the arginine end-group guanidinium only forms one hydrogen bond with the phosphate, and a bidentate form in which it forms two. Density functional theory calculations highlight that the combination of sequence, denticity, and salt-bridge positioning enables the histones to apply a tunable mechanochemical stress to the DNA via precise and specific activation of backbone deformations. The results suggest that selection for specific placements of van der Waals contacts, with high-precision control of the spatial distribution of intermolecular forces, may serve as an underlying evolutionary design principle for the structure and function of nucleosomes, a conjecture that is corroborated by previous experimental studies.

  14. The Scc2/Scc4 complex acts in sister chromatid cohesion and transcriptional regulation by maintaining nucleosome-free regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Serra, Lidia; Kelly, Gavin; Patel, Harshil; Stewart, Aengus; Uhlmann, Frank

    2014-01-01

    The cohesin complex is at the heart of many chromosomal activities, including sister chromatid cohesion and transcriptional regulation1-3. Cohesin loading onto chromosomes depends on the Scc2/Scc4 cohesin loader complex4-6, but the chromatin features that form cohesin loading sites remain poorly understood. Here, we show that the RSC chromatin remodeling complex recruits budding yeast Scc2/Scc4 to broad nucleosome-free regions, that the cohesin loader itself helps to maintain. Consequently, inactivation of the cohesin loader or RSC complex have similar effects on nucleosome positioning, gene expression and sister chromatid cohesion. These results reveal an intimate link between local chromatin structure and higher order chromosome architecture. Our findings pertain to the similarities between two severe human disorders, Cornelia de Lange syndrome, caused by mutations in the human cohesin loader, and Coffin-Siris syndrome, resulting from mutations in human RSC complex components7-9. Both could arise from gene misregulation due to related changes in the nucleosome landscape. PMID:25173104

  15. The conformational state of the nucleosome entry–exit site modulates TATA box-specific TBP binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hieb, Aaron R.; Gansen, Alexander; Böhm, Vera; Langowski, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    The TATA binding protein (TBP) is a critical transcription factor used for nucleating assembly of the RNA polymerase II machinery. TBP binds TATA box elements with high affinity and kinetic stability and in vivo is correlated with high levels of transcription activation. However, since most promoters use less stable TATA-less or TATA-like elements, while also competing with nucleosome occupancy, further mechanistic insight into TBP's DNA binding properties and ability to access chromatin is needed. Using bulk and single-molecule FRET, we find that TBP binds a minimal consensus TATA box as a two-state equilibrium process, showing no evidence for intermediate states. However, upon addition of flanking DNA sequence, we observe non-specific cooperative binding to multiple DNA sites that compete for TATA-box specificity. Thus, we conclude that TBP binding is defined by a branched pathway, wherein TBP initially binds with little sequence specificity and is thermodynamically positioned by its kinetic stability to the TATA box. Furthermore, we observed the real-time access of TBP binding to TATA box DNA located within the DNA entry–exit site of the nucleosome. From these data, we determined salt-dependent changes in the nucleosome conformation regulate TBP's access to the TATA box, where access is highly constrained under physiological conditions, but is alleviated by histone acetylation and TFIIA. PMID:24829456

  16. The conformational state of the nucleosome entry-exit site modulates TATA box-specific TBP binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hieb, Aaron R; Gansen, Alexander; Böhm, Vera; Langowski, Jörg

    2014-07-01

    The TATA binding protein (TBP) is a critical transcription factor used for nucleating assembly of the RNA polymerase II machinery. TBP binds TATA box elements with high affinity and kinetic stability and in vivo is correlated with high levels of transcription activation. However, since most promoters use less stable TATA-less or TATA-like elements, while also competing with nucleosome occupancy, further mechanistic insight into TBP's DNA binding properties and ability to access chromatin is needed. Using bulk and single-molecule FRET, we find that TBP binds a minimal consensus TATA box as a two-state equilibrium process, showing no evidence for intermediate states. However, upon addition of flanking DNA sequence, we observe non-specific cooperative binding to multiple DNA sites that compete for TATA-box specificity. Thus, we conclude that TBP binding is defined by a branched pathway, wherein TBP initially binds with little sequence specificity and is thermodynamically positioned by its kinetic stability to the TATA box. Furthermore, we observed the real-time access of TBP binding to TATA box DNA located within the DNA entry-exit site of the nucleosome. From these data, we determined salt-dependent changes in the nucleosome conformation regulate TBP's access to the TATA box, where access is highly constrained under physiological conditions, but is alleviated by histone acetylation and TFIIA. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  17. Minimally spaced electrode positions for multi-functional chest sensors: ECG and respiratory signal estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klum Michael

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Unobtrusive medical instrumentation is a key in continuous patient monitoring. To increase compliance, multi-functional sensor concepts and measurement sites different from gold-standards are used. In this work, we aim to combine both approaches. We focus on minimally spaced electrode positions with high signal correlations to gold-standards. We present twofold experimental data from six and eleven healthy volunteers and provide chest positions with individual correlations up to 0.83 ± 0.06 for ECG and 0.73 ± 0.28 for the respiratory frequency. Using a performance index, we assess positions with correlations up to 0.77 ± 0.12 for ECG and 0.65 ± 0.35 for the respiratory frequency with 24 mm electrode distance.

  18. Activated WNT signaling in postnatal SOX2-positive dental stem cells can drive odontoma formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, Guilherme M; Patist, Amanda L; Healy, Chris; Pagrut, Ankita; Carreno, Gabriela; Sharpe, Paul T; Martinez-Barbera, Juan Pedro; Thavaraj, Selvam; Cobourne, Martyn T; Andoniadou, Cynthia L

    2015-09-28

    In common with most mammals, humans form only two dentitions during their lifetime. Occasionally, supernumerary teeth develop in addition to the normal complement. Odontoma represent a small group of malformations containing calcified dental tissues of both epithelial and mesenchymal origin, with varying levels of organization, including tooth-like structures. The specific cell type responsible for the induction of odontoma, which retains the capacity to re-initiate de novo tooth development in postnatal tissues, is not known. Here we demonstrate that aberrant activation of WNT signaling by expression of a non-degradable form of β-catenin specifically in SOX2-positive postnatal dental epithelial stem cells is sufficient to generate odontoma containing multiple tooth-like structures complete with all dental tissue layers. Genetic lineage-tracing confirms that odontoma form in a similar manner to normal teeth, derived from both the mutation-sustaining epithelial stem cells and adjacent mesenchymal tissues. Activation of the WNT pathway in embryonic SOX2-positive progenitors results in ectopic expression of secreted signals that promote odontogenesis throughout the oral cavity. Significantly, the inductive potential of epithelial dental stem cells is retained in postnatal tissues, and up-regulation of WNT signaling specifically in these cells is sufficient to promote generation and growth of ectopic malformations faithfully resembling human odontoma.

  19. Implementation of Complex Signal Processing Algorithms for Position-Sensitive Microcalorimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Stephen J.

    2008-01-01

    We have recently reported on a theoretical digital signal-processing algorithm for improved energy and position resolution in position-sensitive, transition-edge sensor (POST) X-ray detectors [Smith et al., Nucl, lnstr and Meth. A 556 (2006) 2371. PoST's consists of one or more transition-edge sensors (TES's) on a large continuous or pixellated X-ray absorber and are under development as an alternative to arrays of single pixel TES's. PoST's provide a means to increase the field-of-view for the fewest number of read-out channels. In this contribution we extend the theoretical correlated energy position optimal filter (CEPOF) algorithm (originally developed for 2-TES continuous absorber PoST's) to investigate the practical implementation on multi-pixel single TES PoST's or Hydras. We use numerically simulated data for a nine absorber device, which includes realistic detector noise, to demonstrate an iterative scheme that enables convergence on the correct photon absorption position and energy without any a priori assumptions. The position sensitivity of the CEPOF implemented on simulated data agrees very well with the theoretically predicted resolution. We discuss practical issues such as the impact of random arrival phase of the measured data on the performance of the CEPOF. The CEPOF algorithm demonstrates that full-width-at- half-maximum energy resolution of < 8 eV coupled with position-sensitivity down to a few 100 eV should be achievable for a fully optimized device.

  20. Poly-dA:dT tracts form an in vivo nucleosomal turnstile.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl G de Boer

    Full Text Available Nucleosomes regulate many DNA-dependent processes by controlling the accessibility of DNA, and DNA sequences such as the poly-dA:dT element are known to affect nucleosome binding. We demonstrate that poly-dA:dT tracts form an asymmetric barrier to nucleosome movement in vivo, mediated by ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers. We theorize that nucleosome transit over poly-A elements is more energetically favourable in one direction, leading to an asymmetric arrangement of nucleosomes around these sequences. We demonstrate that different arrangements of poly-A and poly-T tracts result in very different outcomes for nucleosome occupancy in yeast, mouse, and human, and show that yeast takes advantage of this phenomenon in its promoter architecture.

  1. Linker histones: novel insights into structure-specific recognition of the nucleosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutter, Amber R; Hayes, Jeffrey J

    2017-04-01

    Linker histones (H1s) are a primary component of metazoan chromatin, fulfilling numerous functions, both in vitro and in vivo, including stabilizing the wrapping of DNA around the nucleosome, promoting folding and assembly of higher order chromatin structures, influencing nucleosome spacing on DNA, and regulating specific gene expression. However, many molecular details of how H1 binds to nucleosomes and recognizes unique structural features on the nucleosome surface remain undefined. Numerous, confounding studies are complicated not only by experimental limitations, but the use of different linker histone isoforms and nucleosome constructions. This review summarizes the decades of research that has resulted in several models of H1 association with nucleosomes, with a focus on recent advances that suggest multiple modes of H1 interaction in chromatin, while highlighting the remaining questions.

  2. Anti-dsDNA, anti-nucleosome and anti-C1q antibodies as disease activity markers in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živković Valentina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In spite of the growing number of reports on the study of anti-nucleosome and anti-C1q antibodies, there are still controversies on their significance as disease activity markers in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and their use in everyday clinical practice. Objective. Our aim was to assess the presence of anti-dsDNA, anti-nucleosome and anti-C1q antibodies in SLE patients, as well as to establish their sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value, and their correlation with SLE and lupus nephritis clinical activity. Methods. The study enrolled 85 patients aged 45.3±9.7 years on the average, with SLE of average duration 10.37±7.99 years, hospitalized at the Institute „Niška Banja“ during 2011, and 30 healthy individuals as controls. Disease activity was assessed using Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI. In all examinees the levels of anti-dsDNA, anti-nucleosome and anti-C1q antibodies were measured using the ELISA method with Alegria Test Strips Orgentec (Germany. Results. Patients with active lupus nephritis had a higher presence of anti-C1q antibodies and higher co-positivity of anti-dsDNA, anti-nucleosome, and anti-C1q antibodies compared to those with inactive lupus nephritis (77.77% vs. 21.74%; p<0.01. SLE patients with SLEDAI ≥11 had a higher presence of antinucleosome (93.75% vs. 64.15%; p<0.01 and anti-C1q antibodies (46.87% vs. 22.64%; p<0.05, as well as a higher mean level of anti-nucleosome antibodies (107.79±83.46 U/ml vs. 57.81±63.15 U/ml; p<0.05, compared to those with SLEDAI of 0-10. There was a positive correlation between the SLEDAI and the level of anti-dsDNA (r=0.290; p<0.01, anti-nucleosome (r=0.443; p<0.001, and anti-C1q antibodies (r=0.382; p<0.001. Only anti-C1q antibodies demonstrated correlation with proteinuria (r=0.445; p<0.001. Conclusion. Anti-nucleosome and anti-C1q antibodies demonstrated association with SLE and lupus nephritis

  3. Direct Position Determination of Unknown Signals in the Presence of Multipath Propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jianping; Wang, Ding; Yu, Wanting; Yu, Hongyi

    2018-03-17

    A novel geolocation architecture, termed "Multiple Transponders and Multiple Receivers for Multiple Emitters Positioning System (MTRE)" is proposed in this paper. Existing Direct Position Determination (DPD) methods take advantage of a rather simple channel assumption (line of sight channels with complex path attenuations) and a simplified MUltiple SIgnal Classification (MUSIC) algorithm cost function to avoid the high dimension searching. We point out that the simplified assumption and cost function reduce the positioning accuracy because of the singularity of the array manifold in a multi-path environment. We present a DPD model for unknown signals in the presence of Multi-path Propagation (MP-DPD) in this paper. MP-DPD adds non-negative real path attenuation constraints to avoid the mistake caused by the singularity of the array manifold. The Multi-path Propagation MUSIC (MP-MUSIC) method and the Active Set Algorithm (ASA) are designed to reduce the dimension of searching. A Multi-path Propagation Maximum Likelihood (MP-ML) method is proposed in addition to overcome the limitation of MP-MUSIC in the sense of a time-sensitive application. An iterative algorithm and an approach of initial value setting are given to make the MP-ML time consumption acceptable. Numerical results validate the performances improvement of MP-MUSIC and MP-ML. A closed form of the Cramér-Rao Lower Bound (CRLB) is derived as a benchmark to evaluate the performances of MP-MUSIC and MP-ML.

  4. The Nucleosome Assembly Activity of NAP1 Is Enhanced by Alien▿

    OpenAIRE

    Eckey, Maren; Hong, Wei; Papaioannou, Maria; Baniahmad, Aria

    2007-01-01

    The assembly of nucleosomes into chromatin is essential for the compaction of DNA and inactivation of the DNA template to modulate and repress gene expression. The nucleosome assembly protein 1, NAP1, assembles nucleosomes independent of DNA synthesis and was shown to enhance coactivator-mediated gene expression, suggesting a role for NAP1 in transcriptional regulation. Here, we show that Alien, known to harbor characteristics of a corepressor of nuclear hormone receptors such as of the vitam...

  5. Stabilization of Nucleosomes by Histone Tails and by FACT Revealed by spFRET Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria E. Valieva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A correct chromatin structure is important for cell viability and is tightly regulated by numerous factors. Human protein complex FACT (facilitates chromatin transcription is an essential factor involved in chromatin transcription and cancer development. Here FACT-dependent changes in the structure of single nucleosomes were studied with single-particle Förster resonance energy transfer (spFRET microscopy using nucleosomes labeled with a donor-acceptor pair of fluorophores, which were attached to the adjacent gyres of DNA near the contact between H2A-H2B dimers. Human FACT and its version without the C-terminal domain (CTD and the high mobility group (HMG domain of the structure-specific recognition protein 1 (SSRP1 subunit did not change the structure of the nucleosomes, while FACT without the acidic C-terminal domains of the suppressor of Ty 16 (Spt16 and the SSRP1 subunits caused nucleosome aggregation. Proteolytic removal of histone tails significantly disturbed the nucleosome structure, inducing partial unwrapping of nucleosomal DNA. Human FACT reduced DNA unwrapping and stabilized the structure of tailless nucleosomes. CTD and/or HMG domains of SSRP1 are required for this FACT activity. In contrast, previously it has been shown that yeast FACT unfolds (reorganizes nucleosomes using the CTD domain of SSRP1-like Pol I-binding protein 3 subunit (Pob3. Thus, yeast and human FACT complexes likely utilize the same domains for nucleosome reorganization and stabilization, respectively, and these processes are mechanistically similar.

  6. Dynamic recruitment of Ets1 to both nucleosome-occupied and -depleted enhancer regions mediates a transcriptional program switch during early T-cell differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauchy, Pierre; Maqbool, Muhammad A.; Zacarias-Cabeza, Joaquin; Vanhille, Laurent; Koch, Frederic; Fenouil, Romain; Gut, Marta; Gut, Ivo; Santana, Maria A.; Griffon, Aurélien; Imbert, Jean; Moraes-Cabé, Carolina; Bories, Jean-Christophe; Ferrier, Pierre; Spicuglia, Salvatore; Andrau, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Ets1 is a sequence-specific transcription factor that plays an important role during hematopoiesis, and is essential for the transition of CD4−/CD8− double negative (DN) to CD4+/CD8+ double positive (DP) thymocytes. Using genome-wide and functional approaches, we investigated the binding properties, transcriptional role and chromatin environment of Ets1 during this transition. We found that while Ets1 binding at distal sites was associated with active genes at both DN and DP stages, its enhancer activity was attained at the DP stage, as reflected by levels of the core transcriptional hallmarks H3K4me1/3, RNA Polymerase II and eRNA. This dual, stage-specific ability reflected a switch from non-T hematopoietic toward T-cell specific gene expression programs during the DN-to-DP transition, as indicated by transcriptome analyses of Ets1−/− thymic cells. Coincidentally, Ets1 associates more specifically with Runx1 in DN and with TCF1 in DP cells. We also provide evidence that Ets1 predominantly binds distal nucleosome-occupied regions in DN and nucleosome-depleted regions in DP. Finally and importantly, we demonstrate that Ets1 induces chromatin remodeling by displacing H3K4me1-marked nucleosomes. Our results thus provide an original model whereby the ability of a transcription factor to bind nucleosomal DNA changes during differentiation with consequences on its cognate enhancer activity. PMID:26673693

  7. Real-time measurement of relative sensor position changes using ultrasonic signal evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yastrebova, O.; Bulavinov, A.; Kroening, M. [Fraunhofer Institute Nondestructive Testing IZFP, Saarbruecken (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Ultrasonic testing is considered to be one of the most commonly applied nondestructive testing techniques for flaw detection and material characterization. Traditional Nondestructive Testing (NDT) provides detection of material discontinuities that may cause failure within the designed lifetime of a part or component. In addition, Quantitative Nondestructive Testing (QNDT) provides means to obtain required information about type, size and location of deficiencies to the integrity of the inspected structure and further use under specific, given load conditions. The ''Acoustic Mouse'' technique has been developed as a tool for manual ultrasonic inspection to provide test results that can be evaluated quantitatively. The ultrasonic data are processed by real-time variation methods to extract position information from backscattered acoustic noise and geometric scatter signals in the inspection volume. The position and positional changes of the ''Acoustic Mouse'' sensor (transducer) are determined by the sequential analysis of ultrasonic data (highresolution sector-scans), which are acquired and reconstructed using the Sampling Phased Array technique. The results of first experiments conducted with linear scanning and intentional lift-offs demonstrate sufficient accuracy in position measurements. (orig.)

  8. Removal of histone tails from nucleosome dissects the physical mechanisms of salt-induced aggregation, linker histone H1-induced compaction, and 30-nm fiber formation of the nucleosome array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hizume, Kohji; Nakai, Tonau; Araki, Sumiko; Prieto, Eloise; Yoshikawa, Kenichi; Takeyasu, Kunio

    2009-01-01

    In order to reveal the roles of histone tails in the formation of higher-order chromatin structures, we employed atomic force microscopy (AFM), and an in vitro reconstitution system to examine the properties of reconstituted chromatin composed of tail-less histones and a long DNA (106-kb plasmid) template. The tail-less nucleosomes did not aggregate at high salt concentrations or with an excess amount of core histones, in contrast with the behavior of nucleosomal arrays composed of nucleosomes containing normal, N-terminal tails. Analysis of our nucleosome distributions reveals that the attractive interaction between tail-less nucleosomes is weakened. Addition of linker histone H1 into the tail-less nucleosomal array failed to promote the formation of 30 nm chromatin fibers that are usually formed in the normal nucleosomal array. These results demonstrate that the attractive interaction between nucleosomes via histone tails plays a critical role in the formation of the uniform 30-nm chromatin fiber.

  9. Direct Position Determination of Unknown Signals in the Presence of Multipath Propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianping Du

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A novel geolocation architecture, termed “Multiple Transponders and Multiple Receivers for Multiple Emitters Positioning System (MTRE” is proposed in this paper. Existing Direct Position Determination (DPD methods take advantage of a rather simple channel assumption (line of sight channels with complex path attenuations and a simplified MUltiple SIgnal Classification (MUSIC algorithm cost function to avoid the high dimension searching. We point out that the simplified assumption and cost function reduce the positioning accuracy because of the singularity of the array manifold in a multi-path environment. We present a DPD model for unknown signals in the presence of Multi-path Propagation (MP-DPD in this paper. MP-DPD adds non-negative real path attenuation constraints to avoid the mistake caused by the singularity of the array manifold. The Multi-path Propagation MUSIC (MP-MUSIC method and the Active Set Algorithm (ASA are designed to reduce the dimension of searching. A Multi-path Propagation Maximum Likelihood (MP-ML method is proposed in addition to overcome the limitation of MP-MUSIC in the sense of a time-sensitive application. An iterative algorithm and an approach of initial value setting are given to make the MP-ML time consumption acceptable. Numerical results validate the performances improvement of MP-MUSIC and MP-ML. A closed form of the Cramér–Rao Lower Bound (CRLB is derived as a benchmark to evaluate the performances of MP-MUSIC and MP-ML.

  10. Investigation on the coloured noise in GPS-derived position with time-varying seasonal signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruszczynska, Marta; Klos, Anna; Bos, Machiel Simon; Bogusz, Janusz

    2016-04-01

    The seasonal signals in the GPS-derived time series arise from real geophysical signals related to tidal (residual) or non-tidal (loadings from atmosphere, ocean and continental hydrosphere, thermo elastic strain, etc.) effects and numerical artefacts including aliasing from mismodelling in short periods or repeatability of the GPS satellite constellation with respect to the Sun (draconitics). Singular Spectrum Analysis (SSA) is a method for investigation of nonlinear dynamics, suitable to either stationary or non-stationary data series without prior knowledge about their character. The aim of SSA is to mathematically decompose the original time series into a sum of slowly varying trend, seasonal oscillations and noise. In this presentation we will explore the ability of SSA to subtract the time-varying seasonal signals in GPS-derived North-East-Up topocentric components and show properties of coloured noise from residua. For this purpose we used data from globally distributed IGS (International GNSS Service) permanent stations processed by the JPL (Jet Propulsion Laboratory) in a PPP (Precise Point Positioning) mode. After introducing a threshold of 13 years, 264 stations left with a maximum length reaching 23 years. The data was initially pre-processed for outliers, offsets and gaps. The SSA was applied to pre-processed series to estimate the time-varying seasonal signals. We adopted a 3-years window as the optimal dimension of its size determined with the Akaike's Information Criteria (AIC) values. A Fisher-Snedecor test corrected for the presence of temporal correlation was used to determine the statistical significance of reconstructed components. This procedure showed that first four components describing annual and semi-annual signals, are significant at a 99.7% confidence level, which corresponds to 3-sigma criterion. We compared the non-parametric SSA approach with a commonly chosen parametric Least-Squares Estimation that assumes constant amplitudes and

  11. Differential Nucleosome Occupancies across Oct4-Sox2 Binding Sites in Murine Embryonic Stem Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Sebeson

    Full Text Available The binding sequence for any transcription factor can be found millions of times within a genome, yet only a small fraction of these sequences encode functional transcription factor binding sites. One of the reasons for this dichotomy is that many other factors, such as nucleosomes, compete for binding. To study how the competition between nucleosomes and transcription factors helps determine a functional transcription factor site from a predicted transcription factor site, we compared experimentally-generated in vitro nucleosome occupancy with in vivo nucleosome occupancy and transcription factor binding in murine embryonic stem cells. Using a solution hybridization enrichment technique, we generated a high-resolution nucleosome map from targeted regions of the genome containing predicted sites and functional sites of Oct4/Sox2 regulation. We found that at Pax6 and Nes, which are bivalently poised in stem cells, functional Oct4 and Sox2 sites show high amounts of in vivo nucleosome displacement compared to in vitro. Oct4 and Sox2, which are active, show no significant displacement of in vivo nucleosomes at functional sites, similar to nonfunctional Oct4/Sox2 binding. This study highlights a complex interplay between Oct4 and Sox2 transcription factors and nucleosomes among different target genes, which may result in distinct patterns of stem cell gene regulation.

  12. The nucleosome assembly activity of NAP1 is enhanced by Alien.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckey, Maren; Hong, Wei; Papaioannou, Maria; Baniahmad, Aria

    2007-05-01

    The assembly of nucleosomes into chromatin is essential for the compaction of DNA and inactivation of the DNA template to modulate and repress gene expression. The nucleosome assembly protein 1, NAP1, assembles nucleosomes independent of DNA synthesis and was shown to enhance coactivator-mediated gene expression, suggesting a role for NAP1 in transcriptional regulation. Here, we show that Alien, known to harbor characteristics of a corepressor of nuclear hormone receptors such as of the vitamin D receptor (VDR), binds in vivo and in vitro to NAP1 and modulates its activity by enhancing NAP1-mediated nucleosome assembly on DNA. Furthermore, Alien reduces the accessibility of the histones H3 and H4 for NAP1-promoted assembly reaction. This indicates that Alien sustains and reinforces the formation of nucleosomes. Employing deletion mutants of Alien suggests that different regions of Alien are involved in enhancement of NAP1-mediated nucleosome assembly and in inhibiting the accessibility of the histones H3 and H4. In addition, we provide evidence that Alien is associated with chromatin and with micrococcus nuclease-prepared nucleosome fractions and interacts with the histones H3 and H4. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation and reimmunoprecipitation experiments suggest that NAP1 and Alien localize to the endogenous CYP24 promoter in vivo, a VDR target gene. Based on these findings, we present here a novel pathway linking corepressor function with nucleosome assembly activity.

  13. Nucleosomes and histones are present in glomerular deposits in human lupus nephritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanBruggen, MCJ; Kramers, C; Walgreen, B; Elema, JD; Kallenberg, CGM; vandenBorn, J; Smeenk, RJT; Assmann, KJM; Muller, S; Monestier, M; Berden, JHM

    Background. Recently we showed that antinuclear autoantibodies complexed to nucleosomes can bind to heparan sulphate (HS) in the glomerular basement membrane (GEM) via the histone part of the nucleosome. Histones have been identified in glomerular deposits in human and murine lupus nephritis. In

  14. PARP-1 Interaction with and Activation by Histones and Nucleosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Colin; Kotova, Elena; Tulin, Alexei V

    2017-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase 1 (PARP-1) is an abundant chromatin associated protein, typical for most eukaryotic nuclei. The localization of PARP-1 in chromatin and its enzymatic activation involves multiple interactions of PARP-1 with nucleosomal histones, other proteins, and DNA. We report a set of methods designed to reconstitute PARP-1 regulation in vitro. These methods involve the expression of PARP-1 and PARP-1-regulating proteins using bacterial and eukaryotic systems, purification of these proteins using chromatography, testing of individual interactions in vitro, assembly of active complexes, and reconstitution of PARP-1 regulating reactions in vitro.

  15. Stimulation of the Drosophila immune system alters genome-wide nucleosome occupancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingxue Ren

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In eukaryotes, nucleosomes participate in all DNA-templated events by regulating access to the underlying DNA sequence. However, nucleosome dynamics during a genome response have not been well characterized [1,2]. We stimulated Drosophila S2 cells with heat-killed Gram-negative bacteria Salmonella typhimurium, and mapped genome-wide nucleosome occupancy at high temporal resolution by MNase-seq using Illumina HiSeq 2500. We show widespread nucleosome occupancy change in S2 cells during the immune response, with the significant nucleosomal loss occurring at 4 h after stimulation. Data have been deposited to the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO database repository with the dataset identifier GSE64507.

  16. Received Signal Strength Recovery in Green WLAN Indoor Positioning System Using Singular Value Thresholding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Ma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Green WLAN is a promising technique for accessing future indoor Internet services. It is designed not only for high-speed data communication purposes but also for energy efficiency. The basic strategy of green WLAN is that all the access points are not always powered on, but rather work on-demand. Though powering off idle access points does not affect data communication, a serious asymmetric matching problem will arise in a WLAN indoor positioning system due to the fact the received signal strength (RSS readings from the available access points are different in their offline and online phases. This asymmetry problem will no doubt invalidate the fingerprint algorithm used to estimate the mobile device location. Therefore, in this paper we propose a green WLAN indoor positioning system, which can recover RSS readings and achieve good localization performance based on singular value thresholding (SVT theory. By solving the nuclear norm minimization problem, SVT recovers not only the radio map, but also online RSS readings from a sparse matrix by sensing only a fraction of the RSS readings. We have implemented the method in our lab and evaluated its performances. The experimental results indicate the proposed system could recover the RSS readings and achieve good localization performance.

  17. Initiation of Antiviral B Cell Immunity Relies on Innate Signals from Spatially Positioned NKT Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaya, Mauro; Barral, Patricia; Burbage, Marianne; Aggarwal, Shweta; Montaner, Beatriz; Warren Navia, Andrew; Aid, Malika; Tsui, Carlson; Maldonado, Paula; Nair, Usha; Ghneim, Khader; Fallon, Padraic G; Sekaly, Rafick-Pierre; Barouch, Dan H; Shalek, Alex K; Bruckbauer, Andreas; Strid, Jessica; Batista, Facundo D

    2018-01-25

    B cells constitute an essential line of defense from pathogenic infections through the generation of class-switched antibody-secreting cells (ASCs) in germinal centers. Although this process is known to be regulated by follicular helper T (TfH) cells, the mechanism by which B cells initially seed germinal center reactions remains elusive. We found that NKT cells, a population of innate-like T lymphocytes, are critical for the induction of B cell immunity upon viral infection. The positioning of NKT cells at the interfollicular areas of lymph nodes facilitates both their direct priming by resident macrophages and the localized delivery of innate signals to antigen-experienced B cells. Indeed, NKT cells secrete an early wave of IL-4 and constitute up to 70% of the total IL-4-producing cells during the initial stages of infection. Importantly, the requirement of this innate immunity arm appears to be evolutionarily conserved because early NKT and IL-4 gene signatures also positively correlate with the levels of neutralizing antibodies in Zika-virus-infected macaques. In conclusion, our data support a model wherein a pre-TfH wave of IL-4 secreted by interfollicular NKT cells triggers the seeding of germinal center cells and serves as an innate link between viral infection and B cell immunity. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Links between DNA methylation and nucleosome occupancy in the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collings, Clayton K; Anderson, John N

    2017-01-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification that is enriched in heterochromatin but depleted at active promoters and enhancers. However, the debate on whether or not DNA methylation is a reliable indicator of high nucleosome occupancy has not been settled. For example, the methylation levels of DNA flanking CTCF sites are higher in linker DNA than in nucleosomal DNA, while other studies have shown that the nucleosome core is the preferred site of methylation. In this study, we make progress toward understanding these conflicting phenomena by implementing a bioinformatics approach that combines MNase-seq and NOMe-seq data and by comprehensively profiling DNA methylation and nucleosome occupancy throughout the human genome. The results demonstrated that increasing methylated CpG density is correlated with nucleosome occupancy in the total genome and within nearly all subgenomic regions. Features with elevated methylated CpG density such as exons, SINE-Alu sequences, H3K36-trimethylated peaks, and methylated CpG islands are among the highest nucleosome occupied elements in the genome, while some of the lowest occupancies are displayed by unmethylated CpG islands and unmethylated transcription factor binding sites. Additionally, outside of CpG islands, the density of CpGs within nucleosomes was shown to be important for the nucleosomal location of DNA methylation with low CpG frequencies favoring linker methylation and high CpG frequencies favoring core particle methylation. Prominent exceptions to the correlations between methylated CpG density and nucleosome occupancy include CpG islands marked by H3K27me3 and CpG-poor heterochromatin marked by H3K9me3, and these modifications, along with DNA methylation, distinguish the major silencing mechanisms of the human epigenome. Thus, the relationship between DNA methylation and nucleosome occupancy is influenced by the density of methylated CpG dinucleotides and by other epigenomic components in chromatin.

  19. The changing paradigm: estrogen receptor α recognition on DNA and within the dynamic nature of nucleosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William M. Scovell

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα plays a major role in the expression of estrogen-responsive genes. Although its conventional binding characteristics have been considered coincident with & exclusively in the class of steroid hormone receptors, increasing evidence challenges this paradigm. ERα was shown to bind to consensus estrogen response element half-sites (cHERE in DNA in the presence of the ubiquitous, abundant & conserved architectural protein, high mobility group protein 1 (HMGB1. It also binds to direct repeats with various spacers, in addition to everted repeats. These in vitro binding sites have been shown to be active in vivo, with both the binding affinity and transcriptional activity increased in the presence of HMGB1. Surprisingly, ERα does not bind to the optimally oriented cERE at the dyad in rotationally phased and translationally positioned nucleosomes. However, the presence of HMGB1 restructures the nucleosome to facilitate increased ERα accessibility, resulting in sequence-specific estrogen receptor binding. The finding that HMGB1 interacts with unbound ERα provides a unique avenue for enhanced ERα activity and possibly an increase in the extent of targeting at estrogen-responsive genes. The findings are consistent with ERα 1 targeting a much wider selection of genomic response elements (half-sites and inverted, direct and everted repeats and 2 exhibiting characteristics of both steroid and non steroid nuclear receptors. Growing evidence already shows a competition occurs at the DNA level between ERα and the non steroid nuclear hormone receptor, thyroid receptor (TR. Collectively, these reports suggest a less restrictive cataloging for estrogen receptor and a broader paradigm for understanding its role in the regulation of estrogen-responsive genes and influence on non steroid hormone receptor activities.

  20. In silico evidence for sequence-dependent nucleosome sliding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lequieu, Joshua; Schwartz, David C.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2017-10-18

    Nucleosomes represent the basic building block of chromatin and provide an important mechanism by which cellular processes are controlled. The locations of nucleosomes across the genome are not random but instead depend on both the underlying DNA sequence and the dynamic action of other proteins within the nucleus. These processes are central to cellular function, and the molecular details of the interplay between DNA sequence and nudeosome dynamics remain poorly understood. In this work, we investigate this interplay in detail by relying on a molecular model, which permits development of a comprehensive picture of the underlying free energy surfaces and the corresponding dynamics of nudeosome repositioning. The mechanism of nudeosome repositioning is shown to be strongly linked to DNA sequence and directly related to the binding energy of a given DNA sequence to the histone core. It is also demonstrated that chromatin remodelers can override DNA-sequence preferences by exerting torque, and the histone H4 tail is then identified as a key component by which DNA-sequence, histone modifications, and chromatin remodelers could in fact be coupled.

  1. Interaction of nucleosome assembly proteins abolishes nuclear localization of DGKζ by attenuating its association with importins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Masashi; Hozumi, Yasukazu; Ichimura, Tohru; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Masakazu; Takahashi, Nobuya; Iseki, Ken; Yagisawa, Hitoshi; Shinkawa, Takashi; Isobe, Toshiaki; Goto, Kaoru

    2011-01-01

    Diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) is involved in the regulation of lipid-mediated signal transduction through the metabolism of a second messenger diacylglycerol. Of the DGK family, DGKζ, which contains a nuclear localization signal, localizes mainly to the nucleus but translocates to the cytoplasm under pathological conditions. However, the detailed mechanism of translocation and its functional significance remain unclear. To elucidate these issues, we used a proteomic approach to search for protein targets that interact with DGKζ. Results show that nucleosome assembly protein (NAP) 1-like 1 (NAP1L1) and NAP1-like 4 (NAP1L4) are identified as novel DGKζ binding partners. NAP1Ls constitutively shuttle between the nucleus and the cytoplasm in transfected HEK293 cells. The molecular interaction of DGKζ and NAP1Ls prohibits nuclear import of DGKζ because binding of NAP1Ls to DGKζ blocks import carrier proteins, Qip1 and NPI1, to interact with DGKζ, leading to cytoplasmic tethering of DGKζ. In addition, overexpression of NAP1Ls exerts a protective effect against doxorubicin-induced cytotoxicity. These findings suggest that NAP1Ls are involved in a novel molecular basis for the regulation of nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of DGKζ and provide a clue to examine functional significance of its translocation under pathological conditions.

  2. Estimating sleep parameters using nasal pressure signals applicable to continuous positive airway pressure devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong-Uk; Erdenebayar, Urtnasan; Joo, Eun-Yeon; Lee, Kyoung-Joung

    2017-06-27

    This paper proposes a method for classifying sleep-wakefulness and estimating sleep parameters using nasal pressure signals applicable to a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) device. In order to classify the sleep-wakefulness states of patients with sleep-disordered breathing (SDB), apnea-hypopnea and snoring events are first detected. Epochs detected as SDB are classified as sleep, and time-domain- and frequency-domain-based features are extracted from the epochs that are detected as normal breathing. Subsequently, sleep-wakefulness is classified using a support vector machine (SVM) classifier in the normal breathing epoch. Finally, four sleep parameters-sleep onset, wake after sleep onset, total sleep time and sleep efficiency-are estimated based on the classified sleep-wakefulness. In order to develop and test the algorithm, 110 patients diagnosed with SDB participated in this study. Ninety of the subjects underwent full-night polysomnography (PSG) and twenty underwent split-night PSG. The subjects were divided into 50 patients of a training set (full/split: 42/8), 30 of a validation set (full/split: 24/6) and 30 of a test set (full/split: 24/6). In the experiments conducted, sleep-wakefulness classification accuracy was found to be 83.2% in the test set, compared with the PSG scoring results of clinical experts. Furthermore, all four sleep parameters showed higher correlations than the results obtained via PSG (r  ⩾  0.84, p  CPAP, sleep-wakefulness classification performances were evaluated for each CPAP in the split-night PSG data. The results indicate that the accuracy and sensitivity of sleep-wakefulness classification by CPAP variation shows no statistically significant difference (p  CPAP devices and evaluation of the quality of sleep.

  3. Spindle assembly checkpoint signalling is uncoupled from chromosomal position in mouse oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Liming; Homer, Hayden

    2012-06-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) averts aneuploidy by coordinating proper bipolar chromosomal attachment with anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C)-mediated securin and cyclin B1 destruction required for anaphase onset. The generation of a Mad2-based signal at kinetochores is central to current models of SAC-based APC/C inhibition. During mitosis, kinetochores of polar-displaced chromosomes, which are at greatest risk of mis-segregating, recruit the highest levels of Mad2, thereby ensuring that SAC activation is proportionate to aneuploidy risk. Paradoxically, although an SAC operates in mammalian oocytes, meiosis I (MI) is notoriously error prone and polar-displaced chromosomes do not prevent anaphase onset. Here we find that Mad2 is not preferentially recruited to the kinetochores of polar chromosomes of wild-type mouse oocytes, in which polar chromosomes are rare, or of oocytes depleted of the kinesin-7 motor CENP-E, in which polar chromosomes are more abundant. Furthermore, in CENP-E-depleted oocytes, although polar chromosomal displacement intensified during MI and the capacity to form stable end-on attachments was severely compromised, all kinetochores nevertheless became devoid of Mad2. Thus, it is possible that the ability of the SAC to robustly discriminate chromosomal position might be compromised by the propensity of oocyte kinetochores to become saturated with unproductive attachments, thereby predisposing to aneuploidy. Our data also reveal novel functions for CENP-E in oocytes: first, CENP-E stabilises BubR1, thereby impacting MI progression; and second, CENP-E mediates bi-orientation by promoting kinetochore reorientation and preventing chromosomal drift towards the poles.

  4. Instantaneous Real-Time Kinematic Decimeter-Level Positioning with BeiDou Triple-Frequency Signals over Medium Baselines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiyang He

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Many applications, such as marine navigation, land vehicles location, etc., require real time precise positioning under medium or long baseline conditions. In this contribution, we develop a model of real-time kinematic decimeter-level positioning with BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS triple-frequency signals over medium distances. The ambiguities of two extra-wide-lane (EWL combinations are fixed first, and then a wide lane (WL combination is reformed based on the two EWL combinations for positioning. Theoretical analysis and empirical analysis is given of the ambiguity fixing rate and the positioning accuracy of the presented method. The results indicate that the ambiguity fixing rate can be up to more than 98% when using BDS medium baseline observations, which is much higher than that of dual-frequency Hatch-Melbourne-Wübbena (HMW method. As for positioning accuracy, decimeter level accuracy can be achieved with this method, which is comparable to that of carrier-smoothed code differential positioning method. Signal interruption simulation experiment indicates that the proposed method can realize fast high-precision positioning whereas the carrier-smoothed code differential positioning method needs several hundreds of seconds for obtaining high precision results. We can conclude that a relatively high accuracy and high fixing rate can be achieved for triple-frequency WL method with single-epoch observations, displaying significant advantage comparing to traditional carrier-smoothed code differential positioning method.

  5. Altered nucleosomes of active nucleolar chromatin contain accessible histone H3 in its hyperacetylated forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, E.M.; Sterner, R.; Allfrey, V.G.

    1987-01-01

    Chromatin of the organism Physarum polycephalum contains a class of conformationally altered nucleosomes previously localized to the transcribing regions of ribosomal genes in nucleoli. When nuclei are treated with 2-iodo[2-tritium]acetate, the histone H3 sulfhydryl group of the altered nucleosomes is derivatized while that of folded nucleosomes is not, and the labeled histones can then be identified by autoradiography of gels that separate H3 isoforms. The H3 derivatized is predominantly of tri- and tetraacetylated forms. In contrast, total free histone reacted with iodoacetate shows no preferential labeling of isoforms. Selective reaction of acetylated H3 is prevalent in both nucleolar and non-nucleolar chromatin. The results link specific patterns of H3 acetylation to changes in nucleosome conformation that occur during transcription

  6. The Drosophila Duox maturation factor is a key component of a positive feedback loop that sustains regeneration signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sumbul Jawed; Abidi, Syeda Nayab Fatima; Skinner, Andrea; Tian, Yuan; Smith-Bolton, Rachel K

    2017-07-01

    Regenerating tissue must initiate the signaling that drives regenerative growth, and sustain that signaling long enough for regeneration to complete. How these key signals are sustained is unclear. To gain a comprehensive view of the changes in gene expression that occur during regeneration, we performed whole-genome mRNAseq of actively regenerating tissue from damaged Drosophila wing imaginal discs. We used genetic tools to ablate the wing primordium to induce regeneration, and carried out transcriptional profiling of the regeneration blastema by fluorescently labeling and sorting the blastema cells, thus identifying differentially expressed genes. Importantly, by using genetic mutants of several of these differentially expressed genes we have confirmed that they have roles in regeneration. Using this approach, we show that high expression of the gene moladietz (mol), which encodes the Duox-maturation factor NIP, is required during regeneration to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS), which in turn sustain JNK signaling during regeneration. We also show that JNK signaling upregulates mol expression, thereby activating a positive feedback signal that ensures the prolonged JNK activation required for regenerative growth. Thus, by whole-genome transcriptional profiling of regenerating tissue we have identified a positive feedback loop that regulates the extent of regenerative growth.

  7. Nucleosome repositioning during differentiation of a human myeloid leukemia cell line

    OpenAIRE

    Teif, Vladimir B.; Mallm, Jan-Philipp; Sharma, Tanvi; Mark Welch, David B.; Rippe, Karsten; Eils, Roland; Langowski, J?rg; Olins, Ada L.; Olins, Donald E.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cell differentiation is associated with changes in chromatin organization and gene expression. In this study, we examine chromatin structure following differentiation of the human myeloid leukemia cell line (HL-60/S4) into granulocytes with retinoic acid (RA) or into macrophage with phorbol ester (TPA). We performed ChIP-seq of histone H3 and its modifications, analyzing changes in nucleosome occupancy, nucleosome repeat length, eu-/heterochromatin redistribution and properties of ep...

  8. Soft skills turned into hard facts: nucleosome remodelling at developmental switches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chioda, M; Becker, P B

    2010-07-01

    Nucleosome remodelling factors are regulators of DNA accessibility in chromatin and lubricators of all major functions of eukaryotic genomes. Their action is transient and reversible, yet can be decisive for irreversible cell-fate decisions during development. In addition to the well-known local actions of nucleosome remodelling factors during transcription initiation, more global and fundamental roles for remodelling complexes in shaping the epigenome during development are emerging.

  9. A simple approach to detect and correct signal faults of Hall position sensors for brushless DC motors at steady speed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yongli; Wu, Zhong; Zhi, Kangyi; Xiong, Jun

    2018-03-01

    In order to realize reliable commutation of brushless DC motors (BLDCMs), a simple approach is proposed to detect and correct signal faults of Hall position sensors in this paper. First, the time instant of the next jumping edge for Hall signals is predicted by using prior information of pulse intervals in the last electrical period. Considering the possible errors between the predicted instant and the real one, a confidence interval is set by using the predicted value and a suitable tolerance for the next pulse edge. According to the relationship between the real pulse edge and the confidence interval, Hall signals can be judged and the signal faults can be corrected. Experimental results of a BLDCM at steady speed demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach.

  10. Herpes simplex virus 1 DNA is in unstable nucleosomes throughout the lytic infection cycle, and the instability of the nucleosomes is independent of DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacasse, Jonathan J; Schang, Luis M

    2012-10-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) DNA is chromatinized during latency and consequently regularly digested by micrococcal nuclease (MCN) to nucleosome-size fragments. In contrast, MCN digests HSV-1 DNA in lytically infected cells to mostly heterogeneous sizes. Yet HSV-1 DNA coimmunoprecipitates with histones during lytic infections. We have shown that at 5 h postinfection, most nuclear HSV-1 DNA is in particularly unstable nucleoprotein complexes and consequently is more accessible to MCN than DNA in cellular chromatin. HSV-1 DNA was quantitatively recovered at this time in complexes with the biophysical properties of mono- to polynucleosomes following a modified MCN digestion developed to detect potential unstable intermediates. We proposed that most HSV-1 DNA is in unstable nucleosome-like complexes during lytic infections. Physiologically, nucleosome assembly typically associates with DNA replication, although DNA replication transiently disrupts nucleosomes. It therefore remained unclear whether the instability of the HSV-1 nucleoprotein complexes was related to the ongoing viral DNA replication. Here we tested whether HSV-1 DNA is in unstable nucleosome-like complexes before, during, or after the peak of viral DNA replication or when HSV-1 DNA replication is inhibited. HSV-1 DNA was quantitatively recovered in complexes fractionating as mono- to polynucleosomes from nuclei harvested at 2, 5, 7, or 9 h after infection, even if viral DNA replication was inhibited. Therefore, most HSV-1 DNA is in unstable nucleosome-like complexes throughout the lytic replication cycle, and the instability of these complexes is surprisingly independent of HSV-1 DNA replication. The specific accessibility of nuclear HSV-1 DNA, however, varied at different times after infection.

  11. Inducible nucleosome depletion at OREBP-binding-sites by hypertonic stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edith H Y Tong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Osmotic Response Element-Binding Protein (OREBP, also known as TonEBP or NFAT5, is a unique transcription factor. It is hitherto the only known mammalian transcription factor that regulates hypertonic stress-induced gene transcription. In addition, unlike other monomeric members of the NFAT family, OREBP exists as a homodimer and it is the only transcription factor known to bind naked DNA targets by complete encirclement in vitro. Nevertheless, how OREBP interacts with target DNA, also known as ORE/TonE, and how it elicits gene transcription in vivo, remains unknown. METHODOLOGY: Using hypertonic induction of the aldose reductase (AR gene activation as a model, we showed that OREs contained dynamic nucleosomes. Hypertonic stress induced a rapid and reversible loss of nucleosome(s around the OREs. The loss of nucleosome(s was found to be initiated by an OREBP-independent mechanism, but was significantly potentiated in the presence of OREBP. Furthermore, hypertonic induction of AR gene was associated with an OREBP-dependent hyperacetylation of histones that spanned the 5' upstream sequences and at least some exons of the gene. Nevertheless, nucleosome loss was not regulated by the acetylation status of histone. SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings offer novel insights into the mechanism of OREBP-dependent transcriptional regulation and provide a basis for understanding how histone eviction and transcription factor recruitment are coupled.

  12. A positive role of cadherin in Wnt/β-catenin signalling during epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Howard

    Full Text Available The Wnt/β-catenin signalling pathway shares a key component, β-catenin, with the cadherin-based adhesion system. The signalling function of β-catenin is conferred by a soluble cytoplasmic pool that is unstable in the absence of a Wnt signal, whilst the adhesion function is based on a cadherin-bound, stable pool at the membrane. The cadherin complex is dynamic, allowing for cell-cell rearrangements such as epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT, where the complex turns over through internalisation. Potential interplay between the two pools remains poorly understood, but cadherins are generally considered negative regulators of Wnt signalling because they sequester cytoplasmic β-catenin. Here we explore how cellular changes at EMT affect the signalling capacity of β-catenin using two models of EMT: hepatocyte growth factor (HGF treatment of MDCK cells, and gastrulation in embryonic development. We show that EMT not only provides a pool of signalling-competent β-catenin following internalisation of cadherin, but also significantly facilitates activation of the Wnt pathway in response to both Wnt signals and exogenous β-catenin. We further demonstrate that availability of β-catenin in the cytoplasm does not necessarily correlate with Wnt/β-catenin pathway activity, since blocking endocytosis or depleting endogenous cadherin abolishes pathway activation despite the presence of β-catenin in the cytoplasm. Lastly we present data suggesting that cadherins are required for augmented activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in vivo. This suggests that cadherins play a crucial role in β-catenin-dependent transcription.

  13. Refinement of the subunit interaction network within the nucleosome remodelling and deacetylase (NuRD) complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrado, Mario; Low, Jason K K; Silva, Ana P G; Schmidberger, Jason W; Sana, Maryam; Sharifi Tabar, Mehdi; Isilak, Musa E; Winning, Courtney S; Kwong, Cherry; Bedward, Max J; Sperlazza, Mary J; Williams, David C; Shepherd, Nicholas E; Mackay, Joel P

    2017-12-01

    The nucleosome remodelling and deacetylase (NuRD) complex is essential for the development of complex animals. NuRD has roles in regulating gene expression and repairing damaged DNA. The complex comprises at least six proteins with two or more paralogues of each protein routinely identified when the complex is purified from cell extracts. To understand the structure and function of NuRD, a map of direct subunit interactions is needed. Dozens of published studies have attempted to define direct inter-subunit connectivities. We propose that conclusions reported in many such studies are in fact ambiguous for one of several reasons. First, the expression of many NuRD subunits in bacteria is unlikely to lead to folded, active protein. Second, interaction studies carried out in cells that contain endogenous NuRD complex can lead to false positives through bridging of target proteins by endogenous components. Combining existing information on NuRD structure with a protocol designed to minimize false positives, we report a conservative and robust interaction map for the NuRD complex. We also suggest a 3D model of the complex that brings together the existing data on the complex. The issues and strategies discussed herein are also applicable to the analysis of a wide range of multi-subunit complexes. Micrococcal nuclease (MNase), EC 3.1.31.1; histone deacetylase (HDAC), EC 3.5.1.98. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  14. Development of capacitive beam position, beam current and Schottky-signal monitors for the Cryogenic Storage Ring (CSR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laux, Felix

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis novel techniques based on capacitive pickups for the determination of the beam current, the beam position and the Schottky-signal in storage rings have been developed. Beam current measurements at the heavy ion storage ring TSR with a capacitive pickup have been found in very good agreement with the theory. Using this device the accurate measurement of beam currents at the TSR far below 1 μA is now possible. This method will also be used at the Cryogenic Storage Ring (CSR) at which beam currents in the range of 1 nA-1 μA are expected. For the first time, position measurements with a resonant amplifier system for capacitive pickups have been examined at the TSR for later use of this technique in the CSR. With this method an increased signal-to-noise ratio can be achieved using a parallel inductance. A comparison with measurements using the rest gas beam profile monitor has shown very good agreement even at very low intensities. Experiments with the cryo-capable electronics for the CSR beam position monitors have shown an achievable quality factor of Q=500, resulting in the prospect of precise position measurements at the CSR even at very low beam currents. The CSR Schottky-Pickup will also be equipped with a resonant amplifier system with a comparable quality factor. An estimation of the signal-to-noise ratio suggests a detection limit of a few protons. (orig.)

  15. FGFR2-Driven Signaling Counteracts Tamoxifen Effect on ERα-Positive Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukasz Turczyk

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Signaling mediated by growth factors receptors has long been suggested as one of the key factors responsible for failure of endocrine treatment in breast cancer (BCa. Herein we present that in the presence of tamoxifen, FGFs (Fibroblast Growth Factors promote BCa cell growth with the strongest effect being produced by FGF7. FGFR2 was identified as a mediator of FGF7 action and the FGFR2-induced signaling was found to underlie cancer-associated fibroblasts-dependent resistance to tamoxifen. FGF7/FGFR2-triggered pathway was shown to induce ER phosphorylation, ubiquitination and subsequent ER proteasomal degradation which counteracted tamoxifen-promoted ER stabilization. We also identified activation of PI3K/AKT signaling targeting ER-Ser167 and regulation of Bcl-2 expression as a mediator of FGFR2-promoted resistance to tamoxifen. Analysis of tissue samples from patients with invasive ductal carcinoma revealed an inversed correlation between expression of FGFR2 and ER, thus supporting our in vitro data. These results unveil the complexity of ER regulation by FGFR2-mediated signaling likely to be associated with BCa resistance to endocrine therapy.

  16. Increasing Nucleosome Occupancy Is Correlated with an Increasing Mutation Rate so Long as DNA Repair Machinery Is Intact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdi, Puya G; Pedersen, Brian A; Taylor, Jared F; Khattab, Omar S; Chen, Yu-Han; Chen, Yumay; Jacobsen, Steven E; Wang, Ping H

    2015-01-01

    Deciphering the multitude of epigenomic and genomic factors that influence the mutation rate is an area of great interest in modern biology. Recently, chromatin has been shown to play a part in this process. To elucidate this relationship further, we integrated our own ultra-deep sequenced human nucleosomal DNA data set with a host of published human genomic and cancer genomic data sets. Our results revealed, that differences in nucleosome occupancy are associated with changes in base-specific mutation rates. Increasing nucleosome occupancy is associated with an increasing transition to transversion ratio and an increased germline mutation rate within the human genome. Additionally, cancer single nucleotide variants and microindels are enriched within nucleosomes and both the coding and non-coding cancer mutation rate increases with increasing nucleosome occupancy. There is an enrichment of cancer indels at the theoretical start (74 bp) and end (115 bp) of linker DNA between two nucleosomes. We then hypothesized that increasing nucleosome occupancy decreases access to DNA by DNA repair machinery and could account for the increasing mutation rate. Such a relationship should not exist in DNA repair knockouts, and we thus repeated our analysis in DNA repair machinery knockouts to test our hypothesis. Indeed, our results revealed no correlation between increasing nucleosome occupancy and increasing mutation rate in DNA repair knockouts. Our findings emphasize the linkage of the genome and epigenome through the nucleosome whose properties can affect genome evolution and genetic aberrations such as cancer.

  17. Structure of centromere chromatin: from nucleosome to chromosomal architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalch, Thomas; Steiner, Florian A

    2017-08-01

    The centromere is essential for the segregation of chromosomes, as it serves as attachment site for microtubules to mediate chromosome segregation during mitosis and meiosis. In most organisms, the centromere is restricted to one chromosomal region that appears as primary constriction on the condensed chromosome and is partitioned into two chromatin domains: The centromere core is characterized by the centromere-specific histone H3 variant CENP-A (also called cenH3) and is required for specifying the centromere and for building the kinetochore complex during mitosis. This core region is generally flanked by pericentric heterochromatin, characterized by nucleosomes containing H3 methylated on lysine 9 (H3K9me) that are bound by heterochromatin proteins. During mitosis, these two domains together form a three-dimensional structure that exposes CENP-A-containing chromatin to the surface for interaction with the kinetochore and microtubules. At the same time, this structure supports the tension generated during the segregation of sister chromatids to opposite poles. In this review, we discuss recent insight into the characteristics of the centromere, from the specialized chromatin structures at the centromere core and the pericentromere to the three-dimensional organization of these regions that make up the functional centromere.

  18. NUP37, a positive regulator of YAP/TEAD signaling, promotes the progression of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiaoling; Liu, Yuting; Feng, Weiguang; Lei, Liu; Du, Yemu; Wu, Jinsheng; Wang, Shaochuang

    2017-11-17

    Activation of YAP/TEAD signaling is very common in the progression of HCC (Hepatocellular carcinoma). Nuclear pore complex (NPC) regulates the shuttling of proteins between cytoplasm and nucleus. Nuclear accumulation of YAP protein has been observed in the majority of HCC tissues. However, whether NPC could regulate the YAP/TEAD signaling remains unknown. In this study, it was found NUP37, the component of NPC, significantly up-regulated in HCC clinical samples and mouse model. Over-expression of NUP37 promoted the growth, migration and invasion of HCC cells, while knocking down the expression of NUP37 inhibited the growth, migration, invasion and metastasis of HCC cells and improved the survival of the mouse model. NUP37 interacted with YAP and activated YAP/TEAD signaling by enhancing the interaction between YAP and TEAD. Taken together, these data demonstrated the oncogenic roles of NUP37 in the progression of HCC and suggested that NUP37 might be a promising therapeutic target.

  19. Nucleosome Core Particle Disassembly and Assembly Kinetics Studied Using Single-Molecule Fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazan, Noa Plavner; Tomov, Toma E; Tsukanov, Roman; Liber, Miran; Berger, Yaron; Masoud, Rula; Toth, Katalin; Langowski, Joerg; Nir, Eyal

    2015-10-20

    The stability of the nucleosome core particle (NCP) is believed to play a major role in regulation of gene expression. To understand the mechanisms that influence NCP stability, we studied stability and dissociation and association kinetics under different histone protein (NCP) and NaCl concentrations using single-pair Förster resonance energy transfer and alternating laser excitation techniques. The method enables distinction between folded, unfolded, and intermediate NCP states and enables measurements at picomolar to nanomolar NCP concentrations where dissociation and association reactions can be directly observed. We reproduced the previously observed nonmonotonic dependence of NCP stability on NaCl concentration, and we suggest that this rather unexpected behavior is a result of interplay between repulsive and attractive forces within positively charged histones and between the histones and the negatively charged DNA. Higher NaCl concentrations decrease the attractive force between the histone proteins and the DNA but also stabilize H2A/H2B histone dimers, and possibly (H3/H4)2 tetramers. An intermediate state in which one DNA arm is unwrapped, previously observed at high NaCl concentrations, is also explained by this salt-induced stabilization. The strong dependence of NCP stability on ion and histone concentrations, and possibly on other charged macromolecules, may play a role in chromosomal morphology. Copyright © 2015 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Miro1 Regulates Activity-Driven Positioning of Mitochondria within Astrocytic Processes Apposed to Synapses to Regulate Intracellular Calcium Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, Terri-Leigh; Higgs, Nathalie F.; Sheehan, David F.; Al Awabdh, Sana; López-Doménech, Guillermo; Arancibia-Carcamo, I. Lorena

    2015-01-01

    It is fast emerging that maintaining mitochondrial function is important for regulating astrocyte function, although the specific mechanisms that govern astrocyte mitochondrial trafficking and positioning remain poorly understood. The mitochondrial Rho-GTPase 1 protein (Miro1) regulates mitochondrial trafficking and detachment from the microtubule transport network to control activity-dependent mitochondrial positioning in neurons. However, whether Miro proteins are important for regulating signaling-dependent mitochondrial dynamics in astrocytic processes remains unclear. Using live-cell confocal microscopy of rat organotypic hippocampal slices, we find that enhancing neuronal activity induces transient mitochondrial remodeling in astrocytes, with a concomitant, transient reduction in mitochondrial trafficking, mediated by elevations in intracellular Ca2+. Stimulating neuronal activity also induced mitochondrial confinement within astrocytic processes in close proximity to synapses. Furthermore, we show that the Ca2+-sensing EF-hand domains of Miro1 are important for regulating mitochondrial trafficking in astrocytes and required for activity-driven mitochondrial confinement near synapses. Additionally, activity-dependent mitochondrial positioning by Miro1 reciprocally regulates the levels of intracellular Ca2+ in astrocytic processes. Thus, the regulation of intracellular Ca2+ signaling, dependent on Miro1-mediated mitochondrial positioning, could have important consequences for astrocyte Ca2+ wave propagation, gliotransmission, and ultimately neuronal function. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Mitochondria are key cellular organelles that play important roles in providing cellular energy and buffering intracellular calcium ions. The mechanisms that control mitochondrial distribution within the processes of glial cells called astrocytes and the impact this may have on calcium signaling remains unclear. We show that activation of glutamate receptors or increased neuronal

  1. Bub1 positions Mad1 close to KNL1 MELT repeats to promote checkpoint signalling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Gang; Kruse, Thomas; López-Méndez, Blanca

    2017-01-01

    Proper segregation of chromosomes depends on a functional spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) and requires kinetochore localization of the Bub1 and Mad1/Mad2 checkpoint proteins. Several aspects of Mad1/Mad2 kinetochore recruitment in human cells are unclear and in particular the underlying direct...... interactions. Here we show that conserved domain 1 (CD1) in human Bub1 binds directly to Mad1 and a phosphorylation site exists in CD1 that stimulates Mad1 binding and SAC signalling. Importantly, fusion of minimal kinetochore-targeting Bub1 fragments to Mad1 bypasses the need for CD1, revealing that the main...

  2. PINK1 positively regulates IL-1β-mediated signaling through Tollip and IRAK1 modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Hyun Jung

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parkinson disease (PD is characterized by a slow, progressive degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantianigra. The cause of neuronal loss in PD is not well understood, but several genetic loci, including PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1, have been linked to early-onset autosomal recessive forms of familial PD. Neuroinflammation greatly contributes to PD neuronal degeneration and pathogenesis. IL-1 is one of the principal cytokines that regulates various immune and inflammatory responses via the activation of the transcription factors NF-κB and activating protein-1. Despite the close relationship between PD and neuroinflammation, the functional roles of PD-linked genes during inflammatory processes remain poorly understood. Methods To explore the functional roles of PINK1 in response to IL-1β stimulation, HEK293 cells, mouse embryonic fibroblasts derived from PINK1-null (PINK1−/− and control (PINK1+/+ mice, and 293 IL-1RI cells stably expressing type 1 IL-1 receptor were used. Immunoprecipitation and western blot analysis were performed to detect protein–protein interaction and protein ubiquitination. To confirm the effect of PINK1 on NF-κB activation, NF-κB-dependent firefly luciferase reporter assay was conducted. Results PINK1 specifically binds two components of the IL-1-mediated signaling cascade, Toll-interacting protein (Tollip and IL-1 receptor-associated kinase 1 (IRAK1. The association of PINK1 with Tollip, a negative regulator of IL-1β signaling, increases upon IL-1β stimulation, which then facilitates the dissociation of Tollip from IRAK1 as well as the assembly of the IRAK1–TNF receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6 complex. PINK1 also enhances Lys63-linked polyubiquitination of IRAK1, an essential modification of recruitment of NF-κB essential modulator and subsequent IκB kinase activation, and increases formation of the intermediate signalosome including IRAK1, TRAF6, and

  3. LET-99 opposes Galpha/GPR signaling to generate asymmetry for spindle positioning in response to PAR and MES-1/SRC-1 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsou, Meng-Fu Bryan; Hayashi, Adam; Rose, Lesilee S

    2003-12-01

    G-protein signaling plays important roles in asymmetric cell division. In C. elegans embryos, homologs of receptor-independent G protein activators, GPR-1 and GPR-2 (GPR-1/2), function together with Galpha (GOA-1 and GPA-16) to generate asymmetric spindle pole elongation during divisions in the P lineage. Although Galpha is uniformly localized at the cell cortex, the cortical localization of GPR-1/2 is asymmetric in dividing P cells. In this report, we show that the asymmetry of GPR-1/2 localization depends on PAR-3 and its downstream intermediate LET-99. Furthermore, in addition to its involvement in spindle elongation, Galpha is required for the intrinsically programmed nuclear rotation event that orients the spindle in the one-cell. LET-99 functions antagonistically to the Galpha/GPR-1/2 signaling pathway, providing an explanation for how Galpha-dependent force is regulated asymmetrically by PAR polarity cues during both nuclear rotation and anaphase spindle elongation. In addition, Galpha and LET-99 are required for spindle orientation during the extrinsically polarized division of EMS cells. In this cell, both GPR-1/2 and LET-99 are asymmetrically localized in response to the MES-1/SRC-1 signaling pathway. Their localization patterns at the EMS/P2 cell boundary are complementary, suggesting that LET-99 and Galpha/GPR-1/2 signaling function in opposite ways during this cell division as well. These results provide insight into how polarity cues are transmitted into specific spindle positions in both extrinsic and intrinsic pathways of asymmetric cell division.

  4. Solution structure of variant H2A.Z.1 nucleosome investigated by small-angle X-ray and neutron scatterings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Masaaki; Horikoshi, Naoki; Suzuki, Yuya; Taguchi, Hiroyuki; Kujirai, Tomoya; Inoue, Rintaro; Oba, Yojiro; Sato, Nobuhiro; Martel, Anne; Porcar, Lionel; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2015-12-01

    Solution structures of nucleosomes containing a human histone variant, H2A.Z.1, were measured by small-angle X-ray and neutron scatterings (SAXS and SANS). SAXS revealed that the outer shape, reflecting the DNA shape, of the H2A.Z.1 nucleosome is almost the same as that of the canonical H2A nucleosome. In contrast, SANS employing a contrast variation technique revealed that the histone octamer of the H2A.Z.1 nucleosome is smaller than that of the canonical nucleosome. The DNA within the H2A.Z.1 nucleosome was more susceptible to micrococcal nuclease than that within the canonical nucleosome. These results suggested that the DNA is loosely wrapped around the histone core in the H2A.Z.1 nucleosome.

  5. Chromatin Regulation of Estrogen-Mediated Transcription in Breast Cancer: Rules for Binding Sites in Nucleosomes and Modified Histones that Enhance ER Binding

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chrivia, John C

    2005-01-01

    .... Using gel shift assays, we tested whether ER can bind these nucleosomes. We have also found that the non-histone chromatin protein HMOB2 enhances binding of ER to an ERE located at the center of the nucleosome...

  6. Two-Component Signal Transduction System SaeRS Positively Regulates Staphylococcus epidermidis Glucose Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Lou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus epidermidis, which is a causative pathogen of nosocomial infection, expresses its virulent traits such as biofilm and autolysis regulated by two-component signal transduction system SaeRS. In this study, we performed a proteomic analysis of differences in expression between the S. epidermidis 1457 wild-type and saeRS mutant to identify candidates regulated by saeRS using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE combined with matrix-assisted laser desorption/lonization mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS. Of 55 identified proteins that significantly differed in expression between the two strains, 15 were upregulated and 40 were downregulated. The downregulated proteins included enzymes related to glycolysis and TCA cycle, suggesting that glucose is not properly utilized in S. epidermidis when saeRS was deleted. The study will be helpful for treatment of S. epidermidis infection from the viewpoint of metabolic modulation dependent on two-component signal transduction system SaeRS.

  7. Coordination of Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycans with Wnt Signaling To Control Cellular Migrations and Positioning in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saied-Santiago, Kristian; Townley, Robert A; Attonito, John D; da Cunha, Dayse S; Díaz-Balzac, Carlos A; Tecle, Eillen; Bülow, Hannes E

    2017-08-01

    Heparan sulfates (HS) are linear polysaccharides with complex modification patterns, which are covalently bound via conserved attachment sites to core proteins to form heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs). HSPGs regulate many aspects of the development and function of the nervous system, including cell migration, morphology, and network connectivity. HSPGs function as cofactors for multiple signaling pathways, including the Wnt-signaling molecules and their Frizzled receptors. To investigate the functional interactions among the HSPG and Wnt networks, we conducted genetic analyses of each, and also between these networks using five cellular migrations in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans We find that HSPG core proteins act genetically in a combinatorial fashion dependent on the cellular contexts. Double mutant analyses reveal distinct redundancies among HSPGs for different migration events, and different cellular migrations require distinct heparan sulfate modification patterns. Our studies reveal that the transmembrane HSPG SDN-1/Syndecan functions within the migrating cell to promote cellular migrations, while the GPI-linked LON-2/Glypican functions cell nonautonomously to establish the final cellular position. Genetic analyses with the Wnt-signaling system show that (1) a given HSPG can act with different Wnts and Frizzled receptors, and that (2) a given Wnt/Frizzled pair acts with different HSPGs in a context-dependent manner. Lastly, we find that distinct HSPG and Wnt/Frizzled combinations serve separate functions to promote cellular migration and establish position of specific neurons. Our studies suggest that HSPGs use structurally diverse glycans in coordination with Wnt-signaling pathways to control multiple cellular behaviors, including cellular and axonal migrations and, cellular positioning. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  8. RhoH is important for positive thymocyte selection and T-cell receptor signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dorn, Tatjana; Kuhn, Ursula; Bungartz, Gerd

    2006-01-01

    RhoH is a small GTPase expressed only in the hematopoietic system. With the use of mice with targeted disruption of the RhoH gene, we demonstrated that RhoH is crucial for thymocyte maturation during DN3 to DN4 transition and during positive selection. Furthermore, the differentiation and expansion...

  9. Inhibition of BMP signaling in P-Cadherin positive hair progenitor cells leads to trichofolliculoma-like hair follicle neoplasias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Lixin; Liu, Yijie; McGuire, Tammy L; Bonaguidi, Michael A; Kessler, John A

    2011-12-14

    Skin stem cells contribute to all three major lineages of epidermal appendages, i.e., the epidermis, the hair follicle, and the sebaceous gland. In hair follicles, highly proliferative committed progenitor cells, called matrix cells, are located at the base of the follicle in the hair bulb. The differentiation of these early progenitor cells leads to specification of a central hair shaft surrounded by an inner root sheath (IRS) and a companion layer. Multiple signaling molecules, including bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), have been implicated in this process. To further probe the contribution of BMP signaling to hair follicle development and maintenance we employed a transgenic mouse that expresses the BMP inhibitor, Noggin, to disrupt BMP signaling specifically in subset of hair follicle progenitors under the control of neuron specific enolase (Nse) promoter. We then studied the skin tumor phenotypes of the transgenic mice through histology, immunohistochemistry and Western Blotting to delineate the underlying mechanisms. Double transgenic mice expressing BMP as well as noggin under control of the Nse promoter were used to rescue the skin tumor phenotypes. We found that the transgene is expressed specifically in a subpopulation of P-cadherin positive progenitor cells in Nse-Noggin mice. Blocking BMP signaling in this cell population led to benign hair follicle-derived neoplasias resembling human trichofolliculomas, associated with down-regulation of E-cadherin expression and dynamic regulation of CD44. These observations further define a critical role for BMP signaling in maintaining the homeostasis of hair follicles, and suggest that dysregulation of BMP signaling in hair follicle progenitors may contribute to human trichofolliculoma.

  10. Positional signaling mediated by a receptor-like kinase in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Su-Hwan; Shen, Ronglai; Schiefelbein, John

    2005-02-18

    The position-dependent specification of root epidermal cells in Arabidopsis provides an elegant paradigm for cell patterning during development. Here, we describe a new gene, SCRAMBLED (SCM), required for cells to appropriately interpret their location within the developing root epidermis. SCM encodes a receptor-like kinase protein with a predicted extracellular domain of six leucine-rich repeats and an intracellular serine-threonine kinase domain. SCM regulates the expression of the GLABRA2, CAPRICE, WEREWOLF, and ENHANCER OF GLABRA3 transcription factor genes that define the cell fates. Further, the SCM gene is expressed throughout the developing root. Therefore, SCM likely enables developing epidermal cells to detect positional cues and establish an appropriate cell-type pattern.

  11. The supercoiling state of DNA determines the handedness of both H3 and CENP-A nucleosomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlijm, R.; Kim, S.H.; De Zwart, P. L.; Dalal, Y.; Dekker, C.

    2017-01-01

    Nucleosomes form the unit structure of the genome in eukaryotes, thereby constituting a fundamental tenet of chromatin biology. In canonical nucleosomes, DNA wraps around the histone octamer in a left-handed toroidal ramp. Here, in single-molecule magnetic tweezers studies of chaperone-assisted

  12. Transmission of modified nucleosomes from the mouse male germline to the zygote and subsequent remodeling of paternal chromatin.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijden, G.W. van der; Derijck, A.H.A.; Ramos, L.; Giele, M.M.; Vlag, J. van der; Boer, P. de

    2006-01-01

    Rapidly after gamete fusion, the sperm nucleus loses its specific chromatin conformation and the DNA is repopulated with maternally derived nucleosomes. We evaluated the nature of paternally derived nucleosomes and the dynamics of sperm chromatin remodeling in the zygote directly after gamete

  13. Nucleosome Binding Alters the Substrate Bonding Environment of Histone H3 Lysine 36 Methyltransferase NSD2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulin, Myles B; Schneck, Jessica L; Matico, Rosalie E; Hou, Wangfang; McDevitt, Patrick J; Holbert, Marc; Schramm, Vern L

    2016-06-01

    Nuclear receptor-binding SET domain protein 2 (NSD2) is a histone H3 lysine 36 (H3K36)-specific methyltransferase enzyme that is overexpressed in a number of cancers, including multiple myeloma. NSD2 binds to S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) and nucleosome substrates to catalyze the transfer of a methyl group from SAM to the ε-amino group of histone H3K36. Equilibrium binding isotope effects and density functional theory calculations indicate that the SAM methyl group is sterically constrained in complex with NSD2, and that this steric constraint is released upon nucleosome binding. Together, these results show that nucleosome binding to NSD2 induces a significant change in the chemical environment of enzyme-bound SAM.

  14. New insights into nucleosome and chromatin structure: an ordered state or a disordered affair?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luger, Karolin; Dechassa, Mekonnen L.; Tremethick, David J.

    2012-01-01

    The compaction of genomic DNA into chromatin has profound implications for the regulation of key processes such as transcription, replication and DNA repair. Nucleosomes, the repeating building blocks of chromatin, vary in the composition of their histone protein components. This is the result of the incorporation of variant histones and post-translational modifications of histone amino acid side chains. The resulting changes in nucleosome structure, stability and dynamics affect the compaction of nucleosomal arrays into higher-order structures. It is becoming clear that chromatin structures are not nearly as uniform and regular as previously assumed. This implies that chromatin structure must also be viewed in the context of specific biological functions. PMID:22722606

  15. CaCDPK15 positively regulates pepper responses to Ralstonia solanacearum inoculation and forms a positive-feedback loop with CaWRKY40 to amplify defense signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Lei; Yang, Sheng; Yang, Tong; Liang, Jiaqi; Cheng, Wei; Wen, Jiayu; Liu, Yanyan; Li, Jiazhi; Shi, Lanping; Tang, Qian; Shi, Wei; Hu, Jiong; Liu, Cailing; Zhang, Yangwen; Mou, Shaoliang; Liu, Zhiqin; Cai, Hanyang; He, Li; Guan, Deyi; Wu, Yang; He, Shuilin

    2016-01-01

    CaWRKY40 is a positive regulator of pepper (Capsicum annum) response to Ralstonia solanacearum inoculation (RSI), but the underlying mechanism remains largely unknown. Here, we functionally characterize CaCDPK15 in the defense signaling mediated by CaWRKY40. Pathogen-responsive TGA, W, and ERE boxes were identified in the CaCDPK15 promoter (pCaCDPK15), and pCaCDPK15-driven GUS expression was significantly enhanced in response to RSI and exogenously applied salicylic acid, methyl jasmonate, abscisic acid, and ethephon. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of CaCDPK15 significantly increased the susceptibility of pepper to RSI and downregulated the immunity-associated markers CaNPR1, CaPR1, and CaDEF1. By contrast, transient CaCDPK15 overexpression significantly activated hypersensitive response associated cell death, upregulated the immunity-associated marker genes, upregulated CaWRKY40 expression, and enriched CaWRKY40 at the promoters of its targets genes. Although CaCDPK15 failed to interact with CaWRKY40, the direct binding of CaWRKY40 to pCaCDPK15 was detected by chromatin immunoprecipitation, which was significantly potentiated by RSI in pepper plants. These combined results suggest that RSI in pepper induces CaCDPK15 and indirectly activates downstream CaWRKY40, which in turn potentiates CaCDPK15 expression. This positive-feedback loop would amplify defense signaling against RSI and efficiently activate strong plant immunity. PMID:26928570

  16. Monitoring of the Orbital Position of a Geostationary Satellite by the Spatially Separated Reception of Signals of Digital Satellite Television

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaliuzny, M.P.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of the determination of the geostationary satellite «Eutelsat-13B» orbital position obtained during 2015-2016 years using European stations’ network for reception of DVB-S signals from the satellite are presented. The network consists of five stations located in Ukraine and Latvia. The stations are equipped with a radio engineering complex developed by the RI «MAO». The measured parameter is a time difference of arrival (TDOA of the DVB-S signals to the stations of the network. The errors of TDOA determination and satellite coordinates, obtained using a numerical model of satellite motion, are equal ±2.6m and ±35m respectively. Software implementation of the numerical model is taken from the free space dynamics library OREKIT.

  17. The Two-Component Signal Transduction System VxrAB Positively Regulates Vibrio cholerae Biofilm Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teschler, Jennifer K; Cheng, Andrew T; Yildiz, Fitnat H

    2017-09-15

    Two-component signal transduction systems (TCSs), typically composed of a sensor histidine kinase (HK) and a response regulator (RR), are the primary mechanism by which pathogenic bacteria sense and respond to extracellular signals. The pathogenic bacterium Vibrio cholerae is no exception and harbors 52 RR genes. Using in-frame deletion mutants of each RR gene, we performed a systematic analysis of their role in V. cholerae biofilm formation. We determined that 7 RRs impacted the expression of an essential biofilm gene and found that the recently characterized RR, VxrB, regulates the expression of key structural and regulatory biofilm genes in V. cholerae vxrB is part of a 5-gene operon, which contains the cognate HK vxrA and three genes of unknown function. Strains carrying Δ vxrA and Δ vxrB mutations are deficient in biofilm formation, while the Δ vxrC mutation enhances biofilm formation. The overexpression of VxrB led to a decrease in motility. We also observed a small but reproducible effect of the absence of VxrB on the levels of cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP). Our work reveals a new function for the Vxr TCS as a regulator of biofilm formation and suggests that this regulation may act through key biofilm regulators and the modulation of cellular c-di-GMP levels. IMPORTANCE Biofilms play an important role in the Vibrio cholerae life cycle, providing protection from environmental stresses and contributing to the transmission of V. cholerae to the human host. V. cholerae can utilize two-component systems (TCS), composed of a histidine kinase (HK) and a response regulator (RR), to regulate biofilm formation in response to external cues. We performed a systematic analysis of V. cholerae RRs and identified a new regulator of biofilm formation, VxrB. We demonstrated that the VxrAB TCS is essential for robust biofilm formation and that this system may regulate biofilm formation via its regulation of key biofilm regulators and cyclic di-GMP levels. This research furthers

  18. Novel method for hit-position reconstruction using voltage signals in plastic scintillators and its application to Positron Emission Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raczyński, L.; Moskal, P.; Kowalski, P.; Wiślicki, W.; Bednarski, T.; Białas, P.; Czerwiński, E.; Kapłon, Ł.; Kochanowski, A.; Korcyl, G.; Kowal, J.; Kozik, T.; Krzemień, W.; Kubicz, E.; Molenda, M.; Moskal, I.; Niedźwiecki, Sz.; Pałka, M.; Pawlik-Niedźwiecka, M.; Rudy, Z.; Salabura, P.; Sharma, N. G.; Silarski, M.; Słomski, A.; Smyrski, J.; Strzelecki, A.; Wieczorek, A.; Zieliński, M.; Zoń, N.

    2014-11-01

    Currently inorganic scintillator detectors are used in all commercial Time of Flight Positron Emission Tomograph (TOF-PET) devices. The J-PET collaboration investigates a possibility of construction of a PET scanner from plastic scintillators which would allow for single bed imaging of the whole human body. This paper describes a novel method of hit-position reconstruction based on sampled signals and an example of an application of the method for a single module with a 30 cm long plastic strip, read out on both ends by Hamamatsu R4998 photomultipliers. The sampling scheme to generate a vector with samples of a PET event waveform with respect to four user-defined amplitudes is introduced. The experimental setup provides irradiation of a chosen position in the plastic scintillator strip with an annihilation gamma quanta of energy 511 keV. The statistical test for a multivariate normal (MVN) distribution of measured vectors at a given position is developed, and it is shown that signals sampled at four thresholds in a voltage domain are approximately normally distributed variables. With the presented method of a vector analysis made out of waveform samples acquired with four thresholds, we obtain a spatial resolution of about 1 cm and a timing resolution of about 80 ps (σ).

  19. Novel method for hit-position reconstruction using voltage signals in plastic scintillators and its application to Positron Emission Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raczyński, L.; Moskal, P.; Kowalski, P.; Wiślicki, W.; Bednarski, T.; Białas, P.; Czerwiński, E.; Kapłon, Ł.; Kochanowski, A.; Korcyl, G.; Kowal, J.; Kozik, T.; Krzemień, W.; Kubicz, E.; Molenda, M.; Moskal, I.; Niedźwiecki, Sz.; Pałka, M.; Pawlik-Niedźwiecka, M.; Rudy, Z.

    2014-01-01

    Currently inorganic scintillator detectors are used in all commercial Time of Flight Positron Emission Tomograph (TOF-PET) devices. The J-PET collaboration investigates a possibility of construction of a PET scanner from plastic scintillators which would allow for single bed imaging of the whole human body. This paper describes a novel method of hit-position reconstruction based on sampled signals and an example of an application of the method for a single module with a 30 cm long plastic strip, read out on both ends by Hamamatsu R4998 photomultipliers. The sampling scheme to generate a vector with samples of a PET event waveform with respect to four user-defined amplitudes is introduced. The experimental setup provides irradiation of a chosen position in the plastic scintillator strip with an annihilation gamma quanta of energy 511 keV. The statistical test for a multivariate normal (MVN) distribution of measured vectors at a given position is developed, and it is shown that signals sampled at four thresholds in a voltage domain are approximately normally distributed variables. With the presented method of a vector analysis made out of waveform samples acquired with four thresholds, we obtain a spatial resolution of about 1 cm and a timing resolution of about 80 ps (σ)

  20. Novel method for hit-position reconstruction using voltage signals in plastic scintillators and its application to Positron Emission Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raczyński, L., E-mail: lech.raczynski@ncbj.gov.pl [Świerk Computing Centre, National Centre for Nuclear Research, 05-400 Otwock-Świerk (Poland); Moskal, P. [Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Applied Computer Science, Jagiellonian University, 30-059 Cracow (Poland); Kowalski, P.; Wiślicki, W. [Świerk Computing Centre, National Centre for Nuclear Research, 05-400 Otwock-Świerk (Poland); Bednarski, T.; Białas, P.; Czerwiński, E. [Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Applied Computer Science, Jagiellonian University, 30-059 Cracow (Poland); Kapłon, Ł. [Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Applied Computer Science, Jagiellonian University, 30-059 Cracow (Poland); Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science of Polish Academy of Sciences, Cracow (Poland); Kochanowski, A. [Faculty of Chemistry, Jagiellonian University, 30-060 Cracow (Poland); Korcyl, G.; Kowal, J.; Kozik, T.; Krzemień, W.; Kubicz, E. [Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Applied Computer Science, Jagiellonian University, 30-059 Cracow (Poland); Molenda, M. [Faculty of Chemistry, Jagiellonian University, 30-060 Cracow (Poland); Moskal, I.; Niedźwiecki, Sz.; Pałka, M.; Pawlik-Niedźwiecka, M.; Rudy, Z. [Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Applied Computer Science, Jagiellonian University, 30-059 Cracow (Poland); and others

    2014-11-11

    Currently inorganic scintillator detectors are used in all commercial Time of Flight Positron Emission Tomograph (TOF-PET) devices. The J-PET collaboration investigates a possibility of construction of a PET scanner from plastic scintillators which would allow for single bed imaging of the whole human body. This paper describes a novel method of hit-position reconstruction based on sampled signals and an example of an application of the method for a single module with a 30 cm long plastic strip, read out on both ends by Hamamatsu R4998 photomultipliers. The sampling scheme to generate a vector with samples of a PET event waveform with respect to four user-defined amplitudes is introduced. The experimental setup provides irradiation of a chosen position in the plastic scintillator strip with an annihilation gamma quanta of energy 511 keV. The statistical test for a multivariate normal (MVN) distribution of measured vectors at a given position is developed, and it is shown that signals sampled at four thresholds in a voltage domain are approximately normally distributed variables. With the presented method of a vector analysis made out of waveform samples acquired with four thresholds, we obtain a spatial resolution of about 1 cm and a timing resolution of about 80 ps (σ)

  1. Receiver Architecture for 12.5 Gb/s 16-ary Pulse Position Modulation (PPM) Signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendez, A J; Gagliardi, R M; Hernandez, V J; Bennett, C V

    2008-07-11

    PPM is a signaling scheme that enables the transmission of multiple bits per symbol [1]. It has found favor in the regime of free space optical communications ('FSO' or 'Lasercom'); however, PPM has yet to be widely applied to fiber optic-based communications. Its limitation in fiber results from the exceedingly high bandwidth requirements needed to electronically process a directly detected pulse, especially as the symbol rate increases and the pulse width correspondingly decreases. As a solution, we introduced the concept of a virtual quadrant receiver for receiving 1.25 Gb/s 4-ary PPM, where photonic processing reduced the number of required electronic components [2]. In this paper, we extend these photonic process techniques to a 16-ary, 12.5 Gb/s (10 Gb/s plus 8B/10B line coding) PPM communications system for fiber optic avionics, wherein much of the receiver processing is enabled by techniques based on planar lightwave circuits (PLCs). The architecture is applicable to higher input data rates and M-ary PPM. In the following, we present the PPM encoding and decoding architectures and numerically simulated results.

  2. Models for positional signalling, the threefold subdivision of segments and the pigmentation pattern of molluscs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinhardt, H

    1984-11-01

    Models of biological pattern formation are discussed. The regulatory features expected from the models are compared to those observed experimentally. It will be shown that: (i) Stable gradients appropriate to supply positional information can be produced by local autocatalysis and long-range inhibition. (ii) Spatially ordered sequences of differentiated cell states can emerge if these cell states mutually activate each other on long range but exclude each other locally. Segmentation results from the repetition of three such cell states, S, A and P (and not of only two, as is usually assumed). With a repetition of three states, each segment has a defined polarity. The confrontation of P cells and S cells lead to the formation of a segment border (...P/SAP/SAP/S...) while the A-P confrontation is a prerequisite for appendage formation. Mutations of Drosophila affecting larval segmentation are discussed in terms of this model. (iii) The two models for the generation of sequences of structures in space (positional information including interpretation versus mutual activation) lead to different predictions with respect to intercalary regeneration. This allows a distinction between the two models on the basis of experiments. (iv) The pigmentation patterns of certain molluscs emerge from a coupled oscillation of cells (that is, a lateral inhibition in time, instead of space). The oblique lines result from a chain of triggering events.

  3. In vivo dynamics of GFRα1-positive spermatogonia stimulated by GDNF signals using a bead transplantation assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchida, Aya; Kishi, Kasane; Aiyama, Yoshimi; Miura, Kento [Department of Veterinary Anatomy, The University of Tokyo, Yayoi, Tokyo, 113-8657 (Japan); Takase, Hinako M.; Suzuki, Hitomi; Kanai-Azuma, Masami [Department of Experimental Animal Model for Human Disease, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, 113-8510 (Japan); Iwamori, Tokuko [Center of Biomedical Research, Kyusyu University, Fukuoka, 812-8582 (Japan); Kurohmaru, Masamichi; Tsunekawa, Naoki [Department of Veterinary Anatomy, The University of Tokyo, Yayoi, Tokyo, 113-8657 (Japan); Kanai, Yoshiakira, E-mail: aykanai@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Veterinary Anatomy, The University of Tokyo, Yayoi, Tokyo, 113-8657 (Japan)

    2016-08-05

    In mouse testes, spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs), a subpopulation of GFRα1 (GDNF family receptor-α1)-positive spermatogonia, are widely distributed along the convoluted seminiferous tubules. The proliferation and differentiation of the SSCs are regulated in part by local expression of GDNF (glial cell-derived neurotorphic factor), one of major niche factors for SSCs. However, the in vivo dynamics of the GDNF-stimulated GFRα1-positive spermatogonia remains unclear. Here, we developed a simple method for transplanting DiI-labeled and GDNF-soaked beads into the mouse testicular interstitium. By using this method, we examined the dynamics of GFRα1-positive spermatogonia in the tubular walls close to the transplanted GDNF-soaked beads. The bead-derived GDNF signals were able to induce the stratified aggregate formation of GFRα1-positive undifferentiated spermatogonia by day 3 post-transplantation. Each aggregate consisted of tightly compacted A{sub single} and marginal A{sub paired}–A{sub aligned} GFRα1-positive spermatogonia and was surrounded by A{sub aligned} GFRα1-negative spermatogonia at more advanced stages. These data not only provide in vivo evidence for the inductive roles of GDNF in forming a rapid aggregation of GFRα1-positive spermatogonia but also indicate the usefulness of this in vivo assay system of various growth factors for the stem/progenitor spermatogonia in mammalian spermatogenesis. - Highlights: • A novel bead transplantation assay was developed to examine the in vivo effects of growth factors on spermatogonia. • A rapid aggregation of GFRα1-positive spermatogonia was induced by the transplanted GDNF-soaked beads. • Tightly-compacted A{sub single} and marginal A{sub paired}–A{sub aligned} spermatogonia were formed in each GFRα1-positive aggregate.

  4. Simulation study of signal formation in position sensitive planar p-on-n silicon detectors after short range charge injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltola, T.; Eremin, V.; Verbitskaya, E.; Härkönen, J.

    2017-09-01

    Segmented silicon detectors (micropixel and microstrip) are the main type of detectors used in the inner trackers of Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiments at CERN. Due to the high luminosity and eventual high fluence of energetic particles, detectors with fast response to fit the short shaping time of 20-25 ns and sufficient radiation hardness are required. Charge collection measurements carried out at the Ioffe Institute have shown a reversal of the pulse polarity in the detector response to short-range charge injection. Since the measured negative signal is about 30-60% of the peak positive signal, the effect strongly reduces the CCE even in non-irradiated detectors. For further investigation of the phenomenon the measurements have been reproduced by TCAD simulations. As for the measurements, the simulation study was applied for the p-on-n strip detectors similar in geometry to those developed for the ATLAS experiment and for the Ioffe Institute designed p-on-n strip detectors with each strip having a window in the metallization covering the p+ implant, allowing the generation of electron-hole pairs under the strip implant. Red laser scans across the strips and the interstrip gap with varying laser diameters and Si-SiO2 interface charge densities (Qf) were carried out. The results verify the experimentally observed negative response along the scan in the interstrip gap. When the laser spot is positioned on the strip p+ implant the negative response vanishes and the collected charge at the active strip increases respectively. The simulation results offer a further insight and understanding of the influence of the oxide charge density in the signal formation. The main result of the study is that a threshold value of Qf, that enables negligible losses of collected charges, is defined. The observed effects and details of the detector response for different charge injection positions are discussed in the context of Ramo's theorem.

  5. ATP-Dependent Chromatin Remodeling Factors and Their Roles in Affecting Nucleosome Fiber Composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Lusser

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling factors of the SNF2 family are key components of the cellular machineries that shape and regulate chromatin structure and function. Members of this group of proteins have broad and heterogeneous functions ranging from controlling gene activity, facilitating DNA damage repair, promoting homologous recombination to maintaining genomic stability. Several chromatin remodeling factors are critical components of nucleosome assembly processes, and recent reports have identified specific functions of distinct chromatin remodeling factors in the assembly of variant histones into chromatin. In this review we will discuss the specific roles of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling factors in determining nucleosome composition and, thus, chromatin fiber properties.

  6. Genome-wide nucleosome map and cytosine methylation levels of an ancient human genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jakob Skou; Valen, Eivind; Velazquez, Amhed Missael Vargas

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic information is available from contemporary organisms, but is difficult to track back in evolutionary time. Here, we show that genome-wide epigenetic information can be gathered directly from next-generation sequence reads of DNA isolated from ancient remains. Using the genome sequence...... data generated from hair shafts of a 4000-yr-old Paleo-Eskimo belonging to the Saqqaq culture, we generate the first ancient nucleosome map coupled with a genome-wide survey of cytosine methylation levels. The validity of both nucleosome map and methylation levels were confirmed by the recovery...

  7. Disentangling evolutionary signals: conservation, specificity determining positions and coevolution. Implication for catalytic residue prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teppa, Elin; Wilkins, Angela D.; Nielsen, Morten

    2012-01-01

    within a multiple sequence alignment to investigate their predictive potential and degree of overlap. Results: Our results demonstrate that the different methods included in the benchmark in general can be divided into three groups with a limited mutual overlap. One group containing real-value...... Evolutionary Trace (rvET) methods and conservation, another containing mutual information (MI) methods, and the last containing methods designed explicitly for the identification of specificity determining positions (SDPs): integer-value Evolutionary Trace (ivET), SDPfox, and XDET. In terms of prediction of CR......, we find using a proximity score integrating structural information (as the sum of the scores of residues located within a given distance of the residue in question) that only the methods from the first two groups displayed a reliable performance. Next, we investigated to what degree proximity scores...

  8. Three-Dimensional Eye Position Signals Shape Both Peripersonal Space and Arm Movement Activity in the Medial Posterior Parietal Cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostas eHadjidimitrakis

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Research conducted over the last decades has established that the medial part of posterior parietal cortex is crucial for controlling visually guided actions in human and non-human primates. Within this cortical sector there is area V6A, a crucial node of the parietofrontal network involved in arm movement control in both monkeys and humans. However, the encoding of action-in-depth by V6A cells had been not studied till recently. Recent neurophysiological studies show the existence in V6A neurons of signals related to the distance of targets from the eyes. These signals are integrated, often at the level of single cells, with information about the direction of gaze, thus encoding spatial location in 3D space. Moreover, 3D eye position signals seem to be further exploited at two additional levels of neural processing: a in determining whether targets are located in the peripersonal space or not, and b in shaping the spatial tuning of arm movement related activity towards reachable targets. These findings are in line with studies in putative homolog regions in humans and together point to a role of medial posterior parietal cortex in encoding both the vergence angle of the eyes and peripersonal space. Besides this role in spatial encoding also in depth, several findings demonstrate the involvement of this cortical sector in non-spatial processes.

  9. Tropospheric Signal Delay Estimates Derived from Numerical Weather Prediction Models and Their Impact on Real-Time GNSS Positioning Accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutman, S. I.; Bock, Y.

    2007-12-01

    The accurate characterization of atmospheric moisture fields (including water vapor and clouds) is essential for improved weather forecasting and climate monitoring. Despite its importance, the ability to do so under all weather conditions has been a continuing problem for atmospheric scientists. The principle reason why this problem has been so difficult to solve is related to the high temporal and spatial variability of water in the free atmosphere. Under certain circumstances the distribution of moisture in the atmosphere can change abruptly over short distances, and this causes it to be under-observed using conventional weather observing systems. As water vapor, temperature and pressure change in the atmosphere, the refractivity of the troposphere changes accordingly and GNSS accuracy can suffer if the hydrostatic and wet signal delays are mismodeled. Recognizing this, the geodetic community developed techniques to treat the signal delays caused by the neutral atmosphere as nuisance parameters and remove them for high accuracy positioning applications. In ground-based GNSS/GPS Meteorology at NOAA, the tropospheric signal delay is estimated in near real-time from a network of about 400 continuously operating reference stations distributed across the U.S. using an 8-hr sliding window technique. Estimates of tropospheric refractivity (and/or integrated precipitable water vapor retrieved from these delays) have been assimilated into numerical weather prediction models in the U.S., Canada, Europe and Japan with exceptionally good results. Based on these and other findings, GNSS/GPS-Met is scheduled to transition from NOAA Research into operational use in NOAA's National Weather Service starting in 2009. Recognizing the need for improved ways to mitigate tropospheric effects on GNSS accuracy, especially for applications requiring low-latency measurements of height, scientists at NOAA's Earth System Research Laboratory began to investigate the feasibility of using

  10. Foxa1 and Foxa2 positively and negatively regulate Shh signalling to specify ventral midbrain progenitor identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavromatakis, Yannis E; Lin, Wei; Metzakopian, Emmanouil; Ferri, Anna L M; Yan, Carol H; Sasaki, Hiroshi; Whisett, Jeff; Ang, Siew-Lan

    2011-01-01

    Foxa2, a member of the Foxa family of forkhead/winged helix family of transcription factors, has previously been shown to be an upstream positive regulator of Shh expression in many different tissues. Recent studies also strongly suggest that Foxa2 specify cell fate by inhibiting the expression of cell fate determinants such as Helt1 and Nkx2.2. In this paper, phenotypic analyses of Wnt1cre; Foxa2flox/flox embryos in the midbrain have demonstrated a novel role for Foxa2 and its related family member, Foxa1, to attenuate Shh signalling by inhibiting the expression of its intracellular transducer, Gli2, at the transcriptional level. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments indicate that Foxa2 binds to genomic regions of Gli2 and likely regulates its expression in a direct manner. Our studies, involving loss and gain of function studies in mice, also provided further insights into the gene regulatory interactions among Foxa1, Foxa2 and Shh in ventral midbrain progenitors that contribute to midbrain patterning. Altogether, these data indicate that Foxa1 and Foxa2 contribute to the specification of ventral midbrain progenitor identity by regulating Shh signalling in a positive and negative manner. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A positive role for patched-smoothened signaling in promoting cell proliferation during normal head development in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyamala, Baragur V; Bhat, Krishna Moorthi

    2002-04-01

    The transmembrane receptor Patched regulates several developmental processes in both invertebrates and vertebrates. In vertebrates, Patched also acts as a tumor suppressor. The Patched pathway normally operates by negatively regulating Smoothened, a G-protein-coupled receptor; binding of Hedgehog ligand to Patched relieves this negative interaction and allows signaling by Smoothened. We show that Ptc regulates Drosophila head development by promoting cell proliferation in the eye-antennal disc. During head morphogenesis, Patched positively interacts with Smoothened, which leads to the activation of Activin type I receptor Baboon and stimulation of cell proliferation in the eye-antennal disc. Thus, loss of Ptc or Smoothened activity affects cell proliferation in the eye-antennal disc and results in adult head capsule defects. Similarly, reducing the dose of smoothened in a patched background enhances the head defects. Consistent with these results, gain-of-function Hedgehog interferes with the activation of Baboon by Patched and Smoothened, leading to a similar head capsule defect. Expression of an activated form of Baboon in the patched domain in a patched mutant background completely rescues the head defects. These results provide insight into head morphogenesis, a process we know very little about, and reveal an unexpected non-canonical positive signaling pathway in which Patched and Smoothened function to promote cell proliferation as opposed to repressing it.

  12. NAP-1, Nucleosome assembly protein 1, a histone chaperone involved in Drosophila telomeres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Panadès, Elisenda; Casacuberta, Elena

    2016-03-01

    Telomere elongation is a function that all eukaryote cells must accomplish in order to guarantee, first, the stability of the end of the chromosomes and second, to protect the genetic information from the inevitable terminal erosion. The targeted transposition of the telomere transposons HeT-A, TART and TAHRE perform this function in Drosophila, while the telomerase mechanism elongates the telomeres in most eukaryotes. In order to integrate telomere maintenance together with cell cycle and metabolism, different components of the cell interact, regulate, and control the proteins involved in telomere elongation. Different partners of the telomerase mechanism have already been described, but in contrast, very few proteins have been related with assisting the telomere transposons of Drosophila. Here, we describe for the first time, the implication of NAP-1 (Nucleosome assembly protein 1), a histone chaperone that has been involved in nuclear transport, transcription regulation, and chromatin remodeling, in telomere biology. We find that Nap-1 and HeT-A Gag, one of the major components of the Drosophila telomeres, are part of the same protein complex. We also demonstrate that their close interaction is necessary to guarantee telomere stability in dividing cells. We further show that NAP-1 regulates the transcription of the HeT-A retrotransposon, pointing to a positive regulatory role of NAP-1 in telomere expression. All these results facilitate the understanding of the transposon telomere maintenance mechanism, as well as the integration of telomere biology with the rest of the cell metabolism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Recent insights from single-molecule studies into nucleosome structure and dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ordu, O.; Lusser, A; Dekker, N.H.

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic DNA is tightly packed into a hierarchically ordered structure called chromatin in order to fit into the micron-scaled nucleus. The basic unit of chromatin is the nucleosome, which consists of a short piece of DNA wrapped around a core of eight histone proteins. In addition to their role

  14. Nanoscale dynamics of centromere nucleosomes and the critical roles of CENP-A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumme-Diers, Micah P; Banerjee, Siddhartha; Hashemi, Mohtadin; Sun, Zhiqiang

    2018-01-01

    Abstract In the absence of a functioning centromere, chromosome segregation becomes aberrant, leading to an increased rate of aneuploidy. The highly specific recognition of centromeres by kinetochores suggests that specific structural characteristics define this region, however, the structural details and mechanism underlying this recognition remains a matter of intense investigation. To address this, high-speed atomic force microscopy was used for direct visualization of the spontaneous dynamics of CENP-A nucleosomes at the sub-second time scale. We report that CENP-A nucleosomes change conformation spontaneously and reversibly, utilizing two major pathways: unwrapping, and looping of the DNA; enabling core transfer between neighboring DNA substrates. Along with these nucleosome dynamics we observed that CENP-A stabilizes the histone core against dissociating to histone subunits upon unwrapping DNA, unique from H3 cores which are only capable of such plasticity in the presence of remodeling factors. These findings have implications for the dynamics and integrity of nucleosomes at the centromere. PMID:29040671

  15. Extranuclear detection of histones and nucleosomes in activated human lymphoblasts as an early event in apoptosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gabler, C.; Blank, N.; Hieronymus, T.; Schiller, M.; Berden, J.H.M.; Kalden, J.R.; Lorenz, H.M.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the presence of histones and nucleosomes in cell lysates of freshly isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), fully activated lymphoblasts, or lymphoblasts after induction of apoptosis. METHODS: Each histone class (H1, H2A, H2B, H3, and H4) was detected by western

  16. Dynamic Conformations of Nucleosome Arrays in Solution from Small-Angle X-ray Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howell, Steven C. [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States)

    2016-01-31

    We set out to determine quantitative information regarding the dynamic conformation of nucleosome arrays in solution using experimental SAXS. Toward this end, we developed a CG simulation algorithm for dsDNA which rapidly generates ensembles of structures through Metropolis MC sampling of a Markov chain.

  17. Functional roles of the DNA-binding HMGB domain in the histone chaperone FACT in nucleosome reorganization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Laura L; Connell, Zaily; Xin, Hua; Studitsky, Vasily M; Feofanov, Alexey V; Valieva, Maria E; Formosa, Tim

    2018-03-07

    The essential histone chaperone FAcilitates Chromatin Transcription (FACT) promotes both nucleosome assembly and disassembly. FACT is a heterodimer of Spt16 with either SSRP1 or Pob3, differing primarily by the presence of a high-mobility group B (HMGB) DNA-binding domain furnished only by SSRP1. Yeast FACT lacks the intrinsic HMGB domain found in SSRP1-based homologs such as human FACT, but yeast FACT activity is supported by Nhp6, which is a freestanding, single HMGB domain protein. The importance of histone binding by FACT domains has been established, but the roles of DNA binding activity remain poorly understood. Here, we examined these roles by fusing single or multiple HMGB modules to Pob3 to mimic SSRP1 or to test the effects of extended DNA-binding capacity. Human FACT and a yeast mimic both required Nhp6 to support nucleosome reorganization in vitro, indicating that a single intrinsic DNA-binding HMGB module is insufficient for full FACT activity. Three fused HMGB modules supported activity without Nhp6 assistance, but this FACT variant did not efficiently release from nucleosomes and was toxic in vivo. Notably, intrinsic DNA-binding HMGB modules reduced the DNA accessibility and histone H2A-H2B dimer loss normally associated with nucleosome reorganization. We propose that DNA bending by HMGB domains promotes nucleosome destabilization and reorganization by exposing FACT's histone binding sites, but DNA bending also produces DNA curvature needed to accommodate nucleosome assembly. Intrinsic DNA bending activity therefore favors nucleosome assembly by FACT over nucleosome reorganization, but excessive activity impairs FACT release, suggesting a quality control checkpoint during nucleosome assembly. Published under license by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Interaction of nucleosome assembly proteins abolishes nuclear localization of DGK{zeta} by attenuating its association with importins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okada, Masashi; Hozumi, Yasukazu [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Yamagata University School of Medicine, Yamagata 990-9585 (Japan); Ichimura, Tohru [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Sciences and Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Hachioji 192-0397 (Japan); Tanaka, Toshiaki; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Masakazu; Takahashi, Nobuya [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Yamagata University School of Medicine, Yamagata 990-9585 (Japan); Iseki, Ken [Department of Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Yamagata University School of Medicine, Yamagata 990-9585 (Japan); Yagisawa, Hitoshi [Laboratory of Biological Signaling, Graduate School of Life Science, University of Hyogo, Hyogo 678-1297 (Japan); Shinkawa, Takashi; Isobe, Toshiaki [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Sciences and Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Hachioji 192-0397 (Japan); Goto, Kaoru, E-mail: kgoto@med.id.yamagata-u.ac.jp [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Yamagata University School of Medicine, Yamagata 990-9585 (Japan)

    2011-12-10

    Diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) is involved in the regulation of lipid-mediated signal transduction through the metabolism of a second messenger diacylglycerol. Of the DGK family, DGK{zeta}, which contains a nuclear localization signal, localizes mainly to the nucleus but translocates to the cytoplasm under pathological conditions. However, the detailed mechanism of translocation and its functional significance remain unclear. To elucidate these issues, we used a proteomic approach to search for protein targets that interact with DGK{zeta}. Results show that nucleosome assembly protein (NAP) 1-like 1 (NAP1L1) and NAP1-like 4 (NAP1L4) are identified as novel DGK{zeta} binding partners. NAP1Ls constitutively shuttle between the nucleus and the cytoplasm in transfected HEK293 cells. The molecular interaction of DGK{zeta} and NAP1Ls prohibits nuclear import of DGK{zeta} because binding of NAP1Ls to DGK{zeta} blocks import carrier proteins, Qip1 and NPI1, to interact with DGK{zeta}, leading to cytoplasmic tethering of DGK{zeta}. In addition, overexpression of NAP1Ls exerts a protective effect against doxorubicin-induced cytotoxicity. These findings suggest that NAP1Ls are involved in a novel molecular basis for the regulation of nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of DGK{zeta} and provide a clue to examine functional significance of its translocation under pathological conditions.

  19. Expression of Death Receptor 4 Is Positively Regulated by MEK/ERK/AP-1 Signaling and Suppressed upon MEK Inhibition*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Weilong; Oh, You-Take; Deng, Jiusheng; Yue, Ping; Deng, Liang; Huang, Henry; Zhou, Wei; Sun, Shi-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Death receptor 4 (DR4) is a cell surface receptor for tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and triggers apoptosis upon ligation with TRAIL or aggregation. MEK/ERK signaling is a well known and the best-studied effector pathway downstream of Ras and Raf. This study focuses on determining the impact of pharmacological MEK inhibition on DR4 expression and elucidating the underlying mechanism. We found that several MEK inhibitors including MEK162, AZD6244, and PD0325901 effectively decreased DR4 protein levels including cell surface DR4 in different cancer cell lines. Accordingly, pre-treatment of TRAIL-sensitive cancer cell lines with a MEK inhibitor desensitized them to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. These results indicate that MEK inhibition negatively regulates DR4 expression and cell response to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. MEK inhibitors did not alter DR4 protein stability, rather decreased its mRNA levels, suggesting a transcriptional regulation. In contrast, enforced activation of MEK/ERK signaling by expressing ectopic B-Raf (V600E) or constitutively activated MEK1 (MEK1-CA) or MEK2 (MEK2-CA) activated ERK and increased DR4 expression; these effects were inhibited when a MEK inhibitor was present. Promoter analysis through deletion and mutation identified the AP-1 binding site as an essential response element for enhancing DR4 transactivation by MEK1-CA. Furthermore, inhibition of AP-1 by c-Jun knockdown abrogated the ability of MEK1-CA to increase DR4 promoter activity and DR4 expression. These results suggest an essential role of AP-1 in mediating MEK/ERK activation-induced DR4 expression. Our findings together highlight a previously undiscovered mechanism that positively regulates DR4 expression through activation of the MEK/ERK/AP-1 signaling pathway. PMID:27576686

  20. Genomic resources and their influence on the detection of the signal of positive selection in genome scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manel, S; Perrier, C; Pratlong, M; Abi-Rached, L; Paganini, J; Pontarotti, P; Aurelle, D

    2016-01-01

    Genome scans represent powerful approaches to investigate the action of natural selection on the genetic variation of natural populations and to better understand local adaptation. This is very useful, for example, in the field of conservation biology and evolutionary biology. Thanks to Next Generation Sequencing, genomic resources are growing exponentially, improving genome scan analyses in non-model species. Thousands of SNPs called using Reduced Representation Sequencing are increasingly used in genome scans. Besides, genome sequences are also becoming increasingly available, allowing better processing of short-read data, offering physical localization of variants, and improving haplotype reconstruction and data imputation. Ultimately, genome sequences are also becoming the raw material for selection inferences. Here, we discuss how the increasing availability of such genomic resources, notably genome sequences, influences the detection of signals of selection. Mainly, increasing data density and having the information of physical linkage data expand genome scans by (i) improving the overall quality of the data, (ii) helping the reconstruction of demographic history for the population studied to decrease false-positive rates and (iii) improving the statistical power of methods to detect the signal of selection. Of particular importance, the availability of a high-quality reference genome can improve the detection of the signal of selection by (i) allowing matching the potential candidate loci to linked coding regions under selection, (ii) rapidly moving the investigation to the gene and function and (iii) ensuring that the highly variable regions of the genomes that include functional genes are also investigated. For all those reasons, using reference genomes in genome scan analyses is highly recommended. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. OVATE Family Protein 8 Positively Mediates Brassinosteroid Signaling through Interacting with the GSK3-like Kinase in Rice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Yang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available OVATE gene was first identified as a key regulator of fruit shape in tomato. OVATE family proteins (OFPs are characterized as plant-specific transcription factors and conserved in Arabidopsis, tomato, and rice. Roles of OFPs involved in plant development and growth are largely unknown. Brassinosteroids (BRs are a class of steroid hormones involved in diverse biological functions. OsGKS2 plays a critical role in BR signaling by phosphorylating downstream components such as OsBZR1 and DLT. Here we report in rice that OsOFP8 plays a positive role in BR signaling pathway. BL treatment induced the expression of OsOFP8 and led to enhanced accumulation of OsOFP8 protein. The gain-of-function mutant Osofp8 and OsOFP8 overexpression lines showed enhanced lamina joint inclination, whereas OsOFP8 RNAi transgenic lines showed more upright leaf phenotype, which suggest that OsOFP8 is involved in BR responses. Further analyses indicated that OsGSK2 interacts with and phosphorylates OsOFP8. BRZ treatment resulted in the cytoplasmic distribution of OsOFP8, and bikinin treatment reduced the cytoplasmic accumulation of OsOFP8. Phosphorylation of OsOFP8 by OsGSK2 is needed for its nuclear export. The phospphorylated OsOFP8 shuttles to the cytoplasm and is targeted for proteasomal degradation. These results indicate that OsOFP8 is a substrate of OsGSK2 and the function of OsOFP8 in plant growth and development is at least partly through the BR signaling pathway.

  2. Examination of intra-gastrointestinal tract signal elimination in MRCP. Combined use of positive contrast agent and fast inversion recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Joji; Kawamura, Yoshihiko

    1999-01-01

    To examine the effects of removing the gastrointestinal signal in MRCP, investigations were carried out on the combined use of intestine-positive contrast medium FerriSeltz with Ferric ammonium citrate as the main component and high-speed imaging using fast inversion recovery. The contrast effect was significantly elevated to 9.90±1.77 after administration, compared with 5.3±2.45 before administration (p<0.001). The enhancement effect also was significantly elevated to 14.45±3.18 after administration, compared with 3.50±3.10 before administration (p<0.001). These results were obtained because the null point of FerriSeltz aqueous solution (5.97 mmol/1) was in the range of about 150-200 ms. With the present method, adequate suppression of the signal intensity of the digestive tract was obtained relatively easily on MRCP, and the technique was found to be effective. (author)

  3. Genome-wide analysis of H3.3 dissociation reveals high nucleosome turnover at distal regulatory regions of embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Misook; Kraushaar, Daniel C; Zhao, Keji

    2014-01-01

    The histone variant H3.3 plays a critical role in maintaining the pluripotency of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) by regulating gene expression programs important for lineage specification. H3.3 is deposited by various chaperones at regulatory sites, gene bodies, and certain heterochromatic sites such as telomeres and centromeres. Using Tet-inhibited expression of epitope-tagged H3.3 combined with ChIP-Seq we undertook genome-wide measurements of H3.3 dissociation rates across the ESC genome and examined the relationship between H3.3-nucleosome turnover and ESC-specific transcription factors, chromatin modifiers, and epigenetic marks. Our comprehensive analysis of H3.3 dissociation rates revealed distinct H3.3 dissociation dynamics at various functional chromatin domains. At transcription start sites, H3.3 dissociates rapidly with the highest rate at nucleosome-depleted regions (NDRs) just upstream of Pol II binding, followed by low H3.3 dissociation rates across gene bodies. H3.3 turnover at transcription start sites, gene bodies, and transcription end sites was positively correlated with transcriptional activity. H3.3 is found decorated with various histone modifications that regulate transcription and maintain chromatin integrity. We find greatly varying H3.3 dissociation rates across various histone modification domains: high dissociation rates at active histone marks and low dissociation rates at heterochromatic marks. Well- defined zones of high H3.3-nucleosome turnover were detected at binding sites of ESC-specific pluripotency factors and chromatin remodelers, suggesting an important role for H3.3 in facilitating protein binding. Among transcription factor binding sites we detected higher H3.3 turnover at distal cis-acting sites compared to proximal genic transcription factor binding sites. Our results imply that fast H3.3 dissociation is a hallmark of interactions between DNA and transcriptional regulators. Our study demonstrates that H3.3 turnover and

  4. Comprehensive Comparisons of Satellite Data, Signals, and Measurements between the BeiDou Navigation Satellite System and the Global Positioning System †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, Shau-Shiun; Tao, An-Lin

    2016-01-01

    The Chinese BeiDou navigation satellite system (BDS) aims to provide global positioning service by 2020. The combined use of BDS and Global Positioning System (GPS) is proposed to provide navigation service with more stringent requirements. Actual satellite data, signals and measurements were collected for more than one month to analyze the positioning service qualities from both BDS and GPS. In addition to the conversions of coordinate and timing system, five data quality analysis (DQA) methods, three signal quality analysis (SQA) methods, and four measurement quality analysis (MQA) methods are proposed in this paper to improve the integrated positioning performance of BDS and GPS. As shown in the experiment results, issues related to BDS and GPS are resolved by the above proposed quality analysis methods. Thus, the anomalies in satellite data, signals and measurements can be detected by following the suggested resolutions to enhance the positioning performance of the combined use of BDS and GPS in the Asia Pacific region. PMID:27187403

  5. Arabidopsis Chromatin Assembly Factor 1 is required for occupancy and position of a subset of nucleosomes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Munoz-Viana, R.; Wildhaber, T.; Trejo-Arellano, M.S.; Mozgová, Iva; Hennig, L.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 92, č. 3 (2017), s. 363-374 ISSN 0960-7412 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Arabidopsis thaliana * chromatin * CAF-1 Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 5.901, year: 2016

  6. Plant 5S rDNA has multiple alternative nucleosome positions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fulneček, Jaroslav; Matyášek, Roman; Kovařík, Aleš

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 7 (2006), s. 840-850 ISSN 0831-2796 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP204/03/P104; GA ČR(CZ) GA521/04/0775; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06004 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507 Keywords : 5S rRNA genes * chromatin * repeat length Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.972, year: 2006

  7. Mechanical properties of symmetric and asymmetric DNA A-tracts: implications for looping and nucleosome positioning

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dršata, Tomáš; Špačková, Naďa; Jurečka, P.; Zgarbová, M.; Šponer, Jiří; Lankaš, Filip

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 11 (2014), s. 7383-7394 ISSN 0305-1048 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-21893S Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) ED2.1.00/03.0058; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0068 Program:ED; ED Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:68081707 Keywords : molecular dynamics simulations * sequence-directed curvature * adenine-thymine tract Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 9.112, year: 2014 http://nar.oxfordjournals.org/content/42/11/7383

  8. Structure and Dynamics of a 197 bp Nucleosome in Complex with Linker Histone H1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednar, Jan; Garcia-Saez, Isabel; Boopathi, Ramachandran; Cutter, Amber R; Papai, Gabor; Reymer, Anna; Syed, Sajad H; Lone, Imtiaz Nisar; Tonchev, Ognyan; Crucifix, Corinne; Menoni, Hervé; Papin, Christophe; Skoufias, Dimitrios A; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi; Lavery, Richard; Hamiche, Ali; Hayes, Jeffrey J; Schultz, Patrick; Angelov, Dimitar; Petosa, Carlo; Dimitrov, Stefan

    2017-05-04

    Linker histones associate with nucleosomes to promote the formation of higher-order chromatin structure, but the underlying molecular details are unclear. We investigated the structure of a 197 bp nucleosome bearing symmetric 25 bp linker DNA arms in complex with vertebrate linker histone H1. We determined electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) and crystal structures of unbound and H1-bound nucleosomes and validated these structures by site-directed protein cross-linking and hydroxyl radical footprinting experiments. Histone H1 shifts the conformational landscape of the nucleosome by drawing the two linkers together and reducing their flexibility. The H1 C-terminal domain (CTD) localizes primarily to a single linker, while the H1 globular domain contacts the nucleosome dyad and both linkers, associating more closely with the CTD-distal linker. These findings reveal that H1 imparts a strong degree of asymmetry to the nucleosome, which is likely to influence the assembly and architecture of higher-order structures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The H1 linker histones: multifunctional proteins beyond the nucleosomal core particle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hergeth, Sonja P; Schneider, Robert

    2015-11-01

    The linker histone H1 family members are a key component of chromatin and bind to the nucleosomal core particle around the DNA entry and exit sites. H1 can stabilize both nucleosome structure and higher-order chromatin architecture. In general, H1 molecules consist of a central globular domain with more flexible tail regions at both their N- and C-terminal ends. The existence of multiple H1 subtypes and a large variety of posttranslational modifications brings about a considerable degree of complexity and makes studying this protein family challenging. Here, we review recent progress in understanding the function of linker histones and their subtypes beyond their role as merely structural chromatin components. We summarize current findings on the role of H1 in heterochromatin formation, transcriptional regulation and embryogenesis with a focus on H1 subtypes and their specific modifications. © 2015 The Authors.

  10. c-Jun/AP-1 overexpression reprograms ERα signaling related to tamoxifen response in ERα-positive breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Huan; Sinha, Indranil; Fan, Rongrong; Haldosen, Lars-Arne; Yan, Feifei; Zhao, Chunyan; Dahlman-Wright, Karin

    2018-02-22

    A critical mechanism that has been proposed for transcription regulation by estrogen receptor α (ER) is the tethering of ER to DNA via other transcription factors, such as AP-1. However, genome-wide assessment of the overlap in chromatin binding repertoires of these two transcription factors has not been reported. Here, we show that the AP-1 transcription factor c-Jun interacts with ER and that c-Jun chromatin binding shows extensive overlap with ER binding at the global level. Further, we show that c-Jun overexpression reprograms ER chromatin binding and modulates ER-mediated gene regulation. Our data are consistent with a mechanism where estrogen/ER-dependent crosstalk with AP-1 at the transcriptional level is mediated through the tethering of ER to DNA bound AP-1. Additionally, in our system c-Jun overexpression causes reduced sensitivity to tamoxifen in ER+ breast cancer cells. Integrated cistrome, transcriptome, and clinical data reveal TGFBI as a candidate gene which may confer tamoxifen resistance by ER and AP-1 crosstalk. Further, we show that TGFBI expression is elevated in breast cancer compared to normal breast. Together, our data provide a novel genome-wide footprint of ER and AP-1 crosstalk and suggest AP-1 and TGFBI signaling as potential therapeutic targets in AP-1-overexpressing ER-positive breast tumors.

  11. TOR complex 2-Ypk1 signaling is an essential positive regulator of the general amino acid control response and autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlahakis, Ariadne; Graef, Martin; Nunnari, Jodi; Powers, Ted

    2014-07-22

    The highly conserved Target of Rapamycin (TOR) kinase is a central regulator of cell growth and metabolism in response to nutrient availability. TOR functions in two structurally and functionally distinct complexes, TOR Complex 1 (TORC1) and TOR Complex 2 (TORC2). Through TORC1, TOR negatively regulates autophagy, a conserved process that functions in quality control and cellular homeostasis and, in this capacity, is part of an adaptive nutrient deprivation response. Here we demonstrate that during amino acid starvation TOR also operates independently as a positive regulator of autophagy through the conserved TORC2 and its downstream target protein kinase, Ypk1. Under these conditions, TORC2-Ypk1 signaling negatively regulates the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent phosphatase, calcineurin, to enable the activation of the amino acid-sensing eIF2α kinase, Gcn2, and to promote autophagy. Our work reveals that the TORC2 pathway regulates autophagy in an opposing manner to TORC1 to provide a tunable response to cellular metabolic status.

  12. Target model of nucleosome particle for track structure calculations and DNA damage modeling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Michalik, Věslav; Běgusová, Marie

    1994-01-01

    Roč. 66, č. 3 (1994), s. 267-277 ISSN 0955-3002 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA204/93/2451; GA AV ČR(CZ) IA135102; GA AV ČR(CZ) IA50405 Keywords : DNA nucleosome * ionizing radiation * theoretical modeling Subject RIV: AQ - Safety, Health Protection, Human - Machine Impact factor: 2.761, year: 1994

  13. Nucleosome–nucleosome interactions via histone tails and linker DNA regulate nuclear rigidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimamoto, Yuta; Tamura, Sachiko; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Maeshima, Kazuhiro

    2017-01-01

    Cells, as well as the nuclei inside them, experience significant mechanical stress in diverse biological processes, including contraction, migration, and adhesion. The structural stability of nuclei must therefore be maintained in order to protect genome integrity. Despite extensive knowledge on nuclear architecture and components, however, the underlying physical and molecular mechanisms remain largely unknown. We address this by subjecting isolated human cell nuclei to microneedle-based quantitative micromanipulation with a series of biochemical perturbations of the chromatin. We find that the mechanical rigidity of nuclei depends on the continuity of the nucleosomal fiber and interactions between nucleosomes. Disrupting these chromatin features by varying cation concentration, acetylating histone tails, or digesting linker DNA results in loss of nuclear rigidity. In contrast, the levels of key chromatin assembly factors, including cohesin, condensin II, and CTCF, and a major nuclear envelope protein, lamin, are unaffected. Together with in situ evidence using living cells and a simple mechanical model, our findings reveal a chromatin-based regulation of the nuclear mechanical response and provide insight into the significance of local and global chromatin structures, such as those associated with interdigitated or melted nucleosomal fibers. PMID:28428255

  14. Two distinct promoter architectures centered on dynamic nucleosomes control ribosomal protein gene transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Britta; Kubik, Slawomir; Ghosh, Bhaswar; Bruzzone, Maria Jessica; Geertz, Marcel; Martin, Victoria; Dénervaud, Nicolas; Jacquet, Philippe; Ozkan, Burak; Rougemont, Jacques; Maerkl, Sebastian J; Naef, Félix; Shore, David

    2014-08-01

    In yeast, ribosome production is controlled transcriptionally by tight coregulation of the 138 ribosomal protein genes (RPGs). RPG promoters display limited sequence homology, and the molecular basis for their coregulation remains largely unknown. Here we identify two prevalent RPG promoter types, both characterized by upstream binding of the general transcription factor (TF) Rap1 followed by the RPG-specific Fhl1/Ifh1 pair, with one type also binding the HMG-B protein Hmo1. We show that the regulatory properties of the two promoter types are remarkably similar, suggesting that they are determined to a large extent by Rap1 and the Fhl1/Ifh1 pair. Rapid depletion experiments allowed us to define a hierarchy of TF binding in which Rap1 acts as a pioneer factor required for binding of all other TFs. We also uncovered unexpected features underlying recruitment of Fhl1, whose forkhead DNA-binding domain is not required for binding at most promoters, and Hmo1, whose binding is supported by repeated motifs. Finally, we describe unusually micrococcal nuclease (MNase)-sensitive nucleosomes at all RPG promoters, located between the canonical +1 and -1 nucleosomes, which coincide with sites of Fhl1/Ifh1 and Hmo1 binding. We speculate that these "fragile" nucleosomes play an important role in regulating RPG transcriptional output. © 2014 Knight et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  15. Regulation of biosynthesis and intracellular localization of rice and tobacco homologues of nucleosome assembly protein 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Aiwu; Zhu, Yan; Yu, Yu; Cao, Kaiming; Sun, Chongrong; Shen, Wen-Hui

    2003-02-01

    The nucleosome assembly protein 1 (NAP1) is considered to be a conserved histone chaperone, facilitating the assembly of nucleosomes in all eukaryotes. However, studies in yeast and animal cells also indicated that NAP1 proteins have diverse functions likely independent of nucleosome-assembly activity. Here, we describe the isolation and characterization of cDNAs encoding NAP1-like proteins from the monocotyledon rice ( Oryza sativa L.) and the dicotyledon tobacco ( Nicotiana tabacum L.). Northern-blot analysis demonstrated that the two rice NAP1-like genes are predominantly expressed in stem tissues such as root and shoot apical meristems as well as in young flowers. During the cell cycle, all four tobacco NAP1-like genes are highly expressed, with one of them showing a slightly increased expression at the G1/S transition. These results are consistent with a role for plant NAP1-like proteins in cell division. In vitro binding assays revealed that different NAP1-like proteins bind, with distinct relative binding strengths, to different classes of histone. Intracellular localization analyses showed that some NAP1-like proteins could be targeted into the nucleus whereas others are exclusively cytoplasm-localized. It is thus likely that different plant NAP1-like proteins have distinct functions in vivo. Plant NAP1-like proteins were observed to concentrate around the metaphase plate and in the phragmoplast, suggesting a role in mitotic events and cytokinesis.

  16. Nucleosomes containing methylated DNA stabilize DNA methyltransferases 3A/3B and ensure faithful epigenetic inheritance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shikhar Sharma

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available How epigenetic information is propagated during somatic cell divisions is still unclear but is absolutely critical for preserving gene expression patterns and cellular identity. Here we show an unanticipated mechanism for inheritance of DNA methylation patterns where the epigenetic mark not only recruits the catalyzing enzyme but also regulates the protein level, i.e. the enzymatic product (5-methylcytosine determines the level of the methylase, thus forming a novel homeostatic inheritance system. Nucleosomes containing methylated DNA stabilize de novo DNA methyltransferases, DNMT3A/3B, allowing little free DNMT3A/3B enzymes to exist in the nucleus. Stabilization of DNMT3A/3B on nucleosomes in methylated regions further promotes propagation of DNA methylation. However, reduction of cellular DNA methylation levels creating more potential CpG substrates counter-intuitively results in a dramatic decrease of DNMT3A/3B proteins due to diminished nucleosome binding and subsequent degradation of the unstable free proteins. These data show an unexpected self-regulatory inheritance mechanism that not only ensures somatic propagation of methylated states by DNMT1 and DNMT3A/3B enzymes but also prevents aberrant de novo methylation by causing degradation of free DNMT3A/3B enzymes.

  17. Non-Canonical Hedgehog Signaling Is a Positive Regulator of the WNT Pathway and Is Required for the Survival of Colon Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph L. Regan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Colon cancer is a heterogeneous tumor driven by a subpopulation of cancer stem cells (CSCs. To study CSCs in colon cancer, we used limiting dilution spheroid and serial xenotransplantation assays to functionally define the frequency of CSCs in a panel of patient-derived cancer organoids. These studies demonstrated cancer organoids to be enriched for CSCs, which varied in frequency between tumors. Whole-transcriptome analysis identified WNT and Hedgehog signaling components to be enhanced in CSC-enriched tumors and in aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH-positive CSCs. Canonical GLI-dependent Hedgehog signaling is a negative regulator of WNT signaling in normal intestine and intestinal tumors. Here, we show that Hedgehog signaling in colon CSCs is autocrine SHH-dependent, non-canonical PTCH1 dependent, and GLI independent. In addition, using small-molecule inhibitors and RNAi against SHH-palmitoylating Hedgehog acyltransferase (HHAT, we demonstrate that non-canonical Hedgehog signaling is a positive regulator of WNT signaling and required for colon CSC survival. : Colon cancer is a heterogeneous tumor driven by a subpopulation(s of therapy-resistant cancer stem cells (CSCs. Regan et al. use 3D culture models to demonstrate that CSC survival is regulated by non-canonical, SHH-dependent, PTCH1-dependent Hedgehog signaling, which acts as a positive regulator of WNT signaling to block CSC differentiation. Keywords: WNT pathway, non-canonical Hedgehog signaling, cancer stem cell, colon cancer, cancer organoid, PTCH1, HHAT, SHH

  18. Development of immunoglobulin lambda-chain-positive B cells, but not editing of immunoglobulin kappa-chain, depends on NF-kappaB signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derudder, Emmanuel; Cadera, Emily J; Vahl, J Christoph; Wang, Jing; Fox, Casey J; Zha, Shan; van Loo, Geert; Pasparakis, Manolis; Schlissel, Mark S; Schmidt-Supprian, Marc; Rajewsky, Klaus

    2009-06-01

    By genetically ablating IkappaB kinase (IKK)-mediated activation of the transcription factor NF-kappaB in the B cell lineage and by analyzing a mouse mutant in which immunoglobulin lambda-chain-positive B cells are generated in the absence of rearrangements in the locus encoding immunoglobulin kappa-chain, we define here two distinct, consecutive phases of early B cell development that differ in their dependence on IKK-mediated NF-kappaB signaling. During the first phase, in which NF-kappaB signaling is dispensable, predominantly kappa-chain-positive B cells are generated, which undergo efficient receptor editing. In the second phase, predominantly lambda-chain-positive B cells are generated whose development is ontogenetically timed to occur after rearrangements of the locus encoding kappa-chain. This second phase of development is dependent on NF-kappaB signals, which can be substituted by transgenic expression of the prosurvival factor Bcl-2.

  19. Body language: The interplay between positional behavior and gestural signaling in the genus Pan and its implications for language evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Lindsey W; Delgado, Roberto A

    2015-08-01

    The gestural repertoires of bonobos and chimpanzees are well documented, but the relationship between gestural signaling and positional behavior (i.e., body postures and locomotion) has yet to be explored. Given that one theory for language evolution attributes the emergence of increased gestural communication to habitual bipedality, this relationship is important to investigate. In this study, we examined the interplay between gestures, body postures, and locomotion in four captive groups of bonobos and chimpanzees using ad libitum and focal video data. We recorded 43 distinct manual (involving upper limbs and/or hands) and bodily (involving postures, locomotion, head, lower limbs, or feet) gestures. In both species, actors used manual and bodily gestures significantly more when recipients were attentive to them, suggesting these movements are intentionally communicative. Adults of both species spent less than 1.0% of their observation time in bipedal postures or locomotion, yet 14.0% of all bonobo gestures and 14.7% of all chimpanzee gestures were produced when subjects were engaged in bipedal postures or locomotion. Among both bonobo groups and one chimpanzee group, these were mainly manual gestures produced by infants and juvenile females. Among the other chimpanzee group, however, these were mainly bodily gestures produced by adult males in which bipedal posture and locomotion were incorporated into communicative displays. Overall, our findings reveal that bipedality did not prompt an increase in manual gesturing in these study groups. Rather, body postures and locomotion are intimately tied to many gestures and certain modes of locomotion can be used as gestures themselves. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. You are that smiling guy I met at the party! Socially positive signals foster memory for identities and contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righi, Stefania; Gronchi, Giorgio; Marzi, Tessa; Rebai, Mohamed; Viggiano, Maria Pia

    2015-07-01

    The emotional influence of facial expressions on memory is well-known whereas the influence of emotional contextual information on memory for emotional faces is yet to be extensively explored. This study investigated the interplay between facial expression and the emotional surrounding context in affecting both memory for identities (item memory) and memory for associative backgrounds (source memory). At the encoding fearful and happy faces were presented embedded in fear or happy scenes (i.e.: fearful faces in fear-scenes, happy faces in happy-scenes, fearful faces in happy-scenes and happy faces in fear-scenes) and participants were asked to judge the emotional congruency of the face-scene compounds (i.e. fearful faces in fear-scenes and happy faces in happy-scenes were congruent compounds). In the recognition phase, the old faces were intermixed with the new ones: all the faces were presented isolated with a neutral expression. Participants were requested to indicate whether each face had been previously presented (item memory). Then, for each old face the memory for the scene originally compounded with the face was tested by a three alternative forced choice recognition task (source memory). The results evidenced that face identity memory is differently modulated by the valence in congruent face-context compounds with better identity recognition (item memory) for happy faces encoded in happy-scenarios. Moreover, also the memory for the surrounding context (source memory) benefits from the association with a smiling face. Our findings highlight that socially positive signals conveyed by smiling faces may prompt memory for identity and context. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Positive or negative feedback of optokinetic signals: degree of the misrouted optic flow determines system dynamics of human ocular motor behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien-Cheng; Bockisch, Christopher J; Olasagasti, Itsaso; Weber, Konrad P; Straumann, Dominik; Huang, Melody Ying-Yu

    2014-04-09

    The optokinetic system in healthy humans is a negative-feedback system that stabilizes gaze: slow-phase eye movements (i.e., the output signal) minimize retinal slip (i.e., the error signal). A positive-feedback optokinetic system may exist due to the misrouting of optic fibers. Previous studies have shown that, in a zebrafish mutant with a high degree of the misrouting, the optokinetic response (OKR) is reversed. As a result, slow-phase eye movements amplify retinal slip, forming a positive-feedback optokinetic loop. The positive-feedback optokinetic system cannot stabilize gaze, thus leading to spontaneous eye oscillations (SEOs). Because the misrouting in human patients (e.g., with a condition of albinism or achiasmia) is partial, both positive- and negative-feedback loops co-exist. How this co-existence affects human ocular motor behavior remains unclear. We presented a visual environment consisting of two stimuli in different parts of the visual field to healthy subjects. One mimicked positive-feedback optokinetic signals and the other preserved negative-feedback optokinetic signals. By changing the ratio and position of the visual field of these visual stimuli, various optic nerve misrouting patterns were simulated. Eye-movement responses to stationary and moving stimuli were measured and compared with computer simulations. The SEOs were correlated with the magnitude of the virtual positive-feedback optokinetic effect. We found a correlation among the simulated misrouting, the corresponding OKR, and the SEOs in humans. The proportion of the simulated misrouting needed to be greater than 50% to reverse the OKR and at least greater than or equal to 70% to evoke SEOs. Once the SEOs were evoked, the magnitude positively correlated to the strength of the positive-feedback OKR. This study provides a mechanism of how the misrouting of optic fibers in humans could lead to SEOs, offering a possible explanation for a subtype of infantile nystagmus syndrome (INS).

  2. Signal Processing of Ground Penetrating Radar Using Spectral Estimation Techniques to Estimate the Position of Buried Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanker Man Shrestha

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Super-resolution is very important for the signal processing of GPR (ground penetration radar to resolve closely buried targets. However, it is not easy to get high resolution as GPR signals are very weak and enveloped by the noise. The MUSIC (multiple signal classification algorithm, which is well known for its super-resolution capacity, has been implemented for signal and image processing of GPR. In addition, conventional spectral estimation technique, FFT (fast Fourier transform, has also been implemented for high-precision receiving signal level. In this paper, we propose CPM (combined processing method, which combines time domain response of MUSIC algorithm and conventional IFFT (inverse fast Fourier transform to obtain a super-resolution and high-precision signal level. In order to support the proposal, detailed simulation was performed analyzing SNR (signal-to-noise ratio. Moreover, a field experiment at a research field and a laboratory experiment at the University of Electro-Communications, Tokyo, were also performed for thorough investigation and supported the proposed method. All the simulation and experimental results are presented.

  3. Chromatin associated mechanisms in base excision repair - nucleosome remodeling and DNA transcription, two key players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menoni, Hervé; Di Mascio, Paolo; Cadet, Jean; Dimitrov, Stefan; Angelov, Dimitar

    2017-06-01

    Genomic DNA is prone to a large number of insults by a myriad of endogenous and exogenous agents. The base excision repair (BER) is the major mechanism used by cells for the removal of various DNA lesions spontaneously or environmentally induced and the maintenance of genome integrity. The presence of persistent DNA damage is not compatible with life, since abrogation of BER leads to early embryonic lethality in mice. There are several lines of evidences showing existence of a link between deficient BER, cancer proneness and ageing, thus illustrating the importance of this DNA repair pathway in human health. Although the enzymology of BER mechanisms has been largely elucidated using chemically defined DNA damage substrates and purified proteins, the complex interplay of BER with another vital process like transcription or when DNA is in its natural state (i.e. wrapped in nucleosome and assembled in chromatin fiber is largely unexplored. Cells use chromatin remodeling factors to overcome the general repression associated with the nucleosomal organization. It is broadly accepted that energy-dependent nucleosome remodeling factors disrupt histones-DNA interactions at the expense of ATP hydrolysis to favor transcription as well as DNA repair. Importantly, unlike transcription, BER is not part of a regulated developmental process but represents a maintenance system that should be efficient anytime and anywhere in the genome. In this review we will discuss how BER can deal with chromatin organization to maintain genetic information. Emphasis will be placed on the following challenging question: how BER is initiated within chromatin? Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The disequilibrium of nucleosomes distribution along chromosomes plays a functional and evolutionarily role in regulating gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Cui

    Full Text Available To further understand the relationship between nucleosome-space occupancy (NO and global transcriptional activity in mammals, we acquired a set of genome-wide nucleosome distribution and transcriptome data from the mouse cerebrum and testis based on ChIP (H3-seq and RNA-seq, respectively. We identified a nearly consistent NO patterns among three mouse tissues--cerebrum, testis, and ESCs--and found, through clustering analysis for transcriptional activation, that the NO variations among chromosomes are closely associated with distinct expression levels between house-keeping (HK genes and tissue-specific (TS genes. Both TS and HK genes form clusters albeit the obvious majority. This feature implies that NO patterns, i.e. nucleosome binding and clustering, are coupled with gene clustering that may be functionally and evolutionarily conserved in regulating gene expression among different cell types.

  5. The disequilibrium of nucleosomes distribution along chromosomes plays a functional and evolutionarily role in regulating gene expression

    KAUST Repository

    Cui, Peng

    2011-08-19

    To further understand the relationship between nucleosome-space occupancy (NO) and global transcriptional activity in mammals, we acquired a set of genome-wide nucleosome distribution and transcriptome data from the mouse cerebrum and testis based on ChIP (H3)-seq and RNA-seq, respectively. We identified a nearly consistent NO patterns among three mouse tissues-cerebrum, testis, and ESCs-and found, through clustering analysis for transcriptional activation, that the NO variations among chromosomes are closely associated with distinct expression levels between house-keeping (HK) genes and tissue-specific (TS) genes. Both TS and HK genes form clusters albeit the obvious majority. This feature implies that NO patterns, i.e. nucleosome binding and clustering, are coupled with gene clustering that may be functionally and evolutionarily conserved in regulating gene expression among different cell types. © 2011 Cui et al.

  6. Analysis of the histone protein tail and DNA in nucleosome using molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimori, R.; Komatsu, Y.; Fukuda, M.; Miyakawa, T.; Morikawa, R.; Takasu, M.

    2013-02-01

    We study the effect of the tails of H3 and H4 histones in the nucleosomes, where DNA and histones are packed in the form of chromatin. We perform molecular dynamics simulations of the complex of DNA and histones and calculate the mean square displacement and the gyration radius of the complex of DNA and histones for the cases with tails intact and the cases with tails missing. Our results show that the H3 tails are important for the motion of the histones. We also find that the motion of one tail is affected by other tails, although the tails are distanced apart, suggesting the correlated motion in biological systems.

  7. GAGA factor maintains nucleosome-free regions and has a role in RNA polymerase II recruitment to promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuda, Nicholas J; Guertin, Michael J; Sharma, Sumeet; Danko, Charles G; Martins, André L; Siepel, Adam; Lis, John T

    2015-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that GAGA Factor (GAF) is enriched on promoters with paused RNA Polymerase II (Pol II), but its genome-wide function and mechanism of action remain largely uncharacterized. We assayed the levels of transcriptionally-engaged polymerase using global run-on sequencing (GRO-seq) in control and GAF-RNAi Drosophila S2 cells and found promoter-proximal polymerase was significantly reduced on a large subset of paused promoters where GAF occupancy was reduced by knock down. These promoters show a dramatic increase in nucleosome occupancy upon GAF depletion. These results, in conjunction with previous studies showing that GAF directly interacts with nucleosome remodelers, strongly support a model where GAF directs nucleosome displacement at the promoter and thereby allows the entry Pol II to the promoter and pause sites. This action of GAF on nucleosomes is at least partially independent of paused Pol II because intergenic GAF binding sites with little or no Pol II also show GAF-dependent nucleosome displacement. In addition, the insulator factor BEAF, the BEAF-interacting protein Chriz, and the transcription factor M1BP are strikingly enriched on those GAF-associated genes where pausing is unaffected by knock down, suggesting insulators or the alternative promoter-associated factor M1BP protect a subset of GAF-bound paused genes from GAF knock-down effects. Thus, GAF binding at promoters can lead to the local displacement of nucleosomes, but this activity can be restricted or compensated for when insulator protein or M1BP complexes also reside at GAF bound promoters.

  8. GAGA factor maintains nucleosome-free regions and has a role in RNA polymerase II recruitment to promoters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J Fuda

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that GAGA Factor (GAF is enriched on promoters with paused RNA Polymerase II (Pol II, but its genome-wide function and mechanism of action remain largely uncharacterized. We assayed the levels of transcriptionally-engaged polymerase using global run-on sequencing (GRO-seq in control and GAF-RNAi Drosophila S2 cells and found promoter-proximal polymerase was significantly reduced on a large subset of paused promoters where GAF occupancy was reduced by knock down. These promoters show a dramatic increase in nucleosome occupancy upon GAF depletion. These results, in conjunction with previous studies showing that GAF directly interacts with nucleosome remodelers, strongly support a model where GAF directs nucleosome displacement at the promoter and thereby allows the entry Pol II to the promoter and pause sites. This action of GAF on nucleosomes is at least partially independent of paused Pol II because intergenic GAF binding sites with little or no Pol II also show GAF-dependent nucleosome displacement. In addition, the insulator factor BEAF, the BEAF-interacting protein Chriz, and the transcription factor M1BP are strikingly enriched on those GAF-associated genes where pausing is unaffected by knock down, suggesting insulators or the alternative promoter-associated factor M1BP protect a subset of GAF-bound paused genes from GAF knock-down effects. Thus, GAF binding at promoters can lead to the local displacement of nucleosomes, but this activity can be restricted or compensated for when insulator protein or M1BP complexes also reside at GAF bound promoters.

  9. Study of sub-pixel position resolution with time-correlated transient signals in 3D pixelated CdZnTe detectors with varying pixel sizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocampo Giraldo, L.; Bolotnikov, A. E.; Camarda, G. S.; De Geronimo, G.; Fried, J.; Gul, R.; Hodges, D.; Hossain, A.; Ünlü, K.; Vernon, E.; Yang, G.; James, R. B.

    2018-03-01

    We evaluated the sub-pixel position resolution achievable in large-volume CdZnTe pixelated detectors with conventional pixel patterns and for several different pixel sizes: 2.8 mm, 1.72 mm, 1.4 mm and 0.8 mm. Achieving position resolution below the physical dimensions of pixels (sub-pixel resolution) is a practical path for making high-granularity position-sensitive detectors, important for improving the imaging capability of CZT gamma cameras. It also allows for making more accurate corrections of response non-uniformities caused by crystal defects, thus enabling use of standard-grade (unselected) and less expensive CZT crystals for producing large-volume position-sensitive CZT detectors feasible for many practical applications. We analyzed the digitized charge signals from a representative 9 pixels and the cathode, generated using a pulsed-laser light beam focused down to 10 μm (650 nm) to scan over a selected 3 × 3 pixel area. We applied our digital pulse processing technique to the time-correlated signals captured from adjacent pixels to achieve and evaluate the capability for sub-pixel position resolution. As an example, we also demonstrated an application of 3D corrections to improve the energy resolution and positional information of the events for the tested detectors.

  10. The Structural Location of DNA Lesions in Nucleosome Core Particles Determines Accessibility by Base Excision Repair Enzymes*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Yesenia; Smerdon, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Packaging of DNA into chromatin affects accessibility of DNA regulatory factors involved in transcription, replication, and repair. Evidence suggests that even in the nucleosome core particle (NCP), accessibility to damaged DNA is hindered by the presence of the histone octamer. Base excision repair is the major pathway in mammalian cells responsible for correcting a large number of chemically modified bases. We have measured the repair of site-specific uracil and single nucleotide gaps along the surface of the NCP. Our results indicate that removal of DNA lesions is greatly dependent on their rotational and translational positioning in NCPs. Significantly, the rate of uracil removal with outwardly oriented DNA backbones is 2–10-fold higher than those with inwardly oriented backbones. In general, uracils with inwardly oriented backbones farther away from the dyad center of the NCP are more accessible than those near the dyad. The translational positioning of outwardly oriented gaps is the key factor driving gap filling activity. An outwardly oriented gap near the DNA ends exhibits a 3-fold increase in gap filling activity as compared with one near the dyad with the same rotational orientation. Near the dyad, uracil DNA glycosylase/APE1 removes an outwardly oriented uracil efficiently; however, polymerase β activity is significantly inhibited at this site. These data suggest that the hindrance presented by the location of a DNA lesion is dependent on the structural requirements for enzyme catalysis. Therefore, remodeling at DNA damage sites in NCPs is critical for preventing accumulation of aborted intermediates and ensuring completion of base excision repair. PMID:23543741

  11. Influence of longitudinal position on the evolution of steady-state signal in cardiac cine balanced steady-state free precession imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spear, Tyler J; Stromp, Tori A; Leung, Steve W; Vandsburger, Moriel H

    2017-11-01

    Emerging quantitative cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) techniques use cine balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) to measure myocardial signal intensity and probe underlying physiological parameters. This correlation assumes that steady-state is maintained uniformly throughout the heart in space and time. To determine the effects of longitudinal cardiac motion and initial slice position on signal deviation in cine bSSFP imaging by comparing two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) acquisitions. Nine healthy volunteers completed cardiac MRI on a 1.5-T scanner. Short axis images were taken at six slice locations using both 2D and 3D cine bSSFP. 3D acquisitions spanned two slices above and below selected slice locations. Changes in myocardial signal intensity were measured across the cardiac cycle and compared to longitudinal shortening. For 2D cine bSSFP, 46% ± 9% of all frames and 84% ± 13% of end-diastolic frames remained within 10% of initial signal intensity. For 3D cine bSSFP the proportions increased to 87% ± 8% and 97% ± 5%. There was no correlation between longitudinal shortening and peak changes in myocardial signal. The initial slice position significantly impacted peak changes in signal intensity for 2D sequences ( P  cine bSSFP that is only restored at the center of a 3D excitation volume. During diastole, a transient steady-state is established similar to that achieved with 3D cine bSSFP regardless of slice location.

  12. Real-time positioning in logging: Effects of forest stand characteristics, topography, and line-of-sight obstructions on GNSS-RF transponder accuracy and radio signal propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimbelman, Eloise G; Keefe, Robert F

    2018-01-01

    Real-time positioning on mobile devices using global navigation satellite system (GNSS) technology paired with radio frequency (RF) transmission (GNSS-RF) may help to improve safety on logging operations by increasing situational awareness. However, GNSS positional accuracy for ground workers in motion may be reduced by multipath error, satellite signal obstruction, or other factors. Radio propagation of GNSS locations may also be impacted due to line-of-sight (LOS) obstruction in remote, forested areas. The objective of this study was to characterize the effects of forest stand characteristics, topography, and other LOS obstructions on the GNSS accuracy and radio signal propagation quality of multiple Raveon Atlas PT GNSS-RF transponders functioning as a network in a range of forest conditions. Because most previous research with GNSS in forestry has focused on stationary units, we chose to analyze units in motion by evaluating the time-to-signal accuracy of geofence crossings in 21 randomly-selected stands on the University of Idaho Experimental Forest. Specifically, we studied the effects of forest stand characteristics, topography, and LOS obstructions on (1) the odds of missed GNSS-RF signals, (2) the root mean squared error (RMSE) of Atlas PTs, and (3) the time-to-signal accuracy of safety geofence crossings in forested environments. Mixed-effects models used to analyze the data showed that stand characteristics, topography, and obstructions in the LOS affected the odds of missed radio signals while stand variables alone affected RMSE. Both stand characteristics and topography affected the accuracy of geofence alerts.

  13. ATP-independent cooperative binding of yeast Isw1a to bare and nucleosomal DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne De Cian

    Full Text Available Among chromatin remodeling factors, the ISWI family displays a nucleosome-enhanced ATPase activity coupled to DNA translocation. While these enzymes are known to bind to DNA, their activity has not been fully characterized. Here we use TEM imaging and single molecule manipulation to investigate the interaction between DNA and yeast Isw1a. We show that Isw1a displays a highly cooperative ATP-independent binding to and bridging between DNA segments. Under appropriate tension, rare single nucleation events can sometimes be observed and loop DNA with a regular step. These nucleation events are often followed by binding of successive complexes bridging between nearby DNA segments in a zipper-like fashion, as confirmed by TEM observations. On nucleosomal substrates, we show that the specific ATP-dependent remodeling activity occurs in the context of cooperative Isw1a complexes bridging extranucleosomal DNA. Our results are interpreted in the context of the recently published partial structure of Isw1a and support its acting as a "protein ruler" (with possibly more than one tick.

  14. The Cac2 subunit is essential for productive histone binding and nucleosome assembly in CAF-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattiroli, Francesca; Gu, Yajie; Balsbaugh, Jeremy L.; Ahn, Natalie G.; Luger, Karolin

    2017-04-18

    Nucleosome assembly following DNA replication controls epigenome maintenance and genome integrity. Chromatin assembly factor 1 (CAF-1) is the histone chaperone responsible for histone (H3-H4)2 deposition following DNA synthesis. Structural and functional details for this chaperone complex and its interaction with histones are slowly emerging. Using hydrogen-deuterium exchange coupled to mass spectrometry, combined with in vitro and in vivo mutagenesis studies, we identified the regions involved in the direct interaction between the yeast CAF-1 subunits, and mapped the CAF-1 domains responsible for H3-H4 binding. The large subunit, Cac1 organizes the assembly of CAF-1. Strikingly, H3-H4 binding is mediated by a composite interface, shaped by Cac1-bound Cac2 and the Cac1 acidic region. Cac2 is indispensable for productive histone binding, while deletion of Cac3 has only moderate effects on H3-H4 binding and nucleosome assembly. These results define direct structural roles for yeast CAF-1 subunits and uncover a previously unknown critical function of the middle subunit in CAF-1.

  15. Essential role of Bmp signaling and its positive feedback loop in the early cell fate evolution of chordates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kozmiková, Iryna; Candiani, S.; Fabian, Peter; Gurská, Daniela; Kozmik, Zbyněk

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 382, č. 2 (2013), s. 538-554 ISSN 0012-1606 R&D Projects: GA ČR GCP305/10/J064; GA MŠk EE2.3.30.0027 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Bmp signaling * axial patterning * cell fate * chordates * evolution Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.637, year: 2013

  16. FACT, the Bur kinase pathway, and the histone co-repressor HirC have overlapping nucleosome-related roles in yeast transcription elongation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer R Stevens

    Full Text Available Gene transcription is constrained by the nucleosomal nature of chromosomal DNA. This nucleosomal barrier is modulated by FACT, a conserved histone-binding heterodimer. FACT mediates transcription-linked nucleosome disassembly and also nucleosome reassembly in the wake of the RNA polymerase II transcription complex, and in this way maintains the repression of 'cryptic' promoters found within some genes. Here we focus on a novel mutant version of the yeast FACT subunit Spt16 that supplies essential Spt16 activities but impairs transcription-linked nucleosome reassembly in dominant fashion. This Spt16 mutant protein also has genetic effects that are recessive, which we used to show that certain Spt16 activities collaborate with histone acetylation and the activities of a Bur-kinase/Spt4-Spt5/Paf1C pathway that facilitate transcription elongation. These collaborating activities were opposed by the actions of Rpd3S, a histone deacetylase that restores a repressive chromatin environment in a transcription-linked manner. Spt16 activity paralleling that of HirC, a co-repressor of histone gene expression, was also found to be opposed by Rpd3S. Our findings suggest that Spt16, the Bur/Spt4-Spt5/Paf1C pathway, and normal histone abundance and/or stoichiometry, in mutually cooperative fashion, facilitate nucleosome disassembly during transcription elongation. The recessive nature of these effects of the mutant Spt16 protein on transcription-linked nucleosome disassembly, contrasted to its dominant negative effect on transcription-linked nucleosome reassembly, indicate that mutant FACT harbouring the mutant Spt16 protein competes poorly with normal FACT at the stage of transcription-linked nucleosome disassembly, but effectively with normal FACT for transcription-linked nucleosome reassembly. This functional difference is consistent with the idea that FACT association with the transcription elongation complex depends on nucleosome disassembly, and that the

  17. Contextualizing Emotional Exhaustion and Positive Emotional Display : The Signaling Effects of Supervisors' Emotional Exhaustion and Service Climate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lam, Catherine K.; Huang, Xu; Janssen, Onne; Lam, K.C.

    In this study, we investigated how supervisors' emotional exhaustion and service climate jointly influence the relationship between subordinates' emotional exhaustion and their display of positive emotions at work. Using data from frontline sales employees and their immediate supervisors in a

  18. Measurement of resonance modes causative of beam position monitor signal noise in vacuum chamber of storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joo, Youngdo; Hwang, Ilmoon; Park, Sungju; Kim, Changbum

    2011-01-01

    It is known that the position reading obtained from the beam position monitor (BPM) mounted at the storage ring can be corrupted by the resonance mode. We carried out a three dimensional finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation of vacuum chambers of the storage ring of the Pohang Light Source (PLS) without simplified modeling to measure the frequencies of resonance modes excited in the vacuum chamber. The frequencies of resonance modes obtained by the eigenmode simulation are well matched with the peak frequencies of RF transmission scattering matrix (S 21 ) graph of sector vacuum chamber measured using a network analyzer. It is found that a transverse electric (TE) resonance mode exists in the operation frequency band of BPM and the vertically oriented electric field of TE resonance mode is linked to the BPM position reading noise. Based on this study, we can easily design a vacuum chamber free from the BPM position reading noise caused by the TE resonance mode.

  19. Constitutional variants are not associated with HER2-positive breast cancer: results from the SIGNAL/PHARE clinical cohort

    OpenAIRE

    Pivot, Xavier; Romieu, Gilles; Fumoleau, Pierre; Rios, Maria; Bonnefoi, Herv?; Bachelot, Thomas; Souli?, Patrick; Jouannaud, Christelle; Bourgeois, Hugues; Petit, Thierry; Tennevet, Isabelle; Assouline, David; Mathieu, Marie-Christine; Jacquin, Jean-Philippe; Lavau-Denes, Sandrine

    2017-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive breast cancer is a subtype of interest regarding its outcome and the impressive impact of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 targeted therapy. Constitutional variants may be involved in the aetiology of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive breast cancer, and we propose a case?case study to test the hypothesis that single nucleotide polymorphisms may be associated with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 status. A Genome...

  20. Calcium signalling in the ciliated protozoan model, Paramecium: strict signal localisation by epigenetically controlled positioning of different Ca²⁺-channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plattner, Helmut

    2015-03-01

    The Paramecium tetraurelia cell is highly organised, with regularly spaced elements pertinent to Ca(2+) signalling under epigenetic control. Vesicles serving as stationary Ca(2+) stores or undergoing trafficking contain Ca(2+)-release channels (PtCRCs) which, according to sequence and domain comparison, are related either to inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) receptors (IP3R) or to ryanodine receptor-like proteins (RyR-LP) or to both, with intermediate characteristics or deviation from conventional domain structure. Six groups of such PtCRCs have been found. The ryanodine-InsP3-receptor homology (RIH) domain is not always recognisable, in contrast to the channel domain with six trans-membrane domains and the pore between transmembrane domain 5 and 6. Two CRC subtypes tested more closely, PtCRC-II and PtCRC-IV, with and without an InsP3-binding domain, reacted to InsP3 and to caffeine, respectively, and hence represent IP3Rs and RyR-LPs. IP3Rs occur in the contractile vacuole complex where they allow for stochastic constitutive Ca(2+) reflux into the cytosol. RyR-LPs are localised to cortical Ca(2+) stores; they are engaged in dense core-secretory vesicle exocytosis by Ca(2+) release, superimposed by Ca(2+)-influx via non-ciliary Ca(2+)-channels. One or two different types of PtCRCs also occur in other vesicles undergoing trafficking. Since the PtCRCs described combine different features they are considered derivatives of primitive precursors. The highly regular, epigenetically controlled design of a Paramecium cell allows it to make Ca(2+) available very locally, in a most efficient way, along predetermined trafficking pathways, including regulation of exocytosis, endocytosis, phagocytosis and recycling phenomena. The activity of cilia is also regulated by Ca(2+), yet independently from any CRCs, by de- and hyperpolarisation of the cell membrane potential. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Increased a-series gangliosides positively regulate leptin/Ob receptor-mediated signals in hypothalamus of GD3 synthase-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Shuting; Tokizane, Kyohei; Ohkawa, Yuki; Ohmi, Yuhsuke; Banno, Ryoichi; Okajima, Tetsuya; Kiyama, Hiroshi; Furukawa, Koichi; Furukawa, Keiko

    2016-10-21

    Gangliosides are widely involved in the regulation of cells and organs. However, little is known about their roles in adipose tissues and hypothalamus. In GD3 synthase-knockout (GD3S KO) mice, deletion of b-series gangliosides resulted in the reduction of serum leptin due to disturbed secretion from adipocytes. To examine whether leptin signals altered, leptin/leptin receptor (ObR)-mediated signaling in hypothalamus was analyzed. Hypothalamus of GD3S KO mouse showed increased expression of GM1 and GD1a, and increased activation of ObR-mediated signals such as pSTAT3 and c-Fos. Leptin stimulation of hypothalamus-derived N-41 cells and their transfectants with GD3S cDNA showed that a-series gangliosides positively regulate leptin/ObR-mediated signals. Co-precipitation analysis revealed that ObR interacts with a-series gangliosides with increased association by leptin stimulation. In brown adipose tissues (BAT) of GD3S KO mice, their weights and adipocyte numbers were increased, and BAT markers such as PGC1α and UCP-1 were also up-regulated. These results suggested that leptin/ObRb-mediated signals were enhanced in hypothalamus of GD3S KO mice due to increased a-series gangliosides, leading to the apparently similar features of energy expenditure between the KO and wild type mice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Transmembrane Adaptor Protein PAG/CBP Is Involved in both Positive and Negative Regulation of Mast Cell Signaling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dráberová, Lubica; Bugajev, Viktor; Potůčková, Lucie; Hálová, Ivana; Bambousková, Monika; Polakovičová, Iva; Xavier, R.J.; Seed, B.; Dráber, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 23 (2014), s. 4285-4300 ISSN 0270-7306 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA301/09/1826; GA ČR GAP302/10/1759; GA ČR(CZ) GBP302/12/G101; GA ČR(CZ) GD204/09/H084; GA MŠk LD12073; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-00703S; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-09807S Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : plasma membrane * cel signaling * IgE receptor Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.777, year: 2014

  3. Nitrated nucleosome levels and neuropsychiatric events in systemic lupus erythematosus; a multi-center retrospective case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferreira, Isabel; Croca, Sara; Raimondo, Maria Gabriella

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) there is no serological test that will reliably distinguish neuropsychiatric (NP) events due to active SLE from those due to other causes. Previously we showed that serum levels of nitrated nucleosomes (NN) were elevated in a small n...

  4. Vaccination with L. infantum chagasi nucleosomal histones confers protection against new world cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania braziliensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Marcia W; Santos, Diego M; Fukutani, Kiyoshi F; Clarencio, Jorge; Miranda, Jose Carlos; Brodskyn, Claudia; Barral, Aldina; Barral-Netto, Manoel; Soto, Manuel; de Oliveira, Camila I

    2012-01-01

    Nucleosomal histones are intracellular proteins that are highly conserved among Leishmania species. After parasite destruction or spontaneous lysis, exposure to these proteins elicits a strong host immune response. In the present study, we analyzed the protective capability of Leishmania infantum chagasi nucleosomal histones against L. braziliensis infection using different immunization strategies. BALB/c mice were immunized with either a plasmid DNA cocktail (DNA) containing four Leishmania nucleosomal histones or with the DNA cocktail followed by the corresponding recombinant proteins plus CpG (DNA/Protein). Mice were later challenged with L. braziliensis, in the presence of sand fly saliva. Lesion development, parasite load and the cellular immune response were analyzed five weeks after challenge. Immunization with either DNA alone or with DNA/Protein was able to inhibit lesion development. This finding was highlighted by the absence of infected macrophages in tissue sections. Further, parasite load at the infection site and in the draining lymph nodes was also significantly lower in vaccinated animals. This outcome was associated with increased expression of IFN-γ and down regulation of IL-4 at the infection site. The data presented here demonstrate the potential use of L. infantum chagasi nucleosomal histones as targets for the development of vaccines against infection with L. braziliensis, as shown by the significant inhibition of disease development following a live challenge.

  5. The incorporation of the novel histone variant H2AL2 confers unusual structural and functional properties of the nucleosome

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Syed, S.H.; Boulard, M.; Shukla, M.S.; Gautier, T.; Travers, A.; Bednár, Jan; Faivre-Moskalenko, C.; Dimitrov, S.; Angelov, D.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 14 (2009), s. 4684-4695 ISSN 0305-1048 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) LC535; GA ČR(CZ) GA304/05/2168 Program:LC Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : nucleosome * histone * variant Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 7.479, year: 2009

  6. Inhibitory Effects of Robo2 on Nephrin: A Crosstalk between Positive and Negative Signals Regulating Podocyte Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueping Fan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Robo2 is the cell surface receptor for the repulsive guidance cue Slit and is involved in axon guidance and neuronal migration. Nephrin is a podocyte slit-diaphragm protein that functions in the kidney glomerular filtration barrier. Here, we report that Robo2 is expressed at the basal surface of mouse podocytes and colocalizes with nephrin. Biochemical studies indicate that Robo2 forms a complex with nephrin in the kidney through adaptor protein Nck. In contrast to the role of nephrin that promotes actin polymerization, Slit2-Robo2 signaling inhibits nephrin-induced actin polymerization. In addition, the amount of F-actin associated with nephrin is increased in Robo2 knockout mice that develop an altered podocyte foot process structure. Genetic interaction study further reveals that loss of Robo2 alleviates the abnormal podocyte structural phenotype in nephrin null mice. These results suggest that Robo2 signaling acts as a negative regulator on nephrin to influence podocyte foot process architecture.

  7. A simple efficient method of delay-line termination and timing-signals extraction in position-sensitive proportional counters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birk, M.; Breskin, A.; Trautner, N.

    1976-01-01

    Pulse transformers are used to match the readout delay line (Z 0 approximately 1.5 kΩ) in a position-sensitive proportional counter to 50-ohm cables, which are terminated by the input impedances of remotely located ground-gate FET aplifiers. Good terminations and high slope-to-noise ratios were achieved. (author)

  8. A cassette of basic amino acids in histone H2B regulates nucleosome dynamics and access to DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Yesenia; Duan, Mingrui; Wyrick, John J; Smerdon, Michael J

    2018-03-27

    Nucleosome dynamics, such as spontaneous DNA unwrapping, are postulated to have a critical role in regulating the access of DNA repair machinery to DNA lesions within nucleosomes. However, the specific histone domains that regulate nucleosome dynamics and their impact on DNA repair are not well understood. Previous studies have identified the histone H2B repression (or HBR) domain, a highly conserved, basic region in the N-terminal tail of histone H2B, which significantly influences gene expression, chromatin assembly, and DNA damage and repair. However, knowledge about the molecular mechanism(s) that may account for these observations is limited. Here, we characterized the stability and dynamics of ΔHBR mutant nucleosome core particles (NCPs) in vitro by restriction-enzyme accessibility, FRET, and temperature-induced sliding of histone octamers. Our results indicate that ΔHBR NCPs are more dynamic and the steady-state fraction of the ΔHBR NCP population occupying the unwrapped state is larger than that of WT NCPs. Moreover, ΔHBR-histone octamers are more susceptible to temperature-induced sliding on DNA than WT histone octamers. Notably, the activity of base-excision repair (BER) enzymes at uracil lesions and single-nucleotide gaps is enhanced in a site-specific manner in ΔHBR NCPs and correlates well with increased DNA unwrapping in these damaged regions. Finally, removal of the HBR domain is insufficient for completely alleviating the structural constraints imposed by histone octamers on the activity of BER enzymes. In summary, our findings indicate that the conserved HBR domain of histone H2B regulates the accessibility of repair factors to DNA lesions in nucleosomes. Published under license by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. Positional signaling and expression of ENHANCER OF TRY AND CPC1 are tuned to increase root hair density in response to phosphate deficiency in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Savage

    Full Text Available Phosphate (Pi deficiency induces a multitude of responses aimed at improving the acquisition of Pi, including an increased density of root hairs. To understand the mechanisms involved in Pi deficiency-induced alterations of the root hair phenotype in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana, we analyzed the patterning and length of root epidermal cells under control and Pi-deficient conditions in wild-type plants and in four mutants defective in the expression of master regulators of cell fate, CAPRICE (CPC, ENHANCER OF TRY AND CPC 1 (ETC1, WEREWOLF (WER and SCRAMBLED (SCM. From this analysis we deduced that the longitudinal cell length of root epidermal cells is dependent on the correct perception of a positional signal ('cortical bias' in both control and Pi-deficient plants; mutants defective in the receptor of the signal, SCM, produced short cells characteristic of root hair-forming cells (trichoblasts. Simulating the effect of cortical bias on the time-evolving probability of cell fate supports a scenario in which a compromised positional signal delays the time point at which non-hair cells opt out the default trichoblast pathway, resulting in short, trichoblast-like non-hair cells. Collectively, our data show that Pi-deficient plants increase root hair density by the formation of shorter cells, resulting in a higher frequency of hairs per unit root length, and additional trichoblast cell fate assignment via increased expression of ETC1.

  10. Positional signaling and expression of ENHANCER OF TRY AND CPC1 are tuned to increase root hair density in response to phosphate deficiency in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Natasha; Yang, Thomas J W; Chen, Chung Ying; Lin, Kai-Lan; Monk, Nicholas A M; Schmidt, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Phosphate (Pi) deficiency induces a multitude of responses aimed at improving the acquisition of Pi, including an increased density of root hairs. To understand the mechanisms involved in Pi deficiency-induced alterations of the root hair phenotype in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), we analyzed the patterning and length of root epidermal cells under control and Pi-deficient conditions in wild-type plants and in four mutants defective in the expression of master regulators of cell fate, CAPRICE (CPC), ENHANCER OF TRY AND CPC 1 (ETC1), WEREWOLF (WER) and SCRAMBLED (SCM). From this analysis we deduced that the longitudinal cell length of root epidermal cells is dependent on the correct perception of a positional signal ('cortical bias') in both control and Pi-deficient plants; mutants defective in the receptor of the signal, SCM, produced short cells characteristic of root hair-forming cells (trichoblasts). Simulating the effect of cortical bias on the time-evolving probability of cell fate supports a scenario in which a compromised positional signal delays the time point at which non-hair cells opt out the default trichoblast pathway, resulting in short, trichoblast-like non-hair cells. Collectively, our data show that Pi-deficient plants increase root hair density by the formation of shorter cells, resulting in a higher frequency of hairs per unit root length, and additional trichoblast cell fate assignment via increased expression of ETC1.

  11. Results of the Ongoing Monitoring of the Position of a Geostationary Telecommunication Satellite by the Method of Spatially Separated Basis Receiving of Digital Satellite Television Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushuev, F.; Kaliuzhnyi, M.; Sybiryakova, Y.; Shulga, O.; Moskalenko, S.; Balagura, O.; Kulishenko, V.

    2016-10-01

    The results of the ongoing monitoring of the position of geostationary telecommunication satellite Eutelsat-13B (13° East) are presented in the article. The results were obtained using a radio engineering complex (RC) of four stations receiving digital satellite television and a data processing centre. The stations are located in Kyiv, Mukachevo, Kharkiv and Mykolaiv. The equipment of each station allows synchronous recording (by the GPS) of fragments of DVB-S signal from the quadrature detector output of the satellite television receiver. Samples of the complex signal are archived and sent to the data processing center through the Internet. Here three linearly independent slant range differences (Δr) for three pairs of the stations are determined as a result of correlation processing of received signals. Every second measured values of Δr are used to calculate Cartesian coordinates (XYZ) of the satellite in the coordinate system WGS84 by multilateration method. The time series of Δr, X, Y and Z obtained during continuous observations from March to May 2015 are presented in the article. Single-measurement errors of Δr, X, Y and Z are equal to 2.6 m, 3540 m, 705 m and 455 m, respectively. The complex is compared with known analogues. Ways of reduction of measurement errors of satellite coordinates are considered. The radio engineering complex could be considered a prototype of a system of independent ongoing monitoring of the position of geostationary telecommunication satellites.

  12. Give it AGO: The search for miRNA-Argonaute sorting signals in Arabidopsis thaliana indicates a relevance of sequence positions other than the 5’-position alone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph J Thieme

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The specific recognition of miRNAs by Argonaute (AGO proteins, the effector proteins of the RNA-induced silencing complex, constitutes the final step of the biogenesis of miRNAs and is crucial for their target interaction. In the genome of Arabidopsis thaliana (Ath, 10 different AGO proteins are encoded and the sorting decision, which miRNA associates with which AGO protein, was reported to lie exclusively in the identity of the 5’-sequence position of mature miRNAs. Hence, with only four different bases possible, a 5’-position-only sorting signal would not suffice to specifically target all 10 different AGOs individually or would suggest a redundant AGO action. Alternatively, other and as of yet unidentified sorting signals may exist. We analyzed a dataset comprising 117 Ath-miRNAs with clear sorting preference to either AGO1, AGO2, or AGO5 as identified in co-immunoprecipitation experiments combined with sequencing. While mutual information analysis did not identify any other single but the 5’-nucleotide to be informative for the sorting at sufficient statistical significance, significantly better then random classification results using Random Forests nonetheless suggest that additional positions and combinations thereof also carry information with regard to the AGO sorting. Positions 2, 6, 9, and 13 appear to be of particular importance. Furthermore, uracil bases at defined positions appear to be important for the sorting to AGO2 and AGO5, in particular. No predictive value was associated with neither miRNA length nor basepair-binding pattern in the miRNA:miRNA* duplex. From inspecting available AGO gene expression data in Arabidopsis, we conclude that the temporal and spatial expression profile may also contribute to the fine-tuning of miRNA sorting and function.

  13. Small molecule ErbB inhibitors decrease proliferative signaling and promote apoptosis in philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary E Irwin

    Full Text Available The presence of the Philadelphia chromosome in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph(+ALL is a negative prognostic indicator. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI that target BCR/ABL, such as imatinib, have improved treatment of Ph(+ALL and are generally incorporated into induction regimens. This approach has improved clinical responses, but molecular remissions are seen in less than 50% of patients leaving few treatment options in the event of relapse. Thus, identification of additional targets for therapeutic intervention has potential to improve outcomes for Ph+ALL. The human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (ErbB2 is expressed in ~30% of B-ALLs, and numerous small molecule inhibitors are available to prevent its activation. We analyzed a cohort of 129 ALL patient samples using reverse phase protein array (RPPA with ErbB2 and phospho-ErbB2 antibodies and found that activity of ErbB2 was elevated in 56% of Ph(+ALL as compared to just 4.8% of Ph(-ALL. In two human Ph+ALL cell lines, inhibition of ErbB kinase activity with canertinib resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in the phosphorylation of an ErbB kinase signaling target p70S6-kinase T389 (by 60% in Z119 and 39% in Z181 cells at 3 µM. Downstream, phosphorylation of S6-kinase was also diminished in both cell lines in a dose-dependent manner (by 91% in both cell lines at 3 µM. Canertinib treatment increased expression of the pro-apoptotic protein Bim by as much as 144% in Z119 cells and 49% in Z181 cells, and further produced caspase-3 activation and consequent apoptotic cell death. Both canertinib and the FDA-approved ErbB1/2-directed TKI lapatinib abrogated proliferation and increased sensitivity to BCR/ABL-directed TKIs at clinically relevant doses. Our results suggest that ErbB signaling is an additional molecular target in Ph(+ALL and encourage the development of clinical strategies combining ErbB and BCR/ABL kinase inhibitors for this subset of ALL patients.

  14. Diagnosing and Correcting Mass Accuracy and Signal Intensity Error Due to Initial Ion Position Variations in a MALDI TOFMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malys, Brian J.; Piotrowski, Michelle L.; Owens, Kevin G.

    2017-12-01

    Frustrated by worse than expected error for both peak area and time-of-flight (TOF) in matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) experiments using samples prepared by electrospray deposition, it was finally determined that there was a correlation between sample location on the target plate and the measured TOF/peak area. Variations in both TOF and peak area were found to be due to small differences in the initial position of ions formed in the source region of the TOF mass spectrometer. These differences arise largely from misalignment of the instrument sample stage, with a smaller contribution arising from the non-ideal shape of the target plates used. By physically measuring the target plates used and comparing TOF data collected from three different instruments, an estimate of the magnitude and direction of the sample stage misalignment was determined for each of the instruments. A correction method was developed to correct the TOFs and peak areas obtained for a given combination of target plate and instrument. Two correction factors are determined, one by initially collecting spectra from each sample position used and another by using spectra from a single position for each set of samples on a target plate. For TOF and mass values, use of the correction factor reduced the error by a factor of 4, with the relative standard deviation (RSD) of the corrected masses being reduced to 12-24 ppm. For the peak areas, the RSD was reduced from 28% to 16% for samples deposited twice onto two target plates over two days. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  15. Changes in Nucleosome Occupancy Associated with Metabolic Alterations in Aged Mammalian Liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina M. Bochkis

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Aging is accompanied by physiological impairments, which, in insulin-responsive tissues, including the liver, predispose individuals to metabolic disease. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these changes remain largely unknown. Here, we analyze genome-wide profiles of RNA and chromatin organization in the liver of young (3 months and old (21 months mice. Transcriptional changes suggest that derepression of the nuclear receptors PPARα, PPARγ, and LXRα in aged mouse liver leads to activation of targets regulating lipid synthesis and storage, whereas age-dependent changes in nucleosome occupancy are associated with binding sites for both known regulators (forkhead factors and nuclear receptors and candidates associated with nuclear lamina (Hdac3 and Srf implicated to govern metabolic function of aging liver. Winged-helix transcription factor Foxa2 and nuclear receptor corepressor Hdac3 exhibit a reciprocal binding pattern at PPARα targets contributing to gene expression changes that lead to steatosis in aged liver.

  16. Towards the theoretical bases of the folding of the 100-A nucleosome filament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chela Flores, J.

    1994-01-01

    We attempt to model DNA packaging at the various stages of ever increasing DNA folding from the 100-A nucleosome filament to various further stages leading up to the metaphase chromosome. We have assumed that a phase transition has induced chromatin into a condensed mode. The mean-field model allows the simultaneous discussion of chromatin with packaging ration η and DNA replication at various stages of folding. We derive a formula correlating (during the S phase of the cell cycle) the DNA polymerase velocity r f (measured in nucleotides per minute) in a relation of inverse proportionality with the degree of DNA packaging: r f = λη -1/2 , where the dimensional constant λ has been determined. This model suggests that in the heterochromatic regions of chromatin there is reduced activity of DNA polymerases. We discuss the possible relevance of our model to late replicating telomeres in yeast and several higher eukaryotes. (author). 28 refs, 3 tabs

  17. Brownian dynamics simulation of the cross-talking effect among modified histones on conformations of nucleosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Zhao-Wen; Li, Wei; Xie, Ping; Dou, Shuo-Xing; Wang, Peng-Ye

    2010-04-01

    Using Brownian dynamics simulation, we studied the effect of histone modifications on conformations of an array of nucleosomes in a segment of chromatin. The simulation demonstrated that the segment of chromatin shows the dynamic behaviour that its conformation can switch between a state with nearly all of the histones being wrapped by DNA and a state with nearly all of the histones being unwrapped by DNA, thus involving the “cross-talking" interactions among the histones. Each state can stay for a sufficiently long time. These conformational states are essential for gene expression or gene silence. The simulation also shows that these conformational states can be inherited by the daughter DNAs during DNA replication, giving a theoretical explanation of the epigenetic phenomenon.

  18. Brownian dynamics simulation of the cross-talking effect among modified histones on conformations of nucleosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao-Wen, Duan; Wei, Li; Ping, Xie; Shuo-Xing, Dou; Peng-Ye, Wang

    2010-01-01

    Using Brownian dynamics simulation, we studied the effect of histone modifications on conformations of an array of nucleosomes in a segment of chromatin. The simulation demonstrated that the segment of chromatin shows the dynamic behaviour that its conformation can switch between a state with nearly all of the histones being wrapped by DNA and a state with nearly all of the histones being unwrapped by DNA, thus involving the “cross-talking” interactions among the histones. Each state can stay for a sufficiently long time. These conformational states are essential for gene expression or gene silence. The simulation also shows that these conformational states can be inherited by the daughter DNAs during DNA replication, giving a theoretical explanation of the epigenetic phenomenon. (cross-disciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  19. Thermomechanical damage of nucleosome by the shock wave initiated by ion passing through liquid water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakubovich, Alexander V.; Surdutovich, Eugene; Solov’yov, Andrey V.

    2012-01-01

    We report on the results of full-atom molecular dynamics simulations of the heat spike in the water medium caused by the propagation of the heavy ion in the vicinity of its Bragg peak. High rate of energy transfer from an ion to the molecules of surrounding water environment leads to the rapid increase of the temperature of the molecules in the vicinity of ions trajectory. As a result of an abrupt increase of the temperature we observe the formation of the nanoscale shock wave propagating through the medium. We investigate the thermomechanical damage caused by the shock wave to the nucleosome located in the vicinity of heavy ion trajectory. We observe the substantial deformation of the DNA secondary structure. We show that the produced shock wave can lead to the thermomechanical breakage of the DNA backbone covalent bonds and present estimates for the number of such strand brakes per one cell nucleus.

  20. Adults with high social anhedonia have altered neural connectivity with ventral lateral prefrontal cortex when processing positive social signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Hong; Tully, Laura M; Lincoln, Sarah Hope; Hooker, Christine I

    2015-01-01

    Social anhedonia (SA) is a debilitating characteristic of schizophrenia, a common feature in individuals at psychosis-risk, and a vulnerability for developing schizophrenia-spectrum disorders. Prior work (Hooker et al., 2014) revealed neural deficits in the ventral lateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) when processing positive social cues in a community sample of people with high SA. Lower VLPFC neural activity was related to more severe self-reported schizophrenia-spectrum symptoms as well as the exacerbation of symptoms after social stress. In the current study, psycho-physiological interaction (PPI) analysis was applied to further investigate the neural mechanisms mediated by the VLPFC during emotion processing. PPI analysis revealed that, compared to low SA controls, participants with high SA exhibited reduced connectivity between the VLPFC and the motor cortex, the inferior parietal and the posterior temporal regions when viewing socially positive (relative to neutral) emotions. Across all participants, VLPFC connectivity correlated with behavioral and self-reported measures of attentional control, emotion management, and reward processing. Our results suggest that impairments to the VLPFC mediated neural circuitry underlie the cognitive and emotional deficits associated with social anhedonia, and may serve as neural targets for prevention and treatment of schizophrenia-spectrum disorders.

  1. A role for tuned levels of nucleosome remodeler subunit ACF1 during Drosophila oogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Börner, Kenneth; Jain, Dhawal; Vazquez-Pianzola, Paula; Vengadasalam, Sandra; Steffen, Natascha; Fyodorov, Dmitry V; Tomancak, Pavel; Konev, Alexander; Suter, Beat; Becker, Peter B

    2016-03-15

    The Chromatin Accessibility Complex (CHRAC) consists of the ATPase ISWI, the large ACF1 subunit and a pair of small histone-like proteins, CHRAC-14/16. CHRAC is a prototypical nucleosome sliding factor that mobilizes nucleosomes to improve the regularity and integrity of the chromatin fiber. This may facilitate the formation of repressive chromatin. Expression of the signature subunit ACF1 is restricted during embryonic development, but remains high in primordial germ cells. Therefore, we explored roles for ACF1 during Drosophila oogenesis. ACF1 is expressed in somatic and germline cells, with notable enrichment in germline stem cells and oocytes. The asymmetrical localization of ACF1 to these cells depends on the transport of the Acf1 mRNA by the Bicaudal-D/Egalitarian complex. Loss of ACF1 function in the novel Acf1(7) allele leads to defective egg chambers and their elimination through apoptosis. In addition, we find a variety of unusual 16-cell cyst packaging phenotypes in the previously known Acf1(1) allele, with a striking prevalence of egg chambers with two functional oocytes at opposite poles. Surprisingly, we found that the Acf1(1) deletion--despite disruption of the Acf1 reading frame--expresses low levels of a PHD-bromodomain module from the C-terminus of ACF1 that becomes enriched in oocytes. Expression of this module from the Acf1 genomic locus leads to packaging defects in the absence of functional ACF1, suggesting competitive interactions with unknown target molecules. Remarkably, a two-fold overexpression of CHRAC (ACF1 and CHRAC-16) leads to increased apoptosis and packaging defects. Evidently, finely tuned CHRAC levels are required for proper oogenesis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. c-di-AMP: An Essential Molecule in the Signaling Pathways that Regulate the Viability and Virulence of Gram-Positive Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahmi, Tazin; Port, Gary C; Cho, Kyu Hong

    2017-08-07

    Signal transduction pathways enable organisms to monitor their external environment and adjust gene regulation to appropriately modify their cellular processes. Second messenger nucleotides including cyclic adenosine monophosphate (c-AMP), cyclic guanosine monophosphate (c-GMP), cyclic di-guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP), and cyclic di-adenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP) play key roles in many signal transduction pathways used by prokaryotes and/or eukaryotes. Among the various second messenger nucleotides molecules, c-di-AMP was discovered recently and has since been shown to be involved in cell growth, survival, and regulation of virulence, primarily within Gram-positive bacteria. The cellular level of c-di-AMP is maintained by a family of c-di-AMP synthesizing enzymes, diadenylate cyclases (DACs), and degradation enzymes, phosphodiesterases (PDEs). Genetic manipulation of DACs and PDEs have demonstrated that alteration of c-di-AMP levels impacts both growth and virulence of microorganisms. Unlike other second messenger molecules, c-di-AMP is essential for growth in several bacterial species as many basic cellular functions are regulated by c-di-AMP including cell wall maintenance, potassium ion homeostasis, DNA damage repair, etc. c-di-AMP follows a typical second messenger signaling pathway, beginning with binding to receptor molecules to subsequent regulation of downstream cellular processes. While c-di-AMP binds to specific proteins that regulate pathways in bacterial cells, c-di-AMP also binds to regulatory RNA molecules that control potassium ion channel expression in Bacillus subtilis . c-di-AMP signaling also occurs in eukaryotes, as bacterially produced c-di-AMP stimulates host immune responses during infection through binding of innate immune surveillance proteins. Due to its existence in diverse microorganisms, its involvement in crucial cellular activities, and its stimulating activity in host immune responses, c-di-AMP signaling pathway has become

  3. Gene expression profiling reveals new aspects of PIK3CA mutation in ERalpha-positive breast cancer: major implication of the Wnt signaling pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Cizkova

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The PI3K/AKT pathway plays a pivotal role in breast cancer development and maintenance. PIK3CA, encoding the PI3K catalytic subunit, is the oncogene exhibiting a high frequency of gain-of-function mutations leading to PI3K/AKT pathway activation in breast cancer. PIK3CA mutations have been observed in 30% to 40% of ERα-positive breast tumors. However the physiopathological role of PIK3CA mutations in breast tumorigenesis remains largely unclear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To identify relevant downstream target genes and signaling activated by aberrant PI3K/AKT pathway in breast tumors, we first analyzed gene expression with a pangenomic oligonucleotide microarray in a series of 43 ERα-positive tumors with and without PIK3CA mutations. Genes of interest were then investigated in 249 ERα-positive breast tumors by real-time quantitative RT-PCR. A robust collection of 19 genes was found to be differently expressed in PIK3CA-mutated tumors. PIK3CA mutations were associated with over-expression of several genes involved in the Wnt signaling pathway (WNT5A, TCF7L2, MSX2, TNFRSF11B, regulation of gene transcription (SEC14L2, MSX2, TFAP2B, NRIP3 and metal ion binding (CYP4Z1, CYP4Z2P, SLC40A1, LTF, LIMCH1. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This new gene set should help to understand the behavior of PIK3CA-mutated cancers and detailed knowledge of Wnt signaling activation could lead to novel therapeutic strategies.

  4. An all-atom model of the chromatin fiber containing linker histones reveals a versatile structure tuned by the nucleosomal repeat length.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Wong

    Full Text Available In the nucleus of eukaryotic cells, histone proteins organize the linear genome into a functional and hierarchical architecture. In this paper, we use the crystal structures of the nucleosome core particle, B-DNA and the globular domain of H5 linker histone to build the first all-atom model of compact chromatin fibers. In this 3D jigsaw puzzle, DNA bending is achieved by solving an inverse kinematics problem. Our model is based on recent electron microscopy measurements of reconstituted fiber dimensions. Strikingly, we find that the chromatin fiber containing linker histones is a polymorphic structure. We show that different fiber conformations are obtained by tuning the linker histone orientation at the nucleosomes entry/exit according to the nucleosomal repeat length. We propose that the observed in vivo quantization of nucleosomal repeat length could reflect nature's ability to use the DNA molecule's helical geometry in order to give chromatin versatile topological and mechanical properties.

  5. Activation of HER family signaling as a mechanism of acquired resistance to ALK inhibitors in EML4-ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanizaki, Junko; Okamoto, Isamu; Okabe, Takafumi; Sakai, Kazuko; Tanaka, Kaoru; Hayashi, Hidetoshi; Kaneda, Hiroyasu; Takezawa, Ken; Kuwata, Kiyoko; Yamaguchi, Haruka; Hatashita, Erina; Nishio, Kazuto; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko

    2012-11-15

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) such as crizotinib show marked efficacy in patients with non-small cell lung cancer positive for the echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4)-ALK fusion protein. However, acquired resistance to these agents has already been described in treated patients, and the mechanisms of such resistance remain largely unknown. We established lines of EML4-ALK-positive H3122 lung cancer cells that are resistant to the ALK inhibitor TAE684 (H3122/TR cells) and investigated their resistance mechanism with the use of immunoblot analysis, ELISA, reverse transcription and real-time PCR analysis, and an annexin V binding assay. We isolated EML4-ALK-positive lung cancer cells (K-3) from a patient who developed resistance to crizotinib and investigated their characteristics. The expression of EML4-ALK was reduced at the transcriptional level, whereas phosphorylation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), HER2, and HER3 was upregulated, in H3122/TR cells compared with those in H3122 cells. This activation of HER family proteins was accompanied by increased secretion of EGF. Treatment with an EGFR-TKI induced apoptosis in H3122/TR cells, but not in H3122 cells. The TAE684-induced inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and STAT3 phosphorylation observed in parental cells was prevented by exposure of these cells to exogenous EGF, resulting in a reduced sensitivity of cell growth to TAE684. K-3 cells also manifested HER family activation accompanied by increased EGF secretion. EGF-mediated activation of HER family signaling is associated with ALK-TKI resistance in lung cancer positive for EML4-ALK. ©2012 AACR.

  6. The ER-associated protein ZDHHC1 is a positive regulator of DNA virus-triggered, MITA/STING-dependent innate immune signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qian; Lin, Heng; Wang, Suyun; Wang, Shuai; Ran, Yong; Liu, Ying; Ye, Wen; Xiong, Xiaozhe; Zhong, Bo; Shu, Hong-Bing; Wang, Yan-Yi

    2014-10-08

    Viral DNA sensing within the cytosol of infected cells activates type I interferon (IFN) expression. MITA/STING plays an essential role in this pathway by acting as both a sensor for the second messenger cGAMP and as an adaptor for downstream signaling components. In an expression screen for proteins that can activate the IFNB1 promoter, we identified the ER-associated protein ZDHHC1 as a positive regulator of virus-triggered, MITA/STING-dependent immune signaling. Zdhhc1(-/-) cells failed to effectively produce IFNs and other cytokines in response to infection with DNA but not RNA viruses. Zdhhc1(-/-) mice infected with the neurotropic DNA virus HSV-1 exhibited lower cytokine levels and higher virus titers in the brain, resulting in higher lethality. ZDHHC1 constitutively associated with MITA/STING and mediates dimerization/aggregation of MITA/STING and recruitment of the downstream signaling components TBK1 and IRF3. These findings support a role for ZDHHC1 in mediating MITA/STING-dependent innate immune response against DNA viruses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Naponski izlazni signali poziciono-osetljivog optičkog prijemnika / The voltage output signals of the optical position-sensitive receiver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Željko Vukobrat

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Teorijski model za određivanje naponskih izlaznih signala poziciono-osetljivog prijemnika razvijen je i eksperimentalno verifikovan. Upotrebljen je kvadrantni detektor za konvertovanje svetlosne energije u električnu energiju. Kvadrantni detektor ima četiri nezavisne i identične fotodiode na osetljivoj površini. Korektno fokusiran simetrični laserski ili optički snop formiraće kružni spot na aktivnoj površini detektora nakon prolaska kroz sočivo. Foto-diode su spojene preko otpornika sa izvorom za napajanje. Fotoelektrična struja generisana u fotodiodi uzrokuje pad napona na odgovarajućem otporniku i, na taj način, obezbeđuje izlazni signal. Signal detektovan pomoću svake fotodiode kvadrantnog detektora proporcionalan je površini svetlosnog špota koji je pao nafotodiodu. Izvedeni teorijski model omogućava brzu i korektnu analizu eksperimentalnih rezultata, stoje u osnovi provere zadovoljenja tehničkih zahteva postavljenih u pretprojektnoj fazi dizajniranja poziciono-osetljivog optičkog prijemnika određene namene. Eksperimentalni rezultati se potpuno slažu sa teorijom. / A theoretical model for determining the voltage output signals of the position-sensitive receiver is developed and verified experimentally. A quadrant detector is used for converting light energy into electrical energy. The quadrant detector has four independent and equal photodiodes on the sensing surface. A correctly focused symmetrical laser or optical beam will form a circular spot on the detector's active surface after passing through the lens. The photodiodes are connected to a voltage source via resistors. A photoelectric current generated in the photodiode causes a voltage drop across the associated resistor and thus provides an output signal. The signal detected by each photodiode of the quadrant detector is proportional to the area of the light spot image on the photodiode. The derived theoretical model enables a quick and correct analysis of

  8. Chemical Synthesis of K34-Ubiquitylated H2B for Nucleosome Reconstitution and Single-Particle Cryo-Electron Microscopy Structural Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiabin; He, Qiaoqiao; Liu, Yuntao; Liu, Sanling; Tang, Shan; Li, Chengmin; Sun, Demeng; Li, Xiaorun; Zhou, Min; Zhu, Ping; Bi, Guoqiang; Zhou, Zhenghong; Zheng, Ji-Shen; Tian, Changlin

    2017-01-17

    Post-translational modifications (e.g., ubiquitylation) of histones play important roles in dynamic regulation of chromatin. Histone ubiquitylation has been speculated to directly influence the structure and dynamics of nucleosomes. However, structural information for ubiquitylated nucleosomes is still lacking. Here we report an alternative strategy for total chemical synthesis of homogenous histone H2B-K34-ubiquitylation (H2B-K34Ub) by using acid-cleavable auxiliary-mediated ligation of peptide hydrazides for site-specific ubiquitylation. Synthetic H2B-K34Ub was efficiently incorporated into nucleosomes and further used for single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) imaging. The cryo-EM structure of the nucleosome containing H2B-K34Ub suggests that two flexible ubiquitin domains protrude between the DNA chains of the nucleosomes. The DNA chains around the H2B-K34 sites shift and provide more space for ubiquitin to protrude. These analyses indicated local and slight structural influences on the nucleosome with ubiquitylation at the H2B-K34 site. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Position encoder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goursky, Vsevolod

    1975-01-01

    A circuitry for deriving the quotient of signal delivered by position-sensitive detectors is described. Digital output is obtained in the form of 10- to 12-bit words. Impact position may be determined with 0.25% accuracy when the dynamic range of the energy signal is less 1:10, and 0.5% accuracy when the dynamic range is 1:20. The division requires an average time of 5μs for 10-bit words

  10. Position encoder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goursky, V.

    1975-05-01

    This paper describes circuitry for deriving the quotient of signals delivered by position-sensitive detectors. Digital output is obtained in the form of 10 to 12 bit words. Impact position may be determined with 0.25% accuracy when the dynamic range of the energy signal is less than 1:10, and 0.5% accuracy when the dynamic range is 1:20. The division requires an average time of 5μs for 10-bit words [fr

  11. Computer Modeling Reveals that Modifications of the Histone Tail Charges Define Salt-Dependent Interaction of the Nucleosome Core Particles

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Ye; Lyubartsev, Alexander P.; Korolev, Nikolay; Nordenskiöld, Lars

    2009-01-01

    Coarse-grained Langevin molecular dynamics computer simulations were conducted for systems that mimic solutions of nucleosome core particles (NCPs). The NCP was modeled as a negatively charged spherical particle representing the complex of DNA and the globular part of the histones combined with attached strings of connected charged beads modeling the histone tails. The size, charge, and distribution of the tails relative to the core were built to match real NCPs. Three models of NCPs were con...

  12. CD5-positive and CD5-negative human B cells converge to an indistinguishable population on signalling through B-cell receptors and CD40.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagro, A; McCloskey, N; Challa, A; Holder, M; Grafton, G; Pound, J D; Gordon, J

    2000-10-01

    Whether CD5 on B cells marks a subset functionally distinct from the conventional CD5 negative (CD5neg) adult population or is more an indicator of activation, remains contentious. Here we have investigated whether CD5 positive (CD5pos) and CD5neg B cells can be distinguished in terms of their response to surrogate signals aimed to model, in vitro, T-cell dependent (TD) and T-independent (TI) encounters with antigen in vivo: the predominantly CD5pos B-cell population found in cord blood, CD5 B cells positively selected from tonsils and their CD5neg counterparts, were compared. Neonatal B cells displayed a near-identical phenotype to that of adult CD5pos B cells, being characterized by uniform immunoglobulin M (IgM), immunoglobulin D (IgD), CD23 and CD44 coexpression. When cultured with anti-IgM maintained at high density on CD32-tranfected mouse L cells to model TI responses or on CD40 ligand (CD40L)-bearing L cells (with or without captured anti-IgM) to model TD encounters, DNA synthesis was stimulated to a similar extent in all three populations. Focusing on CD5 and CD23, we found that - although the signals delivered promoted distinct profiles of expression - under each condition of activation, the phenotypes that emerged for adult CD5pos and CD5neg B cells were remarkably similar. Neonatal B cells displayed a greater diminution in CD5 expression than adult CD5pos B cells following CD40 signals but otherwise the two populations again behaved similarly. The inclusion of interleukin-4 (IL-4) to cultures where cells were costimulated via surface (s)IgM and CD40 resulted in a complete loss of CD5 expression and a corresponding hyperexpression of CD23, irrespective of the population studied. The near-identical response of CD5pos and CD5neg B cells to surrogate TD or TI signals in vitro and their convergence to indistinguishable phenotypes is wholly supportive of CD5 being a fluctuating marker of activation rather than it delineating functionally distinct subsets.

  13. Structural Flexibility of the Nucleosome Core Particle at Atomic Resolution studied by Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roccatano, Danilo; Barthel, Andre; Zacharias, Martin W.

    2007-01-24

    The research described in this product was performed in part in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Comparative explicit solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been performed on a complete nucleosome core particle with and without N-terminal histone tails for more than 20 ns. Main purpose of the simulations was to study the dynamics of mobile elements such as histone N-terminal tails and how packing and DNA-bending influences the fine structure and dynamics of DNA. Except for the tails, histone and DNA molecules stayed on average close to the crystallographic start structure supporting the quality of the current force field approach. Despite the packing strain, no increase of transitions to noncanonical nucleic acid backbone conformations compared to regular B-DNA was observed. The pattern of kinks and bends along the DNA remained close to the experiment overall. In addition to the local dynamics, the simulations allowed the analysis of the superhelical mobility indicating a limited relative mobility of DNA segments separated by one superhelical turn (mean relative displacement of approximately 60.2 nm, mainly along the superhelical axis). An even higher rigidity was found for relative motions (distance fluctuations) of segments separated by half a superhelical turn (approximately 60.1 nm). The N-terminal tails underwent dramatic conformational rearrangements on the nanosecond time scale toward partially and transiently wrapped states around the DNA. Many of the histone tail changes corresponded to coupled association and folding events from fully solvent-exposed states toward complexes with the major and minor grooves of DNA. The simulations indicate that the rapid conformational changes of the tails can modulate the DNA accessibility within a few nanoseconds

  14. ASM-3 acid sphingomyelinase functions as a positive regulator of the DAF-2/AGE-1 signaling pathway and serves as a novel anti-aging target.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongsoon Kim

    Full Text Available In C. elegans, the highly conserved DAF-2/insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor signaling (IIS pathway regulates longevity, metabolism, reproduction and development. In mammals, acid sphingomyelinase (ASM is an enzyme that hydrolyzes sphingomyelin to produce ceramide. ASM has been implicated in CD95 death receptor signaling under certain stress conditions. However, the involvement of ASM in growth factor receptor signaling under physiological conditions is not known. Here, we report that in vivo ASM functions as a positive regulator of the DAF-2/IIS pathway in C. elegans. We have shown that inactivation of asm-3 extends animal lifespan and promotes dauer arrest, an alternative developmental process. A significant cooperative effect on lifespan is observed between asm-3 deficiency and loss-of-function alleles of the age-1/PI 3-kinase, with the asm-3; age-1 double mutant animals having a mean lifespan 259% greater than that of the wild-type animals. The lifespan extension phenotypes caused by the loss of asm-3 are dependent on the functions of daf-16/FOXO and daf-18/PTEN. We have demonstrated that inactivation of asm-3 causes nuclear translocation of DAF-16::GFP protein, up-regulates endogenous DAF-16 protein levels and activates the downstream targeting genes of DAF-16. Together, our findings reveal a novel role of asm-3 in regulation of lifespan and diapause by modulating IIS pathway. Importantly, we have found that two drugs known to inhibit mammalian ASM activities, desipramine and clomipramine, markedly extend the lifespan of wild-type animals, in a manner similar to that achieved by genetic inactivation of the asm genes. Our studies illustrate a novel strategy of anti-aging by targeting ASM, which may potentially be extended to mammals.

  15. ASM-3 Acid Sphingomyelinase Functions as a Positive Regulator of the DAF-2/AGE-1 Signaling Pathway and Serves as a Novel Anti-Aging Target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yongsoon; Sun, Hong

    2012-01-01

    In C. elegans, the highly conserved DAF-2/insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor signaling (IIS) pathway regulates longevity, metabolism, reproduction and development. In mammals, acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) is an enzyme that hydrolyzes sphingomyelin to produce ceramide. ASM has been implicated in CD95 death receptor signaling under certain stress conditions. However, the involvement of ASM in growth factor receptor signaling under physiological conditions is not known. Here, we report that in vivo ASM functions as a positive regulator of the DAF-2/IIS pathway in C. elegans. We have shown that inactivation of asm-3 extends animal lifespan and promotes dauer arrest, an alternative developmental process. A significant cooperative effect on lifespan is observed between asm-3 deficiency and loss-of-function alleles of the age-1/PI 3-kinase, with the asm-3; age-1 double mutant animals having a mean lifespan 259% greater than that of the wild-type animals. The lifespan extension phenotypes caused by the loss of asm-3 are dependent on the functions of daf-16/FOXO and daf-18/PTEN. We have demonstrated that inactivation of asm-3 causes nuclear translocation of DAF-16::GFP protein, up-regulates endogenous DAF-16 protein levels and activates the downstream targeting genes of DAF-16. Together, our findings reveal a novel role of asm-3 in regulation of lifespan and diapause by modulating IIS pathway. Importantly, we have found that two drugs known to inhibit mammalian ASM activities, desipramine and clomipramine, markedly extend the lifespan of wild-type animals, in a manner similar to that achieved by genetic inactivation of the asm genes. Our studies illustrate a novel strategy of anti-aging by targeting ASM, which may potentially be extended to mammals. PMID:23049887

  16. ASM-3 acid sphingomyelinase functions as a positive regulator of the DAF-2/AGE-1 signaling pathway and serves as a novel anti-aging target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yongsoon; Sun, Hong

    2012-01-01

    In C. elegans, the highly conserved DAF-2/insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor signaling (IIS) pathway regulates longevity, metabolism, reproduction and development. In mammals, acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) is an enzyme that hydrolyzes sphingomyelin to produce ceramide. ASM has been implicated in CD95 death receptor signaling under certain stress conditions. However, the involvement of ASM in growth factor receptor signaling under physiological conditions is not known. Here, we report that in vivo ASM functions as a positive regulator of the DAF-2/IIS pathway in C. elegans. We have shown that inactivation of asm-3 extends animal lifespan and promotes dauer arrest, an alternative developmental process. A significant cooperative effect on lifespan is observed between asm-3 deficiency and loss-of-function alleles of the age-1/PI 3-kinase, with the asm-3; age-1 double mutant animals having a mean lifespan 259% greater than that of the wild-type animals. The lifespan extension phenotypes caused by the loss of asm-3 are dependent on the functions of daf-16/FOXO and daf-18/PTEN. We have demonstrated that inactivation of asm-3 causes nuclear translocation of DAF-16::GFP protein, up-regulates endogenous DAF-16 protein levels and activates the downstream targeting genes of DAF-16. Together, our findings reveal a novel role of asm-3 in regulation of lifespan and diapause by modulating IIS pathway. Importantly, we have found that two drugs known to inhibit mammalian ASM activities, desipramine and clomipramine, markedly extend the lifespan of wild-type animals, in a manner similar to that achieved by genetic inactivation of the asm genes. Our studies illustrate a novel strategy of anti-aging by targeting ASM, which may potentially be extended to mammals.

  17. Characteristic arrangement of nucleosomes is predictive of chromatin interactions at kilobase resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Li, Feifei; Jia, Yan; Xu, Bingxiang; Zhang, Yiqun; Li, Xiaoli; Zhang, Zhihua

    2017-12-15

    High-throughput chromosome conformation capture (3C) technologies, such as Hi-C, have made it possible to survey 3D genome structure. However, obtaining 3D profiles at kilobase resolution at low cost remains a major challenge. Therefore, we herein present an algorithm for precise identification of chromatin interaction sites at kilobase resolution from MNase-seq data, termed chromatin interaction site detector (CISD), and a CISD-based chromatin loop predictor (CISD_loop) that predicts chromatin-chromatin interactions (CCIs) from low-resolution Hi-C data. We show that the predictions of CISD and CISD_loop overlap closely with chromatin interaction analysis by paired-end tag sequencing (ChIA-PET) anchors and loops, respectively. The validity of CISD/CISD_loop was further supported by a 3C assay at about 5 kb resolution. Finally, we demonstrate that only modest amounts of MNase-seq and Hi-C data are sufficient to achieve ultrahigh resolution CCI maps. Our results suggest that CCIs may result in characteristic nucleosomes arrangement patterns flanking the interaction sites, and our algorithms may facilitate precise and systematic investigations of CCIs on a larger scale than hitherto have been possible. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  18. Skin vaccination using microneedles coated with a plasmid DNA cocktail encoding nucleosomal histones of Leishmania spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Esther; Schwartz, Juana; Calvo, Alba; Blanco, Laura; Larrea, Esther; Irache, Juan M; Sanmartín, Carmen; Coulman, Sion A; Soto, Manuel; Birchall, James C; Espuelas, Socorro

    2017-11-25

    Vaccine delivery using microneedles (MNs) represents a safe, easily disposable and painless alternative to traditional needle immunizations. The MN delivery of DNA vaccines to the dermis may result in a superior immune response and/or an equivalent immune response at a lower vaccine dose (dose-sparing). This could be of special interest for immunization programs against neglected tropical diseases such as leishmaniasis. In this work, we loaded a MN device with 60μg of a plasmid DNA cocktail encoding the Leishmania infantum nucleosomal histones H2A, H2B, H3 and H4 and compared its immunogenicity and protective capacity against conventional s.c. or i.d. injection of the plasmid. Mice immunized with MNs showed increased ratios of IFN-γ/IL-10, IFN-γ/IL-13, IFN-γ/IL-4, and IFN-γ/TGF-β in the spleens and lymph nodes compared with mice immunized by s.c. and i.d. routes. Furthermore, CCXCL9, CXCL10 and CCL2 levels were also higher. These data suggest that the nucleic acid immunization using MNs produced a better bias towards a Th1 response. However, none of the immunizations strategies were able to control Leishmania major infection in BALB/c mice, as illustrated by an increase in lesion size and parasite burden. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Dengue virus capsid protein binds core histones and inhibits nucleosome formation in human liver cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonya M Colpitts

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV is a member of the Flaviviridae and a globally (reemerging pathogen that causes serious human disease. There is no specific antiviral or vaccine for dengue virus infection. Flavivirus capsid (C is a structural protein responsible for gathering the viral RNA into a nucleocapsid that forms the core of a mature virus particle. Flaviviral replication is known to occur in the cytoplasm yet a large portion of capsid protein localizes to the nucleus during infection. The reasons for the nuclear presences of capsid are not completely understood. Here, we expressed mature DENV C in a tandem affinity purification assay to identify potential binding partners in human liver cells. DENV C targeted the four core histones, H2A, H2B, H3 and H4. DENV C bound recombinant histones in solution and colocalized with histones in the nucleus and cytoplasm of liver cells during DENV infection. We show that DENV C acts as a histone mimic, forming heterodimers with core histones, binding DNA and disrupting nucleosome formation. We also demonstrate that DENV infection increases the amounts of core histones in livers cells, which may be a cellular response to C binding away the histone proteins. Infection with DENV additionally alters levels of H2A phosphorylation in a time-dependent manner. The interactions of C and histones add an interesting new role for the presence of C in the nucleus during DENV infection.

  20. Dengue virus capsid protein binds core histones and inhibits nucleosome formation in human liver cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colpitts, Tonya M; Barthel, Sebastian; Wang, Penghua; Fikrig, Erol

    2011-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a member of the Flaviviridae and a globally (re)emerging pathogen that causes serious human disease. There is no specific antiviral or vaccine for dengue virus infection. Flavivirus capsid (C) is a structural protein responsible for gathering the viral RNA into a nucleocapsid that forms the core of a mature virus particle. Flaviviral replication is known to occur in the cytoplasm yet a large portion of capsid protein localizes to the nucleus during infection. The reasons for the nuclear presences of capsid are not completely understood. Here, we expressed mature DENV C in a tandem affinity purification assay to identify potential binding partners in human liver cells. DENV C targeted the four core histones, H2A, H2B, H3 and H4. DENV C bound recombinant histones in solution and colocalized with histones in the nucleus and cytoplasm of liver cells during DENV infection. We show that DENV C acts as a histone mimic, forming heterodimers with core histones, binding DNA and disrupting nucleosome formation. We also demonstrate that DENV infection increases the amounts of core histones in livers cells, which may be a cellular response to C binding away the histone proteins. Infection with DENV additionally alters levels of H2A phosphorylation in a time-dependent manner. The interactions of C and histones add an interesting new role for the presence of C in the nucleus during DENV infection.

  1. Dengue Virus Capsid Protein Binds Core Histones and Inhibits Nucleosome Formation in Human Liver Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colpitts, Tonya M.; Barthel, Sebastian; Wang, Penghua; Fikrig, Erol

    2011-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a member of the Flaviviridae and a globally (re)emerging pathogen that causes serious human disease. There is no specific antiviral or vaccine for dengue virus infection. Flavivirus capsid (C) is a structural protein responsible for gathering the viral RNA into a nucleocapsid that forms the core of a mature virus particle. Flaviviral replication is known to occur in the cytoplasm yet a large portion of capsid protein localizes to the nucleus during infection. The reasons for the nuclear presences of capsid are not completely understood. Here, we expressed mature DENV C in a tandem affinity purification assay to identify potential binding partners in human liver cells. DENV C targeted the four core histones, H2A, H2B, H3 and H4. DENV C bound recombinant histones in solution and colocalized with histones in the nucleus and cytoplasm of liver cells during DENV infection. We show that DENV C acts as a histone mimic, forming heterodimers with core histones, binding DNA and disrupting nucleosome formation. We also demonstrate that DENV infection increases the amounts of core histones in livers cells, which may be a cellular response to C binding away the histone proteins. Infection with DENV additionally alters levels of H2A phosphorylation in a time-dependent manner. The interactions of C and histones add an interesting new role for the presence of C in the nucleus during DENV infection. PMID:21909430

  2. Genetic identification of a network of factors that functionally interact with the nucleosome remodeling ATPase ISWI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giosalba Burgio

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Nucleosome remodeling and covalent modifications of histones play fundamental roles in chromatin structure and function. However, much remains to be learned about how the action of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling factors and histone-modifying enzymes is coordinated to modulate chromatin organization and transcription. The evolutionarily conserved ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling factor ISWI plays essential roles in chromosome organization, DNA replication, and transcription regulation. To gain insight into regulation and mechanism of action of ISWI, we conducted an unbiased genetic screen to identify factors with which it interacts in vivo. We found that ISWI interacts with a network of factors that escaped detection in previous biochemical analyses, including the Sin3A gene. The Sin3A protein and the histone deacetylase Rpd3 are part of a conserved histone deacetylase complex involved in transcriptional repression. ISWI and the Sin3A/Rpd3 complex co-localize at specific chromosome domains. Loss of ISWI activity causes a reduction in the binding of the Sin3A/Rpd3 complex to chromatin. Biochemical analysis showed that the ISWI physically interacts with the histone deacetylase activity of the Sin3A/Rpd3 complex. Consistent with these findings, the acetylation of histone H4 is altered when ISWI activity is perturbed in vivo. These findings suggest that ISWI associates with the Sin3A/Rpd3 complex to support its function in vivo.

  3. RBPJ, the major transcriptional effector of Notch signaling, remains associated with chromatin throughout mitosis, suggesting a role in mitotic bookmarking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, Robert J; Tsai, Pei-Fang; Choi, Inchan; Won, Kyoung-Jae; Fan, Hua-Ying

    2014-03-01

    Mechanisms that maintain transcriptional memory through cell division are important to maintain cell identity, and sequence-specific transcription factors that remain associated with mitotic chromatin are emerging as key players in transcriptional memory propagation. Here, we show that the major transcriptional effector of Notch signaling, RBPJ, is retained on mitotic chromatin, and that this mitotic chromatin association is mediated through the direct association of RBPJ with DNA. We further demonstrate that RBPJ binds directly to nucleosomal DNA in vitro, with a preference for sites close to the entry/exit position of the nucleosomal DNA. Genome-wide analysis in the murine embryonal-carcinoma cell line F9 revealed that roughly 60% of the sites occupied by RBPJ in asynchronous cells were also occupied in mitotic cells. Among them, we found that a fraction of RBPJ occupancy sites shifted between interphase and mitosis, suggesting that RBPJ can be retained on mitotic chromatin by sliding on DNA rather than disengaging from chromatin during mitotic chromatin condensation. We propose that RBPJ can function as a mitotic bookmark, marking genes for efficient transcriptional activation or repression upon mitotic exit. Strikingly, we found that sites of RBPJ occupancy were enriched for CTCF-binding motifs in addition to RBPJ-binding motifs, and that RBPJ and CTCF interact. Given that CTCF regulates transcription and bridges long-range chromatin interactions, our results raise the intriguing hypothesis that by collaborating with CTCF, RBPJ may participate in establishing chromatin domains and/or long-range chromatin interactions that could be propagated through cell division to maintain gene expression programs.

  4. RBPJ, the major transcriptional effector of Notch signaling, remains associated with chromatin throughout mitosis, suggesting a role in mitotic bookmarking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J Lake

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Mechanisms that maintain transcriptional memory through cell division are important to maintain cell identity, and sequence-specific transcription factors that remain associated with mitotic chromatin are emerging as key players in transcriptional memory propagation. Here, we show that the major transcriptional effector of Notch signaling, RBPJ, is retained on mitotic chromatin, and that this mitotic chromatin association is mediated through the direct association of RBPJ with DNA. We further demonstrate that RBPJ binds directly to nucleosomal DNA in vitro, with a preference for sites close to the entry/exit position of the nucleosomal DNA. Genome-wide analysis in the murine embryonal-carcinoma cell line F9 revealed that roughly 60% of the sites occupied by RBPJ in asynchronous cells were also occupied in mitotic cells. Among them, we found that a fraction of RBPJ occupancy sites shifted between interphase and mitosis, suggesting that RBPJ can be retained on mitotic chromatin by sliding on DNA rather than disengaging from chromatin during mitotic chromatin condensation. We propose that RBPJ can function as a mitotic bookmark, marking genes for efficient transcriptional activation or repression upon mitotic exit. Strikingly, we found that sites of RBPJ occupancy were enriched for CTCF-binding motifs in addition to RBPJ-binding motifs, and that RBPJ and CTCF interact. Given that CTCF regulates transcription and bridges long-range chromatin interactions, our results raise the intriguing hypothesis that by collaborating with CTCF, RBPJ may participate in establishing chromatin domains and/or long-range chromatin interactions that could be propagated through cell division to maintain gene expression programs.

  5. Evc2 is a positive modulator of Hedgehog signalling that interacts with Evc at the cilia membrane and is also found in the nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ponting Chris P

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evc is essential for Indian Hedgehog (Hh signalling in the cartilage growth plate. The gene encoding Evc2 is in close proximity in divergent orientation to Evc and mutations in both human genes lead to the chondrodysplasia Ellis-van Creveld syndrome. Results Bioinformatic analysis reveals that the Evc and Evc2 genes arose through a duplication event early in metazoan evolution and were subsequently lost in arthropods and nematodes. Here we demonstrate that Evc2 is essential for Hh pathway activation in response to the Smo agonist purmorphamine. A yeast two-hybrid screen using Evc as bait identified Evc2 as an Evc binding partner and we confirmed the interaction by immunoprecipitation. We developed anti-Evc2 antibodies and show that Evc2 and Evc co-localize at the basal body and also on primary cilia. In transfected cells, basal body and cilia localization is observed when Evc and Evc2 constructs are co-transfected but not when either construct is transfected individually. We show that Evc and Evc2 are cilia transmembrane proteins, the C-terminus for both being intracellular and Evc2, but not Evc, having an extracellular portion. Furthermore, Evc is absent at the basal body in Evc2 null cells. Using Western blots of cytoplasmic and nuclear protein, we also demonstrate that full length Evc2 but not Evc, is located in the nucleus. Conclusions We demonstrate for the first time that Evc2 is a positive regulator of the Hh signalling pathway and that it is located at the basal body of primary cilia. We show that the presence of Evc and Evc2 at the basal body and cilia membrane is co-dependent. In addition, Evc2, but not Evc, is present in the cell nucleus suggesting movement of Evc2 between the cilium and nucleus.

  6. Evc2 is a positive modulator of Hedgehog signalling that interacts with Evc at the cilia membrane and is also found in the nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Helen J; Tompson, Stuart; Liu, Yu-Ning; Campbell, Jennifer; MacArthur, Katie; Ponting, Chris P; Ruiz-Perez, Victor L; Goodship, Judith A

    2011-02-28

    Evc is essential for Indian Hedgehog (Hh) signalling in the cartilage growth plate. The gene encoding Evc2 is in close proximity in divergent orientation to Evc and mutations in both human genes lead to the chondrodysplasia Ellis-van Creveld syndrome. Bioinformatic analysis reveals that the Evc and Evc2 genes arose through a duplication event early in metazoan evolution and were subsequently lost in arthropods and nematodes. Here we demonstrate that Evc2 is essential for Hh pathway activation in response to the Smo agonist purmorphamine. A yeast two-hybrid screen using Evc as bait identified Evc2 as an Evc binding partner and we confirmed the interaction by immunoprecipitation. We developed anti-Evc2 antibodies and show that Evc2 and Evc co-localize at the basal body and also on primary cilia. In transfected cells, basal body and cilia localization is observed when Evc and Evc2 constructs are co-transfected but not when either construct is transfected individually. We show that Evc and Evc2 are cilia transmembrane proteins, the C-terminus for both being intracellular and Evc2, but not Evc, having an extracellular portion. Furthermore, Evc is absent at the basal body in Evc2 null cells. Using Western blots of cytoplasmic and nuclear protein, we also demonstrate that full length Evc2 but not Evc, is located in the nucleus. We demonstrate for the first time that Evc2 is a positive regulator of the Hh signalling pathway and that it is located at the basal body of primary cilia. We show that the presence of Evc and Evc2 at the basal body and cilia membrane is co-dependent. In addition, Evc2, but not Evc, is present in the cell nucleus suggesting movement of Evc2 between the cilium and nucleus.

  7. Interferon Potentiates Toll-Like Receptor-Induced Prostaglandin D2 Production through Positive Feedback Regulation between Signal Transducer and Activators of Transcription 1 and Reactive Oxygen Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Yun Kim

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Prostaglandin D2 (PGD2 is a potent lipid mediator that controls inflammation, and its dysregulation has been implicated in diverse inflammatory disorders. Despite significant progress made in understanding the role of PGD2 as a key regulator of immune responses, the molecular mechanism underlying PGD2 production remains unclear, particularly upon challenge with different and multiple inflammatory stimuli. Interferons (IFNs potentiate macrophage activation and act in concert with exogenous inflammatory mediators such as toll-like receptor (TLR ligands to amplify inflammatory responses. A recent study found that IFN-γ enhanced lipopolysaccharide-induced PGD2 production, indicating a role of IFNs in PGD2 regulation. Here, we demonstrate that TLR-induced PGD2 production by macrophages was significantly potentiated by signaling common to IFN-β and IFN-γ in a signal transducer and activators of transcription (STAT1-dependent mechanism. Such potentiation by IFNs was also observed for PGE2 production, despite the differential regulation of PGD synthase and PGE synthase isoforms mediating PGD2 and PGE2 production under inflammatory conditions. Mechanistic analysis revealed that the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS was remarkably potentiated by IFNs and required for PGD2 production, but was nullified by STAT1 deficiency. Conversely, the regulation of STAT1 level and activity by IFNs was largely dependent on ROS levels. Using a model of zymosan-induced peritonitis, the relevance of this finding in vivo was supported by marked inhibition of PGD2 and ROS produced in peritoneal exudate cells by STAT1 deficiency. Collectively, our findings suggest that IFNs, although not activating on their own, are potent amplifiers of TLR-induced PGD2 production via positive-feedback regulation between STAT1 and ROS.

  8. Efficient cleavage of single and clustered AP site lesions within mono-nucleosome templates by CHO-K1 nuclear extract contrasts with retardation of incision by purified APE1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eccles, Laura J.; Menoni, Hervé; Angelov, Dimitar; Lomax, Martine E.; O’Neill, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Clustered DNA damage is a unique characteristic of radiation-induced DNA damage and the formation of these sites poses a serious challenge to the cell’s repair machinery. Within a cell DNA is compacted, with nucleosomes being the first order of higher level structure. However, few data are reported on the efficiency of clustered-lesion processing within nucleosomal DNA templates. Here, we show retardation of cleavage of a single AP site by purified APE1 when contained in nucleosomal DNA, compared to cleavage of an AP site in non-nucleosomal DNA. This retardation seen in nucleosomal DNA was alleviated by incubation with CHO-K1 nuclear extract. When clustered DNA damage sites containing bistranded AP sites were present in nucleosomal DNA, efficient cleavage of the AP sites was observed after treatment with nuclear extract. The resultant DSB formation led to DNA dissociating from the histone core and nucleosomal dispersion. Clustered damaged sites containing bistranded AP site/8-oxoG residues showed no retardation of cleavage of the AP site but retardation of 8-oxoG excision, compared to isolated lesions, thus DSB formation was not seen. An increased understanding of processing of clustered DNA damage in a nucleosomal environment may lead to new strategies to enhance the cytotoxic effects of radiotherapeutics. PMID:26439176

  9. Using the ratio of the magnetic field to the analytic signal of the magnetic gradient tensor in determining the position of simple shaped magnetic anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Kurosh; Shirzaditabar, Farzad

    2017-08-01

    The analytic signal of magnitude of the magnetic field’s components and its first derivatives have been employed for locating magnetic structures, which can be considered as point-dipoles or line of dipoles. Although similar methods have been used for locating such magnetic anomalies, they cannot estimate the positions of anomalies in noisy states with an acceptable accuracy. The methods are also inexact in determining the depth of deep anomalies. In noisy cases and in places other than poles, the maximum points of the magnitude of the magnetic vector components and Az are not located exactly above 3D bodies. Consequently, the horizontal location estimates of bodies are accompanied by errors. Here, the previous methods are altered and generalized to locate deeper models in the presence of noise even at lower magnetic latitudes. In addition, a statistical technique is presented for working in noisy areas and a new method, which is resistant to noise by using a ‘depths mean’ method, is made. Reduction to the pole transformation is also used to find the most possible actual horizontal body location. Deep models are also well estimated. The method is tested on real magnetic data over an urban gas pipeline in the vicinity of Kermanshah province, Iran. The estimated location of the pipeline is accurate in accordance with the result of the half-width method.

  10. Immunization strategies against visceral leishmaniosis with the nucleosomal histones of Leishmania infantum encoded in DNA vaccine or pulsed in dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrión, Javier; Folgueira, Cristina; Alonso, Carlos

    2008-05-12

    Immunization of BALB/c mice with a DNA vaccine encoding the nucleosomal histones from Leishmania infantum resulted in a complete failure of protection against visceral leishmaniosis (VL), whereas the adoptive transfer of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells pulsed with the same pathoantigens plays an essential role in controlling parasite growth in half of the cases. Reduction of the visceral parasite burden seems to be related to low persistence of regulatory T-cells in the spleen from vaccinated mice. These results provide clues for the optimization of this vaccine strategy with the four Leishmania nucleosomal histones against L. infantum infection.

  11. DMS-Seq for In Vivo Genome-wide Mapping of Protein-DNA Interactions and Nucleosome Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeyama, Taichi; Ito, Takashi

    2017-10-03

    Protein-DNA interactions provide the basis for chromatin structure and gene regulation. Comprehensive identification of protein-occupied sites is thus vital to an in-depth understanding of genome function. Dimethyl sulfate (DMS) is a chemical probe that has long been used to detect footprints of DNA-bound proteins in vitro and in vivo. Here, we describe a genomic footprinting method, dimethyl sulfate sequencing (DMS-seq), which exploits the cell-permeable nature of DMS to obviate the need for nuclear isolation. This feature makes DMS-seq simple in practice and removes the potential risk of protein re-localization during nuclear isolation. DMS-seq successfully detects transcription factors bound to cis-regulatory elements and non-canonical chromatin particles in nucleosome-free regions. Furthermore, an unexpected preference of DMS confers on DMS-seq a unique potential to directly detect nucleosome centers without using genetic manipulation. We expect that DMS-seq will serve as a characteristic method for genome-wide interrogation of in vivo protein-DNA interactions. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. ERECTA signaling controls Arabidopsis inflorescence architecture through chromatin-mediated activation of PRE1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Hanyang; Zhao, Lihua; Wang, Lulu; Zhang, Man; Su, Zhenxia; Cheng, Yan; Zhao, Heming; Qin, Yuan

    2017-06-01

    Flowering plants display a remarkable diversity in inflorescence architecture, and pedicel length is one of the key contributors to this diversity. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the receptor-like kinase ERECTA (ER) mediated signaling pathway plays important roles in regulating inflorescence architecture by promoting cell proliferation. However, the regulating mechanism remains elusive in the pedicel. Genetic interactions between ERECTA signaling and the chromatin remodeling complex SWR1 in the control of inflorescence architecture were studied. Comparative transcriptome analysis was applied to identify downstream components. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and nucleosome occupancy was further investigated. The results indicated that the chromatin remodeler SWR1 coordinates with ERECTA signaling in regulating inflorescence architecture by activating the expression of PRE1 family genes and promoting pedicel elongation. It was found that SWR1 is required for the incorporation of the H2A.Z histone variant into nucleosomes of the whole PRE1 gene family and the ERECTA controlled expression of PRE1 gene family through regulating nucleosome dynamics. We propose that utilization of a chromatin remodeling complex to regulate gene expression is a common theme in developmental control across kingdoms. These findings shed light on the mechanisms through which chromatin remodelers orchestrate complex transcriptional regulation of gene expression in coordination with a developmental cue. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  13. Nuclear Positioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundersen, Gregg G.; Worman, Howard J.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The nucleus is the largest organelle and is commonly depicted in the center of the cell. Yet during cell division, migration and differentiation, it frequently moves to an asymmetric position aligned with cell function. We consider the toolbox of proteins that move and anchor the nucleus within the cell and how forces generated by the cytoskeleton are coupled to the nucleus to move it. The significance of proper nuclear positioning is underscored by numerous diseases resulting from genetic alterations in the toolbox proteins. Finally, we discuss how nuclear position may influence cellular organization and signaling pathways. PMID:23498944

  14. High mobility group protein number17 cross-links primarily to histone H2A in the reconstituted HMG 17 - nucleosome core particle complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, G.R.; Yau, P.; Yasuda, H.; Traut, R.R.; Bradbury, E.M.

    1986-01-01

    The neighbor relationship of lamb thymus High Mobility Group (HMG) protein 17 to native HeLa nucleosome core particle histones in the reconstituted complex has been studied. 125 I-labeled HMG 17 was cross-linking to core histones using the protein-protein cross-linking reagent 2-iminothiolane. Specific cross-linked products were separated on a two-dimensional Triton-acid-urea/SDS gel system, located by autoradiography, excised and quantified. Disulfide bonds in the cross links were then cleaved and the protein constituents were identified by SDS gel electrophoresis. HMG 17 cross-linked primarily to histone H2A while lower levels of cross-linking occurred between HMG 17 and the other histones. In contrast, cross-linking between two HMG 17 molecules bound on the same nucleosome was relatively rare. It is concluded that the same nucleosome was relatively rare. It is concluded that H2A comprises part of the HMG 17 binding site but that HMG 17 is sufficiently elongated and mobile to permit cross-linking to the other histones and to a second HMG 17 molecule. These results are in agreement with the current model for the structure of the nucleosome and the proposed binding sites for HMG 17

  15. ErbB-2 signaling plays a critical role in regulating androgen-sensitive and castration-resistant androgen receptor-positive prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniyan, Sakthivel; Chen, Siu-Ju; Lin, Fen-Fen; Wang, Zhengzhong; Mehta, Parmender P; Batra, Surinder K; Lin, Ming-Fong

    2015-11-01

    While androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) reduces tumor burden, autocrine growth factor loops such as human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2/ErbB-2/neu) have been proposed to contribute to prostate cancer (PCa) survival and relapse. However, the role of ErbB-2 in regulating androgen-sensitive (AS) and castration-resistant (CR) cell proliferation remains unclear. Here, we determined the role of ErbB-2 in PCa progression and survival under steroid-reduced conditions using two independent PCa cell progression models. In AR-positive androgen-independent (AI) PCa cells that exhibit the CR phenotype, ErbB-2 was constitutively activated, compared to corresponding AS PCa cells. In AS LNCaP C-33 cells, androgen-induced ErbB-2 activation through ERK1/2 mediates PCa cell proliferation. Further, the ErbB-2-specific but not EGFR-specific inhibitor suppresses basal and androgen-stimulated cell proliferation and also blocks ERK1/2 activation. ErbB-2 ectopic expression and cPAcP siRNA transfection of LNCaP C-33 cells each increases ErbB-2 tyrosine phosphorylation, correlating with increased AI PSA secretion and cell proliferation. Conversely, trapping ErbB-2 by transfected endoplasmic reticulum-targeting ScFv5R expression vector abolished DHT-induced LNCaP C-33 cell growth. Moreover, inhibition of ErbB-2 but not EGFR in AI LNCaP C-81 and MDA PCa2b-AI PCa cells significantly abolished AI cell growth. In contrast to androgens via ErbB-2/ERK1/2 signaling in AS PCa cells, the inhibition of ErbB-2 abrogated AI cell proliferation by inhibiting the cell survival protein Akt in those AI cells. These results suggest that ErbB-2 is a prominent player in mediating the ligand-dependent and -independent activation of AR in AS and AI/CR PCa cells respectively for PCa progression and survival. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Nonpeptide and peptide growth hormone secretagogues act both as ghrelin receptor agonist and as positive or negative allosteric modulators of ghrelin signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Birgitte; Brandt, Erik; Bach, Anders

    2005-01-01

    Two nonpeptide (L692,429 and MK-677) and two peptide [GH-releasing peptide (GHRP)-6 and ghrelin] agonists were compared in binding and in signal transduction assays: calcium mobilization, inositol phosphate turnover, cAMP-responsive element (CRE), and serum-responsive element (SRE) controlled...... transcription, as well as arrestin mobilization. MK-677 acted as a simple agonist having an affinity of 6.5 nm and activated all signal transduction systems with similar high potency (0.2-1.4 nm). L-692,429 also displayed a very similar potency in all signaling assays (25-60 nm) but competed with a 1000-fold...... agonist properties and in their ability to modulate ghrelin signaling. A receptor model is presented wherein ghrelin normally only activates one receptor subunit in a dimer and where the smaller nonendogenous agonists bind in the other subunit to act both as coagonists and as either neutral (MK-677...

  17. Genome-Wide Mapping Targets of the Metazoan Chromatin Remodeling Factor NURF Reveals Nucleosome Remodeling at Enhancers, Core Promoters and Gene Insulators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Yeon Kwon

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available NURF is a conserved higher eukaryotic ISWI-containing chromatin remodeling complex that catalyzes ATP-dependent nucleosome sliding. By sliding nucleosomes, NURF is able to alter chromatin dynamics to control transcription and genome organization. Previous biochemical and genetic analysis of the specificity-subunit of Drosophila NURF (Nurf301/Enhancer of Bithorax (E(bx has defined NURF as a critical regulator of homeotic, heat-shock and steroid-responsive gene transcription. It has been speculated that NURF controls pathway specific transcription by co-operating with sequence-specific transcription factors to remodel chromatin at dedicated enhancers. However, conclusive in vivo demonstration of this is lacking and precise regulatory elements targeted by NURF are poorly defined. To address this, we have generated a comprehensive map of in vivo NURF activity, using MNase-sequencing to determine at base pair resolution NURF target nucleosomes, and ChIP-sequencing to define sites of NURF recruitment. Our data show that, besides anticipated roles at enhancers, NURF interacts physically and functionally with the TRF2/DREF basal transcription factor to organize nucleosomes downstream of active promoters. Moreover, we detect NURF remodeling and recruitment at distal insulator sites, where NURF functionally interacts with and co-localizes with DREF and insulator proteins including CP190 to establish nucleosome-depleted domains. This insulator function of NURF is most apparent at subclasses of insulators that mark the boundaries of chromatin domains, where multiple insulator proteins co-associate. By visualizing the complete repertoire of in vivo NURF chromatin targets, our data provide new insights into how chromatin remodeling can control genome organization and regulatory interactions.

  18. The nucleosome (histone-DNA complex) is the TLR9-specific immunostimulatory component of Plasmodium falciparum that activates DCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowda, Nagaraj M; Wu, Xianzhu; Gowda, D Channe

    2011-01-01

    The systemic clinical symptoms of Plasmodium falciparum infection such as fever and chills correspond to the proinflammatory cytokines produced in response to the parasite components released during the synchronized rupture of schizonts. We recently demonstrated that, among the schizont-released products, merozoites are the predominant components that activate dendritic cells (DCs) by TLR9-specific recognition to induce the maturation of cells and to produce proinflammatory cytokines. We also demonstrated that DNA is the active constituent and that formation of a DNA-protein complex is essential for the entry of parasite DNA into cells for recognition by TLR9. However, the nature of endogenous protein-DNA complex in the parasite is not known. In this study, we show that parasite nucleosome constitute the major protein-DNA complex involved in the activation of DCs by parasite nuclear material. The parasite components were fractionated into the nuclear and non-nuclear materials. The nuclear material was further fractionated into chromatin and the proteins loosely bound to chromatin. Polynucleosomes and oligonucleosomes were prepared from the chromatin. These were tested for their ability to activate DCs obtained by the FLT3 ligand differentiation of bone marrow cells from the wild type, and TLR2(-/-), TLR9(-/-) and MyD88(-/-) mice. DCs stimulated with the nuclear material and polynucleosomes as well as mono- and oligonucleosomes efficiently induced the production of proinflammatory cytokines in a TLR9-dependent manner, demonstrating that nucleosomes (histone-DNA complex) represent the major TLR9-specific DC-immunostimulatory component of the malaria parasite nuclear material. Thus, our data provide a significant insight into the activation of DCs by malaria parasites and have important implications for malaria vaccine development.

  19. The nucleosome (histone-DNA complex is the TLR9-specific immunostimulatory component of Plasmodium falciparum that activates DCs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagaraj M Gowda

    Full Text Available The systemic clinical symptoms of Plasmodium falciparum infection such as fever and chills correspond to the proinflammatory cytokines produced in response to the parasite components released during the synchronized rupture of schizonts. We recently demonstrated that, among the schizont-released products, merozoites are the predominant components that activate dendritic cells (DCs by TLR9-specific recognition to induce the maturation of cells and to produce proinflammatory cytokines. We also demonstrated that DNA is the active constituent and that formation of a DNA-protein complex is essential for the entry of parasite DNA into cells for recognition by TLR9. However, the nature of endogenous protein-DNA complex in the parasite is not known. In this study, we show that parasite nucleosome constitute the major protein-DNA complex involved in the activation of DCs by parasite nuclear material. The parasite components were fractionated into the nuclear and non-nuclear materials. The nuclear material was further fractionated into chromatin and the proteins loosely bound to chromatin. Polynucleosomes and oligonucleosomes were prepared from the chromatin. These were tested for their ability to activate DCs obtained by the FLT3 ligand differentiation of bone marrow cells from the wild type, and TLR2(-/-, TLR9(-/- and MyD88(-/- mice. DCs stimulated with the nuclear material and polynucleosomes as well as mono- and oligonucleosomes efficiently induced the production of proinflammatory cytokines in a TLR9-dependent manner, demonstrating that nucleosomes (histone-DNA complex represent the major TLR9-specific DC-immunostimulatory component of the malaria parasite nuclear material. Thus, our data provide a significant insight into the activation of DCs by malaria parasites and have important implications for malaria vaccine development.

  20. Base-Line Calibrations of the Mini-Ranger III and the Role of Signal Strength in Correcting Real-Time Hydrographic Position Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-06-01

    resolved but others are as mysterious as ever. Operation of the system can be affected by range, meteorological conditions, range holes or null zones...SUBROUTINES TO GENERATE PLOTS OF C MINI-RANGER SIGNAL STRENGTH VERSUS - C MEAN RANGE ERROR WITH STANDARD , C DEVIATIONS. C INPUT: INPUT COZIES FROM A DATA

  1. Position display device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishizawa, Yukio.

    1974-01-01

    Object: To provide a device capable of easily and quickly reading mutual mounting relations of control bodies such as control rods mounted on a nuclear reactor and positions to which the control bodies are driven. Structure: A scanning circuit is provided to scan positions of controllably mounted control bodies such as control rods. Values detected by scanning the positions are converted into character signals according to the values and converted into preranked color signals. The character signals and color signals are stored in a memory circuit by synchronous signals in synchronism with the scanning in the scanning circuit. Outputs of the memory circuit are displayed by a display unit such as a color Braun tube in accordance with the synchronous signals to provide color representations according to positions to which control bodies are driven in the same positional relation as the mounting of the control bodies. (Kamimura, M.)

  2. Transcription factor binding site positioning in yeast: proximal promoter motifs characterize TATA-less promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erb, Ionas; van Nimwegen, Erik

    2011-01-01

    The availability of sequence specificities for a substantial fraction of yeast's transcription factors and comparative genomic algorithms for binding site prediction has made it possible to comprehensively annotate transcription factor binding sites genome-wide. Here we use such a genome-wide annotation for comprehensively studying promoter architecture in yeast, focusing on the distribution of transcription factor binding sites relative to transcription start sites, and the architecture of TATA and TATA-less promoters. For most transcription factors, binding sites are positioned further upstream and vary over a wider range in TATA promoters than in TATA-less promoters. In contrast, a group of 6 'proximal promoter motifs' (GAT1/GLN3/DAL80, FKH1/2, PBF1/2, RPN4, NDT80, and ROX1) occur preferentially in TATA-less promoters and show a strong preference for binding close to the transcription start site in these promoters. We provide evidence that suggests that pre-initiation complexes are recruited at TATA sites in TATA promoters and at the sites of the other proximal promoter motifs in TATA-less promoters. TATA-less promoters can generally be classified by the proximal promoter motif they contain, with different classes of TATA-less promoters showing different patterns of transcription factor binding site positioning and nucleosome coverage. These observations suggest that different modes of regulation of transcription initiation may be operating in the different promoter classes. In addition we show that, across all promoter classes, there is a close match between nucleosome free regions and regions of highest transcription factor binding site density. This close agreement between transcription factor binding site density and nucleosome depletion suggests a direct and general competition between transcription factors and nucleosomes for binding to promoters.

  3. Results of the Ongoing Monitoring of the Position of a Geostationary Telecommunication Satellite by the Method of Spatially Separated Basis Receiving of Digital Satellite Television Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bushuev F.

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The results of the ongoing monitoring of the position of geostationary telecommunication satellite Eutelsat-13B (13° East are presented in the article. The results were obtained using a radio engineering complex (RC of four stations receiving digital satellite television and a data processing centre. The stations are located in Kyiv, Mukachevo, Kharkiv and Mykolaiv.

  4. Acute hepatitis B virus infection with simultaneous high HBsAg and high anti-HBs signals in a previously HBV vaccinated HIV-1 positive patient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dommelen, Laura; Verbon, Annelies; van Doorn, H. Rogier; Goossens, Valère J.

    2010-01-01

    We present a case of a clinical manifest hepatitis B virus infection and a potentially misleading HBV serological profile in an HIV-1 positive patient despite previous HBV vaccination. The patient presented with an acute hepatitis B and there was no indication of chronic HBV infection or the

  5. Contrasting signals of positive selection in genes involved in human skin-color variation from tests based on SNP scans and resequencing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. de Gruijter (Johanna); O. Lao Grueso (Oscar); M. Vermeulen (Mark); Y. Xue (Yali); C. Woodwark (Cara); C.J. Gillson (Christopher); A.J. Coffey (Alison); Q. Ayub (Qasim); S.Q. Mehdi (Qasim); M.H. Kayser (Manfred); C. Tyler-Smith (Chris)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Numerous genome-wide scans conducted by genotyping previously ascertained single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have provided candidate signatures for positive selection in various regions of the human genome, including in genes involved in pigmentation traits. However, it

  6. Lysine methyltransferase G9a is not required for DNMT3A/3B anchoring to methylated nucleosomes and maintenance of DNA methylation in somatic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Shikhar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA methylation, histone modifications and nucleosome occupancy act in concert for regulation of gene expression patterns in mammalian cells. Recently, G9a, a H3K9 methyltransferase, has been shown to play a role in establishment of DNA methylation at embryonic gene targets in ES cells through recruitment of de novo DNMT3A/3B enzymes. However, whether G9a plays a similar role in maintenance of DNA methylation in somatic cells is still unclear. Results Here we show that G9a is not essential for maintenance of DNA methylation in somatic cells. Knockdown of G9a has no measurable effect on DNA methylation levels at G9a-target loci. DNMT3A/3B remain stably anchored to nucleosomes containing methylated DNA even in the absence of G9a, ensuring faithful propagation of methylated states in cooperation with DNMT1 through somatic divisions. Moreover, G9a also associates with nucleosomes in a DNMT3A/3B and DNA methylation-independent manner. However, G9a knockdown synergizes with pharmacologic inhibition of DNMTs resulting in increased hypomethylation and inhibition of cell proliferation. Conclusions Taken together, these data suggest that G9a is not involved in maintenance of DNA methylation in somatic cells but might play a role in re-initiation of de novo methylation after treatment with hypomethylating drugs, thus serving as a potential target for combinatorial treatments strategies involving DNMTs inhibitors.

  7. Dynamics of gene expression with positive feedback to histone modifications at bivalent domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rongsheng; Lei, Jinzhi

    2018-03-01

    Experiments have shown that in embryonic stem cells, the promoters of many lineage-control genes contain “bivalent domains”, within which the nucleosomes possess both active (H3K4me3) and repressive (H3K27me3) marks. Such bivalent modifications play important roles in maintaining pluripotency in embryonic stem cells. Here, to investigate gene expression dynamics when there are regulations in bivalent histone modifications and random partition in cell divisions, we study how positive feedback to histone methylation/demethylation controls the transition dynamics of the histone modification patterns along with cell cycles. We constructed a computational model that includes dynamics of histone marks, three-stage chromatin state transitions, transcription and translation, feedbacks from protein product to enzymes to regulate the addition and removal of histone marks, and the inheritance of nucleosome state between cell cycles. The model reveals how dynamics of both nucleosome state transition and gene expression are dependent on the enzyme activities and feedback regulations. Results show that the combination of stochastic histone modification at each cell division and the deterministic feedback regulation work together to adjust the dynamics of chromatin state transition in stem cell regenerations.

  8. X-ray irradiation has positive effects for the recovery of peripheral nerve injury maybe through the vascular smooth muscle contraction signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Bo; Zhang, Yong; She, Chang; Zhao, Jiaju; Zhou, Kailong; Zuo, Zhicheng; Zhou, Xiaozhong; Wang, Peiji; Dong, Qirong

    2017-09-01

    It is well known that moderate to high doses of ionizing radiation have a toxic effect on the organism. However, there are few experimental studies on the mechanisms of LDR ionizing radiation on nerve regeneration after peripheral nerve injury. We established the rats' peripheral nerve injury model via repaired Peripheral nerve injury nerve, vascular endothelial growth factor a and Growth associated protein-43 were detected from different treatment groups. We performed transcriptome sequencing focusing on investigating the differentially expressed genes and gene functions between the control group and 1Gy group. Sequencing was done by using high-throughput RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) technologies. The results showed the 1Gy group to be the most effective promoting repair. RNA-sequencing identified 619 differently expressed genes between control and treated groups. A Gene Ontology analysis of the differentially expressed genes revealed enrichment in the functional pathways. Among them, candidate genes associated with nerve repair were identified. Pathways involved in cell-substrate adhesion, vascular smooth muscle contraction and cell adhesion molecule signaling may be involved in recovery from peripheral nerve injury. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. CD4+CD8β+ double-positive T cells in skin-draining lymph nodes respond to inflammatory signals from the skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Nana Haahr; Cruz, Jazmina L.; Bridge, Jennifer A.

    2017-01-01

    CD4+CD8+ double-positive (DP), mature, peripheral T cells are readily detectable in a variety of species and tissues. Despite a common association with autoimmune and malignant skin disorders, however, little is understood about their role or function. Herein, we show that DP T cells are readily...... detectable in the blood, spleen, and peripheral lymph nodes of naïve C57BL/6 mice. DP T cells were also present in Jα-/- and CD1d-/- mice, indicating that these cells are not NK-T cells. After skin administration of CASAC adjuvant, but not Quil A adjuvant, both total DP T cells and skin-infiltrating DP T...... cells increased in number. We explored the possibility that DP T cells could represent aggregates between CD4+ and CD8+ single-positive T cells and found strong evidence that a large proportion of apparent DP T cells were indeed aggregates. However, the existence of true CD4+CD8+ DP T cells...

  10. Splice variants of the SWR1-type nucleosome remodeling factor Domino have distinct functions during Drosophila melanogaster oogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Börner, Kenneth; Becker, Peter B

    2016-09-01

    SWR1-type nucleosome remodeling factors replace histone H2A by variants to endow chromatin locally with specialized functionality. In Drosophila melanogaster a single H2A variant, H2A.V, combines functions of mammalian H2A.Z and H2A.X in transcription regulation and the DNA damage response. A major role in H2A.V incorporation for the only SWR1-like enzyme in flies, Domino, is assumed but not well documented in vivo. It is also unclear whether the two alternatively spliced isoforms, DOM-A and DOM-B, have redundant or specialized functions. Loss of both DOM isoforms compromises oogenesis, causing female sterility. We systematically explored roles of the two DOM isoforms during oogenesis using a cell type-specific knockdown approach. Despite their ubiquitous expression, DOM-A and DOM-B have non-redundant functions in germline and soma for egg formation. We show that chromatin incorporation of H2A.V in germline and somatic cells depends on DOM-B, whereas global incorporation in endoreplicating germline nurse cells appears to be independent of DOM. By contrast, DOM-A promotes the removal of H2A.V from stage 5 nurse cells. Remarkably, therefore, the two DOM isoforms have distinct functions in cell type-specific development and H2A.V exchange. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  11. Structural Architecture of the Nucleosome Remodeler ISWI Determined from Cross-Linking, Mass Spectrometry, SAXS, and Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrer, Nadine; Schindler, Christina E M; Bruetzel, Linda K; Forné, Ignasi; Ludwigsen, Johanna; Imhof, Axel; Zacharias, Martin; Lipfert, Jan; Mueller-Planitz, Felix

    2018-02-06

    Chromatin remodeling factors assume critical roles by regulating access to nucleosomal DNA. To determine the architecture of the Drosophila ISWI remodeling enzyme, we developed an integrative structural approach that combines protein cross-linking, mass spectrometry, small-angle X-ray scattering, and computational modeling. The resulting structural model shows the ATPase module in a resting state with both ATPase lobes twisted against each other, providing support for a conformation that was recently trapped by crystallography. The autoinhibiting NegC region does not protrude from the ATPase module as suggested previously. The regulatory NTR domain is located near both ATPase lobes. The full-length enzyme is flexible and can adopt a compact structure in solution with the C-terminal HSS domain packing against the ATPase module. Our data imply a series of conformational changes upon activation of the enzyme and illustrate how the NTR, NegC, and HSS domains contribute to regulation of the ATPase module. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Dual roles of p300 in chromatin assembly and transcriptional activation in cooperation with nucleosome assembly protein 1 in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asahara, Hiroshi; Tartare-Deckert, Sophie; Nakagawa, Takeya; Ikehara, Tsuyoshi; Hirose, Fumiko; Hunter, Tony; Ito, Takashi; Montminy, Marc

    2002-05-01

    In a yeast two-hybrid screen to identify proteins that bind to the KIX domain of the coactivator p300, we obtained cDNAs encoding nucleosome assembly protein 1 (NAP-1), a 60-kDa histone H2A-H2B shuttling protein that promotes histone deposition. p300 associates preferentially with the H2A-H2B-bound form of NAP-1 rather than with the unbound form of NAP-1. Formation of NAP-1-p300 complexes was found to increase during S phase, suggesting a potential role for p300 in chromatin assembly. In micrococcal nuclease and supercoiling assays, addition of p300 promoted efficient chromatin assembly in vitro in conjunction with NAP-1 and ATP-utilizing chromatin assembly and remodeling factor; this effect was dependent in part on the intrinsic histone acetyltransferase activity of p300. Surprisingly, NAP-1 potently inhibited acetylation of core histones by p300, suggesting that efficient assembly requires acetylation of either NAP-1 or p300 itself. As p300 acted cooperatively with NAP-1 in stimulating transcription from a chromatin template in vitro, our results suggest a dual role of NAP-1-p300 complexes in promoting chromatin assembly and transcriptional activation.

  13. Transcription factor 19 interacts with histone 3 lysine 4 trimethylation and controls gluconeogenesis via the nucleosome-remodeling-deacetylase complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Sabyasachi; Sanyal, Sulagna; Srivastava, Dushyant Kumar; Dasgupta, Dipak; Roy, Siddhartha; Das, Chandrima

    2017-12-15

    Transcription factor 19 (TCF19) has been reported as a type 1 diabetes-associated locus involved in maintenance of pancreatic β cells through a fine-tuned regulation of cell proliferation and apoptosis. TCF19 also exhibits genomic association with type 2 diabetes, although the precise molecular mechanism remains unknown. It harbors both a plant homeodomain and a forkhead-associated domain implicated in epigenetic recognition and gene regulation, a phenomenon that has remained unexplored. Here, we show that TCF19 selectively interacts with histone 3 lysine 4 trimethylation through its plant homeodomain finger. Knocking down TCF19 under high-glucose conditions affected many metabolic processes, including gluconeogenesis. We found that TCF19 overexpression represses de novo glucose production in HepG2 cells. The transcriptional repression of key genes, induced by TCF19, coincided with NuRD (nucleosome-remodeling-deacetylase) complex recruitment to the promoters of these genes. TCF19 interacted with CHD4 (chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 4), which is a part of the NuRD complex, in a glucose concentration-independent manner. In summary, our results show that TCF19 interacts with an active transcription mark and recruits a co-repressor complex to regulate gluconeogenic gene expression in HepG2 cells. Our study offers critical insights into the molecular mechanisms of transcriptional regulation of gluconeogenesis and into the roles of chromatin readers in metabolic homeostasis. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. beta-catenin is involved in N-cadherin-dependent adhesion, but not in canonical Wnt signaling in E2A-PBX1-positive B acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nygren, Marit Kveine; Døsen-Dahl, Guri; Stubberud, Heidi; Wälchli, Sébastien; Munthe, Else; Rian, Edith

    2009-02-01

    The t(1;19)(q23;13) translocation, resulting in the production of the E2A-PBX1 chimeric protein, is a common nonrandom translocation in pediatric B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). The E2A-PBX1 chimeric protein activates expression of several genes, including Wnt16. In the present study, we explored the role of Wnt16 and beta-catenin in t(1;19) B-ALL cells. Canonical Wnt signaling was measured by TOPflash activity. Localization of beta-catenin in the cell membrane and its involvement in leukemia-stroma interaction were studied by confocal microscopy. Adhesion to N-cadherin was analyzed by adding (3)H-thymidin-labeled cells to N-cadherin-coated wells. In contrast to previous reports, we detected no effects on cell viability or proliferation upon modulation of the Wnt16 levels. Moreover, despite high levels of Wnt16 and beta-catenin, the cells had very low levels of canonical Wnt signaling. Instead, beta-catenin was located in the cell membrane along with N-cadherin. E2A-PBX1-positive leukemia cells adhered strongly to bone marrow stroma cells, and we showed that adherence junctions stained strongly for both proteins. Moreover, knockdown of beta-catenin reduced the adhesion of E2A-PBX1-positive leukemia cells to N-cadherin, suggesting that beta-catenin and N-cadherin play a central role in homotypic cell-to-cell adhesion and in leukemia-stroma adhesion. Interestingly, knockdown of Wnt16 by small interfering RNA reduced the level of N-cadherin. Wnt16 does not activate canonical Wnt signaling in E2A-PBX1-positive cells. Instead, beta-catenin is involved in N-cadherin-dependent adherence junctions, suggesting for the first time that leukemia-stroma interactions may be mediated via an N-cadherin-dependent mechanism.

  15. Global Positioning System Standard Positioning Service Performance Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    The U.S. Global Positioning System (GPS) Standard Positioning Service (SPS) consists of space-based positioning, navigation, and timing (PNT) signals delivered free of direct user fees for peaceful civil, commercial, and scientific uses worldwide. Th...

  16. Acute hepatitis B virus infection with simultaneous high HBsAg and high anti-HBs signals in a previously HBV vaccinated HIV-1 positive patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dommelen, Laura; Verbon, Annelies; van Doorn, H Rogier; Goossens, Valère J

    2010-03-01

    We present a case of a clinical manifest hepatitis B virus infection and a potentially misleading HBV serological profile in an HIV-1 positive patient despite previous HBV vaccination. The patient presented with an acute hepatitis B and there was no indication of chronic HBV infection or the presence of a mutation in the 'a' determinant. Remarkably, simultaneously with high HBV surface antigen and HBV viral load, high anti-HBs antibodies were present. If, due to previous HBV vaccination only anti-HBs was tested in this patient, the result of the high anti-HBs antibodies could be very misleading and offering a false sense of security. Our findings contribute to the ongoing discussion on how to assess HBV specific immunological memory and determining the role of HBV booster vaccinations in immunocompromised individuals.

  17. Activation of the sonic hedgehog signaling pathway occurs in the CD133 positive cells of mouse liver cancer Hepa 1–6 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeng KS

    2013-08-01

    cells that harbor stem cell features, with an underexpression of Shh mRNA and an overexpression of Smoh mRNA. Blockade of the Shh signaling pathway may be a potential therapeutic strategy for hepatocarcinogenesis.Keywords: sonic hedgehog, hepatocellular carcinoma, stem cells, CD133+ cells, liver cancer, Hepa 1–6 cells

  18. Coupling mechanisms between nucleosome assembly and the cellular response to DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lautrette, Aurelie

    2006-01-01

    Cells are continuously exposed to genotoxic stresses that induce a variety of DNA lesions. To protect their genome, cells have specific pathways that orchestrate the detection, signaling and repair of DNA damages. This work is dedicated to the characterization of such pathways that couple the DNA damage response to the assembly of chromatin, a complex that protects and regulates DNA accessibility. We have focused our study on two multifunctional proteins: Rad53, a central checkpoint kinase in the cellular response to DNA damage and Asf1, a histone chaperone involved in chromatin assembly. We have characterized in vitro the binding mode of Asf1 with Rad53 and Asfl with histones. This study is associated with the functional analysis of the role of these interactions in vivo in yeast cells. (author) [fr

  19. Vaccination with a plasmid DNA cocktail encoding the nucleosomal histones of Leishmania confers protection against murine cutaneous leishmaniosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iborra, Salvador; Soto, Manuel; Carrión, Javier; Alonso, Carlos; Requena, Jose M

    2004-09-28

    Leishmania histones are relevant immunogens for the host immune system during both Leishmania infection and disease. In the present paper we have evaluated the prophylactic value of the four Leishmania infantum histones forming the nucleosomal core in the murine model of cutaneous leishmaniasis. In a first stage, the immune response elicited by the intramuscular injection of a mixture of four plasmid DNAs, encoding the L. infantum histones H2A, H2B, H3 and H4, was determined in BALB/c mice. It was found that the immunized animals developed a specific Th1 immune response, which was associated with an antigen-specific production of interferon (IFN-gamma) and a limited humoral response against histones (dominated by antibodies of the IgG2a isotype). According to the pure Th1-type immune response elicited by the DNA vaccination with Leishmania histones, vaccinated mice showed a solid immunity that efficiently controlled the Leishmania major infection. The protection in mice vaccinated with histone-DNAs was associated with a low humoral response against leishmanial antigens, an enhanced IFN-gamma production and little, if any, IL-4 production. The relative contribution of both CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells to the IFN-gamma production, and the IL-12 dependence were also evaluated. All these data indicated that DNA vaccination with Leishmania histones genes results in a specific Th1-like response during L. major infection, and that both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells contribute to the resistance of vaccinated mice to cutaneous leishmaniasis.

  20. Positive trigonometric polynomials and signal processing applications

    CERN Document Server

    Dumitrescu, Bogdan

    2017-01-01

    This revised edition is made up of two parts: theory and applications. Though many of the fundamental results are still valid and used, new and revised material is woven throughout the text. As with the original book, the theory of sum-of-squares trigonometric polynomials is presented unitarily based on the concept of Gram matrix (extended to Gram pair or Gram set). The programming environment has also evolved, and the books examples are changed accordingly. The applications section is organized as a collection of related problems that use systematically the theoretical results. All the problems are brought to a semi-definite programming form, ready to be solved with algorithms freely available, like those from the libraries SeDuMi, CVX and Pos3Poly. A new chapter discusses applications in super-resolution theory, where Bounded Real Lemma for trigonometric polynomials is an important tool. This revision is written to be more appealing and easier to use for new readers. < Features updated information on LMI...

  1. Differences in inferred genome-wide signals of positive selection during the evolution of Trypanosoma cruzi and Leishmania spp. lineages: A result of disparities in host and tissue infection ranges?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-López, Carlos A; Machado, Carlos A

    2015-07-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi and Leishmania spp. are kinetoplastids responsible for Chagas disease and Leishmaniasis, neglected tropical diseases for which there are no effective methods of control. These two human pathogens differ widely in the range of mammal species they can infect, their cell/tissue tropism and cell invasion mechanisms. Whether such major biological differences have had any impact on genome-wide patterns of genetic diversification in both pathogens has not been explored. The recent genome sequencing projects of medically important species of Leishmania and T. cruzi lineages provide unique resources for performing comparative evolutionary analyses to address that question. We show that inferred genome-wide signals of positive selection are higher in T. cruzi proteins than in Leishmania spp. proteins. We report significant differences in the fraction of protein-coding genes showing evidence of positive selection in the two groups of parasites, and also report that the intensity of positive selection and the proportion of sites under selection are higher in T. cruzi than in Leishmania spp. The pattern is unlikely to be the result of confounding factors like differences in GC content, average gene length or differences in reproductive mode between the two taxa. We propose that the greater versatility of T. cruzi in its host range, cell tropism and cell invasion mechanisms may explain the observed differences between the two groups of parasites. Genes showing evidence of positive selection within each taxonomic group may be under diversifying selection to evade the immune system and thus, depending on their functions, could represent viable candidates for the development of drugs or vaccines for these neglected human diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Modulations of DNA Contacts by Linker Histones and Post-translational Modifications Determine the Mobility and Modifiability of Nucleosomal H3 Tails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stützer, Alexandra; Liokatis, Stamatios; Kiesel, Anja; Schwarzer, Dirk; Sprangers, Remco; Söding, Johannes; Selenko, Philipp; Fischle, Wolfgang

    2016-01-21

    Post-translational histone modifications and linker histone incorporation regulate chromatin structure and genome activity. How these systems interface on a molecular level is unclear. Using biochemistry and NMR spectroscopy, we deduced mechanistic insights into the modification behavior of N-terminal histone H3 tails in different nucleosomal contexts. We find that linker histones generally inhibit modifications of different H3 sites and reduce H3 tail dynamics in nucleosomes. These effects are caused by modulations of electrostatic interactions of H3 tails with linker DNA and largely depend on the C-terminal domains of linker histones. In agreement, linker histone occupancy and H3 tail modifications segregate on a genome-wide level. Charge-modulating modifications such as phosphorylation and acetylation weaken transient H3 tail-linker DNA interactions, increase H3 tail dynamics, and, concomitantly, enhance general modifiability. We propose that alterations of H3 tail-linker DNA interactions by linker histones and charge-modulating modifications execute basal control mechanisms of chromatin function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Vaccination with Leishmania infantum acidic ribosomal P0 but not with nucleosomal histones proteins controls Leishmania infantum infection in hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Lais; Abbehusen, Melissa; Teixeira, Clarissa; Cunha, Jurema; Nascimento, Ivan P; Fukutani, Kyioshi; dos-Santos, Washington; Barral, Aldina; de Oliveira, Camila Indiani; Barral-Netto, Manoel; Soto, Manoel; Brodskyn, Cláudia Ida

    2015-02-01

    Several intracellular Leishmania antigens have been identified in order to find a potential vaccine capable of conferring long lasting protection against Leishmania infection. Histones and Acid Ribosomal proteins are already known to induce an effective immune response and have successfully been tested in the cutaneous leishmaniasis mouse model. Here, we investigate the protective ability of L. infantum nucleosomal histones (HIS) and ribosomal acidic protein P0 (LiP0) against L. infantum infection in the hamster model of visceral leishmaniasis using two different strategies: homologous (plasmid DNA only) or heterologous immunization (plasmid DNA plus recombinant protein and adjuvant). Immunization with both antigens using the heterologous strategy presented a high antibody production level while the homologous strategy immunized group showed predominantly a cellular immune response with parasite load reduction. The pcDNA-LiP0 immunized group showed increased expression ratio of IFN-γ/IL-10 and IFN-γ/TGF-β in the lymph nodes before challenge. Two months after infection hamsters immunized with the empty plasmid presented a pro-inflammatory immune response in the early stages of infection with increased expression ratio of IFN-γ/IL-10 and IFN-γ/TGF-β, whereas hamsters immunized with pcDNA-HIS presented an increase only in the ratio IFN-γ/ TGF-β. On the other hand, hamsters immunized with LiP0 did not present any increase in the IFN-γ/TGF-β and IFN-γ/IL-10 ratio independently of the immunization strategy used. Conversely, five months after infection, hamsters immunized with HIS maintained a pro-inflammatory immune response (ratio IFN-γ/ IL-10) while pcDNA-LiP0 immunized hamsters continued showing a balanced cytokine profile of pro and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Moreover we observed a significant reduction in parasite load in the spleen, liver and lymph node in this group compared with controls. Our results suggest that vaccination with L. infantum LiP0

  4. Computer modeling reveals that modifications of the histone tail charges define salt-dependent interaction of the nucleosome core particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ye; Lyubartsev, Alexander P; Korolev, Nikolay; Nordenskiöld, Lars

    2009-03-18

    Coarse-grained Langevin molecular dynamics computer simulations were conducted for systems that mimic solutions of nucleosome core particles (NCPs). The NCP was modeled as a negatively charged spherical particle representing the complex of DNA and the globular part of the histones combined with attached strings of connected charged beads modeling the histone tails. The size, charge, and distribution of the tails relative to the core were built to match real NCPs. Three models of NCPs were constructed to represent different extents of covalent modification on the histone tails: (nonmodified) recombinant (rNCP), acetylated (aNCP), and acetylated and phosphorylated (paNCP). The simulation cell contained 10 NCPs in a dielectric continuum with explicit mobile counterions and added salt. The NCP-NCP interaction is decisively dependent on the modification state of the histone tails and on salt conditions. Increasing the monovalent salt concentration (KCl) from salt-free to physiological concentration leads to NCP aggregation in solution for rNCP, whereas NCP associates are observed only occasionally in the system of aNCPs. In the presence of divalent salt (Mg(2+)), rNCPs form dense stable aggregates, whereas aNCPs form aggregates less frequently. Aggregates are formed via histone-tail bridging and accumulation of counterions in the regions of NCP-NCP contacts. The paNCPs do not show NCP-NCP interaction upon addition of KCl or in the presence of Mg(2+). Simulations for systems with a gradual substitution of K(+) for Mg(2+), to mimic the Mg(2+) titration of an NCP solution, were performed. The rNCP system showed stronger aggregation that occurred at lower concentrations of added Mg(2+), compared to the aNCP system. Additional molecular dynamics simulations performed with a single NCP in the simulation cell showed that detachment of the tails from the NCP core was modest under a wide range of salt concentrations. This implies that salt-induced tail dissociation of the

  5. Retrograde signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleine, Tatjana; Leister, Dario Michael

    2016-01-01

    The term retrograde signaling refers to the fact that chloroplasts and mitochondria utilize specific signaling molecules to convey information on their developmental and physiological states to the nucleus and modulate the expression of nuclear genes accordingly. Signals emanating from plastids...... of retrograde signaling has since been extended and revised. Elements of several 'operational' signaling circuits have come to light, including metabolites, signaling cascades in the cytosol and transcription factors. Here, we review recent advances in the identification and characterization of retrograde...

  6. Plasma position control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takase, Haruhiko.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To conduct position control stably to various plasmas and reduce the burden on the control coil power source. Constitution: Among the proportional, integration and differentiation controls, a proportional-differentiation control section and an integration control section are connected in parallel. Then, a signal switching circuit is disposed to the control signal input section for the proportional-differentiation control section such that either a present position of plasmas or deviation between the present plasma position and an aimed value can be selected as a control signal depending on the control procedures or the state of the plasmas. For instance, if a rapid response is required for the control, the deviation between the present plasma position and the aimed value is selected as the input signal to conduct proportional, integration and differentiation controls. While on the other hand, if it is intended to reduce the burden on the control coil power source, it is adapted such that the control signal inputted to the proportional-differentiation control section itself can select the present plasma position. (Yoshihara, H.)

  7. Plasma position control method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirahama, Hidefumi; Sakurai, Yoshimi.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To suppress the non-linear relationship between the horizontal position of plasmas and the intensity of the vertical magnetic fields, thereby control the horizontal position of the plasmas stably and at a high speed in a closed loop in a tokamak type thermonuclear device. Method: In a control method for approaching the plasma position to a target position in the tokamak type thermonuclear device, a function circuit having two inputs and one output is disposed in a loop constituting the plasma position control system. The characteristics of the function circuit are so designed as to provide a proportional relationship between the first input and the output, while an inverse proportional relationship between the second input and the output. A detected value for the plasma current is used as a signal for the first input, while the detected value for the plasma position or a operation amount based on the difference with the detected value is used as a signal for the second input. By using the function circuit, it is possible to suppress the non-linear characteristics in the dynamic properties of the plasmas, by which the remarkable change of gains in the plasma position control circuit due to the fluctuations of the plasma current and the position can be prevented. (Ikeda, J.)

  8. Position Information

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Position Information Data Asset provides the ability to search for active SSA position descriptions using various search criteria. An individual may search by PD...

  9. Positioning consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halkier, Bente; Keller, Margit

    2014-01-01

    This article analyses the ways in which media discourses become a part of contested consumption activities. We apply a positioning perspective with practice theory to focus on how practitioners relate to media discourse as a symbolic resource in their everyday practices. A typology of performance...... positionings emerges based on empirical examples of research in parent–children consumption. Positionings are flexible discursive fixations of the relationship between the performances of the practitioner, other practitioners, media discourse and consumption activities. The basic positioning types...

  10. Positive Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Positive psychology is a deliberate correction to the focus of psychology on problems. Positive psychology does not deny the difficulties that people may experience but does suggest that sole attention to disorder leads to an incomplete view of the human condition. Positive psychologists concern themselves with four major topics: (1) positive…

  11. Mobile ultrasonic transducer positioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Omar Khyam

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available For positioning a moving ultrasonic transmitter, most of the existing ultrasonic positioning systems require the use of a bank of correlators to estimate the Doppler shift associated with its movement which require high computational complexity. In this paper, for positioning a moving transmitter, a computationally efficient a Doppler shift estimation and compensation technique is proposed. As the proposed approach has the ability to measure the Doppler shift directly from the received signal, it does not require to use a bank of correlators to estimate the Doppler shift associated with its movement of the transmitter.

  12. Ubiquitous positioning

    CERN Document Server

    Mannings, Robin

    2008-01-01

    This groundbreaking resource offers a practical, in-depth understanding of Ubiquitous Positioning - positioning systems that identify the location and position of people, vehicles and objects in time and space in the digitized networked economy. The future and growth of ubiquitous positioning will be fueled by the convergence of many other areas of technology, from mobile telematics, Internet technology, and location systems, to sensing systems, geographic information systems, and the semantic web. This first-of-its-kind volume explores ubiquitous positioning from a convergence perspective, of

  13. Positioning consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halkier, Bente; Keller, Margit

    2014-01-01

    This article analyses the ways in which media discourses become a part of contested consumption activities. We apply a positioning perspective with practice theory to focus on how practitioners relate to media discourse as a symbolic resource in their everyday practices. A typology of performance...... positionings emerges based on empirical examples of research in parent–children consumption. Positionings are flexible discursive fixations of the relationship between the performances of the practitioner, other practitioners, media discourse and consumption activities. The basic positioning types...... are the practice maintenance and the practice change position, with different sorts of adapting in between. Media discourse can become a resource for a resistant position against social control or for an appropriating position in favour of space for action. Regardless of the current relation to a particular media...

  14. Signal detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tholomier, M.

    1985-01-01

    In a scanning electron microscope, whatever is the measured signal, the same set is found: incident beam, sample, signal detection, signal amplification. The resulting signal is used to control the spot luminosity with the observer cathodoscope. This is synchronized with the beam scanning on the sample; on the cathodoscope, the image in secondary electrons, backscattered electrons,... of the sample surface is reconstituted. The best compromise must be found between a register time low enough to remove eventual variations (under the incident beam) of the nature of the observed phenomenon, and a good spatial resolution of the image and a signal-to-noise ratio high enough. The noise is one of the basic limitations of the scanning electron microscope performance. The whose measurement line must be optimized to reduce it [fr

  15. Phosphoinositide signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boss, Wendy F; Im, Yang Ju

    2012-01-01

    "All things flow and change…even in the stillest matter there is unseen flux and movement." Attributed to Heraclitus (530-470 BC), from The Story of Philosophy by Will Durant. Heraclitus, a Greek philosopher, was thinking on a much larger scale than molecular signaling; however, his visionary comments are an important reminder for those studying signaling today. Even in unstimulated cells, signaling pathways are in constant metabolic flux and provide basal signals that travel throughout the organism. In addition, negatively charged phospholipids, such as the polyphosphorylated inositol phospholipids, provide a circuit board of on/off switches for attracting or repelling proteins that define the membranes of the cell. This template of charged phospholipids is sensitive to discrete changes and metabolic fluxes-e.g., in pH and cations-which contribute to the oscillating signals in the cell. The inherent complexities of a constantly fluctuating system make understanding how plants integrate and process signals challenging. In this review we discuss one aspect of lipid signaling: the inositol family of negatively charged phospholipids and their functions as molecular sensors and regulators of metabolic flux in plants.

  16. Multiscale Signal Analysis and Modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Zayed, Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Multiscale Signal Analysis and Modeling presents recent advances in multiscale analysis and modeling using wavelets and other systems. This book also presents applications in digital signal processing using sampling theory and techniques from various function spaces, filter design, feature extraction and classification, signal and image representation/transmission, coding, nonparametric statistical signal processing, and statistical learning theory. This book also: Discusses recently developed signal modeling techniques, such as the multiscale method for complex time series modeling, multiscale positive density estimations, Bayesian Shrinkage Strategies, and algorithms for data adaptive statistics Introduces new sampling algorithms for multidimensional signal processing Provides comprehensive coverage of wavelets with presentations on waveform design and modeling, wavelet analysis of ECG signals and wavelet filters Reviews features extraction and classification algorithms for multiscale signal and image proce...

  17. Pre-analytical variables of circulating cell-free nucleosomes containing 5-methylcytosine DNA or histone modification H3K9Me3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Louise; Herzog, Marielle; Rømer, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate pre-analytical variables of circulating cell-free nucleosomes containing 5-methylcytosine DNA (5mC) or histone modification H3K9Me3 (H3K9Me3). Materials and methods: Six studies were designed to assess the possible influence of pre-analytical variables. Study 1: influence of stas...... significantly lower levels of 5mC or H3K9Me3 compared to levels in healthy individuals. Conclusion: Levels of 5mC or H3K9Me3 appear stable in most pre-analytical settings if blood samples are stored at room temperature until centrifugation.......3K9Me3 measurements were performed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Results: Stasis, white-cell and platelet contamination, within-day variations, varying storage time before centrifugation, colonoscopy, and surgical trauma had no significant influence on levels of 5mC or H3K9Me3. Day......-to-day variations of 12.7% and 11.5% (intra-individual) and 98.1% and 60.8% (inter-individual) were shown for 5mC and H3K9Me3, respectively. Levels of 5mC or H3K9Me3 were significantly higher in samples stored at room temperature until centrifugation compared to samples stored on ice. Patients with cancer had...

  18. High-mobility group nucleosome-binding domain 2 protein inhibits the invasion of Klebsiella pneumoniae into mouse lungs in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Shuang; Ren, Laibin; Li, Heng; Shen, Xiaofei; Yang, Xiaolong; Li, Na; Wang, Xinyuan; Guo, Xiaojuan; Wang, Xiaoying; Huang, Ning

    2015-07-01

    Since bacterial invasion into host cells is a critical step in the infection process and the predominance of multiple-antibiotic-resistant Klebsiella (K.) pneumoniae strains, using molecular agents to interfere with K. pneumoniae invasion is an attractive approach for the prevention of infection and suppress the immune inflammatory response. In previous studies by our group, high-mobility group nucleosome-binding domain 2 (HMGN2) protein was shown to exhibit anti-bacterial activity in vitro. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of HMGN2 protein on the invasion of K. pneumoniae 03183 in vivo. The results showed that pre-treatment with 128 µg/ml HMGN2 significantly reduced K. pneumoniae 03183 invasion into mouse lungs and increased the mRNA expression of CXCL1 and LCN2 within 2 h. Immunohistochemical staining showed that F-actin expression was significantly decreased, and fluorescence microscopy and western blot analysis further demonstrated that HMGN2 significantly blocked K. pneumoniae 03183-induced actin polymerization. These changes implied that HMGN2 may provide protection against K. pneumoniae 03183 infection in vivo.

  19. Radiographic positioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisenberg, R.L.; Dennis, C.A.; May, C.

    1989-01-01

    This book concentrates on the routine radiographic examinations commonly performed. It details the wide variety of examinations possible and their place in initial learning and in the radiology department as references for those occasions when an unusual examination is requested. This book provides information ranging from basic terminology to skeletal positioning to special procedures. Positions are discussed and supplemented with a picture of a patient, the resulting radiograph, and a labeled diagram. Immobilization and proper shielding of the patient are also shown

  20. [Positive psychiatry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmerby, Nina; Austin, Stephen; Bech, Per

    2016-02-08

    Positive psychiatry (PP) is a field within psychiatry with a particular focus on promoting well-being in people who already have or are at high risk of developing mental or physical illness. PP should be considered a supplement to trad-tional psychiatry and a call for therapists in psychiatry to focus on the person as a whole rather than just as a patient. PP is in line with current national and international health policy focus on promoting positive mental health.

  1. Indoor Positioning System using Bluetooth

    OpenAIRE

    Sahil Puri

    2015-01-01

    This Paper on Bluetooth Indoor Positioning System is the intersection of Bluetooth Technology and Indoor Positioning Systems. Almost every smartphone today is Bluetooth enabled, making the use of the technology more flexible. We aim at using the RSSI value of Bluetooth signals to track the location of a device.

  2. Researcher positioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørck, Line Lerche; Khawaja, Iram

    2009-01-01

    abstract  This article focuses on the complex and multi-layered process of researcher positioning, specifically in relation to the politically sensitive study of marginalised and ‘othered' groups such as Muslims living in Denmark. We discuss the impact of different ethnic, religious and racial...... backgrounds, of membership in a minoritised[i] or majoritised group, and the influence of different theoretical and methodological outlooks on our common goal of trying to transcend existing othering and objectifying representations of Muslims in Western societies. This process sometimes entails a direct...... political and personal involvement by the researcher, which challenges traditional perspectives on research and researcher positioning. A key point in this regard is the importance of constant awareness of and reflection on the multiple ways in which one's positioning as a researcher influences the research...

  3. Positional games

    CERN Document Server

    Hefetz, Dan; Stojaković, Miloš; Szabó, Tibor

    2014-01-01

    This text serves as a thorough introduction to the rapidly developing field of positional games. This area constitutes an important branch of combinatorics, whose aim it is to systematically develop an extensive mathematical basis for a variety of two-player perfect information games. These range from such popular games as Tic-Tac-Toe and Hex to purely abstract games played on graphs and hypergraphs. The subject of positional games is strongly related to several other branches of combinatorics such as Ramsey theory, extremal graph and set theory, and the probabilistic method. These notes cover a variety of topics in positional games, including both classical results and recent important developments. They are presented in an accessible way and are accompanied by exercises of varying difficulty, helping the reader to better understand the theory. The text will benefit both researchers and graduate students in combinatorics and adjacent fields.

  4. Researcher Positioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khawaja, Iram; Mørck, Line Lerche

    2009-01-01

    involvement by the researcher, which challenges traditional perspectives onresearch and researcher positioning. A key point in this regard is the importance ofconstant awareness of and reflection on the multiple ways in which one's positioningas a researcher influences the research process. Studying the other...

  5. Optogenetic control of organelle transport and positioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bergeijk, Petra|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/338805508; Adrian, Max|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/369490959; Hoogenraad, Casper C|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/227263502; Kapitein, Lukas C|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/298806630

    2015-01-01

    Proper positioning of organelles by cytoskeleton-based motor proteins underlies cellular events such as signalling, polarization and growth. For many organelles, however, the precise connection between position and function has remained unclear, because strategies to control intracellular organelle

  6. Position fusion for an outdoor mobile robot

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Burke, Michael G

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Global Positioning Systems (GPS) provide an effective means of outdoor localisation. Unfortunately they are subject to a variety of errors, particularly in cluttered environments where GPS signal is not always available. Whilst GPS positional...

  7. Signal Processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    Signal processing techniques, extensively used nowadays to maximize the performance of audio and video equipment, have been a key part in the design of hardware and software for high energy physics detectors since pioneering applications in the UA1 experiment at CERN in 1979

  8. Friend of GATA (FOG interacts with the nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase complex (NuRD to support primitive erythropoiesis in Xenopus laevis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mizuho S Mimoto

    Full Text Available Friend of GATA (FOG plays many diverse roles in adult and embryonic hematopoiesis, however the mechanisms by which it functions and the roles of potential interaction partners are not completely understood. Previous work has shown that overexpression of FOG in Xenopus laevis causes loss of blood suggesting that in contrast to its role in mammals, FOG might normally function to repress erythropoiesis in this species. Using loss-of-function analysis, we demonstrate that FOG is essential to support primitive red blood cell (RBC development in Xenopus. Moreover, we show that it is specifically required to prevent excess apoptosis of circulating primitive RBCs and that in the absence of FOG, the pro-apoptotic gene Bim-1 is strongly upregulated. To identify domains of FOG that are essential for blood development and, conversely, to begin to understand the mechanism by which overexpressed FOG represses primitive erythropoiesis, we asked whether FOG mutants that are unable to interact with known co-factors retain their ability to rescue blood formation in FOG morphants and whether they repress erythropoiesis when overexpressed in wild type embryos. We find that interaction of FOG with the Nucleosome Remodeling and Deacetylase complex (NuRD, but not with C-terminal Binding Protein, is essential for normal primitive RBC development. In contrast, overexpression of all mutant and wild type constructs causes a comparable repression of primitive erythropoiesis. Together, our data suggest that a requirement for FOG and its interaction with NuRD during primitive erythropoiesis are conserved in Xenopus and that loss of blood upon FOG overexpression is due to a dominant-interfering effect.

  9. Signal processing systems for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, Kazuo.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To carry out the works signal processing, in a nuclear power plant, automatically. Constitution: Neutron flux signal from reactor instruments is inputted into a reactivity meter, and processes in accordance with reactor characteristic equations and, as the result, outputted as a reactivity signal rho. The signal rho, as well as the neutron flux signal and temperature signal are inputted together to a pen recorder and recorded on a record chart. While on the other hand, these signals are inputted into a signal processor, together with a range-switching signal from the reactivity meter and with a control-rod-position signal n from other instrument. In the signal processor, the differentiation and integration values such as Δrho/(n 1 -n 2 ) and ΣΔrho of the control element are conducted automatically. The results are indicated on a graphic display. (J.P.N.)

  10. Digital, electromagnetic rod position indicator with compensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feilchenfeld, M.M.; Geis, C.G.

    1985-01-01

    A digital rod position indicator having discrete coils L 0 , L 1 , L 2 ..... spaced along the travel path of an elongate magnetically permeable member stores in digital form compensation signals for automatically adjusting the location relative to the coils at which a digital output signal representative of the position of the end of the elongate member transitions from one code to the next. The appropriate compensation signal is addressed using the digital output signal and a correction factor which takes into account the direction of movement including reversals. Reference is made to the positioning of the control rods in a pressurized water reactor. (author)

  11. Positioning apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Max A.; Alter, Paul

    1986-01-01

    An apparatus for precisely positioning materials test specimens within the optimum neutron flux path emerging from a neutron source located in a housing. The test specimens are retained in a holder mounted on the free end of a support pivotably mounted and suspended from a movable base plate. The support is gravity biased to urge the holder in a direction longitudinally of the flux path against the housing. Means are provided for moving the base plate in two directions to effect movement of the holder in two mutually perpendicular directions normal to the axis of the flux path.

  12. 47 CFR 76.57 - Channel positioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Channel positioning. 76.57 Section 76.57... CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Carriage of Television Broadcast Signals § 76.57 Channel positioning. (a) At... choice of channel position when it requests carriage. Channel positioning requests from local commercial...

  13. Beam Position Monitor Engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Stephen R.

    1996-07-01

    The design of beam position monitors often involves challenging system design choices. Position transducers must be robust, accurate, and generate adequate position signal without unduly disturbing the beam. Electronics must be reliable and affordable, usually while meeting tough requirements on precision. accuracy, and dynamic range. These requirements may be difficult to achieve simultaneously, leading the designer into interesting opportunities for optimization or compromise. Some useful techniques and tools are shown. Both finite element analysis and analytic techniques will be used to investigate quasi-static aspects of electromagnetic fields such as the impedance of and the coupling of beam to striplines or buttons. Finite-element tools will be used to understand dynamic aspects of the electromagnetic fields of beams, such as wake-fields and transmission-line and cavity effects in vacuum-to-air feed through. Mathematical modeling of electrical signals through a processing chain will be demonstrated, in particular to illuminate areas where neither a pure time-domain nor a pure frequency-domain analysis is obviously advantageous. Emphasis will be on calculational techniques, in particular on using both time-domain and frequency domain approaches to the applicable parts of interesting problems

  14. Comparison of beam-position-transfer functions using circular beam-position monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilpatrick, J.D.

    1997-01-01

    A cylindrical beam-position monitor (BPM) used in many accelerator facilities has four electrodes on which beam-image currents induce bunched-beam signals. These probe-electrode signals are geometrically configured to provide beam-position information about two orthogonal axes. An electronic processor performs a mathematical transfer function (TF) on these BPM-electrode signals to produce output signals whose time-varying amplitude is proportional to the beam's vertical and horizontal position. This paper will compare various beam-position TFs using both pencil beams and will further discuss how diffuse beams interact with some of these TFs

  15. Prosocial Signalling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kahsay, Goytom Abraha

    signalling can cause reverse price reactions resembling the crowding-out of pre-existing motives for prosocial behavior seen in situations of volunteering and charitable giving. Using a unique combination of questionnaire and purchase panel data, it presents evidence of such reputation-driven reverse price...... reactions in the Danish market for organic milk. The second paper proposes a self-image model to account consumers’ behaviour under PWYW. It finds that when a good’s fixed price is lower than an exogenously given threshold fair value, PWYW can lead to a lower utility, which may lead to lower purchase rate...

  16. Serial position learning in honeybees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randolf Menzel

    Full Text Available Learning of stimulus sequences is considered as a characteristic feature of episodic memory since it contains not only a particular item but also the experience of preceding and following events. In sensorimotor tasks resembling navigational performance, the serial order of objects is intimately connected with spatial order. Mammals and birds develop episodic(-like memory in serial spatio-temporal tasks, and the honeybee learns spatio-temporal order when navigating between the nest and a food source. Here I examine the structure of the bees' memory for a combined spatio-temporal task. I ask whether discrimination and generalization are based solely on simple forms of stimulus-reward learning or whether they require sequential configurations. Animals were trained to fly either left or right in a continuous T-maze. The correct choice was signaled by the sequence of colors (blue, yellow at four positions in the access arm. If only one of the possible 4 signals is shown (either blue or yellow, the rank order of position salience is 1, 2 and 3 (numbered from T-junction. No learning is found if the signal appears at position 4. If two signals are shown, differences at positions 1 and 2 are learned best, those at position 3 at a low level, and those at position 4 not at all. If three or more signals are shown these results are corroborated. This salience rank order again appeared in transfer tests, but additional configural phenomena emerged. Most of the results can be explained with a simple model based on the assumption that the four positions are equipped with different salience scores and that these add up independently. However, deviations from the model are interpreted by assuming stimulus configuration of sequential patterns. It is concluded that, under the conditions chosen, bees rely most strongly on memories developed during simple forms of associative reward learning, but memories of configural serial patterns contribute, too.

  17. 49 CFR 236.21 - Location of roadway signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Location of roadway signals. 236.21 Section 236.21...: All Systems Roadway Signals and Cab Signals § 236.21 Location of roadway signals. Each roadway signal shall be positioned and aligned so that its aspects can be clearly associated with the track it governs...

  18. WE-E-BRE-11: New Method to Simulate DNA Damage Using Ionization Cross-Sections and a Geometrical Nucleosome Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pater, P; Seuntjens, J; El Naqa, I

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain probability distributions of various DNA damage types as a function of the incident electron kinetic energy. Methods: Using Geant4-DNA electron ionization cross-sections, we calculated path length distributions for electrons of energies between 10 eV and 1 MeV, defined as the length between two subsequent interactions. These path lengths were then convolved with probability distributions for the creation of same-strand damage, opposite-strand damage, clustered damage, isolated damage, and same DNA strand target damage. These probability distributions of DNA damage were obtained by a Monte Carlo routine calculating probabilities of interaction in DNA targets inside a nucleosome geometrical model. Results represent the probability of a secondary electron, initially created inside a DNA strand target, of undergoing its next interaction: (1) in the opposite strand (DSB), (2) in the same strand (SSB+), (3) in either the opposite or same-strand (clustered), (4) in the same DNA target (multiple-hit) or (5) more than 10 base pairs away (isolated). Results: Electrons with kinetic energy between 50 and 250 eV have a maximal probability of creating DSB, SSB+, clustered damage and multiple-hits in the same target The probabilities for these damage patterns have values of 2.5%, 4.3%, 6.7% and 5.4%, respectively. Isolated damage is most probable between 700 eV to 900 eV with a probability of 0.2%. Conclusion: We obtained DNA damage probability distributions as a function of electron incident energy. We showed that electrons with kinetic energies between 50 and 250 eV have the highest probability of producing complex forms of DNA damage (DSB, SSB+). We also showed that a double ionization within the same DNA target is the most frequent outcome occurring 5% of the time. It is expected that electron slowing down spectra can be convolved with our formalism to calculate source specific DNA damage patterns. Research grants from governments of Canada and Quebec. PP

  19. Signal processing for radiation detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Nakhostin, Mohammad

    2018-01-01

    This book provides a clear understanding of the principles of signal processing of radiation detectors. It puts great emphasis on the characteristics of pulses from various types of detectors and offers a full overview on the basic concepts required to understand detector signal processing systems and pulse processing techniques. Signal Processing for Radiation Detectors covers all of the important aspects of signal processing, including energy spectroscopy, timing measurements, position-sensing, pulse-shape discrimination, and radiation intensity measurement. The book encompasses a wide range of applications so that readers from different disciplines can benefit from all of the information. In addition, this resource: * Describes both analog and digital techniques of signal processing * Presents a complete compilation of digital pulse processing algorithms * Extrapolates content from more than 700 references covering classic papers as well as those of today * Demonstrates concepts with more than 340 origin...

  20. GNSS Positioning - Status and Features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lemmens, M.

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays, GNSS receivers have scores – and often more than one hundred – of channels, enabling them to track GPS, Glonass, Galileo and Compass signals simultaneously. The whole workfl ow from satellite tracking to calculating the coordinates of the position in a preferred reference system can be

  1. Specific-detection of clinical samples, systematic functional investigations, and transcriptome analysis reveals that splice variant MUC4/Y contributes to the malignant progression of pancreatic cancer by triggering malignancy-related positive feedback loops signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yi; Zhang, Jing-Jing; Xie, Kun-Ling; Tang, Jie; Liang, Wen-Biao; Zhu, Rong; Zhu, Yan; Wang, Bin; Tao, Jin-Qiu; Zhi, Xiao-Fei; Li, Zheng; Gao, Wen-Tao; Jiang, Kui-Rong; Miao, Yi; Xu, Ze-Kuan

    2014-11-04

    MUC4 plays important roles in the malignant progression of human pancreatic cancer. But the huge length of MUC4 gene fragment restricts its functional and mechanism research. As one of its splice variants, MUC4/Y with coding sequence is most similar to that of the full-length MUC4 (FL-MUC4), together with alternative splicing of the MUC4 transcript has been observed in pancreatic carcinomas but not in normal pancreas. So we speculated that MUC4/Y might be involved in malignant progression similarly to FL-MUC4, and as a research model of MUC4 in pancreatic cancer. The conjecture was confirmed in the present study. MUC4/Y expression was detected by real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) using gene-specific probe in the clinic samples. The effects of MUC4/Y were observed by serial in vitro and in vivo experiments based on stable over-expressed cell model. The underlying mechanisms were investigated by sequence-based transcriptome analysis and verified by qRT-PCR, Western blot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. The detection of clinical samples indicates that MUC4/Y is significantly positive-correlated with tumor invasion and distant metastases. Based on stable forced-expressed pancreatic cancer PANC-1 cell model, functional studies show that MUC4/Y enhances malignant activity in vitro and in vivo, including proliferation under low-nutritional-pressure, resistance to apoptosis, motility, invasiveness, angiogenesis, and distant metastasis. Mechanism studies indicate the novel finding that MUC4/Y triggers malignancy-related positive feedback loops for concomitantly up-regulating the expression of survival factors to resist adverse microenvironment and increasing the expression of an array of cytokines and adhesion molecules to affect the tumor milieu. In light of the enormity of the potential regulatory circuitry in cancer afforded by MUC4 and/or MUC4/Y, repressing MUC4 transcription, inhibiting post

  2. Terminality implies non-signalling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bob Coecke

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A 'process theory' is any theory of systems and processes which admits sequential and parallel composition. `Terminality' unifies normalisation of pure states, trace-preservation of CP-maps, and adding up to identity of positive operators in quantum theory, and generalises this to arbitrary process theories. We show that terminality and non-signalling coincide in any process theory, provided one makes causal structure explicit. In fact, making causal structure explicit is necessary to even make sense of non-signalling in process theories. We conclude that because of its much simpler mathematical form, terminality should be taken to be a more fundamental notion than non-signalling.

  3. Global Positioning System wide area augmentation system (WAAS) performance standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-31

    The U.S. Global Positioning System (GPS) Standard Positioning Service (SPS) consists of spacebased : positioning, navigation, and timing (PNT) signals generated from space vehicles orbiting the : earth and delivered free of direct user fees for civil...

  4. Prediction of twin-arginine signal peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Jannick Dyrløv; Nielsen, Henrik; Widdick, D.

    2005-01-01

    a publicly available method, TatP, for prediction of bacterial Tat signal peptides. Results: We have retrieved sequence data for Tat substrates in order to train a computational method for discrimination of Sec and Tat signal peptides. The TatP method is able to positively classify 91% of 35 known Tat signal...... peptides and 84% of the annotated cleavage sites of these Tat signal peptides were correctly predicted. This method generates far less false positive predictions on various datasets than using simple pattern matching. Moreover, on the same datasets TatP generates less false positive predictions than...... expressions, whereas hydrophobicity discrimination of Tat- and Sec- signal peptides is carried out by an artificial neural network. A potential cleavage site of the predicted Tat signal peptide is also reported. The TatP prediction server is available as a public web server at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/TatP/....

  5. Position reconstruction in LUX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akerib, D. S.; Alsum, S.; Araújo, H. M.; Bai, X.; Bailey, A. J.; Balajthy, J.; Beltrame, P.; Bernard, E. P.; Bernstein, A.; Biesiadzinski, T. P.; Boulton, E. M.; Brás, P.; Byram, D.; Cahn, S. B.; Carmona-Benitez, M. C.; Chan, C.; Currie, A.; Cutter, J. E.; Davison, T. J. R.; Dobi, A.; Druszkiewicz, E.; Edwards, B. N.; Fallon, S. R.; Fan, A.; Fiorucci, S.; Gaitskell, R. J.; Genovesi, J.; Ghag, C.; Gilchriese, M. G. D.; Hall, C. R.; Hanhardt, M.; Haselschwardt, S. J.; Hertel, S. A.; Hogan, D. P.; Horn, M.; Huang, D. Q.; Ignarra, C. M.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Ji, W.; Kamdin, K.; Kazkaz, K.; Khaitan, D.; Knoche, R.; Larsen, N. A.; Lenardo, B. G.; Lesko, K. T.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, M. I.; Manalaysay, A.; Mannino, R. L.; Marzioni, M. F.; McKinsey, D. N.; Mei, D.-M.; Mock, J.; Moongweluwan, M.; Morad, J. A.; Murphy, A. St. J.; Nehrkorn, C.; Nelson, H. N.; Neves, F.; O'Sullivan, K.; Oliver-Mallory, K. C.; Palladino, K. J.; Pease, E. K.; Rhyne, C.; Shaw, S.; Shutt, T. A.; Silva, C.; Solmaz, M.; Solovov, V. N.; Sorensen, P.; Sumner, T. J.; Szydagis, M.; Taylor, D. J.; Taylor, W. C.; Tennyson, B. P.; Terman, P. A.; Tiedt, D. R.; To, W. H.; Tripathi, M.; Tvrznikova, L.; Uvarov, S.; Velan, V.; Verbus, J. R.; Webb, R. C.; White, J. T.; Whitis, T. J.; Witherell, M. S.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Xu, J.; Yazdani, K.; Young, S. K.; Zhang, C.

    2018-02-01

    The (x, y) position reconstruction method used in the analysis of the complete exposure of the Large Underground Xenon (LUX) experiment is presented. The algorithm is based on a statistical test that makes use of an iterative method to recover the photomultiplier tube (PMT) light response directly from the calibration data. The light response functions make use of a two dimensional functional form to account for the photons reflected on the inner walls of the detector. To increase the resolution for small pulses, a photon counting technique was employed to describe the response of the PMTs. The reconstruction was assessed with calibration data including 83mKr (releasing a total energy of 41.5 keV) and 3H (β- with Q = 18.6 keV) decays, and a deuterium-deuterium (D-D) neutron beam (2.45 MeV) . Within the detector's fiducial volume, the reconstruction has achieved an (x, y) position uncertainty of σ = 0.82 cm and σ = 0.17 cm for events of only 200 and 4,000 detected electroluminescence photons respectively. Such signals are associated with electron recoils of energies ~0.25 keV and ~10 keV, respectively. The reconstructed position of the smallest events with a single electron emitted from the liquid surface (22 detected photons) has a horizontal (x, y) uncertainty of 2.13 cm.

  6. DELTA beam position monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brinker, S.; Heisterhagen, R.; Wille, K.

    1991-01-01

    For the electron storage ring DELTA (Dortmund ELectron Test Accelerator) a beam-position-monitor system based on button pickups has been designed. Two different concepts for the monitor electronics have been developed obtaining a long-term stability better than ± 150 μm and a short-term resolution below ± 10 μm. There are no hybrids integrated in the electronic circuits as all four button signals should be amplified and digitized to provide redundancy. First, a concept using four separated electronic branches, one for each button, was tested. Then a concept with a multiplexer in front followed by only one amplifier was designed. This concept, the electronic circuits and the measurements are presented

  7. The Global Positioning System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    1999-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) is a constellation of navigation satellites called Navigation Satellite Timing And Ranging (NAVSTAR), maintained by the U.S. Department of Defense. Many outdoor enthusiasts recognize that a handheld GPS receiver can be an accurate tool for determining their location on the terrain. The GPS receiver helps determine locations on the Earth's surface by collecting signals from three or more satellites through a process called triangulation. Identifying a location on the Earth is more useful if you also know about the surrounding topographic conditions. Using a topographic map with the GPS receiver provides important information about features of the surrounding terrain and can help you plot an effective route from one location to another.

  8. The Positive Side of Negative Labelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, van Y.K.; Jonge, de J.

    2015-01-01

    Ethical labels signal positive ethical quality of a product but fail to create massive demand for such products. Based on regulatory focus theory and prospect theory, it is argued that negative signalling of low ethical quality would have a stronger effect on the adoption of ethical products than

  9. Benign positional vertigo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertigo - positional; Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo; BPPV: dizziness- positional ... Benign positional vertigo is also called benign paroxysmal ... ear has fluid-filled tubes called semicircular canals. When you ...

  10. Digital Signal Processing Based Biotelemetry Receivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Avtar; Hines, John; Somps, Chris

    1997-01-01

    This is an attempt to develop a biotelemetry receiver using digital signal processing technology and techniques. The receiver developed in this work is based on recovering signals that have been encoded using either Pulse Position Modulation (PPM) or Pulse Code Modulation (PCM) technique. A prototype has been developed using state-of-the-art digital signal processing technology. A Printed Circuit Board (PCB) is being developed based on the technique and technology described here. This board is intended to be used in the UCSF Fetal Monitoring system developed at NASA. The board is capable of handling a variety of PPM and PCM signals encoding signals such as ECG, temperature, and pressure. A signal processing program has also been developed to analyze the received ECG signal to determine heart rate. This system provides a base for using digital signal processing in biotelemetry receivers and other similar applications.

  11. Prediction of twin-arginine signal peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widdick David

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteins carrying twin-arginine (Tat signal peptides are exported into the periplasmic compartment or extracellular environment independently of the classical Sec-dependent translocation pathway. To complement other methods for classical signal peptide prediction we here present a publicly available method, TatP, for prediction of bacterial Tat signal peptides. Results We have retrieved sequence data for Tat substrates in order to train a computational method for discrimination of Sec and Tat signal peptides. The TatP method is able to positively classify 91% of 35 known Tat signal peptides and 84% of the annotated cleavage sites of these Tat signal peptides were correctly predicted. This method generates far less false positive predictions on various datasets than using simple pattern matching. Moreover, on the same datasets TatP generates less false positive predictions than a complementary rule based prediction method. Conclusion The method developed here is able to discriminate Tat signal peptides from cytoplasmic proteins carrying a similar motif, as well as from Sec signal peptides, with high accuracy. The method allows filtering of input sequences based on Perl syntax regular expressions, whereas hydrophobicity discrimination of Tat- and Sec-signal peptides is carried out by an artificial neural network. A potential cleavage site of the predicted Tat signal peptide is also reported. The TatP prediction server is available as a public web server at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/TatP/.

  12. Studies Of Positive-Position-Feedback Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanson, James L.; Caughey, Thomas K.

    1992-01-01

    Report discusses theoretical and experimental studies of positive-position-feedback control for suppressing vibrations in large flexible structures. Positive-position-feedback control involves placement of actuators and sensors on structure; control voltages applied to actuators in response to outputs of sensors processed via compensator algorithm. Experiments demonstrate feasibility of suppressing vibrations by positive position feedback, and spillover of vibrational energy into uncontrolled modes has stabilizing effect if control gain sufficiently small.

  13. Positive and Negative Signals in Mast Cell Activation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bulfone-Paus, S.; Nilsson, G.; Dráber, Petr; Blank, U.; Levi-Schaffer, F.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 38, č. 9 (2017), s. 657-667 ISSN 1471-4906 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : fc-epsilon-ri * receptor irp60 cd300a * inhibitory receptor * inflammatory responses * allergic reactions * tetraspanin cd9 * human basophils * ige repertoire * host-defense * in-vitro Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Immunology Impact factor: 13.287, year: 2016

  14. Tevatron Beam Position Monitor Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Wolbers, Stephen; Barker, B; Bledsoe, S; Boes, T; Bowden, Mark; Cancelo, Gugstavo I; Dürling, G; Forster, B; Haynes, B; Hendricks, B; Kasza, T; Kutschke, Robert K; Mahlum, R; Martens, Michael A; Mengel, M; Olsen, M; Pavlicek, V; Pham, T; Piccoli, Luciano; Steimel, Jim; Treptow, K; Votava, Margaret; Webber, Robert C; West, B; Zhang, D

    2005-01-01

    The Tevatron Beam Position Monitor (BPM) readout electronics and software have been upgraded to improve measurement precision, functionality and reliability. The original system, designed and built in the early 1980s, became inadequate for current and future operations of the Tevatron. The upgraded system consists of 960 channels of new electronics to process analog signals from 240 BPMs, new front-end software, new online and controls software, and modified applications to take advantage of the improved measurements and support the new functionality. The new system reads signals from both ends of the existing directional stripline pickups to provide simultaneous proton and antiproton position measurements. Measurements using the new system are presented that demonstrate its improved resolution and overall performance.

  15. Digital Signal Processor For GPS Receivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, J. B.; Meehan, T. K.; Srinivasan, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Three innovative components combined to produce all-digital signal processor with superior characteristics: outstanding accuracy, high-dynamics tracking, versatile integration times, lower loss-of-lock signal strengths, and infrequent cycle slips. Three components are digital chip advancer, digital carrier downconverter and code correlator, and digital tracking processor. All-digital signal processor intended for use in receivers of Global Positioning System (GPS) for geodesy, geodynamics, high-dynamics tracking, and ionospheric calibration.

  16. Basic digital signal processing

    CERN Document Server

    Lockhart, Gordon B

    1985-01-01

    Basic Digital Signal Processing describes the principles of digital signal processing and experiments with BASIC programs involving the fast Fourier theorem (FFT). The book reviews the fundamentals of the BASIC program, continuous and discrete time signals including analog signals, Fourier analysis, discrete Fourier transform, signal energy, power. The text also explains digital signal processing involving digital filters, linear time-variant systems, discrete time unit impulse, discrete-time convolution, and the alternative structure for second order infinite impulse response (IIR) sections.

  17. Hedgehog signaling in neonatal and adult lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li; Kugler, Matthias C; Loomis, Cynthia A; Samdani, Rashmi; Zhao, Zhicheng; Chen, Gregory J; Brandt, Julia P; Brownell, Isaac; Joyner, Alexandra L; Rom, William N; Munger, John S

    2013-06-01

    Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) signaling is essential during embryonic lung development, but its role in postnatal lung development and adult lung are not known. Using Gli1(nlacZ) reporter mice to identify cells with active Hh signaling, we found that Gli1(nlacZ)-positive mesenchymal cells are densely and diffusely present up to 2 weeks after birth and decline in number thereafter. In adult mice, Gli1(nlacZ)-positive cells are present around large airways and vessels and are sparse in alveolar septa. Hh-stimulated cells are mostly fibroblasts; only 10% of Gli1(nlacZ)-positive cells are smooth muscle cells, and most smooth muscle cells do not have activation of Hh signaling. To assess its functional relevance, we influenced Hh signaling in the developing postnatal lung and adult injured lung. Inhibition of Hh signaling during early postnatal lung development causes airspace enlargement without diminished alveolar septation. After bleomycin injury in the adult lung, there are abundant Gli1(nlacZ)-positive mesenchymal cells in fibrotic lesions and increased numbers of Gli1(nlacZ)-positive cells in preserved alveolar septa. Inhibition of Hh signaling with an antibody against all Hedgehog isoforms does not reduce bleomycin-induced fibrosis, but adenovirus-mediated overexpression of Shh increases collagen production in this model. Our data provide strong evidence that Hh signaling can regulate lung stromal cell function in two critical scenarios: normal development in postnatal lung and lung fibrosis in adult lung.

  18. 75 FR 59108 - Positive Train Control Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-27

    ...-0132, Notice No. 4] RIN 2130-AC03 Positive Train Control Systems AGENCY: Federal Railroad... amendments to the final rule regarding the development, testing, implementation, and use of Positive Train... Compliance, Staff Director, Signal & Train Control Division, Federal Railroad Administration, Mail Stop 25...

  19. 76 FR 63899 - Positive Train Control Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-14

    ...-0028, Notice No. 2] RIN 2130-AC27 Positive Train Control Systems AGENCY: Federal Railroad...-based criteria in order to avoid positive train control (PTC) system implementation on track segments... and Compliance, Staff Director, Signal & Train Control Division, Federal Railroad Administration, Mail...

  20. Variability in Chromatin Architecture and Associated DNA Repair at Genomic Positions Containing Somatic Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Byungho; Mun, Jihyeob; Kim, Yong Sung; Kim, Seon-Young

    2017-06-01

    Dynamic chromatin structures result in differential chemical reactivity to mutational processes throughout the genome. To identify chromatin features responsible for mutagenesis, we compared chromatin architecture around single-nucleotide variants (SNV), insertion/deletions (indels), and their context-matched, nonmutated positions. We found epigenetic differences between genomic regions containing missense SNVs and those containing frameshift indels across multiple cancer types. Levels of active histone marks were higher around frameshift indels than around missense SNV, whereas repressive histone marks exhibited the reverse trend. Accumulation of repressive histone marks and nucleosomes distinguished mutated positions (both SNV and indels) from the context-matched, nonmutated positions, whereas active marks were associated with substitution- and cancer type-specific mutagenesis. We also explained mutagenesis based on genome maintenance mechanisms, including nucleotide excision repair (NER), mismatch repair (MMR), and DNA polymerase epsilon (POLE). Regional NER variation correlated strongly with chromatin features; NER machineries exhibited shifted or depleted binding around SNV, resulting in decreased NER at mutation positions, especially at sites of recurrent mutations. MMR-deficient tumors selectively acquired SNV in regions with high active histone marks, especially H3K36me3, whereas POLE-deficient tumors selectively acquired indels and SNV in regions with low active histone marks. These findings demonstrate the importance of fine-scaled chromatin structures and associated DNA repair mechanisms in mutagenesis. Cancer Res; 77(11); 2822-33. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  1. Signal Processing and Restoration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biemond, J.; Slump, C.H.; Lagendijk, R.L.; Tolhuizen, L.M.G.M.; de With, P.H.N.

    2004-01-01

    Digital Signal Processing (DSP) concerns the theoretical and practical aspects of representing information-bearing signals in digital form and the use of processors or special purpose hardware to extract that information or to transform the signals in useful ways. Areas where digital signal

  2. Retroactive signaling in short signaling pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques-Alexandre Sepulchre

    Full Text Available In biochemical signaling pathways without explicit feedback connections, the core signal transduction is usually described as a one-way communication, going from upstream to downstream in a feedforward chain or network of covalent modification cycles. In this paper we explore the possibility of a new type of signaling called retroactive signaling, offered by the recently demonstrated property of retroactivity in signaling cascades. The possibility of retroactive signaling is analysed in the simplest case of the stationary states of a bicyclic cascade of signaling cycles. In this case, we work out the conditions for which variables of the upstream cycle are affected by a change of the total amount of protein in the downstream cycle, or by a variation of the phosphatase deactivating the same protein. Particularly, we predict the characteristic ranges of the downstream protein, or of the downstream phosphatase, for which a retroactive effect can be observed on the upstream cycle variables. Next, we extend the possibility of retroactive signaling in short but nonlinear signaling pathways involving a few covalent modification cycles.

  3. Signal verification can promote reliable signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broom, Mark; Ruxton, Graeme D; Schaefer, H Martin

    2013-11-22

    The central question in communication theory is whether communication is reliable, and if so, which mechanisms select for reliability. The primary approach in the past has been to attribute reliability to strategic costs associated with signalling as predicted by the handicap principle. Yet, reliability can arise through other mechanisms, such as signal verification; but the theoretical understanding of such mechanisms has received relatively little attention. Here, we model whether verification can lead to reliability in repeated interactions that typically characterize mutualisms. Specifically, we model whether fruit consumers that discriminate among poor- and good-quality fruits within a population can select for reliable fruit signals. In our model, plants either signal or they do not; costs associated with signalling are fixed and independent of plant quality. We find parameter combinations where discriminating fruit consumers can select for signal reliability by abandoning unprofitable plants more quickly. This self-serving behaviour imposes costs upon plants as a by-product, rendering it unprofitable for unrewarding plants to signal. Thus, strategic costs to signalling are not a prerequisite for reliable communication. We expect verification to more generally explain signal reliability in repeated consumer-resource interactions that typify mutualisms but also in antagonistic interactions such as mimicry and aposematism.

  4. Position automatic determination technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-10-01

    This book tells of method of position determination and characteristic, control method of position determination and point of design, point of sensor choice for position detector, position determination of digital control system, application of clutch break in high frequency position determination, automation technique of position determination, position determination by electromagnetic clutch and break, air cylinder, cam and solenoid, stop position control of automatic guide vehicle, stacker crane and automatic transfer control.

  5. In vivo dose estimations through transit signal measured with thimble chamber positioned along the central axis at electronic portal imaging device level in medical linear accelerator in carcinoma of the middle-third esophagus patients undergoing three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Putha Suman; Banerjee, S; Arun Kumar, E S; Srinivas, Challapalli; Vadhiraja, B M; Saxena, P U; Ravichandran, Ramamoorthy; Kasturi, Dinesh Pai

    2018-01-01

    This study presents a method to estimate midplane dose (D iso, transit ) in vivo from transit signal (S t ) measured with thimble ionization chamber in cancer of the middle-third esophagus patients treated with three-dimensional radiotherapy (RT). This detector is positioned at the level of electronic portal imaging device in the gantry of a medical linear accelerator. Efficacy of inhomogeneity corrections of three dose calculation algorithms available in XiO treatment planning system (TPS) for planned dose (for open fields) (D iso, TPS ) was studied with three heterogeneous phantoms. D iso, transit represents measured signal at transit point (S t ) far away correlating to dose at isocenter. A locally fabricated thorax phantom was used to measure the in vivo midplane dose (D iso, mid ) which was also estimated through S t . Thirteen patients with carcinoma of the middle-third esophagus treated with three-dimensional conformal RT were studied. S t was recorded (three times, with a gap of 5-6 fractions during the treatment) to estimate D iso, transit , which was compared with the doses calculated by TPS. The dose predictions by superposition algorithm were superior compared to the other algorithms. Percentage deviation of D iso, transit , D iso, mid with D iso, TPS combined all fields was 2.7 and -2.6%, respectively, with the thorax phantom. The mean percentage deviation with standard deviation of estimated D iso, transit with D iso, TPS observed in patients was within standard deviation -0.73% ±2.09% (n = 39). Midplane dose estimates in vivo using this method provide accurate determination of delivered dose in the middle-third esophagus RT treatments. This method could be useful in similar clinical circumstances for dose confirmation and documentation.

  6. Computing angle of arrival of radio signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchardt, John J.; Steele, David K.

    2017-11-07

    Various technologies pertaining to computing angle of arrival of radio signals are described. A system that is configured for computing the angle of arrival of a radio signal includes a cylindrical sheath wrapped around a cylindrical object, where the cylindrical sheath acts as a ground plane. The system further includes a plurality of antennas that are positioned about an exterior surface of the cylindrical sheath, and receivers respectively coupled to the antennas. The receivers output measurements pertaining to the radio signal. A processing circuit receives the measurements and computes the angle of arrival of the radio signal based upon the measurements.

  7. Voting as a Signaling Device

    OpenAIRE

    R. Emre Aytimur; Aristotelis Boukouras; Robert Schwager

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, citizens vote in order to influence the election outcome and in order to signal their unobserved characteristics to others. The model is one of rational voting and generates the following predictions: (i) The paradox of not voting does not arise, because the benefit of voting does not vanish with population size. (ii) Turnout in elections is positively related to the size of the local community and the importance of social interactions. (iii) Voting may exhibit bandwagon effect...

  8. Terminality implies non-signalling

    OpenAIRE

    Coecke, Bob

    2014-01-01

    A 'process theory' is any theory of systems and processes which admits sequential and parallel composition. `Terminality' unifies normalisation of pure states, trace-preservation of CP-maps, and adding up to identity of positive operators in quantum theory, and generalises this to arbitrary process theories. We show that terminality and non-signalling coincide in any process theory, provided one makes causal structure explicit. In fact, making causal structure explicit is necessary to even ma...

  9. BOC(n,n) signal multipath mitigation using MEDLL technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xuan; Zhang, Yanmei; Su, Lianqing; Guo, Haichao

    2015-11-01

    For satellite navigation and positioning receivers are susceptible to the influence of the multipath, this paper used multipath estimating delay lock loop (MEDLL) technology for BOC (n, n) multipath signal tracking. Through the analysis of multipath signal model, it is concluded that all the multipath signal can be expressed by its amplitude, phase and delay. Then in odor to get the accurate direct signal, this paper applied MEDLL algorithm to estimate the received signal. Finally, the simulation show that this algorithm can realize multipath signal track demodulation and accurate data demodulation under a low signal noise ratio environment (SNR= -20db).

  10. Method for acoustic signal detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blalock, S.E.

    1980-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a method and apparatus for acoustic signal detection, adapted for use in acoustic velocity well logging to measure the difference in transit times of an acoustic signal between a transmitter and two or more receivers. In a preferred embodiment of the present invention two timing measurements of the signal arriving at each of two receivers may be made by activating zero crossing detectors at the arrival of the first negative and first positive half-cycles at each receiver. A transit time is calculated from the zero crossing times following the first negative half-cycle. This first transit time may be checked for accuracy by comparing the first transit time with a second transit time calculated from zero crossing times following the first positive half-cycles, by comparing the first transit time to a previously measured transit time and/or by detecting the order of arrival of the negative and positive half-cycles to determine whether the half-cycles have been detected out of sequence at either receiver. Should the first transit time be determined to be inaccurate, the previously measured transit time or the second transit time may be substituted therefor

  11. Design and properties of position-sensitive proportional counters using resistance--capacitance position encoding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borkowski, C.J.; Kopp, M.K.

    1975-01-01

    The construction and signal processing methods of several experimental gas-filled, position-sensitive proportional counters (PSPCs) using resistance--capacitance (RC) position encoding are described, and guidelines for the design and operation of these counters are given. Using these guidelines, we were able to improve the spatial resolution and shorten the signal processing time; for example, the intrinsic spatial uncertainty in the position measurement was reduced to 28 μ FWHM for alpha particles and 100 μ FWHM for low-energy x rays (2--6 keV). Also, the signal processing time was reduced to 0.6 μsec without seriously degrading the spatial resolution. These results have widened the field of application of the RC position encoding method for position measurements of low-energy photons, neutrons, and charged particles in a wide variety of nuclear physics experiments, in nuclear medicine imaging, and in low-dose, medium-resolution radiography. (AIP)

  12. Angular Positioning Sensor for Space Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Nicolas; Chapuis, Dominique

    2013-09-01

    Angular position sensors are used on various rotating mechanisms such as solar array drive mechanisms, antenna pointing mechanisms, scientific instruments, motors or actuators.Now a days, potentiometers and encoders are mainly used for angular measurement purposes. Both of them have their own pros and cons.As alternative, Ruag Space Switzerland Nyon (RSSN) is developing and qualifying two innovative technologies of angular position sensors which offer easy implementation, medium to very high lifetime and high flexibility with regards to the output signal shape/type.The Brushed angular position sensor uses space qualified processes which are already flying on RSSN's sliprings for many years. A large variety of output signal shape can be implemented to fulfill customer requirements (digital, analog, customized, etc.).The contactless angular position sensor consists in a new radiation hard Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) based on the Hall effect and providing the angular position without complex processing algorithm.

  13. Self-calibrating solar position sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxey, Lonnie Curt

    2018-01-30

    A sun positioning sensor and method of accurately tracking the sun are disclosed. The sensor includes a position sensing diode and a disk having a body defining an aperture for accepting solar light. An extension tube having a body that defines a duct spaces the position sensing diode from the disk such that the solar light enters the aperture in the disk, travels through the duct in the extension tube and strikes the position sensing diode. The extension tube has a known length that is fixed. Voltage signals indicative of the location and intensity of the sun are generated by the position sensing diode. If it is determined that the intensity values are unreliable, then historical position values are used from a table. If the intensity values are deemed reliable, then actual position values are used from the position sensing diode.

  14. Control rod position detection device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akita, Haruo; Ogiwara, Sakae.

    1996-01-01

    The device of the present invention is used in a back-up shut down system of an LMFBR type reactor which is easy for maintenance, has high reliability and can recognize the position of control rods accurately. Namely, a permanent magnet is disposed to a control rod extension tube connected to the lower portion of the control rod. The detector guide tube is disposed in the vicinity of the control rod extension tube. A detector having a detection coil is inserted into a detector tube. With such constitution, the control rod can be detected at one position using the following method. (1) the movement of the magnetic field of the permanent magnet is detected by the detection coil. (2) a plurality of grooves are formed on the control rod extension tube, and the movement of the grooves is detected. In addition, the detection coil is inserted into the detector guide tube, and the signals from the detection coil are inputted to a signal processing circuit disposed at the outside of the reactor vessel using an MI cable to enable the maintenance of the detector. Further, if the detector comprises a detection coil and an excitation coil, the position of a dropped control rod can be recognized at a plurality of points. (I.S.)

  15. Positive Education: Positive Psychology and Classroom Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligman, Martin E. P.; Ernst, Randal M.; Gillham, Jane; Reivich, Karen; Linkins, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Positive education is defined as education for both traditional skills and for happiness. The high prevalence worldwide of depression among young people, the small rise in life satisfaction, and the synergy between learning and positive emotion all argue that the skills for happiness should be taught in school. There is substantial evidence from…

  16. Want Positive Behavior? Use Positive Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Chip; Freeman-Loftis, Babs

    2012-01-01

    Positive adult language is the professional use of words and tone of voice to enable students to learn in an engaged, active way. This includes learning social skills. To guide children toward choosing and maintaining positive behaviors, adults need to carefully choose the words and tone of voice used when speaking to them. Learning to use…

  17. Signal sciences workshop. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Candy, J.V.

    1997-01-01

    This meeting is aimed primarily at signal processing and controls. The technical program for the 1997 Workshop includes a variety of efforts in the Signal Sciences with applications in the Microtechnology Area a new program at LLNL and a future area of application for both Signal/Image Sciences. Special sessions organized by various individuals in Seismic and Optical Signal Processing as well as Micro-Impulse Radar Processing highlight the program, while the speakers at the Signal Processing Applications session discuss various applications of signal processing/control to real world problems. For the more theoretical, a session on Signal Processing Algorithms was organized as well as for the more pragmatic, featuring a session on Real-Time Signal Processing

  18. Traffic signal timing manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    This report serves as a comprehensive guide to traffic signal timing and documents the tasks completed in association with its development. The focus of this document is on traffic signal control principles, practices, and procedures. It describes th...

  19. Signal sciences workshop proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candy, J.V.

    1997-05-01

    This meeting is aimed primarily at signal processing and controls. The technical program for the 1997 Workshop includes a variety of efforts in the Signal Sciences with applications in the Microtechnology Area a new program at LLNL and a future area of application for both Signal/Image Sciences. Special sessions organized by various individuals in Seismic and Optical Signal Processing as well as Micro-Impulse Radar Processing highlight the program, while the speakers at the Signal Processing Applications session discuss various applications of signal processing/control to real world problems. For the more theoretical, a session on Signal Processing Algorithms was organized as well as for the more pragmatic, featuring a session on Real-Time Signal Processing.

  20. Signal processing for distributed readout using TESs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Stephen J.; Whitford, Chris H.; Fraser, George W.

    2006-01-01

    We describe optimal filtering algorithms for determining energy and position resolution in position-sensitive Transition Edge Sensor (TES) Distributed Read-Out Imaging Devices (DROIDs). Improved algorithms, developed using a small-signal finite-element model, are based on least-squares minimisation of the total noise power in the correlated dual TES DROID. Through numerical simulations we show that significant improvements in energy and position resolution are theoretically possible over existing methods

  1. Indoor Positioning Using GPS Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Mikkel Baun; Blunck, Henrik; Godsk, Torben

    2010-01-01

    It has been considered a fact that GPS performs too poorly inside buildings to provide usable indoor positioning. We analyze results of a measurement campaign to improve on the understanding of indoor GPS reception characteristics. The results show that using state-of-the-art receivers GPS...... low signal-to-noise ratios, multipath phenomena or bad satellite constellation geometry. We have also measured the indoor performance of embedded GPS receivers in mobile phones which provided lower availability and accuracy than state-of-the-art ones. Finally, we consider how the GPS performance...

  2. Deposition of newly synthesized histones: new histones H2A and H2B do not deposit in the same nucleosome with new Histones H3 and H4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, V.

    1987-01-01

    The authors have developed procedures to study histone-histone interactions during the deposition of histones in replicating cells. Cells are labeled for 60 min with dense amino acids, and subsequently, the histones within the nucleosomes are cross-linked into an octameric complex with formaldehyde. These complexes are sedimented to equilibrium in density gradients and octamer and dioctamer complexes separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. With reversal of the cross-link, the distribution of the individual density-labeled histones in the octamer is determined. Newly synthesized H3 and H4 deposits as a tetramer and are associated with old H2A and H2B. Newly synthesized H2A and H2B deposit as a dimer associated with old H2A, H2B, H3, and H4. The significance of these results with respect to the dynamics of histone interactions in the nucleus is discussed. Control experiments are presented to test for artifactual formation of these complexes during preparative procedures. In addition, reconstitution experiments were performed to demonstrate that the composition of these octameric complexes can be determined from their distribution of density gradients

  3. Determination of signal intensity affected by Gaussian noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blostein, Jeronimo J.; Bennun, Leonardo

    1999-01-01

    A methodology based on maximum likelihood criteria, to identify and quantify an arbitrary signal affected by Gaussian noise is shown. To use this methodology it is necessary to know the position in the spectrum where the signal of interest should appear, and the shape of the signal when the background is null or unappreciable. (author)

  4. Biomedical signal processing

    CERN Document Server

    Akay, Metin

    1994-01-01

    Sophisticated techniques for signal processing are now available to the biomedical specialist! Written in an easy-to-read, straightforward style, Biomedical Signal Processing presents techniques to eliminate background noise, enhance signal detection, and analyze computer data, making results easy to comprehend and apply. In addition to examining techniques for electrical signal analysis, filtering, and transforms, the author supplies an extensive appendix with several computer programs that demonstrate techniques presented in the text.

  5. Scalability Optimization of Seamless Positioning Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juraj Machaj

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently positioning services are getting more attention not only within research community but also from service providers. From the service providers point of view positioning service that will be able to work seamlessly in all environments, for example, indoor, dense urban, and rural, has a huge potential to open new markets. However, such system does not only need to provide accurate position estimates but have to be scalable and resistant to fake positioning requests. In the previous works we have proposed a modular system, which is able to provide seamless positioning in various environments. The system automatically selects optimal positioning module based on available radio signals. The system currently consists of three positioning modules—GPS, GSM based positioning, and Wi-Fi based positioning. In this paper we will propose algorithm which will reduce time needed for position estimation and thus allow higher scalability of the modular system and thus allow providing positioning services to higher amount of users. Such improvement is extremely important, for real world application where large number of users will require position estimates, since positioning error is affected by response time of the positioning server.

  6. Optimal Signal Quality Index for Photoplethysmogram Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Elgendi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A photoplethysmogram (PPG is a noninvasive circulatory signal related to the pulsatile volume of blood in tissue and is typically collected by pulse oximeters. PPG signals collected via mobile devices are prone to artifacts that negatively impact measurement accuracy, which can lead to a significant number of misleading diagnoses. Given the rapidly increased use of mobile devices to collect PPG signals, developing an optimal signal quality index (SQI is essential to classify the signal quality from these devices. Eight SQIs were developed and tested based on: perfusion, kurtosis, skewness, relative power, non-stationarity, zero crossing, entropy, and the matching of systolic wave detectors. Two independent annotators annotated all PPG data (106 recordings, 60 s each and a third expert conducted the adjudication of differences. The independent annotators labeled each PPG signal with one of the following labels: excellent, acceptable or unfit for diagnosis. All indices were compared using Mahalanobis distance, linear discriminant analysis, quadratic discriminant analysis, and support vector machine with leave-one-out cross-validation. The skewness index outperformed the other seven indices in differentiating between excellent PPG and acceptable, acceptable combined with unfit, and unfit recordings, with overall F 1 scores of 86.0%, 87.2%, and 79.1%, respectively.

  7. Optimal Signal Quality Index for Photoplethysmogram Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgendi, Mohamed

    2016-09-22

    A photoplethysmogram (PPG) is a noninvasive circulatory signal related to the pulsatile volume of blood in tissue and is typically collected by pulse oximeters. PPG signals collected via mobile devices are prone to artifacts that negatively impact measurement accuracy, which can lead to a significant number of misleading diagnoses. Given the rapidly increased use of mobile devices to collect PPG signals, developing an optimal signal quality index (SQI) is essential to classify the signal quality from these devices. Eight SQIs were developed and tested based on: perfusion, kurtosis, skewness, relative power, non-stationarity, zero crossing, entropy, and the matching of systolic wave detectors. Two independent annotators annotated all PPG data (106 recordings, 60 s each) and a third expert conducted the adjudication of differences. The independent annotators labeled each PPG signal with one of the following labels: excellent, acceptable or unfit for diagnosis. All indices were compared using Mahalanobis distance, linear discriminant analysis, quadratic discriminant analysis, and support vector machine with leave-one-out cross-validation. The skewness index outperformed the other seven indices in differentiating between excellent PPG and acceptable, acceptable combined with unfit, and unfit recordings, with overall F 1 scores of 86.0%, 87.2%, and 79.1%, respectively.

  8. Neutron position sensitive proportional counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gal'tsov, V.S.; Zakharkin, I.I.; Kuznetsov, V.A.; Shchetinin, O.I.

    1979-01-01

    A design of a position-sensitive neutron counter is given in which ionizing events are positioned along the length of the counter on the basis of time shift between signals propagating towards both ends of the counter. The propagation velocity decreases due to the use of a spiral cathode which, together with an external grounded frame, constitutes an electromagnetic delay line. The counter frame is made of a steel tube 200 mm long and 32 mm in diameter. The spiral cathode is a single-layer solenoid, 27.5 mm in internal diameter, which is made of a copper wire. The counter filled with 3 He (1200 torr) and Kr (750 torr) mixture, its efficiency of thermal neutron detection is 48% for the 3 He(n,p) 2 H reaction. An evaluated spatial resolution is 5 mm. Total delay time for the above design of the counter is 280 ns

  9. The Signal Distribution System

    CERN Document Server

    Belohrad, D; CERN. Geneva. AB Department

    2005-01-01

    For the purpose of LHC signal observation and high frequency signal distribution, the Signal Distribution System (SDS) was built. The SDS can contain up to 5 switching elements, where each element allows the user to switch between one of the maximum 8 bi-directional signals. The coaxial relays are used to switch the signals. Depending of the coaxial relay type used, the transfer bandwidth can go up to 18GHz. The SDS is controllable via TCP/IP, parallel port, or locally by rotary switch.

  10. Acoustic Signals and Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    The Handbook of Signal Processing in Acoustics will compile the techniques and applications of signal processing as they are used in the many varied areas of Acoustics. The Handbook will emphasize the interdisciplinary nature of signal processing in acoustics. Each Section of the Handbook...... will present topics on signal processing which are important in a specific area of acoustics. These will be of interest to specialists in these areas because they will be presented from their technical perspective, rather than a generic engineering approach to signal processing. Non-specialists, or specialists...

  11. SignalP 4.0 Server - prediction results The deduced signal peptide ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    15136770661wry

    SignalP 4.0 Server - prediction results. The deduced signal peptide data of MaSox4. Measure Position Value. Cutoff signal peptide? max. C. 40. 0.125 max. Y. 40. 0.111 max. S. 39. 0.117 mean S. 1-39. 0.097. D. 1-39. 0.103 0.450 NO. Name=Sequence SP='NO' D=0.103 D-cutoff=0.450 Networks=SignalP-noTM. Name= ...

  12. Transmitter Signal Measurements, Task 5C Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Kent; Eppic, Brian; Huffman, Mitch; White, Harrison

    2005-01-01

    Signal Measurements were obtained on four (4) different airport systems. Systems measured were Localizer (LOC), Very High Frequency Communication, (VHF), Glideslope, (G/S), and Global Positioning System (GPS). The task calls for path loss measurements to be taken at Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport (ATL) and one smaller airport which was Greenville/ Spartanburg Airport (GSP) to determine relative signal strengths on the airport properties.

  13. Method and apparatus for relative navigation using reflected GPS signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Ian R. (Inventor); Boegner, Jr., Gregory J. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method and system to passively navigate an orbiting moving body towards an orbiting target using reflected GPS signals. A pair of antennas is employed to receive both direct signals from a plurality of GPS satellites and a second antenna to receive GPS signals reflected off an orbiting target. The direct and reflected signals are processed and compared to determine the relative distance and position of the orbiting moving body relative to the orbiting target.

  14. Position-sensitive superconductor detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurakado, M.; Taniguchi, K.

    2016-01-01

    Superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) detectors and superconducting transition- edge sensors (TESs) are representative superconductor detectors having energy resolutions much higher than those of semiconductor detectors. STJ detectors are thin, thereby making it suitable for detecting low-energy X rays. The signals of STJ detectors are more than 100 times faster than those of TESs. By contrast, TESs are microcalorimeters that measure the radiation energy from the change in the temperature. Therefore, signals are slow and their time constants are typically several hundreds of μs. However, TESs possess excellent energy resolutions. For example, TESs have a resolution of 1.6 eV for 5.9-keV X rays. An array of STJs or TESs can be used as a pixel detector. Superconducting series-junction detectors (SSJDs) comprise multiple STJs and a single-crystal substrate that acts as a radiation absorber. SSJDs are also position sensitive, and their energy resolutions are higher than those of semiconductor detectors. In this paper, we give an overview of position-sensitive superconductor detectors.

  15. A position sensitive parallel plate avalanche counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombardi, M.; Tan Jilian; Potenza, R.; D'amico, V.

    1986-01-01

    A position sensitive parallel plate avalanche counter with a distributed constant delay-line-cathode (PSAC) is described. The strips formed on the printed board were served as the cathode and the delay line for readout of signals. The detector (PSAC) was operated in isobutane gas at the pressure range from 10 to 20 torr. The position resolution is better than 1 mm and the time resolution is about 350 ps, for 252 Cf fission-spectrum source

  16. Degenerate RFID Channel Modeling for Positioning Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Povalac

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces the theory of channel modeling for positioning applications in UHF RFID. It explains basic parameters for channel characterization from both the narrowband and wideband point of view. More details are given about ranging and direction finding. Finally, several positioning scenarios are analyzed with developed channel models. All the described models use a degenerate channel, i.e. combined signal propagation from the transmitter to the tag and from the tag to the receiver.

  17. Method of signal analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthomier, Charles

    1975-01-01

    A method capable of handling the amplitude and the frequency time laws of a certain kind of geophysical signals is described here. This method is based upon the analytical signal idea of Gabor and Ville, which is constructed either in the time domain by adding an imaginary part to the real signal (in-quadrature signal), or in the frequency domain by suppressing negative frequency components. The instantaneous frequency of the initial signal is then defined as the time derivative of the phase of the analytical signal, and his amplitude, or envelope, as the modulus of this complex signal. The method is applied to three types of magnetospheric signals: chorus, whistlers and pearls. The results obtained by analog and numerical calculations are compared to results obtained by classical systems using filters, i.e. based upon a different definition of the concept of frequency. The precision with which the frequency-time laws are determined leads then to the examination of the principle of the method and to a definition of instantaneous power density spectrum attached to the signal, and to the first consequences of this definition. In this way, a two-dimensional representation of the signal is introduced which is less deformed by the analysis system properties than the usual representation, and which moreover has the advantage of being obtainable practically in real time [fr

  18. Positions, positionings and posture of the enunciator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Rabatel

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article draws connections between the notions of enunciator position, positioning and posture, which structure the dialogic, cognitive and interactional co- production of utterances. The notion of enunciative position corresponds to the fact that the (first or second enunciator refers to objects of discourse while positioning himself/herself with regard to them, by indicating from what point of view he/she considers them. In view of the dialogic nature of the discourse, two modal subjects and levels of responsibility can be discerned: the first enunciator has the role of the agent in charge of the discourse and the second enunciator fulfills internal functions of validation, assuming thus a sort of responsibility which does not necessarily commit the first enunciator. The article then analyses the dialogic strategies of positioning by enunciative reduplication and separation which account for auto- dialogic and hetero-dialogic situations. Finally it deals with the enunciative postures of co-enunciation, over-enunciation and under-enunciation, which refine the notions of enunciative reduplication or separation, by specifying the degrees of agreement, according to dialectic between discordant concordance and concordant discordance.

  19. Side-emitting fiber optic position sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Jonathan D [Albuquerque, NM

    2008-02-12

    A side-emitting fiber optic position sensor and method of determining an unknown position of an object by using the sensor. In one embodiment, a concentrated beam of light source illuminates the side of a side-emitting fiber optic at an unknown axial position along the fiber's length. Some of this side-illuminated light is in-scattered into the fiber and captured. As the captured light is guided down the fiber, its intensity decreases due to loss from side-emission away from the fiber and from bulk absorption within the fiber. By measuring the intensity of light emitted from one (or both) ends of the fiber with a photodetector(s), the axial position of the light source is determined by comparing the photodetector's signal to a calibrated response curve, look-up table, or by using a mathematical model. Alternatively, the side-emitting fiber is illuminated at one end, while a photodetector measures the intensity of light emitted from the side of the fiber, at an unknown position. As the photodetector moves further away from the illuminated end, the detector's signal strength decreases due to loss from side-emission and/or bulk absorption. As before, the detector's signal is correlated to a unique position along the fiber.

  20. AR Signaling in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilal Rahim

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Androgen receptor (AR, a member of the steroid hormone receptor family status has become increasingly important as both a prognostic marker and potential therapeutic target in breast cancer. AR is expressed in up to 90% of estrogen receptor (ER positive breast cancer, and to a lesser degree, human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2 amplified tumors. In the former, AR signaling has been correlated with a better prognosis given its inhibitory activity in estrogen dependent disease, though conversely has also been shown to increase resistance to anti-estrogen therapies such as tamoxifen. AR blockade can mitigate this resistance, and thus serves as a potential target in ER-positive breast cancer. In HER2 amplified breast cancer, studies are somewhat conflicting, though most show either no effect or are associated with poorer survival. Much of the available data on AR signaling is in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC, which is an aggressive disease with inferior outcomes comparative to other breast cancer subtypes. At present, there are no approved targeted therapies in TNBC, making study of the AR signaling pathway compelling. Gene expression profiling studies have also identified a luminal androgen receptor (LAR subtype that is dependent on AR signaling in TNBC. Regardless, there seems to be an association between AR expression and improved outcomes in TNBC. Despite lower pathologic complete response (pCR rates with neoadjuvant therapy, patients with AR-expressing TNBC have been shown to have a better prognosis than those that are AR-negative. Clinical studies targeting AR have shown somewhat promising results. In this paper we review the literature on the biology of AR in breast cancer and its prognostic and predictive roles. We also present our thoughts on therapeutic strategies.

  1. Coherent pulse position modulation quantum cipher

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohma, Masaki; Hirota, Osamu

    2014-01-01

    On the basis of fundamental idea of Yuen, we present a new type of quantum random cipher, where pulse position modulated signals are encrypted in the picture of quantum Gaussian wave form. We discuss the security of our proposed system with a phase mask encryption

  2. Wnt signaling in cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, T; Rindtorff, N; Boutros, M

    2017-01-01

    Wnt signaling is one of the key cascades regulating development and stemness, and has also been tightly associated with cancer. The role of Wnt signaling in carcinogenesis has most prominently been described for colorectal cancer, but aberrant Wnt signaling is observed in many more cancer entities. Here, we review current insights into novel components of Wnt pathways and describe their impact on cancer development. Furthermore, we highlight expanding functions of Wnt signaling for both solid and liquid tumors. We also describe current findings how Wnt signaling affects maintenance of cancer stem cells, metastasis and immune control. Finally, we provide an overview of current strategies to antagonize Wnt signaling in cancer and challenges that are associated with such approaches. PMID:27617575

  3. Hedgehog Signaling in Neonatal and Adult Lung

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Li; Kugler, Matthias C.; Loomis, Cynthia A.; Samdani, Rashmi; Zhao, Zhicheng; Chen, Gregory J.; Brandt, Julia P.; Brownell, Isaac; Joyner, Alexandra L.; Rom, William N.; Munger, John S.

    2013-01-01

    Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) signaling is essential during embryonic lung development, but its role in postnatal lung development and adult lung are not known. Using Gli1nlacZ reporter mice to identify cells with active Hh signaling, we found that Gli1nlacZ–positive mesenchymal cells are densely and diffusely present up to 2 weeks after birth and decline in number thereafter. In adult mice, Gli1nlacZ–positive cells are present around large airways and vessels and are sparse in alveolar septa. Hh-stim...

  4. Multi-technology positioning

    CERN Document Server

    Lohan, Elena-Simona; Wymeersch, Henk; Seco-Granados, Gonzalo; Nykänen, Ossi

    2017-01-01

    This book provides an overview of positioning technologies, applications and services in a format accessible to a wide variety of readers. Readers who have always wanted to understand how satellite-based positioning, wireless network positioning, inertial navigation, and their combinations work will find great value in this book. Readers will also learn about the advantages and disadvantages of different positioning methods, their limitations and challenges. Cognitive positioning, adding the brain to determine which technologies to use at device runtime, is introduced as well. Coverage also includes the use of position information for Location Based Services (LBS), as well as context-aware positioning services, designed for better user experience. • Brings understanding of positioning technology to readers from a variety of disciplines • Reviews multiple techniques, providing insight on the pros, cons and challenges related to each • Designed to be a tutorial on basic principles, avoiding unnecessary de...

  5. Biomedical signals and systems

    CERN Document Server

    Tranquillo, Joseph V

    2013-01-01

    Biomedical Signals and Systems is meant to accompany a one-semester undergraduate signals and systems course. It may also serve as a quick-start for graduate students or faculty interested in how signals and systems techniques can be applied to living systems. The biological nature of the examples allows for systems thinking to be applied to electrical, mechanical, fluid, chemical, thermal and even optical systems. Each chapter focuses on a topic from classic signals and systems theory: System block diagrams, mathematical models, transforms, stability, feedback, system response, control, time

  6. Digital signal processing

    CERN Document Server

    O'Shea, Peter; Hussain, Zahir M

    2011-01-01

    In three parts, this book contributes to the advancement of engineering education and that serves as a general reference on digital signal processing. Part I presents the basics of analog and digital signals and systems in the time and frequency domain. It covers the core topics: convolution, transforms, filters, and random signal analysis. It also treats important applications including signal detection in noise, radar range estimation for airborne targets, binary communication systems, channel estimation, banking and financial applications, and audio effects production. Part II considers sel

  7. Geolocation of RF signals

    CERN Document Server

    Progri, Ilir

    2011-01-01

    ""Geolocation of RF Signals - Principles and Simulations"" offers an overview of the best practices and innovative techniques in the art and science of geolocation over the last twenty years. It covers all research and development aspects including theoretical analysis, RF signals, geolocation techniques, key block diagrams, and practical principle simulation examples in the frequency band from 100 MHz to 18 GHz or even 60 GHz. Starting with RF signals, the book progressively examines various signal bands - such as VLF, LF, MF, HF, VHF, UHF, L, S, C, X, Ku, and, K and the corresponding geoloca

  8. Navicular bone position determined by positional MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Philip; Johannsen, Finn E; Hangaard, Stine

    2016-01-01

    -scanner). Scanning was performed in supine and standing position, respectively. Two radiologists evaluated the images in a blinded manner. Reliability and agreement were assessed by calculation of intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and 95 % limits of agreement as a percentage of the mean (LOA%). RESULTS...

  9. Reflection Positive Doubles

    OpenAIRE

    Jaffe, Arthur; Janssens, Bas

    2016-01-01

    Here we introduce reflection positive doubles, a general framework for reflection positivity, covering a wide variety of systems in statistical physics and quantum field theory. These systems may be bosonic, fermionic, or parafermionic in nature. Within the framework of reflection positive doubles, we give necessary and sufficient conditions for reflection positivity. We use a reflection-invariant cone to implement our construction. Our characterization allows for a direct interpretation in t...

  10. Non-Contact Linear Actuator Position Sensor Having a PID-Compensating Controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhorn, Dean C. (Inventor); Howard, David E. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A position sensor or controller generates a response signal in existing armature windings of an actuator and detects the response signal to determine the position of the armature. To generate the response signal, the actuator includes a sensor excitation winding near the armature. Two sensor excitation windings can be provided, above and below the armature, to cancel out z components and thus allow for a variable gap. The sensor excitation winding or windings are supplied with an excitation signal to induce the response signal in the armature windings. The response signal is derived by differentially amplifying and frequency filtering a raw output of the armature windings. The response signal is demodulated to determine position. If a position controller rather than a mere sensor is desired, the position signal can be buffered, PID compensated, amplified, and fed back to the armature windings.

  11. Perception of eye positions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lorteije, J.A.M.; Wezel, R.J.A. van; Lankheet, M.J.M.

    2002-01-01

    In a two-alternative forced-choice psychophysical test human subjects were tested for their ability to perceive their own viewing direction. A small red flash was presented at different horizontal positions left or right from the subjects' eye position on the screen. Eye positions were recorded with

  12. The Positivity Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caprara, Gian Vittorio; Alessandri, Guido; Eisenberg, Nancy; Kupfer, A.; Steca, Patrizia; Caprara, Maria Giovanna; Yamaguchi, Susumu; Fukuzawa, Ai; Abela, John

    2012-01-01

    Five studies document the validity of a new 8-item scale designed to measure "positivity," defined as the tendency to view life and experiences with a positive outlook. In the first study (N = 372), the psychometric properties of Positivity Scale (P Scale) were examined in accordance with classical test theory using a large number of…

  13. Malignant paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Stefano, Alessandro; Kulamarva, Gautham; Dispenza, Francesco

    2012-08-01

    An insidious percentage of paroxysmal positional vertigo appears to be intractable with canalith repositioning maneuver and also is not self-limiting. This type of positional vertigo is sustained by the action of intracranial tumors that mimics the clinical aspects of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.Aim of this study is to clarify the features of these forms of positional vertigo, which we indicate as malignant paroxysmal positional vertigo. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical records of all the patients who presented with vertigo spells and were managed at our tertiary care referral centre over a three years period. Two hundred and eleven patients with diagnosis of positional paroxysmal vertigo were included in the final study. Seven patients were affected by intracranial tumors causing a positional vertigo and were classified as malignant paroxysmal positional vertigo patients after radiological and histological diagnosis. These patients were affected by an internal auditory canal mass alone or with extension in the cerebello pontine angle that mimicked a benign positional vertigo. We can conclude that the clinician should keep in mind the differentiation between benign positional vertigo and malignant positional vertigo. When the patients with positional vertigo presents a strange behaviour of symptoms, nystagmus or response to the canalith repositioning maneuver a radiological investigation must be undertaken in every doubtful case. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Application of digital beam position processor Libera on tune measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chunhui; Sun Baogen; Cao Yong; Lu Ping; Li Jihao

    2006-01-01

    Digital signal processing (DSP) is widely used in the field of beam diagnostics. Especially, DSP achieves very good performance in beam position signal analysis and betatron tune measurement. In Hefei light source, when beam was excited by narrow-band Gaussian white nose, Libera, a digital beam position processor, was used to process the signals from beam position monitor (BPM), which contained betatron oscillation. Fast Fourier transform (FFT) was applied to finding out betatron resonance frequency, from which the decimal part of betatron oscillation tune was calculated. By this means, the measure of horizontal tune was 3.5352 and the measure of vertical tune is 2.6299. (authors)

  15. Elementary signaling modes predict the essentiality of signal transduction network components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui-Sheng; Albert, Réka

    2011-03-22

    Understanding how signals propagate through signaling pathways and networks is a central goal in systems biology. Quantitative dynamic models help to achieve this understanding, but are difficult to construct and validate because of the scarcity of known mechanistic details and kinetic parameters. Structural and qualitative analysis is emerging as a feasible and useful alternative for interpreting signal transduction. In this work, we present an integrative computational method for evaluating the essentiality of components in signaling networks. This approach expands an existing signaling network to a richer representation that incorporates the positive or negative nature of interactions and the synergistic behaviors among multiple components. Our method simulates both knockout and constitutive activation of components as node disruptions, and takes into account the possible cascading effects of a node's disruption. We introduce the concept of elementary signaling mode (ESM), as the minimal set of nodes that can perform signal transduction independently. Our method ranks the importance of signaling components by the effects of their perturbation on the ESMs of the network. Validation on several signaling networks describing the immune response of mammals to bacteria, guard cell abscisic acid signaling in plants, and T cell receptor signaling shows that this method can effectively uncover the essentiality of components mediating a signal transduction process and results in strong agreement with the results of Boolean (logical) dynamic models and experimental observations. This integrative method is an efficient procedure for exploratory analysis of large signaling and regulatory networks where dynamic modeling or experimental tests are impractical. Its results serve as testable predictions, provide insights into signal transduction and regulatory mechanisms and can guide targeted computational or experimental follow-up studies. The source codes for the algorithms

  16. Position-sensitive proportional counters using resistance-capacitance position encoding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopp, M.K.; Borkowski, C.J.

    1975-12-01

    A new method was developed for encoding the position of individual photons, neutrons, or charged particles in proportional counters by using the distributed RC line characteristics of these counters. The signal processing is described and guidelines for the design and operation of these position sensitive proportional counters (PSPCs) are given. Using these guidelines, several prototypic PSPCs were constructed to improve the spatial resolution and shorten the signal processing time; for example, the intrinsic spatial uncertainty was reduced to 28 μ fwhm for alpha particles and 100 μ fwhm for low-energy x rays (2 to 6 keV). Also, the signal processing time was reduced to 0.6 μsec without seriously degrading the spatial resolution. These results have opened new fields of application of the RC position encoding method in imaging distributions of photons, charged particles, or neutrons in nuclear medicine, physics, and radiography

  17. Crankshaft position sensing with combined starter alternator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandenburg, Larry Raymond; Miller, John Michael

    2000-06-13

    A crankshaft position sensing apparatus for use with an engine (16) having a combined starter/alternator assembly (18). The crankshaft position sensing apparatus includes a tone ring (38) with a sensor (36) and bandpass filter (46), having a cylinder identification input from a camshaft sensor (48), and a gain limiter (54). The sensing apparatus mounts near the rotor (30) of the combined starter/alternator assembly (18). The filtered crankshaft position signal can then be input into a vehicle system controller (58) and an inner loop controller (60). The starter/alternator assembly (18) in combination with an internal combustion engine is particularly useful for a hybrid electric vehicle system.

  18. Pretty Easy Pervasive Positioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Rene; Wind, Rico; Jensen, Christian Søndergaard

    2009-01-01

    With the increasing availability of positioning based on GPS, Wi-Fi, and cellular technologies and the proliferation of mobile devices with GPS, Wi-Fi and cellular connectivity, ubiquitous positioning is becoming a reality. While offerings by companies such as Google, Skyhook, and Spotigo render...... positioning possible in outdoor settings, including urban environments with limited GPS coverage, they remain unable to offer accurate indoor positioning. We will demonstrate a software infrastructure that makes it easy for anybody to build support for accurate Wi-Fi based positioning in buildings. All...... that is needed is a building with Wi-Fi coverage, access to the building, a floor plan of the building, and a Wi-Fi enabled device. Specifically, we will explain the software infrastructure and the steps that must be completed to obtain support for positioning. And we will demonstrate the positioning obtained...

  19. Signaling in symbiosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Limpens, E.H.M.; Bisseling, T.

    2003-01-01

    In recent years, the major focus in nodulation research has been on the genetic dissection of Nod-factor signaling. Components of this pathway appear to be shared with signaling processes that are induced during the formation of mycorrhiza. With the cloning of orthologs of the NIN and DMI2 genes

  20. SignalR blueprints

    CERN Document Server

    Ingebrigtsen, Einar

    2015-01-01

    This book is designed for software developers, primarily those with knowledge of C#, .NET, and JavaScript. Good knowledge and understanding of SignalR is assumed to allow efficient programming of core elements and applications in SignalR.

  1. Digital Signal Processors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A computer controlling the motion of a satellite should acquire signals from the satellite while it is in motion, compute corrections (if required) to the trajectory and send control signals back within a specified time for effective control. Delays may be fatal to ..... emulators and system evaluation tools have facilitated concurrent.

  2. Ubiquitination in apoptosis signaling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Kooij, L.W.

    2014-01-01

    The work described in this thesis focuses on ubiquitination and protein degradation, with an emphasis on how these processes regulate apoptosis signaling. More specifically, our aims were: 1. To increase the understanding of ubiquitin-mediated regulation of apoptosis signaling. 2. To identify the E3

  3. Second-hand signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergenholtz, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    used by various agents in their search for and assessment of products and firms. I conclude by arguing how this second‐hand nature of signals goes beyond a simple dyadic focus on senders and receivers of signals, and thus elucidates the more complex interrelations of the various types of agents...

  4. Quantum cloning without signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Gisin, Nicolas

    1998-01-01

    Perfect Quantum Cloning Machines (QCM) would allow to use quantum nonlocality for arbitrary fast signaling. However perfect QCM cannot exist. We derive a bound on the fidelity of QCM compatible with the no-signaling constraint. This bound equals the fidelity of the Bu\\v{z}ek-Hillery QCM.

  5. Signal sampling circuit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louwsma, S.M.; Vertregt, Maarten

    2011-01-01

    A sampling circuit for sampling a signal is disclosed. The sampling circuit comprises a plurality of sampling channels adapted to sample the signal in time-multiplexed fashion, each sampling channel comprising a respective track-and-hold circuit connected to a respective analogue to digital

  6. Signal sampling circuit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louwsma, S.M.; Vertregt, Maarten

    2010-01-01

    A sampling circuit for sampling a signal is disclosed. The sampling circuit comprises a plurality of sampling channels adapted to sample the signal in time-multiplexed fashion, each sampling channel comprising a respective track-and-hold circuit connected to a respective analogue to digital

  7. Optimal fault signal estimation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoorvogel, Antonie Arij; Niemann, H.H.; Saberi, A.; Sannuti, P.

    2002-01-01

    We consider here both fault identification and fault signal estimation. Regarding fault identification, we seek either exact or almost fault identification. On the other hand, regarding fault signal estimation, we seek either $H_2$ optimal, $H_2$ suboptimal or Hinfinity suboptimal estimation. By

  8. Neutron signal transfer analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Pleinert, H; Lehmann, E

    1999-01-01

    A new method called neutron signal transfer analysis has been developed for quantitative determination of hydrogenous distributions from neutron radiographic measurements. The technique is based on a model which describes the detector signal obtained in the measurement as a result of the action of three different mechanisms expressed by signal transfer functions. The explicit forms of the signal transfer functions are determined by Monte Carlo computer simulations and contain only the distribution as a variable. Therefore an unknown distribution can be determined from the detector signal by recursive iteration. This technique provides a simple and efficient tool for analysis of this type while also taking into account complex effects due to the energy dependency of neutron interaction and single and multiple scattering. Therefore this method provides an efficient tool for precise quantitative analysis using neutron radiography, as for example quantitative determination of moisture distributions in porous buil...

  9. Molecular and Cellular Signaling

    CERN Document Server

    Beckerman, Martin

    2005-01-01

    A small number of signaling pathways, no more than a dozen or so, form a control layer that is responsible for all signaling in and between cells of the human body. The signaling proteins belonging to the control layer determine what kinds of cells are made during development and how they function during adult life. Malfunctions in the proteins belonging to the control layer are responsible for a host of human diseases ranging from neurological disorders to cancers. Most drugs target components in the control layer, and difficulties in drug design are intimately related to the architecture of the control layer. Molecular and Cellular Signaling provides an introduction to molecular and cellular signaling in biological systems with an emphasis on the underlying physical principles. The text is aimed at upper-level undergraduates, graduate students and individuals in medicine and pharmacology interested in broadening their understanding of how cells regulate and coordinate their core activities and how diseases ...

  10. Adaptive signal processor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walz, H.V.

    1980-07-01

    An experimental, general purpose adaptive signal processor system has been developed, utilizing a quantized (clipped) version of the Widrow-Hoff least-mean-square adaptive algorithm developed by Moschner. The system accommodates 64 adaptive weight channels with 8-bit resolution for each weight. Internal weight update arithmetic is performed with 16-bit resolution, and the system error signal is measured with 12-bit resolution. An adapt cycle of adjusting all 64 weight channels is accomplished in 8 ..mu..sec. Hardware of the signal processor utilizes primarily Schottky-TTL type integrated circuits. A prototype system with 24 weight channels has been constructed and tested. This report presents details of the system design and describes basic experiments performed with the prototype signal processor. Finally some system configurations and applications for this adaptive signal processor are discussed.

  11. Adaptive signal processor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walz, H.V.

    1980-07-01

    An experimental, general purpose adaptive signal processor system has been developed, utilizing a quantized (clipped) version of the Widrow-Hoff least-mean-square adaptive algorithm developed by Moschner. The system accommodates 64 adaptive weight channels with 8-bit resolution for each weight. Internal weight update arithmetic is performed with 16-bit resolution, and the system error signal is measured with 12-bit resolution. An adapt cycle of adjusting all 64 weight channels is accomplished in 8 μsec. Hardware of the signal processor utilizes primarily Schottky-TTL type integrated circuits. A prototype system with 24 weight channels has been constructed and tested. This report presents details of the system design and describes basic experiments performed with the prototype signal processor. Finally some system configurations and applications for this adaptive signal processor are discussed

  12. Nuclear movement regulated by non-Smad Nodal signaling via JNK is associated with Smad signaling during zebrafish endoderm specification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hozumi, Shunya; Aoki, Shun; Kikuchi, Yutaka

    2017-11-01

    Asymmetric nuclear positioning is observed during animal development, but its regulation and significance in cell differentiation remain poorly understood. Using zebrafish blastulae, we provide evidence that nuclear movement towards the yolk syncytial layer, which comprises extraembryonic tissue, occurs in the first cells fated to differentiate into the endoderm. Nodal signaling is essential for nuclear movement, whereas nuclear envelope proteins are involved in movement through microtubule formation. Positioning of the microtubule-organizing center, which is proposed to be crucial for nuclear movement, is regulated by Nodal signaling and nuclear envelope proteins. The non-Smad JNK signaling pathway, which is downstream of Nodal signaling, regulates nuclear movement independently of the Smad pathway, and this nuclear movement is associated with Smad signal transduction toward the nucleus. Our study provides insight into the function of nuclear movement in Smad signaling toward the nucleus, and could be applied to the control of TGFβ signaling. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  13. A machine protection beam position monitor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medvedko, E.; Smith, S.; Fisher, A.

    1998-01-01

    Loss of the stored beam in an uncontrolled manner can cause damage to the PEP-II B Factory. We describe here a device which detects large beam position excursions or unexpected beam loss and triggers the beam abort system to extract the stored beam safely. The bad-orbit abort trigger beam position monitor (BOAT BPM) generates a trigger when the beam orbit is far off the center (>20 mm), or rapid beam current loss (dI/dT) is detected. The BOAT BPM averages the input signal over one turn (136 kHz). AM demodulation is used to convert input signals at 476 MHz to baseband voltages. The detected signal goes to a filter section for suppression of the revolution frequency, then on to amplifiers, dividers, and comparators for position and current measurements and triggering. The derived current signal goes to a special filter, designed to perform dI/dT monitoring at fast, medium, and slow current loss rates. The BOAT BPM prototype test results confirm the design concepts

  14. Motion signals bias localization judgments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagleman, David M.; Sejnowski, Terrence J.

    2008-01-01

    In the flash-lag illusion, a moving object aligned with a flash is perceived to be offset in the direction of motion following the flash. In the “flash-drag” illusion, a flash is mislocalized in the direction of nearby motion. In the “flash-jump” illusion, a transient change in the appearance of a moving object (e.g., color) is mislocalized in the direction of subsequent motion. Finally, in the Frohlich illusion, the starting position of a suddenly appearing moving object is mislocalized in the direction of the subsequent motion. We demonstrate, in a series of experiments, a unified explanation for all these illusions: Perceptual localization is influenced by motion signals collected over ∼80 ms after a query is triggered. These demonstrations rule out “latency difference” and asynchronous feature binding models, in which objects appear in their real positions but misaligned in time. Instead, the illusions explored here are best understood as biases in localization caused by motion signals. We suggest that motion biasing exists because it allows the visual system to account for neural processing delays by retrospectively “pushing” an object closer to its true physical location, and we propose directions for exploring the neural mechanisms underlying the dynamic updating of location by the activity of motion-sensitive neurons. PMID:17461687

  15. Signal Incongruence and its Consequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vergne, Jean-Philippe; Wernicke, Maria Stokholm; Brenner, Steffen

    2018-01-01

    We draw on the signaling and infomediary literatures to examine how media evaluations of CEO overcompensation (a negative cue associated with selfishness and greed) are affected by the presence of corporate philanthropy (a positive cue associated with altruism and generosity). In line with our th...... and damage media evaluations of firms and CEOs. Taken together, these findings shed new light on the media as agents of external corporate governance for firms and open new avenues for research on executive compensation.......We draw on the signaling and infomediary literatures to examine how media evaluations of CEO overcompensation (a negative cue associated with selfishness and greed) are affected by the presence of corporate philanthropy (a positive cue associated with altruism and generosity). In line with our...... incongruence, and to infomediary and corporate governance research by showing that media disapproval can lead to lower executive compensation. We also reconcile two conflicting views on firm prosocial behavior by showing that, in the presence of incongruent cues, philanthropy can simultaneously enhance...

  16. Positive criminology in practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronel, Natti; Segev, Dana

    2014-11-01

    The discourse regarding offender rehabilitation has been criticized by various scholars who have claimed that reducing negative causes and managing risk will not automatically prompt positive human development and elements that are associated with desistance. Positive criminology is an innovative concept that challenges the common preoccupation with negative elements, by placing emphasis on human encounters and forces of inclusion that are experienced positively by target individuals and that can promote crime desistance. However, as the concept is relatively new, there are still no guiding principles for the practice of positive criminology that could direct research and the criminal justice system. This article attempts to fill that gap by providing principles that could be practiced by criminal justice personnel and examples of different interventions that reflect positive criminology. The article also provides ideological explanations for adopting the concept of positive criminology in practice. © The Author(s) 2013.

  17. EAACI taskforce position paper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konstantinou, G N; Asero, R; Ferrer, M

    2013-01-01

    between functionality and immunoreactivity. Approximately 25% of CU patients have a positive basophil histamine release assay and show autoreactivity (a positive autologous serum skin test), whereas 50% are negative regarding both. Functionality of CU sera appears to be complement dependent on mast cells...... (positive autoreactivity, functional bioassay and immunoassay) to define preliminary criteria sets for the diagnosis of ACU based on clinical and laboratory features with highest individual sensitivity and specificity....

  18. Linear position sensing using magnetoresistive sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bratland, T.; Wan, H. [Honeywell Inc., Plymouth, MN (United States). Solid State Electronics Center

    2001-07-01

    This paper presents a non-contact, non-wear-out solution for long span absolute linear position sensing. This solution utilizes an array of magnetoresistive (MR) sensors, a magnet and signal conditioning electronics. The sensors are used to determine the position of a magnet that is attached to a moving object. In addition to mechanical benefits, this solution offers a high accuracy, low power solution. In this paper we will discuss the operating principles, system error and applications of this approach. This approach will be beneficial in applications for linear position or displacement, LVDT replacements, proximity detection, valve positioning, shaft travel, automotive steering, brake and throttle position systems. This will be used in industries including automotive, aviation and industrial process control. (orig.)

  19. Noise in position measurement by centroid calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, P.

    1996-01-01

    The position of a particle trajectory in a gaseous (or semiconductor) detector can be measured by calculating the centroid of the induced charge on the cathode plane. The charge amplifiers attached to each cathode strip introduce noise which is added to the signal. This noise broadens the position resolution line. Our article gives an analytical tool to estimate the resolution broadening due to the noise per strip and the number of strips involved in the centroid calculation. It is shown that the position resolution increases faster than the square root of the number of strips involved. We also consider the consequence of added interstrip capacitors, intended to diminish the differential nonlinearity. It is shown that the position error increases slower than linearly with the interstrip capacities, due to the cancellation of correlated noise. The estimation we give, can be applied to calculations of position broadening other than the centroid finding. (orig.)

  20. Orexin/Hypocretin Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukkonen, Jyrki P

    Orexin/hypocretin peptide (orexin-A and orexin-B) signaling is believed to take place via the two G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), named OX 1 and OX 2 orexin receptors, as described in the previous chapters. Signaling of orexin peptides has been investigated in diverse endogenously orexin receptor-expressing cells - mainly neurons but also other types of cells - and in recombinant cells expressing the receptors in a heterologous manner. Findings in the different systems are partially convergent but also indicate cellular background-specific signaling. The general picture suggests an inherently high degree of diversity in orexin receptor signaling.In the current chapter, I present orexin signaling on the cellular and molecular levels. Discussion of the connection to (potential) physiological orexin responses is only brief since these are in focus of other chapters in this book. The same goes for the post-synaptic signaling mechanisms, which are dealt with in Burdakov: Postsynaptic actions of orexin. The current chapter is organized according to the tissue type, starting from the central nervous system. Finally, receptor signaling pathways are discussed across tissues, cell types, and even species.

  1. Video-Aided GPS/INS Positioning and Attitude Determination

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brown, Alison; Silva, Randy

    2006-01-01

    .... When the GPS satellite signals are denied, either through intentional jamming or by natural conditions such as urban or terrain masking, the positioning and attitude performance will rapidly degrade...

  2. Right Time, Right Place : Probing the Functions of Organelle Positioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bergeijk, Petra; Hoogenraad, Casper C; Kapitein, Lukas C

    2016-01-01

    The proper spatial arrangement of organelles underlies many cellular processes including signaling, polarization, and growth. Despite the importance of local positioning, the precise connection between subcellular localization and organelle function is often not fully understood. To address this,

  3. Cloning and superluminal signaling£

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Buzek and Hillery [2] (and then BruЯet al [3]) provided the answer to the 2nd question in the case of 1. 2 universal symmetric (as the two copies produced are ..... light in vacuum) provided by Newton's gravitational law, when one disturbs the position of any object in the universe; but this signaling is not usable to carry some ...

  4. Reproducible positioning in chest X-ray radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    A device is described that can be used to ensure reproducibility in the positioning of the patient during X-ray radiography of the thorax. Signals are taken from an electrocardiographic monitor and from a device recording the respiratory cycle. Radiography is performed only when two preselected signals coincide

  5. Signal flow analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Abrahams, J R; Hiller, N

    1965-01-01

    Signal Flow Analysis provides information pertinent to the fundamental aspects of signal flow analysis. This book discusses the basic theory of signal flow graphs and shows their relation to the usual algebraic equations.Organized into seven chapters, this book begins with an overview of properties of a flow graph. This text then demonstrates how flow graphs can be applied to a wide range of electrical circuits that do not involve amplification. Other chapters deal with the parameters as well as circuit applications of transistors. This book discusses as well the variety of circuits using ther

  6. Positioning and locking apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, M.L.; Harper, W.H.

    1985-06-19

    A positioning and locking apparatus including a fixture having a rotatable torque ring provided with a plurality of cam segments for automatically guiding a container into a desired location within the fixture. Rotation of the ring turns the container into a final position in pressure sealing relation against a hatch member.

  7. Positioning health professional identity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Ole; Krogh Christensen, Mette; Mørcke, Anne Mette

    2017-01-01

    Drawing on positioning theory, the purpose of this paper is to characterize the activities and positions of students and supervisors at workplaces and on-campus skills training sites across the higher health professional educations of medicine, sports science, and nursing. Furthermore, the study...... explored the impact of work-based learning (WBL) and skills training on students’ personal professional identity development....

  8. Detecting Position Using ARKit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilek, Ufuk; Erol, Mustafa

    2018-01-01

    Developed by using ARKit, a novel app which can be used to detect position in physics experiments was introduced. The ARKit relies on a new technique. The result of the experiment presented in this study was satisfactory, suggesting that the new technique can be employed in position detection experiments/demonstrations that are conducted using…

  9. Precise Point Positioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xiaohong

    performance of point positioning for kinematic applications, the precise point positioning attracted a lot of attention and opened a new alternative door to kinematic positioning. In this report different tests have been done to evaluate the ability and accuracy of the software TriP in the kinematic...... and static case by using internal consistency (residuals, RMS, repeatability etc.), known coordinates, ground truth and double-differenced solutions. The kinematic GPS positioning accuracy using four different software systems has been investigated and tested by comparing the degree of agreement between...... the airborne lidar system misalignment angle by automating the matching of lidar data with ground truth. Kinematic GPS positioning has been widely used, but the available commercial software systems are normally only suitable for the short or medium range kinematic baseline. However, in polar areas, airborne...

  10. Purinergic signalling and diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burnstock, Geoffrey; Novak, Ivana

    2013-01-01

    The pancreas is an organ with a central role in nutrient breakdown, nutrient sensing and release of hormones regulating whole body nutrient homeostasis. In diabetes mellitus, the balance is broken-cells can be starving in the midst of plenty. There are indications that the incidence of diabetes...... molecules in purinergic signalling cascades. This signalling takes place at the level of the pancreas, where the close apposition of various cells-endocrine, exocrine, stromal and immune cells-contributes to the integrated function. Following an introduction to diabetes, the pancreas and purinergic...... signalling, we will focus on the role of purinergic signalling and its changes associated with diabetes in the pancreas and selected tissues/organ systems affected by hyperglycaemia and other stress molecules of diabetes. Since this is the first review of this kind, a comprehensive historical angle is taken...

  11. Topological signal processing

    CERN Document Server

    Robinson, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Signal processing is the discipline of extracting information from collections of measurements. To be effective, the measurements must be organized and then filtered, detected, or transformed to expose the desired information.  Distortions caused by uncertainty, noise, and clutter degrade the performance of practical signal processing systems. In aggressively uncertain situations, the full truth about an underlying signal cannot be known.  This book develops the theory and practice of signal processing systems for these situations that extract useful, qualitative information using the mathematics of topology -- the study of spaces under continuous transformations.  Since the collection of continuous transformations is large and varied, tools which are topologically-motivated are automatically insensitive to substantial distortion. The target audience comprises practitioners as well as researchers, but the book may also be beneficial for graduate students.

  12. Transmembrane Signalling: Membrane messengers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockroft, Scott L.

    2017-05-01

    Life has evolved elaborate means of communicating essential chemical information across cell membranes. Inspired by biology, two new artificial mechanisms have now been developed that use synthetic messenger molecules to relay chemical signals into or across lipid membranes.

  13. Ultrahigh bandwidth signal processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oxenløwe, Leif Katsuo

    2016-01-01

    Optical time lenses have proven to be very versatile for advanced optical signal processing. Based on a controlled interplay between dispersion and phase-modulation by e.g. four-wave mixing, the processing is phase-preserving, an hence useful for all types of data signals including coherent multi......-level modulation founats. This has enabled processing of phase-modulated spectrally efficient data signals, such as orthogonal frequency division multiplexed (OFDM) signa In that case, a spectral telescope system was used, using two time lenses with different focal lengths (chirp rates), yielding a spectral...... regeneratio These operations require a broad bandwidth nonlinear platform, and novel photonic integrated nonlinear platform like aluminum gallium arsenide nano-waveguides used for 1.28 Tbaud optical signal processing will be described....

  14. Acoustic MIMO signal processing

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Yiteng; Chen, Jingdong

    2006-01-01

    A timely and important book addressing a variety of acoustic signal processing problems under multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) scenarios. It uniquely investigates these problems within a unified framework offering a novel and penetrating analysis.

  15. Signals and systems

    CERN Document Server

    Rao, K Deergha

    2018-01-01

    This textbook covers the fundamental theories of signals and systems analysis, while incorporating recent developments from integrated circuits technology into its examples. Starting with basic definitions in signal theory, the text explains the properties of continuous-time and discrete-time systems and their representation by differential equations and state space. From those tools, explanations for the processes of Fourier analysis, the Laplace transform, and the z-Transform provide new ways of experimenting with different kinds of time systems. The text also covers the separate classes of analog filters and their uses in signal processing applications. Intended for undergraduate electrical engineering students, chapter sections include exercise for review and practice for the systems concepts of each chapter. Along with exercises, the text includes MATLAB-based examples to allow readers to experiment with signals and systems code on their own. An online repository of the MATLAB code from this textbook can...

  16. Signal Station Inspection Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Handwritten reports resulting from detailed inspections of US Army Signal Service Stations, 1871-1889. Features reported included instrument exposure and condition,...

  17. Foundations of signal processing

    CERN Document Server

    Vetterli, Martin; Goyal, Vivek K

    2014-01-01

    This comprehensive and engaging textbook introduces the basic principles and techniques of signal processing, from the fundamental ideas of signals and systems theory to real-world applications. Students are introduced to the powerful foundations of modern signal processing, including the basic geometry of Hilbert space, the mathematics of Fourier transforms, and essentials of sampling, interpolation, approximation and compression. The authors discuss real-world issues and hurdles to using these tools, and ways of adapting them to overcome problems of finiteness and localisation, the limitations of uncertainty and computational costs. Standard engineering notation is used throughout, making mathematical examples easy for students to follow, understand and apply. It includes over 150 homework problems and over 180 worked examples, specifically designed to test and expand students' understanding of the fundamentals of signal processing, and is accompanied by extensive online materials designed to aid learning, ...

  18. Traffic Signal Cycle Lengths

    Data.gov (United States)

    Town of Chapel Hill, North Carolina — Traffic signal location list for the town of Chapel Hill. This data set includes light cycle information as well as as intersection information.The Town of Chapel...

  19. POSITIONING STRATEGIES DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakhshir Ghassan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The positioning strategy has suffered serious changes in the last few decades, being influenced by the rapid development of competition and the growing focus on specific traits belonging to the market, to the consumer or to the product. The purpose of this paper is to present the developments of theoretical positioning strategies and the orientation from more simple, product oriented strategies, to ones more oriented towards the client and with a briefer period of time. The world is moving in a much faster pace than in the past, thanks to communication development so companies are obliged to adopt more specific strategies in order for them to be effective. This essay represents a literary review presenting a documentary research within the scientific articles and strategy and positioning books. The paper begins with the analysis of company strategies and the marketing strategies in general. The first author to group the product positioning strategies is Porter with his three generic strategies. Following the development of brands and because of the lack of competitiveness in the simple generic positioning strategies, this paper has also presented the newer positioning strategies proposed by Kotler, Treacy & Wiersema, and also more complex ones such as Bowman's Strategy Clock and Blankson and Kalafatis positioning strategy based on the type of the consumer. The fast expansion of local brands in all categories has led to mistakes in positioning strategies, categories also presented in the current essay. The results of this study show that new positioning strategies are more and more based on the consumer and market segments and on the product specification - which have also evolved in the last decades. Adaptability to fast changes in the competitive market will represent the future positioning strategies.

  20. Redox signaling in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foyer, Christine H; Noctor, Graham

    2013-06-01

    Our aim is to deliver an authoritative and challenging perspective of current concepts in plant redox signaling, focusing particularly on the complex interface between the redox and hormone-signaling pathways that allow precise control of plant growth and defense in response to metabolic triggers and environmental constraints and cues. Plants produce significant amounts of singlet oxygen and other reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a result of photosynthetic electron transport and metabolism. Such pathways contribute to the compartment-specific redox-regulated signaling systems in plant cells that convey information to the nucleus to regulate gene expression. Like the chloroplasts and mitochondria, the apoplast-cell wall compartment makes a significant contribution to the redox signaling network, but unlike these organelles, the apoplast has a low antioxidant-buffering capacity. The respective roles of ROS, low-molecular antioxidants, redox-active proteins, and antioxidant enzymes are considered in relation to the functions of plant hormones such as salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, and auxin, in the composite control of plant growth and defense. Regulation of redox gradients between key compartments in plant cells such as those across the plasma membrane facilitates flexible and multiple faceted opportunities for redox signaling that spans the intracellular and extracellular environments. In conclusion, plants are recognized as masters of the art of redox regulation that use oxidants and antioxidants as flexible integrators of signals from metabolism and the environment.