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Sample records for nucleoside phosphorylase deficiency

  1. Genetics Home Reference: purine nucleoside phosphorylase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the expand/collapse boxes. Description Purine nucleoside phosphorylase deficiency is one of several disorders that damage the immune system and cause severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). People with SCID lack virtually all immune protection from foreign invaders such as bacteria, viruses, and ...

  2. Purine nucleoside phosphorylase deficiency in two unrelated Saudi patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alangari, Abdullah; AlHarbi, Abdullah; AlGhonaium Abdulaziz; Santisteban, Ines; Hershfield, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive metabolic disorder that results in combined immunodeficiency, neurologic dysfunction and autoimmunity. PNP deficiency has never been reported from Saudi Arabia or in patients with an Arabic ethnic background. We report on two Saudi girls with PNP deficiency. Both showed severe lymphopenia and neurological involvement. Sequencing of the PNP gene of one girl revealed a novel missense mutation Pro146>Leu in exon 4 due to a change in the codon from CCT>CTT. Expression of PNP (146L) cDNA in E coli indicated that the mutation greatly reduced, but did not completely eliminate PNP activity. (author)

  3. Muscle phosphorylase kinase deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preisler, N; Orngreen, M C; Echaniz-Laguna, A

    2012-01-01

    To examine metabolism during exercise in 2 patients with muscle phosphorylase kinase (PHK) deficiency and to further define the phenotype of this rare glycogen storage disease (GSD).......To examine metabolism during exercise in 2 patients with muscle phosphorylase kinase (PHK) deficiency and to further define the phenotype of this rare glycogen storage disease (GSD)....

  4. Two purine nucleoside phosphorylases in Bacillus subtilis. Purification and some properties of the adenosine-specific phosphorylase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kaj Frank

    1978-01-01

    Two purine nucleoside phosphorylases (purine-nucleoside:orthophosphate ribosyltransferase, EC 2.4.2.1) were purified from vegetative Bacillus subtilis cells. One enzyme, inosine-guanosine phosphorylase, showed great similarity to the homologous enzyme of Bacillus cereus. It appeared...

  5. Development and validation of a 2nd tier test for identification of purine nucleoside phosphorylase deficiency patients during expanded newborn screening by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    la Marca, Giancarlo; Giocaliere, Elisa; Malvagia, Sabrina; Villanelli, Fabio; Funghini, Silvia; Ombrone, Daniela; Della Bona, Maria; Forni, Giulia; Canessa, Clementina; Ricci, Silvia; Romano, Francesca; Guerrini, Renzo; Resti, Massimo; Azzari, Chiara

    2016-04-01

    Purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) deficiency has been recently introduced in the newborn screening program in Tuscany. In order to improve the PNP screening efficiency, we developed a 2nd tier test to quantify PNP primary markers deoxyguanosine (dGuo) and deoxyinosine (dIno). Dried blood spots (DBS) samples were extracted with 200 μL of methanol and 100 μL of water (by two steps). Internal standards were added at a final concentration of 10 μmol/L. After extraction, samples were analysed by LC-MS/MS. The chromatographic run was performed in gradient mode by using a Synergi Fusion column. The assay was linear over a concentration range of 0.05-50 μmol/L (R2>0.999) for dGuo and 0.5-50 μmol/L (R2>0.998) for dIno. Intra- and interassay imprecision (mean CVs) for dIno and dGuo ranged from 2.9% to 12%. Limit of quantitaion (LOQ) were found to be 0.05 μmol/L and 0.5 μmol/L for dGuo and dIno, respectively. The reference ranges, obtained by measuring dGuo and dIno concentrations on DBS, were close to zero for both biomarkers. Moreover, DBS samples from seven patients with confirmed PNP were retrospectively evaluated and correctly identified. The LC-MS/MS method can reliably measure dIno and dGuo in DBS for the diagnosis of PNP. Validation data confirm the present method is characterised by good reproducibility, accuracy and imprecision for the quantitation of dIno and dGuo. The assay also appears suitable for use in monitoring treatment of PNP patients.

  6. Infusion of Sibling Marrow in a Patient with Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase Deficiency Leads to Split Mixed Donor Chimerism and Normal Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Yeates

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP deficiency, a rare autosomal recessive metabolic disease causes combined immunodeficiency and developmental delay, hypotonia, and spasticity. Patients present with recurrent infections associated with T-lymphocytopenia, characteristically presenting later than patients with classical severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID. PNP, with adenosine deaminase (ADA, is part of the purine salvage pathway. The only curative therapy is hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Myeloablative conditioning is recommended to prevent rejection caused by residual immune function. However, HLA-identical sibling stem cell infusions in ADA-SCID result in some donor stem cell engraftment and long-term thymopoiesis. We report a patient with PNP deficiency, who received HLA-identical sibling marrow without chemotherapy because of disseminated cytomegalovirus (CMV infection. The patient presented at 14 months of age following recurrent infections, from early infancy, with persistent irritability, developmental delay, and hypotonia. She had neutropenia, pan-lymphocytopenia, and hypogammaglobulinemia with low plasma urate and erythrocyte PNP activity. Diagnosis was confirmed with a homozygous mutation in PNP. The patient was viremic with CMV detected in blood and CSF by PCR. Dual antiviral therapy improved the clinical condition and reduced the viral load. In view of the disseminated CMV infection, the decision was made to infuse stem cells without any pre-conditioning chemotherapy. She received a matched sibling donor unconditioned stem cell infusion at 16 months of age. The post-transplant course was uneventful. Blood PCR became negative for CMV. Global hypotonia persisted, although with significant improvement in irritability. At 4 years of age and 29 months post-transplant, the patient demonstrated normal T-lymphocyte and natural killer cell numbers. Recent thymic emigrants represented 12% of the total T

  7. The Crystal Structure of Streptococcus pyogenes Uridine Phosphorylase Reveals a Distinct Subfamily of Nucleoside Phosphorylases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tran, Timothy H.; Christoffersen, S.; Allan, Paula W.; Parker, William B.; Piskur, Jure; Serra, I.; Terreni, M.; Ealick, Steven E. (Cornell); (Pavia); (Lund); (Southern Research)

    2011-09-20

    Uridine phosphorylase (UP), a key enzyme in the pyrimidine salvage pathway, catalyzes the reversible phosphorolysis of uridine or 2'-deoxyuridine to uracil and ribose 1-phosphate or 2'-deoxyribose 1-phosphate. This enzyme belongs to the nucleoside phosphorylase I superfamily whose members show diverse specificity for nucleoside substrates. Phylogenetic analysis shows Streptococcus pyogenes uridine phosphorylase (SpUP) is found in a distinct branch of the pyrimidine subfamily of nucleoside phosphorylases. To further characterize SpUP, we determined the crystal structure in complex with the products, ribose 1-phosphate and uracil, at 1.8 {angstrom} resolution. Like Escherichia coli UP (EcUP), the biological unit of SpUP is a hexamer with an ?/? monomeric fold. A novel feature of the active site is the presence of His169, which structurally aligns with Arg168 of the EcUP structure. A second active site residue, Lys162, is not present in previously determined UP structures and interacts with O2 of uracil. Biochemical studies of wild-type SpUP showed that its substrate specificity is similar to that of EcUP, while EcUP is {approx}7-fold more efficient than SpUP. Biochemical studies of SpUP mutants showed that mutations of His169 reduced activity, while mutation of Lys162 abolished all activity, suggesting that the negative charge in the transition state resides mostly on uracil O2. This is in contrast to EcUP for which transition state stabilization occurs mostly at O4.

  8. Anopheles gambiae Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase: Catalysis, Structure, and Inhibition

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    Taylor,E.; Rinaldo-Matthis, A.; Li, L.; Ghanem, M.; Hazleton, K.; Cassera, M.; Almo, S.; Schramm, V.

    2007-01-01

    The purine salvage pathway of Anopheles gambiae, a mosquito that transmits malaria, has been identified in genome searches on the basis of sequence homology with characterized enzymes. Purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) is a target for the development of therapeutic agents in humans and purine auxotrophs, including malarial parasites. The PNP from Anopheles gambiae (AgPNP) was expressed in Escherichia coli and compared to the PNPs from Homo sapiens (HsPNP) and Plasmodium falciparum (PfPNP). AgPNP has kcat values of 54 and 41 s-1 for 2'-deoxyinosine and inosine, its preferred substrates, and 1.0 s-1 for guanosine. However, the chemical step is fast for AgPNP at 226 s-1 for guanosine in pre-steady-state studies. 5'-Deaza-1'-aza-2'-deoxy-1'-(9-methylene)-Immucillin-H (DADMe-ImmH) is a transition-state mimic for a 2'-deoxyinosine ribocation with a fully dissociated N-ribosidic bond and is a slow-onset, tight-binding inhibitor with a dissociation constant of 3.5 pM. This is the tightest-binding inhibitor known for any PNP, with a remarkable Km/Ki* of 5.4 x 107, and is consistent with enzymatic transition state predictions of enhanced transition-state analogue binding in enzymes with enhanced catalytic efficiency. Deoxyguanosine is a weaker substrate than deoxyinosine, and DADMe-Immucillin-G is less tightly bound than DADMe-ImmH, with a dissociation constant of 23 pM for AgPNP as compared to 7 pM for HsPNP. The crystal structure of AgPNP was determined in complex with DADMe-ImmH and phosphate to a resolution of 2.2 Angstroms to reveal the differences in substrate and inhibitor specificity. The distance from the N1' cation to the phosphate O4 anion is shorter in the AgPNP{center_dot}DADMe-ImmH{center_dot}PO4 complex than in HsPNP{center_dot}DADMe-ImmH{center_dot}SO4, offering one explanation for the stronger inhibitory effect of DADMe-ImmH for AgPNP.

  9. Interactions of trimeric purine nucleoside phosphorylases with ground state analogues - calorimetric and fluorimetric studies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wielgus-Kutrowska, B.; Frank, J.; Holý, Antonín; Koellner, G.; Bzowska, A.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 22, 5/8 (2003), s. 1695-1698 ISSN 1525-7770 Grant - others:PCSR(PL) 6 P04A04416; PCSR(PL) 3 P04A03524 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4055905 Keywords : purine nucleoside phosphorylase * fluorescence Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 0.813, year: 2003

  10. Can Crystal Symmetry and Packing Influence the Active Site Conformation of Homohexameric Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Luić

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available It is generaly believed that enzymes retain most of their functionality in the crystal form due to the large solvent content of protein crystals. This is facilitated by the fact that their natural environment in solution is not too far from the one found in the crystal form. Nevertheless, if the nature of the enzyme is such to require conformational changes, overcoming of the crystal packing constraints may prove to be too difficult. Such conformational change is present in one class of enzymes (purine nucleoside phosphorylases, that is the subject of our scientific interest for many years. The influence of crystal symmetry and crystal packing on the conformation of the active sites in the case of homohexameric purine nucleoside phosphorylases is presented and analysed. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

  11. Three-dimensional structure of E. Coli purine nucleoside phosphorylase at 0.99 Å resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timofeev, V. I., E-mail: tostars@mail.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation); Abramchik, Yu. A., E-mail: ugama@yandex.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shemyakin–Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry (Russian Federation); Zhukhlistova, N. E., E-mail: inna@ns.crys.ras.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation); Muravieva, T. I.; Esipov, R. S. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shemyakin–Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry (Russian Federation); Kuranova, I. P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

    2016-03-15

    Purine nucleoside phosphorylases (PNPs) catalyze the reversible phosphorolysis of nucleosides and are key enzymes involved in nucleotide metabolism. They are essential for normal cell function and can catalyze the transglycosylation. Crystals of E. coli PNP were grown in microgravity by the capillary counterdiffusion method through a gel layer. The three-dimensional structure of the enzyme was determined by the molecular-replacement method at 0.99 Å resolution. The structural features are considered, and the structure of E. coli PNP is compared with the structures of the free enzyme and its complexes with purine base derivatives established earlier. A comparison of the environment of the purine base in the complex of PNP with formycin A and of the pyrimidine base in the complex of uridine phosphorylase with thymidine revealed the main structural features of the base-binding sites. Coordinates of the atomic model determined with high accuracy were deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB-ID: 4RJ2).

  12. Preliminary crystallographic studies of purine nucleoside phosphorylase from the cariogenic pathogen Streptococcus mutans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou, Qiao-Ming; Liu, Xiang; Brostromer, Erik; Li, Lan-Fen; Su, Xiao-Dong

    2009-01-01

    Purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP), which is a pivotal enzyme in the nucleotide-salvage pathway, has been expressed in Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3) in a soluble form at a high level. After purification of the PNP enzyme, the protein was crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion technique. The punA gene of the cariogenic pathogen Streptococcus mutans encodes purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP), which is a pivotal enzyme in the nucleotide-salvage pathway, catalyzing the phosphorolysis of purine nucleosides to generate purine bases and α-ribose 1-phosphate. In the present work, the PNP protein was expressed in Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3) in a soluble form at a high level. After purification of the PNP enzyme, the protein was crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion technique; the crystals diffracted to 1.6 Å resolution at best. The crystals belonged to space group H3, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 113.0, c = 60.1 Å

  13. Cytological localization of adenosine kinase, nucleoside phosphorylase-1, and esterase-10 genes on mouse chromosome 14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samuelson, L.C.; Farber, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    The authors have determined the regional locations on mouse chromosome 14 of the genes for mouse adenosine kinase (ADK), nucleoside phosphorylase- 1 (NP-1), and esterase-10 (ES-10) by analysis of rearranged mouse chromosomes in gamma-irradiated Chinese hamster X mouse hybrid cell lines. Irradiated clones were screened for expression of the murine forms of these enzymes; segregant clones that expressed only one or two of the three markers were karyotyped. The patterns of enzyme expression in these segregants were correlated with the presence of rearranged chromosomes. The Adk gene was localized to bands A2 to B, Np-1 to bands B to C1, and Es-10 to bands D2 to E2

  14. Diagnosis of immunodeficiency caused by a purine nucleoside phosphorylase defect by using tandem mass spectrometry on dried blood spots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    la Marca, Giancarlo; Canessa, Clementina; Giocaliere, Elisa; Romano, Francesca; Malvagia, Sabrina; Funghini, Silvia; Moriondo, Maria; Valleriani, Claudia; Lippi, Francesca; Ombrone, Daniela; Della Bona, Maria Luisa; Speckmann, Carsten; Borte, Stephan; Brodszki, Nicholas; Gennery, Andrew R; Weinacht, Katja; Celmeli, Fatih; Pagel, Julia; de Martino, Maurizio; Guerrini, Renzo; Wittkowski, Helmut; Santisteban, Ines; Bali, Pawan; Ikinciogullari, Aydan; Hershfield, Michael; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Resti, Massimo; Azzari, Chiara

    2014-07-01

    Purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) deficiency is a rare form of autosomal recessive combined primary immunodeficiency caused by a enzyme defect leading to the accumulation of inosine, 2'-deoxy-inosine (dIno), guanosine, and 2'-deoxy-guanosine (dGuo) in all cells, especially lymphocytes. Treatments are available and curative for PNP deficiency, but their efficacy depends on the early approach. PNP-combined immunodeficiency complies with the criteria for inclusion in a newborn screening program. This study evaluate whether mass spectrometry can identify metabolite abnormalities in dried blood spots (DBSs) from affected patients, with the final goal of individuating the disease at birth during routine newborn screening. DBS samples from 9 patients with genetically confirmed PNP-combined immunodeficiency, 10,000 DBS samples from healthy newborns, and 240 DBSs from healthy donors of different age ranges were examined. Inosine, dIno, guanosine, and dGuo were tested by using tandem mass spectrometry (TMS). T-cell receptor excision circle (TREC) and kappa-deleting recombination excision circle (KREC) levels were evaluated by using quantitative RT-PCR only for the 2 patients (patients 8 and 9) whose neonatal DBSs were available. Mean levels of guanosine, inosine, dGuo, and dIno were 4.4, 133.3, 3.6, and 3.8 μmol/L, respectively, in affected patients. No indeterminate or false-positive results were found. In patient 8 TREC levels were borderline and KREC levels were abnormal; in patient 9 TRECs were undetectable, whereas KREC levels were normal. TMS is a valid method for diagnosis of PNP deficiency on DBSs of affected patients at a negligible cost. TMS identifies newborns with PNP deficiency, whereas TREC or KREC measurement alone can fail. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction study on pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylase TTHA1771 from Thermus thermophilus HB8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Katsumi; Kunishima, Naoki

    2007-01-01

    The pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylase TTHA1771 from T. thermophilus HB8 has been overexpressed, purified and crystallized. The crystals diffract X-rays to 1.8 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation. Pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylase (PYNP) catalyzes the reversible phosphorolysis of pyrimidines in the nucleotide-synthesis salvage pathway. In order to study the structure–thermostability relationship of this enzyme, PYNP from the extreme thermophile Thermus thermophilus HB8 (TTHA1771) has been cloned, overexpressed and purified. The TTHA1771 protein was crystallized at 291 K using the oil-microbatch method with PEG 4000 as a precipitant. A native data set was collected to 1.8 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation. The crystal belongs to the monoclinic space group P2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 58.83, b = 76.23, c = 103.86 Å, β = 91.3°

  16. The crystal structure of the hexameric purine nucleoside phosphorylase from Bacillus subtilis in complex with adenosine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giuseppe, P.O.; Meza, A.N.; Martins, N.H.; Santos, C.R.; Murakami, M.T. [Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron (LNLS), Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: Purine nucleoside phosphorylases (PNPs) play a key role in the purine-salvage pathway in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Its ribosyltransferase activity is of great biotechnological interest due to potential application in the synthesis of nucleoside analogues used in the treatment of antiviral infections and in anticancer chemotherapy. Trimeric PNPs are found mainly in vertebrates and are specific for 6-oxo-purines whereas hexameric PNPs are prevalent in prokaryotes and exhibit a broad range of substrates including 6-oxo and 6-amino purines. BsPNP233, the hexameric PNP from B. subtilis, is able to catalyze the bioconversion of ribavirin, an anti-viral drug, and is relatively thermostable, being a good target for industrial use. Here we report the crystal structures of BsPNP233 in the apo form and in complex with adenosine solved at 2.65 and 1.91 resolution, respectively. The apo and ligand-bound BsPNP233 subunits superposed with an overall r.m.s. deviation of 0.31 for all C{alpha} atoms, which suggests that no major conformational changes occur upon substrate binding. Based on the crystal structure of BsPNP233 in complex with adenosine we have defined the active site residues implicated in binding the ribose (H4{sup *}, R43{sup *}, M64, R87, E178, M179, E180) and the nitrogenous base (S90, C91, G92, S202, V177, F159). These residues are highly conserved among the bacterial hexameric PNPs, suggesting they share the same mode of interaction with the substrates. This work will probably contribute to a better understanding of the molecular basis for the broad substrate specificity of hexameric PNPs and to projects aiming the rational design of PNPs for industrial purposes. (author)

  17. Radiochromatographic determination of activity of adenosine deaminase and purine nucleoside phosphorylase in blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pechan, I.; Rendekova, V.; Pechanova, E.; Krizko, J.

    1982-01-01

    Expeditious and sensitive methods are described for determining the activities of adenosine deaminase (ADA) and purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) in human lymphocytes and erythrocytes. ADA and PNP activity is determined on the basis of the reaction of (U- 14 C)adenosine or (8- 14 C)inosine with the lysate of human blood cells. Reaction products are separated using paper chromatography. Following the measurement of the radioactivity of spots of adenosine, inosine and hypoxanthine, a calculation is made of ADA and PNP activity from the results of the said measurements. On a sample of 52 clinically healthy people average ADA and PNP activity in isolated lymphocytes was found to be (51.6+-18.8) and (185.6+-94.7) pcat/10 6 cells and in erythrocytes (9.8+-2.98) and (17.1+-3.19) pcat/mg of proteins, respectively. The advantage of the method is the small amount of sample needed (1 to 2 ml) which allows its application in pediatrics. (Ha)

  18. Four Generations of Transition State Analogues for Human Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, M.; Shi, W; Rinaldo-Mathis, A; Tyler, P; Evans, G; Almo, S; Schramm, V

    2010-01-01

    Inhibition of human purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) stops growth of activated T-cells and the formation of 6-oxypurine bases, making it a target for leukemia, autoimmune disorders, and gout. Four generations of ribocation transition-state mimics bound to PNP are structurally characterized. Immucillin-H (K*{sub i} = 58 pM, first-generation) contains an iminoribitol cation with four asymmetric carbons. DADMe-Immucillin-H (K*{sub i} = 9 pM, second-generation), uses a methylene-bridged dihydroxypyrrolidine cation with two asymmetric centers. DATMe-Immucillin-H (K*{sub i} = 9 pM, third-generation) contains an open-chain amino alcohol cation with two asymmetric carbons. SerMe-ImmH (K*{sub i} = 5 pM, fourth-generation) uses achiral dihydroxyaminoalcohol seramide as the ribocation mimic. Crystal structures of PNPs establish features of tight binding to be; (1) ion-pair formation between bound phosphate (or its mimic) and inhibitor cation, (2) leaving-group interactions to N1, O6, and N7 of 9-deazahypoxanthine, (3) interaction between phosphate and inhibitor hydroxyl groups, and (4) His257 interacting with the 5{prime}-hydroxyl group. The first generation analogue is an imperfect fit to the catalytic site with a long ion pair distance between the iminoribitol and bound phosphate and weaker interactions to the leaving group. Increasing the ribocation to leaving-group distance in the second- to fourth-generation analogues provides powerful binding interactions and a facile synthetic route to powerful inhibitors. Despite chemical diversity in the four generations of transition-state analogues, the catalytic site geometry is almost the same for all analogues. Multiple solutions in transition-state analogue design are available to convert the energy of catalytic rate enhancement to binding energy in human PNP.

  19. Insights into phosphate cooperativity and influence of substrate modifications on binding and catalysis of hexameric purine nucleoside phosphorylases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila O de Giuseppe

    Full Text Available The hexameric purine nucleoside phosphorylase from Bacillus subtilis (BsPNP233 displays great potential to produce nucleoside analogues in industry and can be exploited in the development of new anti-tumor gene therapies. In order to provide structural basis for enzyme and substrates rational optimization, aiming at those applications, the present work shows a thorough and detailed structural description of the binding mode of substrates and nucleoside analogues to the active site of the hexameric BsPNP233. Here we report the crystal structure of BsPNP233 in the apo form and in complex with 11 ligands, including clinically relevant compounds. The crystal structure of six ligands (adenine, 2'deoxyguanosine, aciclovir, ganciclovir, 8-bromoguanosine, 6-chloroguanosine in complex with a hexameric PNP are presented for the first time. Our data showed that free bases adopt alternative conformations in the BsPNP233 active site and indicated that binding of the co-substrate (2'deoxyribose 1-phosphate might contribute for stabilizing the bases in a favorable orientation for catalysis. The BsPNP233-adenosine complex revealed that a hydrogen bond between the 5' hydroxyl group of adenosine and Arg(43* side chain contributes for the ribosyl radical to adopt an unusual C3'-endo conformation. The structures with 6-chloroguanosine and 8-bromoguanosine pointed out that the Cl(6 and Br(8 substrate modifications seem to be detrimental for catalysis and can be explored in the design of inhibitors for hexameric PNPs from pathogens. Our data also corroborated the competitive inhibition mechanism of hexameric PNPs by tubercidin and suggested that the acyclic nucleoside ganciclovir is a better inhibitor for hexameric PNPs than aciclovir. Furthermore, comparative structural analyses indicated that the replacement of Ser(90 by a threonine in the B. cereus hexameric adenosine phosphorylase (Thr(91 is responsible for the lack of negative cooperativity of phosphate binding

  20. Inhibition and Structure of Trichomonas vaginalis Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase with Picomolar Transition State Analogues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinaldo-Matthis,A.; Wing, C.; Ghanem, M.; Deng, H.; Wu, P.; Gupta, A.; Tyler, P.; Evans, G.; Furneaux, R.; et al.

    2007-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a parasitic protozoan purine auxotroph possessing a unique purine salvage pathway consisting of a bacterial type purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) and a purine nucleoside kinase. Thus, T. vaginalis PNP (TvPNP) functions in the reverse direction relative to the PNPs in other organisms. Immucillin-A (ImmA) and DADMe-Immucillin-A (DADMe-ImmA) are transition stte mimics of adenosine with geometric and electrostatic features that resemble early and late transition states of adenosine at the transition state stabilized by TvPNP. ImmA demonstrates slow-onset tight-binding inhibition with TvPNP, to give an equilibrium dissociation constant of 87 pM, an inhibitor release half-time of 17.2 min, and a K{sub m}/K{sub d} ratio of 70,100. DADMe-ImmA resembles a late ribooxacarbenium ion transition state for TvPNP to give a dissociation constant of 30 pM, an inhibitor release half-time of 64 min, and a K{sub m}/K{sub d} ratio of 203,300. The tight binding of DADMe-ImmA supports a late S{sub N}1 transition state. Despite their tight binding to TvPNP, ImmA and DADMe-ImmA are weak inhibitors of human and P. falciparum PNPs. The crystal structures of the TvPNP-ImmA{center_dot}PO{sub 4} and TvPNP{center_dot}DADMe-ImmA{center_dot}PO{sub 4} ternary complexes differ from previous structures with substrate anologues. The tight binding with DADMe-ImmA is in part due to a 2.7 {angstrom} ionic interaction between a PO{sub 4} oxygen and the N1 cation of the hydroxypyrrolidine and is weaker in the TvPNP{center_dot}ImmA{center_dot}PO{sub 4} structure at 3.5 {angstrom}. However, the TvPNP{center_dot}ImmA{center_dot}PO{sub 4} structure includes hydrogen bonds between the 2'-hydroxyl and the protein that are not present in TvPNP{center_dot}DADMe-ImmA{center_dot}PO{sub 4}. These structures explain why DADMe-ImmA binds tighter than ImmA. Immucillin-H is a 12 nM inhibitor of TvPNP but a 56 pM inhibitor of human PNP. And this difference is explained by isotope

  1. A quantitative histochemical procedure for the demonstration of purine nucleoside phosphorylase activity in rat and human liver using Tetranitro BT and xanthine oxidase as auxiliary enzyme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frederiks, W. M.; Bosch, K. S.; van Gulik, T.

    1993-01-01

    A quantitative histochemical procedure was developed for the demonstration of purine nucleoside phosphorylase in rat liver using unfixed cryostat sections and the auxiliary enzyme xanthine oxidase. The optimum incubation medium contained 18% (w/v) poly(vinyl alcohol), 100 mM phosphate buffer, pH

  2. Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase (PNP) Activity of Lymphocytes and T Cell Subsets in Peripheral Blood in Thyroid Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Soo

    1992-01-01

    To elucidate alteration of purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) activity of peripheral lymphocytes and helper/inducer and suppressor/cytototxic T cells in patients with thyroid tumors, the author examined PNP activity, and CD4 + and CD8 + cells of peripheral blood in 20 cases of simple goiter, 9 cases of thyroid adenoma and 20 cases of thyroid cancer as well as 11 cases of adult healthy subjects as control. Diagnoses were established on the basis of commonly accepted clinical and biochemical criteria in simple goiter and were confirmed histopathologically in thyroid adenoma and cancer. All blood was obtained from veins of the patients and control subjects in Pusan National University Hospital during the period of January to August, 1991. The results obtained were summarized as follows: 1) The PNP activity was significantly decreased or tended to be decreased in thyroid adenomas and cancers as compared with control subjects and simple goiters. 2) The percentage of CD8 cells was significantly decreased or tended to be decreased in thyroid cancers as compared with simple goiters, thyroid adenomas and control subjects. 3) The CD4/CD8 ratio was significantly increased or tended to be increased in thyroid cancer as compared with simple goiters, thyroid adenomas and control subjects. On the basis of the results, it can be suggested that the immunodysfunction in thyroid cancer may be due to decreased suppressor/cytotoxic T cells, and the estimation of PNP activity of peripheral lymphocyte is a helpful test in detecting the immune status in thyroid tumors.

  3. Site-Selective Ribosylation of Fluorescent Nucleobase Analogs Using Purine-Nucleoside Phosphorylase as a Catalyst: Effects of Point Mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicja Stachelska-Wierzchowska

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Enzymatic ribosylation of fluorescent 8-azapurine derivatives, like 8-azaguanine and 2,6-diamino-8-azapurine, with purine-nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP as a catalyst, leads to N9, N8, and N7-ribosides. The final proportion of the products may be modulated by point mutations in the enzyme active site. As an example, ribosylation of the latter substrate by wild-type calf PNP gives N7- and N8-ribosides, while the N243D mutant directs the ribosyl substitution at N9- and N7-positions. The same mutant allows synthesis of the fluorescent N7-β-d-ribosyl-8-azaguanine. The mutated form of the E. coli PNP, D204N, can be utilized to obtain non-typical ribosides of 8-azaadenine and 2,6-diamino-8-azapurine as well. The N7- and N8-ribosides of the 8-azapurines can be analytically useful, as illustrated by N7-β-d-ribosyl-2,6-diamino-8-azapurine, which is a good fluorogenic substrate for mammalian forms of PNP, including human blood PNP, while the N8-riboside is selective to the E. coli enzyme.

  4. Enzymatic Synthesis of Highly Fluorescent 8-Azapurine Ribosides Using a Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase Reverse Reaction: Variable Ribosylation Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran Mikleušević

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Various forms of purine-nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP were used as catalysts of enzymatic ribosylation of selected fluorescent 8-azapurines. It was found that the recombinant calf PNP catalyzes ribosylation of 2,6-diamino-8-azapurine in a phosphate-free medium, with ribose-1-phosphate as ribose donor, but the ribosylation site is predominantly N7 and N8, with the proportion of N8/N7 ribosylated products markedly dependent on the reaction conditions. Both products are fluorescent. Application of the E. coli PNP gave a mixture of N8 and N9-substituted ribosides. Fluorescence of the ribosylated 2,6-diamino-8-azapurine has been briefly characterized. The highest quantum yield, ~0.9, was obtained for N9-β-d-riboside (λmax 365 nm, while for N8-β-d-riboside, emitting at ~430 nm, the fluorescence quantum yield was found to be close to 0.4. Ribosylation of 8-azaguanine with calf PNP as a catalyst goes exclusively to N9. By contrast, the E. coli PNP ribosylates 8-azaGua predominantly at N9, with minor, but highly fluorescent products ribosylated at N8/N7.

  5. Is muscle glycogenolysis impaired in X-linked phosphorylase b kinase deficiency?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orngreen, M.C.; Schelhaas, H.J.; Jeppesen, T.D.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: It is unclear to what extent muscle phosphorylase b kinase (PHK) deficiency is associated with exercise-related symptoms and impaired muscle metabolism, because 1) only four patients have been characterized at the molecular level, 2) reported symptoms have been nonspecific, and 3......) lactate responses to ischemic handgrip exercise have been normal. METHODS: We studied a 50-year-old man with X-linked PHK deficiency using ischemic forearm and cycle ergometry exercise tests to define the derangement of muscle metabolism. We compared our findings with those in patients with Mc...... in healthy subjects. Constant workload elicited a second wind in all patients with McArdle disease, but not in the patient with PHK deficiency. IV glucose administration appeared to improve exercise tolerance in the patient with PHK deficiency, but not to the same extent as in the patients with Mc...

  6. Retained sensitivity to cytotoxic pyrimidine nucleoside analogs in thymidine kinase 2 deficient human fibroblasts

    OpenAIRE

    Bjerke, Mia; Solaroli, Nicola; Lesko, Nicole; Balzarini, Jan; Johansson, Magnus; Karlsson, Anna

    2010-01-01

    Thymidine kinase 2 (TK2) is a mitochondrial deoxyribonucleoside kinase that phosphorylates several nucleoside analogs used in anti-viral and anti-cancer therapy. A fibroblast cell line with decreased TK2 activity was investigated in order to obtain insights in the effects of TK2 deficiency on nucleotide metabolism. The role of TK2 for the sensitivity against cytotoxic nucleoside analogs was also investigated. The TK2 deficient cells retained their sensitivity against all pyrimidine nucleoside...

  7. Nucleoside analog toxicity and nucleoside kinase deficiency : Effects on mitochondrial DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Bjerke, Mia

    2008-01-01

    Nucleoside analogs are modified nucleosides used in treatment of cancer and viral infections. They are dependent on intracellular phosphorylation to be pharmacologically active. Deoxyribonucleoside kinases catalyze the rate-limiting step in the phosphorylation of many clinically used nucleoside analogs. Human cells contain four distinct deoxyribonucleoside kinases that have partially overlapping substrate specificities for both naturally occurring deoxyribonucleosides as wel...

  8. Retained sensitivity to cytotoxic pyrimidine nucleoside analogs in thymidine kinase 2 deficient human fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerke, Mia; Solaroli, Nicola; Lesko, Nicole; Balzarini, Jan; Johansson, Magnus; Karlsson, Anna

    2010-01-01

    Thymidine kinase 2 (TK2) is a mitochondrial deoxyribonucleoside kinase that phosphorylates several nucleoside analogs used in anti-viral and anti-cancer therapy. A fibroblast cell line with decreased TK2 activity was investigated in order to obtain insights in the effects of TK2 deficiency on nucleotide metabolism. The role of TK2 for the sensitivity against cytotoxic nucleoside analogs was also investigated. The TK2 deficient cells retained their sensitivity against all pyrimidine nucleoside analogs tested. This study suggests that nucleoside analog phosphorylation mediated by TK2 may be less important, compared to other deoxyribonucleoside kinases, for the cytotoxic effects of these compounds.

  9. Escherichia coli Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase II, the Product of the xapA Gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dandanell, Gert; Szczepanowski, R.H.; Kierdaszuk, B.

    2005-01-01

    the monoanionic form of xanthine. A single amino acid exchange, tyrosine 191 to leucine, is sufficient to convert E. coli PNP-II into an enzyme with the specificity of conventional trimeric PNPs, but the reciprocal mutation in human PNP, valine 195 to tyrosine, does not elicit xanthosine phosphorylase activity...... forms, PNP-II trimers dimerize, leading to a subunit arrangement that is qualitatively different from the "trimer of dimers" arrangement of conventional high molecular mass PNPs. Crystal structures are compatible with similar binding modes for guanine and xanthine, with a preference for the neutral over...

  10. Inhibition of human thymidine phosphorylase by conformationally constrained pyrimidine nucleoside phosphonic acids and their "open-structure" isosteres

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kóšiová, Ivana; Šimák, Ondřej; Panova, Natalya; Buděšínský, Miloš; Petrová, Magdalena; Rejman, Dominik; Liboska, Radek; Páv, Ondřej; Rosenberg, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 74, Mar 3 (2014), s. 145-168 ISSN 0223-5234 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/0820; GA ČR GA202/09/0193; GA ČR GA13-24880S; GA ČR GA13-26526S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : phosphonate * conformationally constrained nucleotide analog * human thymidine phosphorylase * PBMC * bi-substrate-like inhibitor * Michael addition Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.447, year: 2014

  11. Functional and Structural Characterization of Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase from Kluyveromyces lactis and Its Potential Applications in Reducing Purine Content in Food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahor, Durga; Priyanka, Anu; Prasad, Gandham S; Thakur, Krishan Gopal

    2016-01-01

    Consumption of foods and beverages with high purine content increases the risk of hyperuricemia, which causes gout and can lead to cardiovascular, renal, and other metabolic disorders. As patients often find dietary restrictions challenging, enzymatically lowering purine content in popular foods and beverages offers a safe and attractive strategy to control hyperuricemia. Here, we report structurally and functionally characterized purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) from Kluyveromyces lactis (KlacPNP), a key enzyme involved in the purine degradation pathway. We report a 1.97 Å resolution crystal structure of homotrimeric KlacPNP with an intrinsically bound hypoxanthine in the active site. KlacPNP belongs to the nucleoside phosphorylase-I (NP-I) family, and it specifically utilizes 6-oxopurine substrates in the following order: inosine > guanosine > xanthosine, but is inactive towards adenosine. To engineer enzymes with broad substrate specificity, we created two point variants, KlacPNPN256D and KlacPNPN256E, by replacing the catalytically active Asn256 with Asp and Glu, respectively, based on structural and comparative sequence analysis. KlacPNPN256D not only displayed broad substrate specificity by utilizing both 6-oxopurines and 6-aminopurines in the order adenosine > inosine > xanthosine > guanosine, but also displayed reversal of substrate specificity. In contrast, KlacPNPN256E was highly specific to inosine and could not utilize other tested substrates. Beer consumption is associated with increased risk of developing gout, owing to its high purine content. Here, we demonstrate that KlacPNP and KlacPNPN256D could be used to catalyze a key reaction involved in lowering beer purine content. Biochemical properties of these enzymes such as activity across a wide pH range, optimum activity at about 25°C, and stability for months at about 8°C, make them suitable candidates for food and beverage industries. Since KlacPNPN256D has broad substrate specificity, a

  12. The diagnostic value of immunohistochemically detected methylthioadenosine phosphorylase deficiency in malignant pleural mesotheliomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zimling, Zarah Glad; Jørgensen, Anne; Santoni-Rugiu, Eric

    2012-01-01

      Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) often causes diagnostic difficulties for pathologists. We assessed whether loss of methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP), a key enzyme in the intracellular recycling of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) often deleted in MPM, could be detected with immunohistoc...

  13. Characterization of an engineered human purine nucleoside phosphorylase fused to an anti-her2/neu single chain Fv for use in ADEPT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Anna M

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antibody Directed Enzyme Prodrug Therapy (ADEPT can be used to generate cytotoxic agents at the tumor site. To date non-human enzymes have mainly been utilized in ADEPT. However, these non-human enzymes are immunogenic limiting the number of times that ADEPT can be administered. To overcome the problem of immunogenicity, a fully human enzyme, capable of converting a non-toxic prodrug to cytotoxic drug was developed and joined to a human tumor specific scFv yielding a fully human targeting agent. Methods A double mutant of human purine nucleoside phosphorylase (hDM was developed which unlike the human enzyme can cleave adenosine-based prodrugs. For tumor-specific targeting, hDM was fused to the human anti-HER2/neu single chain Fv (scFv, C6 MH3B1. Enzymatic activity of hDM with its natural substrates and prodrugs was determined using spectrophotomeric approaches. A cell proliferation assay was used to assess the cytotoxicity generated following conversion of prodrug to drug as a result of enzymatic activity of hDM. Affinity of the targeting scFv, C6 MH3B1 fused to hDM to Her2/neu was confirmed using affinity chromatography, surface plasmon resonance, and flow-cytometry. Results In vitro hDM-C6 MH3B1 binds specifically to HER2/neu expressing tumor cells and localizes hDM to tumor cells, where the enzymatic activity of hDM-C6 MH3B1, but not the wild type enzyme, results in phosphorolysis of the prodrug, 2-fluoro-2'-deoxyadenosine to the cytotoxic drug 2-fluoroadenine (F-Ade causing inhibition of tumor cell proliferation. Significantly, the toxic small drug diffuses through the cell membrane of HER2/neu expressing cells as well as cells that lack the expression of HER2/neu, causing a bystander effect. F-Ade is toxic to cells irrespective of their growth rate; therefore, both the slowly dividing tumor cells and the non-dividing neighboring stromal cells that support tumor growth should be killed. Analysis of potential novel MHCII

  14. A novel GDP-D-glucose phosphorylase involved in quality control of the nucleoside diphosphate sugar pool in Caenorhabditis elegans and mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Lital N; Gomez, Tara A; Clarke, Steven G; Linster, Carole L

    2011-06-17

    The plant VTC2 gene encodes GDP-L-galactose phosphorylase, a rate-limiting enzyme in plant vitamin C biosynthesis. Genes encoding apparent orthologs of VTC2 exist in both mammals, which produce vitamin C by a distinct metabolic pathway, and in the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans where vitamin C biosynthesis has not been demonstrated. We have now expressed cDNAs of the human and worm VTC2 homolog genes (C15orf58 and C10F3.4, respectively) and found that the purified proteins also display GDP-hexose phosphorylase activity. However, as opposed to the plant enzyme, the major reaction catalyzed by these enzymes is the phosphorolysis of GDP-D-glucose to GDP and D-glucose 1-phosphate. We detected activities with similar substrate specificity in worm and mouse tissue extracts. The highest expression of GDP-D-glucose phosphorylase was found in the nervous and male reproductive systems. A C. elegans C10F3.4 deletion strain was found to totally lack GDP-D-glucose phosphorylase activity; this activity was also found to be decreased in human HEK293T cells transfected with siRNAs against the human C15orf58 gene. These observations confirm the identification of the worm C10F3.4 and the human C15orf58 gene expression products as the GDP-D-glucose phosphorylases of these organisms. Significantly, we found an accumulation of GDP-D-glucose in the C10F3.4 mutant worms, suggesting that the GDP-D-glucose phosphorylase may function to remove GDP-D-glucose formed by GDP-D-mannose pyrophosphorylase, an enzyme that has previously been shown to lack specificity for its physiological D-mannose 1-phosphate substrate. We propose that such removal may prevent the misincorporation of glucosyl residues for mannosyl residues into the glycoconjugates of worms and mammals.

  15. A Novel GDP-d-glucose Phosphorylase Involved in Quality Control of the Nucleoside Diphosphate Sugar Pool in Caenorhabditis elegans and Mammals*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Lital N.; Gomez, Tara A.; Clarke, Steven G.; Linster, Carole L.

    2011-01-01

    The plant VTC2 gene encodes GDP-l-galactose phosphorylase, a rate-limiting enzyme in plant vitamin C biosynthesis. Genes encoding apparent orthologs of VTC2 exist in both mammals, which produce vitamin C by a distinct metabolic pathway, and in the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans where vitamin C biosynthesis has not been demonstrated. We have now expressed cDNAs of the human and worm VTC2 homolog genes (C15orf58 and C10F3.4, respectively) and found that the purified proteins also display GDP-hexose phosphorylase activity. However, as opposed to the plant enzyme, the major reaction catalyzed by these enzymes is the phosphorolysis of GDP-d-glucose to GDP and d-glucose 1-phosphate. We detected activities with similar substrate specificity in worm and mouse tissue extracts. The highest expression of GDP-d-glucose phosphorylase was found in the nervous and male reproductive systems. A C. elegans C10F3.4 deletion strain was found to totally lack GDP-d-glucose phosphorylase activity; this activity was also found to be decreased in human HEK293T cells transfected with siRNAs against the human C15orf58 gene. These observations confirm the identification of the worm C10F3.4 and the human C15orf58 gene expression products as the GDP-d-glucose phosphorylases of these organisms. Significantly, we found an accumulation of GDP-d-glucose in the C10F3.4 mutant worms, suggesting that the GDP-d-glucose phosphorylase may function to remove GDP-d-glucose formed by GDP-d-mannose pyrophosphorylase, an enzyme that has previously been shown to lack specificity for its physiological d-mannose 1-phosphate substrate. We propose that such removal may prevent the misincorporation of glucosyl residues for mannosyl residues into the glycoconjugates of worms and mammals. PMID:21507950

  16. Selective killing of tumors deficient in methylthioadenosine phosphorylase: a novel strategy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Lubin

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The gene for methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP lies on 9p21, close to the gene CDKN2A that encodes the tumor suppressor proteins p16 and p14ARF. MTAP and CDKN2A are homozygously co-deleted, with a frequency of 35 to 70%, in lung and pancreatic cancer, glioblastoma, osteosarcoma, soft-tissue sarcoma, mesothelioma, and T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In normal cells, but not in tumor cells lacking MTAP, MTAP cleaves the natural substrate, 5'-deoxy-5'-methylthioadenosine (MTA, to adenine and 5-methylthioribose-1-phosphate (MTR-1-P, which are then converted to adenine nucleotides and methionine. This distinct difference between normal MTAP-positive cells and tumor MTAP-negative cells led to several proposals for therapy. We offer a novel strategy in which both MTA and a toxic adenine analog, such as 2,6-diaminopurine (DAP, 6-methylpurine (MeP, or 2-fluoroadenine (F-Ade, are administered. In MTAP-positive cells, abundant adenine, generated from supplied MTA, competitively blocks the conversion of an analog, by adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT, to its active nucleotide form. In MTAP-negative tumor cells, the supplied MTA cannot generate adenine; hence conversion of the analog is not blocked.We show that this combination treatment--adenine analog plus MTA--kills MTAP-negative A549 lung tumor cells, while MTAP-positive human fibroblasts (HF are protected. In co-cultures of the breast tumor cell line, MCF-7, and HF cells, MCF-7 is inhibited or killed, while HF cells proliferate robustly. 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU and 6-thioguanine (6-TG may also be used with our strategy. Though neither analog is activated by APRT, in MTAP-positive cells, adenine produced from supplied MTA blocks conversion of 5-FU and 6-TG to their toxic nucleotide forms by competing for 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP. The combination of MTA with 5-FU or 6-TG, in the treatment of MTAP-negative tumors, may produce a significantly improved therapeutic index

  17. Transgene expression of Drosophila melanogaster nucleoside kinase reverses mitochondrial thymidine kinase 2 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Shuba; Zhou, Xiaoshan; Paredes, João A; Kuiper, Raoul V; Curbo, Sophie; Karlsson, Anna

    2013-02-15

    A strategy to reverse the symptoms of thymidine kinase 2 (TK2) deficiency in a mouse model was investigated. The nucleoside kinase from Drosophila melanogaster (Dm-dNK) was expressed in TK2-deficient mice that have been shown to present with a severe phenotype caused by mitochondrial DNA depletion. The Dm-dNK(+/-) transgenic mice were shown to be able to rescue the TK2-deficient mice. The Dm-dNK(+/-)TK2(-/-) mice were normal as judged by growth and behavior during the observation time of 6 months. The Dm-dNK-expressing mice showed a substantial increase in thymidine-phosphorylating activity in investigated tissues. The Dm-dNK expression also resulted in highly elevated dTTP pools. The dTTP pool alterations did not cause specific mitochondrial DNA mutations or deletions when 6-month-old mice were analyzed. The mitochondrial DNA was also detected at normal levels. In conclusion, the Dm-dNK(+/-)TK2(-/-) mouse model illustrates how dTMP synthesized in the cell nucleus can compensate for loss of intramitochondrial dTMP synthesis in differentiated tissue. The data presented open new possibilities to treat the severe symptoms of TK2 deficiency.

  18. Transgene Expression of Drosophila melanogaster Nucleoside Kinase Reverses Mitochondrial Thymidine Kinase 2 Deficiency*♦

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Shuba; Zhou, Xiaoshan; Paredes, João A.; Kuiper, Raoul V.; Curbo, Sophie; Karlsson, Anna

    2013-01-01

    A strategy to reverse the symptoms of thymidine kinase 2 (TK2) deficiency in a mouse model was investigated. The nucleoside kinase from Drosophila melanogaster (Dm-dNK) was expressed in TK2-deficient mice that have been shown to present with a severe phenotype caused by mitochondrial DNA depletion. The Dm-dNK+/− transgenic mice were shown to be able to rescue the TK2-deficient mice. The Dm-dNK+/−TK2−/− mice were normal as judged by growth and behavior during the observation time of 6 months. The Dm-dNK-expressing mice showed a substantial increase in thymidine-phosphorylating activity in investigated tissues. The Dm-dNK expression also resulted in highly elevated dTTP pools. The dTTP pool alterations did not cause specific mitochondrial DNA mutations or deletions when 6-month-old mice were analyzed. The mitochondrial DNA was also detected at normal levels. In conclusion, the Dm-dNK+/−TK2−/− mouse model illustrates how dTMP synthesized in the cell nucleus can compensate for loss of intramitochondrial dTMP synthesis in differentiated tissue. The data presented open new possibilities to treat the severe symptoms of TK2 deficiency. PMID:23288848

  19. A QM-MD simulation approach to the analysis of FRET processes in (bio)molecular systems. A case study: complexes of E. coli purine nucleoside phosphorylase and its mutants with formycin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobieraj, M; Krzyśko, K A; Jarmuła, A; Kalinowski, M W; Lesyng, B; Prokopowicz, M; Cieśla, J; Gojdź, A; Kierdaszuk, B

    2015-04-01

    Predicting FRET pathways in proteins using computer simulation techniques is very important for reliable interpretation of experimental data. A novel and relatively simple methodology has been developed and applied to purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) complexed with a fluorescent ligand - formycin A (FA). FRET occurs between an excited Tyr residue (D*) and FA (A). This study aims to interpret experimental data that, among others, suggests the absence of FRET for the PNPF159A mutant in complex with FA, based on novel theoretical methodology. MD simulations for the protein molecule containing D*, and complexed with A, are carried out. Interactions of D* with its molecular environment are accounted by including changes of the ESP charges in S1, compared to S0, and computed at the SCF-CI level. FRET probability W F depends on the inverse six-power of the D*-A distance, R da . The orientational factor 0 < k(2) < 4 between D* and A is computed and included in the analysis. Finally W F is time-averaged over the MD trajectories resulting in its mean value. The red-shift of the tyrosinate anion emission and thus lack of spectral overlap integral and thermal energy dissipation are the reasons for the FRET absence in the studied mutants at pH 7 and above. The presence of the tyrosinate anion results in a competitive energy dissipation channel and red-shifted emission, thus in consequence in the absence of FRET. These studies also indicate an important role of the phenyl ring of Phe159 for FRET in the wild-type PNP, which does not exist in the Ala159 mutant, and for the effective association of PNP with FA. In a more general context, our observations point out very interesting and biologically important properties of the tyrosine residue in its excited state, which may undergo spontaneous deprotonation in the biomolecular systems, resulting further in unexpected physical and/or biological phenomena. Until now, this observation has not been widely discussed in the

  20. Pentose phosphates in nucleoside interconversion and catabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozzi, Maria G; Camici, Marcella; Mascia, Laura; Sgarrella, Francesco; Ipata, Piero L

    2006-03-01

    Ribose phosphates are either synthesized through the oxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway, or are supplied by nucleoside phosphorylases. The two main pentose phosphates, ribose-5-phosphate and ribose-1-phosphate, are readily interconverted by the action of phosphopentomutase. Ribose-5-phosphate is the direct precursor of 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate, for both de novo and 'salvage' synthesis of nucleotides. Phosphorolysis of deoxyribonucleosides is the main source of deoxyribose phosphates, which are interconvertible, through the action of phosphopentomutase. The pentose moiety of all nucleosides can serve as a carbon and energy source. During the past decade, extensive advances have been made in elucidating the pathways by which the pentose phosphates, arising from nucleoside phosphorolysis, are either recycled, without opening of their furanosidic ring, or catabolized as a carbon and energy source. We review herein the experimental knowledge on the molecular mechanisms by which (a) ribose-1-phosphate, produced by purine nucleoside phosphorylase acting catabolically, is either anabolized for pyrimidine salvage and 5-fluorouracil activation, with uridine phosphorylase acting anabolically, or recycled for nucleoside and base interconversion; (b) the nucleosides can be regarded, both in bacteria and in eukaryotic cells, as carriers of sugars, that are made available though the action of nucleoside phosphorylases. In bacteria, catabolism of nucleosides, when suitable carbon and energy sources are not available, is accomplished by a battery of nucleoside transporters and of inducible catabolic enzymes for purine and pyrimidine nucleosides and for pentose phosphates. In eukaryotic cells, the modulation of pentose phosphate production by nucleoside catabolism seems to be affected by developmental and physiological factors on enzyme levels.

  1. Stabilization of Escherichia coli uridine phosphorylase by evolution and immobilization

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Visser, Daniel F

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available nucleoside phosphorylase (BHPNP1) from the thermotolerant alkalophile Bacillus halodurans with the Escherichia coli uridine phosphorylase (EcUP) (EC 2.4.2.3) in a one-pot cascade reaction can produce 5-MU in high yield [2, 3]. The optimal operating... reaction temperature of 60?C is within the thermostability range of BHPNP, but the stability of the UP is only 40?C. This requires higher enzyme loading to offset the rate of thermal deactivation. Moreover, due to the low solubility of the reaction...

  2. Long term expression of Drosophila melanogaster nucleoside kinase in thymidine kinase 2-deficient mice with no lethal effects caused by nucleotide pool imbalances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Shuba; Paredes, João A; Zhou, Xiaoshan; Kuiper, Raoul V; Hultenby, Kjell; Curbo, Sophie; Karlsson, Anna

    2014-11-21

    Mitochondrial DNA depletion caused by thymidine kinase 2 (TK2) deficiency can be compensated by a nucleoside kinase from Drosophila melanogaster (Dm-dNK) in mice. We show that transgene expression of Dm-dNK in Tk2 knock-out (Tk2(-/-)) mice extended the life span of Tk2(-/-) mice from 3 weeks to at least 20 months. The Dm-dNK(+/-)Tk2(-/-) mice maintained normal mitochondrial DNA levels throughout the observation time. A significant difference in total body weight due to the reduction of subcutaneous and visceral fat in the Dm-dNK(+/-)Tk2(-/-) mice was the only visible difference compared with control mice. This indicates an effect on fat metabolism mediated through residual Tk2 deficiency because Dm-dNK expression was low in both liver and fat tissues. Dm-dNK expression led to increased dNTP pools and an increase in the catabolism of purine and pyrimidine nucleotides but these alterations did not apparently affect the mice during the 20 months of observation. In conclusion, Dm-dNK expression in the cell nucleus expanded the total dNTP pools to levels required for efficient mitochondrial DNA synthesis, thereby compensated the Tk2 deficiency, during a normal life span of the mice. The Dm-dNK(+/-) mouse serves as a model for nucleoside gene or enzyme substitutions, nucleotide imbalances, and dNTP alterations in different tissues. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Long Term Expression of Drosophila melanogaster Nucleoside Kinase in Thymidine Kinase 2-deficient Mice with No Lethal Effects Caused by Nucleotide Pool Imbalances*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Shuba; Paredes, João A.; Zhou, Xiaoshan; Kuiper, Raoul V.; Hultenby, Kjell; Curbo, Sophie; Karlsson, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA depletion caused by thymidine kinase 2 (TK2) deficiency can be compensated by a nucleoside kinase from Drosophila melanogaster (Dm-dNK) in mice. We show that transgene expression of Dm-dNK in Tk2 knock-out (Tk2−/−) mice extended the life span of Tk2−/− mice from 3 weeks to at least 20 months. The Dm-dNK+/−Tk2−/− mice maintained normal mitochondrial DNA levels throughout the observation time. A significant difference in total body weight due to the reduction of subcutaneous and visceral fat in the Dm-dNK+/−Tk2−/− mice was the only visible difference compared with control mice. This indicates an effect on fat metabolism mediated through residual Tk2 deficiency because Dm-dNK expression was low in both liver and fat tissues. Dm-dNK expression led to increased dNTP pools and an increase in the catabolism of purine and pyrimidine nucleotides but these alterations did not apparently affect the mice during the 20 months of observation. In conclusion, Dm-dNK expression in the cell nucleus expanded the total dNTP pools to levels required for efficient mitochondrial DNA synthesis, thereby compensated the Tk2 deficiency, during a normal life span of the mice. The Dm-dNK+/− mouse serves as a model for nucleoside gene or enzyme substitutions, nucleotide imbalances, and dNTP alterations in different tissues. PMID:25296759

  4. The role of pH on the thermodynamics and kinetics of muscle biochemistry: an in vivo study by (31)P-MRS in patients with myo-phosphorylase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malucelli, E; Iotti, S; Manners, D N; Testa, C; Martinuzzi, A; Barbiroli, B; Lodi, R

    2011-09-01

    In this study we assessed ΔG'(ATP) hydrolysis, cytosolic [ADP], and the rate of phosphocreatine recovery using Phosphorus Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in the calf muscle of a group of patients affected by glycogen myo-phosphorylase deficiency (McArdle disease). The goal was to ascertain whether and to what extent the deficit of the glycogenolytic pathway would affect the muscle energy balance. A typical feature of this pathology is the lack of intracellular acidosis. Therefore we posed the question of whether, in the absence of pH decrease, the rate of phosphocreatine recovery depends on the amount of phosphocreatine consumed during exercise. Results showed that at the end of exercise both [ADP] and ΔG'(ATP) of patients were significantly higher than those of matched control groups reaching comparable levels of phosphocreatine concentration. Furthermore, in these patients we found that the rate of phosphocreatine recovery is not influenced by the amount of phosphocreatine consumed during exercise. These outcomes provide experimental evidence that: i) the intracellular acidification occurring in exercising skeletal muscle is a protective factor for the energy consumption; and ii) the influence of pH on the phosphocreatine recovery rate is at least in part related to the kinetic mechanisms of mitochondrial creatine kinase enzyme. 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Structural basis of the substrate specificity of Bacillus cereus adenosine phosphorylase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dessanti, Paola [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-1301 (United States); Università di Sassari, (Italy); Zhang, Yang [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-1301 (United States); Allegrini, Simone [Università di Sassari, (Italy); Tozzi, Maria Grazia [Università di Pisa, (Italy); Sgarrella, Francesco [Università di Sassari, (Italy); Ealick, Steven E., E-mail: see3@cornell.edu [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-1301 (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Adenosine phosphorylase from B. cereus shows a strong preference for adenosine over other 6-oxopurine nucleosides. Mutation of Asp204 to asparagine reduces the efficiency of adenosine cleavage but does not affect inosine cleavage, effectively reversing the substrate specificity. The structures of D204N complexes explain these observations. Purine nucleoside phosphorylases catalyze the phosphorolytic cleavage of the glycosidic bond of purine (2′-deoxy)nucleosides, generating the corresponding free base and (2′-deoxy)ribose 1-phosphate. Two classes of PNPs have been identified: homotrimers specific for 6-oxopurines and homohexamers that accept both 6-oxopurines and 6-aminopurines. Bacillus cereus adenosine phosphorylase (AdoP) is a hexameric PNP; however, it is highly specific for 6-aminopurines. To investigate the structural basis for the unique substrate specificity of AdoP, the active-site mutant D204N was prepared and kinetically characterized and the structures of the wild-type protein and the D204N mutant complexed with adenosine and sulfate or with inosine and sulfate were determined at high resolution (1.2–1.4 Å). AdoP interacts directly with the preferred substrate through a hydrogen-bond donation from the catalytically important residue Asp204 to N7 of the purine base. Comparison with Escherichia coli PNP revealed a more optimal orientation of Asp204 towards N7 of adenosine and a more closed active site. When inosine is bound, two water molecules are interposed between Asp204 and the N7 and O6 atoms of the nucleoside, thus allowing the enzyme to find alternative but less efficient ways to stabilize the transition state. The mutation of Asp204 to asparagine led to a significant decrease in catalytic efficiency for adenosine without affecting the efficiency of inosine cleavage.

  6. Structural basis of the substrate specificity of Bacillus cereus adenosine phosphorylase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dessanti, Paola; Zhang, Yang; Allegrini, Simone; Tozzi, Maria Grazia; Sgarrella, Francesco; Ealick, Steven E. (Cornell); (Sassari); (Pisa)

    2012-10-08

    Purine nucleoside phosphorylases catalyze the phosphorolytic cleavage of the glycosidic bond of purine (2{prime}-deoxy)nucleosides, generating the corresponding free base and (2{prime}-deoxy)ribose 1-phosphate. Two classes of PNPs have been identified: homotrimers specific for 6-oxopurines and homohexamers that accept both 6-oxopurines and 6-aminopurines. Bacillus cereus adenosine phosphorylase (AdoP) is a hexameric PNP; however, it is highly specific for 6-aminopurines. To investigate the structural basis for the unique substrate specificity of AdoP, the active-site mutant D204N was prepared and kinetically characterized and the structures of the wild-type protein and the D204N mutant complexed with adenosine and sulfate or with inosine and sulfate were determined at high resolution (1.2-1.4 {angstrom}). AdoP interacts directly with the preferred substrate through a hydrogen-bond donation from the catalytically important residue Asp204 to N7 of the purine base. Comparison with Escherichia coli PNP revealed a more optimal orientation of Asp204 towards N7 of adenosine and a more closed active site. When inosine is bound, two water molecules are interposed between Asp204 and the N7 and O6 atoms of the nucleoside, thus allowing the enzyme to find alternative but less efficient ways to stabilize the transition state. The mutation of Asp204 to asparagine led to a significant decrease in catalytic efficiency for adenosine without affecting the efficiency of inosine cleavage.

  7. Isolation, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of Salmonella typhimurium uridine phosphorylase crystallized with 2,2′-anhydrouridine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timofeev, Vladimir I.; Lashkov, Alexander A.; Gabdoulkhakov, Azat G.; Pavlyuk, Bogdan Ph. [A. V. Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography, Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninskiy Prospect 59, 119333 Moscow (Russian Federation); Kachalova, Galina S. [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Biophysics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Institutskaya Street 3, 142290 Pushchino, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Betzel, Christian [Institute fur Biochemie und Lebensmittelchemie, University of Hamburg, c/o DESY, Building 22, Notkestrasse 85, 22604 Hamburg (Germany); Morgunova, Ekaterina Yu.; Zhukhlistova, Nadezhda E.; Mikhailov, Al’bert M., E-mail: amm@ns.crys.ras.ru [A. V. Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography, Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninskiy Prospect 59, 119333 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2007-10-01

    S. typhimurium uridine phosphorylase has been isolated and crystallized in the presence of ligand. Uridine phosphorylase (UPh; EC 2.4.2.3) is a member of the pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylase family of enzymes which catalyzes the phosphorolytic cleavage of the C—N glycoside bond of uridine, with the formation of ribose 1-phosphate and uracil. This enzyme has been shown to be important in the activation and catabolism of fluoropyrimidines. Modulation of its enzymatic activity may affect the therapeutic efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents. The structural investigation of the bacterial uridine phosphorylases, both unliganded and complexed with substrate/product analogues and inhibitors, may help in understanding the catalytic mechanism of the phosphorolytic cleavage of uridine. Salmonella typhimurium uridine phosphorylase has been crystallized with 2,2′-anhydrouridine. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.15 Å. Preliminary analysis of the diffraction data indicates that the crystal belongs to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 88.52, b = 123.98, c = 133.52 Å. The solvent content is 45.51%, assuming the presence of one hexamer molecule per asymmetric unit.

  8. Structure of a complex of uridine phosphorylase from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis with the modified bacteriostatic antibacterial drug determined by X-ray crystallography and computer analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balaev, V. V.; Lashkov, A. A., E-mail: alashkov83@gmail.com; Gabdoulkhakov, A. G.; Seregina, T. A.; Dontsova, M. V.; Mikhailov, A. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

    2015-03-15

    Pseudotuberculosis and bubonic plague are acute infectious diseases caused by the bacteria Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Yersinia pestis. These diseases are treated, in particular, with trimethoprim and its modified analogues. However, uridine phosphorylases (pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylases) that are present in bacterial cells neutralize the action of trimethoprim and its modified analogues on the cells. In order to reveal the character of the interaction of the drug with bacterial uridine phosphorylase, the atomic structure of the unligated molecule of uridine-specific pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylase from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis (YptUPh) was determined by X-ray diffraction at 1.7 Å resolution with high reliability (R{sub work} = 16.2, R{sub free} = 19.4%; r.m.s.d. of bond lengths and bond angles are 0.006 Å and 1.005°, respectively; DPI = 0.107 Å). The atoms of the amino acid residues of the functionally important secondary-structure elements—the loop L9 and the helix H8—of the enzyme YptUPh were located. The three-dimensional structure of the complex of YptUPh with modified trimethoprim—referred to as 53I—was determined by the computer simulation. It was shown that 53I is a pseudosubstrate of uridine phosphorylases, and its pyrimidine-2,4-diamine group is located in the phosphate-binding site of the enzyme YptUPh.

  9. Structure of a complex of uridine phosphorylase from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis with the modified bacteriostatic antibacterial drug determined by X-ray crystallography and computer analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balaev, V. V.; Lashkov, A. A.; Gabdoulkhakov, A. G.; Seregina, T. A.; Dontsova, M. V.; Mikhailov, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudotuberculosis and bubonic plague are acute infectious diseases caused by the bacteria Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Yersinia pestis. These diseases are treated, in particular, with trimethoprim and its modified analogues. However, uridine phosphorylases (pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylases) that are present in bacterial cells neutralize the action of trimethoprim and its modified analogues on the cells. In order to reveal the character of the interaction of the drug with bacterial uridine phosphorylase, the atomic structure of the unligated molecule of uridine-specific pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylase from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis (YptUPh) was determined by X-ray diffraction at 1.7 Å resolution with high reliability (R work = 16.2, R free = 19.4%; r.m.s.d. of bond lengths and bond angles are 0.006 Å and 1.005°, respectively; DPI = 0.107 Å). The atoms of the amino acid residues of the functionally important secondary-structure elements—the loop L9 and the helix H8—of the enzyme YptUPh were located. The three-dimensional structure of the complex of YptUPh with modified trimethoprim—referred to as 53I—was determined by the computer simulation. It was shown that 53I is a pseudosubstrate of uridine phosphorylases, and its pyrimidine-2,4-diamine group is located in the phosphate-binding site of the enzyme YptUPh

  10. Structure of a complex of uridine phosphorylase from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis with the modified bacteriostatic antibacterial drug determined by X-ray crystallography and computer analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaev, V. V.; Lashkov, A. A.; Gabdoulkhakov, A. G.; Seregina, T. A.; Dontsova, M. V.; Mikhailov, A. M.

    2015-03-01

    Pseudotuberculosis and bubonic plague are acute infectious diseases caused by the bacteria Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Yersinia pestis. These diseases are treated, in particular, with trimethoprim and its modified analogues. However, uridine phosphorylases (pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylases) that are present in bacterial cells neutralize the action of trimethoprim and its modified analogues on the cells. In order to reveal the character of the interaction of the drug with bacterial uridine phosphorylase, the atomic structure of the unligated molecule of uridine-specific pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylase from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis ( YptUPh) was determined by X-ray diffraction at 1.7 Å resolution with high reliability ( R work = 16.2, R free = 19.4%; r.m.s.d. of bond lengths and bond angles are 0.006 Å and 1.005°, respectively; DPI = 0.107 Å). The atoms of the amino acid residues of the functionally important secondary-structure elements—the loop L9 and the helix H8—of the enzyme YptUPh were located. The three-dimensional structure of the complex of YptUPh with modified trimethoprim—referred to as 53I—was determined by the computer simulation. It was shown that 53I is a pseudosubstrate of uridine phosphorylases, and its pyrimidine-2,4-diamine group is located in the phosphate-binding site of the enzyme YptUPh.

  11. Efficient chemoenzymatic oligosaccharide synthesis by reverse phosphorolysis using cellobiose phosphorylase and cellodextrin phosphorylase from Clostridium thermocellum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nakai, Hiroyuki; Abou Hachem, Maher; Petersen, Bent O.

    2010-01-01

    Inverting cellobiose phosphorylase (CtCBP) and cellodextrin phosphorylase (CtCDP) from Clostridium thermocellum ATCC27405 of glycoside hydrolase family 94 catalysed reverse phosphorolysis to produce cellobiose and cellodextrins in 57% and 48% yield from α-d-glucose 1-phosphate as donor with glucose...

  12. Pd-catalyzed Suzuki-Miyaura coupling reaction in the synthesis of 5-aryl-1-[2-(phosphonomethoxy)ethyl]uracils as potential multisubstrate inhibitors of thymidine phosphorylase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pomeisl, Karel; Holý, Antonín; Pohl, Radek

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 17 (2007), s. 3065-3067 ISSN 0040-4039 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0508 Grant - others:Descartes Prize(XE) HPAW-CT-2002-9001 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : acyclic nucleoside phosphonates * thymidine phosphorylase * Suzuki coupling * pyrimidine Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.615, year: 2007

  13. Enhancement of Nucleoside Production in Hirsutella sinensis Based on Biosynthetic Pathway Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Zhang, Bo; Lin, Shan; Baker, Peter James; Chen, Mao-Sheng; Xue, Ya-Ping; Wu, Hui; Xu, Feng; Yuan, Shui-Jin; Teng, Yi; Wu, Ling-Fang

    2017-01-01

    To enhance nucleoside production in Hirsutella sinensis, the biosynthetic pathways of purine and pyrimidine nucleosides were constructed and verified. The differential expression analysis showed that purine nucleoside phosphorylase, inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase, and guanosine monophosphate synthase genes involved in purine nucleotide biosynthesis were significantly upregulated 16.56-fold, 8-fold, and 5.43-fold, respectively. Moreover, dihydroorotate dehydrogenase, uridine nucleosidase, uridine/cytidine monophosphate kinase, and inosine triphosphate pyrophosphatase genes participating in pyrimidine nucleoside biosynthesis were upregulated 4.53-fold, 10.63-fold, 4.26-fold, and 5.98-fold, respectively. To enhance the nucleoside production, precursors for synthesis of nucleosides were added based on the analysis of biosynthetic pathways. Uridine and cytidine contents, respectively, reached 5.04 mg/g and 3.54 mg/g when adding 2 mg/mL of ribose, resulting in an increase of 28.6% and 296% compared with the control, respectively. Meanwhile, uridine and cytidine contents, respectively, reached 10.83 mg/g 2.12 mg/g when adding 0.3 mg/mL of uracil, leading to an increase of 176.3% and 137.1%, respectively. This report indicated that fermentation regulation was an effective way to enhance the nucleoside production in H. sinensis based on biosynthetic pathway analysis. PMID:29333435

  14. Cisgenic inhibition of the potato cold induced phosphorylase L gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    transgenic line M4), implying that silencing of starch phosphorylase L gene reduced starch breakdown during cold storage conditions. Key words: Cold sweetening, potato (Solanum tuberosum L.), RNA interference, starch phosphorylase L. gene, ...

  15. Recent development of phosphorylases possessing large potential for oligosaccharide synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nakai, Hiroyuki; Kitaoka, Motomitsu; Svensson, Birte

    2013-01-01

    Phosphorylases are one group of carbohydrate active enzymes involved in the cleavage and formation of glycosidic linkages together with glycoside hydrolases and sugar nucleotide-dependent glycosyltransferases. Noticeably, the catalyzed phosphorolysis is reversible, making phosphorylases suitable...

  16. Nucleotides, Nucleosides, and Nucleobases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kaj Frank; Dandanell, Gert; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne

    2008-01-01

    We review literature on the metabolism of ribo- and deoxyribonucleotides, nucleosides, and nucleobases in Escherichia coli and Salmonella,including biosynthesis, degradation, interconversion, and transport. Emphasis is placed on enzymology and regulation of the pathways, at both the level of gene...

  17. Rational engineering of Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM maltose phosphorylase into either trehalose or kojibiose dual specificity phosphorylase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nakai, Hiroyuki; Petersen, B.O.; Westphal, Y.

    2010-01-01

    . LaMP has about 35 and 26% amino acid sequence identity with GH65 trehalose phosphorylase (TP) and kojibiose phosphorylase (KP) from Thermoanaerobacter brockii ATCC35047. The structure of L. brevis MP and multiple sequence alignment identified (alpha/alpha)(6)-barrel loop 3 that forms the rim...... group of the glucose moiety at subsite +1, by corresponding segments from Ser426-Ala431 in TP and Thr419-Phe427 in KP, thus conferred LaMP with phosphorolytic activity towards trehalose and kojibiose, respectively. Two different loop 3 LaMP variants catalysed the formation of trehalose and kojibiose...

  18. Pyrimidine nucleoside analogues, potential chemotherapeutic agents, and substrates/inhibitors in various enzyme systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulikowski, T.; Bretner, M.; Felczak, K.; Drabikowska, A.; Shugar, D.

    1998-01-01

    substrates for thymidine phosphorylase and were quite inactive vs uridine phosphorylase. S 2 ,3'-F ddUrd proved to be a moderate, and S 2 ,3'-FddThd a potent and selective, inhibitor of the replication of HIV-1 in CEM4 cells, comparable to the activity of the known antiretroviral agent AZT. 5-fluorouridine and 5-fluorocitidine are potent antitumor agent s, but too toxic to be used as drugs. To decrease this toxicity, a new class of branched-chain sugar nucleosides, pyrimidine and purine hamamelose nucleosides, was synthetized, with uracil and 5-fluorouracil derivatives being the most potent antileukemic agents, activities being comparable to that of 5-fluorouridine. (author)

  19. Cloning, purification and characterisation of a recombinant purine nucleoside phosphorylase from Bacillus halodurans Alk36

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Visser, Daniel F

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available expression. Batch fermentations A 1.5 l InFors HT batch fermentor (Labfors, Switzerland) containing 1 l of GMO 20 medium was inoculated with a 50 ml inoculum (overnight culture of E. coli JM109 [pMSPNP] in LB medium). The composition of the GMO 20...

  20. High-yielding cascade enzymatic synthesis of 5-methyluridine using a novel combination of nucleoside phosphorylases

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Visser, Daniel F

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available and thymine. A 5-methyluridine yield of 79% on guanosine was achieved in a reaction slurry at a 53 mM (1.5% w/w) guanosine concentration. 5-Methyluridine is an intermediate in synthetic routes to thymidine and the antiretroviral drugs zidovudine...

  1. The effect of cyclophosphamide and gamma irradiation on adenosine deaminase and purine nucleoside phosphorylase in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosek, B.; Bohaecek, J.; Sikulova, J.

    1991-01-01

    Changes in ADA and PNP activities in the spleens and thymuses of mice were studied after a single administration of cyclophosphamide and after whole-body gamma irradiation, applied alone or three days after CY application, In the first days after the treatment the enzyme activities were significantly depressed with the exception of ADA in the spleen, where a high elevation in relation to controls was observed. During the regeneration period a pronounced rise of PNP activity in the spleen occurred mainly after a combined application of CY and irradiation. In the thymus the regeneration was manifested by a mild increase of both ADA and PNP activities towards control values. The findings suggest that the expressive changes of ADA and PNP activities, participating in the purine salvage pathway, may, after a cytotoxic treatment, influence the nucleotide pool and DNA synthesis in lymphoid organs

  2. Diurnal variation in glycogen phosphorylase activity in rat liver. A quantitative histochemical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frederiks, W. M.; Marx, F.; Bosch, K. S.

    1987-01-01

    The diurnal variations of the glycogen content and of glycogen phosphorylase activity in periportal and pericentral areas of rat liver parenchyma have been analyzed in periodic acid Schiff (PAS)-stained cryostat sections using quantitative microdensitometry. Glycogen content and phosphorylase

  3. Studies on allosteric phenomena in glycogen phosphorylase b.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, N B; Avramovic-Zikic, O; Lue, P F; Honikel, K O

    1976-03-26

    This article attempts to trace, from a personal point of view, the history of discoveries of allosteric phenomena in phosphorylase b and the later development of systematic attempts to fit the data into comprehensive theoretical models. Work from our own laboratory is emphasized, but we try to integrate this into the results from other investigators and show their contributions to our ideas and experiments. Finally, some recent unpublished data is presented together with some conclusions and predictions from a new hypothesis. The discoveries by Carl and Gerty Cori of the activation of phosphorylase by AMP, the inhibition of glucose and the enzymatic interconversion of two forms fo the enzyme with different control properties helped lay the foundations of our present understanding of allosteric mechanisms. The later discovery of the oligomeric nature of phosphorylase and its relationship to AMP binding served as a basis for many years of research into the structure-function relationships of phosphorylase and other enzymes. Data showing that AMP lowers the entropy of activation is discussed with respect to the role of the nucleotide and its binding close to the active site. The discovery of the control of phosphorylase b by common metabolites and the impetus this gave to the intensive kinetic studies of the last ten years, wherein fitting to theoretical models has been a common feature, is reviewed.

  4. Crystal structure of sucrose phosphorylase from Bifidobacterium adolescentis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sprogøe, Desiree; van den Broek, Lambertus A M; Mirza, Osman

    2004-01-01

    phosphorylase from Bifidobacterium adolescentis (BiSP) refined at 1.77 A resolution. It represents the first 3D structure of a sucrose phosphorylase and is the first structure of a phosphate-dependent enzyme from the glycoside hydrolase family 13. The structure of BiSP is composed of the four domains A, B, B...... binding and reduces the size of the substrate access channel compared to other family 13 members, underlining the role of this domain in modulating the function of these enzymes. It is remarkable that the fold of the C domain is not observed in any other known hydrolases of family 13. BiSP was found...

  5. [Activities and properties of phosphorylases of turbellariae Phagocata sibirica and cestodes Bothriocephalus scorpii].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burenina, E A

    2007-01-01

    Activities and properties of phosphorylases of cytosol and mitochondrial fractions are studied in free-living turbellaria Phagocata sibirica and cestodes Bothriocephalus scorpii. The phosphorylase activities in P. sibirica and B. scorpii differ significantly both in form and the total activity of this enzyme. Dependence of the phosphorylase reaction rate on substrate concentration is studied. The high activity of phosphorylase as compared with that of hexokinase suggests glycogen to be the main energy source of the studied flatworms. Effects of various effectors on activities of cytosol and mitochondrial phosphorylases are studied.

  6. Nucleoside Inhibitors of Zika Virus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Eyer, L.; Nencka, Radim; Huvarová, I.; Palus, Martin; Alves, M. J.; Gould, E. A.; De Clercq, E.; Růžek, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 214, č. 5 (2016), s. 707-711 ISSN 0022-1899 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:60077344 Keywords : Zika virus * flavivirus * nucleoside analogue * antiviral * therapy Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry; EE - Microbiology, Virology (BC-A) Impact factor: 6.273, year: 2016

  7. Mechanism of activation of glycogen phosphorylase by fructose in the liver. Stimulation of phosphorylase kinase related to the consumption of adenosine triphosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Werve, G; Hers, H G

    1979-01-15

    1. A dose-dependent activation of phosphorylase and consumption of ATP was observed in isolated hepatocytes incubated in the presence of fructose; histone kinase and phosphorylase kinase activities were unchanged at doses of this sugar that were fully effective on phosphorylase. The activation of phosphorylase by fructose was also observed in cells incubated in a Ca2+-free medium as well as in the livers of rats in vivo. 2. In a liver high-speed supernatant, fructose, tagatose and sorbose stimulated the activity of phosphorylase kinase; this effect was dependent on the presence of K+ ions, which are required for the activity of fructokinase; it was accompanied by the transformation of ATP into ADP. In the presence of hexokinase, glucose also stimulated phosphorylase kinase, both in an Na+ or a K+ medium. 3. The activities of partially purified muscle or liver phosphorylase kinase were unchanged in the presence of fructose. 4. Some properties of liver phosphorylase kinase are described, including a high molecular weight and an inhibition at ATP/Mg ratios above 0.5, as well as an effect of ATP concentration on the hysteretic behaviour of this enzyme. 5. The effect of fructose on the activation of phosphorylase is discussed in relation to the comsumption of ATP.

  8. Immobilization of starch phosphorylase from seeds of Indian millet ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-12-03

    Dec 3, 2007 ... Starch phosphorylase has been isolated from the seeds of millet (Pennisetum typhoides) variety KB560 and partially .... After storage for 5 h, it was centrifuged at 15000 x g for 20 ..... The property of reuse up to so many times.

  9. Increased hepatic glycogen synthetase and decreased phosphorylase in trained rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galbo, H; Saugmann, P; Richter, Erik

    1979-01-01

    Rats were either physically trained by a 12 wk swimming program or were freely eating or weight matched, sedentary controls. Trained rats had a higher relative liver weight and total hepatic glycogen synthetase (EC 2.4.1.11) activity and a lower phosphorylase (EC 2.4.1.1) activity than the other...

  10. Total-Body Irradiation Followed By Cyclosporine and Mycophenolate Mofetil in Treating Patients With Severe Combined Immunodeficiency Undergoing Donor Bone Marrow Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-12

    Adenosine Deaminase Deficiency; Autosomal Recessive Disorder; Immune System Disorder; Purine-Nucleoside Phosphorylase Deficiency; Severe Combined Immunodeficiency; Severe Combined Immunodeficiency With Absence of T and B Cells; X-Linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency

  11. Marine Nucleosides: Structure, Bioactivity, Synthesis and Biosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ri-Ming Huang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Nucleosides are glycosylamines that structurally form part of nucleotide molecules, the building block of DNA and RNA. Both nucleosides and nucleotides are vital components of all living cells and involved in several key biological processes. Some of these nucleosides have been obtained from a variety of marine resources. Because of the biological importance of these compounds, this review covers 68 marine originated nucleosides and their synthetic analogs published up to June 2014. The review will focus on the structures, bioactivities, synthesis and biosynthetic processes of these compounds.

  12. Pan-pathway based interaction profiling of FDA-approved nucleoside and nucleobase analogs with enzymes of the human nucleotide metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egeblad, Louise; Welin, Martin; Flodin, Susanne; Gräslund, Susanne; Wang, Liya; Balzarini, Jan; Eriksson, Staffan; Nordlund, Pär

    2012-01-01

    To identify interactions a nucleoside analog library (NAL) consisting of 45 FDA-approved nucleoside analogs was screened against 23 enzymes of the human nucleotide metabolism using a thermal shift assay. The method was validated with deoxycytidine kinase; eight interactions known from the literature were detected and five additional interactions were revealed after the addition of ATP, the second substrate. The NAL screening gave relatively few significant hits, supporting a low rate of "off target effects." However, unexpected ligands were identified for two catabolic enzymes guanine deaminase (GDA) and uridine phosphorylase 1 (UPP1). An acyclic guanosine prodrug analog, valaciclovir, was shown to stabilize GDA to the same degree as the natural substrate, guanine, with a ΔT(agg) around 7°C. Aciclovir, penciclovir, ganciclovir, thioguanine and mercaptopurine were also identified as ligands for GDA. The crystal structure of GDA with valaciclovir bound in the active site was determined, revealing the binding of the long unbranched chain of valaciclovir in the active site of the enzyme. Several ligands were identified for UPP1: vidarabine, an antiviral nucleoside analog, as well as trifluridine, idoxuridine, floxuridine, zidovudine, telbivudine, fluorouracil and thioguanine caused concentration-dependent stabilization of UPP1. A kinetic study of UPP1 with vidarabine revealed that vidarabine was a mixed-type competitive inhibitor with the natural substrate uridine. The unexpected ligands identified for UPP1 and GDA imply further metabolic consequences for these nucleoside analogs, which could also serve as a starting point for future drug design.

  13. High yielding cascade enzymatic synthesis of 5-methyluridine using a novel Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase, from Bacillus halodurans Alk36

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Vissser, D

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available were amplified as previously described3,4. E.coli BL21(DE3) was used as the expression host. • Production of Enzymes in Batch Fermentation - E. coli UP and B. halodurans BHPNP1 were produced in batch fermentations using GMO media5. Crude extracts...

  14. Nucleoside antibiotics: biosynthesis, regulation, and biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Guoqing; Tan, Huarong

    2015-02-01

    The alarming rise in antibiotic-resistant pathogens has coincided with a decline in the supply of new antibiotics. It is therefore of great importance to find and create new antibiotics. Nucleoside antibiotics are a large family of natural products with diverse biological functions. Their biosynthesis is a complex process through multistep enzymatic reactions and is subject to hierarchical regulation. Genetic and biochemical studies of the biosynthetic machinery have provided the basis for pathway engineering and combinatorial biosynthesis to create new or hybrid nucleoside antibiotics. Dissection of regulatory mechanisms is leading to strategies to increase the titer of bioactive nucleoside antibiotics. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Purine salvage in the apicomplexan Sarcocystis neurona, and generation of hypoxanthine-xanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase-deficient clones for positive-negative selection of transgenic parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dangoudoubiyam, Sriveny; Zhang, Zijing; Howe, Daniel K

    2014-09-01

    Sarcocystis neurona is an apicomplexan parasite that causes severe neurological disease in horses and marine mammals. The Apicomplexa are all obligate intracellular parasites that lack purine biosynthesis pathways and rely on the host cell for their purine requirements. Hypoxanthine-xanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HXGPRT) and adenosine kinase (AK) are key enzymes that function in two complementary purine salvage pathways in apicomplexans. Bioinformatic searches of the S. neurona genome revealed genes encoding HXGPRT, AK and all of the major purine salvage enzymes except purine nucleoside phosphorylase. Wild-type S. neurona were able to grow in the presence of mycophenolic acid (MPA) but were inhibited by 6-thioxanthine (6-TX), suggesting that the pathways involving either HXGPRT or AK are functional in this parasite. Prior work with Toxoplasma gondii demonstrated the utility of HXGPRT as a positive-negative selection marker. To enable the use of HXGPRT in S. neurona, the SnHXGPRT gene sequence was determined and a gene-targeting plasmid was transfected into S. neurona. SnHXGPRT-deficient mutants were selected with 6-TX, and single-cell clones were obtained. These Sn∆HXG parasites were susceptible to MPA and could be complemented using the heterologous T. gondii HXGPRT gene. In summary, S. neurona possesses both purine salvage pathways described in apicomplexans, thus allowing the use of HXGPRT as a positive-negative drug selection marker in this parasite.

  16. Route of administration of pentobarbital affects activity of liver glycogen phosphorylase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikines, K J; Sonne, B; Richter, Erik

    1986-01-01

    pentobarbital (5 mg/100 g body wt) either intraperitoneally, as a slow intravenous infusion, or as an intravenous or intracardial bolus. Times from administration of barbiturate to sampling of the liver were 10 min, 10 min, 85 +/- 32 s (mean +/- SE), and 53 +/- 10 s, respectively. Phosphorylase a activity...... in % of total phosphorylase activity was 40 +/- 2, 56 +/- 4, 82 +/- 3, and 92 +/- 2, respectively, all significantly different. Thus the route of administration of pentobarbital affects the phosphorylase a activity and should be considered when evaluating this activity. This fact can only be partially explained...

  17. Precision Synthesis of Functional Polysaccharide Materials by Phosphorylase-Catalyzed Enzymatic Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-ichi Kadokawa

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this review article, the precise synthesis of functional polysaccharide materials using phosphorylase-catalyzed enzymatic reactions is presented. This particular enzymatic approach has been identified as a powerful tool in preparing well-defined polysaccharide materials. Phosphorylase is an enzyme that has been employed in the synthesis of pure amylose with a precisely controlled structure. Similarly, using a phosphorylase-catalyzed enzymatic polymerization, the chemoenzymatic synthesis of amylose-grafted heteropolysaccharides containing different main-chain polysaccharide structures (e.g., chitin/chitosan, cellulose, alginate, xanthan gum, and carboxymethyl cellulose was achieved. Amylose-based block, star, and branched polymeric materials have also been prepared using this enzymatic polymerization. Since phosphorylase shows a loose specificity for the recognition of substrates, different sugar residues have been introduced to the non-reducing ends of maltooligosaccharides by phosphorylase-catalyzed glycosylations using analog substrates such as α-d-glucuronic acid and α-d-glucosamine 1-phosphates. By means of such reactions, an amphoteric glycogen and its corresponding hydrogel were successfully prepared. Thermostable phosphorylase was able to tolerate a greater variance in the substrate structures with respect to recognition than potato phosphorylase, and as a result, the enzymatic polymerization of α-d-glucosamine 1-phosphate to produce a chitosan stereoisomer was carried out using this enzyme catalyst, which was then subsequently converted to the chitin stereoisomer by N-acetylation. Amylose supramolecular inclusion complexes with polymeric guests were obtained when the phosphorylase-catalyzed enzymatic polymerization was conducted in the presence of the guest polymers. Since the structure of this polymeric system is similar to the way that a plant vine twines around a rod, this polymerization system has been named

  18. X-ray structures of uridine phosphorylase from Vibrio cholerae in complexes with uridine, thymidine, uracil, thymine, and phosphate anion: Substrate specificity of bacterial uridine phosphorylases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prokofev, I. I.; Lashkov, A. A., E-mail: alashkov83@gmail.com; Gabdulkhakov, A. G.; Balaev, V. V.; Seregina, T. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography of Federal Scientific Research Centre “Crystallography and Photonics” (Russian Federation); Mironov, A. S. [State Research Institute of Genetics and Selection of Industrial Microorganisms (Russian Federation); Betzel, C. [University of Hamburg (Germany); Mikhailov, A. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography of Federal Scientific Research Centre “Crystallography and Photonics” (Russian Federation)

    2016-11-15

    In many types of human tumor cells and infectious agents, the demand for pyrimidine nitrogen bases increases during the development of the disease, thus increasing the role of the enzyme uridine phosphorylase in metabolic processes. The rational use of uridine phosphorylase and its ligands in pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries requires knowledge of the structural basis for the substrate specificity of the target enzyme. This paper summarizes the results of the systematic study of the three-dimensional structure of uridine phosphorylase from the pathogenic bacterium Vibrio cholerae in complexes with substrates of enzymatic reactions—uridine, phosphate anion, thymidine, uracil, and thymine. These data, supplemented with the results of molecular modeling, were used to consider in detail the structural basis for the substrate specificity of uridine phosphorylases. It was shown for the first time that the formation of a hydrogen-bond network between the 2′-hydroxy group of uridine and atoms of the active-site residues of uridine phosphorylase leads to conformational changes of the ribose moiety of uridine, resulting in an increase in the reactivity of uridine compared to thymidine. Since the binding of thymidine to residues of uridine phosphorylase causes a smaller local strain of the β-N1-glycosidic bond in this the substrate compared to the uridine molecule, the β-N1-glycosidic bond in thymidine is more stable and less reactive than that in uridine. It was shown for the first time that the phosphate anion, which is the second substrate bound at the active site, interacts simultaneously with the residues of the β5-strand and the β1-strand through hydrogen bonding, thus securing the gate loop in a conformation.

  19. X-ray structures of uridine phosphorylase from Vibrio cholerae in complexes with uridine, thymidine, uracil, thymine, and phosphate anion: Substrate specificity of bacterial uridine phosphorylases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokofev, I. I.; Lashkov, A. A.; Gabdulkhakov, A. G.; Balaev, V. V.; Seregina, T. A.; Mironov, A. S.; Betzel, C.; Mikhailov, A. M.

    2016-11-01

    In many types of human tumor cells and infectious agents, the demand for pyrimidine nitrogen bases increases during the development of the disease, thus increasing the role of the enzyme uridine phosphorylase in metabolic processes. The rational use of uridine phosphorylase and its ligands in pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries requires knowledge of the structural basis for the substrate specificity of the target enzyme. This paper summarizes the results of the systematic study of the three-dimensional structure of uridine phosphorylase from the pathogenic bacterium Vibrio cholerae in complexes with substrates of enzymatic reactions—uridine, phosphate anion, thymidine, uracil, and thymine. These data, supplemented with the results of molecular modeling, were used to consider in detail the structural basis for the substrate specificity of uridine phosphorylases. It was shown for the first time that the formation of a hydrogen-bond network between the 2'-hydroxy group of uridine and atoms of the active-site residues of uridine phosphorylase leads to conformational changes of the ribose moiety of uridine, resulting in an increase in the reactivity of uridine compared to thymidine. Since the binding of thymidine to residues of uridine phosphorylase causes a smaller local strain of the β-N1-glycosidic bond in this the substrate compared to the uridine molecule, the β-N1-glycosidic bond in thymidine is more stable and less reactive than that in uridine. It was shown for the first time that the phosphate anion, which is the second substrate bound at the active site, interacts simultaneously with the residues of the β5-strand and the β1-strand through hydrogen bonding, thus securing the gate loop in a conformation

  20. The N-terminus of glycogen phosphorylase b is not required for activation by adenosine 5'-monophosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigley, Andrew N; Reinhart, Gregory D

    2010-06-15

    The, so far unsuccessful, search for selective effective inhibitors of glycogen phosphorylase for the treatment of type II diabetes has made phosphorylase an active target of research for the past 20 years. Many crystallographic structures of phosphorylase are currently available to aid in this research. However, those structures have been interpreted, at least in part, on the basis of work conducted with a proteolytically derived form of phosphorylase that lacked the N-terminus (phosphorylase b'). It has been reported that phosphorylase b' shows no allostery, neither homotropic nor heterotropic. The original report on phosphorylase b' examined the allosteric characteristics over very narrow ranges of effector and substrate concentrations and reported the presence of proteolytic cleavages in addition to the removal of the N-terminus. We have applied molecular biological techniques to generate a truncate lacking the N-terminus with known primary structure, and we have established conditions for fully quantifying the allosteric effect of AMP on glycogen phosphorylase b. We report here for the first time the full thermodynamic effect of AMP on phosphorylase b. Our findings with a truncate lacking the N-terminus show that the effect of AMP binding does not depend on the N-terminus.

  1. Tetrofuranose nucleoside phosphonic acids: Synthesis and properties

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Poláková, Ivana; Buděšínský, Miloš; Točík, Zdeněk; Rosenberg, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 76, č. 5 (2011), s. 503-536 ISSN 0010-0765 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN200520801; GA ČR GA203/09/0820; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06061; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06077 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : tetrofuranosyl phosphonate * nucleotide analogues * phosphonomethoxy nucleosides * sugar hydroxyphosphonates Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.283, year: 2011

  2. Structural and mechanistic analysis of a β-glycoside phosphorylase identified by screening a metagenomic library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, Spencer S; Patel, Ankoor; Larmour, Veronica L C; Morgan-Lang, Connor; Hallam, Steven J; Mark, Brian L; Withers, Stephen G

    2018-03-02

    Glycoside phosphorylases have considerable potential as catalysts for the assembly of useful glycans for products ranging from functional foods and prebiotics to novel materials. However, the substrate diversity of currently identified phosphorylases is relatively small, limiting their practical applications. To address this limitation, we developed a high-throughput screening approach using the activated substrate 2,4-dinitrophenyl β-d-glucoside (DNPGlc) and inorganic phosphate for identifying glycoside phosphorylase activity and used it to screen a large insert metagenomic library. The initial screen, based on release of 2,4-dinitrophenyl from DNPGlc in the presence of phosphate, identified the gene bglP, encoding a retaining β-glycoside phosphorylase from the CAZy GH3 family. Kinetic and mechanistic analysis of the gene product, BglP, confirmed a double displacement ping-pong mechanism involving a covalent glycosyl-enzyme intermediate. X-ray crystallographic analysis provided insights into the phosphate-binding mode and identified a key glutamine residue in the active site important for substrate recognition. Substituting this glutamine for a serine swapped the substrate specificity from glucoside to N -acetylglucosaminide. In summary, we present a high-throughput screening approach for identifying β-glycoside phosphorylases, which was robust, simple to implement, and useful in identifying active clones within a metagenomics library. Implementation of this screen enabled discovery of a new glycoside phosphorylase class and has paved the way to devising simple ways in which enzyme specificity can be encoded and swapped, which has implications for biotechnological applications. © 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. A conformationally locked tricyclic nucleoside. Synthesis, crystal structure and incorporation into oligonucleotides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Jacob; Thorup, Niels; Nielsen, Poul

    2001-01-01

    A tricyclic nucleoside is synthesised from a bicyclic nucleoside precursor by applying a stereoselective dihydroxylation, a regioselective tosylation and an intramolecular ether formation. This tricyclic nucleoside is constructed as a conformationally locked thymidine analogue and has been analys...

  4. Desulfurization of 2-thiouracil nucleosides: conformational studies of 4-pyrimidinone nucleosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraszewska, Karina; Kaczyńska, Iwona; Jankowski, Stefan; Karolak-Wojciechowska, Janina; Sochacka, Elzbieta

    2011-04-01

    4-Pyrimidinone ribofuranoside (H(2)o(4)U) and 4-pyrimidinone 2'-deoxyribofuranoside (dH(2)o(4)U) were synthesized by the oxidative desulfurization of parent 2-thiouracil nucleosides with m-chloroperbenzoic acid. The crystal structures of H(2)o(4)U and dH(2)o(4)U and their conformations in solution were determined and compared with corresponding 2-thiouracil and uracil nucleosides. The absence of a large 2-thiocarbonyl/2-carbonyl group in the nucleobase moiety results in C2'-endo puckering of the ribofuranose ring (S conformer) in the crystal structure of H(2)o(4)U, which is not typical of RNA nucleosides. Interestingly, the hydrogen bonding network in the crystals of dH(2)o(4)U stabilizes the sugar moiety conformation in the C3'-endo form (N conformer), rarely found in DNA nucleosides. In aqueous solution, dH(2)o(4)U reveals a similar population of the C2'-endo conformation (65%) to that of 2'-deoxy-2-thiouridine (62%), while the 62% population of the S conformer for H(2)o(4)U is significantly different from that of the parent 2-thiouridine, for which the N conformer is dominant (71%). Such a difference may be of biological importance, as the desulfurization process of natural tRNA 2-thiouridines may occur under conditions of oxidative stress in the cell and may influence the decoding process. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Ionic liquids as cosolvents for glycosylation by sucrose phosphorylase: balancing acceptor solubility and enzyme stability

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    De Winter, K.; Verlinden, K.; Křen, Vladimír; Weignerová, Lenka; Soetaert, W.; Desmet, T.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 7 (2013), s. 1949-1955 ISSN 1463-9262 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 7E11011 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : DISACCHARIDE PHOSPHORYLASES * THERMAL-STABILITY * ALPHA-GLUCOSIDASE Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 6.852, year: 2013

  6. Chemoenzymatic Synthesis of beta-D-Glucosides using Cellobiose Phosphorylase from Clostridium thermocellum

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    De Winter, K.; Van Renterghem, L.; Wuyts, K.; Pelantová, Helena; Křen, Vladimír; Soetaert, W.; Desmet, T.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 357, č. 8 (2015), s. 1961-1969 ISSN 1615-4150 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD13042; GA MŠk(CZ) 7E11011 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : cellobiose phosphorylase * cross-linked enzyme aggregates * beta-glucosides Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 6.453, year: 2015

  7. Structural rearrangements of sucrose phosphorylase from Bifidobacterium adolescentis during sucrose conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirza, Osman; Henriksen, Lars Skov; Sprogøe, Desiree

    2006-01-01

    The reaction mechanism of sucrose phosphorylase from Bifidobacterium adolescentis (BiSP) was studied by site-directed mutagenesis and x-ray crystallography. An inactive mutant of BiSP (E232Q) was co-crystallized with sucrose. The structure revealed a substrate-binding mode comparable with that se...

  8. A monoclonal antibody that specifically recognizes m6A nucleoside

    OpenAIRE

    Espuny, Ruth; Castro, Ana; Codony, Carles; Eritja Casadellà, Ramón; Bach-Elias, Montse

    1998-01-01

    A hybridoma against the nucleoside m6A has been obtained from mouse spleen. This hybridoma was named H65 and it secretes monoclonal antibodies anti-m6A. The competition assays showed that the monoclonal antibody was highly specific for m6A nucleoside.

  9. Two nucleoside transporters in Lactococcus lactis with different substrate specificities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, Jan; Sørensen, Claus; Jendresen, Christian Bille

    2010-01-01

    , and the utilization of nucleotides is dependent on exogenous phosphatases. The composition of transporters with specificity for purine and pyrimidine nucleosides and nucleobases is subject to variation. The ability of Lactococcus lactis to transport different nucleosides across the cell membrane was characterized...

  10. Dual door entry to exciplex emission in a chimeric DNA duplex containing non-nucleoside-nucleoside pair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bag, Subhendu Sekhar; Talukdar, Sangita; Kundu, Rajen; Saito, Isao; Jana, Subhashis

    2014-01-25

    Dual door entry to exciplex formation was established in a chimeric DNA duplex wherein a fluorescent non-nucleosidic base surrogate () is paired against a fluorescent nucleosidic base surrogate (). Packing of the nucleobases via intercalative stacking interactions led to an exciplex emission either via FRET from the donor or direct excitation of the FRET acceptor .

  11. An Efficient and Facile Methodology for Bromination of Pyrimidine and Purine Nucleosides with Sodium Monobromoisocyanurate (SMBI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Stromberg

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available An efficient and facile strategy has been developed for bromination of nucleosides using sodium monobromoisocyanurate (SMBI. Our methodology demonstrates bromination at the C-5 position of pyrimidine nucleosides and the C-8 position of purine nucleosides. Unprotected and also several protected nucleosides were brominated in moderate to high yields following this procedure.

  12. Regulation of Maltodextrin Phosphorylase Synthesis in Escherichia coli by Cyclic Adenosine 3′, 5′-Monophosphate and Glucose1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Julie; Weathersbee, Carolyn J.

    1974-01-01

    Cyclic adenosine 3′, 5′-monophosphate (AMP) stimulates maltodextrin phosphorylase synthesis in Escherichia coli cells induced with maltose. A maximal effect occurs at 2 to 3 mM cyclic AMP. The action of cyclic AMP is specific, inasmuch as adenosine triphosphate, 3′-AMP, 5′-AMP, adenosine, and dibutyryl cyclic AMP are inactive. Glucose, α-methyl glucoside, 2-deoxyglucose, and pyridoxal 5′-phosphate repress maltodextrin phosphorylase synthesis. This repression is reversed by cyclic AMP. The action of cyclic AMP appears to be at the transcriptional level, since cyclic AMP fails to stimulate phosphorylase production in induced cells in which messenger ribonucleic acid synthesis has been arrested by rifampin or by inducer removal. The two other enzymes involved in the metabolism of maltose, amylomaltase and maltose permease, are also induced in this strain of E. coli and affected by glucose and cyclic AMP in a manner similar to phosphorylase. PMID:4358043

  13. Susceptibility of recombinant porcine endogenous retrovirus reverse transcriptase to nucleoside and non-nucleoside inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, M; Fishman, J A; Pontikis, R; Aubertin, A M; Wilhelm, F X

    2002-12-01

    Transplantation of organs, tissues or cells from pigs to humans could be a potential solution to the shortage of human organs for transplantation. Porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs) remain a major safety concern for porcine xenotransplantation. Thus, finding drugs that could be used as virological prophylaxis (or therapy) against PERV replication would be desirable. One of the most effective ways to block retroviral multiplication is to inhibit the enzyme reverse transcriptase (RT) which catalyzes the reverse transcription of viral RNA to proviral double-stranded DNA. We report here the cloning and expression of PERV RT and its susceptibility to several inhibitors. Our data demonstrate PERV susceptibility in vitro to the triphosphorylated nucleoside analog of zidovudine (AZT) and to ddGTP and to a lesser extent to ddTTP but almost no susceptibility to the non-nucleoside RT inhibitors tested.

  14. Storage Pool Deficiencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Deficiency Factor V Deficiency Combined FV & FVIII Deficiencies Factor VII Deficiency Factor X Deficiency Factor XI Deficiency Factor ... Deficiency Factor V Deficiency Combined FV & FVIII Deficiencies Factor VII Deficiency Factor X Deficiency Factor XI Deficiency Factor ...

  15. Vitamin E Phosphate Nucleoside Prodrugs: A Platform for Intracellular Delivery of Monophosphorylated Nucleosides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Daifuku

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin E phosphate (VEP nucleoside prodrugs are designed to bypass two mechanisms of tumor resistance to therapeutic nucleosides: nucleoside transport and kinase downregulation. Certain isoforms of vitamin E (VE have shown activity against solid and hematologic tumors and result in chemosensitization. Because gemcitabine is one of the most common chemotherapeutics for the treatment of cancer, it was used to demonstrate the constructs utility. Four different VE isoforms were conjugated with gemcitabine at the 5′ position. Two of these were δ-tocopherol-monophosphate (MP gemcitabine (NUC050 and δ-tocotrienol-MP gemcitabine (NUC052. NUC050 was shown to be able to deliver gemcitabine-MP intracellularly by a nucleoside transport independent mechanism. Its half-life administered IV in mice was 3.9 h. In a mouse xenograft model of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC NCI-H460, NUC050 at a dose of 40 mg/kg IV qwk × 4 resulted in significant inhibition to tumor growth on days 11–31 (p < 0.05 compared to saline control (SC. Median survival was 33 days (NUC050 vs. 25.5 days (SC ((hazard ratio HR = 0.24, p = 0.017. Further, NUC050 significantly inhibited tumor growth compared to historic data with gemcitabine at 135 mg/kg IV q5d × 3 on days 14–41 (p < 0.05. NUC052 was administered at a dose of 40 mg/kg IV qwk × 2 followed by 50 mg/kg qwk × 2. NUC052 resulted in inhibition to tumor growth on days 14–27 (p < 0.05 and median survival was 34 days (HR = 0.27, p = 0.033. NUC050 and NUC052 have been shown to be safe and effective in a mouse xenograft of NSCLC.

  16. Meteorite-catalyzed synthesis of nucleosides and other prebiotic compounds

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ferus, Martin; Knížek, Antonín; Civiš, Svatopluk

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 112, č. 23 (2015), s. 7109-7110 ISSN 0027-8424 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : meteorite-catalzzed synthesis * nucleosides * prebiotic compounds Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 9.423, year: 2015

  17. Architecture of Amylose Supramolecules in Form of Inclusion Complexes by Phosphorylase-Catalyzed Enzymatic Polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-ichi Kadokawa

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the architecture of amylose supramolecules in form of inclusion complexes with synthetic polymers by phosphorylase-catalyzed enzymatic polymerization. Amylose is known to be synthesized by enzymatic polymerization using α-d-glucose 1-phosphate as a monomer, by phosphorylase catalysis. When the phosphorylase-catalyzed enzymatic polymerization was conducted in the presence of various hydrophobic polymers, such as polyethers, polyesters, poly(ester-ether, and polycarbonates as a guest polymer, such inclusion supramolecules were formed by the hydrophobic interaction in the progress of polymerization. Because the representation of propagation in the polymerization is similar to the way that a vine of a plant grows, twining around a rod, this polymerization method for the formation of amylose-polymer inclusion complexes was proposed to be named “vine-twining polymerization”. To yield an inclusion complex from a strongly hydrophobic polyester, the parallel enzymatic polymerization system was extensively developed. The author found that amylose selectively included one side of the guest polymer from a mixture of two resemblant guest polymers, as well as a specific range in molecular weights of the guest polymers poly(tetrahydrofuran (PTHF in the vine-twining polymerization. Selective inclusion behavior of amylose toward stereoisomers of chiral polyesters, poly(lactides, also appeared in the vine-twining polymerization.

  18. Purification of the alpha and beta subunits of phosphorylase kinase for structural studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sotiroudis, T.G.; Heilmeyer, L.M.G. Jr.; Crabb, J.W.

    1987-01-01

    Structural analysis of the alpha (Mr, 132,000) and beta (Mr, 113,000) subunits of phosphorylase kinase may provide clues to their yet unknown functions however purification remains problematic. Preparative RP-HPLC procedures yield inconveniently large, dilute solutions and concentration steps are required prior to subunit modification and fragmentation. Concentration of the β subunit usually results in significant losses due to insolubility. Using preparative SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, they have purified the α, 7 , and β subunits from rabbit muscle phosphorylase kinase in a soluble and concentrated form suitable for structural studies. Phosphorylase kinase labelled with fluorescein isothiocyanate in the α and α' subunits and fully 14 C-S-carboxymethylated was fractionated on a 5% acrylamide Laemmli slab gel. The subunit bands were visualized by fluorescence and by SDS precipitation then excised and electroeluted in the presence of SDS using an ELUTRAP device. From 4.5 mg of enzyme applied to a 4.5 mm thick gel about 70% of the α subunit and about 90% of the β subunit were typically recovered in less than 1 ml with overnight elution

  19. Synthesis of coumarin or ferrocene labeled nucleosides via Staudinger ligation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kois Pavol

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reaction of azides with triaryl phosphines under mild conditions gives iminophosphoranes which can react with almost any kind of electrophilic reagent, e.g. aldehydes/ketones to form imines or esters to form amides. This so-called Staudinger ligation has been employed in a wide range of applications as a general tool for bioconjugation including specific labeling of nucleic acids. Results A new approach for the preparation of labeled nucleosides via intermolecular Staudinger ligation is described. Reaction of azidonucleosides with triphenylphosphine lead to iminophosphorane intermediates, which react subsequently with derivatives of coumarin or ferrocene to form coumarin or ferrocene labeled nucleosides. Fluorescent properties of coumarin labeled nucleosides are determined. Conclusion New coumarin and ferrocene labeled nucleosides were prepared via intermolecular Staudinger ligation. This reaction joins the fluorescent coumarin and biospecific nucleoside to the new molecule with promising fluorescent and electrochemical properties. The isolated yields of products depend on the structure of azidonucleoside and carboxylic acids. A detailed study of the kinetics of the Staudinger ligation with nucleoside substrates is in progress.

  20. Synthesis of glycogen from fructose in the presence of elevated levels of glycogen phosphorylase a in rat hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciudad, C J; Massagué, J; Salavert, A; Guinovart, J J

    1980-03-20

    Incubation of hepatocytes with glucose promoted the increase in the glycogen synthase (-glucose 6-phosphate/+glucose 6-phosphate) activity ratio, the decrease in the levels of phosphorylase a and a marked increase in the intracellular glycogen level. Incubation with fructose alone promoted the simultaneous activation of glycogen synthase and increase in the levels of phosphorylase a. Strikingly, glycogen deposition occurred in spite of the elevated levels of phosphorylase a. When glucose and fructose were added to the media the activation of glycogen synthase was always higher than when the hexoses were added separately. On the other hand the effects on glycogen phosphorylase were a function of the relative concentrations of both sugars. Inactivation of glycogen phosphorylase occurred when the fructose to glucose ratio was low while activation took place when the ratio was high. The simultaneous presence of glucose and fructose resulted, in all cases, in an enhancement in the deposition of glycogen. The effects described were not limited to fructose as D-glyceraldehyde, dihydroxyacetone, L-sorbose, D-tagatose and sorbitol, compounds metabolically related to fructose, provoked the same behaviour.

  1. New insights into the synergism of nucleoside analogs with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Michael W; Parker, William B; Xu, Bo

    2013-01-01

    Nucleoside analogs have been frequently used in combination with radiotherapy in the clinical setting, as it has long been understood that inhibition of DNA repair pathways is an important means by which many nucleoside analogs synergize. Recent advances in our understanding of the structure and function of deoxycytidine kinase (dCK), a critical enzyme required for the anti-tumor activity for many nucleoside analogs, have clarified the mechanistic role this kinase plays in chemo- and radio-sensitization. A heretofore unrecognized role of dCK in the DNA damage response and cell cycle machinery has helped explain the synergistic effect of these agents with radiotherapy. Since most currently employed nucleoside analogs are primarily activated by dCK, these findings lend fresh impetus to efforts focused on profiling and modulating dCK expression and activity in tumors. In this review we will briefly review the pharmacology and biochemistry of the major nucleoside analogs in clinical use that are activated by dCK. This will be followed by discussions of recent advances in our understanding of dCK activation via post-translational modifications in response to radiation and current strategies aimed at enhancing this activity in cancer cells

  2. Synthesis and Antiviral Activity of 3-Aminoindole Nucleosides of 2-Acetamido-2-deoxy-D-glucose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdelrahman, Adel A. H.; Elessawy, Farag A.; Barakat, Yousif A. [Menoufia Univ., Shebin El-Koam (Egypt); Ellatif, Mona M. Abd [The British Univ. in Egypt, Cairo (Egypt)

    2012-10-15

    A new method for the construction of 3-aminoindole nucleosides of 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-D-glucose based is presented. Nitration and acetylation of the indole nucleosides by acetic anhydride-nitric acid mixture followed by reduction using silver catalyst (SNSM) impregnated on silica gel, afforded the corresponding amino indole nucleosides. The nucleosides were tested for antiviral activity against hepatitis B virus (HBV) to show different degrees of antiviral activities or inhibitory actions.

  3. Advanced Prodrug Strategies in Nucleoside and Non-Nucleoside Antiviral Agents: A Review of the Recent Five Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanadi Sinokrot

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Poor pharmacokinetic profiles and resistance are the main two drawbacks from which currently used antiviral agents suffer, thus make them excellent targets for research, especially in the presence of viral pandemics such as HIV and hepatitis C. Methods: The strategies employed in the studies covered in this review were sorted by the type of drug synthesized into ester prodrugs, targeted delivery prodrugs, macromolecular prodrugs, other nucleoside conjugates, and non-nucleoside drugs. Results: Utilizing the ester prodrug approach a novel isopropyl ester prodrug was found to be potent HIV integrase inhibitor. Further, employing the targeted delivery prodrug zanamivir and valine ester prodrug was made and shown a sole delivery of zanamivir. Additionally, VivaGel, a dendrimer macromolecular prodrug, was found to be very efficient and is now undergoing clinical trials. Conclusions: Of all the strategies employed (ester, targeted delivery, macromolecular, protides and nucleoside analogues, and non-nucleoside analogues prodrugs, the most promising are nucleoside analogues and macromolecular prodrugs. The macromolecular prodrug VivaGel works by two mechanisms: envelope mediated and receptor mediated disruption. Nucleotide analogues have witnessed productive era in the recent past few years. The era of non-interferon based treatment of hepatitis (through direct inhibitors of NS5A has dawned.

  4. Methylthioadenosine phosphorylase compositions and methods of use in the diagnosis and treatment of proliferative disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.

    2005-03-22

    Disclosed are novel nucleic acid and peptide compositions comprising methythlioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP) and methods of use for MTAP amino acid sequences and DNA segments comprising MTAP in the diagnosis of human cancers and development of MTAP-specific antibodies. Also disclosed are methods for the diagnosis and treatment of tumors and other proliferative cell disorders, and idenification tumor suppressor genes and gene products from the human 9p21-p22 chromosome region. Such methods are useful in the diagnosis of multiple tumor types such as bladder cancer, lung cancer, breast cancer, pancreatic cancer, brain tumors, lymphomas, gliomas, melanomas, and leukemias.

  5. Compositions and methods involving methyladenosine phosphorylase in the diagnosis and treatment of proliferative disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.

    2007-03-20

    Disclosed are novel nucleic acid and peptide compositions comprising methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP) and methods of use for MTAP amino acid sequences and DNA segments comprising MTAP in the diagnosis of human cancers and development of MTAP-specific antibodies. Also disclosed are methods for the diagnosis and treatment of tumors and other proliferative cell disorders, and identification of tumor suppressor genes and gene products from the human 9p21-p22 chromosome region. Such methods are useful in the diagnosis of multiple tumor types such as bladder cancer, lung cancer, breast cancer, pancreatic cancer, brain tumors, lymphomas, gliomas, melanomas, and leukemias.

  6. Synthesis of (benzimidazol-2-yl)aniline derivatives as glycogen phosphorylase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galal, Shadia A; Khattab, Muhammad; Andreadaki, Fotini; Chrysina, Evangelia D; Praly, Jean-Pierre; Ragab, Fatma A F; El Diwani, Hoda I

    2016-11-01

    A series of (benzimidazol-2-yl)-aniline (1) derivatives has been synthesized and evaluated as glycogen phosphorylase (GP) inhibitors. Kinetics studies revealed that compounds displaying a lateral heterocyclic residue with several heteroatoms (series 3 and 5) exhibited modest inhibitory properties with IC 50 values in the 400-600μM range. Arylsulfonyl derivatives 7 (Ar: phenyl) and 9 (Ar: o-nitrophenyl) of 1 exhibited the highest activity (series 2) among the studied compounds (IC 50 324μM and 357μM, respectively) with stronger effect than the p-tolyl analogue 8. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Deoxyribonucleoside kinases activate nucleoside antibiotics in severely pathogenic bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandrini, Michael; Shannon, O.; Clausen, A.R.

    2007-01-01

    Common bacterial pathogens are becoming progressively more resistant to traditional antibiotics, representing a major public-health crisis. Therefore, there is a need for a variety of antibiotics with alternative modes of action. In our study, several nucleoside analogs were tested against pathog...... alternative for combating pathogenic bacteria.......Common bacterial pathogens are becoming progressively more resistant to traditional antibiotics, representing a major public-health crisis. Therefore, there is a need for a variety of antibiotics with alternative modes of action. In our study, several nucleoside analogs were tested against...... pathogenic staphylococci and streptococci. We show that pyrimidine-based nucleoside analogs, like 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT) and 2',2'-difluoro-2'deoxycytidine (gemcitabine), are specifically activated by the endogenous bacterial deoxyribonucleoside kinases, leading to cell death. Deoxyribonucleoside...

  8. Synthesis of O-Amino Sugars and Nucleosides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Chen

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Nucleic acids and carbohydrates are essential biomolecules involved in numerous biological and pathological processes. Development of multifunctional building blocks based on nucleosides and sugars is in high demand for the generation of novel oligonucleotide mimics and glycoconjugates for biomedical applications. Recently, aminooxyl-functionalized compounds have attracted increasing research interest because of their easy derivatization through oxime ligation or N-oxyamide formation reactions. Various biological applications have been reported for O-amino carbohydrate- and nucleoside-derived compounds. Here, we report our efforts in the design and synthesis of glyco-, glycosyl, nucleoside- and nucleo-aminooxy acid derivatives from readily available sugars and amino acids, and their use for the generation of N-oxyamide-linked oligosaccharides, glycopeptides, glycolipids, oligonucleosides and nucleopeptides as novel glycoconjugates or oligonucleotide mimics. Delicate and key points in the synthesis will be emphasized.

  9. Nucleoside analogues are activated by bacterial deoxyribonucleoside kinases in a species-specific manner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandrini, Michael; Clausen, Anders; On, Stephen L. W.

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the bactericidal activity of antiviral and anticancer nucleoside analogues against a variety of pathogenic bacteria and characterize the activating enzymes, deoxyribonucleoside kinases (dNKs). Several FDA-approved nucleoside analogue drugs were screened for their potential bacteric......-specific manner. Therefore, nucleoside analogues have a potential to be employed as antibiotics in the fight against emerging multiresistant bacteria....

  10. Area, age and gender dependence of the nucleoside system in the brain: a review of current literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, Zsolt; Juhász, Gábor; Palkovits, Miklós; Dobolyi, Arpád; Kékesi, Katalin A

    2011-01-01

    Nucleosides, such as uridine, inosine, guanosine and adenosine, may participate in the regulation of sleep, cognition, memory and nociception, the suppression of seizures, and have also been suggested to play a role in the pathophysiology of some neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric diseases. Under pathological conditions, levels of nucleosides change extremely in the brain, indicating their participation in the pathophysiology of disorders like Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and schizophrenia. These findings have resulted in an increasing attention to the roles of nucleosides in the central nervous system. The specific effects of nucleosides depend on the expression of their receptors and transporters in neuronal and glial cells, as well as their extracellular concentrations in the brain. A complex interlinked metabolic network and transporters of nucleosides may balance nucleoside levels in the brain tissue under normal conditions and enable the fine modulation of neuronal and glial processes via nucleoside receptor signaling mechanisms. Brain levels of nucleosides were found to vary when measured in a variety of different brain regions. In addition, nucleoside levels also depend on age and gender. Furthermore, distributions of nucleoside transporters and receptors as well as nucleoside metabolic enzyme activities demonstrate the area, age and gender dependence of the nucleoside system, suggesting different roles of nucleosides in functionally different brain areas. The aim of this review article is to summarize our present knowledge of the area-, age- and gender-dependent distribution of nucleoside levels, nucleoside metabolic enzyme activity, nucleoside receptors and nucleoside transporters in the brain.

  11. Synthesis, molecular docking study and thymidine phosphorylase inhibitory activity of 3-formylcoumarin derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Muhammad; Adnan Ali Shah, Syed; Afifi, Muhammad; Imran, Syahrul; Sultan, Sadia; Rahim, Fazal; Hadiani Ismail, Nor; Mohammed Khan, Khalid

    2018-03-01

    Thymidine phosphorylase (TP) over expression plays role in several pathological conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis, chronic inflammatory diseases, psoriasis, and tumor angiogenesis. The inhibitor of this enzyme plays an important role in preventing the serious threat due to over expression of TP. In this regard, a series of seventeenanalogs of 3-formylcoumarin (1-17) were synthesized, characterized by 1 HNMR and EI-MS and screened for thymidine phosphorylaseinhibitory activity. All analogs showed a variable degree of thymidine phosphorylase inhibition with IC 50 values ranging between 0.90 ± 0.01 and 53.50 ± 1.20 μM when compared with the standard inhibitor 7-Deazaxanthine having IC 50 value 38.68 ± 1.12 μM. Among the series, fifteenanalogs such as 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 15, 16 and 17 showed excellent inhibition which is many folds better than the standard 7-Deazaxanthine whiletwo analogs 13 and 14 showed good inhibition. The structure activity relationship (SAR) was mainly based upon by bring about difference of substituents on phenyl ring. Molecular docking study was carried out to understand the binding interaction of the most active analogs. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Structural basis for the mechanism of inhibition of uridine phosphorylase from Salmonella typhimurium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lashkov, A. A.; Zhukhlistova, N. E.; Sotnichenko, S. E.; Gabdulkhakov, A. G.; Mikhailov, A. M., E-mail: amm@ns.crys.ras.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

    2010-01-15

    The three-dimensional structures of three complexes of Salmonella typhimurium uridine phosphorylase with the inhibitor 2,2'-anhydrouridine, the substrate PO{sub 4}, and with both the inhibitor 2,2'-anhydrouridine and the substrate PO{sub 4} (a binary complex) were studied in detail by X-ray diffraction. The structures of the complexes were refined at 2.38, 1.5, and 1.75 A resolution, respectively. Changes in the three-dimensional structure of the subunits in different crystal structures are considered depending on the presence or absence of the inhibitor molecule and (or) the phosphate ion in the active site of the enzyme. The presence of the phosphate ion in the phosphate-binding site was found to substantially change the orientations of the side chains of the amino-acid residues Arg30, Arg91, and Arg48 coordinated to this ion. A comparison showed that the highly flexible loop L9 is unstable. The atomic coordinates of the refined structures of the complexes and the corresponding structure factors were deposited in the Protein Data Bank (their PDB ID codes are 3DD0 and 3C74). The experimental data on the spatial reorganization of the active site caused by changes in its functional state from the unligated to the completely inhibited state suggest the structural basis for the mechanism of inhibition of Salmonella typhimurium uridine phosphorylase.

  13. Iodine Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fax/Phone Home » Iodine Deficiency Leer en Español Iodine Deficiency Iodine is an element that is needed ... world’s population remains at risk for iodine deficiency. Iodine Deficiency FAQs WHAT IS THE THYROID GLAND? The ...

  14. Functional characterization of a recombinant sodium-dependent nucleoside transporter with selectivity for pyrimidine nucleosides (cNT1rat) by transient expression in cultured mammalian cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Fang, X; Parkinson, F E; Mowles, D A; Young, J D; Cass, C E

    1996-01-01

    We have demonstrated that monkey kidney (COS-1) cells have a single type of nucleoside transport process, which, because it was equilibrative, sodium-independent and could be inhibited by nitrobenzylthioinosine (NBMPR), was identified as the 'equilibrative sensitive' or 'es' transporter. Using NBMPR or dilazep to inhibit the endogenous nucleoside transport activity, we have transiently expressed a cDNA that encodes an inhibitor-insensitive, concentrative nucleoside transporter protein (cNT1ra...

  15. Synthesis of (Purin-6-yl)methylphosphonate Bases and Nucleosides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hasník, Zbyněk; Pohl, Radek; Hocek, Michal

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 18 (2010), s. 2464-2466 ISSN 0040-4039 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0508 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : purines * nucleosides * phosphonates * cross-coupling Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.618, year: 2010

  16. Amino Acid Ester Prodrugs of Nucleoside and Nucleotide Antivirals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krečmerová, Marcela

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 10 (2017), s. 818-833 ISSN 1389-5575 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) M200551201 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : acyclic nucleoside analogues * antiherpetics * antiretrovirals * cidofovir * peptidomimetics * prodrugs Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry OBOR OECD: Organic chemistry Impact factor: 2.661, year: 2016

  17. Antiviral acyclic nucleoside phosphonates: New structures and prodrugs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krečmerová, Marcela; Tichý, Tomáš; Pomeisl, Karel; Andrei, G.; Balzarini, J.; Snoeck, R.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 2 (2016), s. 37 [PharmaMed-2016. International Conference on Medicinal and Pharmaceutical Chemistry . 05.12.2016-07.12.2016, Dubai] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-00522S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : acyclic nucleoside phosphonates * prodrugs * antivirals * 5-azacytosine Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  18. Two convergent approaches toward novel carbocyclic C-nucleosides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nencka, Radim; Šála, Michal; Dejmek, Milan; Dračínský, Martin; Holý, Antonín; Hřebabecký, Hubert

    -, č. 23 (2010), s. 4119-4130 ISSN 0039-7881 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0508 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : carbocyclic C-nucleosides * convergent approach * uracil * pyrimidines Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.260, year: 2010

  19. Efficient synthesis and biological properties of the 2‘-trifluoromethyl analogues of acyclic nucleosides and acyclic nucleoside phosphonates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jansa, Petr; Kolman, Viktor; Kostinová, Alexandra; Dračínský, Martin; Mertlíková-Kaiserová, Helena; Janeba, Zlatko

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 76, č. 10 (2011), s. 1187-1198 ISSN 0010-0765 R&D Projects: GA MV VG20102015046 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : nucleosides * nucleotides * phosphorus * fluorine * biological activity * antibiotics Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.283, year: 2011

  20. Health Deficiencies

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A list of all health deficiencies currently listed on Nursing Home Compare, including the nursing home that received the deficiency, the associated inspection date,...

  1. Natural flavonoids as antidiabetic agents. The binding of gallic and ellagic acids to glycogen phosphorylase b.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyriakis, Efthimios; Stravodimos, George A; Kantsadi, Anastassia L; Chatzileontiadou, Demetra S M; Skamnaki, Vassiliki T; Leonidas, Demetres D

    2015-07-08

    We present a study on the binding of gallic acid and its dimer ellagic acid to glycogen phosphorylase (GP). Ellagic acid is a potent inhibitor with Kis of 13.4 and 7.5 μM, in contrast to gallic acid which displays Kis of 1.7 and 3.9 mM for GPb and GPa, respectively. Both compounds are competitive inhibitors with respect to the substrate, glucose-1-phoshate, and non-competitive to the allosteric activator, AMP. However, only ellagic acid functions with glucose in a strongly synergistic mode. The crystal structures of the GPb-gallic acid and GPb-ellagic acid complexes were determined at high resolution, revealing that both ligands bind to the inhibitor binding site of the enzyme and highlight the structural basis for the significant difference in their inhibitory potency. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Functional and structural characterization of plastidic starch phosphorylase during barley endosperm development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cuesta-Seijo, Jose A.; Ruzanski, Christian; Krucewicz, Katarzyna

    2017-01-01

    The production of starch is essential for human nutrition and represents a major metabolic flux in the biosphere. The biosynthesis of starch in storage organs like barley endosperm operates via two main pathways using different substrates: starch synthases use ADP-glucose to produce amylose......,4-glucans using HvPho1 from G1P as the sole substrate. The structural properties of HvPho1 provide insights into the low affinity of HvPho1 for large polysaccharides like starch or amylopectin. Our results suggest that HvPho1 may play a role during the initiation of starch biosynthesis in barley....... and amylopectin, the two major components of starch, whereas starch phosphorylase (Pho1) uses glucose-1-phosphate (G1P), a precursor for ADP-glucose production, to produce α-1,4 glucans. The significance of the Pho1 pathway in starch biosynthesis has remained unclear. To elucidate the importance of barley Pho1...

  3. A thermal after-effect of UV irradiation of muscle glycogen phosphorylase b.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeriya V Mikhaylova

    Full Text Available Different test systems are used to characterize the anti-aggregation efficiency of molecular chaperone proteins and of low-molecular-weight chemical chaperones. Test systems based on aggregation of UV-irradiated protein are of special interest because they allow studying the protective action of different agents at physiological temperatures. The kinetics of UV-irradiated glycogen phosphorylase b (UV-Phb from rabbit skeletal muscle was studied at 37°C using dynamic light scattering in a wide range of protein concentrations. It has been shown that the order of aggregation with respect to the protein is equal to unity. A conclusion has been made that the rate-limiting stage of the overall process of aggregation is heat-induced structural reorganization of a UV-Phb molecule, which contains concealed damage.

  4. Synthesis of tritium labelled nucleoside triphosphates by enzymatic phosphorylation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Decun; Ji Linzhen; Liao Sha

    1986-01-01

    [5- 3 H]UMP, [5- 3 H]CMP, [8- 3 H]AMP and [8- 3 H]GMP were prepared from 5BrUMP 5BrCMP 8BrAMP and 8BrGMP by catalytic halogentritium replacement at the same time. [5- 3 H]UTP, [5- 3 H]CTP, [8- 3 H]ATP and [8- 3 H]GTP were subsequently synthesized from [5- 3 H]UMP, [5- 3 H]CMP, [8- 3 H]AMP and [8- 3 H]GMP by enzymatic phosphorylation with the crude enzyme prepared from brewer's yeasts and purified by paper chromatography simultaneously. In addition, four kinds of tritium labelled nucleoside monophosphates and four kinds of tritium labelled nucleoside diphosphates were obtained as the by-products. The specific activity of these products is between 14-19 Ci/mmol and the radiochemical purity is more than 98%

  5. Longitudinal Study of Neurodegenerative Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-31

    MLD; Krabbe Disease; ALD; MPS I; MPS II; MPS III; Vanishing White Matter Disease; GM3 Gangliosidosis; PKAN; Tay-Sachs Disease; NP Deficiency; Osteopetrosis; Alpha-Mannosidosis; Sandhoff Disease; Niemann-Pick Diseases; MPS IV; Gaucher Disease; GAN; GM1 Gangliosidoses; Morquio Disease; S-Adenosylhomocysteine Hydrolase Deficiency; Batten Disease; Pelizaeus-Merzbacher Disease; Leukodystrophy; Lysosomal Storage Diseases; Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase Deficiency; Multiple Sulfatase Deficiency Disease

  6. C-Nucleosides: Synthetic Strategies and Biological Applications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štambaský, J.; Hocek, Michal; Kočovský, P.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 109, č. 12 (2009), s. 6729-6764 ISSN 0009-2665 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC512; GA AV ČR IAA400550902 Grant - others:NIH(US) 1R03TW007372-01 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : nucleosides * nucleobases * biological activity * extension of genetic alphabet Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 35.957, year: 2009

  7. Nucleoside-Lipid-Based Nanocarriers for Sorafenib Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benizri, Sebastien; Ferey, Ludivine; Alies, Bruno; Mebarek, Naila; Vacher, Gaelle; Appavoo, Ananda; Staedel, Cathy; Gaudin, Karen; Barthélémy, Philippe

    2018-01-01

    Although the application of sorafenib, a small inhibitor of tyrosine protein kinases, to cancer treatments remains a worldwide option in chemotherapy, novel strategies are needed to address the low water solubility (drug. In this context, the use of nanocarriers is currently investigated in order to overcome these drawbacks. In this contribution, we report a new type of sorafenib-based nanoparticles stabilized by hybrid nucleoside-lipids. The solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) showed negative or positive zeta potential values depending on the nucleoside-lipid charge. Transmission electron microscopy of sorafenib-loaded SLNs revealed parallelepiped nanoparticles of about 200 nm. Biological studies achieved on four different cell lines, including liver and breast cancers, revealed enhanced anticancer activities of Sorafenib-based SLNs compared to the free drug. Importantly, contrast phase microscopy images recorded after incubation of cancer cells in the presence of SLNs at high concentration in sorafenib (> 80 μM) revealed a total cancer cell death in all cases. These results highlight the potential of nucleoside-lipid-based SLNs as drug delivery systems.

  8. Synthesis and antiproliferative evaluation of novel azido nucleosides and their phosphoramidate derivatives

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Xavier, N.M.; Goncalves-Pereira, R.; Jorda, Radek; Řezníčková, Eva; Kryštof, Vladimír; Oliveira, M.C.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 89, č. 9 (2017), s. 1267-1281 ISSN 0033-4545 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : anticancer activity * azido nucleosides * bioactive molecules * ics-28 * N-glycosylation * nucleoside phosphoramidates * nucleoside/nucleotide analogs * Staudinger-phosphite reaction Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Organic chemistry Impact factor: 2.626, year: 2016

  9. Purine restriction induces pronounced translational upregulation of the NT1 adenosine/pyrimidine nucleoside transporter in Leishmania major.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Diana; Valdés, Raquel; Sanchez, Marco A; Hayenga, Johanna; Elya, Carolyn; Detke, Siegfried; Landfear, Scott M

    2010-10-01

    Leishmania and other parasitic protozoa are unable to synthesize purines de novo and are reliant upon purine nucleoside and nucleobase transporters to import preformed purines from their hosts. To study the roles of the four purine permeases NT1-NT4 in Leishmania major, null mutants in each transporter gene were prepared and the effect of each gene deletion on purine uptake was monitored. Deletion of the NT3 purine nucleobase transporter gene or both NT3 and the NT2 nucleoside transporter gene resulted in pronounced upregulation of adenosine and uridine uptake mediated by the NT1 permease and also induced up to a 200-fold enhancement in the level of the NT1 protein but not mRNA. A similar level of upregulation of NT1 was achieved in wild-type promastigotes that were transferred to medium deficient in purines. Pulse labelling and treatment of cells with the translation inhibitor cycloheximide revealed that control of NT1 expression occurs primarily at the level of translation and not protein turnover. These observations imply the existence of a translational control mechanism that enhances the ability of Leishmania parasites to import essential purines when they are present at limiting concentrations. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Determination of redox potentials for the Watson-Crick base pairs, DNA nucleosides, and relevant nucleoside analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo-Hernandez, Carlos E; Close, David M; Gorb, Leonid; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2007-05-17

    Redox potentials for the DNA nucleobases and nucleosides, various relevant nucleoside analogues, Watson-Crick base pairs, and seven organic dyes are presented based on DFT/B3LYP/6-31++G(d,p) and B3YLP/6-311+G(2df,p)//B3LYP/6-31+G* levels of calculations. The values are determined from an experimentally calibrated set of equations that correlate the vertical ionization (electron affinity) energy of 20 organic molecules with their experimental reversible oxidation (reduction) potential. Our results are in good agreement with those estimated experimentally for the DNA nucleosides in acetonitrile solutions (Seidel et al. J. Phys. Chem. 1996, 100, 5541). We have found that nucleosides with anti conformation exhibit lower oxidation potentials than the corresponding syn conformers. The lowering in the oxidation potential is due to the formation of an intramolecular hydrogen bonding interaction between the 5'-OH group of the sugar and the N3 of the purine bases or C2=O of the pyrimidine bases in the syn conformation. Pairing of adenine or guanine with its complementary pyrimidine base decreases its oxidation potential by 0.15 or 0.28 V, respectively. The calculated energy difference between the oxidation potential for the G.C base pair and that of the guanine base is in good agreement with the experimental value estimated recently (0.34 V: Caruso, T.; et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2005, 127, 15040). The complete and consistent set of reversible redox values determined in this work for the DNA constituents is expected to be of considerable value to those studying charge and electronic energy transfer in DNA.

  11. Polysaccharide fraction from higher plants which strongly interacts with the cytosolic phosphorylase isozyme. I. Isolation and characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Yi; Steup, M.

    1990-01-01

    From leaves of Spinacia oleracea L. or from Pisum sativum L. and from cotyledons of germinating pea seeds a high molecular weight polysaccharide fraction was isolated. The apparent size of the fraction, as determined by gel filtration, was similar to that of dextran blue. Following acid hydrolysis the monomer content of the polysaccharide preparation was studied using high pressure liquid and thin layer chromatography. Glucose, galactose, arabinose, and ribose were the main monosaccharide compounds. The native polysaccharide preparation interacted strongly with the cytosolic isozyme of phosphorylase (EC 2.4.1.1). Interaction with the plastidic phosphorylase isozyme(s) was by far weaker. Interaction with the cytosolic isozyme was demonstrated by affinity electrophoresis, kinetic measurements, and by 14 C-labeling experiments in which the glucosyl transfer from [ 14 C]glucose 1-phosphate to the polysaccharide preparation was monitored

  12. Synthesis of Hyperbranched Glycoconjugates by the Combined Action of Potato Phosphorylase and Glycogen Branching Enzyme from Deinococcus geothermalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Loos

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Potato phosphorylase is able to synthesize linear polyglucans from maltoheptaose primers. By coupling maltoheptaose to butane diamine, tris(2-aminoethylamine and amine functionalized amine functionalized poly ethyleneglycol (PEG, new primer molecules became available. The resulting di-, tri- and macro-primers were incubated with potato phosphorylase and glycogen branching enzyme from Deinococcus geothermalis. Due to the action of both enzymes, hyperbranched polyglucan arms were grown from the maltoheptaose derivatives with a maximum degree of branching of 11%. The size of the synthesized hyperbranched polyglucans could be controlled by the ratio monomer over primer. About 60%–80% of the monomers were incorporated in the glycoconjugates. The resulting hyperbranched glycoconjugates were subjected to Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS measurements in order to determine the hydrodynamic radius and it became obvious that the structures formed agglomerates in the range of 14–32 nm.

  13. Functional characterization of sucrose phosphorylase and scrR, a regulator of sucrose metabolism in Lactobacillus reuteri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Januana S; Abdi, Reihaneh; Su, Marcia Shu-Wei; Schwab, Clarissa; Gänzle, Michael G

    2013-12-01

    Lactobacillus reuteri harbours alternative enzymes for sucrose metabolism, sucrose phosphorylase, fructansucrases, and glucansucrases. Sucrose phosphorylase and fructansucrases additionally contribute to raffinose metabolism. Glucansucrases and fructansucrases produce exopolysaccharides as alternative to sucrose hydrolysis. L. reuteri LTH5448 expresses a levansucrase (ftfA) and sucrose phosphorylase (scrP), both are inducible by sucrose. This study determined the contribution of scrP to sucrose and raffinose metabolism in L. reuteri LTH5448, and elucidated the role of scrR in regulation sucrose metabolism. Disruption of scrP and scrR was achieved by double crossover mutagenesis. L. reuteri LTH5448, LTH5448ΔscrP and LTH5448ΔscrR were characterized with respect to growth and metabolite formation with glucose, sucrose, or raffinose as sole carbon source. Inactivation of scrR led to constitutive transcription of scrP and ftfA, demonstrating that scrR is negative regulator. L. reuteri LTH5448 and the LTH5448ΔscrP or LTH5448ΔscrR mutant strains did not differ with respect to glucose, sucrose or raffinose utilization. However, L. reuteri LTH5448ΔscrP produced more levan, indicating that the lack of sucrose phosphorylase is compensated by an increased metabolic flux through levansucrase. In conclusion, the presence of alternate pathways for sucrose and raffinose metabolism and their regulation indicate that these substrates, which are abundant in plants, are preferred carbohydrate sources for L. reuteri. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. In silico binding analysis and SAR elucidations of newly designed benzopyrazine analogs as potent inhibitors of thymidine phosphorylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Muhammad; Ismail, Nor Hadiani; Imran, Syahrul; Rahim, Fazal; Wadood, Abdul; Al Muqarrabun, Laode Muhammad Ramadhan; Khan, Khalid Mohammed; Ghufran, Mehreen; Ali, Muhammad

    2016-10-01

    Thymidine phosphorylase (TP) is up regulated in wide variety of solid tumors and therefore presents a remarkable target for drug discovery in cancer. A novel class of extremely potent TPase inhibitors based on benzopyrazine (1-28) has been developed and evaluated against thymidine phosphorylase enzyme. Out of these twenty-eight analogs eleven (11) compounds 1, 4, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 24 and 28 showed potent thymidine phosphorylase inhibitory potentials with IC50 values ranged between 3.20±0.30 and 37.60±1.15μM when compared with the standard 7-Deazaxanthine (IC50=38.68±4.42μM). Structure-activity relationship was established and molecular docking studies were performed to determine the binding interactions of these newly synthesized compounds. Current studies have revealed that these compounds established stronger hydrogen bonding networks with active site residues as compare to the standard compound 7DX. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Iodine Deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.

    2009-01-01

    Iodine deficiency has multiple adverse effects in humans, termed iodine deficiency disorders, due to inadequate thyroid hormone production. Globally, it is estimated that 2 billion individuals have an insufficient iodine intake, and South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa are particularly affected.

  16. An enzymatic glycosylation of nucleoside analogues using beta-galactosidase from Escherichia coli

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Blažek, Jiří; Jansa, Petr; Baszczyňski, Ondřej; Kaiser, Martin Maxmilian; Otmar, Miroslav; Krečmerová, Marcela; Dračínský, Martin; Holý, Antonín; Králová, B.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 9 (2012), s. 3111-3118 ISSN 0968-0896 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0508 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : glycosylation * galactosylation * beta-galactosidase * enzymatic synthesis * nucleoside * acyclic nucleoside analogues Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.903, year: 2012

  17. Origin, Utilization, and Recycling of Nucleosides in the Central Nervous System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipata, Piero Luigi

    2011-01-01

    The brain relies on the salvage of preformed purine and pyrimidine rings, mainly in the form of nucleosides, to maintain its nucleotide pool in the proper qualitative and quantitative balance. The transport of nucleosides from blood into neurons and glia is considered to be an essential prerequisite to enter their metabolic utilization in the…

  18. Cytosine arabinoside influx and nucleoside transport sites in acute leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, J S; Jones, S P; Sawyer, W H; Paterson, A R

    1982-02-01

    Although cytosine arabinoside (araC) can induce a remission in a majority of patients presenting with acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML), a minority fail to respond and moreover the drug has less effect in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The carrier-mediated influx of araC into purified blasts from patients with AML, ALL, and acute undifferentiated leukemia (AUL) has been compared to that of normal lymphocytes and polymorphs. Blasts showed a larger mediated influx of araC than mature cells, since mean influxes for myeloblasts and lymphoblasts were 6- and 2.3-fold greater than polymorphs and lymphocytes, respectively. Also, the mean influx for myeloblasts was fourfold greater than the mean for lymphoblasts. The number of nucleoside transport sites was estimated for each cell type by measuring the equilibrium binding of [(3)H]nitrobenzylthioinosine (NBMPR), which inhibits nucleoside fluxes by binding with high affinity to specific sites on the transport mechanism. The mean binding site numbers for myeloblasts and lymphoblasts were 5- and 2.8-fold greater, respectively, than for the mature cells of the same maturation series. The mean number of NBMPR binding sites for myeloblasts was fourfold greater than for lymphoblasts. Patients with AUL were heterogeneous since blasts from some gave values within the myeloblastic range and others within the lymphoblastic range. The araC influx correlated closely with the number of NBMPR binding sites measured in the same cells on the same day. Transport parameters were measured on blasts from 15 patients with AML or AUL who were then treated with standard induction therapy containing araC. Eight patients entered complete remission, while seven failed therapy, among whom were the three patients with the lowest araC influx (myeloblasts have both higher araC transport rates and more nucleoside transport sites than lymphoblasts and this factor may contribute to the greater sensitivity of AML to this drug. AraC transport varied >10

  19. Addressing the selectivity and toxicity of antiviral nucleosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Joy Y

    2018-01-01

    Nucleoside and nucleotide analogs have played significant roles in antiviral therapies and are valued for their impressive potency and high barrier to resistance. They have been approved for treatment of herpes simplex virus-1, HIV, HBV, HCV, and influenza, and new drugs are being developed for the treatment of RSV, Ebola, coronavirus MERS, and other emerging viruses. However, this class of compounds has also experienced a high attrition rate in clinical trials due to toxicity. In this review, we discuss the utility of different biochemical and cell-based assays and provide recommendations for assessing toxicity liability before entering animal toxicity studies.

  20. HIV-1 Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vanangamudi, Murugesan; Poongavanam, Vasanthanathan; Namasivayam, Vigneshwaran

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Design of inhibitors for HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibition (HIV-1 RT) is one of the successful chemotherapies for the treatment of HIV infection. Among the inhibitors available for HIV-1 RT, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) have shown to be very promising......: The conformation dependent-alignment based (CoMFA and CoMSIA) methods have been proven very successful ligand based strategy in the drug design. Here, CoMFA and CoMSIA studies reported for structurally distinct NNRTIs including thiazolobenzimidazole, dipyridodiazepinone, 1,1,3-trioxo [1,2,4]-thiadiazine...

  1. Multiple cellobiohydrolases and cellobiose phosphorylases cooperate in the ruminal bacterium Ruminococcus albus 8 to degrade cellooligosaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devendran, Saravanan; Abdel-Hamid, Ahmed M; Evans, Anton F; Iakiviak, Michael; Kwon, In Hyuk; Mackie, Roderick I; Cann, Isaac

    2016-10-17

    Digestion of plant cell wall polysaccharides is important in energy capture in the gastrointestinal tract of many herbivorous and omnivorous mammals, including humans and ruminants. The members of the genus Ruminococcus are found in both the ruminant and human gastrointestinal tract, where they show versatility in degrading both hemicellulose and cellulose. The available genome sequence of Ruminococcus albus 8, a common inhabitant of the cow rumen, alludes to a bacterium well-endowed with genes that target degradation of various plant cell wall components. The mechanisms by which R. albus 8 employs to degrade these recalcitrant materials are, however, not clearly understood. In this report, we demonstrate that R. albus 8 elaborates multiple cellobiohydrolases with multi-modular architectures that overall enhance the catalytic activity and versatility of the enzymes. Furthermore, our analyses show that two cellobiose phosphorylases encoded by R. albus 8 can function synergistically with a cognate cellobiohydrolase and endoglucanase to completely release, from a cellulosic substrate, glucose which can then be fermented by the bacterium for production of energy and cellular building blocks. We further use transcriptomic analysis to confirm the over-expression of the biochemically characterized enzymes during growth of the bacterium on cellulosic substrates compared to cellobiose.

  2. Preparation and Applications of Amylose Supramolecules by Means of Phosphorylase-Catalyzed Enzymatic Polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-ichi Kadokawa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews preparation and applications of amylose supramolecules by means of phosphorylase-catalyzed enzymatic polymerization. When the enzymatic polymerization of α-d-glucose 1-phosphate (G-1-P as a monomer was carried out in the presence of poly(tetrahydrofuran (PTHF of a hydrophobic polyether as a guest polymer, the supramolecule, i.e., an amylose-PTHF inclusion complex, was formed in the process of polymerization. Because the representation of propagation in the polymerization is similar to the way that vines of plants grow twining around rods, this polymerization method for the preparation of amylose-polymer inclusion complexes was proposed to be named “vine-twining polymerization”. Various hydrophobic polyethers, polyesters, poly(ester-ether, and polycarbonates were also employed as the guest polymer in the vine-twining polymerization to produce the corresponding inclusion complexes. To obtain the inclusion complex from a strongly hydrophobic guest polymer, the parallel enzymatic polymerization system was developed as an advanced extension of the vine-twining polymerization. In addition, it was found that amylose selectively includes one side of the guest polymer from a mixture of two resemblant guest polymers, as well as a specific range in molecular weights of the guest PTHF. Amylose also exhibited selective inclusion behavior toward stereoisomers of poly(lactides. Moreover, the preparation of hydrogels through the formation of inclusion complexes of amylose in vine-twining polymerization was achieved.

  3. Thymidine phosphorylase exerts complex effects on bone resorption and formation in myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huan; Liu, Zhiqiang; Du, Juan; He, Jin; Lin, Pei; Amini, Behrang; Starbuck, Michael W; Novane, Nora; Shah, Jatin J; Davis, Richard E; Hou, Jian; Gagel, Robert F; Yang, Jing

    2016-08-24

    Myelomatous bone disease is characterized by the development of lytic bone lesions and a concomitant reduction in bone formation, leading to chronic bone pain and fractures. To understand the underlying mechanism, we investigated the contribution of myeloma-expressed thymidine phosphorylase (TP) to bone lesions. In osteoblast progenitors, TP up-regulated the methylation of RUNX2 and osterix, leading to decreased bone formation. In osteoclast progenitors, TP up-regulated the methylation of IRF8 and thereby enhanced expression of NFATc1 (nuclear factor of activated T cells, cytoplasmic 1 protein), leading to increased bone resorption. TP reversibly catalyzes thymidine into thymine and 2-deoxy-d-ribose (2DDR). Myeloma-secreted 2DDR bound to integrin αVβ3/α5β1 in the progenitors, activated PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase)/Akt signaling, and increased DNMT3A (DNA methyltransferase 3A) expression, resulting in hypermethylation of RUNX2, osterix, and IRF8 This study elucidates an important mechanism for myeloma-induced bone lesions, suggesting that targeting TP may be a viable approach to healing resorbed bone in patients. Because TP overexpression is common in bone-metastatic tumors, our findings could have additional mechanistic implications. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  4. Biocatalytic Process for Production of α-Glucosylglycerol Using Sucrose Phosphorylase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Luley-Goedl

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Glycosylglycerols are powerful osmolytes, produced by various plants, algae and bacteria in adaptation to salt stress and drought. Among them, glucosylglycerol (2-O-α-D-glucopyranosyl-sn-glycerol; GG has attracted special attention for its promising application as a moisturizing agent in cosmetics. A biocatalytic process for the synthesis of GG as industrial fine chemical is described in which sucrose phosphorylase (from Leuconostoc mesenteroides catalyzes regioselective glucosylation of glycerol using sucrose as the donor substrate. The overall enzymatic conversion, therefore, is sucrose+glycerol→GG+D-fructose. Using a twofold molar excess of glycerol acceptor in highly concentrated substrate solution, GG yield was 90 % based on ≥250 g/L of converted sucrose. Enzymatic GG production was implemented on a multihundred kg-per-year manufacturing scale, and a commercial product for cosmetic applications is distributed on the market under the name Glycoin®. Technical features of the biotransformation that were decisive for a successful process development are elaborated. Stabilization of proteins is another interesting field of application for GG.

  5. Production and application of a rare disaccharide using sucrose phosphorylase from Leuconostoc mesenteroides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Kenji; Yoshihara, Akihide; Furumoto, Toshio; Takata, Goro

    2015-06-01

    Sucrose phosphorylase (SPase) from Leuconostoc mesenteroides exhibited activity towards eight ketohexoses, which behaved as D-glucosyl acceptors, and α-D-glucose-1-phosphate (G1P), which behaved as a donor. All eight of these ketohexoses were subsequently transformed into the corresponding d-glucosyl-ketohexoses. Of the eight ketohexoses evaluated in the current study, d-allulose behaved as the best substrate for SPase, and the resulting d-glucosyl-d-alluloside product was found to be a non-reducing sugar with a specific optical rotation of [α]D(20) + 74.36°. D-Glucosyl-D-alluloside was identified as α-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-β-D-allulofuranoside by NMR analysis. D-Glucosyl-D-alluloside exhibited an inhibitory activity towards an invertase from yeast with a Km value of 50 mM, where it behaved as a competitive inhibitor with a Ki value of 9.2 mM. D-Glucosyl-D-alluloside was also successfully produced from sucrose using SPase and D-tagatose 3-epimerase. This process also allowed for the production of G1P from sucrose and d-allulose from D-fructose, which suggested that this method could be used to prepare d-glucosyl-d-alluloside without the need for expensive reagents such as G1P and d-allulose. Copyright © 2014 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Fluorescence and computational studies of thymidine phosphorylase affinity toward lipidated 5-FU derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lettieri, R.; D'Abramo, M.; Stella, L.; La Bella, A.; Leonelli, F.; Giansanti, L.; Venanzi, M.; Gatto, E.

    2018-04-01

    Thymidine phosphorylase (TP) is an enzyme that is up-regulated in a wide variety of solid tumors, including breast and colorectal cancers. It is involved in tumor growth and metastasis, for this reason it is one of the key enzyme to be inhibited, in an attempt to prevent tumor proliferation. However, it also plays an active role in cancer treatment, through its contribution in the conversion of the anti-cancer drug 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) to an irreversible inhibitor of thymidylate synthase (TS), responsible of the inhibition of the DNA synthesis. In this work, the intrinsic TP fluorescence has been investigated for the first time and exploited to study TP binding affinity for the unsubstituted 5-FU and for two 5-FU derivatives, designed to expose this molecule on liposomal membranes. These molecules were obtained by functionalizing the nitrogen atom with a chain consisting of six (1) or seven (2) units of glycol, linked to an alkyl moiety of 12 carbon atoms. Derivatives (1) and (2) exhibited an affinity for TP in the micromolar range, 10 times higher than the parent compound, irrespective of the length of the polyoxyethylenic spacer. This high affinity was maintained also when the compounds were anchored in liposomal membranes. Experimental results were supported by molecular dynamics simulations and docking calculations, supporting a feasible application of the designed supramolecular lipid structure in selective targeting of TP, to be potentially used as a drug delivery system or sensor device.

  7. The structure of brain glycogen phosphorylase-from allosteric regulation mechanisms to clinical perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Cécile; Dupret, Jean-Marie; Rodrigues Lima, Fernando

    2017-02-01

    Glycogen phosphorylase (GP) is the key enzyme that regulates glycogen mobilization in cells. GP is a complex allosteric enzyme that comprises a family of three isozymes: muscle GP (mGP), liver GP (lGP), and brain GP (bGP). Although the three isozymes display high similarity and catalyze the same reaction, they differ in their sensitivity to the allosteric activator adenosine monophosphate (AMP). Moreover, inactivating mutations in mGP and lGP have been known to be associated with glycogen storage diseases (McArdle and Hers disease, respectively). The determination, decades ago, of the structure of mGP and lGP have allowed to better understand the allosteric regulation of these two isoforms and the development of specific inhibitors. Despite its important role in brain glycogen metabolism, the structure of the brain GP had remained elusive. Here, we provide an overview of the human brain GP structure and its relationship with the two other members of this key family of the metabolic enzymes. We also summarize how this structure provides valuable information to understand the regulation of bGP and to design specific ligands of potential pharmacological interest. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  8. Isoform-selective regulation of glycogen phosphorylase by energy deprivation and phosphorylation in astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Margit S; Pedersen, Sofie E; Walls, Anne B; Waagepetersen, Helle S; Bak, Lasse K

    2015-01-01

    Glycogen phosphorylase (GP) is activated to degrade glycogen in response to different stimuli, to support both the astrocyte's own metabolic demand and the metabolic needs of neurons. The regulatory mechanism allowing such a glycogenolytic response to distinct triggers remains incompletely understood. In the present study, we used siRNA-mediated differential knockdown of the two isoforms of GP expressed in astrocytes, muscle isoform (GPMM), and brain isoform (GPBB), to analyze isoform-specific regulatory characteristics in a cellular setting. Subsequently, we tested the response of each isoform to phosphorylation, triggered by incubation with norepinephrine (NE), and to AMP, increased by glucose deprivation in cells in which expression of one GP isoform had been silenced. Successful knockdown was demonstrated on the protein level by Western blot, and on a functional level by determination of glycogen content showing an increase in glycogen levels following knockdown of either GPMM or GPBB. NE triggered glycogenolysis within 15 min in control cells and after GPBB knockdown. However, astrocytes in which expression of GPMM had been silenced showed a delay in response to NE, with glycogen levels significantly reduced only after 60 min. In contrast, allosteric activation of GP by AMP, induced by glucose deprivation, seemed to mainly affect GPBB, as only knockdown of GPBB, but not of GPMM, delayed the glycogenolytic response to glucose deprivation. Our results indicate that the two GP isoforms expressed in astrocytes respond to different physiological triggers, therefore conferring distinct metabolic functions of brain glycogen. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Versatile synthesis and biological evaluation of novel 3’-fluorinated purine nucleosides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hang Ren

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A unified synthetic strategy accessing novel 3'-fluorinated purine nucleoside derivatives and their biological evaluation were achieved. Novel 3’-fluorinated analogues were constructed from a common 3’-deoxy-3’-fluororibofuranose intermediate. Employing Suzuki and Stille cross-coupling reactions, fifteen 3’-fluororibose purine nucleosides 1–15 and eight 3’-fluororibose 2-chloro/2-aminopurine nucleosides 16–23 with various substituents at position 6 of the purine ring were efficiently synthesized. Furthermore, 3’-fluorine analogs of natural products nebularine and 6-methylpurine riboside were constructed via our convergent synthetic strategy. Synthesized nucleosides were tested against HT116 (colon cancer and 143B (osteosarcoma cancer tumor cell lines. We have demonstrated 3’-fluorine purine nucleoside analogues display potent tumor cell growth inhibition activity at sub- or low micromolar concentration.

  10. Selenium-Mediated Dehalogenation of Halogenated Nucleosides and its Relevance to the DNA Repair Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Santanu; Manna, Debasish; Mugesh, Govindasamy

    2015-08-03

    Halogenated nucleosides can be incorporated into the newly synthesized DNA of replicating cells and therefore are commonly used in the detection of proliferating cells in living tissues. Dehalogenation of these modified nucleosides is one of the key pathways involved in DNA repair mediated by the uracil-DNA glycosylase. Herein, we report the first example of a selenium-mediated dehalogenation of halogenated nucleosides. We also show that the mechanism for the debromination is remarkably different from that of deiodination and that the presence of a ribose or deoxyribose moiety in the nucleosides facilitates the deiodination. The results described herein should help in understanding the metabolism of halogenated nucleosides in DNA and RNA. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Alkylsulfanylphenyl derivatives of cytosine and 7-deazaadenine nucleosides, nucleotides and nucleoside triphosphates. Synthesis, polymerase incorporation to DNA and electrochemical study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Macíčková-Cahová, Hana; Pohl, Radek; Horáková Brázdilová, Petra; Havran, Luděk; Špaček, Jan; Fojta, Miroslav; Hocek, Michal

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 21 (2011), s. 5833-5841 ISSN 0947-6539 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06035; GA MŠk LC512; GA ČR GA203/09/0317; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA400040901 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506; CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : DNA polymerases * electrochemistry * nucleosides * nucleotides * organosulfur compounds Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 5.925, year: 2011

  12. The role of nucleoside/nucleotide transport and metabolism in the uptake and retention of 3'-fluoro-3'-deoxythymidine in human B-lymphoblast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plotnik, David A.; McLaughlin, Lena J.; Chan, Jenny; Redmayne-Titley, Joshua N.; Schwartz, Jeffrey L.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Recent studies in the human adenocarcinoma cell line A549 have identified cell growth-dependent equilibrative nucleoside transporter-1 (hENT1) as a modifier of 3'-fluoro-3'-deoxythymidine (FLT) uptake and retention. In the present study, we used the ability to isolate human lymphoblastoid clones deficient in thymidine kinase 1 (TK1) to study how metabolism and nucleoside transport influence FLT uptake and retention. Methods: Transport and metabolism of FLT were measured in the human lymphoblastoid cell line TK6 and in eight clones isolated from TK6. Four clones were TK1-proficient, while four were TK1-deficient. Both influx and efflux of FLT were measured under conditions where concentrative and equilibrative transport could be distinguished. Results: Sodium-dependent concentrative FLT transport dominated over equilibrative transport mechanisms and while inhibition of hENT1 reduced FLT uptake, there were no correlations between clonal variations in hENT1 levels and FLT uptake. There was an absolute requirement of TK1 for concentration of FLT in TK6 cells. FLT uptake reached a peak after 60 min of incubation with FLT after which intracellular levels of FLT and FLT metabolites declined. Efflux was rapid and was associated with reductions in FLT and each of its metabolites. Both FLT and FLT-monophosphate were found in the efflux buffer. Conclusions: Initial rates of FLT uptake were a function of both concentrative and equilibrative transporters. TK1 activity was an absolute requirement for the accumulation of FLT. Retention was dependent on nucleoside/nucleotide efflux and retrograde metabolism of FLT nucleotides.

  13. Do non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors contribute to lipodystrophy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, David

    2005-01-01

    Lipodystrophy complications, including lipoatrophy (pathological fat loss) and metabolic complications, have emerged as important long-term toxicities associated with antiretroviral therapy in the current era. The wealth of data that has accumulated over the past 6 years has now clarified the contribution of specific antiretroviral drugs to the risk of these clinical endpoints, with evidence that lipoatrophy is strongly associated with the choice of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor therapy (specifically, stavudine and to a lesser extent zidovudine). The aetiological basis of metabolic complications of antiretroviral therapy has proven to be complex, in that the risk appears to be modulated by a number of lifestyle factors that have made the metabolic syndrome highly prevalent in the general population, with additional contributions from HIV disease status itself, as well as from individual drugs within the HIV protease inhibitor class. The currently licensed non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) drugs, efavirenz and nevirapine, have been proven to have a favourable safety profile in terms of lipodystrophy complications. However, it must be noted that NNRTI drugs also have individual toxicity profiles that must be accounted for when considering and/or monitoring their use in the treatment of HIV infection.

  14. Nucleobases, nucleosides, and nucleotides: versatile biomolecules for generating functional nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Fang; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2018-02-21

    The incorporation of biomolecules into nanomaterials generates functional nanosystems with novel and advanced properties, presenting great potential for applications in various fields. Nucleobases, nucleosides and nucleotides, as building blocks of nucleic acids and biological coenzymes, constitute necessary components of the foundation of life. In recent years, as versatile biomolecules for the construction or regulation of functional nanomaterials, they have stimulated interest in researchers, due to their unique properties such as structural diversity, multiplex binding sites, self-assembly ability, stability, biocompatibility, and chirality. In this review, strategies for the synthesis of nanomaterials and the regulation of their morphologies and functions using nucleobases, nucleosides, and nucleotides as building blocks, templates or modulators are summarized alongside selected applications. The diverse applications range from sensing, bioimaging, and drug delivery to mimicking light-harvesting antenna, the construction of logic gates, and beyond. Furthermore, some perspectives and challenges in this emerging field are proposed. This review is directed toward the broader scientific community interested in biomolecule-based functional nanomaterials.

  15. Toxoplasma gondii Requires Glycogen Phosphorylase for Balancing Amylopectin Storage and for Efficient Production of Brain Cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugi, Tatsuki; Tu, Vincent; Ma, Yanfen; Tomita, Tadakimi; Weiss, Louis M

    2017-08-29

    In immunocompromised hosts, latent infection with Toxoplasma gondii can reactivate from tissue cysts, leading to encephalitis. A characteristic of T. gondii bradyzoites in tissue cysts is the presence of amylopectin granules. The regulatory mechanisms and role of amylopectin accumulation in this organism are not fully understood. The T. gondii genome encodes a putative glycogen phosphorylase (TgGP), and mutants were constructed to manipulate the activity of TgGP and to evaluate the function of TgGP in amylopectin storage. Both a stop codon mutant (Pru/TgGP S25stop [expressing a Ser-to-stop codon change at position 25 in TgGP]) and a phosphorylation null mutant (Pru/TgGP S25A [expressing a Ser-to-Ala change at position 25 in TgGp]) mutated at Ser25 displayed amylopectin accumulation, while the phosphorylation-mimetic mutant (Pru/TgGP S25E [expressing a Ser-to-Glu change at position 25 in TgGp]) had minimal amylopectin accumulation under both tachyzoite and bradyzoite growth conditions. The expression of active TgGP S25S or TgGP S25E restored amylopectin catabolism in Pru/TgGP S25A To understand the relation between GP and calcium-dependent protein kinase 2 (CDPK2), which was recently reported to regulate amylopectin consumption, we knocked out CDPK2 in these mutants. Pru Δcdpk2 /TgGP S25E had minimal amylopectin accumulation, whereas the Δcdpk2 phenotype in the other GP mutants and parental lines displayed amylopectin accumulation. Both the inactive S25A and hyperactive S25E mutant produced brain cysts in infected mice, but the numbers of cysts produced were significantly less than the number produced by the S25S wild-type GP parasite. Complementation that restored amylopectin regulation restored brain cyst production to the control levels seen in infected mice. These data suggest that T. gondii requires tight regulation of amylopectin expression for efficient production of cysts and persistent infections and that GP phosphorylation is a regulatory mechanism

  16. The exoribonuclease Polynucleotide Phosphorylase influences the virulence and stress responses of yersiniae and many other pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason A. Rosenzweig

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Microbes are incessantly challenged by both biotic and abiotic stressors threatening their existence. Therefore, bacterial pathogens must possess mechanisms to successfully subvert host immune defenses as well as overcome the stress associated with host-cell encounters. To achieve this, bacterial pathogens typically experience a genetic re-programming whereby anti-host/stress factors become expressed and eventually translated into effector proteins. In that vein, the bacterial host-cell induced stress-response is similar to any other abiotic stress to which bacteria respond by up-regulating specific stress-responsive genes. Following the stress encounter, bacteria must degrade unnecessary stress responsive transcripts through RNA decay mechanisms. The 3 pathogenic yersiniae (Yersinia pestis, Y. pseudo-tuberculosis, and Y. enterocolitica are all psychrotropic bacteria capable of growth at 4˚C; however, cold growth is dependent on the presence of an exoribonuclease, polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase. PNPase has also been implicated as a virulence factor in several notable pathogens including the salmonellae, Helicobacter pylori, and the yersiniae (where it typically influences the type three secretion system. Further, PNPase has been shown to associate with ribonuclease E (endoribonuclease, RhlB (RNA helicase, and enolase (glycolytic enzyme in several Gram-negative bacteria forming a large, multi-protein complex known as the RNA degradosome. This review will highlight studies demonstrating the influence of PNPase on the virulence potentials and stress responses of various bacterial pathogens as well as focusing on the degradosome- dependent and -independent roles played by PNPase in yersiniae stress responses.

  17. Insights into Brain Glycogen Metabolism: THE STRUCTURE OF HUMAN BRAIN GLYCOGEN PHOSPHORYLASE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Cécile; Li de la Sierra-Gallay, Ines; Duval, Romain; Xu, Ximing; Cocaign, Angélique; Léger, Thibaut; Woffendin, Gary; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Etchebest, Catherine; Haouz, Ahmed; Dupret, Jean-Marie; Rodrigues-Lima, Fernando

    2016-08-26

    Brain glycogen metabolism plays a critical role in major brain functions such as learning or memory consolidation. However, alteration of glycogen metabolism and glycogen accumulation in the brain contributes to neurodegeneration as observed in Lafora disease. Glycogen phosphorylase (GP), a key enzyme in glycogen metabolism, catalyzes the rate-limiting step of glycogen mobilization. Moreover, the allosteric regulation of the three GP isozymes (muscle, liver, and brain) by metabolites and phosphorylation, in response to hormonal signaling, fine-tunes glycogenolysis to fulfill energetic and metabolic requirements. Whereas the structures of muscle and liver GPs have been known for decades, the structure of brain GP (bGP) has remained elusive despite its critical role in brain glycogen metabolism. Here, we report the crystal structure of human bGP in complex with PEG 400 (2.5 Å) and in complex with its allosteric activator AMP (3.4 Å). These structures demonstrate that bGP has a closer structural relationship with muscle GP, which is also activated by AMP, contrary to liver GP, which is not. Importantly, despite the structural similarities between human bGP and the two other mammalian isozymes, the bGP structures reveal molecular features unique to the brain isozyme that provide a deeper understanding of the differences in the activation properties of these allosteric enzymes by the allosteric effector AMP. Overall, our study further supports that the distinct structural and regulatory properties of GP isozymes contribute to the different functions of muscle, liver, and brain glycogen. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Affinity Crystallography Reveals the Bioactive Compounds of Industrial Juicing Byproducts of Punica granatum for Glycogen Phosphorylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stravodimos, George A; Kantsadi, Anastassia L; Apostolou, Anna; Kyriakis, Efthimios; Kafaski-Kanelli, Vassiliki-Nafsika; Solovou, Theodora; Gatzona, Pagona; Liggri, Panagiota G V; Theofanous, Stavroula; Gorgogietas, Vyron A; Kissa, Apostolia; Psachoula, Chariklia; Lemonakis, Angelos; Chatzileontiadou, Demetra S M; Psarra, Anna-Maria G; Skamnaki, Vassiliki T; Haroutounian, Serkos A; Leonidas, Demetres D

    2018-01-01

    Glycogen phosphorylase (GP) is a pharmaceutical target for the discovery of new antihyperglycaemic agents. Punica granatum is a well-known plant for its potent antioxidant and antimicrobial activities but so far has not been examined for antihyperglycaemic activity. The aim was to examine the inhibitory potency of eighteen polyphenolic extracts obtained from Punica granatum fruits and industrial juicing byproducts against GP and discover their most bioactive ingredients. Kinetic experiments were conducted to measure the IC50 values of the extracts while affinity crystallography was used to identify the most bioactive ingredient. The inhibitory effect of one of the polyphenolic extracts was also verified ex vivo, in HepG2 cells. All extracts exhibited significant in vitro inhibitory potency (IC50 values in the range of low μg/mL). Affinity crystallography revealed that the most bioactive ingredients of the extracts were chlorogenic and ellagic acids, found bound in the active and the inhibitor site of GP, respectively.While ellagic acid is an established GP inhibitor, the inhibition of chlorogenic acid is reported for the first time. Kinetic analysis indicated that chlorogenic acid is an inhibitor with Ki=2.5 x 10-3Mthat acts synergistically with ellagic acid. Our study provides the first evidence for a potential antidiabetic usage of Punica granatum extracts as antidiabetic food supplements. Although, more in vivo studies have to be performed before these extracts reach the stage of antidiabetic food supplements, our study provides a first positive step towards this process. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  19. Triazole nucleoside derivatives bearing aryl functionalities on the nucleobases show antiviral and anticancer activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yi; Qu, Fanqi; Peng, Ling

    2010-08-01

    Synthetic nucleoside mimics are important candidates in the searing for antiviral and anticancer drugs. Ribavirin, the first antiviral nucleoside drug, is unique in its antiviral activity with mutilple modes of action, which are mainly due to its special triazole heterocycle as nucleobase. Additionally, introducing aromatic functionalities to the nucleobase is able to confer novel mechanisms of action for nucleoside mimics. With the aim to combine the special characteristics of unnatural triazole heterocycles with those of the appended aromatic groups on the nucleobases, novel 1,2,4-triazole nucleoside analogs bearing aromatic moieties were designed and developed. The present short review summarizes the molecular design, chemical synthesis and biological activity of these triazole nucleoside analogs. Indeed, the discovery of antiviral and anticancer activities shown by these triazole nucleosides as well as the new mechanism underlying the biological activity by one of the anticancer leads has validated the rationale for molecular design and impacted us to further explore the concept with the aim of developing structurally novel nucleoside drug candidates with new modes of action.

  20. Aqueous microwaves assisted cross-coupling reactions applied to unprotected nucleosides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHRISTOPHE eLEN

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Nucleoside analogues have attracted much attention due to their potential biological activities. Amongst all synthetic nucleosides, C5-modified pyrimidines and C7- or C8-modified purines have mostly been prepared using palladium cross-coupling reactions and then studied as antitumoral and antiviral agents. Our objective is to focus this review on the Suzuki-Miyaura and on the Heck cross-couplings of nucleosides using microwave irradiations which are an alternative technology compatible with green chemistry and sustainable development.

  1. Relative mRNA expression of prostate-derived E-twenty-six factor and E-twenty-six variant 4 transcription factors, and of uridine phosphorylase-1 and thymidine phosphorylase enzymes, in benign and malignant prostatic tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    CAVAZZOLA, LUCIANE ROSTIROLA; CARVALHAL, GUSTAVO FRANCO; DEVES, CANDIDA; RENCK, DAIANA; ALMEIDA, RICARDO; SANTOS, DIóGENES SANTIAGO

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most frequent urological tumor, and the second most common cancer diagnosed in men. Incidence and mortality are variable and appear to depend on behavioral factors and genetic predisposition. The prostate-derived E-twenty-six factor (PDEF) and E-twenty-six variant 4 (ETV4) transcription factors, and the thymidine phosphorylase (TP) and uridine phosphorylase-1 (UP-1) enzymes, are reported to be components of the pathways leading to tumorigenesis and/or metastasis in a number of tumors. The present study aimed to analyze the mRNA expression levels of these proteins in prostatic cancerous and benign tissue, and their association with clinical and pathological variables. Using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, the mRNA expression levels of PDEF, ETV4, TP and UP-1 were studied in 52 tissue samples (31 of benign prostatic hyperplasia and 21 of prostate adenocarcinomas) obtained from patients treated by transurethral resection of the prostate or by radical prostatectomy. Relative expression was assessed using the ∆-CT method. Data was analyzed using Spearman's tests for correlation. Pbenign and malignant prostatic tissues. Further studies are necessary to define the role of these proteins as therapeutic targets in prostate cancer. PMID:26137165

  2. The synthesis of nucleoside bases with 14 C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matloubi, H.; Mehrdad, M.

    1997-01-01

    Labelled organic compounds have been widely and diligently applied to research problems in life science and chemistry. In many laboratories they have lost their novelty and have been become conventional research tools since long time ago. these applications frequently require organic compounds substituted (or labelled) with isotopes, but the isotopes are (with certain exception) extracted in first place in simple inorganic forms. The conversion of these simple form into the more or less complex labelled compounds called for by research workers has become in effect a new branch of practical organic chemistry. The preparation of labelled compounds, carbon-14 is probably more extensively and variously used than any other isotope. It emits only beta-particles. In this project, two kinds of nucleoside bases under the name uracil-2- 14 C and thymine (methyl- 14 C) were prepared.(author). 14 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  3. What Are Rare Clotting Factor Deficiencies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Deficiency Factor V Deficiency Combined FV & FVIII Deficiencies Factor VII Deficiency Factor X Deficiency Factor XI Deficiency Factor ... Deficiency Factor V Deficiency Combined FV & FVIII Deficiencies Factor VII Deficiency Factor X Deficiency Factor XI Deficiency Factor ...

  4. Modification of Purine and Pyrimidine Nucleosides by Direct C-H Bond Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Liang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Transition metal-catalyzed modifications of the activated heterocyclic bases of nucleosides as well as DNA or RNA fragments employing traditional cross-coupling methods have been well-established in nucleic acid chemistry. This review covers advances in the area of cross-coupling reactions in which nucleosides are functionalized via direct activation of the C8-H bond in purine and the C5-H or C6-H bond in uracil bases. The review focuses on Pd/Cu-catalyzed couplings between unactivated nucleoside bases with aryl halides. It also discusses cross-dehydrogenative arylations and alkenylations as well as other reactions used for modification of nucleoside bases that avoid the use of organometallic precursors and involve direct C-H bond activation in at least one substrate. The scope and efficiency of these coupling reactions along with some mechanistic considerations are discussed.

  5. Molecular moment similarity between several nucleoside analogs of thymidine and thymidine. sil@watson.ibm.com.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, B D; Pitman, M C; Platt, D E

    1999-06-01

    Molecular moment descriptors of the shape and charge distributions of twenty five nucleoside structures have been examined. The structures include thymidine as well as the difluorotoluene nucleoside analog which has been found to pair efficiently with adenine by polymerase catalysis. The remaining twenty three structures have been chosen to be as structurally similar to thymidine and to the difluorotoluene nucleoside analog as possible. The moment descriptors which include a description of the relationship of molecular charge to shape show the difluorotoluene nucleoside to be one of the most proximate molecules to thymidine in the space of the molecular moments. The calculations, therefore, suggest that polymerase specificity might be not only a consequence of molecular steric features alone but also of the molecular electrostatic environment and its registration with molecular shape.

  6. Efficient method of enzymatic synthesis of nucleosides labelled with 14C and 3H

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nejedly, Z.; Filip, J.

    1988-01-01

    The method is presented of enzymatic synthesis of nucleosides labelled with 14 C or 3 H either uniformly or specifically in the base or the deoxyribosyl or ribosyl moiety. The method is based on the ribosylation or deoxyribosylation of the nucleic acid bases (non-labelled or labelled with 14 C or 3 H) by the catalytic effect of enzymes occurring in the supernatant fractions of non-purified homogenates of Escherichia coli B. bacteria. The non-labelled and labelled nucleosides are used as donors of ribosyl or deoxyribosyl groups. The HPLC method is used for separating labelled nucleosides. The radiochemical purity of the labelled nucleosides is higher than 98%, molar activity ranges from 9.2 to 18.5 GBq.mmol -1 ( 14 C-labelled compounds) and from 0.6 to 1.9 TBq.mmol -1 (3H-labelled compounds). (author). 4 figs., 8 refs

  7. Aberrant Apoptotic Response of Colorectal Cancer Cells to Novel Nucleoside Analogues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonie Harmse

    Full Text Available Despite the increased understanding of colorectal cancer and the introduction of targeted drug therapy, the metastatic phase of the disease remains refractory to treatment. Since the deregulation of normal apoptosis contributes to the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer, novel nucleoside analogues were synthesized here and evaluated for their ability to induce apoptosis and cause cell death in two colorectal adeno-carcinoma cell lines, Caco-2 and HT-29. Three novel nucleoside analogues assessed here showed cytotoxic activity, as measured by the MTT assay against both cell lines: the IC50 values ranged between 3 and 37 μM, with Caco-2 cells being more sensitive than HT-29 cells. Compared to camptothecin, the positive control, the nucleoside analogues were significantly less toxic to normal unstimulated leukocytes (p>0.05. Moreover, the nucleosides were able to induce apoptosis as measured by an increase in caspase 8 and caspase 3 activity above that of the control. This was additionally supported by data derived from Annexin V-FITC assays. Despite marginal changes to the mitochondrial membrane potential, all three nucleosides caused a significant increase in cytosolic cytochrome c (p>0.05, with a corresponding decrease in mitochondrial cytochrome c. Morphological analysis of both cell lines showed the rapid appearance of vacuoles following exposure to two of the nucleosides, while a third caused cellular detachment, delayed cytoplasmic vacuolisation and nuclear abnormalities. Preliminary investigations, using the autophagic indicator monodansylcadaverine and chloroquine as positive control, showed that two of the nucleosides induced the formation of autophagic vacuoles. In summary, the novel nucleoside analogues showed selective cytotoxicity towards both cancer cell lines and are effective initiators of an unusual apoptotic response, demonstrating their potential to serve as structural scaffolds for more potent analogues.

  8. Aberrant Apoptotic Response of Colorectal Cancer Cells to Novel Nucleoside Analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmse, Leonie; Dahan-Farkas, Nurit; Panayides, Jenny-Lee; van Otterlo, Willem; Penny, Clement

    2015-01-01

    Despite the increased understanding of colorectal cancer and the introduction of targeted drug therapy, the metastatic phase of the disease remains refractory to treatment. Since the deregulation of normal apoptosis contributes to the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer, novel nucleoside analogues were synthesized here and evaluated for their ability to induce apoptosis and cause cell death in two colorectal adeno-carcinoma cell lines, Caco-2 and HT-29. Three novel nucleoside analogues assessed here showed cytotoxic activity, as measured by the MTT assay against both cell lines: the IC50 values ranged between 3 and 37 μM, with Caco-2 cells being more sensitive than HT-29 cells. Compared to camptothecin, the positive control, the nucleoside analogues were significantly less toxic to normal unstimulated leukocytes (p>0.05). Moreover, the nucleosides were able to induce apoptosis as measured by an increase in caspase 8 and caspase 3 activity above that of the control. This was additionally supported by data derived from Annexin V-FITC assays. Despite marginal changes to the mitochondrial membrane potential, all three nucleosides caused a significant increase in cytosolic cytochrome c (p>0.05), with a corresponding decrease in mitochondrial cytochrome c. Morphological analysis of both cell lines showed the rapid appearance of vacuoles following exposure to two of the nucleosides, while a third caused cellular detachment, delayed cytoplasmic vacuolisation and nuclear abnormalities. Preliminary investigations, using the autophagic indicator monodansylcadaverine and chloroquine as positive control, showed that two of the nucleosides induced the formation of autophagic vacuoles. In summary, the novel nucleoside analogues showed selective cytotoxicity towards both cancer cell lines and are effective initiators of an unusual apoptotic response, demonstrating their potential to serve as structural scaffolds for more potent analogues.

  9. Inhibition by nucleosides of glucose-transport activity in human erythrocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    Jarvis, S M

    1988-01-01

    The interaction of nucleosides with the glucose carrier of human erythrocytes was examined by studying the effect of nucleosides on reversible cytochalasin B-binding activity and glucose transport. Adenosine, inosine and thymidine were more potent inhibitors of cytochalasin B binding to human erythrocyte membranes than was D-glucose [IC50 (concentration causing 50% inhibition) values of 10, 24, 28 and 38 mM respectively]. Moreover, low concentrations of thymidine and adenosine inhibited D-glu...

  10. 2-O-α-D-glucosylglycerol phosphorylase from Bacillus selenitireducens MLS10 possessing hydrolytic activity on β-D-glucose 1-phosphate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takanori Nihira

    Full Text Available The glycoside hydrolase family (GH 65 is a family of inverting phosphorylases that act on α-glucosides. A GH65 protein (Bsel_2816 from Bacillus selenitireducens MLS10 exhibited inorganic phosphate (Pi-dependent hydrolysis of kojibiose at the rate of 0.43 s(-1. No carbohydrate acted as acceptor for the reverse phosphorolysis using β-D-glucose 1-phosphate (βGlc1P as donor. During the search for a suitable acceptor, we found that Bsel_2816 possessed hydrolytic activity on βGlc1P with a k cat of 2.8 s(-1; moreover, such significant hydrolytic activity on sugar 1-phosphate had not been reported for any inverting phosphorylase. The H2 (18O incorporation experiment and the anomeric analysis during the hydrolysis of βGlc1P revealed that the hydrolysis was due to the glucosyl-transferring reaction to a water molecule and not a phosphatase-type reaction. Glycerol was found to be the best acceptor to generate 2-O-α-D-glucosylglycerol (GG at the rate of 180 s(-1. Bsel_2816 phosphorolyzed GG through sequential Bi-Bi mechanism with a k cat of 95 s(-1. We propose 2-O-α-D-glucopyranosylglycerol: phosphate β-D-glucosyltransferase as the systematic name and 2-O-α-D-glucosylglycerol phosphorylase as the short name for Bsel_2816. This is the first report describing a phosphorylase that utilizes polyols, and not carbohydrates, as suitable acceptor substrates.

  11. The maltodextrin transport system and metabolism in Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM and production of novel alpha-glucosides through reverse phosphorolysis by maltose phosphorylase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nakai, Hiroyuki; Baumann, Martin; Petersen, B.O.

    2009-01-01

    regulator of the LacI-GalR family. Enzymatic properties are described for recombinant maltose phosphorylase (MalP) of glycoside hydrolase family 65 (GH65), which is encoded by malP (GenBank: AAV43670.1) of this gene cluster and produced in Escherichia coli. MalP catalyses phosphorolysis of maltose...

  12. Efficient one-pot enzymatic synthesis of alpha-(1 -> 4)-glucosidic disaccharides through a coupled reaction catalysed by Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM maltose phosphorylase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nakai, Hiroyuki; Dilokpimol, Adiphol; Abou Hachem, Maher

    2010-01-01

    Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM maltose phosphorylase (LaMalP) of glycoside hydrolase family 65 catalysed enzymatic synthesis of alpha-(1 -> 4)-glucostdic disacchandes from maltose and five monosacchandes in a coupled phosphorolysis/reverse phosphorolysis one-pot reaction Thus phosphorolysis...

  13. Peptide microarray analysis of substrate specificity of the transmembrane Ser/Thr kinase KPI-2 reveals reactivity with cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and phosphorylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong; Brautigan, David L

    2006-11-01

    Human lemur (Lmr) kinases are predicted to be Tyr kinases based on sequences and are related to neurotrophin receptor Trk kinases. This study used homogeneous recombinant KPI-2 (Lmr2, LMTK2, Cprk, brain-enriched protein kinase) kinase domain and a library of 1,154 peptides on a microarray to analyze substrate specificity. We found that KPI-2 is strictly a Ser/Thr kinase that reacts with Ser either preceded by or followed by Pro residues but unlike other Pro-directed kinases does not strictly require an adjacent Pro residue. The most reactive peptide in the library corresponds to Ser-737 of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, and the recombinant R domain of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator was a preferred substrate. Furthermore the KPI-2 kinase phosphorylated peptides corresponding to the single site in phosphorylase and purified phosphorylase b, making this only the second known phosphorylase b kinase. Phosphorylase was used as a specific substrate to show that KPI-2 is inhibited in living cells by addition of nerve growth factor or serum. The results demonstrate the utility of the peptide library to probe specificity and discover kinase substrates and offer a specific assay that reveals hormonal regulation of the activity of this unusual transmembrane kinase.

  14. Lipases in green chemistry: acylation and alcoholysis on steroids and nucleosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldessari, Alicia; Iglesias, Luis E

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we describe the application of lipases in acylation and alcoholysis reactions on steroids and nucleosides. In the field of steroids, a variety of acetyl and fatty acid derivatives of androstanes, pregnanes, and cholestanes have been prepared through lipase-catalyzed acylation and alcoholysis reactions taking advantage of the high regio- and stereoselectivity of these enzymes. The substrates as well as the products show a high degree of biological activity as neurosteroids, hormones, and glucocorticoids. The regioselective preparation of diacylated nucleosides by means of an enzymatic alcoholysis allowed the synthesis of nucleosides prodrugs or modified nucleosides. The quantitative full deacylation and dealkoxycarbonylation of nucleosides and steroids is a mild synthetic method for the deprotection of these labile compounds. Some of the reported steroid and nucleoside products are novel, and it is not possible to obtain them satisfactorily by following traditional synthetic procedures. The advantages presented by this methodology, such as selectivity, mild reaction conditions, and low environmental impact, make the lipases an important tool in the application of the principles of Green Chemistry, offering a convenient way to prepare derivatives of natural compounds with a great potential in the pharmaceutical industry.

  15. Quantification of the glycogen cascade system: the ultrasensitive responses of liver glycogen synthase and muscle phosphorylase are due to distinctive regulatory designs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatesh KV

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Signaling pathways include intricate networks of reversible covalent modification cycles. Such multicyclic enzyme cascades amplify the input stimulus, cause integration of multiple signals and exhibit sensitive output responses. Regulation of glycogen synthase and phosphorylase by reversible covalent modification cycles exemplifies signal transduction by enzyme cascades. Although this system for regulating glycogen synthesis and breakdown appears similar in all tissues, subtle differences have been identified. For example, phosphatase-1, a dephosphorylating enzyme of the system, is regulated quite differently in muscle and liver. Do these small differences in regulatory architecture affect the overall performance of the glycogen cascade in a specific tissue? We address this question by analyzing the regulatory structure of the glycogen cascade system in liver and muscle cells at steady state. Results The glycogen cascade system in liver and muscle cells was analyzed at steady state and the results were compared with literature data. We found that the cascade system exhibits highly sensitive switch-like responses to changes in cyclic AMP concentration and the outputs are surprisingly different in the two tissues. In muscle, glycogen phosphorylase is more sensitive than glycogen synthase to cyclic AMP, while the opposite is observed in liver. Furthermore, when the liver undergoes a transition from starved to fed-state, the futile cycle of simultaneous glycogen synthesis and degradation switches to reciprocal regulation. Under such a transition, different proportions of active glycogen synthase and phosphorylase can coexist due to the varying inhibition of glycogen-synthase phosphatase by active phosphorylase. Conclusion The highly sensitive responses of glycogen synthase in liver and phosphorylase in muscle to primary stimuli can be attributed to distinctive regulatory designs in the glycogen cascade system. The different

  16. Characterization of reactive intermediates in laser photolysis of nucleoside using of sodium salt anthraquinone-2-sulfonic acid as photosensitizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Jianhua; Lin Weizhen; Wang Wenfeng; Han Zhenhui; Yao Side; Lin Nianyun

    1999-01-01

    The interaction of triplet state of sodium salt of anthraquinone-2-sulfonic acid (AQS) with nucleosides has been investigated in CH 3 CN using KrF(248 nm) laser flash photolysis. The transient absorption spectra and kinetics obtained from the interaction of triplet AQS and nucleoside demonstrated that the primary ionic radical pair, radical cation of nucleosides and radical anion of AQS has been detected simultaneously for the first time

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Research Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency ... iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor ...

  18. Profiling of modified nucleosides from ribonucleic acid digestion by supercritical fluid chromatography coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laboureur, Laurent; Guérineau, Vincent; Auxilien, Sylvie; Yoshizawa, Satoko; Touboul, David

    2018-02-16

    A method based on supercritical fluid chromatography coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry for the profiling of canonical and modified nucleosides was optimized, and compared to classical reverse-phase liquid chromatography in terms of separation, number of detected modified nucleosides and sensitivity. Limits of detection and quantification were measured using statistical method and quantifications of twelve nucleosides of a tRNA digest from E. coli are in good agreement with previously reported data. Results highlight the complementarity of both separation techniques to cover the largest view of nucleoside modifications for forthcoming epigenetic studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Sodium valproate increases the brain isoform of glycogen phosphorylase: looking for a compensation mechanism in McArdle disease using a mouse primary skeletal-muscle culture in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noemí de Luna

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available McArdle disease, also termed ‘glycogen storage disease type V’, is a disorder of skeletal muscle carbohydrate metabolism caused by inherited deficiency of the muscle-specific isoform of glycogen phosphorylase (GP-MM. It is an autosomic recessive disorder that is caused by mutations in the PYGM gene and typically presents with exercise intolerance, i.e. episodes of early exertional fatigue frequently accompanied by rhabdomyolysis and myoglobinuria. Muscle biopsies from affected individuals contain subsarcolemmal deposits of glycogen. Besides GP-MM, two other GP isoforms have been described: the liver (GP-LL and brain (GP-BB isoforms, which are encoded by the PYGL and PYGB genes, respectively; GP-BB is the main GP isoform found in human and rat foetal tissues, including the muscle, although its postnatal expression is dramatically reduced in the vast majority of differentiated tissues with the exception of brain and heart, where it remains as the major isoform. We developed a cell culture model from knock-in McArdle mice that mimics the glycogen accumulation and GP-MM deficiency observed in skeletal muscle from individuals with McArdle disease. We treated mouse primary skeletal muscle cultures in vitro with sodium valproate (VPA, a histone deacetylase inhibitor. After VPA treatment, myotubes expressed GP-BB and a dose-dependent decrease in glycogen accumulation was also observed. Thus, this in vitro model could be useful for high-throughput screening of new drugs to treat this disease. The immortalization of these primary skeletal muscle cultures could provide a never-ending source of cells for this experimental model. Furthermore, VPA could be considered as a gene-expression modulator, allowing compensatory expression of GP-BB and decreased glycogen accumulation in skeletal muscle of individuals with McArdle disease.

  20. Rilpivirine: a new non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Mamta; Saravolatz, Louis D

    2013-02-01

    Rilpivirine is a new non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) that is approved for HIV-1 treatment-naive adult patients in combination with other antiretroviral agents. The recommended dose is a 25 mg tablet once daily taken orally with a meal. Due to cytochrome P450 3A4 enzyme induction or gastric pH increase, rilpivirine cannot be coadministered with a number of other drugs (anticonvulsants, rifabutin, rifampicin, rifapentine, proton pump inhibitors, systemic dexamethasone and St John's wort). Rilpivirine should be used with caution when coadministered with a drug with a known risk for torsade de pointes. Rilpivirine has a better tolerability than a comparative NNRTI, efavirenz, in clinical trials, with fewer central nervous system adverse effects, rashes, lipid abnormalities and discontinuation rates. Virological failure occurs more commonly with higher baseline viral loads (>100,000 copies/mL) and lower baseline CD4 counts (<50 cells/mm(3)). Seventeen NNRTI mutations have been associated with decreased susceptibility to rilpivirine: K101E/P, E138A/G/K/Q/R, V179L, Y181C/I/V, H221Y, F227C, M230I/L, Y188L and the combination L100I + K103N. Resistance to rilpivirine largely excludes future use of the NNRTI class.

  1. Visualizing multistep elevator-like transitions of a nucleoside transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschi, Marscha; Johnson, Zachary Lee; Lee, Seok-Yong

    2017-05-04

    Membrane transporters move substrates across the membrane by alternating access of their binding sites between the opposite sides of the membrane. An emerging model of this process is the elevator mechanism, in which a substrate-binding transport domain moves a large distance across the membrane. This mechanism has been characterized by a transition between two states, but the conformational path that leads to the transition is not yet known, largely because the available structural information has been limited to the two end states. Here we present crystal structures of the inward-facing, intermediate, and outward-facing states of a concentrative nucleoside transporter from Neisseria wadsworthii. Notably, we determined the structures of multiple intermediate conformations, in which the transport domain is captured halfway through its elevator motion. Our structures present a trajectory of the conformational transition in the elevator model, revealing multiple intermediate steps and state-dependent conformational changes within the transport domain that are associated with the elevator-like motion.

  2. Oxidation of pyrimidine nucleosides and nucleotides by osmium tetroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, K

    1967-08-01

    1. Pyrimidine nucleosides such as thymidine, uridine or cytidine are oxidized readily at 0 degrees by osmium tetroxide in ammonium chloride buffer. There is virtually no oxidation in bicarbonate buffer of similar pH. Oxidation of 1-methyluracil yields 5,6-dihydro-4,5,6-trihydroxy-1-methyl-2-pyrimidone. 2. Osmium tetroxide and ammonia react reversibly in aqueous solution to form a yellow 1:1 complex, probably OsO(3)NH. A second molecule of ammonia must be involved in the oxidation of UMP since the rate of this reaction is approximately proportional to the square of the concentration of unprotonated ammonia. 3. 4-Thiouridine reacts with osmium tetroxide much more rapidly than does uridine. The changes of absorption spectra are different in sodium bicarbonate buffer and in ammonium chloride buffer. They occur faster in the latter buffer and, under suitable conditions, cytidine is a major product. 4. Polyuridylic acid is oxidized readily by ammoniacal osmium tetroxide, but its oxidation is inhibited by polyadenylic acid. Pyrimidines of yeast amino acid-transfer RNA are oxidized more slowly than the corresponding mononucleosides, especially the thymine residues. Appreciable oxidation can occur without change of sedimentation coefficient.

  3. Formation of Mixed-Ligand Complexes of Pd2+ with Nucleoside 5'-Monophosphates and Some Metal-Ion-Binding Nucleoside Surrogates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Golubev

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Formation of mixed-ligand Pd2+ complexes between canonical nucleoside 5'-monophosphates and five metal-ion-binding nucleoside analogs has been studied by 1H-NMR spectroscopy to test the ability of these nucleoside surrogates to discriminate between unmodified nucleobases by Pd2+-mediated base pairing. The nucleoside analogs studied included 2,6-bis(3,5-dimethylpyrazol-1-yl-, 2,6-bis(1-methylhydrazinyl- and 6-(3,5-dimethylpyrazol-1-yl-substituted 9-(β-d-ribofuranosylpurines 1–3, and 2,4-bis(3,5-dimethylpyrazol-1-yl- and 2,4-bis(1-methylhydrazinyl-substituted 5-(β-d-ribofuranosyl-pyrimidines 4–5. Among these, the purine derivatives 1-3 bound Pd2+ much more tightly than the pyrimidine derivatives 4, 5 despite apparently similar structures of the potential coordination sites. Compounds 1 and 2 formed markedly stable mixed-ligand Pd2+ complexes with UMP and GMP, UMP binding favored by 1 and GMP by 2. With 3, formation of mixed-ligand complexes was retarded by binding of two molecules of 3 to Pd2+.

  4. Iron deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Morten; Bosselmann, Helle; Gaborit, Freja

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both iron deficiency (ID) and cardiovascular biomarkers are associated with a poor outcome in heart failure (HF). The relationship between different cardiovascular biomarkers and ID is unknown, and the true prevalence of ID in an outpatient HF clinic is probably overlooked. OBJECTIVES.......043). CONCLUSION: ID is frequent in an outpatient HF clinic. ID is not associated with cardiovascular biomarkers after adjustment for traditional confounders. Inflammation, but not neurohormonal activation is associated with ID in systolic HF. Further studies are needed to understand iron metabolism in elderly HF...

  5. Maternal micronutrient deficiency leads to alteration in the kidney proteome in rat pups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Shadab; Basak, Trayambak; Anand Kumar, K; Bhardwaj, Gourav; Lalitha, A; Yadav, Dilip K; Chandak, Giriraj Ratan; Raghunath, Manchala; Sengupta, Shantanu

    2015-09-08

    Maternal nutritional deficiency significantly perturbs the offspring's physiology predisposing them to metabolic diseases during adulthood. Vitamin B12 and folate are two such micronutrients, whose deficiency leads to elevated homocysteine levels. We earlier generated B12 and/or folate deficient rat models and using high-throughput proteomic approach, showed that maternal vitamin B12 deficiency modulates carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in the liver of pups through regulation of PPAR signaling pathway. In this study, using similar approach, we identified 26 differentially expressed proteins in the kidney of pups born to mothers fed with vitamin B12 deficient diet while only four proteins were identified in the folate deficient group. Importantly, proteins like calreticulin, cofilin 1 and nucleoside diphosphate kinase B that are involved in the functioning of the kidney were upregulated in B12 deficient group. Our results hint towards a larger effect of vitamin B12 deficiency compared to that of folate presumably due to greater elevation of homocysteine in vitamin B12 deficient group. In view of widespread vitamin B12 and folate deficiency and its association with several diseases like anemia, cardiovascular and renal diseases, our results may have large implications for kidney diseases in populations deficient in vitamin B12 especially in vegetarians and the elderly people.This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Proteomics in India. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency ... anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency ... anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor ...

  8. An ATP-dependent ligase with substrate flexibility involved in assembly of the peptidyl nucleoside antibiotic polyoxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyoxin (POL) is an unusual nucleoside antibiotic, in which peptidyl moiety and nucleoside skeleton are linked by an amide bond. However, their biosynthesis remains poorly understood. Here, we report the deciphering of PolG as an ATP-dependent ligase responsible for the assembly of POL. A polG muta...

  9. Highly regioselective synthesis of undecylenic acid esters of purine nucleosides catalyzed by Candida antarctica lipase B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wen-Li; Li, Ning; Zong, Min-Hua

    2011-11-01

    Regioselective undecylenoylation of purine nucleosides as potential dual prodrugs was achieved by Candida antarctica lipase B using adenosine as a model reactant. The optimum organic solvent, molar ratio of vinyl ester to nucleoside, enzyme dosage, reaction temperature and molecular sieve amount were anhydrous THF, 5:1, 20 U/ml, 45°C and 75 mg/ml, respectively. Under the optimum conditions, the initial reaction rate, yield and 5'-regioselectivity were 1.1 mM/h, 90% and >99%, respectively. The enzymatic acylation of various nucleosides furnished the desired 5'-ester derivatives with the yields of 60-95% and 5'-regioselectivities of >99%. In addition, the lipase displayed excellent operational stability in THF, and retained 96% of its initial activity after reused for five batches.

  10. Characterization of nucleosides and nucleobases in fruits of Ziziphus jujuba by UPLC-DAD-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Sheng; Duan, Jin-Ao; Tang, Yu-Ping; Zhu, Zhen-Hua; Qian, Ye-Fei; Yang, Nian-Yun; Shang, Er-Xin; Qian, Da-Wei

    2010-10-13

    The fruit of Ziziphus jujuba , named dazao in Chinese, has been utilized as food as well as crude drugs in China for thousands of years. To explore the profiles of the nucleosides and nucleobases in this fruit, an ultraperformance liquid chromatograph coupled with a photodiode array detector and electrospray ionization-mass spectrometer method (UPLC-DAD-MS) has been established and validated in this paper. The validated method was successfully applied for the simultaneous characterization and quantitation of 9 nucleosides and nucleobases in 49 dazao samples, which comprised 43 cultivars from 26 cultivation regions. Furthermore, principal component analysis (PCA) was performed to classify the samples on the basis of the contents of the nine analyzed compounds. The results showed that almost all of these dazao samples were rich in nucleosides and nucleobases, although their contents were obviously various, and the proposed method could serve as a prerequisite for quality control of jujube products.

  11. Synthesis and antiviral activity of 3'-deoxy-3'-C-hydroxymethyl nucleosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamford, M J; Coe, P L; Walker, R T

    1990-09-01

    A series of 3'-branched-chain sugar nucleosides, in particular 3'-deoxy-3'-C-hydroxmethyl nucleosides, have been synthesized and evaluated as antiviral agents. Reaction of 1-(2,3-epoxy-5-O-trityl-beta-D-lyxo-pentofuranosyl) derivatives 12 and 13, of uracil and thymine, respectively, with 5,6-dihydro-2-lithio-5-methyl-1,3,5-dithiazine 14 afforded the corresponding 3'-functionalized nucleosides 15 and 16, respectively. Replacement of the trityl group with tertbutyldiphenylsilyl allowed high yielding hydrolysis of the 3'-function to give the 3'-deoxy-3'-C-formyl-beta-D-arabino-pentofuranosyl nucleosides 21 and 22. Desilylation afforded the 1-(3-deoxy-3-C-formyl-beta- D-lyxo-pentofuranosyl) 3',5'-O-hemiacetal nucleosides 33 and 34, respectively. Reduction of the formyl group of 21 and 22, followed by desilylation, yielded the 3'-deoxy-3'-C-(hydroxymethyl)-beta-D-arabino- pentofuranosyl) analogues 7 and 8, respectively. The uracil base moiety of 7 was converted to 5-iodouracil and then to (E)-5-(2-bromovinyl)uracil to furnish an analogue 10 of BVaraU. The 1-(3-deoxy-3-C-(hydroxymethyl)-beta-D-lyxo-pentofuranosyl) and 1-(2,3-dideoxy-3-C-(hydroxymethyl)-beta-D-erythro-pentofuranosyl) derivatives of uracil (31 and 6, respectively) and 5-iodouracil (32 and 9, respectively) were also obtained. All novel, fully deprotected nucleoside analogues were evaluated for antiviral activity against human immunodeficiency virus type-1, herpes simplex virus types-1 and -2, varicella zoster virus, human cytomegalovirus and influenza A. Of the compounds tested only (E)-5-(2-bromovinyl)-1-[3-deoxy- 3-C-(hydroxymethyl)-beta-D-arabino-pentofuranosyl]uracil (10) inhibited VZV (alone), but did so at concentrations well below the cytotoxicity threshold.

  12. Synthesis of Novel Homo-N-Nucleoside Analogs Composed of a Homo-1,4-Dioxane Sugar Analog and Substituted 1,3,5-Triazine Base Equivalents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Yu

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Enantioselective syntheses from dimethyl tartrate of 1,3,5-triazine homo-N-nucleoside analogs, containing a 1,4-dioxane moiety replacing the sugar unit in natural nucleosides, were accomplished. The triazine heterocycle in the nucleoside analogs was further substituted with combinations of NH2, OH and Cl in the 2,4-triazine positions.

  13. Repriming by PrimPol is critical for DNA replication restart downstream of lesions and chain-terminating nucleosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kaori; Guilliam, Thomas A; Tsuda, Masataka; Yamamoto, Junpei; Bailey, Laura J; Iwai, Shigenori; Takeda, Shunichi; Doherty, Aidan J; Hirota, Kouji

    2016-08-02

    PrimPol is a DNA damage tolerance enzyme possessing both translesion synthesis (TLS) and primase activities. To uncover its potential role in TLS-mediated IgVλ hypermutation and define its interplay with other TLS polymerases, PrimPol(-/-) and PrimPol(-/-)/Polη(-/-)/Polζ (-/-) gene knockouts were generated in avian cells. Loss of PrimPol had no significant impact on the rate of hypermutation or the mutation spectrum of IgVλ. However, PrimPol(-/-) cells were sensitive to methylmethane sulfonate, suggesting that it may bypass abasic sites at the IgVλ segment by repriming DNA synthesis downstream of these sites. PrimPol(-/-) cells were also sensitive to cisplatin and hydroxyurea, indicating that it assists in maintaining / restarting replication at a variety of lesions. To accurately measure the relative contribution of the TLS and primase activities, we examined DNA damage sensitivity in PrimPol(-/-) cells complemented with polymerase or primase-deficient PrimPol. Polymerase-defective, but not primase-deficient, PrimPol suppresses the hypersensitivity of PrimPol(-/-) cells. This indicates that its primase, rather than TLS activity, is pivotal for DNA damage tolerance. Loss of TLS polymerases, Polη and Polζ has an additive effect on the sensitivity of PrimPol(-/-) cells. Moreover, we found that PrimPol and Polη-Polζ redundantly prevented cell death and facilitated unperturbed cell cycle progression. PrimPol(-/-) cells also exhibited increased sensitivity to a wide variety of chain-terminating nucleoside analogs (CTNAs). PrimPol could perform close-coupled repriming downstream of CTNAs and oxidative damage in vitro. Together, these results indicate that PrimPol's repriming activity plays a central role in reinitiating replication downstream from CTNAs and other specific DNA lesions.

  14. Versatile synthesis of amino acid functionalized nucleosides via a domino carboxamidation reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicky Gheerardijn

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Functionalized oligonucleotides have recently gained increased attention for incorporation in modified nucleic acid structures both for the design of aptamers with enhanced binding properties as well as the construction of catalytic DNA and RNA. As a shortcut alternative to the incorporation of multiple modified residues, each bearing one extra functional group, we present here a straightforward method for direct linking of functionalized amino acids to the nucleoside base, thus equipping the nucleoside with two extra functionalities at once. As a proof of principle, we have introduced three amino acids with functional groups frequently used as key-intermediates in DNA- and RNAzymes via an efficient and straightforward domino carboxamidation reaction.

  15. Use of nucleoside (tide) analogues in patients with hepatitis B-related acute liver failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dao, Doan Y; Seremba, Emmanuel; Ajmera, Veeral

    2012-01-01

    The efficacy of nucleoside(tide) analogues (NA) in the treatment of acute liver failure due to hepatitis B virus (HBV-ALF) remains controversial. We determined retrospectively the impact of NAs in a large cohort of patients with HBV-ALF.......The efficacy of nucleoside(tide) analogues (NA) in the treatment of acute liver failure due to hepatitis B virus (HBV-ALF) remains controversial. We determined retrospectively the impact of NAs in a large cohort of patients with HBV-ALF....

  16. Mutagenicity of irradiated solutions of nuclei acid bases and nucleosides in Salmonella typhimurium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilmer, J.; Schubert, J.

    1981-01-01

    Solutions of nucleic acid bases, nucleosides and a nucleotide, saturated with either N 2 , N 2 O or O 2 , were irradiated and tested for mutagenicity towards Salmonella typhimurium, with and without pre-incubation. Irradiated solutions of the nuclei acid bases were all non-mutagenic. Irradiated solutions of the nucleosides showed mutagenicity in S. typhimurium TA100 (pre-incubation assay). Generally, the mutagenicity followed the order: N 2 O > N 2 > O 2 . The results show that the formation of mutagenic radiolytic products is initiated by attack of mainly solutions of the nucleotide thymidine-5'-monophosphate, no mutagenicity could be detected. (orig.)

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you are diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia. Risk Factors You may have an increased risk for iron- ... iron-deficiency anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to moderate iron-deficiency anemia, or red blood cell transfusion for severe iron-deficiency anemia. You may ... body needs iron to make healthy red blood cells. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time because ...

  19. Vitamin Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are unique to specific vitamin deficiencies. Folate-deficiency anemia risk factors include: Undergoing hemodialysis for kidney failure. ... the metabolism of folate. Vitamin B-12 deficiency anemia risk factors include: Lack of intrinsic factor. Most ...

  20. Three-dimensional structures of unligated uridine phosphorylase from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis at 1.4 Å resolution and its complex with an antibacterial drug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaev, V. V.; Lashkov, A. A.; Gabdulkhakov, A. G.; Dontsova, M. V.; Mironov, A. S.; Betzel, C.; Mikhailov, A. M.

    2015-07-01

    Uridine phosphorylases play an essential role in the cellular metabolism of some antibacterial agents. Acute infectious diseases (bubonic plague, yersiniosis, pseudotuberculosis, etc., caused by bacteria of the genus Yersinia) are treated using both sulfanilamide medicines and antibiotics, including trimethoprim. The action of an antibiotic on a bacterial cell is determined primarily by the character of its interactions with cellular components, including those which are not targets (for example, with pyrimidine phosphorylases). This type of interaction should be taken into account in designing drugs. The three-dimensional structure of uridine phosphorylase from the bacterium Yersinia pseudotuberculosis ( YptUPh) with the free active site was determined for the first time by X-ray crystallography and refined at 1.40 Å resolution (DPI = 0.062 Å; ID PDB: 4OF4). The structure of the complex of YptUPh with the bacteriostatic drug trimethoprim was studied by molecular docking and molecular dynamics methods. The trimethoprim molecule was shown to be buffered by the enzyme YptUPh, resulting in a decrease in the efficiency of the treatment of infectious diseases caused by bacteria of the genus Yersinia with trimethoprim.

  1. Crystallization of uridine phosphorylase from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 in the laboratory and under microgravity and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safonova, Tatyana N.; Mordkovich, Nadezhda N.; Polyakov, Konstantin M.; Manuvera, Valentin A.; Veiko, Vladimir P.; Popov, Vladimir O.

    2012-01-01

    High-quality crystals of uridine phosphorylase from Shewanella oneidensis were grown under microgravity conditions. X-ray diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 0.95 Å. Uridine phosphorylase (UDP, EC 2.4.2.3), a key enzyme in the pyrimidine salvage pathway, catalyses the reversible phosphorolysis of uridine to uracil and ribose 1-phosphate. The gene expression of UDP from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was performed in the recipient strain Escherichia coli. The UDP protein was crystallized on earth (in the free form and in complex with uridine as the substrate) by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method at 296 K and under microgravity conditions (in the free form) aboard the Russian Segment of the International Space Station by the capillary counter-diffusion method. The data sets were collected to a resolution of 1.9 Å from crystals of the free form grown on earth, 1.6 Å from crystals of the complex with uridine and 0.95 Å from crystals of the free form grown under microgravity. All crystals belong to the space group P2 1 and have similar unit-cell parameters. The crystal of uridine phosphorylase grown under microgravity diffracted to ultra-high resolution and gave high-quality X-ray diffraction data

  2. The role of nucleoside/nucleotide transport and metabolism in the uptake and retention of 3'-fluoro-3'-deoxythymidine in human B-lymphoblast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plotnik, David A.; McLaughlin, Lena J.; Chan, Jenny; Redmayne-Titley, Joshua N.; Schwartz, Jeffrey L., E-mail: jschwart@uw.edu

    2011-10-15

    Introduction: Recent studies in the human adenocarcinoma cell line A549 have identified cell growth-dependent equilibrative nucleoside transporter-1 (hENT1) as a modifier of 3'-fluoro-3'-deoxythymidine (FLT) uptake and retention. In the present study, we used the ability to isolate human lymphoblastoid clones deficient in thymidine kinase 1 (TK1) to study how metabolism and nucleoside transport influence FLT uptake and retention. Methods: Transport and metabolism of FLT were measured in the human lymphoblastoid cell line TK6 and in eight clones isolated from TK6. Four clones were TK1-proficient, while four were TK1-deficient. Both influx and efflux of FLT were measured under conditions where concentrative and equilibrative transport could be distinguished. Results: Sodium-dependent concentrative FLT transport dominated over equilibrative transport mechanisms and while inhibition of hENT1 reduced FLT uptake, there were no correlations between clonal variations in hENT1 levels and FLT uptake. There was an absolute requirement of TK1 for concentration of FLT in TK6 cells. FLT uptake reached a peak after 60 min of incubation with FLT after which intracellular levels of FLT and FLT metabolites declined. Efflux was rapid and was associated with reductions in FLT and each of its metabolites. Both FLT and FLT-monophosphate were found in the efflux buffer. Conclusions: Initial rates of FLT uptake were a function of both concentrative and equilibrative transporters. TK1 activity was an absolute requirement for the accumulation of FLT. Retention was dependent on nucleoside/nucleotide efflux and retrograde metabolism of FLT nucleotides.

  3. Effective lethal mutagenesis of influenza virus by three nucleoside analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauly, Matthew D; Lauring, Adam S

    2015-04-01

    Lethal mutagenesis is a broad-spectrum antiviral strategy that exploits the high mutation rate and low mutational tolerance of many RNA viruses. This approach uses mutagenic drugs to increase viral mutation rates and burden viral populations with mutations that reduce the number of infectious progeny. We investigated the effectiveness of lethal mutagenesis as a strategy against influenza virus using three nucleoside analogs, ribavirin, 5-azacytidine, and 5-fluorouracil. All three drugs were active against a panel of seasonal H3N2 and laboratory-adapted H1N1 strains. We found that each drug increased the frequency of mutations in influenza virus populations and decreased the virus' specific infectivity, indicating a mutagenic mode of action. We were able to drive viral populations to extinction by passaging influenza virus in the presence of each drug, indicating that complete lethal mutagenesis of influenza virus populations can be achieved when a sufficient mutational burden is applied. Population-wide resistance to these mutagenic agents did not arise after serial passage of influenza virus populations in sublethal concentrations of drug. Sequencing of these drug-passaged viral populations revealed genome-wide accumulation of mutations at low frequency. The replicative capacity of drug-passaged populations was reduced at higher multiplicities of infection, suggesting the presence of defective interfering particles and a possible barrier to the evolution of resistance. Together, our data suggest that lethal mutagenesis may be a particularly effective therapeutic approach with a high genetic barrier to resistance for influenza virus. Influenza virus is an RNA virus that causes significant morbidity and mortality during annual epidemics. Novel therapies for RNA viruses are needed due to the ease with which these viruses evolve resistance to existing therapeutics. Lethal mutagenesis is a broad-spectrum strategy that exploits the high mutation rate and the low

  4. N-Branched acyclic nucleoside phosphonates as monomers for the synthesis of modified oligonucleotides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hocková, Dana; Rosenbergová, Šárka; Ménová, Petra; Páv, Ondřej; Pohl, Radek; Novák, Pavel; Rosenberg, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 15 (2015), s. 4449-4458 ISSN 1477-0520 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP207/11/0108; GA ČR GA13-26526S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : acyclic nucleoside phosphonates * oligonucleotides * solid phase synthesis Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.559, year: 2015

  5. High yield expression and purification of equilibrative nucleoside transporter 7 (ENT7) from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girke, Christopher; Arutyunova, Elena; Syed, Maria; Traub, Michaela; Möhlmann, Torsten; Lemieux, M Joanne

    2015-09-01

    Equilibrative nucleoside transporters (ENTs) facilitate the import of nucleosides and their analogs into cells in a bidirectional, non-concentrative manner. However, in contrast to their name, most characterized plant ENTs act in a concentrative manner. A direct characterization of any ENT protein has been hindered due to difficulties in overexpression and obtaining pure recombinant protein. The equilibrative nucleoside transporter 7 from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtENT7) was expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes to assess mechanism of substrate uptake. Recombinant protein fused to enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) was expressed in Pichia pastoris to characterize its oligomeric state by gel filtration and substrate binding by microscale thermophoresis (MST). AtENT7 expressed in X. laevis oocytes works as a classic equilibrative transporter. The expression of AtENT7-eGFP in the P. pastoris system yielded milligram amounts of pure protein that exists as stable homodimers. The concentration dependent binding of purine and pyrimidine nucleosides to the purified recombinant protein, assessed by MST, confirmed that AtENT7-eGFP is properly folded. For the first time the binding of nucleobases was observed for AtENT7. The availability of pure recombinant AtENT7 will permit detailed kinetic and structural studies of this unique member of the ENT family and, given the functional similarity to mammalian ENTs, will serve as a good model for understanding the structural basis of translocation mechanism for the family. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Acyclic nucleoside phosphonate antivirals activate gene expression of monocyte chemotactic protein 1 and 3.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Potměšil, Petr; Holý, Antonín; Kmoníčková, Eva; Křížková, Jana; Zídek, Zdeněk

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 1 (2007), s. 59-66 ISSN 1021-7770 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0508 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512; CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : Acyclic nucleoside phosponate * HIV * Monocyte chemotactic protein Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.024, year: 2007

  7. Nucleoside analogue 2’-C-methylcytidine inhibits hepatitis E virus replication but antagonizes ribavirin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qu, C. (Changbo); L. Xu (Lei); Y. Yin (Yuebang); M.P. Peppelenbosch (Maikel); Q. Pan (Qiuwei); W. Wang (Wenshi)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractHepatitis E virus (HEV) infection has emerged as a global health issue, but no approved medication is available. The nucleoside analogue 2’-C-methylcytidine (2CMC), a viral polymerase inhibitor, has been shown to inhibit infection with a variety of viruses, including hepatitis C virus

  8. Phosphorylation of nm23/nucleoside diphosphate kinase by casein kinase 2 in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engel, M; Issinger, O G; Lascu, I

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated phosphorylation of human nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NDPK) and of homologous NDPK from different species by human casein kinase 2 (CK-2). The human NDPK isotypes A and B were phosphorylated by CK-2 in vitro both when the purified proteins and total lysate of HL-60 leukemia...

  9. Inhibition of the Escherichia coli 6-oxopurine phosphoribosyltransferases by nucleoside phosphonates: potential for new antibacterial agents

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Keough, D. T.; Hocková, Dana; Rejman, Dominik; Špaček, Petr; Vrbková, Silvie; Krečmerová, Marcela; Eng, W. S.; Jans, H.; West, N. P.; Naesens, L. M. J.; de Jersey, J.; Guddat, L. W.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 17 (2013), s. 6967-6984 ISSN 0022-2623 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP207/11/0108 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : nucleoside phosphonates * antibacterial agents * hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase * state analog inhibitor * antimalarial chemotherapy Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 5.480, year: 2013

  10. Inhibition of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase by acyclic nucleoside phosphonates: A new class of antimalarial therapeutics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Keough, D. T.; Hocková, Dana; Holý, Antonín; Naesens, L.; Skinner-Adams, T. S.; de Jersey, J.; Guddat, L. W.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 14 (2009), s. 4391-4399 ISSN 0022-2623 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0508; GA AV ČR 1QS400550501 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : acyclic nucleoside phosphonates * phosphoribosyltransferase * enzyme inhibitors * Plasmodium falciparum Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 4.802, year: 2009

  11. Antiretrovirus activity of a novel class of acyclic pyrimidine nucleoside phosphonates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Balzarini, J.; Pannecouque, C.; De Clercq, E.; Aquaro, S.; Perno, C. F.; Egberink, H.; Holý, Antonín

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 7 (2002), s. 2185-2193 ISSN 0066-4804 R&D Projects: GA ČR GV203/96/K001 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4055905 Keywords : nucleoside phosphonates Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 4.215, year: 2002

  12. Norbornane-based nucleoside and nucleotide analogues locked in North conformation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dejmek, Milan; Šála, Michal; Hřebabecký, Hubert; Dračínský, Martin; Procházková, Eliška; Chalupská, Dominika; Klíma, Martin; Plačková, Pavla; Hájek, Miroslav; Andrei, G.; Naesens, L.; Leyssen, P.; Neyts, J.; Balzarini, J.; Bouřa, Evžen; Nencka, Radim

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 1 (2015), s. 184-191 ISSN 0968-0896 R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP207/12/P625; GA MŠk LO1302 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : carbocyclic nucleosides * purines * norbornane * antiviral * PI4KIIalpha Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.923, year: 2015

  13. Design and Synthesis of Fluorescent Acyclic Nucleoside Phosphonates as Potent Inhibitors of Bacterial Adenylate Cyclases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Břehová, Petra; Šmídková, Markéta; Skácel, Jan; Dračínský, Martin; Mertlíková-Kaiserová, Helena; Velasquez, M. P. S.; Watts, V. J.; Janeba, Zlatko

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 22 (2016), s. 2534-2546 ISSN 1860-7179 R&D Projects: GA MV VG20102015046; GA MŠk LO1302 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : adenylate cyclase toxin * acyclic nucleoside phosphonates * anthranilic acid Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.225, year: 2016

  14. Synthesis of 2'-deoxyuridine and 2'-deoxycytidine nucleosides bearing bipyridine and terpyridine ligands in position 5

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kalachová, Lubica; Pohl, Radek; Hocek, Michal

    -, č. 1 (2009), s. 105-112 ISSN 0039-7881 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC512 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : nucleosides * pyrimidines * cross-coupling * bipyridine s Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.572, year: 2009

  15. Secretion of antiretroviral chemokines by human cells cultured with acyclic nucleoside phosphonates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zídek, Zdeněk; Kmoníčková, Eva; Holý, Antonín

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 574, - (2007), s. 77-84 ISSN 0014-2999 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0508 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512; CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : Acyclic nucleoside phosphonate * Chemokine * Cytokine Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.376, year: 2007

  16. ACTIVATION OF G-PROTEINS BY RECEPTOR-STIMULATED NUCLEOSIDE DIPHOSPHATE KINASE IN DICTYOSTELIUM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bominaar, Anthony A.; Molijn, Anco C.; Pestel, Martine; Veron, Michel; Haastert, Peter J.M. van

    Recently, interest in the enzyme nucleoside diphosphate kinase (EC 2.7.4.6) has increased as a result of its possible involvement in cell proliferation and development. Since NDP kinase is one of the major sources of GTP in cells, it has been suggested that the effects of an altered NDP kinase

  17. Aspartic acid based nucleoside phosphoramidate prodrugs as potent inhibitors of hepatitis C virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiti, Munmun; Maiti, Mohitosh; Rozenski, Jef; De Jonghe, Steven; Herdewijn, Piet

    2015-05-14

    In view of a persistent threat to mankind, the development of nucleotide-based prodrugs against hepatitis C virus (HCV) is considered as a constant effort in many medicinal chemistry groups. In an attempt to identify novel nucleoside phosphoramidate analogues for improving the anti-HCV activity, we have explored, for the first time, aspartic acid (Asp) and iminodiacetic acid (IDA) esters as amidate counterparts by considering three 2'-C-methyl containing nucleosides, 2'-C-Me-cytidine, 2'-C-Me-uridine and 2'-C-Me-2'-fluoro-uridine. Synthesis of these analogues required protection for the vicinal diol functionality of the sugar moiety and the amino group of the cytidine nucleoside to regioselectively perform phosphorylation reaction at the 5'-hydroxyl group. Anti-HCV data demonstrate that the Asp-based phosphoramidates are ∼550 fold more potent than the parent nucleosides. The inhibitory activity of the Asp-ProTides was higher than the Ala-ProTides, suggesting that Asp would be a potential amino acid candidate to be considered for developing novel antiviral prodrugs.

  18. Pd0-Catalyzed Methyl Transfer on Nucleosides and Oligonucleotides, Envisaged as a PET Tracer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Fouquet

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The methyl transfer reaction from activated monomethyltin, via a modified Stille coupling reaction, was studied under “ligandless” conditions on fully deprotected 5'-modified nucleosides and one dinucleotide. The reaction was optimized to proceed in a few minutes and quantitative yield, even under dilute conditions, thus affording a rapid and efficient new method for oligonucleotide labelling with carbon-11.

  19. beta-1,2,3-Triazolyl-Nucleosides as Nicotinamide Riboside Mimics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Amigues, E.J.; Armstrong, E.; Dvořáková, Marcela; Migaud, M.E.; Huang, M.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 3 (2009), s. 238-259 ISSN 1525-7770 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Nucleoside * nucleotide * sirtuin Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.768, year: 2009

  20. Synthesis and NMR spectral studies if some nucleosides and their analoges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansari, F.L.; Awan, H.S.; Kazmi, N.A.

    1995-01-01

    Massive efforts have been extended towards the analysis of nucleosides due mainly to their applications in the field of medicine. Present work describes two methods for the synthesis of nucleosides and their analogues. The first method involves the use of phase transfer catalysis for the glycosidation of benzimidazoles. The reaction of 2,3,5-tri-o-benzoyl-beta -d-arabinofuranosyl chloride with benzimidazole and 2 (alpha-hydroxyethyl) benzimidazole in the presence of tetrabutylammoniumhydroensulfide led to the synthesis of nucleosides respectively. Likewise the coupling of 1,2:4, 6-di-O-isopropylidene-3-chloro-alpha-D-fructofurano side with benzimidazole led to the desired product. The second method involves a triflate mediated coupling of benzyl-2,3-anhydro-4-O-triflyl-beta-L-ribopyranoside with benzimidazole which led to the facile displacement of the triflyl group with benzimidazole resulting in the synthesis of nucleoside. However, an attempt towards the coupling of 1,2:5,6-di-O-isopropylidene-3-O-triflyl-alpha-D-glucofuranoside with benzimidazole does not led to the desired coupling, instead an unusual conversion of the triflate ester to mesitylate ester of the sugar appears to have been taken place. (author)

  1. Structural studies of nucleoside analog and feedback inhibitor binding to Drosophila melanogaster multisubstrate deoxyribonucleoside kinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Niels Egil; Munch-Petersen, Birgitte; Eklund, Hans

    2008-01-01

    -drug that eventually may kill the cell. To be able to optimize the function of dNK, it is vital to have structural information of dNK complexes. Here we present crystal structures of dNK complexed with four different nucleoside analogs floxuridine (5FdU), brivudine (BVDU), zidovudine (AZT) and zalcitabine (ddC...

  2. Detergent inhibited, heat labile nucleoside triphosphatase in cores of avian myeloblastosis virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kaj Frank

    1978-01-01

    Endogenous DNA synthesis was studied in isolated core particles of avian myeloblastosis virus. It was found that cores contained an enzymatic activity which rapidly converted the added nucleoside triphosphates to diphosphates (but not further) at 0 degrees C, thus inhibiting DNA synthesis...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency anemia is a ... address the cause of your iron deficiency, such as any underlying bleeding. If undiagnosed or untreated, iron- ...

  4. A Study on the Interaction of Rhodamine B with Methylthioadenosine Phosphorylase Protein Sourced from an Antarctic Soil Metagenomic Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bujacz, Anna; Wierzbicka-Woś, Anna; Kur, Józef

    2013-01-01

    The presented study examines the phenomenon of the fluorescence under UV light excitation (312 nm) of E. coli cells expressing a novel metagenomic-derived putative methylthioadenosine phosphorylase gene, called rsfp, grown on LB agar supplemented with a fluorescent dye rhodamine B. For this purpose, an rsfp gene was cloned and expressed in an LMG194 E. coli strain using an arabinose promoter. The resulting RSFP protein was purified and its UV-VIS absorbance spectrum and emission spectrum were assayed. Simultaneously, the same spectroscopic studies were carried out for rhodamine B in the absence or presence of RSFP protein or native E. coli proteins, respectively. The results of the spectroscopic studies suggested that the fluorescence of E. coli cells expressing rsfp gene under UV illumination is due to the interaction of rhodamine B molecules with the RSFP protein. Finally, this interaction was proved by a crystallographic study and then by site-directed mutagenesis of rsfp gene sequence. The crystal structures of RSFP apo form (1.98 Å) and complex RSFP/RB (1.90 Å) show a trimer of RSFP molecules located on the crystallographic six fold screw axis. The RSFP complex with rhodamine B revealed the binding site for RB, in the pocket located on the interface between symmetry related monomers. PMID:23383268

  5. Distribution of glycogen phosphorylase and cytochrome oxidase in the central nervous system of the turtle Trachemys dorbigni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partata, W A; Krepsky, A M; Xavier, L L; Marques, M; Achaval, M

    1999-10-01

    Glycogen phosphorylase (GP) and cytochrome oxidase (CO) activities were mapped histochemically in the brain of the turtle Trachemys dorbigni. In the telencephalon, both activities occurred in the olfactory bulb, in all cortical areas, in the dorsal ventricular ridge, striatum, primordium hippocampi and olfactory tubercle. In the diencephalon, they were identified in some areas of the hypothalamus, and in rotundus and geniculate nuclei. Both reactions were detected in the oculomotor, trochlear, mesencephalic trigeminal nuclei, the nucleus of the posterior commissure, torus semicircularis, substantia nigra and ruber and isthmic nuclei of the mesencephalon. In all layers of the optic tectum GP activity was found, but CO only labelled the stratum griseum centrale. In the medulla oblonga both enzymes appear in the reticular, raphe and vestibular nuclei, locus coeruleus and nuclei of cranial nerves. In the cerebellum, the granular and molecular layers, and the deep cerebellar nuclei were positive for both enzymes. The Purkinje cells were only reactive for CO. In the spinal cord, motor and commissural neurones exhibited a positive reaction for the two enzymes. However, CO also occurred in the marginal nucleus and in the lateral funiculus. These results may be useful as a basis for subsequent studies on turtle brain metabolism.

  6. Synthesis of substituted 2-(β-D-glucopyranosyl)-benzimidazoles and their evaluation as inhibitors of glycogen phosphorylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokor, Éva; Szilágyi, Enikő; Docsa, Tibor; Gergely, Pál; Somsák, László

    2013-11-15

    Microwave assisted condensation of O-perbenzoylated C-(β-d-glucopyranosyl)formic acid with 1,2-diaminobenzenes in the presence of triphenylphosphite gave the corresponding O-protected 2-(β-d-glucopyranosyl)-benzimidazoles in moderate yields. O-Perbenzoylated C-(β-d-glucopyranosyl)formamide and -thioformamide were transformed into the corresponding ethyl C-(β-d-glucopyranosyl)formimidate and -thioformimidate, respectively, by Et3O·BF4. Treatment of the formimidate with 1,2-diaminobenzenes afforded O-protected 2-(β-d-glucopyranosyl)-benzimidazoles in good to excellent yields. Similar reaction of the thioformimidate gave these compounds in lower yields. The O-benzoyl protecting groups were removed by the Zemplén protocol. These test compounds were assayed against rabbit muscle glycogen phosphorylase (GP) b, the prototype of liver GP, the rate limiting enzyme of glycogen degradation. The best inhibitors were 2-(β-d-glucopyranosyl)-4-methyl-benzimidazole (Ki=2.8μM) and 2-(β-d-glucopyranosyl)-naphtho[2,3-d]imidazole (Ki=2.1μM) exhibiting a ∼3-4 times stronger binding than the unsubstituted parent compound. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Thymidylate Synthase, Thymidine Phosphorylase and Orotate Phosphoribosyl Transferase Levels as Predictive Factors of Chemotherapy in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogiuchi, Yosuke; Maruoka, Yasubumi; Ando, Tomohiro; Kobayashi, Makio; Ogiuchi, Hideki

    2008-01-01

    We conducted a clinicopathologic study on protein and mRNA levels of thymidylate synthase (TS), thymidine phosphorylase (TP) and orotate phosphoribosyl transferase (OPRT) using biopsy tissue specimens before treatment. The mRNA levels have been measured in tumor cells microdissected from paraffin-embedded specimens (Danenberg Tumor Profile method: DTP method). We studied the mRNA and protein expression as effect predictive factors in chemotherapy. The subjects consisted of 20 cases of untreated oral squamous cell carcinoma who had undergone chemotherapy with TS-1 (16 males and 4 females, tongue in 8 cases, upper gingiva in 3 cases, lower gingiva in 3 cases, buccal mucosa in 5 cases and floor of the mouth in 1 case). TS gene expressions of the responders were lower than those for the nonresponders. Furthermore, regarding males who were less than 70 years of age, stage I and II, well differentiated type and tongue, TS mRNA expression of the responders were lower than that for the nonresponders. The mRNA expression of OPRT for the male responders was lower than that for the nonresponders. No remarkable difference was observed by immunohistochemistry. In this study, the measurement of the TS levels using the DTP method may potentially act as a predictive factor of antitumor effectiveness

  8. Structural and thermodynamic analysis of modified nucleosides in self-assembled DNA cross-tiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakker, Lauren; Marchi, Alexandria N; Harris, Kimberly A; LaBean, Thomas H; Agris, Paul F

    2014-01-01

    DNA Holliday junctions are important natural strand-exchange structures that form during homologous recombination. Immobile four-arm junctions, analogs to Holliday junctions, have been designed to self-assemble into cross-tile structures by maximizing Watson-Crick base pairing and fixed crossover points. The cross-tiles, self-assembled from base pair recognition between designed single-stranded DNAs, form higher order lattice structures through cohesion of self-associating sticky ends. These cross-tiles have 16 unpaired nucleosides in the central loop at the junction of the four duplex stems. The importance of the centralized unpaired nucleosides to the structure's thermodynamic stability and self-assembly is unknown. Cross-tile DNA nanostructures were designed and constructed from nine single-stranded DNAs with four shell strands, four arms, and a central loop containing 16 unpaired bases. The 16 unpaired bases were either 2'-deoxyribothymidines, 2'-O-methylribouridines, or abasic 1',2'-dideoxyribonucleosides. Thermodynamic profiles and structural base-stacking contributions were assessed using UV absorption spectroscopy during thermal denaturation and circular dichroism spectroscopy, respectively, and the resulting structures were observed by atomic force microscopy. There were surprisingly significant changes in the thermodynamic and structural properties of lattice formation as a result of altering only the 16 unpaired, centralized nucleosides. The 16 unpaired 2'-O-methyluridines were stabilizing and produced uniform tubular structures. In contrast, the abasic nucleosides were destabilizing producing a mixture of structures. These results strongly indicate the importance of a small number of centrally located unpaired nucleosides within the structures. Since minor modifications lead to palpable changes in lattice formation, DNA cross-tiles present an easily manipulated structure convenient for applications in biomedical and biosensing devices.

  9. Assessment of nucleosides as putative tumor biomarkers in prostate cancer screening by CE-UV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzatto, Adriana Zardini; de Oliveira Silva, Mariana; Poppi, Ronei Jesus; Simionato, Ana Valéria Colnaghi

    2017-05-01

    Cancer is responsible for millions of deaths worldwide, but most base diseases may be cured if detected early. Screening tests may be used to identify early-stage malignant neoplasms. However, the major screening tool for prostate cancer, the prostate-specific antigen test, has unsuitable sensitivity. Since cancer cells may affect the pattern of consumption and excretion of nucleosides, such biomolecules are putative biomarkers that can be used for diagnosis and treatment evaluation. Using a previously validated method for the analysis of nucleosides in blood serum by capillary electrophoresis with UV-vis spectroscopy detection, we investigated 60 samples from healthy individuals and 42 samples from prostate cancer patients. The concentrations of nucleosides in both groups were compared and a multivariate partial least squares-discriminant analysis classification model was optimized for prediction of prostate cancer. The validation of the model with an independent sample set resulted in the correct classification of 82.4% of the samples, with sensitivity of 90.5% and specificity of 76.7%. A significant downregulation of 5-methyluridine and inosine was observed, which can be indicative of the carcinogenic process. Therefore, such analytes are potential candidates for prostate cancer screening. Graphical Abstract Separation of the studied nucleosides and the internal standard 8-Bromoguanosine by CE-UV (a); classification of the external validation samples (30 from healthy volunteers and 21 from prostate cancer patients) by the developed Partial Least Square - Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA) model with accuracy of 82.4% (b); Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC) curve (c); and Variable Importance in the Projection (VIP) values for the studied nucleosides (d). A significant down-regulation of 5- methyluridine (5mU) and inosine (I) was observed, which can be indicative of the presence of prostate tumors.

  10. Na+-dependent nucleoside transport in liver: two different isoforms from the same gene family are expressed in liver cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Felipe, A; Valdes, R; Santo, B; Lloberas, J; Casado, J; Pastor-Anglada, M

    1998-01-01

    Hepatocytes show a Na+-dependent nucleoside transport activity that is kinetically heterogeneous and consistent with the expression of at least two independent concentrative Na+-coupled nucleoside transport systems (Mercader et al. Biochem. J. 317, 835-842, 1996). So far, only a single nucleoside carrier-related cDNA (SPNT) has been isolated from liver cells (Che et al. J. Biol. Chem. 270, 13596-13599, 1995). This cDNA presumably encodes a plasma membrane protein responsible for Na+-dependent...

  11. Kinetic α-deuterium isotope effect as a probe of transition state structure and reaction mechanism in nucleoside hydrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stein, R.L.

    1978-01-01

    Theoretical equilibrium α-deuterium isotope effects were calculated for systems modeling nucleoside and glycoside hydrolyses using a computer program (Burton, G.W., Sims, L.B., Wilson, J.C., and Fry, A.J., J. Amer. Chem. Soc., 99, 3374(1977)) which computes isotope effects directly from the expression of Biegeleisen and Mayer (Biegeleisen, J. and Mayer, M.G., J. Chem. Phys., 17, 675(1949)). For nucleoside hydrolysis proceeding through an oxocarbonium ion intermediate, KH/KD = 1.21 to 1.25; while for nucleoside hydrolysis proceeding through an oxocarbonium ion intermediate KH/KD = 1.15 to 1.19. The models used in the calculations were generated systematically and involved a minimum of subjectivity in the selection of molecular parameters. The isotope effects calculated formed the basis for the interpretation of experimental kinetic α-deuterium isotope effects for nucleoside and glycoside hydrolysis

  12. 31P-NMR study of human pyrimidine 5'-nucleotidase deficient erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higaki, Tsuyoshi; Kagimoto, Tadashi; Nagata, Koichi; Tanase, Sumio; Morino, Yoshimasa; Takatsuki, Kiyoshi

    1982-01-01

    Metabolic disorder of nucleotides in human pyrimidine 5'-nucleotidase (P5N) deficient erythrocytes was studied by 31 P-NMR with high resolution. Identification by combination of high-speed liquid chromatography revealed two-fold increases from the normal in the spectra in the α-, β- and γ-zones of nucleoside triphosphates of P5N deficient erythrocytes, 2,3-diphosphoglycerate shifted to the 0.3 ppm low magnetic field and signals of NAD and UDP-sugars(s) in the diphosphodiester zone. These results were obtained from the 31 P-NMR spectrum about one hour after blood sampling, indicating the high utility of this NMR for the diagnosis of P5N deficiency. (Chiba, N.)

  13. Point mutations in a nucleoside transporter gene from Leishmania donovani confer drug resistance and alter substrate selectivity

    OpenAIRE

    Vasudevan, Gayatri; Ullman, Buddy; Landfear, Scott M.

    2001-01-01

    Leishmania parasites lack a purine biosynthetic pathway and depend on surface nucleoside and nucleobase transporters to provide them with host purines. Leishmania donovani possess two closely related genes that encode high affinity adenosine-pyrimidine nucleoside transporters LdNT1.1 and LdNT1.2 and that transport the toxic adenosine analog tubercidin in addition to the natural substrates. In this study, we have characterized a drug-resistant clonal mutant of L. do...

  14. Cloning and expression of the sucrose phosphorylase gene in Bacillus subtilis and synthesis of kojibiose using the recombinant enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Miaomiao; Wu, Jing; Wu, Dan

    2018-02-15

    Kojibiose as a prebiotic and inhibitor of α-glucosidase exhibits potential for a wide range of applications in the food and medicine fields; however, large-scale separation and extraction of kojibiose from nature is difficult. Sucrose phosphorylase (SPase) can be used for the production of kojibiose, and currently, SPase is only heterologously expressed in E. coli, making it unsuitable for use in the food industry. However, Bacillus subtilis is generally considered to be a safe organism potentially useful for SPase expression. Here, for the first time, we heterologously expressed Bifidobacterium adolescentis SPase in a food-grade B. subtilis strain. The results showed that SPase was efficiently secreted into the extracellular medium in the absence of a signal peptide. After culturing the recombinant strain in a 3-L bioreactor, crude SPase yield and activity reached 7.5 g/L and 5.3 U/mL, respectively, the highest levels reported to date. The optimal reaction conditions for kojibiose synthesis catalyzed by recombinant SPase were as follows: 0.5 M sucrose, 0.5 M glucose, 0.02 U enzyme /mg all_substrates , pH 7.0, 50 °C, and 30 h. Furthermore, the substrate-conversion rate reached 40.01%, with kojibiose accounting for 104.45 g/L and selectivity for kojibiose production at 97%. Here, we successfully expressed SPase in B. subtilis in the absence of a signal peptide and demonstrated its secretion into the extracellular medium. Our results indicated high levels of recombinant enzyme expression, with a substrate-conversion rate of 40.01%. These results provide a basis for large-scale preparation of kojibiose by the recombinant SPase.

  15. Identification of genes potentially regulated by human polynucleotide phosphorylase (hPNPase old-35 using melanoma as a model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upneet K Sokhi

    Full Text Available Human Polynucleotide Phosphorylase (hPNPase(old-35 or PNPT1 is an evolutionarily conserved 3'→ 5' exoribonuclease implicated in the regulation of numerous physiological processes including maintenance of mitochondrial homeostasis, mtRNA import and aging-associated inflammation. From an RNase perspective, little is known about the RNA or miRNA species it targets for degradation or whose expression it regulates; except for c-myc and miR-221. To further elucidate the functional implications of hPNPase(old-35 in cellular physiology, we knocked-down and overexpressed hPNPase(old-35 in human melanoma cells and performed gene expression analyses to identify differentially expressed transcripts. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis indicated that knockdown of hPNPase(old-35 resulted in significant gene expression changes associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and cholesterol biosynthesis; whereas overexpression of hPNPase(old-35 caused global changes in cell-cycle related functions. Additionally, comparative gene expression analyses between our hPNPase(old-35 knockdown and overexpression datasets allowed us to identify 77 potential "direct" and 61 potential "indirect" targets of hPNPase(old-35 which formed correlated networks enriched for cell-cycle and wound healing functional association, respectively. These results provide a comprehensive database of genes responsive to hPNPase(old-35 expression levels; along with the identification new potential candidate genes offering fresh insight into cellular pathways regulated by PNPT1 and which may be used in the future for possible therapeutic intervention in mitochondrial- or inflammation-associated disease phenotypes.

  16. Thymine utilization in Escherichia coli K12. On the role of deoxyribose 1-phosphate and thymidine phosphorylase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kaj Frank; Leer, Johan Christian; Nygaard, Per

    1973-01-01

    Exogenously supplied thymine is only poorly utilized by wild-type cells of Escherichia coli for the synthesis of their DNA. It appears that the lack of incorporation of exogenous thymine is due to a lack of endogenous deoxyribosyl groups, which are required for the synthesis of thymidine. Data...... to the external thymine concentration. The experiments in vivo led us to conclude that the incorporation of exogenous thymine occurs via thymidine, which is synthesized from thymine and deoxyribose 1-phosphate, catalyzed by thymidine phosphorylase. In accordance with this studies in vitro with purified thymidine...

  17. Supplementation of Nucleosides During Selection can Reduce Sequence Variant Levels in CHO Cells Using GS/MSX Selection System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Danming; Lam, Cynthia; Louie, Salina; Hoi, Kam Hon; Shaw, David; Yim, Mandy; Snedecor, Brad; Misaghi, Shahram

    2018-01-01

    In the process of generating stable monoclonal antibody (mAb) producing cell lines, reagents such as methotrexate (MTX) or methionine sulfoximine (MSX) are often used. However, using such selection reagent(s) increases the possibility of having higher occurrence of sequence variants in the expressed antibody molecules due to the effects of MTX or MSX on de novo nucleotide synthesis. Since MSX inhibits glutamine synthase (GS) and results in both amino acid and nucleoside starvation, it is questioned whether supplementing nucleosides into the media could lower sequence variant levels without affecting titer. The results show that the supplementation of nucleosides to the media during MSX selection decreased genomic DNA mutagenesis rates in the selected cells, probably by reducing nucleotide mis-incorporation into the DNA. Furthermore, addition of nucleosides enhance clone recovery post selection and does not affect antibody expression. It is further observed that nucleoside supplements lowered DNA mutagenesis rates only at the initial stage of the clone selection and do not have any effect on DNA mutagenesis rates after stable cell lines are established. Therefore, the data suggests that addition of nucleosides during early stages of MSX selection can lower sequence variant levels without affecting titer or clone stability in antibody expression. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... fatigue or tiredness, shortness of breath, or chest pain. If your doctor diagnoses you with iron-deficiency ... Common symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia include: Chest pain Coldness in the hands and feet Difficulty concentrating ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... heart failure . Increased risk of infections Motor or cognitive development delays in children Pregnancy complications, such as ... for iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about exciting research areas that NHLBI is exploring about iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  20. Factor VII deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000548.htm Factor VII deficiency To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Factor VII (seven) deficiency is a disorder caused by a ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... deficiency anemia can cause serious complications, including heart failure and development delays in children. Explore this Health ... lead to iron-deficiency anemia include: End-stage kidney failure, where there is blood loss during dialysis. ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... deficiency anemia can cause serious complications, including heart failure and development delays in children. Explore this Health ... to iron-deficiency anemia include: End-stage kidney failure, where there is blood loss during dialysis. People ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... view the colon directly. What if my doctor thinks something else is causing my iron-deficiency anemia? ... deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in premature ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... mg and women need 18 mg. After age 51, both men and women need 8 mg. Pregnant ... for iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about exciting research areas that NHLBI is exploring about iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia. These conditions include: Intestinal and digestive conditions, such as celiac disease; inflammatory bowel diseases, ... iron-deficiency anemia , such as bleeding in the digestive or urinary tract or heavy menstrual bleeding, your ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen ... the size of your liver and spleen. Blood tests Based on results from blood tests to screen ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... from developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, eggs, lean red meat, ... signs of iron-deficiency anemia include: Brittle nails ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... your doctor may recommend you eat heart-healthy foods or control other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen ...

  10. Fire Safety Deficiencies

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A list of all fire safety deficiencies currently listed on Nursing Home Compare, including the nursing home that received the deficiency, the associated inspection...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... learning how having iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. ... iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, such as how ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, such as how ... Cells From Iron-deficient Donors: Recovery and Storage Quality. Learn more about participating in a clinical trial . ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... leaving cells where it is stored or from being absorbed in the duodenum, the first part of ... treatments for iron-deficiency anemia. Living With After being diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia, it is important ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... if you are diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia. Risk Factors You may have an increased risk for iron-deficiency anemia because of your age, ... or sex. Age You may be at increased risk for iron deficiency at certain ages: Infants between ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español ... bleeding Consuming less than recommended daily amounts of iron Iron-deficiency anemia can be caused by getting ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend you eat heart-healthy foods or control other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  19. Mechanisms by Which Human DNA Primase Chooses To Polymerize a Nucleoside Triphosphate

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Urban, M.; Joubert, Nicolas; Purse, B. W.; Hocek, Michal; Kuchta, R. D.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 4 (2010), s. 727-735 ISSN 0006-2960 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC512; GA AV ČR IAA400550902 Grant - others:NIH(US) GM54194 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : C-nucleosides * DNA polymerase * primase * mechanism Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.226, year: 2010

  20. Novel modified purine bases and nucleosides: new methodologies of synthesis and biological activity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hocek, Michal

    -, č. 49 (2005), s. 29-30 ISSN 0261-3166. [International Symposium on Nucleic Acids Chemistry /4./. Fukuoka, 20.09.2005-22.09.2005] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA203/03/0035; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0508 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : purines * nucleosides * synthesis Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  1. Enhanced Topical and Transdermal Delivery of Antineoplastic and Antiviral Acyclic Nucleoside Phosphonate cPr-PMEDAP

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vávrová, K.; Kovaříková, P.; Školová, B.; Líbalová, M.; Roh, J.; Čáp, R.; Holý, Antonín; Hrabálek, A.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 12 (2011), s. 3105-3115 ISSN 0724-8741 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0508 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GAP207/11/0365 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : acyclic nucleoside phosphonates * antivirals * antineoplastics * permeation enhancer * topical skin application * transdermal delivery Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 4.093, year: 2011

  2. Mechanism of action and selective toxicity of ascamycin, a nucleoside antibiotic.

    OpenAIRE

    Osada, H; Isono, K

    1985-01-01

    An unidentified Streptomyces sp. produces two nucleoside antibiotics, ascamycin and its dealanyl derivative. In contrast to the broad antibacterial activity of dealanylascamycin against various gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, ascamycin showed selective toxicity against Xanthomonas citri and X. oryzae. Both ascamycin and dealanylascamycin inhibited the protein synthesis of X. citri, but only dealanylascamycin inhibited that of Escherichia coli. In cell-free systems from E. coli and X...

  3. Synthesis of alpha-Branched Acyclic Nucleoside Phosphonates as Potential Inhibitors of Bacterial Adenylate Cyclases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frydrych, Jan; Skácel, Jan; Šmídková, Markéta; Mertlíková-Kaiserová, Helena; Dračínský, Martin; Gnanasekaran, Ramachandran; Lepšík, Martin; Soto-Velasquez, M.; Watts, V. J.; Janeba, Zlatko

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 2 (2018), s. 199-206 ISSN 1860-7179 R&D Projects: GA MV VG20102015046; GA ČR(CZ) GBP208/12/G016; GA MŠk LO1302 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : acyclic nucleoside phosphonates * adenylate cyclase toxin * bisamidates * Bordetella pertussis * prodrugs Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry OBOR OECD: Organic chemistry Impact factor: 3.225, year: 2016

  4. Structure-activity relationships of nucleoside analogues for inhibition of tick-borne encephalitis virus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Eyer, L.; Šmídková, Markéta; Nencka, Radim; Neča, J.; Kastl, T.; Palus, Martin; De Clercq, E.; Růžek, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 133, Sep (2016), s. 119-129 ISSN 0166-3542 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NV16-34238A; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-20054S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:60077344 Keywords : structure-activity relationship * tick-borne encephalitis * nucleoside inhibitor * antiviral activity * cytotoxicity Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry; EE - Microbiology, Virology (BC-A) Impact factor: 4.271, year: 2016

  5. New prodrugs of two pyrimidine acyclic nucleoside phosphonates: Synthesis and antiviral activity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krečmerová, Marcela; Dračínský, Martin; Snoeck, R.; Balzarini, J.; Pomeisl, Karel; Andrei, G.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 17 (2017), s. 4637-4648 ISSN 0968-0896 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-00522S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : acyclic nucleoside phosphonates * open-ring * PMEO-DAPy * 5-azacytosine * PME-azaC * HPMP-5-azaC Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry OBOR OECD: Organic chemistry Impact factor: 2.930, year: 2016

  6. In Silico Investigation of Flavonoids as Potential Trypanosomal Nucleoside Hydrolase Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Hung Hung Ha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human African Trypanosomiasis is endemic to 37 countries of sub-Saharan Africa. It is caused by two related species of Trypanosoma brucei. Current therapies suffer from resistance and public accessibility of expensive medicines. Finding safer and effective therapies of natural origin is being extensively explored worldwide. Pentamidine is the only available therapy for inhibiting the P2 adenosine transporter involved in the purine salvage pathway of the trypanosomatids. The objective of the present study is to use computational studies for the investigation of the probable trypanocidal mechanism of flavonoids. Docking experiments were carried out on eight flavonoids of varying level of hydroxylation, namely, flavone, 5-hydroxyflavone, 7-hydroxyflavone, chrysin, apigenin, kaempferol, fisetin, and quercetin. Using AutoDock 4.2, these compounds were tested for their affinity towards inosine-adenosine-guanosine nucleoside hydrolase and the inosine-guanosine nucleoside hydrolase, the major enzymes of the purine salvage pathway. Our results showed that all of the eight tested flavonoids showed high affinities for both hydrolases (lowest free binding energy ranging from −10.23 to −7.14 kcal/mol. These compounds, especially the hydroxylated derivatives, could be further studied as potential inhibitors of the nucleoside hydrolases.

  7. [Comparative study on specific chromatograms and main nucleosides of cultivated and wild Cordyceps sinensis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zan, Ke; Huang, Li-Li; Guo, Li-Nong; Liu, Jie; Zheng, Jian; Ma, Shuang-Cheng; Qian, Zheng-Ming; Li, Wen-Jia

    2017-10-01

    This study is to establish the HPLC specific chromatogram and determine four main nucleosides of wild and cultivated Cordyceps sinensis. Uridine, inosine, guanosine and adenosine were selected as reference substance. HPLC analysis was performed on a Waters XSelect HSS T3 C₁₈ (4.6 mm×250 mm, 5 μm), with a mobile phase consisting of water(A)-acetonitrile (B) at a flow rate of 0.6 mL•min⁻¹ (0-5 min,0% B;5-15 min,0%-10% B, 15-30 min,10%-20% B, 30-33 min, 20%-50% B, 33-35 min, 50%-0% B, 35-40 min, 0% B). The detection wavelength was 260 nm and the column temperature was controlled at 30 ℃, and the injection volume was 5 μL. HPLC specific chromatogram of wild and cultivated C. sinensis was established and four main nucleosides were simultaneously determined by the above method. Specific chromatograms and contents of four main nucleosides showed no significant differences between cultivated and wild C. sinensis. These results can provide scientific evidences for further development and utilization of cultivated C. sinensis. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  8. Carnitine Deficiency and Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anouk de Bruyn

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present two cases of carnitine deficiency in pregnancy. In our first case, systematic screening revealed L-carnitine deficiency in the first born of an asymptomatic mother. In the course of her second pregnancy, maternal carnitine levels showed a deficiency as well. In a second case, a mother known with carnitine deficiency under supplementation was followed throughout her pregnancy. Both pregnancies had an uneventful outcome. Because carnitine deficiency can have serious complications, supplementation with carnitine is advised. This supplementation should be continued throughout pregnancy according to plasma concentrations.

  9. Small-angle scattering studies show distinct conformations of calmodulin in its complexes with two peptides based on the regulatory domain of the catalytic subunit of phosphorylase kinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trewhella, J.; Blumenthal, D.K.; Rokop, S.E.; Seeger, P.A.

    1990-01-01

    Small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering have been used to study the solution structures of calmodulin complexed with synthetic peptides corresponding to residues 342-366 and 301-326, designated PhK5 and PhK13, respectively, in the regulatory domain of the catalytic subunit of skeletal muscle phosphorylase kinase. The scattering data show that binding of PhK5 to calmodulin induces a dramatic contraction of calmodulin, similar to that previously observed when calmodulin is complexed with the calmodulin-binding domain peptide from rabbit skeletal muscle myosin light chain kinase. In contrast, calmodulin remains extended upon binding PhK13. In the presence of both peptides, calmodulin also remains extended. Apparently, the presence of PhK13 inhibits calmodulin from undergoing the PhK5-induced contraction. These data indicate that there is a fundamentally different type of calmodulin-target enzyme interaction in the case of the catalytic subunit of phosphorylase kinase compared with that for myosin light chain kinase

  10. Impact of Oxidative Stress on Ascorbate Biosynthesis in Chlamydomonas via Regulation of the VTC2 Gene Encoding a GDP-l-galactose Phosphorylase*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urzica, Eugen I.; Adler, Lital N.; Page, M. Dudley; Linster, Carole L.; Arbing, Mark A.; Casero, David; Pellegrini, Matteo; Merchant, Sabeeha S.; Clarke, Steven G.

    2012-01-01

    The l-galactose (Smirnoff-Wheeler) pathway represents the major route to l-ascorbic acid (vitamin C) biosynthesis in higher plants. Arabidopsis thaliana VTC2 and its paralogue VTC5 function as GDP-l-galactose phosphorylases converting GDP-l-galactose to l-galactose-1-P, thus catalyzing the first committed step in the biosynthesis of l-ascorbate. Here we report that the l-galactose pathway of ascorbate biosynthesis described in higher plants is conserved in green algae. The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii genome encodes all the enzymes required for vitamin C biosynthesis via the l-galactose pathway. We have characterized recombinant C. reinhardtii VTC2 as an active GDP-l-galactose phosphorylase. C. reinhardtii cells exposed to oxidative stress show increased VTC2 mRNA and l-ascorbate levels. Genes encoding enzymatic components of the ascorbate-glutathione system (e.g. ascorbate peroxidase, manganese superoxide dismutase, and dehydroascorbate reductase) are also up-regulated in response to increased oxidative stress. These results indicate that C. reinhardtii VTC2, like its plant homologs, is a highly regulated enzyme in ascorbate biosynthesis in green algae and that, together with the ascorbate recycling system, the l-galactose pathway represents the major route for providing protective levels of ascorbate in oxidatively stressed algal cells. PMID:22393048

  11. Contraction-mediated glycogenolysis in mouse skeletal muscle lacking creatine kinase: the role of phosphorylase b activation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Katz, A.; Andersson, D.C.; Yu, J.; Norman, B.; Sandstrom, M.E.; Wieringa, B.; Westerblad, H.

    2003-01-01

    Skeletal muscle that is deficient in creatine kinase (CK-/-) exhibits accelerated glycogenolysis during contraction. Understanding this phenomenon could provide insight into the control of glycogenolysis during contraction. Therefore, glycogen breakdown was investigated in isolated extensor

  12. The First Synthesis and Anti-retroviral Activity of 5',5'-Difluoro-3'-Hydroxy-Apiosyl Nucleoside Cyclomonophosphonic Acid Analogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seyeon; Hong, Joon Hee [Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    The first synthesis of novel 5',5'-difluoro-30-hydroxy apiose nucleoside cyclomonophosphonic acid analogs was performed as potent anti-retroviral agents. Phosphonation was performed by direct displacement of a triflate intermediate with diethyl(lithiodifluoromethyl) phosphonate to give the corresponding(α, α-difluoroalkyl) phosphonate. Condensation successfully proceeded from a glycosyl donor with persilylated bases to yield the nucleoside phosphonate analogs. Deprotection of diethyl phosphonates provided the target nucleoside cyclomonophosphonic acid analogs. The synthesized nucleoside analogs were subjected to anti-viral screening against the human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1). Cytosine analogs show significant anti-HIV activity.

  13. In silico analysis of the three-dimensional structures of the homodimer of uridine phosphorylase from Yersinia Pseudotuberculosis in the ligand-free state and in a complex with 5-fluorouracil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lashkov, A. A., E-mail: alashkov83@gmail.com; Sotnichenko, S. E.; Mikhailov, A. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

    2013-03-15

    Pseudotuberculosis is an acute infectious disease characterized by a lesion of the gastrointestinal tract. A positive therapeutic effect can be achieved by selectively suppressing the activity of uridine phosphorylase from the causative agent of the disease Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. The synergistic effect of a combination of the chemotherapeutic agent 5-fluorouracil and antimicrobial drugs, which block the synthesis of pyrimidine bases, on the cells of pathogenic protozoa and bacteria is described in the literature. The three-dimensional structures of uridine phosphorylase from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis (YptUPh) both in the ligand-free state and in complexes with pharmacological agents are unknown, which hinders the search for and design of selective inhibitors of YptUPh. The three-dimensional structure of the ligand-free homodimer of YptUPh was determined by homology-based molecular modeling. The three-dimensional structure of the subunit of the YptUPh molecule belongs to {alpha}/{beta} proteins, and its topology is a three-layer {alpha}/{beta}/{alpha} sandwich. The subunit monomer of the YptUPh molecule consists of 38% helices and 24% {beta} strands. A model of the homodimer structure of YptUPh in a complex with 5-FU was obtained by the molecular docking. The position of 5-FU in the active site of the molecule is very consistent with the known data on the X-ray diffraction structures of other bacterial uridine phosphorylases (the complex of uridine phosphorylase from Salmonella typhimurium (StUPh) with 5-FU, ID PDB: 4E1V and the complex of uridine phosphorylase from Escherichia coli (EcUPh) with 5-FU and ribose 1-phosphate, ID PDB: 1RXC).

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... increased need for iron during growth spurts. Older adults, especially those over age ... athletes. Athletes, especially young females, are at risk for iron deficiency. Endurance ...

  15. Iodine deficiency disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, S M [Pakistan Council for Science and Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    1994-12-31

    Iodine deficiency (IDD) is one of the common problem in the diet. Iodine deficiency as prevalence of goiter in population occurs in the mountainous areas. There is consensus that 800 million people are at risk of IDD from living in iodine deficient area and 190 million from goiter. Very high prevalence of IDD in different parts of the world are striking. It has generally observed that in iodine-deficient areas about 50% are affected with goiter, 1-5% from cretinsim and 20% from impaired mental and/or mortor function. (A.B.).

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) programs. Our ... more information about Donor Iron Deficiency Study - Red Blood Cells ...

  17. Pharmacogenetic characterization of naturally occurring germline NT5C1A variants to chemotherapeutic nucleoside analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saliba, Jason; Zabriskie, Ryan; Ghosh, Rajarshi; Powell, Bradford C; Hicks, Stephanie; Kimmel, Marek; Meng, Qingchang; Ritter, Deborah I; Wheeler, David A; Gibbs, Richard A; Tsai, Francis T F; Plon, Sharon E

    2016-01-01

    Background Mutations or alteration in expression of the 5’ nucleotidase gene family can confer altered responses to treatment with nucleoside analogs. While investigating leukemia susceptibility genes, we discovered a very rare p.L254P NT5C1A missense variant in the substrate recognition motif. Given the paucity of cellular drug response data from NT5C1A germline variation, we characterized p.L254P and eight rare variants of NT5C1A from genomic databases. Methods Through lentiviral infection, we created HEK293 cell lines that stably overexpress wildtype NT5C1A, p.L254P, or eight NT5C1A variants reported in the NHLBI Exome Variant server (one truncating and seven missense). IC50 values were determined by cytotoxicity assays after exposure to chemotherapeutic nucleoside analogs (Cladribine, Gemcitabine, 5-Fluorouracil). In addition, we used structure-based homology modeling to generate a 3D model for the C-terminal region of NT5C1A. Results The p.R180X (truncating), p.A214T, and p.L254P missense changes were the only variants that significantly impaired protein function across all nucleotide analogs tested (>5-fold difference versus WT; p<.05). Several of the remaining variants individually displayed differential effects (both more and less resistant) across the analogs tested. The homology model provided a structural framework to understand the impact of NT5C1A mutants on catalysis and drug processing. The model predicted active site residues within NT5C1A motif III and we experimentally confirmed that p.K314 (not p.K320) is required for NT5C1A activity. Conclusion We characterized germline variation and predicted protein structures of NT5C1A. Individual missense changes showed substantial variation in response to the different nucleoside analogs tested, which may impact patients’ responses to treatment. PMID:26906009

  18. Inhibitory effect of extracellular purine nucleotide and nucleoside concentrations on T cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiler, Monica [Department of Medicine III and Transfusion Medicine, University Hospital Grosshadern, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich (Germany); Schmetzer, Helga [Helmholtz Center Munich (Germany); German Research Center for Environmental Health, Munich (Germany); Braeu, Marion; Buhmann, Raymund [Helmholtz Center Munich (Germany); German Research Center for Environmental Health, Munich (Germany); Department of Medicine III and Transfusion Medicine, University Hospital Grosshadern, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    The release of nucleic acids and derivatives after tissue-injury may affect cellular immune-response. We studied the impact of extracellular ribo-, desoxyribonucleotides and nucleosides on T-cell immunity. Peripheral-blood-mononuclear-cells (PBMCs) or isolated CD3{sup +}T-cells obtained from 6 healthy donors were stimulated via CD3/CD28 Dynabeads or dendritic cells (DCs) in the presence or absence of pyrimidine-, purine-nucleotides and -nucleosides (range 2–200 µM). Addition of deoxy-, guanosine-triphosphate (dGTP, GTP) and guanosine resulted concentration dependent in a complete, adenosine-triphosphate (ATP) in a partial inhibition of the induced T-cell-proliferation. Deoxyadenosine-triphosphate (dATP), adenosine and the pyrimidine-ribo- and -deoxyribonucleotides displayed no inhibitory capacity. Inhibitory effects of dGTP and GTP, but not of guanosine and ATP were culture-media-dependent and could be almost abrogated by use of the serum-free lymphocyte-culture-media X-Vivo15 instead of RPMI1640 with standard-supplementation. In contrast to RPMI1640, X-Vivo15 resulted in a significant down-regulation of the cell-surface-located ectonucleotidases CD39 (Ecto-Apyrase) and CD73 (Ecto-5′-Nucleotidase), critical for the extracellular nucleotides-hydrolysis to nucleosides, explaining the loss of inhibition mediated by dGTP and GTP, but not Guanosine. In line with previous findings ATP was found to exert immunosuppressive effects on T-cell-proliferation. Purine-nucleotides, dGTP and GTP displayed a higher inhibitory capacity, but seem to be strictly dependent on the microenvironmental conditions modulating the responsiveness of the respective T-lymphocytes. Further evaluation of experimental and respective clinical settings should anticipate these findings.

  19. Inhibitory effect of extracellular purine nucleotide and nucleoside concentrations on T cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiler, Monica; Schmetzer, Helga; Braeu, Marion; Buhmann, Raymund

    2016-01-01

    The release of nucleic acids and derivatives after tissue-injury may affect cellular immune-response. We studied the impact of extracellular ribo-, desoxyribonucleotides and nucleosides on T-cell immunity. Peripheral-blood-mononuclear-cells (PBMCs) or isolated CD3 + T-cells obtained from 6 healthy donors were stimulated via CD3/CD28 Dynabeads or dendritic cells (DCs) in the presence or absence of pyrimidine-, purine-nucleotides and -nucleosides (range 2–200 µM). Addition of deoxy-, guanosine-triphosphate (dGTP, GTP) and guanosine resulted concentration dependent in a complete, adenosine-triphosphate (ATP) in a partial inhibition of the induced T-cell-proliferation. Deoxyadenosine-triphosphate (dATP), adenosine and the pyrimidine-ribo- and -deoxyribonucleotides displayed no inhibitory capacity. Inhibitory effects of dGTP and GTP, but not of guanosine and ATP were culture-media-dependent and could be almost abrogated by use of the serum-free lymphocyte-culture-media X-Vivo15 instead of RPMI1640 with standard-supplementation. In contrast to RPMI1640, X-Vivo15 resulted in a significant down-regulation of the cell-surface-located ectonucleotidases CD39 (Ecto-Apyrase) and CD73 (Ecto-5′-Nucleotidase), critical for the extracellular nucleotides-hydrolysis to nucleosides, explaining the loss of inhibition mediated by dGTP and GTP, but not Guanosine. In line with previous findings ATP was found to exert immunosuppressive effects on T-cell-proliferation. Purine-nucleotides, dGTP and GTP displayed a higher inhibitory capacity, but seem to be strictly dependent on the microenvironmental conditions modulating the responsiveness of the respective T-lymphocytes. Further evaluation of experimental and respective clinical settings should anticipate these findings.

  20. Analysis of the Main Nucleosides in Cordyceps Sinensis by LC/ESI-MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Biao He

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A sensitive, selective and reliable liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry coupled with electrospray ionization interface method for simultaneous separation and determination of thymine, adenine, adenosine and cordycepin in Cordyceps sinensis has been established. The optimum separation for these analytes was achieved using a gradient elution system and a 2.0 × 150 mm Shimadzu VP-ODS column. 2-Chloroadenosine was used as internal standard for this assay. [M+H]+ions at m/z 127, 136, 268, 252 and 302 were chosen and selective ion monitoring (SIM mode was used for quantitative analysis of the four main nucleosides. The regression equations were linear in the range of 1.0–117.5 μg·mL-1 for thymine, 1.8-127.0 μg·mL-1 for adenine, 0.6-114.0 μg·mL-1 for adenosine and 0.5-107.5 μg·mL-1 for cordycepin. The limits of quantitation (LOQ and detection (LOD were 1.0 and 0.2 μg·mL-1 for thymine, 1.8 and 0.6 μg·mL-1 for adenine, 0.6 and 0.1 μg·mL-1 for adenosine and 0.5 and 0.1 μg·mL-1 for cordycepin, respectively. The recoveries of the four nucleosides ranged from 98.47 to 99.32%. The developed method was successfully used to determine nucleosides in Cordyceps sinensis from different sources.

  1. Absence of a Universal Mechanism of Mitochondrial Toxicity by Nucleoside Analogs▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Kaleb C.; Peterson, LaRae L.; Wallace, Kendall B.

    2007-01-01

    Nucleoside analogs are associated with various mitochondrial toxicities, and it is becoming increasingly difficult to accommodate these differences solely in the context of DNA polymerase gamma inhibition. Therefore, we examined the toxicities of zidovudine (AZT) (10 and 50 μM; 2.7 and 13.4 μg/ml), didanosine (ddI) (10 and 50 μM; 2.4 and 11.8 μg/ml), and zalcitabine (ddC) (1 and 5 μM; 0.21 and 1.1 μg/ml) in HepG2 and H9c2 cells without the presumption of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion. Ethidium bromide (EtBr) (0.5 μg/ml; 1.3 μM) was used as a positive control. AZT treatment resulted in metabolic disruption (increased lactate and superoxide) and increased cell mortality with decreased proliferation, while mtDNA remained unchanged or increased (HepG2 cells; 50 μM AZT). ddC caused pronounced mtDNA depletion in HepG2 cells but not in H9c2 cells and increased mortality in HepG2 cells, but no significant metabolic disruption in either cell type. ddI caused a moderate depletion of mtDNA in both cell types but showed no other effects. EtBr exposure resulted in metabolic disruption, increased cell mortality with decreased cell proliferation, and mtDNA depletion in both cell types. We conclude that nucleoside analogs display unique toxicities within and between culture models, and therefore, care should be taken when generalizing about the mechanisms of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor toxicity. Additionally, mtDNA abundance does not necessarily correlate with metabolic disruption, especially in cell culture; careful discernment is recommended in this regard. PMID:17470651

  2. Absence of a universal mechanism of mitochondrial toxicity by nucleoside analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Kaleb C; Peterson, LaRae L; Wallace, Kendall B

    2007-07-01

    Nucleoside analogs are associated with various mitochondrial toxicities, and it is becoming increasingly difficult to accommodate these differences solely in the context of DNA polymerase gamma inhibition. Therefore, we examined the toxicities of zidovudine (AZT) (10 and 50 microM; 2.7 and 13.4 microg/ml), didanosine (ddI) (10 and 50 microM; 2.4 and 11.8 microg/ml), and zalcitabine (ddC) (1 and 5 microM; 0.21 and 1.1 microg/ml) in HepG2 and H9c2 cells without the presumption of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion. Ethidium bromide (EtBr) (0.5 microg/ml; 1.3 microM) was used as a positive control. AZT treatment resulted in metabolic disruption (increased lactate and superoxide) and increased cell mortality with decreased proliferation, while mtDNA remained unchanged or increased (HepG2 cells; 50 microM AZT). ddC caused pronounced mtDNA depletion in HepG2 cells but not in H9c2 cells and increased mortality in HepG2 cells, but no significant metabolic disruption in either cell type. ddI caused a moderate depletion of mtDNA in both cell types but showed no other effects. EtBr exposure resulted in metabolic disruption, increased cell mortality with decreased cell proliferation, and mtDNA depletion in both cell types. We conclude that nucleoside analogs display unique toxicities within and between culture models, and therefore, care should be taken when generalizing about the mechanisms of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor toxicity. Additionally, mtDNA abundance does not necessarily correlate with metabolic disruption, especially in cell culture; careful discernment is recommended in this regard.

  3. Synthesis of Conformationally North-Locked Pyrimidine Nucleosides Built on an Oxabicyclo[3.1.0]hexane Scaffold | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beginning with a known 3-oxabicyclo[3.1.0]-hexane scaffold, the relocation of the fused cyclopropane ring bond and the shifting of the oxygen atom to an alternative location engendered a new 2-oxabicyclo[3.1.0]hexane template that mimics more closely the tetrahydrofuran ring of conventional nucleosides. The synthesis of this new class of locked nucleosides involved a novel

  4. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a nucleoside kinase from the hyperthermophile Methanocaldococcus jannaschii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnfors, Linda; Hansen, Thomas; Meining, Winfried; Schönheit, Peter; Ladenstein, Rudolf

    2005-01-01

    Nucleoside kinase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon M. jannaschii is a member of the PFK-B family which belongs to the ribokinase superfamily. Here, its expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis are described. Methanocaldococcus jannaschii nucleoside kinase (MjNK) is an ATP-dependent non-allosteric phosphotransferase that shows high catalytic activity for guanosine, inosine and cytidine. MjNK is a member of the phosphofructokinase B family, but participates in the biosynthesis of nucleoside monophosphates rather than in glycolysis. MjNK was crystallized as the apoenzyme as well as in complex with an ATP analogue and Mg 2+ . The latter crystal form was also soaked with fructose-6-phosphate. Synchrotron-radiation data were collected to 1.70 Å for the apoenzyme crystals and 1.93 Å for the complex crystals. All crystals exhibit orthorhombic symmetry; however, the apoenzyme crystals contain one monomer per asymmetric unit whereas the complex crystals contain a dimer

  5. The identification and characterization of non-coding and coding RNAs and their modified nucleosides by mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaston, Kirk W; Limbach, Patrick A

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of ribonucleic acids (RNA) by mass spectrometry has been a valuable analytical approach for more than 25 years. In fact, mass spectrometry has become a method of choice for the analysis of modified nucleosides from RNA isolated out of biological samples. This review summarizes recent progress that has been made in both nucleoside and oligonucleotide mass spectral analysis. Applications of mass spectrometry in the identification, characterization and quantification of modified nucleosides are discussed. At the oligonucleotide level, advances in modern mass spectrometry approaches combined with the standard RNA modification mapping protocol enable the characterization of RNAs of varying lengths ranging from low molecular weight short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) to the extremely large 23 S rRNAs. New variations and improvements to this protocol are reviewed, including top-down strategies, as these developments now enable qualitative and quantitative measurements of RNA modification patterns in a variety of biological systems. PMID:25616408

  6. The identification and characterization of non-coding and coding RNAs and their modified nucleosides by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaston, Kirk W; Limbach, Patrick A

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of ribonucleic acids (RNA) by mass spectrometry has been a valuable analytical approach for more than 25 years. In fact, mass spectrometry has become a method of choice for the analysis of modified nucleosides from RNA isolated out of biological samples. This review summarizes recent progress that has been made in both nucleoside and oligonucleotide mass spectral analysis. Applications of mass spectrometry in the identification, characterization and quantification of modified nucleosides are discussed. At the oligonucleotide level, advances in modern mass spectrometry approaches combined with the standard RNA modification mapping protocol enable the characterization of RNAs of varying lengths ranging from low molecular weight short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) to the extremely large 23 S rRNAs. New variations and improvements to this protocol are reviewed, including top-down strategies, as these developments now enable qualitative and quantitative measurements of RNA modification patterns in a variety of biological systems.

  7. Enhancement of radiation-induced base release from nucleosides in alkaline solution: essential role of the O.- radical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholes, M.L.; Schuchmann, M.N.; Sonntag, C. von

    1992-01-01

    The effect of pH on base release in the γ-radiolysis of N 2 O-saturated solutions of a number of nucleosides (including uridine, 3-methyluridine, 2', 3' -O-isopropylidene-uridine, and adenosine) has been investigated. For all these nucleosides, independent of the base or sugar moiety, base release is very low at pH below 10 (G∼(0.3-0.7) x 10 -7 mol J -1 ), but increases drastically to G∼(3-4) x 10 -7 mol J -1 at pH ≥ 13. It is concluded that the increase in base release at high pH is caused by the increasing participation of O .- , which, unlike . OH, attacks the nucleosides preferentially at their sugar moieties, and is not due to an OH - -induced radical transfer from the base to the sugar moiety. (author)

  8. Cu(I)-catalyzed efficient synthesis of 2′-Triazolo-nucleoside conjugates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathur, D.; Rana, N.; Olsen, Carl Erik

    2015-01-01

    -nucleoside conjugates, which can be evaluated for different biological activity for suitable drug development, were unambiguously identified on the basis of 1H NMR, 13C NMR, IR, and HRMS data analysis. These compounds have been synthesized for the first time and have not been reported in the literature earlier.......A small library of thirty-two 2′-triazolyl uridine and 2′-triazolyl-5-methyluridine has been synthesized by Cu(I)-catalyzed condensation of 2′-azido-2′-deoxyuridine and 2′-azido-2′-deoxy-5-methyluridine with different alkynes and aryl propargyl ethers in almost quantitative yields. Triazolo...

  9. Biophysical Insights into the Inhibitory Mechanism of Non-Nucleoside HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Sluis-Cremer

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT plays a central role in HIV infection. Current United States Federal Drug Administration (USFDA-approved antiretroviral therapies can include one of five approved non-nucleoside RT inhibitors (NNRTIs, which are potent inhibitors of RT activity. Despite their crucial clinical role in treating and preventing HIV-1 infection, their mechanism of action remains elusive. In this review, we introduce RT and highlight major advances from experimental and computational biophysical experiments toward an understanding of RT function and the inhibitory mechanism(s of NNRTIs.

  10. Pyrimidine and nucleoside gamma-esters of L-Glu-Sar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, André H; Elm, Peter L; Begtrup, Mikael

    2005-01-01

    -tetrahydrofuran-3-yl ester)-Sar (I), l-Glu(thymine-1-yl-methyl ester)-Sar (II) and l-Glu(acyclothymidine)-Sar (III) were synthesised and in vitro stability was studied in various aqueous and biological media. Affinity to and translocation via hPEPT1 was investigated in mature Caco-2 cell monolayers, grown......The aim of the present study was to improve the synthetic pathway of bioreversible dipeptide derivatives as well as evaluate the potential of using l-Glu-Sar as a pro-moiety for delivering three newly synthesised nucleoside and pyrimidine l-Glu-Sar derivatives. l-Glu(trans-2-thymine-1-yl...

  11. Evaluation of localized bacterial infection using radioisotope-labeled nucleosides imaging modality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Su Jin; Kang, Joo Hyun; Lee, Yong Jin; Lee, Tae Sup; Kim, Kwang Il; Lee, Kyo Chul; An, Gwang II; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Lim, Sang Moo [KIRAMS, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Sang Yong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    Conventional diagnostic methods for infections are difficult to distinguish localized bacterial infections from sites of sterile inflammation. For this reason, the importance of developing methods to image bacterial infections is widely recognized. In this study to acquire bacterial infection imaging with radiolabeled nucleosides, in vitro bacterial thymidine kinase (tk) activities of Salmonella typhimurium with [{sup 18}F]FLT and [{sup 125}I]IVDU were measured and localized infections model in BALB/c mice was imaged with [{sup 18}F]FLT or [{sup 125}I]FIAU

  12. Template-directed addition of nucleosides to DNA by the BfiI restriction enzyme

    OpenAIRE

    Sasnauskas, Giedrius; Connolly, Bernard A.; Halford, Stephen E.; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2008-01-01

    Restriction endonucleases catalyse DNA cleavage at specific sites. The BfiI endonuclease cuts DNA to give staggered ends with 1-nt 3′-extensions. We show here that BfiI can also fill in the staggered ends: while cleaving DNA, it can add a 2′-deoxynucleoside to the reaction product to yield directly a blunt-ended DNA. We propose that nucleoside incorporation proceeds through a two-step reaction, in which BfiI first cleaves the DNA to make a covalent enzyme–DNA intermediate and then resolves it...

  13. Conformationally constrained nucleoside phosphonic acids - potent inhibitors of human mitochondrial and cytosolic 5'(3')-nucleotidases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šimák, Ondřej; Pachl, Petr; Fábry, Milan; Buděšínský, Miloš; Jandušík, T.; Hnízda, Aleš; Skleničková, Radka; Petrová, Magdalena; Veverka, Václav; Řezáčová, Pavlína; Brynda, Jiří; Rosenberg, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 40 (2014), s. 7971-7982 ISSN 1477-0520 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/0820; GA ČR GA13-24880S; GA ČR GA13-26526S; GA MŠk(CZ) LK11205; GA AV ČR KAN200520801 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:68378050 Keywords : 5'(3')-nucleotidase * structure * inhibition * cdN * mdN * nucleoside * SAR * phosphonic acid Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.562, year: 2014

  14. Synthesis and in vitro growth inhibitory activity of novel silyl- and trityl-modified nucleosides

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Panayides, Jenny-Lee

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available -Farkas d, Hajierah Davids d,e , Leonie Harmse d , M. E. Christine Rey f , Ivan R. Green g, Stephen C. Pelly g, Robert Kiss c, Alexander Kornienko h, Willem A. L. van Otterlo a,g,⇑ a Molecular Sciences Institute, School of Chemistry, University..., Matieland 7602, South Africa hDepartment of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Texas State University, San Marcos, TX 78666, USA Abstract Seventeen silyl- and trityl-modified (5'-O- and 3',5'-di-O-) nucleosides were synthesized with the aim of investigating...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... exploring about iron-deficiency anemia. Read more New treatments for disorders that lead to iron-deficiency anemia. We are ... and other pathways. This could help develop new therapies for conditions that ... behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... loss and lead to iron-deficiency anemia. Common causes of blood loss that lead to iron-deficiency anemia include: Bleeding in your GI tract, from an ulcer, colon cancer, or regular use of medicines such as aspirin ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia. Search the NIH Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools (RePORT) to learn about research that ... iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, such as how ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... blocks the intestine from taking up iron. Other medical conditions Other medical conditions that may lead to iron-deficiency anemia ... daily amount of iron. If you have other medical conditions that cause iron-deficiency anemia , such as ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend you eat heart-healthy foods or control other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Are you curious about how inflammation from chronic diseases can cause iron-deficiency anemia? Read more When there is ... DBDR) is a leader in research on the causes, prevention, and treatment of blood diseases, including iron-deficiency anemia. Search the NIH Research ...

  1. Nutritional iron deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Hurrell, R.F.

    2007-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the leading risk factors for disability and death worldwide, affecting an estimated 2 billion people. Nutritional iron deficiency arises when physiological requirements cannot be met by iron absorption from diet. Dietary iron bioavailability is low in populations consuming

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Topics section only, or the News and Resources section. NHLBI Entire Site NHLBI Entire Site Health ... español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type of anemia that occurs if you do not have enough iron in your body. People with mild or moderate iron-deficiency anemia ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... blood cells. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time because your body’s intake of iron is too ... clamping of your newborn’s umbilical cord at the time of delivery. This may help prevent iron-deficiency ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen ... check the size of your liver and spleen. Blood tests Based on results from blood tests to screen ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... also are hoping to determine which iron supplements work best to treat iron-deficiency anemia in children who do not consume the daily recommended amount of iron. Read less Participate in NHLBI Clinical Trials We lead or sponsor many studies related to iron-deficiency anemia. See if you ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... en español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type of anemia that occurs if you do not ... iron-deficiency anemia and help rule out other types of anemia. Treatment will explain treatment-related complications ...

  8. Iron deficiency in childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uijterschout, L.

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency (ID) is the most common micronutrient deficiency in the world. Iron is involved in oxygen transport, energy metabolism, immune response, and plays an important role in brain development. In infancy, ID is associated with adverse effects on cognitive, motor, and behavioral development

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... anemia. Return to Signs, Symptoms, and Complications to review signs and symptoms as well as complications from iron-deficiency ... NIH]) Heavy Menstrual Bleeding (Centers for Disease Control and ... Dietary Supplement Fact Sheet (NIH) Iron-Deficiency Anemia (National Library ...

  10. Iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anemia - iron deficiency ... iron from old red blood cells. Iron deficiency anemia develops when your body's iron stores run low. ... You may have no symptoms if the anemia is mild. Most of the time, ... slowly. Symptoms may include: Feeling weak or tired more often ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be at risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, ... you are experiencing side effects such as a bad metallic taste, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, or upset stomach. ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... how we are using current research and advancing research to prevent iron-deficiency anemia. Participate in NHLBI Clinical Trials will explain our ongoing clinical studies that are investigating prevention strategies for iron-deficiency anemia. Signs, Symptoms, and Complications ...

  13. Guanine nucleotide exchange factor αPIX leads to activation of the Rac 1 GTPase/glycogen phosphorylase pathway in interleukin (IL)-2-stimulated T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Llavero, Francisco; Urzelai, Bakarne; Osinalde, Nerea

    2015-01-01

    Recently, we have reported that the active form of Rac 1 GTPase binds to the glycogen phosphorylase muscle isoform (PYGM) and modulates its enzymatic activity leading to T cell proliferation. In the lymphoid system, Rac 1 and in general other small GTPases of the Rho family participate...... in the signaling cascades that are activated after engagement of the T cell antigen receptor. However, little is known about the IL-2-dependent Rac 1 activator molecules. For the first time, a signaling pathway leading to the activation of Rac 1/PYGM in response to IL-2-stimulated T cell proliferation is described....... More specifically, αPIX, a known guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the small GTPases of the Rho family, preferentially Rac 1, mediates PYGM activation in Kit 225 T cells stimulated with IL-2. Using directed mutagenesis, phosphorylation of αPIX Rho-GEF serines 225 and 488 is required for activation...

  14. Purine Restriction Induces Pronounced Translational Upregulation of the NT1 Adenosine/Pyrimidine Nucleoside Transporter in Leishmania major

    OpenAIRE

    Ortiz, Diana; Valdés, Raquel; Sanchez, Marco A.; Hayenga, Johanna; Elya, Carolyn; Detke, Siegfried; Landfear, Scott M.

    2010-01-01

    Leishmania and other parasitic protozoa are unable to synthesize purines de novo and are reliant upon purine nucleoside and nucleobase transporters to import preformed purines from their hosts. To study the roles of the four purine permeases NT1-NT4 in Leishmania major, null mutants in each transporter gene were prepared and the effect of each gene deletion on purine uptake was monitored. Deletion of the NT3 purine nucleobase transporter gene or both NT3 and the NT2 nucleoside transporter gen...

  15. The Synthesis and Study of New Ribavirin Derivatives and Related Nucleoside Azole Carboxamides as Agents Active against RNA Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-01

    of the nitrate salt or degradation of the starting heterocycle. An alternate procedure for obtaining aromatic nitro compounds is the oxidation of the...SAcO OAc AcO OAc RO OR S102 99103, R-Ac 1--04, RC H -OH N HcO 0 cOY RO ᝹ HO O Ac RO OR 102 0_6 103, R - Ac 108, R = H 6- mercaptopurine riboside...occurring C-nucleoside antibiotic and unlike N-nucleosides, formycin B will not suffer enzymatic cleavage * 29 and degradation by phosphorolysis

  16. [Determination of 5 nucleosides components in culture of Paecilomyces hepialid by HPLC].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dan; Ma, Yun-shu; Huang, Ting-ting; Chen, Cheng

    2015-08-01

    The concentration of 5 nucleosides, uracil, uridine, guanidine, adenine and adenosine in culture of Paecilomyces hepialid was determined by the developed method of HPLC. The HPLC method was performed on a Waters SunFire C18 (4.6 mm x 250 mm, 5 μm) column with methanol-water gradient elution as the mobile phase. The detection wavelength was 260 nm and the colunmn temperature was controlled at 30 °C. The linear range was 10.00-200.00 mg · L(-1) (r = 0.9994) for uracil, 10.10-202.00 mg · L(-1) (r = 0.9992) for uridine, 10.00-200.00 mg · L(-1) (r = 0.9991) for guanidine, 10.30-206.00 mg · L(-1) (r = 0.9992) for adenine and 10.45-209.00 mg · L(-1) (r = 0.9991) for adenosine, respectively. The RSD of precision was 0.032%, 0.035%, 0.039%, 0.049%, 0.00080%, respectively. The average recoveries of uracil, guanidine, adenine, and adenosine were 97.34%, 99.10%, 101.6%, 98.61% and 100.2% with RSD of 1.3%, 2.1%, 0.96%, 0.95%, and 1.3% respectively. The method showed high sensitivity, good selectivity, linearity and repeatability, which was suitable for the content analysis of 5 nucleosides components in P. hepialid and its extracts.

  17. Protein preparation, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of Trypanosoma cruzi nucleoside diphosphate kinase 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gómez Barroso, J. A.; Pereira, H.; Miranda, M.; Pereira, C.; Garratt, R. C.; Aguilar, C. F.

    2010-01-01

    T. cruzi TcNDPK1 was overexpressed in Escherichia coli as an N-terminally poly-His-tagged fusion protein and crystallized. The flagellated protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi is the aetiological agent of Chagas disease. Nucleoside diphosphate kinases (NDPKs) are enzymes that are involved in energy management and nucleoside balance in the cell. T. cruzi TcNDPK1, a canonical isoform, was overexpressed in Escherichia coli as an N-terminally poly-His-tagged fusion protein and crystallized. Crystals grew after 72 h in 0.2 M MgCl 2 , 20% PEG 3350. Data were collected to 3.5 Å resolution using synchrotron X-ray radiation at the National Synchrotron Light Laboratory (Campinas, Brazil). The crystals belonged to the trigonal space group P3, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 127.84, c = 275.49 Å. Structure determination is under way and will provide relevant information that may lead to the first step in rational drug design for the treatment of Chagas disease

  18. Crystallization and preliminary X ray analysis of nucleoside diphosphate kinase 1 from T. cruzi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez Barroso, J.A.; Aguilar, C.F.; Miranda, M.R.; Pereira, C.A.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiologic agent of Chagas disease. The Nucleoside diphosphate kinases (NDPKs) are enzymes involved in energy management and nucleoside balance in the cell. T. cruzi TcNDPK1, a canonical isoform. The objective of this work is obtaining protein's crystals, diffract and process the data for tridimensional structure resolution. Materials and Methods: TcNDPK1 was expressed in E. coli as a fusion protein with Nterminal His-tag. TcNDPK1 was overexpressed and purified by FPLC. Crystallization was assayed by sitting drop and hanging drop vapor diffusion method. Crystals was frozen and diffracted on synchrotron x-ray radiation in Campinas (Brasil). The data set collected was reduced and merged using MOSFLM and SCALA programs. Results and Discussion: His-TcNDPK was overexpressed, purified and crystallized. The crystals are diffracted and collected the data to 3.5A. The crystals belong to the trigonal space group P3, with unit cell parameters a=127.94, b=127.84, c=275.49. Structure determination is under way. These results will provide relevant information that could be the first step in rational drug design for treating Chagas disease.(authors)

  19. Methylated nucleosides in tRNA and tRNA methyltransferases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki eHori

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available To date, more than 90 modified nucleosides have been found in tRNA and the biosynthetic pathways of the majority of tRNA modifications include a methylation step(s. Recent studies of the biosynthetic pathways have demonstrated that the availability of methyl group donors for the methylation in tRNA is important for correct and efficient protein synthesis. In this review, I focus on the methylated nucleosides and tRNA methyltransferases. The primary functions of tRNA methylations are linked to the different steps of protein synthesis, such as the stabilization of tRNA structure, reinforcement of the codon–anticodon interaction, regulation of wobble base pairing, and prevention of frameshift errors. However, beyond these basic functions, recent studies have demonstrated that tRNA methylations are also involved in the RNA quality control system and regulation of tRNA localization in the cell. In a thermophilic eubacterium, tRNA modifications and the modification enzymes form a network that responses to temperature changes. Furthermore, several modifications are involved in genetic diseases, infections, and the immune response. Moreover, structural, biochemical, and bioinformatics studies of tRNA methyltransferases have been clarifying the details of tRNA methyltransferases and have enabled these enzymes to be classified. In the final section, the evolution of modification enzymes is discussed.

  20. Identification of a nucleoside analog active against adenosine kinase–expressing plasma cell malignancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadek, Jouliana; Hernandez-Hopkins, Denise; Akar, Gunkut; Barelli, Peter J.; Sahai, Michelle A.; Zhou, Hufeng; Totonchy, Jennifer; Jayabalan, David; Niesvizky, Ruben; Guasparri, Ilaria; Liu, Yifang; Sei, Shizuko; Shoemaker, Robert H.; Elemento, Olivier; Kaye, Kenneth M.

    2017-01-01

    Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) is a largely incurable malignancy of B cell origin with plasmacytic differentiation. Here, we report the identification of a highly effective inhibitor of PEL. This compound, 6-ethylthioinosine (6-ETI), is a nucleoside analog with toxicity to PEL in vitro and in vivo, but not to other lymphoma cell lines tested. We developed and performed resistome analysis, an unbiased approach based on RNA sequencing of resistant subclones, to discover the molecular mechanisms of sensitivity. We found different adenosine kinase–inactivating (ADK-inactivating) alterations in all resistant clones and determined that ADK is required to phosphorylate and activate 6-ETI. Further, we observed that 6-ETI induces ATP depletion and cell death accompanied by S phase arrest and DNA damage only in ADK-expressing cells. Immunohistochemistry for ADK served as a biomarker approach to identify 6-ETI–sensitive tumors, which we documented for other lymphoid malignancies with plasmacytic features. Notably, multiple myeloma (MM) expresses high levels of ADK, and 6-ETI was toxic to MM cell lines and primary specimens and had a robust antitumor effect in a disseminated MM mouse model. Several nucleoside analogs are effective in treating leukemias and T cell lymphomas, and 6-ETI may fill this niche for the treatment of PEL, plasmablastic lymphoma, MM, and other ADK-expressing cancers. PMID:28504647

  1. Identification of a nucleoside analog active against adenosine kinase-expressing plasma cell malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayar, Utthara; Sadek, Jouliana; Reichel, Jonathan; Hernandez-Hopkins, Denise; Akar, Gunkut; Barelli, Peter J; Sahai, Michelle A; Zhou, Hufeng; Totonchy, Jennifer; Jayabalan, David; Niesvizky, Ruben; Guasparri, Ilaria; Hassane, Duane; Liu, Yifang; Sei, Shizuko; Shoemaker, Robert H; Warren, J David; Elemento, Olivier; Kaye, Kenneth M; Cesarman, Ethel

    2017-06-01

    Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) is a largely incurable malignancy of B cell origin with plasmacytic differentiation. Here, we report the identification of a highly effective inhibitor of PEL. This compound, 6-ethylthioinosine (6-ETI), is a nucleoside analog with toxicity to PEL in vitro and in vivo, but not to other lymphoma cell lines tested. We developed and performed resistome analysis, an unbiased approach based on RNA sequencing of resistant subclones, to discover the molecular mechanisms of sensitivity. We found different adenosine kinase-inactivating (ADK-inactivating) alterations in all resistant clones and determined that ADK is required to phosphorylate and activate 6-ETI. Further, we observed that 6-ETI induces ATP depletion and cell death accompanied by S phase arrest and DNA damage only in ADK-expressing cells. Immunohistochemistry for ADK served as a biomarker approach to identify 6-ETI-sensitive tumors, which we documented for other lymphoid malignancies with plasmacytic features. Notably, multiple myeloma (MM) expresses high levels of ADK, and 6-ETI was toxic to MM cell lines and primary specimens and had a robust antitumor effect in a disseminated MM mouse model. Several nucleoside analogs are effective in treating leukemias and T cell lymphomas, and 6-ETI may fill this niche for the treatment of PEL, plasmablastic lymphoma, MM, and other ADK-expressing cancers.

  2. An Analysis of Enzyme Kinetics Data for Mitochondrial DNA Strand Termination by Nucleoside Reverse Transcription Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendelsdorf, Katherine V.; Song, Zhuo; Cao, Yang; Samuels, David C.

    2009-01-01

    Nucleoside analogs used in antiretroviral treatment have been associated with mitochondrial toxicity. The polymerase-γ hypothesis states that this toxicity stems from the analogs' inhibition of the mitochondrial DNA polymerase (polymerase-γ) leading to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion. We have constructed a computational model of the interaction of polymerase-γ with activated nucleoside and nucleotide analog drugs, based on experimentally measured reaction rates and base excision rates, together with the mtDNA genome size, the human mtDNA sequence, and mitochondrial dNTP concentrations. The model predicts an approximately 1000-fold difference in the activated drug concentration required for a 50% probability of mtDNA strand termination between the activated di-deoxy analogs d4T, ddC, and ddI (activated to ddA) and the activated forms of the analogs 3TC, TDF, AZT, FTC, and ABC. These predictions are supported by experimental and clinical data showing significantly greater mtDNA depletion in cell culture and patient samples caused by the di-deoxy analog drugs. For zidovudine (AZT) we calculated a very low mtDNA replication termination probability, in contrast to its reported mitochondrial toxicity in vitro and clinically. Therefore AZT mitochondrial toxicity is likely due to a mechanism that does not involve strand termination of mtDNA replication. PMID:19132079

  3. Vitamin B12 deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, Ralph; Allen, Lindsay H; Bjørke-Monsen, Anne-Lise

    2017-01-01

    , subclinical deficiency affects between 2.5% and 26% of the general population depending on the definition used, although the clinical relevance is unclear. B12 deficiency can affect individuals at all ages, but most particularly elderly individuals. Infants, children, adolescents and women of reproductive age...... remain debated. Management depends on B12 supplementation, either via high-dose oral routes or via parenteral administration. This Primer describes the current knowledge surrounding B12 deficiency, and highlights improvements in diagnostic methods as well as shifting concepts about the prevalence, causes...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... body to absorb iron from the gastrointestinal tract (GI tract). Blood loss When you lose blood, you ... to iron-deficiency anemia include: Bleeding in your GI tract, from an ulcer, colon cancer, or regular ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... for gastrointestinal bleeding To see if gastrointestinal bleeding is causing your iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may order the following procedures to guide treatment . Fecal ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... complications, including heart failure and development delays in children. Explore this Health ... red blood cells. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time because your body’s intake of iron ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Supplement Fact Sheet (NIH) Iron-Deficiency Anemia (National Library of Medicine, MedlinePlus) ... Privacy Policy Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Accessibility Copyright and Usage No FEAR ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... our clinical trials . Are you a frequent blood donor living in New York City? This study is looking at how iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, ...

  9. Vitamin D Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to other diseases. In children, it can cause rickets. Rickets is a rare disease that causes the bones ... and children are at higher risk of getting rickets. In adults, severe vitamin D deficiency leads to ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Health and Human Development, we are investigating how best to treat premature newborns with low hemoglobin levels. ... are hoping to determine which iron supplements work best to treat iron-deficiency anemia in children who ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... and Strategic Vision Leadership Scientific Divisions Operations and Administration Advisory Committees Budget and Legislative Information Jobs and ... may recommend you eat heart-healthy foods or control other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia may cause the following complications: Depression Heart problems. If you do not have enough ... these usually go away within a day or two. Red blood cell transfusions. These may be used ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... more. Read less Reminders Return to Causes to review how blood loss, not consuming the recommended amount ... iron-deficiency anemia. Return to Risk Factors to review family history, lifestyle, unhealthy environments, or other factors ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... same for boys and girls. From birth to 6 months, babies need 0.27 mg of iron. ... for iron deficiency at certain ages: Infants between 6 and 12 months, especially if they are fed ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... detect signs of iron-deficiency anemia and help rule out other types of anemia. Treatment will explain ... your blood. More testing may be needed to rule out other types of anemia. Tests for gastrointestinal ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... red blood cells, called hemolysis . Hemolysis, in this case, is caused by strong muscle contractions and the ... to prevent iron-deficiency anemia. Participate in NHLBI Clinical Trials will explain our ongoing clinical studies that ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... to improve health through research and scientific discovery. Improving health with current research Learn about the following ... deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in premature ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... A-Z Clinical Trials Publications and Resources Health Education and Awareness ... If your doctor diagnoses you with iron-deficiency anemia, your treatment will depend on the cause and severity of the condition. Your ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... your blood may be normal even if the total amount of iron in your body is low. ... iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, such as how ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... interferes with the body’s ability to make hemoglobin. Family history and genetics Von Willebrand disease is an ... deficiency anemia. Return to Risk Factors to review family history, lifestyle, unhealthy environments, or other factors that ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... diagnoses you with iron-deficiency anemia, your treatment will depend on the cause and severity of the ... of iron. The recommended daily amounts of iron will depend on your age, sex, and whether you ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... from developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, ... iron is needed, such as childhood and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... A-Z Clinical Trials Publications and Resources Health Education and Awareness The Science Science Home Blood Disorders ... infancy has lasting effects. We are interested in learning how having iron-deficiency anemia early in life ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... heart failure . Increased risk of infections Motor or cognitive development delays in children Pregnancy complications, such as ... iron-deficiency anemia may require intravenous (IV) iron therapy or a blood transfusion . Iron supplements Your doctor ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... absorb iron and lead to iron-deficiency anemia. These conditions include: Intestinal and digestive conditions, such as ... tract. Inflammation from congestive heart failure or obesity . These chronic conditions can lead to inflammation that may ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Blood Disorders and Blood Safety Sleep Science and Sleep Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine ... prevention and treatment of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders, including iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the current ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in ... Visit Children and Clinical Studies to hear experts, parents, and children talk about their experiences with clinical ...

  8. Factor V deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000550.htm Factor V deficiency To use the sharing features on ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  9. Factor II deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000549.htm Factor II deficiency To use the sharing features on ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  10. Factor X deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000553.htm Factor X deficiency To use the sharing features on ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... is caused by strong muscle contractions and the impact of feet repeatedly striking the ground, such as ... funding on iron-deficiency anemia. We stimulate high-impact research. Our Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... may be diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia if you have low iron or ferritin levels in your blood. More testing may be needed to rule out other types of anemia. Tests for gastrointestinal ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... for your body to absorb iron from the gastrointestinal tract (GI tract). Blood loss When you lose blood, ... iron deficiency. Endurance athletes lose iron through their gastrointestinal tracts. They also lose iron through the breakdown of ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... vegetables. Foods rich in vitamin C, such as oranges, strawberries, and tomatoes, may help increase your absorption ... deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend erythropoiesis stimulating agents (esa) . These medicines stimulate the bone marrow to ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... were born prematurely may be at an even higher risk, as most of a newborn’s iron stores ... men of the same age. Women are at higher risk for iron-deficiency anemia under some circumstances, ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Iron-Deficiency Anemia (National Library of Medicine, MedlinePlus) Building 31 31 Center Drive Bethesda, MD 20892 Learn ... and Usage No FEAR Act Grants and Funding Building 31 31 Center Drive Bethesda, MD 20892 Learn ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... may recommend erythropoiesis stimulating agents (esa) . These medicines stimulate the bone marrow to make more red blood ... NHLBI is funding on iron-deficiency anemia. We stimulate high-impact research. Our Trans-Omics for Precision ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... tests, especially in infants and small children Heavy menstrual periods Injury or surgery Urinary tract bleeding Consuming ... iron-deficiency anemia from trauma, surgery, or heavy menstrual periods. Individuals with a gene for hemophilia, including ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... and naproxen Certain rare genetic conditions such as hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, which causes bleeding in the bowels ... iron-deficiency anemia may cause the following complications: Depression Heart problems. If you do not have enough ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... lead in their blood from their environment or water. Lead interferes with the body’s ability to make ... iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, such as how ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... also often take other medicines—such as proton pump inhibitors, anticoagulants, or blood thinners—that may cause iron-deficiency anemia. Proton pump inhibitors interfere with iron absorption, and blood thinners ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Cells From Iron-deficient Donors: Recovery and Storage Quality. Learn more about participating in a clinical trial . View all trials from ClinicalTrials.gov . Visit Children and Clinical Studies to hear experts, parents, and ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Look for Treatment will discuss medicines and eating pattern changes that your doctors may recommend if you ... iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... girls. From birth to 6 months, babies need 0.27 mg of iron. This number goes up ... screen blood donors for low iron stores. Reliable point-of-care testing may help identify iron deficiency ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... striking the ground, such as with marathon runners. Sex Girls and women between the ages of 14 ... developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, eggs, ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron- ... factors , such as if you are following a vegetarian eating pattern, your doctor may recommend changes to ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... deficiency anemia. Proton pump inhibitors interfere with iron absorption, and blood thinners increase the likelihood of bleeding ... oranges, strawberries, and tomatoes, may help increase your absorption of iron. If you are pregnant, talk to ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may order a blood test called a complete blood count ( ... your risk factors , do a physical exam, or order blood tests or other diagnostic tests. Physical exam ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... duodenum, the first part of the small intestine just beyond the stomach. Even if you have enough ... clamping of your newborn’s umbilical cord at the time of delivery. This may help prevent iron-deficiency ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... less than 12 g/dl for women is diagnostic of anemia. In iron-deficiency anemia, red blood ... both full-term and preterm infants. Look for Diagnosis will explain tests and procedures that your doctor ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... less than 12 g/dl for women is diagnostic of anemia. In iron-deficiency anemia, red blood ... physical exam, or order blood tests or other diagnostic tests. Physical exam Your doctor may ask about ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... risk for iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, ... iron-fortified foods that have iron added. Vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you choose nonmeat ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... bleeding. If undiagnosed or untreated, iron-deficiency anemia can cause serious complications, including heart failure and development ... iron is too low. Low intake of iron can happen because of blood loss, consuming less than ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... improved health for people with iron-deficiency anemia. Recipient Epidemiology Donor Studies program findings help to protect blood donors . NHLBI’s Recipient Epidemiology Donor Studies (REDS) program , which began in ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... a frequent blood donor living in New York City? This study is looking at how iron-deficiency ... frequently. This study is located in New York City, and is recruiting by invitation only. View more ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... to 11 mg for children ages 7 to 12 months, and down to 7 mg for children ... deficiency at certain ages: Infants between 6 and 12 months, especially if they are fed only breast ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... in our clinical trials . Are you a frequent blood donor living in New York City? This study is looking at how iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia may cause the following complications: Depression Heart problems. If you do not have enough ... prevent complications such as abnormal heart rhythms and depression. Learn the warning signs of serious complications and ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... prevent complications such as abnormal heart rhythms and depression. Learn the warning signs of serious complications and ... donors for low iron stores. Reliable point-of-care testing may help identify iron deficiency before potentially ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... be at risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk for ... Surgery, upper endoscopy or colonoscopy, to stop bleeding. Healthy lifestyle changes To help you meet your daily ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... breastfeeding women older than 18 need 9 mg. Problems absorbing iron Even if you consume the recommended ... interested in learning how having iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... starch. Restless legs syndrome Shortness of breath Weakness Complications Undiagnosed or untreated iron-deficiency anemia may cause ... as complete blood count and iron studies. Prevent complications over your lifetime To prevent complications from iron- ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... you do not have enough iron in your body. People with mild or moderate iron-deficiency anemia ... and where to find more information. Causes Your body needs iron to make healthy red blood cells. ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the current and future NHLBI efforts to improve health through research and ... blood donors. Cardiovascular Health Study identifies predictors of future health problems in older adults. The NHLBI-sponsored ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... as most of a newborn’s iron stores are developed during the third trimester of pregnancy. Children between ... This makes it harder to stop bleeding and can increase the risk of iron-deficiency anemia from ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... an MCV of less than 80 femtoliters (fL). Prevention strategies If you have certain risk factors , such ... explain our ongoing clinical studies that are investigating prevention strategies for iron-deficiency anemia. Signs, Symptoms, and ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Safety Sleep Science and Sleep Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, ... iron-deficiency anemia can cause serious complications, including heart failure and development delays in children. Explore this ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... symptoms. More severe iron-deficiency anemia may cause fatigue or tiredness, shortness of breath, or chest pain. ... in the hands and feet Difficulty concentrating Dizziness Fatigue, or feeling tired, is the most common symptom. ...

  9. Manganese deficiency in plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Sidsel Birkelund; Jensen, Poul Erik; Husted, Søren

    2016-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential plant micronutrient with an indispensable function as a catalyst in the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII). Even so, Mn deficiency frequently occurs without visual leaf symptoms, thereby masking the distribution and dimension of the problem...... restricting crop productivity in many places of the world. Hence, timely alleviation of latent Mn deficiency is a challenge in promoting plant growth and quality. We describe here the key mechanisms of Mn deficiency in plants by focusing on the impact of Mn on PSII stability and functionality. We also address...... the mechanisms underlying the differential tolerance towards Mn deficiency observed among plant genotypes, which enable Mn-efficient plants to grow on marginal land with poor Mn availability....

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... to learn more about iron-deficiency anemia, our role in research and clinical trials to improve health, ... of Blood Diseases and Resources (DBDR) is a leader in research on the causes, prevention, and treatment ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Treatment will explain treatment-related complications or side effects. Diagnosis Iron-deficiency anemia may be detected during ... to your doctor if you are experiencing side effects such as a bad metallic taste, vomiting, diarrhea, ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... an increased risk for iron-deficiency anemia because of your age, unhealthy environments, family ... 12 months, especially if they are fed only breast milk or are fed formula that is not fortified ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... blood tests, especially in infants and small children Heavy menstrual periods Injury or surgery Urinary tract bleeding ... of iron-deficiency anemia from trauma, surgery, or heavy menstrual periods. Individuals with a gene for hemophilia, ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, eggs, ... is needed, such as childhood and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and iron- ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Individuals with a gene for hemophilia, including symptomatic female carriers who have heavy menstrual periods, may be ... anemia. Endurance activities and athletes. Athletes, especially young females, are at risk for iron deficiency. Endurance athletes ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... and Strategic Vision Leadership Scientific Divisions Operations and Administration Advisory Committees Budget and Legislative Information Jobs and ... blood cells. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time because your body’s intake of iron is too ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... MCV of less than 80 femtoliters (fL). Prevention strategies If you have certain risk factors , such as ... our ongoing clinical studies that are investigating prevention strategies for iron-deficiency anemia. Signs, Symptoms, and Complications ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... may recommend you eat heart-healthy foods or control other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. ... heavy menstrual bleeding, your doctor will want to control these other conditions to prevent you from developing ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... lead to iron-deficiency anemia include: End-stage kidney failure, where there is blood loss during dialysis. People who have chronic kidney disease also often take other medicines—such as ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... may be at risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk ... upper endoscopy or colonoscopy, to stop bleeding. Healthy lifestyle changes To help you meet your daily recommended ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... endoscopy or colonoscopy, to stop bleeding. Healthy lifestyle changes To help you meet your daily recommended iron ... iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Chest pain Coldness in the hands and feet Difficulty concentrating Dizziness Fatigue, or feeling tired, is the ... Our support of SBIR/STTR programs is helping advance research in iron-deficiency anemia, in part by ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... infancy has lasting effects. We are interested in learning how having iron-deficiency anemia early in life ... Customer Service/Center for Health Information Email Alerts Jobs and Careers Site Index About NHLBI National Institute ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... family history and genetics , lifestyle habits, or sex. Age You may be at increased risk for iron ... Signs, Symptoms, and Complications Iron-deficiency anemia can range from mild to severe. People with mild or ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron to prepare for blood loss during delivery. Screening and Prevention Your doctor may screen you for ... and symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia. Return to Screening and Prevention to review tests to screen for ...

  6. Evaluation of nevirapine and/or hydroxyurea with nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors in treatment-naive HIV-1-infected subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blanckenberg, Daniel H.; Wood, Robin; Horban, Andrzej; Beniowski, Marek; Boron-Kaczmarska, Anna; Trocha, Hanna; Halota, Waldemar; Schmidt, Reinhold E.; Fatkenheuer, G.; Jessen, Heiko; Lange, Joep M. A.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To examine the effect of adding nevirapine (NVP) and/or hydroxyurea (HU) to a triple nucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) regimen in terms of efficacy and tolerability. Methods: HIV-1-infected, treatment-naive adults were randomized, using a factorial design, to add

  7. The efficient synthesis of 2-arylpyrimidine acyclic nucleoside phosphonates using Liebeskind-Srogl cross-coupling reaction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Břehová, Petra; Česnek, Michal; Dračínský, Martin; Holý, Antonín; Janeba, Zlatko

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 67, č. 38 (2011), s. 7379-7385 ISSN 0040-4020 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0508 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : Liebeskind-Srogl cross - coupling * acyclic nucleoside phosphonates * pyrimidines * arylboronic acids * microwave Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.025, year: 2011

  8. Acyclic Nucleoside Phosphonates Containing 9-Deazahypoxanthine and a Five-Membered Heterocycle as Selective Inhibitors of Plasmodial 6-Oxopurine Phosphoribosyltransferases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kaiser, Martin Maxmilian; Baszczyňski, Ondřej; Hocková, Dana; Poštová Slavětínská, Lenka; Dračínský, Martin; Keough, D. T.; Guddat, L. W.; Janeba, Zlatko

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 14 (2017), s. 1133-1141 ISSN 1860-7179 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-06049S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : inhibitors * nucleosides * malaria * phosphonates * purine salvage Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry OBOR OECD: Organic chemistry Impact factor: 3.225, year: 2016

  9. Synthesis and Evaluation of Novel Acyclic Nucleoside Phosphonates as Inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum and Human 6-Oxopurine Phosphoribosyltransferases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kaiser, Martin Maxmilian; Hocková, Dana; Wang, T. H.; Dračínský, Martin; Poštová Slavětínská, Lenka; Procházková, Eliška; Edstein, M. D.; Chavchich, M.; Keough, D. T.; Guddat, L. W.; Janeba, Zlatko

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 10 (2015), s. 1707-1723 ISSN 1860-7179 R&D Projects: GA MV VG20102015046; GA ČR GAP207/11/0108 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : 6-oxopurine * acyclic nucleoside phosphonates * phosphoribosyltransferases * malaria * phosphoramidates Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.980, year: 2015

  10. [Iron deficiency and pica].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, J A; Marcos, J; Risueño, C E; de Cos, C; López, R; Capote, F J; Martín, M V; Gil, J L

    1998-02-01

    To study the relationship between pica and iron-lack anaemia in a series of iron-deficiency patients in order to establish the pathogenesis of such relationship. Four-hundred and thirty-three patients were analysed. Pica was studied by introducing certain diet queries into the clinical history. All patients received oral iron and were periodically controlled with the usual clinico-haematological procedures. Pica was present in 23 patients (5.3%). Eight nourishing (namely, coffee grains, almonds, chocolate, ice, lettuce, carrots, sunflower seeds and bread) and 2 non-nourishing (clay and paper) substances were involved. A second episode of pica appeared in 9 cases upon relapsing of iron deficiency. Both anaemia and pica were cured by etiologic and substitutive therapy in all instances. No clear correlation was found with either socio-economic status or pathogenetic causes of iron deficiency and pica, and no haematological differences were seen between patients with pica and those without this alteration. (1) The pathogenesis of pica is unclear, although it appears unrelated to the degree of iron deficiency. (2) According to the findings in this series, pica seems a consequence of iron deficiency rather than its cause. (3) Adequate therapy can cure both conditions, although pica may reappear upon relapse of iron deficiency.

  11. Pd-catalyzed versus uncatalyzed, PhI(OAc)2-mediated cyclization reactions of N6-([1,1'-biaryl]-2-yl)adenine nucleosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satishkumar, Sakilam; Poudapally, Suresh; Vuram, Prasanna K; Gurram, Venkateshwarlu; Pottabathini, Narender; Sebastian, Dellamol; Yang, Lijia; Pradhan, Padmanava; Lakshman, Mahesh K

    2017-11-09

    In this work we have assessed reactions of N 6 -([1,1'-biaryl]-2-yl)adenine nucleosides with Pd(OAc) 2 and PhI(OAc) 2 , via a Pd II /Pd IV redox cycle. The substrates are readily obtained by Pd/Xantphos-catalyzed reaction of adenine nucleosides with 2-bromo-1,1'-biaryls. In PhMe, the N 6 -biarylyl nucleosides gave C6-carbazolyl nucleoside analogues by C-N bond formation with the exocyclic N 6 nitrogen atom. In the solvent screening for the Pd-catalyzed reactions, an uncatalyzed process was found to be operational. It was observed that the carbazolyl products could also be obtained in the absence of a metal catalyst by reaction with PhI(OAc) 2 in 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoroisopropanol (HFIP). Thus, under Pd catalysis and in HFIP, reactions proceed to provide carbazolyl nucleoside analogues, with some differences. If reactions of N 6 -biarylyl nucleoside substrates were conducted in MeCN, formation of aryl benzimidazopurinyl nucleoside derivatives was observed in many cases by C-N bond formation with the N 1 ring nitrogen atom of the purine (carbazole and benzimidazole isomers are readily separated by chromatography). Whereas Pd II /Pd IV redox is responsible for carbazole formation under the metal-catalyzed conditions, in HFIP and MeCN radical cations and/or nitrenium ions can be intermediates. An extensive set of radical inhibition experiments was conducted and the data are presented.

  12. Targeted Delivery of Deoxycytidine Kinase to Her2-Positive Cells Enhances the Efficacy of the Nucleoside Analog Fludarabine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujatha P Koduvayur

    Full Text Available Cytotoxic drugs, such as nucleoside analogs and toxins, commonly suffer from off-target effects. One approach to mitigate this problem is to deliver the cytotoxic drug selectively to the intended site. While for toxins this can be achieved by conjugating the cell-killing moiety to a targeting moiety, it is not an option for nucleoside analogs, which rely on intracellular enzymes to convert them to their active triphosphorylated form. To overcome this limitation, and achieve site-targeted activation of nucleoside analogs, we fused the coding region of a prodrug-activating enzyme, deoxycytidine kinase (dCK, to affinity reagents that bind to the Her2 cell surface protein. We evaluated dCK fusions to an anti-Her2 affibody and Designed Ankyrin Repeat Protein (DARPin for their ability to kill cancer cells by promoting the activation of the nucleoside analog fludarabine. Cell staining and flow cytometry experiments with three Her2 positive cancer cell lines (BT-474-JB, JIMT-1 and SK-OV-3 indicate dCK fusions binding and cellular internalization. In contrast, these reagents bind only weakly to the Her2 negative cell line, MCF-7. Cell proliferation assays indicate that SK-OV-3 and BT-474-JB cell lines exhibit significantly reduced proliferation rates when treated with targeting-module fused dCK and fludarabine, compared to fludarabine alone. These findings demonstrate that we have succeeded in delivering active dCK into the Her2-positive cells, thereby increasing the activation of fludarabine, which ultimately reduces the dose of nucleoside analog needed for cell killing. This strategy may help establish the therapeutic index required to differentiate between healthy tissues and cancer cells.

  13. Structure-Activity Relationships of Acyclic Selenopurine Nucleosides as Antiviral Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pramod K. Sahu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A series of acyclic selenopurine nucleosides 3a–f and 4a–g were synthesized based on the bioisosteric rationale between oxygen and selenium, and then evaluated for antiviral activity. Among the compounds tested, seleno-acyclovir (4a exhibited the most potent anti-herpes simplex virus (HSV-1 (EC50 = 1.47 µM and HSV-2 (EC50 = 6.34 µM activities without cytotoxicity up to 100 µM, while 2,6-diaminopurine derivatives 4e–g exhibited significant anti-human cytomegalovirus (HCMV activity, which is slightly more potent than the guanine derivative 4d, indicating that they might act as prodrugs of seleno-ganciclovir (4d.

  14. Low liver stiffness among cirrhotic patients with hepatitis B after prolonged treatment with nucleoside analogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ellen Sloth; Weiland, Ola; Leutscher, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective. Case reports and short-term clinical trials have suggested that treatment for chronic hepatitis B (CHB) may lead to improvement of cirrhosis. The aim of the present study was to measure liver stiffness in patients diagnosed with advanced fibrosis or cirrhosis prior to prolonged...... treatment with nucleoside or nucleotide analogs (NUCs) for CHB. Materials and methods. Patients with CHB and advanced fibrosis or cirrhosis prior to treatment with NUCs for at least 1 year were offered inclusion in the study. We measured liver stiffness using transient elastography (TE) at follow-up. TE cut...... duration was 50.5 months. Among patients with cirrhosis prior to treatment, 26 (49%) had liver stiffness below 11.0 kPa at follow-up, suggesting regression of cirrhosis. Among patients with advanced fibrosis (F3) prior to treatment, 10 (77%) had liver stiffness below 8.1 kPa after treatment, suggesting...

  15. Complete inactivation of HIV-1 using photo-labeled non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios, Adan; Quesada, Jorge; Anderson, Dallas; Goldstein, Allan; Fossum, Theresa; Colby-Germinario, Susan; Wainberg, Mark A

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate that a photo-labeled derivative of the non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) dapivirine termed DAPY, when used together with exposure to ultraviolet light, was able to completely and irreversibly inactivate both HIV-1 RT activity as well as infectiousness in each of a T cell line and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Control experiments using various concentrations of DAPY revealed that a combination of exposure to ultraviolet light together with use of the specific, high affinity photo-labeled compound was necessary for complete inactivation to occur. This method of HIV RT inactivation may have applicability toward preservation of an intact viral structure and warrants further investigation in regard to the potential of this approach to elicit a durable, broad protective immune response. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. A fluorescence study of the molecular interactions of harmane with the nucleobases, their nucleosides and mononucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balón, M; Muñoz, M A; Carmona, C; Guardado, P; Galán, M

    1999-07-19

    Fluorescence binding studies of harmane to the elemental components of the nucleic acids were undertaken to investigate the origin of the interaction between the drug and DNA. Most of the tested substrates have been found to induce hypochromism in the absorption spectrum of harmane and to quench its fluorescence. The quenching process induced by the nucleobases and their nucleosides is mainly due to the formation of ground state 1:1 complexes. However, in the case of the mononucleotides a dynamic quenching component is also observed. This quenching component is likely due to the excited state interaction of harmane with the phosphate group of the nucleotides. UV-vis spectral changes and quenching measurements have been used to quantify the ground state association constants of the complexes and the quenching rate constants.

  17. Absence of a Universal Mechanism of Mitochondrial Toxicity by Nucleoside Analogs▿

    OpenAIRE

    Lund, Kaleb C.; Peterson, LaRae L.; Wallace, Kendall B.

    2007-01-01

    Nucleoside analogs are associated with various mitochondrial toxicities, and it is becoming increasingly difficult to accommodate these differences solely in the context of DNA polymerase gamma inhibition. Therefore, we examined the toxicities of zidovudine (AZT) (10 and 50 μM; 2.7 and 13.4 μg/ml), didanosine (ddI) (10 and 50 μM; 2.4 and 11.8 μg/ml), and zalcitabine (ddC) (1 and 5 μM; 0.21 and 1.1 μg/ml) in HepG2 and H9c2 cells without the presumption of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion. E...

  18. Radiolysis of nucleosides in aqueous solutions: base liberation by the base attack mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, S.

    1984-01-01

    On the radiolysis of uridine and some other nucleosides in aqueous solution, a pH-dependent liberation of uracil or the corresponding base was found. e - sub(aq) and HOsup(anion radicals) 2 gave no freed bases, although many oxidizing radicals, including OH, Clsup(anion radicals) 2 , Brsup(anion radicals) 2 , (CNS)sup(anion radicals) 2 and SOsup(anion radicals) 4 , did cause the release of unaltered bases, depending on the pH of the solutions. The base yields were generally high at pH >= 11, with the exception of SOsup(anion radicals) 4 , which gave a rather high yield of uracil (from uridine) even in the pH region of - , present at high pH as the dissociated form of OH, may act partly as an oxidizing radical. A plausible mechanism of 3 1 -radical formation is discussed. (author)

  19. The thiopurine nucleoside analogue 6-methylmercaptopurine riboside (6MMPr) effectively blocks Zika virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Otavio Valério; Félix, Daniele Mendes; de Mendonça, Leila Rodrigues; de Araújo, Catarina Maria Cataldi Sabino; de Oliveira Franca, Rafael Freitas; Cordeiro, Marli Tenório; Silva Júnior, Abelardo; Pena, Lindomar José

    2017-12-01

    Since the emergence of Zika virus (ZIKV) in Brazil in 2015, 48 countries and territories in the Americas have confirmed autochthonous cases of disease caused by the virus. ZIKV-associated neurological manifestations and congenital defects make the development of safe and effective antivirals against ZIKV of utmost importance. Here we evaluated the antiviral activity of 6-methylmercaptopurine riboside (6MMPr), a thiopurine nucleoside analogue derived from the prodrug azathioprine, against the epidemic ZIKV strain circulating in Brazil. In all of the assays, an epithelial (Vero) and a human neuronal (SH-SY5Y) cell line were used to evaluate the cytotoxicity and effective concentrations of 6MMPr against ZIKV. Levels of ZIKV-RNA, viral infectious titre and the percentage of infected cells in the presence or absence of 6MMPr were used to determine antiviral efficacy. 6MMPr decreased ZIKV production by >99% in both cell lines in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Interestingly, 6MMPr was 1.6 times less toxic to SH-SY5Y cells compared with Vero cells, presenting a 50% cytotoxic concentrations (CC 50 ) of 460.3 µM and 291 µM, respectively. The selectivity index of 6MMPr for Vero and SH-SY5Y cells was 11.9 and 22.7, respectively, highlighting the safety profile of the drug to neuronal cells. Taken together, these results identify, for the first time, the thiopurine nucleoside analogue 6MMPr as a promising antiviral candidate against ZIKV that warrants further in vivo evaluation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  20. Immuno-Northern Blotting: Detection of RNA Modifications by Using Antibodies against Modified Nucleosides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eikan Mishima

    Full Text Available The biological roles of RNA modifications are still largely not understood. Thus, developing a method for detecting RNA modifications is important for further clarification. We developed a method for detecting RNA modifications called immuno-northern blotting (INB analysis and herein introduce its various capabilities. This method involves the separation of RNAs using either polyacrylamide or agarose gel electrophoresis, followed by transfer onto a nylon membrane and subsequent immunoblotting using antibodies against modified nucleosides for the detection of specific modifications. We confirmed that INB with the antibodies for 1-methyladenosine (m1A, N6-methyladenosine (m6A, pseudouridine, and 5-methylcytidine (m5C showed different modifications in a variety of RNAs from various species and organelles. INB with the anti-m5C antibody revealed that the antibody cross-reacted with another modification on DNA, suggesting the application of this method for characterization of the antibody for modified nucleosides. Additionally, using INB with the antibody for m1A, which is a highly specific modification in eukaryotic tRNA, we detected tRNA-derived fragments known as tiRNAs under the cellular stress response, suggesting the application for tracking target RNA containing specific modifications. INB with the anti-m6A antibody confirmed the demethylation of m6A by the specific demethylases fat mass and obesity-associated protein (FTO and ALKBH5, suggesting its application for quantifying target modifications in separated RNAs. Furthermore, INB demonstrated that the knockdown of FTO and ALKBH5 increased the m6A modification in small RNAs as well as in mRNA. The INB method has high specificity, sensitivity, and quantitative capability, and it can be employed with conventional experimental apparatus. Therefore, this method would be useful for research on RNA modifications and metabolism.

  1. Immuno-Northern Blotting: Detection of RNA Modifications by Using Antibodies against Modified Nucleosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishima, Eikan; Jinno, Daisuke; Akiyama, Yasutoshi; Itoh, Kunihiko; Nankumo, Shinnosuke; Shima, Hisato; Kikuchi, Koichi; Takeuchi, Yoichi; Elkordy, Alaa; Suzuki, Takehiro; Niizuma, Kuniyasu; Ito, Sadayoshi; Tomioka, Yoshihisa; Abe, Takaaki

    2015-01-01

    The biological roles of RNA modifications are still largely not understood. Thus, developing a method for detecting RNA modifications is important for further clarification. We developed a method for detecting RNA modifications called immuno-northern blotting (INB) analysis and herein introduce its various capabilities. This method involves the separation of RNAs using either polyacrylamide or agarose gel electrophoresis, followed by transfer onto a nylon membrane and subsequent immunoblotting using antibodies against modified nucleosides for the detection of specific modifications. We confirmed that INB with the antibodies for 1-methyladenosine (m1A), N6-methyladenosine (m6A), pseudouridine, and 5-methylcytidine (m5C) showed different modifications in a variety of RNAs from various species and organelles. INB with the anti-m5C antibody revealed that the antibody cross-reacted with another modification on DNA, suggesting the application of this method for characterization of the antibody for modified nucleosides. Additionally, using INB with the antibody for m1A, which is a highly specific modification in eukaryotic tRNA, we detected tRNA-derived fragments known as tiRNAs under the cellular stress response, suggesting the application for tracking target RNA containing specific modifications. INB with the anti-m6A antibody confirmed the demethylation of m6A by the specific demethylases fat mass and obesity-associated protein (FTO) and ALKBH5, suggesting its application for quantifying target modifications in separated RNAs. Furthermore, INB demonstrated that the knockdown of FTO and ALKBH5 increased the m6A modification in small RNAs as well as in mRNA. The INB method has high specificity, sensitivity, and quantitative capability, and it can be employed with conventional experimental apparatus. Therefore, this method would be useful for research on RNA modifications and metabolism.

  2. Aquaporin 3 (AQP3) participates in the cytotoxic response to nucleoside-derived drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pérez-Torras, Sandra; Casado, F Javier; Pastor-Anglada, Marçal

    2012-01-01

    Nucleoside analogs used in the chemotherapy of solid tumors, such as the capecitabine catabolite 5 ′ -deoxy-5-fluorouridine (5 ′ -DFUR) trigger a transcriptomic response that involves the aquaglyceroporin aquaporin 3 along with other p53-dependent genes. Here, we examined whether up-regulation of aquaporin 3 (AQP3) mRNA in cancer cells treated with 5 ′ -DFUR represents a collateral transcriptomic effect of the drug, or conversely, AQP3 participates in the activity of genotoxic agents. The role of AQP3 in cell volume increase, cytotoxicity and cell cycle arrest was analyzed using loss-of-function approaches. 5 ′ -DFUR and gemcitabine, but not cisplatin, stimulated AQP3 expression and cell volume, which was partially and significantly blocked by knockdown of AQP3. Moreover, AQP3 siRNA significantly blocked other effects of nucleoside analogs, including G 1 /S cell cycle arrest, p21 and FAS up-regulation, and cell growth inhibition. Short incubations with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) also induced AQP3 expression and increased cell volume, and the inhibition of AQP3 expression significantly blocked growth inhibition triggered by this drug. To further establish whether AQP3 induction is related to cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, cells were exposed to long incubations with escalating doses of 5-FU. AQP3 was highly up-regulated at doses associated with cell cycle arrest, whereas at doses promoting apoptosis induction of AQP3 mRNA expression was reduced. Based on the results, we propose that the aquaglyceroporin AQP3 is required for cytotoxic activity of 5’-DFUR and gemcitabine in the breast cancer cell line MCF7 and the colon adenocarcinoma cell line HT29, and is implicated in cell volume increase and cell cycle arrest

  3. Retrospective natural history of thymidine kinase 2 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garone, Caterina; Taylor, Robert W; Nascimento, Andrés; Poulton, Joanna; Fratter, Carl; Domínguez-González, Cristina; Evans, Julie C; Loos, Mariana; Isohanni, Pirjo; Suomalainen, Anu; Ram, Dipak; Hughes, M Imelda; McFarland, Robert; Barca, Emanuele; Lopez Gomez, Carlos; Jayawant, Sandeep; Thomas, Neil D; Manzur, Adnan Y; Kleinsteuber, Karin; Martin, Miguel A; Kerr, Timothy; Gorman, Grainne S; Sommerville, Ewen W; Chinnery, Patrick F; Hofer, Monika; Karch, Christoph; Ralph, Jeffrey; Cámara, Yolanda; Madruga-Garrido, Marcos; Domínguez-Carral, Jana; Ortez, Carlos; Emperador, Sonia; Montoya, Julio; Chakrapani, Anupam; Kriger, Joshua F; Schoenaker, Robert; Levin, Bruce; Thompson, John L P; Long, Yuelin; Rahman, Shamima; Donati, Maria Alice; DiMauro, Salvatore; Hirano, Michio

    2018-03-30

    Thymine kinase 2 (TK2) is a mitochondrial matrix protein encoded in nuclear DNA and phosphorylates the pyrimidine nucleosides: thymidine and deoxycytidine. Autosomal recessive TK2 mutations cause a spectrum of disease from infantile onset to adult onset manifesting primarily as myopathy. To perform a retrospective natural history study of a large cohort of patients with TK2 deficiency. The study was conducted by 42 investigators across 31 academic medical centres. We identified 92 patients with genetically confirmed diagnoses of TK2 deficiency: 67 from literature review and 25 unreported cases. Based on clinical and molecular genetics findings, we recognised three phenotypes with divergent survival: (1) infantile-onset myopathy (42.4%) with severe mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion, frequent neurological involvement and rapid progression to early mortality (median post-onset survival (POS) 1.00, CI 0.58 to 2.33 years); (2) childhood-onset myopathy (40.2%) with mtDNA depletion, moderate-to-severe progression of generalised weakness and median POS at least 13 years; and (3) late-onset myopathy (17.4%) with mild limb weakness at onset and slow progression to respiratory insufficiency with median POS of 23 years. Ophthalmoparesis and facial weakness are frequent in adults. Muscle biopsies show multiple mtDNA deletions often with mtDNA depletion. In TK2 deficiency, age at onset, rate of weakness progression and POS are important variables that define three clinical subtypes. Nervous system involvement often complicates the clinical course of the infantile-onset form while extraocular muscle and facial involvement are characteristic of the late-onset form. Our observations provide essential information for planning future clinical trials in this disorder. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  4. Regulation of rat hepatocyte function by P2Y receptors: focus on control of glycogen phosphorylase and cyclic AMP by 2-methylthioadenosine 5'-diphosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, C Jane; Hall, John F; Webb, Tania E; Boarder, Michael R

    2004-10-01

    Hepatocyte function is regulated by several P2Y receptor subtypes. Here we report that 2-methylthioadenosine 5'-diphosphate (2-MeSADP), an agonist at P2Y(1), P2Y(12), and P2Y(13) receptors, potently (threshold 30 nM) stimulates glycogen phosphorylase in freshly isolated rat hepatocytes. Antagonism by N(6)-methyl 2'-deoxyadenosine 3',5'-bisphosphate (MRS 2179) confirms that this response is mediated by P2Y(1) receptors. In addition, in these cells, both 2-MeSADP and UTP inhibited glucagon-stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation. This inhibitory effect of 2-MeSADP was not reversed by the P2Y(1) antagonists, adenosine-3'-phosphate-5'-phosphate (A3P5P) or MRS 2179, both in the range 1 to 300 microM, indicating that it was not mediated by P2Y(1) receptors. This contrasts with the increase in cytosolic free Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](c)) induced by 2-MeSADP, which has shown to be inhibited by A3P5P. Pertussis toxin abolished the inhibitory effect of both UTP and 2-MeSADP. After culture of cells for 48 h, the ability of 2-MeSADP to inhibit cyclic AMP accumulation was greatly diminished. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that during this culture period, there was a decline in the ability to detect transcripts for P2Y(12) and P2Y(13) receptors, both of which are activated by 2-MeSADP and negatively coupled to adenylyl cyclase. However, in freshly isolated cells, the P2Y(12) and P2Y(13) receptor antagonist, 2-propylthio-beta,gamma-dichloromethylene-d-ATP (AR-C67085) (10 nM to 300 microM) did not alter the ability of 2-MeSADP to inhibit glucagon-stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation. We conclude that 2-MeSADP regulates rat hepatocyte glycogen phosphorylase by acting on P2Y(1) receptors coupled to raised [Ca(2+)](c), and by inhibiting cyclic AMP levels by an unknown G(i)-coupled receptor subtype, distinct from P2Y(1), P2Y(12), or P2Y(13) receptors.

  5. Antepartum Ornithine Transcarbamylase Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitoshi Nakajima

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency (OTCD is the most common type urea cycle enzyme deficiencies. This syndrome results from a deficiency of the mitochondrial enzyme ornithine transcarbamylase, which catalyzes the conversion of ornithine and carbamoyl phosphate to citrullin. Our case was a 28-year-old female diagnosed with OTCD following neurocognitive deficit during her first pregnancy. Although hyperammonemia was suspected as the cause of the patient's mental changes, there was no evidence of chronic liver disease. Plasma amino acid and urine organic acid analysis revealed OTCD. After combined modality treatment with arginine, sodium benzoate and hemodialysis, the patient's plasma ammonia level stabilized and her mental status returned to normal. At last she recovered without any damage left.

  6. Vitamin Excess and Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diab, Liliane; Krebs, Nancy F

    2018-04-01

    The published literature supports the high prevalence of supplement use in children and adolescents in the United States. Pediatricians today are faced with questions from parents and patients about the benefits, safety, efficacy, and correct dose of vitamins and minerals. In this article, we review 7 vitamins with the most clinical relevance as judged by abundance in food, risks and symptoms of deficiency, and potential for toxicity. Specifically, we focus on possible clinical scenarios that can be indicative of nutritional deficiency. We synthesize and summarize guidelines from nutrition experts, various medical societies, the World Health Organization, and the American Academy of Pediatrics. © American Academy of Pediatrics, 2018. All rights reserved.

  7. Preferences of AAA/AAG codon recognition by modified nucleosides, τm5s2U34 and t6A37 present in tRNALys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonawane, Kailas D; Kamble, Asmita S; Fandilolu, Prayagraj M

    2017-12-27

    Deficiency of 5-taurinomethyl-2-thiouridine, τm 5 s 2 U at the 34th 'wobble' position in tRNA Lys causes MERRF (Myoclonic Epilepsy with Ragged Red Fibers), a neuromuscular disease. This modified nucleoside of mt tRNA Lys , recognizes AAA/AAG codons during protein biosynthesis process. Its preference to identify cognate codons has not been studied at the atomic level. Hence, multiple MD simulations of various molecular models of anticodon stem loop (ASL) of mt tRNA Lys in presence and absence of τm 5 s 2 U 34 and N 6 -threonylcarbamoyl adenosine (t 6 A 37 ) along with AAA and AAG codons have been accomplished. Additional four MD simulations of multiple ASL mt tRNA Lys models in the context of ribosomal A-site residues have also been performed to investigate the role of A-site in recognition of AAA/AAG codons. MD simulation results show that, ASL models in presence of τm 5 s 2 U 34 and t 6 A 37 with codons AAA/AAG are more stable than the ASL lacking these modified bases. MD trajectories suggest that τm 5 s 2 U recognizes the codons initially by 'wobble' hydrogen bonding interactions, and then tRNA Lys might leave the explicit codon by a novel 'single' hydrogen bonding interaction in order to run the protein biosynthesis process smoothly. We propose this model as the 'Foot-Step Model' for codon recognition, in which the single hydrogen bond plays a crucial role. MD simulation results suggest that, tRNA Lys with τm 5 s 2 U and t 6 A recognizes AAA codon more preferably than AAG. Thus, these results reveal the consequences of τm 5 s 2 U and t 6 A in recognition of AAA/AAG codons in mitochondrial disease, MERRF.

  8. What Is Combined Deficiency of Vitamin K-Dependent Clotting Factors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Deficiency Factor V Deficiency Combined FV & FVIII Deficiencies Factor VII Deficiency Factor X Deficiency Factor XI Deficiency Factor ... Deficiency Factor V Deficiency Combined FV & FVIII Deficiencies Factor VII Deficiency Factor X Deficiency Factor XI Deficiency Factor ...

  9. L-Aspartic and l-glutamic acid ester-based ProTides of anticancer nucleosides: Synthesis and antitumoral evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ling-Jie; De Jonghe, Steven; Daelemans, Dirk; Herdewijn, Piet

    2016-05-01

    A series of novel aryloxyphosphoramidate nucleoside prodrugs based on l-aspartic acid and l-glutamic acid as amino acid motif has been synthesized and evaluated for antitumoral activity. Depending on the cancer cell line studied and on the nature of the parent nucleoside compound (gemcitabine, 5-iodo-2'-deoxy-uridine, floxuridine or brivudin), the corresponding ProTides are endowed with an improved or decreased cytotoxic activity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Cross-coupling reactions of unprotected halopurine bases, nucleosides, nucleotides and nucleoside triphosphates with 4-boronophenylalanine in water. Synthesis of (purin-8-yl)- and (purin-6-yl)phenylalanines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čapek, Petr; Pohl, Radek; Hocek, Michal

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 11 (2006), s. 2278-2284 ISSN 1477-0520 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) 1QS400550501; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0508 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : amino acids * purines * nucleosides * cross-coupling reactions Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.874, year: 2006

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... grams per deciliter (g/dl) for men and less than 12 g/dl for women is diagnostic of anemia. In iron-deficiency anemia, ... blood levels of iron will be low, or less than 10 micromoles per liter (mmol/L) for both men and women. Normal levels are 10 to 30 mmol/L. ...

  12. Alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stolk, Jan; Seersholm, Niels; Kalsheker, Noor

    2006-01-01

    The Alpha One International Registry (AIR), a multinational research program focused on alpha1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency, was formed in response to a World Health Organization recommendation. Each of the nearly 20 participating countries maintains a national registry of patients with AAT defic...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is blood loss during dialysis. People who have chronic kidney disease also often take other medicines—such as proton ... reduces iron absorption. Other treatments If you have chronic kidney disease and iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... A-Z Clinical Trials Publications and Resources Health Education and Awareness The Science Science Home Blood Disorders ... Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) ... We are interested in learning how having iron-deficiency anemia early in life ...

  15. Arginase-1 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sin, Yuan Yan; Baron, Garrett; Schulze, Andreas; Funk, Colin D

    2015-12-01

    Arginase-1 (ARG1) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder that affects the liver-based urea cycle, leading to impaired ureagenesis. This genetic disorder is caused by 40+ mutations found fairly uniformly spread throughout the ARG1 gene, resulting in partial or complete loss of enzyme function, which catalyzes the hydrolysis of arginine to ornithine and urea. ARG1-deficient patients exhibit hyperargininemia with spastic paraparesis, progressive neurological and intellectual impairment, persistent growth retardation, and infrequent episodes of hyperammonemia, a clinical pattern that differs strikingly from other urea cycle disorders. This review briefly highlights the current understanding of the etiology and pathophysiology of ARG1 deficiency derived from clinical case reports and therapeutic strategies stretching over several decades and reports on several exciting new developments regarding the pathophysiology of the disorder using ARG1 global and inducible knockout mouse models. Gene transfer studies in these mice are revealing potential therapeutic options that can be exploited in the future. However, caution is advised in extrapolating results since the lethal disease phenotype in mice is much more severe than in humans indicating that the mouse models may not precisely recapitulate human disease etiology. Finally, some of the functions and implications of ARG1 in non-urea cycle activities are considered. Lingering questions and future areas to be addressed relating to the clinical manifestations of ARG1 deficiency in liver and brain are also presented. Hopefully, this review will spark invigorated research efforts that lead to treatments with better clinical outcomes.

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Science Science Home Blood Disorders and Blood Safety Sleep Science and Sleep Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision ... prevention and treatment of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders, including iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... infection. A history of gastrointestinal surgery, such as weight-loss surgery—especially gastric bypass—or gastrectomy. Certain rare ... prevention and treatment of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders, including iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the ...

  18. Vitamin B12 deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitamin B12 (B12; also known as cobalamin) is a B vitamin that has an important role in cellular metabolism, especially in DNA synthesis, methylation and mitochondrial metabolism. Clinical B12 deficiency with classic haematological and neurological manifestations is relatively uncommon. However, sub...

  19. Leukocyte adhesion deficiencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Vijver, Edith; van den Berg, Timo K.; Kuijpers, Taco W.

    2013-01-01

    During inflammation, leukocytes play a key role in maintaining tissue homeostasis through elimination of pathogens and removal of damaged tissue. Leukocytes migrate to the site of inflammation by crawling over and through the blood vessel wall, into the tissue. Leukocyte adhesion deficiencies (ie,

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron supplements work best to treat iron-deficiency anemia in children who do not consume the daily recommended amount ... and Clinical Studies to hear experts, parents, and children talk about their experiences with clinical ... Anemia Arrhythmia Blood Donation Blood Tests Blood ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Working at the NHLBI Contact and FAQs Accessible Search Form Search the NHLBI, use the drop down list to ... treatment of blood diseases, including iron-deficiency anemia. Search the NIH Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools (RePORT) ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or even heart failure . Increased risk of infections Motor or cognitive development delays in children Pregnancy complications, ... Upper endoscopy to look for bleeding in the esophagus, stomach, and the first part of the ... blood, and sleep disorders, including iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the current ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... how having iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in premature or very small newborns . In collaboration with the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how ...

  4. Iron deficiency in children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cell and excess iron is stored as ferritin to protect the cell from oxidative ... iron deficiency has negative effects during pregnancy and in the postpartum period, which affects maternal health ... use of undiluted cow's milk and a predominant cow's milk intake in .... on bone marrow smear or biopsy for the definitive diagnosis of.

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Certain conditions or medicines can decrease your body’s ability to absorb iron and lead to iron-deficiency ... environment or water. Lead interferes with the body’s ability to make hemoglobin. Family history and genetics Von ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... supplements. Iron supplements can change how certain medicines work. Your doctor may suggest check-ups to make sure your ... To prevent complications from iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may ... during certain stages of life when more iron is needed, such as childhood ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... an MCV of less than 80 femtoliters (fL). Prevention strategies If you have certain risk factors , such as if you are following a ... unhealthy environments, or other factors that increase your risk of developing iron-deficiency ... to Screening and Prevention to review tests to screen for and strategies ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Services’ National Institutes of Health (NIH)—the Nation’s biomedical research agency that makes important scientific discoveries to improve ... efforts for iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about exciting research areas that ... This could help develop new therapies for conditions that affect the balance of iron ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Complications Undiagnosed or untreated iron-deficiency anemia may cause the following complications: Depression Heart problems. If you do not have enough hemoglobin-carrying red blood cells, your heart has to work harder to move oxygen-rich blood through your ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how best to treat premature newborns with low hemoglobin levels. We also are hoping to determine which iron supplements work best to treat iron-deficiency anemia in children ...

  11. MCAD deficiency in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Brage Storstein; Lund, Allan Meldgaard; Hougaard, David Michael

    2012-01-01

    Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MCADD) is the most common defect of fatty acid oxidation. Many countries have introduced newborn screening for MCADD, because characteristic acylcarnitines can easily be identified in filter paper blood spot samples by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/M...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... NHLBI News NHLBI in the Press Research Features All Events Past Events Upcoming Events About NHLBI About NHLBI Home Mission and Strategic Vision ... deficient Donors: Recovery and Storage Quality. Learn more about ... trial . View all trials from ClinicalTrials.gov . Visit Children and Clinical ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... A-Z Clinical Trials Publications and Resources Health Education and Awareness The Science Science Home Blood Disorders ... Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) programs. Our ... more information about Donor Iron Deficiency Study - Red Blood Cells ...

  14. Isolated sulfite oxidase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupar, C A; Gillett, J; Gordon, B A; Ramsay, D A; Johnson, J L; Garrett, R M; Rajagopalan, K V; Jung, J H; Bacheyie, G S; Sellers, A R

    1996-12-01

    Isolated sulfite oxidase (SO) deficiency is an autosomal recessively inherited inborn error of sulfur metabolism. In this report of a ninth patient the clinical history, laboratory results, neuropathological findings and a mutation in the sulfite oxidase gene are described. The data from this patient and previously published patients with isolated sulfite oxidase deficiency and molybdenum cofactor deficiency are summarized to characterize this rare disorder. The patient presented neonatally with intractable seizures and did not progress developmentally beyond the neonatal stage. Dislocated lenses were apparent at 2 months. There was increased urine excretion of sulfite and S-sulfocysteine and a decreased concentration of plasma cystine. A lactic acidemia was present for 6 months. Liver sulfite oxidase activity was not detectable but xanthine dehydrogenase activity was normal. The boy died of respiratory failure at 32 months. Neuropathological findings of cortical necrosis and extensive cavitating leukoencephalopathy were reminiscent of those seen in severe perinatal asphyxia suggesting an etiology of energy deficiency. A point mutation that resulted in a truncated protein missing the molybdenum-binding site has been identified.

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... do not have enough iron in your body. People with mild or moderate iron-deficiency anemia may ... as a TMRPSS6 gene mutation that causes a person’s body to make too much of a hormone ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in ... deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend heart-healthy eating and choosing iron-rich foods, especially during certain stages of life when more ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in premature or very small newborns . In collaboration with the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how best to treat ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in you getting less than the recommended daily amount of iron. Frequent blood donation. Individuals who donate blood often may be ...

  19. Familial lipoprotein lipase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lack an enzyme called lipoprotein lipase. Without this enzyme, the body cannot break down fat from digested food. Fat particles called chylomicrons build up in the blood. Risk factors include a family history of lipoprotein lipase deficiency. The condition is usually ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s Health All Science A-Z Grants ... health for people with iron-deficiency anemia. Recipient Epidemiology Donor Studies program findings help to protect blood ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and save lives. We are committed to advancing science and translating discoveries into clinical practice to promote the prevention and treatment of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders, including iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the current and future NHLBI efforts to improve health through ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in premature or very small newborns . In collaboration with the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how best to treat premature newborns with low hemoglobin levels. We also are hoping to determine which iron supplements work best to treat iron-deficiency anemia in children ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of the body. When your heart has to work harder, this can lead to several conditions: irregular heartbeats called arrhythmias , a heart murmur , an ... chronic conditions, iron-deficiency anemia can make their condition worse or result in treatments not working as well. Look for Diagnosis will discuss any ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... normally stores but has used up. Increase your intake of vitamin C to help your body absorb iron. Avoid drinking black tea, which reduces iron absorption. Other treatments If you have chronic kidney disease and iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... deficiency anemia. We stimulate high-impact research. Our Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) Program now includes ... Studies (REDS) program Blood Disorders and Blood Safety Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) Program Non-NHLBI ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Medicine (TOPMed) Program Non-NHLBI resources Anemia (National Library of Medicine, MedlinePlus) Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease ( ... Supplement Fact Sheet (NIH) Iron-Deficiency Anemia (National Library of Medicine, MedlinePlus) Building 31 31 Center Drive ...

  8. Iodine-deficiency disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Jooste, P.L.; Pandav, C.S.

    2008-01-01

    billion individuals worldwide have insufficient iodine intake, with those in south Asia and sub-Saharan Africa particularly affected. Iodine deficiency has many adverse effects on growth and development. These effects are due to inadequate production of thyroid hormone and are termed

  9. Comparative analysis of three-dimensional structures of homodimers of uridine phosphorylase from Salmonella typhimurium in the unligated state and in a complex with potassium ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lashkov, A. A.; Zhukhlistova, N. E.; Gabdulkhakov, A. G.; Mikhailov, A. M.

    2009-01-01

    The spatial organization of the homodimer of unligated uridine phosphorylase from Salmonella typhimurium (St UPh) was determined with high accuracy. The structure was refined at 1.80 A resolution to R work = 16.1% and R free = 20.0%. The rms deviations for the bond lengths, bond angles, and chiral angles are 0.006 A, 1.042 o , and 0.071 o , respectively. The coordinate error estimated by the Luzzati plot is 0.166 A. The coordinate error based on the maximum likelihood is 0.199 A. A comparative analysis of the spatial organization of the homodimer in two independently refined structures and the structure of the homodimer St UPh in the complex with a K + ion was performed. The substrate-binding sites in the homodimers StUPhs in the unligated state were found to act asynchronously. In the presence of a potassium ion, the three-dimensional structures of the subunits in the homodimer are virtually identical, which is apparently of importance for the synchronous action of both substrate-binding sites. The atomic coordinates of the refined structure of the homodimer and structure factors have been deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB ID code 3DPS).

  10. Thymidine phosphorylase and hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α expression in clinical stage II/III rectal cancer: association with response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy and prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shuhan; Lai, Hao; Qin, Yuzhou; Chen, Jiansi; Lin, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether pretreatment status of thymidine phosphorylase (TP), and hypoxia-inducible factor alpha (HIF-1α) could predict pathologic response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy with oxaliplatin and capecitabine (XELOXART) and outcomes for clinical stage II/III rectal cancer patients. A total of 180 patients diagnosed with clinical stage II/III rectal cancer received XELOXART. The status of TP, and HIF-1α were determined in pretreatment biopsies by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Tumor response was assessed in resected regimens using the tumor regression grade system and TNM staging system. 5-year disease free survival (DFS) and 5-year overall survival (OS) were evaluated with the Kaplan-Meier method and were compared by the log-rank test. Over expression of TP and low expression of HIF-1α were associated with pathologic response to XELOXART and better outcomes (DFS and OS) in clinical stage II/III rectal cancer patients (P rectal cancer received XELOXART. Additional well-designed, large sample, multicenter, prospective studies are needed to confirm the result of this study.

  11. Comparative analysis of three-dimensional structures of homodimers of uridine phosphorylase from Salmonella typhimurium in the unligated state and in a complex with potassium ion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lashkov, A. A.; Zhukhlistova, N. E.; Gabdulkhakov, A. G.; Mikhailov, A. M., E-mail: amm@ns.crys.ras.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

    2009-03-15

    The spatial organization of the homodimer of unligated uridine phosphorylase from Salmonella typhimurium (St UPh) was determined with high accuracy. The structure was refined at 1.80 A resolution to R{sub work} = 16.1% and R{sub free} = 20.0%. The rms deviations for the bond lengths, bond angles, and chiral angles are 0.006 A, 1.042{sup o}, and 0.071{sup o}, respectively. The coordinate error estimated by the Luzzati plot is 0.166 A. The coordinate error based on the maximum likelihood is 0.199 A. A comparative analysis of the spatial organization of the homodimer in two independently refined structures and the structure of the homodimer St UPh in the complex with a K{sup +} ion was performed. The substrate-binding sites in the homodimers StUPhs in the unligated state were found to act asynchronously. In the presence of a potassium ion, the three-dimensional structures of the subunits in the homodimer are virtually identical, which is apparently of importance for the synchronous action of both substrate-binding sites. The atomic coordinates of the refined structure of the homodimer and structure factors have been deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB ID code 3DPS).

  12. In vitro and in vivo evaluations of a radioiodinated thymidine phosphorylase inhibitor as a tumor diagnostic agent for angiogenic enzyme imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akizawa, Hiromichi; Zhao, Songji; Takahashi, Masayuki; Nishijima, Ken-ichi; Kuge, Yuji; Tamaki, Nagara; Seki, Koh-ichi; Ohkura, Kazue

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The expression of thymidine phosphorylase (TP) is closely associated with angiogenesis, tumor invasiveness and activation of antitumor agents. We evaluated radioiodinated 5-iodo-6-[(2-iminoimidazolidinyl)methyl]uracil ([ 125 I]IIMU) having high TP-inhibitory potency as the new radiotracer for SPECT targeting of TP expression in tumors. Methods: The characteristics of the radioiodinated TP inhibitor IIMU were determined by evaluating the uptake by tumor cells in vitro and by biodistribution studies in vivo. The distribution of the radiotracer and the extent of TP-specific uptake by tumors were evaluated by a counting method in tumor-bearing mice. Results: The in vitro uptake of radiolabeled IIMU by A431 cells along with high TP expressions was attributed to the binding of the radiotracer to its target enzyme, i.e., TP. In vivo distribution of the radiotracer in A431 tumor-bearing mice revealed tumor/blood and tumor/muscle activity uptake ratios of 36 and 106, respectively, at 3 h after the radiotracer injection. On using low TP-expressing tumors and TP blocking studies as controls, minor TP-specific accumulation of the radiotracer was detected in these studies. Conclusion: According to the binding of radioiodinated IIMU to the angiogenic enzyme TP, it can be concluded that radioiodinated IIMU might be suitable as a SPECT tracer for tumor imaging.

  13. Reduction of the plastidial phosphorylase in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) reveals impact on storage starch structure during growth at low temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orawetz, Tom; Malinova, Irina; Orzechowski, Slawomir; Fettke, Joerg

    2016-03-01

    Tubers of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.), one of the most important crops, are a prominent example for an efficient production of storage starch. Nevertheless, the synthesis of this storage starch is not completely understood. The plastidial phosphorylase (Pho1; EC 2.4.1.1) catalyzes the reversible transfer of glucosyl residues from glucose-1-phosphate to the non-reducing end of α-glucans with the release of orthophosphate. Thus, the enzyme is in principle able to act during starch synthesis. However, so far under normal growth conditions no alterations in tuber starch metabolism were observed. Based on analyses of other species and also from in vitro experiments with potato tuber slices it was supposed, that Pho1 has a stronger impact on starch metabolism, when plants grow under low temperature conditions. Therefore, we analyzed the starch content, granule size, as well as the internal structure of starch granules isolated from potato plants grown under low temperatures. Besides wild type, transgenic potato plants with a strong reduction in the Pho1 activity were analyzed. No significant alterations in starch content and granule size were detected. In contrast, when plants were cultivated at low temperatures the chain length distributions of the starch granules were altered. Thus, the granules contained more short glucan chains. That was not observed in the transgenic plants, revealing that Pho1 in wild type is involved in the formation of the short glucan chains, at least at low temperatures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Simple method for fast deprotection of nucleosides by triethylamine-catalyzed methanolysis of acetates in aqueous medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier, Lidiane; Monteiro, Gustavo C.; Baldissera, Rodrigo A.M.; Sa, Marcus Mandolesi

    2010-01-01

    A straightforward methodology for deacetylation of protected ribonucleosides was developed based on triethylamine-catalyzed solvolysis in aqueous methanol. Reactions are completed in a few minutes under microwave irradiation and the free nucleosides are obtained in high yield after simple evaporation of volatiles. Other important features include the involvement of readily available reagents and the compatibility with diverse functional groups, which make this process very attractive for broad application. (author)

  15. Acyclic nucleoside bisphosphonates: Synthesis and properties of chiral 2-amino-4,6-bis[(phosphonomethoxy)alkoxy]pyrimidines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Doláková, Petra; Dračínský, Martin; Masojídková, Milena; Šolínová, Veronika; Kašička, Václav; Holý, Antonín

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 6 (2009), s. 2408-2424 ISSN 0223-5234 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0508 Grant - others:NIH(US) 1UC1AIO62540-01 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : acyclic nucleoside phosphonates * pyrimidine * bisphosphonates Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.269, year: 2009

  16. Sonogashira reactions of alpha and beta-1-ethynyl-2-deoxyribosides: synthesis of acetylene-extended C-nucleosides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bobula, T.; Hocek, Michal; Kotora, M.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 66, č. 2 (2010), s. 530-536 ISSN 0040-4020 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0508; GA AV ČR IAA400550902 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : alkynes * C-nucleosides * aryl halides * cross-coupling reactions Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.011, year: 2010

  17. Sequence-engineered mRNA Without Chemical Nucleoside Modifications Enables an Effective Protein Therapy in Large Animals

    OpenAIRE

    Thess, Andreas; Grund, Stefanie; Mui, Barbara L; Hope, Michael J; Baumhof, Patrick; Fotin-Mleczek, Mariola; Schlake, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Being a transient carrier of genetic information, mRNA could be a versatile, flexible, and safe means for protein therapies. While recent findings highlight the enormous therapeutic potential of mRNA, evidence that mRNA-based protein therapies are feasible beyond small animals such as mice is still lacking. Previous studies imply that mRNA therapeutics require chemical nucleoside modifications to obtain sufficient protein expression and avoid activation of the innate immune system. Here we sh...

  18. Influence of Acyclic Nucleoside Phosphonate Antivirals on Gene Expression of Chemokine Receptors CCR5 and CXCR4

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Potměšil, P.; Holý, Antonín; Zídek, Zdeněk

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 1 (2015), s. 1-7 ISSN 0015-5500 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA305/03/1470; GA MŠk 1M0508 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:68378041 Keywords : acyclic nucleoside phosphonate * HIV * CCR5 * CXCR4 * cytokine * RT-PCR Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry; FR - Pharmacology ; Medidal Chemistry (UEM-P) Impact factor: 0.833, year: 2015

  19. Direct One-Pot Synthesis of Nucleosides from Unprotected or 5-O-Monoprotected D-Ribose

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Downey, Alan Michael; Richter, C.; Pohl, Radek; Mahrwald, R.; Hocek, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 18 (2015), s. 4604-4607 ISSN 1523-7060 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP207/11/0344 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : nucleosides * cytostatics * biological activity Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 6.732, year: 2015 http://pubs.acs.org/doi/pdf/10.1021/acs.orglett.5b02332

  20. Enantiopurity analysis of new types of acyclic nucleoside phosphonates by capillary electrophoresis with cyclodextrins as chiral selectors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šolínová, Veronika; Kaiser, Martin Maxmilian; Lukáč, Miloš; Janeba, Zlatko; Kašička, Václav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 3 (2014), s. 295-303 ISSN 1615-9306 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP206/12/0453; GA ČR(CZ) GA13-17224S; GA MV VG20102015046 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : acyclic nucleoside phosphonates * CE * chiral analysis * cyclodextrins * nucleotide analogs Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 2.737, year: 2014

  1. Distinct modulation of telomere length in two T-lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines by cytotoxic nucleoside phosphonates PMEG and PMEDAP

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hájek, Miroslav; Cvilink, Viktor; Votruba, Ivan; Holý, Antonín; Mertlíková-Kaiserová, Helena

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 643, č. 1 (2010), s. 6-12 ISSN 0014-2999 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0508; GA AV ČR 1QS400550501 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : acyclic nucleoside phosphonates * PMEG * PMEDAP * telomere length * telomerase inhibition Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.737, year: 2010

  2. Anthraquinone as a Redox Label for DNA: Synthesis, Enzymatic Incorporation, and Electrochemistry of Anthraquinone-Modified Nucleosides, Nucleotides, and DNA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Balintová, Jana; Pohl, Radek; Horáková Brázdilová, Petra; Vidláková, Pavlína; Havran, Luděk; Fojta, Miroslav; Hocek, Michal

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 50 (2011), s. 14063-14073 ISSN 0947-6539 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06035; GA MŠk LC512; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA400040901 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506; CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : anthraquinone * DNA * electrochemistry * nucleosides * oligonucleotides Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 5.925, year: 2011

  3. Design and synthesis of N₁-aryl-benzimidazoles 2-substituted as novel HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monforte, Anna-Maria; Ferro, Stefania; De Luca, Laura; Lo Surdo, Giuseppa; Morreale, Francesca; Pannecouque, Christophe; Balzarini, Jan; Chimirri, Alba

    2014-02-15

    A series of novel N1-aryl-2-arylthioacetamido-benzimidazoles were synthesized and evaluated as inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1). Some of them proved to be effective in inhibiting HIV-1 replication at submicromolar and nanomolar concentration acting as HIV-1 non-nucleoside RT inhibitors (NNRTIs), with low cytotoxicity. The preliminary structure-activity relationship (SAR) of these new derivatives was discussed and rationalized by docking studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Estimation of apparent binding constant of complexes of selected acyclic nucleoside phosphonates with beta-cyclodextrin by affinity capillary electrophoresis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šolínová, Veronika; Mikysková, Hana; Kaiser, Martin Maxmilian; Janeba, Zlatko; Holý, Antonín; Kašička, Václav

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 2 (2016), s. 239-247 ISSN 0173-0835 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-17224S; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-01948S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : acyclic nucleoside phosphonates * affinity capillary electrophoresis * binding constant * nucleotide analogs * beta-cyclodextrin Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry , Separation Impact factor: 2.744, year: 2016

  5. Nucleoside adducts are formed by cooperative reaction of acetaldehyde and alcohols: Possible mechanism for the role of ethanol in carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraenkel-Conrat, H.; Singer, B.

    1988-01-01

    The exocyclic amino groups of ribonucleosides and deoxyribonucleosides react rapidly at ambient temperature with acetaldehyde and alcohols to yield mixed acetals [-NH-CH(CH 3 )OR]. Nucleotides and nucleoside di- and triphosphates also react. Depending on the nucleoside used and on the relative amounts of aldehyde, alcohol, and water, preparative reactions reach equilibrium with yields up to 75% in a few house. The structures have been confirmed by fast atom bombardment MS and proton NMR. Half-lives at 37 degree C have been determined, and maximum stability is in the pH range of 7.5-9.5. In the absence of alcohol, acetaldehyde-nucleoside adducts could be isolated at 4 degree C, but these were too unstable to characterize except for their UV spectra, also at 4 degree C. Ethanol is often present in human blood and tissues, and acetaldehyde is its initial metabolic product, as well as being formed by many other metabolic processes. Both chemicals have separately been implicated in carcinogenic and other cytophathologic processes, but no cooperative mechanism has been proposed. The reactions reported here are of biological concern because they also occur in dilute aqueous solution. These finding supply a mechanism by which ethanol can be covalently bound to nucleic acids under physiological conditions

  6. Lack of the nucleoside transporter ENT1 results in the Augustine-null blood type and ectopic mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Geoff; Ballif, Bryan A; Helias, Virginie; Saison, Carole; Grimsley, Shane; Mannessier, Lucienne; Hustinx, Hein; Lee, Edmond; Cartron, Jean-Pierre; Peyrard, Thierry; Arnaud, Lionel

    2015-06-04

    The Augustine-negative alias At(a-) blood type, which seems to be restricted to people of African ancestry, was identified half a century ago but remains one of the last blood types with no known genetic basis. Here we report that a nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphism in SLC29A1 (rs45458701) is responsible for the At(a-) blood type. The resulting p.Glu391Lys variation in the last extracellular loop of the equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (ENT1; also called SLC29a1) is known not to alter its ability to transport nucleosides and nucleoside analog drugs. Furthermore, we identified 3 individuals of European ancestry who are homozygous for a null mutation in SLC29A1 (c.589+1G>C) and thus have the Augustine-null blood type. These individuals lacking ENT1 exhibit periarticular and ectopic mineralization, which confirms an important role for ENT1/SLC29A1 in human bone homeostasis as recently suggested by the skeletal phenotype of aging Slc29a1(-/-) mice. Our results establish Augustine as a new blood group system and place SLC29A1 as a new candidate gene for idiopathic disorders characterized with ectopic calcification/mineralization. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology.

  7. Determination of nucleosides in Cordyceps sinensis and Ganoderma lucidum by high performance liquid chromatography method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masood Shah Khan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nucleosides are supportive in the regulation and modulation of various physiological processes in body, they acts as precursors in nucleic acid synthesis, enhance immune response, help in absorption of iron and influence the metabolism of fatty acids. Cordyceps sinensis and Ganoderma lucidum are well-known for its use in traditional medicine of China, Nepal and India. They are rich in nucleosides such as adenine, adenosine, cordycepin, etc. Hence, a simple, economic and accurate high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC analytical method was proposed for determination of adenine and adenosine for the quality control of plants. Materials and Methods: Chromatographic experiments were conducted on YL9100 HPLC system (South Korea. Reversed-phase chromatography was performed on a C18 column with methanol and dihydrogen phosphate as the mobile phase in isocratic elution method at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. Detection was carried out at 254 nm, which gives a sharp peak of adenine and adenosine at a retention time of 6.53 ± 0.02 min and 12.41 ± 0.02, respectively. Results and Discussion: Linear regression analysis data for the calibration plot showed a good linear relationship between response and concentration in the range of 25–200 µg/mL for adenosine and 100–800 µg/mL for adenine with regression coefficient of 0.999 and 0.996, respectively. The adenine was found 0.16% and 0.71% w/w in G. lucidum and in C. sinensis, respectively, and adenosine was found to be 0.14% w/w in G. lucidum whereas absent in C. sinensis. Conclusion: The developed HPLC method for the quantification of adenosine and adenine can be used for the quality control and standardization of crude drug and for the different herbal formulations, in which adenine and adenosine are present as major constituents. The wide linearity range, sensitivity, accuracy, and simple mobile phase imply the method is suitable for routine quantification of adenosine and adenine with

  8. Iron deficiency and cognitive functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jáuregui-Lobera I

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Ignacio Jáuregui-Lobera Department of Nutrition and Bromatology, Pablo de Olavide University, Seville, Spain Abstract: Micronutrient deficiencies, especially those related to iodine and iron, are linked to different cognitive impairments, as well as to potential long-term behavioral changes. Among the cognitive impairments caused by iron deficiency, those referring to attention span, intelligence, and sensory perception functions are mainly cited, as well as those associated with emotions and behavior, often directly related to the presence of iron deficiency anemia. In addition, iron deficiency without anemia may cause cognitive disturbances. At present, the prevalence of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia is 2%–6% among European children. Given the importance of iron deficiency relative to proper cognitive development and the alterations that can persist through adulthood as a result of this deficiency, the objective of this study was to review the current state of knowledge about this health problem. The relevance of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia, the distinction between the cognitive consequences of iron deficiency and those affecting specifically cognitive development, and the debate about the utility of iron supplements are the most relevant and controversial topics. Despite there being methodological differences among studies, there is some evidence that iron supplementation improves cognitive functions. Nevertheless, this must be confirmed by means of adequate follow-up studies among different groups. Keywords: iron deficiency, anemia, cognitive functions, supplementation

  9. Adult growth hormone deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal Gupta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult growth hormone deficiency (AGHD is being recognized increasingly and has been thought to be associated with premature mortality. Pituitary tumors are the commonest cause for AGHD. Growth hormone deficiency (GHD has been associated with neuropsychiatric-cognitive, cardiovascular, neuromuscular, metabolic, and skeletal abnormalities. Most of these can be reversed with growth hormone therapy. The insulin tolerance test still remains the gold standard dynamic test to diagnose AGHD. Growth hormone is administered subcutaneously once a day, titrated to clinical symptoms, signs and IGF-1 (insulin like growth factor-1. It is generally well tolerated at the low-doses used in adults. Pegylated human growth hormone therapy is on the horizon, with a convenient once a week dosing.

  10. Epidemiology of SHOX deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolosi, A; Caruso-Nicoletti, M

    2010-06-01

    Deletion of short stature homeobox-containing (SHOX) gene, in the pseudoautosomal region (PAR1) of X and Y chromosomes, is an important cause of short stature. Homozygous loss of SHOX results in the more severe Langer mesomelic dysplasia, while SHOX haploinsufficiency cause a wide spectrum of short stature phenotypes, including patients with Turner syndrome, Leri Weill dyschondrosteosis (LWD), and idiopathic short stature (ISS). In Turner syndrome, haploinsufficiency of SHOX gene, as well as short stature, are present in 100%; nevertheless, SHOX deficiency accounts for only two-thirds of Turner patients' short stature. In LWD the prevalence of SHOX gene anomalies varies from 56% to 100%. This wide range might be due to different factors such as selection criteria of patients, sample size, and method used for screening SHOX mutations. The real challenge is to establish the prevalence of SHOX deficiency in ISS children given that published studies have reported this association with a very broad frequency range varying from 1.5% to 15%. An important variable in these studies is represented by the method used for screening SHOX mutations and sometimes by differences in patient selection. Short stature is present by definition in 3 out of 100 subjects; if we consider a frequency of SHOX defects of 3% among ISS, we should expect a population prevalence of 1 in 1000. This prevalence would be higher than that of GH deficiency (1:3,500) and of Turner syndrome (1:2,500 females), suggesting that SHOX deficiency could be one of the most frequent monogenetic causes of short stature.

  11. Biotin and biotinidase deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Zempleni, Janos; Hassan, Yousef I; Wijeratne, Subhashinee SK

    2008-01-01

    Biotin is a water-soluble vitamin that serves as an essential coenzyme for five carboxylases in mammals. Biotin-dependent carboxylases catalyze the fixation of bicarbonate in organic acids and play crucial roles in the metabolism of fatty acids, amino acids and glucose. Carboxylase activities decrease substantially in response to biotin deficiency. Biotin is also covalently attached to histones; biotinylated histones are enriched in repeat regions in the human genome and appear to play a role...

  12. The Dipeptide Monoester Prodrugs of Floxuridine and Gemcitabine—Feasibility of Orally Administrable Nucleoside Analogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Tsume

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dipeptide monoester prodrugs of floxuridine and gemcitabine were synthesized. Their chemical stability in buffers, enzymatic stability in cell homogenates, permeability in mouse intestinal membrane along with drug concentration in mouse plasma, and anti-proliferative activity in cancer cells were determined and compared to their parent drugs. Floxuridine prodrug was more enzymatically stable than floxuridine and the degradation from prodrug to parent drug works as the rate-limiting step. On the other hand, gemcitabine prodrug was less enzymatically stable than gemcitabine. Those dipeptide monoester prodrugs exhibited 2.4- to 48.7-fold higher uptake than their parent drugs in Caco-2, Panc-1, and AsPC-1 cells. Floxuridine and gemcitabine prodrugs showed superior permeability in mouse jejunum to their parent drugs and exhibited the higher drug concentration in plasma after in situ mouse perfusion. Cell proliferation assays in ductal pancreatic cancer cells, AsPC-1 and Panc-1, indicated that dipeptide prodrugs of floxuridine and gemcitabine were more potent than their parent drugs. The enhanced potency of nucleoside analogs was attributed to their improved membrane permeability. The prodrug forms of 5¢-L-phenylalanyl-l-tyrosyl-floxuridine and 5¢-L-phenylalanyl-L-tyrosyl-gemcitabine appeared in mouse plasma after the permeation of intestinal membrane and the first-pass effect, suggesting their potential for the development of oral dosage form for anti-cancer agents.

  13. Enzymatic primer-extension with glycerol-nucleoside triphosphates on DNA templates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse J Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Glycerol nucleic acid (GNA has an acyclic phosphoglycerol backbone repeat-unit, but forms stable duplexes based on Watson-Crick base-pairing. Because of its structural simplicity, GNA is of particular interest with respect to the possibility of evolving functional polymers by in vitro selection. Template-dependent GNA synthesis is essential to any GNA-based selection system. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we investigated the ability of various DNA polymerases to use glycerol-nucleoside triphosphates (gNTPs as substrates for GNA synthesis on DNA templates. Therminator DNA polymerase catalyzes quantitative primer-extension by the incorporation of two glyceronucleotides, with much less efficient extension up to five glyceronucleotides. Steady-state kinetic experiments suggested that GNA synthesis by Therminator was affected by both decreased catalytic rates and weakened substrate binding, especially for pyrimidines. In an attempt to improve pyrimidine incorporation by providing additional stacking interactions, we synthesized two new gNTP analogs with 5-propynyl substituted pyrimidine nucleobases. This led to more efficient incorporation of gC, but not gT. CONCLUSIONS: We suggest that directed evolution of Therminator might lead to mutants with improved substrate binding and catalytic efficiency.

  14. Tunnel conductance of Watson-Crick nucleoside-base pairs from telegraph noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Shuai; He Jin; Lin Lisha; Zhang Peiming; Liang Feng; Huang Shuo; Lindsay, Stuart; Young, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The use of tunneling signals to sequence DNA is presently hampered by the small tunnel conductance of a junction spanning an entire DNA molecule. The design of a readout system that uses a shorter tunneling path requires knowledge of the absolute conductance across base pairs. We have exploited the stochastic switching of hydrogen-bonded DNA base-nucleoside pairs trapped in a tunnel junction to determine the conductance of individual molecular pairs. This conductance is found to be sensitive to the geometry of the junction, but a subset of the data appears to come from unstrained molecular pairs. The conductances determined from these pairs are within a factor of two of the predictions of density functional calculations. The experimental data reproduces the counterintuitive theoretical prediction that guanine-deoxycytidine pairs (3 H-bonds) have a smaller conductance than adenine-thymine pairs (2 H-bonds). A bimodal distribution of switching lifetimes shows that both H-bonds and molecule-metal contacts break.

  15. TNF α is involved in neuropathic pain induced by nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xuexing; Ouyang, Handong; Liu, Shue; Mata, Marina; Fink, David J.; Hao, Shuanglin

    2011-01-01

    In patients with HIV/AIDS, neuropathic pain is a common neurological complication. Infection with the HIV itself may lead to neuropathic pain, and painful symptoms are enhanced when patients are treated with nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI). The mechanisms by which NRTIs contribute to the development of neuropathic pain are not known. In the current studies, we tested the role of TNFα in antiretroviral drug-induced neuropathic pain. We administered 2′,3′-dideoxycytidine (ddC, one of the NRTIs) systemically to induce mechanical allodynia. We found that ddC induced overexpression of both mRNA and proteins of GFAP and TNFα in the spinal dorsal horn. TNFα was colocalized with GFAP in the spinal dorsal horn and with NeuN in the DRG. Knockdown of TNFα with siRNA blocked the mechanical allodynia induced by ddC. Intrathecal administration of glial inhibitor or recombinant TNF soluble receptor, reversed mechanical allodynia induced by ddC. These results suggest that TNFα is involved in NRTI-induced neuropathic pain. PMID:21741472

  16. Immunotherapy against visceral leishmaniasis with the nucleoside hydrolase-DNA vaccine of Leishmania donovani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamboa-León, R; Paraguai de Souza, E; Borja-Cabrera, G P; Santos, F N; Myashiro, L M; Pinheiro, R O; Dumonteil, E; Palatnik-de-Sousa, C B

    2006-05-29

    The nucleoside hydrolase (NH36) of Leishmania (L.) donovani is a vital enzyme which releases purines or pyrimidines of foreign DNA to be used in the synthesis of parasite DNA. As a bivalent DNA vaccine, the VR1012-NH36 was immunoprotective against visceral and cutaneous murine leishmaniasis. In this work we tested the immunotherapy against Leishmania (L.) chagasi infection, using two doses of 100 or 20 microg VR1012-NH36 vaccine (i.m. route), and, as a possible immunomodulator, aqueous garlic extract (8 mg/kg/day by the i.p. route), which was effective in immunotherapy of cutaneous murine leishmaniasis. Liver parasitic load was significantly reduced following treatment with 100 microg (91%) and 20 microg (77%) of the DNA vaccine, and by 20 microg DNA vaccine and garlic extract (76%) (p=0.023). Survival was 33% for saline controls, 100% for the 100 microg vaccine, and 83 and 67% for the 20 microg vaccine with and without garlic extract addition, respectively. Garlic treatment alone did not reduce parasite load (p>0.05), but increased survival (100%). The NH36-DNA vaccine was highly effective as a new tool for the therapy and control of visceral leishmaniasis, while the mild protective effect of garlic might be related to an unspecific enhancement of IFN-gamma secretion.

  17. The binding of the primary water of hydration to nucleosides, CsDNA and potassium hyaluronate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukan, A. M.; Cavanaugh, D.; Whitson, K. B.; Marlowe, R. L.; Lee, S. A.; Anthony, L.; Rupprecht, A.; Mohan, V.

    1998-03-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) has been used to study the eight nucleosides, CsDNA and KHA hydrated at 59% relative humidity. Thermograms were measured between 25 and 180 ^oC for scan rates of 1, 2, 5, 10 and 20 K/min. A broad endothermic transition (due to the desorption of the water) near 80 ^oC was observed for all runs. The average enthalpy of desorption per water molecule was evaluated from the area under the peak. A Kissinger analysis of these data yielded the net activation energy for desorption. Both parameters were very similar for the two biopolymers. Rayleigh scattering of Mossbauer radiation (RSMR) data(G. Albanese et al. ) Hyperfine Int. 95, 97 (1995) were analyzed via a simple harmonic oscillator model to evaluate the effective force constant of the water bound to the biopolymer. This analysis suggests that the effective force constant of water bound to HA is much larger (about 5 times) than for water bound to DNA.

  18. Effect of Purine Nucleoside Analogue-Acyclovir on The Sperm Parameters and Testosterone Production in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Nejati

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acyclovir (ACV, a synthetic purine nucleoside analogue derived fromguanosine, is known to be toxic to gonads and the aim of this study was to evaluate theeffect of ACV on the sperm parameters and testosterone production in rat.Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, forty adult male Wistar rats (220± 20 g were randomly divided into five groups (n=8 for each group. One groupserved as control and one group served as sham control [distilled water was intraperitoneally(i.p. injected]. ACV was administered intraperitoneally in the drugtreatment groups (4, 16 and 48 mg/kg/day for 15 days. Eighteen days after the lastinjection, rats were sacrificed by CO2 inhalation. After that, cauda epididymideswere removed surgically. At the end, sperm concentrations in the cauda epididymis,sperm motility, morphology, viability, chromatin quality and DNA integrity wereanalyzed. Serum testosterone concentrations were determined.Results: The results showed that ACV did not affect sperm count, but decreased spermmotility and sperm viability at 16 and 48 mg/kg dose-levels. Sperm abnormalities increasedat 48 mg/kg dose-level of ACV. Further, ACV significantly increases DNA damageat 16 and 48 mg/kg dose-levels and chromatin abnormality at all doses. Besides, asignificant decrease in serum testosterone concentrations was observed at 16 and 48 mg/kg doses.Conclusion: The present results highly support the idea that ACV induces testicular toxicityby adverse effects on the sperm parameters and serum level of testosterone in malerats.

  19. A structural study of lamellar phases formed by nucleoside-functionalized lipids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berti, D.; Fratini, E.; Baglioni, P. [Department of Chemistry and CSGI, University of Florence, Via G. Capponi 9, 50121 Florence (Italy); Dante, S.; Hauss, T. [Berlin Neutron Scattering Center, Hahn Meitner Institut, Glienicker Strasse 100, Wannsee, 14109 Berlin (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    We report a neutron-scattering investigation of lamellar phases formed by novel phospholipids bearing nucleosides at the polar-head-group region. These nucleolipids can interact through stacking and H-bond interactions, following a pattern that resembles base-base coupling in natural nucleic acids (DNA, RNA), i.e. they have similar recognition properties. Bilayer stacks formed of DPP-adenosine, DPP-uridine and their 1:1 mixture were investigated after equilibration in a 98% relative humidity atmosphere. The DPP-adenosine spectrum can be accounted for (in analogy to DPPC) by a lamellar phase with a smectic period of about 60 A. DPP-uridine displays a not so straightforward behavior that we have tentatively ascribed to the coexistence of lamellae with different smectic periods. In the 1:1 mixture the lamellar mesophase of DPP-uridine is retained, suggesting a specific interaction of the uridine polar-head group with the adenosine moiety of DPP-adenosine. It should be stressed that this behavior can be considered as an indication of the recognition process occurring at the polar-head-group region of the mixed phospholiponucleoside membrane. (orig.)

  20. Structure-function relationship of substituted bromomethylcoumarins in nucleoside specificity of RNA alkylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellner, Stefanie; Kollar, Laura Bettina; Ochel, Antonia; Ghate, Manjunath; Helm, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Selective alkylation of RNA nucleotides is an important field of RNA biochemistry, e.g. in applications of fluorescent labeling or in structural probing experiments, yet detailed structure-function studies of labeling agents are rare. Here, bromomethylcoumarins as reactive compounds for fluorescent labeling of RNA are developed as an attractive scaffold on which electronic properties can be modulated by varying the substituents. Six different 4-bromomethyl-coumarins of various substitution patterns were tested for nucleotide specificity of RNA alkylation using tRNA from Escherichia coli as substrate. Using semi-quantitative LC-MS/MS analysis, reactions at mildly acidic and slightly alkaline pH were compared. For all tested compounds, coumarin conjugates with 4-thiouridine, pseudouridine, guanosine, and uridine were identified, with the latter largely dominating. This data set shows that selectivity of ribonucleotide alkylation depends on the substitution pattern of the reactive dye, and even more strongly on the modulation of the reaction conditions. The latter should be therefore carefully optimized when striving to achieve selectivity. Interestingly, the highest selectivity for labeling of a modified nucleoside, namely of 4-thiouridine, was achieved with a compound whose selectivity was somewhat less dependent on reaction conditions than the other compounds. In summary, bromomethylcoumarin derivatives are a highly interesting class of compounds, since their selectivity for 4-thiouridine can be efficiently tuned by variation of substitution pattern and reaction conditions.