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Sample records for nucleocapsid protein based

  1. Oligomerization of Uukuniemi virus nucleocapsid protein

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    Katz Anna

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Uukuniemi virus (UUKV belongs to the Phlebovirus genus in the family Bunyaviridae. As a non-pathogenic virus for humans UUKV has served as a safe model bunyavirus in a number of studies addressing fundamental questions such as organization and regulation of viral genes, genome replication, structure and assembly. The present study is focused on the oligomerization of the UUKV nucleocapsid (N protein, which plays an important role in several steps of virus replication. The aim was to locate the domains involved in the N protein oligomerization and study the process in detail. Results A set of experiments concentrating on the N- and C-termini of the protein was performed, first by completely or partially deleting putative N-N-interaction domains and then by introducing point mutations of amino acid residues. Mutagenesis strategy was based on the computer modeling of secondary and tertiary structure of the N protein. The N protein mutants were studied in chemical cross-linking, immunofluorescence, mammalian two-hybrid, minigenome, and virus-like particle-forming assays. The data showed that the oligomerization ability of UUKV-N protein depends on the presence of intact α-helices on both termini of the N protein molecule and that a specific structure in the N-terminal region plays a crucial role in the N-N interaction(s. This structure is formed by two α-helices, rich in amino acid residues with aromatic (W7, F10, W19, F27, F31 or long aliphatic (I14, I24 side chains. Furthermore, some of the N-terminal mutations (e.g. I14A, I24A, F31A affected the N protein functionality both in mammalian two-hybrid and minigenome assays. Conclusions UUKV-N protein has ability to form oligomers in chemical cross-linking and mammalian two-hybrid assays. In mutational analysis, some of the introduced single-point mutations abolished the N protein functionality both in mammalian two-hybrid and minigenome assays, suggesting that especially the N

  2. Recombinant nucleocapsid protein-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of antibody to turkey coronavirus.

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    Abdelwahab, Mohamed; Loa, Chien Chang; Wu, Ching Ching; Lin, Tsang Long

    2015-06-01

    Nucleocapsid (N) protein gene of turkey coronavirus (TCoV) was expressed in a prokaryotic system and used to develop an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for detection of antibody to TCoV. Anti-TCoV hyperimmune turkey serum and normal turkey serum were used as positive or negative controls for optimization of the ELISA. Goat anti-turkey IgG (H+L) conjugated with horseradish peroxidase was used as detector antibody. Three hundred and twenty two turkey sera from the field were used to evaluate the performance of ELISA and determine the cut-off point of ELISA. The established ELISA was also examined with serum samples obtained from turkeys experimentally infected with TCoV. Those serum samples were collected at various time intervals from 1 to 63 days post-infection. The optimum conditions for differentiation between anti-TCoV hyperimmune serum and normal turkey serum were recombinant TCoV N protein concentration at 20 μg/ml, serum dilution at 1:800, and conjugate dilution at 1:10,000. Of the 322 sera from the field, 101 were positive for TCoV by immunofluorescent antibody assay (IFA). The sensitivity and specificity of the ELISA relative to IFA test were 86.0% and 96.8%, respectively, using the optimum cut-off point of 0.2 as determined by logistic regression method. Reactivity of anti-rotavirus, anti-reovirus, anti-adenovirus, or anti-enterovirus antibodies with the recombinant N protein coated on the ELISA plates was not detected. These results indicated that the established antibody-capture ELISA in conjunction with recombinant TCoV N protein as the coating protein can be utilized for detection of antibodies to TCoV in turkey flocks.

  3. Nucleocytoplasmic transport of nucleocapsid proteins of enveloped RNA viruses

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    Wahyu eWulan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Most viruses with non-segmented single stranded RNA genomes complete their life cycle in the cytoplasm of infected cells. However, despite undergoing replication in the cytoplasm, the structural proteins of some of these RNA viruses localize to the nucleus at specific times in the virus life cycle, primarily early in infection. Limited evidence suggests that this enhances successful viral replication by interfering with or inhibiting the host antiviral response. Nucleocapsid proteins of RNA viruses have a well-established, essential cytoplasmic role in virus replication and assembly. Intriguingly, nucleocapsid proteins of some RNA viruses also localize to the nucleus/nucleolus of infected cells. Their nuclear function is less well understood although significant advances have been made in recent years. This review will focus on the nucleocapsid protein of cytoplasmic enveloped RNA viruses, including their localization to the nucleus/nucleolus and function therein. A greater understanding of the nuclear localization of nucleocapsid proteins has the potential to enhance therapeutic strategies as it can be a target for the development of live-attenuated vaccines or antiviral drugs.

  4. Elucidating the Interacting Domains of Chandipura Virus Nucleocapsid Protein

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    Kapila Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The nucleocapsid (N protein of Chandipura virus (CHPV plays a crucial role in viral life cycle, besides being an important structural component of the virion through proper organization of its interactions with other viral proteins. In a recent study, the authors had mapped the associations among CHPV proteins and shown that N protein interacts with four of the viral proteins: N, phosphoprotein (P, matrix protein (M, and glycoprotein (G. The present study aimed to distinguish the regions of CHPV N protein responsible for its interactions with other viral proteins. In this direction, we have generated the structure of CHPV N protein by homology modeling using SWISS-MODEL workspace and Accelrys Discovery Studio client 2.55 and mapped the domains of N protein using PiSQRD. The interactions of N protein fragments with other proteins were determined by ZDOCK rigid-body docking method and validated by yeast two-hybrid and ELISA. The study revealed a unique binding site, comprising of amino acids 1–30 at the N terminus of the nucleocapsid protein (N1 that is instrumental in its interactions with N, P, M, and G proteins. It was also observed that N2 associates with N and G proteins while N3 interacts with N, P, and M proteins.

  5. Validation of an indirect ELISA based on a recombinant nucleocapsid protein of Rift Valley fever virus for the detection of IgG antibody in humans.

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    Paweska, Janusz T; Jansen van Vuren, Petrus; Swanepoel, Robert

    2007-12-01

    An indirect enzyme-linked immunoassay (I-ELISA) based on the recombinant nucleocapsid protein (rNp) of Rift Valley fever virus was validated for the detection of specific IgG antibody in human sera. Validation data sets derived from testing sera collected in Africa (n=2967) were categorized according to the results of a virus neutralisation test. The assay had high intra- and inter-plate repeatability in routine runs. No detectable cross-reactions between IgG antibodies generated from mice experimentally infected with viruses representing genus Phlebovirus, Nairovirus, Orthobunyavirus and Bhanja virus of the family Bunyaviridae were observed. At a cut-off optimised by the two-graph receiver operating characteristics analysis at 95% accuracy level, the diagnostic sensitivity of the I-ELISA was 99.72% and diagnostic specificity 99.62% while estimates for the Youden's index (J) and efficiency (Ef) were 0.993 and 99.62%. When cut-off values determined by mean plus two and by mean plus three standard deviations derived from I-ELISA readings in an uninfected reference population were used, the diagnostic sensitivity was 100% but estimates of Y, Ef and other combined measures of diagnostic accuracy were lower. The I-ELISA based on rNp is highly sensitive, specific and robust and can be applied for diagnosis of infection of Rift Valley fever and disease-surveillance studies in humans.

  6. Detection of TGEV Antibody by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay Using Recombinant Nucleocapsid Proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Li-yun; HOU Xi-lin

    2005-01-01

    An enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) based on recombinant nucleocapsid (N) protein generated in Escherichia coli was evaluated for its sensitivity and specificity for diagnosis of transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) infection.The N gene encoding the N protein was cloned and expressed as a fusion protein with His tag protein in E. coli. The recombinant N protein migrated at 42 kDa and reacted with His6 tag specific monoclonal antibody by immunoblotting.Recombinant N protein ELISA (rnELISA) demonstrated 97.5% specificity among 80 TGEV-free individuals, and 97.3%sensitivity ranging among 110 clinical samples with TGEV. Taken together, these results indicated that nucleocapsid may be a useful antigen for the sera-diagnosis of TGEV and it was also suggested that the ELISA is a highly sensitive and specific test for detecting antibodies against TGEV.

  7. The nucleocapsid protein of human coronavirus NL63.

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    Kaja Zuwała

    Full Text Available Human coronavirus (HCoV NL63 was first described in 2004 and is associated with respiratory tract disease of varying severity. At the genetic and structural level, HCoV-NL63 is similar to other members of the Coronavirinae subfamily, especially human coronavirus 229E (HCoV-229E. Detailed analysis, however, reveals several unique features of the pathogen. The coronaviral nucleocapsid protein is abundantly present in infected cells. It is a multi-domain, multi-functional protein important for viral replication and a number of cellular processes. The aim of the present study was to characterize the HCoV-NL63 nucleocapsid protein. Biochemical analyses revealed that the protein shares characteristics with homologous proteins encoded in other coronaviral genomes, with the N-terminal domain responsible for nucleic acid binding and the C-terminal domain involved in protein oligomerization. Surprisingly, analysis of the subcellular localization of the N protein of HCoV-NL63 revealed that, differently than homologous proteins from other coronaviral species except for SARS-CoV, it is not present in the nucleus of infected or transfected cells. Furthermore, no significant alteration in cell cycle progression in cells expressing the protein was observed. This is in stark contrast with results obtained for other coronaviruses, except for the SARS-CoV.

  8. Identification of an epitope of SARS-coronavirus nucleocapsid protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YING LIN; JIN WANG; HONG XIA WANG; HUA LIANG JIANG; JIAN HUA SHEN; YOU HUA XIE; YUAN WANG; GANG PEI; BEI FEN SHEN; JIA RUI WU; BING SUN; XU SHEN; RUI FU YANG; YI XUE LI; YONG YONG JI; YOU YU HE; MUDE SHI; WEI LU; TIE LIU SHI

    2003-01-01

    The nucleocapsid (N) protein of severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus (SARS-CoV) is a majorvirion structural protein. In this study, two epitopes (N1 and N2) of the N protein of SARS-CoV werepredicted by bioinformatics analysis. After immunization with two peptides, the peptides-specific antibodieswere isolated from the immunized rabbits. The further experiments demonstrated that N1 peptide-inducedpolyclonal antibodies had a high affinity to bind to E. coli expressed N protein of SARS-CoV. Furthermore, itwas confirmed that N1 peptide-specific IgG antibodies were detectable in the sera of severe acute respiratorysyndrome (SARS) patients. The results indicated that an epitope of the N protein has been identified andN protein specific Abs were produced by peptide immunization, which will be useful for the study of SARS-CoV.

  9. The SARS coronavirus nucleocapsid protein--forms and functions.

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    Chang, Chung-ke; Hou, Ming-Hon; Chang, Chi-Fon; Hsiao, Chwan-Deng; Huang, Tai-huang

    2014-03-01

    The nucleocapsid phosphoprotein of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV N protein) packages the viral genome into a helical ribonucleocapsid (RNP) and plays a fundamental role during viral self-assembly. It is a protein with multifarious activities. In this article we will review our current understanding of the N protein structure and its interaction with nucleic acid. Highlights of the progresses include uncovering the modular organization, determining the structures of the structural domains, realizing the roles of protein disorder in protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid interactions, and visualizing the ribonucleoprotein (RNP) structure inside the virions. It was also demonstrated that N-protein binds to nucleic acid at multiple sites with a coupled-allostery manner. We propose a SARS-CoV RNP model that conforms to existing data and bears resemblance to the existing RNP structures of RNA viruses. The model highlights the critical role of modular organization and intrinsic disorder of the N protein in the formation and functions of the dynamic RNP capsid in RNA viruses. This paper forms part of a symposium in Antiviral Research on "From SARS to MERS: 10 years of research on highly pathogenic human coronaviruses." Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Interfacial interactions involved in the biological assembly of Chandipura virus nucleocapsid protein.

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    Sreejith, R; Gulati, Sahil; Gupta, Sanjay

    2013-06-01

    The biological assembly of Chandipura virus nucleocapsid (N) protein has been modeled and the amino acid residues involved in specific intermolecular interactions among N monomers during oligomerisation have been predicted.

  11. Characterization of an Extremely Basic Protein Derived from Granulosis Virus Nucleocapsids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tweeten, Kathleen A.; Bulla, Lee A.; Consigli, Richard A.

    1980-01-01

    Nucleocapsids were isolated from purified enveloped nucleocapsids of Plodia interpunctella granulosis virus by treatment with Nonidet P-40. When analyzed on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels, the nucleocapsids consisted of eight polypeptides. One of these, a major component with a molecular weight of 12,500 (VP12), was selectively extracted from the nucleocapsids with 0.25 M sulfuric acid. Its electrophoretic mobility on acetic acid-urea gels was intermediate to that of cellular histones and protamine. Amino acid analysis showed that 39% of the amino acid residues of VP12 were basic: 27% were arginine and 12% were histidine. The remaining residues consisted primarily of serine, valine, and isoleucine. Proteins of similar arginine content also were extracted from the granulosis virus of Pieris rapae and from the nuclear polyhedrosis viruses of Spodoptera frugiperda and Autographa californica. The basic polypeptide appeared to be virus specific because it was found in nucleocapsids and virus-infected cells but not in uninfected cells. VP12 was not present in polypeptide profiles of granulosis virus capsids, indicating that it was an internal or core protein of the nucleocapsids. Electron microscopic observations suggested that the basic protein was associated with the viral DNA in the form of a DNA-protein complex. Images PMID:16789190

  12. Bead-based suspension array for simultaneous detection of antibodies against the Rift Valley fever virus nucleocapsid and Gn glycoprotein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wal, van der F.J.; Achterberg, R.P.; Boer, de S.M.; Boshra, H.; Brun, A.; Maassen, C.B.M.; Kortekaas, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    A multiplex bead-based suspension array was developed that can be used for the simultaneous detection of antibodies against the surface glycoprotein Gn and the nucleocapsid protein N of Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) in various animal species. The N protein and the purified ectodomain of the Gn prot

  13. Cloning and expression of nucleocapsid protein gene of TGEV HB06 strain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Jinghui; ZUO Yuzhu; ZHAO Yuelan; LI Tanqing; ZHANG Xiaobo

    2007-01-01

    The nucleocapsid protein gene of transmissible gastroenteritis virus,1 149 bp in length,was amplified by RT-PCR from isolated strain HB06 and cloned into pMD 18T.Sequence comparison with other transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) strains selected from the Gene Bank revealed that the homology of N gene complete sequence shares more than 97% in nucleotide.N gene was cloned into BamHI and EcoRI multiple cloning sites of the prokaryotic expression vector pET 20 b,and named pETN.After being induced by isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG),the recombinant nucleocapsid protein was expressed.The result of SDS-PAGE and Western-blot showed that the recombinant nucleocapsid protein was 47 kDa and had strong positive reactions with TGEV-specific antibody.

  14. Identification of the Nucleocapsid, Tegument, and Envelope Proteins of the Shrimp White Spot Syndrome Virus Virion

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    Tsai, Jyh-Ming; Wang, Han-Ching; Leu, Jiann-Horng; Wang, Andrew H.-J.; Zhuang, Ying; Walker, Peter J.; Kou, Guang-Hsiung; Lo, Chu-Fang

    2006-01-01

    The protein components of the white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) virion have been well established by proteomic methods, and at least 39 structural proteins are currently known. However, several details of the virus structure and assembly remain controversial, including the role of one of the major structural proteins, VP26. In this study, Triton X-100 was used in combination with various concentrations of NaCl to separate intact WSSV virions into distinct fractions such that each fraction contained envelope and tegument proteins, tegument and nucleocapsid proteins, or nucleocapsid proteins only. From the protein profiles and Western blotting results, VP26, VP36A, VP39A, and VP95 were all identified as tegument proteins distinct from the envelope proteins (VP19, VP28, VP31, VP36B, VP38A, VP51B, VP53A) and nucleocapsid proteins (VP664, VP51C, VP60B, VP15). We also found that VP15 dissociated from the nucleocapsid at high salt concentrations, even though DNA was still present. These results were confirmed by CsCl isopycnic centrifugation followed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and liquid chromatography-nanoelectrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry, by a trypsin sensitivity assay, and by an immunogold assay. Finally, we propose an assembly process for the WSSV virion. PMID:16501111

  15. INDUCTION OF ANTIVIRAL IMMUNE-RESPONSES BY IMMUNIZATION WITH RECOMBINANT-DNA ENCODED AVIAN CORONAVIRUS NUCLEOCAPSID PROTEIN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BOOTS, AMH; BENAISSATROUW, BJ; HESSELINK, W; RIJKE, E; SCHRIER, C; HENSEN, EJ; Boots, Annemieke

    1992-01-01

    Immune responses to the infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) nucleocapsid protein were studied using a recombinant-DNA expression product. In mice, a lymphocyte proliferative response and a delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction to IBV were induced upon immunization with this nucleocapsid protein. Next

  16. Nucleocapsid-independent assembly of coronavirus-like particles by co-expression of viral envelope protein genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vennema, H; Godeke, G J; Rossen, J W; Voorhout, W F; Horzinek, M C; Opstelten, D J; Rottier, P J

    1996-01-01

    Budding of enveloped viruses has been shown to be driven by interactions between a nucleocapsid and a proteolipid membrane. By contrast, we here describe the assembly of viral envelopes independent of a nucleocapsid. Membrane particles containing coronaviral envelope proteins were assembled in and r

  17. FILTRATION OF NUCLEOCAPSID PROTEIN OF NEWCASTLE DISEASE VIRUS FOR IMMUNODIAGNOSTIC KIT

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    R. Ahmad Raus

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to purify recombinant nucleocapsid (NP protein of Newcastle disease virus (NDV using microfitration fitration system and improve the processing conditions as well. A microporous membrane screening using two different sizes of membrane which are 0.1µm and 0.45µm was performed before further improvement on NP protein filtration was carried out. Several conditions of the independent variables that affect the microfiltration process such as the temperature, transmembrane pressure (TMP, and viscosity were observed. It turned out to be that 0.45µm membrane gave higher yield of NP protein than that of 0.1µm membrane. Thus, 0.45µm membrane was used to improve the filtration process for NP protein. Based on the Full Factorial Design (STATISTICA 8.0, Statsoft, Inc., eight sets of experiment were designed to identify the best conditions for the NP protein filtration. From these experiments, the optimal conditions that gave the highest yield of NP protein are; TMP 4.5psi, viscosity 2.39cP at 4ºC. Based on ANOVA (analysis of variance, all the independent variables studied do not significantly affect the purification of NP protein. However, based on the lowest p value for each variable corresponding to the response, temperature has the largest effect for the NP protein yield.

  18. Molecular characterization of parainfluenza virus type 3 and nucleotide sequence of the major nucleocapsid protein gene

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    Jambou, R.C.

    1987-01-01

    The polypeptide composition and transcriptional complexity of human parainfluenza-3 virus were analyzed. Extracellular virus obtained using BS-C-1 cells was purified by successive sucrose gradient centrifugation and the viral peptides analyzed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Five proteins were associated with detergent and salt resistant viral cores. Of these, three proteins remained stably associated with the 59S RNA in the CsCl gradient purified nucleocapsid fraction; these were the major nucleocapsid protein, NP (68 Kdal) and two smaller NP-related proteins. Other core proteins included a large 240 Kdal protein designated (L) and an 84 Kdal protein designated phosphoprotein (P) by virtue of its predominant incorporation of orthophosphate. By labeling virions with (/sup 3/H) glucosamine and mannose, the major envelope components were visualized.

  19. Trichoplusia ni Kinesin-1 Associates with Autographa californica Multiple Nucleopolyhedrovirus Nucleocapsid Proteins and Is Required for Production of Budded Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Siddhartha; Blissard, Gary W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The mechanism by which nucleocapsids of Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) egress from the nucleus to the plasma membrane, leading to the formation of budded virus (BV), is not known. AC141 is a nucleocapsid-associated protein required for BV egress and has previously been shown to be associated with β-tubulin. In addition, AC141 and VP39 were previously shown by fluorescence resonance energy transfer by fluorescence lifetime imaging to interact directly with the Drosophila melanogaster kinesin-1 light chain (KLC) tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain. These results suggested that microtubule transport systems may be involved in baculovirus nucleocapsid egress and BV formation. In this study, we investigated the role of lepidopteran microtubule transport using coimmunoprecipitation, colocalization, yeast two-hybrid, and small interfering RNA (siRNA) analyses. We show that nucleocapsid AC141 associates with the lepidopteran Trichoplusia ni KLC and kinesin-1 heavy chain (KHC) by coimmunoprecipitation and colocalization. Kinesin-1, AC141, and microtubules colocalized predominantly at the plasma membrane. In addition, the nucleocapsid proteins VP39, FP25, and BV/ODV-C42 were also coimmunoprecipitated with T. ni KLC. Direct analysis of the role of T. ni kinesin-1 by downregulation of KLC by siRNA resulted in a significant decrease in BV production. Nucleocapsids labeled with VP39 fused with three copies of the mCherry fluorescent protein also colocalized with microtubules. Yeast two-hybrid analysis showed no evidence of a direct interaction between kinesin-1 and AC141 or VP39, suggesting that either other nucleocapsid proteins or adaptor proteins may be required. These results further support the conclusion that microtubule transport is required for AcMNPV BV formation. IMPORTANCE In two key processes of the replication cycle of the baculovirus Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV), nucleocapsids are

  20. HSV-1 nucleocapsid egress mediated by UL31 in association with UL34 is impeded by cellular transmembrane protein 140

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    Guan, Ying [Department of Viral Immunology, Institute of Medical Biology, Chinese Academy of Medicine Science, Peking Union Medical College, Kunming 650118 (China); Yunnan Academy of Tobacco Science, Kunming, Yunnan 650106 (China); Guo, Lei; Yang, Erxia; Liao, Yun; Liu, Longding; Che, Yanchun; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Lichun; Wang, Jingjing [Department of Viral Immunology, Institute of Medical Biology, Chinese Academy of Medicine Science, Peking Union Medical College, Kunming 650118 (China); Li, Qihan, E-mail: imbcams.lq@gmail.com [Department of Viral Immunology, Institute of Medical Biology, Chinese Academy of Medicine Science, Peking Union Medical College, Kunming 650118 (China)

    2014-09-15

    During HSV-1 infection, the viral UL31 protein forms a complex with the UL34 protein at the cellular nuclear membrane, where both proteins play important roles in the envelopment of viral nucleocapsids and their egress into the cytoplasm. To characterize the mechanism of HSV-1 nucleocapsid egress, we screened host proteins to identify proteins that interacted with UL31 via yeast two-hybrid analysis. Transmembrane protein 140 (TMEM140), was identified and confirmed to bind to and co-localize with UL31 during viral infection. Further studies indicated that TMEM140 inhibits HSV-1 proliferation through selectively blocking viral nucleocapsid egress during the viral assembly process. The blockage function of TMEM140 is mediated by impeding the formation of the UL31–UL34 complex due to competitive binding to UL31. Collectively, these data suggest the essentiality of the UL31–UL34 interaction in the viral nucleocapsid egress process and provide a new anti-HSV-1 strategy in viral assembly process of nucleocapsid egress. - Highlights: • Cellular TMEM140 protein interacts with HSV-1 UL31 protein during viral infection. • Increasing expression of TMEM140 leads to inhibition of HSV-1 proliferation. • Increasing expression of TMEM140 blocks HSV-1 nucleocapsid egress process. • Binding to UL31 of TMEM140 impedes formation of HSV-1 UL31–UL34 complex.

  1. Monoclonal antibodies against proteins of the IBR virus nucleocapside and their assessing by ELISA

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    Jeannette Navarrete 0.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies were produced against the nucleocapside of a field IBR virus strain. The virus was growth in MOBK cell line. Viral components were purified and concentrated in a continuous 30% sacarose gradient followed by chemical precipitation. Nucleocapsides were run in a 10% SDS-PAGE gel. Positive hybridomes were tested using a direct ELISA developed in our laboratory. As a result eigth ELISA positive clones were obtained, from these five were also positive to seronetralization and immunodot. The clones recognize a 39.8Kda protein. Aditionally, a capture-ELISA was developed using the monoclonal antobodies from this research. This ELISA is useful to detect a reference as a field nm virus strain.

  2. RNA-binding domain in the nucleocapsid protein of gill-associated nidovirus of penaeid shrimp.

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    Chumporn Soowannayan

    Full Text Available Gill-associated virus (GAV infects Penaeus monodon shrimp and is the type species okavirus in the Roniviridae, the only invertebrate nidoviruses known currently. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs using His(6-tagged full-length and truncated proteins were employed to examine the nucleic acid binding properties of the GAV nucleocapsid (N protein in vitro. The EMSAs showed full-length N protein to bind to all synthetic single-stranded (ssRNAs tested independent of their sequence. The ssRNAs included (+ and (- sense regions of the GAV genome as well as a (+ sense region of the M RNA segment of Mourilyan virus, a crustacean bunya-like virus. GAV N protein also bound to double-stranded (dsRNAs prepared to GAV ORF1b gene regions and to bacteriophage M13 genomic ssDNA. EMSAs using the five N protein constructs with variable-length N-terminal and/or C-terminal truncations localized the RNA binding domain to a 50 amino acid (aa N-terminal sequence spanning Met(11 to Arg(60. Similarly to other RNA binding proteins, the first 16 aa portion of this sequence was proline/arginine rich. To examine this domain in more detail, the 18 aa peptide (M(11PVRRPLPPQPPRNARLI(29 encompassing this sequence was synthesized and found to bind nucleic acids similarly to the full-length N protein in EMSAs. The data indicate a fundamental role for the GAV N protein proline/arginine-rich domain in nucleating genomic ssRNA to form nucleocapsids. Moreover, as the synthetic peptide formed higher-order complexes in the presence of RNA, the domain might also play some role in protein/protein interactions stabilizing the helical structure of GAV nucleocapsids.

  3. The nucleocapsid protein of measles virus blocks host interferon response

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    Takayama, Ikuyo; Sato, Hiroki; Watanabe, Akira; Omi-Furutani, Mio; Sugai, Akihiro; Kanki, Keita; Yoneda, Misako; Kai, Chieko, E-mail: ckai@ims.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2012-03-01

    Measles virus (MV) belongs to the genus Morbillivirus of the family Paramyxoviridae. A number of paramyxoviruses inhibit host interferon (IFN) signaling pathways in host immune systems by various mechanisms. Inhibition mechanisms have been described for many paramyxoviruses. Although there are inconsistencies among previous reports concerning MV, it appears that P/V/C proteins interfere with the pathways. In this study, we confirmed the effects of MV P gene products of a wild MV strain on IFN pathways and examined that of other viral proteins on it. Interestingly, we found that N protein acts as an IFN-{alpha}/{beta} and {gamma}-antagonist as strong as P gene products. We further investigated the mechanisms of MV-N inhibition, and revealed that MV-N blocks the nuclear import of activated STAT without preventing STAT and Jak activation or STAT degradation, and that the nuclear translocation of MV-N is important for the inhibition. The inhibitory effect of the N protein was observed as a common feature of other morbilliviruses. The results presented in this report suggest that N protein of MV as well as P/V/C proteins is involved in the inhibition of host IFN signaling pathways.

  4. Molecular characterisation of the nucleocapsid protein gene, glycoprotein gene and gene junctions of rhabdovirus 903/87, a novel fish pathogenic rhabdovirus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Tove; Nylund, S.; Olesen, Niels Jørgen

    2001-01-01

    The sequences of the nucleocapsid and glycoprotein genes and the gene junctions of the fish pathogenic rhabdovirus 903/87 were determined from cDNA and PCR clones. The mRNA of the nucleocapsid is most likely 1492 nucleotides long and encodes a protein of 426 amino acids, whereas the mRNA of the g......The sequences of the nucleocapsid and glycoprotein genes and the gene junctions of the fish pathogenic rhabdovirus 903/87 were determined from cDNA and PCR clones. The mRNA of the nucleocapsid is most likely 1492 nucleotides long and encodes a protein of 426 amino acids, whereas the m...

  5. Characterisation of human coronavirus-NL63 nucleocapsid protein

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael

    2012-09-18

    Sep 18, 2012 ... Coronavirus N is a multifunctional protein that plays an essential role in enhancing the efficiency of .... HCoV-NL63 was shown to be most similar to the human ... evolution of these coronaviruses and gave rise to the.

  6. The C-Terminal Portion of the Nucleocapsid Protein Demonstrates SARS-CoV Antigenicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guozhen Liu; Bo You; Ye Yin; Shuting Li; Hao Wang; Yan Ren; Jia Ji; Xiaoqian Zhao; Yongqiao Sun; Xiaowei Zhang; Jianqiu Fang; Shaohui Hu; Jian Wang; Siqi Liu; Jun Yu; Heng Zhu; Huanming Yang; Yongwu Hu; Peng Chen; Jianning Yin; Jie Wen; Jingqiang Wang; Liang Lin; Jinxiu Liu

    2003-01-01

    In order to develop clinical diagnostic tools for rapid detection of SARS-CoV (severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus) and to identify candidate proteins for vaccine development, the C-terminal portion of the nucleocapsid (NC)gene was amplified using RT-PCR from the SARS-CoV genome, cloned into a yeast expression vector (pEGH), and expressed as a glutathione S-transferase (GST) and Hisx6 double-tagged fusion protein under the control of an inducible promoter.Western analysis on the purified protein confirmed the expression and purification of the NC fusion proteins from yeast. To determine its antigenicity, the fusion protein was challenged with serum samples from SARS patients and normal controls.The NC fusion protein demonstrated high antigenicity with high specificity, and therefore, it should have great potential in designing clinical diagnostic tools and provide useful information for vaccine development.

  7. High-yield expression of recombinant SARS coronavirus nucleocapsid protein in methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ru-Shi Liu; Kun-Yu Yang; Jian Lin; Yi-Wei Lin; Zhi-Hong Zhang; Jun Zhang; Ning-Shao Xia

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Nucleocapsid (N) protein plays an important role in reproduction and pathological reaction of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus (SCoV), theantigenicity of the protein is better than spike (S) protein.This study was to find a highly specific and antigenic recombinant SCoV nucleocapsid (rSCoVN) protein, and to provide a basis for further researches on early diagnosis of SARS.METHODS: Full length cDNA of SCoV nucleocapsid (SCoVN)protein was amplified through polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and cloned into yeast expression vector pPIC3.5K to construct plasmid of pPIC3.5K-SCoVN. The plasmid was linearized and then transformed into Pichia pastoris (P. pastoris) GS115 (HisMut+) by electroporation. His+Mut+recombinant strains were identified by PCR and cultivated on MM/MD plates. The influence of different factors on biomass and rSCoVN protein production during induction phase, such as various induction media, dissolved oxygen (DO) and different final concentrations of methanol, was subsequently studied. The expression level and activation were detected by SDS-PAGE and Western-blot respectively.RESULTS: All of the recombinants were His+Mut+ aftertransformation of P. pastoriswith linearized plasmids. The BMMY medium was optimal for recombinant ScoVN (rSCoVN)protein expression and growth of the recombinant strains.The final optimal concentration of methanol was 20 mL/L,the DO had a significant effect on rSCoVN protein expression and growth of recombinant strains. The rSCoVN protein expressed in recombinant strains was about 8% of the total cell protein, 520 mg/L of rSCoVN protein was achieved,and a maximum cell ,A at 600 nm of 62 was achieved in shake flask culture. The rSCoVN protein had a high specificity against mouse-anti-SARS-CoVN-mAb and SARS positive sera, but had no cross-reaction with normal human serum.The biological activity of rSCoVN expressed in P. pastoris was about 4-fold higher than that expressed in E.coliwhen the same rSCoVN protein

  8. HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein localizes efficiently to the nucleus and nucleolus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Kyung Lee; Lee, Sun Hee; Lee, Eun Soo; You, Ji Chang, E-mail: jiyou@catholic.ac.kr

    2016-05-15

    The HIV-1 nucleocapsid (NC) is an essential viral protein containing two highly conserved retroviral-type zinc finger (ZF) motifs, which functions in multiple stages of the HIV-1 life cycle. Although a number of functions for NC either in its mature form or as a domain of Gag have been revealed, little is known about the intracellular localization of NC and, moreover, its role in Gag protein trafficking. Here, we have investigated various forms of HIV-1 NC protein for its cellular localization and found that the NC has a strong nuclear and nucleolar localization activity. The linker region, composed of a stretch of basic amino acids between the two ZF motifs, was necessary and sufficient for the activity. - Highlights: • HIV-1 NC possess a NLS and leads to nuclear and nucleolus localization. • Mutations in basic residues between two ZFs in NC decrease the nucleus localization. • ZFs of NC affect cytoplasmic organelles localization rather than nucleus localization.

  9. HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein localizes efficiently to the nucleus and nucleolus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kyung Lee; Lee, Sun Hee; Lee, Eun Soo; You, Ji Chang

    2016-05-01

    The HIV-1 nucleocapsid (NC) is an essential viral protein containing two highly conserved retroviral-type zinc finger (ZF) motifs, which functions in multiple stages of the HIV-1 life cycle. Although a number of functions for NC either in its mature form or as a domain of Gag have been revealed, little is known about the intracellular localization of NC and, moreover, its role in Gag protein trafficking. Here, we have investigated various forms of HIV-1 NC protein for its cellular localization and found that the NC has a strong nuclear and nucleolar localization activity. The linker region, composed of a stretch of basic amino acids between the two ZF motifs, was necessary and sufficient for the activity.

  10. Cloning and characterization of DNA complementary to the canine distemper virus mRNA encoding matrix, phosphoprotein, and nucleocapsid protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozenblatt, S.; Eizenberg, O.; Englund, G.; Bellini, W.J.

    1985-02-01

    Double-stranded cDNA synthesized from total polyadenylate-containing mRNA, extracted from monkey kidney cells infected with canine distemper virus (CDV), has been cloned into the PstI site of Escherichia coli plasmid pBR322. Clones containing canine distemper virus DNA were identified by hybridization to a canine distemper virus-specific, /sup 32/P-labeled cDNA. Four specific clones containing different classes of sequences have been identified. The cloned plasmids contain inserts of 800 (clone 44-80), 960 (clone 74-16), 1700 (clone 364), and 950 (clone 40-9) base pairs. The sizes of the mRNA species complementary to these inserts are 1500, 1850, 1850 and 2500 nucleotides, respectively, as determined by the Northern technique. Three of the cloned DNA fragments were further identified as the reverse transcripts of the mRNA coding for the matrix, phosphoprotein, and nucleocapsid protein of CDV.

  11. Structure and Function Analysis of Nucleocapsid Protein of Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus Interacting with RNA Using Homology Modeling*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia; Feng, Zhike; Wu, Jianyan; Huang, Ying; Lu, Gang; Zhu, Min; Wang, Bi; Mao, Xiang; Tao, Xiaorong

    2015-01-01

    The nucleocapsid (N) protein of tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) plays key roles in assembling genomic RNA into ribonucleoprotein (RNP), which serves as a template for both viral gene transcription and genome replication. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism of how TSWV N interacts with genomic RNA. In this study, we demonstrated that TSWV N protein forms a range of higher ordered oligomers. Analysis of the RNA binding behavior of N protein revealed that no specific oligomer binds to RNA preferentially, instead each type of N oligomer is able to bind RNA. To better characterize the structure and function of N protein interacting with RNA, we constructed homology models of TSWV N and N-RNA complexes. Based on these homology models, we demonstrated that the positively charged and polar amino acids in its predicted surface cleft of TSWV N are critical for RNA binding. Moreover, by N-RNA homology modeling, we found that the RNA component is deeply embedded in the predicted protein cleft; consistently, TSWV N-RNA complexes are relatively resistant to digestion by RNase. Collectively, using homology modeling, we determined the RNA binding sites on N and found a new protective feature for N protein. Our findings also provide novel insights into the molecular details of the interaction of TSWV N with RNA components. PMID:25540203

  12. Structure and function analysis of nucleocapsid protein of tomato spotted wilt virus interacting with RNA using homology modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia; Feng, Zhike; Wu, Jianyan; Huang, Ying; Lu, Gang; Zhu, Min; Wang, Bi; Mao, Xiang; Tao, Xiaorong

    2015-02-13

    The nucleocapsid (N) protein of tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) plays key roles in assembling genomic RNA into ribonucleoprotein (RNP), which serves as a template for both viral gene transcription and genome replication. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism of how TSWV N interacts with genomic RNA. In this study, we demonstrated that TSWV N protein forms a range of higher ordered oligomers. Analysis of the RNA binding behavior of N protein revealed that no specific oligomer binds to RNA preferentially, instead each type of N oligomer is able to bind RNA. To better characterize the structure and function of N protein interacting with RNA, we constructed homology models of TSWV N and N-RNA complexes. Based on these homology models, we demonstrated that the positively charged and polar amino acids in its predicted surface cleft of TSWV N are critical for RNA binding. Moreover, by N-RNA homology modeling, we found that the RNA component is deeply embedded in the predicted protein cleft; consistently, TSWV N-RNA complexes are relatively resistant to digestion by RNase. Collectively, using homology modeling, we determined the RNA binding sites on N and found a new protective feature for N protein. Our findings also provide novel insights into the molecular details of the interaction of TSWV N with RNA components. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Generation of Recombinant Schmallenberg Virus Nucleocapsid Protein in Yeast and Development of Virus-Specific Monoclonal Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justas Lazutka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Schmallenberg virus (SBV, discovered in continental Europe in late 2011, causes mild clinical signs in adult ruminants, including diarrhoea and reduced milk yield. However, fetal infection can lead to severe malformation in newborn offspring. To develop improved reagents for SBV serology, a high-level yeast expression system was employed to produce recombinant SBV nucleocapsid (N protein. Recombinant SBV N protein was investigated as an antigen in SBV-specific IgG enzyme immunoassay and used for generation of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs. Yeast-expressed SBV N protein was reactive with anti-SBV IgG-positive cow serum specimens collected from different farms of Lithuania. After immunization of mice with recombinant SBV N protein, four MAbs were generated. The MAbs raised against recombinant SBV N protein reacted with native viral nucleocapsids in SBV-infected BHK cells by immunofluorescence assay. The reactivity of recombinant N protein with SBV-positive cow serum specimens and the ability of the MAbs to recognize virus-infected cells confirm the antigenic similarity between yeast-expressed SBV N protein and native viral nucleocapsids. Our study demonstrates that yeast expression system is suitable for high-level production of recombinant SBV N protein and provides the first evidence on the presence of SBV-specific antibodies in cow serum specimens collected in Lithuania.

  14. A spatio-temporal analysis of matrix protein and nucleocapsid trafficking during vesicular stomatitis virus uncoating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mire, Chad E; White, Judith M; Whitt, Michael A

    2010-07-15

    To study VSV entry and the fate of incoming matrix (M) protein during virus uncoating we used recombinant viruses encoding M proteins with a C-terminal tetracysteine tag that could be fluorescently labeled using biarsenical (Lumio) compounds. We found that uncoating occurs early in the endocytic pathway and is inhibited by expression of dominant-negative (DN) Rab5, but is not inhibited by DN-Rab7 or DN-Rab11. Uncoating, as defined by the separation of nucleocapsids from M protein, occurred between 15 and 20 minutes post-entry and did not require microtubules or an intact actin cytoskeleton. Unexpectedly, the bulk of M protein remained associated with endosomal membranes after uncoating and was eventually trafficked to recycling endosomes. Another small, but significant fraction of M distributed to nuclear pore complexes, which was also not dependent on microtubules or polymerized actin. Quantification of fluorescence from high-resolution confocal micrographs indicated that after membrane fusion, M protein diffuses across the endosomal membrane with a concomitant increase in fluorescence from the Lumio label which occurred soon after the release of RNPs into the cytoplasm. These data support a new model for VSV uncoating in which RNPs are released from M which remains bound to the endosomal membrane rather than the dissociation of M protein from RNPs after release of the complex into the cytoplasm following membrane fusion.

  15. A spatio-temporal analysis of matrix protein and nucleocapsid trafficking during vesicular stomatitis virus uncoating.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad E Mire

    Full Text Available To study VSV entry and the fate of incoming matrix (M protein during virus uncoating we used recombinant viruses encoding M proteins with a C-terminal tetracysteine tag that could be fluorescently labeled using biarsenical (Lumio compounds. We found that uncoating occurs early in the endocytic pathway and is inhibited by expression of dominant-negative (DN Rab5, but is not inhibited by DN-Rab7 or DN-Rab11. Uncoating, as defined by the separation of nucleocapsids from M protein, occurred between 15 and 20 minutes post-entry and did not require microtubules or an intact actin cytoskeleton. Unexpectedly, the bulk of M protein remained associated with endosomal membranes after uncoating and was eventually trafficked to recycling endosomes. Another small, but significant fraction of M distributed to nuclear pore complexes, which was also not dependent on microtubules or polymerized actin. Quantification of fluorescence from high-resolution confocal micrographs indicated that after membrane fusion, M protein diffuses across the endosomal membrane with a concomitant increase in fluorescence from the Lumio label which occurred soon after the release of RNPs into the cytoplasm. These data support a new model for VSV uncoating in which RNPs are released from M which remains bound to the endosomal membrane rather than the dissociation of M protein from RNPs after release of the complex into the cytoplasm following membrane fusion.

  16. Nucleocapsid protein from fig mosaic virus forms cytoplasmic agglomerates that are hauled by endoplasmic reticulum streaming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Kazuya; Miura, Chihiro; Maejima, Kensaku; Komatsu, Ken; Hashimoto, Masayoshi; Tomomitsu, Tatsuya; Fukuoka, Misato; Yusa, Akira; Yamaji, Yasuyuki; Namba, Shigetou

    2015-01-01

    Although many studies have demonstrated intracellular movement of viral proteins or viral replication complexes, little is known about the mechanisms of their motility. In this study, we analyzed the localization and motility of the nucleocapsid protein (NP) of Fig mosaic virus (FMV), a negative-strand RNA virus belonging to the recently established genus Emaravirus. Electron microscopy of FMV-infected cells using immunogold labeling showed that NPs formed cytoplasmic agglomerates that were predominantly enveloped by the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane, while nonenveloped NP agglomerates also localized along the ER. Likewise, transiently expressed NPs formed agglomerates, designated NP bodies (NBs), in close proximity to the ER, as was the case in FMV-infected cells. Subcellular fractionation and electron microscopic analyses of NP-expressing cells revealed that NBs localized in the cytoplasm. Furthermore, we found that NBs moved rapidly with the streaming of the ER in an actomyosin-dependent manner. Brefeldin A treatment at a high concentration to disturb the ER network configuration induced aberrant accumulation of NBs in the perinuclear region, indicating that the ER network configuration is related to NB localization. Dominant negative inhibition of the class XI myosins, XI-1, XI-2, and XI-K, affected both ER streaming and NB movement in a similar pattern. Taken together, these results showed that NBs localize in the cytoplasm but in close proximity to the ER membrane to form enveloped particles and that this causes passive movements of cytoplasmic NBs by ER streaming. Intracellular trafficking is a primary and essential step for the cell-to-cell movement of viruses. To date, many studies have demonstrated the rapid intracellular movement of viral factors but have failed to provide evidence for the mechanism or biological significance of this motility. Here, we observed that agglomerates of nucleocapsid protein (NP) moved rapidly throughout the cell, and we

  17. TGEV nucleocapsid protein induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through activation of p53 signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Li [College of Veterinary Medicine, Northwest A and F University, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China); College of Life Sciences, Hainan Normal University, Haikou, Hainan 571158 (China); Huang, Yong; Du, Qian; Dong, Feng; Zhao, Xiaomin; Zhang, Wenlong; Xu, Xingang [College of Veterinary Medicine, Northwest A and F University, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China); Tong, Dewen, E-mail: dwtong@nwsuaf.edu.cn [College of Veterinary Medicine, Northwest A and F University, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China)

    2014-03-07

    Highlights: • TGEV N protein reduces cell viability by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. • TGEV N protein induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis by regulating p53 signaling. • TGEV N protein plays important roles in TGEV-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. - Abstract: Our previous studies showed that TGEV infection could induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis via activation of p53 signaling in cultured host cells. However, it is unclear which viral gene causes these effects. In this study, we investigated the effects of TGEV nucleocapsid (N) protein on PK-15 cells. We found that TGEV N protein suppressed cell proliferation by causing cell cycle arrest at the S and G2/M phases and apoptosis. Characterization of various cellular proteins that are involved in regulating cell cycle progression demonstrated that the expression of N gene resulted in an accumulation of p53 and p21, which suppressed cyclin B1, cdc2 and cdk2 expression. Moreover, the expression of TGEV N gene promoted translocation of Bax to mitochondria, which in turn caused the release of cytochrome c, followed by activation of caspase-3, resulting in cell apoptosis in the transfected PK-15 cells following cell cycle arrest. Further studies showed that p53 inhibitor attenuated TGEV N protein induced cell cycle arrest at S and G2/M phases and apoptosis through reversing the expression changes of cdc2, cdk2 and cyclin B1 and the translocation changes of Bax and cytochrome c induced by TGEV N protein. Taken together, these results demonstrated that TGEV N protein might play an important role in TGEV infection-induced p53 activation and cell cycle arrest at the S and G2/M phases and apoptosis occurrence.

  18. Quantitative Characterization of Configurational Space Sampled by HIV-1 Nucleocapsid Using Solution NMR, X-ray Scattering and Protein Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, Lalit; Schwieters, Charles D; Grishaev, Alexander; Clore, G Marius

    2016-06-03

    Nucleic-acid-related events in the HIV-1 replication cycle are mediated by nucleocapsid, a small protein comprising two zinc knuckles connected by a short flexible linker and flanked by disordered termini. Combining experimental NMR residual dipolar couplings, solution X-ray scattering and protein engineering with ensemble simulated annealing, we obtain a quantitative description of the configurational space sampled by the two zinc knuckles, the linker and disordered termini in the absence of nucleic acids. We first compute the conformational ensemble (with an optimal size of three members) of an engineered nucleocapsid construct lacking the N- and C-termini that satisfies the experimental restraints, and then validate this ensemble, as well as characterize the disordered termini, using the experimental data from the full-length nucleocapsid construct. The experimental and computational strategy is generally applicable to multidomain proteins. Differential flexibility within the linker results in asymmetric motion of the zinc knuckles which may explain their functionally distinct roles despite high sequence identity. One of the configurations (populated at a level of ≈40 %) closely resembles that observed in various ligand-bound forms, providing evidence for conformational selection and a mechanistic link between protein dynamics and function.

  19. Characterization of expression of Puumala virus nucleocapsid protein in transgenic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khattak, Shahryar; Darai, Gholamreza; Süle, Sandor; Rösen-Wolff, Angela

    2002-01-01

    Transgenic plants expressing a foreign gene are a suitable system for the production of relevant immunogens in high amounts that can be used for the development of a new generation of vaccines against a variety of infectious diseases. In the present study, the expression of the nucleocapsid (N) protein of hantavirus serotype Puumala in tobacco and potato plants was investigated. Transgenic tobacco and potato plants were generated and established. These transgenic plants expressed the N protein of Puumala virus strain CG-1820. No major differences were observed when the phenotype and growth rates of transgenic plants were compared to those of normal plants. However, it was found that the leaves of transgenic tobacco plants were more slender and the tubers of transgenic potato plants were smaller than those in normal plants. In order to investigate the distribution of the expression of the foreign gene in transgenic plants, the proteins of leaves and roots of the individual transgenic tobacco and potato plants were examined by Western blot analyses. It was found that all transgenic tobacco and potato plants expressed the N protein in the leaves, whereas transgenic potato plants are able to significantly express the viral proteins also in the tubers and roots. The antigens were expressed at a level of 1 ng of protein/5 microg of dried leaves. The hantaviral recombinant N proteins obtained from transgenic tobacco and potato plants were able to elicit specific humoral and mucosal immune responses when administered intraperitoneally or orally to rabbits and mice. The expression of viral proteins in plants has two major advantages compared to other expression systems: firstly, there is no risk of contamination with mammalian viruses or other pathogens, and secondly, the production of high amounts of antigens is cheap and therefore of great economic interest.

  20. Selective translation of the measles virus nucleocapsid mRNA by La protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihisa eInoue

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Measles, caused by measles virus (MeV infection, is the leading cause of death in children because of secondary infections attributable to MeV-induced immune suppression. Recently, we have shown that wild-type MeVs induce the suppression of protein synthesis in host cells (referred to as "shutoff" and that viral mRNAs are preferentially translated under shutoff conditions in infected cells. To determine the mechanism behind the preferential translation of viral mRNA, we focused on the 5 untranslated region (UTR of nucleocapsid (N mRNA. The La/SSB autoantigen (La was found to specifically bind to an N-5UTR probe. Recombinant La enhanced the translation of luciferase mRNA containing the N-5UTR (N-fLuc, and RNA interference of La suppressed N-fLuc translation. Furthermore, recombinant MeV lacking the La-binding motif in the N-5UTR displayed delayed viral protein synthesis and growth kinetics at an early phase of infection. These results suggest that La induced predominant translation of N mRNA via binding to its 5UTR under shutoff conditions. This is the first report on a cellular factor that specifically regulates paramyxovirus mRNA translation.

  1. Vaccinia virus protein A3 is required for the production of normal immature virions and for the encapsidation of the nucleocapsid protein L4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesus, Desyree Murta; Moussatche, Nissin; McFadden, Baron B D; Nielsen, Casey Paulasue; D'Costa, Susan M; Condit, Richard C

    2015-07-01

    Maturation of the vaccinia virion is an intricate process that results in the organization of the viroplasm contained in immature virions into the lateral bodies, core wall and nucleocapsid observed in the mature particles. It is unclear how this organization takes place and studies with mutants are indispensable in understanding this process. By characterizing an inducible mutant in the A3L gene, we revealed that A3, an inner core wall protein, is important for formation of normal immature viruses and also for the correct localization of L4, a nucleocapsid protein. L4 did not accumulate in the viral factories in the absence of A3 and was not encapsidated in the particles that do not contain A3. These data strengthen our previously suggested hypothesis that A3 and L4 interact and that this interaction is critical for proper formation of the core wall and nucleocapsid.

  2. Relationship between the intrahepatic expression of 'e' and 'c' epitopes of the nucleocapsid protein of hepatitis B virus and viraemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballaré, M; Lavarini, C; Brunetto, M R; Petruzzelli, E; Dovis, M; Molino, G; Bonino, F

    1989-01-01

    The relationship between hepatitis B viraemia and intrahepatic HBV nucleocapsid proteins (HBcAg and HBeAg) was studied in 18 patients with chronic hepatitis B. Monoclonal antibodies (MoABs) were obtained in BALB/c mice primed with recombinant HBV nucleocapsid proteins. Four MoABs reacting with recombinant proteins gave positive results in competitive assays. Two reacted as anti-HBc and two as anti-HBe. One of them showed a strong affinity for the cytoplasmic, membrane-bound antigen (P23e) of infected hepatocytes while the latter showed a higher specificity for serum HBeAg than for the intrahepatic antigen. Anti-HBc MoABs had a staining capacity for liver cell nuclei comparable with that of polyclonal antibodies. Overall the anti-HBc MoABs stained the liver cell nuclei in 86% of cases, while anti-HBe MoABs stained in 58% of cases. The hepatocyte cytoplasm was stained by anti-HBc MoABs and anti-HBe MoABs in 64% and 72% of cases respectively. Not one of 12 control liver biopsies was stained. Viraemia (HBV-DNA) was measured by dot blot hybridization and was correlated with the number of hepatocytes containing the nucleocapsid antigen. The highest levels of HBV-DNA (greater than 10(8) genomes/ml) were detected in patients with prevalent nuclear staining while the lowest ones were observed in those with prevalent cytoplasmic expression of this antigen. The application of anti-HBV-nucleocapsid MoABs in diagnostics requires careful scrutiny since some are specific for the circulating antigen while others show a higher affinity for the intrahepatic antigen. PMID:2467769

  3. Kinetic analysis of the effect of HIV nucleocapsid protein (NCp) on internal strand transfer reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, A; DeStefano, J J

    1999-04-20

    The mechanism of HIV reverse transcriptase (RT) catalyzed strand transfer synthesis (i.e., switching of the primer to a new template) from internal regions on RNA templates in the presence and absence of HIV nucleocapsid protein (NCp) was investigated. Two different systems each consisting of DNA-primed RNA donor (on which primer extension initiated) and acceptor (to which DNAs initiated on the donor could transfer) templates were used to determine kinetic parameters of strand transfer. The donor and acceptor shared an internal region of homology where homologous strand transfer could occur. The rate of strand transfer at various acceptor concentrations was determined by monitoring the production of transfer products over time. These rates were used to construct Lineweaver-Burk plots. In each system, NCp increased the Vmax about 3-fold while the Km for acceptor template was decreased severalfold. NCp's effects on RT extension ranged from no effect to inhibition depending on the primer-template used. The lowered Km shows that NCp increases the affinity of the acceptor template for the transferring DNA. Vmax increases despite the inhibition of RT extension. The increased Vmax implies a stimulatory mechanism that cannot be mimicked by high acceptor concentrations. Therefore, NCp does not act by merely increasing the effective concentration of nucleic acids.

  4. Cross-Protection against Challenge with Puumala Virus after Immunization with Nucleocapsid Proteins from Different Hantaviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho Nicacio, Cristina; Gonzalez Della Valle, Marcelo; Padula, Paula; Björling, Ewa; Plyusnin, Alexander; Lundkvist, Åke

    2002-01-01

    Hantaviruses are rodent-borne agents that cause hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome or hantavirus pulmonary syndrome in humans. The nucleocapsid protein (N) is relatively conserved among hantaviruses and highly immunogenic in both laboratory animals and humans, and it has been shown to induce efficient protective immunity in animal models. To investigate the ability of recombinant N (rN) from different hantaviruses to elicit cross-protection, we immunized bank voles with rN from Puumala (PUUV), Topografov (TOPV), Andes (ANDV), and Dobrava (DOBV) viruses and subsequently challenged them with PUUV. All animals immunized with PUUV and TOPV rN were completely protected. In the group immunized with DOBV rN, 7 of 10 animals were protected, while only 3 of 8 animals were protected in the group immunized with ANDV rN, which is more closely related to PUUV rN than DOBV rN. Humoral and cellular immune responses after rN immunization were also investigated. The highest cross-reactive humoral responses against PUUV antigen were detected in sera from ANDV rN-immunized animals, followed by those from TOPV rN-immunized animals, and only very low antibody cross-reactivity was observed in sera from DOBV rN-immunized animals. In proliferation assays, T lymphocytes from animals immunized with all heterologous rNs were as efficiently recalled in vitro by PUUV rN as were T lymphocytes from animals immunized with homologous protein. In summary, this study has shown that hantavirus N can elicit cross-protective immune responses against PUUV, and the results suggest a more important role for the cellular arm of the immune response than for the humoral arm in cross-protection elicited by rN. PMID:12050380

  5. Live-cell imaging of Marburg virus-infected cells uncovers actin-dependent transport of nucleocapsids over long distances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schudt, Gordian; Kolesnikova, Larissa; Dolnik, Olga; Sodeik, Beate; Becker, Stephan

    2013-08-27

    Transport of large viral nucleocapsids from replication centers to assembly sites requires contributions from the host cytoskeleton via cellular adaptor and motor proteins. For the Marburg and Ebola viruses, related viruses that cause severe hemorrhagic fevers, the mechanism of nucleocapsid transport remains poorly understood. Here we developed and used live-cell imaging of fluorescently labeled viral and host proteins to characterize the dynamics and molecular requirements of nucleocapsid transport in Marburg virus-infected cells under biosafety level 4 conditions. The study showed a complex actin-based transport of nucleocapsids over long distances from the viral replication centers to the budding sites. Only after the nucleocapsids had associated with the matrix viral protein VP40 at the plasma membrane were they recruited into filopodia and cotransported with host motor myosin 10 toward the budding sites at the tip or side of the long cellular protrusions. Three different transport modes and velocities were identified: (i) Along actin filaments in the cytosol, nucleocapsids were transported at ∼200 nm/s; (ii) nucleocapsids migrated from one actin filament to another at ∼400 nm/s; and (iii) VP40-associated nucleocapsids moved inside filopodia at 100 nm/s. Unique insights into the spatiotemporal dynamics of nucleocapsids and their interaction with the cytoskeleton and motor proteins can lead to novel classes of antivirals that interfere with the trafficking and subsequent release of the Marburg virus from infected cells.

  6. Measles virus nucleocapsid protein increases osteoblast differentiation in Paget’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teramachi, Jumpei; Nagata, Yuki; Mohammad, Khalid; Inagaki, Yuji; Ohata, Yasuhisa; Guise, Theresa; Michou, Laëtitia; Brown, Jacques P.; Windle, Jolene J.; Kurihara, Noriyoshi; Roodman, G. David

    2016-01-01

    Paget’s disease (PD) is characterized by focal and dramatic bone resorption and formation. Treatments that target osteoclasts (OCLs) block both pagetic bone resorption and formation; therefore, PD offers key insights into mechanisms that couple bone resorption and formation. Here, we evaluated OCLs from 3 patients with PD and determined that measles virus nucleocapsid protein (MVNP) was expressed in 70% of these OCLs. Moreover, transgenic mice with OCL-specific expression of MVNP (MVNP mice) developed PD-like bone lesions that required MVNP-dependent induction of high IL-6 expression levels in OCLs. In contrast, mice harboring a knockin of p62P394L (p62-KI mice), which is the most frequent PD-associated mutation, exhibited increased bone resorption, but not formation. Evaluation of OCLs from MVNP, p62-KI, and WT mice revealed increased IGF1 expression in MVNP-expressing OCLs that resulted from the high IL-6 expression levels in these cells. IL-6, in turn, increased the expression of coupling factors, specifically ephrinB2 on OCLs and EphB4 on osteoblasts (OBs). IGF1 enhanced ephrinB2 expression on OCLs and OB differentiation. Importantly, ephrinB2 and IGF1 levels were increased in MVNP-expressing OCLs from patients with PD and MVNP-transduced human OCLs compared with levels detected in controls. Further, anti-IGF1 or anti-IGF1R blocked Runx2 and osteocalcin upregulation in OBs cocultured with MVNP-expressing OCLs. These results suggest that in PD, MVNP upregulates IL-6 and IGF1 in OCLs to increase ephrinB2-EphB4 coupling and bone formation. PMID:26878170

  7. Bovine leukemia virus nucleocapsid protein is an efficient nucleic acid chaperone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qualley, Dominic F., E-mail: dqualley@berry.edu; Sokolove, Victoria L.; Ross, James L.

    2015-03-13

    Nucleocapsid proteins (NCs) direct the rearrangement of nucleic acids to form the most thermodynamically stable structure, and facilitate many steps throughout the life cycle of retroviruses. NCs bind strongly to nucleic acids (NAs) and promote NA aggregation by virtue of their cationic nature; they also destabilize the NA duplex via highly structured zinc-binding motifs. Thus, they are considered to be NA chaperones. While most retroviral NCs are structurally similar, differences are observed both within and between retroviral genera. In this work, we compare the NA binding and chaperone activity of bovine leukemia virus (BLV) NC to that of two other retroviral NCs: human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) NC, which is structurally similar to BLV NC but from a different retrovirus genus, and human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) NC, which possesses several key structural differences from BLV NC but is from the same genus. Our data show that BLV and HIV-1 NCs bind to NAs with stronger affinity in relation to HTLV-1 NC, and that they also accelerate the annealing of complementary stem-loop structures to a greater extent. Analysis of kinetic parameters derived from the annealing data suggests that while all three NCs stimulate annealing by a two-step mechanism as previously reported, the relative contributions of each step to the overall annealing equilibrium are conserved between BLV and HIV-1 NCs but are different for HTLV-1 NC. It is concluded that while BLV and HTLV-1 belong to the same genus of retroviruses, processes that rely on NC may not be directly comparable. - Highlights: • BLV NC binds strongly to DNA and RNA. • BLV NC promotes mini-TAR annealing as well as HIV-1 NC. • Annealing kinetics suggest a low degree of similarity between BLV NC and HTLV-1 NC.

  8. TBK1 Mediates Critical Effects of Measles Virus Nucleocapsid Protein (MVNP) on Pagetic Osteoclast Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Quanhong; Sammut, Bénédicte; Wang, Feng-Ming; Kurihara, Noriyoshi; Windle, Jolene J.; Roodman, G. David; Galson, Deborah L.

    2013-01-01

    Paget’s disease of bone (PDB) is characterized by abnormal osteoclasts with unique characteristics that include: increased sensitivity of osteoclast progenitors to 1,25(OH)2D3, RANKL and TNF-α, increased osteoclast numbers, increased expression of IL-6 and several transcription factors. We recently reported that measles virus nucleocapsid protein (MVNP) plays a key role in the development of these abnormal osteoclasts. MVNP can induce the pagetic osteoclast phenotype in vitro and in vivo in TRAP-MVNP transgenic mice. However, the molecular mechanisms by which MVNP generates pagetic osteoclasts have not been determined. TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1) and IκB kinase-ɛ (IKKɛ) are IKK family members which complex with MVNP and activate both IRF3 and NF-κB pathways. MVNP increases the amount of TBK1 protein in bone marrow monocytes (BMM). Interestingly, we found that RANKL increased TBK1 and IKKɛ early in osteoclast differentiation, suggesting a possible role in normal osteoclastogenesis. However, only TBK1 is further increased in osteoclasts formed by TRAP-MVNP BMM due to increased TBK1 protein stability. TBK1 over-expression induced IL6 promoter reporter activity, and elevated endogenous IL6 mRNA and p65 NF-κB, TAF12 and ATF7 proteins in several cell lines. Over-expression of TBK1 was insufficient to induce pagetic osteoclasts from WT BMM, but synergized with MVNP to increase pagetic osteoclast formation from TRAP-MVNP BMM. BX795 inhibition of TBK1 impaired MVNP-induced IL-6 expression in both NIH3T3 cells and BMM, and shRNA knockdown of Tbk1 in NIH3T3 cells impaired IL-6 secretion induced by MVNP and decreased TAF12 and ATF7, factors involved in 1,25(OH)2D3 hypersensitivity of pagetic osteoclasts. Similarly, Tbk1 knockdown in BMM from TRAP-MVNP and WT mice specifically impaired development of the MVNP-induced osteoclast pagetic phenotype. These results demonstrate that TBK1 plays a critical role in mediating the effects of MVNP on osteoclast differentiation

  9. Packaging of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus replicon RNA by a stable cell line expressing its nucleocapsid protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Byung-Hak; Kim, Jeong-Min; Kim, Jin-Kyoung; Jang, Han-Saem; Yun, Gil-Nam; Choi, Eun-Jin; Song, Jae-Young; Yun, Sang-Im; Lee, Young-Min

    2011-06-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), a member of the Arteriviridae family, is one of the most common and economically important swine pathogens. Although both live-attenuated and killed-inactivated vaccines against the virus have been available for a decade, PRRSV is still a major problem in the swine industry worldwide. To explore the possibility of producing single-round infectious PRRSV replicon particles as a potential vaccine strategy, we have now generated two necessary components: 1) a stable cell line (BHK/Sinrepl9/PRRSV-N) that constitutively expresses the viral nucleocapsid (N) protein localized to the cytoplasm and the nucleolus and 2) a PRRSV replicon vector (pBAC/PRRSV/Replicon-AN) with a 177-nucleotide deletion, removing the 3'-half portion of ORF7 in the viral genome, from which the self-replicating propagation-defective replicon RNAs were synthesized in vitro by SP6 polymerase run-off transcription. Transfection of this replicon RNA into N protein-expressing BHK-21 cells led to the secretion of infectious particles that packaged the replicon RNA, albeit with a low production efficiency of 0.4 × 10(2) to 1.1 × 10(2) infectious units/ml; the produced particles had only single-round infectivity with no cell-to-cell spread. This trans-complementation system for PRRSV provides a useful platform for studies to define the packaging signals and motifs present within the viral genome and N protein, respectively, and to develop viral replicon-based antiviral vaccines that will stop the infection and spread of this pathogen.

  10. Identification of phosphorylation sites in the nucleocapsid protein (N protein) of SARS-coronavirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Liang; Shao, Jianmin; Sun, Maomao; Liu, Jinxiu; Xu, Gongjin; Zhang, Xumin; Xu, Ningzhi; Wang, Rong; Liu, Siqi

    2007-12-01

    After decoding the genome of SARS-coronavirus (SARS-CoV), next challenge is to understand how this virus causes the illness at molecular bases. Of the viral structural proteins, the N protein plays a pivot role in assembly process of viral particles as well as viral replication and transcription. The SARS-CoV N proteins expressed in the eukaryotes, such as yeast and HEK293 cells, appeared in the multiple spots on two-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE), whereas the proteins expressed in E. coli showed a single 2DE spotE These 2DE spots were further examined by Western blot and MALDI-TOF/TOF MS, and identified as the N proteins with differently apparent pI values and similar molecular mass of 50 kDa. In the light of the observations and other evidences, a hypothesis was postulated that the SARS-CoV N protein could be phosphorylated in eukaryotes. To locate the plausible regions of phosphorylation in the N protein, two truncated N proteins were generated in E. coli and treated with PKC[alpha]. The two truncated N proteins after incubation of PKC[alpha] exhibited the differently electrophoretic behaviors on 2DE, suggesting that the region of 1-256 aa in the N protein was the possible target for PKC[alpha] phosphorylation. Moreover, the SARS-CoV N protein expressed in yeast were partially digested with trypsin and carefully analyzed by MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. In contrast to the completely tryptic digestion, these partially digested fragments generated two new peptide mass signals with neutral loss, and MS/MS analysis revealed two phosphorylated peptides located at the "dense serine" island in the N protein with amino acid sequences, GFYAEGSRGGSQASSRSSSR and GNSGNSTPGSSRGNSPARMASGGGK. With the PKC[alpha] phosphorylation treatment and the partially tryptic digestion, the N protein expressed in E. coli released the same peptides as observed in yeast cells. Thus, this investigation provided the preliminary data to determine the phosphorylation sites in the SARS-CoV N protein, and

  11. Mass Spectrometry Analysis Coupled with de novo Sequencing Reveals Amino Acid Substitutions in Nucleocapsid Protein from Influenza A Virus

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    Zijian Li

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Amino acid substitutions in influenza A virus are the main reasons for both antigenic shift and virulence change, which result from non-synonymous mutations in the viral genome. Nucleocapsid protein (NP, one of the major structural proteins of influenza virus, is responsible for regulation of viral RNA synthesis and replication. In this report we used LC-MS/MS to analyze tryptic digestion of nucleocapsid protein of influenza virus (A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 H1N1, which was isolated and purified by SDS poly-acrylamide gel electrophoresis. Thus, LC-MS/MS analyses, coupled with manual de novo sequencing, allowed the determination of three substituted amino acid residues R452K, T423A and N430T in two tryptic peptides. The obtained results provided experimental evidence that amino acid substitutions resulted from non-synonymous gene mutations could be directly characterized by mass spectrometry in proteins of RNA viruses such as influenza A virus.

  12. Studies on Mucosal Immunity Induced by Transmissible Gastroenteritis Virus Nucleocapsid Protein Recombinant Lactobacillus casei in Mice and Sow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Gui-hua; HOU Xi-lin; YU Li-yun; LIU Jian-kui; WEI Chun-hua

    2009-01-01

    Mucosal immunity plays an important role in protecting pigs against transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) infection. To elicit mucosal immune response against TGEV, we developed a surface antigen display system using the poly-γ-glutamate synthetase A (pgsA) protein of Bacillus subtilis as an anchoring matrix to express recombinant fusion proteins of pgsA and nucleocapsid protein of TGEV in Lactobacillus casei. Surface location of fusion protein was verified by ELISA and indirect immunofluorescence test. Oral and intranasal inoculations of pregnant sow and mice with recombinant L. casei resulted in high levels of serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) and secretory immunogiobulin A (sIgA) against recombinant N protein as demonstrated by ELISA. More importantly, the level of specific slgA in colostrum significantly increased compared with that of IgG. The serum lgG levels of the piglets increased after suckling coiostrum produced by sows was previously inoculated with recombinant L. casei. These results indicate that immunization with recombinant L. casei expressing TGEV N protein on its surface elicited high levels of specific slgA and circulating lgG against TGEV N protein.

  13. Critical epitopes in the nucleocapsid protein of SFTS virus recognized by a panel of SFTS patients derived human monoclonal antibodies.

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    Li Yu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: SFTS virus (SFTSV is a newly discovered pathogen to cause severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS in human. Successful control of SFTSV epidemic requires better understanding of the antigen target in humoral immune responses to the new bunyavirus infection. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have generated a combinatorial Fab antibody phage library from two SFTS patients recovered from SFTSV infection. To date, 94 unique human antibodies have been generated and characterized from over 1200 Fab antibody clones obtained by screening the library with SFTS purified virions. All those monoclonal antibodies (MAbs recognized the nucleocapsid (N protein of SFTSV while none of them were reactive to the viral glycoproteins Gn or Gc. Furthermore, over screening 1000 mouse monoclonal antibody clones derived from SFTSV virions immunization, 462 clones reacted with N protein, while only 16 clones were reactive to glycoprotein. Furthermore, epitope mapping of SFTSV N protein was performed through molecular simulation, site mutation and competitive ELISA, and we found that at least 4 distinct antigenic epitopes within N protein were recognized by those human and mouse MAbs, in particular mutation of Glu10 to Ala10 abolished or significantly reduced the binding activity of nearly most SFTS patients derived MAbs. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The large number of human recombinant MAbs derived from SFTS patients recognized the viral N protein indicated the important role of the N protein in humoral responses to SFTSV infection, and the critical epitopes we defined in this study provided molecular basis for detection and diagnosis of SFTSV infection.

  14. Identification and Characterization of Nuclear Localization Signals within the Nucleocapsid Protein VP15 of White Spot Syndrome Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-juan LI; Hua-jun ZHANG; Cong ZHANG; Zheng-li SHI

    2009-01-01

    The nucleocapsid protein VP15 of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is a basic DNA-binding protein. Three canonical bipartite nuclear localization signals (NLSs), called NLS1 (aa 11-27), NLS2 (aa 33-49) and NLS3 (44-60), have been detected in this protein, using the ScanProsite computer program. To determine the nuclear localization sequence of VP15, the full-length open reading frame, or the sequence of one of the three NLSs, was fused to the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene, and transiently expressed in insect Sf9 cells. Transfection with full-length VP15 resulted in GFP fluorescence being distributed exclusively in the nucleus. NLS 1 alone could also direct GFP to the nucleus, but less efficiently. Neither of the other two NLSs (NLS2 and 3) was functional when expressed alone, but exhibited similar activity to NLS1 when they were expressed as a fusion peptide. Furthermore, a mutated VP15, in which the two basic amino acids (11RR12) of NLSI were changed to two alanines (11AA12), caused GFP to be localized only in the cytoplasm of Sf9 cells. These results demonstrated that VP15, as a nuclear localization protein, needs cooperation between its three NLSs, and that the two residues (11RR12) of NLS1 play a key role in transporting the protein to the nucleus.

  15. Nucleocapsid-like particles of dengue-2 virus enhance the immune response against a recombinant protein of dengue-4 virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazo, Laura; Gil, Lázaro; Lopez, Carlos; Valdes, Iris; Marcos, Ernesto; Alvarez, Mayling; Blanco, Aracelys; Romero, Yaremis; Falcon, Viviana; Guzmán, María G; Guillén, Gerardo; Hermida, Lisset

    2010-10-01

    In this study, we evaluate in mice a novel formulation containing nucleocapsid-like particles of dengue-2 virus (recNLP) co-immunized with a chimeric protein composed of the dengue-4 envelope domain III fused twice within the meningococcal P64k protein of Neisseria meningitidis (PD24). The animals receiving the PD24-recNLP mixture showed the highest levels of antiviral antibodies. Similar results were obtained for IFNγ secretion levels, indicating a functional Th1 cellular response. Consistently, the percentage of mice surviving after viral challenge was significantly higher for those immunized with the mixture than for those inoculated with PD24 protein alone. In addition, in vivo depletion experiments demonstrated the decisive role of CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells in the protection conferred by immunization with PD24-recNLP. In conclusion, this report demonstrates for the first time the adjuvant capacity of dengue-2 virus recNLP. Additionally, the evidence presented highlights the potential of these particles for enhancing the immune response against heterologous recombinant proteins.

  16. Study on the Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes Clone Specific for the Nucleocapsid Protein of Hantaan Virus from Peripheral Blood in Patients with Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘蕾; 白雪帆; 黄长形; 李光玉

    2003-01-01

    In order to elucidate the molecular and immunological mechanisms as well as the pathogenesis of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS), the CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphecytes (CTL) clone was established directly from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of patients with HFRS. The activities of CTL were detected as usual with EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cell line (BLCL) as target cells. The results showed that the CTL clone could recognized and killed the targetcells with specificity of nucleocapsid protein of Hantaan virus (HTNVNP) with the cytotoxicity percentages of 50.2%,25.4% and 39.0% respectively. These results demonstrated that the antigenic epitopes of HTNVNP mainly located on the C-temainal of the viral nucleocapsid protein.

  17. Functional and Structural Characterization of Novel Type of Linker Connecting Capsid and Nucleocapsid Protein Domains in Murine Leukemia Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doležal, Michal; Hadravová, Romana; Kožíšek, Milan; Bednárová, Lucie; Langerová, Hana; Ruml, Tomáš; Rumlová, Michaela

    2016-09-23

    The assembly of immature retroviral particles is initiated in the cytoplasm by the binding of the structural polyprotein precursor Gag with viral genomic RNA. The protein interactions necessary for assembly are mediated predominantly by the capsid (CA) and nucleocapsid (NC) domains, which have conserved structures. In contrast, the structural arrangement of the CA-NC connecting region differs between retroviral species. In HIV-1 and Rous sarcoma virus, this region forms a rod-like structure that separates the CA and NC domains, whereas in Mason-Pfizer monkey virus, this region is densely packed, thus holding the CA and NC domains in close proximity. Interestingly, the sequence connecting the CA and NC domains in gammaretroviruses, such as murine leukemia virus (MLV), is unique. The sequence is called a charged assembly helix (CAH) due to a high number of positively and negatively charged residues. Although both computational and deletion analyses suggested that the MLV CAH forms a helical conformation, no structural or biochemical data supporting this hypothesis have been published. Using an in vitro assembly assay, alanine scanning mutagenesis, and biophysical techniques (circular dichroism, NMR, microcalorimetry, and electrophoretic mobility shift assay), we have characterized the structure and function of the MLV CAH. We provide experimental evidence that the MLV CAH belongs to a group of charged, E(R/K)-rich, single α-helices. This is the first single α-helix motif identified in viral proteins.

  18. Mutagenesis and nuclear magnetic resonance analyses of the fusion peptide of Helicoverpa armigera single nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus F protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Ying; Jiang, Ling; Wang, Manli; Yin, Feifei; Deng, Fei; Liu, Maili; Hu, Zhihong; Wang, Hualin

    2008-08-01

    The entry of enveloped viruses into cells is normally mediated by fusion between viral and cellular membranes, in which the fusion peptide plays a crucial role. The fusion peptides of group II nucleopolyhedrovirus (NPV) F proteins are quite conserved, with a hydrophobic region located at the N terminal of the F(1) fragment. For this report, we used mutagenesis and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to study the structure and function of the fusion peptide of the Helicoverpa armigera single-nucleocapsid NPV (HearNPV) F protein (HaF). Five mutations in the fusion peptide of HaF, N(1)G, N(1)L, I(2)N, G(3)L, and D(11)L, were generated separately, and the mutated f genes were transformed into the f-null HearNPV bacmid. The mutations N(1)L, I(2)N, and D(11)L were found to completely abolish the ability of the recombinant bacmids to produce infectious budded virus, while the mutations N(1)G and G(3)L did not. The low-pH-induced envelope fusion assay demonstrated that the N(1)G substitution increased the fusogenicity of HaF, while the G(3)L substitution reduced its fusogenicity. NMR spectroscopy was used to determine the structure of a synthetic fusion peptide of HaF in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate micelles at pH 5.0. The fusion peptide appeared to be an amphiphilic structure composed of a flexible coil in the N terminus from N(1) to N(5), a 3(10)-helix from F(6) to G(8), a turn at S(9), and a regular alpha-helix from V(10) to D(19). The data provide the first NMR structure of a baculovirus fusion peptide and allow us to further understand the relationship of structure and function of the fusion peptide.

  19. The inhibitory effect of the hepatitis B virus singly-spliced RNA-encoded p21.5 protein on HBV nucleocapsid formation.

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    Yi-Ling Wang

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B virus (HBV is the smallest DNA virus and the major cause of acute and chronic hepatitis. The 3.2 kb HBV viral genome generates four major species of unspliced viral transcript as well as several alternatively spliced RNAs. A 2.2 kb singly-spliced RNA is the most abundant spliced RNA and is widely expressed among all HBV genotypes. The expression of the singly-spliced RNA, as well as that of its encoded protein HBSP, is strongly associated with hepatopathology during HBV infection. Here, we report a novel inhibitory role of a p21.5 protein, which is encoded by a 2.2 kb singly-spliced RNA, in the modulation of HBV replication. We show that overexpression of the singly-spliced RNA is able to efficiently inhibit HBV replication. Furthermore, a mutation in the ATG start codon of the precore region completely abolishes the inhibitory effect of the singly-spliced RNA, indicating that a viral protein (p21.5 derived from the singly-spliced RNA is the mediator of the inhibition. Furthermore, p21.5 is able to form a homodimer that interacts with core dimers forming hybrid viral assembly components. Sucrose gradient fractionation revealed that co-expression of p21.5 resulted in a spread distribution pattern of core proteins ranging from low to high sucrose densities. When compared with p22, p21.5 is almost ten times more efficient at destabilizing HBV nucleocapsid assembly in Huh7 cells overexpressing either p21.5 or p22 protein. Moreover, in vivo expression of p21.5 protein by tail vein injection was found to decrease the amount of nucleocapsid in the livers of HBV-expressing BALB/c mice. In conclusion, our study reveals that the HBV 2.2 kb singly-spliced RNA encodes a 21.5 kDa viral protein that significantly interferes with the assembly of nucleocapsids during HBV nucleocapsid formation. These findings provide a possible strategy for elimination of HBV particles inside cells.

  20. The structurally disordered paramyxovirus nucleocapsid protein tail domain is a regulator of the mRNA transcription gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Robert M.; Krumm, Stefanie A.; Thakkar, Vidhi D.; Sohn, Maximilian; Plemper, Richard K.

    2017-01-01

    The paramyxovirus RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase (RdRp) complex loads onto the nucleocapsid protein (N)–encapsidated viral N:RNA genome for RNA synthesis. Binding of the RdRp of measles virus (MeV), a paramyxovirus archetype, is mediated through interaction with a molecular recognition element (MoRE) located near the end of the carboxyl-terminal Ntail domain. The structurally disordered central Ntail section is thought to add positional flexibility to MoRE, but the functional importance of this Ntail region for RNA polymerization is unclear. To address this question, we dissected functional elements of Ntail by relocating MoRE into the RNA-encapsidating Ncore domain. Linker-scanning mutagenesis identified a microdomain in Ncore that tolerates insertions. MoRE relocated to Ncore supported efficient interaction with N, MoRE-deficient Ntails had a dominant-negative effect on bioactivity that was alleviated by insertion of MoRE into Ncore, and recombinant MeV encoding N with relocated MoRE grew efficiently and remained capable of mRNA editing. MoRE in Ncore also restored viability of a recombinant lacking the disordered central Ntail section, but this recombinant was temperature-sensitive, with reduced RdRp loading efficiency and a flattened transcription gradient. These results demonstrate that virus replication requires high-affinity RdRp binding sites in N:RNA, but productive RdRp binding is independent of positional flexibility of MoRE and cis-acting elements in Ntail. Rather, the disordered central Ntail section independent of the presence of MoRE in Ntail steepens the paramyxovirus transcription gradient by promoting RdRp loading and preventing the formation of nonproductive polycistronic viral mRNAs. Disordered Ntails may have evolved as a regulatory element to adjust paramyxovirus gene expression. PMID:28168220

  1. Open reading frame 122 of Helicoverpa armigera single nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus encodes a novel structurual protein of occlusion-derived virions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Long, G.; Chen Xinwen,; Peters, D.; Vlak, J.M.; Hu, Z.

    2003-01-01

    Helicoverpa armigera single nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (HaSNPV) and its closely related variant H. zea SNPV (HzSNPV) contain 20 open reading frames (ORFs) unique among baculoviruses. In this report, the function of HaSNPV ORF 122 (Ha122) is investigated. Ha122 was transcribed as a

  2. Identification of mayaro virus nucleocapsid protein in nucleus of Aedes albopictus cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, C; de Andrade-Rozental, A F; Souto-Padrón, T; Carvalho, M G

    1997-01-01

    The modifications in the pattern of nuclear proteins of Aedes albopictus cells in response to Mayaro virus infection were analysed early and late after infection. The viral capsid (C) protein of 34 kDa (p34) could be detected in the nuclear compartment 4 h after infection, soon after its synthesis in the cytoplasm. In addition to p34, a group of high molecular weight proteins was also present in this compartment late after infection. The exposition of infected cells to supra optimal temperature of growth modifies significantly the pattern of nuclear proteins. However, the stress condition does not inhibit the transport of p34 to the nucleus. The transport of proteins into nuclei was also followed under "in vitro' conditions by incubating radiolabeled post-mitochondrial extract of infected cells with unlabeled nuclei. Under these conditions, as observed "in vivo', a specific transport of viral C protein and of a group of proteins of high molecular weight to the nuclei was also detected. These results indicate that Mayaro virus infection modifies the nuclear protein pattern in invertebrate cells.

  3. Charge neutralization as the major factor for the assembly of nucleocapsid-like particles from C-terminal truncated hepatitis C virus core protein

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    Theo Luiz Ferraz de Souza

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV core protein, in addition to its structural role to form the nucleocapsid assembly, plays a critical role in HCV pathogenesis by interfering in several cellular processes, including microRNA and mRNA homeostasis. The C-terminal truncated HCV core protein (C124 is intrinsically unstructured in solution and is able to interact with unspecific nucleic acids, in the micromolar range, and to assemble into nucleocapsid-like particles (NLPs in vitro. The specificity and propensity of C124 to the assembly and its implications on HCV pathogenesis are not well understood. Methods Spectroscopic techniques, transmission electron microscopy and calorimetry were used to better understand the propensity of C124 to fold or to multimerize into NLPs when subjected to different conditions or in the presence of unspecific nucleic acids of equivalent size to cellular microRNAs. Results The structural analysis indicated that C124 has low propensity to self-folding. On the other hand, for the first time, we show that C124, in the absence of nucleic acids, multimerizes into empty NLPs when subjected to a pH close to its isoelectric point (pH ≈ 12, indicating that assembly is mainly driven by charge neutralization. Isothermal calorimetry data showed that the assembly of NLPs promoted by nucleic acids is enthalpy driven. Additionally, data obtained from fluorescence correlation spectroscopy show that C124, in nanomolar range, was able to interact and to sequester a large number of short unspecific nucleic acids into NLPs. Discussion Together, our data showed that the charge neutralization is the major factor for the nucleocapsid-like particles assembly from C-terminal truncated HCV core protein. This finding suggests that HCV core protein may physically interact with unspecific cellular polyanions, which may correspond to microRNAs and mRNAs in a host cell infected by HCV, triggering their confinement into infectious particles.

  4. Expression of the Lassa virus nucleocapsid protein in insect cells infected with a recombinant baculovirus: application to diagnostic assays for Lassa virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, G N; Clegg, J C; Lloyd, G

    1990-01-01

    The coding region of the gene for the nucleocapsid protein of Lassa virus has been inserted into the genome of Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcNPV) using the transfer vector pAcYM1, so that expression of the foreign DNA is under the control of the promoter of the AcNPV polyhedrin gene. Infection of cultured Spodoptera frugiperda cells with recombinant virus resulted in the synthesis of high levels of a protein that was indistinguishable from the authentic Lassa virus protein by SDS gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting with a variety of specific immune sera and monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). The kinetics of appearance of the protein were comparable to those of polyhedrin production in wild-type AcNPV-infected cells. The recombinant material was antigenic when used in ELISA for Lassa virus-specific antibodies, reacting well with MAbs specific for the nucleocapsid protein and with sera from experimentally infected guinea-pigs. The recombinant ELISA was able to clearly distinguish sera from human cases of Lassa fever against a panel of known negative sera of African origin. Recombinant-infected insect cells were an effective substitute for mammalian cells infected with Lassa virus itself in the immunofluorescence assay for Lassa virus-specific antibodies. This system offers attractive alternatives to the use of Lassa virus-infected materials as reagents in diagnostic procedures.

  5. Use of surface plasmon resonance for the measurement of low affinity binding interactions between HSP72 and measles virus nucleocapsid protein

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    Zhang Xinsheng

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The 72 kDa heat shock protein (HSP72 is a molecular chaperone that binds native protein with low affinity. These interactions can alter function of the substrate, a property known as HSP-mediated activity control. In the present work, BIAcore instrumentation was used to monitor binding reactions between HSP72 and naturally occurring sequence variants of the measles virus (MV nucleocapsid protein (N, a structural protein regulating transcription/replication of the viral genome. Binding reactions employed synthetic peptides mimicking a putative HSP72 binding motif of N. Sequences were identified that bound HSP72 with affinities comparable to well-characterized activity control reactions. These sequences, but not those binding with lesser affinity, supported HSP72 activity control of MV transcription/replication. BIAcore instrumentation thus provides an effective way to measure biologically relevant low affinity interactions with structural variants of viral proteins.

  6. The Herpes Simplex Virus Protein pUL31 Escorts Nucleocapsids to Sites of Nuclear Egress, a Process Coordinated by Its N-Terminal Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Claus-Henning; Binz, Anne; Sodeik, Beate; Bauerfeind, Rudolf; Bailer, Susanne M.

    2015-01-01

    Progeny capsids of herpesviruses leave the nucleus by budding through the nuclear envelope. Two viral proteins, the membrane protein pUL34 and the nucleo-phosphoprotein pUL31 form the nuclear egress complex that is required for capsid egress out of the nucleus. All pUL31 orthologs are composed of a diverse N-terminal domain with 1 to 3 basic patches and a conserved C-terminal domain. To decipher the functions of the N-terminal domain, we have generated several Herpes simplex virus mutants and show here that the N-terminal domain of pUL31 is essential with basic patches being critical for viral propagation. pUL31 and pUL34 entered the nucleus independently of each other via separate routes and the N-terminal domain of pUL31 was required to prevent their premature interaction in the cytoplasm. Unexpectedly, a classical bipartite nuclear localization signal embedded in this domain was not required for nuclear import of pUL31. In the nucleus, pUL31 associated with the nuclear envelope and newly formed capsids. Viral mutants lacking the N-terminal domain or with its basic patches neutralized still associated with nucleocapsids but were unable to translocate them to the nuclear envelope. Replacing the authentic basic patches with a novel artificial one resulted in HSV1(17+)Lox-UL31-hbpmp1mp2, that was viable but delayed in nuclear egress and compromised in viral production. Thus, while the C-terminal domain of pUL31 is sufficient for the interaction with nucleocapsids, the N-terminal domain was essential for capsid translocation to sites of nuclear egress and a coordinated interaction with pUL34. Our data indicate an orchestrated sequence of events with pUL31 binding to nucleocapsids and escorting them to the inner nuclear envelope. We propose a common mechanism for herpesviral nuclear egress: pUL31 is required for intranuclear translocation of nucleocapsids and subsequent interaction with pUL34 thereby coupling capsid maturation with primary envelopment. PMID:26083367

  7. The Herpes Simplex Virus Protein pUL31 Escorts Nucleocapsids to Sites of Nuclear Egress, a Process Coordinated by Its N-Terminal Domain.

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    Christina Funk

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Progeny capsids of herpesviruses leave the nucleus by budding through the nuclear envelope. Two viral proteins, the membrane protein pUL34 and the nucleo-phosphoprotein pUL31 form the nuclear egress complex that is required for capsid egress out of the nucleus. All pUL31 orthologs are composed of a diverse N-terminal domain with 1 to 3 basic patches and a conserved C-terminal domain. To decipher the functions of the N-terminal domain, we have generated several Herpes simplex virus mutants and show here that the N-terminal domain of pUL31 is essential with basic patches being critical for viral propagation. pUL31 and pUL34 entered the nucleus independently of each other via separate routes and the N-terminal domain of pUL31 was required to prevent their premature interaction in the cytoplasm. Unexpectedly, a classical bipartite nuclear localization signal embedded in this domain was not required for nuclear import of pUL31. In the nucleus, pUL31 associated with the nuclear envelope and newly formed capsids. Viral mutants lacking the N-terminal domain or with its basic patches neutralized still associated with nucleocapsids but were unable to translocate them to the nuclear envelope. Replacing the authentic basic patches with a novel artificial one resulted in HSV1(17+Lox-UL31-hbpmp1mp2, that was viable but delayed in nuclear egress and compromised in viral production. Thus, while the C-terminal domain of pUL31 is sufficient for the interaction with nucleocapsids, the N-terminal domain was essential for capsid translocation to sites of nuclear egress and a coordinated interaction with pUL34. Our data indicate an orchestrated sequence of events with pUL31 binding to nucleocapsids and escorting them to the inner nuclear envelope. We propose a common mechanism for herpesviral nuclear egress: pUL31 is required for intranuclear translocation of nucleocapsids and subsequent interaction with pUL34 thereby coupling capsid maturation with primary

  8. Osteoclast inhibitory peptide-1 (OIP-1) inhibits measles virus nucleocapsid protein stimulated osteoclast formation/activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugarajan, Srinivasan; Youssef, Rimon F; Pati, Parmita; Ries, William L; Rao, D Sudhaker; Reddy, Sakamuri V

    2008-07-01

    Paget's disease (PD) of bone is characterized by increased activity of large abnormal osteoclasts (OCLs) which contain paramyxoviral nuclear and cytoplasmic inclusions. MVNP gene expression has been shown to induce pagetic phenotype in OCLs. We previously characterized the osteoclast inhibitory peptide-1 (OIP-1/hSca) which inhibits OCL formation/bone resorption. OIP-1 is a glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI)-linked membrane protein containing a 79 amino acid extra cellular peptide and a 32 amino acid carboxy terminal GPI-linked peptide (c-peptide) which is critical for OCL inhibition. In this study, we demonstrate that OIP-1 c-peptide significantly decreased (43%) osteoclast differentiation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with PD. Also, OIP-1 treatment to normal human bone marrow mononuclear cells transduced with the MVNP inhibited (41%) osteoclast precursor (CFU-GM) growth in methyl-cellulose cultures. We further tested if OIP-1 overexpression in the OCL lineage in transgenic mice inhibits MVNP stimulated OCL formation. MVNP transduction and RANKL stimulation of OIP-1 mouse bone marrow cells showed a significant decrease (43%) in OCL formation and inhibition (38%) of bone resorption area compared to wild-type mice. Western blot analysis identified that OIP-1 decreased (3.5-fold) MVNP induced TRAF2 expression during OCL differentiation. MVNP or OIP-1 expression did not affect TRAF6 levels. Furthermore, OIP-1 expression resulted in a significant inhibition of MVNP stimulated ASK1, Rac1, c-Fos, p-JNK, and NFATc1 expression during OCL differentiation. These results suggest that OIP-1 inhibits MVNP induced pagetic OCL formation/activity through suppression of RANK signaling. Thus, OIP-1 may have therapeutic utility against excess bone resorption in patients with PD.

  9. A Tetravalent Formulation Based on Recombinant Nucleocapsid-like Particles from Dengue Viruses Induces a Functional Immune Response in Mice and Monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Lázaro; Cobas, Karem; Lazo, Laura; Marcos, Ernesto; Hernández, Laura; Suzarte, Edith; Izquierdo, Alienys; Valdés, Iris; Blanco, Aracelys; Puentes, Pedro; Romero, Yaremis; Pérez, Yusleidi; Guzmán, María G; Guillén, Gerardo; Hermida, Lisset

    2016-11-01

    Despite the considerable effort that has been invested in elucidating the mechanisms of protection and immunopathogenesis associated with dengue virus infections, a reliable correlate of protection against the disease remains to be found. Neutralizing Abs, long considered the prime component of a protective response, can exacerbate disease severity when present at subprotective levels, and a growing body of data is challenging the notion that their titers are positively correlated with disease protection. Consequently, the protective role of cell-mediated immunity in the control of dengue infections has begun to be studied. Although earlier research implicated cellular immunity in dengue immunopathogenesis, a wealth of newer data demonstrated that multifunctional CD8(+) T cell responses are instrumental for avoiding the more severe manifestations of dengue disease. In this article, we describe a new tetravalent vaccine candidate based on recombinant dengue virus capsid proteins, efficiently produced in Escherichia coli and purified using a single ion-exchange chromatography step. After aggregation to form nucleocapsid-like particles upon incubation with an oligodeoxynucleotide containing immunostimulatory CpG motifs, these Ags induce, in mice and monkeys, an IFN-γ-secreting cell response that significantly reduces viral load after challenge without the contribution of antiviral Abs. Therefore, this new vaccine candidate may not carry the risk for disease enhancement associated with Ab-based formulations.

  10. Carbonyl J Acid Derivatives Block Protein Priming of Hepadnaviral P Protein and DNA-Dependent DNA Synthesis Activity of Hepadnaviral Nucleocapsids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong-Xiang; Wen, Yu-Mei

    2012-01-01

    Current treatments for chronic hepatitis B are effective in only a fraction of patients. All approved directly antiviral agents are nucleos(t)ide analogs (NAs) that target the DNA polymerase activity of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) P protein; resistance and cross-resistance may limit their long-term applicability. P protein is an unusual reverse transcriptase that initiates reverse transcription by protein priming, by which a Tyr residue in the unique terminal protein domain acts as an acceptor of the first DNA nucleotide. Priming requires P protein binding to the ε stem-loop on the pregenomic RNA (pgRNA) template. This interaction also mediates pgRNA encapsidation and thus provides a particularly attractive target for intervention. Exploiting in vitro priming systems available for duck HBV (DHBV) but not HBV, we demonstrate that naphthylureas of the carbonyl J acid family, in particular KM-1, potently suppress protein priming by targeting P protein and interfering with the formation of P-DHBV ε initiation complexes. Quantitative evaluation revealed a significant increase in complex stability during maturation, yet even primed complexes remained sensitive to KM-1 concentrations below 10 μM. Furthermore, KM-1 inhibited the DNA-dependent DNA polymerase activity of both DHBV and HBV nucleocapsids, including from a lamivudine-resistant variant, directly demonstrating the sensitivity of human HBV to the compound. Activity against viral replication in cells was low, likely due to low intracellular availability. KM-1 is thus not yet a drug candidate, but its distinct mechanism of action suggests that it is a highly useful lead for developing improved, therapeutically applicable derivatives. PMID:22787212

  11. Role of the N-Terminal Zinc Finger of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Nucleocapsid Protein in Virus Structure and Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanchou, Valérie; Decimo, Didier; Péchoux, Christine; Lener, Daniela; Rogemond, Véronique; Berthoux, Lionel; Ottmann, Michèle; Darlix, Jean-Luc

    1998-01-01

    Nucleocapsid protein (NCp7) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 is found covering the genomic RNA in the interior of the viral particle. It is a highly basic protein with two zinc fingers of the form CX2CX4HX4C which exhibit strong affinity for a zinc cation. To study the structure-function relationship of the N-terminal zinc finger of NCp7, this domain was either deleted or changed to CX2CX4CX4C. We examined virus formation and structure as well as proviral DNA synthesis. Our data show that these two NC mutations result in the formation of particles with an abnormal core morphology and impair the end of proviral DNA synthesis, leading to noninfectious viruses. PMID:9557738

  12. The nucleocapsid protein of Rift Valley fever virus is a potent human CD8+ T cell antigen and elicits memory responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weidong Xu

    Full Text Available There is no licensed human vaccine currently available for Rift Valley Fever Virus (RVFV, a Category A high priority pathogen and a serious zoonotic threat. While neutralizing antibodies targeting the viral glycoproteins are protective, they appear late in the course of infection, and may not be induced in time to prevent a natural or bioterrorism-induced outbreak. Here we examined the immunogenicity of RVFV nucleocapsid (N protein as a CD8(+ T cell antigen with the potential for inducing rapid protection after vaccination. HLA-A*0201 (A2-restricted epitopic determinants were identified with N-specific CD8(+ T cells from eight healthy donors that were primed with dendritic cells transduced to express N, and subsequently expanded in vitro by weekly re-stimulations with monocytes pulsed with 59 15mer overlapping peptides (OLPs across N. Two immunodominant epitopes, VT9 (VLSEWLPVT, N(121-129 and IL9 (ILDAHSLYL, N165-173, were defined. VT9- and IL9-specific CD8(+ T cells identified by tetramer staining were cytotoxic and polyfunctional, characteristics deemed important for viral control in vivo. These peptides induced specific CD8(+ T cell responses in A2-transgenic mice, and more importantly, potent N-specific CD8(+ T cell reactivities, including VT9- and IL9-specific ones, were mounted by mice after a booster vaccination with the live attenuated RVF MP-12. Our data suggest that the RVFV N protein is a potent human T cell immunogen capable of eliciting broad, immunodominant CD8(+ T cell responses that are potentially protective. Understanding the immune responses to the nucleocapsid is central to the design of an effective RVFV vaccine irrespective of whether this viral protein is effective as a stand-alone immunogen or only in combination with other RVFV antigens.

  13. Structure of the vesicular stomatitis virus nucleocapsid in complex with the nucleocapsid-binding domain of the small polymerase cofactor, P

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Todd J.; Luo, Ming; (UAB-MED)

    2009-10-05

    The negative-strand RNA viruses (NSRVs) are unique because their nucleocapsid, not the naked RNA, is the active template for transcription and replication. The viral polymerase of nonsegmented NSRVs contains a large polymerase catalytic subunit (L) and a nonenzymatic cofactor, the phosphoprotein (P). Insight into how P delivers the polymerase complex to the nucleocapsid has long been pursued by reverse genetics and biochemical approaches. Here, we present the X-ray crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of P of vesicular stomatitis virus, a prototypic nonsegmented NSRV, bound to nucleocapsid-like particles. P binds primarily to the C-terminal lobe of 2 adjacent N proteins within the nucleocapsid. This binding mode is exclusive to the nucleocapsid, not the nucleocapsid (N) protein in other existing forms. Localization of phosphorylation sites within P and their proximity to the RNA cavity give insight into how the L protein might be oriented to access the RNA template.

  14. Analysis of proteins that interact with nucleocapsid protein of SARS-CoV using 15-mer phage-displayed library

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU ZhengXue; WANG ZhanHui; LIU YingLe; DONG Wei; QI YiPeng

    2007-01-01

    Analysis of proteins that interact with N protein of SARS-CoV using 15-mer phage-displayed library will help to explore the virus pathogenesis and to develop new drugs and vaccines against SARS. In this study, we cloned, expressed and purified N protein of SARS-CoV. This 46-kD N protein was verified by SDS-PAGE and Western-blot. Then, the peptides binding-specific to N protein were identified using 15-mer phage-displayed library. Surprisingly, all of the 89 clones from monoclonal ELISA were positive (S/N>2.1) and the result was further confirmed experimentally once again. Six N protein-binding peptides, designated separately as SNA1, SNA2, SNA4, SNA5, SNA9 and SNG11, were selected for sequencing. Sequence analysis suggested that SNA5 shared approximatively 100% sequence identity to SNA4, SNA2, SNA9 and SNA1. In addition, the binding specificity of the 15-mer peptides with the SARS-CoV N protein was further demonstrated by blocking ELISA using the synthetical 15-mer peptide according to the deduced amino acid sequence of SNA5. Also, the deduced amino sequence of SNA5 was compared with proteins in translated database using the tblastx program, and the results showed that the proteins with the highest homology were Ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase iron-sulfur subunits (UCRI or UQCR), otherwise known as the Rieske iron-sulfur proteins (RISP). Notablely, in the [2Fe-2S] redox centre of UCRI, there were 6 residues [GGW(Y)F(Y)CP] compatible to the residues (position 2→7, GGWFCP7) of the NH2-terminal of the 15-mer peptide, which indicated higher binding specificity between the N protein of SARS-CoV and the redox centre of UCRI to some extent. Here, the possible molecular mechanisms of SARS-CoV N protein in the pathogenesis of SARS are discussed.

  15. Antigenic cross-reactivity among avian pneumoviruses of subgroups A, B, and C at the matrix but not nucleocapsid proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lwamba, Humphrey C M; Halvorson, David A; Nagaraja, Kakambi V; Turpin, Elizabeth A; Swayne, David; Seal, Bruce S; Njenga, M Kariuki

    2002-01-01

    Earlier findings from our laboratory based on analysis of nucleotide and predicted amino acid sequence identities of 15 avian pneumoviruses (APVs) isolated from the United States (subgroup C) demonstrated that the viruses were phylogenetically separated from the European subgroup A and subgroup B viruses. Here, we investigated whether viruses from the three subgroups were cross-reactive by testing field sera positive for each of the APV subgroups in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test with recombinant matrix (M) and nucleoprotein (N) proteins generated from a Minnesota APV isolate (APV/MN2A). Sera from turkeys infected with APV subgroup A, B, or C reacted with recombinant M protein derived from APV/MN2A. In contrast, recombinant N protein from APV/MN2A virus was reactive with sera from subtypes A and C viruses but not from subtype B virus. The results illustrate that viruses from the three APV subtypes share antigenic homology, and the M protein-based ELISA is adequate for monitoring APV outbreaks but not for distinguishing between different subtypes.

  16. Site-selective probing of cTAR destabilization highlights the necessary plasticity of the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein to chaperone the first strand transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godet, Julien; Kenfack, Cyril; Przybilla, Frédéric; Richert, Ludovic; Duportail, Guy; Mély, Yves

    2013-01-01

    The HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein (NCp7) is a nucleic acid chaperone required during reverse transcription. During the first strand transfer, NCp7 is thought to destabilize cTAR, the (−)DNA copy of the TAR RNA hairpin, and subsequently direct the TAR/cTAR annealing through the zipping of their destabilized stem ends. To further characterize the destabilizing activity of NCp7, we locally probe the structure and dynamics of cTAR by steady-state and time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. NC(11–55), a truncated NCp7 version corresponding to its zinc-finger domain, was found to bind all over the sequence and to preferentially destabilize the penultimate double-stranded segment in the lower part of the cTAR stem. This destabilization is achieved through zinc-finger–dependent binding of NC to the G10 and G50 residues. Sequence comparison further revealed that C•A mismatches close to the two G residues were critical for fine tuning the stability of the lower part of the cTAR stem and conferring to G10 and G50 the appropriate mobility and accessibility for specific recognition by NC. Our data also highlight the necessary plasticity of NCp7 to adapt to the sequence and structure variability of cTAR to chaperone its annealing with TAR through a specific pathway. PMID:23511968

  17. Investigation by two-photon fluorescence correlation spectroscopy of the interaction of the nucleocapsid protein of HIV-1 with hairpin loop DNA sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mely, Yves; Azoulay, Joel; Beltz, Herve; Clamme, Jean-Pierre; Bernacchi, Serena; Ficheux, Damien; Roques, Bernard P.; Darlix, Jean-Luc

    2004-09-01

    The nucleocapsid protein NCp7 of HIV-1 possesses nucleic acid chaperone properties that are critical for the two strand transfer reactions required during reverse transcription. The first DNA strand transfer relies on the destabilization by NCp7 of double-stranded segments of the transactivation response element, TAR sequence, at the 3' end of the genomic RNA and the complementary sequence cTAR at the 3" terminus of the early product of reverse transcription. To characterize NCp7-mediated nucleic acid destabilization, we investigated by steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and two photon fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, the interaction of a doubly-labelled cTAR sequence with NCp7. The conformational fluctuations observed in the absence of NCp7 were associated with the rapid opening and closing (fraying) of the double stranded terminal segment of cTAR. NCp7 destabilizes cTAR mainly through a large increase of the opening rate constant. Additionally, the various destabilizing structures (bulges, internal loop, mismatches) spread all over cTAR secondary structure were found to be critical for NCp7 chaperone activity. Taken together, our data enabled us to propose a molecular mechanism for the destabilizing activity of NCp7 on cTAR which is crucial for the formation of the cTAR-TAR complex during the first strand transfer reaction.

  18. An alphavirus temperature-sensitive capsid mutant reveals stages of nucleocapsid assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Yan, E-mail: yzheng15@students.kgi.edu; Kielian, Margaret, E-mail: margaret.kielian@einstein.yu.edu

    2015-10-15

    Alphaviruses have a nucleocapsid core composed of the RNA genome surrounded by an icosahedral lattice of capsid protein. An insertion after position 186 in the capsid protein produced a strongly temperature-sensitive growth phenotype. Even when the structural proteins were synthesized at the permissive temperature (28 °C), subsequent incubation of the cells at the non-permissive temperature (37 °C) dramatically decreased mutant capsid protein stability and particle assembly. Electron microscopy confirmed the presence of cytoplasmic nucleocapsids in mutant-infected cells cultured at the permissive temperature, but these nucleocapsids were not stable to sucrose gradient separation. In contrast, nucleocapsids isolated from mutant virus particles had similar stability to that of wildtype virus. Our data support a model in which cytoplasmic nucleocapsids go through a maturation step during packaging into virus particles. The insertion site lies in the interface between capsid proteins in the assembled nucleocapsid, suggesting the region where such a stabilizing transition occurs. - Highlights: • We characterize an alphavirus capsid insertion mutation. • These capsid mutants are highly temperature sensitive for growth. • The insertion affects nucleocapsid stability. • Results suggest that the nucleocapsid is stabilized during virus budding.

  19. Open reading frame 94 of Helicoverpa armigera single nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus encodes a novel conserved occlusion-derived virion protein, ODV-EC43

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fang, M.; Wang, H.; Yuan, L.; Chen Xinwen,; Vlak, J.M.; Hu, Z.

    2003-01-01

    Open reading frame 94 (Ha94) of Helicoverpa armigera single nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (HaSNPV) is 1086 bp long and a homologue of Autographa californica multiple NPV ORF109. The gene is conserved among all baculoviruses whose genomes have been completely sequenced so far and is thus

  20. Measles virus nucleocapsid protein, a key contributor to Paget’s disease, increases IL-6 expression via down-regulation of FoxO3/Sirt1signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng-Ming; Sarmasik, Aliye; Hiruma, Yuko; Sun, Quanhong; Sammut, Benedicte; Windle, Jolene J.; Roodman, G. David; Galson, Deborah L.

    2012-01-01

    Measles virus plays an important role as an environmental factor in the pathogenesis of Paget’s disease (PD). Previous studies have shown that IL-6 is increased in the bone marrow of Paget’s patients and that measles virus nucleocapsid protein (MVNP) induces IL-6 secretion by pagetic osteoclasts. Further, IL-6 plays a critical role in the development of pagetic osteoclasts and bone lesions induced by PD, but the mechanisms regulating IL-6 production by MVNP remain unclear. Our current studies revealed that MVNP expression in osteoclast precursors down-regulated Sirt1 mRNA and protein, a negative regulator of NF-κB activity, which is a key factor for IL-6 expression. MVNP expression in NIH3T3 cells also elevated Il-6 transcription and impaired the expression of Sirt1 mRNA both under basal conditions and upon activation of the Sirt1 upstream regulator FoxO3 by LY294002 (a PI3K/AKT inhibitor). Luciferase activity assays showed that constitutively active FoxO3 abolished the repressive effect of MVNP on reporters driven by either FoxO3 response elements or the Sirt1 promoter. Further, protein stability assays revealed that FoxO3 was degraded more rapidly in MVNP-expressing cells than in control cells following the addition of cycloheximide. Similarly, co-transfection of MVNP and FoxO3 into HEK293 cells demonstrated that MVNP decreased the protein levels of over-expressed FoxO3 in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment with the proteasome inhibitor, MG132, blocked the MVNP-triggered decrease of FoxO3, and the treatment with the serine/threonine phosphatase inhibitor, Calyculin A, revealed that MVNP increased phosphorylation of FoxO3. Further, over-expression of Sirt1 or treatment with the Sirt1 activator resveratrol blocked the increase in Il-6 transcription by MVNP. Finally, resveratrol reduced the numbers of TRAP positive multi-nuclear cells in bone marrow cultures from TRAP-MVNP transgenic mice to wild type levels. These results indicate that MVNP decreases FoxO3

  1. Strong resistance against Rice grassy stunt virus is induced in transgenic rice plants expressing double-stranded RNA of the viral genes for nucleocapsid or movement proteins as targets for RNA interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Takumi; Ogamino, Takumi; Hiraguri, Akihiro; Nakazono-Nagaoka, Eiko; Uehara-Ichiki, Tamaki; Nakajima, Masami; Akutsu, Katsumi; Omura, Toshihiro; Sasaya, Takahide

    2013-05-01

    Rice grassy stunt virus (RGSV), a member of the genus Tenuivirus, causes significant economic losses in rice production in South, Southeast, and East Asian countries. Growing resistant varieties is the most efficient method to control RGSV; however, suitable resistance genes have not yet been found in natural rice resources. One of the most promising methods to confer resistance against RGSV is the use of RNA interference (RNAi). It is important to target viral genes that play important roles in viral infection and proliferation at an early stage of viral replication. Our recent findings obtained from an RNAi experiment with Rice stripe virus (RSV), a tenuivirus, revealed that the genes for nucleocapsid and movement proteins were appropriate targets for RNAi to confer resistance against RSV. In this study, we transformed rice plants by introducing an RNAi construct of the RGSV genes for the nucelocapsid protein pC5 or movement protein pC6. All progenies from self-fertilized transgenic plants had strong resistance against RGSV infection and did not allow the proliferation of RGSV. Thus, our strategy to target genes for nucleocapsid and movement proteins for conferring viral resistance might be applicable to the plant viruses in the genus Tenuivirus.

  2. Pentagalloylglucose Blocks the Nuclear Transport and the Process of Nucleocapsid Egress to Inhibit HSV-1 Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Fujun; Ma, Kaiqi; Chen, Maoyun; Zou, Muping; Wu, Yanting; Li, Feng; Wang, Yifei

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), a widespread virus, causes a variety of human viral diseases worldwide. The serious threat of drug-resistance highlights the extreme urgency to develop novel antiviral drugs with different mechanisms of action. Pentagalloylglucose (PGG) is a natural polyphenolic compound with significant anti-HSV activity; however, the mechanisms underlying its antiviral activity need to be defined by further studies. In this study, we found that PGG treatment delays the nuclear transport process of HSV-1 particles by inhibiting the upregulation of dynein (a cellular major motor protein) induced by HSV-1 infection. Furthermore, PGG treatment affects the nucleocapsid egress of HSV-1 by inhibiting the expression and disrupting the cellular localization of pEGFP-UL31 and pEGFP-UL34, which are indispensable for HSV-1 nucleocapsid egress from the nucleus. However, the over-expression of pEGFP-UL31 and pEGFP-UL34 could decrease the antiviral effect of PGG. In this study, for the first time, the antiviral activity of PGG against acyclovir-resistant virus was demonstrated in vitro, and the possible mechanisms of its anti-HSV activities were identified based on the inhibition of nuclear transport and nucleocapsid egress in HSV-1. It was further confirmed that PGG could be a promising candidate for HSV therapy, especially for drug-resistant strains.

  3. Resolution of the cellular proteome of the nucleocapsid protein from a highly pathogenic isolate of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus identifies PARP-1 as a cellular target whose interaction is critical for virus biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Long; Lear, Zoe; Hughes, David J; Wu, Weining; Zhou, En-min; Whitehouse, Adrian; Chen, Hongying; Hiscox, Julian A

    2015-03-23

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is a major threat to the swine industry and food security worldwide. The nucleocapsid (N) protein is a major structural protein of PRRSV. The primary function of this protein is to encapsidate the viral RNA genome, and it is also thought to participate in the modulation of host cell biology and recruitment of cellular factors to facilitate virus infection. In order to the better understand these latter roles the cellular interactome of PRRSV N protein was defined using label free quantitative proteomics. This identified several cellular factors that could interact with the N protein including poly [ADP-ribose] polymerase 1 (PARP-1), a cellular protein, which can add adenosine diphosphate ribose to a protein. Use of the PARP-1 small molecule inhibitor, 3-AB, in PRRSV infected cells demonstrated that PARP-1 was required and acted as an enhancer factor for virus biology. Serial growth of PRRSV in different concentrations of 3-AB did not yield viruses that were able to grow with wild type kinetics, suggesting that by targeting a cellular protein crucial for virus biology, resistant phenotypes did not emerge. This study provides further evidence that cellular proteins, which are critical for virus biology, can also be targeted to ablate virus growth and provide a high barrier for the emergence of drug resistance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The nucleocapsid proteins of mouse hepatitis virus and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus share the same IFN-β antagonizing mechanism: attenuation of PACT-mediated RIG-I/ MDA5 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Zhen; Fang, Liurong; Yuan, Shuangling; Zhao, Ling; Wang, Xunlei; Long, Siwen; Wang, Mohan; Wang, Dang; Foda, Mohamed Frahat; Xiao, Shaobo

    2017-07-25

    Coronaviruses (CoVs) are a huge threat to both humans and animals and have evolved elaborate mechanisms to antagonize interferons (IFNs). Nucleocapsid (N) protein is the most abundant viral protein in CoV-infected cells, and has been identified as an innate immunity antagonist in several CoVs, including mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)-CoV. However, the underlying molecular mechanism(s) remain unclear. In this study, we found that MHV N protein inhibited Sendai virus and poly(I:C)-induced IFN-β production by targeting a molecule upstream of retinoic acid-induced gene I (RIG-I) and melanoma differentiation gene 5 (MDA5). Further studies showed that both MHV and SARS-CoV N proteins directly interacted with protein activator of protein kinase R (PACT), a cellular dsRNA-binding protein that can bind to RIG-I and MDA5 to activate IFN production. The N-PACT interaction sequestered the association of PACT and RIG-I/MDA5, which in turn inhibited IFN-β production. However, the N proteins from porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), which are also classified in the order Nidovirales, did not interact and counteract with PACT. Taken together, our present study confirms that both MHV and SARS-CoV N proteins can perturb the function of cellular PACT to circumvent the innate antiviral response. However, this strategy does not appear to be used by all CoVs N proteins.

  5. Heat Shock Protein 70 Family Members Interact with Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus and Hazara Virus Nucleocapsid Proteins and Perform a Functional Role in the Nairovirus Replication Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surtees, Rebecca; Dowall, Stuart D.; Shaw, Amelia; Armstrong, Stuart; Hewson, Roger; Carroll, Miles W.; Mankouri, Jamel; Edwards, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Nairovirus genus of the Bunyaviridae family contains serious human and animal pathogens classified within multiple serogroups and species. Of these serogroups, the Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) serogroup comprises sole members CCHFV and Hazara virus (HAZV). CCHFV is an emerging zoonotic virus that causes often-fatal hemorrhagic fever in infected humans for which preventative or therapeutic strategies are not available. In contrast, HAZV is nonpathogenic to humans and thus represents an excellent model to study aspects of CCHFV biology under conditions of more-accessible biological containment. The three RNA segments that form the nairovirus genome are encapsidated by the viral nucleocapsid protein (N) to form ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes that are substrates for RNA synthesis and packaging into virus particles. We used quantitative proteomics to identify cellular interaction partners of CCHFV N and identified robust interactions with cellular chaperones. These interactions were validated using immunological methods, and the specific interaction between native CCHFV N and cellular chaperones of the HSP70 family was confirmed during live CCHFV infection. Using infectious HAZV, we showed for the first time that the nairovirus N-HSP70 association was maintained within both infected cells and virus particles, where N is assembled as RNPs. Reduction of active HSP70 levels in cells by the use of small-molecule inhibitors significantly reduced HAZV titers, and a model for chaperone function in the context of high genetic variability is proposed. These results suggest that chaperones of the HSP70 family are required for nairovirus replication and thus represent a genetically stable cellular therapeutic target for preventing nairovirus-mediated disease. IMPORTANCE Nairoviruses compose a group of human and animal viruses that are transmitted by ticks and associated with serious or fatal disease. One member is Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever

  6. Novel immunodominant peptide presentation strategy: a featured HLA-A*2402-restricted cytotoxic T-lymphocyte epitope stabilized by intrachain hydrogen bonds from severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus nucleocapsid protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Wu, Peng; Gao, Feng; Qi, Jianxun; Kawana-Tachikawa, Ai; Xie, Jing; Vavricka, Christopher J; Iwamoto, Aikichi; Li, Taisheng; Gao, George F

    2010-11-01

    Antigenic peptides recognized by virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are presented by major histocompatibility complex (MHC; or human leukocyte antigen [HLA] in humans) molecules, and the peptide selection and presentation strategy of the host has been studied to guide our understanding of cellular immunity and vaccine development. Here, a severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) nucleocapsid (N) protein-derived CTL epitope, N1 (QFKDNVILL), restricted by HLA-A*2402 was identified by a series of in vitro studies, including a computer-assisted algorithm for prediction, stabilization of the peptide by co-refolding with HLA-A*2402 heavy chain and β(2)-microglobulin (β(2)m), and T2-A24 cell binding. Consequently, the antigenicity of the peptide was confirmed by enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT), proliferation assays, and HLA-peptide complex tetramer staining using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from donors who had recovered from SARS donors. Furthermore, the crystal structure of HLA-A*2402 complexed with peptide N1 was determined, and the featured peptide was characterized with two unexpected intrachain hydrogen bonds which augment the central residues to bulge out of the binding groove. This may contribute to the T-cell receptor (TCR) interaction, showing a host immunodominant peptide presentation strategy. Meanwhile, a rapid and efficient strategy is presented for the determination of naturally presented CTL epitopes in the context of given HLA alleles of interest from long immunogenic overlapping peptides.

  7. HIV-1 protease and reverse transcriptase control the architecture of their nucleocapsid partner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilles Mirambeau

    Full Text Available The HIV-1 nucleocapsid is formed during protease (PR-directed viral maturation, and is transformed into pre-integration complexes following reverse transcription in the cytoplasm of the infected cell. Here, we report a detailed transmission electron microscopy analysis of the impact of HIV-1 PR and reverse transcriptase (RT on nucleocapsid plasticity, using in vitro reconstitutions. After binding to nucleic acids, NCp15, a proteolytic intermediate of nucleocapsid protein (NC, was processed at its C-terminus by PR, yielding premature NC (NCp9 followed by mature NC (NCp7, through the consecutive removal of p6 and p1. This allowed NC co-aggregation with its single-stranded nucleic-acid substrate. Examination of these co-aggregates for the ability of RT to catalyse reverse transcription showed an effective synthesis of double-stranded DNA that, remarkably, escaped from the aggregates more efficiently with NCp7 than with NCp9. These data offer a compelling explanation for results from previous virological studies that focused on i Gag processing leading to nucleocapsid condensation, and ii the disappearance of NCp7 from the HIV-1 pre-integration complexes. We propose that HIV-1 PR and RT, by controlling the nucleocapsid architecture during the steps of condensation and dismantling, engage in a successive nucleoprotein-remodelling process that spatiotemporally coordinates the pre-integration steps of HIV-1. Finally we suggest that nucleoprotein remodelling mechanisms are common features developed by mobile genetic elements to ensure successful replication.

  8. Screening and identification of T helper 1 and linear immunodominant antibody-binding epitopes in the spike 2 domain and the nucleocapsid protein of feline infectious peritonitis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Ryoichi; Furukawa, Tomoko; Kotake, Masako; Takano, Tomomi; Motokawa, Kenji; Gemma, Tsuyoshi; Watanabe, Rie; Arai, Setsuo; Hohdatsu, Tsutomu

    2011-02-17

    inductivity of fIFN-γ production in PBMCs isolated from type I FIPV- and type II FIPV-infected non-FIP cats. In N protein, 4 peptides containing linear immunodominant antibody-binding epitopes were identified, and 2 peptides derived from residues 345 to 372 showed strong reactivity with plasma of type I FIPV- and type II FIPV-infected cats. The Th1 and linear immunodominant antibody-binding epitopes were located at different positions in both the S2 domain and N protein. Our results may provide important information for the development of peptide-based vaccine against FIPV infection.

  9. TROUBLESHOOTING IN EXPRESSION AND PURIFICATION OF RECOMBINANT SEVERE ACUTE RESPIRATORY SYNDROME-ASSOCIATED CORONAVIRUS NUCLEOCAPSID PROTEIN IN Escherichia coli BL21

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budiman Bela

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Considering importance of N protein for study of viral pathogenesis or development of immunodiagnostic assay, wereported effects of several conditions on purity and homogeneity of recombinant SARS-CoV N protein expressed in E.coli BL21. The SARS-CoV N gene was reverse transcribed and amplified by the reverse transcription-polymerase chainreaction (RT-PCR technique. The amplicons were cloned into pGEX-6P1 and followed by subcloning of the targetgene into pQE-80L. After inserting the recombinant plasmid (pQE80-N into E. coli, the recombinant protein (6 x Histag-N protein fusion was expressed by inducing the bacterial cells with 0.1-0.5 mM isopropyl-1-thio-Dgalactopyranoside(IPTG for 1-5 h. The protein recombinant were extracted from the bacterial cells by NTT buffercontaining 0-20 mM imidazol, and followed by Ni-NTA affinity resin purification. The results showed that induction ofE. coli BL21 with 0.2 mM IPTG for 4 h and followed with lysis of bacterial cells in NTT buffer containing 10 mMimidazol were optimal conditions to obtain the pure recombinant SARS-CoV N protein.

  10. The 15N and 46R Residues of Highly Pathogenic Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus Nucleocapsid Protein Enhance Regulatory T Lymphocytes Proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baochao Fan

    Full Text Available Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV negatively modulates host immune responses, resulting in persistent infection and immunosuppression. PRRSV infection increases the number of PRRSV-specific regulatory T lymphocytes (Tregs in infected pigs. However, the target antigens for Tregs proliferation in PRRSV infection have not been fully understood. In this study, we demonstrated that the highly pathogenic PRRSV (HP-PRRSV induced more CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Tregs than classical PRRSV (C-PRRSV strain. Of the recombinant GP5, M and N proteins of HP-PRRSV expressed in baculovirus expression systems, only N protein induced Tregs proliferation. The Tregs assays showed that three amino-acid regions, 15-21, 42-48 and 88-94, in N protein played an important role in induction of Tregs proliferation with synthetic peptides covering the whole length of N protein. By using reverse genetic methods, it was firstly found that the 15N and 46R residues in PRRSV N protein were critical for induction of Tregs proliferation. The phenotype of induced Tregs closely resembled that of transforming-growth-factor-β-secreting T helper 3 Tregs in swine. These data should be useful for understanding the mechanism of immunity to PRRSV and development of infection control strategies in the future.

  11. The 15N and 46R Residues of Highly Pathogenic Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus Nucleocapsid Protein Enhance Regulatory T Lymphocytes Proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Baochao; Liu, Xing; Bai, Juan; Li, Yufeng; Zhang, Qiaoya; Jiang, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) negatively modulates host immune responses, resulting in persistent infection and immunosuppression. PRRSV infection increases the number of PRRSV-specific regulatory T lymphocytes (Tregs) in infected pigs. However, the target antigens for Tregs proliferation in PRRSV infection have not been fully understood. In this study, we demonstrated that the highly pathogenic PRRSV (HP-PRRSV) induced more CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Tregs than classical PRRSV (C-PRRSV) strain. Of the recombinant GP5, M and N proteins of HP-PRRSV expressed in baculovirus expression systems, only N protein induced Tregs proliferation. The Tregs assays showed that three amino-acid regions, 15-21, 42-48 and 88-94, in N protein played an important role in induction of Tregs proliferation with synthetic peptides covering the whole length of N protein. By using reverse genetic methods, it was firstly found that the 15N and 46R residues in PRRSV N protein were critical for induction of Tregs proliferation. The phenotype of induced Tregs closely resembled that of transforming-growth-factor-β-secreting T helper 3 Tregs in swine. These data should be useful for understanding the mechanism of immunity to PRRSV and development of infection control strategies in the future.

  12. HBc二聚体组装核衣壳相关功能域突变对HBV复制的影响%The effect of mutation of hepatitis B virus core protein dimer interface domain related to nucleocapsid formation on HBV replication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓凯; 蒋栋; 韩进超; 潘孝本; 王豪; 魏来

    2010-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of hepatitis B virus core protein (HBc) dimer interfaces amino acids mutation on nucleocapsid assembly and HBV DNA replication. Methods Based on HBc three dimension structure, four HBc dimer interfaces domain mutation plasmids, pHBc14-18M,pHBc120-135M,pHBc23-39M and pHBc122-139M were constructed in pcDNA3.1 vector by PCR site-directed mutagenesis, there was a flag-tag at the C-terminal of all mutants for easy detection. Wild type core protein plasmid 1-183flag was also constructed as a positive control. The 4 mutants were cotransfected HepG2 cells with pHBV1.2 core negative plasmid (pHBV1.2-core-) ,which contained 1.2 copies of HBV whole genome but the core protein would not express due to a stop codon. The capsid formation, HBV pregenome(pgRNA) and HBV DNA replication mediate were analyzed by native agarose gel electrophoresis and Western blot, Northern blot and Southern blot , respectively. The 4 mutants were also cotransfected HepG2 cells with HBV wild type plasmid pHBV1.2 and examined by Southern blot. Virions in the medium were determined by native agarose gel electrophoresis and Western blot. Results Cotransfecting HepG2 cells with pHBV1.2-core- plasmid, pHBc14-18M,pHBc120-135M and pHBc122-139M mutant groups formed nucleocapsid-like structure but pHBc23-39M could not, Northern and Southern blot displayed no signal in all mutants except 1-183flag conrol group. In pHBV1.2 cotransfection experiment, HBV DNA replication was blocked in pHBc14-18M, pHBc120-135M and pHBc122-139M mutant groups, sharply decreased in pHBc120-135M and pHBc122-139M groups, correspondingly virons production in medium were also inhibited. pHBc23-39M mutant exerted no influence on HBV replication. Conclusion pHBc23-39M mutant can neither form nucleocapsid-like structure nor interact with wild type HBc dimmer to interfere HBV replication.On the contrast, pHBc14-18M, pHBc120-135M and pHBc122-139M mutants can form nucleocapsid-like structure by themselves

  13. Eukaryotic expression of nucleocapsid protein gene from bovine parainfluenza virus type 3%牛副流感病毒3型核衣壳蛋白基因的真核表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    师新川; 温永俊; 王凤雪; 王炜; 王建科; 程世鹏; 武华

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to construct an eukaryotic expression plasmid for nucleocapsid protein ( N) gene of bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 ( BPIV-3 ). According to the complete sequence of BPIV-3 NM09 strain ( GenBank accession: JQ063064 ) , a pair of primers was designed and synthesized. The N gene of BPIV3 was amplified by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The N gene was cloned into pcDNA3. 1 (+) vector using Nhel and Notl, and thus the expression plasmid pcDNA3. 1-N was successfully constructed. Then pcDNA3. 1-N was transfected into BSR cell using lipoplast mediate method and positive results were demonstrated by indirect im-munofluorescence assay (IFA) and RT-PCR. The results showed N gene of BPIV-3 was successfully expressed in BSR cell. The study provided fundamental information for the further study on the prevention of BPIV3 infection and new vaccine development%根据牛副流感病毒3型(BPIV-3)内蒙09株(NM09)全基因组序列(GenBank登录号:JQ063064)设计特异性引物,利用RT-PCR方法扩增出牛副流感病毒3型分离株的核衣壳蛋白(N)基因,通过NheI和NotI限制性内切酶位点亚克隆至真核表达载体pcDNA3.1/Zeo(+),获得真核重组质粒pcDNA3.1-N.采用Superfect转染试剂将重组质粒转染至BSR细胞中,转染后的BSR细胞经间接免疫荧光试验和RT-PCR方法检测,重组质粒pcDNA3.1-N在BSR细胞中能正确表达N蛋白.本研究结果为BPIV-3新型疫苗的研制奠定基础.

  14. Comparative Immunization in BALB/c Mice with Recombinant Replication-Defective Adenovirus Vector and DNA Plasmid Expressing a SARS-CoV Nucleocapsid Protein Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunling Ma; Kun Yao; Feng Zhou; Minsheng Zhu

    2006-01-01

    In order to investigate immunogenicity in the induction of humoral and cellular immune responses, severe acute respiratory syndrome associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV)-N gene recombinant replication-defective adenoviral vector, rAd-N, was generated and immunized BALB/c mice in a pcDNA3.1-N prime-rAd-N boost regimen. After humoral and cellular immune response detection, different levels of SARS-CoV N protein specific antibodies and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) secretion are shown compared to controls. The humoral immune response was induced more effectively by the DNA priming and recombinant adenovirus boosting regimen. There is a significant difference between heterogeneous and homologous vaccinations. The heterogeneous combinations were all higher than those of the homologous combinations in the induction of anti-N antibody response. Among the three heterogeneous combinations, pcDNA3.1-N/pcDNA3.1-N/pcDNA3.1-N/rAd-N induced the strongest antibody response. In the induction of IFN-γ production, the homologous combination of rAd-N/rAd-N/rAd-N/rAd- N was significantly stronger than that of pcDNA3.1-N/pcDNA3. 1-N/pcDNA3.1-N/pcDNA3.1-N, but was relatively weaker than the heterogeneous combination of pcDAN3.1-N/pcDAN3.1-N/pcDAN3.1-N/rAd-N. This combination was a most efficient immunization regimen in induction of SARS-CoV-N-specific (IFN-γ) secretion just as the antibody response. These results suggest that DNA immunization followed by recombinant adenovirus boosting could be used as a potential SARS-CoV vaccine.

  15. Preparation and preliminary application of monoclonal antibody against nucleocapsid protein of bovine parainfluenza virus type 3%牛副流感病毒3型NP单抗的制备及初步应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕闯; 朱远茂; 董秀梅; 蔡红; 于作; 高欲燃; 薛飞

    2011-01-01

    To prepare monoclonal antibody (Mab) against nucleocapsid protein (NP) of bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 (BPIV3), BALB/c mice were immunized with purified recombinant NP (Rnp) expressed by E. Coli and a hybridoma secreting Mab was screened from fusing the SP2/0 cells with the spleen cells of the immunized BALB/c mice by indirect ELISA coated with BPIV3. The titers of Mab in ascites were 2 x 106 and 1.28 x 105 as detected by Rnp and BPIV3 coated ELISA, respectively. The Mab was specifically reacted with BPIV3 identified by indirect ELISA, western blot, immunofluroescence assay. The specific tests indicated the Mab had no reaction with infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus and bovine viral diarrhea virus. The BPIV3 was detected in experimentally infected animals in immunohistochemical test with the Mab. Therefore, this Mab could be used to establish diagnosis method for BPIV3 and further study on the structure and function of NP.%为制备牛副流感病毒3型(BPIV3)核衣壳蛋白(NP)单克隆抗体(MAb),本研究利用原核表达并纯化的重组NP (rNP)免疫BALB/c小鼠,取免疫后小鼠脾细胞与骨髓瘤细胞SP2/0融合.采用以BPIV3为检测抗原的间接ELISA方法筛选阳性细胞克隆,经3次克隆纯化后获得1株稳定分泌抗NP特异性MAb的杂交瘤细胞株(5E5)并制备腹水,采用rNP及BPIV3包被的ELISA效价分别是2×106和1.28×105.间接ELISA、western blot、IFA试验表明该MAb具有良好的反应性和特异性.经抗体亚类鉴定该MAb亚类为IgGl/κ.特异性试验表明该MAb不与牛传染性鼻气管炎病毒、牛病毒性腹泻病毒反应.免疫组化试验表明该MAb可以检测BPIV3感染动物体内的病原.该MAb还可用于建立检测BPIV3病原及抗体的诊断方法,同时为研究NP的结构和功能提供了条件.

  16. Importance of Basic Residues in Binding of Rous Sarcoma Virus Nucleocapsid to the RNA Packaging Signal

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Eun-Gyung; Alidina, Annie; May, Cynthia; Linial, Maxine L.

    2003-01-01

    In the context of the Rous sarcoma virus Gag polyprotein, only the nucleocapsid (NC) domain is required to mediate the specificity of genomic RNA packaging. We have previously showed that the Saccharomyces cerevisiae three-hybrid system provides a rapid genetic assay to analyze the RNA and protein components of the avian retroviral RNA-Gag interactions necessary for specific encapsidation. In this study, using both site-directed mutagenesis and in vivo random screening in the yeast three-hybr...

  17. Protein Crystal Based Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Jeffrey A.; VanRoey, Patrick

    2001-01-01

    This is the final report on a NASA Grant. It concerns a description of work done, which includes: (1) Protein crystals cross-linked to form fibers; (2) Engineering of protein to favor crystallization; (3) Better knowledge-based potentials for protein-protein contacts; (4) Simulation of protein crystallization.

  18. Cloning and expression of nucleocapsid protein of feline infectious peritonitis virus and establishment of an indirect ELISA for EIPV%猫传染性腹膜炎病毒核衣壳蛋白的表达及间接ELISA法的建立

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊炜; 林颖峥; 王艳; 魏晓锋; 王巧全; 黄忠荣; 胡建华; 李健

    2014-01-01

    本研究对猫传染性腹膜炎病毒(FIPV)N蛋白的编码基因进行克隆和原核表达,并在纯化重组N蛋白的基础上,建立了FIPV抗体间接ELISA检测方法。研究结果显示,该重组纯化的N蛋白具有良好的抗原反应性,可用于FIPV阳性血清的筛查,为我国出入境检疫部门监控FIPV疫情提供技术支撑。%In this study,the gene of nucleocapsid protein(N protein)of feline infectious peritonitis virus(FIPV) was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. And an indirect ELISA method was established with the purified recombi-nant N protein. The results showed this recombinant N protein had perfect antigen reactivity of FIPV and could be used to screen FIPV positive serum,and the study was helpful to monitor the FIPV infection status.

  19. An SH3 binding motif within the nucleocapsid protein of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus interacts with the host cellular signaling proteins STAMI, TXK, Fyn, Hck, and cortactin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, Scott P; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2015-06-02

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) causes an economically important global swine disease, and has a complicated virus-host immunomodulation that often leads to a weak Th2 immune response and viral persistence. In this study, we identified a Src homology 3 (SH3) binding motif, PxxPxxP, that is conserved within the N protein of PRRSV strains. Subsequently, we identified five host cellular proteins [signal transducing adaptor molecule (STAM)I, TXK tyrosine kinase (TXK), protein tyrosine kinase fyn (Fyn), hematopoietic cell kinase (Hck), and cortactin] that interact with this SH3 motif. We demonstrated that binding of SH3 proteins with PRRSV N protein depends on at least one intact PxxP motif as disruption of P53 within the motif significantly reduced interaction of each of the 5 proteins. The first PxxP motif appears to be more important for STAMI-N protein interactions whereas the second PxxP motif was more important for Hck interaction. Both STAMI and Hck interactions with PRRSV N protein required an unhindered C-terminal domain as the interaction was only observed with STAMI and Hck proteins with N-terminal but not C-terminal fluorescent tags. We showed that the P56 residue within the SH3 motif is critical for virus lifecycle as mutation resulted in a loss of virus infectivity, however the P50 and P53 mutations did not abolish virus infectivity suggesting that these highly conserved proline residues within the SH3 motif may provide a selective growth advantage through interactions with the host rather than a vital functional element. These results have important implications in understanding PRRSV-host interactions.

  20. Interaction with Tsg101 is necessary for the efficient transport and release of nucleocapsids in marburg virus-infected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolnik, Olga; Kolesnikova, Larissa; Welsch, Sonja; Strecker, Thomas; Schudt, Gordian; Becker, Stephan

    2014-10-01

    Endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) machinery supports the efficient budding of Marburg virus (MARV) and many other enveloped viruses. Interaction between components of the ESCRT machinery and viral proteins is predominantly mediated by short tetrapeptide motifs, known as late domains. MARV contains late domain motifs in the matrix protein VP40 and in the genome-encapsidating nucleoprotein (NP). The PSAP late domain motif of NP recruits the ESCRT-I protein tumor susceptibility gene 101 (Tsg101). Here, we generated a recombinant MARV encoding NP with a mutated PSAP late domain (rMARV(PSAPmut)). rMARV(PSAPmut) was attenuated by up to one log compared with recombinant wild-type MARV (rMARV(wt)), formed smaller plaques and exhibited delayed virus release. Nucleocapsids in rMARV(PSAPmut)-infected cells were more densely packed inside viral inclusions and more abundant in the cytoplasm than in rMARV(wt)-infected cells. A similar phenotype was detected when MARV-infected cells were depleted of Tsg101. Live-cell imaging analyses revealed that Tsg101 accumulated in inclusions of rMARV(wt)-infected cells and was co-transported together with nucleocapsids. In contrast, rMARV(PSAPmut) nucleocapsids did not display co-localization with Tsg101, had significantly shorter transport trajectories, and migration close to the plasma membrane was severely impaired, resulting in reduced recruitment into filopodia, the major budding sites of MARV. We further show that the Tsg101 interacting protein IQGAP1, an actin cytoskeleton regulator, was recruited into inclusions and to individual nucleocapsids together with Tsg101. Moreover, IQGAP1 was detected in a contrail-like structure at the rear end of migrating nucleocapsids. Down regulation of IQGAP1 impaired release of MARV. These results indicate that the PSAP motif in NP, which enables binding to Tsg101, is important for the efficient actin-dependent transport of nucleocapsids to the sites of budding. Thus, the

  1. Interaction with Tsg101 is necessary for the efficient transport and release of nucleocapsids in marburg virus-infected cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Dolnik

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT machinery supports the efficient budding of Marburg virus (MARV and many other enveloped viruses. Interaction between components of the ESCRT machinery and viral proteins is predominantly mediated by short tetrapeptide motifs, known as late domains. MARV contains late domain motifs in the matrix protein VP40 and in the genome-encapsidating nucleoprotein (NP. The PSAP late domain motif of NP recruits the ESCRT-I protein tumor susceptibility gene 101 (Tsg101. Here, we generated a recombinant MARV encoding NP with a mutated PSAP late domain (rMARV(PSAPmut. rMARV(PSAPmut was attenuated by up to one log compared with recombinant wild-type MARV (rMARV(wt, formed smaller plaques and exhibited delayed virus release. Nucleocapsids in rMARV(PSAPmut-infected cells were more densely packed inside viral inclusions and more abundant in the cytoplasm than in rMARV(wt-infected cells. A similar phenotype was detected when MARV-infected cells were depleted of Tsg101. Live-cell imaging analyses revealed that Tsg101 accumulated in inclusions of rMARV(wt-infected cells and was co-transported together with nucleocapsids. In contrast, rMARV(PSAPmut nucleocapsids did not display co-localization with Tsg101, had significantly shorter transport trajectories, and migration close to the plasma membrane was severely impaired, resulting in reduced recruitment into filopodia, the major budding sites of MARV. We further show that the Tsg101 interacting protein IQGAP1, an actin cytoskeleton regulator, was recruited into inclusions and to individual nucleocapsids together with Tsg101. Moreover, IQGAP1 was detected in a contrail-like structure at the rear end of migrating nucleocapsids. Down regulation of IQGAP1 impaired release of MARV. These results indicate that the PSAP motif in NP, which enables binding to Tsg101, is important for the efficient actin-dependent transport of nucleocapsids to the sites of budding. Thus

  2. Interaction with Tsg101 is necessary for the efficient transport and release of nucleocapsids in marburg virus-infected cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Dolnik

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT machinery supports the efficient budding of Marburg virus (MARV and many other enveloped viruses. Interaction between components of the ESCRT machinery and viral proteins is predominantly mediated by short tetrapeptide motifs, known as late domains. MARV contains late domain motifs in the matrix protein VP40 and in the genome-encapsidating nucleoprotein (NP. The PSAP late domain motif of NP recruits the ESCRT-I protein tumor susceptibility gene 101 (Tsg101. Here, we generated a recombinant MARV encoding NP with a mutated PSAP late domain (rMARV(PSAPmut. rMARV(PSAPmut was attenuated by up to one log compared with recombinant wild-type MARV (rMARV(wt, formed smaller plaques and exhibited delayed virus release. Nucleocapsids in rMARV(PSAPmut-infected cells were more densely packed inside viral inclusions and more abundant in the cytoplasm than in rMARV(wt-infected cells. A similar phenotype was detected when MARV-infected cells were depleted of Tsg101. Live-cell imaging analyses revealed that Tsg101 accumulated in inclusions of rMARV(wt-infected cells and was co-transported together with nucleocapsids. In contrast, rMARV(PSAPmut nucleocapsids did not display co-localization with Tsg101, had significantly shorter transport trajectories, and migration close to the plasma membrane was severely impaired, resulting in reduced recruitment into filopodia, the major budding sites of MARV. We further show that the Tsg101 interacting protein IQGAP1, an actin cytoskeleton regulator, was recruited into inclusions and to individual nucleocapsids together with Tsg101. Moreover, IQGAP1 was detected in a contrail-like structure at the rear end of migrating nucleocapsids. Down regulation of IQGAP1 impaired release of MARV. These results indicate that the PSAP motif in NP, which enables binding to Tsg101, is important for the efficient actin-dependent transport of nucleocapsids to the sites of budding. Thus

  3. False-Positive Results in a Recombinant Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome-Associated Coronavirus (SARS-CoV) Nucleocapsid-Based Western Blot Assay Were Rectified by the Use of Two Subunits (S1 and S2) of Spike for Detection of Antibody to SARS-CoV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maache, Mimoun; Komurian-Pradel, Florence; Rajoharison, Alain; Perret, Magali; Berland, Jean-Luc; Pouzol, Stéphane; Bagnaud, Audrey; Duverger, Blandine; Xu, Jianguo; Osuna, Antonio; Paranhos-Baccalà, Glaucia

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the reactivity of the recombinant proteins expressed in Escherichia coli strain BL21(DE3), a Western blot assay was performed by using a panel of 78 serum samples obtained, respectively, from convalescent-phase patients infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) (30 samples) and from healthy donors (48 samples). As antigen for detection of SARS-CoV, the nucleocapsid protein (N) showed high sensitivity and strong reactivity with all samples from SARS-CoV patients and cross-reacted with all serum samples from healthy subjects, with either those obtained from China (10 samples) or those obtained from France (38 serum samples), giving then a significant rate of false positives. Specifically, our data indicated that the two subunits, S1 (residues 14 to 760) and S2 (residues 761 to 1190), resulted from the divided spike reacted with all samples from SARS-CoV patients and without any cross-reactivity with any of the healthy serum samples. Consequently, these data revealed the nonspecific nature of N protein in serodiagnosis of SARS-CoV compared with the S1 and S2, where the specificity is of 100%. Moreover, the reported results indicated that the use of one single protein as a detection antigen of SARS-CoV infection may lead to false-positive diagnosis. These may be rectified by using more than one protein for the serodiagnosis of SARS-CoV. PMID:16522785

  4. Nucleocapsid formation and RNA synthesis of Marburg virus is dependent on two coiled coil motifs in the nucleoprotein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lander Angelika

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The nucleoprotein (NP of Marburg virus (MARV is responsible for the encapsidation of viral genomic RNA and the formation of the helical nucleocapsid precursors that accumulate in intracellular inclusions in infected cells. To form the large helical MARV nucleocapsid, NP needs to interact with itself and the viral proteins VP30, VP35 and L, which are also part of the MARV nucleocapsid. In the present study, a conserved coiled coil motif in the central part of MARV NP was shown to be an important element for the interactions of NP with itself and VP35, the viral polymerase cofactor. Additionally, the coiled coil motif was essential for the formation of NP-induced intracellular inclusions and for the function of NP in the process of transcription and replication of viral RNA in a minigenome system. Transfer of the coiled coil motif to a reporter protein was sufficient to mediate interaction of the constructed fusion protein with the N-terminus of NP. The coiled coil motif is bipartite, constituted by two coiled coils which are separated by a flexible linker.

  5. Sub-nucleocapsid nanoparticles: a nasal vaccine against respiratory syncytial virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Roux

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bronchiolitis caused by the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV in infants less than two years old is a growing public health concern worldwide, and there is currently no safe and effective vaccine. A major component of RSV nucleocapsid, the nucleoprotein (N, has been so far poorly explored as a potential vaccine antigen, even though it is a target of protective anti-viral T cell responses and is remarkably conserved between human RSV A and B serotypes. We recently reported a method to produce recombinant N assembling in homogenous rings composed of 10-11 N subunits enclosing a bacterial RNA. These nanoparticles were named sub-nucleocapsid ring structure (N SRS. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The vaccine potential of N SRS was evaluated in a well-characterized and widely acknowledged mouse model of RSV infection. BALB/c adult mice were immunized intranasally with N SRS adjuvanted with the detoxified E. coli enterotoxin LT(R192G. Upon RSV challenge, vaccinated mice were largely protected against virus replication in the lungs, with a mild inflammatory lymphocytic and neutrophilic reaction in their airways. Mucosal immunization with N SRS elicited strong local and systemic immunity characterized by high titers of IgG1, IgG2a and IgA anti-N antibodies, antigen-specific CD8(+ T cells and IFN-gamma-producing CD4(+ T cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first report of using nanoparticles formed by the recombinant nucleocapsid protein as an efficient and safe intra-nasal vaccine against RSV.

  6. MERS冠状病毒核衣壳蛋白原核表达和纯化%Expression and purification of nucleocapsid protein of MERS coronavirus in E.coli

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付洋波; 胡勇; 黄成成; 白圆圆; 邱立红; 曹诚; 高婷

    2015-01-01

    Objective To construct a prokaryotic expression vector pET-22b+with Middle East respiratory syndrome ( MERS) coronavirus nuclocapsid protein( NP) gene and to express and purify N protein.Methods N gene amplified by PCR was inserted into the prokaryotic expression vector pET-22b+.Recombinant plasmid was confirmed using DNA elec-trophoresis and sequencing.NP was expressed in E.coli BL21(DE3) by IPTG induced and purified by cation exchange chromatography using the AKTA purification system.Results The NP gene sequence was proved to be correct by sequen-cing and the protein was expressed in both soluble and insoluble forms in E.coli BL21 ( DE3 ) after IPTG induction.The purity and concentration of recombinant protein was improved obviously by cation exchange chromatography and enrich-ment.Conclusion Recombiant NP of high purity and concentration is purified and will facilitate NP functional research.%目的 构建带有MERS-CoV N( MERS冠状病毒核衣壳蛋白)基因片段的pET-22b+原核表达载体,并表达和纯化核衣壳蛋白( NP). 方法 通过PCR技术扩增NP蛋白基因片段,插入到原核表达载体pET-22b+上. 使用核酸电泳、测序以及小量诱导表达确认所构建克隆的正确性,然后将重组质粒转化进大肠杆菌BL21a(DE3)中,并在大肠杆菌BL21a(DE3)中大规模诱导表达NP蛋白,使用AKTA纯化系统经强阳离子交换层析纯化出NP蛋白.结果 测序和小量诱导结果表明,扩增的NP蛋白片段序列正确,所构建的pET-22b+-NP克隆可在大肠杆菌BL21a (DE3)的包涵体和细胞质中表达;通过阳离子交换层析和浓缩后,蛋白的纯度和浓度都得到明显提高. 结论纯化出高纯度、高浓度的NP蛋白,为NP蛋白功能性研究提供重要基础.

  7. Expression and Identification of Nucleocapsid Protein of IHNV in Baculovirus Expression System%IHNV核衣壳蛋白在杆状病毒表达系统中的表达及鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢三磊; 王雯慧; 孙惠玲

    2014-01-01

    采用RT-PCR方法从传染性造血器官坏死病病毒( IHNV)中扩增RNA获得1176 bp的核衣壳蛋白( N)基因,将其插入于pFB-LIC-Bse杆状病毒载体中,构建了重组质粒pFB-LIC-Bse-N,转化至感受态细胞DH10Bac中,获得重组杆粒rBacmid-N。再将其转染至Sf9昆虫细胞,获得重组杆状病毒。 IFA和Western Blot分析表明,重组N蛋白可以被辣根过氧化物酶(HRP)标记的组氨酸单抗(anti-His)识别,表明,IHNV N基因在昆虫细胞Sf9中获得了正确表达。为深入研究N蛋白的功能和免疫学特性奠定了基础。%To study the major structural nucleoprotein ( N ) of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus ( IHNV ) by baculovirus systems,in this study nucleoprotein ( N) gene(1 176 bp) was amplified by RT-PCR from infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus ( IHNV) and inserted into the baculovirus vector pFB-LIC-Bse to construct a recombi-nant plasmid pFB-LIC-Bse-N. The constructed recombinant transposition plasmid pFB-LIC-Bse-N was transformed to competent E. coli DH10Bac to get recombinant bacmids rBacmid-N. The obtained recombinant bacmid rBacmid-N was transfected to insect Sf9 cells,and the recombinant baculovirus that contained N gene was obtained. IFA and Western Blot analysis showed that the recombinant N protein can be recognized by horseradish peroxidase ( HRP) labeled histidine monoclonal antibody ( anti-His) which indicated IHNV N gene has been successfully expressed in Sf9 cells infected with recombinant baculovirus. The study laid a foundation of further study on N protein structure, function and immunological characteristics.

  8. Molecular Interactions of the Hantaan Virus Nucleocapsid Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-09-12

    Antoniades et, §J^., 1985/ Avsic- Zupanc et. al., 1989/ Brummer-Korvenkonto et. al., 1980). Several NE viruses have been isolated, the type strain...virus: Comparison to other causative agents of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome. Virology 176: 114-125. Avsic- Zupanc , T., B. Cizman, A. Gligic, G

  9. A facile inhibitor screening of SARS coronavirus N protein using nanoparticle-based RNA oligonucleotide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roh C

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Changhyun RohDivision of Biotechnology, Advanced Radiation Technology Institute (ARTI, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI, Jeongeup, Republic of KoreaAbstract: Hundreds of million people worldwide have been infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS, and the rate of global death from SARS has remarkably increased. Hence, the development of efficient drug treatments for the biological effects of SARS is highly needed. We have previously shown that quantum dots (QDs-conjugated RNA oligonucleotide is sensitive to the specific recognition of the SARS-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV nucleocapsid (N protein. In this study, we found that a designed biochip could analyze inhibitors of the SARS-CoV N protein using nanoparticle-based RNA oligonucleotide. Among the polyphenolic compounds examined, (--catechin gallate and (--gallocatechin gallate demonstrated a remarkable inhibition activity on SARS-CoV N protein. (--catechin gallate and (--gallocatechin gallate attenuated the binding affinity in a concentrated manner as evidenced by QDs-conjugated RNA oligonucleotide on a designed biochip. At a concentration of 0.05 µg mL–1, (--catechin gallate and (--gallocatechin gallate showed more than 40% inhibition activity on a nanoparticle-based RNA oligonucleotide biochip system.Keywords: SARS, RNA oligonucleotide, quantum dots, inhibitor, screening

  10. A facile inhibitor screening of SARS coronavirus N protein using nanoparticle-based RNA oligonucleotide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Changhyun

    2012-01-01

    Hundreds of million people worldwide have been infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), and the rate of global death from SARS has remarkably increased. Hence, the development of efficient drug treatments for the biological effects of SARS is highly needed. We have previously shown that quantum dots (QDs)-conjugated RNA oligonucleotide is sensitive to the specific recognition of the SARS-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) nucleocapsid (N) protein. In this study, we found that a designed biochip could analyze inhibitors of the SARS-CoV N protein using nanoparticle-based RNA oligonucleotide. Among the polyphenolic compounds examined, (-)-catechin gallate and (-)-gallocatechin gallate demonstrated a remarkable inhibition activity on SARS-CoV N protein. (-)-catechin gallate and (-)-gallocatechin gallate attenuated the binding affinity in a concentrated manner as evidenced by QDs-conjugated RNA oligonucleotide on a designed biochip. At a concentration of 0.05 μg mL(-1), (-)-catechin gallate and (-)-gallocatechin gallate showed more than 40% inhibition activity on a nanoparticle-based RNA oligonucleotide biochip system.

  11. Rab33B Controls Hepatitis B Virus Assembly by Regulating Core Membrane Association and Nucleocapsid Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartusch, Christina; Döring, Tatjana; Prange, Reinhild

    2017-06-21

    Many viruses take advantage of cellular trafficking machineries to assemble and release new infectious particles. Using RNA interference (RNAi), we demonstrate that the Golgi/autophagosome-associated Rab33B is required for hepatitis B virus (HBV) propagation in hepatoma cell lines. While Rab33B is dispensable for the secretion of HBV subviral envelope particles, its knockdown reduced the virus yield to 20% and inhibited nucleocapsid (NC) formation and/or NC trafficking. The overexpression of a GDP-restricted Rab33B mutant phenocopied the effect of deficit Rab33B, indicating that Rab33B-specific effector proteins may be involved. Moreover, we found that HBV replication enhanced Rab33B expression. By analyzing HBV infection cycle steps, we identified a hitherto unknown membrane targeting module in the highly basic C-terminal domain of the NC-forming core protein. Rab33B inactivation reduced core membrane association, suggesting that membrane platforms participate in HBV assembly reactions. Biochemical and immunofluorescence analyses provided further hints that the viral core, rather than the envelope, is the main target for Rab33B intervention. Rab33B-deficiency reduced core protein levels without affecting viral transcription and hampered core/NC sorting to envelope-positive, intracellular compartments. Together, these results indicate that Rab33B is an important player in intracellular HBV trafficking events, guiding core transport to NC assembly sites and/or NC transport to budding sites.

  12. DDX3 DEAD-Box RNA helicase inhibits hepatitis B virus reverse transcription by incorporation into nucleocapsids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haifeng; Kim, Seahee; Ryu, Wang-Shick

    2009-06-01

    Viruses utilize host factors in many steps of their life cycles. Yet, little is known about host factors that contribute to the life cycle of hepatitis B virus (HBV), which replicates its genome by reverse transcription. To identify host factors that contribute to viral reverse transcription, we sought to identify cellular proteins that interact with HBV polymerase (Pol) by using affinity purification coupled with mass spectrometry. One of the HBV Pol-interacting host factors identified was DDX3 DEAD-box RNA helicase, which unwinds RNA in an ATPase-dependent manner. Recently, it was shown that DDX3 is essential for both human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis C virus infection. In contrast, we found that the ectopic expression of DDX3 led to significantly reduced viral DNA synthesis. The DDX3-mediated inhibition of viral DNA synthesis did not affect RNA encapsidation, a step prior to reverse transcription, and indicated that DDX3 inhibits HBV reverse transcription. Mutational analysis revealed that mutant DDX3 with an inactive ATPase motif, but not that with an inactive RNA helicase motif, failed to inhibit viral DNA synthesis. Our interpretation is that DDX3 inhibits viral DNA synthesis at a step following ATP hydrolysis but prior to RNA unwinding. Finally, OptiPrep density gradient analysis revealed that DDX3 was incorporated into nucleocapsids, suggesting that DDX3 inhibits viral reverse transcription following nucleocapsid assembly. Thus, DDX3 represents a novel host restriction factor that limits HBV infection.

  13. The respiratory syncytial virus nucleoprotein-RNA complex forms a left-handed helical nucleocapsid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Saskia E; Duquerroy, Stéphane; Galloux, Marie; Loney, Colin; Conner, Edward; Eléouët, Jean-François; Rey, Félix A; Bhella, David

    2013-08-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is an important human pathogen. Its nucleocapsid (NC), which comprises the negative sense RNA viral genome coated by the viral nucleoprotein N, is a critical assembly that serves as template for both mRNA synthesis and genome replication. We have previously described the X-ray structure of an NC-like structure: a decameric ring formed of N-RNA that mimics one turn of the helical NC. In the absence of experimental data we had hypothesized that the NC helix would be right-handed, as the N-N contacts in the ring appeared to more easily adapt to that conformation. We now unambiguously show that the RSV NC is a left-handed helix. We further show that the contacts in the ring can be distorted to maintain key N-N-protein interactions in a left-handed helix, and discuss the implications of the resulting atomic model of the helical NC for viral replication and transcription.

  14. The metastable state of nucleocapsids of enveloped viruses as probed by high hydrostatic pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspar, L P; Terezan, A F; Pinheiro, A S; Foguel, D; Rebello, M A; Silva, J L

    2001-03-09

    Enveloped viruses fuse their membranes with cellular membranes to transfer their genomes into cells at the beginning of infection. What is not clear, however, is the role of the envelope (lipid bilayer and glycoproteins) in the stability of the viral particle. To address this question, we compared the stability between enveloped and nucleocapsid particles of the alphavirus Mayaro using hydrostatic pressure and urea. The effects were monitored by intrinsic fluorescence, light scattering, and binding of fluorescent dyes, including bis(8-anilinonaphthalene-1-sulfonate) and ethidium bromide. Pressure caused a drastic dissociation of the nucleocapsids as determined by tryptophan fluorescence, light scattering, and gel filtration chromatography. Pressure-induced dissociation of the nucleocapsids was poorly reversible. In contrast, when the envelope was present, pressure effects were much less marked and were highly reversible. Binding of ethidium bromide occurred when nucleocapsids were dissociated under pressure, indicating exposure of the nucleic acid, whereas enveloped particles underwent no changes. Overall, our results demonstrate that removal of the envelope with the glycoproteins leads the particle to a metastable state and, during infection, may serve as the trigger for disassembly and delivery of the genome. The envelope acts as a "Trojan horse," gaining entry into the host cell to allow release of a metastable nucleocapsid prone to disassembly.

  15. Protein-based composite materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Hu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Protein-based composite biomaterials have been actively pursued as they can encompass a range of physical properties to accommodate a broader spectrum of functional requirements, such as elasticity to support diverse tissues. By optimizing molecular interfaces between structural proteins, useful composite materials can be fabricated as films, gels, particles, and fibers, as well as for electrical and optical devices. Such systems provide analogies to more traditional synthetic polymers yet with expanded utility due to the material's tunability, mechanical properties, degradability, biocompatibility, and functionalization, such as for drug delivery, biosensors, and tissue regeneration.

  16. The sf32 unique gene of Spodoptera frugiperda multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (SfMNPV is a non-essential gene that could be involved in nucleocapsid organization in occlusion-derived virions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inés Beperet

    Full Text Available A recombinant virus lacking the sf32 gene (Sf32null, unique to the Spodoptera frugiperda multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (SfMNPV, was generated by homologous recombination from a bacmid comprising the complete viral genome (Sfbac. Transcriptional analysis revealed that sf32 is an early gene. Occlusion bodies (OBs of Sf32null contained 62% more genomic DNA than viruses containing the sf32 gene, Sfbac and Sf32null-repair, although Sf32null DNA was three-fold less infective when injected in vivo. Sf32null OBs were 18% larger in diameter and contained 17% more nucleocapsids within ODVs than those of Sfbac. No significant differences were detected in OB pathogenicity (50% lethal concentration, speed-of-kill or budded virus production in vivo. In contrast, the production of OBs/larva was reduced by 39% in insects infected by Sf32null compared to those infected by Sfbac. The SF32 predicted protein sequence showed homology (25% identity, 44% similarity to two adhesion proteins from Streptococcus pyogenes and a single N-mirystoylation site was predicted. We conclude that SF32 is a non-essential protein that could be involved in nucleocapsid organization during ODV assembly and occlusion, resulting in increased numbers of nucleocapsids within ODVs.

  17. The sf32 Unique Gene of Spodoptera frugiperda Multiple Nucleopolyhedrovirus (SfMNPV) Is a Non-Essential Gene That Could Be Involved in Nucleocapsid Organization in Occlusion-Derived Virions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beperet, Inés; Barrera, Gloria; Simón, Oihane; Williams, Trevor; López-Ferber, Miguel; Gasmi, Laila; Herrero, Salvador; Caballero, Primitivo

    2013-01-01

    A recombinant virus lacking the sf32 gene (Sf32null), unique to the Spodoptera frugiperda multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (SfMNPV), was generated by homologous recombination from a bacmid comprising the complete viral genome (Sfbac). Transcriptional analysis revealed that sf32 is an early gene. Occlusion bodies (OBs) of Sf32null contained 62% more genomic DNA than viruses containing the sf32 gene, Sfbac and Sf32null-repair, although Sf32null DNA was three-fold less infective when injected in vivo. Sf32null OBs were 18% larger in diameter and contained 17% more nucleocapsids within ODVs than those of Sfbac. No significant differences were detected in OB pathogenicity (50% lethal concentration), speed-of-kill or budded virus production in vivo. In contrast, the production of OBs/larva was reduced by 39% in insects infected by Sf32null compared to those infected by Sfbac. The SF32 predicted protein sequence showed homology (25% identity, 44% similarity) to two adhesion proteins from Streptococcus pyogenes and a single N-mirystoylation site was predicted. We conclude that SF32 is a non-essential protein that could be involved in nucleocapsid organization during ODV assembly and occlusion, resulting in increased numbers of nucleocapsids within ODVs. PMID:24204916

  18. Molecular characterization of the HIV-1 gag nucleocapsid gene associated with vertical transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramakrishnan Rajesh

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 nucleocapsid (NC plays a pivotal role in the viral lifecycle: including encapsulating the viral genome, aiding in strand transfer during reverse transcription, and packaging two copies of the viral genome into progeny virions. Another gag gene product, p6, plays an integral role in successful viral budding from the plasma membrane and inclusion of the accessory protein Vpr within newly budding virions. In this study, we have characterized the gag NC and p6 genes from six mother-infant pairs following vertical transmission by performing phylogenetic analysis and by analyzing the degree of genetic diversity, evolutionary dynamics, and conservation of functional domains. Results Phylogenetic analysis of 168 gag NC and p6 genes sequences revealed six separate subtrees that corresponded to each mother-infant pair, suggesting that epidemiologically linked individuals were closer to each other than epidemiologically unlinked individuals. A high frequency (92.8% of intact open reading frames of NC and p6 with patient and pair specific sequence motifs were conserved in mother-infant pairs' sequences. Nucleotide and amino acid distances showed a lower degree of viral heterogeneity, and a low degree of estimates of genetic diversity was also found in NC and p6 sequences. The NC and p6 sequences from both mothers and infants were found to be under positive selection pressure. The two important functional motifs within NC, the zinc-finger motifs, were highly conserved in most of the sequences, as were the gag p6 Vpr binding, AIP1 and late binding domains. Several CTL recognition epitopes identified within the NC and p6 genes were found to be mostly conserved in 6 mother-infant pairs' sequences. Conclusion These data suggest that the gag NC and p6 open reading frames and functional domains were conserved in mother-infant pairs' sequences following vertical transmission, which confirms the

  19. Towards structure-based protein drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Changsheng; Lai, Luhua

    2011-10-01

    Structure-based drug design for chemical molecules has been widely used in drug discovery in the last 30 years. Many successful applications have been reported, especially in the field of virtual screening based on molecular docking. Recently, there has been much progress in fragment-based as well as de novo drug discovery. As many protein-protein interactions can be used as key targets for drug design, one of the solutions is to design protein drugs based directly on the protein complexes or the target structure. Compared with protein-ligand interactions, protein-protein interactions are more complicated and present more challenges for design. Over the last decade, both sampling efficiency and scoring accuracy of protein-protein docking have increased significantly. We have developed several strategies for structure-based protein drug design. A grafting strategy for key interaction residues has been developed and successfully applied in designing erythropoietin receptor-binding proteins. Similarly to small-molecule design, we also tested de novo protein-binder design and a virtual screen of protein binders using protein-protein docking calculations. In comparison with the development of structure-based small-molecule drug design, we believe that structure-based protein drug design has come of age.

  20. Horizontal and vertical transmission of wild-type and recombinant Helicoverpa armigera single-nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, M.; Sun, X.; Sun, X.C.; Vlak, J.M.; Hu, Z.H.; Werf, van der W.

    2005-01-01

    Transmission plays a central role in the ecology of baculoviruses and the population dynamics of their hosts. Here, we report on the horizontal and vertical transmission dynamics of wild-type Helicoverpa armigera single-nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (HaSNPV-WT) and a genetically modified variant

  1. Horizontal and vertical transmission of wild-type and recombinant Helicoverpa armigera single-nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, M.; Sun, X.; Sun, X.C.; Vlak, J.M.; Hu, Z.H.; Werf, van der W.

    2005-01-01

    Transmission plays a central role in the ecology of baculoviruses and the population dynamics of their hosts. Here, we report on the horizontal and vertical transmission dynamics of wild-type Helicoverpa armigera single-nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (HaSNPV-WT) and a genetically modified variant

  2. Protein-protein interaction based on pairwise similarity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaki Nazar

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-protein interaction (PPI is essential to most biological processes. Abnormal interactions may have implications in a number of neurological syndromes. Given that the association and dissociation of protein molecules is crucial, computational tools capable of effectively identifying PPI are desirable. In this paper, we propose a simple yet effective method to detect PPI based on pairwise similarity and using only the primary structure of the protein. The PPI based on Pairwise Similarity (PPI-PS method consists of a representation of each protein sequence by a vector of pairwise similarities against large subsequences of amino acids created by a shifting window which passes over concatenated protein training sequences. Each coordinate of this vector is typically the E-value of the Smith-Waterman score. These vectors are then used to compute the kernel matrix which will be exploited in conjunction with support vector machines. Results To assess the ability of the proposed method to recognize the difference between "interacted" and "non-interacted" proteins pairs, we applied it on different datasets from the available yeast saccharomyces cerevisiae protein interaction. The proposed method achieved reasonable improvement over the existing state-of-the-art methods for PPI prediction. Conclusion Pairwise similarity score provides a relevant measure of similarity between protein sequences. This similarity incorporates biological knowledge about proteins and it is extremely powerful when combined with support vector machine to predict PPI.

  3. Characterization and interactome study of white spot syndrome virus envelope protein VP11.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang-Jing Liu

    Full Text Available White spot syndrome virus (WSSV is a large enveloped virus. The WSSV viral particle consists of three structural layers that surround its core DNA: an outer envelope, a tegument and a nucleocapsid. Here we characterize the WSSV structural protein VP11 (WSSV394, GenBank accession number AF440570, and use an interactome approach to analyze the possible associations between this protein and an array of other WSSV and host proteins. Temporal transcription analysis showed that vp11 is an early gene. Western blot hybridization of the intact viral particles and fractionation of the viral components, and immunoelectron microscopy showed that VP11 is an envelope protein. Membrane topology software predicted VP11 to be a type of transmembrane protein with a highly hydrophobic transmembrane domain at its N-terminal. Based on an immunofluorescence assay performed on VP11-transfected Sf9 cells and a trypsin digestion analysis of the virion, we conclude that, contrary to topology software prediction, the C-terminal of this protein is in fact inside the virion. Yeast two-hybrid screening combined with co-immunoprecipitation assays found that VP11 directly interacted with at least 12 other WSSV structural proteins as well as itself. An oligomerization assay further showed that VP11 could form dimers. VP11 is also the first reported WSSV structural protein to interact with the major nucleocapsid protein VP664.

  4. Characterization and interactome study of white spot syndrome virus envelope protein VP11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wang-Jing; Shiung, Hui-Jui; Lo, Chu-Fang; Leu, Jiann-Horng; Lai, Ying-Jang; Lee, Tai-Lin; Huang, Wei-Tung; Kou, Guang-Hsiung; Chang, Yun-Shiang

    2014-01-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is a large enveloped virus. The WSSV viral particle consists of three structural layers that surround its core DNA: an outer envelope, a tegument and a nucleocapsid. Here we characterize the WSSV structural protein VP11 (WSSV394, GenBank accession number AF440570), and use an interactome approach to analyze the possible associations between this protein and an array of other WSSV and host proteins. Temporal transcription analysis showed that vp11 is an early gene. Western blot hybridization of the intact viral particles and fractionation of the viral components, and immunoelectron microscopy showed that VP11 is an envelope protein. Membrane topology software predicted VP11 to be a type of transmembrane protein with a highly hydrophobic transmembrane domain at its N-terminal. Based on an immunofluorescence assay performed on VP11-transfected Sf9 cells and a trypsin digestion analysis of the virion, we conclude that, contrary to topology software prediction, the C-terminal of this protein is in fact inside the virion. Yeast two-hybrid screening combined with co-immunoprecipitation assays found that VP11 directly interacted with at least 12 other WSSV structural proteins as well as itself. An oligomerization assay further showed that VP11 could form dimers. VP11 is also the first reported WSSV structural protein to interact with the major nucleocapsid protein VP664.

  5. Isolation of coronavirus envelope glycoproteins and interaction with the viral nucleocapsid.

    OpenAIRE

    Sturman, L S; Holmes, K V; Behnke, J.

    1980-01-01

    The two envelope glycoproteins and the viral nucleocapsid of the coronavirus A59 were isolated by solubilization of the viral membrane with Nonidet P-40 at 4 degrees C followed by sucrose density gradient sedimentation. Isolated E2 consisted of rosettes of peplomers, whereas E1, the membrane glycoprotein, was irregular and amorphous. Under certain conditions significant interactions occurred between components of Nonidet P-40-disrupted virions. Incubation of the Nonidet P-40-disrupted virus a...

  6. Improved corn protein based articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing higher value uses for zein (corn protein), a potential major co-product of the bio-ethanol industry, will improve the economics of this business. Historically, zein was predominantly used in the textile fiber industry. Unfortunately the techniques used at that time to modify the zein cann...

  7. The Development and Characterization of Protein-Based Stationary Phases for Studying Drug-Protein and Protein-Protein Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Sanghvi, Mitesh; Moaddel, Ruin; Wainer, Irving W.

    2011-01-01

    Protein-based liquid chromatography stationary phases are used in bioaffinity chromatography for studying drug-protein interactions, the determination of binding affinities, competitive and allosteric interactions, as well as for studying protein-protein interactions. This review addresses the development and characterization of protein-based stationary phase, and the application of these phases using frontal and zonal chromatography techniques. The approach will be illustrated using immobili...

  8. Predicting disease-related proteins based on clique backbone in protein-protein interaction network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lei; Zhao, Xudong; Tang, Xianglong

    2014-01-01

    Network biology integrates different kinds of data, including physical or functional networks and disease gene sets, to interpret human disease. A clique (maximal complete subgraph) in a protein-protein interaction network is a topological module and possesses inherently biological significance. A disease-related clique possibly associates with complex diseases. Fully identifying disease components in a clique is conductive to uncovering disease mechanisms. This paper proposes an approach of predicting disease proteins based on cliques in a protein-protein interaction network. To tolerate false positive and negative interactions in protein networks, extending cliques and scoring predicted disease proteins with gene ontology terms are introduced to the clique-based method. Precisions of predicted disease proteins are verified by disease phenotypes and steadily keep to more than 95%. The predicted disease proteins associated with cliques can partly complement mapping between genotype and phenotype, and provide clues for understanding the pathogenesis of serious diseases.

  9. Activity-Based Protein Profiling of Microbes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadler, Natalie C.; Wright, Aaron T.

    2015-02-01

    Activity-Based Protein Profiling (ABPP) in conjunction with multimodal characterization techniques has yielded impactful findings in microbiology, particularly in pathogen, bioenergy, drug discovery, and environmental research. Using small molecule chemical probes that react irreversibly with specific proteins or protein families in complex systems has provided insights in enzyme functions in central metabolic pathways, drug-protein interactions, and regulatory protein redox, for systems ranging from photoautotrophic cyanobacteria to mycobacteria, and combining live cell or cell extract ABPP with proteomics, molecular biology, modeling, and other techniques has greatly expanded our understanding of these systems. New opportunities for application of ABPP to microbial systems include: enhancing protein annotation, characterizing protein activities in myriad environments, and reveal signal transduction and regulatory mechanisms in microbial systems.

  10. Nanochemistry of protein-based delivery agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subin R.C.K. Rajendran

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The past decade has seen an increased interest in the conversion of food proteins into functional biomaterials, including their use for loading and delivery of physiologically active compounds such as nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals. Proteins possess a competitive advantage over other platforms for the development of nanodelivery systems since they are biocompatible, amphipathic, and widely available. Proteins also have unique molecular structures and diverse functional groups that can be selectively modified to alter encapsulation and release properties. A number of physical and chemical methods have been used for preparing protein nanoformulations, each based on different underlying protein chemistry. This review focuses on the chemistry of the reorganization and/or modification of proteins into functional nanostructures for delivery, from the perspective of their preparation, functionality, stability and physiological behavior.

  11. Nanochemistry of protein-based delivery agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendran, Subin; Udenigwe, Chibuike; Yada, Rickey

    2016-07-01

    The past decade has seen an increased interest in the conversion of food proteins into functional biomaterials, including their use for loading and delivery of physiologically active compounds such as nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals. Proteins possess a competitive advantage over other platforms for the development of nanodelivery systems since they are biocompatible, amphipathic, and widely available. Proteins also have unique molecular structures and diverse functional groups that can be selectively modified to alter encapsulation and release properties. A number of physical and chemical methods have been used for preparing protein nanoformulations, each based on different underlying protein chemistry. This review focuses on the chemistry of the reorganization and/or modification of proteins into functional nanostructures for delivery, from the perspective of their preparation, functionality, stability and physiological behavior.

  12. Kinetics of Incorporation of Structural Proteins into Sindbis Virions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheele, Christina M.; Pfefferkorn, E. R.

    1969-01-01

    The morphogenesis of Sindbis virus was studied by determining the kinetics with which newly synthesized nucleocapsid and envelope proteins appeared in virions released into the extracellular medium. Assembly of the nucleocapsid was more rapid than modification of the cellular membrane by the addition of the viral envelope protein. However, both viral structural proteins were efficiently incorporated into virions; a 0.5-hr pulse-labeling period resulted in the release of maximally labeled virus during the next hour. When protein synthesis was inhibited, release of virus soon declined even though large amounts of both viral structural proteins were present within the cell and ribonucleic acid replication was unaffected. PMID:5771964

  13. Biomolecular interactions in HCV nucleocapsid-like particles as revealed by vibrational spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Casado, Arantxa; Molina, Marina; Carmona, Pedro

    2007-05-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) occurs in the form of 55-65 nm spherical particles, but the structure of the virion remains to be clarified. Structural studies of HCV have been hampered by the lack of an appropriate cell culture system. However, structural analyses of HCV components can provide an essential framework for understanding of the molecular mechanism of virion assembly. This article reviews the potential of vibrational spectroscopy aimed at the knowledge of HCV structural biology, particularly regarding biomolecular interactions in nucleocapsid-like particles obtained in vitro.

  14. Recombinant nucleocapsid-like particles from dengue-2 induce functional serotype-specific cell-mediated immunity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Lázaro; Bernardo, Lídice; Pavón, Alequis; Izquierdo, Alienys; Valdés, Iris; Lazo, Laura; Marcos, Ernesto; Romero, Yaremis; Guzmán, María G; Guillén, Gerardo; Hermida, Lisset

    2012-06-01

    The interplay of different inflammatory cytokines induced during dengue virus infection plays a role in either protection or increased disease severity. In this sense, vaccine strategies incorporating whole virus are able to elicit both functional and pathological responses. Therefore, an ideal tetravalent vaccine candidate against dengue should be focused on serotype-specific sequences. In the present work, a new formulation of nucleocapsid-like particles (NLPs) obtained from the recombinant dengue-2 capsid protein was evaluated in mice to determine the level of protection against homologous and heterologous viral challenge and to measure the cytotoxicity and cytokine-secretion profiles induced upon heterologous viral stimulation. As a result, a significant protection rate was achieved after challenge with lethal dengue-2 virus, which was dependent on CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells. In turn, no protection was observed after heterologous challenge. In accordance, in vitro-stimulated spleen cells from mice immunized with NLPs from the four dengue serotypes showed a serotype-specific response of gamma interferon- and tumour necrosis factor alpha-secreting cells. A similar pattern was detected when spleen cells from dengue-immunized animals were stimulated with the capsid protein. Taking these data together, we can assert that NLPs constitute an attractive vaccine candidate against dengue. They induce a functional immune response mediated by CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells in mice, which is protective against viral challenge. In turn, they are potentially safe due to two important facts: induction of serotype specific cell-mediated immunity and lack of induction of antiviral antibodies. Further studies in non-human primates or humanized mice should be carried out to elucidate the usefulness of the NLPs as a potential vaccine candidate against dengue disease.

  15. Protein-Based Drug-Delivery Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dave Jao

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available There is a pressing need for long-term, controlled drug release for sustained treatment of chronic or persistent medical conditions and diseases. Guided drug delivery is difficult because therapeutic compounds need to survive numerous transport barriers and binding targets throughout the body. Nanoscale protein-based polymers are increasingly used for drug and vaccine delivery to cross these biological barriers and through blood circulation to their molecular site of action. Protein-based polymers compared to synthetic polymers have the advantages of good biocompatibility, biodegradability, environmental sustainability, cost effectiveness and availability. This review addresses the sources of protein-based polymers, compares the similarity and differences, and highlights characteristic properties and functionality of these protein materials for sustained and controlled drug release. Targeted drug delivery using highly functional multicomponent protein composites to guide active drugs to the site of interest will also be discussed. A systematical elucidation of drug-delivery efficiency in the case of molecular weight, particle size, shape, morphology, and porosity of materials will then be demonstrated to achieve increased drug absorption. Finally, several important biomedical applications of protein-based materials with drug-delivery function—including bone healing, antibiotic release, wound healing, and corneal regeneration, as well as diabetes, neuroinflammation and cancer treatments—are summarized at the end of this review.

  16. CLP-based protein fragment assembly

    CERN Document Server

    Palu', Alessandro Dal; Fogolari, Federico; Pontelli, Enrico; 10.1017/S1471068410000372

    2010-01-01

    The paper investigates a novel approach, based on Constraint Logic Programming (CLP), to predict the 3D conformation of a protein via fragments assembly. The fragments are extracted by a preprocessor-also developed for this work- from a database of known protein structures that clusters and classifies the fragments according to similarity and frequency. The problem of assembling fragments into a complete conformation is mapped to a constraint solving problem and solved using CLP. The constraint-based model uses a medium discretization degree Ca-side chain centroid protein model that offers efficiency and a good approximation for space filling. The approach adapts existing energy models to the protein representation used and applies a large neighboring search strategy. The results shows the feasibility and efficiency of the method. The declarative nature of the solution allows to include future extensions, e.g., different size fragments for better accuracy.

  17. Fluorescent sensors based on bacterial fusion proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prats Mateu, Batirtze; Kainz, Birgit; Pum, Dietmar; Sleytr, Uwe B.; Toca-Herrera, José L.

    2014-06-01

    Fluorescence proteins are widely used as markers for biomedical and technological purposes. Therefore, the aim of this project was to create a fluorescent sensor, based in the green and cyan fluorescent protein, using bacterial S-layers proteins as scaffold for the fluorescent tag. We report the cloning, expression and purification of three S-layer fluorescent proteins: SgsE-EGFP, SgsE-ECFP and SgsE-13aa-ECFP, this last containing a 13-amino acid rigid linker. The pH dependence of the fluorescence intensity of the S-layer fusion proteins, monitored by fluorescence spectroscopy, showed that the ECFP tag was more stable than EGFP. Furthermore, the fluorescent fusion proteins were reassembled on silica particles modified with cationic and anionic polyelectrolytes. Zeta potential measurements confirmed the particle coatings and indicated their colloidal stability. Flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy showed that the fluorescence of the fusion proteins was pH dependent and sensitive to the underlying polyelectrolyte coating. This might suggest that the fluorescent tag is not completely exposed to the bulk media as an independent moiety. Finally, it was found out that viscosity enhanced the fluorescence intensity of the three fluorescent S-layer proteins.

  18. A protein relational database and protein family knowledge bases to facilitate structure-based design analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobilio, Dominick; Walker, Gary; Brooijmans, Natasja; Nilakantan, Ramaswamy; Denny, R Aldrin; Dejoannis, Jason; Feyfant, Eric; Kowticwar, Rupesh K; Mankala, Jyoti; Palli, Satish; Punyamantula, Sairam; Tatipally, Maneesh; John, Reji K; Humblet, Christine

    2010-08-01

    The Protein Data Bank is the most comprehensive source of experimental macromolecular structures. It can, however, be difficult at times to locate relevant structures with the Protein Data Bank search interface. This is particularly true when searching for complexes containing specific interactions between protein and ligand atoms. Moreover, searching within a family of proteins can be tedious. For example, one cannot search for some conserved residue as residue numbers vary across structures. We describe herein three databases, Protein Relational Database, Kinase Knowledge Base, and Matrix Metalloproteinase Knowledge Base, containing protein structures from the Protein Data Bank. In Protein Relational Database, atom-atom distances between protein and ligand have been precalculated allowing for millisecond retrieval based on atom identity and distance constraints. Ring centroids, centroid-centroid and centroid-atom distances and angles have also been included permitting queries for pi-stacking interactions and other structural motifs involving rings. Other geometric features can be searched through the inclusion of residue pair and triplet distances. In Kinase Knowledge Base and Matrix Metalloproteinase Knowledge Base, the catalytic domains have been aligned into common residue numbering schemes. Thus, by searching across Protein Relational Database and Kinase Knowledge Base, one can easily retrieve structures wherein, for example, a ligand of interest is making contact with the gatekeeper residue.

  19. Discovery of binding proteins for a protein target using protein-protein docking-based virtual screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Changsheng; Tang, Bo; Wang, Qian; Lai, Luhua

    2014-10-01

    Target structure-based virtual screening, which employs protein-small molecule docking to identify potential ligands, has been widely used in small-molecule drug discovery. In the present study, we used a protein-protein docking program to identify proteins that bind to a specific target protein. In the testing phase, an all-to-all protein-protein docking run on a large dataset was performed. The three-dimensional rigid docking program SDOCK was used to examine protein-protein docking on all protein pairs in the dataset. Both the binding affinity and features of the binding energy landscape were considered in the scoring function in order to distinguish positive binding pairs from negative binding pairs. Thus, the lowest docking score, the average Z-score, and convergency of the low-score solutions were incorporated in the analysis. The hybrid scoring function was optimized in the all-to-all docking test. The docking method and the hybrid scoring function were then used to screen for proteins that bind to tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), which is a well-known therapeutic target for rheumatoid arthritis and other autoimmune diseases. A protein library containing 677 proteins was used for the screen. Proteins with scores among the top 20% were further examined. Sixteen proteins from the top-ranking 67 proteins were selected for experimental study. Two of these proteins showed significant binding to TNFα in an in vitro binding study. The results of the present study demonstrate the power and potential application of protein-protein docking for the discovery of novel binding proteins for specific protein targets.

  20. Protein-protein interaction network-based detection of functionally similar proteins within species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Baoxing; Wang, Fen; Guo, Yang; Sang, Qing; Liu, Min; Li, Dengyun; Fang, Wei; Zhang, Deli

    2012-07-01

    Although functionally similar proteins across species have been widely studied, functionally similar proteins within species showing low sequence similarity have not been examined in detail. Identification of these proteins is of significant importance for understanding biological functions, evolution of protein families, progression of co-evolution, and convergent evolution and others which cannot be obtained by detection of functionally similar proteins across species. Here, we explored a method of detecting functionally similar proteins within species based on graph theory. After denoting protein-protein interaction networks using graphs, we split the graphs into subgraphs using the 1-hop method. Proteins with functional similarities in a species were detected using a method of modified shortest path to compare these subgraphs and to find the eligible optimal results. Using seven protein-protein interaction networks and this method, some functionally similar proteins with low sequence similarity that cannot detected by sequence alignment were identified. By analyzing the results, we found that, sometimes, it is difficult to separate homologous from convergent evolution. Evaluation of the performance of our method by gene ontology term overlap showed that the precision of our method was excellent. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Assessing protein-protein interactions based on the semantic similarity of interacting proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Guangyu; Kim, Byungmin; Alguwaizani, Saud; Han, Kyungsook

    2015-01-01

    The Gene Ontology (GO) has been used in estimating the semantic similarity of proteins since it has the largest and reliable vocabulary of gene products and characteristics. We developed a new method which can assess Protein-Protein Interactions (PPI) using the branching factor and information content of the common ancestor of interacting proteins in the GO hierarchy. We performed a comparative evaluation of the measure with other GO-based similarity measures and evaluation results showed that our method outperformed others in most GO domains.

  2. Structural Characterization of Human Coronavirus NL63 N Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szelazek, Bozena; Kabala, Wojciech; Kus, Krzysztof; Zdzalik, Michal; Twarda-Clapa, Aleksandra; Golik, Przemyslaw; Burmistrz, Michal; Florek, Dominik; Wladyka, Benedykt; Pyrc, Krzysztof; Dubin, Grzegorz

    2017-06-01

    Coronaviruses are responsible for upper and lower respiratory tract infections in humans. It is estimated that 1 to 10% of the population suffers annually from cold-like symptoms related to infection with human coronavirus NL63 (HCoV-NL63), an alphacoronavirus. The nucleocapsid (N) protein, the major structural component of the capsid, facilitates RNA packing, links the capsid to the envelope, and is also involved in multiple other processes, including viral replication and evasion of the immune system. Although the role of N protein in viral replication is relatively well described, no structural data are currently available regarding the N proteins of alphacoronaviruses. Moreover, our understanding of the mechanisms of RNA binding and nucleocapsid formation remains incomplete. In this study, we solved the crystal structures of the N- and C-terminal domains (NTD, residues 10 to 140, and CTD, residues 221 to 340, respectively) of the N protein of HCoV-NL63, both at a 1.5-Å resolution. Based on our structure of NTD solved here, we proposed and experimentally evaluated a model of RNA binding. The structure of the CTD reveals the mode of N protein dimerization. Overall, this study expands our understanding of the initial steps of N protein-nucleic acid interaction and may facilitate future efforts to control the associated infections.IMPORTANCE Coronaviruses are responsible for the common cold and other respiratory tract infections in humans. According to multiple studies, 1 to 10% of the population is infected each year with HCoV-NL63. Viruses are relatively simple organisms composed of a few proteins and the nucleic acids that carry the information determining their composition. The nucleocapsid (N) protein studied in this work protects the nucleic acid from the environmental factors during virus transmission. This study investigated the structural arrangement of N protein, explaining the first steps of its interaction with nucleic acid at the initial stages of

  3. Widely predicting specific protein functions based on protein-protein interaction data and gene expression profile

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Lei; LI Xia; GUO Zheng; ZHU MingZhu; LI YanHui; RAO ShaoQi

    2007-01-01

    GESTs (gene expression similarity and taxonomy similarity), a gene functional prediction approach previously proposed by us, is based on gene expression similarity and concept similarity of functional classes defined in Gene Ontology (GO). In this paper, we extend this method to protein-protein interaction data by introducing several methods to filter the neighbors in protein interaction networks for a protein of unknown function(s). Unlike other conventional methods, the proposed approach automatically selects the most appropriate functional classes as specific as possible during the learning process, and calls on genes annotated to nearby classes to support the predictions to some small-sized specific classes in GO. Based on the yeast protein-protein interaction information from MIPS and a dataset of gene expression profiles, we assess the performances of our approach for predicting protein functions to "biology process" by three measures particularly designed for functional classes organized in GO. Results show that our method is powerful for widely predicting gene functions with very specific functional terms. Based on the GO database published in December 2004, we predict some proteins whose functions were unknown at that time, and some of the predictions have been confirmed by the new SGD annotation data published in April, 2006.

  4. Widely predicting specific protein functions based on protein-protein interaction data and gene expression profile

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    GESTs (gene expression similarity and taxonomy similarity), a gene functional prediction approach previously proposed by us, is based on gene expression similarity and concept similarity of functional classes defined in Gene Ontology (GO). In this paper, we extend this method to protein-protein interac-tion data by introducing several methods to filter the neighbors in protein interaction networks for a protein of unknown function(s). Unlike other conventional methods, the proposed approach automati-cally selects the most appropriate functional classes as specific as possible during the learning proc-ess, and calls on genes annotated to nearby classes to support the predictions to some small-sized specific classes in GO. Based on the yeast protein-protein interaction information from MIPS and a dataset of gene expression profiles, we assess the performances of our approach for predicting protein functions to “biology process” by three measures particularly designed for functional classes organ-ized in GO. Results show that our method is powerful for widely predicting gene functions with very specific functional terms. Based on the GO database published in December 2004, we predict some proteins whose functions were unknown at that time, and some of the predictions have been confirmed by the new SGD annotation data published in April, 2006.

  5. Protein-based nanotoxicology assessment strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elnegaard, Marlene Pedersen; List, Markus; Christiansen, Helle

    2017-01-01

    The nanomaterial community calls for standardized in vitro assays to determine nanoparticle toxicity in the effort to reduce the number of in vivo validation experiments. We demonstrate that chip-based protein detection is suitable for assessing toxicity and may complement traditional assays to i...

  6. Budding of peste des petits ruminants virus-like particles from insect cell membrane based on intracellular co-expression of peste des petits ruminants virus M, H and N proteins by recombinant baculoviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fuxiao; Wu, Xiaodong; Zhao, Yonggang; Li, Lin; Wang, Zhiliang

    2014-10-01

    Peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV), an etiological agent of peste des petits ruminants (PPR), is classified into the genus Morbillivirus in the family Paramyxovirida. In this study, two full-length open reading frames (ORF) corresponding to the PPRV matrix (M) and haemagglutinin (H) genes underwent a codon-optimization based on insect cells, respectively. Two codon-optimized ORFs along with one native nucleocapsid (N) ORF were used to construct recombinant baculoviruses co-expressing the PPRV M, H and N proteins in insect cells. Analysis of Western blot, immunofluorescence, confocal microscopy and flow cytometry demonstrated co-expression of the three proteins but at different levels in insect cells, and PPR virus-like particles (VLPs) budded further from cell membrane based on self-assembly of the three proteins by viewing of ultrathin section with a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Subsequently, a small number of VLPs were purified by sucrose density gradient centrifugation for TEM viewing. The PPR VLPs, either purified by sucrose density gradient centrifugation or budding from insect cell membrane on ultrathin section, morphologically resembled authentic PPRVs but were smaller in diameter by the TEM examination. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Protein Structure Network-based Drug Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhongjie; Hu, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Although structure-based drug design (SBDD) has become an indispensable tool in drug discovery for a long time, it continues to pose major challenges to date. With the advancement of "omics" techniques, systems biology has enriched SBDD into a new era, called polypharmacology, in which multi-targets drug or drug combination is designed to fight complex diseases. As a preliminary tool in systems biology, protein structure networks (PSNs) treat a protein as a set of residues linked by edges corresponding to the intramolecular interactions existing in folded structures between the residues. The PSN offers a computationally efficient tool to study the structure and function of proteins, and thus may facilitate structurebased drug design. Herein, we provide an overview of recent advances in PSNs, from predicting functionally important residues, to charactering protein-protein interactions and allosteric communication paths. Furthermore, we discuss potential pharmacological applications of PSN concepts and tools, and highlight the application to two families of drug targets, GPCRs and Hsp90. Although the application of PSNs as a framework for computer-aided drug discovery has been limited to date, we put forward the potential utility value in the near future and propose the PSNs could also serve as a new tool for polypharmacology research.

  8. Localization studies of two white spot syndrome virus structural proteins VP51 and VP76

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Feng

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract VP51 and VP76 are two structural proteins of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV. However, there is some controversy about their localization in the virion at present. In this study, we employ multiple approaches to reevaluate the location of VP51 and VP76. Firstly, we found VP51 and VP76 presence in viral nucleocapsids fraction by Western blotting. Secondly, after the high-salt treatment of nucleocapsids, VP51 and VP76 were still exclusively present in viral capsids by Western blotting and immunoelectron microscopy, suggesting two proteins are structural components of the viral capsid. To gather more evidence, we developed a method based on immunofluorescence flow cytometry. The results revealed that the mean fluorescence intensity of the viral capsids group was significantly higher than that of intact virions group after incubation with anti-VP51 or anti-VP76 serum and fluorescein isothiocyanate conjugated secondary antibody. All these results indicate that VP51 and VP76 are both capsid proteins of WSSV.

  9. A reliability measure of protein-protein interactions and a reliability measure-based search engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Byungkyu; Han, Kyungsook

    2010-02-01

    Many methods developed for estimating the reliability of protein-protein interactions are based on the topology of protein-protein interaction networks. This paper describes a new reliability measure for protein-protein interactions, which does not rely on the topology of protein interaction networks, but expresses biological information on functional roles, sub-cellular localisations and protein classes as a scoring schema. The new measure is useful for filtering many spurious interactions, as well as for estimating the reliability of protein interaction data. In particular, the reliability measure can be used to search protein-protein interactions with the desired reliability in databases. The reliability-based search engine is available at http://yeast.hpid.org. We believe this is the first search engine for interacting proteins, which is made available to public. The search engine and the reliability measure of protein interactions should provide useful information for determining proteins to focus on.

  10. Protein complex prediction based on k-connected subgraphs in protein interaction network

    OpenAIRE

    Habibi Mahnaz; Eslahchi Changiz; Wong Limsoon

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Protein complexes play an important role in cellular mechanisms. Recently, several methods have been presented to predict protein complexes in a protein interaction network. In these methods, a protein complex is predicted as a dense subgraph of protein interactions. However, interactions data are incomplete and a protein complex does not have to be a complete or dense subgraph. Results We propose a more appropriate protein complex prediction method, CFA, that is based on ...

  11. [Detection and antigenic characteristics of the recombinant nucleocapsid proteins of Lassa and Marburg viruses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladyko, A S; Scheslenok, E P; Fomina, E G; Semizhon, P A; Ignat'ev, G M; Shkolina, T V; Kras'ko, A G; Semenov, S F; Vinokurov, N V

    2012-01-01

    Two plasmid vectors, which allow the recombinant polypeptides of Lassa and Marburg viruses to be expressed in prokaryotic cells E. coli strain BL21 (DE3), were produced. The two recombinant polypeptides are able to bind specific antibodies. This provides an opportunity to use them as antigenic components of immunoassay diagnostic test kits.

  12. Recombinant nucleocapsid-like particles from dengue-2 virus induce protective CD4+ and CD8+ cells against viral encephalitis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Lázaro; López, Carlos; Lazo, Laura; Valdés, Iris; Marcos, Ernesto; Alonso, Ruby; Gambe, Ailyn; Martín, Jorge; Romero, Yaremis; Guzmán, María G; Guillén, Gerardo; Hermida, Lisset

    2009-10-01

    Virus-like particles are a highly effective type of subunit vaccine that mimics the overall structure of virus particles without containing infectious genetic material. In this work, a particulate form of the recombinant capsid protein from dengue-2 was evaluated in mice to determine the level of protection against viral challenge and to measure the antigen-induced cell-mediated immunity (CMI). The nucleocapsid-like particles (NLPs) adjuvanted with alum did not induce antiviral antibodies. However, splenocytes from the immunized animals secreted high levels of IFN-gamma upon virus stimulation, and a significant protection rate was achieved after challenge with lethal dengue-2 virus. Finally, both IFN-gamma secretion and protection against viral encephalitis were demonstrated to be dependent on CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells. This study provides new evidences regarding the protective role of the CMI in the mouse model without the induction of neutralizing antibodies. Further studies in non-human primates or humanized mice should be carried out to elucidate the usefulness of the NLPs as a potential vaccine candidate against dengue disease.

  13. Genetic engineering of Helicoverpa armigera single-nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus as an improved pesticide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X; Sun, X; Hu, Z; Li, M; O'Reilly, D R; Zuidema, D; Vlak, J M

    2000-08-01

    The Helicoverpa armigera single-nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (HearNPV) has been registered and is commercially produced in China as a biopesticide to control the bollworm in cotton. However, the virus has a relatively slow speed of action. To improve its efficacy, recombinant HearNPVs were generated by deleting the ecdysteroid UDP-glucosyltransferase (egt) gene (HaCXW1 and HaLM2) or by inserting the insect-specific toxin gene AaIT in the egt locus (HaCXW2) of HearNPV using conventional recombination strategies in insect cell culture. The various recombinants remained genetically stable when cultured in HzAM1 insect cells. Bioassay data showed a significant reduction in the time required for all HearNPV recombinants to kill second instar H. armigera larvae. The LT(50) of the egt deletion recombinants HaCXW1 and HaLM2 was about 27% faster than that of wild-type HearNPV. The largest reduction in LT(50) was achieved by inserting the gene for the insect-specific neurotoxin, AaIT, in the egt locus, giving a reduction in LT(50) of 32% compared to wild-type HearNPV. The ability to genetically improve the properties of HearNPV as a biopesticide provides a further opportunity to develop this virus into a commercially viable product to control the bollworm in China.

  14. Prediction of Protein-Protein Interaction Sites Based on Naive Bayes Classifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haijiang Geng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein functions through interactions with other proteins and biomolecules and these interactions occur on the so-called interface residues of the protein sequences. Identifying interface residues makes us better understand the biological mechanism of protein interaction. Meanwhile, information about the interface residues contributes to the understanding of metabolic, signal transduction networks and indicates directions in drug designing. In recent years, researchers have focused on developing new computational methods for predicting protein interface residues. Here we creatively used a 181-dimension protein sequence feature vector as input to the Naive Bayes Classifier- (NBC- based method to predict interaction sites in protein-protein complexes interaction. The prediction of interaction sites in protein interactions is regarded as an amino acid residue binary classification problem by applying NBC with protein sequence features. Independent test results suggested that Naive Bayes Classifier-based method with the protein sequence features as input vectors performed well.

  15. Protein-based biofilm matrices in Staphylococci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro eSpeziale

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis are the most important etiological agents of biofilm associated-infections on indwelling medical devices. Biofilm infections may also develop independently of indwelling devices, e.g. in native valve endocarditis, bone tissue and open wounds. After attachment to tissue or indwelling medical devices that have been conditioned with host plasma proteins, staphylococcal biofilms grow and produce a specific environment which provides the conditions for cell-cell interaction and formation of multicellular communities. Bacteria living in biofilms express a variety of macromolecules, including exopolysaccharides, proteins, extracellular eDNA and other polymers. The S. aureus surface protein C and G (SasC and SasG, clumping factor B (ClfB, serine aspartate repeat protein (SdrC, the biofilm-associated protein (Bap and the fibronectin/fibrinogen-binding proteins (FnBPA and FnBPB are individually implicated in biofilm matrix formation. In S. epidermidis, a protein named accumulation-associated protein (Aap contributes to both the primary attachment phase and the establishment of intercellular connections by forming fibrils on the cell surface. In S. epidermidis proteinaceous biofilm formation can also be mediated by the extracellular matrix binding protein (Embp and S. epidermidis surface protein C (SesC. Additionally, multifunctional proteins such as extracellular adherence protein (Eap and extracellular matrix protein binding protein (Emp of S. aureus and the iron-regulated surface determinant protein C (IsdC of S. lugdunensis can promote biofilm formation in iron-depleted conditions. This multitude of proteins intervene at different stages of biofilm formation with certain proteins contributing to biofilm accumulation and others mediating primary attachment to surfaces. This review examines the contribution of proteins to biofilm formation in staphylococci. The potential to develop vaccines to prevent

  16. Preliminary study on chicken feather protein-based wood adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehui Jiang; Daochun Qin; Chung-Yun Hse; Monlin Kuo; Zhaohui Luo; Ge Wang; Yan Yu

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this preliminary study was to partially replace phenol in the synthesis of phenol-formaldehyde resin with feather protein. Feather protein–based resins, which contained one part feather protein and two parts phenol, were formulated under the conditions of two feather protein hydrolysis methods (with and without presence of phenol during...

  17. DNA & Protein detection based on microbead agglutination

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas

    2012-06-06

    We report a simple and rapid room temperature assay for point-of-care (POC) testing that is based on specific agglutination. Agglutination tests are based on aggregation of microparticles in the presence of a specific analyte thus enabling the macroscopic observation. Agglutination-based tests are most often used to explore the antibody-antigen reactions. Agglutination has been used for mode protein assays using a biotin/streptavidin two-component system, as well as a hybridization based two-component assay; however, as our work shows, two-component systems are prone to self-termination of the linking analyte and thus have a lower sensitivity. Three component systems have also been used with DNA hybridization, as in our work; however, their assay requires 48 hours for incubation, while our assay is performed in 5 minutes making it a real candidate for POC testing. We demonstrate three assays: a two-component biotin/streptavidin assay, a three-component hybridization assay using single stranded DNA (ssDNA) molecules and a stepped three-component hybridization assay. The comparison of these three assays shows our simple stepped three-component agglutination assay to be rapid at room temperature and more sensitive than the two-component version by an order of magnitude. An agglutination assay was also performed in a PDMS microfluidic chip where agglutinated beads were trapped by filter columns for easy observation. We developed a rapid (5 minute) room temperature assay, which is based on microbead agglutination. Our three-component assay solves the linker self-termination issue allowing an order of magnitude increase in sensitivity over two–component assays. Our stepped version of the three-component assay solves the issue with probe site saturation thus enabling a wider range of detection. Detection of the agglutinated beads with the naked eye by trapping in microfluidic channels has been shown.

  18. Patchwork structure-function analysis of the Sendai virus matrix protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottet-Osman, Geneviève; Miazza, Vincent; Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier; Roux, Laurent

    2014-09-01

    Paramyxoviruses contain a bi-lipidic envelope decorated by two transmembrane glycoproteins and carpeted on the inner surface with a layer of matrix proteins (M), thought to bridge the glycoproteins with the viral nucleocapsids. To characterize M structure-function features, a set of M domains were mutated or deleted. The genes encoding these modified M were incorporated into recombinant Sendai viruses and expressed as supplemental proteins. Using a method of integrated suppression complementation system (ISCS), the functions of these M mutants were analyzed in the context of the infection. Cellular membrane association, localization at the cell periphery, nucleocapsid binding, cellular protein interactions and promotion of viral particle formation were characterized in relation with the mutations. At the end, lack of nucleocapsid binding go together with lack of cell surface localization and both features definitely correlate with loss of M global function estimated by viral particle production.

  19. Dextran-based microspheres as controlled delivery systems for proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlugt-Wensink, K.D.F.

    2007-01-01

    Dextran-based microspheres as controlled delivery systems for proteins Dextran based microspheres are investigated as controlled delivery system for proteins. Microspheres were prepared by polymerization of dex-HEMA in an aqueous two-phase system of dex-HEMA and PEG. Protein loaded microspheres are

  20. Protein-Based Urine Test Predicts Kidney Transplant Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Releases News Release Thursday, August 22, 2013 Protein-based urine test predicts kidney transplant outcomes NIH- ... supporting development of noninvasive tests. Levels of a protein in the urine of kidney transplant recipients can ...

  1. On the analysis of protein-protein interactions via knowledge-based potentials for the prediction of protein-protein docking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feliu, Elisenda; Aloy, Patrick; Oliva, Baldo

    2011-01-01

    Development of effective methods to screen binary interactions obtained by rigid-body protein-protein docking is key for structure prediction of complexes and for elucidating physicochemical principles of protein-protein binding. We have derived empirical knowledge-based potential functions...... results were compared with a residue-pair potential scoring function (RPScore) and an atomic-detailed scoring function (Zrank). We have combined knowledge-based potentials to score protein-protein poses of decoys of complexes classified either as transient or as permanent protein-protein interactions...

  2. Horizontal and vertical transmission of wild-type and recombinant Helicoverpa armigera single-nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Mingzhe; Sun, Xiulian; Sun, Xincheng; Vlak, Just M; Hu, Zhihong; van der Werf, Wopke

    2005-06-01

    Transmission plays a central role in the ecology of baculoviruses and the population dynamics of their hosts. Here, we report on the horizontal and vertical transmission dynamics of wild-type Helicoverpa armigera single-nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (HaSNPV-WT) and a genetically modified variant (HaSNPV-AaIT) with enhanced speed of action through the expression of an insect-selective scorpion toxin (AaIT). In caged field plots, horizontal transmission of both HaSNPV variants was greatest when inoculated 3rd instar larvae were used as infectors, transmission was intermediate with 2nd instar infectors and lowest with 1st instar infectors. Transmission was greater at a higher density of infectors (1 per plant) than at a lower density (1 per 4 plants); however, the transmission coefficient (number of new infections per initial infector) was lower at the higher density of infectors than at the lower density. HaSNPV-AaIT exhibited a significantly lower rate of transmission than HaSNPV-WT in the field cages. This was also the case in open field experiments. In the laboratory, the vertical transmission of HaSNPV-AaIT from infected females to offspring of 16.7+/-2.1% was significantly lower than that of HaSNPV-WT (30.9+/-2.9%). Likewise, in the field, vertical transmission of HaSNPV-AaIT (8.4+/-1.1%) was significantly lower than that of HaSNPV-WT (12.6+/-2.0%). The results indicate that the recombinant virus will be transmitted at lower rates in H. armigera populations than the wild-type virus. This may potentially affect negatively its long-term efficacy as compared to wild-type virus, but contributing positively to its biosafety.

  3. A new essential protein discovery method based on the integration of protein-protein interaction and gene expression data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Min

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identification of essential proteins is always a challenging task since it requires experimental approaches that are time-consuming and laborious. With the advances in high throughput technologies, a large number of protein-protein interactions are available, which have produced unprecedented opportunities for detecting proteins' essentialities from the network level. There have been a series of computational approaches proposed for predicting essential proteins based on network topologies. However, the network topology-based centrality measures are very sensitive to the robustness of network. Therefore, a new robust essential protein discovery method would be of great value. Results In this paper, we propose a new centrality measure, named PeC, based on the integration of protein-protein interaction and gene expression data. The performance of PeC is validated based on the protein-protein interaction network of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The experimental results show that the predicted precision of PeC clearly exceeds that of the other fifteen previously proposed centrality measures: Degree Centrality (DC, Betweenness Centrality (BC, Closeness Centrality (CC, Subgraph Centrality (SC, Eigenvector Centrality (EC, Information Centrality (IC, Bottle Neck (BN, Density of Maximum Neighborhood Component (DMNC, Local Average Connectivity-based method (LAC, Sum of ECC (SoECC, Range-Limited Centrality (RL, L-index (LI, Leader Rank (LR, Normalized α-Centrality (NC, and Moduland-Centrality (MC. Especially, the improvement of PeC over the classic centrality measures (BC, CC, SC, EC, and BN is more than 50% when predicting no more than 500 proteins. Conclusions We demonstrate that the integration of protein-protein interaction network and gene expression data can help improve the precision of predicting essential proteins. The new centrality measure, PeC, is an effective essential protein discovery method.

  4. Structure based alignment and clustering of proteins (STRALCP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemla, Adam T.; Zhou, Carol E.; Smith, Jason R.; Lam, Marisa W.

    2013-06-18

    Disclosed are computational methods of clustering a set of protein structures based on local and pair-wise global similarity values. Pair-wise local and global similarity values are generated based on pair-wise structural alignments for each protein in the set of protein structures. Initially, the protein structures are clustered based on pair-wise local similarity values. The protein structures are then clustered based on pair-wise global similarity values. For each given cluster both a representative structure and spans of conserved residues are identified. The representative protein structure is used to assign newly-solved protein structures to a group. The spans are used to characterize conservation and assign a "structural footprint" to the cluster.

  5. Protein-Based Nanomedicine Platforms for Drug Delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma Ham, Aihui; Tang, Zhiwen; Wu, Hong; Wang, Jun; Lin, Yuehe

    2009-08-03

    Drug delivery systems have been developed for many years, however some limitations still hurdle the pace of going to clinical phase, for example, poor biodistribution, drug molecule cytotoxicity, tissue damage, quick clearance from the circulation system, solubility and stability of drug molecules. To overcome the limitations of drug delivery, biomaterials have to be developed and applied to drug delivery to protect the drug molecules and to enhance the drug’s efficacy. Protein-based nanomedicine platforms for drug delivery are platforms comprised of naturally self-assembled protein subunits of the same protein or a combination of proteins making up a complete system. They are ideal for drug delivery platforms due to their biocompatibility and biodegradability coupled with low toxicity. A variety of proteins have been used and characterized for drug delivery systems including the ferritin/apoferritin protein cage, plant derived viral capsids, the small Heat shock protein (sHsp) cage, albumin, soy and whey protein, collagen, and gelatin. There are many different types and shapes that have been prepared to deliver drug molecules using protein-based platforms including the various protein cages, microspheres, nanoparticles, hydrogels, films, minirods and minipellets. There are over 30 therapeutic compounds that have been investigated with protein-based drug delivery platforms for the potential treatment of various cancers, infectious diseases, chronic diseases, autoimmune diseases. In protein-based drug delivery platforms, protein cage is the most newly developed biomaterials for drug delivery and therapeutic applications. Their uniform sizes, multifunctions, and biodegradability push them to the frontier for drug delivery. In this review, the recent strategic development of drug delivery has been discussed with a special emphasis upon the polymer based, especially protein-based nanomedicine platforms for drug delivery. The advantages and disadvantages are also

  6. Identification of Essential Proteins Based on a New Combination of Local Interaction Density and Protein Complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiawei Luo

    Full Text Available Computational approaches aided by computer science have been used to predict essential proteins and are faster than expensive, time-consuming, laborious experimental approaches. However, the performance of such approaches is still poor, making practical applications of computational approaches difficult in some fields. Hence, the development of more suitable and efficient computing methods is necessary for identification of essential proteins.In this paper, we propose a new method for predicting essential proteins in a protein interaction network, local interaction density combined with protein complexes (LIDC, based on statistical analyses of essential proteins and protein complexes. First, we introduce a new local topological centrality, local interaction density (LID, of the yeast PPI network; second, we discuss a new integration strategy for multiple bioinformatics. The LIDC method was then developed through a combination of LID and protein complex information based on our new integration strategy. The purpose of LIDC is discovery of important features of essential proteins with their neighbors in real protein complexes, thereby improving the efficiency of identification.Experimental results based on three different PPI(protein-protein interaction networks of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli showed that LIDC outperformed classical topological centrality measures and some recent combinational methods. Moreover, when predicting MIPS datasets, the better improvement of performance obtained by LIDC is over all nine reference methods (i.e., DC, BC, NC, LID, PeC, CoEWC, WDC, ION, and UC.LIDC is more effective for the prediction of essential proteins than other recently developed methods.

  7. Identification of Essential Proteins Based on a New Combination of Local Interaction Density and Protein Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jiawei; Qi, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Background Computational approaches aided by computer science have been used to predict essential proteins and are faster than expensive, time-consuming, laborious experimental approaches. However, the performance of such approaches is still poor, making practical applications of computational approaches difficult in some fields. Hence, the development of more suitable and efficient computing methods is necessary for identification of essential proteins. Method In this paper, we propose a new method for predicting essential proteins in a protein interaction network, local interaction density combined with protein complexes (LIDC), based on statistical analyses of essential proteins and protein complexes. First, we introduce a new local topological centrality, local interaction density (LID), of the yeast PPI network; second, we discuss a new integration strategy for multiple bioinformatics. The LIDC method was then developed through a combination of LID and protein complex information based on our new integration strategy. The purpose of LIDC is discovery of important features of essential proteins with their neighbors in real protein complexes, thereby improving the efficiency of identification. Results Experimental results based on three different PPI(protein-protein interaction) networks of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli showed that LIDC outperformed classical topological centrality measures and some recent combinational methods. Moreover, when predicting MIPS datasets, the better improvement of performance obtained by LIDC is over all nine reference methods (i.e., DC, BC, NC, LID, PeC, CoEWC, WDC, ION, and UC). Conclusions LIDC is more effective for the prediction of essential proteins than other recently developed methods. PMID:26125187

  8. The nucleocapsid region of HIV-1 Gag cooperates with the PTAP and LYPXnL late domains to recruit the cellular machinery necessary for viral budding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Dussupt

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 release is mediated through two motifs in the p6 region of Gag, PTAP and LYPX(nL, which recruit cellular proteins Tsg101 and Alix, respectively. The Nucleocapsid region of Gag (NC, which binds the Bro1 domain of Alix, also plays an important role in HIV-1 release, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here we show that the first 202 residues of the Bro1 domain (Bro(i are sufficient to bind Gag. Bro(i interferes with HIV-1 release in an NC-dependent manner and arrests viral budding at the plasma membrane. Similar interrupted budding structures are seen following over-expression of a fragment containing Bro1 with the adjacent V domain (Bro1-V. Although only Bro1-V contains binding determinants for CHMP4, both Bro(i and Bro1-V inhibited release via both the PTAP/Tsg101 and the LYPX(nL/Alix pathways, suggesting that they interfere with a key step in HIV-1 release. Remarkably, we found that over-expression of Bro1 rescued the release of HIV-1 lacking both L domains. This rescue required the N-terminal region of the NC domain in Gag and the CHMP4 binding site in Bro1. Interestingly, release defects due to mutations in NC that prevented Bro1 mediated rescue of virus egress were rescued by providing a link to the ESCRT machinery via Nedd4.2s over-expression. Our data support a model in which NC cooperates with PTAP in the recruitment of cellular proteins necessary for its L domain activity and binds the Bro1-CHMP4 complex required for LYPX(nL-mediated budding.

  9. NMR-based screening of membrane protein ligands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yanamala, Naveena; Dutta, Arpana; Beck, Barbara; Van Fleet, Bart; Hay, Kelly; Yazbak, Ahmad; Ishima, Rieko; Doemling, Alexander; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith

    2010-01-01

    Membrane proteins pose problems for the application of NMR-based ligand-screening methods because of the need to maintain the proteins in a membrane mimetic environment such as detergent micelles: they add to the molecular weight of the protein, increase the viscosity of the solution, interact with

  10. Novel Technology for Protein-Protein Interaction-based Targeted Drug Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Me Hwang

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a simple but highly efficient in-cell protein-protein interaction (PPI discovery system based on the translocation properties of protein kinase C- and its C1a domain in live cells. This system allows the visual detection of trimeric and dimeric protein interactions including cytosolic, nuclear, and/or membrane proteins with their cognate ligands. In addition, this system can be used to identify pharmacological small compounds that inhibit specific PPIs. These properties make this PPI system an attractive tool for screening drug candidates and mapping the protein interactome.

  11. M13 Bacteriophage Based Protein Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ju Hun

    Despite significant progress in biotechnology and biosensing, early detection and disease diagnosis remains a critical issue for improving patient survival rates and well-being. Many of the typical detection schemes currently used possess issues such as low sensitivity and accuracy and are also time consuming to run and expensive. In addition, multiplexed detection remains difficult to achieve. Therefore, developing advanced approaches for reliable, simple, quantitative analysis of multiple markers in solution that also are highly sensitive are still in demand. In recent years, much of the research has primarily focused on improving two key components of biosensors: the bio-recognition agent (bio-receptor) and the transducer. Particular bio-receptors that have been used include antibodies, aptamers, molecular imprinted polymers, and small affinity peptides. In terms of transducing agents, nanomaterials have been considered as attractive candidates due to their inherent nanoscale size, durability and unique chemical and physical properties. The key focus of this thesis is the design of a protein detection and identification system that is based on chemically engineered M13 bacteriophage coupled with nanomaterials. The first chapter provides an introduction of biosensors and M13 bacteriophage in general, where the advantages of each are provided. In chapter 2, an efficient and enzyme-free sensor is demonstrated from modified M13 bacteriophage to generate highly sensitive colorimetric signals from gold nanocrystals. In chapter 3, DNA conjugated M13 were used to enable facile and rapid detection of antigens in solution that also provides modalities for identification. Lastly, high DNA loadings per phage was achieved via hydrozone chemistry and these were applied in conjunction with Raman active DNA-gold/silver core/shell nanoparticles toward highly sensitive SERS sensing.

  12. Genetically encoded biosensors based on engineered fluorescent proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frommer, Wolf B; Davidson, Michael W; Campbell, Robert E

    2009-10-01

    Fluorescent proteins have revolutionized cell biology by allowing researchers to non-invasively peer into the inner workings of cells and organisms. While the most common applications of fluorescent proteins are to image expression, localization, and dynamics of protein chimeras, there is a growing interest in using fluorescent proteins to create biosensors for minimally invasive imaging of concentrations of ions and small molecules, the activity of enzymes, and changes in the conformation of proteins in living cells. This tutorial review provides an overview of the progress made in the development of fluorescent protein-based biosensors to date.

  13. HomPPI: a class of sequence homology based protein-protein interface prediction methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobbs Drena

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although homology-based methods are among the most widely used methods for predicting the structure and function of proteins, the question as to whether interface sequence conservation can be effectively exploited in predicting protein-protein interfaces has been a subject of debate. Results We studied more than 300,000 pair-wise alignments of protein sequences from structurally characterized protein complexes, including both obligate and transient complexes. We identified sequence similarity criteria required for accurate homology-based inference of interface residues in a query protein sequence. Based on these analyses, we developed HomPPI, a class of sequence homology-based methods for predicting protein-protein interface residues. We present two variants of HomPPI: (i NPS-HomPPI (Non partner-specific HomPPI, which can be used to predict interface residues of a query protein in the absence of knowledge of the interaction partner; and (ii PS-HomPPI (Partner-specific HomPPI, which can be used to predict the interface residues of a query protein with a specific target protein. Our experiments on a benchmark dataset of obligate homodimeric complexes show that NPS-HomPPI can reliably predict protein-protein interface residues in a given protein, with an average correlation coefficient (CC of 0.76, sensitivity of 0.83, and specificity of 0.78, when sequence homologs of the query protein can be reliably identified. NPS-HomPPI also reliably predicts the interface residues of intrinsically disordered proteins. Our experiments suggest that NPS-HomPPI is competitive with several state-of-the-art interface prediction servers including those that exploit the structure of the query proteins. The partner-specific classifier, PS-HomPPI can, on a large dataset of transient complexes, predict the interface residues of a query protein with a specific target, with a CC of 0.65, sensitivity of 0.69, and specificity of 0.70, when homologs of

  14. Chitosan-based delivery systems for protein therapeutics and antigens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amidi, M.; Mastrobattista, E.; Jiskoot, W.; Hennink, W.E.

    2010-01-01

    Therapeutic peptides/proteins and protein-based antigens are chemically and structurally labile compounds, which are almost exclusively administered by parenteral injections. Recently, non-invasive mucosal routes have attracted interest for administration of these biotherapeutics. Chitosan-based del

  15. [Lyophilisation of protein-based drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murányi, Andrej; Vitková, Mária

    2014-10-01

    Lyophilisation is a well-established method for drying of various substances with a wide range of applications in the pharmaceutical area. During the last decade its relevance increases with a number of therapeutically used proteins. A sensitive protein drug may undergo several changes, like unfolding and loss of activity due to various stresses during the lyophilisation process. Understanding of these processes (freezing, primary drying, secondary drying) is fundamental for manufacturing of a drug product with desired properties, namely its safety and efficacy. In order to reduce costs and increase the quality, new technologies are being rapidly developed and established in industrial lyophilisation (e.g. process analytical technologies, control nucleation techniques).

  16. Comparison of sequence-based and structure-based phylogenetic trees of homologous proteins: Inferences on protein evolution

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Balaji; N Srinivasan

    2007-01-01

    Several studies based on the known three-dimensional (3-D) structures of proteins show that two homologous proteins with insignificant sequence similarity could adopt a common fold and may perform same or similar biochemical functions. Hence, it is appropriate to use similarities in 3-D structure of proteins rather than the amino acid sequence similarities in modelling evolution of distantly related proteins. Here we present an assessment of using 3-D structures in modelling evolution of homologous proteins. Using a dataset of 108 protein domain families of known structures with at least 10 members per family we present a comparison of extent of structural and sequence dissimilarities among pairs of proteins which are inputs into the construction of phylogenetic trees. We find that correlation between the structure-based dissimilarity measures and the sequence-based dissimilarity measures is usually good if the sequence similarity among the homologues is about 30% or more. For protein families with low sequence similarity among the members, the correlation coefficient between the sequence-based and the structure-based dissimilarities are poor. In these cases the structure-based dendrogram clusters proteins with most similar biochemical functional properties better than the sequence-similarity based dendrogram. In multi-domain protein families and disulphide-rich protein families the correlation coefficient for the match of sequence-based and structure-based dissimilarity (SDM) measures can be poor though the sequence identity could be higher than 30%. Hence it is suggested that protein evolution is best modelled using 3-D structures if the sequence similarities (SSM) of the homologues are very low.

  17. Identifying drug-target proteins based on network features

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU MingZhu; GAO Lei; LI Xia; LIU ZhiCheng

    2009-01-01

    Proteins rarely function in isolation Inside and outside cells, but operate as part of a highly Intercon-nected cellular network called the interaction network. Therefore, the analysis of the properties of drug-target proteins in the biological network is especially helpful for understanding the mechanism of drug action In terms of informatice. At present, no detailed characterization and description of the topological features of drug-target proteins have been available in the human protein-protein interac-tion network. In this work, by mapping the drug-targets in DrugBank onto the interaction network of human proteins, five topological indices of drug-targets were analyzed and compared with those of the whole protein interactome set and the non-drug-target set. The experimental results showed that drug-target proteins have higher connectivity and quicker communication with each other in the PPI network. Based on these features, all proteins In the interaction network were ranked. The results showed that, of the top 100 proteins, 48 are covered by DrugBank; of the remaining 52 proteins, 9 are drug-target proteins covered by the TTD, Matador and other databases, while others have been dem-onstrated to be drug-target proteins in the literature.

  18. Identifying drug-target proteins based on network features

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Proteins rarely function in isolation inside and outside cells, but operate as part of a highly intercon- nected cellular network called the interaction network. Therefore, the analysis of the properties of drug-target proteins in the biological network is especially helpful for understanding the mechanism of drug action in terms of informatics. At present, no detailed characterization and description of the topological features of drug-target proteins have been available in the human protein-protein interac- tion network. In this work, by mapping the drug-targets in DrugBank onto the interaction network of human proteins, five topological indices of drug-targets were analyzed and compared with those of the whole protein interactome set and the non-drug-target set. The experimental results showed that drug-target proteins have higher connectivity and quicker communication with each other in the PPI network. Based on these features, all proteins in the interaction network were ranked. The results showed that, of the top 100 proteins, 48 are covered by DrugBank; of the remaining 52 proteins, 9 are drug-target proteins covered by the TTD, Matador and other databases, while others have been dem- onstrated to be drug-target proteins in the literature.

  19. Prediction of Protein-Protein Interactions by NanoLuc-Based Protein-Fragment Complementation Assay | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The CTD2 Center at Emory has developed a new NanoLuc®-based protein-fragment complementation assay (NanoPCA) which allows the detection of novel protein-protein interactions (PPI). NanoPCA allows the study of PPI dynamics with reversible interactions.  Read the abstract. Experimental Approaches Read the detailed Experimetnal Approaches. 

  20. Screening serum hepatocellular carcinoma-associated proteins by SELDI-based protein spectrum analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To find out potential serum hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)-associated proteins with low molecular weight and low abundance by SELDI-based serum protein spectra analysis, that will have much application in the diagnosis or differentiated diagnosis of HCC, as well as giving a better undersyanding of the mechanism of hepato-carcinogenesis. METHODS: Total serum samples were collected with informed consent from 81 HCC patients with HBV (+)/cirrhosis(+),36 cirrhosis patients and 43 chronic hepatitis B patients. Serum protein fingerprint profiles were first generated by selected WCX2 protein chip capture integrating with SELDI-TOF-MS, then normalized and aligned by Ciphergen SELDI Software 3.1.1 with Biomarker Wizard.. Comparative analysis of the intensity of corresponding protein fingerprint peaks in normalized protein spectra, some protein peaks with significant difference between H.CC and cirrhosis or chronic hepatitis B were found. RESULTS: One hundred and twenty-eight serum protein peaks between.2000 and 30000Da were identified under the condition of signal-to-noise>5 and minimum threshold for cluster>20%.Eight-seven of these proteins were showed significant differences in intensity between HCC and cirrhosis (P<0.05=.Of the above differential proteins, 45 proteins had changes greater than two-fold, including 15 upregulated proteins and 30downregulated proteins in HCC serum. Between HCC and chronic hepatitis B,9 of 52 differential proteins (P<0.05= had intensities of more than two-fold, including 2 upregulated proteins and 7 downregulated proteins in HCC serum. Between cirrhosis and chronic hepatitis B,28 of 79 significant differential proteins (P<0.05= changes greater than two-fold in intensity, including 17 upregulated proteins and 11 downregulated proteins in cirrhosis serum. For the analysis of these leading differential proteins in subtraction difference mode among three diseases, the five common downregulated proteins in HCC serum (M/Z 2870

  1. Protein complex prediction based on k-connected subgraphs in protein interaction network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habibi Mahnaz

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein complexes play an important role in cellular mechanisms. Recently, several methods have been presented to predict protein complexes in a protein interaction network. In these methods, a protein complex is predicted as a dense subgraph of protein interactions. However, interactions data are incomplete and a protein complex does not have to be a complete or dense subgraph. Results We propose a more appropriate protein complex prediction method, CFA, that is based on connectivity number on subgraphs. We evaluate CFA using several protein interaction networks on reference protein complexes in two benchmark data sets (MIPS and Aloy, containing 1142 and 61 known complexes respectively. We compare CFA to some existing protein complex prediction methods (CMC, MCL, PCP and RNSC in terms of recall and precision. We show that CFA predicts more complexes correctly at a competitive level of precision. Conclusions Many real complexes with different connectivity level in protein interaction network can be predicted based on connectivity number. Our CFA program and results are freely available from http://www.bioinf.cs.ipm.ir/softwares/cfa/CFA.rar.

  2. Metazoan Hsp70-based protein disaggregases: Emergence and mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadinath Bandara Nillegoda

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Proteotoxic stresses and ageing cause breakdown of cellular protein homeostasis, allowing misfolded proteins to form aggregates, which dedicated molecular machines have evolved to solubilize. In bacteria, fungi, protozoa and plants protein disaggregation involves an Hsp70-J-protein chaperone system, which loads and activates a powerful AAA+ ATPase (Hsp100 disaggregase onto protein aggregate substrates. Metazoans lack cytosolic and nuclear Hsp100 disaggregases but still eliminate protein aggregates. This longstanding puzzle of protein quality control is now resolved. Robust protein disaggregation activity recently shown for the metazoan Hsp70-based disaggregases relies instead on a crucial cooperation between two J-protein classes and interaction with the Hsp110 co-chaperone. An expanding multiplicity of Hsp70 and J-protein family members in metazoan cells facilitates different configurations of this Hsp70-based disaggregase allowing unprecedented versatility and specificity in protein disaggregation. Here we review the architecture, operation and adaptability of the emerging metazoan disaggregation system and discuss how this evolved.

  3. SURVEY REGARDING THE ULTRAFILTRATION OF PROTEINES THROUGH MEMBRANE BASED PROCEDURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CAMELIA HODOSAN

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This work is based on examples that emphasize the complexity of the proteins ultrafiltration process, pointing out the first 10-15 minutes of ultrafiltration. The knowledgement of the factors that influence the separation through ultrafiltration of proteins will allow to choose the right type of membrane, the frequent use of the same membrane and the operation in mechanical and chemical conditions adequate to the ultrafiltration system, when it is separated a protein with certain molecular weight.

  4. Protein-protein interaction inference based on semantic similarity of Gene Ontology terms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shu-Bo; Tang, Qiang-Rong

    2016-07-21

    Identifying protein-protein interactions is important in molecular biology. Experimental methods to this issue have their limitations, and computational approaches have attracted more and more attentions from the biological community. The semantic similarity derived from the Gene Ontology (GO) annotation has been regarded as one of the most powerful indicators for protein interaction. However, conventional methods based on GO similarity fail to take advantage of the specificity of GO terms in the ontology graph. We proposed a GO-based method to predict protein-protein interaction by integrating different kinds of similarity measures derived from the intrinsic structure of GO graph. We extended five existing methods to derive the semantic similarity measures from the descending part of two GO terms in the GO graph, then adopted a feature integration strategy to combines both the ascending and the descending similarity scores derived from the three sub-ontologies to construct various kinds of features to characterize each protein pair. Support vector machines (SVM) were employed as discriminate classifiers, and five-fold cross validation experiments were conducted on both human and yeast protein-protein interaction datasets to evaluate the performance of different kinds of integrated features, the experimental results suggest the best performance of the feature that combines information from both the ascending and the descending parts of the three ontologies. Our method is appealing for effective prediction of protein-protein interaction.

  5. In silico identification of essential proteins in Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis based on protein-protein interaction networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folador, Edson Luiz; de Carvalho, Paulo Vinícius Sanches Daltro; Silva, Wanderson Marques;

    2016-01-01

    and decreased production of meat, wool, and milk. Current diagnosis or treatment protocols are not fully effective and, thus, require further research of Cp pathogenesis. RESULTS: Here, we mapped known protein-protein interactions (PPI) from various species to nine Cp strains to reconstruct parts...

  6. Structure and assembly of a paramyxovirus matrix protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battisti, Anthony J; Meng, Geng; Winkler, Dennis C; McGinnes, Lori W; Plevka, Pavel; Steven, Alasdair C; Morrison, Trudy G; Rossmann, Michael G

    2012-08-28

    Many pleomorphic, lipid-enveloped viruses encode matrix proteins that direct their assembly and budding, but the mechanism of this process is unclear. We have combined X-ray crystallography and cryoelectron tomography to show that the matrix protein of Newcastle disease virus, a paramyxovirus and relative of measles virus, forms dimers that assemble into pseudotetrameric arrays that generate the membrane curvature necessary for virus budding. We show that the glycoproteins are anchored in the gaps between the matrix proteins and that the helical nucleocapsids are associated in register with the matrix arrays. About 90% of virions lack matrix arrays, suggesting that, in agreement with previous biological observations, the matrix protein needs to dissociate from the viral membrane during maturation, as is required for fusion and release of the nucleocapsid into the host's cytoplasm. Structure and sequence conservation imply that other paramyxovirus matrix proteins function similarly.

  7. A least square method based model for identifying protein complexes in protein-protein interaction network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Qiguo; Guo, Maozu; Guo, Yingjie; Liu, Xiaoyan; Liu, Yang; Teng, Zhixia

    2014-01-01

    Protein complex formed by a group of physical interacting proteins plays a crucial role in cell activities. Great effort has been made to computationally identify protein complexes from protein-protein interaction (PPI) network. However, the accuracy of the prediction is still far from being satisfactory, because the topological structures of protein complexes in the PPI network are too complicated. This paper proposes a novel optimization framework to detect complexes from PPI network, named PLSMC. The method is on the basis of the fact that if two proteins are in a common complex, they are likely to be interacting. PLSMC employs this relation to determine complexes by a penalized least squares method. PLSMC is applied to several public yeast PPI networks, and compared with several state-of-the-art methods. The results indicate that PLSMC outperforms other methods. In particular, complexes predicted by PLSMC can match known complexes with a higher accuracy than other methods. Furthermore, the predicted complexes have high functional homogeneity.

  8. Modulating protein interaction on a molecular and Microstructural level for texture control in protein based gels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin, A.H.; Baigts Allende, D.; Munialo, C.D.; Urbonaite, V.; Pouvreau, L.A.M.; Jongh, de H.H.J.

    2014-01-01

    The exploration of microstructures and textures of protein based systems is essential to understand (oral) breakdown properties and thereby textural aspects, or macroscopic functionalities such as water holding. Upon structure breakdown, the applied energy (W) is primarily directed towards fracture

  9. Non-antibody protein-based biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Biosensors that depend on a physical or chemical measurement can be adversely affected by non-specific interactions. For example, a biosensor designed to measure specifically the levels of a rare analyte can give false positive results if there is even a small amount of interaction with a highly abundant but irrelevant molecule. To overcome this limitation, the biosensor community has frequently turned to antibody molecules as recognition elements because they are renowned for their exquisite specificity. Unfortunately antibodies can often fail when immobilised on inorganic surfaces, and alternative biological recognition elements are needed. This article reviews the available non-antibody-binding proteins that have been successfully used in electrical and micro-mechanical biosensor platforms. PMID:27365032

  10. Diets based on soybean protein for Mediterranean fruit fly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobrinho, Raimundo Braga [Embrapa Agroindustria Tropical, Rua Dra. Sara Mesquita, 2270, CEP 60511-110 Fortaleza, CE (Brazil)]. E-mail: braga@cnpat.embrapa.br; Caceres, Carlos; Islam, Amirul; Wornoayporn, Vivat [Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Agriculture and Biotechnology Laboratory, A-2444 Seibersdorf (Austria)]. E-mail: C.Caceres@iaea.org; Enkerlin, Walter [Insect Pest Control Section, Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture, Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: W.Enkerlin@iaea.org

    2006-04-15

    The objective of this work was to develop suitable and economic diets for mass rearing Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Diptera: Tephritidae). Diets containing sugar beet bagasse, wheat bran, brewer yeast, and others with wheat bran and palletized soybean protein from Brazil were tested. Diets based on soybean protein have shown promising results regarding pupal recovery, pupal weight and adult emergence. Soybean bagasse in the form of pellets with 60% of protein can be a very important substitute for other expensive sources of protein. (author)

  11. Considerations of Protein Subpockets in Fragment-Based Drug Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolowits, Matthew; Davisson, V Jo

    2016-01-01

    While the fragment-based drug design approach continues to gain importance, gaps in the tools and methods available in the identification and accurate utilization of protein subpockets have limited the scope. The importance of these features of small molecule-protein recognition is highlighted with several examples. A generalized solution for the identification of subpockets and corresponding chemical fragments remains elusive, but there are numerous advancements in methods that can be used in combination to address subpockets. Finally, additional examples of approaches that consider the relative importance of small-molecule co-dependence of protein conformations are highlighted to emphasize an increased significance of subpockets, especially at protein interfaces.

  12. Piperidine-based glycodendrons as protein N-glycan prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudak, Jason E; Belardi, Brian; Appel, Mason J; Solania, Angelo; Robinson, Peter V; Bertozzi, Carolyn R

    2016-10-15

    The generation of homogeneously glycosylated proteins is essential for defining glycoform-specific activity and improving protein-based therapeutics. We present a novel glycodendron prosthetic which can be site-selectively appended to recombinant proteins to create 'N-glycosylated' glycoprotein mimics. Using computational modeling, we designed the dendrimer scaffold and protein attachment point to resemble the native N-glycan architecture. Three piperidine-melamine glycodendrimers were synthesized via a chemoenzymatic route and attached to human growth hormone and the Fc region of human IgG. These products represent a new class of engineered biosimilars bearing novel glycodendrimer structures.

  13. study of the strength characteristics of protein-based lightweight ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Compressive strength test was carried out on the protein-based lightweight foamed concrete produced ... 150 mm were produced using ordinary Portland cement (OPC), fine aggregate, ..... values obtained for the loss on ignition (LOI) and SO3.

  14. A Shortest Dependency Path Based Convolutional Neural Network for Protein-Protein Relation Extraction

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The state-of-the-art methods for protein-protein interaction (PPI) extraction are primarily based on kernel methods, and their performances strongly depend on the handcraft features. In this paper, we tackle PPI extraction by using convolutional neural networks (CNN) and propose a shortest dependency path based CNN (sdpCNN) model. The proposed method (1) only takes the sdp and word embedding as input and (2) could avoid bias from feature selection by using CNN. We performed experiments on sta...

  15. Efficient fold-change detection based on protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buijsman, W; Sheinman, M

    2014-02-01

    Various biological sensory systems exhibit a response to a relative change of the stimulus, often referred to as fold-change detection. In the past few years, fold-change detecting mechanisms, based on transcriptional networks, have been proposed. Here we present a fold-change detecting mechanism, based on protein-protein interactions, consisting of two interacting proteins. This mechanism does not consume chemical energy and is not subject to transcriptional and translational noise, in contrast to previously proposed mechanisms. We show by analytical and numerical calculations that the mechanism is robust and can have a fast, precise, and efficient response for parameters that are relevant to eukaryotic cells.

  16. Efficient fold-change detection based on protein-protein interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buijsman, W.; Sheinman, M.

    2014-02-01

    Various biological sensory systems exhibit a response to a relative change of the stimulus, often referred to as fold-change detection. In the past few years, fold-change detecting mechanisms, based on transcriptional networks, have been proposed. Here we present a fold-change detecting mechanism, based on protein-protein interactions, consisting of two interacting proteins. This mechanism does not consume chemical energy and is not subject to transcriptional and translational noise, in contrast to previously proposed mechanisms. We show by analytical and numerical calculations that the mechanism is robust and can have a fast, precise, and efficient response for parameters that are relevant to eukaryotic cells.

  17. Protein analysis based on molecular beacon probes and biofunctionalized nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    With the completion of the human genome-sequencing project, there has been a resulting change in the focus of studies from genomics to proteomics. By utilizing the inherent advantages of molecular beacon probes and biofunctionalized nanoparticles, a series of novel principles, methods and techniques have been exploited for bioanalytical and biomedical studies. This review mainly discusses the applications of molecular beacon probes and biofunctionalized nanoparticles-based technologies for realtime, in-situ, highly sensitive and highly selective protein analysis, including the nonspecific or specific protein detection and separation, protein/DNA interaction studies, cell surface protein recognition, and antigen-antibody binding process-based bacteria assays. The introduction of molecular beacon probes and biofunctionalized nanoparticles into the protein analysis area would necessarily advance the proteomics research.

  18. Protein-based supramolecular polymers: progress and prospect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Quan; Dong, Zeyuan; Hou, Chunxi; Liu, Junqiu

    2014-09-11

    Proteins are naturally evolved macromolecules with highly sophisticated structures and diverse properties. The design and controlled self-assembly of proteins into polymeric architectures via supramolecular interactions offers unique advantages in understanding the spontaneously self-organisational process and fabrication of various bioactive materials. This feature article highlights recent advances and future trends in supramolecular polymers that are directly assembled from the building blocks of proteins. Non-covalent interactions capable of inducing polymerization include aromatic π-π stacking, host-guest interactions, metal coordination, and interprotein interactions combined with site-selective protein modification to explore the dynamic and specific unidirectional aggregation behaviours among protein units. We also discuss some extended supramolecular protein polymers achieved by rational design and fine-tuning the protein-protein interactions, which may help to inspire future design of more complicated polymeric protein assemblies. The protein-based supramolecular polymer system provides a versatile platform for functionalization and thereby shows great potential in the development of novel biomaterials with controlled structures and properties.

  19. MIPCE: An MI-based protein complex extraction technique

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Priyakshi Mahanta; Dhruba K R Bhattacharyya; Ashish Ghosh

    2015-10-01

    Protein–protein interaction (PPI) networks are believed to be important sources of information related to biological processes and complex metabolic functions of the cell. Identifying protein complexes is of great importance for understanding cellular organization and functions of organisms. In this work, a method is proposed, referred to as MIPCE, to find protein complexes in a PPI network based on mutual information. MIPCE has been biologically validated by GO-based score and satisfactory results have been obtained. We have also compared our method with some well-known methods and obtained better results in terms of various parameters such as precession, recall and F-measure.

  20. Evaluating Peptide Mass Fingerprinting-based Protein Identification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Senthilkumar; Damodaran; Troy; D.; Wood; Priyadharsini; Nagarajan; Richard; A.; Rabin

    2007-01-01

    Identification of proteins by mass spectrometry (MS) is an essential step in pro- teomic studies and is typically accomplished by either peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF) or amino acid sequencing of the peptide. Although sequence information from MS/MS analysis can be used to validate PMF-based protein identification, it may not be practical when analyzing a large number of proteins and when high- throughput MS/MS instrumentation is not readily available. At present, a vast majority of proteomic studies employ PMF. However, there are huge disparities in criteria used to identify proteins using PMF. Therefore, to reduce incorrect protein identification using PMF, and also to increase confidence in PMF-based protein identification without accompanying MS/MS analysis, definitive guiding principles are essential. To this end, we propose a value-based scoring system that provides guidance on evaluating when PMF-based protein identification can be deemed sufficient without accompanying amino acid sequence data from MS/MS analysis.

  1. Essential C-Terminal region of the baculovirus minor capsid protein VP80 binds DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marek, M.; Merten, O.W.; Francis-Devaraj, F.; Oers, van M.M.

    2012-01-01

    The essential Autographa californica multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) minor capsid protein VP80 has been recently shown to interact with the virus-triggered, nuclear F-actin cytoskeleton. A role for VP80 in virus morphogenesis has been proposed in the maturation of progeny nucleocapsids and

  2. Profile-based short linear protein motif discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Short linear protein motifs are attracting increasing attention as functionally independent sites, typically 3–10 amino acids in length that are enriched in disordered regions of proteins. Multiple methods have recently been proposed to discover over-represented motifs within a set of proteins based on simple regular expressions. Here, we extend these approaches to profile-based methods, which provide a richer motif representation. Results The profile motif discovery method MEME performed relatively poorly for motifs in disordered regions of proteins. However, when we applied evolutionary weighting to account for redundancy amongst homologous proteins, and masked out poorly conserved regions of disordered proteins, the performance of MEME is equivalent to that of regular expression methods. However, the two approaches returned different subsets within both a benchmark dataset, and a more realistic discovery dataset. Conclusions Profile-based motif discovery methods complement regular expression based methods. Whilst profile-based methods are computationally more intensive, they are likely to discover motifs currently overlooked by regular expression methods. PMID:22607209

  3. Profile-based short linear protein motif discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haslam Niall J

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Short linear protein motifs are attracting increasing attention as functionally independent sites, typically 3–10 amino acids in length that are enriched in disordered regions of proteins. Multiple methods have recently been proposed to discover over-represented motifs within a set of proteins based on simple regular expressions. Here, we extend these approaches to profile-based methods, which provide a richer motif representation. Results The profile motif discovery method MEME performed relatively poorly for motifs in disordered regions of proteins. However, when we applied evolutionary weighting to account for redundancy amongst homologous proteins, and masked out poorly conserved regions of disordered proteins, the performance of MEME is equivalent to that of regular expression methods. However, the two approaches returned different subsets within both a benchmark dataset, and a more realistic discovery dataset. Conclusions Profile-based motif discovery methods complement regular expression based methods. Whilst profile-based methods are computationally more intensive, they are likely to discover motifs currently overlooked by regular expression methods.

  4. Controllability of protein-protein interaction phosphorylation-based networks: Participation of the hub 14-3-3 protein family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhart, Marina; Flores, Gabriel; Bustos, Diego M

    2016-05-19

    Posttranslational regulation of protein function is an ubiquitous mechanism in eukaryotic cells. Here, we analyzed biological properties of nodes and edges of a human protein-protein interaction phosphorylation-based network, especially of those nodes critical for the network controllability. We found that the minimal number of critical nodes needed to control the whole network is 29%, which is considerably lower compared to other real networks. These critical nodes are more regulated by posttranslational modifications and contain more binding domains to these modifications than other kinds of nodes in the network, suggesting an intra-group fast regulation. Also, when we analyzed the edges characteristics that connect critical and non-critical nodes, we found that the former are enriched in domain-to-eukaryotic linear motif interactions, whereas the later are enriched in domain-domain interactions. Our findings suggest a possible structure for protein-protein interaction networks with a densely interconnected and self-regulated central core, composed of critical nodes with a high participation in the controllability of the full network, and less regulated peripheral nodes. Our study offers a deeper understanding of complex network control and bridges the controllability theorems for complex networks and biological protein-protein interaction phosphorylation-based networked systems.

  5. Protein-protein interactions prediction based on iterative clique extension with gene ontology filtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lei; Tang, Xianglong

    2014-01-01

    Cliques (maximal complete subnets) in protein-protein interaction (PPI) network are an important resource used to analyze protein complexes and functional modules. Clique-based methods of predicting PPI complement the data defection from biological experiments. However, clique-based predicting methods only depend on the topology of network. The false-positive and false-negative interactions in a network usually interfere with prediction. Therefore, we propose a method combining clique-based method of prediction and gene ontology (GO) annotations to overcome the shortcoming and improve the accuracy of predictions. According to different GO correcting rules, we generate two predicted interaction sets which guarantee the quality and quantity of predicted protein interactions. The proposed method is applied to the PPI network from the Database of Interacting Proteins (DIP) and most of the predicted interactions are verified by another biological database, BioGRID. The predicted protein interactions are appended to the original protein network, which leads to clique extension and shows the significance of biological meaning.

  6. Protein-Protein Interactions Prediction Based on Iterative Clique Extension with Gene Ontology Filtering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cliques (maximal complete subnets in protein-protein interaction (PPI network are an important resource used to analyze protein complexes and functional modules. Clique-based methods of predicting PPI complement the data defection from biological experiments. However, clique-based predicting methods only depend on the topology of network. The false-positive and false-negative interactions in a network usually interfere with prediction. Therefore, we propose a method combining clique-based method of prediction and gene ontology (GO annotations to overcome the shortcoming and improve the accuracy of predictions. According to different GO correcting rules, we generate two predicted interaction sets which guarantee the quality and quantity of predicted protein interactions. The proposed method is applied to the PPI network from the Database of Interacting Proteins (DIP and most of the predicted interactions are verified by another biological database, BioGRID. The predicted protein interactions are appended to the original protein network, which leads to clique extension and shows the significance of biological meaning.

  7. Micro-photonic cylindrical waveguide based protein biosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padigi, Sudhaprasanna Kumar [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Portland State University, 160-11 FAB, 1900 SW Fourth Avenue, Portland, OR 97201 (United States); Asante, Kofi [Department of Physics, Portland State University, Portland, OR 97201 (United States); Kovvuri, Vijay Sekhar Reddy [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Portland State University, 160-11 FAB, 1900 SW Fourth Avenue, Portland, OR 97201 (United States); Reddy, Ravi Kiran Kondama [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Portland State University, 160-11 FAB, 1900 SW Fourth Avenue, Portland, OR 97201 (United States); Rosa, Andres La [Department of Physics, Portland State University, Portland, OR 97201 (United States); Prasad, Shalini [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Portland State University, 160-11 FAB, 1900 SW Fourth Avenue, Portland, OR 97201 (United States)

    2006-09-14

    In this paper we experimentally demonstrate the fabrication and operation of a rapidly prototyped optical cylindrical micro-waveguide based biosensor. This device works on the principle of variation to the light intensity and path of coupled input light due to the binding of protein bio-molecules onto the micro-waveguide surface as a method of physical transduction. The variation to the coupled light intensity and path is dependent on the nature of the bio-molecule and the density of the bio-molecules. This technique has been used to identify protein biomarkers for inflammation and thrombosis, namely myeloperoxidase (MPO) and C-reactive protein (CRP). The detection limit that has been demonstrated is pg ml{sup -1}. The detection speed is of the order of seconds from the time of injection of the bio-molecule. The optical signature that is obtained to identify a protein bio-molecule is entirely dependent on the nature of adsorption of the bio-molecule on to the cylindrical cavity surfaces. This in turn is dependent on the protein conformation and the surface charge of the bio-molecules. Hence a specific protein bio-molecule generates a unique optical identifier based on the nature of binding/adsorption to the cavity surface. This physical phenomenon is exploited to identify individual proteins. This technique is a demonstration of detection of nano-scale protein bio-molecules using the optical biosensor technique with unprecedented sensitivity.

  8. Helicoverpa armigera nucleopolyhedrovirus occlusion-derived virus-associated protein, HA100, affects oral infectivity in vivo but not virus replication in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luo, S.; Zhang, Y.; Xu, X.; Westenberg, M.; Vlak, J.M.; Wang, H.; Hu, Z.; Deng, F.

    2011-01-01

    ORF100 (ha100) of Helicoverpa armigera nucleopolyhedrovirus (HearNPV) has been reported as one of the unique genes of group II alphabaculoviruses encoding a protein located in the occlusion-derived virus (ODV) envelope and nucleocapsid. The protein consists of 510 aa with a predicted mass of 58.1 kD

  9. Sport Nutrition Drinks Based on Octopus Protein Hydrolysate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambang Riyanto

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available AbstractSport nutrition drinks are well-known in escalating athlete’s performance and endurance. These product developed from whey protein hydrolysates and soybean protein hydrolysates have already been recognized, however expansion from marine product is comparatively rare. Octopus (Octopus cyanea widely acknowledged containing taurine and rich in amino acids is potential to be developed as ingredient for sport nutrition drink. The aims of this study were to create and characterize sport nutrition drinks based on marine peptides through Octopus protein hydrolyzate. Octopus protein hydrolysate has 77.78±2.69% degree of hydrolysis and 751.02±10.63 mg / 100g taurine. Sports nutrition drinks with the addition of 4% Octopus protein hydrolyzate was acceptable sensory panelists, and the serving size of 600 ml contained taurine 726.06±0.82 mg and detected 17 types of amino acids.

  10. Identification of protein superfamily from structure- based sequence motif

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The structure-based sequence motif of the distant proteins in evolution, protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTP) Ⅰ and Ⅱ superfamilies, as an example, has been defined by the structural comparison, structure-based sequence alignment and analyses on substitution patterns of residues in common sequence conserved regions. And the phosphatases Ⅰ and Ⅱ can be correctly identified together by the structure-based PTP sequence motif from SWISS-PROT and TrEBML databases. The results show that the correct rates of identification are over 98%. This is the first time to identify PTP Ⅰ and Ⅱ together by this motif.

  11. Comparison of surface and hydrogel-based protein microchips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubtsov, D A; Savvateeva, E N; Rubina, A Yu; Pan'kov, S V; Konovalova, E V; Moiseeva, O V; Chechetkin, V R; Zasedatelev, A S

    2007-09-15

    Protein microchips are designed for high-throughput evaluation of the concentrations and activities of various proteins. The rapid advance in microchip technology and a wide variety of existing techniques pose the problem of unified approach to the assessment and comparison of different platforms. Here we compare the characteristics of protein microchips developed for quantitative immunoassay with those of antibodies immobilized on glass surfaces and in hemispherical gel pads. Spotting concentrations of antibodies used for manufacturing of microchips of both types and concentrations of antigen in analyte solution were identical. We compared the efficiency of antibody immobilization, the intensity of fluorescence signals for both direct and sandwich-type immunoassays, and the reaction-diffusion kinetics of the formation of antibody-antigen complexes for surface and gel-based microchips. Our results demonstrate higher capacity and sensitivity for the hydrogel-based protein microchips, while fluorescence saturation kinetics for the two types of microarrays was comparable.

  12. DNA binding protein identification by combining pseudo amino acid composition and profile-based protein representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bin; Wang, Shanyi; Wang, Xiaolong

    2015-10-01

    DNA-binding proteins play an important role in most cellular processes. Therefore, it is necessary to develop an efficient predictor for identifying DNA-binding proteins only based on the sequence information of proteins. The bottleneck for constructing a useful predictor is to find suitable features capturing the characteristics of DNA binding proteins. We applied PseAAC to DNA binding protein identification, and PseAAC was further improved by incorporating the evolutionary information by using profile-based protein representation. Finally, Combined with Support Vector Machines (SVMs), a predictor called iDNAPro-PseAAC was proposed. Experimental results on an updated benchmark dataset showed that iDNAPro-PseAAC outperformed some state-of-the-art approaches, and it can achieve stable performance on an independent dataset. By using an ensemble learning approach to incorporate more negative samples (non-DNA binding proteins) in the training process, the performance of iDNAPro-PseAAC was further improved. The web server of iDNAPro-PseAAC is available at http://bioinformatics.hitsz.edu.cn/iDNAPro-PseAAC/.

  13. A new protein-protein docking scoring function based on interface residue properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernauer, J; Azé, J; Janin, J; Poupon, A

    2007-03-01

    Protein-protein complexes are known to play key roles in many cellular processes. However, they are often not accessible to experimental study because of their low stability and difficulty to produce the proteins and assemble them in native conformation. Thus, docking algorithms have been developed to provide an in silico approach of the problem. A protein-protein docking procedure traditionally consists of two successive tasks: a search algorithm generates a large number of candidate solutions, and then a scoring function is used to rank them. To address the second step, we developed a scoring function based on a Voronoï tessellation of the protein three-dimensional structure. We showed that the Voronoï representation may be used to describe in a simplified but useful manner, the geometric and physico-chemical complementarities of two molecular surfaces. We measured a set of parameters on native protein-protein complexes and on decoys, and used them as attributes in several statistical learning procedures: a logistic function, Support Vector Machines (SVM), and a genetic algorithm. For the later, we used ROGER, a genetic algorithm designed to optimize the area under the receiver operating characteristics curve. To further test the scores derived with ROGER, we ranked models generated by two different docking algorithms on targets of a blind prediction experiment, improving in almost all cases the rank of native-like solutions. http://genomics.eu.org/spip/-Bioinformatics-tools-

  14. Protein Function Prediction Based on Sequence and Structure Information

    KAUST Repository

    Smaili, Fatima Z.

    2016-05-25

    The number of available protein sequences in public databases is increasing exponentially. However, a significant fraction of these sequences lack functional annotation which is essential to our understanding of how biological systems and processes operate. In this master thesis project, we worked on inferring protein functions based on the primary protein sequence. In the approach we follow, 3D models are first constructed using I-TASSER. Functions are then deduced by structurally matching these predicted models, using global and local similarities, through three independent enzyme commission (EC) and gene ontology (GO) function libraries. The method was tested on 250 “hard” proteins, which lack homologous templates in both structure and function libraries. The results show that this method outperforms the conventional prediction methods based on sequence similarity or threading. Additionally, our method could be improved even further by incorporating protein-protein interaction information. Overall, the method we use provides an efficient approach for automated functional annotation of non-homologous proteins, starting from their sequence.

  15. Chromatographic Studies of Protein-Based Chiral Separations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Cong; Zheng, Xiwei; Azaria, Shiden; Beeram, Sandya; Li, Zhao; Hage, David S.

    2016-01-01

    The development of separation methods for the analysis and resolution of chiral drugs and solutes has been an area of ongoing interest in pharmaceutical research. The use of proteins as chiral binding agents in high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) has been an approach that has received particular attention in such work. This report provides an overview of proteins that have been used as binding agents to create chiral stationary phases (CSPs) and in the use of chromatographic methods to study these materials and protein-based chiral separations. The supports and methods that have been employed to prepare protein-based CSPs will also be discussed and compared. Specific types of CSPs that are considered include those that employ serum transport proteins (e.g., human serum albumin, bovine serum albumin, and alpha1-acid glycoprotein), enzymes (e.g., penicillin G acylase, cellobiohydrolases, and α-chymotrypsin) or other types of proteins (e.g., ovomucoid, antibodies, and avidin or streptavidin). The properties and applications for each type of protein and CSP will also be discussed in terms of their use in chromatography and chiral separations.

  16. Ultrasound-based protein determination in maize seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drochioiu, Gabi; Ciobanu, Catalina Ionica; Bancila, Sabina; Ion, Laura; Petre, Brindusa Alina; Andries, Claudia; Gradinaru, Robert Vasile; Murariu, Manuela

    2016-03-01

    The need for a simple and accurate method for protein estimation in alcoholic extracts led to the reexamination of the optimum conditions of a colorimetric assay based on the biuret reaction. Sonication time and the other experimental parameters were optimized after kinetics study on the extraction of either zein or total proteins. Zein extraction and purity were investigated by (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy, SDS-PAGE electrophoresis, and UV-visible spectrophotometry (UV-vis). A zein assay was proposed, which involves the reaction of copper ions in copper phosphate powder with zein extracted in ethanolic solutions under strong alkaline environment. Furthermore, we extended this procedure to determine total proteins in maize samples simultaneously with their ultrasonic-assisted (US) extraction with an alkaline-alcoholic solution. Proteins in both types of extracts were well characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy. However, the 545 nm absorbance of the violet-colored supernatants which is proportional to the protein content was found to be the key parameter of the improved biuret-based protein assay. Comparison of values obtained by this procedure and by Micro-Kjeldahl method was in excellent agreement. A scaled-down procedure agreed well with the standard procedure. Enhanced accuracy and repeatability was found in protein determination in maize using the modified biuret method. The optimization of reagent concentrations and incubation times were studied as well.

  17. In vivo protein quality of selected cereal-based staple foods enriched with soybean proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Acevedo-Pacheco

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: One way to diminish protein malnutrition in children is by enriching cereal-based flours for the manufacturing of maize tortillas, wheat flour tortillas, and yeast-leavened breads, which are widely consumed among low socio-economic groups. Objective: The aim was to determine and compare the essential amino acid (EAA scores, protein digestibility corrected amino acid scores (PDCAAS, and in vivo protein quality (protein digestibility, protein efficiency ratio (PER, biological values (BV, and net protein utilization (NPU values of regular versus soybean-fortified maize tortillas, yeast-leavened bread, and wheat flour tortillas. Design: To comparatively assess differences in protein quality among maize tortillas, wheat flour tortillas, and yeast-leavened breads, EAA compositions and in vivo studies with weanling rats were performed. The experimental diets based on regular or soybean-fortified food products were compared with a casein-based diet. Food intake, weight gains, PER, dry matter and protein digestibility, BV, NPU, and PDCAAS were assessed. The soybean-fortified tortillas contained 6% of defatted soybean flour, whereas the yeast-leavened bread flour contained 4.5% of soybean concentrate. Results: The soybean-fortified tortillas and bread contained higher amounts of lysine and tryptophan, which improved their EAA scores and PDCAAS. Rats fed diets based on soybean-fortified maize or wheat tortillas gained considerably more weight and had better BV and NPU values compared with counterparts fed with respective regular products. As a result, fortified maize tortillas and wheat flour tortillas improved PER from 0.73 to 1.64 and 0.69 to 1.77, respectively. The PER improvement was not as evident in rats fed the enriched yeast-leavened bread because the formulation contained sugar that decreased lysine availability possibly to Maillard reactions. Conclusions: The proposed enrichment of cereal-based foods with soybean proteins greatly

  18. Detecting Protein-Protein Interactions with a Novel Matrix-Based Protein Sequence Representation and Support Vector Machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu-Hong You

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Proteins and their interactions lie at the heart of most underlying biological processes. Consequently, correct detection of protein-protein interactions (PPIs is of fundamental importance to understand the molecular mechanisms in biological systems. Although the convenience brought by high-throughput experiment in technological advances makes it possible to detect a large amount of PPIs, the data generated through these methods is unreliable and may not be completely inclusive of all possible PPIs. Targeting at this problem, this study develops a novel computational approach to effectively detect the protein interactions. This approach is proposed based on a novel matrix-based representation of protein sequence combined with the algorithm of support vector machine (SVM, which fully considers the sequence order and dipeptide information of the protein primary sequence. When performed on yeast PPIs datasets, the proposed method can reach 90.06% prediction accuracy with 94.37% specificity at the sensitivity of 85.74%, indicating that this predictor is a useful tool to predict PPIs. Achieved results also demonstrate that our approach can be a helpful supplement for the interactions that have been detected experimentally.

  19. Identifying Hierarchical and Overlapping Protein Complexes Based on Essential Protein-Protein Interactions and “Seed-Expanding” Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Ren

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Many evidences have demonstrated that protein complexes are overlapping and hierarchically organized in PPI networks. Meanwhile, the large size of PPI network wants complex detection methods have low time complexity. Up to now, few methods can identify overlapping and hierarchical protein complexes in a PPI network quickly. In this paper, a novel method, called MCSE, is proposed based on λ-module and “seed-expanding.” First, it chooses seeds as essential PPIs or edges with high edge clustering values. Then, it identifies protein complexes by expanding each seed to a λ-module. MCSE is suitable for large PPI networks because of its low time complexity. MCSE can identify overlapping protein complexes naturally because a protein can be visited by different seeds. MCSE uses the parameter λ_th to control the range of seed expanding and can detect a hierarchical organization of protein complexes by tuning the value of λ_th. Experimental results of S. cerevisiae show that this hierarchical organization is similar to that of known complexes in MIPS database. The experimental results also show that MCSE outperforms other previous competing algorithms, such as CPM, CMC, Core-Attachment, Dpclus, HC-PIN, MCL, and NFC, in terms of the functional enrichment and matching with known protein complexes.

  20. Controlling chitosan-based encapsulation for protein and vaccine delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppolu, Bhanu prasanth; Smith, Sean G.; Ravindranathan, Sruthi; Jayanthi, Srinivas; Kumar, Thallapuranam K.S.; Zaharoff, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Chitosan-based nano/microencapsulation is under increasing investigation for the delivery of drugs, biologics and vaccines. Despite widespread interest, the literature lacks a defined methodology to control chitosan particle size and drug/protein release kinetics. In this study, the effects of precipitation-coacervation formulation parameters on chitosan particle size, protein encapsulation efficiency and protein release were investigated. Chitosan particle sizes, which ranged from 300 nm to 3 μm, were influenced by chitosan concentration, chitosan molecular weight and addition rate of precipitant salt. The composition of precipitant salt played a significant role in particle formation with upper Hofmeister series salts containing strongly hydrated anions yielding particles with a low polydispersity index (PDI) while weaker anions resulted in aggregated particles with high PDIs. Sonication power had minimal effect on mean particle size, however, it significantly reduced polydispersity. Protein loading efficiencies in chitosan nano/microparticles, which ranged from 14.3% to 99.2%, was inversely related to the hydration strength of precipitant salts, protein molecular weight and directly related to the concentration and molecular weight of chitosan. Protein release rates increased with particle size and were generally inversely related to protein molecular weight. This study demonstrates that chitosan nano/microparticles with high protein loading efficiencies can be engineered with well-defined sizes and controllable release kinetics through manipulation of specific formulation parameters. PMID:24560459

  1. Prototype Protein-Based Three-Dimensional Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    protein is all-trans retinal, which is bound via a protonated Schiff base to Lys-216. Light induces an all-trans to 13-cis isomerization in...the all-trans retinal Schiff base , absorbs light and undergoes the photocycle schematically shown in Fig. 3.6. Although many aspects of the proton...creates an electrostatic environment that destabilizes the protonated Schiff base , resulting in deprotonation of the chromophore and protonation of

  2. Biomolecular Simulation of Base Excision Repair and Protein Signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straatsma, TP; McCammon, J A; Miller, John H; Smith, Paul E; Vorpagel, Erich R; Wong, Chung F; Zacharias, Martin W

    2006-03-03

    The goal of the Biomolecular Simulation of Base Excision Repair and Protein Signaling project is to enhance our understanding of the mechanism of human polymerase-β, one of the key enzymes in base excision repair (BER) and the cell-signaling enzymes cyclic-AMP-dependent protein kinase. This work used molecular modeling and simulation studies to specifically focus on the • dynamics of DNA and damaged DNA • dynamics and energetics of base flipping in DNA • mechanism and fidelity of nucleotide insertion by BER enzyme human polymerase-β • mechanism and inhibitor design for cyclic-AMP-dependent protein kinase. Molecular dynamics simulations and electronic structure calculations have been performed using the computer resources at the Molecular Science Computing Facility at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory.

  3. A comparison of protein extraction methods suitable for gel-based proteomic studies of aphid proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilia, M; Fish, T; Yang, X; McLaughlin, M; Thannhauser, T W; Gray, S

    2009-09-01

    Protein extraction methods can vary widely in reproducibility and in representation of the total proteome, yet there are limited data comparing protein isolation methods. The methodical comparison of protein isolation methods is the first critical step for proteomic studies. To address this, we compared three methods for isolation, purification, and solubilization of insect proteins. The aphid Schizaphis graminum, an agricultural pest, was the source of insect tissue. Proteins were extracted using TCA in acetone (TCA-acetone), phenol, or multi-detergents in a chaotrope solution. Extracted proteins were solubilized in a multiple chaotrope solution and examined using 1-D and 2-D electrophoresis and compared directly using 2-D Difference Gel Electrophoresis (2-D DIGE). Mass spectrometry was used to identify proteins from each extraction type. We were unable to ascribe the differences in the proteins extracted to particular physical characteristics, cell location, or biological function. The TCA-acetone extraction yielded the greatest amount of protein from aphid tissues. Each extraction method isolated a unique subset of the aphid proteome. The TCA-acetone method was explored further for its quantitative reliability using 2-D DIGE. Principal component analysis showed that little of the variation in the data was a result of technical issues, thus demonstrating that the TCA-acetone extraction is a reliable method for preparing aphid proteins for a quantitative proteomics experiment. These data suggest that although the TCA-acetone method is a suitable method for quantitative aphid proteomics, a combination of extraction approaches is recommended for increasing proteome coverage when using gel-based separation techniques.

  4. Gene ontology based transfer learning for protein subcellular localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Shuigeng

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prediction of protein subcellular localization generally involves many complex factors, and using only one or two aspects of data information may not tell the true story. For this reason, some recent predictive models are deliberately designed to integrate multiple heterogeneous data sources for exploiting multi-aspect protein feature information. Gene ontology, hereinafter referred to as GO, uses a controlled vocabulary to depict biological molecules or gene products in terms of biological process, molecular function and cellular component. With the rapid expansion of annotated protein sequences, gene ontology has become a general protein feature that can be used to construct predictive models in computational biology. Existing models generally either concatenated the GO terms into a flat binary vector or applied majority-vote based ensemble learning for protein subcellular localization, both of which can not estimate the individual discriminative abilities of the three aspects of gene ontology. Results In this paper, we propose a Gene Ontology Based Transfer Learning Model (GO-TLM for large-scale protein subcellular localization. The model transfers the signature-based homologous GO terms to the target proteins, and further constructs a reliable learning system to reduce the adverse affect of the potential false GO terms that are resulted from evolutionary divergence. We derive three GO kernels from the three aspects of gene ontology to measure the GO similarity of two proteins, and derive two other spectrum kernels to measure the similarity of two protein sequences. We use simple non-parametric cross validation to explicitly weigh the discriminative abilities of the five kernels, such that the time & space computational complexities are greatly reduced when compared to the complicated semi-definite programming and semi-indefinite linear programming. The five kernels are then linearly merged into one single kernel for

  5. Structure-based Drug Screening and Ligand-Based Drug Screening Toward Protein-Compound Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukunishi, Yoshifumi

    2007-12-01

    We developed two new methods to improve the accuracy of molecular interaction data using a protein-compound affinity matrix calculated by a protein-compound docking software. One method is a structure-based in silico drug screening method and another method is a ligand-based in silico drug screening method. These methods were applied to enhance the database enrichment of in silico drug screening and in silico target protein screening.

  6. Blind test of physics-based prediction of protein structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shell, M Scott; Ozkan, S Banu; Voelz, Vincent; Wu, Guohong Albert; Dill, Ken A

    2009-02-01

    We report here a multiprotein blind test of a computer method to predict native protein structures based solely on an all-atom physics-based force field. We use the AMBER 96 potential function with an implicit (GB/SA) model of solvation, combined with replica-exchange molecular-dynamics simulations. Coarse conformational sampling is performed using the zipping and assembly method (ZAM), an approach that is designed to mimic the putative physical routes of protein folding. ZAM was applied to the folding of six proteins, from 76 to 112 monomers in length, in CASP7, a community-wide blind test of protein structure prediction. Because these predictions have about the same level of accuracy as typical bioinformatics methods, and do not utilize information from databases of known native structures, this work opens up the possibility of predicting the structures of membrane proteins, synthetic peptides, or other foldable polymers, for which there is little prior knowledge of native structures. This approach may also be useful for predicting physical protein folding routes, non-native conformations, and other physical properties from amino acid sequences.

  7. Quantum Dots-based Reverse Phase Protein Microarray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shingyoji, Masato; Gerion, Daniele; Pinkel, Dan; Gray, Joe W.; Chen, Fanqing

    2005-07-15

    CdSe nanocrystals, also called quantum dots (Qdots) are a novel class of fluorophores, which have a diameter of a few nanometers and possess high quantum yield, tunable emission wavelength and photostability. They are an attractive alternative to conventional fluorescent dyes. Quantum dots can be silanized to be soluble in aqueous solution under biological conditions, and thus be used in bio-detection. In this study, we established a novel Qdot-based technology platform that can perform accurate and reproducible quantification of protein concentration in a crude cell lysate background. Protein lysates have been spiked with a target protein, and a dilution series of the cell lysate with a dynamic range of three orders of magnitude has been used for this proof-of-concept study. The dilution series has been spotted in microarray format, and protein detection has been achieved with a sensitivity that is at least comparable to standard commercial assays, which are based on horseradish peroxidase (HRP) catalyzed diaminobenzidine (DAB) chromogenesis. The data obtained through the Qdot method has shown a close linear correlation between relative fluorescence unit and relative protein concentration. The Qdot results are in almost complete agreement with data we obtained with the well-established HRP-DAB colorimetric array (R{sup 2} = 0.986). This suggests that Qdots can be used for protein quantification in microarray format, using the platform presented here.

  8. Lead Generation and Optimization Based on Protein-Ligand Complementarity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Ogata

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This work proposes a computational procedure for structure-based lead generation and optimization, which relies on the complementarity of the protein-ligand interactions. This procedure takes as input the known structure of a protein-ligand complex. Retaining the positions of the ligand heavy atoms in the protein binding site it designs structurally similar compounds considering all possible combinations of atomic species (N, C, O, CH3, NH,etc. Compounds are ranked based on a score which incorporates energetic contributions evaluated using molecular mechanics force fields. This procedure was used to design new inhibitor molecules for three serine/threonine protein kinases (p38 MAP kinase, p42 MAP kinase (ERK2, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase 3 (JNK3. For each enzyme, the calculations produce a set of potential inhibitors whose scores are in agreement with IC50 data and Ki values. Furthermore, the native ligands for each protein target, scored within the five top-ranking compounds predicted by our method, one of the top-ranking compounds predicted to inhibit JNK3 was synthesized and his inhibitory activity confirmed against ATP hydrolysis. Our computational procedure is therefore deemed to be a useful tool for generating chemically diverse molecules active against known target proteins.

  9. Radiation effects on viscosimetry of protein based solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabato, S. F.; Lacroix, M.

    2002-03-01

    Due to their good functional properties allied to their excellent nutritional value, milk protein isolates and soy protein concentrates have gained a crescent interest. These proteins could have their structural properties improved when some treatments are applied, such as gamma irradiation, alone or in presence of other compounds, as a plasticizer. In this work, solutions of those proteins were mixed with a generally recognized as safe plasticizer, glycerol. These mixtures (8% protein (w/v) base) at two ratios 1:1 and 2:1 (protein:glycerol) were submitted to a gamma irradiation treatment ( 60Co), at doses 0, 5, 15 and 25 kGy, and their rheological performance was studied. As irradiation dose increased viscosity measurements decayed significantly ( pwhey/glycerol remained almost constant as irradiation dose increases. In the case of soy protein isolate and sodium caseinate, a mixture of 2:1 showed a significant higher viscosity ( p<0.05) than a mixture of 1:1.

  10. Identifying folding nucleus based on residue contact networks of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Wang, Jun; Wang, Wei

    2008-06-01

    In the native structure of a protein, all the residues are tightly parked together in a specific order following its folding and every residue contacts with some spatially neighbor residues. A residue contact network can be constructed by defining the residues as nodes and the native contacts as edges. During the folding of small single-domain proteins, there is a set of contacts (or bonds), defined as the folding nucleus (FN), which is formed around the transition state, i.e., a rate-limiting barrier located at about the middle between the unfolded states and the native state on the free energy landscape. Such a FN plays an essential role in the folding dynamics and the residues, which form the related contacts called as folding nucleus residues (FNRs). In this work, the FNRs in proteins are identified by using quantities which characterize the topology of residue contact networks of proteins. By comparing the specificities of residues with the network quantities K(R), L(R), and D(R), up to 90% FNRs of six typical proteins found experimentally are identified. It is found that the FNRs behave the full-closeness centrals rather than degree or closeness centers in the residue contact network, implying that they are important to the folding cooperativity of proteins. Our study shows that the FNRs can be identified solely from the native structures of proteins based on the analysis of residue contact network without any knowledge of the transition state ensemble. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Food protein-based phytosterol nanoparticles: fabrication and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Wen-Jun; Ou, Shi-Yi; Lin, Wei-Feng; Tang, Chuan-He

    2016-09-14

    The development of food-grade (nano)particles as a delivery system for poorly water soluble bioactives has recently attracted increasing attention. This work is an attempt to fabricate food protein-based nanoparticles as delivery systems for improving the water dispersion and bioaccessibility of phytosterols (PS) by an emulsification-evaporation method. The fabricated PS nanoparticles were characterized in terms of particle size, encapsulation efficiency (EE%) and loading amount (LA), and ξ-potential. Among all the test proteins, including soy protein isolate (SPI), whey protein concentrate (WPC) and sodium caseinate (SC), SC was confirmed to be the most suitable protein for the PS nano-formulation. Besides the type of protein, the particle size, EE% and LA of PS in the nanoparticles varied with the applied protein concentration in the aqueous phase and organic volume fraction. The freeze-dried PS nanoparticles with SC exhibited good water re-dispersion behavior and low crystallinity of PS. The LA of PS in the nanoparticles decreased upon storage, especially at high temperatures (e.g., >25 °C). The PS in the fabricated nanoparticles exhibited much better bioaccessibility than free PS. The findings would be of relevance for the fabrication of food-grade colloidal phytosterols, with great potential to be applied in functional food formulations.

  12. Preventing rheumatic fever: M-protein based vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandon, Rajendra

    2014-01-01

    Group A beta hemolytic streptococcus (GAS), the organism which initiates rheumatic fever (RF) continues to be sensitive to penicillin. However, penicillin cannot prevent RF if the preceding sore throat is asymptomatic in more than 70 percent children. Prevention of rheumatic fever (RF) may be possible only with the use of a vaccine. Efforts to design a vaccine based on emm gene identification of GAS, M-protein going on for more than 40 years, is unlikely to succeed. M-protein is strain specific. Infection with one strain does not provide immunity from infection with another strain. Based on the emm gene identification, of 250 or more identified strains of GAS, the distribution is heterogenous and keeps changing. The M-protein gene sequence of the organism tends to mutate. A vaccine prepared from available strains may not be effective against a strain following mutation. Lethal toxic shock syndrome due to GAS infection has been described with organisms without identifiable or functional M-protein. M-protein has been excluded as the antigen responsible for acute glomerulonephritis (GN). Therefore M-protein plays no role in one suppurative (toxic shock syndrome) and one non-suppurative (acute GN) manifestation due to GAS infection. Lastly there is no direct evidence to indicate that M-protein is involved in inducing RF. The role of M-protein and the GAS component resulting in the suppurative manifestations of GAS infections like pyoderma, septic arthritis or necrotizing fasciitis etc is unknown. For a vaccine to be effective, an epitope of the streptococcus which is stable and uniformly present in all strains, needs to be identified and tested for its safety and efficacy. The vaccine if and when available is expected to prevent GAS infection. Preventing GAS infection will prevent all the suppurative as well as non-suppurative manifestations including RF.

  13. Protein-protein docking using region-based 3D Zernike descriptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sael Lee

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-protein interactions are a pivotal component of many biological processes and mediate a variety of functions. Knowing the tertiary structure of a protein complex is therefore essential for understanding the interaction mechanism. However, experimental techniques to solve the structure of the complex are often found to be difficult. To this end, computational protein-protein docking approaches can provide a useful alternative to address this issue. Prediction of docking conformations relies on methods that effectively capture shape features of the participating proteins while giving due consideration to conformational changes that may occur. Results We present a novel protein docking algorithm based on the use of 3D Zernike descriptors as regional features of molecular shape. The key motivation of using these descriptors is their invariance to transformation, in addition to a compact representation of local surface shape characteristics. Docking decoys are generated using geometric hashing, which are then ranked by a scoring function that incorporates a buried surface area and a novel geometric complementarity term based on normals associated with the 3D Zernike shape description. Our docking algorithm was tested on both bound and unbound cases in the ZDOCK benchmark 2.0 dataset. In 74% of the bound docking predictions, our method was able to find a near-native solution (interface C-αRMSD ≤ 2.5 Å within the top 1000 ranks. For unbound docking, among the 60 complexes for which our algorithm returned at least one hit, 60% of the cases were ranked within the top 2000. Comparison with existing shape-based docking algorithms shows that our method has a better performance than the others in unbound docking while remaining competitive for bound docking cases. Conclusion We show for the first time that the 3D Zernike descriptors are adept in capturing shape complementarity at the protein-protein interface and useful for

  14. Improvement of the relative entropy based protein folding method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The "relative entropy" has been used as a minimization function to predict the tertiary structure of a protein backbone, and good results have been obtained. However, in our previous work, the ensemble average of the contact potential was estimated by an approximate calculation. In order to improve the theoretical integrity of the relative-entropy-based method, a new theoretical calculation method of the ensemble average of the contact potential was presented in this work, which is based on the thermodynamic perturbation theory. Tests of the improved algorithm were performed on twelve small proteins. The root mean square deviations of the predicted versus the native structures from Protein Data Bank range from 0.40 to 0.60 nm. Compared with the previous approximate values, the average prediction accuracy is improved by 0.04 nm.

  15. Improvement of the relative entropy based protein folding method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI LiSheng; SU JiGuo; CHEN WeiZu; WANG CunXin

    2009-01-01

    The "relative entropy" has been used as a minimization function to predict the tertiary structure of a protein backbone, and good results have been obtained. However, in our previous work, the ensemble average of the contact potential was estimated by an approximate calculation. In order to improve the theoretical integrity of the relative-entropy-based method, a new theoretical calculation method of the ensemble average of the contact potential was presented in this work, which is based on the thermodynamic perturbation theory. Testa of the improved algorithm were performed on twelve small proteins. The root mean square deviations of the predicted versus the native structures from Protein Data Bank range from 0.40 to 0.60 nm. Compared with the previous approximate values, the average prediction accuracy is improved by 0.04 nm.

  16. Phenylglyoxal-Based Visualization of Citrullinated Proteins on Western Blots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanne M. M. Hensen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Citrullination is the conversion of peptidylarginine to peptidylcitrulline, which is catalyzed by peptidylarginine deiminases. This conversion is involved in different physiological processes and is associated with several diseases, including cancer and rheumatoid arthritis. A common method to detect citrullinated proteins relies on anti-modified citrulline antibodies directed to a specific chemical modification of the citrulline side chain. Here, we describe a versatile, antibody-independent method for the detection of citrullinated proteins on a membrane, based on the selective reaction of phenylglyoxal with the ureido group of citrulline under highly acidic conditions. The method makes use of 4-azidophenylglyoxal, which, after reaction with citrullinated proteins, can be visualized with alkyne-conjugated probes. The sensitivity of this procedure, using an alkyne-biotin probe, appeared to be comparable to the antibody-based detection method and independent of the sequence surrounding the citrulline.

  17. High content screening for G protein-coupled receptors using cell-based protein translocation assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grånäs, Charlotta; Lundholt, Betina Kerstin; Heydorn, Arne

    2005-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have been one of the most productive classes of drug targets for several decades, and new technologies for GPCR-based discovery promise to keep this field active for years to come. While molecular screens for GPCR receptor agonist- and antagonist-based drugs...... as valuable discovery tools for several years. The application of high content cell-based screening to GPCR discovery has opened up additional possibilities, such as direct tracking of GPCRs, G proteins and other signaling pathway components using intracellular translocation assays. These assays provide...... the capability to probe GPCR function at the cellular level with better resolution than has previously been possible, and offer practical strategies for more definitive selectivity evaluation and counter-screening in the early stages of drug discovery. The potential of cell-based translocation assays for GPCR...

  18. Electrospun fish protein fibers as a biopolymer-based carrier – implications for oral protein delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boutrup Stephansen, Karen; García-Díaz, María; Jessen, Flemming

    2014-01-01

    . The electrospinning process did not affect the functionality of the encapsulated insulin and it provided controlled release kinetics. The epithelial permeability enhancing effect and biocompatibility of the FSP fibers provide evidence for further investigating protein-based electrospun nanofibers for delivery...

  19. Current protein-based anti-angiogenic therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Sanjukta; Barrow, Colin J; Kanwar, Rupinder K; Ramana, Venkata; Kanwar, Jagat R

    2014-01-01

    Angiogenesis is a multistep process for the formation of new blood vessels. Interactions between several cellular factors including growth factors, cytokines and hematopoietic factors lead to activation of various cellular pathways finally resulting in the extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation, endothelial cell proliferation, survival and migration. Normally, angiogenesis is an essential requirement for vascular development in growing embryos as well as in adult tissues where this process depends on the intricate balance between the activities of the pro- and anti-angiogenic factors. Abnormal angiogenesis results in aberrant vasculature leading to various pathological conditions. The most important factor implicated in angiogenic processes is vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its family of ligands and receptors. Several anti-angiogenic drugs have been developed and many more are currently in different phases of clinical trials, which target various angiogenesis-inducing agents including VEGF, VEGF receptors, angiopoietins and ECM components such as integrins. Anti-angiogenic therapy can be divided into gene-based therapy and protein-based therapy. Gene-based therapies include the use of antisense oligonucleotides, siRNA, aptamers, catalytic oligonucleotides including ribozymes and DNAzymes and transcription decoys. Protein-based therapeutics includes monoclonal antibodies, peptidomimetics, fusion proteins and decoy receptors. The later class of therapeutics has several advantages over gene-based and small molecule drugs, including specificity and complexity in functions, better tolerability, less interference with normal biological processes and lesser adverse effects due to decreased immune response by virtue of being mostly body's natural proteins. This review provides a comprehensive overview of angiogenesis and on the current protein-based anti-angiogenic therapeutics under research and in the clinic.

  20. Lysine 242 within helix 10 of the pseudorabies virus nuclear egress complex pUL31 component is critical for primary envelopment of nucleocapsids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rönfeldt, Sebastian; Klupp, Barbara G; Franzke, Kati; Mettenleiter, Thomas C

    2017-09-06

    Newly assembled herpesvirus nucleocapsids are translocated from the nucleus to the cytosol by a vesicle-mediated process engaging the nuclear membranes. This transport is governed by the conserved nuclear egress complex (NEC), consisting of the alphaherpesviral pUL34 and pUL31 homologs. The NEC is not only required for efficient nuclear egress but also sufficient for vesicle formation from the inner nuclear membrane (INM) as well as from synthetic lipid bilayers. The recently solved crystal structures for the NECs from different herpesviruses revealed molecular details of this membrane deformation and scission machinery uncovering the interfaces involved in complex and coat formation. However, the interaction domain with the nucleocapsid remained undefined. Since the NEC assembles a curved hexagonal coat on the nucleoplasmic side of the INM consisting of tightly interwoven pUL31/pUL34 heterodimers arranged in hexamers, only the membrane-distal end of the NEC formed by pUL31 residues appears accessible for interaction with the nucleocapsid cargo. To identify the amino acids involved in capsid incorporation we mutated the corresponding regions in the alphaherpesvirus pseudorabies virus (PrV). Site-specifically mutated pUL31 were tested for localization, interaction with pUL34 and complementation of PrV-ΔUL31. Here, we identify a conserved lysine residue at amino acid position 242 in PrV pUL31 located in the alpha-helical domain H10 exposed on the membrane-distal end of the NEC as a key residue for nucleocapsid incorporation into the nascent primary particle.IMPORTANCE Vesicular transport through the nuclear envelope is a focus of research but still not well understood. Herpesviruses pioneered this mechanism for translocation of the newly assembled nucleocapsid from the nucleus into the cytosol via vesicles derived from the inner nuclear membrane which fuse in a well-tuned process with the outer nuclear membrane to release their content. The structure of the viral

  1. Protein-binding site prediction based on three-dimensional protein modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Mina; Joo, Keehyoung; Lee, Jooyoung

    2009-01-01

    Structural information of a protein can guide one to understand the function of the protein, and ligand binding is one of the major biochemical functions of proteins. We have applied a two-stage template-based ligand binding site prediction method to CASP8 targets and achieved high quality results with accuracy/coverage = 70/80 (LEE). First, templates are used for protein structure modeling and then for binding site prediction by structural clustering of ligand-containing templates to the predicted protein model. Remarkably, the results are only a few percent worse than those one can obtain from native structures, which were available only after the prediction. Prediction was performed without knowing identity of ligands, and consequently, in many cases the ligand molecules used for prediction were different from the actual ligands, and yet we find that the prediction was quite successful. The current approach can be easily combined with experiments to investigate protein activities in a systematic way. Copyright 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. A New Method for Identifying Essential Proteins Based on Network Topology Properties and Protein Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Chao; Sun, Yongqi; Dong, Yadong

    2016-01-01

    Essential proteins are indispensable to the viability and reproduction of an organism. The identification of essential proteins is necessary not only for understanding the molecular mechanisms of cellular life but also for disease diagnosis, medical treatments and drug design. Many computational methods have been proposed for discovering essential proteins, but the precision of the prediction of essential proteins remains to be improved. In this paper, we propose a new method, LBCC, which is based on the combination of local density, betweenness centrality (BC) and in-degree centrality of complex (IDC). First, we introduce the common centrality measures; second, we propose the densities Den1(v) and Den2(v) of a node v to describe its local properties in the network; and finally, the combined strategy of Den1, Den2, BC and IDC is developed to improve the prediction precision. The experimental results demonstrate that LBCC outperforms traditional topological measures for predicting essential proteins, including degree centrality (DC), BC, subgraph centrality (SC), eigenvector centrality (EC), network centrality (NC), and the local average connectivity-based method (LAC). LBCC also improves the prediction precision by approximately 10 percent on the YMIPS and YMBD datasets compared to the most recently developed method, LIDC. PMID:27529423

  3. Lab-on-a-Chip Based Protein Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    vanderWoerd, Mark J.; Brasseur, Michael M.; Spearing, Scott F.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We are developing a novel technique with which we will grow protein crystals in very small volumes, utilizing chip-based, microfluidic ("LabChip") technology. This development, which is a collaborative effort between NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center and Caliper Technologies Corporation, promises a breakthrough in the field of protein crystal growth. Our initial results obtained from two model proteins, Lysozyme and Thaumatin, show that it is feasible to dispense and adequately mix protein and precipitant solutions on a nano-liter scale. The mixtures have shown crystal growth in volumes in the range of 10 nanoliters to 5 microliters. In addition, large diffraction quality crystals were obtained by this method. X-ray data from these crystals were shown to be of excellent quality. Our future efforts will include the further development of protein crystal growth with LabChip(trademark) technology for more complex systems. We will initially address the batch growth method, followed by the vapor diffusion method and the liquid-liquid diffusion method. The culmination of these chip developments is to lead to an on orbit protein crystallization facility on the International Space Station. Structural biologists will be invited to utilize the on orbit Iterative Biological Crystallization facility to grow high quality macromolecular crystals in microgravity.

  4. Recent advances in recombinant protein-based malaria vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, Simon J; Angov, Evelina; Horii, Toshihiro; Miller, Louis H; Srinivasan, Prakash; Theisen, Michael; Biswas, Sumi

    2015-12-22

    Plasmodium parasites are the causative agent of human malaria, and the development of a highly effective vaccine against infection, disease and transmission remains a key priority. It is widely established that multiple stages of the parasite's complex lifecycle within the human host and mosquito vector are susceptible to vaccine-induced antibodies. The mainstay approach to antibody induction by subunit vaccination has been the delivery of protein antigen formulated in adjuvant. Extensive efforts have been made in this endeavor with respect to malaria vaccine development, especially with regard to target antigen discovery, protein expression platforms, adjuvant testing, and development of soluble and virus-like particle (VLP) delivery platforms. The breadth of approaches to protein-based vaccines is continuing to expand as innovative new concepts in next-generation subunit design are explored, with the prospects for the development of a highly effective multi-component/multi-stage/multi-antigen formulation seeming ever more likely. This review will focus on recent progress in protein vaccine design, development and/or clinical testing for a number of leading malaria antigens from the sporozoite-, merozoite- and sexual-stages of the parasite's lifecycle-including PfCelTOS, PfMSP1, PfAMA1, PfRH5, PfSERA5, PfGLURP, PfMSP3, Pfs48/45 and Pfs25. Future prospects and challenges for the development, production, human delivery and assessment of protein-based malaria vaccines are discussed.

  5. ELISA for brucellosis detection based on three Brucella recombinant proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thepsuriyanont, Pikun; Intarapuk, Apiradee; Chanket, Panita; Tunyong, Wittawat; Kalambaheti, Thareerat

    2014-01-01

    Control of brucellosis among farm animals, wildlife and humans require reliable diagnosis. Rose Bengal serological test (RBT) is based on lipopolysaccharide antigen of Brucella, which may cross react with other gram-negative bacteria and produce false positive result. Immunoreactive proteins, such as outer-membrane protein BP26, ribosome recycling factor protein CP24 and Brucella lumazine synthase (BLS), previously reported to be recognized by infected sheep sera, were selected for production of recombinant proteins for use in an ELISA in order to investigate immune response among goats and cows, in comparison with commercial RBT. Cut-off value for ELISA was based on the immune response of in vitro fertilized goats and cows. Goats positive for Brucella culture or by RBT were ELISA positive for either IgG or IgM against at least one recombinant protein. For animals with negative RBT, animals with positive ELISA could be detected, and 61.6% possessed ELISA values as high as in infected animals. Thus, this ELISA procedure is proposed as an alternative to RBT for screening of brucellosis in farm animals.

  6. Proteomics in quality control: Whey protein-based supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido, Bruno Carius; Souza, Gustavo H M F; Lourenço, Daniela C; Fasciotti, Maíra

    2016-09-16

    The growing consumption of nutritional supplements might represent a problem, given the concern about the quality of these supplements. One of the most used supplements is whey protein (WP); because of its popularity, it has been a target of adulteration with substitute products, such as cheaper proteins with lower biological value. To investigate this type of adulteration, this study used shotgun proteomics analyses by MS(E) (multiplexed, low- and high-collision energy, data-independent acquisition) of WP-based supplements. Seventeen WP-based supplement samples were evaluated. Chicken, maize, rice, potato, soybean, and wheat proteins were considered as probable sources of bovine whey adulteration. Collectively, 523 proteins were identified across all 16 samples and replicates, with 94% of peptides inside a normal distribution within 10ppm of maximum error. In 10 of the 16 samples analyzed, only proteins from bovine whey could be detected, while in the other samples several other protein sources were detected in high concentrations, especially soybean, wheat, and rice. These results point out a probable adulteration and/or sample contamination during manufacturing that could only be detected using this proteomic approach. The present work shows how shotgun proteomics can be used to provide reliable answers in quality control matters, especially focusing on Whey Protein nutritional supplements which are a very popular subject in food and nutrition. In order to achieve an appropriate methodology, careful evaluation was performed applying extremely rigorous quality criteria, established for the proteomic analysis. These criteria and the methodological approach used in this work might serve as a guide for other authors seeking to use proteomics in quality control. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Lanthanide-based imaging of protein-protein interactions in live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendran, Megha; Yapici, Engin; Miller, Lawrence W

    2014-02-17

    In order to deduce the molecular mechanisms of biological function, it is necessary to monitor changes in the subcellular location, activation, and interaction of proteins within living cells in real time. Förster resonance energy-transfer (FRET)-based biosensors that incorporate genetically encoded, fluorescent proteins permit high spatial resolution imaging of protein-protein interactions or protein conformational dynamics. However, a nonspecific fluorescence background often obscures small FRET signal changes, and intensity-based biosensor measurements require careful interpretation and several control experiments. These problems can be overcome by using lanthanide [Tb(III) or Eu(III)] complexes as donors and green fluorescent protein (GFP) or other conventional fluorophores as acceptors. Essential features of this approach are the long-lifetime (approximately milliseconds) luminescence of Tb(III) complexes and time-gated luminescence microscopy. This allows pulsed excitation, followed by a brief delay, which eliminates nonspecific fluorescence before the detection of Tb(III)-to-GFP emission. The challenges of intracellular delivery, selective protein labeling, and time-gated imaging of lanthanide luminescence are presented, and recent efforts to investigate the cellular uptake of lanthanide probes are reviewed. Data are presented showing that conjugation to arginine-rich, cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) can be used as a general strategy for the cellular delivery of membrane-impermeable lanthanide complexes. A heterodimer of a luminescent Tb(III) complex, Lumi4, linked to trimethoprim and conjugated to nonaarginine via a reducible disulfide linker rapidly (∼10 min) translocates into the cytoplasm of Maden Darby canine kidney cells from the culture medium. With this reagent, the intracellular interaction between GFP fused to FK506 binding protein 12 (GFP-FKBP12) and the rapamycin binding domain of mTOR fused to Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase (FRB

  8. Liposome-based Formulation for Intracellular Delivery of Functional Proteins

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    Benoît Chatin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The intracellular delivery of biologically active protein represents an important emerging strategy for both fundamental and therapeutic applications. Here, we optimized in vitro delivery of two functional proteins, the β-galactosidase (β-gal enzyme and the anti-cytokeratin8 (K8 antibody, using liposome-based formulation. The guanidinium-cholesterol cationic lipid bis (guanidinium-tren-cholesterol (BGTC (bis (guanidinium-tren-cholesterol combined to the colipid dioleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE (dioleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine was shown to efficiently deliver the β-gal intracellularly without compromising its activity. The lipid/protein molar ratio, protein amount, and culture medium were demonstrated to be key parameters affecting delivery efficiency. The protein itself is an essential factor requiring selection of the appropriate cationic lipid as illustrated by low K8 binding activity of the anti-K8 antibody using guanidinium-based liposome. Optimization of various lipids led to the identification of the aminoglycoside lipid dioleyl succinyl paromomycin (DOSP associated with the imidazole-based helper lipid MM27 as a potent delivery system for K8 antibody, achieving delivery in 67% of HeLa cells. Cryo-transmission electron microscopy showed that the structure of supramolecular assemblies BGTC:DOPE/β-gal and DOSP:MM27/K8 were different depending on liposome types and lipid/protein molar ratio. Finally, we observed that K8 treatment with DOSP:MM27/K8 rescues the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP-dependent chloride efflux in F508del-CFTR expressing cells, providing a new tool for the study of channelopathies.

  9. Contributions of the Measles Virus Nucleocapsid Gene and the SQSTM1/p62P392L Mutation to Paget's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, Noriyoshi; Hiruma, Yuko; Yamana, Kei; Michou, Laëtitia; Rousseau, Côme; Morissette, Jean; Galson, Deborah L.; Teramachi, Jumpei; Zhou, Hua; Dempster, David W.; Windle, Jolene J.; Brown, Jacques P.; Roodman, G. David

    2011-01-01

    Summary Paget's Disease (PD) is characterized by abnormal osteoclasts (OCL) that secrete high IL-6 levels and induce exuberant bone formation. Because measles virus nucleocapsid gene (MVNP) and the p62P392L mutation are implicated in PD, marrows from 12 PD patients harboring p62P392L and 8 normals were tested for MVNP expression and pagetic OCL formation. 8/12 patients expressed MVNP and formed pagetic OCL in vitro, which were inhibited by antisense-MVNP. 4/12 patients lacked MVNP and formed normal OCL that were hyper-responsive to RANKL but unaffected by antisense-MVNP. Similarly, mice expressing only p62P394L formed normal OCL, while mice expressing MVNP in OCL, with or without p62P394L, developed pagetic OCL and expressed high IL-6 levels dependent on p38MAPK activation. IL-6 deficiency in MVNP mice abrogated pagetic OCL development in vitro. Mice co-expressing MVNP and p62P394L developed dramatic Paget's-like bone lesions. These results suggest that p62P394L and IL-6 induction by MVNP play key roles in PD. PMID:21195346

  10. Contributions of the measles virus nucleocapsid gene and the SQSTM1/p62(P392L) mutation to Paget's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, Noriyoshi; Hiruma, Yuko; Yamana, Kei; Michou, Laëtitia; Rousseau, Côme; Morissette, Jean; Galson, Deborah L; Teramachi, Jumpei; Zhou, Hua; Dempster, David W; Windle, Jolene J; Brown, Jacques P; Roodman, G David

    2011-01-05

    Paget's disease (PD) is characterized by abnormal osteoclasts (OCL) that secrete high IL-6 levels and induce exuberant bone formation. Because measles virus nucleocapsid gene (MVNP) and the p62(P392L) mutation are implicated in PD, marrows from 12 PD patients harboring p62(P392L) and eight normals were tested for MVNP expression and pagetic OCL formation. Eight out of twelve patients expressed MVNP and formed pagetic OCL in vitro, which were inhibited by antisense-MVNP. Four out of twelve patients lacked MVNP and formed normal OCL that were hyperresponsive to RANKL but unaffected by antisense-MVNP. Similarly, mice expressing only p62(P394L) formed normal OCL, while mice expressing MVNP in OCL, with or without p62(P394L), developed pagetic OCL and expressed high IL-6 levels dependent on p38MAPK activation. IL-6 deficiency in MVNP mice abrogated pagetic OCL development in vitro. Mice coexpressing MVNP and p62(P394L) developed dramatic Paget's-like bone lesions. These results suggest that p62(P394L) and IL-6 induction by MVNP play key roles in PD.

  11. A Shortest Dependency Path Based Convolutional Neural Network for Protein-Protein Relation Extraction

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    Lei Hua

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The state-of-the-art methods for protein-protein interaction (PPI extraction are primarily based on kernel methods, and their performances strongly depend on the handcraft features. In this paper, we tackle PPI extraction by using convolutional neural networks (CNN and propose a shortest dependency path based CNN (sdpCNN model. The proposed method (1 only takes the sdp and word embedding as input and (2 could avoid bias from feature selection by using CNN. We performed experiments on standard Aimed and BioInfer datasets, and the experimental results demonstrated that our approach outperformed state-of-the-art kernel based methods. In particular, by tracking the sdpCNN model, we find that sdpCNN could extract key features automatically and it is verified that pretrained word embedding is crucial in PPI task.

  12. A Shortest Dependency Path Based Convolutional Neural Network for Protein-Protein Relation Extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Lei; Quan, Chanqin

    2016-01-01

    The state-of-the-art methods for protein-protein interaction (PPI) extraction are primarily based on kernel methods, and their performances strongly depend on the handcraft features. In this paper, we tackle PPI extraction by using convolutional neural networks (CNN) and propose a shortest dependency path based CNN (sdpCNN) model. The proposed method (1) only takes the sdp and word embedding as input and (2) could avoid bias from feature selection by using CNN. We performed experiments on standard Aimed and BioInfer datasets, and the experimental results demonstrated that our approach outperformed state-of-the-art kernel based methods. In particular, by tracking the sdpCNN model, we find that sdpCNN could extract key features automatically and it is verified that pretrained word embedding is crucial in PPI task.

  13. MHC CLASS-II-RESTRICTED T-CELL HYBRIDOMAS RECOGNIZING THE NUCLEOCAPSID PROTEIN OF AVIAN CORONAVIUS IBV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BOOTS, AMH; VANLIEROP, MJ; KUSTERS, JG; VANKOOTEN, PJS; VANDERZELIST, BAM; HENSEN, EJ; Boots, Annemieke

    1991-01-01

    Mice were immunized with purified infectious bronchitis virus (IBV), strain M41. Spleen cells, expanded in vitro by stimulation with M41, were immortalized by fusion to obtain T-cell hybridomas, and two major histocompatability complex (MHC) class II (I-E)-restricted T-cell hybridomas were selected

  14. DECK: Distance and environment-dependent, coarse-grained, knowledge-based potentials for protein-protein docking

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    Vakser Ilya A

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Computational approaches to protein-protein docking typically include scoring aimed at improving the rank of the near-native structure relative to the false-positive matches. Knowledge-based potentials improve modeling of protein complexes by taking advantage of the rapidly increasing amount of experimentally derived information on protein-protein association. An essential element of knowledge-based potentials is defining the reference state for an optimal description of the residue-residue (or atom-atom pairs in the non-interaction state. Results The study presents a new Distance- and Environment-dependent, Coarse-grained, Knowledge-based (DECK potential for scoring of protein-protein docking predictions. Training sets of protein-protein matches were generated based on bound and unbound forms of proteins taken from the DOCKGROUND resource. Each residue was represented by a pseudo-atom in the geometric center of the side chain. To capture the long-range and the multi-body interactions, residues in different secondary structure elements at protein-protein interfaces were considered as different residue types. Five reference states for the potentials were defined and tested. The optimal reference state was selected and the cutoff effect on the distance-dependent potentials investigated. The potentials were validated on the docking decoys sets, showing better performance than the existing potentials used in scoring of protein-protein docking results. Conclusions A novel residue-based statistical potential for protein-protein docking was developed and validated on docking decoy sets. The results show that the scoring function DECK can successfully identify near-native protein-protein matches and thus is useful in protein docking. In addition to the practical application of the potentials, the study provides insights into the relative utility of the reference states, the scope of the distance dependence, and the coarse-graining of

  15. Detailed protein sequence alignment based on Spectral Similarity Score (SSS

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    Thomas Dina

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The chemical property and biological function of a protein is a direct consequence of its primary structure. Several algorithms have been developed which determine alignment and similarity of primary protein sequences. However, character based similarity cannot provide insight into the structural aspects of a protein. We present a method based on spectral similarity to compare subsequences of amino acids that behave similarly but are not aligned well by considering amino acids as mere characters. This approach finds a similarity score between sequences based on any given attribute, like hydrophobicity of amino acids, on the basis of spectral information after partial conversion to the frequency domain. Results Distance matrices of various branches of the human kinome, that is the full complement of human kinases, were developed that matched the phylogenetic tree of the human kinome establishing the efficacy of the global alignment of the algorithm. PKCd and PKCe kinases share close biological properties and structural similarities but do not give high scores with character based alignments. Detailed comparison established close similarities between subsequences that do not have any significant character identity. We compared their known 3D structures to establish that the algorithm is able to pick subsequences that are not considered similar by character based matching algorithms but share structural similarities. Similarly many subsequences with low character identity were picked between xyna-theau and xyna-clotm F/10 xylanases. Comparison of 3D structures of the subsequences confirmed the claim of similarity in structure. Conclusion An algorithm is developed which is inspired by successful application of spectral similarity applied to music sequences. The method captures subsequences that do not align by traditional character based alignment tools but give rise to similar secondary and tertiary structures. The Spectral

  16. Recent advances in recombinant protein-based malaria vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Draper, Simon J; Angov, Evelina; Horii, Toshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium parasites are the causative agent of human malaria, and the development of a highly effective vaccine against infection, disease and transmission remains a key priority. It is widely established that multiple stages of the parasite's complex lifecycle within the human host and mosquito...... vector are susceptible to vaccine-induced antibodies. The mainstay approach to antibody induction by subunit vaccination has been the delivery of protein antigen formulated in adjuvant. Extensive efforts have been made in this endeavor with respect to malaria vaccine development, especially with regard...... to target antigen discovery, protein expression platforms, adjuvant testing, and development of soluble and virus-like particle (VLP) delivery platforms. The breadth of approaches to protein-based vaccines is continuing to expand as innovative new concepts in next-generation subunit design are explored...

  17. Proteinuria: The diagnostic strategy based on urine proteins differentiation

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    Stojimirović Biljana B.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Basal glomerular membrane represents mechanical and electrical barrier for passing of the plasma proteins. Mechanical barrier is composed of cylindrical pores and filtration fissure, and negative layer charge in exterior and interior side of basal glomerular membrane, made of heparan sulphate and sialoglicoproteine, provides certain electrical barrier. Diagnostic strategy based on different serum and urine proteins enables the differentiation of various types of proteinuria. Depending on etiology of proteinuria it can be prerenal, renal and postrenal. By analyzing albumin, armicroglobulin, immunoglobulin G and armacroglobulin, together with total protein in urine, it is possible to detect and differentiate causes of prerenal, renal (glomerular, tubular, glomerulo-tubular and postrenal proteinuria. The adequate and early differentiation of proteinuria type is of an immense diagnostic and therapeutic importance.

  18. Intrinsically Disordered Proteins in a Physics-Based World

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    Jianhan Chen

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs are a newly recognized class of functional proteins that rely on a lack of stable structure for function. They are highly prevalent in biology, play fundamental roles, and are extensively involved in human diseases. For signaling and regulation, IDPs often fold into stable structures upon binding to specific targets. The mechanisms of these coupled binding and folding processes are of significant importance because they underlie the organization of regulatory networks that dictate various aspects of cellular decision-making. This review first discusses the challenge in detailed experimental characterization of these heterogeneous and dynamics proteins and the unique and exciting opportunity for physics-based modeling to make crucial contributions, and then summarizes key lessons from recent de novo simulations of the structure and interactions of several regulatory IDPs.

  19. [Fast Implementation Method of Protein Spots Detection Based on CUDA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Bangshu; Ye, Yijia; Ou, Qiaofeng; Zhang, Haodong

    2016-02-01

    In order to improve the efficiency of protein spots detection, a fast detection method based on CUDA was proposed. Firstly, the parallel algorithms of the three most time-consuming parts in the protein spots detection algorithm: image preprocessing, coarse protein point detection and overlapping point segmentation were studied. Then, according to single instruction multiple threads executive model of CUDA to adopted data space strategy of separating two-dimensional (2D) images into blocks, various optimizing measures such as shared memory and 2D texture memory are adopted in this study. The results show that the operative efficiency of this method is obviously improved compared to CPU calculation. As the image size increased, this method makes more improvement in efficiency, such as for the image with the size of 2,048 x 2,048, the method of CPU needs 52,641 ms, but the GPU needs only 4,384 ms.

  20. Designing coarse grained-and atom based-potentials for protein-protein docking

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    Tobi Dror

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-protein docking is a challenging computational problem in functional genomics, particularly when one or both proteins undergo conformational change(s upon binding. The major challenge is to define a scoring function soft enough to tolerate these changes and specific enough to distinguish between near-native and "misdocked" conformations. Results Using a linear programming (LP technique, we developed two types of potentials: (i Side chain-based and (ii Heavy atom-based. To achieve this we considered a set of 161 transient complexes and generated a large set of putative docked structures (decoys, based on a shape complementarity criterion, for each complex. The demand on the potentials was to yield, for the native (correctly docked structure, a potential energy lower than those of any of the non-native (misdocked structures. We show that the heavy atom-based potentials were able to comply with this requirement but not the side chain-based one. Thus, despite the smaller number of parameters, the capability of heavy atom-based potentials to discriminate between native and "misdocked" conformations is improved relative to those of the side chain-based potentials. The performance of the atom-based potentials was evaluated by a jackknife test on a set of 50 complexes taken from the Zdock2.3 decoys set. Conclusions Our results show that, using the LP approach, we were able to train our potentials using a dataset of transient complexes only the newly developed potentials outperform three other known potentials in this test.

  1. Tree kernel-based protein-protein interaction extraction from biomedical literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Longhua; Zhou, Guodong

    2012-06-01

    There is a surge of research interest in protein-protein interaction (PPI) extraction from biomedical literature. While most of the state-of-the-art PPI extraction systems focus on dependency-based structured information, the rich structured information inherent in constituent parse trees has not been extensively explored for PPI extraction. In this paper, we propose a novel approach to tree kernel-based PPI extraction, where the tree representation generated from a constituent syntactic parser is further refined using the shortest dependency path between two proteins derived from a dependency parser. Specifically, all the constituent tree nodes associated with the nodes on the shortest dependency path are kept intact, while other nodes are removed safely to make the constituent tree concise and precise for PPI extraction. Compared with previously used constituent tree setups, our dependency-motivated constituent tree setup achieves the best results across five commonly used PPI corpora. Moreover, our tree kernel-based method outperforms other single kernel-based ones and performs comparably with some multiple kernel ones on the most commonly tested AIMed corpus.

  2. Protein-based flexible whispering gallery mode resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Huzeyfe; Pena-Francesch, Abdon; Xu, Linhua; Shreiner, Robert; Jung, Huihun; Huang, Steven H.; Özdemir, Sahin K.; Demirel, Melik C.; Yang, Lan

    2016-02-01

    The idea of creating photonics tools for sensing, imaging and material characterization has long been pursued and many achievements have been made. Approaching the level of solutions provided by nature however is hindered by routine choice of materials. To this end recent years have witnessed a great effort to engineer mechanically flexible photonic devices using polymer substrates. On the other hand, biodegradability and biocompatibility still remains to be incorporated. Hence biomimetics holds the key to overcome the limitations of traditional materials in photonics design. Natural proteins such as sucker ring teeth (SRT) and silk for instance have remarkable mechanical and optical properties that exceed the endeavors of most synthetic and natural polymers. Here we demonstrate for the first time, toroidal whispering gallery mode resonators (WGMR) fabricated entirely from protein structures such as SRT of Loligo vulgaris (European squid) and silk from Bombyx mori. We provide here complete optical and material characterization of proteinaceous WGMRs, revealing high quality factors in microscale and enhancement of Raman signatures by a microcavity. We also present a most simple application of a WGMR as a natural protein add-drop filter, made of SRT protein. Our work shows that with protein-based materials, optical, mechanical and thermal properties can be devised at the molecular level and it lays the groundwork for future eco-friendly, flexible photonics device design.

  3. Clarification of Interaction Mechanism of Mouse Hepatitis Virus (MHV) N and nsp3 Protein with Homology Modeling and Protein-Protein Docking Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatar, Gizem; Tok, Tugba Taskin

    2016-02-26

    The coronavirus nucleocapsid (N) plays an important role in the virus structure, the replication, and the transcription of CoV. This protein, which has a helix and flexible structure, and capable of binding on to the viral genomic RNA, is a non-structural protein (nsp3). Many studies suggest that the N protein interaction with nsp3 plays a critical role in the virus replication early in infection. Therefore, it is necessary to know the definition of the interaction mechanism of N and nsp3 protein in terms of the CoV replication transcription mechanism. We report on the homology modeling, molecular dynamics simulation, and docking studies to explain the structure-function relationship and the interaction mechanism. In addition, the prototype MHV is preferred in the wet experiment, so we also based our study on the MHV N and nsp3 proteins that belong to the experimental study. The amino acid sequences of MHV N and nsp3 proteins have similarity between human and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus. Therefore, the 3D structure models of these proteins were built with using the crystal structure of the CoV family members as a template. By following these models, molecular dynamics simulations were applied to attain the most stable conformation. Finally, protein-protein docking was performed to prove accuracy of model structures of the MHV N and to clarify the interaction with nsp3. As a result, Lys 113, Arg 125, Tyr 127, Glu 173, Tyr 190 residues that play an important role in virus replication were determined.

  4. Identification of serum protein biomarkers for utrophin based DMD therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiraud, Simon; Edwards, Benjamin; Squire, Sarah E.; Babbs, Arran; Shah, Nandini; Berg, Adam; Chen, Huijia; Davies, Kay E.

    2017-01-01

    Despite promising therapeutic avenues, there is currently no effective treatment for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a lethal monogenic disorder caused by the loss of the large cytoskeletal protein, dystrophin. A highly promising approach to therapy, applicable to all DMD patients irrespective to their genetic defect, is to modulate utrophin, a functional paralogue of dystrophin, able to compensate for the primary defects of DMD restoring sarcolemmal stability. One of the major difficulties in assessing the effectiveness of therapeutic strategies is to define appropriate outcome measures. In the present study, we utilised an aptamer based proteomics approach to profile 1,310 proteins in plasma of wild-type, mdx and Fiona (mdx overexpressing utrophin) mice. Comparison of the C57 and mdx sera revealed 83 proteins with statistically significant >2 fold changes in dystrophic serum abundance. A large majority of previously described biomarkers (ANP32B, THBS4, CAMK2A/B/D, CYCS, CAPNI) were normalised towards wild-type levels in Fiona animals. This work also identified potential mdx markers specific to increased utrophin (DUS3, TPI1) and highlights novel mdx biomarkers (GITR, MYBPC1, HSP60, SIRT2, SMAD3, CNTN1). We define a panel of putative protein mdx biomarkers to evaluate utrophin based strategies which may help to accelerate their translation to the clinic. PMID:28252048

  5. Chitosan-based membrane chromatography for protein adsorption and separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yezhuo; Feng, Zhicheng; Shao, Zhengzhong; Chen, Xin

    2012-08-01

    A chitosan-based membrane chromatography was set up by using natural chitosan/carboxymethylchitosan (CS/CMCS) blend membrane as the matrix. The dynamic adsorption property for protein (lysozyme as model protein) was detailed discussed with the change in pore size of the membrane, the flow rate and the initial concentration of the feed solution, and the layer of membrane in membrane stack. The best dynamic adsorption capacity of lysozyme on the CS/CMCS membrane chromatography was found to be 15.3mg/mL under the optimal flow conditions. Moreover, the CS/CMCS membrane chromatography exhibited good repeatability and reusability with the desorption efficiency of ~90%. As an application, lysozyme and ovalbumin were successfully separated from their binary mixture through the CS/CMCS membrane chromatography. This implies that such a natural chitosan-based membrane chromatography may have great potential on the bioseparation field in the future.

  6. Regulation, cell differentiation and protein-based inheritance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malagnac, Fabienne; Silar, Philippe

    2006-11-01

    Recent research using fungi as models provide new insight into the ability of regulatory networks to generate cellular states that are sufficiently stable to be faithfully transmitted to daughter cells, thereby generating epigenetic inheritance. Such protein-based inheritance is driven by infectious factors endowed with properties usually displayed by prions. We emphasize the contribution of regulatory networks to the emerging properties displayed by cells.

  7. Novel Antibody-Based Proteins for Cancer Immunotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuenmayor, Jaheli; Montaño, Ramon F., E-mail: jfuenmay@ivic.gob.ve [Laboratorio de Patología Celular y Molecular, Centro de Medicina Experimental, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas. Caracas, 1020-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2011-08-19

    The relative success of monoclonal antibodies in cancer immunotherapy and the vast manipulation potential of recombinant antibody technology have encouraged the development of novel antibody-based antitumor proteins. Many insightful reagents have been produced, mainly guided by studies on the mechanisms of action associated with complete and durable remissions, results from experimental animal models, and our current knowledge of the human immune system. Strikingly, only a small percent of these new reagents has demonstrated clinical value. Tumor burden, immune evasion, physiological resemblance, and cell plasticity are among the challenges that cancer therapy faces, and a number of antibody-based proteins are already available to deal with many of them. Some of these novel reagents have been shown to specifically increase apoptosis/cell death of tumor cells, recruit and activate immune effectors, and reveal synergistic effects not previously envisioned. In this review, we look into different approaches that have been followed during the past few years to produce these biologics and analyze their relative success, mainly in terms of their clinical performance. The use of antibody-based antitumor proteins, in combination with standard or novel therapies, is showing significant improvements in objective responses, suggesting that these reagents will become important components of the antineoplastic protocols of the future.

  8. Tree-based disease classification using protein data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongtu; Yu, Chang-Yung; Zhang, Heping

    2003-09-01

    A reliable and precise classification of diseases is essential for successful diagnosis and treatment. Using mass spectrometry from clinical specimens, scientists may find the protein variations among disease and use this information to improve diagnosis. In this paper, we propose a novel procedure to classify disease status based on the protein data from mass spectrometry. Our new tree-based algorithm consists of three steps: projection, selection and classification tree. The projection step aims to project all observations from specimens into the same bases so that the projected data have fixed coordinates. Thus, for each specimen, we obtain a large vector of 'coefficients' on the same basis. The purpose of the selection step is data reduction by condensing the large vector from the projection step into a much lower order of informative vector. Finally, using these reduced vectors, we apply recursive partitioning to construct an informative classification tree. This method has been successfully applied to protein data, provided by the Department of Radiology and Chemistry at Duke University.

  9. Acid-base chemistry of frustrated water at protein interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Ariel

    2016-01-01

    Water molecules at a protein interface are often frustrated in hydrogen-bonding opportunities due to subnanoscale confinement. As shown, this condition makes them behave as a general base that may titrate side-chain ammonium and guanidinium cations. Frustration-based chemistry is captured by a quantum mechanical treatment of proton transference and shown to remove same-charge uncompensated anticontacts at the interface found in the crystallographic record and in other spectroscopic information on the aqueous interface. Such observations are untenable within classical arguments, as hydronium is a stronger acid than ammonium or guanidinium. Frustration enables a directed Grotthuss mechanism for proton transference stabilizing same-charge anticontacts.

  10. Protein-Based Three-Dimensional Memories and Associative Processors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birge, Robert

    2008-03-01

    The field of bioelectronics has benefited from the fact that nature has often solved problems of a similar nature to those which must be solved to create molecular electronic or photonic devices that operate with efficiency and reliability. Retinal proteins show great promise in bioelectronic devices because they operate with high efficiency (˜0.65%), high cyclicity (>10^7), operate over an extended wavelength range (360 -- 630 nm) and can convert light into changes in voltage, pH, absorption or refractive index. This talk will focus on a retinal protein called bacteriorhodopsin, the proton pump of the organism Halobacterium salinarum. Two memories based on this protein will be described. The first is an optical three-dimensional memory. This memory stores information using volume elements (voxels), and provides as much as a thousand-fold improvement in effective capacity over current technology. A unique branching reaction of a variant of bacteriorhodopsin is used to turn each protein into an optically addressed latched AND gate. Although three working prototypes have been developed, a number of cost/performance and architectural issues must be resolved prior to commercialization. The major issue is that the native protein provides a very inefficient branching reaction. Genetic engineering has improved performance by nearly 500-fold, but a further order of magnitude improvement is needed. Protein-based holographic associative memories will also be discussed. The human brain stores and retrieves information via association, and human intelligence is intimately connected to the nature and enormous capacity of this associative search and retrieval process. To a first order approximation, creativity can be viewed as the association of two seemingly disparate concepts to form a totally new construct. Thus, artificial intelligence requires large scale associative memories. Current computer hardware does not provide an optimal environment for creating artificial

  11. Protein-Ligand Docking Based on Beta-Shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chong-Min; Won, Chung-In; Kim, Jae-Kwan; Ryu, Joonghyun; Bhak, Jong; Kim, Deok-Soo

    Protein-ligand docking is to predict the location and orientation of a ligand with respect to a protein within its binding site, and has been known to be essential for the development of new drugs. The protein-ligand docking problem is usually formulated as an energy minimization problem to identify the docked conformation of the ligand. A ligand usually docks around a depressed region, called a pocket, on the surface of a protein. Presented in this paper is a docking method, called BetaDock, based on the newly developed geometric construct called the β-shape and the β-complex. To cope with the computational intractability, the global minimum of the potential energy function is searched using the genetic algorithm. The proposed algorithm first locates initial chromosomes at some locations within the pocket recognized according to the local shape of the β-shape. Then, the algorithm proceeds generations by taking advantage of powerful properties of the β-shape to achieve an extremely fast and good solution. We claim that the proposed method is much faster than other popular docking softwares including AutoDock.

  12. Plasticizing Effects of Polyamines in Protein-Based Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Sabbah

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Zeta potential and nanoparticle size were determined on film forming solutions of native and heat-denatured proteins of bitter vetch as a function of pH and of different concentrations of the polyamines spermidine and spermine, both in the absence and presence of the plasticizer glycerol. Our results showed that both polyamines decreased the negative zeta potential of all samples under pH 8.0 as a consequence of their ionic interaction with proteins. At the same time, they enhanced the dimension of nanoparticles under pH 8.0 as a result of macromolecular aggregations. By using native protein solutions, handleable films were obtained only from samples containing either a minimum of 33 mM glycerol or 4 mM spermidine, or both compounds together at lower glycerol concentrations. However, 2 mM spermidine was sufficient to obtain handleable film by using heat-treated samples without glycerol. Conversely, brittle materials were obtained by spermine alone, thus indicating that only spermidine was able to act as an ionic plasticizer. Lastly, both polyamines, mainly spermine, were found able to act as “glycerol-like” plasticizers at concentrations higher than 5 mM under experimental conditions at which their amino groups are undissociated. Our findings open new perspectives in obtaining protein-based films by using aliphatic polycations as components.

  13. A Chrysodeixis chalcites single-nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus population from the Canary Islands is genotypically structured to maximize survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal, Alexandra; Simón, Oihane; Williams, Trevor; Muñoz, Delia; Caballero, Primitivo

    2013-12-01

    A Chrysodeixis chalcites single-nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus wild-type isolate from the Canary Islands, Spain, named ChchSNPV-TF1 (ChchTF1-wt), appears to have great potential as the basis for a biological insecticide for control of the pest. An improved understanding of the genotypic structure of this wild-type strain population should facilitate the selection of genotypes for inclusion in a bioinsecticidal product. Eight genetically distinct genotypes were cloned in vitro: ChchTF1-A to ChchTF1-H. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) analysis confirmed that ChchTF1-A accounted for 36% of the genotypes in the wild-type population. In bioassays, ChchTF1-wt occlusion bodies (OBs) were significantly more pathogenic than any of the component single-genotype OBs, indicating that genotype interactions were likely responsible for the pathogenicity phenotype of wild-type OBs. However, the wild-type population was slower killing and produced higher OB yields than any of the single genotypes alone. These results strongly suggested that the ChchTF1-wt population is structured to maximize its transmission efficiency. Experimental OB mixtures and cooccluded genotype mixtures containing the most abundant and the rarest genotypes, at frequencies similar to those at which they were isolated, revealed a mutualistic interaction that restored the pathogenicity of OBs. In OB and cooccluded mixtures containing only the most abundant genotypes, ChchTF1-ABC, OB pathogenicity was even greater than that of wild-type OBs. The ChchTF1-ABC cooccluded mixture killed larvae 33 h faster than the wild-type population and remained genotypically and biologically stable throughout five successive passages in vivo. In conclusion, the ChchTF1-ABC mixture shows great potential as the active ingredient of a bioinsecticide to control C. chalcites in the Canary Islands.

  14. Sequence-based prediction of protein protein interaction using a deep-learning algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tanlin; Zhou, Bo; Lai, Luhua; Pei, Jianfeng

    2017-05-25

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are critical for many biological processes. It is therefore important to develop accurate high-throughput methods for identifying PPI to better understand protein function, disease occurrence, and therapy design. Though various computational methods for predicting PPI have been developed, their robustness for prediction with external datasets is unknown. Deep-learning algorithms have achieved successful results in diverse areas, but their effectiveness for PPI prediction has not been tested. We used a stacked autoencoder, a type of deep-learning algorithm, to study the sequence-based PPI prediction. The best model achieved an average accuracy of 97.19% with 10-fold cross-validation. The prediction accuracies for various external datasets ranged from 87.99% to 99.21%, which are superior to those achieved with previous methods. To our knowledge, this research is the first to apply a deep-learning algorithm to sequence-based PPI prediction, and the results demonstrate its potential in this field.

  15. Multi-Component Protein - Protein Docking Based Protocol with External Scoring for Modeling Dimers of G Protein-Coupled Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczor, Agnieszka A; Guixà-González, Ramon; Carrió, Pau; Poso, Antti; Dove, Stefan; Pastor, Manuel; Selent, Jana

    2015-04-01

    In order to apply structure-based drug design techniques to GPCR complexes, it is essential to model their 3D structure. For this purpose, a multi-component protocol was derived based on protein-protein docking which generates populations of dimers compatible with membrane integration, considering all reasonable interfaces. At the next stage, we applied a scoring procedure based on up to eleven different parameters including shape or electrostatics complementarity. Two methods of consensus scoring were performed: (i) average scores of 100 best scored dimers with respect to each interface, and (ii) frequencies of interfaces among 100 best scored dimers. In general, our multi-component protocol gives correct indications for dimer interfaces that have been observed in X-ray crystal structures of GPCR dimers (opsin dimer, chemokine CXCR4 and CCR5 dimers, κ opioid receptor dimer, β1 adrenergic receptor dimer and smoothened receptor dimer) but also suggests alternative dimerization interfaces. Interestingly, at times these alternative interfaces are scored higher than the experimentally observed ones suggesting them to be also relevant in the life cycle of studied GPCR dimers. Further results indicate that GPCR dimer and higher-order oligomer formation may involve transmembrane helices (TMs) TM1-TM2-TM7, TM3-TM4-TM5 or TM4-TM5-TM6 but not TM1-TM2-TM3 or TM2-TM3-TM4 which is in general agreement with available experimental and computational data.

  16. Colorful protein-based fluorescent probes for collagen imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stijn J A Aper

    Full Text Available Real-time visualization of collagen is important in studies on tissue formation and remodeling in the research fields of developmental biology and tissue engineering. Our group has previously reported on a fluorescent probe for the specific imaging of collagen in live tissue in situ, consisting of the native collagen binding protein CNA35 labeled with fluorescent dye Oregon Green 488 (CNA35-OG488. The CNA35-OG488 probe has become widely used for collagen imaging. To allow for the use of CNA35-based probes in a broader range of applications, we here present a toolbox of six genetically-encoded collagen probes which are fusions of CNA35 to fluorescent proteins that span the visible spectrum: mTurquoise2, EGFP, mAmetrine, LSSmOrange, tdTomato and mCherry. While CNA35-OG488 requires a chemical conjugation step for labeling with the fluorescent dye, these protein-based probes can be easily produced in high yields by expression in E. coli and purified in one step using Ni2+-affinity chromatography. The probes all bind specifically to collagen, both in vitro and in porcine pericardial tissue. Some first applications of the probes are shown in multicolor imaging of engineered tissue and two-photon imaging of collagen in human skin. The fully-genetic encoding of the new probes makes them easily accessible to all scientists interested in collagen formation and remodeling.

  17. Structure-based druggability assessment of the mammalian structural proteome with inclusion of light protein flexibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn A Loving

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Advances reported over the last few years and the increasing availability of protein crystal structure data have greatly improved structure-based druggability approaches. However, in practice, nearly all druggability estimation methods are applied to protein crystal structures as rigid proteins, with protein flexibility often not directly addressed. The inclusion of protein flexibility is important in correctly identifying the druggability of pockets that would be missed by methods based solely on the rigid crystal structure. These include cryptic pockets and flexible pockets often found at protein-protein interaction interfaces. Here, we apply an approach that uses protein modeling in concert with druggability estimation to account for light protein backbone movement and protein side-chain flexibility in protein binding sites. We assess the advantages and limitations of this approach on widely-used protein druggability sets. Applying the approach to all mammalian protein crystal structures in the PDB results in identification of 69 proteins with potential druggable cryptic pockets.

  18. Novel blood protein based scaffolds for cardiovascular tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuhn Antonia I.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A major challenge in cardiovascular tissue engineering is the fabrication of scaffolds, which provide appropriate morphological and mechanical properties while avoiding undesirable immune reactions. In this study electrospinning was used to fabricate scaffolds out of blood proteins for cardiovascular tissue engineering. Lyophilised porcine plasma was dissolved in deionised water at a final concentration of 7.5% m/v and blended with 3.7% m/v PEO. Electrospinning resulted in homogeneous fibre morphologies with a mean fibre diameter of 151 nm, which could be adapted to create macroscopic shapes (mats, tubes. Cross-linking with glutaraldehyde vapour improved the long-term stability of protein based scaffolds in comparison to untreated scaffolds, resulting in a mass loss of 41% and 96% after 28 days of incubation in aqueous solution, respectively.

  19. Virus-Specific Proteins Synthesized in Cells Infected with RNA+ Temperature-Sensitive Mutants of Sindbis Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheele, Christina M.; Pfefferkorn, E. R.

    1970-01-01

    All Sindbis virus temperature-sensitive mutants defective in “late” functions were systematically surveyed by acrylamide-gel electrophoresis for similarities and differences in the intracellular pattern of virus-specific proteins synthesized at the permissive and nonpermissive temperatures. Only cells infected with mutants of complementation group C showed an altered pattern. At the nonpermissive temperature, these mutants failed to induce the synthesis of a polypeptide corresponding to the nucleocapsid protein and instead overproduced a protein of higher molecular weight than either viral structural protein. This defect was shown to be irreversible by the finding that 3H-leucine incorporated at 41.5 C specifically failed to appear in the nucleocapsid of virions subsequently released at 29 C. Attempts to demonstrate a precursor protein in wild-type infections were inconclusive. PMID:5461887

  20. Detection Tuna and Processed Products Based Protein and DNA Barcoding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuring Wulansari

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Tuna is the second largest fishery commodity in Indonesia after the shrimp. Since the high demand and the limited stock of tuna resulted in fraudulent chance. Authentication is required to meassure consumers regarding the accuracy of its labeling and food safety. In this study, the authentication was based on protein and DNA barcoding using cytochrome-b gene (cyt-b of the mitochondrial DNA as the target of gene. Primer of cyt b gene was designed based on the tuna species. This study aimed to identify the authenticity of tuna fresh and its processed products through protein using SDS-PAGE and DNA barcoding techniques. The phases of this research were protein electrophoresis by SDS-PAGE, DNA extraction, PCR amplification, electrophoresis and sequencing. Samples of fresh fish (Tu1, Tu2, Tu3, Tu4, and Tu5 and processed tuna (canned and steak were successfully extracted. Result showed that SDS-PAGE proved the damage of proteins in the processed tuna, so this method was not appropriate if it is used to identify the authenticity of tuna. PCR electrophoresis results showed that the samples of tuna, tuna steak, sushi, meat ball, abon, and caned tuna were successfully amplified in the range of 500-750 bp except Ka3, which was in line with the target of DNA (620 bp. Resulted sequences of Tu2, Tu3, Tu4 and Tu5 were identified according the results of morphometric namely T. albacares, while Tu1 was identified as T. obesus with homology level of 99%. Processed tunas (steak and canned tuna were identified as T. albacares, as stated on the labels.

  1. Preparation of the Human Cytomegalovirus Nuclear Egress Complex and Associated Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Mayuri; Kamil, Jeremy P; Coen, Donald M

    2016-01-01

    Herpesviruses, like most DNA viruses, replicate their genomes in the host cell nucleus. Their DNA is then packaged and assembled into viral nucleocapsids, which, in most cases, are too large to pass through the nuclear pore complex. Instead, herpesviruses use a complex multistep pathway, termed nuclear egress, to exit the nucleus. Key players in this process include two conserved viral proteins that form the nuclear egress complex (NEC). In human cytomegalovirus, these NEC proteins are UL50, embedded in the inner nuclear membrane, and its nucleoplasmic partner UL53. Both are essential for viral nuclear egress. However, other viral components as well as host nuclear envelope proteins may also participate in nuclear egress. Identifying these viral and cellular factors may provide important insight into the herpesvirus lifecycle and its relationship to the underlying, yet still-mysterious, host nuclear egress pathway. We developed an immunoprecipitation-based protocol, described herein, to identify protein-protein interactions involving the NEC from the nuclear fraction of infected cells that express an epitope-tagged version of NEC subunit UL53.

  2. A Protein Nanopore-Based Approach for Bacteria Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apetrei, Aurelia; Ciuca, Andrei; Lee, Jong-kook; Seo, Chang Ho; Park, Yoonkyung; Luchian, Tudor

    2016-11-01

    We present herein a first proof of concept demonstrating the potential of a protein nanopore-based technique for real-time detection of selected Gram-negative bacteria ( Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Escherichia coli) at a concentration of 1.2 × 108 cfu/mL. The anionic charge on the bacterial outer membrane promotes the electrophoretically driven migration of bacteria towards a single α-hemolysin nanopore isolated in a lipid bilayer, clamped at a negative electric potential, and followed by capture at the nanopore's mouth, which we found to be described according to the classical Kramers' theory. By using a specific antimicrobial peptide as a putative molecular biorecognition element for the bacteria used herein, we suggest that the detection system can combine the natural sensitivity of the nanopore-based sensing techniques with selective biological recognition, in aqueous samples, and highlight the feasibility of the nanopore-based platform to provide portable, sensitive analysis and monitoring of bacterial pathogens.

  3. Distance matrix-based approach to protein structure prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloczkowski, Andrzej; Jernigan, Robert L; Wu, Zhijun; Song, Guang; Yang, Lei; Kolinski, Andrzej; Pokarowski, Piotr

    2009-03-01

    Much structural information is encoded in the internal distances; a distance matrix-based approach can be used to predict protein structure and dynamics, and for structural refinement. Our approach is based on the square distance matrix D = [r(ij)(2)] containing all square distances between residues in proteins. This distance matrix contains more information than the contact matrix C, that has elements of either 0 or 1 depending on whether the distance r (ij) is greater or less than a cutoff value r (cutoff). We have performed spectral decomposition of the distance matrices D = sigma lambda(k)V(k)V(kT), in terms of eigenvalues lambda kappa and the corresponding eigenvectors v kappa and found that it contains at most five nonzero terms. A dominant eigenvector is proportional to r (2)--the square distance of points from the center of mass, with the next three being the principal components of the system of points. By predicting r (2) from the sequence we can approximate a distance matrix of a protein with an expected RMSD value of about 7.3 A, and by combining it with the prediction of the first principal component we can improve this approximation to 4.0 A. We can also explain the role of hydrophobic interactions for the protein structure, because r is highly correlated with the hydrophobic profile of the sequence. Moreover, r is highly correlated with several sequence profiles which are useful in protein structure prediction, such as contact number, the residue-wise contact order (RWCO) or mean square fluctuations (i.e. crystallographic temperature factors). We have also shown that the next three components are related to spatial directionality of the secondary structure elements, and they may be also predicted from the sequence, improving overall structure prediction. We have also shown that the large number of available HIV-1 protease structures provides a remarkable sampling of conformations, which can be viewed as direct structural information about the

  4. Mussel-mimetic protein-based adhesive hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bum Jin; Oh, Dongyeop X; Kim, Sangsik; Seo, Jeong Hyun; Hwang, Dong Soo; Masic, Admir; Han, Dong Keun; Cha, Hyung Joon

    2014-05-12

    Hydrogel systems based on cross-linked polymeric materials which could provide both adhesion and cohesion in wet environment have been considered as a promising formulation of tissue adhesives. Inspired by marine mussel adhesion, many researchers have tried to exploit the 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) molecule as a cross-linking mediator of synthetic polymer-based hydrogels which is known to be able to achieve cohesive hardening as well as adhesive bonding with diverse surfaces. Beside DOPA residue, composition of other amino acid residues and structure of mussel adhesive proteins (MAPs) have also been considered important elements for mussel adhesion. Herein, we represent a novel protein-based hydrogel system using DOPA-containing recombinant MAP. Gelation can be achieved using both oxdiation-induced DOPA quinone-mediated covalent and Fe(3+)-mediated coordinative noncovalent cross-linking. Fe(3+)-mediated hydrogels show deformable and self-healing viscoelastic behavior in rheological analysis, which is also well-reflected in bulk adhesion strength measurement. Quinone-mediated hydrogel has higher cohesive strength and can provide sufficient gelation time for easier handling. Collectively, our newly developed MAP hydrogel can potentially be used as tissue adhesive and sealant for future applications.

  5. Predicting Protein-Protein Interaction Sites with a Novel Membership Based Fuzzy SVM Classifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriwastava, Brijesh K; Basu, Subhadip; Maulik, Ujjwal

    2015-01-01

    Predicting residues that participate in protein-protein interactions (PPI) helps to identify, which amino acids are located at the interface. In this paper, we show that the performance of the classical support vector machine (SVM) algorithm can further be improved with the use of a custom-designed fuzzy membership function, for the partner-specific PPI interface prediction problem. We evaluated the performances of both classical SVM and fuzzy SVM (F-SVM) on the PPI databases of three different model proteomes of Homo sapiens, Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces Cerevisiae and calculated the statistical significance of the developed F-SVM over classical SVM algorithm. We also compared our performance with the available state-of-the-art fuzzy methods in this domain and observed significant performance improvements. To predict interaction sites in protein complexes, local composition of amino acids together with their physico-chemical characteristics are used, where the F-SVM based prediction method exploits the membership function for each pair of sequence fragments. The average F-SVM performance (area under ROC curve) on the test samples in 10-fold cross validation experiment are measured as 77.07, 78.39, and 74.91 percent for the aforementioned organisms respectively. Performances on independent test sets are obtained as 72.09, 73.24 and 82.74 percent respectively. The software is available for free download from http://code.google.com/p/cmater-bioinfo.

  6. Simultaneous Synthesis and Biotinylation of Proteins Using Puromycin-Based Labeling Technology for Fabrication of Protein Array Chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumal, Subhashini Raj; Biyani, Manish; Ueno, Shingo; Akagi, Takanori; Ichiki, Takanori

    2013-06-01

    Protein arrays represent a class of devices that are of growing importance in the field of proteomics. These arrays enable screening of a large amount of proteins in a short time and at a lower cost. Here we present a method to fabricate protein array using biotin-conjugated puromycin to simultaneously synthesize and label proteins followed by immobilization onto streptavidin-functionalized surface based on the noncovalent biotin-streptavidin interaction. This method demonstrates the fabrication of protein array based on cell-free transcription/translation system using unmodified DNA as a starting genetic material. As a consequence, the procedure of protein arraying has been greatly simplified over the conventional approaches that require tedious and multi-step reactions. Further, an integrated approach of micro reactor array technology makes this method very simple and robust for achieving high-density protein arrays.

  7. PCE-FR: A Novel Method for Identifying Overlapping Protein Complexes in Weighted Protein-Protein Interaction Networks Using Pseudo-Clique Extension Based on Fuzzy Relation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Buwen; Luo, Jiawei; Liang, Cheng; Wang, Shulin; Ding, Pingjian

    2016-10-01

    Identifying overlapping protein complexes in protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks can provide insight into cellular functional organization and thus elucidate underlying cellular mechanisms. Recently, various algorithms for protein complexes detection have been developed for PPI networks. However, majority of algorithms primarily depend on network topological feature and/or gene expression profile, failing to consider the inherent biological meanings between protein pairs. In this paper, we propose a novel method to detect protein complexes using pseudo-clique extension based on fuzzy relation (PCE-FR). Our algorithm operates in three stages: it first forms the nonoverlapping protein substructure based on fuzzy relation and then expands each substructure by adding neighbor proteins to maximize the cohesive score. Finally, highly overlapped candidate protein complexes are merged to form the final protein complex set. Particularly, our algorithm employs the biological significance hidden in protein pairs to construct edge weight for protein interaction networks. The experiment results show that our method can not only outperform classical algorithms such as CFinder, ClusterONE, CMC, RRW, HC-PIN, and ProRank +, but also achieve ideal overall performance in most of the yeast PPI datasets in terms of composite score consisting of precision, accuracy, and separation. We further apply our method to a human PPI network from the HPRD dataset and demonstrate it is very effective in detecting protein complexes compared to other algorithms.

  8. Microwave-assisted acid and base hydrolysis of intact proteins containing disulfide bonds for protein sequence analysis by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiz, Bela; Li, Liang

    2010-09-01

    Controlled hydrolysis of proteins to generate peptide ladders combined with mass spectrometric analysis of the resultant peptides can be used for protein sequencing. In this paper, two methods of improving the microwave-assisted protein hydrolysis process are described to enable rapid sequencing of proteins containing disulfide bonds and increase sequence coverage, respectively. It was demonstrated that proteins containing disulfide bonds could be sequenced by MS analysis by first performing hydrolysis for less than 2 min, followed by 1 h of reduction to release the peptides originally linked by disulfide bonds. It was shown that a strong base could be used as a catalyst for microwave-assisted protein hydrolysis, producing complementary sequence information to that generated by microwave-assisted acid hydrolysis. However, using either acid or base hydrolysis, amide bond breakages in small regions of the polypeptide chains of the model proteins (e.g., cytochrome c and lysozyme) were not detected. Dynamic light scattering measurement of the proteins solubilized in an acid or base indicated that protein-protein interaction or aggregation was not the cause of the failure to hydrolyze certain amide bonds. It was speculated that there were some unknown local structures that might play a role in preventing an acid or base from reacting with the peptide bonds therein.

  9. Factors influencing protein tyrosine nitration--structure-based predictive models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayden, Alexander S; Yakovlev, Vasily A; Graves, Paul R; Mikkelsen, Ross B; Kellogg, Glen E

    2011-03-15

    Models for exploring tyrosine nitration in proteins have been created based on 3D structural features of 20 proteins for which high-resolution X-ray crystallographic or NMR data are available and for which nitration of 35 total tyrosines has been experimentally proven under oxidative stress. Factors suggested in previous work to enhance nitration were examined with quantitative structural descriptors. The role of neighboring acidic and basic residues is complex: for the majority of tyrosines that are nitrated the distance to the heteroatom of the closest charged side chain corresponds to the distance needed for suspected nitrating species to form hydrogen bond bridges between the tyrosine and that charged amino acid. This suggests that such bridges play a very important role in tyrosine nitration. Nitration is generally hindered for tyrosines that are buried and for those tyrosines for which there is insufficient space for the nitro group. For in vitro nitration, closed environments with nearby heteroatoms or unsaturated centers that can stabilize radicals are somewhat favored. Four quantitative structure-based models, depending on the conditions of nitration, have been developed for predicting site-specific tyrosine nitration. The best model, relevant for both in vitro and in vivo cases, predicts 30 of 35 tyrosine nitrations (positive predictive value) and has a sensitivity of 60/71 (11 false positives). Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Miniaturized Aptamer-Based Assays for Protein Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Bosco

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The availability of devices for cancer biomarker detection at early stages of the disease is one of the most critical issues in biomedicine. Towards this goal, to increase the assay sensitivity, device miniaturization strategies empowered by the employment of high affinity protein binders constitute a valuable approach. In this work we propose two different surface-based miniaturized platforms for biomarker detection in body fluids: the first platform is an atomic force microscopy (AFM-based nanoarray, where AFM is used to generate functional nanoscale areas and to detect biorecognition through careful topographic measurements; the second platform consists of a miniaturized electrochemical cell to detect biomarkers through electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS analysis. Both devices rely on robust and highly-specific protein binders as aptamers, and were tested for thrombin detection. An active layer of DNA-aptamer conjugates was immobilized via DNA directed immobilization on complementary single-stranded DNA self-assembled monolayers confined on a nano/micro area of a gold surface. Results obtained with these devices were compared with the output of surface plasmon resonance (SPR assays used as reference. We succeeded in capturing antigens in concentrations as low as a few nM. We put forward ideas to push the sensitivity further to the pM range, assuring low biosample volume (μL range assay conditions.

  11. Inferring drug-disease associations based on known protein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Liang; Huang, Jianbin; Ma, Zhixin; Zhang, Jing; Zou, Yapeng; Gao, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Inferring drug-disease associations is critical in unveiling disease mechanisms, as well as discovering novel functions of available drugs, or drug repositioning. Previous work is primarily based on drug-gene-disease relationship, which throws away many important information since genes execute their functions through interacting others. To overcome this issue, we propose a novel methodology that discover the drug-disease association based on protein complexes. Firstly, the integrated heterogeneous network consisting of drugs, protein complexes, and disease are constructed, where we assign weights to the drug-disease association by using probability. Then, from the tripartite network, we get the indirect weighted relationships between drugs and diseases. The larger the weight, the higher the reliability of the correlation. We apply our method to mental disorders and hypertension, and validate the result by using comparative toxicogenomics database. Our ranked results can be directly reinforced by existing biomedical literature, suggesting that our proposed method obtains higher specificity and sensitivity. The proposed method offers new insight into drug-disease discovery. Our method is publicly available at http://1.complexdrug.sinaapp.com/Drug_Complex_Disease/Data_Download.html.

  12. Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Food Service Resources Additional Resources About FAQ Contact Protein Protein is found throughout the body—in muscle, ... the heart and respiratory system, and death. All Protein Isn’t Alike Protein is built from building ...

  13. Prioritizing Disease Candidate Proteins in Cardiomyopathy-Specific Protein-Protein Interaction Networks Based on “Guilt by Association” Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Weiming; Li, Weiguo; Qu, Xiaoli; Liang, Binhua; Gao, Qianping; Feng, Chenchen; Jia, Xu; Lv, Yana; Zhang, Siya; Li, Xia

    2013-01-01

    The cardiomyopathies are a group of heart muscle diseases which can be inherited (familial). Identifying potential disease-related proteins is important to understand mechanisms of cardiomyopathies. Experimental identification of cardiomyophthies is costly and labour-intensive. In contrast, bioinformatics approach has a competitive advantage over experimental method. Based on “guilt by association” analysis, we prioritized candidate proteins involving in human cardiomyopathies. We first built weighted human cardiomyopathy-specific protein-protein interaction networks for three subtypes of cardiomyopathies using the known disease proteins from Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man as seeds. We then developed a method in prioritizing disease candidate proteins to rank candidate proteins in the network based on “guilt by association” analysis. It was found that most candidate proteins with high scores shared disease-related pathways with disease seed proteins. These top ranked candidate proteins were related with the corresponding disease subtypes, and were potential disease-related proteins. Cross-validation and comparison with other methods indicated that our approach could be used for the identification of potentially novel disease proteins, which may provide insights into cardiomyopathy-related mechanisms in a more comprehensive and integrated way. PMID:23940716

  14. Sequence- and interactome-based prediction of viral protein hotspots targeting host proteins: a case study for HIV Nef.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Sarmady

    Full Text Available Virus proteins alter protein pathways of the host toward the synthesis of viral particles by breaking and making edges via binding to host proteins. In this study, we developed a computational approach to predict viral sequence hotspots for binding to host proteins based on sequences of viral and host proteins and literature-curated virus-host protein interactome data. We use a motif discovery algorithm repeatedly on collections of sequences of viral proteins and immediate binding partners of their host targets and choose only those motifs that are conserved on viral sequences and highly statistically enriched among binding partners of virus protein targeted host proteins. Our results match experimental data on binding sites of Nef to host proteins such as MAPK1, VAV1, LCK, HCK, HLA-A, CD4, FYN, and GNB2L1 with high statistical significance but is a poor predictor of Nef binding sites on highly flexible, hoop-like regions. Predicted hotspots recapture CD8 cell epitopes of HIV Nef highlighting their importance in modulating virus-host interactions. Host proteins potentially targeted or outcompeted by Nef appear crowding the T cell receptor, natural killer cell mediated cytotoxicity, and neurotrophin signaling pathways. Scanning of HIV Nef motifs on multiple alignments of hepatitis C protein NS5A produces results consistent with literature, indicating the potential value of the hotspot discovery in advancing our understanding of virus-host crosstalk.

  15. DrugScorePPI knowledge-based potentials used as scoring and objective function in protein-protein docking.

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    Dennis M Krüger

    Full Text Available The distance-dependent knowledge-based DrugScore(PPI potentials, previously developed for in silico alanine scanning and hot spot prediction on given structures of protein-protein complexes, are evaluated as a scoring and objective function for the structure prediction of protein-protein complexes. When applied for ranking "unbound perturbation" ("unbound docking" decoys generated by Baker and coworkers a 4-fold (1.5-fold enrichment of acceptable docking solutions in the top ranks compared to a random selection is found. When applied as an objective function in FRODOCK for bound protein-protein docking on 97 complexes of the ZDOCK benchmark 3.0, DrugScore(PPI/FRODOCK finds up to 10% (15% more high accuracy solutions in the top 1 (top 10 predictions than the original FRODOCK implementation. When used as an objective function for global unbound protein-protein docking, fair docking success rates are obtained, which improve by ∼ 2-fold to 18% (58% for an at least acceptable solution in the top 10 (top 100 predictions when performing knowledge-driven unbound docking. This suggests that DrugScore(PPI balances well several different types of interactions important for protein-protein recognition. The results are discussed in view of the influence of crystal packing and the type of protein-protein complex docked. Finally, a simple criterion is provided with which to estimate a priori if unbound docking with DrugScore(PPI/FRODOCK will be successful.

  16. Endocytosis of GPI-anchored proteins in human lymphocytes: role of glycolipid-based domains, actin cytoskeleton, and protein kinases

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    GPI-anchored surface proteins mediate many important functions, including transport, signal transduction, adhesion, and protection against complement. They cluster into glycolipid-based membrane domains and caveolae, plasmalemmal vesicles involved in the transcytosis and endocytosis of these surface proteins. However, in lymphocytes, neither the characteristic flask shaped caveolae nor caveolin, a transmembrane protein typical of caveolae, have been observed. Here, we show that the GPI-anchor...

  17. Prediction of Protein-Protein Interaction By Metasample-Based Sparse Representation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuquan Du

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein-protein interactions (PPIs play key roles in many cellular processes such as transcription regulation, cell metabolism, and endocrine function. Understanding these interactions takes a great promotion to the pathogenesis and treatment of various diseases. A large amount of data has been generated by experimental techniques; however, most of these data are usually incomplete or noisy, and the current biological experimental techniques are always very time-consuming and expensive. In this paper, we proposed a novel method (metasample-based sparse representation classification, MSRC for PPIs prediction. A group of metasamples are extracted from the original training samples and then use the l1-regularized least square method to express a new testing sample as the linear combination of these metasamples. PPIs prediction is achieved by using a discrimination function defined in the representation coefficients. The MSRC is applied to PPIs dataset; it achieves 84.9% sensitivity, and 94.55% specificity, which is slightly lower than support vector machine (SVM and much higher than naive Bayes (NB, neural networks (NN, and k-nearest neighbor (KNN. The result shows that the MSRC is efficient for PPIs prediction.

  18. A cell-based method for screening RNA-protein interactions: identification of constitutive transport element-interacting proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert L Nakamura

    Full Text Available We have developed a mammalian cell-based screening platform to identify proteins that assemble into RNA-protein complexes. Based on Tat-mediated activation of the HIV LTR, proteins that interact with an RNA target elicit expression of a GFP reporter and are captured by fluorescence activated cell sorting. This "Tat-hybrid" screening platform was used to identify proteins that interact with the Mason Pfizer monkey virus (MPMV constitutive transport element (CTE, a structured RNA hairpin that mediates the transport of unspliced viral mRNAs from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Several hnRNP-like proteins, including hnRNP A1, were identified and shown to interact with the CTE with selectivity in the reporter system comparable to Tap, a known CTE-binding protein. In vitro gel shift and pull-down assays showed that hnRNP A1 is able to form a complex with the CTE and Tap and that the RGG domain of hnRNP A1 mediates binding to Tap. These results suggest that hnRNP-like proteins may be part of larger export-competent RNA-protein complexes and that the RGG domains of these proteins play an important role in directing these binding events. The results also demonstrate the utility of the screening platform for identifying and characterizing new components of RNA-protein complexes.

  19. A Protein-Based Ferritin Bio-Nanobattery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald D. Watt

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured materials are increasingly important for the construction of electrochemical energy storage devices that will meet the needs of portable nanodevices. Here we describe the development of a nanoenergy storage system based on inorganic mineral phases contained in ferritin proteins. The electrochemical cell consists of an anode containing ~2000 iron atoms as Fe(OH2 in the hollow protein interior of ferritin and a cathode containing ~2000 of Co(OH3 in a separate ferritin molecule. The achieved initial voltage output from a combination of Fe2+- and Co3+-ferritins adsorbed on gold electrodes was ~500 mV, while a combination of Fe2+- and Co3+-ferritins immobilized on gold produced a voltage of 350–405 mV. When fully discharged, Fe(OH3 and Co(OH2 are the products of a single electron transfer per metal atom from anode to cathode. The spent components can be regenerated by chemical or electrochemical methods restoring battery function. The properties of ferritins are presented and their unique characteristics are described, which have led to the development of a functional bio-nanobattery.

  20. Polysaccharides-based polyelectrolyte nanoparticles as protein drugs delivery system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shu Shujun; Sun Lei; Zhang Xinge, E-mail: zhangxinge@nankai.edu.cn [Nankai University, Key Laboratory of Functional Polymer Materials Ministry of Education, Institute of Polymer Chemistry (China); Wu Zhongming [Tianjin Medical University, Metabolic Diseases Hospital (China); Wang Zhen; Li Chaoxing, E-mail: lcx@nankai.edu.cn [Nankai University, Key Laboratory of Functional Polymer Materials Ministry of Education, Institute of Polymer Chemistry (China)

    2011-09-15

    Polysaccharides-based nanoparticles were prepared by synthesized quaternized chitosan and dextran sulfate through simple ionic-gelation self-assembled method. Introduction of quaternized groups was intended to increase water solubility of chitosan and make the nanoparticles have broader pH sensitive range which can remain more stable in physiological pH and decrease the loss of protein drugs caused by the gastric cavity. The load of BSA was affected by molecular parameter, i.e., degree of substitution, and average molecular weight of quaternized chitosan, as well as concentration of BSA. Fast release occurred in phosphate buffer solution (pH 7.4) while the release was slow in hydrochloric acid (pH 1.4). The drug release mechanism is Fickian diffusion through release kinetics analysis. Cell uptake demonstrated nanoparicles can internalize into Caco-2 cells, which suggested that nanoparticles had good biocompatibility. No significant conformation change was noted for the released BSA in comparison with native BSA using circular dichroism spectroscopy. This kind of novel composite nanoparticles may be a promising delivery system for oral protein and peptide drugs.

  1. GRIP: A web-based system for constructing Gold Standard datasets for protein-protein interaction prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Fiona; Wang, Haiying; Zheng, Huiru; Azuaje, Francisco

    2009-01-26

    Information about protein interaction networks is fundamental to understanding protein function and cellular processes. Interaction patterns among proteins can suggest new drug targets and aid in the design of new therapeutic interventions. Efforts have been made to map interactions on a proteomic-wide scale using both experimental and computational techniques. Reference datasets that contain known interacting proteins (positive cases) and non-interacting proteins (negative cases) are essential to support computational prediction and validation of protein-protein interactions. Information on known interacting and non interacting proteins are usually stored within databases. Extraction of these data can be both complex and time consuming. Although, the automatic construction of reference datasets for classification is a useful resource for researchers no public resource currently exists to perform this task. GRIP (Gold Reference dataset constructor from Information on Protein complexes) is a web-based system that provides researchers with the functionality to create reference datasets for protein-protein interaction prediction in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Both positive and negative cases for a reference dataset can be extracted, organised and downloaded by the user. GRIP also provides an upload facility whereby users can submit proteins to determine protein complex membership. A search facility is provided where a user can search for protein complex information in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. GRIP is developed to retrieve information on protein complex, cellular localisation, and physical and genetic interactions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Manual construction of reference datasets can be a time consuming process requiring programming knowledge. GRIP simplifies and speeds up this process by allowing users to automatically construct reference datasets. GRIP is free to access at http://rosalind.infj.ulst.ac.uk/GRIP/.

  2. GRIP: A web-based system for constructing Gold Standard datasets for protein-protein interaction prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Huiru

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Information about protein interaction networks is fundamental to understanding protein function and cellular processes. Interaction patterns among proteins can suggest new drug targets and aid in the design of new therapeutic interventions. Efforts have been made to map interactions on a proteomic-wide scale using both experimental and computational techniques. Reference datasets that contain known interacting proteins (positive cases and non-interacting proteins (negative cases are essential to support computational prediction and validation of protein-protein interactions. Information on known interacting and non interacting proteins are usually stored within databases. Extraction of these data can be both complex and time consuming. Although, the automatic construction of reference datasets for classification is a useful resource for researchers no public resource currently exists to perform this task. Results GRIP (Gold Reference dataset constructor from Information on Protein complexes is a web-based system that provides researchers with the functionality to create reference datasets for protein-protein interaction prediction in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Both positive and negative cases for a reference dataset can be extracted, organised and downloaded by the user. GRIP also provides an upload facility whereby users can submit proteins to determine protein complex membership. A search facility is provided where a user can search for protein complex information in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Conclusion GRIP is developed to retrieve information on protein complex, cellular localisation, and physical and genetic interactions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Manual construction of reference datasets can be a time consuming process requiring programming knowledge. GRIP simplifies and speeds up this process by allowing users to automatically construct reference datasets. GRIP is free to access at http://rosalind.infj.ulst.ac.uk/GRIP/.

  3. Formulation of plant based Rainbow trout feeds on an Ideal Protein Basis can reduce total dietary protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish meal has been a primary protein source in trout feeds and any changes that can reduce fish meal levels and total costs are beneficial. Replacing fish meal with plant protein is a first step, but amino acid content of plant based diets can be limiting. Amino acids are needed for many metabolic...

  4. A disulfide-bonded dimer of the core protein of hepatitis C virus is important for virus-like particle production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushima, Yukihiro; Wakita, Takaji; Hijikata, Makoto

    2010-09-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein forms the nucleocapsid of the HCV particle. Although many functions of core protein have been reported, how the HCV particle is assembled is not well understood. Here we show that the nucleocapsid-like particle of HCV is composed of a disulfide-bonded core protein complex (dbc-complex). We also found that the disulfide-bonded dimer of the core protein (dbd-core) is formed at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), where the core protein is initially produced and processed. Mutational analysis revealed that the cysteine residue at amino acid position 128 (Cys128) of the core protein, a highly conserved residue among almost all reported isolates, is responsible for dbd-core formation and virus-like particle production but has no effect on the replication of the HCV RNA genome or the several known functions of the core protein, including RNA binding ability and localization to the lipid droplet. The Cys128 mutant core protein showed a dominant negative effect in terms of HCV-like particle production. These results suggest that this disulfide bond is critical for the HCV virion. We also obtained the results that the dbc-complex in the nucleocapsid-like structure was sensitive to proteinase K but not trypsin digestion, suggesting that the capsid is built up of a tightly packed structure of the core protein, with its amino (N)-terminal arginine-rich region being concealed inside.

  5. Glucose Synthesis in a Protein-Based Artificial Photosynthesis System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hao; Yuan, Wenqiao; Zhou, Jack; Chong, Parkson Lee-Gau

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to understand glucose synthesis of a protein-based artificial photosynthesis system affected by operating conditions, including the concentrations of reactants, reaction temperature, and illumination. Results from non-vesicle-based glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate (GAP) and glucose synthesis showed that the initial concentrations of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP), lighting source, and temperature significantly affected glucose synthesis. Higher initial concentrations of RuBP and ATP significantly enhanced GAP synthesis, which was linearly correlated to glucose synthesis, confirming the proper functions of all catalyzing enzymes in the system. White fluorescent light inhibited artificial photosynthesis and reduced glucose synthesis by 79.2 % compared to in the dark. The reaction temperature of 40 °C was optimum, whereas lower or higher temperature reduced glucose synthesis. Glucose synthesis in the vesicle-based artificial photosynthesis system reconstituted with bacteriorhodopsin, F 0 F 1 ATP synthase, and polydimethylsiloxane-methyloxazoline-polydimethylsiloxane triblock copolymer was successfully demonstrated. This system efficiently utilized light-induced ATP to drive glucose synthesis, and 5.2 μg ml(-1) glucose was synthesized in 0.78-ml reaction buffer in 7 h. Light-dependent reactions were found to be the bottleneck of the studied artificial photosynthesis system.

  6. Flexible Molybdenum Electrodes towards Designing Affinity Based Protein Biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamakoti, Vikramshankar; Panneer Selvam, Anjan; Radha Shanmugam, Nandhinee; Muthukumar, Sriram; Prasad, Shalini

    2016-07-18

    Molybdenum electrode based flexible biosensor on porous polyamide substrates has been fabricated and tested for its functionality as a protein affinity based biosensor. The biosensor performance was evaluated using a key cardiac biomarker; cardiac Troponin-I (cTnI). Molybdenum is a transition metal and demonstrates electrochemical behavior upon interaction with an electrolyte. We have leveraged this property of molybdenum for designing an affinity based biosensor using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. We have evaluated the feasibility of detection of cTnI in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and human serum (HS) by measuring impedance changes over a frequency window from 100 mHz to 1 MHz. Increasing changes to the measured impedance was correlated to the increased dose of cTnI molecules binding to the cTnI antibody functionalized molybdenum surface. We achieved cTnI detection limit of 10 pg/mL in PBS and 1 ng/mL in HS medium. The use of flexible substrates for designing the biosensor demonstrates promise for integration with a large-scale batch manufacturing process.

  7. Protein NMR Structure Refinement based on Bayesian Inference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeya, Teppei; Ikeda, Shiro; Kigawa, Takanori; Ito, Yutaka; Güntert, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a tool to investigate threedimensional (3D) structures and dynamics of biomacromolecules at atomic resolution in solution or more natural environments such as living cells. Since NMR data are principally only spectra with peak signals, it is required to properly deduce structural information from the sparse experimental data with their imperfections and uncertainty, and to visualize 3D conformations by NMR structure calculation. In order to efficiently analyse the data, Rieping et al. proposed a new structure calculation method based on Bayes’ theorem. We implemented a similar approach into the program CYANA with some modifications. It allows us to handle automatic NOE cross peak assignments in unambiguous and ambiguous usages, and to create a prior distribution based on a physical force field with the generalized Born implicit water model. The sampling scheme for obtaining the posterior is performed by a hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm combined with Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) by the Gibbs sampler, and molecular dynamics simulation (MD) for obtaining a canonical ensemble of conformations. Since it is not trivial to search the entire function space particularly for exploring the conformational prior due to the extraordinarily large conformation space of proteins, the replica exchange method is performed, in which several MCMC calculations with different temperatures run in parallel as replicas. It is shown with simulated data or randomly deleted experimental peaks that the new structure calculation method can provide accurate structures even with less peaks, especially compared with the conventional method. In particular, it dramatically improves in-cell structures of the proteins GB1 and TTHA1718 using exclusively information obtained in living Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells.

  8. A Comparison of Protein Extraction Methods Suitable for Gel-Based Proteomics Studies of Aphid Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Few attempts have been made to methodically compare protein isolation methods from insect tissues for proteomic studies. To address this, we compared qualitative and quantitative differences among three methods for isolation, purification and solubilization of insect proteins. Schizaphis graminum,...

  9. Analysis of signaling networks distributed over intracellular compartments based on protein-protein interactions

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    BackgroundBiological processes are usually distributed over various intracellular compartments. Proteins from diverse cellular compartments are often involved in similar signaling networks. However, the difference in the reaction rates between similar proteins among different compartments is usually quite high. We suggest that the estimation of frequency of intracompartmental as well as intercompartmental protein-protein interactions is an appropriate approach to predict the efficiency of a p...

  10. Quantitative analysis of Nipah virus proteins released as virus-like particles reveals central role for the matrix protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eaton Bryan T

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nipah virus (NiV is an emerging paramyxovirus distinguished by its ability to cause fatal disease in both animal and human hosts. Together with Hendra virus (HeV, they comprise the genus Henipavirus in the Paramyxoviridae family. NiV and HeV are also restricted to Biosafety Level-4 containment and this has hampered progress towards examining details of their replication and morphogenesis. Here, we have established recombinant expression systems to study NiV particle assembly and budding through the formation of virus-like particles (VLPs. Results When expressed by recombinant Modified Vaccinia virus Ankara (rMVA or plasmid transfection, individual NiV matrix (M, fusion (F and attachment (G proteins were all released into culture supernatants in a membrane-associated state as determined by sucrose density gradient flotation and immunoprecipitation. However, co-expression of F and G along with M revealed a shift in their distribution across the gradient, indicating association with M in VLPs. Protein release was also altered depending on the context of viral proteins being expressed, with F, G and nucleocapsid (N protein reducing M release, and N release dependent on the co-expression of M. Immunoelectron microscopy and density analysis revealed VLPs that were similar to authentic virus. Differences in the budding dynamics of NiV proteins were also noted between rMVA and plasmid based strategies, suggesting that over-expression by poxvirus may not be appropriate for studying the details of recombinant virus particle assembly and release. Conclusion Taken together, the results indicate that NiV M, F, and G each possess some ability to bud from expressing cells, and that co-expression of these viral proteins results in a more organized budding process with M playing a central role. These findings will aid our understanding of paramyxovirus particle assembly in general and could help facilitate the development of a novel vaccine

  11. Mapping functional prion-prion protein interaction sites using prion protein based peptide-arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rigter, A.; Priem, J.; Timmers-Parohi, D.; Langeveld, J.; Bossers, A.

    2009-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are at the basis of most if not all biological processes in living cells. Therefore, adapting existing techniques or developing new techniques to study interactions between proteins are of importance in elucidating which amino acid sequences contribute to these interacti

  12. Protein Foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size: A A A Listen En Español Protein Foods Foods high in protein such as fish, ... for the vegetarian proteins, whether they have carbohydrate. Protein Choices Plant-Based Proteins Plant-based protein foods ...

  13. A 3D model of the membrane protein complex formed by the white spot syndrome virus structural proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Shiang Chang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Outbreaks of white spot disease have had a large negative economic impact on cultured shrimp worldwide. However, the pathogenesis of the causative virus, WSSV (whit spot syndrome virus, is not yet well understood. WSSV is a large enveloped virus. The WSSV virion has three structural layers surrounding its core DNA: an outer envelope, a tegument and a nucleocapsid. In this study, we investigated the protein-protein interactions of the major WSSV structural proteins, including several envelope and tegument proteins that are known to be involved in the infection process. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present report, we used coimmunoprecipitation and yeast two-hybrid assays to elucidate and/or confirm all the interactions that occur among the WSSV structural (envelope and tegument proteins VP51A, VP19, VP24, VP26 and VP28. We found that VP51A interacted directly not only with VP26 but also with VP19 and VP24. VP51A, VP19 and VP24 were also shown to have an affinity for self-interaction. Chemical cross-linking assays showed that these three self-interacting proteins could occur as dimers. CONCLUSIONS: From our present results in conjunction with other previously established interactions we construct a 3D model in which VP24 acts as a core protein that directly associates with VP26, VP28, VP38A, VP51A and WSV010 to form a membrane-associated protein complex. VP19 and VP37 are attached to this complex via association with VP51A and VP28, respectively. Through the VP26-VP51C interaction this envelope complex is anchored to the nucleocapsid, which is made of layers of rings formed by VP664. A 3D model of the nucleocapsid and the surrounding outer membrane is presented.

  14. Design and synthesis of ATP-based nucleotide analogues and profiling of nucleotide-binding proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolters, Justina. C.; Roelfes, Gerard; Poolman, Bert

    2011-01-01

    Two nucleotide-based probes were designed and synthesized in order to enrich samples for specific classes of proteins by affinity-based protein profiling. We focused on the profiling of adenine nucleotide-binding proteins. Two properties were considered in the design of the probes: the bait needs to

  15. Design and synthesis of ATP-based nucleotide analogues and profiling of nucleotide-binding proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolters, Justina. C.; Roelfes, Gerard; Poolman, Bert

    Two nucleotide-based probes were designed and synthesized in order to enrich samples for specific classes of proteins by affinity-based protein profiling. We focused on the profiling of adenine nucleotide-binding proteins. Two properties were considered in the design of the probes: the bait needs to

  16. Pfarao: a web application for protein family analysis customized for cytoskeletal and motor proteins (CyMoBase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kollmar Martin

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Annotation of protein sequences of eukaryotic organisms is crucial for the understanding of their function in the cell. Manual annotation is still by far the most accurate way to correctly predict genes. The classification of protein sequences, their phylogenetic relation and the assignment of function involves information from various sources. This often leads to a collection of heterogeneous data, which is hard to track. Cytoskeletal and motor proteins consist of large and diverse superfamilies comprising up to several dozen members per organism. Up to date there is no integrated tool available to assist in the manual large-scale comparative genomic analysis of protein families. Description Pfarao (Protein Family Application for Retrieval, Analysis and Organisation is a database driven online working environment for the analysis of manually annotated protein sequences and their relationship. Currently, the system can store and interrelate a wide range of information about protein sequences, species, phylogenetic relations and sequencing projects as well as links to literature and domain predictions. Sequences can be imported from multiple sequence alignments that are generated during the annotation process. A web interface allows to conveniently browse the database and to compile tabular and graphical summaries of its content. Conclusion We implemented a protein sequence-centric web application to store, organize, interrelate, and present heterogeneous data that is generated in manual genome annotation and comparative genomics. The application has been developed for the analysis of cytoskeletal and motor proteins (CyMoBase but can easily be adapted for any protein.

  17. Recombinant protein-based viral disease diagnostics in veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balamurugan, Vinayagamurthy; Venkatesan, Gnanavel; Sen, Arnab; Annamalai, Lakshmanan; Bhanuprakash, Veerakyathappa; Singh, Raj Kumar

    2010-09-01

    Identification of pathogens or antibody response to pathogens in human and animals modulates the treatment strategies for naive population and subsequent infections. Diseases can be controlled and even eradicated based on the epidemiology and effective prophylaxis, which often depends on development of efficient diagnostics. In addition, combating newly emerging diseases in human as well as animal healthcare is challenging and is dependent on developing safe and efficient diagnostics. Detection of antibodies directed against specific antigens has been the method of choice for documenting prior infection. Other than zoonosis, development of inexpensive vaccines and diagnostics is a unique problem in animal healthcare. The advent of recombinant DNA technology and its application in the biotechnology industry has revolutionized animal healthcare. The use of recombinant DNA technology in animal disease diagnosis has improved the rapidity, specificity and sensitivity of various diagnostic assays. This is because of the absence of host cellular proteins in the recombinant derived antigen preparations that dramatically decrease the rate of false-positive reactions. Various recombinant products are used for disease diagnosis in veterinary medicine and this article discusses recombinant-based viral disease diagnostics currently used for detection of pathogens in livestock and poultry.

  18. Adenovirus Vectors Expressing Hantavirus Proteins Protect Hamsters against Lethal Challenge with Andes Virus ▿

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Hantaviruses infect humans following aerosolization from rodent feces and urine, producing hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome and hantavirus pulmonary syndrome. Due to the high rates of mortality and lack of therapies, vaccines are urgently needed. Nonreplicating adenovirus (Ad) vectors that express Andes hantavirus (ANDV) nucleocapsid protein (AdN) or glycoproteins (AdGN and AdGC) were constructed. Ad vectors were tested for their ability to protect Syrian hamsters from a lethal ANDV infe...

  19. Tertiary structure-based protein classification by virtual-bond-angles series

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Bin; HE Hong-bo; LI Yi-bing; XIONG Gui-lin

    2005-01-01

    Structure-based protein classification can be based on the similarities in primary, second or tertiary structures of proteins. A method using virtual-bond-angles series that transformed the protein space configuration into a sequence was used for the classification of three-dimensional structures of proteins. By transforming the main chains formed by Cα atoms of proteins into sequences, the series of virtual-bond-angles corresponding to the tertiary structure of the proteins were constructed. Then a distance-based hierarchical clustering method similar to Ward method was introduced to classify these virtual-bond-angles series of proteins. 200 files of protein structures were selected from Brookheaven protein data bank, and 11 clusters were classified.

  20. PPISEARCHENGINE: gene ontology-based search for protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Byungkyu; Cui, Guangyu; Lee, Hyunjin; Huang, De-Shuang; Han, Kyungsook

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a new search engine called PPISearchEngine which finds protein-protein interactions (PPIs) using the gene ontology (GO) and the biological relations of proteins. For efficient retrieval of PPIs, each GO term is assigned a prime number and the relation between the terms is represented by the product of prime numbers. This representation is hidden from users but facilitates the search for the interactions of a query protein by unique prime factorisation of the number that represents the query protein. For a query protein, PPISearchEngine considers not only the GO term associated with the query protein but also the GO terms at the lower level than the GO term in the GO hierarchy, and finds all the interactions of the query protein which satisfy the search condition. In contrast, the standard keyword-matching or ID-matching search method cannot find the interactions of a protein unless the interactions involve a protein with explicit annotations. To the best of our knowledge, this search engine is the first method that can process queries like 'for protein p with GO [Formula: see text], find p's interaction partners with GO [Formula: see text]'. PPISearchEngine is freely available to academics at http://search.hpid.org/.

  1. Network based approaches reveal clustering in protein point patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Joshua; Barr, Valarie; Aldridge, Joshua; Samelson, Lawrence E.; Losert, Wolfgang

    2014-03-01

    Recent advances in super-resolution imaging have allowed for the sub-diffraction measurement of the spatial location of proteins on the surfaces of T-cells. The challenge is to connect these complex point patterns to the internal processes and interactions, both protein-protein and protein-membrane. We begin analyzing these patterns by forming a geometric network amongst the proteins and looking at network measures, such the degree distribution. This allows us to compare experimentally observed patterns to models. Specifically, we find that the experimental patterns differ from heterogeneous Poisson processes, highlighting an internal clustering structure. Further work will be to compare our results to simulated protein-protein interactions to determine clustering mechanisms.

  2. Inferential protein structure determination and refinement using fast, electronic structure based backbone amide chemical shift predictions

    CERN Document Server

    Christensen, Anders S

    2015-01-01

    This report covers the development of a new, fast method for calculating the backbone amide proton chemical shifts in proteins. Through quantum chemical calculations, structure-based forudsiglese the chemical shift for amidprotonen in protein has been parameterized. The parameters are then implemented in a computer program called Padawan. The program has since been implemented in protein folding program Phaistos, wherein the method andvendes to de novo folding of the protein structures and to refine the existing protein structures.

  3. Developing Novel Protein-based Materials using Ultrabithorax: Production, Characterization, and Functionalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhao

    2011-12-01

    Compared to 'conventional' materials made from metal, glass, or ceramics, protein-based materials have unique mechanical properties. Furthermore, the morphology, mechanical properties, and functionality of protein-based materials may be optimized via sequence engineering for use in a variety of applications, including textile materials, biosensors, and tissue engineering scaffolds. The development of recombinant DNA technology has enabled the production and engineering of protein-based materials ex vivo. However, harsh production conditions can compromise the mechanical properties of protein-based materials and diminish their ability to incorporate functional proteins. Developing a new generation of protein-based materials is crucial to (i) improve materials assembly conditions, (ii) create novel mechanical properties, and (iii) expand the capacity to carry functional protein/peptide sequences. This thesis describes development of novel protein-based materials using Ultrabithorax, a member of the Hox family of proteins that regulate developmental pathways in Drosophila melanogaster. The experiments presented (i) establish the conditions required for the assembly of Ubx-based materials, (ii) generate a wide range of Ubx morphologies, (iii) examine the mechanical properties of Ubx fibers, (iv) incorporate protein functions to Ubx-based materials via gene fusion, (v) pattern protein functions within the Ubx materials, and (vi) examine the biocompatibility of Ubx materials in vitro. Ubx-based materials assemble at mild conditions compatible with protein folding and activity, which enables Ubx chimeric materials to retain the function of appended proteins in spatial patterns determined by materials assembly. Ubx-based materials also display mechanical properties comparable to existing protein-based materials and demonstrate good biocompatibility with living cells in vitro. Taken together, this research demonstrates the unique features and future potential of novel Ubx-based

  4. Classifying proteins into functional groups based on all-versus-all BLAST of 10 million proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolker, Natali; Higdon, Roger; Broomall, William; Stanberry, Larissa; Welch, Dean; Lu, Wei; Haynes, Winston; Barga, Roger; Kolker, Eugene

    2011-01-01

    To address the monumental challenge of assigning function to millions of sequenced proteins, we completed the first of a kind all-versus-all sequence alignments using BLAST for 9.9 million proteins in the UniRef100 database. Microsoft Windows Azure produced over 3 billion filtered records in 6 days using 475 eight-core virtual machines. Protein classification into functional groups was then performed using Hive and custom jars implemented on top of Apache Hadoop utilizing the MapReduce paradigm. First, using the Clusters of Orthologous Genes (COG) database, a length normalized bit score (LNBS) was determined to be the best similarity measure for classification of proteins. LNBS achieved sensitivity and specificity of 98% each. Second, out of 5.1 million bacterial proteins, about two-thirds were assigned to significantly extended COG groups, encompassing 30 times more assigned proteins. Third, the remaining proteins were classified into protein functional groups using an innovative implementation of a single-linkage algorithm on an in-house Hadoop compute cluster. This implementation significantly reduces the run time for nonindexed queries and optimizes efficient clustering on a large scale. The performance was also verified on Amazon Elastic MapReduce. This clustering assigned nearly 2 million proteins to approximately half a million different functional groups. A similar approach was applied to classify 2.8 million eukaryotic sequences resulting in over 1 million proteins being assign to existing KOG groups and the remainder clustered into 100,000 functional groups.

  5. Viral protein determinants of Lassa virus entry and release from polarized epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlie, Katrin; Maisa, Anna; Freiberg, Fabian; Groseth, Allison; Strecker, Thomas; Garten, Wolfgang

    2010-04-01

    The epithelium plays a key role in the spread of Lassa virus. Transmission from rodents to humans occurs mainly via inhalation or ingestion of droplets, dust, or food contaminated with rodent urine. Here, we investigated Lassa virus infection in cultured epithelial cells and subsequent release of progeny viruses. We show that Lassa virus enters polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells mainly via the basolateral route, consistent with the basolateral localization of the cellular Lassa virus receptor alpha-dystroglycan. In contrast, progeny virus was efficiently released from the apical cell surface. Further, we determined the roles of the glycoprotein, matrix protein, and nucleoprotein in directed release of nascent virus. To do this, a virus-like-particle assay was developed in polarized MDCK cells based on the finding that, when expressed individually, both the glycoprotein GP and matrix protein Z form virus-like particles. We show that GP determines the apical release of Lassa virus from epithelial cells, presumably by recruiting the matrix protein Z to the site of virus assembly, which is in turn essential for nucleocapsid incorporation into virions.

  6. Proteomics-Based Analysis of Protein Complexes in Pluripotent Stem Cells and Cancer Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Putty-Reddy Sudhir

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A protein complex consists of two or more proteins that are linked together through protein–protein interactions. The proteins show stable/transient and direct/indirect interactions within the protein complex or between the protein complexes. Protein complexes are involved in regulation of most of the cellular processes and molecular functions. The delineation of protein complexes is important to expand our knowledge on proteins functional roles in physiological and pathological conditions. The genetic yeast-2-hybrid method has been extensively used to characterize protein-protein interactions. Alternatively, a biochemical-based affinity purification coupled with mass spectrometry (AP-MS approach has been widely used to characterize the protein complexes. In the AP-MS method, a protein complex of a target protein of interest is purified using a specific antibody or an affinity tag (e.g., DYKDDDDK peptide (FLAG and polyhistidine (His and is subsequently analyzed by means of MS. Tandem affinity purification, a two-step purification system, coupled with MS has been widely used mainly to reduce the contaminants. We review here a general principle for AP-MS-based characterization of protein complexes and we explore several protein complexes identified in pluripotent stem cell biology and cancer biology as examples.

  7. Imaging of membrane proteins using antenna-based optical microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeppener, Christiane; Novotny, Lukas [Institute of Optics and Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627 (United States)], E-mail: novotny@optics.rochester.edu

    2008-09-24

    The localization and identification of individual proteins is of key importance for the understanding of biological processes on the molecular scale. Here, we demonstrate near-field fluorescence imaging of single proteins in their native cell membrane. Incident laser radiation is localized and enhanced with an optical antenna in the form of a spherical gold particle attached to a pointed dielectric tip. Individual proteins can be identified with a diffraction-unlimited spatial resolution of {approx}50 nm. Besides determining the concentration and distribution of specific membrane proteins, this approach makes it possible to study the colocalization of different membrane proteins. Moreover, it enables a simultaneous recording of the membrane topology. Protein distributions can be correlated with the local membrane topology, thereby providing important information on the chemical and structural organization of cellular membranes.

  8. Protein feature based identification of cell cycle regulated proteins in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Lichtenberg, Ulrik; Jensen, Thomas Skøt; Jensen, Lars Juhl;

    2003-01-01

    DNA microarrays have been used extensively to identify cell cycle regulated genes in yeast; however, the overlap in the genes identified is surprisingly small. We show that certain protein features can be used to distinguish cell cycle regulated genes from other genes with high confidence (features...... include protein phosphorylation, glycosylation, subcellular location and instability/degradation). We demonstrate that co-expressed, periodic genes encode proteins which share combinations of features, and provide an overview of the proteome dynamics during the cycle. A large set of novel putative cell...... cycle regulated proteins were identified, many of which have no known function....

  9. Transgenic chickens as bioreactors for protein-based drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillico, Simon G; McGrew, Michael J; Sherman, Adrian; Sang, Helen M

    2005-02-01

    The potential of using transgenic animals for the synthesis of therapeutic proteins was suggested over twenty years ago. Considerable progress has been made in developing methods for the production of transgenic animals and specifically in the expression of therapeutic proteins in the mammary glands of cows, sheep and goats. Development of transgenic hens for protein production in eggs has lagged behind these systems. The positive features associated with the use of the chicken in terms of cost, speed of development of a production flock and potentially appropriate glycosylation of target proteins have led to significant advances in transgenic chicken models in the past few years.

  10. The Increasing Impact of Activity-Based Protein Profiling in Plant Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Kyoko; van der Hoorn, Renier A L

    2016-03-01

    The active proteome dictates plant physiology. Yet, active proteins are difficult to predict based on transcript or protein levels, because protein activities are regulated post-translationally in their microenvironments. Over the past 10 years, activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) is increasingly used in plant science. ABPP monitors the activities of hundreds of plant proteins using tagged chemical probes that react with the active site of proteins in a mechanism-dependent manner. Since labeling is covalent and irreversible, labeled proteins can be detected and identified on protein gels and by mass spectrometry using tagged fluorophores and/or biotin. Here, we discuss general concepts, approaches and practical considerations of ABPP, before we summarize the discoveries made using 40 validated probes representing 14 chemotypes that can monitor the active state of >4,500 plant proteins. These discoveries and new opportunities indicate that this emerging functional proteomic technology is a powerful discovery tool that will have an increasing impact on plant science.

  11. Affixing plant sections without protein based adhesives for protease histochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jona, R; Griglione, R

    1999-01-01

    To submit a section of plant tissue to histochemical analysis using protease, the protein based adhesives which keep the slices attached to the slides must be replaced because they are attacked by the enzyme and the slices are washed off the slides. We devised a method to keep the slices attached to the slides during histochemical extractions and subsequent staining. Slides are frosted on two lateral zones by spreading on them a fluoride paste composed of 15 g barium sulfate, 15 g ammonium difluoride, 8 g oxalic acid, 40 ml glycerine and 12 ml deionized water using a thin paint brush. After removing the paste with tap water and drying the slides, the sections are placed on the central clear zone of the slide and covered with an ethyl-cellulose film that keeps the slices in place and allows the reagents to act through it. To do this, the slides are dipped into 0.5% ethyl cellulose (ETC) prepared in a 4:1 mixture of toluene and absolute ethanol. The ETC coating is layered three times to improve its firmness and its ability to retain the slices on the slides. To obtain perfect adhesion, the slide should be oven dried (40-50 C for 10-15 min) to remove any trace of humidity before applying each layer of ETC. Subsequently the sections can be extracted and stained without undue loss of material.

  12. Understanding Viral Transmission Behavior via Protein Intrinsic Disorder Prediction: Coronaviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerard Kian-Meng Goh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Besides being a common threat to farm animals and poultry, coronavirus (CoV was responsible for the human severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS epidemic in 2002–4. However, many aspects of CoV behavior, including modes of its transmission, are yet to be fully understood. We show that the amount and the peculiarities of distribution of the protein intrinsic disorder in the viral shell can be used for the efficient analysis of the behavior and transmission modes of CoV. The proposed model allows categorization of the various CoVs by the peculiarities of disorder distribution in their membrane (M and nucleocapsid (N. This categorization enables quick identification of viruses with similar behaviors in transmission, regardless of genetic proximity. Based on this analysis, an empirical model for predicting the viral transmission behavior is developed. This model is able to explain some behavioral aspects of important coronaviruses that previously were not fully understood. The new predictor can be a useful tool for better epidemiological, clinical, and structural understanding of behavior of both newly emerging viruses and viruses that have been known for a long time. A potentially new vaccine strategy could involve searches for viral strains that are characterized by the evolutionary misfit between the peculiarities of the disorder distribution in their shells and their behavior.

  13. A Topology Potential-Based Method for Identifying Essential Proteins from PPI Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Lu, Yu; Wang, Jianxin; Wu, Fang-Xiang; Pan, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Essential proteins are indispensable for cellular life. It is of great significance to identify essential proteins that can help us understand the minimal requirements for cellular life and is also very important for drug design. However, identification of essential proteins based on experimental approaches are typically time-consuming and expensive. With the development of high-throughput technology in the post-genomic era, more and more protein-protein interaction data can be obtained, which make it possible to study essential proteins from the network level. There have been a series of computational approaches proposed for predicting essential proteins based on network topologies. Most of these topology based essential protein discovery methods were to use network centralities. In this paper, we investigate the essential proteins' topological characters from a completely new perspective. To our knowledge it is the first time that topology potential is used to identify essential proteins from a protein-protein interaction (PPI) network. The basic idea is that each protein in the network can be viewed as a material particle which creates a potential field around itself and the interaction of all proteins forms a topological field over the network. By defining and computing the value of each protein's topology potential, we can obtain a more precise ranking which reflects the importance of proteins from the PPI network. The experimental results show that topology potential-based methods TP and TP-NC outperform traditional topology measures: degree centrality (DC), betweenness centrality (BC), closeness centrality (CC), subgraph centrality (SC), eigenvector centrality (EC), information centrality (IC), and network centrality (NC) for predicting essential proteins. In addition, these centrality measures are improved on their performance for identifying essential proteins in biological network when controlled by topology potential.

  14. Predicting the Effect of Mutations on Protein-Protein Binding Interactions through Structure-Based Interface Profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brender, Jeffrey R; Zhang, Yang

    2015-10-01

    The formation of protein-protein complexes is essential for proteins to perform their physiological functions in the cell. Mutations that prevent the proper formation of the correct complexes can have serious consequences for the associated cellular processes. Since experimental determination of protein-protein binding affinity remains difficult when performed on a large scale, computational methods for predicting the consequences of mutations on binding affinity are highly desirable. We show that a scoring function based on interface structure profiles collected from analogous protein-protein interactions in the PDB is a powerful predictor of protein binding affinity changes upon mutation. As a standalone feature, the differences between the interface profile score of the mutant and wild-type proteins has an accuracy equivalent to the best all-atom potentials, despite being two orders of magnitude faster once the profile has been constructed. Due to its unique sensitivity in collecting the evolutionary profiles of analogous binding interactions and the high speed of calculation, the interface profile score has additional advantages as a complementary feature to combine with physics-based potentials for improving the accuracy of composite scoring approaches. By incorporating the sequence-derived and residue-level coarse-grained potentials with the interface structure profile score, a composite model was constructed through the random forest training, which generates a Pearson correlation coefficient >0.8 between the predicted and observed binding free-energy changes upon mutation. This accuracy is comparable to, or outperforms in most cases, the current best methods, but does not require high-resolution full-atomic models of the mutant structures. The binding interface profiling approach should find useful application in human-disease mutation recognition and protein interface design studies.

  15. Protein and gene model inference based on statistical modeling in k-partite graphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerster, Sarah; Qeli, Ermir; Ahrens, Christian H; Bühlmann, Peter

    2010-07-06

    One of the major goals of proteomics is the comprehensive and accurate description of a proteome. Shotgun proteomics, the method of choice for the analysis of complex protein mixtures, requires that experimentally observed peptides are mapped back to the proteins they were derived from. This process is also known as protein inference. We present Markovian Inference of Proteins and Gene Models (MIPGEM), a statistical model based on clearly stated assumptions to address the problem of protein and gene model inference for shotgun proteomics data. In particular, we are dealing with dependencies among peptides and proteins using a Markovian assumption on k-partite graphs. We are also addressing the problems of shared peptides and ambiguous proteins by scoring the encoding gene models. Empirical results on two control datasets with synthetic mixtures of proteins and on complex protein samples of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Drosophila melanogaster, and Arabidopsis thaliana suggest that the results with MIPGEM are competitive with existing tools for protein inference.

  16. Nanoparticle-based capillary electroseparation of proteins in polymer capillaries under physiological conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, C.; Harwigsson, I.; Becker, K.

    2010-01-01

    Totally porous lipid-based liquid crystalline nanoparticles were used as pseudostationary phase for capillary electroseparation with LIF detection of proteins at physiological conditions using unmodified cyclic olefin copolymer capillaries (Topas (R), 6.7 cm effective length). In the absence...... at protein friendly conditions. The developed capillary-based method facilitates future electrochromatography of proteins on polymer-based microchips under physiological conditions and enables the initial optimization of separation conditions in parallel to the chip development....

  17. Feature Fusion Based SVM Classifier for Protein Subcellular Localization Prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Julia; Mondal, Md Nazrul Islam; Islam, Md Khaled Ben; Hasan, Md Al Mehedi

    2016-12-18

    For the importance of protein subcellular localization in different branches of life science and drug discovery, researchers have focused their attentions on protein subcellular localization prediction. Effective representation of features from protein sequences plays a most vital role in protein subcellular localization prediction specially in case of machine learning techniques. Single feature representation-like pseudo amino acid composition (PseAAC), physiochemical property models (PPM), and amino acid index distribution (AAID) contains insufficient information from protein sequences. To deal with such problems, we have proposed two feature fusion representations, AAIDPAAC and PPMPAAC, to work with Support Vector Machine classifiers, which fused PseAAC with PPM and AAID accordingly. We have evaluated the performance for both single and fused feature representation of a Gram-negative bacterial dataset. We have got at least 3% more actual accuracy by AAIDPAAC and 2% more locative accuracy by PPMPAAC than single feature representation.

  18. Investigating the importance of Delaunay-based definition of atomic interactions in scoring of protein-protein docking results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Rahim; Sadeghi, Mehdi; Mirzaie, Mehdi

    2016-05-01

    The approaches taken to represent and describe structural features of the macromolecules are of major importance when developing computational methods for studying and predicting their structures and interactions. This study attempts to explore the significance of Delaunay tessellation for the definition of atomic interactions by evaluating its impact on the performance of scoring protein-protein docking prediction. Two sets of knowledge-based scoring potentials are extracted from a training dataset of native protein-protein complexes. The potential of the first set is derived using atomic interactions extracted from Delaunay tessellated structures. The potential of the second set is calculated conventionally, that is, using atom pairs whose interactions were determined by their separation distances. The scoring potentials were tested against two different docking decoy sets and their performances were compared. The results show that, if properly optimized, the Delaunay-based scoring potentials can achieve higher success rate than the usual scoring potentials. These results and the results of a previous study on the use of Delaunay-based potentials in protein fold recognition, all point to the fact that Delaunay tessellation of protein structure can provide a more realistic definition of atomic interaction, and therefore, if appropriately utilized, may be able to improve the accuracy of pair potentials.

  19. Stringent homology-based prediction of H. sapiens-M. tuberculosis H37Rv protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hufeng; Gao, Shangzhi; Nguyen, Nam Ninh; Fan, Mengyuan; Jin, Jingjing; Liu, Bing; Zhao, Liang; Xiong, Geng; Tan, Min; Li, Shijun; Wong, Limsoon

    2014-04-08

    H. sapiens-M. tuberculosis H37Rv protein-protein interaction (PPI) data are essential for understanding the infection mechanism of the formidable pathogen M. tuberculosis H37Rv. Computational prediction is an important strategy to fill the gap in experimental H. sapiens-M. tuberculosis H37Rv PPI data. Homology-based prediction is frequently used in predicting both intra-species and inter-species PPIs. However, some limitations are not properly resolved in several published works that predict eukaryote-prokaryote inter-species PPIs using intra-species template PPIs. We develop a stringent homology-based prediction approach by taking into account (i) differences between eukaryotic and prokaryotic proteins and (ii) differences between inter-species and intra-species PPI interfaces. We compare our stringent homology-based approach to a conventional homology-based approach for predicting host-pathogen PPIs, based on cellular compartment distribution analysis, disease gene list enrichment analysis, pathway enrichment analysis and functional category enrichment analysis. These analyses support the validity of our prediction result, and clearly show that our approach has better performance in predicting H. sapiens-M. tuberculosis H37Rv PPIs. Using our stringent homology-based approach, we have predicted a set of highly plausible H. sapiens-M. tuberculosis H37Rv PPIs which might be useful for many of related studies. Based on our analysis of the H. sapiens-M. tuberculosis H37Rv PPI network predicted by our stringent homology-based approach, we have discovered several interesting properties which are reported here for the first time. We find that both host proteins and pathogen proteins involved in the host-pathogen PPIs tend to be hubs in their own intra-species PPI network. Also, both host and pathogen proteins involved in host-pathogen PPIs tend to have longer primary sequence, tend to have more domains, tend to be more hydrophilic, etc. And the protein domains from both

  20. Structure-sequence based analysis for identification of conserved regions in proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemla, Adam T; Zhou, Carol E; Lam, Marisa W; Smith, Jason R; Pardes, Elizabeth

    2013-05-28

    Disclosed are computational methods, and associated hardware and software products for scoring conservation in a protein structure based on a computationally identified family or cluster of protein structures. A method of computationally identifying a family or cluster of protein structures in also disclosed herein.

  1. Characterization of white grub (Melolonthidae; Coleoptera in salak plantation based on morphology and protein banding pattern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUGIYARTO

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Maryati KT, Sugiyarto. 2010. Characterization of white grub (Melolonthidae; Coleoptera in salak plantation based on morphology and protein banding pattern. Nusantara Bioscience 1: 72-77. This research aims to find out the white grub (Melolonthidae; Coleoptera variability based on the morphological characteristic and protein banding pattern found in ”salak pondoh” farm in Regencies of Sleman, Yogyakarta and Magelang, Central Java. Each area has five sampling points. Morphological analysis on white grub was conducted using descriptive method and analysis on protein banding pattern was conducted using qualitative analysis based on the presence or absent of band pattern on the gel, and qualitatively based on the relative mobility value (Rf of protein. The result indicated that the white grub in Sleman and Magelang, based on morphology characteristic is only one species, namely Holothricia sp. Based on the protein banding pattern, the white grub sample have differences of protein band number and protein molecular weight. Key words: Salacca zalacca, white grub, morphology, protein banding pattern.Abstrak. Maryati KT, Sugiyarto. 2010. Karakterisasi lundi putih (Melolonthidae: Coleoptera pada pertanaman salak berdasarkan ciri morfologi dan pola pita protein. Nusantara Bioscience 1: 72-77. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui keanekaragaman lundi putih (Melolonthidae; Coleoptera berdasarkan ciri morfologi dan pola pita protein yang ditemukan di lahan pertanaman salak pondoh di Kabupaten Sleman, Yogyakarta dan Kabupaten Magelang, Jawa Tengah. Pada masing-masing wilayah diambil lima titik sampling. Analisis morfologi lundi putih digunakan metode deskriptif, dan analisis pola pita protein digunakan analisis kualitatif berdasarkan muncul tidaknya pola pita pada gel, dan secara kuantitatif berdasarkan nilai mobilitas relatif protein (RF. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa sampel lundi putih di Kabupaten Sleman dan Magelang, berdasar karakter

  2. Multi-kernel transfer learning based on Chou's PseAAC formulation for protein submitochondria localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Suyu

    2012-01-21

    Protein sub-organelle localization, e.g. submitochondria, seems more challenging than general protein subcellular localization, because the determination of protein's micro-level localization within organelle by fluorescent imaging technique would face up with more difficulties. Up to present, there are far few computational methods for protein submitochondria localization, and the existing sequence-based predictive models demonstrate moderate or unsatisfactory performance. Recent researches have demonstrated that gene ontology (GO) is a convincingly effective protein feature for protein subcellular localization. However, the GO information may not be available for novel proteins or sparsely annotated protein subfamilies. In allusion to the problem, we transfer the homology's GO information to the target protein and propose a multi-kernel transfer learning model for protein submitochondria localization (MK-TLM), which substantially extends our previously published work (gene ontology based transfer learning model for protein subcellular localization, GO-TLM). To reduce the risk of performance overestimation, we conduct a more comprehensive survey of the model performance in optimistic case, moderate case and pessimistic case according to the abundance of target protein's GO information. The experiments on submitochondria benchmark datasets show that MK-TLM significantly outperforms the baseline models, and demonstrates excellent performance for novel mitochondria proteins and those mitochondria proteins that belong to the subfamily we know little about.

  3. A sequence-based dynamic ensemble learning system for protein ligand-binding site prediction

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Peng

    2015-12-03

    Background: Proteins have the fundamental ability to selectively bind to other molecules and perform specific functions through such interactions, such as protein-ligand binding. Accurate prediction of protein residues that physically bind to ligands is important for drug design and protein docking studies. Most of the successful protein-ligand binding predictions were based on known structures. However, structural information is not largely available in practice due to the huge gap between the number of known protein sequences and that of experimentally solved structures

  4. A novel domain-based method for predicting the functional classes of proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Xiaojing; LIN Jiancheng; SHI Tieliu; LI Yixue

    2004-01-01

    Prediction of protein functions from known genomic sequences is an important mission of bioinformatics. One approach is to classify proteins into functional categories. We have therefore developed a method based on protein domain composition and the maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) algorithm to classify proteins according to functions. Using the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome, we compared the effectiveness of the MLE approach with that of an intuitive and simple method. The MLE method outperformed the simple method, achieving an estimated specificity of 75.45% and an estimated sensitivity of 40.26%. These results indicate that domain is an important feature of proteins and is closely related to protein function.

  5. In vivo Biotinylation Based Method for the Study of Protein-Protein Proximity in Eukaryotic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arman Kulyyassov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The spatiotemporal order plays an important role in cell functioning and is affected in many pathologies such as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. One of the ultimate goals of molecular biology is reconstruction of the spatiotemporal structure of a living cell at the molecular level. This task includes determination of proximities between different molecular components in the cell and monitoring their time- and physiological state-dependent changes. In many cases, proximity between macromolecules arises due to their interactions; however, the contribution of dynamic self-organization in generation of spatiotemporal order is emerging as another viable possibility. Specifically, in proteomics, this implies that the detection of protein-protein proximity is a more general task than gaining information about physical interactions between proteins, as it could detail aspects of spatial order in vivo that are challenging to reconstitute in binding experiments in vitro. Methods: In this work, we have developed a method of monitoring protein-protein proximity in vivo. For this purpose, the BirA was fused to one of the interaction partners, whereas the BAP was modified to make the detection of its biotinylation possible by mass spectrometry. Results: Using several experimental systems, we showed that the biotinylation is interaction dependent. In addition, we demonstrated that BAP domains with different primary amino acid structures and thus with different molecular weights can be used in the same experiment, providing the possibility of multiplexing. Alternatively to the changes in primary amino acid structure, the stable isotope format can also be used, providing another way to perform multiplexing experiments. Finally, we also demonstrated that our system could help to overcome another limitation of current methodologies to detect protein-protein proximity. For example, one can follow the state of a protein of interest at a defined

  6. A gateway-based system for fast evaluation of protein-protein interactions in bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsten Wille

    Full Text Available Protein-protein interactions are important layers of regulation in all kingdoms of life. Identification and characterization of these interactions is one challenging task of the post-genomic era and crucial for understanding of molecular processes within a cell. Several methods have been successfully employed during the past decades to identify protein-protein interactions in bacteria, but most of them include tedious and time-consuming manipulations of DNA. In contrast, the MultiSite Gateway system is a fast tool for transfer of multiple DNA fragments between plasmids enabling simultaneous and site directed cloning of up to four fragments into one construct. Here we developed a new set of Gateway vectors including custom made entry vectors and modular Destination vectors for studying protein-protein interactions via Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET, Bacterial two Hybrid (B2H and split Gaussia luciferase (Gluc, as well as for fusions with SNAP-tag and HaloTag for dual-color super-resolution microscopy. As proof of principle, we characterized the interaction between the Salmonella effector SipA and its chaperone InvB via split Gluc and B2H approach. The suitability for FRET analysis as well as functionality of fusions with SNAP- and HaloTag could be demonstrated by studying the transient interaction between chemotaxis response regulator CheY and its phosphatase CheZ.

  7. Peptide and protein-based nanotubes for nanobiotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Anna; Audette, Gerald F

    2012-01-01

    The development of biologically relevant nanosystems such as biomolecular probes and sensors requires systems that effectively interface specific biochemical environments with abiotic architectures. The most widely studied nanomaterial, carbon nanotubes, has proven challenging in their adaptation for biomedical applications despite their numerous advantageous physical and electrochemical properties. On the other hand, development of bionanosystems through adaptation of existing biological systems has several advantages including their adaptability through modern recombinant DNA strategies. Indeed, the use of peptides, proteins and protein assemblies as nanotubes, scaffolds, and nanowires has shown much promise as a bottom-up approach to the development of novel bionanosystems. We highlight several unique peptide and protein systems that generate protein nanotubes (PNTs) that are being explored for the development of biosensors, probes, bionanowires, and drug delivery systems.

  8. Sport Nutrition Drinks Based on Octopus Protein Hydrolysate

    OpenAIRE

    Bambang Riyanto; Wini Trilaksani; Rika Lestari

    2017-01-01

    AbstractSport nutrition drinks are well-known in escalating athlete’s performance and endurance. These product developed from whey protein hydrolysates and soybean protein hydrolysates have already been recognized, however expansion from marine product is comparatively rare. Octopus (Octopus cyanea) widely acknowledged containing taurine and rich in amino acids is potential to be developed as ingredient for sport nutrition drink. The aims of this study were to create and characterize sport nu...

  9. A genecentric Human Protein Atlas for expression profiles based on antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglund, Lisa; Björling, Erik; Oksvold, Per; Fagerberg, Linn; Asplund, Anna; Szigyarto, Cristina Al-Khalili; Persson, Anja; Ottosson, Jenny; Wernérus, Henrik; Nilsson, Peter; Lundberg, Emma; Sivertsson, Asa; Navani, Sanjay; Wester, Kenneth; Kampf, Caroline; Hober, Sophia; Pontén, Fredrik; Uhlén, Mathias

    2008-10-01

    An attractive path forward in proteomics is to experimentally annotate the human protein complement of the genome in a genecentric manner. Using antibodies, it might be possible to design protein-specific probes for a representative protein from every protein-coding gene and to subsequently use the antibodies for systematical analysis of cellular distribution and subcellular localization of proteins in normal and disease tissues. A new version (4.0) of the Human Protein Atlas has been developed in a genecentric manner with the inclusion of all human genes and splice variants predicted from genome efforts together with a visualization of each protein with characteristics such as predicted membrane regions, signal peptide, and protein domains and new plots showing the uniqueness (sequence similarity) of every fraction of each protein toward all other human proteins. The new version is based on tissue profiles generated from 6120 antibodies with more than five million immunohistochemistry-based images covering 5067 human genes, corresponding to approximately 25% of the human genome. Version 4.0 includes a putative list of members in various protein classes, both functional classes, such as kinases, transcription factors, G-protein-coupled receptors, etc., and project-related classes, such as candidate genes for cancer or cardiovascular diseases. The exact antigen sequence for the internally generated antibodies has also been released together with a visualization of the application-specific validation performed for each antibody, including a protein array assay, Western blot analysis, immunohistochemistry, and, for a large fraction, immunofluorescence-based confocal microscopy. New search functionalities have been added to allow complex queries regarding protein expression profiles, protein classes, and chromosome location. The new version of the protein atlas thus is a resource for many areas of biomedical research, including protein science and biomarker discovery.

  10. An evolution-based approach to De Novo protein design and case study on Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Pralay; Shultis, David; Brender, Jeffrey R; Czajka, Jeff; Marsh, David; Gray, Felicia; Cierpicki, Tomasz; Zhang, Yang

    2013-10-01

    Computational protein design is a reverse procedure of protein folding and structure prediction, where constructing structures from evolutionarily related proteins has been demonstrated to be the most reliable method for protein 3-dimensional structure prediction. Following this spirit, we developed a novel method to design new protein sequences based on evolutionarily related protein families. For a given target structure, a set of proteins having similar fold are identified from the PDB library by structural alignments. A structural profile is then constructed from the protein templates and used to guide the conformational search of amino acid sequence space, where physicochemical packing is accommodated by single-sequence based solvation, torsion angle, and secondary structure predictions. The method was tested on a computational folding experiment based on a large set of 87 protein structures covering different fold classes, which showed that the evolution-based design significantly enhances the foldability and biological functionality of the designed sequences compared to the traditional physics-based force field methods. Without using homologous proteins, the designed sequences can be folded with an average root-mean-square-deviation of 2.1 Å to the target. As a case study, the method is extended to redesign all 243 structurally resolved proteins in the pathogenic bacteria Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which is the second leading cause of death from infectious disease. On a smaller scale, five sequences were randomly selected from the design pool and subjected to experimental validation. The results showed that all the designed proteins are soluble with distinct secondary structure and three have well ordered tertiary structure, as demonstrated by circular dichroism and NMR spectroscopy. Together, these results demonstrate a new avenue in computational protein design that uses knowledge of evolutionary conservation from protein structural families to engineer

  11. Two-dimensional gel-based protein standardization verified by western blot analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haniu, Hisao; Watanabe, Daisuke; Kawashima, Yusuke; Matsumoto, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    In data presentation of biochemical investigation the amount of a target protein is shown in the y-axis against the x-axis representing time, concentrations of various agents, or other parameters. Western blot is a versatile and convenient tool in such an analysis to quantify and display the amount of proteins. In western blot, so-called housekeeping gene product(s), or "housekeeping proteins," are widely used as internal standards. The rationale of using housekeeping proteins for standardization of western blot is based on the assumption that the expression of chosen housekeeping gene is always constant, which could be false under certain physiological or pathological conditions. We have devised a two-dimensional gel-based standardization method in which the protein content of each sample is determined by scanning the total protein density of two-dimensional gels and the expression of each protein is quantified as the density ratio of each protein divided by the density of the total proteins on the two-dimensional gel. The advantage of this standardization method is that it is not based on any presumed "housekeeping proteins" that are supposed to be being expressed constantly under all physiological conditions. We will show that the total density of a two-dimensional gel can render a reliable protein standardization parameter by running western blot analysis on one of the proteins analyzed by two-dimensional gels.

  12. Efficient identification of critical residues based only on protein structure by network analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P Cusack

    Full Text Available Despite the increasing number of published protein structures, and the fact that each protein's function relies on its three-dimensional structure, there is limited access to automatic programs used for the identification of critical residues from the protein structure, compared with those based on protein sequence. Here we present a new algorithm based on network analysis applied exclusively on protein structures to identify critical residues. Our results show that this method identifies critical residues for protein function with high reliability and improves automatic sequence-based approaches and previous network-based approaches. The reliability of the method depends on the conformational diversity screened for the protein of interest. We have designed a web site to give access to this software at http://bis.ifc.unam.mx/jamming/. In summary, a new method is presented that relates critical residues for protein function with the most traversed residues in networks derived from protein structures. A unique feature of the method is the inclusion of the conformational diversity of proteins in the prediction, thus reproducing a basic feature of the structure/function relationship of proteins.

  13. Recent progress in design of protein-based fluorescent biosensors and their cellular applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Tomonori; Hamachi, Itaru

    2014-12-19

    Protein-based fluorescent biosensors have emerged as key bioanalytical tools to visualize and quantify a wide range of biological substances and events in vitro, in cells, and even in vivo. On the basis of the construction method, the protein-based fluorescent biosensors can be principally classified into two classes: (1) genetically encoded fluorescent biosensors harnessing fluorescent proteins (FPs) and (2) semisynthetic biosensors comprised of protein scaffolds and synthetic fluorophores. Recent advances in protein engineering and chemical biology not only allowed the further optimization of conventional biosensors but also facilitated the creation of novel biosensors based on unique strategies. In this review, we survey the recent studies in the development and improvement of protein-based fluorescent biosensors and highlight the successful applications to live cell and in vivo imaging. Furthermore, we provide perspectives on possible future directions of the technique.

  14. Struct2Net: a web service to predict protein-protein interactions using a structure-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rohit; Park, Daniel; Xu, Jinbo; Hosur, Raghavendra; Berger, Bonnie

    2010-07-01

    Struct2Net is a web server for predicting interactions between arbitrary protein pairs using a structure-based approach. Prediction of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) is a central area of interest and successful prediction would provide leads for experiments and drug design; however, the experimental coverage of the PPI interactome remains inadequate. We believe that Struct2Net is the first community-wide resource to provide structure-based PPI predictions that go beyond homology modeling. Also, most web-resources for predicting PPIs currently rely on functional genomic data (e.g. GO annotation, gene expression, cellular localization, etc.). Our structure-based approach is independent of such methods and only requires the sequence information of the proteins being queried. The web service allows multiple querying options, aimed at maximizing flexibility. For the most commonly studied organisms (fly, human and yeast), predictions have been pre-computed and can be retrieved almost instantaneously. For proteins from other species, users have the option of getting a quick-but-approximate result (using orthology over pre-computed results) or having a full-blown computation performed. The web service is freely available at http://struct2net.csail.mit.edu.

  15. QCM Biosensor Based on Polydopamine Surface for Real-Time Analysis of the Binding Kinetics of Protein-Protein Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunli Wu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A quartz crystal microbalance (QCM biosensor based on polydopamine (PDA surface was developed for real-time analysis of the binding kinetics of protein-protein interactions. The biosensor was fabricated by simply immersing the gold sensor chip into an aqueous dopamine solution at pH 8.5 leading to a spontaneous deposition of PDA film onto the sensor chip surface, which was followed by incubation with the protein to immobilize it onto the PDA-coated sensor chip surface via Michael addition and/or Schiff base reactions. In this paper, the interaction between monoclonal anti-myoglobin 7005 antibody (IgG1 and its antigen human cardiac myoglobin was used as a model system for real-time analysis of biomolecule interactions on the biosensor surface. The kinetic parameters of the interaction between anti-myoglobin 7005 and myoglobin were studied on the biosensor surface, which were consistent with the results obtained via amine coupling. The biosensor based on PDA surface has excellent regenerability, reproducibility, and specificity. Compared with the most frequently/typically used amine coupling method for immobilization of proteins on carboxylated substrates, the modification methodology presented in this paper is simple, mild and is not subjected to the limitations of the isoelectric point (pI of the protein. In addition, the PDA biosensor chip can be easily reused, which makes QCM biosensor analysis more efficient and cost effective.

  16. Technology and mechanism of a new protein-based core sand for aluminum casting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石晶玉; 黄天佑; 石红玉; 何镇明

    2001-01-01

    The protein-based binding material is from natural products, which is nontoxic and recyclable. This kind of green binder is earnestly needed by aluminum casting products. The new protein-based core possesses higher strength and easier shakeout. Its tensile strength is close to that of common resin sands. The micro-mechanism of protein binder was investigated by using infrared spectrum, chemical element analysis, SEM and thermal lost-mass analysis.

  17. From laptop to benchtop to bedside: Structure-based Drug Design on Protein Targets

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Lu; Morrow, John K.; Tran, Hoang T.; Phatak, Sharangdhar S.; Du-Cuny, Lei; Zhang, Shuxing

    2012-01-01

    As an important aspect of computer-aided drug design, structure-based drug design brought a new horizon to pharmaceutical development. This in silico method permeates all aspects of drug discovery today, including lead identification, lead optimization, ADMET prediction and drug repurposing. Structure-based drug design has resulted in fruitful successes drug discovery targeting protein-ligand and protein-protein interactions. Meanwhile, challenges, noted by low accuracy and combinatoric issue...

  18. MOLECULAR DOCKING ANALYSES OF CYNODON DACTYLON DERIVED PHYTOCHEMICALS AGAINST WHITE SPOT SYNDROME VIRUS (WSSV STRUCTURAL PROTEIN VP26

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damayanthi Devi.I

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available White spot disease is a major infectious disease of penaeid shrimps caused by the white spot syndrome virus (WSSV. The viral structural proteins are responsib le for binding virus to the cellular membranes of the host that is being systematically infected. An In silic o attempt was made to identify the potential drug to inhibit the WSSV spread of diseases. For that an effort , was made to deduce the antiviral potentiality of Cynodon dactylon derived phytochemicals with docking tec hnique. To stimulate the structure based drug design the, 3D structure of the VP26 (PDB-ID: 2EDM, a tegument protein thought to be i nvolved in the entry of WSSV nucleocapsid into the host nucleus, is retrieved from PDB datab ase and docking studies are carried out with the sketched phytochemical structures using GOLD software. Among the phytochemicals scr eened, luteolin and apigenin shows the best binding affinity with binding energies of 42.51 and 38.92 K.cal/m ol exhibiting the potential to block VP26 (2EDM protein of WSSV. This study will be helpful in developing novel antiviral drugs from plant sources against aquatic important pathogens.

  19. Optical sensing systems based on biomolecular recognition of recombinant proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salins, Lyndon L.; Schauer-Vukasinovic, Vesna; Daunert, Sylvia

    1998-05-01

    SIte-directed mutagenesis and the associated site-specific fluorescent labeling of proteins can be used to rationally design reagentless fluorescent molecular senors. The phosphate binding protein (PBP) and calmodulin (CaM) bind to phosphate and calcium in a highly specific manner. These ions induce a hinge motion in the proteins, and the resultant conformational change constitutes the basis of the sensor development. By labeling each protein at a specific site with environment-sensitive fluorescent probes, these conformational changes can be monitored and related to the amount of analyte ion present. In this study, the polymerase chain reaction was used to construct mutants of PBP and CaM that have a single cysteine at positions 197 and 109, respectively. Each protein was site-specifically labeled through the sulfhydryl group of the introduced cysteine residue at a single location with an environment-sensitive fluorescent probe. Characterization of the steady-state fluorescence indicated an enhancement of signal intensity upon binding of the analyte ion. Highly sensitive and selective and selective sensing systems for phosphate and calcium were obtained by using this approach.

  20. Efficient prediction of co-complexed proteins based on coevolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien M de Vienne

    Full Text Available The prediction of the network of protein-protein interactions (PPI of an organism is crucial for the understanding of biological processes and for the development of new drugs. Machine learning methods have been successfully applied to the prediction of PPI in yeast by the integration of multiple direct and indirect biological data sources. However, experimental data are not available for most organisms. We propose here an ensemble machine learning approach for the prediction of PPI that depends solely on features independent from experimental data. We developed new estimators of the coevolution between proteins and combined them in an ensemble learning procedure.We applied this method to a dataset of known co-complexed proteins in Escherichia coli and compared it to previously published methods. We show that our method allows prediction of PPI with an unprecedented precision of 95.5% for the first 200 sorted pairs of proteins compared to 28.5% on the same dataset with the previous best method.A close inspection of the best predicted pairs allowed us to detect new or recently discovered interactions between chemotactic components, the flagellar apparatus and RNA polymerase complexes in E. coli.

  1. Ensemble models of proteins and protein domains based on distance distribution restraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeschke, Gunnar

    2016-04-01

    Conformational ensembles of intrinsically disordered peptide chains are not fully determined by experimental observations. Uncertainty due to lack of experimental restraints and due to intrinsic disorder can be distinguished if distance distributions restraints are available. Such restraints can be obtained from pulsed dipolar electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy applied to pairs of spin labels. Here, we introduce a Monte Carlo approach for generating conformational ensembles that are consistent with a set of distance distribution restraints, backbone dihedral angle statistics in known protein structures, and optionally, secondary structure propensities or membrane immersion depths. The approach is tested with simulated restraints for a terminal and an internal loop and for a protein with 69 residues by using sets of sparse restraints for underlying well-defined conformations and for published ensembles of a premolten globule-like and a coil-like intrinsically disordered protein.

  2. Pea proteins based food products as meat replacers: the Profetas concept

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongen, W.M.F.; Meerdink, G.

    2001-01-01

    Profetas (Protein Foods, Environment, Technology and Society) is a Dutch trans-disciplinary research programme, aiming to develop more sustainable food systems. The central theme of the programme is the question: is a transition feasible from a diet based primarily on animal proteins to a diet based

  3. Antibody-based protein detection using piezoresistive cantilever arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauksaite, Vita; Lorentzen, Martin; Besenbacher, Flemming; Kjems, Jørgen

    2007-03-01

    A piezoresistive cantilever array platform with electrical read-out was applied for protein detection using GST (glutathione-S-transferase) and GST antibodies as a model system. Sensing was performed in the static deflection mode under constant flow conditions. The GST antibodies were directly immobilized on the cantilever gold surface by means of free thiol groups. The setup allowed simultaneous deflection measurements with sensor and control-antibody-immobilized reference cantilevers and enabled detection of 1 ng µl-1 (40 nM) of GST protein, which is similar to the sensitivity reported for cantilever sensors using an optical read-out system.

  4. Protein Classification Based on Analysis of Local Sequence-Structure Correspondence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zemla, A T

    2006-02-13

    The goal of this project was to develop an algorithm to detect and calculate common structural motifs in compared structures, and define a set of numerical criteria to be used for fully automated motif based protein structure classification. The Protein Data Bank (PDB) contains more than 33,000 experimentally solved protein structures, and the Structural Classification of Proteins (SCOP) database, a manual classification of these structures, cannot keep pace with the rapid growth of the PDB. In our approach called STRALCP (STRucture Alignment based Clustering of Proteins), we generate detailed information about global and local similarities between given set of structures, identify similar fragments that are conserved within analyzed proteins, and use these conserved regions (detected structural motifs) to classify proteins.

  5. BRET: NanoLuc-Based Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer Platform to Monitor Protein-Protein Interactions in Live Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Xiu-Lei; Fu, Haian

    2016-01-01

    Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) is a prominent biophysical technology for monitoring molecular interactions, and has been widely used to study protein-protein interactions (PPI) in live cells. This technology requires proteins of interest to be associated with an energy donor (i.e., luciferase) and an acceptor (e.g., fluorescent protein) molecule. Upon interaction of the proteins of interest, the donor and acceptor will be brought into close proximity and energy transfer of chemical reaction-induced luminescence to its corresponding acceptor will result in an increased emission at an acceptor-defined wavelength, generating the BRET signal. We leverage the advantages of the superior optical properties of the NanoLuc(®) luciferase (NLuc) as a BRET donor coupled with Venus, a yellow fluorescent protein, as acceptor. We term this NLuc-based BRET platform "BRET(n)". BRET(n) has been demonstrated to have significantly improved assay performance, compared to previous BRET technologies, in terms of sensitivity and scalability. This chapter describes a step-by-step practical protocol for developing a BRET(n) assay in a multi-well plate format to detect PPIs in live mammalian cells.

  6. PETs: A Stable and Accurate Predictor of Protein-Protein Interacting Sites Based on Extremely-Randomized Trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Bin; Zhang, Hong; Li, Qianmu; Li, Tao

    2015-12-01

    Protein-protein interaction (PPI) plays crucial roles in the performance of various biological processes. A variety of methods are dedicated to identify whether proteins have interaction residues, but it is often more crucial to recognize each amino acid. In practical applications, the stability of a prediction model is as important as its accuracy. However, random sampling, which is widely used in previous prediction models, often brings large difference between each training model. In this paper, a Predictor of protein-protein interaction sites based on Extremely-randomized Trees (PETs) is proposed to improve the prediction accuracy while maintaining the prediction stability. In PETs, a cluster-based sampling strategy is proposed to ensure the model stability: first, the training dataset is divided into subsets using specific features; second, the subsets are clustered using K-means; and finally the samples are selected from each cluster. Using the proposed sampling strategy, samples which have different types of significant features could be selected independently from different clusters. The evaluation shows that PETs is able to achieve better accuracy while maintaining a good stability. The source code and toolkit are available at https://github.com/BinXia/PETs.

  7. Symmetry based assembly of a 2 dimensional protein lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poulos, Sandra; Agah, Sayeh; Jallah, Nikardi; Faham, Salem; van Raaij, Mark J.

    2017-04-18

    The design of proteins that self-assemble into higher order architectures is of great interest due to their potential application in nanotechnology. Specifically, the self-assembly of proteins into ordered lattices is of special interest to the field of structural biology. Here we designed a 2 dimensional (2D) protein lattice using a fusion of a tandem repeat of three TelSAM domains (TTT) to the Ferric uptake regulator (FUR) domain. We determined the structure of the designed (TTT-FUR) fusion protein to 2.3 Å by X-ray crystallographic methods. In agreement with the design, a 2D lattice composed of TelSAM fibers interdigitated by the FUR domain was observed. As expected, the fusion of a tandem repeat of three TelSAM domains formed 21 screw axis, and the self-assembly of the ordered oligomer was under pH control. We demonstrated that the fusion of TTT to a domain having a 2-fold symmetry, such as the FUR domain, can produce an ordered 2D lattice. The TTT-FUR system combines features from the rotational symmetry matching approach with the oligomer driven crystallization method. This TTT-FUR fusion was amenable to X-ray crystallographic methods, and is a promising crystallization chaperone.

  8. Use of soy proteins in polyketone-based wood adhesives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamarneh, A.; Heeres, H. J.; Broekhuis, A. A.; Sjollema, K. A.; Zhang, Y.; Picchioni, F.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the preparation of aqueous emulsions consisting of soy proteins and chemically modified thermosetting aliphatic polyketones. Emulsions were prepared in a range of total solids contents and different addition protocols were tested. Room temperature stability and structure of the

  9. Symmetry based assembly of a 2 dimensional protein lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulos, Sandra; Agah, Sayeh; Jallah, Nikardi; Faham, Salem

    2017-01-01

    The design of proteins that self-assemble into higher order architectures is of great interest due to their potential application in nanotechnology. Specifically, the self-assembly of proteins into ordered lattices is of special interest to the field of structural biology. Here we designed a 2 dimensional (2D) protein lattice using a fusion of a tandem repeat of three TelSAM domains (TTT) to the Ferric uptake regulator (FUR) domain. We determined the structure of the designed (TTT-FUR) fusion protein to 2.3 Å by X-ray crystallographic methods. In agreement with the design, a 2D lattice composed of TelSAM fibers interdigitated by the FUR domain was observed. As expected, the fusion of a tandem repeat of three TelSAM domains formed 21 screw axis, and the self-assembly of the ordered oligomer was under pH control. We demonstrated that the fusion of TTT to a domain having a 2-fold symmetry, such as the FUR domain, can produce an ordered 2D lattice. The TTT-FUR system combines features from the rotational symmetry matching approach with the oligomer driven crystallization method. This TTT-FUR fusion was amenable to X-ray crystallographic methods, and is a promising crystallization chaperone.

  10. Methods and Approaches to Mass Spectroscopy Based Protein Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    This book chapter is a review of current mass spectrometers and the role in the field of proteomics. Various instruments are discussed and their strengths and weaknesses are highlighted. In addition, the methods of protein identification using a mass spectrometer are explained as well as data vali...

  11. Protein consensus-based surface engineering (ProCoS): a computer-assisted method for directed protein evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivange, Amol V; Hoeffken, Hans Wolfgang; Haefner, Stefan; Schwaneberg, Ulrich

    2016-12-01

    Protein consensus-based surface engineering (ProCoS) is a simple and efficient method for directed protein evolution combining computational analysis and molecular biology tools to engineer protein surfaces. ProCoS is based on the hypothesis that conserved residues originated from a common ancestor and that these residues are crucial for the function of a protein, whereas highly variable regions (situated on the surface of a protein) can be targeted for surface engineering to maximize performance. ProCoS comprises four main steps: (i) identification of conserved and highly variable regions; (ii) protein sequence design by substituting residues in the highly variable regions, and gene synthesis; (iii) in vitro DNA recombination of synthetic genes; and (iv) screening for active variants. ProCoS is a simple method for surface mutagenesis in which multiple sequence alignment is used for selection of surface residues based on a structural model. To demonstrate the technique's utility for directed evolution, the surface of a phytase enzyme from Yersinia mollaretii (Ymphytase) was subjected to ProCoS. Screening just 1050 clones from ProCoS engineering-guided mutant libraries yielded an enzyme with 34 amino acid substitutions. The surface-engineered Ymphytase exhibited 3.8-fold higher pH stability (at pH 2.8 for 3 h) and retained 40% of the enzyme's specific activity (400 U/mg) compared with the wild-type Ymphytase. The pH stability might be attributed to a significantly increased (20 percentage points; from 9% to 29%) number of negatively charged amino acids on the surface of the engineered phytase.

  12. Effects of Hydrolysed Whey Proteins on the Techno-Functional Characteristics of Whey Protein-Based Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Noller

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Pure whey protein isolate (WPI-based cast films are very brittle due to its strong formation of protein cross-linking of disulphide bonding, hydrogen bonding as well as hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. However, this strong cross-linking is the reason for its final barrier performance. To overcome film brittleness of whey protein layers, plasticisers like glycerol are used. It reduces intermolecular interactions, increases the mobility of polymer chains and thus film flexibility can be achieved. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of hydrolysed whey protein isolate (WPI in whey protein isolate-based cast films on their techno-functional properties. Due to the fact, that the addition of glycerol is necessary but at the same time increases the free volume in the film leading to higher oxygen and water vapour permeability, the glycerol concentration was kept constant. Cast films with different ratios of hydrolysed and not hydrolysed WPI were produced. They were characterised in order to determine the influence of the lower molecular weight caused by the addition of hydrolysed WPI on the techno-functional properties. This study showed that increasing hydrolysed WPI concentrations significantly change the mechanical properties while maintaining the oxygen and water vapour permeability. The tensile and elastic film properties decreased significantly by reducing the average molecular weight whereas the yellowish coloration and the surface tension considerably increased. This study provided new data which put researchers and material developers in a position to tailor the characteristics of whey protein based films according to their intended application and further processing.

  13. A 2-D graphical representation of protein sequences based on nucleotide triplet codons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Fenglan; Wang, Tianming

    2005-09-01

    Graphical representation of DNA provides a simple way of viewing, sorting and comparing various gene structures. A 2-D graphical representation of protein sequences based on nucleotide triplet codons has been derived for similarity analysis of protein sequences. This approach is based on a graphical representation of triplets of DNA in which the interior of the left half plane of the complex plane is used to accommodate 64 sites for the 64 codons. We associate a directed curve, numerical value, or matrix with a protein as a descriptor. The approach is illustrated on the Homo sapiens X-linked nuclear protein (ATRX) gene.

  14. A Statistical Analysis of Protein-Protein Interaction with Knowledge-Based Potential at Residue Level

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林巍; 孙飞; 饶子和

    2003-01-01

    Protein-protein recognition is an important step in biological processes, which still largely remains elusive.The inter-residue contact potential, CPij, describes the propensity of contact between two types of residue.In this study, several different CPij variants were examined with the objective of discriminating the binding potential of surface pairs.Using solvent mediated inter-molecule contact potential (SM-IMCPij), an evaluation model was deduced and tested.Using the evaluation model it was found that the SM-IMCPij gives a better performance than either residue mediated IMCPij(RM-IMCPij) or folding-residue contact potential (FCPij).The results suggest that the evaluation model provides a fast, effective, and discriminative method for the evaluation of proposed binding interfaces.

  15. In silico identification of essential proteins in Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis based on protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folador, Edson Luiz; de Carvalho, Paulo Vinícius Sanches Daltro; Silva, Wanderson Marques

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis (Cp) is a gram-positive bacterium that is classified into equi and ovis serovars. The serovar ovis is the etiological agent of caseous lymphadenitis, a chronic infection affecting sheep and goats, causing economic losses due to carcass condemnation...... of the potential Cp interactome and to identify potentially essential proteins serving as putative drug targets. On average, we predict 16,669 interactions for each of the nine strains (with 15,495 interactions shared among all strains). An in silico sanity check suggests that the potential networks were...... not formed by spurious interactions but have a strong biological bias. With the inferred Cp networks we identify 181 essential proteins, among which 41 are non-host homologous. CONCLUSIONS: The list of candidate interactions of the Cp strains lay the basis for developing novel hypotheses and designing...

  16. DBD-Hunter: a knowledge-based method for the prediction of DNA-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Mu; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2008-07-01

    The structures of DNA-protein complexes have illuminated the diversity of DNA-protein binding mechanisms shown by different protein families. This lack of generality could pose a great challenge for predicting DNA-protein interactions. To address this issue, we have developed a knowledge-based method, DNA-binding Domain Hunter (DBD-Hunter), for identifying DNA-binding proteins and associated binding sites. The method combines structural comparison and the evaluation of a statistical potential, which we derive to describe interactions between DNA base pairs and protein residues. We demonstrate that DBD-Hunter is an accurate method for predicting DNA-binding function of proteins, and that DNA-binding protein residues can be reliably inferred from the corresponding templates if identified. In benchmark tests on approximately 4000 proteins, our method achieved an accuracy of 98% and a precision of 84%, which significantly outperforms three previous methods. We further validate the method on DNA-binding protein structures determined in DNA-free (apo) state. We show that the accuracy of our method is only slightly affected on apo-structures compared to the performance on holo-structures cocrystallized with DNA. Finally, we apply the method to approximately 1700 structural genomics targets and predict that 37 targets with previously unknown function are likely to be DNA-binding proteins. DBD-Hunter is freely available at http://cssb.biology.gatech.edu/skolnick/webservice/DBD-Hunter/.

  17. Structural Protein-based Flexible Whispering Gallery Mode Resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Yilmaz, Huzeyfe; Shreiner, Robert; Szwejkowski, Chester J; Jung, Huihun; Hopkins, Patrick; Ozdemir, Sahin Kaya; Yang, Lan; Demirel, Melik C

    2016-01-01

    Nature provides a set of solutions for photonic structures that are finely tuned, organically diverse and optically efficient. Exquisite knowledge of structure-property relationships in proteins aids in the design of materials with desired properties for building devices with novel functionalities, which are difficult to achieve or previously unattainable. Recent bio-inspired photonic platforms made from proteinaceous materials lay the groundwork for many functional device applications, such as electroluminescence in peptide nucleic acids1, multiphoton absorption in amyloid fibers2 and silk waveguides and inverse opals3-5. Here we report whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) microresonators fabricated entirely from semi-crystalline structural proteins (i.e., squid ring teeth, SRT, from Loligo vulgaris and its recombinant, and silk from Bombyx mori) with unconventional thermo-optic response. We present a striking example of how small modifications at the molecular level lead to structural changes and alter macroscopic...

  18. Structure-based prediction of protein-folding transition paths

    CERN Document Server

    Jacobs, William M

    2016-01-01

    We propose a general theory to describe the distribution of protein-folding transition paths. We show that transition paths follow a predictable sequence of high-free-energy transient states that are separated by free-energy barriers. Each transient state corresponds to the assembly of one or more discrete, cooperative units, which are determined directly from the native structure. We show that the transition state on a folding pathway is reached when a small number of critical contacts are formed between a specific set of substructures, after which folding proceeds downhill in free energy. This approach suggests a natural resolution for distinguishing parallel folding pathways and provides a simple means to predict the rate-limiting step in a folding reaction. Our theory identifies a common folding mechanism for proteins with diverse native structures and establishes general principles for the self-assembly of polymers with specific interactions.

  19. Adaptive Simulated Annealing Based Protein Loop Modeling of Neurotoxins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈杰; 黄丽娜; 彭志红

    2003-01-01

    A loop modeling method, adaptive simulated annealing, for ab initio prediction of protein loop structures, as an optimization problem of searching the global minimum of a given energy function, is proposed. An interface-friendly toolbox-LoopModeller in Windows and Linux systems, VC++ and OpenGL environments is developed for analysis and visualization. Simulation results of three short-chain neurotoxins modeled by LoopModeller show that the method proposed is fast and efficient.

  20. Malaria vaccine based on Self-Assembling Protein Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Burkhard, Peter; David E Lanar

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent progress with GSK’s RTS’S malaria vaccine, there remains a desperate need for an efficient malaria vaccine. We have used a repetitive antigen display technology to display malaria specific B cell and T cell epitopes in an effort to design a vaccine against Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Our protein sequence when assembled into a nanoparticle induces strong, long-lived and protective immune responses against infection with the parasite. We are confident that the clinical trials ...

  1. Phylogeny reconstruction based on protein phylogenetic profiles of organisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    With the coming of the Post Genomic Era, more and more genomes have been sequenced and it has become possible to study phylogeny reconstruction at genome level. The concept of protein phylogenetic profiles of organisms is defined in this work which is used in phylogeny reconstruction by proteome comparisons. This method is more stable than the prevailing molecular systematics methods and can be used widely. It will develop very fast with the rapid progress in genome sequencing.

  2. Malaria vaccine based on Self-Assembling Protein Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Burkhard, Peter; Lanar, David E.

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent progress with GSK’s RTS’S malaria vaccine, there remains a desperate need for an efficient malaria vaccine. We have used a repetitive antigen display technology to display malaria specific B cell and T cell epitopes in an effort to design a vaccine against Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Our protein sequence when assembled into a nanoparticle induces strong, long-lived and protective immune responses against infection with the parasite. We are confident that the clinical trials ...

  3. SCOWLP update: 3D classification of protein-protein, -peptide, -saccharide and -nucleic acid interactions, and structure-based binding inferences across folds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schreiber Sven

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein interactions are essential for coordinating cellular functions. Proteomic studies have already elucidated a huge amount of protein-protein interactions that require detailed functional analysis. Understanding the structural basis of each individual interaction through their structural determination is necessary, yet an unfeasible task. Therefore, computational tools able to predict protein binding regions and recognition modes are required to rationalize putative molecular functions for proteins. With this aim, we previously created SCOWLP, a structural classification of protein binding regions at protein family level, based on the information obtained from high-resolution 3D protein-protein and protein-peptide complexes. Description We present here a new version of SCOWLP that has been enhanced by the inclusion of protein-nucleic acid and protein-saccharide interactions. SCOWLP takes interfacial solvent into account for a detailed characterization of protein interactions. In addition, the binding regions obtained per protein family have been enriched by the inclusion of predicted binding regions, which have been inferred from structurally related proteins across all existing folds. These inferences might become very useful to suggest novel recognition regions and compare structurally similar interfaces from different families. Conclusions The updated SCOWLP has new functionalities that allow both, detection and comparison of protein regions recognizing different types of ligands, which include other proteins, peptides, nucleic acids and saccharides, within a solvated environment. Currently, SCOWLP allows the analysis of predicted protein binding regions based on structure-based inferences across fold space. These predictions may have a unique potential in assisting protein docking, in providing insights into protein interaction networks, and in guiding rational engineering of protein ligands. The newly designed

  4. A new computational strategy for identifying essential proteins based on network topological properties and biological information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Chao; Sun, Yongqi; Dong, Yadong

    2017-01-01

    Essential proteins are the proteins that are indispensable to the survival and development of an organism. Deleting a single essential protein will cause lethality or infertility. Identifying and analysing essential proteins are key to understanding the molecular mechanisms of living cells. There are two types of methods for predicting essential proteins: experimental methods, which require considerable time and resources, and computational methods, which overcome the shortcomings of experimental methods. However, the prediction accuracy of computational methods for essential proteins requires further improvement. In this paper, we propose a new computational strategy named CoTB for identifying essential proteins based on a combination of topological properties, subcellular localization information and orthologous protein information. First, we introduce several topological properties of the protein-protein interaction (PPI) network. Second, we propose new methods for measuring orthologous information and subcellular localization and a new computational strategy that uses a random forest prediction model to obtain a probability score for the proteins being essential. Finally, we conduct experiments on four different Saccharomyces cerevisiae datasets. The experimental results demonstrate that our strategy for identifying essential proteins outperforms traditional computational methods and the most recently developed method, SON. In particular, our strategy improves the prediction accuracy to 89, 78, 79, and 85 percent on the YDIP, YMIPS, YMBD and YHQ datasets at the top 100 level, respectively.

  5. ZifBASE: a database of zinc finger proteins and associated resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Punetha Ankita

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Information on the occurrence of zinc finger protein motifs in genomes is crucial to the developing field of molecular genome engineering. The knowledge of their target DNA-binding sequences is vital to develop chimeric proteins for targeted genome engineering and site-specific gene correction. There is a need to develop a computational resource of zinc finger proteins (ZFP to identify the potential binding sites and its location, which reduce the time of in vivo task, and overcome the difficulties in selecting the specific type of zinc finger protein and the target site in the DNA sequence. Description ZifBASE provides an extensive collection of various natural and engineered ZFP. It uses standard names and a genetic and structural classification scheme to present data retrieved from UniProtKB, GenBank, Protein Data Bank, ModBase, Protein Model Portal and the literature. It also incorporates specialized features of ZFP including finger sequences and positions, number of fingers, physiochemical properties, classes, framework, PubMed citations with links to experimental structures (PDB, if available and modeled structures of natural zinc finger proteins. ZifBASE provides information on zinc finger proteins (both natural and engineered ones, the number of finger units in each of the zinc finger proteins (with multiple fingers, the synergy between the adjacent fingers and their positions. Additionally, it gives the individual finger sequence and their target DNA site to which it binds for better and clear understanding on the interactions of adjacent fingers. The current version of ZifBASE contains 139 entries of which 89 are engineered ZFPs, containing 3-7F totaling to 296 fingers. There are 50 natural zinc finger protein entries ranging from 2-13F, totaling to 307 fingers. It has sequences and structures from literature, Protein Data Bank, ModBase and Protein Model Portal. The interface is cross linked to other public

  6. Construction and analysis of the protein-protein interaction networks based on gene expression profiles of Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hindol Rakshit

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Parkinson's Disease (PD is one of the most prevailing neurodegenerative diseases. Improving diagnoses and treatments of this disease is essential, as currently there exists no cure for this disease. Microarray and proteomics data have revealed abnormal expression of several genes and proteins responsible for PD. Nevertheless, few studies have been reported involving PD-specific protein-protein interactions. RESULTS: Microarray based gene expression data and protein-protein interaction (PPI databases were combined to construct the PPI networks of differentially expressed (DE genes in post mortem brain tissue samples of patients with Parkinson's disease. Samples were collected from the substantia nigra and the frontal cerebral cortex. From the microarray data, two sets of DE genes were selected by 2-tailed t-tests and Significance Analysis of Microarrays (SAM, run separately to construct two Query-Query PPI (QQPPI networks. Several topological properties of these networks were studied. Nodes with High Connectivity (hubs and High Betweenness Low Connectivity (bottlenecks were identified to be the most significant nodes of the networks. Three and four-cliques were identified in the QQPPI networks. These cliques contain most of the topologically significant nodes of the networks which form core functional modules consisting of tightly knitted sub-networks. Hitherto unreported 37 PD disease markers were identified based on their topological significance in the networks. Of these 37 markers, eight were significantly involved in the core functional modules and showed significant change in co-expression levels. Four (ARRB2, STX1A, TFRC and MARCKS out of the 37 markers were found to be associated with several neurotransmitters including dopamine. CONCLUSION: This study represents a novel investigation of the PPI networks for PD, a complex disease. 37 proteins identified in our study can be considered as PD network biomarkers. These network

  7. Dictionary and Gene Ontology Based Similarity for Named Entity Relationship Protein-protein Interaction Prediction from Biotext Corpus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smt K. Prabavathy

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Protein-protein interactions functions as a significant key role in several biological systems. These involves in complex formation and many pathways which are used to perform biological processes. By accurate identification of the set of interacting proteins can get rid of new light on the functional role of various proteins in the complex surroundings of the cell. The ability to construct biologically consequential gene networks and identification of the exact relationship in the gene network is critical for present-day systems biology. In earlier research, the power of presented gene modules to shed light on the functioning of complex biological systems is studied. Most of modules in these networks have shown small link with meaningful biological function, because these methods doesn’t exactly calculate the semantic relationship between the entities. In order to overcome these problems and improve the PPI results in the biotext corpus a new method is proposed in this research. The proposed method which directly incorporates Gene Ontology (GO annotation in construction of gene modules and Dictionary-based text is proposed to extract biotext information. Dictionary-Based Text and Gene Ontology (DBTGO approach that integrates with various gene-gene pairwise similarity values, protein-protein interaction relationship obtained from gene expression, in order to gain better biotext information retrieval result. A result analysis has been carried out on Biotext Project at UC Berkley. Testing the DBTGO algorithm indicates that it is able to improve PPI relationship identification result with all previously suggested methods in terms of the precision, recall, F measure and Normalized Discounted Cumulative Gain (NDCG. The proposed DBTGO algorithm can facilitate comprehensive and in-depth analysis of high throughput experimental data at the gene network level.

  8. Intimate evolution of proteins. Proteome atomic content correlates with genome base composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudouin-Cornu, Peggy; Schuerer, Katja; Marlière, Philippe; Thomas, Dominique

    2004-02-13

    Discerning the significant relations that exist within and among genome sequences is a major step toward the modeling of biopolymer evolution. Here we report the systematic analysis of the atomic composition of proteins encoded by organisms representative of each kingdoms. Protein atomic contents are shown to vary largely among species, the larger variations being observed for the main architectural component of proteins, the carbon atom. These variations apply to the bulk proteins as well as to subsets of ortholog proteins. A pronounced correlation between proteome carbon content and genome base composition is further evidenced, with high G+C genome content being related to low protein carbon content. The generation of random proteomes and the examination of the canonical genetic code provide arguments for the hypothesis that natural selection might have driven genome base composition.

  9. Efficient fold-change detection based on protein-protein interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Buijsman, Wouter

    2012-01-01

    Various biological sensory systems exhibit a response to the relative change of the stimulus, often reffered to as fold-change detection. Here, we present a mechanism consisting of two interacting proteins, able to detect a fold-change effectively. This mechanism, in contrast to other proposed mechanisms, does not consume chemical energy and is not subject to transcriptional and translational noise. We show by analytical and numerical calculations that the mechanism can have a fast, precise and efficient response for parameters that are relevant to eukaryotic cells.

  10. Searching for the Best Protein Crystals: Synchrotron Based Measurements of Protein Crystal Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgstahl, Gloria; Snell, Edward H.; Bellamy, Henry; Pangborn, Walter; Nelson, Chris; Arvai, Andy; Ohren, Jeff; Pokross, Matt

    1999-01-01

    We are developing X-ray diffraction methods to quantitatively evaluate the quality of protein crystals. The ultimate use for these crystal quality will be to optimize crystal growth and freezing conditions to obtain the best diffraction data. We have combined super fine-phi slicing with highly monochromatic, low divergence synchrotron radiation and the ADSC Quantum 4 CCD detector at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation laboratory beamline 1.5 to accurately measure crystal mosaicity. Comparisons of microgravity versus earth-grown insulin crystals using these methods will be presented.

  11. MAS C-Terminal Tail Interacting Proteins Identified by Mass Spectrometry- Based Proteomic Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirupula, Kalyan C; Zhang, Dongmei; Osbourne, Appledene; Chatterjee, Arunachal; Desnoyer, Russ; Willard, Belinda; Karnik, Sadashiva S

    2015-01-01

    Propagation of signals from G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in cells is primarily mediated by protein-protein interactions. MAS is a GPCR that was initially discovered as an oncogene and is now known to play an important role in cardiovascular physiology. Current literature suggests that MAS interacts with common heterotrimeric G-proteins, but MAS interaction with proteins which might mediate G protein-independent or atypical signaling is unknown. In this study we hypothesized that MAS C-terminal tail (Ct) is a major determinant of receptor-scaffold protein interactions mediating MAS signaling. Mass-spectrometry based proteomic analysis was used to comprehensively identify the proteins that interact with MAS Ct comprising the PDZ-binding motif (PDZ-BM). We identified both PDZ and non-PDZ proteins from human embryonic kidney cell line, mouse atrial cardiomyocyte cell line and human heart tissue to interact specifically with MAS Ct. For the first time our study provides a panel of PDZ and other proteins that potentially interact with MAS with high significance. A 'cardiac-specific finger print' of MAS interacting PDZ proteins was identified which includes DLG1, MAGI1 and SNTA. Cell based experiments with wild-type and mutant MAS lacking the PDZ-BM validated MAS interaction with PDZ proteins DLG1 and TJP2. Bioinformatics analysis suggested well-known multi-protein scaffold complexes involved in nitric oxide signaling (NOS), cell-cell signaling of neuromuscular junctions, synapses and epithelial cells. Majority of these protein hits were predicted to be part of disease categories comprising cancers and malignant tumors. We propose a 'MAS-signalosome' model to stimulate further research in understanding the molecular mechanism of MAS function. Identifying hierarchy of interactions of 'signalosome' components with MAS will be a necessary step in future to fully understand the physiological and pathological functions of this enigmatic receptor.

  12. Knowledge base and neural network approach for protein secondary structure prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Maulika S; Mazumdar, Himanshu S

    2014-11-21

    Protein structure prediction is of great relevance given the abundant genomic and proteomic data generated by the genome sequencing projects. Protein secondary structure prediction is addressed as a sub task in determining the protein tertiary structure and function. In this paper, a novel algorithm, KB-PROSSP-NN, which is a combination of knowledge base and modeling of the exceptions in the knowledge base using neural networks for protein secondary structure prediction (PSSP), is proposed. The knowledge base is derived from a proteomic sequence-structure database and consists of the statistics of association between the 5-residue words and corresponding secondary structure. The predicted results obtained using knowledge base are refined with a Backpropogation neural network algorithm. Neural net models the exceptions of the knowledge base. The Q3 accuracy of 90% and 82% is achieved on the RS126 and CB396 test sets respectively which suggest improvement over existing state of art methods.

  13. Malaria vaccine based on self-assembling protein nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhard, Peter; Lanar, David E

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent progress with GSK's RTS,S malaria vaccine, there remains a desperate need for an efficient malaria vaccine. We have used a repetitive antigen display technology to display malaria specific B cell and T cell epitopes in an effort to design a vaccine against Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Our protein sequence when assembled into a nanoparticle induces strong, long-lived and protective immune responses against infection with the parasite. We are confident that the clinical trials with our most developed vaccine candidate will show good protection in a controlled human malaria infection trial.

  14. Modifying the DPClus algorithm for identifying protein complexes based on new topological structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Jian-xin

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identification of protein complexes is crucial for understanding principles of cellular organization and functions. As the size of protein-protein interaction set increases, a general trend is to represent the interactions as a network and to develop effective algorithms to detect significant complexes in such networks. Results Based on the study of known complexes in protein networks, this paper proposes a new topological structure for protein complexes, which is a combination of subgraph diameter (or average vertex distance and subgraph density. Following the approach of that of the previously proposed clustering algorithm DPClus which expands clusters starting from seeded vertices, we present a clustering algorithm IPCA based on the new topological structure for identifying complexes in large protein interaction networks. The algorithm IPCA is applied to the protein interaction network of Sacchromyces cerevisiae and identifies many well known complexes. Experimental results show that the algorithm IPCA recalls more known complexes than previously proposed clustering algorithms, including DPClus, CFinder, LCMA, MCODE, RNSC and STM. Conclusion The proposed algorithm based on the new topological structure makes it possible to identify dense subgraphs in protein interaction networks, many of which correspond to known protein complexes. The algorithm is robust to the known high rate of false positives and false negatives in data from high-throughout interaction techniques. The program is available at http://netlab.csu.edu.cn/bioinformatics/limin/IPCA.

  15. Extrusion foaming of protein-based thermoplastic and polyethylene blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavin, Chanelle; Lay, Mark C.; Verbeek, Casparus J. R.

    2016-03-01

    Currently the extrusion foamability of Novatein® Thermoplastic Protein (NTP) is being investigated at the University of Waikato in collaboration with the Biopolymer Network Ltd (NZ). NTP has been developed from bloodmeal (>86 wt% protein), a co-product of the meat industry, by adding denaturants and plasticisers (tri-ethylene glycol and water) allowing it to be extruded and injection moulded. NTP alone does not readily foam when sodium bicarbonate is used as a chemical blowing agent as its extensional viscosity is too high. The thermoplastic properties of NTP were modified by blending it with different weight fractions of linear low density polyethylene (LLDPE) and polyethylene grafted maleic anhydride (PE-g-MAH) compatibiliser. Extrusion foaming was conducted in two ways, firstly using the existing water content in the material as the blowing agent and secondly by adding sodium bicarbonate. When processed in a twin screw extruder (L/D 25 and 10 mm die) the material readily expanded due to the internal moisture content alone, with a conditioned expansion ratio of up to ± 0.13. Cell structure was non-uniform exhibiting a broad range cell sizes at various stages of formation with some coalescence. The cell size reduced through the addition of sodium bicarbonate, overall more cells were observed and the structure was more uniform, however ruptured cells were also visible on the extrudate skin. Increasing die temperature and introducing water cooling reduced cell size, but the increased die temperature resulted in surface degradation.

  16. Development and evaluation of two truncated recombinant NP antigen-based indirect ELISAs for detection of bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 antibodies in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yong; Wang, Feng-Xue; Sun, Na; Cao, Li; Zhang, Shu-Qin; Zhu, Hong-Wei; Guo, Li; Cheng, Shi-Peng; Wen, Yong-Jun

    2015-09-15

    Bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 (BPIV3) is one of the most important viral respiratory pathogens in both young and adult cattle. Nucleocapsid protein (NP) is the most abundant viral protein and the main regulator of virus replication and transcription. In this study, amino acid sequence data of BPIV3 NP was used to identify potential linear epitopic regions, which were subsequently used to design truncated recombinant NP antigens. The amino-terminal region (aa 9-157, NP-N) and the carboxy-terminal region (aa 391-500, NP-C) were selected, and these two truncated recombinant BPIV3 NP proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli based on the results of prediction studies. Furthermore, Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assays (ELISAs) were established using the truncated recombinant BPIV3-N proteins as antigens, and 154 clinical samples were used to evaluate the newly established ELISA systems in comparison with a virus neutralisation test (VNT) as a reference. The results showed that a high coincidence rate was observed for the data that were obtained by the two methods. The sensitivity of NP-N ELISA and NP-C ELISA were 98.4% and 94.6%, respectively, and the specificity of both ELISAs was 100% with reference to the VNTs. Our data indicated that both ends of NP have high immunogenicity during BPIV3 infection and that they were good targets for serodiagnosis. The ELISAs based on the two truncated proteins were especially suitable for use in large-scale epidemiological investigations.

  17. Isoelectric Point, Electric Charge, and Nomenclature of the Acid-Base Residues of Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Andres A.; Ribeiro, Joao M.; Sillero, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    The main object of this work is to present the pedagogical usefulness of the theoretical methods, developed in this laboratory, for the determination of the isoelectric point (pI) and the net electric charge of proteins together with some comments on the naming of the acid-base residues of proteins. (Contains 8 figures and 4 tables.)

  18. Identification of cardiac myofilament protein isoforms using multiple mass spectrometry based approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooij, V.; Venkatraman, V.; Kirk, J.A.; Ubaida-Mohien, C.; Graham, D.R.; Faber, M.J.; Eyk, J.E. Van

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: The identification of protein isoforms in complex biological samples is challenging. We, therefore, used an MS approach to unambiguously identify cardiac myofilament protein isoforms based on the observation of a tryptic peptide consisting of a sequence unique to a particular isoform. EXPER

  19. A bioinformatics-based overview of protein Lys-Ne-acetylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Among posttranslational modifications, there are some conceptual similarities between Lys-N'-acetylation and Ser/Thr/Tyr O-phosphorylation. Herein we present a bioinformatics-based overview of reversible protein Lys-acetylation, including some comparisons with reversible protein phosphorylation. T...

  20. SYNTHESIS OF PROTEINS BY NATIVE CHEMICAL LIGATION USING FMOC-BASED CHEMISTRY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camarero, J A; Mitchell, A R

    2005-01-20

    C-terminal peptide {alpha}-thioesters are valuable intermediates in the synthesis/semisynthesis of proteins by native chemical ligation. They are prepared either by solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) or biosynthetically by protein splicing techniques. The present paper reviews the different methods available for the chemical synthesis of peptide {alpha}-thioesters using Fmoc-based SPPS.

  1. Refinement of homology-based protein structures by molecular dynamics simulation techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fan, H; Mark, AE

    2004-01-01

    The use of classical molecular dynamics simulations, performed in explicit water, for the refinement of structural models of proteins generated ab initio or based on homology has been investigated. The study involved a test set of 15 proteins that were previously used by Baker and coworkers to asses

  2. Isoelectric Point, Electric Charge, and Nomenclature of the Acid-Base Residues of Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Andres A.; Ribeiro, Joao M.; Sillero, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    The main object of this work is to present the pedagogical usefulness of the theoretical methods, developed in this laboratory, for the determination of the isoelectric point (pI) and the net electric charge of proteins together with some comments on the naming of the acid-base residues of proteins. (Contains 8 figures and 4 tables.)

  3. X-ray repair cross complementing protein 1 in base excision repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanssen-Bauer, Audun; Solvang-Garten, Karin; Akbari, Mansour;

    2012-01-01

    X-ray Repair Cross Complementing protein 1 (XRCC1) acts as a scaffolding protein in the converging base excision repair (BER) and single strand break repair (SSBR) pathways. XRCC1 also interacts with itself and rapidly accumulates at sites of DNA damage. XRCC1 can thus mediate the assembly of large...

  4. The interaction of platinum-based drugs with native biologically relevant proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brauckmann, Christine; Wehe, Christoph A.; Kieshauer, Michael; Lanvers-Kaminsky, Claudia; Sperling, Michael; Karst, Uwe

    2013-01-01

    This study focuses on the identification of the products that are formed upon binding of therapeutically relevant platinum complexes to proteins like beta-lactoglobulin A (LGA), human serum albumin (HSA), or human hemoglobin (HB). The respective proteins were incubated with the platinum-based antica

  5. A new method for predicting essential proteins based on dynamic network topology and complex information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jiawei; Kuang, Ling

    2014-10-01

    Predicting essential proteins is highly significant because organisms can not survive or develop even if only one of these proteins is missing. Improvements in high-throughput technologies have resulted in a large number of available protein-protein interactions. By taking advantage of these interaction data, researchers have proposed many computational methods to identify essential proteins at the network level. Most of these approaches focus on the topology of a static protein interaction network. However, the protein interaction network changes with time and condition. This important inherent dynamics of the protein interaction network is overlooked by previous methods. In this paper, we introduce a new method named CDLC to predict essential proteins by integrating dynamic local average connectivity and in-degree of proteins in complexes. CDLC is applied to the protein interaction network of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The results show that CDLC outperforms five other methods (Degree Centrality (DC), Local Average Connectivity-based method (LAC), Sum of ECC (SoECC), PeC and Co-Expression Weighted by Clustering coefficient (CoEWC)). In particular, CDLC could improve the prediction precision by more than 45% compared with DC methods. CDLC is also compared with the latest algorithm CEPPK, and a higher precision is achieved by CDLC. CDLC is available as Supplementary materials. The default settings of active threshold and alpha-parameter are 0.8 and 0.1, respectively.

  6. A protein block based fold recognition method for the annotation of twilight zone sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, V; Ganesan, K; Parthasarathy, S

    2013-03-01

    The description of protein backbone was recently improved with a group of structural fragments called Structural Alphabets instead of the regular three states (Helix, Sheet and Coil) secondary structure description. Protein Blocks is one of the Structural Alphabets used to describe each and every region of protein backbone including the coil. According to de Brevern (2000) the Protein Blocks has 16 structural fragments and each one has 5 residues in length. Protein Blocks fragments are highly informative among the available Structural Alphabets and it has been used for many applications. Here, we present a protein fold recognition method based on Protein Blocks for the annotation of twilight zone sequences. In our method, we align the predicted Protein Blocks of a query amino acid sequence with a library of assigned Protein Blocks of 953 known folds using the local pair-wise alignment. The alignment results with z-value ≥ 2.5 and P-value ≤ 0.08 are predicted as possible folds. Our method is able to recognize the possible folds for nearly 35.5% of the twilight zone sequences with their predicted Protein Block sequence obtained by pb_prediction, which is available at Protein Block Export server.

  7. Recurring sequence-structure motifs in (βα)8-barrel proteins and experimental optimization of a chimeric protein designed based on such motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jichao; Zhang, Tongchuan; Liu, Ruicun; Song, Meilin; Wang, Juncheng; Hong, Jiong; Chen, Quan; Liu, Haiyan

    2017-02-01

    An interesting way of generating novel artificial proteins is to combine sequence motifs from natural proteins, mimicking the evolutionary path suggested by natural proteins comprising recurring motifs. We analyzed the βα and αβ modules of TIM barrel proteins by structure alignment-based sequence clustering. A number of preferred motifs were identified. A chimeric TIM was designed by using recurring elements as mutually compatible interfaces. The foldability of the designed TIM protein was then significantly improved by six rounds of directed evolution. The melting temperature has been improved by more than 20°C. A variety of characteristics suggested that the resulting protein is well-folded. Our analysis provided a library of peptide motifs that is potentially useful for different protein engineering studies. The protein engineering strategy of using recurring motifs as interfaces to connect partial natural proteins may be applied to other protein folds. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Protein value of cereals and cereal by-products for ruminants: a comparison between crude protein and protein-based estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Javier; Mouhbi, Rabiaa; Guevara-González, Jesús Alberto; Rodríguez, Carlos Alberto; Arroyo, José María

    2015-01-01

    In situ estimates of ruminal undegraded fraction (RU) and effective intestinal digestibility (EID, corrected for microbial colonisation) of dry matter (DM), crude protein (CP) and total analysed amino acids (TAA) of rye, wheat and corn grains, wheat bran, wheat and barley distillers' dried grains with solubles (DDGS) and corn gluten feed were measured on three rumen and duodenum cannulated wethers using (15)N labelling techniques and considering ruminal rates of particle comminution (kc) and outflow. Results indicate that not considering kc and microbial colonisation led to considerable overestimations of RU which increased with feed ruminal degradation. Microbial colonisation may be also associated with overestimations of EID, whose estimates for DM, CP and TAA were predicted from parameters related with the ruminal escape of intestinally indigestible materials. The RU estimates were higher for TAA than for CP in grains, but the opposite was observed in by-products, whereas EID estimates were higher for TAA in all feeds. To obtain accurate protein values in these feedstuffs, it is required to consider both kc and ruminal microbial colonisation. The CP-based results underestimate the intestinally digested protein in grains and the opposite is evidenced in cereal by-products. Microbial protein synthesised in the rumen is largely the major fraction of the feedstuff protein value with the exception of DDGS.

  9. A hybrid approach to protein differential expression in mass spectrometry-based proteomics

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, X.

    2012-04-19

    MOTIVATION: Quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics involves statistical inference on protein abundance, based on the intensities of each protein\\'s associated spectral peaks. However, typical MS-based proteomics datasets have substantial proportions of missing observations, due at least in part to censoring of low intensities. This complicates intensity-based differential expression analysis. RESULTS: We outline a statistical method for protein differential expression, based on a simple Binomial likelihood. By modeling peak intensities as binary, in terms of \\'presence/absence,\\' we enable the selection of proteins not typically amenable to quantitative analysis; e.g. \\'one-state\\' proteins that are present in one condition but absent in another. In addition, we present an analysis protocol that combines quantitative and presence/absence analysis of a given dataset in a principled way, resulting in a single list of selected proteins with a single-associated false discovery rate. AVAILABILITY: All R code available here: http://www.stat.tamu.edu/~adabney/share/xuan_code.zip.

  10. A pairwise residue contact area-based mean force potential for discrimination of native protein structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pezeshk Hamid

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Considering energy function to detect a correct protein fold from incorrect ones is very important for protein structure prediction and protein folding. Knowledge-based mean force potentials are certainly the most popular type of interaction function for protein threading. They are derived from statistical analyses of interacting groups in experimentally determined protein structures. These potentials are developed at the atom or the amino acid level. Based on orientation dependent contact area, a new type of knowledge-based mean force potential has been developed. Results We developed a new approach to calculate a knowledge-based potential of mean-force, using pairwise residue contact area. To test the performance of our approach, we performed it on several decoy sets to measure its ability to discriminate native structure from decoys. This potential has been able to distinguish native structures from the decoys in the most cases. Further, the calculated Z-scores were quite high for all protein datasets. Conclusions This knowledge-based potential of mean force can be used in protein structure prediction, fold recognition, comparative modelling and molecular recognition. The program is available at http://www.bioinf.cs.ipm.ac.ir/softwares/surfield

  11. CRISPR/Cas9-based genome editing for simultaneous interference with gene expression and protein stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez, Virginia; Lauritsen, Ida; Hobel, Tonja

    2017-01-01

    Interference with genes is the foundation of reverse genetics and is key to manipulation of living cells for biomedical and biotechnological applications. However, classical genetic knockout and transcriptional knockdown technologies have different drawbacks and offer no control over existing...... protein levels. Here, we describe an efficient genome editing approach that affects specific protein abundances by changing the rates of both RNA synthesis and protein degradation, based on the two cross-kingdom control mechanisms CRISPRi and the N-end rule for protein stability. In addition, our approach...

  12. Prediction and Classification of Human G-protein Coupled Receptors Based on Support Vector Machines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun-Fei Wang; Huan Chen; Yan-Hong Zhou

    2005-01-01

    A computational system for the prediction and classification of human G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) has been developed based on the support vector machine (SVM) method and protein sequence information. The feature vectors used to develop the SVM prediction models consist of statistically significant features selected from single amino acid, dipeptide, and tripeptide compositions of protein sequences. Furthermore, the length distribution difference between GPCRsand non-GPCRs has also been exploited to improve the prediction performance.The testing results with annotated human protein sequences demonstrate that this system can get good performance for both prediction and classification of human GPCRs.

  13. A novel protein complex identification algorithm based on Connected Affinity Clique Extension (CACE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng; He, Tingting; Hu, Xiaohua; Zhao, Junmin; Shen, Xianjun; Zhang, Ming; Wang, Yan

    2014-06-01

    A novel algorithm based on Connected Affinity Clique Extension (CACE) for mining overlapping functional modules in protein interaction network is proposed in this paper. In this approach, the value of protein connected affinity which is inferred from protein complexes is interpreted as the reliability and possibility of interaction. The protein interaction network is constructed as a weighted graph, and the weight is dependent on the connected affinity coefficient. The experimental results of our CACE in two test data sets show that the CACE can detect the functional modules much more effectively and accurately when compared with other state-of-art algorithms CPM and IPC-MCE.

  14. Meals based on vegetable protein sources (beans and peas) are more satiating than meals based on animal protein sources (veal and pork) - a randomized cross-over meal test study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Marlene Dahlwad; Bendsen, Nathalie Tommerup; Christensen, Sheena M

    2016-01-01

    on appetite regulation. OBJECTIVE: To examine whether meals based on vegetable protein sources (beans/peas) are comparable to meals based on animal protein sources (veal/pork) regarding meal-induced appetite sensations. DESIGN: In total, 43 healthy, normal-weight, young men completed this randomized, double......-blind, placebo-controlled, three-way, cross-over meal test. The meals (all 3.5 MJ, 28 energy-% (E%) fat) were either high protein based on veal and pork meat, HP-Meat (19 E% protein, 53 E% carbohydrate, 6 g fiber/100 g); high protein based on legumes (beans and peas), HP-Legume (19 E% protein, 53 E% carbohydrate...

  15. TCP: a tool for designing chimera proteins based on the tertiary structure information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishida Reina

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chimera proteins are widely used for the analysis of the protein-protein interaction region. One of the major issues is the epitope analysis of the monoclonal antibody. In the analysis, a continuous portion of an antigen is sequentially substituted into a different sequence. This method works well for an antibody recognizing a linear epitope, but not for that recognizing a discontinuous epitope. Although the designing the chimera proteins based on the tertiary structure information is required in such situations, there is no appropriate tool so far. Results In light of the problem, we developed a tool named TCP (standing for a Tool for designing Chimera Proteins, which extracts some sets of mutually orthogonal cutting surfaces for designing chimera proteins using a genetic algorithm. TCP can also incorporate and consider the solvent accessible surface area information calculated by a DSSP program. The test results of our method indicate that the TCP is robust and applicable to various shapes of proteins. Conclusion We developed TCP, a tool for designing chimera proteins based on the tertiary structure information. TCP is robust and possesses several favourable features, and we believe it is a useful tool for designing chimera proteins. TCP is freely available as an additional file of this manuscript for academic and non-profit organization.

  16. Assessment of the effect of methionine supplementation and inclusion of hydrolyzed wheat protein in milk protein-based milk replacers on the performance of intensively fed Holstein calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, J J; Hwang, G H; Saito, A; Vermeire, D A; Drackley, J K

    2016-08-01

    The objectives of this study were to compare 2 milk replacers containing only milk proteins with or without supplemental Met, and to compare a milk replacer containing hydrolyzed wheat protein at 4.5% of dry matter (DM) and supplemental Lys and Met against the 2 all-milk-protein formulas, by assessing their effect on the growth performance, efficiency, and plasma urea nitrogen of pre-weaning Holstein calves. Thus, 57 Holstein calves were allotted to the following 3 treatments: (1) a skim milk plus whey protein concentrate-based milk replacer (SMWP) containing about 2.6% Lys and 0.6% Met on a DM basis; (2) SMWP + M based on skim milk and whey proteins, containing about 2.6% Lys, and supplemental Met to reach 0.9% on a DM basis; and (3) a skim milk plus whey protein concentrate plus 4.5% of the DM as hydrolyzed wheat protein based milk replacer (HWP + LM) where the wheat protein replaced 50% of the whey protein concentrate, and also contained supplemental Lys and Met to match the profile of SMWP + M (i.e., Lys 2.6 and Met 0.9% on DM basis). No difference in any of the responses was observed by supplementing the milk protein based formula with Met or when hydrolyzed wheat protein was added to the formula. Results indicate that (1) a milk replacer based on skim milk protein and whey protein with a Lys concentration of ~2.6% does not benefit from Met supplementation, and (2) milk replacer containing 4.5% of the DM as hydrolyzed wheat protein and supplemented with Lys and Met can support the same growth performance as milk protein-based formulas.

  17. A Particle Swarm Optimization-Based Approach with Local Search for Predicting Protein Folding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cheng-Hong; Lin, Yu-Shiun; Chuang, Li-Yeh; Chang, Hsueh-Wei

    2017-03-13

    The hydrophobic-polar (HP) model is commonly used for predicting protein folding structures and hydrophobic interactions. This study developed a particle swarm optimization (PSO)-based algorithm combined with local search algorithms; specifically, the high exploration PSO (HEPSO) algorithm (which can execute global search processes) was combined with three local search algorithms (hill-climbing algorithm, greedy algorithm, and Tabu table), yielding the proposed HE-L-PSO algorithm. By using 20 known protein structures, we evaluated the performance of the HE-L-PSO algorithm in predicting protein folding in the HP model. The proposed HE-L-PSO algorithm exhibited favorable performance in predicting both short and long amino acid sequences with high reproducibility and stability, compared with seven reported algorithms. The HE-L-PSO algorithm yielded optimal solutions for all predicted protein folding structures. All HE-L-PSO-predicted protein folding structures possessed a hydrophobic core that is similar to normal protein folding.

  18. Host Cell Protein C9orf9 Promotes Viral Proliferation via Interaction with HSV-1 UL25 Protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Zhang; Yan-mei Li; Long-ding Liu; Li Jiang; Ma Ji; Rui-ju Jiang; Lei Guo; Yun Liao; Qi-han Li

    2011-01-01

    In light of the scarcity of reports on the interaction between HSV-1 nucleocapsid protein UL25 and its host cell proteins,the purpose of this study is to use yeast two-hybrid screening to search for cellular proteins that can interact with the UL25 protein.C9orf69,a protein of unknown function was identified.The interaction between the two proteins under physiological conditions was also confirmed by biological experiments including co-localization by fluorescence and immunoprecipitation.A preliminary study of the function of C9orf69 showed that it promotes viral proliferation.Further studies showed that C9orf69 did not influence viral multiplication efficiency by transcriptional regulation of viral genes,but indirectly promoted proliferation via interaction with UL25.

  19. Review on Medusa:a polymer-based sustained release technology for protein and peptide drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Y-P; Meyrueix, R; Kravtzoff, R; Nicolas, F; Lundstrom, K

    2007-07-01

    The polymer-based Medusa system (Flamel Technologies) has been designed for slow release of therapeutic proteins and peptides. The Medusa II consists of a poly L-glutamate backbone grafted with hydrophobic alpha-tocopherol molecules, creating a colloidal suspension of nanoparticles (10 - 50 nm) in water. The sustained drug release is based on reversible drug interactions with hydrophobic nanodomains within the nanoparticles. In vivo, it is suggested that the therapeutic protein is displaced by endogenous proteins present in physiological fluids, leading to a slow drug release. The peak concentration is dramatically decreased and the protein release substantially extended. The Medusa technology has been applied to subcutaneous injection for several therapeutic proteins, such as IL-2 and IFN-alpha(2b), in animal models (rats, dogs, monkeys) and clinical trials in renal cancer (IL-2) and hepatitis C (IFN-alpha(2b)) patients.

  20. Mass spectrometry–based metabolomics, analysis of metabolite-protein interactions, and imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Do Yup; Bowen, Benjamin P.; Northen, Trent R.

    2010-01-01

    Our understanding of biology has been greatly improved through recent developments in mass spectrometry, which is providing detailed information on protein and metabolite composition as well as protein-metabolite interactions. The high sensitivity and resolution of mass spectrometry achieved with liquid or gas chromatography allows for detection and quantification of hundreds to thousands of molecules in a single measurement. Where homogenization-based sample preparation and extraction methods result in a loss of spatial information, mass spectrometry imaging technologies provide the in situ distribution profiles of metabolites and proteins within tissues. Mass spectrometry–based analysis of metabolite abundance, protein-metabolite interactions, and spatial distribution of compounds facilitates the high-throughput screening of biochemical reactions, the reconstruction of metabolic networks, biomarker discovery, determination of tissue compositions, and functional annotation of both proteins and metabolites. PMID:20701590

  1. Protein-based signatures of functional evolution in Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Kate B; Sinha, Ipsita; Bustamante, Leyla Y; Day, Nicholas Pj; White, Nicholas J; Woodrow, Charles J

    2011-09-14

    It has been known for over a decade that Plasmodium falciparum proteins are enriched in non-globular domains of unknown function. The potential for these regions of protein sequence to undergo high levels of genetic drift provides a fundamental challenge to attempts to identify the molecular basis of adaptive change in malaria parasites. Evolutionary comparisons were undertaken using a set of forty P. falciparum metabolic enzyme genes, both within the hominid malaria clade (P. reichenowi) and across the genus (P. chabaudi). All genes contained coding elements highly conserved across the genus, but there were also a large number of regions of weakly or non-aligning coding sequence. These displayed remarkable levels of non-synonymous fixed differences within the hominid malaria clade indicating near complete release from purifying selection (dN/dS ratio at residues non-aligning across genus: 0.64, dN/dS ratio at residues identical across genus: 0.03). Regions of low conservation also possessed high levels of hydrophilicity, a marker of non-globularity. The propensity for such regions to act as potent sources of non-synonymous genetic drift within extant P. falciparum isolates was confirmed at chromosomal regions containing genes known to mediate drug resistance in field isolates, where 150 of 153 amino acid variants were located in poorly conserved regions. In contrast, all 22 amino acid variants associated with drug resistance were restricted to highly conserved regions. Additional mutations associated with laboratory-selected drug resistance, such as those in PfATPase4 selected by spiroindolone, were similarly restricted while mutations in another calcium ATPase (PfSERCA, a gene proposed to mediate artemisinin resistance) that reach significant frequencies in field isolates were located exclusively in poorly conserved regions consistent with genetic drift. Coding sequences of malaria parasites contain prospectively definable domains subject to neutral or nearly

  2. Protein-based signatures of functional evolution in Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Day Nicholas PJ

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been known for over a decade that Plasmodium falciparum proteins are enriched in non-globular domains of unknown function. The potential for these regions of protein sequence to undergo high levels of genetic drift provides a fundamental challenge to attempts to identify the molecular basis of adaptive change in malaria parasites. Results Evolutionary comparisons were undertaken using a set of forty P. falciparum metabolic enzyme genes, both within the hominid malaria clade (P. reichenowi and across the genus (P. chabaudi. All genes contained coding elements highly conserved across the genus, but there were also a large number of regions of weakly or non-aligning coding sequence. These displayed remarkable levels of non-synonymous fixed differences within the hominid malaria clade indicating near complete release from purifying selection (dN/dS ratio at residues non-aligning across genus: 0.64, dN/dS ratio at residues identical across genus: 0.03. Regions of low conservation also possessed high levels of hydrophilicity, a marker of non-globularity. The propensity for such regions to act as potent sources of non-synonymous genetic drift within extant P. falciparum isolates was confirmed at chromosomal regions containing genes known to mediate drug resistance in field isolates, where 150 of 153 amino acid variants were located in poorly conserved regions. In contrast, all 22 amino acid variants associated with drug resistance were restricted to highly conserved regions. Additional mutations associated with laboratory-selected drug resistance, such as those in PfATPase4 selected by spiroindolone, were similarly restricted while mutations in another calcium ATPase (PfSERCA, a gene proposed to mediate artemisinin resistance that reach significant frequencies in field isolates were located exclusively in poorly conserved regions consistent with genetic drift. Conclusion Coding sequences of malaria parasites contain

  3. A visual detection of protein content based on titration of moving reaction boundary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hou-Yu; Guo, Cheng-Ye; Guo, Chen-Gang; Fan, Liu-Yin; Zhang, Lei; Cao, Cheng-Xi

    2013-04-24

    A visual electrophoretic titration method was firstly developed from the concept of moving reaction boundary (MRB) for protein content analysis. In the developed method, when the voltage was applied, the hydroxide ions in the cathodic vessel moved towards the anode, and neutralized the carboxyl groups of protein immobilized via highly cross-linked polyacrylamide gel (PAG), generating a MRB between the alkali and the immobilized protein. The boundary moving velocity (V(MRB)) was as a function of protein content, and an acid-base indicator was used to denote the boundary displacement. As a proof of concept, standard model proteins and biological samples were chosen for the experiments to study the feasibility of the developed method. The experiments revealed that good linear calibration functions between V(MRB) and protein content (correlation coefficients R>0.98). The experiments further demonstrated the following merits of developed method: (1) weak influence of non-protein nitrogen additives (e.g., melamine) adulterated in protein samples, (2) good agreement with the classic Kjeldahl method (R=0.9945), (3) fast measuring speed in total protein analysis of large samples from the same source, and (4) low limit of detection (0.02-0.15 mg mL(-1) for protein content), good precision (R.S.D. of intra-day less than 1.7% and inter-day less than 2.7%), and high recoveries (105-107%).

  4. Affinity filtration coupled with capillary-based affinity purification for the isolation of protein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, M S; Sheikh, Q I; Hill, R; Brown, P E; Dickman, M J; Tzokov, S B; Rice, D W; Gjerde, D T; Hornby, D P

    2013-08-01

    The isolation of complex macromolecular assemblies at the concentrations required for structural analysis represents a major experimental challenge. Here we present a method that combines the genetic power of site-specific recombination in order to selectively "tag" one or more components of a protein complex with affinity-based rapid filtration and a final step of capillary-based enrichment. This modified form of tandem affinity purification produces highly purified protein complexes at high concentrations in a highly efficient manner. The application of the method is demonstrated for the yeast Arp2/3 heptameric protein complex involved in mediating reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton.

  5. Glycopolymer functionalization of engineered spider silk protein-based materials for improved cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, John G; Pfaff, André; Leal-Egaña, Aldo; Müller, Axel H E; Scheibel, Thomas R

    2014-07-01

    Silk protein-based materials are promising biomaterials for application as tissue scaffolds, due to their processability, biocompatibility, and biodegradability. The preparation of films composed of an engineered spider silk protein (eADF4(C16)) and their functionalization with glycopolymers are described. The glycopolymers bind proteins found in the extracellular matrix, providing a biomimetic coating on the films that improves cell adhesion to the surfaces of engineered spider silk films. Such silk-based materials have potential as coatings for degradable implantable devices. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Protein-based biomemory device consisting of the cysteine-modified azurin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jeong-Woo; Oh, Byung-Keun; Kim, Young Jun; Min, Junhong

    2007-12-01

    We demonstrated a protein-based memory device using recombinant Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin (azurin), a metalloprotein with a redox property. Azurin was recombined with a cysteine residue to enhance the stability of the self-assembled protein on the gold surface. The memory device characteristics, including the "read," "write," and "erase" functions of the self-assembled azurin layer, were well demonstrated with three distinct electrical states of azurin layers by cyclic voltammetry. The robustness of the protein-based biomemory device was validated by the repeated electrochemical performance of 500000cycles.

  7. Optimized distance-dependent atom-pair-based potential DOOP for protein structure prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Myong-Ho; Krull, Florian; Knapp, Ernst-Walter

    2015-05-01

    The DOcking decoy-based Optimized Potential (DOOP) energy function for protein structure prediction is based on empirical distance-dependent atom-pair interactions. To optimize the atom-pair interactions, native protein structures are decomposed into polypeptide chain segments that correspond to structural motives involving complete secondary structure elements. They constitute near native ligand-receptor systems (or just pairs). Thus, a total of 8609 ligand-receptor systems were prepared from 954 selected proteins. For each of these hypothetical ligand-receptor systems, 1000 evenly sampled docking decoys with 0-10 Å interface root-mean-square-deviation (iRMSD) were generated with a method used before for protein-protein docking. A neural network-based optimization method was applied to derive the optimized energy parameters using these decoys so that the energy function mimics the funnel-like energy landscape for the interaction between these hypothetical ligand-receptor systems. Thus, our method hierarchically models the overall funnel-like energy landscape of native protein structures. The resulting energy function was tested on several commonly used decoy sets for native protein structure recognition and compared with other statistical potentials. In combination with a torsion potential term which describes the local conformational preference, the atom-pair-based potential outperforms other reported statistical energy functions in correct ranking of native protein structures for a variety of decoy sets. This is especially the case for the most challenging ROSETTA decoy set, although it does not take into account side chain orientation-dependence explicitly. The DOOP energy function for protein structure prediction, the underlying database of protein structures with hypothetical ligand-receptor systems and their decoys are freely available at http://agknapp.chemie.fu-berlin.de/doop/.

  8. A Protein Domain and Family Based Approach to Rare Variant Association Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Tom G.; Shihab, Hashem A.; Rivas, Manuel A.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Campbell, Colin; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Gaunt, Tom R.

    2016-01-01

    Background It has become common practice to analyse large scale sequencing data with statistical approaches based around the aggregation of rare variants within the same gene. We applied a novel approach to rare variant analysis by collapsing variants together using protein domain and family coordinates, regarded to be a more discrete definition of a biologically functional unit. Methods Using Pfam definitions, we collapsed rare variants (Minor Allele Frequency ≤ 1%) together in three different ways 1) variants within single genomic regions which map to individual protein domains 2) variants within two individual protein domain regions which are predicted to be responsible for a protein-protein interaction 3) all variants within combined regions from multiple genes responsible for coding the same protein domain (i.e. protein families). A conventional collapsing analysis using gene coordinates was also undertaken for comparison. We used UK10K sequence data and investigated associations between regions of variants and lipid traits using the sequence kernel association test (SKAT). Results We observed no strong evidence of association between regions of variants based on Pfam domain definitions and lipid traits. Quantile-Quantile plots illustrated that the overall distributions of p-values from the protein domain analyses were comparable to that of a conventional gene-based approach. Deviations from this distribution suggested that collapsing by either protein domain or gene definitions may be favourable depending on the trait analysed. Conclusion We have collapsed rare variants together using protein domain and family coordinates to present an alternative approach over collapsing across conventionally used gene-based regions. Although no strong evidence of association was detected in these analyses, future studies may still find value in adopting these approaches to detect previously unidentified association signals. PMID:27128313

  9. A Protein Domain and Family Based Approach to Rare Variant Association Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom G Richardson

    Full Text Available It has become common practice to analyse large scale sequencing data with statistical approaches based around the aggregation of rare variants within the same gene. We applied a novel approach to rare variant analysis by collapsing variants together using protein domain and family coordinates, regarded to be a more discrete definition of a biologically functional unit.Using Pfam definitions, we collapsed rare variants (Minor Allele Frequency ≤ 1% together in three different ways 1 variants within single genomic regions which map to individual protein domains 2 variants within two individual protein domain regions which are predicted to be responsible for a protein-protein interaction 3 all variants within combined regions from multiple genes responsible for coding the same protein domain (i.e. protein families. A conventional collapsing analysis using gene coordinates was also undertaken for comparison. We used UK10K sequence data and investigated associations between regions of variants and lipid traits using the sequence kernel association test (SKAT.We observed no strong evidence of association between regions of variants based on Pfam domain definitions and lipid traits. Quantile-Quantile plots illustrated that the overall distributions of p-values from the protein domain analyses were comparable to that of a conventional gene-based approach. Deviations from this distribution suggested that collapsing by either protein domain or gene definitions may be favourable depending on the trait analysed.We have collapsed rare variants together using protein domain and family coordinates to present an alternative approach over collapsing across conventionally used gene-based regions. Although no strong evidence of association was detected in these analyses, future studies may still find value in adopting these approaches to detect previously unidentified association signals.

  10. Kloning, Sikuensing dan Analisis Filogenetik Gen Nukleokapsid Protein Virus Tetelo Isolat Bali-1/07

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anak Agung Ayu Mirah Adi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A study was carried out on the molecular characteristics of gene encoding for nucleocapsid protein(NP of Newcastle disease virus (NDV Bali-1/07. A portion of the fragment gene was amplified by reversetranscriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. The RT-PCR product purified from the gel was treatedwith Taq polymerase and cloned into plasmid pT7blueT vector. The recombinant plasmid was tranfectedinto Nova blue singles strain of Escherichia coli-competent cells and selected using white and blue colorselection method. Good white colonies were subcultured and tested for presence of expected gene fragmentby polymerase chain reaction (PCR. The correct size PCR product was recloned and sequenced. The PCRproduct of 540 base pairs were sequenced and aligned with several cognates genes of world NDVisolates.using Cluster IW. The phylogenetic analysis was then performed using MEGA 4. Phylogeneticanalysis showed that the NP gene of NDV Bali-1/07 is closely related with virulent NDVs such asGuangxii-11/03, KBNP-4152 and Ast2755/01 with nucleotide sequence homology of 92%, 91.4% and91%respectively, whereas the nucleotide sequence homology with avirulent NDVs such as LaSota and B1were 77%.

  11. Protein sequence for clustering DNA based on Artificial Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamal. F. Elhadi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA is a nucleic acid that contains the genetic instructions used in the development and functioning of all known living organisms and some viruses. Clustering is a process that groups a set of objects into clusters so that the similarity among objects in the same cluster is high, while that among the objects in different clusters is low. In this paper, we proposed an approach for clustering DNA sequences using Self-Organizing Map (SOM algorithm and Protein Sequence. The main objective is to analyze biological data and to bunch DNA to many clusters more easily and efficiently. We use the proposed approach to analyze both large and small amount of input DNA sequences. The results show that the similarity of the sequences does not depend on the amount of input sequences. Our approach depends on evaluating the degree of the DNA sequences similarity using the hierarchal representation Dendrogram. Representing large amount of data using hierarchal tree gives the ability to compare large sequences efficiently

  12. Protein structure-based design of anti-protozoal drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verlinde Christophe L. M. J.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The repertory of drugs to fight protozoal diseases such as malaria, Chagas' disease, leishmaniasis, and African trypanosomiasis is woefully inadequate. Now, genome sequencing and structural genomics projects are quickly elucidating new drug targets, providing incredible opportunities for medicinal chemists. Here, we illustrate the power of structure-based drug design in this process by our efforts to selectively block trypanosomal glycolysis.

  13. PCR and RFLP analyses based on the ribosomal protein operon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Differentiation and classification of phytoplasmas have been primarily based on the highly conserved 16Sr RNA gene. RFLP analysis of 16Sr RNA gene sequences has identified 31 16Sr RNA (16Sr) groups and more than 100 16Sr subgroups. Classification of phytoplasma strains can however, become more refin...

  14. vProtein: identifying optimal amino acid complements from plant-based foods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J Woolf

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Indispensible amino acids (IAAs are used by the body in different proportions. Most animal-based foods provide these IAAs in roughly the needed proportions, but many plant-based foods provide different proportions of IAAs. To explore how these plant-based foods can be better used in human nutrition, we have created the computational tool vProtein to identify optimal food complements to satisfy human protein needs. METHODS: vProtein uses 1251 plant-based foods listed in the United States Department of Agriculture standard release 22 database to determine the quantity of each food or pair of foods required to satisfy human IAA needs as determined by the 2005 daily recommended intake. The quantity of food in a pair is found using a linear programming approach that minimizes total calories, total excess IAAs, or the total weight of the combination. RESULTS: For single foods, vProtein identifies foods with particularly balanced IAA patterns such as wheat germ, quinoa, and cauliflower. vProtein also identifies foods with particularly unbalanced IAA patterns such as macadamia nuts, degermed corn products, and wakame seaweed. Although less useful alone, some unbalanced foods provide unusually good complements, such as Brazil nuts to legumes. Interestingly, vProtein finds no statistically significant bias toward grain/legume pairings for protein complementation. These analyses suggest that pairings of plant-based foods should be based on the individual foods themselves instead of based on broader food group-food group pairings. Overall, the most efficient pairings include sweet corn/tomatoes, apple/coconut, and sweet corn/cherry. The top pairings also highlight the utility of less common protein sources such as the seaweeds laver and spirulina, pumpkin leaves, and lambsquarters. From a public health perspective, many of the food pairings represent novel, low cost food sources to combat malnutrition. Full analysis results are available online

  15. Protein structure refinement using a quantum mechanics-based chemical shielding predictor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bratholm, Lars Andersen; Jensen, Jan Halborg

    2017-01-01

    The accurate prediction of protein chemical shifts using a quantum mechanics (QM)-based method has been the subject of intense research for more than 20 years but so far empirical methods for chemical shift prediction have proven more accurate. In this paper we show that a QM-based predictor...... of a protein backbone and CB chemical shifts (ProCS15, PeerJ, 2016, 3, e1344) is of comparable accuracy to empirical chemical shift predictors after chemical shift-based structural refinement that removes small structural errors. We present a method by which quantum chemistry based predictions of isotropic...

  16. Comparison of 2 Luminex-based Multiplexed Protein Assays for Quantifying Microglia Activation and Inflammatory Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    streptavidin-phycoerythrin (PE) similar to sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). The 3 fluorescent markers (2 beads plus PE) allow for...least expensive platform. It uses a magnetic plate to create a monolayer of beads that can be imaged with a light-emitting-diode-based imager capable... Magnetic Luminex Screening Assay Rat Premixed Multi-Analyte Kit, a kit was purchased that included all of the 17 analytes included in company’s catalog

  17. A practical method for extending the biuret assay to protein determination of corn-based products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zelong; Pan, Junhui

    2017-06-01

    A modified biuret method suitable for protein determination of corn-based products was developed by introducing a combination of an alkaline reagent with sodium dodecyl sulfate (reagent A) and heat treatments. The method was tested on seven corn-based samples. The results showed mostly good agreement (P>0.05) as compared to the Kjeldahl values. The proposed method was found to enhance the accuracy of prediction on zein content using bovine serum albumin as standard. Reagent A and sample treatment were proved to effectively improve protein solubilization for the thermally-dried corn-based products, e.g. corn gluten meal. The absorbance was stable for at least 1-h. Moreover, the whole measurement of protein content only needs 15-20min more than the traditional biuret assay, and can be performed in batches. The findings suggest that the proposed method could be a timesaving alternative for routine protein analyses in corn processing factories.

  18. Uncovering Molecular Bases Underlying Bone Morphogenetic Protein Receptor Inhibitor Selectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelaziz Alsamarah

    Full Text Available Abnormal alteration of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP signaling is implicated in many types of diseases including cancer and heterotopic ossifications. Hence, small molecules targeting BMP type I receptors (BMPRI to interrupt BMP signaling are believed to be an effective approach to treat these diseases. However, lack of understanding of the molecular determinants responsible for the binding selectivity of current BMP inhibitors has been a big hindrance to the development of BMP inhibitors for clinical use. To address this issue, we carried out in silico experiments to test whether computational methods can reproduce and explain the high selectivity of a small molecule BMP inhibitor DMH1 on BMPRI kinase ALK2 vs. the closely related TGF-β type I receptor kinase ALK5 and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor type 2 (VEGFR2 tyrosine kinase. We found that, while the rigid docking method used here gave nearly identical binding affinity scores among the three kinases; free energy perturbation coupled with Hamiltonian replica-exchange molecular dynamics (FEP/H-REMD simulations reproduced the absolute binding free energies in excellent agreement with experimental data. Furthermore, the binding poses identified by FEP/H-REMD led to a quantitative analysis of physical/chemical determinants governing DMH1 selectivity. The current work illustrates that small changes in the binding site residue type (e.g. pre-hinge region in ALK2 vs. ALK5 or side chain orientation (e.g. Tyr219 in caALK2 vs. wtALK2, as well as a subtle structural modification on the ligand (e.g. DMH1 vs. LDN193189 will cause distinct binding profiles and selectivity among BMP inhibitors. Therefore, the current computational approach represents a new way of investigating BMP inhibitors. Our results provide critical information for designing exclusively selective BMP inhibitors for the development of effective pharmacotherapy for diseases caused by aberrant BMP signaling.

  19. Mass spectrometry based protein identification with accurate statistical significance assignment

    OpenAIRE

    Alves, Gelio; Yu, Yi-Kuo

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Assigning statistical significance accurately has become increasingly important as meta data of many types, often assembled in hierarchies, are constructed and combined for further biological analyses. Statistical inaccuracy of meta data at any level may propagate to downstream analyses, undermining the validity of scientific conclusions thus drawn. From the perspective of mass spectrometry based proteomics, even though accurate statistics for peptide identification can now be ach...

  20. Estimating the effect of human base excision repair protein variants on the repair of oxidative DNA base damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokhansanj, Bahrad A; Wilson, David M

    2006-05-01

    Epidemiologic studies have revealed a complex association between human genetic variance and cancer risk. Quantitative biological modeling based on experimental data can play a critical role in interpreting the effect of genetic variation on biochemical pathways relevant to cancer development and progression. Defects in human DNA base excision repair (BER) proteins can reduce cellular tolerance to oxidative DNA base damage caused by endogenous and exogenous sources, such as exposure to toxins and ionizing radiation. If not repaired, DNA base damage leads to cell dysfunction and mutagenesis, consequently leading to cancer, disease, and aging. Population screens have identified numerous single-nucleotide polymorphism variants in many BER proteins and some have been purified and found to exhibit mild kinetic defects. Epidemiologic studies have led to conflicting conclusions on the association between single-nucleotide polymorphism variants in BER proteins and cancer risk. Using experimental data for cellular concentration and the kinetics of normal and variant BER proteins, we apply a previously developed and tested human BER pathway model to (i) estimate the effect of mild variants on BER of abasic sites and 8-oxoguanine, a prominent oxidative DNA base modification, (ii) identify ranges of variation associated with substantial BER capacity loss, and (iii) reveal nonintuitive consequences of multiple simultaneous variants. Our findings support previous work suggesting that mild BER variants have a minimal effect on pathway capacity whereas more severe defects and simultaneous variation in several BER proteins can lead to inefficient repair and potentially deleterious consequences of cellular damage.

  1. Protein submitochondrial localization from integrated sequence representation and SVM-based backward feature extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liqi; Yu, Sanjiu; Xiao, Weidong; Li, Yongsheng; Hu, Wenjuan; Huang, Lan; Zheng, Xiaoqi; Zhou, Shiwen; Yang, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrion, a tiny energy factory, plays an important role in various biological processes of most eukaryotic cells. Mitochondrial defection is associated with a series of human diseases. Knowledge of the submitochondrial locations of proteins can help to reveal the biological functions of novel proteins, and understand the mechanisms underlying various biological processes occurring in the mitochondrion. However, experimental methods to determine protein submitochondrial locations are costly and time consuming. Thus it is essential to develop a fast and reliable computational method to predict protein submitochondrial locations. Here, we proposed a support vector machine (SVM) based approach for predicting protein submitochondrial locations. Information from the position-specific score matrix (PSSM), gene ontology (GO) and the protein feature (PROFEAT) was integrated into the principal features of this model. Then a recursive feature selection scheme was employed to select the optimal features. Finally, an SVM module was used to predict protein submitochondrial locations based on the optimal features. Through the jackknife cross-validation test, our method achieved an accuracy of 99.37% on benchmark dataset M317, and 100% on the other two datasets, M1105 and T86. These results indicate that our method is economic and effective for accurate prediction of the protein submitochondrial location.

  2. Predict potential drug targets from the ion channel proteins based on SVM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chen; Zhang, Ruijie; Chen, Zhiqiang; Jiang, Yongshuai; Shang, Zhenwei; Sun, Peng; Zhang, Xuehong; Li, Xia

    2010-02-21

    The identification of molecular targets is a critical step in the drug discovery and development process. Ion channel proteins represent highly attractive drug targets implicated in a diverse range of disorders, in particular in the cardiovascular and central nervous systems. Due to the limits of experimental technique and low-throughput nature of patch-clamp electrophysiology, they remain a target class waiting to be exploited. In our study, we combined three types of protein features, primary sequence, secondary structure and subcellular localization to predict potential drug targets from ion channel proteins applying classical support vector machine (SVM) method. In addition, our prediction comprised two stages. In stage 1, we predicted ion channel target proteins based on whole-genome target protein characteristics. Firstly, we performed feature selection by Mann-Whitney U test, then made predictions to identify potential ion channel targets by SVM and designed a new evaluating indicator Q to prioritize results. In stage 2, we made a prediction based on known ion channel target protein characteristics. Genetic algorithm was used to select features and SVM was used to predict ion channel targets. Then, we integrated results of two stages, and found that five ion channel proteins appeared in both prediction results including CGMP-gated cation channel beta subunit and Gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor subunit alpha-5, etc., and four of which were relative to some nerve diseases. It suggests that these five proteins are potential targets for drug discovery and our prediction strategies are effective.

  3. Proximity-based Protein Thiol Oxidation by H2O2-scavenging Peroxidases*♦

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutscher, Marcus; Sobotta, Mirko C.; Wabnitz, Guido H.; Ballikaya, Seda; Meyer, Andreas J.; Samstag, Yvonne; Dick, Tobias P.

    2009-01-01

    H2O2 acts as a signaling molecule by oxidizing critical thiol groups on redox-regulated target proteins. To explain the efficiency and selectivity of H2O2-based signaling, it has been proposed that oxidation of target proteins may be facilitated by H2O2-scavenging peroxidases. Recently, a peroxidase-based protein oxidation relay has been identified in yeast, namely the oxidation of the transcription factor Yap1 by the peroxidase Orp1. It has remained unclear whether the protein oxidase function of Orp1 is a singular adaptation or whether it may represent a more general principle. Here we show that Orp1 is in fact not restricted to oxidizing Yap1 but can also form a highly efficient redox relay with the oxidant target protein roGFP (redox-sensitive green fluorescent protein) in mammalian cells. Orp1 mediates near quantitative oxidation of roGFP2 by H2O2, and the Orp1-roGFP2 redox relay effectively converts physiological H2O2 signals into measurable fluorescent signals in living cells. Furthermore, the oxidant relay phenomenon is not restricted to Orp1 as the mammalian peroxidase Gpx4 also mediates oxidation of proximal roGFP2 in living cells. Together, these findings support the concept that certain peroxidases harbor an intrinsic and powerful capacity to act as H2O2-dependent protein thiol oxidases when they are recruited into proximity of oxidizable target proteins. PMID:19755417

  4. Proximity-based protein thiol oxidation by H2O2-scavenging peroxidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutscher, Marcus; Sobotta, Mirko C; Wabnitz, Guido H; Ballikaya, Seda; Meyer, Andreas J; Samstag, Yvonne; Dick, Tobias P

    2009-11-13

    H(2)O(2) acts as a signaling molecule by oxidizing critical thiol groups on redox-regulated target proteins. To explain the efficiency and selectivity of H(2)O(2)-based signaling, it has been proposed that oxidation of target proteins may be facilitated by H(2)O(2)-scavenging peroxidases. Recently, a peroxidase-based protein oxidation relay has been identified in yeast, namely the oxidation of the transcription factor Yap1 by the peroxidase Orp1. It has remained unclear whether the protein oxidase function of Orp1 is a singular adaptation or whether it may represent a more general principle. Here we show that Orp1 is in fact not restricted to oxidizing Yap1 but can also form a highly efficient redox relay with the oxidant target protein roGFP (redox-sensitive green fluorescent protein) in mammalian cells. Orp1 mediates near quantitative oxidation of roGFP2 by H(2)O(2), and the Orp1-roGFP2 redox relay effectively converts physiological H(2)O(2) signals into measurable fluorescent signals in living cells. Furthermore, the oxidant relay phenomenon is not restricted to Orp1 as the mammalian peroxidase Gpx4 also mediates oxidation of proximal roGFP2 in living cells. Together, these findings support the concept that certain peroxidases harbor an intrinsic and powerful capacity to act as H(2)O(2)-dependent protein thiol oxidases when they are recruited into proximity of oxidizable target proteins.

  5. Structure-based approach to the prediction of disulfide bonds in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salam, Noeris K; Adzhigirey, Matvey; Sherman, Woody; Pearlman, David A

    2014-10-01

    Protein engineering remains an area of growing importance in pharmaceutical and biotechnology research. Stabilization of a folded protein conformation is a frequent goal in projects that deal with affinity optimization, enzyme design, protein construct design, and reducing the size of functional proteins. Indeed, it can be desirable to assess and improve protein stability in order to avoid liabilities such as aggregation, degradation, and immunogenic response that may arise during development. One way to stabilize a protein is through the introduction of disulfide bonds. Here, we describe a method to predict pairs of protein residues that can be mutated to form a disulfide bond. We combine a physics-based approach that incorporates implicit solvent molecular mechanics with a knowledge-based approach. We first assign relative weights to the terms that comprise our scoring function using a genetic algorithm applied to a set of 75 wild-type structures that each contains a disulfide bond. The method is then tested on a separate set of 13 engineered proteins comprising 15 artificial stabilizing disulfides introduced via site-directed mutagenesis. We find that the native disulfide in the wild-type proteins is scored well, on average (within the top 6% of the reasonable pairs of residues that could form a disulfide bond) while 6 out of the 15 artificial stabilizing disulfides scored within the top 13% of ranked predictions. Overall, this suggests that the physics-based approach presented here can be useful for triaging possible pairs of mutations for disulfide bond formation to improve protein stability.

  6. LC-MS/MS based proteomic analysis and functional inference of hypothetical proteins in Desulfovibrio vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weiwen; Culley, David E; Gritsenko, Marina A; Moore, Ronald J; Nie, Lei; Scholten, Johannes C M; Petritis, Konstantinos; Strittmatter, Eric F; Camp, David G; Smith, Richard D; Brockman, Fred J

    2006-11-03

    High efficiency capillary liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was used to examine the proteins extracted from Desulfovibrio vulgaris cells across six treatment conditions. While our previous study provided a proteomic overview of the cellular metabolism based on proteins with known functions [W. Zhang, M.A. Gritsenko, R.J. Moore, D.E. Culley, L. Nie, K. Petritis, E.F. Strittmatter, D.G. Camp II, R.D. Smith, F.J. Brockman, A proteomic view of the metabolism in Desulfovibrio vulgaris determined by liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry, Proteomics 6 (2006) 4286-4299], this study describes the global detection and functional inference for hypothetical D. vulgaris proteins. Using criteria that a given peptide of a protein is identified from at least two out of three independent LC-MS/MS measurements and that for any protein at least two different peptides are identified among the three measurements, 129 open reading frames (ORFs) originally annotated as hypothetical proteins were found to encode expressed proteins. Functional inference for the conserved hypothetical proteins was performed by a combination of several non-homology based methods: genomic context analysis, phylogenomic profiling, and analysis of a combination of experimental information, including peptide detection in cells grown under specific culture conditions and cellular location of the proteins. Using this approach we were able to assign possible functions to 20 conserved hypothetical proteins. This study demonstrated that a combination of proteomics and bioinformatics methodologies can provide verification of the expression of hypothetical proteins and improve genome annotation.

  7. TOUCHSTONE: an ab initio protein structure prediction method that uses threading-based tertiary restraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kihara, D; Lu, H; Kolinski, A; Skolnick, J

    2001-08-28

    The successful prediction of protein structure from amino acid sequence requires two features: an efficient conformational search algorithm and an energy function with a global minimum in the native state. As a step toward addressing both issues, a threading-based method of secondary and tertiary restraint prediction has been developed and applied to ab initio folding. Such restraints are derived by extracting consensus contacts and local secondary structure from at least weakly scoring structures that, in some cases, can lack any global similarity to the sequence of interest. Furthermore, to generate representative protein structures, a reduced lattice-based protein model is used with replica exchange Monte Carlo to explore conformational space. We report results on the application of this methodology, termed TOUCHSTONE, to 65 proteins whose lengths range from 39 to 146 residues. For 47 (40) proteins, a cluster centroid whose rms deviation from native is below 6.5 (5) A is found in one of the five lowest energy centroids. The number of correctly predicted proteins increases to 50 when atomic detail is added and a knowledge-based atomic potential is combined with clustered and nonclustered structures for candidate selection. The combination of the ratio of the relative number of contacts to the protein length and the number of clusters generated by the folding algorithm is a reliable indicator of the likelihood of successful fold prediction, thereby opening the way for genome-scale ab initio folding.

  8. Batch affinity adsorption of His-tagged proteins with EDTA-based chitosan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Weiwei; Lou, Yimin; Xu, Weiyuan; Cheng, Zhixian; Gong, Xingwen; Huang, Jianying

    2016-01-01

    Affinity adsorption purification of hexahistidine-tagged (His-tagged) proteins using EDTA-chitosan-based adsorption was designed and carried out. Chitosan was elaborated with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and the resulting polymer was characterized by FTIR, TGA, and TEM. Different metals including Ni(2+), Cu(2+), and Zn(2+) were immobilized with EDTA-chitosan, and their capability to the specific adsorption of His-tagged proteins were then investigated. The results showed that Ni(2+)-EDTA-chitosan and Zn(2+)-EDTA-chitosan had high affinity toward the His-tagged proteins, thus isolating them from protein mixture. The target fluorescent-labeled hexahistidine protein remained its fluorescent characteristic throughout the purification procedure when Zn(2+)-EDTA-chitosan was used as a sorbent, wherein the real-time monitor was performed to examine the immigration of fluorescent-labeled His-tagged protein. Comparatively, Zn(2+)-EDTA-chitosan showed more specific binding ability for the target protein, but with less binding capacity. It was further proved that this purification system could be recovered and reused at least for 5 times and could run on large scales. The presented M(2+)-EDTA-chitosan system, with the capability to specifically bind His-tagged proteins, make the purification of His-tagged proteins easy to handle, leaving out fussy preliminary treatment, and with the possibility of continuous processing and a reduction in operational cost in relation to the costs of conventional processes.

  9. Novel DNPH-based method for determination of protein carbonylation in muscle and meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soglia, Francesca; Petracci, Massimiliano; Ertbjerg, Per

    2016-04-15

    Protein oxidation is considered an ongoing deteriorative process during storage of fresh and processed meat. Carbonyl compounds have traditionally been detected spectrophotometrically after derivatization with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) to form protein-bound hydrazones with absorbance at 370 nm. Here we describe a novel DNPH-based method to quantify protein carbonylation in muscle and meat. The additional steps of the novel method aimed at increasing the protein solubility and inducing protein unfolding before labeling with DNPH. Compared to the traditional method, the new procedure reflected an increased protein carbonylation level measuring overall two to fourfold more carbonyls in muscles from different species as well as in soluble, salt-soluble and insoluble protein fractions. The study suggested that protein unfolding is a more important phenomenon than solubilization for increased DNPH labeling. The novel method resulted in three to fourfold larger carbonyl content determined in chicken, pork and beef (2.8, 3.6 and 3.1 nmol/mg of protein, respectively). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Development of a Novel Green Fluorescent Protein-Based Binding Assay to Study the Association of Plakins with Intermediate Filament Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favre, Bertrand; Begré, Nadja; Bouameur, Jamal-Eddine; Borradori, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are fundamental for most biological processes, such as the formation of cellular structures and enzymatic complexes or in signaling pathways. The identification and characterization of protein-protein interactions are therefore essential for understanding the mechanisms and regulation of biological systems. The organization and dynamics of the cytoskeleton, as well as its anchorage to specific sites in the plasma membrane and organelles, are regulated by the plakins. These structurally related proteins anchor different cytoskeletal networks to each other and/or to other cellular structures. The association of several plakins with intermediate filaments (IFs) is critical for maintenance of the cytoarchitecture. Pathogenic mutations in the genes encoding different plakins can lead to dramatic manifestations, occurring principally in the skin, striated muscle, and/or nervous system, due to cytoskeletal disorganization resulting in abnormal cell fragility. Nevertheless, it is still unclear how plakins bind to IFs, although some general rules are slowly emerging. We here describe in detail a recently developed protein-protein fluorescence binding assay, based on the production of recombinant proteins tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP) and their use as fluid-phase fluorescent ligands on immobilized IF proteins. Using this method, we have been able to assess the ability of C-terminal regions of GFP-tagged plakin proteins to bind to distinct IF proteins and IF domains. This simple and sensitive technique, which is expected to facilitate further studies in this area, can also be potentially employed for any kind of protein-protein interaction studies.

  11. Cyanine-based probe\\tag-peptide pair fluorescence protein imaging and fluorescence protein imaging methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer-Cumblidge, M. Uljana; Cao, Haishi

    2013-01-15

    A molecular probe comprises two arsenic atoms and at least one cyanine based moiety. A method of producing a molecular probe includes providing a molecule having a first formula, treating the molecule with HgOAc, and subsequently transmetallizing with AsCl.sub.3. The As is liganded to ethanedithiol to produce a probe having a second formula. A method of labeling a peptide includes providing a peptide comprising a tag sequence and contacting the peptide with a biarsenical molecular probe. A complex is formed comprising the tag sequence and the molecular probe. A method of studying a peptide includes providing a mixture containing a peptide comprising a peptide tag sequence, adding a biarsenical probe to the mixture, and monitoring the fluorescence of the mixture.

  12. Effectively integrating information content and structural relationship to improve the GO-based similarity measure between proteins

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Bo; Feltus, F Alex; Zhou, Jizhong; Luo, Feng

    2010-01-01

    The Gene Ontology (GO) provides a knowledge base to effectively describe proteins. However, measuring similarity between proteins based on GO remains a challenge. In this paper, we propose a new similarity measure, information coefficient similarity measure (SimIC), to effectively integrate both the information content (IC) of GO terms and the structural information of GO hierarchy to determine the similarity between proteins. Testing on yeast proteins, our results show that SimIC efficiently addresses the shallow annotation issue in GO, thus improves the correlations between GO similarities of yeast proteins and their expression similarities as well as between GO similarities of yeast proteins and their sequence similarities. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the proposed SimIC is superior in predicting yeast protein interactions. We predict 20484 yeast protein-protein interactions (PPIs) between 2462 proteins based on the high SimIC values of biological process (BP) and cellular component (CC). Examining the...

  13. A tool to facilitate clinical biomarker studies - a tissue dictionary based on the Human Protein Atlas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kampf Caroline

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The complexity of tissue and the alterations that distinguish normal from cancer remain a challenge for translating results from tumor biological studies into clinical medicine. This has generated an unmet need to exploit the findings from studies based on cell lines and model organisms to develop, validate and clinically apply novel diagnostic, prognostic and treatment predictive markers. As one step to meet this challenge, the Human Protein Atlas project has been set up to produce antibodies towards human protein targets corresponding to all human protein coding genes and to map protein expression in normal human tissues, cancer and cells. Here, we present a dictionary based on microscopy images created as an amendment to the Human Protein Atlas. The aim of the dictionary is to facilitate the interpretation and use of the image-based data available in the Human Protein Atlas, but also to serve as a tool for training and understanding tissue histology, pathology and cell biology. The dictionary contains three main parts, normal tissues, cancer tissues and cells, and is based on high-resolution images at different magnifications of full tissue sections stained with H & E. The cell atlas is centered on immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy images, using different color channels to highlight the organelle structure of a cell. Here, we explain how this dictionary can be used as a tool to aid clinicians and scientists in understanding the use of tissue histology and cancer pathology in diagnostics and biomarker studies.

  14. EvoDesign: De novo protein design based on structural and evolutionary profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Pralay; Shultis, David; Zhang, Yang

    2013-07-01

    Protein design aims to identify new protein sequences of desirable structure and biological function. Most current de novo protein design methods rely on physics-based force fields to search for low free-energy states following Anfinsen's thermodynamic hypothesis. A major obstacle of such approaches is the inaccuracy of the force field design, which cannot accurately describe the atomic interactions or distinguish correct folds. We developed a new web server, EvoDesign, to design optimal protein sequences of given scaffolds along with multiple sequence and structure-based features to assess the foldability and goodness of the designs. EvoDesign uses an evolution-profile-based Monte Carlo search with the profiles constructed from homologous structure families in the Protein Data Bank. A set of local structure features, including secondary structure, torsion angle and solvation, are predicted by single-sequence neural-network training and used to smooth the sequence motif and accommodate the physicochemical packing. The EvoDesign algorithm has been extensively tested in large-scale protein design experiments, which demonstrate enhanced foldability and structural stability of designed sequences compared with the physics-based designing methods. The EvoDesign server is freely available at http://zhanglab.ccmb.med.umich.edu/EvoDesign.

  15. Sulfur-based absolute quantification of proteins using isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun-Seok; Heun Kim, Sook; Jeong, Ji-Seon; Lee, Yong-Moon; Yim, Yong-Hyeon

    2015-10-01

    An element-based reductive approach provides an effective means of realizing International System of Units (SI) traceability for high-purity biological standards. Here, we develop an absolute protein quantification method using double isotope dilution (ID) inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) combined with microwave-assisted acid digestion for the first time. We validated the method and applied it to certify the candidate protein certified reference material (CRM) of human growth hormone (hGH). The concentration of hGH was determined by analysing the total amount of sulfur in hGH. Next, the size-exclusion chromatography method was used with ICP-MS to characterize and quantify sulfur-containing impurities. By subtracting the contribution of sulfur-containing impurities from the total sulfur content in the hGH CRM, we obtained a SI-traceable certification value. The quantification result obtained with the present method based on sulfur analysis was in excellent agreement with the result determined via a well-established protein quantification method based on amino acid analysis using conventional acid hydrolysis combined with an ID liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The element-based protein quantification method developed here can be generally used for SI-traceable absolute quantification of proteins, especially pure-protein standards.

  16. Protein-based green resins and nanocomposites from waste residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Muhammad Maksudur

    The main goal of the present research is to design and fabricate 'green' nanocomposites using eco-friendly and biodegradable polymers, an effort driven towards an alternative of conventional petroleum-derived polymers in structural applications considering environmental and economic concerns. The behavior of structure, composition and property relationships between the novel combinations of these materials has been analyzed and discussed. The materials used in this study, many of them from non-edible sources, are obtained, derived and/or synthesized using various wastes from agricultural and food industries, as much as possible, so as to utilize wastes that are discarded at present. At the same time, the use of waste sources reduces the dependency of edible source-based biopolymers in various structural applications and thus, reduces the cost of materials significantly. Overall, this study opens up new avenues in the fabrication of low-cost 'green' nanocomposite with facile and 'green' methodology using various agricultural and food wastes.

  17. Novel column-based protein refolding strategy using dye-ligand affinity chromatography based on macroporous biomaterial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng; Dong, Ping-Jun; Zhuang, Qian-Fen

    2009-05-15

    A novel column-based chromatographic protein refolding strategy was developed using dye-ligand affinity chromatography (DLAC) based on macroporous biomaterial. Chitosan-silica (CS-silica) biomaterial with macroporous surface was used as the supporting matrix for the preparation of the DLAC material. The dye-ligand Cibacron Blue F3GA (CBF) was selected as affinity handle and could be covalently immobilized to form dye-ligand affinity adsorbent (CBF-CS-silica) using the reactivity of NH(2) on CS-silica biomaterial. After the model protein catalase was denatured with 6mol/L urea, the denaturant could be rapidly removed and catalase could be successfully refolded as facilitated by the adsorption of CBF-CS-silica. The urea denaturation process and the elute condition for the chromatographic refolding were optimized by measuring tryptophan fluorescence and activity of catalase. The refolding performance of the proposed DLAC was compared with dilution refolding. The protein concentration during the proposed chromatographic refolding increased by a factor of 20 without reducing the yield achieved as compared to dilution refolding. The column-based protein refolding strategy based on dye-ligand affinity chromatography with porous biomaterial being matrix possessed potential in chromatographic refolding of protein.

  18. PPI-IRO: A two-stage method for protein-protein interaction extraction based on interaction relation ontology

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Chuanxi

    2014-01-01

    Mining Protein-Protein Interactions (PPIs) from the fast-growing biomedical literature resources has been proven as an effective approach for the identifi cation of biological regulatory networks. This paper presents a novel method based on the idea of Interaction Relation Ontology (IRO), which specifi es and organises words of various proteins interaction relationships. Our method is a two-stage PPI extraction method. At fi rst, IRO is applied in a binary classifi er to determine whether sentences contain a relation or not. Then, IRO is taken to guide PPI extraction by building sentence dependency parse tree. Comprehensive and quantitative evaluations and detailed analyses are used to demonstrate the signifi cant performance of IRO on relation sentences classifi cation and PPI extraction. Our PPI extraction method yielded a recall of around 80% and 90% and an F1 of around 54% and 66% on corpora of AIMed and Bioinfer, respectively, which are superior to most existing extraction methods. Copyright © 2014 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.

  19. Why Is There a Glass Ceiling for Threading Based Protein Structure Prediction Methods?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skolnick, Jeffrey; Zhou, Hongyi

    2016-10-26

    Despite their different implementations, comparison of the best threading approaches to the prediction of evolutionary distant protein structures reveals that they tend to succeed or fail on the same protein targets. This is true despite the fact that the structural template library has good templates for all cases. Thus, a key question is why are certain protein structures threadable while others are not. Comparison with threading results on a set of artificial sequences selected for stability further argues that the failure of threading is due to the nature of the protein structures themselves. Using a new contact map based alignment algorithm, we demonstrate that certain folds are highly degenerate in that they can have very similar coarse grained fractions of native contacts aligned and yet differ significantly from the native structure. For threadable proteins, this is not the case. Thus, contemporary threading approaches appear to have reached a plateau, and new approaches to structure prediction are required.

  20. An intrinsically fluorescent recognition ligand scaffold based on chaperonin protein and semiconductor quantum-dot conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hongzhi; Li, Yi-Fen; Kagawa, Hiromi K; Trent, Jonathan D; Mudalige, Kumara; Cotlet, Mircea; Swanson, Basil I

    2009-05-01

    Genetic engineering of a novel protein-nanoparticle hybrid system with great potential for biosensing applications and for patterning of various types of nanoparticles is described. The hybrid system is based on a genetically modified chaperonin protein from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae. This chaperonin is an 18-subunit double ring, which self-assembles in the presence of Mg ions and ATP. Described here is a mutant chaperonin (His-beta-loopless, HBLL) with increased access to the central cavity and His-tags on each subunit extending into the central cavity. This mutant binds water-soluble semiconductor quantum dots, creating a protein-encapsulated fluorescent nanoparticle. The new bioconjugate has high affinity, in the order of strong antibody-antigen interactions, a one-to-one protein-nanoparticle stoichiometry, and high stability. By adding selective binding sites to the solvent-exposed regions of the chaperonin, this protein-nanoparticle bioconjugate becomes a sensor for specific targets.

  1. Prediction of hot spot residues at protein-protein interfaces by combining machine learning and energy-based methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pontil Massimiliano

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alanine scanning mutagenesis is a powerful experimental methodology for investigating the structural and energetic characteristics of protein complexes. Individual amino-acids are systematically mutated to alanine and changes in free energy of binding (ΔΔG measured. Several experiments have shown that protein-protein interactions are critically dependent on just a few residues ("hot spots" at the interface. Hot spots make a dominant contribution to the free energy of binding and if mutated they can disrupt the interaction. As mutagenesis studies require significant experimental efforts, there is a need for accurate and reliable computational methods. Such methods would also add to our understanding of the determinants of affinity and specificity in protein-protein recognition. Results We present a novel computational strategy to identify hot spot residues, given the structure of a complex. We consider the basic energetic terms that contribute to hot spot interactions, i.e. van der Waals potentials, solvation energy, hydrogen bonds and Coulomb electrostatics. We treat them as input features and use machine learning algorithms such as Support Vector Machines and Gaussian Processes to optimally combine and integrate them, based on a set of training examples of alanine mutations. We show that our approach is effective in predicting hot spots and it compares favourably to other available methods. In particular we find the best performances using Transductive Support Vector Machines, a semi-supervised learning scheme. When hot spots are defined as those residues for which ΔΔG ≥ 2 kcal/mol, our method achieves a precision and a recall respectively of 56% and 65%. Conclusion We have developed an hybrid scheme in which energy terms are used as input features of machine learning models. This strategy combines the strengths of machine learning and energy-based methods. Although so far these two types of approaches have mainly been

  2. Classification of lung cancer tumors based on structural and physicochemical properties of proteins by bioinformatics models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinzadeh, Faezeh; Ebrahimi, Mansour; Goliaei, Bahram; Shamabadi, Narges

    2012-01-01

    Rapid distinction between small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tumors is very important in diagnosis of this disease. Furthermore sequence-derived structural and physicochemical descriptors are very useful for machine learning prediction of protein structural and functional classes, classifying proteins and the prediction performance. Herein, in this study is the classification of lung tumors based on 1497 attributes derived from structural and physicochemical properties of protein sequences (based on genes defined by microarray analysis) investigated through a combination of attribute weighting, supervised and unsupervised clustering algorithms. Eighty percent of the weighting methods selected features such as autocorrelation, dipeptide composition and distribution of hydrophobicity as the most important protein attributes in classification of SCLC, NSCLC and COMMON classes of lung tumors. The same results were observed by most tree induction algorithms while descriptors of hydrophobicity distribution were high in protein sequences COMMON in both groups and distribution of charge in these proteins was very low; showing COMMON proteins were very hydrophobic. Furthermore, compositions of polar dipeptide in SCLC proteins were higher than NSCLC proteins. Some clustering models (alone or in combination with attribute weighting algorithms) were able to nearly classify SCLC and NSCLC proteins. Random Forest tree induction algorithm, calculated on leaves one-out and 10-fold cross validation) shows more than 86% accuracy in clustering and predicting three different lung cancer tumors. Here for the first time the application of data mining tools to effectively classify three classes of lung cancer tumors regarding the importance of dipeptide composition, autocorrelation and distribution descriptor has been reported.

  3. Classification of lung cancer tumors based on structural and physicochemical properties of proteins by bioinformatics models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faezeh Hosseinzadeh

    Full Text Available Rapid distinction between small cell lung cancer (SCLC and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC tumors is very important in diagnosis of this disease. Furthermore sequence-derived structural and physicochemical descriptors are very useful for machine learning prediction of protein structural and functional classes, classifying proteins and the prediction performance. Herein, in this study is the classification of lung tumors based on 1497 attributes derived from structural and physicochemical properties of protein sequences (based on genes defined by microarray analysis investigated through a combination of attribute weighting, supervised and unsupervised clustering algorithms. Eighty percent of the weighting methods selected features such as autocorrelation, dipeptide composition and distribution of hydrophobicity as the most important protein attributes in classification of SCLC, NSCLC and COMMON classes of lung tumors. The same results were observed by most tree induction algorithms while descriptors of hydrophobicity distribution were high in protein sequences COMMON in both groups and distribution of charge in these proteins was very low; showing COMMON proteins were very hydrophobic. Furthermore, compositions of polar dipeptide in SCLC proteins were higher than NSCLC proteins. Some clustering models (alone or in combination with attribute weighting algorithms were able to nearly classify SCLC and NSCLC proteins. Random Forest tree induction algorithm, calculated on leaves one-out and 10-fold cross validation shows more than 86% accuracy in clustering and predicting three different lung cancer tumors. Here for the first time the application of data mining tools to effectively classify three classes of lung cancer tumors regarding the importance of dipeptide composition, autocorrelation and distribution descriptor has been reported.

  4. An effective system for detecting protein-protein interaction based on in vivo cleavage by PPV NIa protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Nuoyan; Huang, Xiahe; Yin, Bojiao; Wang, Dan; Xie, Qi

    2012-12-01

    Detection of protein-protein interaction can provide valuable information for investigating the biological function of proteins. The current methods that applied in protein-protein interaction, such as co-immunoprecipitation and pull down etc., often cause plenty of working time due to the burdensome cloning and purification procedures. Here we established a system that characterization of protein-protein interaction was accomplished by co-expression and simply purification of target proteins from one expression cassette within E. coli system. We modified pET vector into co-expression vector pInvivo which encoded PPV NIa protease, two cleavage site F and two multiple cloning sites that flanking cleavage sites. The target proteins (for example: protein A and protein B) were inserted at multiple cloning sites and translated into polyprotein in the order of MBP tag-protein A-site F-PPV NIa protease-site F-protein B-His(6) tag. PPV NIa protease carried out intracellular cleavage along expression, then led to the separation of polyprotein components, therefore, the interaction between protein A-protein B can be detected through one-step purification and analysis. Negative control for protein B was brought into this system for monitoring interaction specificity. We successfully employed this system to prove two cases of reported protien-protein interaction: RHA2a/ANAC and FTA/FTB. In conclusion, a convenient and efficient system has been successfully developed for detecting protein-protein interaction.

  5. Protein structure modelling and evaluation based on a 4-distance description of side-chain interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inbar Yuval

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurate evaluation and modelling of residue-residue interactions within and between proteins is a key aspect of computational structure prediction including homology modelling, protein-protein docking, refinement of low-resolution structures, and computational protein design. Results Here we introduce a method for accurate protein structure modelling and evaluation based on a novel 4-distance description of residue-residue interaction geometry. Statistical 4-distance preferences were extracted from high-resolution protein structures and were used as a basis for a knowledge-based potential, called Hunter. We demonstrate that 4-distance description of side chain interactions can be used reliably to discriminate the native structure from a set of decoys. Hunter ranked the native structure as the top one in 217 out of 220 high-resolution decoy sets, in 25 out of 28 "Decoys 'R' Us" decoy sets and in 24 out of 27 high-resolution CASP7/8 decoy sets. The same concept was applied to side chain modelling in protein structures. On a set of very high-resolution protein structures the average RMSD was 1.47 Å for all residues and 0.73 Å for buried residues, which is in the range of attainable accuracy for a model. Finally, we show that Hunter performs as good or better than other top methods in homology modelling based on results from the CASP7 experiment. The supporting web site http://bioinfo.weizmann.ac.il/hunter/ was developed to enable the use of Hunter and for visualization and interactive exploration of 4-distance distributions. Conclusions Our results suggest that Hunter can be used as a tool for evaluation and for accurate modelling of residue-residue interactions in protein structures. The same methodology is applicable to other areas involving high-resolution modelling of biomolecules.

  6. Isolation and characterization of peptidoglycan recognition protein 1 from antler base of sika deer (Cervus nippon).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wei; Yin, Yongguang; Zhou, Yajun; He, Guidan; Qi, Yue

    2014-03-01

    Peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGRPs) are secreted innate immunity pattern recognition molecules. In this study, a new peptidoglycan recognition protein 1 named cnPGRP1 was isolated from an antler base of sika deer Cervus nippon. The antler base antimicrobial proteins (AAP) were subjected to consecutive chromatographic methods connected to Sephadex G-25 gel filtration column (CM) anion-exchange column, and RP-HPLC. The molecular weight of cnPGRP1 was 17.2 kDa under SDS-PAGE, and peptide mass fingerprint analysis by MALDI-TOF-MS as peptidoglycan recognition protein 1 matched to Dasypus novemcinctus. The matched amino acids sequences were RLYEIIQKWPHYRA. Both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria can be killed by cnPGRP1 in the 50-250 μg/mL range through in vitro. Furthermore, cnPGRP1 has been found to bind Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative bacteria, and even fungus.

  7. A centrifugation-based physicochemical characterization method for the interaction between proteins and nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekdemir, Ahmet; Stellacci, Francesco

    2016-10-01

    Nanomedicine requires in-depth knowledge of nanoparticle-protein interactions. These interactions are studied with methods limited to large or fluorescently labelled nanoparticles as they rely on scattering or fluorescence-correlation signals. Here, we have developed a method based on analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) as an absorbance-based, label-free tool to determine dissociation constants (KD), stoichiometry (Nmax), and Hill coefficient (n), for the association of bovine serum albumin (BSA) with gold nanoparticles. Absorption at 520 nm in AUC renders the measurements insensitive to unbound and aggregated proteins. Measurements remain accurate and do not become more challenging for small (sub-10 nm) nanoparticles. In AUC, frictional ratio analysis allows for the qualitative assessment of the shape of the analyte. Data suggests that small-nanoparticles/protein complexes significantly deviate from a spherical shape even at maximum coverage. We believe that this method could become one of the established approaches for the characterization of the interaction of (small) nanoparticles with proteins.

  8. A statistical framework for protein quantitation in bottom-up MS-based proteomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpievitch, Yuliya; Stanley, Jeffrey R.; Taverner, Thomas; Huang, Jianhua; Adkins, Joshua N.; Ansong, Charles; Heffron, Fred; Metz, Thomas O.; Qian, Weijun; Yoon, Hyunjin; Smith, Richard D.; Dabney, Alan R.

    2009-08-15

    ABSTRACT Motivation: Quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics requires protein-level estimates and confidence measures. Challenges include the presence of low-quality or incorrectly identified peptides and widespread, informative, missing data. Furthermore, models are required for rolling peptide-level information up to the protein level. Results: We present a statistical model for protein abundance in terms of peptide peak intensities, applicable to both label-based and label-free quantitation experiments. The model allows for both random and censoring missingness mechanisms and provides naturally for protein-level estimates and confidence measures. The model is also used to derive automated filtering and imputation routines. Three LC-MS datasets are used to illustrate the methods. Availability: The software has been made available in the open-source proteomics platform DAnTE (Polpitiya et al. (2008)) (http://omics.pnl.gov/software/). Contact: adabney@stat.tamu.edu

  9. SDU: A Semidefinite Programming-Based Underestimation Method for Stochastic Global Optimization in Protein Docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschalidis, Ioannis Ch; Shen, Yang; Vakili, Pirooz; Vajda, Sandor

    2007-04-01

    This paper introduces a new stochastic global optimization method targeting protein-protein docking problems, an important class of problems in computational structural biology. The method is based on finding general convex quadratic underestimators to the binding energy function that is funnel-like. Finding the optimum underestimator requires solving a semidefinite programming problem, hence the name semidefinite programming-based underestimation (SDU). The underestimator is used to bias sampling in the search region. It is established that under appropriate conditions SDU locates the global energy minimum with probability approaching one as the sample size grows. A detailed comparison of SDU with a related method of convex global underestimator (CGU), and computational results for protein-protein docking problems are provided.

  10. Proteome-wide prediction of self-interacting proteins based on multiple properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhongyang; Guo, Feifei; Zhang, Jiyang; Wang, Jian; Lu, Liang; Li, Dong; He, Fuchu

    2013-06-01

    Self-interacting proteins, whose two or more copies can interact with each other, play important roles in cellular functions and the evolution of protein interaction networks (PINs). Knowing whether a protein can self-interact can contribute to and sometimes is crucial for the elucidation of its functions. Previous related research has mainly focused on the structures and functions of specific self-interacting proteins, whereas knowledge on their overall properties is limited. Meanwhile, the two current most common high throughput protein interaction assays have limited ability to detect self-interactions because of biological artifacts and design limitations, whereas the bioinformatic prediction method of self-interacting proteins is lacking. This study aims to systematically study and predict self-interacting proteins from an overall perspective. We find that compared with other proteins the self-interacting proteins in the structural aspect contain more domains; in the evolutionary aspect they tend to be conserved and ancient; in the functional aspect they are significantly enriched with enzyme genes, housekeeping genes, and drug targets, and in the topological aspect tend to occupy important positions in PINs. Furthermore, based on these features, after feature selection, we use logistic regression to integrate six representative features, including Gene Ontology term, domain, paralogous interactor, enzyme, model organism self-interacting protein, and betweenness centrality in the PIN, to develop a proteome-wide prediction model of self-interacting proteins. Using 5-fold cross-validation and an independent test, this model shows good performance. Finally, the prediction model is developed into a user-friendly web service SLIPPER (SeLf-Interacting Protein PrEdictoR). Users may submit a list of proteins, and then SLIPPER will return the probability_scores measuring their possibility to be self-interacting proteins and various related annotation information. This

  11. PCR-based gene synthesis to produce recombinant proteins for crystallization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byrne-Steele Miranda L

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene synthesis technologies are an important tool for structural biology projects, allowing increased protein expression through codon optimization and facilitating sequence alterations. Existing methods, however, can be complex and not always reproducible, prompting researchers to use commercial suppliers rather than synthesize genes themselves. Results A PCR-based gene synthesis method, referred to as SeqTBIO, is described to efficiently assemble the coding regions of two novel hyperthermophilic proteins, PAZ (Piwi/Argonaute/Zwille domain, a siRNA-binding domain of an Argonaute protein homologue and a deletion mutant of a family A DNA polymerase (PolA. The gene synthesis procedure is based on sequential assembly such that homogeneous DNA products can be obtained after each synthesis step without extensive manipulation or purification requirements. Coupling the gene synthesis procedure to in vivo homologous recombination techniques allows efficient subcloning and site-directed mutagenesis for error correction. The recombinant proteins of PAZ and PolA were subsequently overexpressed in E. coli and used for protein crystallization. Crystals of both proteins were obtained and they were suitable for X-ray analysis. Conclusion We demonstrate, by using PAZ and PolA as examples, the feasibility of integrating the gene synthesis, error correction and subcloning techniques into a non-automated gene to crystal pipeline such that genes can be designed, synthesized and implemented for recombinant expression and protein crystallization.

  12. Predicting DNA-binding sites of proteins based on sequential and 3D structural information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bi-Qing; Feng, Kai-Yan; Ding, Juan; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2014-06-01

    Protein-DNA interactions play important roles in many biological processes. To understand the molecular mechanisms of protein-DNA interaction, it is necessary to identify the DNA-binding sites in DNA-binding proteins. In the last decade, computational approaches have been developed to predict protein-DNA-binding sites based solely on protein sequences. In this study, we developed a novel predictor based on support vector machine algorithm coupled with the maximum relevance minimum redundancy method followed by incremental feature selection. We incorporated not only features of physicochemical/biochemical properties, sequence conservation, residual disorder, secondary structure, solvent accessibility, but also five three-dimensional (3D) structural features calculated from PDB data to predict the protein-DNA interaction sites. Feature analysis showed that 3D structural features indeed contributed to the prediction of DNA-binding site and it was demonstrated that the prediction performance was better with 3D structural features than without them. It was also shown via analysis of features from each site that the features of DNA-binding site itself contribute the most to the prediction. Our prediction method may become a useful tool for identifying the DNA-binding sites and the feature analysis described in this paper may provide useful insights for in-depth investigations into the mechanisms of protein-DNA interaction.

  13. Physics-based scoring of protein-ligand interactions: explicit polarizability, quantum mechanics and free energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryce, Richard A

    2011-04-01

    The ability to accurately predict the interaction of a ligand with its receptor is a key limitation in computer-aided drug design approaches such as virtual screening and de novo design. In this article, we examine current strategies for a physics-based approach to scoring of protein-ligand affinity, as well as outlining recent developments in force fields and quantum chemical techniques. We also consider advances in the development and application of simulation-based free energy methods to study protein-ligand interactions. Fuelled by recent advances in computational algorithms and hardware, there is the opportunity for increased integration of physics-based scoring approaches at earlier stages in computationally guided drug discovery. Specifically, we envisage increased use of implicit solvent models and simulation-based scoring methods as tools for computing the affinities of large virtual ligand libraries. Approaches based on end point simulations and reference potentials allow the application of more advanced potential energy functions to prediction of protein-ligand binding affinities. Comprehensive evaluation of polarizable force fields and quantum mechanical (QM)/molecular mechanical and QM methods in scoring of protein-ligand interactions is required, particularly in their ability to address challenging targets such as metalloproteins and other proteins that make highly polar interactions. Finally, we anticipate increasingly quantitative free energy perturbation and thermodynamic integration methods that are practical for optimization of hits obtained from screened ligand libraries.

  14. Fluorescent Protein Based FRET Pairs with Improved Dynamic Range for Fluorescence Lifetime Measurements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobin George Abraham

    Full Text Available Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET using fluorescent protein variants is widely used to study biochemical processes in living cells. FRET detection by fluorescence lifetime measurements is the most direct and robust method to measure FRET. The traditional cyan-yellow fluorescent protein based FRET pairs are getting replaced by green-red fluorescent protein variants. The green-red pair enables excitation at a longer wavelength which reduces cellular autofluorescence and phototoxicity while monitoring FRET. Despite the advances in FRET based sensors, the low FRET efficiency and dynamic range still complicates their use in cell biology and high throughput screening. In this paper, we utilized the higher lifetime of NowGFP and screened red fluorescent protein variants to develop FRET pairs with high dynamic range and FRET efficiency. The FRET variations were analyzed by proteolytic activity and detected by steady-state and time-resolved measurements. Based on the results, NowGFP-tdTomato and NowGFP-mRuby2 have shown high potentials as FRET pairs with large fluorescence lifetime dynamic range. The in vitro measurements revealed that the NowGFP-tdTomato has the highest Förster radius for any fluorescent protein based FRET pairs yet used in biological studies. The developed FRET pairs will be useful for designing FRET based sensors and studies employing Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM.

  15. Prediction of protein secondary structure using probability based features and a hybrid system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanty, Pradip; Pal, Nikhil R; Mudi, Rajani K

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, we propose some co-occurrence probability-based features for prediction of protein secondary structure. The features are extracted using occurrence/nonoccurrence of secondary structures in the protein sequences. We explore two types of features: position-specific (based on position of amino acid on fragments of protein sequences) as well as position-independent (independent of amino acid position on fragments of protein sequences). We use a hybrid system, NEUROSVM, consisting of neural networks and support vector machines for classification of secondary structures. We propose two schemes NSVMps and NSVM for protein secondary structure prediction. The NSVMps uses position-specific probability-based features and NEUROSVM classifier whereas NSVM uses the same classifier with position-independent probability-based features. The proposed method falls in the single-sequence category of methods because it does not use any sequence profile information such as position specific scoring matrices (PSSM) derived from PSI-BLAST. Two widely used datasets RS126 and CB513 are used in the experiments. The results obtained using the proposed features and NEUROSVM classifier are better than most of the existing single-sequence prediction methods. Most importantly, the results using NSVMps that are obtained using lower dimensional features, are comparable to those by other existing methods. The NSVMps and NSVM are finally tested on target proteins of the critical assessment of protein structure prediction experiment-9 (CASP9). A larger dataset is used to compare the performance of the proposed methods with that of two recent single-sequence prediction methods. We also investigate the impact of presence of different amino acid residues (in protein sequences) that are responsible for the formation of different secondary structures.

  16. Structural Insights for Engineering Binding Proteins Based on Non-Antibody Scaffolds

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Engineered binding proteins derived from non-antibody scaffolds constitute an increasingly prominent class of reagents in both research and therapeutic applications. The growing number of crystal structures of these “alternative” scaffold-based binding proteins in complex with their targets illustrate the mechanisms of molecular recognition that are common among these systems and those unique to each. This information is useful for critically assessing and improving/expanding engineering stra...

  17. Extraction and purification methods in downstream processing of plant-based recombinant proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łojewska, Ewelina; Kowalczyk, Tomasz; Olejniczak, Szymon; Sakowicz, Tomasz

    2016-04-01

    During the last two decades, the production of recombinant proteins in plant systems has been receiving increased attention. Currently, proteins are considered as the most important biopharmaceuticals. However, high costs and problems with scaling up the purification and isolation processes make the production of plant-based recombinant proteins a challenging task. This paper presents a summary of the information regarding the downstream processing in plant systems and provides a comprehensible overview of its key steps, such as extraction and purification. To highlight the recent progress, mainly new developments in the downstream technology have been chosen. Furthermore, besides most popular techniques, alternative methods have been described.

  18. Activity Detection of GalNAc Transferases by Protein-Based Fluorescence Sensors In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Lina; Bachert, Collin; Linstedt, Adam D

    2016-01-01

    Mucin-type O-glycosylation occurring in the Golgi apparatus is an important protein posttranslational modification initiated by up to 20 GalNAc-transferase isozymes with largely distinct substrate specificities. Regulation of this enzyme family affects a vast array of proteins transiting the secretory pathway and misregulation causes human diseases. Here we describe the use of protein-based fluorescence sensors that traffic in the secretory pathway to monitor GalNAc-transferase activity in living cells. The sensors can either be "pan" or isozyme specific.

  19. Predicting gram-positive bacterial protein subcellular localization based on localization motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yinxia; Li, Tonghua; Sun, Jiangming; Tang, Shengnan; Xiong, Wenwei; Li, Dapeng; Chen, Guanyan; Cong, Peisheng

    2012-09-07

    The subcellular localization of proteins is closely related to their functions. In this work, we propose a novel approach based on localization motifs to improve the accuracy of predicting subcellular localization of Gram-positive bacterial proteins. Our approach performed well on a five-fold cross validation with an overall success rate of 89.5%. Besides, the overall success rate of an independent testing dataset was 97.7%. Moreover, our approach was tested using a new experimentally-determined set of Gram-positive bacteria proteins and achieved an overall success rate of 96.3%.

  20. Persistence of the protective immunity and kinetics of the isotype specific antibody response against the viral nucleocapsid protein after experimental Schmallenberg virus infection of sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poskin, Antoine; Verite, Stephanie; Comtet, Loic; Van der Stede, Yves; Cay, Brigitte; De Regge, Nick

    2015-10-15

    Schmallenberg virus (SBV) is an Orthobunyavirus that induces abortion, stillbirths and congenital malformations in ruminants. SBV infection induces a long lasting seroconversion under natural conditions. The persistence of the protective immunity and the isotype specific antibody response upon SBV infection of sheep has however not been studied in detail. Five sheep were kept in BSL3 facilities for more than 16 months and subjected to repeated SBV infections. Blood was regularly sampled and organs were collected at euthanasia. The presence of SBV RNA in serum and organs was measured with quantitative real-time PCR. The appearance and persistence of neutralizing and SBV nucleoprotein (N) isotype specific antibodies was determined with virus neutralization tests (VNT) and ELISAs. The primo SBV infection protected ewes against clinical signs, viraemia and virus replication in organs upon challenge infections more than 15 months later. Production of neutralizing SBV specific antibodies was first detected around 6 days post primo-inoculation with VNT and correlated with the appearance of SBV-N specific IgM antibodies. These IgM antibodies remained present for 2 weeks. SBV-N specific IgG antibodies were first detected between 10 and 21 dpi and reached a plateau at 28 dpi. This plateau remained consistently high and no significant decrease in titre was found over a period of more than 1 year. Similar results were found for the neutralising antibody response. In conclusion, the SBV specific IgM response probably eliminates SBV from the blood and the protective immunity induced by SBV infection protects sheep against reinfection for at least 16 months.