WorldWideScience

Sample records for nucleation kinetics effects

  1. Quantifying the Effect of Stress on Sn Whisker Nucleation Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chason, Eric; Vasquez, Justin; Pei, Fei; Jain, Nupur; Hitt, Andrew

    2018-01-01

    Although Sn whiskers have been studied extensively, there is still a need to understand the driving forces behind whisker nucleation and growth. Many studies point to the role of stress, but confirming this requires a quantitative comparison between controlled stress and the resulting whisker evolution. Recent experimental studies applied stress to a Sn layer via thermal cycling and simultaneously monitored the evolution of the temperature, stress and number of nuclei. In this work, we analyze these nucleation kinetics in terms of classical nucleation theory to relate the observed behavior to underlying mechanisms including a stress dependent activation energy and a temperature and stress-dependent whisker growth rate. Non-linear least squares fitting of the data taken at different temperatures and strain rates to the model shows that the results can be understood in terms of stress decreasing the barrier for whisker nucleation.

  2. The Effect of Spatial Heterogeneities on Nucleation Kinetics in Amorphous Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ye

    The mechanical property of the Al based metallic glass could be enhanced significantly by introducing the high number density of Al-fcc nanocrystals (1021 ˜1023 m-3) to the amorphous matrix through annealing treatments, which motivates the study of the nucleation kinetics for the microstructure control. With the presence of a high number density (1025 m-3) of aluminum-like medium range order (MRO), the Al-Y-Fe metallic glass is considered to be spatially heterogeneous. Combining the classical nucleation theory with the structural configuration, a MRO seeded nucleation model has been proposed and yields theoretical steady state nucleation rates consistent with the experimental results. In addition, this model satisfies all the thermodynamic and kinetic constraints to be reasonable. Compared with the Al-Y-Fe system, the primary crystallization onset temperature decreases significantly and the transient delay time (tau) is shorter in the Al-Y-Fe-Pb(In) systems because the insoluble Pb and In nanoparticles in the amorphous matrix served as extrinsic spatial heterogeneity to provide the nucleation sites for Al-fcc precipitation and the high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images of the Pb-Al interface revealed a good wetting behavior between the Al and Pb nanoparticles. The study of the transient delay time (tau) could provide insight on the transport behavior during the nucleation and a more convenient approach to evaluate the delay time has been developed by measuring the Al-Y-Fe amorphous alloy glass transition temperature (Tg) shift with the increasing annealing time (tannealing) in FlashDSC. The break point in the Tg vs. log(tannealing) plot has been identified to correspond to the delay time by the TEM characterization. FlashDSC tests with different heating rates and different compositions (Al-Y-Fe-Pb and Zn-Mg-Ca-Yb amorphous alloys) further confirmed the break point and delay time relationship. The amorphous matrix composition and the

  3. Probabilistic approach to lysozyme crystal nucleation kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, Ivaylo L; Hodzhaoglu, Feyzim V; Koleva, Dobryana P

    2015-09-01

    Nucleation of lysozyme crystals in quiescent solutions at a regime of progressive nucleation is investigated under an optical microscope at conditions of constant supersaturation. A method based on the stochastic nature of crystal nucleation and using discrete time sampling of small solution volumes for the presence or absence of detectable crystals is developed. It allows probabilities for crystal detection to be experimentally estimated. One hundred single samplings were used for each probability determination for 18 time intervals and six lysozyme concentrations. Fitting of a particular probability function to experimentally obtained data made possible the direct evaluation of stationary rates for lysozyme crystal nucleation, the time for growth of supernuclei to a detectable size and probability distribution of nucleation times. Obtained stationary nucleation rates were then used for the calculation of other nucleation parameters, such as the kinetic nucleation factor, nucleus size, work for nucleus formation and effective specific surface energy of the nucleus. The experimental method itself is simple and adaptable and can be used for crystal nucleation studies of arbitrary soluble substances with known solubility at particular solution conditions.

  4. Effects of clustered nucleation on recrystallization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storm, Søren; Juul Jensen, Dorte

    2009-01-01

    Computer simulations are used to study effects of an experimentally determined 3D distribution of nucleation sites on the recrystallization kinetics and on the evolution of the recrystallized microstructure as compared to simulations with random nucleation. It is found that although...... the experimentally observed clustering is not very strong, it changes the kinetics and the recrystallized microstructural morphology plus leads to a recrystallized grain size distribution, which is significantly broadened compared to that of random nucleation simulations. (C) 2009 Published by Elsevier Ltd...

  5. Dust Effects on Nucleation Kinetics and Nanoparticle Product Size Distributions: Illustrative Case Study of a Prototype Ir(0)n Transition-Metal Nanoparticle Formation System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özkar, Saim; Finke, Richard G

    2017-07-05

    The question is addressed if dust is kinetically important in the nucleation and growth of Ir(0) n nanoparticles formed from [Bu 4 N] 5 Na 3 (1,5-COD)Ir I ·P 2 W 15 Nb 3 O 62 (hereafter [(COD)Ir·POM] 8- ), reduced by H 2 in propylene carbonate solvent. Following a concise review of the (often-neglected) literature addressing dust in nucleation phenomena dating back to the late 1800s, the nucleation and growth kinetics of the [(COD)Ir·POM] 8- precatalyst system are examined for the effects of 0.2 μm microfiltration of the solvent and precatalyst solution, of rinsing the glassware with that microfiltered solvent, of silanizing the glass reaction vessel, for the addition of nucleation apparent rate "constant" k 1obs(bimol) is shown to be slowed by a factor of ∼5 to ∼7.6, depending on the precise experiment and its conditions, just by the filtration of the precatalyst solution using a 0.20 μm filter and rinsing the glassware surface with 0.20 μm filtered propylene carbonate solvent; (ii) that simply employing a 0.20 μm filtration step narrows the size distribution of the resulting Ir(0) n nanoparticles by a factor of 2.4 from ±19 to ±8%, a remarkable result; (iii) that the narrower size distribution can be accounted for by the slowed nucleation rate constant, k 1obs(bimol) , and by the unchanged autocatalytic growth rate constant, k 2obs(bimol) , that is, by the increased ratio of k 2obs(bimol) /k 1obs(bimol) that further separates nucleation from growth in time for filtered vs unfiltered solutions; and (iv) that five lines of evidence indicate that the filterable component of the solution, which has nucleation rate-enhancing and size-dispersion broadening effects, is dust.

  6. Nucleation and Growth Kinetics from LaMer Burst Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Daniel B K; Owen, Jonathan S; Peters, Baron

    2017-10-12

    In LaMer burst nucleation, the individual nucleation events happen en masse, quasi-simultaneously, and at nearly identical homogeneous conditions. These properties make LaMer burst nucleation important for applications that require monodispersed particles and also for theoretical analyses. Sugimoto and co-workers predicted that the number of nuclei generated during a LaMer burst depends only on the solute supply rate and the growth rate, independent of the nucleation kinetics. Some experiments confirm that solute supply kinetics control the number of nuclei, but flaws in the original theoretical analysis raise questions about the predicted roles of growth and nucleation kinetics. We provide a rigorous analysis of the coupled equations that govern concentrations of nuclei and solutes. Our analysis confirms that the number of nuclei is largely determined by the solute supply and growth rates, but our predicted relationship differs from that of Sugimoto et al. Moreover, we find that additional nucleus size dependent corrections should emerge in systems with slow growth kinetics. Finally, we show how the nucleation kinetics determine the particle size distribution. We suggest that measured particle size distributions might therefore provide ways to test theoretical models of homogeneous nucleation kinetics.

  7. Nucleation of voids - the impurity effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, I-W; Taiwo, A.

    1984-01-01

    Nucleation of voids under irradiation in multicomponent alloys remains an unsolved theoretical problem. Of particular interest are the effects of nonequilibrium solute segregation phenomena on the critical nucleus and the nucleation rate. The resolution of the multicomponent nucleation in a dissipative system also has broader implication to the field of irreversible thermodynamics. The present paper describes a recent study of solute segregation effects in void nucleation. We begin with a thermodynamic model for a nonequilibrium void with interfacial segregation. The thermodynamic model is coupled with kinetic considerations of solute/solvent diffusion under a bias, which is itself related to segregation by the coating effect, to assess the stability of void embryos. To determine nucleation rate, we develop a novel technique by extending the most probable path method in statistical mechanics for nonequilibrium steady state to simulate large fluctuation with nonlinear dissipation. The path of nucleation is determined by solving an analogous problem on particle trajectory in classical dynamics. The results of both the stability analysis and the fluctuation analysis establish the paramount significance of the impurity effect via the mechanism of nonequilibrium segregation. We conclude that over-segregation is probably the most general cause for the apparently low nucleation barriers that are responsible for nearly ubiquitous occurrence of void swelling in common metals

  8. Modelling the role of compositional fluctuations in nucleation kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ženíšek, J.; Kozeschnik, E.; Svoboda, J.; Fischer, F.D.

    2015-01-01

    The classical nucleation theory of precipitate nucleation in interstitial/substitutional alloys is applied to account for the influence of spatial A–B composition fluctuations in an A–B–C matrix on the kinetics of nucleation of (A,B) 3 C precipitates. A and B are substitutional elements in the matrix and C is an interstitial component, assumed to preferentially bind to B atoms. All lattice sites are considered as potential nucleation sites. The fluctuations of chemical composition result in a local variation of the nucleation probability. The nucleation sites are eliminated from the system if they are located in a C-depleted diffusion zone belonging to an already nucleated and growing precipitate. The chemistry is that of an Fe–Cr–C system, and the specific interface energy is treated as a free parameter. Random, regular and homogeneous A–B distributions in the matrix are simulated and compared for various values of the interface energy. An increasing enhancement of the role of compositional fluctuations on nucleation kinetics with increasing interface energy and decreasing chemical driving force is observed

  9. Focus: Nucleation kinetics of shear bands in metallic glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J Q; Perepezko, J H

    2016-12-07

    The development of shear bands is recognized as the primary mechanism in controlling the plastic deformability of metallic glasses. However, the kinetics of the nucleation of shear bands has received limited attention. The nucleation of shear bands in metallic glasses (MG) can be investigated using a nanoindentation method to monitor the development of the first pop-in event that is a signature of shear band nucleation. The analysis of a statistically significant number of first pop-in events demonstrates the stochastic behavior that is characteristic of nucleation and reveals a multimodal behavior associated with local spatial heterogeneities. The shear band nucleation rate of the two nucleation modes and the associated activation energy, activation volume, and site density were determined by loading rate experiments. The nucleation activation energy is very close to the value that is characteristic of the β relaxation in metallic glass. The identification of the rate controlling kinetics for shear band nucleation offers guidance for promoting plastic flow in metallic glass.

  10. A unified kinetic approach to binary nucleation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevrekidis, P.G. [Department of Physics, Rutgers University, 136 Frelinghuysen Road]|[E.O.H.S.I., Rutgers University]|[UMDNJ, 170 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854-8019 (United States); Lazaridis, M. [Norwegian Institute for Air Research (NILU), Instittutvein 18, P. O. Box 100, N-2007 Kjeller (Norway); Drossinos, Y. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, I-21020 Ispra (Vatican City State, Holy See) (Italy); Georgopoulos, P.G. [E.O.H.S.I., Rutgers University]|[UMDNJ, 170 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States)

    1999-11-01

    Two different methods to calculate the steady-state nucleation rate in heteromolecular systems proposed by Stauffer (1976) and Langer (1969) are analyzed. Their mathematical equivalence is explicitly demonstrated, thereby obtaining a generic expression for the rate of binary nucleation. Its numerical evaluation does not entail rotation of the coordinate system at the saddle point, but it only requires data in the natural coordinate system of number fluctuations, namely molecular impingement rates, the droplet free energy and its second order derivatives at the saddle point, and the total density of condensible vapors. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Crystal nucleation kinetics in confined systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kožíšek, Zdeněk

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 12 (2013), 2269-2274 ISSN 1466-8033 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP108/12/0891 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : nucleation * phase transtion Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.858, year: 2013

  12. Binary nucleation kinetics. III. Transient behavior and time lags

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyslouzil, B.E.; Wilemski, G.

    1996-01-01

    Transient binary nucleation is more complex than unary because of the bidimensionality of the cluster formation kinetics. To investigate this problem qualitatively and quantitatively, we numerically solved the birth-death equations for vapor-to-liquid phase transitions. Our previous work showed that the customary saddle point and growth path approximations are almost always valid in steady state gas phase nucleation and only fail if the nucleated solution phase is significantly nonideal. Now, we demonstrate that in its early transient stages, binary nucleation rarely, if ever, occurs via the saddle point. This affects not only the number of particles forming but their composition and may be important for nucleation in glasses and other condensed mixtures for which time scales are very long. Before reaching the state of saddle point nucleation, most binary systems pass through a temporary stage in which the region of maximum flux extends over a ridge on the free energy surface. When ridge crossing nucleation is the steady state solution, it thus arises quite naturally as an arrested intermediate state that normally occurs in the development of saddle point nucleation. While the time dependent and steady state distributions of the fluxes and concentrations for each binary system are strongly influenced by the gas composition and species impingement rates, the ratio of nonequilibrium to equilibrium concentrations has a quasiuniversal behavior that is determined primarily by the thermodynamic properties of the liquid mixture. To test our quantitive results of the transient behavior, we directly calculated the time lag for the saddle point flux and compared it with the available analytical predictions. Although the analytical results overestimate the time lag by factors of 1.2-5, they should be adequate for purposes of planning experiments. We also found that the behavior of the saddle point time lag can indicate when steady state ridge crossing nucleation will occur

  13. Recent developments in the kinetic theory of nucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruckenstein, E; Djikaev, Y S

    2005-12-30

    A review of recent progress in the kinetics of nucleation is presented. In the conventional approach to the kinetic theory of nucleation, it is necessary to know the free energy of formation of a new-phase particle as a function of its independent variables at least for near-critical particles. Thus the conventional kinetic theory of nucleation is based on the thermodynamics of the process. The thermodynamics of nucleation can be examined by using various approaches, such as the capillarity approximation, density functional theory, and molecular simulation, each of which has its own advantages and drawbacks. Relatively recently a new approach to the kinetics of nucleation was proposed [Ruckenstein E, Nowakowski B. J Colloid Interface Sci 1990;137:583; Nowakowski B, Ruckenstein E. J Chem Phys 1991;94:8487], which is based on molecular interactions and does not employ the traditional thermodynamics, thus avoiding such a controversial notion as the surface tension of tiny clusters involved in nucleation. In the new kinetic theory the rate of emission of molecules by a new-phase particle is determined with the help of a mean first passage time analysis. This time is calculated by solving the single-molecule master equation for the probability distribution function of a surface layer molecule moving in a potential field created by the rest of the cluster. The new theory was developed for both liquid-to-solid and vapor-to-liquid phase transitions. In the former case the single-molecule master equation is the Fokker-Planck equation in the phase space which can be reduced to the Smoluchowski equation owing to the hierarchy of characteristic time scales. In the latter case, the starting master equation is a Fokker-Planck equation for the probability distribution function of a surface layer molecule with respect to both its energy and phase coordinates. Unlike the case of liquid-to-solid nucleation, this Fokker-Planck equation cannot be reduced to the Smoluchowski equation

  14. Modelling the effect of acoustic waves on nucleation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haqshenas, S. R., E-mail: seyyed.haqshenas.12@ucl.ac.uk; Saffari, N., E-mail: n.saffari@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom); Ford, I. J., E-mail: i.ford@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2016-07-14

    A phase transformation in a metastable phase can be affected when it is subjected to a high intensity ultrasound wave. In this study we determined the effect of oscillation in pressure and temperature on a phase transformation using the Gibbs droplet model in a generic format. The developed model is valid for both equilibrium and non-equilibrium clusters formed through a stationary or non-stationary process. We validated the underlying model by comparing the predicted kinetics of water droplet formation from the gas phase against experimental data in the absence of ultrasound. Our results demonstrated better agreement with experimental data in comparison with classical nucleation theory. Then, we determined the thermodynamics and kinetics of nucleation and the early stage of growth of clusters in an isothermal sonocrystallisation process. This new contribution shows that the effect of pressure on the kinetics of nucleation is cluster size-dependent in contrast to classical nucleation theory.

  15. Microstructure development in Kolmogorov, Johnson-Mehl, and Avrami nucleation and growth kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineda, Eloi; Crespo, Daniel

    1999-08-01

    A statistical model with the ability to evaluate the microstructure developed in nucleation and growth kinetics is built in the framework of the Kolmogorov, Johnson-Mehl, and Avrami theory. A populational approach is used to compute the observed grain-size distribution. The impingement process which delays grain growth is analyzed, and the effective growth rate of each population is estimated considering the previous grain history. The proposed model is integrated for a wide range of nucleation and growth protocols, including constant nucleation, pre-existing nuclei, and intermittent nucleation with interface or diffusion-controlled grain growth. The results are compared with Monte Carlo simulations, giving quantitative agreement even in cases where previous models fail.

  16. Effects of shear flow on phase nucleation and crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mura, Federica; Zaccone, Alessio

    2016-04-01

    Classical nucleation theory offers a good framework for understanding the common features of new phase formation processes in metastable homogeneous media at rest. However, nucleation processes in liquids are ubiquitously affected by hydrodynamic flow, and there is no satisfactory understanding of whether shear promotes or slows down the nucleation process. We developed a classical nucleation theory for sheared systems starting from the molecular level of the Becker-Doering master kinetic equation and we analytically derived a closed-form expression for the nucleation rate. The theory accounts for the effect of flow-mediated transport of molecules to the nucleus of the new phase, as well as for the mechanical deformation imparted to the nucleus by the flow field. The competition between flow-induced molecular transport, which accelerates nucleation, and flow-induced nucleus straining, which lowers the nucleation rate by increasing the nucleation energy barrier, gives rise to a marked nonmonotonic dependence of the nucleation rate on the shear rate. The theory predicts an optimal shear rate at which the nucleation rate is one order of magnitude larger than in the absence of flow.

  17. Effect of strain on surface diffusion and nucleation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brune, Harald; Bromann, Karsten; Röder, Holger

    1995-01-01

    The influence of strain on diffusion and nucleation has been studied by means of scanning tunneling microscopy and effective-medium theory for Ag self-diffusion on strained and unstrained (111) surfaces. Experimentally, the diffusion barrier is observed to be substantially lower on a pseudomorphic...... effect on surface diffusion and nucleation in heteroepitaxy and are thus of significance for the film morphology in the kinetic growth regime....

  18. Estimation of the nucleation kinetics for the anti-solvent crystallisation of paracetamol in methanol/water solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ó'Ciardhá, Clifford T.; Frawley, Patrick J.; Mitchell, Niall A.

    2011-08-01

    In this work the primary nucleation kinetics have been estimated for the anti-solvent crystallisation of paracetamol in methanol-water solutions from metastable zone widths (MSZW) and induction times at 25 °C. Laser back-scattering via a focused beam reflectance Measurement (FBRM ®) is utilised to detect the onset of nucleation. The theoretical approach of Kubota was employed to estimate the nucleation kinetics, which accounts for the sensitivity of the nucleation detection technique. This approach is expanded in this work to analyse the induction time for an anti-solvent crystallisation process. Solvent composition is known to have a significant impact on the measured induction times and MSZW. The induction time in this paper was measured from 40% to 70% mass water and the MSZW is measured from 40% to 60% mass water. The primary focus of the paper was to gauge the extent of how solvent composition affects nucleation kinetics so that this effect may be incorporated into a population balance model. Furthermore, the effects of solvent composition on the estimated nucleation rates are investigated. The primary nucleation rates were found to decrease with dynamic solvent composition, with the extent of their reduction linked to the gradient of the solubility curve. Finally, both MSZW and induction time methods have been found to produce similar estimates for the nucleation parameters.

  19. Nucleation of diindenoperylene and pentacene at thermal and hyperthermal incident kinetic energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kish, Edward R.; Desai, Tushar V.; Greer, Douglas R.; Engstrom, James R., E-mail: jre7@cornell.edu [School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Woll, Arthur R. [Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    The authors have examined the nucleation of diindenoperylene (DIP) on SiO{sub 2} employing primarily atomic force microscopy and focusing on the effect of incident kinetic energy employing both thermal and supersonic sources. For all incident kinetic energies examined (E{sub i} = 0.09–11.3 eV), the nucleation of DIP is homogeneous and the dependence of the maximum island density on the growth rate is described by a power law. A critical nucleus of approximately two molecules is implicated by our data. A re-examination of the nucleation of pentacene on SiO{sub 2} gives the same major result that the maximum island density is determined by the growth rate, and it is independent of the incident kinetic energy. These observations are readily understood by factoring in the size of the critical nucleus in each case, and the island density, which indicates that diffusive transport of molecules to the growing islands dominate the dynamics of growth in the submonolayer regime.

  20. Thermodynamics and kinetics of binary nucleation in ideal-gas mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseechkin, Nikolay V

    2015-08-07

    The nonisothermal single-component theory of droplet nucleation [N. V. Alekseechkin, Physica A 412, 186 (2014)] is extended to binary case; the droplet volume V, composition x, and temperature T are the variables of the theory. An approach based on macroscopic kinetics (in contrast to the standard microscopic model of nucleation operating with the probabilities of monomer attachment and detachment) is developed for the droplet evolution and results in the derived droplet motion equations in the space (V, x, T)—equations for V̇≡dV/dt, ẋ, and Ṫ. The work W(V, x, T) of the droplet formation is obtained in the vicinity of the saddle point as a quadratic form with diagonal matrix. Also, the problem of generalizing the single-component Kelvin equation for the equilibrium vapor pressure to binary case is solved; it is presented here as a problem of integrability of a Pfaffian equation. The equation for Ṫ is shown to be the first law of thermodynamics for the droplet, which is a consequence of Onsager's reciprocal relations and the linked-fluxes concept. As an example of ideal solution for demonstrative numerical calculations, the o-xylene-m-xylene system is employed. Both nonisothermal and enrichment effects are shown to exist; the mean steady-state overheat of droplets and their mean steady-state enrichment are calculated with the help of the 3D distribution function. Some qualitative peculiarities of the nucleation thermodynamics and kinetics in the water-sulfuric acid system are considered in the model of regular solution. It is shown that there is a small kinetic parameter in the theory due to the small amount of the acid in the vapor and, as a consequence, the nucleation process is isothermal.

  1. Nanoparticle Nucleation Is Termolecular in Metal and Involves Hydrogen: Evidence for a Kinetically Effective Nucleus of Three {Ir3H2x·P2W15Nb3O62}6- in Ir(0)n Nanoparticle Formation From [(1,5-COD)IrI·P2W15Nb3O62]8- Plus Dihydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özkar, Saim; Finke, Richard G

    2017-04-19

    The nucleation process yielding Ir(0) ∼300 nanoparticles from (Bu 4 N) 5 Na 3 [(1,5-COD)Ir·P 2 W 15 Nb 3 O 62 ] (abbreviated hereafter as (COD)Ir·POM 8- , where POM 9- = the polyoxometalate, P 2 W 15 Nb 3 O 62 9- ) under H 2 is investigated to learn the true molecularity, and hence the associated kinetically effective nucleus (KEN), for nanoparticle formation for the first time. Recent work with this prototype transition-metal nanoparticle formation system ( J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2014 , 136 , 17601 - 17615 ) revealed that nucleation in this system is an apparent second-order in the precatalyst, A = (COD)Ir·POM 8- , not the higher order implied by classic nucleation theory and its nA ⇌ A n , "critical nucleus", A n concept. Herein, the three most reasonable more intimate mechanisms of nucleation are tested: bimolecular nucleation, termolecular nucleation, and a mechanism termed "alternative termolecular nucleation" in which 2(COD)Ir + and 1(COD)Ir·POM 8- yield the transition state of the rate-determining step of nucleation. The results obtained definitively rule out a simple bimolecular nucleation mechanism and provide evidence for the alternative termolecular mechanism with a KEN of 3, Ir 3 . All higher molecularity nucleation mechanisms were also ruled out. Further insights into the KEN and its more detailed composition involving hydrogen, {Ir 3 H 2x POM} 6- , are also obtained from the established role of H 2 in the Ir(0) ∼300 formation balanced reaction stoichiometry, from the p(H 2 ) dependence of the kinetics, and from a D 2 /H 2 kinetic isotope effect of 1.2(±0.3). Eight insights and conclusions are presented. A section covering caveats in the current work, and thus needed future studies, is also included.

  2. Kinetics of heterogeneous nucleation of gas-atomized Sn-5 mass%Pb droplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Shu; Wu Ping; Zhou Wei; Ando, Teiichi

    2008-01-01

    A method for predicting the nucleation kinetics of gas-atomized droplets has been developed by combining models predicting the nucleation temperature of cooling droplets with a model simulating the droplet motion and cooling in gas atomization. Application to a Sn-5 mass%Pb alloy has yielded continuous-cooling transformation (CCT) diagrams for the heterogeneous droplet nucleation in helium gas atomization. Both internal nucleation caused by a catalyst present in the melt and surface nucleation caused by oxidation are considered. Droplets atomized at a high atomizing gas velocity get around surface oxidation and nucleate internally at high supercoolings. Low atomization gas velocities promote oxidation-catalyzed nucleation which leads to lower supercoolings. The developed method enables improved screening of atomized powders for critical applications where stringent control of powder microstructure is required

  3. Nucleation and growth kinetics of zirconium hydroxide by precipitation with ammonium hydroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carleson, T.E.; Chipman, N.A.

    1987-01-01

    The results of a study of the nucleation and growth kinetics of the precipitation of zirconium hydroxide from the reaction of hexafluorozirconate solution with ammonium hydroxide are reported. The McCabe linear growth rate model was used to correlate the results. The growth rate decreased with residence time and supersaturation for studies with 7 residence times (3.5 - 90 minutes and two supersaturation ratios (0.03 - 0.04, and 0.4). The nucleation rate increased with residence time and supersaturation. A negative kinetic order of nucleation was observed that may be due to the inhibition of particle growth by adsorption of reacting species on the crystal surfaces

  4. Theoretical Studies Of Nucleation Kinetics And Nanodroplet Microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilemski, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    The goals of this project were to (1) explore ways of bridging the gap between fundamental molecular nucleation theories and phenomenological approaches based on thermodynamic reasoning, (2) test and improve binary nucleation theory, and (3) provide the theoretical underpinning for a powerful new experimental technique, small angle neutron scattering (SANS) from nanodroplet aerosols, that can probe the compositional structure of nanodroplets. This report summarizes the accomplishments of this project in realizing these goals. Publications supported by this project fall into three general categories: (1) theoretical work on nucleation theory (2) experiments and modeling of nucleation and condensation in supersonic nozzles, and (3) experimental and theoretical work on nanodroplet structure and neutron scattering. These publications are listed and briefly summarized in this report.

  5. Electrostatics Control Actin Filament Nucleation and Elongation Kinetics*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crevenna, Alvaro H.; Naredi-Rainer, Nikolaus; Schönichen, André; Dzubiella, Joachim; Barber, Diane L.; Lamb, Don C.; Wedlich-Söldner, Roland

    2013-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is a central mediator of cellular morphogenesis, and rapid actin reorganization drives essential processes such as cell migration and cell division. Whereas several actin-binding proteins are known to be regulated by changes in intracellular pH, detailed information regarding the effect of pH on the actin dynamics itself is still lacking. Here, we combine bulk assays, total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy techniques, and theory to comprehensively characterize the effect of pH on actin polymerization. We show that both nucleation and elongation are strongly enhanced at acidic pH, with a maximum close to the pI of actin. Monomer association rates are similarly affected by pH at both ends, although dissociation rates are differentially affected. This indicates that electrostatics control the diffusional encounter but not the dissociation rate, which is critical for the establishment of actin filament asymmetry. A generic model of protein-protein interaction, including electrostatics, explains the observed pH sensitivity as a consequence of charge repulsion. The observed pH effect on actin in vitro agrees with measurements of Listeria propulsion in pH-controlled cells. pH regulation should therefore be considered as a modulator of actin dynamics in a cellular environment. PMID:23486468

  6. Electrostatics control actin filament nucleation and elongation kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crevenna, Alvaro H; Naredi-Rainer, Nikolaus; Schönichen, André; Dzubiella, Joachim; Barber, Diane L; Lamb, Don C; Wedlich-Söldner, Roland

    2013-04-26

    The actin cytoskeleton is a central mediator of cellular morphogenesis, and rapid actin reorganization drives essential processes such as cell migration and cell division. Whereas several actin-binding proteins are known to be regulated by changes in intracellular pH, detailed information regarding the effect of pH on the actin dynamics itself is still lacking. Here, we combine bulk assays, total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy techniques, and theory to comprehensively characterize the effect of pH on actin polymerization. We show that both nucleation and elongation are strongly enhanced at acidic pH, with a maximum close to the pI of actin. Monomer association rates are similarly affected by pH at both ends, although dissociation rates are differentially affected. This indicates that electrostatics control the diffusional encounter but not the dissociation rate, which is critical for the establishment of actin filament asymmetry. A generic model of protein-protein interaction, including electrostatics, explains the observed pH sensitivity as a consequence of charge repulsion. The observed pH effect on actin in vitro agrees with measurements of Listeria propulsion in pH-controlled cells. pH regulation should therefore be considered as a modulator of actin dynamics in a cellular environment.

  7. Structuring effects in binary nucleation : Molecular dynamics simulatons and coarse-grained nucleation theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braun, S.; Kraska, T.; Kalikmanov, V.I.

    2013-01-01

    Binary clusters formed by vapor-liquid nucleation are frequently nonhomogeneous objects in which components are not well mixed. The structure of a cluster plays an important role in nucleation and cluster growth. We demonstrate structuring effects by studying high-pressure nucleation and cluster

  8. Colloidal nanoparticle size control: experimental and kinetic modeling investigation of the ligand-metal binding role in controlling the nucleation and growth kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozaffari, Saeed; Li, Wenhui; Thompson, Coogan; Ivanov, Sergei; Seifert, Soenke; Lee, Byeongdu; Kovarik, Libor; Karim, Ayman M

    2017-09-21

    Despite the major advancements in colloidal metal nanoparticles synthesis, a quantitative mechanistic treatment of the ligand's role in controlling their size remains elusive. We report a methodology that combines in situ small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and kinetic modeling to quantitatively capture the role of ligand-metal binding (with the metal precursor and the nanoparticle surface) in controlling the synthesis kinetics. We demonstrate that accurate extraction of the kinetic rate constants requires using both, the size and number of particles obtained from in situ SAXS to decouple the contributions of particle nucleation and growth to the total metal reduction. Using Pd acetate and trioctylphosphine in different solvents, our results reveal that the binding of ligands with both the metal precursor and nanoparticle surface play a key role in controlling the rates of nucleation and growth and consequently the final size. We show that the solvent can affect the metal-ligand binding and consequently ligand coverage on the nanoparticles surface which has a strong effect on the growth rate and final size (1.4 nm in toluene and 4.3 nm in pyridine). The proposed kinetic model quantitatively predicts the effects of varying the metal concentration and ligand/metal ratio on nanoparticle size for our work and literature reports. More importantly, we demonstrate that the final size is exclusively determined by the nucleation and growth kinetics at early times and not how they change with time. Specifically, the nanoparticle size in this work and many literature reports can be predicted using a single, model independent kinetic descriptor, (growth-to-nucleation rate ratio) 1/3 , despite the different metals and synthetic conditions. The proposed model and kinetic descriptor could serve as powerful tools for the design of colloidal nanoparticles with specific sizes.

  9. Kinetics of transformations nucleated on random parallel planes: analytical modelling and computer simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rios, Paulo R; Assis, Weslley L S; Ribeiro, Tatiana C S; Villa, Elena

    2012-01-01

    In a classical paper, Cahn derived expressions for the kinetics of transformations nucleated on random planes and lines. He used those as a model for nucleation on the boundaries, edges and vertices of a polycrystal consisting of equiaxed grains. In this paper it is demonstrated that Cahn's expression for random planes may be used in situations beyond the scope envisaged in Cahn's original paper. For instance, we derived an expression for the kinetics of transformations nucleated on random parallel planes that is identical to that formerly obtained by Cahn considering random planes. Computer simulation of transformations nucleated on random parallel planes is carried out. It is shown that there is excellent agreement between simulated results and analytical solutions. Such an agreement is to be expected if both the simulation and the analytical solution are correct. (paper)

  10. Effect of Air Injection on Nucleation Rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Capellades Mendez, Gerard; Kiil, Søren; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    2017-01-01

    From disruption of the supersaturated solution to improved mass transfer in the crystallizing suspension, the introduction of a moving gas phase in a crystallizer could lead to improved rates of nucleation and crystal growth. In this work, saturated air has been injected to batch crystallizers...... to study the effects on formation of the first crystal and subsequent turbidity buildup. To account for the typically large sample-to-sample variation, nucleation rates were evaluated for a large number of replicates using probability distributions of induction times. The slope and the intercept...... was reduced from 69 to 13 min, and the mean induction time decreased from 128 to 36 min. The effect on aqueous solutions of l-arginine was less apparent, with a detection delay reduction from 15 to 3 min, and no significant changes on the rate of primary nucleation. These results demonstrate the potential...

  11. Growth Kinetics of the Homogeneously Nucleated Water Droplets: Simulation Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokshin, Anatolii V; Galimzyanov, Bulat N

    2012-01-01

    The growth of homogeneously nucleated droplets in water vapor at the fixed temperatures T = 273, 283, 293, 303, 313, 323, 333, 343, 353, 363 and 373 K (the pressure p = 1 atm.) is investigated on the basis of the coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation data with the mW-model. The treatment of simulation results is performed by means of the statistical method within the mean-first-passage-time approach, where the reaction coordinate is associated with the largest droplet size. It is found that the water droplet growth is characterized by the next features: (i) the rescaled growth law is unified at all the considered temperatures and (ii) the droplet growth evolves with acceleration and follows the power law.

  12. Acoustic Effects in Classical Nucleation Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, J. K.; Su, C.-H.

    2017-01-01

    The effect of sound wave oscillations on the rate of nucleation in a parent phase can be calculated by expanding the free energy of formation of a nucleus of the second phase in powers of the acoustic pressure. Since the period of sound wave oscillation is much shorter than the time scale for nucleation, the acoustic effect can be calculated as a time average of the free energy of formation of the nucleus. The leading non-zero term in the time average of the free energy is proportional to the square of the acoustic pressure. The Young-Laplace equation for the surface tension of the nucleus can be used to link the time average of the square of the pressure in the parent phase to its time average in the nucleus of the second phase. Due to the surface tension, the pressure in the nuclear phase is higher than the pressure in the parent phase. The effect is to lower the free energy of formation of the nucleus and increase the rate of nucleation.

  13. Kinetics of heterogeneous nucleation on intrinsic nucleants in pure fcc transition metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilde, G; Bokeloh, J; Santhaweesuk, C; Perepezko, J H; Sebright, J L

    2009-01-01

    Nucleation during solidification is heterogeneous in nature in an overwhelmingly large fraction of all solidification events. Yet, most often the identity of the heterogeneous nucleants that initiate nucleation remains a matter of speculation. In fact, a series of dedicated experiments needs to be designed in order to verify if nucleation of the material under study is based on one type of heterogeneous nucleant and if the potency of that nucleant is constant, e.g. for a population of individual droplets, or stays constant over time, e.g. throughout repeated melting/solidification cycles. In this work it is demonstrated that one way to circumvent ambiguities and analyze nucleation kinetics under well-defined conditions experimentally is given by performing statistically significant numbers of repeated single-droplet experiments. The application of proper statistics analyses based upon a non-homogeneous Poisson process is shown to yield nucleation rates that are independent of a specific nucleation model. Based upon this approach nucleation undercooling measurements on pure Au, Cu and Ni as model materials have confirmed that the experimental strategy and analysis method are valid. The results are comparable to those obtained by classical nucleation theory applied to experimental data that has been verified to comply with the assertions that are necessary for applying this model framework. However, the results reveal also other complex nucleant-sample interactions such as an initial transient undercooling behavior and impurity removal during repeated cycling treatments. The transient undercooling behavior has been analyzed by a nucleant refining model to provide new insight on the operation of melt fluxing treatments.

  14. Experimental validation of kinetic inhibitor strength on natural gas hydrate nucleation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daraboina, Nagu; Pachitsas, Stylianos; von Solms, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    The kinetics of natural gas hydrate formation in the presence of dissolved salts (NaCl) and crude oil ( a middle east crude with density 851.5 kg/m3 were investigated by using a standard rocking cell (RC-5) apparatus. The hydrate nucleation temperature was reduced in the presence of NaCl and oil...... management in oil and gas facilities. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  15. Kinetic study of nucleation and crystal growth during oxalic precipitation in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrieu, Murielle

    1999-01-01

    In spite of an extensive use in chemical industry, most of precipitation processes are based on global and empirical knowledge. However, in the recent years, fundamental and phenomenological theories have been developed and they can be used to better understand the mechanisms of precipitation of plutonium IV oxalate, which is a significant stage of the irradiated fuel reprocessing. For this reason, appropriate methods were developed to study nucleation and crystal growth kinetics in a nuclear environment under a wide range of operating conditions. Each phenomena was studied individually in order to reduce the free parameters of the System. This study bears on the oxalates of plutonium and elements which simulate plutonium behaviour during the precipitation, neodymium III and uranium IV. A compact apparatus of a specific construction was used for nucleation measurements in accordance with the Nielsen's method. The state of the mixing was characterised at the reactor scale (macro-mixing) and at molecular scale (micro-mixing). The experimental results for the studied oxalates are in good agreement with the Volmer and Weber's theory. We propose primary nucleation kinetic laws over a wide range of operating conditions (temperature, non-stoichiometric conditions, acidity...). An original method, using a high seed charge, was developed for the determination of crystal growth kinetics, in a batch crystallizer. The crystal growth rate is first order with respect to the supersaturation and the kinetic constant follows an Arrhenius type relation with activation energies of 14, 29 and 36 kJ.mol -1 for respectively neodymium III, uranium IV and plutonium IV oxalates. The overall growth process is surface integration controlled, with a screw dislocation mechanism. [fr

  16. Thermodynamic and kinetic theory of nucleation, deliquescence and efflorescence transitions in the ensemble of droplets on soluble particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shchekin, Alexander K; Shabaev, Ilya V; Hellmuth, Olaf

    2013-02-07

    Thermodynamic and kinetic peculiarities of nucleation, deliquescence and efflorescence transitions in the ensemble of droplets formed on soluble condensation nuclei from a solvent vapor have been considered. The interplay of the effects of solubility and the size of condensation nuclei has been analyzed. Activation barriers for the deliquescence and phase transitions and for the reverse efflorescence transition have been determined as functions of the relative humidity of the vapor-gas atmosphere, initial size, and solubility of condensation nuclei. It has been demonstrated that, upon variations in the relative humidity of the atmosphere, the crossover in thermodynamically stable and unstable variables of the droplet state takes place. The physical meaning of stable and unstable variables has been clarified. The kinetic equations for establishing equilibrium and steady distributions of binary droplets have been solved. The specific times for relaxation, deliquescence and efflorescence transitions have been calculated.

  17. Exploring bainite formation kinetics distinguishing grain-boundary and autocatalytic nucleation in high and low-Si steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravi, Ashwath M.; Sietsma, Jilt; Santofimia, Maria J.

    2016-01-01

    Bainite formation in steels begins with nucleation of bainitic ferrite at austenite grain boundaries (γ/γ interfaces). This leads to creation of bainitic ferrite/austenite interfaces (α/γ interfaces). Bainite formation continues through autocatalysis with nucleation of bainitic ferrite at these newly created α/γ interfaces. The displacive theory of bainite formation suggests that the formation of bainitic ferrite is accompanied by carbon enrichment of surrounding austenite. This carbon enrichment generally leads to carbide precipitation unless such a reaction is thermodynamically or kinetically unfavourable. Each bainitic ferrite nucleation event is governed by an activation energy. Depending upon the interface at which nucleation occurs, a specific activation energy would be related to a specific nucleation mechanism. On the basis of this concept, a model has been developed to understand the kinetics of bainite formation during isothermal treatments. This model is derived under the assumptions of displacive mechanism of bainite formation. The fitting parameters used in this model are physical entities related to nucleation and microstructural dimensions. The model is designed in such a way that the carbon redistribution during bainite formation is accounted for, leading to prediction of transformation kinetics both with and without of carbide precipitation during bainite formation. Furthermore, the model is validated using two different sets of kinetic data published in the literature.

  18. A method for analyzing the non-stationary nucleation and overall transition kinetics: A case of water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokshin, Anatolii V.; Galimzyanov, Bulat N.

    2014-01-01

    We present the statistical method as a direct extension of the mean first-passage time concept to the analysis of molecular dynamics simulation data of a phase transformation. According to the method, the mean first-passage time trajectories for the first (i = 1) as well as for the subsequent (i = 2, 3, 4,…) nucleation events should be extracted that allows one to calculate the time-dependent nucleation rate, the critical value of the order parameter (the critical size), the waiting times for the nucleation events, and the growth law of the nuclei – i.e., all the terms, which are usually necessary to characterize the overall transition kinetics. There are no restrictions in the application of the method by the specific thermodynamic regions; and the nucleation rate parameters are extracted according to their basic definitions. The method differs from the Wedekind-Bartell scheme and its modification [A. V. Mokshin and B. N. Galimzyanov, J. Phys. Chem. B 116, 11959 (2012)], where the passage-times for the first (largest) nucleus are evaluated only and where the average waiting time for the first nucleation event is accessible instead of the true steady-state nucleation time scale. We demonstrate an efficiency of the method by its application to the analysis of the vapor-to-liquid transition kinetics in water at the different temperatures. The nucleation rate/time characteristics and the droplet growth parameters are computed on the basis of the coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation data

  19. Stochastic kinetics reveal imperative role of anisotropic interfacial tension to determine morphology and evolution of nucleated droplets in nematogenic films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Amit Kumar

    2017-01-01

    For isotropic fluids, classical nucleation theory predicts the nucleation rate, barrier height and critical droplet size by ac- counting for the competition between bulk energy and interfacial tension. The nucleation process in liquid crystals is less understood. We numerically investigate nucleation in monolayered nematogenic films using a mesoscopic framework, in par- ticular, we study the morphology and kinetic pathway in spontaneous formation and growth of droplets of the stable phase in the metastable background. The parameter κ that quantifies the anisotropic elastic energy plays a central role in determining the geometric structure of the droplets. Noncircular nematic droplets with homogeneous director orientation are nucleated in a background of supercooled isotropic phase for small κ. For large κ, noncircular droplets with integer topological charge, accompanied by a biaxial ring at the outer surface, are nucleated. The isotropic droplet shape in a superheated nematic background is found to depend on κ in a similar way. Identical growth laws are found in the two cases, although an unusual two-stage mechanism is observed in the nucleation of isotropic droplets. Temporal distributions of successive events indi- cate the relevance of long-ranged elasticity-mediated interactions within the isotropic domains. Implications for a theoretical description of nucleation in anisotropic fluids are discussed.

  20. Janus effect of antifreeze proteins on ice nucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kai; Wang, Chunlei; Ma, Ji; Shi, Guosheng; Yao, Xi; Fang, Haiping; Song, Yanlin; Wang, Jianjun

    2016-12-20

    The mechanism of ice nucleation at the molecular level remains largely unknown. Nature endows antifreeze proteins (AFPs) with the unique capability of controlling ice formation. However, the effect of AFPs on ice nucleation has been under debate. Here we report the observation of both depression and promotion effects of AFPs on ice nucleation via selectively binding the ice-binding face (IBF) and the non-ice-binding face (NIBF) of AFPs to solid substrates. Freezing temperature and delay time assays show that ice nucleation is depressed with the NIBF exposed to liquid water, whereas ice nucleation is facilitated with the IBF exposed to liquid water. The generality of this Janus effect is verified by investigating three representative AFPs. Molecular dynamics simulation analysis shows that the Janus effect can be established by the distinct structures of the hydration layer around IBF and NIBF. Our work greatly enhances the understanding of the mechanism of AFPs at the molecular level and brings insights to the fundamentals of heterogeneous ice nucleation.

  1. Inference of some pharmacokinetic parameters of the C mitomycin, through the analysis of its micro nucleate polychromatic erythrocytes induction kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales R, P.; Vallarino K, T.; Cruz V, V.; Delgadillo H, A.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to establish pharmacokinetic parameters of the C Mitomycin (MMC) in vivo, comparing its kinetics of induction of polychromatic micro nucleate erythrocytes (EPGMN) with that of the gamma radiation. The used doses were of 0.75; 1.5 and 3. 0 μmoles/kg of MMC. It was observed that the MMC produces MN in the first cycle of cellular division and it is independent of the cytotoxic effect. This agent requires of a relatively long period of latency that is not compatible with her great reactivity, for what the pharmacokinetic values obtained in fact reflect the time that takes the processing of leisure in the DNA and the subsequent induction of ruptures that produce MN. (Author)

  2. Applicability of the Fokker-Planck equation to the description of diffusion effects on nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorokin, M. V.; Dubinko, V. I.; Borodin, V. A.

    2017-01-01

    The nucleation of islands in a supersaturated solution of surface adatoms is considered taking into account the possibility of diffusion profile formation in the island vicinity. It is shown that the treatment of diffusion-controlled cluster growth in terms of the Fokker-Planck equation is justified only provided certain restrictions are satisfied. First of all, the standard requirement that diffusion profiles of adatoms quickly adjust themselves to the actual island sizes (adiabatic principle) can be realized only for sufficiently high island concentration. The adiabatic principle is essential for the probabilities of adatom attachment to and detachment from island edges to be independent of the adatom diffusion profile establishment kinetics, justifying the island nucleation treatment as the Markovian stochastic process. Second, it is shown that the commonly used definition of the "diffusion" coefficient in the Fokker-Planck equation in terms of adatom attachment and detachment rates is justified only provided the attachment and detachment are statistically independent, which is generally not the case for the diffusion-limited growth of islands. We suggest a particular way to define the attachment and detachment rates that allows us to satisfy this requirement as well. When applied to the problem of surface island nucleation, our treatment predicts the steady-state nucleation barrier, which coincides with the conventional thermodynamic expression, even though no thermodynamic equilibrium is assumed and the adatom diffusion is treated explicitly. The effect of adatom diffusional profiles on the nucleation rate preexponential factor is also discussed. Monte Carlo simulation is employed to analyze the applicability domain of the Fokker-Planck equation and the diffusion effect beyond it. It is demonstrated that a diffusional cloud is slowing down the nucleation process for a given monomer interaction with the nucleus edge.

  3. Morphology, Nucleation, and Isothermal Crystallization Kinetics of Poly(ε-caprolactone Mixed with a Polycarbonate/MWCNTs Masterbatch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thandi P. Gumede

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, nanocomposites were prepared by melt blending poly (ε-caprolactone (PCL with a (polycarbonate (PC/multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs masterbatch in a twin-screw extruder. The nanocomposites contained 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, and 4.0 wt % MWCNTs. Even though PCL and PC have been reported to be miscible, our DSC (Differential Scanning Calorimetry, SAXS (Small Angle X-ray Scattering, and WAXS (Wide Angle X-ray Scattering results showed partial miscibility, where two phases were formed (PC-rich and PCL-rich phases. In the PC-rich phase, the small amount of PCL chains included within this phase plasticized the PC component and the PC-rich phase was therefore able to crystallize. In contrast, in the PCL-rich phase the amount of PC chains present generates changes in the glass transition temperature of the PCL phase that were much smaller than those predicted by the Fox equation. The presence of two phases was corroborated by SEM, TEM, and AFM observations where a fair number of MWCNTs diffused from the PC-rich phase to the PCL-rich phase, even though there were some MWCNTs agglomerates confined to PC-rich droplets. Standard DSC measurements demonstrated that the MWCNTs nucleation effects are saturated at a 1 wt % MWCNT concentration on the PCL-rich phase. This is consistent with the dielectric percolation threshold, which was found to be between 0.5 and 1 wt % MWCNTs. However, the nucleating efficiency was lower than literature reports for PCL/MWCNTs, due to limited phase mixing between the PC-rich and the PCL-rich phases. Isothermal crystallization experiments performed by DSC showed an increase in the overall crystallization kinetics of PCL with increases in MWCNTs as a result of their nucleating effect. Nevertheless, the crystallinity degree of the nanocomposite containing 4 wt % MWCNTs decreased by about 15% in comparison to neat PCL. This was attributed to the presence of the PC-rich phase, which was able to crystallize in view of the

  4. Heterogeneous nucleation promotes carrier transport in solution-processed organic field-effect transistors

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Ruipeng

    2012-09-04

    A new way to investigate and control the growth of solution-cast thin films is presented. The combination of in situ quartz crystal microbalance measurements with dissipation capabilities (QCM-D) and in situ grazing-incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering (GIWAXS) in an environmental chamber provides unique quantitative insights into the time-evolution of the concentration of the solution, the onset of nucleation, and the mode of growth of the organic semiconductor under varied drying conditions. It is demonstrated that careful control over the kinetics of solution drying enhances carrier transport significantly by promoting phase transformation predominantly via heterogeneous nucleation and sustained surface growth of a highly lamellar structure at the solid-liquid interface at the expense of homogeneous nucleation. A new way to investigate and control the growth of drop-cast thin films is presented. The solution-processing of small-molecule thin films of TIPS-pentacene is investigated using time-resolved techniques to reveal the mechanisms of nucleation and growth leading to solid film formation. By tuning the drying speed of the solution, the balance between surface and bulk growth modes is altered, thereby controlling the lamellar formation and tuning the carrier mobility in organic field-effect transistors Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Interaction potentials and their effect on crystal nucleation and symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, C.S.; Rahman, A.

    1979-01-01

    Molecular dynamics technique has been used to study the effect of the interaction potential on crystal nucleation and the symmetry of the nucleated phase. Four systems, namely rubidium, Lennard-Jones, rubidium-truncated, and Lennard-Jones-truncated, have been studied each at reduced density 0.95. Two types of calculations were performed. Firstly, starting from a liquid state, each system was quenched rapidly to a reduced temperature of approx.0.1. The nucleation process for these systems was monitored by studying the time dependence of temperature and the pair correlation function, and the resulting crystalline structure analyzed using among other properties the Voronoi polyhedra. Only in the case of rubidium was a b.c.c. structure nucleated. In the other three cases we obtained a f.c.c. ordering. Secondly, we have studied the effect of changing the interaction potential in a system which has already achieved an ordered state under the action of some other potential. After establishing a b.c.c. structure in a rubidium system, the change in the symmetry of the system was studied when the pair potential was modified to one of the other three forms. The results from both types of calculations are consistent: the rubidium potential leads to a b.c.c. structure while the other three potentials give an f.c.c. structure. Metastable disordered structures were not obtained in any of the calculations. However, the time elapse between the moment when the system is quick-quenched and the moment when nucleation occurs appears to depend upon the potential of interaction

  6. The Effect of Volcanic Ash Composition on Ice Nucleation Affinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genareau, K. D.; Cloer, S.; Primm, K.; Woods, T.; Tolbert, M. A.

    2017-12-01

    2 wt%) in hydrometeors, and be compositionally enriched in K2O relative to MnO and TiO2, the nucleation of ice should efficiently occur. These chemical relationships are not only important for understanding ice nucleation in volcanic plumes, but also for constraining the effect of composition on the INA of other atmospheric aerosols.

  7. Nucleation and growth kinetics for intercalated islands during deposition on layered materials with isolated pointlike surface defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Yong; Lii-Rosales, A.; Zhou, Y.; Wang, C.-J.

    2017-01-01

    Theory and stochastic lattice-gas modeling is developed for the formation of intercalated metal islands in the gallery between the top layer and the underlying layer at the surface of layered materials. Our model for this process involves deposition of atoms, some fraction of which then enter the gallery through well-separated pointlike defects in the top layer. Subsequently, these atoms diffuse within the subsurface gallery leading to nucleation and growth of intercalated islands nearby the defect point source. For the case of a single point defect, continuum diffusion equation analysis provides insight into the nucleation kinetics. However, complementary tailored lattice-gas modeling produces a more comprehensive and quantitative characterization. We analyze the large spread in nucleation times and positions relative to the defect for the first nucleated island. We also consider the formation of subsequent islands and the evolution of island growth shapes. The shapes reflect in part our natural adoption of a hexagonal close-packed island structure. As a result, motivation and support for the model is provided by scanning tunneling microscopy observations of the formation of intercalated metal islands in highly-ordered pyrolytic graphite at higher temperatures.

  8. Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Prenucleation Clusters, Classical and Non-Classical Nucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahn, Dirk

    2015-07-20

    Recent observations of prenucleation species and multi-stage crystal nucleation processes challenge the long-established view on the thermodynamics of crystal formation. Here, we review and generalize extensions to classical nucleation theory. Going beyond the conventional implementation as has been used for more than a century now, nucleation inhibitors, precursor clusters and non-classical nucleation processes are rationalized as well by analogous concepts based on competing interface and bulk energy terms. This is illustrated by recent examples of species formed prior to/instead of crystal nucleation and multi-step nucleation processes. Much of the discussed insights were obtained from molecular simulation using advanced sampling techniques, briefly summarized herein for both nucleation-controlled and diffusion-controlled aggregate formation. © 2015 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non-commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made.

  9. Submonolayer nucleation and growth and the initial stage of multilayer kinetic roughening during Ag/Ag (100) homoepitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, C.

    1996-08-01

    A comprehensive Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) study of submonolayer nucleation and growth of 2D islands in Ag/Ag(100) homoepitaxy for temperature between 295K and 370K is presented. The initial stages of multilayer kinetic roughening is also studied. Analysis of an appropriate model for metal (100) homoepitaxy, produces estimates of 350 meV for the terrace diffusion barrier, 400 meV for the adatom bond energy, and 25 meV for the additional Ehrlich-Schwoebel step-edge barrier.

  10. Investigation of nucleation kinetics in H2SO4 vapor through modeling of gas phase kinetics coupled with particle dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, Philip T. M.; Zeuch, Thomas

    2018-03-01

    We have developed a new model utilizing our existing kinetic gas phase models to simulate experimental particle size distributions emerging in dry supersaturated H2SO4 vapor homogeneously produced by rapid oxidation of SO2 through stabilized Criegee-Intermediates from 2-butene ozonolysis. We use a sectional method for simulating the particle dynamics. The particle treatment in the model is based on first principles and takes into account the transition from the kinetic to the diffusion-limited regime. It captures the temporal evolution of size distributions at the end of the ozonolysis experiment well, noting a slight underrepresentation of coagulation effects for larger particle sizes. The model correctly predicts the shape and the modes of the experimentally observed particle size distributions. The predicted modes show an extremely high sensitivity to the H2SO4 evaporation rates of the initially formed H2SO4 clusters (dimer to pentamer), which were arbitrarily restricted to decrease exponentially with increasing cluster size. In future, the analysis presented in this work can be extended to allow a direct validation of quantum chemically predicted stabilities of small H2SO4 clusters, which are believed to initiate a significant fraction of atmospheric new particle formation events. We discuss the prospects and possible limitations of the here presented approach.

  11. Investigations on the nucleation kinetics of γ-glycine single crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yogambal, C.; Rajan Babu, D.; Ezhil Vizhi, R.

    2014-01-01

    Single crystals of γ-glycine were grown by slow evaporation technique. The crystalline system was confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The optical absorption study has shown that the grown crystal possesses lower cut-off wavelength. Solubility and metastable zone width were estimated for different temperatures. The induction period of title compound was determined by varying the temperature and concentration. Nucleation parameters such as Gibbs volume free energy change (ΔG v ), interfacial tension (γ), critical free energy change of the nucleus (ΔG ⁎ ), nucleation rate (J), number of molecules in the critical nucleus (i ⁎ ) have been calculated for the aqueous solution grown γ-glycine single crystals. The second harmonic generation (SHG) of γ-glycine was confirmed by Q-switched Nd:YAG laser technique

  12. Nucleation theory with delayed interactions: an application to the early stages of the receptor-mediated adhesion/fusion kinetics of lipid vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raudino, Antonio; Pannuzzo, Martina

    2010-01-28

    A semiquantitative theory aimed to describe the adhesion kinetics between soft objects, such as living cells or vesicles, has been developed. When rigid bodies are considered, the adhesion kinetics is successfully described by the classical Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey, and Overbeek (DLVO) picture, where the energy profile of two approaching bodies is given by a two asymmetrical potential wells separated by a barrier. The transition probability from the long-distance to the short-distance minimum defines the adhesion rate. Conversely, soft bodies might follow a different pathway to reach the short-distance minimum: thermally excited fluctuations give rise to local protrusions connecting the approaching bodies. These transient adhesion sites are stabilized by short-range adhesion forces (e.g., ligand-receptor interactions between membranes brought at contact distance), while they are destabilized both by repulsive forces and by the elastic deformation energy. Above a critical area of the contact site, the adhesion forces prevail: the contact site grows in size until the complete adhesion of the two bodies inside a short-distance minimum is attained. This nucleation mechanism has been developed in the framework of a nonequilibrium Fokker-Planck picture by considering both the adhesive patch growth and dissolution processes. In addition, we also investigated the effect of the ligand-receptor pairing kinetics at the adhesion site in the time course of the patch expansion. The ratio between the ligand-receptor pairing kinetics and the expansion rate of the adhesion site is of paramount relevance in determining the overall nucleation rate. The theory enables one to self-consistently include both thermodynamics (energy barrier height) and dynamic (viscosity) parameters, giving rise in some limiting cases to simple analytical formulas. The model could be employed to rationalize fusion kinetics between vesicles, provided the short-range adhesion transition is the rate

  13. Thermal interaction effect on nucleation site distribution in subcooled boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou, Ling; Jones, Barclay

    2012-01-01

    An experimental work on subcooled boiling of refrigerant, R134a, to examine nucleation site distributions on both copper and stainless steel heating surfaces was performed. In order to obtain high fidelity active nucleation site density and distribution data, a high-speed digital camera was utilized to record bubble emission images from a view normal to heating surfaces. Statistical analyses on nucleation site data were done and their statistical distributions were obtained. Those experimentally observed nucleation site distributions were compared to the random spatial Poisson distribution. The comparisons showed that, rather than purely random, active nucleation site distributions on boiling surfaces are relatively more uniform. Experimental results also showed that on the copper heating surface, nucleation site distributions are slightly more uniform than on the stainless steel surface. This was concluded as the results of thermal interactions between nucleation sites with different solid thermal conductivities. A two dimensional thermal interaction model was then developed to quantitatively examine the thermal interactions between nucleation sites. The results give a reasonable explanation to the experimental observation on nucleation site distributions.

  14. A water activity based model of heterogeneous ice nucleation kinetics for freezing of water and aqueous solution droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knopf, Daniel A; Alpert, Peter A

    2013-01-01

    Immersion freezing of water and aqueous solutions by particles acting as ice nuclei (IN) is a common process of heterogeneous ice nucleation which occurs in many environments, especially in the atmosphere where it results in the glaciation of clouds. Here we experimentally show, using a variety of IN types suspended in various aqueous solutions, that immersion freezing temperatures and kinetics can be described solely by temperature, T, and solution water activity, a(w), which is the ratio of the vapour pressure of the solution and the saturation water vapour pressure under the same conditions and, in equilibrium, equivalent to relative humidity (RH). This allows the freezing point and corresponding heterogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficient, J(het), to be uniquely expressed by T and a(w), a result we term the a(w) based immersion freezing model (ABIFM). This method is independent of the nature of the solute and accounts for several varying parameters, including cooling rate and IN surface area, while providing a holistic description of immersion freezing and allowing prediction of freezing temperatures, J(het), frozen fractions, ice particle production rates and numbers. Our findings are based on experimental freezing data collected for various IN surface areas, A, and cooling rates, r, of droplets variously containing marine biogenic material, two soil humic acids, four mineral dusts, and one organic monolayer acting as IN. For all investigated IN types we demonstrate that droplet freezing temperatures increase as A increases. Similarly, droplet freezing temperatures increase as the cooling rate decreases. The log10(J(het)) values for the various IN types derived exclusively by Tand a(w), provide a complete description of the heterogeneous ice nucleation kinetics. Thus, the ABIFM can be applied over the entire range of T, RH, total particulate surface area, and cloud activation timescales typical of atmospheric conditions. Lastly, we demonstrate that ABIFM can

  15. E-cadherin junction formation involves an active kinetic nucleation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Kabir H.; Hartman, Kevin L.; Yu, Cheng-han; Harrison, Oliver J.; Song, Hang; Smith, Adam W.; Huang, William Y. C.; Lin, Wan-Chen; Guo, Zhenhuan; Padmanabhan, Anup; Troyanovsky, Sergey M.; Dustin, Michael L.; Shapiro, Lawrence; Honig, Barry; Zaidel-Bar, Ronen; Groves, Jay T.

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial (E)-cadherin-mediated cell−cell junctions play important roles in the development and maintenance of tissue structure in multicellular organisms. E-cadherin adhesion is thus a key element of the cellular microenvironment that provides both mechanical and biochemical signaling inputs. Here, we report in vitro reconstitution of junction-like structures between native E-cadherin in living cells and the extracellular domain of E-cadherin (E-cad-ECD) in a supported membrane. Junction formation in this hybrid live cell-supported membrane configuration requires both active processes within the living cell and a supported membrane with low E-cad-ECD mobility. The hybrid junctions recruit α-catenin and exhibit remodeled cortical actin. Observations suggest that the initial stages of junction formation in this hybrid system depend on the trans but not the cis interactions between E-cadherin molecules, and proceed via a nucleation process in which protrusion and retraction of filopodia play a key role. PMID:26290581

  16. Cloud condensation nuclei droplet growth kinetics of ultrafine particles during anthropogenic nucleation events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shantz, N. C.; Pierce, J. R.; Chang, R. Y.-W.; Vlasenko, A.; Riipinen, I.; Sjostedt, S.; Slowik, J. G.; Wiebe, A.; Liggio, J.; Abbatt, J. P. D.; Leaitch, W. R.

    2012-02-01

    Evolution of the cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) activity of 36 ± 4 nm diameter anthropogenic aerosol particles at a water supersaturation of 1.0 ± 0.1% is examined for particle nucleation and growth. During the early stages of one event, relatively few of the anthropogenic particles at 36 nm were CCN active and their growth rates by water condensation were delayed relative to ammonium sulphate particles. As the event progressed, the particle size distribution evolved to larger sizes and the relative numbers of particles at 36 nm that were CCN active increased until all the 36 nm particles were activating at the end of the event. Based on the chemistry of larger particles and the results from an aerosol chemical microphysics box model, the increase in CCN activity of the particles was most likely the result of the condensation of sulphate in this case. Despite the increased CCN activity, a delay was observed in the initial growth of these particles into cloud droplets, which persisted even when the aerosol was most CCN active later in the afternoon. Simulations show that the delay in water uptake is explained by a reduction of the mass accommodation coefficient assuming that the composition of the 36 nm particles is the same as the measured composition of the 60-100 nm particles.

  17. Kinetic effects on magnetohydrodynamic phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Taro

    2001-01-01

    Resistive and ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theories are insufficient to adequately explain MHD phenomena in the high-temperature plasma. Recent progress in numerical simulations concerning kinetic effects on magnetohydrodynamic phenomena is summarized. The following three topics are studied using various models treating extended-MHD phenomena. (1) Kinetic modifications of internal kink modes in tokamaks with normal and reversed magnetic shear configurations. (2) Temporal evolution of the toroidal Alfven eigenmode and fishbone mode in tokamaks with energetic ions. (3) Kinetic stabilization of a title mode in field-reversed configurations by means of anchoring ions and beam ions. (author)

  18. New Parameterizations for Neutral and Ion-Induced Sulfuric Acid-Water Particle Formation in Nucleation and Kinetic Regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Määttänen, Anni; Merikanto, Joonas; Henschel, Henning; Duplissy, Jonathan; Makkonen, Risto; Ortega, Ismael K.; Vehkamäki, Hanna

    2018-01-01

    We have developed new parameterizations of electrically neutral homogeneous and ion-induced sulfuric acid-water particle formation for large ranges of environmental conditions, based on an improved model that has been validated against a particle formation rate data set produced by Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets (CLOUD) experiments at European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). The model uses a thermodynamically consistent version of the Classical Nucleation Theory normalized using quantum chemical data. Unlike the earlier parameterizations for H2SO4-H2O nucleation, the model is applicable to extreme dry conditions where the one-component sulfuric acid limit is approached. Parameterizations are presented for the critical cluster sulfuric acid mole fraction, the critical cluster radius, the total number of molecules in the critical cluster, and the particle formation rate. If the critical cluster contains only one sulfuric acid molecule, a simple formula for kinetic particle formation can be used: this threshold has also been parameterized. The parameterization for electrically neutral particle formation is valid for the following ranges: temperatures 165-400 K, sulfuric acid concentrations 104-1013 cm-3, and relative humidities 0.001-100%. The ion-induced particle formation parameterization is valid for temperatures 195-400 K, sulfuric acid concentrations 104-1016 cm-3, and relative humidities 10-5-100%. The new parameterizations are thus applicable for the full range of conditions in the Earth's atmosphere relevant for binary sulfuric acid-water particle formation, including both tropospheric and stratospheric conditions. They are also suitable for describing particle formation in the atmosphere of Venus.

  19. The effects of ice on methane hydrate nucleation: a microcanonical molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhengcai; Guo, Guang-Jun

    2017-07-26

    Although ice powders are widely used in gas hydrate formation experiments, the effects of ice on hydrate nucleation and what happens in the quasi-liquid layer of ice are still not well understood. Here, we used high-precision constant energy molecular dynamics simulations to study methane hydrate nucleation from vapor-liquid mixtures exposed to the basal, prismatic, and secondary prismatic planes of hexagonal ice (ice Ih). Although no significant difference is observed in hydrate nucleation processes for these different crystal planes, it is found, more interestingly, that methane hydrate can nucleate either on the ice surface heterogeneously or in the bulk solution phase homogeneously. Several factors are mentioned to be able to promote the heterogeneous nucleation of hydrates, including the adsorption of methane molecules at the solid-liquid interface, hydrogen bonding between hydrate cages and the ice structure, the stronger ability of ice to transfer heat than that of the aqueous solution, and the higher occurrence probability of hydrate cages in the vicinity of the ice surface than in the bulk solution. Meanwhile, however, the other factors including the hydrophilicity of ice and the ice lattice mismatch with clathrate hydrates can inhibit heterogeneous nucleation on the ice surface and virtually promote homogeneous nucleation in the bulk solution. Certainly, the efficiency of ice as a promoter and as an inhibitor for heterogeneous nucleation is different. We estimate that the former is larger than the latter under the working conditions. Additionally, utilizing the benefit of ice to absorb heat, the NVE simulation of hydrate formation with ice can mimic the phenomenon of ice shrinking during the heterogeneous nucleation of hydrates and lower the overly large temperature increase during homogeneous nucleation. These results are helpful in understanding the nucleation mechanism of methane hydrate in the presence of ice.

  20. Effect of Controlled Ice Nucleation on Stability of Lactate Dehydrogenase During Freeze-Drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Rui; Tanaka, Kazunari; Mudhivarthi, Vamsi; Bogner, Robin H; Pikal, Michael J

    2018-03-01

    Several controlled ice nucleation techniques have been developed to increase the efficiency of the freeze-drying process as well as to improve the quality of pharmaceutical products. Owing to the reduction in ice surface area, these techniques have the potential to reduce the degradation of proteins labile during freezing. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of ice nucleation temperature on the in-process stability of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). LDH in potassium phosphate buffer was nucleated at -4°C, -8°C, and -12°C using ControLyo™ or allowed to nucleate spontaneously. Both the enzymatic activity and tetramer recovery after freeze-thawing linearly correlated with product ice nucleation temperature (n = 24). Controlled nucleation also significantly improved batch homogeneity as reflected by reduced inter-vial variation in activity and tetramer recovery. With the correlation established in the laboratory, the degradation of protein in manufacturing arising from ice nucleation temperature differences can be quantitatively predicted. The results show that controlled nucleation reduced the degradation of LDH during the freezing process, but this does not necessarily translate to vastly superior stability during the entire freeze-drying process. The capability of improving batch homogeneity provides potential advantages in scaling-up from lab to manufacturing scale. Copyright © 2018 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Nucleation of microcrystalline silicon: on the effect of the substrate surface nature and nano-imprint topography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmans, J; Faraz, T; Verheijen, M A; Kessels, W M M; Creatore, M

    2016-01-01

    The nucleation of microcrystalline silicon thin-films has been investigated for various substrate natures and topographies. An earlier nucleation onset on aluminium-doped zinc oxide compared to glass substrates has been revealed, associated with a microstructure enhancement and reduced surface energy. Both aspects resulted in a larger crystallite density, following classical nucleation theory. Additionally, the nucleation onset was (plasma deposition) condition-dependent. Therefore, surface chemistry and its interplay with the plasma have been proposed as key factors affecting nucleation and growth. As such, preliminary proof of the substrate nature’s role in microcrystalline silicon growth has been provided. Subsequently, the impact of nano-imprint lithography prepared surfaces on the initial microcrystalline silicon growth has been explored. Strong topographies, with a 5-fold surface area enhancement, led to a reduction in crystalline volume fraction of ∼20%. However, no correlation between topography and microstructure has been found. Instead, the suppressed crystallization has been partially ascribed to a reduced growth flux, limited surface diffusion and increased incubation layer thickness, originating from the surface area enhancement when transiting from flat to nanostructured surfaces. Furthermore, fundamental plasma parameters have been reviewed in relation with surface topography. Strong topographies are not expected to affect the ion-to-growth flux ratio. However, the reduced ion flux (due to increasing surface area) further limited the already weak ion energy transfer to surface processes. Additionally, the atomic hydrogen flux, i.e. the driving force for microcrystalline growth, has been found to decrease by a factor of 10 when transiting from flat to nanostructured topography. This resulted in an almost 6-fold reduction of the hydrogen-to-growth flux ratio, a much stronger effect than the ion-to-growth flux ratio. Since previous studies regarding

  2. Modeling of helium bubble nucleation and growth in austenitic stainless steels using an Object Kinetic Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Backer, A.; Adjanor, G.; Domain, C.; Lescoat, M.L.; Jublot-Leclerc, S.; Fortuna, F.; Gentils, A.; Ortiz, C.J.; Souidi, A.; Becquart, C.S.

    2015-01-01

    Implantation of 10 keV helium in 316L steel thin foils was performed in JANNuS-Orsay facility and modeled using a multiscale approach. Density Functional Theory (DFT) atomistic calculations [1] were used to obtain the properties of He and He-vacancy clusters, and the Binary Collision Approximation based code MARLOWE was applied to determine the damage and He-ion depth profiles as in [2,3]. The processes involved in the homogeneous He bubble nucleation and growth were defined and implemented in the Object Kinetic Monte Carlo code LAKIMOCA [4]. In particular as the He to dpa ratio was high, self-trapping of He clusters and the trap mutation of He-vacancy clusters had to be taken into account. With this multiscale approach, the formation of bubbles was modeled up to nanometer-scale size, where bubbles can be observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy. Their densities and sizes were studied as functions of fluence (up to 5 × 10 19 He/m 2 ) at two temperatures (473 and 723 K) and for different sample thicknesses (25–250 nm). It appears that the damage is not only due to the collision cascades but is also strongly controlled by the He accumulation in pressurized bubbles. Comparison with experimental data is discussed and sensible agreement is achieved

  3. Modeling of helium bubble nucleation and growth in austenitic stainless steels using an Object Kinetic Monte Carlo method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Backer, A., E-mail: andree.debacker@ccfe.ac.uk [UMET, UMR 8207, Université Lille 1, Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); CCFE, Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Abingdon, Oxon (United Kingdom); Adjanor, G.; Domain, C.; Lescoat, M.L. [EDF R& D, MMC Centre des Renardières, Moret-sur-Loing (France); Jublot-Leclerc, S.; Fortuna, F.; Gentils, A. [CSNSM, Univ Paris-Sud, CNRS/IN2P3, Orsay (France); Ortiz, C.J. [CIEMAT, Laboratorio Nacional de Fusión por Confinamiento Magnético, Madrid (Spain); Souidi, A. [Université Dr. Tahar Moulay de Saida, Saida (Algeria); Becquart, C.S. [UMET, UMR 8207, Université Lille 1, Villeneuve d’Ascq (France)

    2015-06-01

    Implantation of 10 keV helium in 316L steel thin foils was performed in JANNuS-Orsay facility and modeled using a multiscale approach. Density Functional Theory (DFT) atomistic calculations [1] were used to obtain the properties of He and He-vacancy clusters, and the Binary Collision Approximation based code MARLOWE was applied to determine the damage and He-ion depth profiles as in [2,3]. The processes involved in the homogeneous He bubble nucleation and growth were defined and implemented in the Object Kinetic Monte Carlo code LAKIMOCA [4]. In particular as the He to dpa ratio was high, self-trapping of He clusters and the trap mutation of He-vacancy clusters had to be taken into account. With this multiscale approach, the formation of bubbles was modeled up to nanometer-scale size, where bubbles can be observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy. Their densities and sizes were studied as functions of fluence (up to 5 × 10{sup 19} He/m{sup 2}) at two temperatures (473 and 723 K) and for different sample thicknesses (25–250 nm). It appears that the damage is not only due to the collision cascades but is also strongly controlled by the He accumulation in pressurized bubbles. Comparison with experimental data is discussed and sensible agreement is achieved.

  4. Vapour–to–liquid nucleation: Nucleation theorems for nonisothermal–nonideal case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malila, J.; McGraw, R.; Napari, I.; Laaksonen, A.

    2010-08-29

    Homogeneous vapour-to-liquid nucleation, a basic process of aerosol formation, is often considered as a type example of nucleation phenomena, while most treatment of the subject introduce several simplifying assumptions (ideal gas phase, incompressible nucleus, isothermal kinetics, size-independent surface free energy...). During last decades, nucleation theorems have provided new insights into properties of critical nuclei facilitating direct comparison between laboratory experiments and molecular simulations. These theorems are, despite of their generality, often applied in forms where the aforementioned assumptions are made. Here we present forms of nucleation theorems that explicitly take into account these effects and allow direct estimation of their importance. Only assumptions are Arrhenius-type kinetics of nucleation process and exclusion carrier gas molecules from the critical nucleus.

  5. Void nucleation at heterogeneities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seyyedi, S.A.; Hadji-Mirzai, M.; Russell, K.C.

    The energetics and kinetics of void nucleation at dislocations and interfaces are analyzed. These are potential void nucleation sites only when they are not point defect sinks. Both kinds of site are found to be excellent catalysts in the presence of inert gas

  6. Morphology, Nucleation, and Isothermal Crystallization Kinetics of Poly(Butylene Succinate Mixed with a Polycarbonate/MWCNT Masterbatch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thandi P. Gumede

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, nanocomposites were prepared by melt blending poly(butylene succinate (PBS with a polycarbonate (PC/multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs masterbatch, in a twin-screw extruder. The nanocomposites contained 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, and 4.0 wt% MWCNTs. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS and wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS results indicate that the blends are partially miscible, hence they form two phases (i.e., PC-rich and PBS-rich phases. The PC-rich phase contained a small amount of PBS chains that acted as a plasticizer and enabled crystallization of the PC component. In the PBS-rich phase, the amount of the PC chains present gave rise to increases in the glass transition temperature of the PBS phase. The presence of two phases was supported by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and atomic force microscopy (AFM analysis, where most MWCNTs aggregated in the PC-rich phase (especially at the high MWCNTs content of 4 wt% and a small amount of MWCNTs were able to diffuse to the PBS-rich phase. Standard DSC scans showed that the MWCNTs nucleation effects saturated at 0.5 wt% MWCNT content on the PBS-rich phase, above this content a negative nucleation effect was observed. Isothermal crystallization results indicated that with 0.5 wt% MWCNTs the crystallization rate was accelerated, but further increases in MWCNTs loading (and also in PC content resulted in progressive decreases in crystallization rate. The results are explained by increased MWCNTs aggregation and reduced diffusion rates of PBS chains, as the masterbatch content in the blends increased.

  7. Effect of Re on stacking fault nucleation under shear strain in Ni by atomistic simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zheng-Guang; Wang Chong-Yu; Yu Tao

    2014-01-01

    The effect of Re on stacking fault (SF) nucleation under shear strain in Ni is investigated using the climbing image nudged elastic band method with a Ni—Al—Re embedded-atom-method potential. A parameter (ΔE sf b ), the activation energy of SF nucleation under shear strain, is introduced to evaluate the effect of Re on SF nucleation under shear strain. Calculation results show that ΔE sf b decreases with Re addition, which means that SF nucleation under shear strain in Ni may be enhanced by Re. The atomic structure observation shows that the decrease of ΔE sf b may be due to the expansion of local structure around the Re atom when SF goes through the Re atom. (rapid communication)

  8. Hydration Effects on the Stability of Calcium Carbonate Pre-Nucleation Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Burgos-Cara

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent experimental evidence and computer modeling have shown that the crystallization of a range of minerals does not necessarily follow classical models and theories. In several systems, liquid precursors, stable pre-nucleation clusters and amorphous phases precede the nucleation and growth of stable mineral phases. However, little is known on the effect of background ionic species on the formation and stability of pre-nucleation species formed in aqueous solutions. Here, we present a systematic study on the effect of a range of background ions on the crystallization of solid phases in the CaCO3-H2O system, which has been thoroughly studied due to its technical and mineralogical importance, and is known to undergo non-classical crystallization pathways. The induction time for the onset of calcium carbonate nucleation and effective critical supersaturation are systematically higher in the presence of background ions with decreasing ionic radii. We propose that the stabilization of water molecules in the pre-nucleation clusters by background ions can explain these results. The stabilization of solvation water hinders cluster dehydration, which is an essential step for precipitation. This hypothesis is corroborated by the observed correlation between parameters such as the macroscopic equilibrium constant for the formation of calcium/carbonate ion associates, the induction time, and the ionic radius of the background ions in the solution. Overall, these results provide new evidence supporting the hypothesis that pre-nucleation cluster dehydration is the rate-controlling step for calcium carbonate precipitation.

  9. The effect of stirring on the heterogeneous nucleation of water and of clathrates of tetrahydrofuran/water mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.W. Wilson

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The statistics of liquid-to-crystal nucleation are measured for both water and for clathrate-forming mixtures of tetrahydrofuran (THF and water using an automatic lag time apparatus (ALTA. We measure the nucleation temperature using this apparatus in which a single sample is repeatedly cooled, nucleated and thawed. The effect of stirring on nucleation has been evaluated numerically and is discussed. We find that stirring of the solution makes no difference to the nucleation temperature of a given solution in a given tube.

  10. Kinetic theory of radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansur, L.K.

    1987-01-01

    To help achieve the quantitative and mechanistic understanding of these processes, the kinetic theory of radiation effects has been developed in the DOE basic energy sciences radiation effects and fusion reactor materials programs, as well as in corresponding efforts in other countries. This discipline grapples with a very wide range of phenomena and draws on numerous sub-fields of theory such as defect physics, diffusion, elasticity, chemical reaction rates, phase transformations and thermodynamics. The theory is cast in a mathematical framework of continuum dynamics. Issues particularly relevant to the present inquiry can be viewed from the standpoints of applications of the theory and areas requiring further progress

  11. Addition effect of erbium(III) trifluoromethanesulfonate in the homopolymerization kinetics of a DGEBA resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, S.J.; Ramis, X.; Serra, A.; Suay, J.

    2006-01-01

    Solid bisphenol-A epoxy resin of medium molecular weight was cured using a Lewis acid initiator (erbium(III) trifluoromethanesulfonate) in three different proportions (0.5, 1 and 2 phr). A kinetic study was performed in a differential scanning calorimeter. The complete kinetic triplet was determined (activation energy, pre-exponential factor, and integral function of the deg.ree of conversion) for each system. A kinetic analysis was performed with an integral isoconversional procedure (model-free), and the kinetic model was determined both with the Coats-Redfern method (the obtained isoconversional E value being accepted as the effective activation energy) and through the compensation effect. All the systems followed the same isothermal curing model simulated from non-isothermal ones. The 'nucleation and growth' Avrami kinetic model A 3/2 has been proposed as the polymerization kinetic model. The addition of initiator accelerated the reaction having higher influence when low temperatures were applied

  12. Synergistic Effects of Nucleating Agents and Plasticizers on the Crystallization Behavior of Poly(lactic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuetao Shi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The synergistic effect of nucleating agents and plasticizers on the thermal and mechanical performance of PLA nanocomposites was investigated with the objective of increasing the crystallinity and balancing the stiffness and toughness of PLA mechanical properties. Calcium carbonate, halloysite nanotubes, talc and LAK (sulfates were compared with each other as heterogeneous nucleating agents. Both the DSC isothermal and non-isothermal studies indicated that talc and LAK were the more effective nucleating agents among the selected fillers. Poly(D-lactic acid (PDLA acted also as a nucleating agent due to the formation of the PLA stereocomplex. The half crystallization time was reduced by the addition of talc to about 2 min from 37.5 min of pure PLA by the isothermal crystallization study. The dynamic mechanical thermal study (DMTA indicated that nanofillers acted as both reinforcement fillers and nucleating agents in relation to the higher storage modulus. The plasticized PLA studied by DMTA indicated a decreasing glass transition temperature with the increasing of the PEG content. The addition of nanofiller increased the Young’s modulus. PEG had the plasticization effect of increasing the break deformation, while sharply decreasing the stiffness and strength of PLA. The synergistic effect of nanofillers and plasticizer achieved the balance between stiffness and toughness with well-controlled crystallization.

  13. The combined effect of thermodynamic promoters tetrahydrofuran and cyclopentane on the kinetics of flue gas hydrate formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daraboina, Nagu; von Solms, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    ) hydrate formation using a rocking cell apparatus. Hydrate formation and decomposition kinetics were investigated by constant cooling (hydrate nucleation temperature) and isothermal (hydrate nucleation time) methods. Improved (synergistic) hydrate formation kinetics (hydrate nucleation and growth) were...... of these two promoters is favorable both thermodynamically and kinetically for hydrate formation from flue gas....

  14. Nucleate pool-boiling heat transfer - I. Review of parametric effects of boiling surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pioro, I.L.; Rohsenow, W.; Doerffer, S.S.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to assess the state-of-the-art of heat transfer in nucleate pool-boiling. Therefore, the paper consists of two parts: part I reviews and examines the effects of major boiling surface parameters affecting nucleate-boiling heat transfer, and part II reviews and examines the existing prediction methods to calculate the nucleate pool-boiling heat transfer coefficient (HTC). A literature review of the parametric trends points out that the major parameters affecting the HTC under nucleate pool-boiling conditions are heat flux, saturation pressure, and thermophysical properties of a working fluid. Therefore, these effects on the HTC under nucleate pool-boiling conditions have been the most investigated and are quite well established. On the other hand, the effects of surface characteristics such as thermophysical properties of the material, dimensions, thickness, surface finish, microstructure, etc., still cannot be quantified, and further investigations are needed. Particular attention has to be paid to the characteristics of boiling surfaces. (author)

  15. Effect of photochemical ageing on the ice nucleation properties of diesel and wood burning particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Chou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A measurement campaign (IMBALANCE conducted in 2009 was aimed at characterizing the physical and chemical properties of freshly emitted and photochemically aged combustion particles emitted from a log wood burner and diesel vehicles: a EURO3 Opel Astra with a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC but no particle filter and a EURO2 Volkswagen Transporter TDI Syncro without emission aftertreatment. Ice nucleation experiments in the deposition and condensation freezing modes were conducted with the Portable Ice Nucleation Chamber (PINC at three nominal temperatures, −30 °C, −35 °C and −40 °C. Freshly emitted diesel particles showed ice formation only at −40 °C in the deposition mode at 137% relative humidity with respect to ice (RHi and 92% relative humidity with respect to water (RHw, and photochemical ageing did not play a role in modifying their ice nucleation behaviour. Only one diesel experiment where α-pinene was added for the ageing process, showed an ice nucleation enhancement at −35 °C. Wood burning particles also act as ice nuclei (IN at −40 °C in the deposition mode at the same conditions as for diesel particles and photochemical ageing also did not alter the ice formation properties of the wood burning particles. Unlike diesel particles, wood burning particles form ice via condensation freezing at −35 °C whereas no ice nucleation was observed at −30 °C. Photochemical ageing did not affect the ice nucleation ability of the diesel and wood burning particles at the three different temperatures investigated but a broader range of temperatures below −40 °C need to be investigated in order to draw an overall conclusion on the effect of photochemical ageing on deposition/condensation ice nucleation across the entire temperature range relevant to cold clouds.

  16. Analysis of the Effect of Water Activity on Ice Formation Using a New Theory of Nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barahona, Donifan

    2013-01-01

    In this work a new theory of nucleation is developed and used to investigate the effect of water activity on the formation of ice within super-cooled droplets. The new theory is based on a novel concept where the interface is assumed to be made of liquid molecules trapped by the solid matrix. Using this concept new expressions are developed for the critical ice germ size and the nucleation work, with explicit dependencies on temperature and water activity. However unlike previous approaches, the new theory does not depend on the interfacial tension between liquid and ice. Comparison against experimental results shows that the new theory is able to reproduce the observed effect of water activity on nucleation rate and freezing temperature. It allows for the first time a theoretical derivation of the constant shift in water activity between melting and nucleation. The new theory offers a consistent thermodynamic view of ice nucleation, simple enough to be applied in atmospheric models of cloud formation.

  17. Immersion Freezing of Aluminas: The Effect of Crystallographic Properties on Ice Nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, M.; Chong, E.; Freedman, M. A.

    2017-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles serve as the nuclei for heterogeneous ice nucleation, a process that allows for ice to form at higher temperatures and lower supersaturations with respect to ice. This process is essential to the formation of ice in cirrus clouds. Heterogeneous ice nucleation is affected by many factors including the composition, crystal structure, porosity, and surface area of the particles. However, these factors are not well understood and, as such, are difficult to account for in climate models. To test the effects of crystal structure on ice nucleation, a system of transition aluminas (Al2O3) that differ only in their crystal structure, despite being compositionally similar, were tested using immersion freezing. Particles were immersed in water and placed into a temperature controlled chamber. Freezing events were then recorded as the chamber was cooled to negative 30 °. Alpha-alumina, which is a member of the hexagonal crystal system, showed a significantly higher temperature at which all particles froze in comparison to other samples. This supports the hypothesis that, since a hexagonal crystal structure is the lowest energy state for ice, hexagonal surface structures would best facilitate ice nucleation. However, a similar sample of hexagonal chi-alumina did not show the same results. Further analysis of the samples will be done to characterize surface structures and composition. These conflicting data sets raise interesting questions about the effect of other surface features, such as surface area and porosity, on ice nucleation.

  18. Nucleation and growth kinetics of electrodeposited sulfate-doped polypyrrole: determination of the diffusion coefficient of SO(4)(2-) in the polymeric membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licona-Sánchez, T de J; Alvarez-Romero, G A; Mendoza-Huizar, L H; Galán-Vidal, C A; Palomar-Pardavé, M; Romero-Romo, M; Herrera-Hernández, H; Uruchurtu, J; Juárez-García, J M

    2010-08-05

    A kinetic study for the electrosynthesis of polypyrrole (Ppy) doped with SO(4)(2-) ions is presented. Ppy films were electrochemically polymerized onto a graphite-epoxy resin electrode. Experimental current density transients (j-t) were obtained for three different potentiometric behaviors: anionic, cationic, and a combination. Theoretical models were used to fit the experimental j-t data to determine the nucleation and growth processes controlling the polymer synthesis. It was encountered that, in all cases, pyrrole electropolimerization involves two concomitant processes, namely, a Ppy diffusion limited multiple 3D nucleation and growth and pyrrole electro-oxidation on the growing surface of the Ppy nuclei. SEM analysis of the electrodes surfaces reveals that Ppy deposition occurred over most of the electrode surface by multiple nucleation of hemispheres, as the theoretical model used for the analysis of the current transients required. Hemispherical particles formed the polymeric film displaying different sizes. The order for the particle size was as follows: anionic > anionic-cationic > cationic. These results are congruent with those obtained by theoretical analysis of the corresponding current transients. Analysis of the impedance measurements recorded on the anionic Ppy film, immersed in an aqueous solution with different sulfate ion concentrations evidenced that SO(4)(2-) ions diffuse through the Ppy film provoking a decrease of its electrical resistance and an increase of its dielectric constant. From the Warburg impedance coefficient, the sulfate coefficient of diffusion in the Ppy film was 1.38 x 10(-9) cm(2) s(-1).

  19. Effect of CaCO3(S) nucleation modes on algae removal from alkaline water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jin Yong; Kinney, Kerry A; Katz, Lynn E

    2016-02-29

    The role of calcite heterogeneous nucleation was studied in a particle coagulation treatment process for removing microalgae from water. Batch experiments were conducted with Scenedesmus sp. and Chlorella sp. in the presence and absence of carbonate and in the presence and absence of Mg to delineate the role of CaCO 3(S) nucleation on microalgae removal. The results indicate that effective algae coagulation (e.g., up to 81 % algae removal efficiency) can be achieved via heterogeneous nucleation with CaCO 3(S) ; however, supersaturation ratios between 120 and 200 are required to achieve at least 50% algae removal, depending on ion concentrations. Algae removal was attributed to adsorption of Ca 2+ onto the cell surface which provides nucleation sites for CaCO 3(S) precipitation. Bridging of calcite particles between the algal cells led to rapid aggregation and formation of larger flocs. However, at higher supersaturation conditions, algae removal was diminished due to the dominance of homogeneous nucleation of CaCO 3(S) . Removal of algae in the presence of Ca 2+ and Mg 2+ required higher supersaturation values; however, the shift from heteronucleation to homonucleation with increasing supersaturation was still evident. The results suggest that water chemistry, pH, ionic strength, alkalinity and Ca 2+ concentration can be optimized for algae removal via coagulation-sedimentation.

  20. Nucleation reactions during deformation and crystallization of metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perepezko, J.H.; Imhoff, S.D.; Chen, M.W.; Gonzalez, S.; Inoue, A.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► New approach to the examination and analysis of shear band nucleation. ► Discovery of multiple shear band nucleation sites. ► Identification of a method of using transient kinetic behavior to provide a more realistic evaluation of the diffusivity that is relevant to nucleation. - Abstract: Nucleation reactions play a central role in the synthesis of both bulk metallic glasses and nanostructured materials. For nanostructured materials it is necessary to promote a high nucleation density without significant growth or coarsening. Beyond crystallization reactions nucleation of shear bands is critical for promoting a homogeneous flow and useful ductility for structural applications of bulk metallic glass. The study and analysis of nucleation reactions for these different situations requires a consideration of the stochastic nature of nucleation, the influence of heterogeneous sites, and the controlling transport properties. For shear band nucleation, the stochastic nature can be effectively probed by instrumented nanoindentation tests. The analysis of a statistically significant number of measurements of the first pop-in shear band nucleation events reveals at least two main nucleation sites. In nanostructured composites, the initial nucleation stage is influenced by transient effects as reflected in the delay time prior to steady state nucleation and by heterogeneous nucleation sites that are related to medium range order regions in Al-base amorphous alloys. Moreover, the early growth characteristics are linked to the maximum achievable particle density. The new developments and insight on the fundamental understanding of nanostructure reaction mechanisms offer valuable guidance for control of nanoscale microstructures and for promoting ductile deformation behavior.

  1. Effect of pretreatment and deposition parameters on diamond nucleation in CVD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazim, E.; Izman, S.; Ourdjini, A.; Shaharoun, A.M.

    2007-01-01

    Chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of diamond films on cemented carbide (WC) has aroused great interest in recent years. The combination of toughness from the WC and the high hardness of diamond results in outstanding wear resistance. This will increase the lifetime and better technical performance of the components made of diamond coated carbide. One of the important steps in the growth of diamond film is the nucleation of diamond as its density strongly influences the diamond growth process, film quality and morphology. In this paper the various effects of surface pretreatment and diamond deposition conditions on the diamond nucleation density are reviewed. (author)

  2. Effects of strain on phonon interactions and phase nucleation in several semiconductor and nano particle systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallman, Robert E.

    .B.Stephens treating the effects of local strain on the secondary growth of crystalline nuclei in a-Se. We were able to conclude that the growth of trigonal selenium is driven by local strain, and that the relaxation of this strain field around the glass transition temperature suppresses crystalline growth until thermally assisted processes accelerate the photo-crystallization at higher temperatures. The observed nucleation kinetics was also found to be relevant to understanding the formation of blemishes in the output images of advanced HARP video cameras.

  3. Evaporation rate of nucleating clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapadinsky, Evgeni

    2011-11-21

    The Becker-Döring kinetic scheme is the most frequently used approach to vapor liquid nucleation. In the present study it has been extended so that master equations for all cluster configurations are included into consideration. In the Becker-Döring kinetic scheme the nucleation rate is calculated through comparison of the balanced steady state and unbalanced steady state solutions of the set of kinetic equations. It is usually assumed that the balanced steady state produces equilibrium cluster distribution, and the evaporation rates are identical in the balanced and unbalanced steady state cases. In the present study we have shown that the evaporation rates are not identical in the equilibrium and unbalanced steady state cases. The evaporation rate depends on the number of clusters at the limit of the cluster definition. We have shown that the ratio of the number of n-clusters at the limit of the cluster definition to the total number of n-clusters is different in equilibrium and unbalanced steady state cases. This causes difference in evaporation rates for these cases and results in a correction factor to the nucleation rate. According to rough estimation it is 10(-1) by the order of magnitude and can be lower if carrier gas effectively equilibrates the clusters. The developed approach allows one to refine the correction factor with Monte Carlo and molecular dynamic simulations.

  4. Effect of the Ultrasonic Substrate Vibration on Nucleation and Crystallization of PbI2 Crystals and Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Zabihi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Preparation of defect-free and well-controlled solution-processed crystalline thin films is highly desirable for emerging technologies, such as perovskite solar cells. In this work, using PbI2 as a model solution with a vast variety of applications, we demonstrate that the excitation of a liquid thin film by imposed ultrasonic vibration on the film substrate significantly affects the nucleation and crystallization kinetics of PbI2 and the morphology of the resulting solid thin film. It is found that by applying ultrasonic vibration to PbI2 solution spun onto an ITO substrate with a moderate power and excitation duration (5 W and 1 min for the 40 kHz transducer used in this study, the nucleation rate increases and the crystals transform from 2D or planar to epitaxial 3D columnar structures, resulting in the suppression of crystallization dewetting. The effects of various induced physical phenomena as a result of the excitation by ultrasonic vibration are discussed, including microstreaming and micromixing, increased heat transfer and local temperature, a change in the thermodynamic state of the solution, and a decrease in the supersaturation point. It is shown that the ultrasonic-assisted solution deposition of the PbI2 thin films is controllable and reproducible, a process which is low-cost and in line with the large-scale fabrication of such solution-processed thin films.

  5. Effect of cholesterol nucleation-promoting activity on cholesterol solubilization in model bile

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, A. K.; Ottenhoff, R.; Jansen, P. L.; van Marle, J.; Tytgat, G. N.

    1989-01-01

    Human bile contains a factor with cholesterol nucleation-promoting activity that binds to concanavalin A-Sepharose. In this study we have investigated the effect of this activity on the dynamics of lipid solubilization in supersaturated model bile. A concanavalin A binding protein fraction of human

  6. Nanocomposites of polypropylene/titanate nanotubes: morphology, nucleation effects of nanoparticles and properties

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikešová, Jana; Šlouf, Miroslav; Gohs, U.; Popelková, Daniela; Vacková, Taťana; Vu, Ngoc Húng; Kratochvíl, Jaroslav; Zhigunov, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 71, č. 4 (2014), s. 795-818 ISSN 0170-0839 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/10/0348 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : titanate nanotubes * polypropylene nanocomposites * nucleation effect Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.438, year: 2014

  7. On the effect of pressure and carrier gas on homogeneous water nucleation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fransen, M. A. L. J.; Hrubý, Jan; Smeulders, D. M. J.; Dongen, M. E. H.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 142, č. 16 (2015), 164307_1-164307_7 ISSN 0021-9606 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP101/11/1593 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : homogeneous nucleation * water * pressure effect Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics Impact factor: 2.894, year: 2015 http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4919249

  8. The effect of impact modifier and of nucleating agent on the radiation tolerance of polypropylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Dongyuan (Beijing Normal Univ., BJ (China)); Czvikovszky, T.; Dobo, J.; Somogyi, A. (Research Inst. for the Plastics Industry, Budapest (Hungary))

    1990-01-01

    The effect of two types of additives was investigated with respect to the oxidative post-irradiation stability of polypropylene: SBS thermoplastic rubbers as impact modifiers and benzoic acid as nucleating agent. Testing was performed by ultimate deformation on bending. The thermoplastic rubber additive increased the post-irradiation stability of polypropylene substantially. (author).

  9. The effect of impact modifier and of nucleating agent on the radiation tolerance of polypropylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Dongyuan; Czvikovszky, T.; Dobo, J.; Somogyi, A.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of two types of additives was investigated with respect to the oxidative post-irradiation stability of polypropylene: SBS thermoplastic rubbers as impact modifiers and benzoic acid as nucleating agent. Testing was performed by ultimate deformation on bending. The thermoplastic rubber additive increased the post-irradiation stability of polypropylene substantially. (author)

  10. Dimers in nucleating vapors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lushnikov, A. A.; Kulmala, M.

    1998-09-01

    The dimer stage of nucleation may affect considerably the rate of the nucleation process at high supersaturation of the nucleating vapor. Assuming that the dimer formation limits the nucleation rate, the kinetics of the particle formation-growth process is studied starting with the definition of dimers as bound states of two associating molecules. The partition function of dimer states is calculated by summing the Boltzmann factor over all classical bound states, and the equilibrium population of dimers is found for two types of intermolecular forces: the Lennard-Jones (LJ) and rectangular well+hard core (RW) potentials. The principle of detailed balance is used for calculating the evaporation rate of dimers. The kinetics of the particle formation-growth process is then investigated under the assumption that the trimers are stable with respect to evaporation and that the condensation rate is a power function of the particle mass. If the power exponent λ=n/(n+1) (n is a non-negative integer), the kinetics of the process is described by a finite set of moments of particle mass distribution. When the characteristic time of the particle formation by nucleation is much shorter than that of the condensational growth, n+2 universal functions of a nondimensional time define the kinetic process. These functions are calculated for λ=2/3 (gas-to-particle conversion in the free molecular regime) and λ=1/2 (formation of islands on surfaces).

  11. Effect of Different Nucleating Agents on the Crystallization of Ziegler-Natta Isotactic Polypropylene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Avalos-Belmontes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ziegler-Natta isotactic polypropylene (iPP was melt mixed with four different nucleating agents (carbon nanotubes (CNT, carbon nanofibers (CNF, lithium benzoate (LiBe, and a sorbitol derivative (Millad in order to study their effect on the crystallization of iPP. It was found that the four different nucleating agents promote the alpha crystalline form. At 0.01 wt%, the carbon nanoparticles produced the higher crystallization temperature “Tc” (~119°C, whereas, at 0.10 wt%, LiBe and Millad produced a markedly higher Tc (~125°C. Tc of pure iPP was 111°C. With 0.1 wt% nucleating agent, at 120°C, the crystallization half-life time of PP, when using LiBe or Millad, was 15 times faster than for pure PP, whereas, when using carbon nanoparticles, it was 20–25 times faster. At 135°C, with 0.01 wt% nucleating agent, the isothermal crystallization process of iPP was completed after 25 min, as well as with Millad. With LiBe, it was completed after just 15 min and, with any of the carbon nanoparticles, it was practically over after only a couple of minutes.

  12. On void nucleation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subbotin, A.V.

    1978-01-01

    Nucleation of viable voids in irradiated materials is considered. The mechanism of evaporation and absorption of interstitials and vacancies disregarding the possibility of void merging is laid down into the basis of the discussion. The effect of irradiated material structure on void nucleation is separated from the effect of the properties of supersaturated solutions of vacancies and interstitials. An analytical expression for the nucleation rate is obtained and analyzed in different cases. The interstitials are concluded to effect severely the nucleation rate of viable voids

  13. Nucleation kinetics and growth aspects of semi organic non-linear optical bis thiourea cadmium acetate single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sankar, R.; Raghavan, C.M.; Jayavel, R.

    2006-01-01

    Nucleation parameters such as metastable zone width, induction period and interfacial energy have been determined for the aqueous solution growth of bis thiourea cadmium acetate (BTCA) single crystals. Solubility of BTCA has been determined for various temperatures. Metastable zone width and induction period values have been estimated in order to optimize the growth parameters. The interfacial tension values derived from experimentally determined induction period are found to be comparable with theoretical values. Bulk crystals of BTCA have been grown using the optimized growth parameters. The grown crystals have been subjected to structural, optical and mechanical property studies. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  14. A numerical investigation of electrohydrodynamic (EHD) effects on bubble deformation under pseudo-nucleate boiling conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zu, Y.Q.; Yan, Y.Y.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the electrohydrodynamic (EHD) effects on nucleate boiling are studied by developing a numerical modelling of EHD effect on bubble deformation in pseudo-nucleate boiling conditions. The volume of fluid (VOF) method is employed to track the interface between the gas-liquid two phases; the user-defined code is written and added to the commercial software FLUENT to solve the electric field and the corresponding electric body force. On this basis, the model is applied to study the EHD effects on heat transfer and fluid flows. An initial air bubble surrounded by liquid CCl 4 and attached to a horizontal superheated wall under the action of electric field is studied. The results of the EHD effect on bubble shape evolution are compared with those of available experiments showing good agreement. The mechanism of EHD enhancement of heat transfer and the EHD induced phenomena including bubble elongation and detachment are analyzed in detail.

  15. Action des copolymères éthylène-acétate de vinyle sur la cinétique de nucléation et de croissance des n-paraffines n milieu hydrocarbure. Effect of Vinyl Ethyleneacetate Copolymers on the Nucleation and Growth Kinetics of N-Paraffins in a Hydrocarbon Medium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petinelli J. C.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available On cherche à mettre en évidence le mode d'action des copolymères éthylène-acétate de vinyle sur la cinétique de cristallisation des n-paraffines en milieu hydro-carbure. On s'attache, notamment, à déterminer si l'efficacité de ces additifs est peu ou prou influencée par le nombre de motifs non paraffiniques contenus dans leur chaîne.On décrit deux montages expérimentaux, l'un permettant d'étudier la cinétique de nucléation, l'autre la cinétique de croissance en solution. On observe, grâce à ces deux dispositifs, que la fréquence de germination tridimensionnelle et la vitesse de croissance des n-paraffines diminuent quand la concentration d'acétate de vinyle dans la solution augmente.On établit une relation entre le taux d'acétate de vinyle de la chaîne des copo-lymères et leur efficacité à retarder la cinétique de nucléation. La cinétique de croissance est discutée. On montre l'adsorption très forte de ces additifs sur les faces des cristaux et que le copolymère le plus riche en groupes acétate de vinyle est celui qui retarde le plus la cinétique de nucléation et de croissance des n- paraffines. An effort is made ta détermine how vinyl ethyleneacetate copolymers effect thé crystallization kinetics of n-paraffins in a hydrocarbon medium. In particular, research was done ta see if thé effectiveness of such additives is in thé least bit influenced by thé number of non-paraffinic patterns contained in their chain.Two expérimental assemblies are described, one for investigating nucléation kinetics, thé other growth kinetics in solution. These two devices are used ta observe thot thé theee-dimensional germination fréquency and growth rate of n-paraffins decrease as thé vinyl-acétate concentration in thé solution increases.A relationship is established between thé vinyl-acétate ratio of thé copolymer chain and thé effectiveness of thé copolymer in delaying thé nucléation kinetics. Growth kinetics

  16. Crystal plasticity model for BCC iron atomistically informed by kinetics of correlated kinkpair nucleation on screw dislocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Sankar; McDowell, David L.; Zhu, Ting

    2014-04-01

    The mobility of dislocation in body-centered cubic (BCC) metals is controlled by the thermally activated nucleation of kinks along the dislocation core. By employing a recent interatomic potential and the Nudged Elastic Band method, we predict the atomistic saddle-point state of 1/2 screw dislocation motion in BCC iron that involves the nucleation of correlated kinkpairs and the resulting double superkinks. This unique process leads to a single-humped minimum energy path that governs the one-step activation of a screw dislocation to move into the adjacent {110} Peierls valley, which contrasts with the double-humped energy path and the two-step transition predicted by other interatomic potentials. Based on transition state theory, we use the atomistically computed, stress-dependent kinkpair activation parameters to inform a coarse-grained crystal plasticity flow rule. Our atomistically-informed crystal plasticity model quantitatively predicts the orientation dependent stress-strain behavior of BCC iron single crystals in a manner that is consistent with experimental results. The predicted temperature and strain-rate dependencies of the yield stress agree with experimental results in the 200-350 K temperature regime, and are rationalized by the small activation volumes associated with the kinkpair-mediated motion of screw dislocations.

  17. Principles of nucleation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clement, C.F.; Wood, M.H.

    1980-01-01

    The nucleation of small stable species is described in the problem of void growth by discrete rate equations. When gas is being produced the problem reduces to one of calculating the incubation dose for the gas bubble to void transition. A general expression for the steady state nucleation rate is derived for the case when voids are formed by vacancy fluctuations which enable an effective nucleation barrier to be crossed. (author)

  18. Effect of freeze-thaw repetitions upon the supercooling release ability of ice-nucleating bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchiya, Yooko; Hasegawa, Hiromi; Sasaki, Kazuhiro

    2004-01-01

    We have studied the durability of ice-nucleating bacteria with a potent supercooling release capacity through repeated freeze-thaw cycles. Through experiment, we confirmed that UV sterilized Erwinia ananas maintains a superior supercooling release capacity at around -1degC through 2000 freeze-thaw cycles. We also found that γ-ray sterilization, which is more suitable than UV for large-scale sterilization treatment, has a similar effect at appropriately selected doses. (author)

  19. Effects of highly ordered TiO2 nanotube substrates on the nucleation of Cu electrodeposits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Won Hee; Park, Chan Jin; Kwon, Hyuk Sang

    2010-05-01

    We investigated the effects of TiO2 nanotube substrates on the nucleation density of Cu during electrodeposition in a solution of CuSO4 and H2SO4 at 50 degrees C compared with those of pure Ti and micro-porous TiO2 substrates. During electrodeposition, the density of Cu nuclei on the TiO2 nanotube substrate increased and the average size of Cu nuclei decreased with increasing anodizing voltage and time for the synthesis of the substrate. In addition, the nucleation density of Cu electrodeposits on the highly ordered TiO2 nanotube substrate was much higher than that on pure Ti and micro-porous TiO2 substrates.

  20. Temperature effect on the nucleation and growth of TiO2 colloidal nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Sasani Ghamsari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The nucleation and growth of sol-gel derived TiO2 colloidal nanoparticles have been studied using  experiment and theory as well. In this study, the temperature effect on the formation of TiO2 nanoparticles was discussed and some effective parameters such as the supply rate of solute (Q0, the mean volumic growth rate of stable nuclei during the nucleation period (u, the diffusion coefficient of [Ti]+4 ions and the nucleus size were determined. The formation of TiO2 nanoparticles in three different temperatures (60, 70 and 80°C was studied. The obtained results showed that the process temperature has a considerable impact on the nucleation and growth of TiO2 nanoparticles. It can be concluded that  increasing the temperature leads to a decrease of the supersaturation and an increase of the nucleus size, supply rate of monomer, nanoparticles density and growth rate as evident from LaMer diagram.

  1. Finite size effects in phase transformation kinetics in thin films and surface layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trofimov, Vladimir I.; Trofimov, Ilya V.; Kim, Jong-Il

    2004-01-01

    In studies of phase transformation kinetics in thin films, e.g. crystallization of amorphous films, until recent time is widely used familiar Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (KJMA) statistical model of crystallization despite it is applicable only to an infinite medium. In this paper a model of transformation kinetics in thin films based on a concept of the survival probability for randomly chosen point during transformation process is presented. Two model versions: volume induced transformation (VIT) when the second-phase grains nucleate over a whole film volume and surface induced transformation (SIT) when they form on an interface with two nucleation mode: instantaneous nucleation at transformation onset and continuous one during all the process are studied. At VIT-process due to the finite film thickness effects the transformation profile has a maximum in a film middle, whereas that of the grains population reaches a minimum inhere, the grains density is always higher than in a volume material, and the thinner film the slower it transforms. The transformation kinetics in a thin film obeys a generalized KJMA equation with parameters depending on a film thickness and in limiting cases of extremely thin and thick film it reduces to classical KJMA equation for 2D- and 3D-system, respectively

  2. The effect of crack blunting on the competition between dislocation nucleation and cleavage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Lisa L.; Beltz, Glenn E.

    2001-03-01

    To better understand the ductile versus brittle fracture behavior of crystalline materials, attention should be directed towards physically realistic crack geometries. Currently, continuum models of ductile versus brittle behavior are typically based on the analysis of a pre-existing sharp crack in order to use analytical solutions for the stress fields around the crack tip. This paper examines the effects of crack blunting on the competition between dislocation nucleation and atomic decohesion using continuum methods. We accomplish this by assuming that the crack geometry is elliptical, which has the primary advantage that the stress fields are available in closed form. These stress field solutions are then used to calculate the thresholds for dislocation nucleation and atomic decohesion. A Peierls-type framework is used to obtain the thresholds for dislocation nucleation, in which the region of the slip plane ahead of the crack develops a distribution of slip discontinuity prior to nucleation. This slip distribution increases as the applied load is increased until an instability is reached and the governing integral equation can no longer be solved. These calculations are carried out for various crack tip geometries to ascertain the effects of crack tip blunting. The thresholds for atomic decohesion are calculated using a cohesive zone model, in which the region of the crack front develops a distribution of opening displacement prior to atomic decohesion. Again, loading of the elliptical crack tip eventually results in an instability, which marks the onset of crack advance. These calculations are carried out for various crack tip geometries. The results of these separate calculations are presented as the critical energy release rates versus the crack tip radius of curvature for a given crack length. The two threshold curves are compared simultaneously to determine which failure mode is energetically more likely at various crack tip curvatures. From these

  3. Small particles big effect? - Investigating ice nucleation abilities of soot particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahrt, Fabian; David, Robert O.; Lohmann, Ulrike; Stopford, Chris; Wu, Zhijun; Kanji, Zamin A.

    2017-04-01

    Atmospheric soot particles are primary particles produced by incomplete combustion of biomass and/or fossil fuels. Thus soot mainly originates from anthropogenic emissions, stemming from combustion related processes in transport vehicles, industrial and residential uses. Such soot particles are generally complex mixtures of black carbon (BC) and organic matter (OM) (Bond et al., 2013; Petzold et al., 2013), depending on the sources and the interaction of the primary particles with other atmospheric matter and/or gases BC absorbs solar radiation having a warming effect on global climate. It can also act as a heterogeneous ice nucleating particle (INP) and thus impact cloud-radiation interactions, potentially cooling the climate (Lohmann, 2002). Previous studies, however, have shown conflicting results concerning the ice nucleation ability of soot, limiting the ability to predict its effects on Earth's radiation budget. Here we present a laboratory study where we systematically investigate the ice nucleation behavior of different soot particles. Commercial soot samples are used, including an amorphous, industrial carbon frequently used in coatings and coloring (FW 200, Orion Engineered Carbons) and a fullerene soot (572497 ALDRICH), e.g. used as catalyst. In addition, we use soot generated from a propane flame Combustion Aerosol Standard Generator (miniCAST, JING AG), as a proxy for atmospheric soot particles. The ice nucleation ability of these soot types is tested on size-selected particles for a wide temperature range from 253 K to 218 K, using the Horizontal Ice Nucleation Chamber (HINC), a Continuous Flow Diffusion Chamber (CFDC) (Kanji and Abbatt, 2009). Ice nucleation results from these soot surrogates will be compared to chemically more complex real world samples, collected on filters. Filters will be collected during the 2016/2017 winter haze periods in Beijing, China and represent atmospheric soot particles with sources from both industrial and residential

  4. Thermokinetics of heterogeneous droplet nucleation on conically textured substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singha, Sanat K; Das, Prasanta K; Maiti, Biswajit

    2015-11-28

    Within the framework of the classical theory of heterogeneous nucleation, a thermokinetic model is developed for line-tension-associated droplet nucleation on conical textures considering growth or shrinkage of the formed cluster due to both interfacial and peripheral monomer exchange and by considering different geometric configurations. Along with the principle of free energy extremization, Katz kinetic approach has been employed to study the effect of substrate conicity and wettability on the thermokinetics of heterogeneous water droplet nucleation. Not only the peripheral tension is found to have a considerable effect on the free energy barrier but also the substrate hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity are observed to switch over their roles between conical crest and trough for different growth rates of the droplet. Besides, the rate of nucleation increases and further promotes nucleation for negative peripheral tension as it diminishes the free energy barrier appreciably. Moreover, nucleation inhibition can be achievable for positive peripheral tension due to the enhancement of the free energy barrier. Analyzing all possible geometric configurations, the hydrophilic narrower conical cavity is found to be the most preferred nucleation site. These findings suggest a physical insight into the context of surface engineering for the promotion or the suppression of nucleation on real or engineered substrates.

  5. A classical density functional investigation of nucleation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Satinath; Ghosh, Swapan K.

    2009-01-01

    Study of nucleation and growth phenomena in condensation is of prime importance in various applications such as crystal growth, nanoparticle synthesis, pattern formation etc. The knowledge of nucleation barrier in condensation is necessary to control the nucleation kinetics, size of the nanoparticles etc. Classical nucleation theory (CNT) assumes the density of the drop as bulk density irrespective of the size of the drop and overestimates the nucleation barrier. Here we are interested in solving the problem analytically using density functional theory (DFT) with square gradient approximation along the lines of Cahn and Hilliard. Nucleation barrier and density profile obtained in this work are consistent with other works based on nonclassical theory. (author)

  6. Effects of gas phase impurities on the topochemical-kinetic behaviour of uranium hydride development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloch, J.; Brami, D.; Kremner, A.; Mintz, M.H.; Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Beersheba

    1988-01-01

    The hydriding kinetics of bulk uranium and U-0.1 wt.% Cr, in the presence of oxidizing gaseous impurities (oxygen and CO), were studied by combined rate measurements and metallographic examinations of partially reacted samples. The effect of the gaseous impurity (type and concentration) was examined metallographically, and the kinetic data were discussed in relation to these examinations. Below about 100 0 C the reaction of uranium with pure hydrogen consists of the following sequence of steps: (i) Surface nucleation; (ii) homogeneous growth (pitting); (iii) relatively fast lateral growth leading to the formation of a reaction front which penetrates into the sample at a constant rate. The effects of oxygen and CO on the hydriding kinetics were related to their abilities to block hydrogen penetration into the uranium. Thus, it was found that oxygen affects only the penetration through the oxide layer, whereas CO affects the penetration through both the oxide and hydride layers. (orig.)

  7. Numerical modeling of the effect of surface topology on the saturated pool nucleate boiling curve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unal, C.; Pasamehmetoglu, K.O.

    1993-01-01

    A numerical study of saturated pool nucleate boiling with an emphasis on the effect of surface topography is presented. The numerical model consisted of solving the three-dimensional transient heat conduction equation within the heater subjected to nucleate boiling over its upper surface. The surface topography model considered the distribution of the cavity and cavity angles based on exponential and normal probability functions. Parametric results showed that the saturated nucleate boiling curve shifted left and became steeper with an increase in the mean cavity radius. The boiling curve was found to be sensitive to the selection of how many cavities were selected for each octagonal cell. A small variation in the statistical parameters, especially cavity radii for smooth surfaces, resulted in noticeable differences in wall superheat for a given heat flux. This result indicated that while the heat transfer coefficient increased with cavity radii, the cavity radii or height alone was not sufficient to characterize the boiling curve. It also suggested that statistical experimental data should consider large samples to characterize the surface topology. The boiling curve shifted to the right when the cavity angle was obtained using a normal distribution. This effect became less important when the number of cavities for each cell was increasing because the probability of the potential cavity with a larger radius in each cell was increased. When the contact angle of the fluid decreased for a given mean cavity radii, the boiling curve shifted to the right. This shift was more pronounced at smaller mean cavity radii and decreased with increasing mean cavity radii

  8. The effect of organic coating on the heterogeneous ice nucleation efficiency of mineral dust aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moehler, O; Benz, S; Saathoff, H; Schnaiter, M; Wagner, R [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institute for Meteorology and Climate Research, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Schneider, J; Walter, S [Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Ebert, V; Wagner, S [University of Heidelberg, Institute for Physical Chemistry, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)], E-mail: Ottmar.Moehler@imk.fzk.de

    2008-04-15

    The effect of organic coating on the heterogeneous ice nucleation (IN) efficiency of dust particles was investigated at simulated cirrus cloud conditions in the AIDA cloud chamber of Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe. Arizona test dust (ATD) and the clay mineral illite were used as surrogates for atmospheric dust aerosols. The dry dust samples were dispersed into a 3.7 m{sup 3} aerosol vessel and either directly transferred into the 84 m{sup 3} cloud simulation chamber or coated before with the semi-volatile products from the reaction of {alpha}-pinene with ozone in order to mimic the coating of atmospheric dust particles with secondary organic aerosol (SOA) substances. The ice-active fraction was measured in AIDA expansion cooling experiments as a function of the relative humidity with respect to ice, RHi, in the temperature range from 205 to 210 K. Almost all uncoated dust particles with diameters between 0.1 and 1.0 {mu}m acted as efficient deposition mode ice nuclei at RHi between 105 and 120%. This high ice nucleation efficiency was markedly suppressed by coating with SOA. About 20% of the ATD particles coated with a SOA mass fraction of 17 wt% were ice-active at RHi between 115 and 130%, and only 10% of the illite particles coated with an SOA mass fraction of 41 wt% were ice-active at RHi between 160 and 170%. Only a minor fraction of pure SOA particles were ice-active at RHi between 150 and 190%. Strong IN activation of SOA particles was observed only at RHi above 200%, which is clearly above water saturation at the given temperature. The IN suppression and the shift of the heterogeneous IN onset to higher RHi seem to depend on the coating thickness or the fractional surface coverage of the mineral particles. The results indicate that the heterogeneous ice nucleation potential of atmospheric mineral particles may also be suppressed if they are coated with secondary organics.

  9. The effect of organic coating on the heterogeneous ice nucleation efficiency of mineral dust aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moehler, O; Benz, S; Saathoff, H; Schnaiter, M; Wagner, R; Schneider, J; Walter, S; Ebert, V; Wagner, S

    2008-01-01

    The effect of organic coating on the heterogeneous ice nucleation (IN) efficiency of dust particles was investigated at simulated cirrus cloud conditions in the AIDA cloud chamber of Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe. Arizona test dust (ATD) and the clay mineral illite were used as surrogates for atmospheric dust aerosols. The dry dust samples were dispersed into a 3.7 m 3 aerosol vessel and either directly transferred into the 84 m 3 cloud simulation chamber or coated before with the semi-volatile products from the reaction of α-pinene with ozone in order to mimic the coating of atmospheric dust particles with secondary organic aerosol (SOA) substances. The ice-active fraction was measured in AIDA expansion cooling experiments as a function of the relative humidity with respect to ice, RHi, in the temperature range from 205 to 210 K. Almost all uncoated dust particles with diameters between 0.1 and 1.0 μm acted as efficient deposition mode ice nuclei at RHi between 105 and 120%. This high ice nucleation efficiency was markedly suppressed by coating with SOA. About 20% of the ATD particles coated with a SOA mass fraction of 17 wt% were ice-active at RHi between 115 and 130%, and only 10% of the illite particles coated with an SOA mass fraction of 41 wt% were ice-active at RHi between 160 and 170%. Only a minor fraction of pure SOA particles were ice-active at RHi between 150 and 190%. Strong IN activation of SOA particles was observed only at RHi above 200%, which is clearly above water saturation at the given temperature. The IN suppression and the shift of the heterogeneous IN onset to higher RHi seem to depend on the coating thickness or the fractional surface coverage of the mineral particles. The results indicate that the heterogeneous ice nucleation potential of atmospheric mineral particles may also be suppressed if they are coated with secondary organics

  10. Effect of microstructure on the nucleation and initiation of adiabatic shear bands (ASBs) during impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boakye Yiadom, Solomon, E-mail: boakyeys@cc.umanitoba.ca; Khaliq Khan, Abdul, E-mail: abdulkhaliq.khan@umanitoba.ca; Bassim, Nabil, E-mail: nabil.bassim@ad.umanitoba.ca

    2014-10-06

    While instability may occur homogenously during plastic deformation, the formation of adiabatic shear band (ASBs) does not follow a homogenous instability during impact. Geometrical stress concentration sites and/or microstructural inhomogeneities result in the nucleation and initiation of shear strain localization. In this study, initial microstructural inhomogeneity was found to produce nucleation sites for the initiation of ASBs. It was observed that double misfit interfaces and boundary layers with random arrangement of atomic columns are formed around precipitated carbides and they increase the volume fraction of dislocation sources within the specimens. The AISI 4340 steel specimens which were tempered at the lowest temperature had smaller precipitated carbides with high aspect ratios densely distributed within the matrix and were easily susceptible to the formation of ASBs. As the tempering temperature increased, the relative sizes of the carbides increased with a corresponding reduction in their aspect ratios and their distribution density within the matrix and thus were more resistant to the formation of ASBs. In this study, it is demonstrated that the intersection of an activated dislocation source with the direction of maximum shear (regions of stress concentrations) within the specimens during impact, is a necessary condition for the point of intersection to act as a possible site for the nucleation of ASBs, depending on the rate of dislocation generation, local strain and strain rate. At a constant carbide volume fraction, the higher susceptibility of the tempered specimens to the initiation of ASBs is attributed to the volume fraction of the points of intersection between activated dislocation sources and direction of maximum shear during impact. Additionally, the smaller carbides, with their higher aspect ratios and distribution densities, accentuate the effect of strain gradients and the microstructural inhomogeneities associated with the tempered

  11. Gas Hydrate Formation Probability Distributions: The Effect of Shear and Comparisons with Nucleation Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Eric F; Lim, Vincent W; Metaxas, Peter J; Du, Jianwei; Stanwix, Paul L; Rowland, Darren; Johns, Michael L; Haandrikman, Gert; Crosby, Daniel; Aman, Zachary M

    2018-03-13

    Gas hydrate formation is a stochastic phenomenon of considerable significance for any risk-based approach to flow assurance in the oil and gas industry. In principle, well-established results from nucleation theory offer the prospect of predictive models for hydrate formation probability in industrial production systems. In practice, however, heuristics are relied on when estimating formation risk for a given flowline subcooling or when quantifying kinetic hydrate inhibitor (KHI) performance. Here, we present statistically significant measurements of formation probability distributions for natural gas hydrate systems under shear, which are quantitatively compared with theoretical predictions. Distributions with over 100 points were generated using low-mass, Peltier-cooled pressure cells, cycled in temperature between 40 and -5 °C at up to 2 K·min -1 and analyzed with robust algorithms that automatically identify hydrate formation and initial growth rates from dynamic pressure data. The application of shear had a significant influence on the measured distributions: at 700 rpm mass-transfer limitations were minimal, as demonstrated by the kinetic growth rates observed. The formation probability distributions measured at this shear rate had mean subcoolings consistent with theoretical predictions and steel-hydrate-water contact angles of 14-26°. However, the experimental distributions were substantially wider than predicted, suggesting that phenomena acting on macroscopic length scales are responsible for much of the observed stochastic formation. Performance tests of a KHI provided new insights into how such chemicals can reduce the risk of hydrate blockage in flowlines. Our data demonstrate that the KHI not only reduces the probability of formation (by both shifting and sharpening the distribution) but also reduces hydrate growth rates by a factor of 2.

  12. On the effect of pre-oxidation on the nitriding kinetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friehling, Peter Bernhard; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2000-01-01

    The oxidation of ferritic surfaces prior to gaseous nitriding has been reported to lead to improved uniformity of the compound layer thickness and enhanced nitriding kinetics. The present work considers the nucleation and growth of a model compound layer on pure iron and, using previous...... experimental and theoretical work reported in the literature, puts forward two hypotheses to explain the effects of pre-oxidation on compound layer formation. It is proposed that the nucleation of iron nitrides is enhanced by the presence of an iron-oxide layer and that the growth of an iron-nitride layer...... proceeds faster after pre-oxidation, due to a higher nitrogen content in the part of the compound layer closest to the surface....

  13. Addition effect of erbium(III) trifluoromethanesulfonate in the homopolymerization kinetics of a DGEBA resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, S.J. [Area de Ciencia de los Materiales, Departament d' Enginyeria de Sistemes Industrials i Disseny, Universitat Jaume I, Avda. Vicent Sos Baynat s/n, 12071 Castellon (Spain)]. E-mail: espallar@sg.uji.es; Ramis, X. [Laboratori de Termodinamica, Escola Tecnica Superior Enginyeria Industrial Barcelona, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Serra, A. [Departament de Q. Analitica i Q. Organica, Facultat de Quimica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, C/Marcel.li Domingo s/n, 43007 Tarragona (Spain); Suay, J. [Centro de Biomateriales, Universitat Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n, E-46071 Valencia (Spain)

    2006-02-01

    Solid bisphenol-A epoxy resin of medium molecular weight was cured using a Lewis acid initiator (erbium(III) trifluoromethanesulfonate) in three different proportions (0.5, 1 and 2 phr). A kinetic study was performed in a differential scanning calorimeter. The complete kinetic triplet was determined (activation energy, pre-exponential factor, and integral function of the deg.ree of conversion) for each system. A kinetic analysis was performed with an integral isoconversional procedure (model-free), and the kinetic model was determined both with the Coats-Redfern method (the obtained isoconversional E value being accepted as the effective activation energy) and through the compensation effect. All the systems followed the same isothermal curing model simulated from non-isothermal ones. The 'nucleation and growth' Avrami kinetic model A {sub 3/2} has been proposed as the polymerization kinetic model. The addition of initiator accelerated the reaction having higher influence when low temperatures were applied.

  14. Kinetic analysis of the effects of target structure on siRNA efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiawen; Zhang, Wenbing

    2012-12-01

    RNAi efficiency for target cleavage and protein expression is related to the target structure. Considering the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) as a multiple turnover enzyme, we investigated the effect of target mRNA structure on siRNA efficiency with kinetic analysis. The 4-step model was used to study the target cleavage kinetic process: hybridization nucleation at an accessible target site, RISC-mRNA hybrid elongation along with mRNA target structure melting, target cleavage, and enzyme reactivation. At this model, the terms accounting for the target accessibility, stability, and the seed and the nucleation site effects are all included. The results are in good agreement with that of experiments which show different arguments about the structure effects on siRNA efficiency. It shows that the siRNA efficiency is influenced by the integrated factors of target's accessibility, stability, and the seed effects. To study the off-target effects, a simple model of one siRNA binding to two mRNA targets was designed. By using this model, the possibility for diminishing the off-target effects by the concentration of siRNA was discussed.

  15. Morphology-dependent crossover effects in heterogeneous nucleation of peritectic materials studied via the phase-field method for Al-Ni

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siquieri, R; Emmerich, H

    2009-01-01

    The application of phase-field modeling to nucleation as a phenomenon at the nanoscale is justified, if one takes into account the great success of continuum approaches in nanofluidics as proven by the many comparisons to experiments. Employed in this manner it provides an approach allowing us to account for effects of the physical diffuseness of a nucleus' interface and thereby go beyond classical nucleation theory (Granasy and James 2000 J. Chem. Phys. 113 9810; Emmerich and Siquieri 2006 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 18 11121). Here we extend the focus of previous work in this field and address the question of how far the phase-field method can also be applied to gain further insight into nucleation statistics, in particular the nucleation prefactor appearing in the nucleation rate. In this context we describe in detail a morphology-dependent crossover effect noticeable for the nucleation rate at small driving forces.

  16. Behavior of pentacene initial nucleation on various dielectrics and its effect on carrier transport in organic field-effect transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Qiong; Yu, Aifang; Wang, Liangmin; Jiang, Chao

    2010-11-01

    The influence of dielectric surface energy on the initial nucleation and the growth of pentacene films as well as the electrical properties of the pentacene-based field-effect transistors are investigated. We have examined a range of organic and inorganic dielectrics with different surface energies, such as polycarbonate/SiO2, polystyrene/SiO2, and PMMA/SiO2 bi-layered dielectrics and also the bare SiO2 dielectric. Atomic force microscopy measurements of sub-monolayer and thick pentacene films indicated that the growth of pentacene film was in Stranski-Kranstanow growth mode on all the dielectrics. However, the initial nucleation density and the size of the first-layered pentacene islands deposited on different dielectrics are drastically influenced by the dielectric surface energy. With the increasing of the surface energy, the nucleation density increased and thus the average size of pentacene islands for the first mono-layer deposition decreased. The performance of fabricated pentacene-based thin film transistors was found to be highly related to nucleation density and the island size of deposited Pentacene film, and it had no relationship to the final particle size of the thick pentacene film. The field effect mobility of the thin film transistor could be achieved as high as 1.38 cm2Ns with on/off ratio over 3 x 10(7) on the PS/SiO2 where the lowest surface energy existed among all the dielectrics. For comparison, the values of mobility and on/off ratio were 0.42 cm2Ns and 1 x 10(6) for thin film transistor deposited directly on bare SiO2 having the highest surface energy.

  17. Nucleation of iron nitrides during gaseous nitriding of iron; the effect of a preoxidation treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friehling, Peter B.; Poulsen, Finn Willy; Somers, Marcel A.J.

    2001-01-01

    grains. On prolonged nitriding, immediate nucleation at the surface of iron grains becomes possible. Calculated incubation times for the nucleation of gamma'-Fe4N1-x during nitriding are generally longer than those observed experimentally in the present work. The incubation time is reduced dramatically...

  18. Effect of oxygen on the bias-enhanced nucleation of diamond on silicon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schreck, M.; Christensen, Carsten; Stritzker, B.

    1999-01-01

    The influence of traces of oxygen in the process gas on the bias-enhanced nucleation (BEN) of diamond on silicon has been studied in the present work. CO2 in concentrations ranging from 0 to 3000 ppm was added during the nucleation procedure at U-bias = -200 V in microwave plasma chemical vapour...

  19. A study on the effects of heated surface wettability on nucleation characteristics in subcooled flow boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajihara, Tomoyuki; Kaiho, Kazuhiro; Okawa, Tomio

    2014-01-01

    Subcooled flow boiling plays an important role in boiling water reactors because it influences the heat transfer performance from fuel rods, two-phase flow stabilities, and neutron moderation characteristics. In the present study, flow visualization of water subcooled flow boiling in a vertical heated channel was carried out to investigate the mechanisms of void fraction development. The two surfaces of distinctly different contact angles were used as the heated surface to investigate the effect of the surface wettability. It was observed that with an increase in the wall heat flux, more nucleation sites were activated and larger bubbles were produced at low-frequency. It was considered that formation of these large bubbles primarily contributed to the void fraction development. (author)

  20. Single-fluorophore monitoring of DNA hybridization for investigating the effect of secondary structure on the nucleation step.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Joon-Jung; Kim, Min-Ji; Son, Jung-Tae; Kim, Jandi; Shin, Jong-Shik

    2009-07-17

    Nucleic acid hybridization is one of the essential biological processes involved in storage and transmission of genetic information. Here we quantitatively determined the effect of secondary structure on the hybridization activation energy using structurally defined oligonucleotides. It turned out that activation energy is linearly proportional to the length of a single-stranded region flanking a nucleation site, generating a 0.18 kcal/mol energy barrier per nucleotide. Based on this result, we propose that the presence of single-stranded segments available for non-productive base pairing with a nucleation counterpart extends the searching process for nucleation sites to find a perfect match. This result may provide insights into rational selection of a target mRNA site for siRNA and antisense gene silencing.

  1. Chitosan and carboxymethyl-chitosan capping ligands: Effects on the nucleation and growth of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles for producing biocomposite membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumont, Vitor C.; Mansur, Alexandra A.P.; Carvalho, Sandhra M.; Medeiros Borsagli, Fernanda G.L.; Pereira, Marivalda M.; Mansur, Herman S., E-mail: hmansur@demet.ufmg.br

    2016-02-01

    Synthetic biomaterials based on calcium phosphates (CaP) have been widely studied for bone tissue reconstruction therapies, but no definitive solution that fulfills all of the required properties has been identified. Thus, this study reports the synthesis of composite membranes based on nanohydroxyapatite particles (nHA) embedded in chitosan (CHI) and O-carboxymethyl chitosan (CMC) matrices produced using a one-step co-precipitation method in water media. Biopolymers were used as capping ligands for simultaneously controlling the nucleation and growth of the nHA particles during the precipitation process and also to form the polymeric network of the biocomposites. The bionanocomposites were extensively characterized using light microscopy (LM), scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM/TEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray micro-CT analysis (μCT), and MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazolyl-2)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) cell proliferation assays for cell cytotoxicity. The results demonstrated that the ligands used during the synthesis highly affected the composites produced, primarily due the changes in the mechanisms and kinetics of nucleation and growth of the HA particles at the nanoscale level. The SEM images revealed that the use of carboxyl-functionalized chitosan (CMC) ligands significantly reduced the average size of the HA nanoparticles and caused the formation of a narrower size distribution (90 ± 20 nm) compared to the HA nanoparticles produced with chitosan ligands (220 ± 50 nm). The same trend was verified by the AFM analysis, where the nHA particles were formed evenly dispersed in the polymer matrix. However, the CMC-based composites were more homogeneously distributed, which was endorsed by the images collected via X-ray micro-CT. The FTIR spectra and the XRD analysis indicated that nanosized hydroxyapatite was the

  2. Numerical study of the effect of gas temperature on the time for onset of particle nucleation in argon-silane low-pressure plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Bhandarkar, U; Girshick, S L

    2003-01-01

    Particle nucleation in silane plasmas has attracted interest for the past decade, both due to the basic problems of plasma chemistry involved and the importance of silane plasmas for many applications. A better understanding of particle nucleation may facilitate the avoidance of undesirable particle contamination as well as enable the controlled production of nanoparticles for novel applications. While understanding of particle nucleation has significantly advanced over the past years, a number of questions have not been resolved. Among these is the delay of particle nucleation with an increasing gas temperature, which has been observed in experiments in argon-silane plasmas. We have developed a quasi-one-dimensional model to simulate particle nucleation and growth in silane containing plasmas. In this paper we present a comparative study of the various effects that have been proposed as explanations for the nucleation delay. Our results suggest that the temperature dependence of the Brownian diffusion coeffi...

  3. Experiments on the effects of nanoparticles on subcooled nucleate pool boiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangude, Prasad; Bhatt, Dhairya; Srivastava, Atul

    2018-05-01

    The effect of nanoparticles on a single bubble-based nucleate pool boiling phenomenon under subcooled conditions has been studied. Water (as the base fluid) and two different concentrations of water-silica nanofluids (0.005% and 0.01% V/V) have been employed as the working fluids. The boiling experiments have been conducted in a specially designed chamber, wherein an ITO-coated heater substrate has been used to induce single bubble nucleation. Measurements have been performed in a completely non-intrusive manner using one of the refractive index-based diagnostics techniques, namely, rainbow schlieren deflectometry. Thus, the thermal gradients prevailing in the boiling chamber have directly been mapped as a two-dimensional distribution of hue values that are recorded in the form of rainbow schlieren images. The schlieren-based measurements clearly revealed the plausible influence of nanoparticles on the strength of temperature gradients prevailing in the boiling chamber. As compared to the base fluid, the experiments with dilute nanofluids showed that the suspended nanoparticles tend to diffuse (homogenize) the strength of temperature gradients, both in the vicinity of the heated substrate and in the thermal boundary layer enveloping the vapor bubble. An overall reduction in the bubble volume and dynamic contact angle was seen with increasing concentrations of dilute nanofluids. In addition, the vapor bubble was found to assume a more spherical shape at higher concentrations of dilute nanofluids in comparison to its shape with water-based experiments. Clear oscillations of the vapor bubble in the subcooled pool of liquids (water and/or nanofluids) were observed, the frequency of which was found to be significantly reduced as the nanoparticle concentration was increased from 0% (water) to 0.01% (V/V). A force balance analysis has been performed to elucidate the plausible mechanisms explaining the observed trends of the oscillation frequencies of the vapor bubble.

  4. Effect of coolant flow rate on the power at onset of nucleate boiling in a swimming pool type research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, L.A.; Ahmad, N.; Ahmad, S.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of flow rate of coolant on power of Onset Nucleate Boiling (ONB) in a reference core of a swimming pool type research reactor has been studied using a as standard computer code PARET. It has been found that the decrease in the coolant flow rate results in a corresponding decrease in power at ONB. (author)

  5. Effects of streptomycin, desiccation, and UV radiation on ice nucleation by Pseudomonas viridiflava

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, J.A.; Ashworth, E.N.

    1986-01-01

    Streptomycin (100 micrograms per milliliter), desiccation (over CaSO 4 ), and ultraviolet radiation (4500 microwatts per square centimeter at 254 nonometers for 15 minutes) reduced ice nucleation activity by Pseudomonas viridiflava strain W-1 as determined by freezing drops of the bacterial suspensions. Highest residual ice nucleation activity by dead cells was obtained by desiccation, although no freezing above -3.5 0 C was detected. The rate and extent of loss of ice nucleation activity following streptomycin and ultraviolet treatment was affected by preconditioning temperature. At 21 0 C and above, loss of activity by dead cells was rapid and irreversible

  6. Truncated Dual-Cap Nucleation Site Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, Douglas M.; Sander, Paul J.

    2012-01-01

    During heterogeneous nucleation within a metastable mushy-zone, several geometries for nucleation site development must be considered. Traditional spherical dual cap and crevice models are compared to a truncated dual cap to determine the activation energy and critical cluster growth kinetics in ternary Fe-Cr-Ni steel alloys. Results of activation energy results indicate that nucleation is more probable at grain boundaries within the solid than at the solid-liquid interface.

  7. Non-isothermal crystallization kinetics of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}–CaO–SiO{sub 2} glass containing nucleation agent P{sub 2}O{sub 5}/TiO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Bin, E-mail: stra-ceo@163.com; Wang, Yongya; Luo, Wenqin; Li, Jingfen [Huzhou University, Department of Material Chemistry (China); Li, Jianyou [Huzhou Central Hospital, Orthopedic Department (China)

    2017-03-15

    Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}–CaO–SiO{sub 2} glass ceramics containing nucleation agent P{sub 2}O{sub 5}/TiO{sub 2} were prepared by sol-gel method. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The activation energy and kinetic parameters for crystallization of the samples were calculated by the Johnson-Mehi-Avrami (JMA) model and Augis-Bennett method according to the results of DSC. The results showed that the crystallization mechanism of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}–CaO–SiO{sub 2} glass, whose non-isothermal kinetic parameter n = 2.3, was consistent with surface crystallization of the JMA model. The kinetics model function of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}–CaO–SiO{sub 2} glass, f(α) = 2.3(1–α)[–ln(1–α)]{sup 0.57}, was also obtained. The addition of nucleation agent P{sub 2}O{sub 5}/TiO{sub 2} could reduce the activation energy, which made the crystal growth modes change from onedimensional to three-dimensional.

  8. Heterogeneous nucleation promotes carrier transport in solution-processed organic field-effect transistors

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Ruipeng; Khan, Hadayat Ullah; Payne, Marcia M.; Smilgies, Detlef Matthias; Anthony, John Edward; Amassian, Aram

    2012-01-01

    -ray scattering (GIWAXS) in an environmental chamber provides unique quantitative insights into the time-evolution of the concentration of the solution, the onset of nucleation, and the mode of growth of the organic semiconductor under varied drying conditions

  9. Arsenic flux dependence of island nucleation on InAs(001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosse, Frank; Barvosa-Carter, William; Zinck, Jenna; Wheeler, Matthew; Gyure, Mark F.

    2002-01-01

    The initial stages of InAs(001) homoepitaxial growth are investigated using a combination of kinetic Monte Carlo simulations based on ab initio density functional theory and scanning tunneling microscopy. In the two dimensional island nucleation mode investigated, the island number density is found to decrease with increasing As. This behavior is explained by a suppression of the effective In-adatom density leading to a reduction in island nucleation. The relevant microscopic processes responsible for this reduction are identified

  10. Effect of environmental factors on the kinetics of insulin fibril formation: elucidation of the molecular mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, L; Khurana, R; Coats, A; Frokjaer, S; Brange, J; Vyas, S; Uversky, V N; Fink, A L

    2001-05-22

    In the search for the molecular mechanism of insulin fibrillation, the kinetics of insulin fibril formation were studied under different conditions using the fluorescent dye thioflavin T (ThT). The effect of insulin concentration, agitation, pH, ionic strength, anions, seeding, and addition of 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonic acid (ANS), urea, TMAO, sucrose, and ThT on the kinetics of fibrillation was investigated. The kinetics of the fibrillation process could be described by the lag time for formation of stable nuclei (nucleation) and the apparent rate constant for the growth of fibrils (elongation). The addition of seeds eliminated the lag phase. An increase in insulin concentration resulted in shorter lag times and faster growth of fibrils. Shorter lag times and faster growth of fibrils were seen at acidic pH versus neutral pH, whereas an increase in ionic strength resulted in shorter lag times and slower growth of fibrils. There was no clear correlation between the rate of fibril elongation and ionic strength. Agitation during fibril formation attenuated the effects of insulin concentration and ionic strength on both lag times and fibril growth. The addition of ANS increased the lag time and decreased the apparent growth rate for insulin fibril formation. The ANS-induced inhibition appears to reflect the formation of amorphous aggregates. The denaturant, urea, decreased the lag time, whereas the stabilizers, trimethylamine N-oxide dihydrate (TMAO) and sucrose, increased the lag times. The results indicated that both nucleation and fibril growth were controlled by hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. A kinetic model, involving the association of monomeric partially folded intermediates, whose concentration is stimulated by the air-water interface, leading to formation of the critical nucleus and thence fibrils, is proposed.

  11. Suppression of Frost Nucleation Achieved Using the Nanoengineered Integral Humidity Sink Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoda; Rykaczewski, Konrad

    2017-01-24

    Inhibition of frost formation is important for increasing efficiency of refrigeration systems and heat exchangers, as well as for preventing the rapid icing over of water-repellant coatings that are designed to prevent accumulation of rime and glaze. From a thermodynamic point of view, this task can be achieved by either increasing hydrophobicity of the surface or decreasing the concentration of water vapor above it. The first approach has been studied in depth, but so far has not yielded a robust solution to the problem of frost formation. In this work, we systematically explore how frost growth can be inhibited by controlling water vapor concentration using bilayer coatings with a porous exterior covering a hygroscopic liquid-infused layer. We lay the theoretical foundation and provide experimental validation of the mass transport mechanism that governs the integral humidity sink effect based on this coating platform as well as reveal intriguing sizing effects about this system. We show that the concentration profile above periodically spaced pores is governed by the sink and source concentrations and two geometrical parameters: the nondimensional pore size and the ratio of the pore spacing to the boundary layer thickness. We demonstrate that when the ratio of the pore spacing to the boundary layer thickness vanishes, as for the nanoporous bilayer coatings, the entire surface concentration becomes uniform and equal to the concentration set by the hygroscopic liquid. In other words, the surface concentration becomes completely independent of the nanopore size. We identified the threshold geometrical parameters for this condition and show that it can lead to a 65 K decrease in the nucleation onset surface temperature below the dew point. With this fundamental insight, we use bilayer coatings to nanoengineer the integral humidity sink effect to provide extreme antifrosting performance with up to a 2 h delay in nucleation onset at 263 K. The nanoporous bilayer

  12. Measurement of the nucleation and domain depinning field in a single Co/Pt multilayer dot by Anomalous Hall effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delalande, M.; Vries, J. de; Abelmann, L.; Lodder, J.C.

    2012-01-01

    Co/Pt multilayer dots with perpendicular anisotropy and with diameters of 250 and 350 nm were fabricated on top of a Hall cross configuration. The angular dependence of the magnetic reversal of the individual dot was investigated by Anomalous Hall effect measurements. At near in-plane angles (85° with the magnetic easy axis) the dot switches partially into a stable two-domain state. This allows for separate analysis of the angular dependence of both the field required for nucleation of a reversed domain, and the field required for depinning of the domain wall. The angular dependence of the depinning field fits accurately to a 1/cos(θ) behavior, whereas the angular dependence of the nucleation field shows a minimum close to 45°. The latter dependency can be accurately fitted to the modified Kondorsky model proposed by Schumacher . - Highlights: ► Reversal takes place by nucleation and subsequent propagation of a domain wall. ► The domain wall can be trapped in the dot at near in-plane field angles. ► Angular dependence of depinning is accurately predicted by the Kondorsky model. ► Angular dependence of nucleation can be fitted to a modified Kondorksy model.

  13. Ice nucleation properties of mineral dust particles: determination of onset RHi, IN active fraction, nucleation time-lag, and the effect of active sites on contact angles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Dobbie

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A newly developed ice nucleation experimental set up was used to investigate the heterogeneous ice nucleation properties of three Saharan and one Spanish dust particle samples. It was observed that the spread in the onset relative humidities with respect to ice (RHi for Saharan dust particles varied from 104% to 110%, whereas for the Spanish dust from 106% to 110%. The elemental composition analysis shows a prominent Ca feature in the Spanish dust sample which could potentially explain the differences in nucleation threshold. Although the spread in the onset RHi for the three Saharan dust samples were in agreement, the active fractions and nucleation time-lags calculated at various temperature and RHi conditions were found to differ. This could be due to the subtle variation in the elemental composition of the dust samples, and surface irregularities like steps, cracks, cavities etc. A combination of classical nucleation theory and active site theory is used to understand the importance of these surface irregularities on the nucleability parameter, contact angle that is widely used in ice cloud modeling. These calculations show that the surface irregularities can reduce the contact angle by approximately 10 degrees.

  14. The effect of channel height on bubble nucleation in superhydrophobic microchannels due to subcritical heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowley, Adam; Maynes, Daniel; Crockett, Julie; Iverson, Brian

    2017-11-01

    This work experimentally investigates the effects of heating on laminar flow in high aspect ratio superhydrophobic (SH) microchannels. When water that is saturated with dissolved air is used, the unwetted cavities of the SH surfaces act as nucleation sites and air effervesces out of solution onto the surfaces. The microchannels consist of a rib/cavity structured SH surface, that is heated, and a glass surface that is utilized for flow visualization. Two channel heights of nominally 183 and 366 μm are considered. The friction factor-Reynolds product (fRe) is obtained via pressure drop and volumetric flow rate measurements and the temperature profile along the channel is obtained via thermocouples embedded in an aluminum block below the SH surface. Five surface types/configurations are investigated: smooth hydrophilic, smooth hydrophobic, SH with ribs perpendicular to the flow, SH with ribs parallel to the flow, and SH with both ribs parallel to the flow and sparse ribs perpendicular to the flow. Depending on the surface type/configuration, large bubbles can form and adversely affect fRe and lead to higher temperatures along the channel. Once bubbles grow large enough, they are expelled from the channel. The channel size greatly effects the residence time of the bubbles and consequently fRe and the channel temperature. This research was supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) (Grant No. CBET-1235881) and the Utah NASA Space Grant Consortium (NASA Grant NNX15A124H).

  15. Studying the effects of nucleating agents on texture modification of puffed corn-fish snack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahmohammadi, Hamid Reza; Bakar, Jamilah; Rahman, Russly Abdul; Adzhan, Noranizan Mohd

    2014-02-01

    To improve textural attributes of puffed corn-fish snack, the effects of 1%, 1.5%, and 2% of calcium carbonate, magnesium silicate (talc), sodium bicarbonate as well as 5% and 10% of wheat bran (as the nucleating materials) on textural attributes were studied. Sensory evaluation, bulk density, expansion ratio, maximum force, and count peaks were measured using the Kramer test. The results showed that all of the additives except bran significantly enhanced the texture. Among them, talc at 0.5% was the best to enhance the density and expansion ratio. Effects of using 0.5% talc on puffed corn-fish snack microstructure were studied using scanning electron microscopy. The average cell diameter of 109 ± 48 μm and cell numbers per square centimeter of 67.4 for talc-treated products were obtained, while for nontalc-treated extrudates, average cell diameter of 798 ± 361 μm and cell numbers per square centimeter of 13.9 were found. Incorporation of 0.5% w/w of magnesium silicate reduced (7-fold) the average cell diameter while increased (4-fold) the cell number. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®

  16. Effect of Different Loading Conditions on the Nucleation and Development of Shear Zones Around Material Heterogeneities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybacki, E.; Nardini, L.; Morales, L. F.; Dresen, G.

    2017-12-01

    Rock deformation at depths in the Earth's crust is often localized in high temperature shear zones, which occur in the field at different scales and in a variety of lithologies. The presence of material heterogeneities has long been recognized to be an important cause for shear zones evolution, but the mechanisms controlling initiation and development of localization are not fully understood, and the question of which loading conditions (constant stress or constant deformation rate) are most favourable is still open. To better understand the effect of boundary conditions on shear zone nucleation around heterogeneities, we performed a series of torsion experiments under constant twist rate (CTR) and constant torque (CT) conditions in a Paterson-type deformation apparatus. The sample assemblage consisted of copper-jacketed Carrara marble hollow cylinders with one weak inclusion of Solnhofen limestone. The CTR experiments were performed at maximum bulk strain rates of 1.8-1.9*10-4 s-1, yielding shear stresses of 19-20 MPa. CT tests were conducted at shear stresses between 18.4 and 19.8 MPa resulting in shear strain rates of 1-2*10-4 s-1. All experiments were run at 900 °C temperature and 400 MPa confining pressure. Maximum bulk shear strains (γ) were ca. 0.3 and 1. Strain localized within the host marble in front of the inclusion in an area termed process zone. Here grain size reduction is intense and local shear strain (estimated from markers on the jackets) is up to 8 times higher than the applied bulk strain, rapidly dropping to 2 times higher at larger distance from the inclusion. The evolution of key microstructural parameters such as average grain size and average grain orientation spread (GOS, a measure of lattice distortion) within the process zone, determined by electron backscatter diffraction analysis, differs significantly as a function of loading conditions. Both parameters indicate that, independent of bulk strain and distance from the inclusion, the

  17. Effect of compatibilization and reprocessing on the isothermal crystallization kinetics of polypropylene/wood flour composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arieny Rodrigues

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have focused on polymer mixtures aimed at the potential applications of these materials. This work analyzed the effect of polymer reprocessing and the type and concentration of compatibilizer on the isothermal crystallization kinetics of polypropylene/wood flour composites. The composites, which were polypropylene grafted with acrylic acid (PP-g-AA and maleic anhydride (PP-g-MA, were processed in a twin screw extruder with and without compatibilizer. Reprocessed polypropylene reached complete crystallization in less time than the composites with virgin polypropylene. The addition of wood flour to the composites did not change the kinetics significantly compared to that of the pure polymers, but the compatibilizers did, particularly PP-g-AA. The nucleation exponent (n and crystallization rate (K were calculated from Avrami plots. The values of n ranged from 2 to 3, indicating instantaneous to sporadic nucleation. The crystallization half-time of reprocessed polypropylene was shorter than that of virgin polypropylene and of the compositions containing PP-g-AA compatibilizer. The activation energy of crystallization and the equilibrium melting temperature were calculated, respectively, from Arrhenius and Hoffman-Weeks plots. Both of these parameters showed lower values in the composites, particularly in the ones containing compatibilizers.

  18. New mechanism for bubble nucleation: Classical transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Easther, Richard; Giblin, John T. Jr; Hui Lam; Lim, Eugene A.

    2009-01-01

    Given a scalar field with metastable minima, bubbles nucleate quantum mechanically. When bubbles collide, energy stored in the bubble walls is converted into kinetic energy of the field. This kinetic energy can facilitate the classical nucleation of new bubbles in minima that lie below those of the 'parent' bubbles. This process is efficient and classical, and changes the dynamics and statistics of bubble formation in models with multiple vacua, relative to that derived from quantum tunneling.

  19. Experimental investigation of tube length effect on nucleate pool boiling heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Myeong-Gie

    1998-01-01

    The effect of a vertically installed tube length on the nucleate pool boiling heat transfer coefficient under atmospheric pressure has been empirically obtained using various combination of major parameters for application to advanced light water reactor design. The experimental data for q'' versus ΔT test are counted as 1,063 points and can cover the extent of D = 9.7 ∼ 25.4 mm, ε = 15.1 ∼ 60.9 nm, H = 5.25 ∼ 30.93, and q'' ≤ 160 kW/m 2 . The experimental results show that a shorter tube is more efficient to increase heat transfer rate due to smaller bubble slug formation on the tube surface. The effect of tube length is greatly observed before H(= L/D) gets 50. After that, the heat flux decreases linearly with H increase. To quantify tube length effect, a new empirical correlation has been developed based on the experimental data bank for pool boiling heat transfer and some parametric studies have been done using the newly developed empirical correlation to broaden its applicability. The newly developed empirical correlation has the form of q'' 0.019ε 0.570 ΔT 4.676 /(D 1.238 H 0.072 ) and can predict the experimental data within ± 20% bound. Heat transfer characteristics can be changed with tube length variation and the transition point is H ∼ 50. Before the transition point, bubble coalescence is active and heat transfer rate gets rapidly decreased with increasing tube length. After that, heat transfer gets somewhat slowly decreased since bubble coalescence effect gets nearly equilibrium with liquid agitation effect

  20. Effect of wetting on nucleation and growth of D2 in confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zepeda-Ruiz, L. A.; Sadigh, B.; Shin, S. J.; Kozioziemski, B. J.; Chernov, A. A.

    2018-04-01

    We have performed a computational study to determine how the wetting of liquid deuterium to the walls of the material influences nucleation. We present the development of a pair-wise interatomic potential that includes zero-point motion of molecular deuterium. Deuterium is used in this study because of its importance to inertial confinement fusion and the potential to generate a superfluid state if the solidification can be suppressed. Our simulations show that wetting dominates undercooling compared to the pore geometries. We observe a transition from heterogeneous nucleation at the confining wall to homogeneous nucleation at the bulk of the liquid (and intermediate cases) as the interaction with the confining wall changes from perfect wetting to non-wetting. When nucleation is heterogeneous, the temperature needed for solidification changes by 4 K with decreasing deuterium-wall interaction, but it remains independent (and equal to the one from bulk samples) when homogeneous nucleation dominates. We find that growth and quality of the resulting microstructure also depends on the magnitude of liquid deuterium-wall interaction strength.

  1. Conjugate heat transfer effects on wall bubble nucleation in subcooled flashing flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, P.F.; Hijikata, K.

    1990-01-01

    A variety of models have been proposed to explain observations that large liquid superheat is required to initiate nucleation in flashing flows of subcooled liquids in nozzles, cracks and pipes. In such flows an abrupt change in the fluid temperature occurs downstream of the nucleating cavities. This paper examines the subcooling of the nucleating cavities due to conjugate heat transfer to the cold downstream fluid. This examination suggests a mechanism limiting the maximum active cavity size. Simple analysis shows that, of the total superheat required to initiate flashing, a substantial portion results from conjugate wall subcooling, which decreases the cavity vapor pressure. The specific case of flashing critical nozzle flow is examined in detail. Here boundary-layer laminarization due to the strong favorable pressure gradient aids the analysis of conjugate heat transfer

  2. A computational fluid dynamics approach to nucleation in the water-sulfuric acid system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, E; Brus, D; Hyvärinen, A-P; Stratmann, F; Wilck, M; Lihavainen, H; Kulmala, M

    2010-08-12

    This study presents a computational fluid dynamics modeling approach to investigate the nucleation in the water-sulfuric acid system in a flow tube. On the basis of an existing experimental setup (Brus, D.; Hyvärinen, A.-P.; Viisanen, Y.; Kulmala, M.; Lihavainen, H. Atmos. Chem. Phys. 2010, 10, 2631-2641), we first establish the effect of convection on the flow profile. We then proceed to simulate nucleation for relative humidities of 10, 30, and 50% and for sulfuric acid concentration between 10(9) to 3 x 10(10) cm(-3). We describe the nucleation zone in detail and determine how flow rate and relative humidity affect its characteristics. Experimental nucleation rates are compared to rates gained from classical binary and kinetic nucleation theory as well as cluster activation theory. For low RH values, kinetic theory yields the best agreement with experimental results while binary nucleation best reproduces the experimental nucleation behavior at 50% relative humidity. Particle growth is modeled for an example case at 50% relative humidity. The final simulated diameter is very close to the experimental result.

  3. Deviation from equilibrium conditions in molecular dynamic simulations of homogeneous nucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halonen, Roope; Zapadinsky, Evgeni; Vehkamäki, Hanna

    2018-04-28

    We present a comparison between Monte Carlo (MC) results for homogeneous vapour-liquid nucleation of Lennard-Jones clusters and previously published values from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Both the MC and MD methods sample real cluster configuration distributions. In the MD simulations, the extent of the temperature fluctuation is usually controlled with an artificial thermostat rather than with more realistic carrier gas. In this study, not only a primarily velocity scaling thermostat is considered, but also Nosé-Hoover, Berendsen, and stochastic Langevin thermostat methods are covered. The nucleation rates based on a kinetic scheme and the canonical MC calculation serve as a point of reference since they by definition describe an equilibrated system. The studied temperature range is from T = 0.3 to 0.65 ϵ/k. The kinetic scheme reproduces well the isothermal nucleation rates obtained by Wedekind et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 127, 064501 (2007)] using MD simulations with carrier gas. The nucleation rates obtained by artificially thermostatted MD simulations are consistently lower than the reference nucleation rates based on MC calculations. The discrepancy increases up to several orders of magnitude when the density of the nucleating vapour decreases. At low temperatures, the difference to the MC-based reference nucleation rates in some cases exceeds the maximal nonisothermal effect predicted by classical theory of Feder et al. [Adv. Phys. 15, 111 (1966)].

  4. Diamond-coated three-dimensional GaN micromembranes: effect of nucleation and deposition techniques

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ižák, Tibor; Vanko, G.; Babchenko, Oleg; Potocký, Štěpán; Marton, M.; Vojs, M.; Choleva, P.; Kromka, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 252, č. 11 (2015), s. 2585-2590 ISSN 0370-1972 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP14-16549P Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : diamond film * GaN micromembranes * microwave chemical vapour deposition * polymer-based nucleation Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.522, year: 2015

  5. Effect of gravity on false-vacuum decay rates for O(4)-symmetric bubble nucleation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samuel, D.A.; Hiscock, W.A.

    1991-01-01

    The self-gravity of quantum fields is often considered to be a negligible perturbation upon a background spacetime and not of much physical interest. Its importance is determined by the ratio of the mass of the field to the Planck mass, this ratio being very small for those fields that we are most familiar in dealing with. However, it is conceivable that either in the very early Universe or even today a false-vacuum decay could occur associated with a field of appreciable mass. The effect of self-gravity upon false-vacuum decay was initially studied within the ''thin-wall'' approximation by Coleman and De Luccia. Their analysis involved the approximate solution of the coupled Euclideanized field and Einstein equations with the assumption of O(4)-symmetric bubble nucleation. In this paper we consider the range of validity of the ''thin-wall'' approximation by comparing the Coleman--De Luccia results with exact numerical results for a quartic polynomial potential. We also extend the analysis into regimes for which the ''thin-wall'' approximation is inapplicable. In the case of an initially de Sitter space decaying into Minkowski space, we find a smooth transition between the Coleman--De Luccia mode of bubble formation and the Hawking-Moss transition, wherein the entire spacetime tunnels ''at once'' to the maximum of the potential. In the case of the decay of an initially Minkowski space to an anti--de Sitter space, we find that there is a ''forbidden region'' of vacuum potential parameters for which decay is not possible. At energies far below the Planck scale, the boundary of this region is accurately described by the thin-wall prediction obtained by Coleman and De Luccia. At energies near the Planck scale, however, the actual ''forbidden region'' is significantly smaller than predicted by the thin-wall approximation; thus, vacuum decays are possible which appear to be forbidden by thin-wall calculations

  6. A dynamical theory of nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutsko, James F.

    2013-05-01

    A dynamical theory of nucleation based on fluctuating hydrodynamics is described. It is developed in detail for the case of diffusion-limited nucleation appropriate to colloids and macro-molecules in solution. By incorporating fluctuations, realistic fluid-transport and realistic free energy models the theory is able to give a unified treatment of both the pre-critical development of fluctuations leading to a critical cluster as well as of post-critical growth. Standard results from classical nucleation theory are shown to follow in the weak noise limit while the generality of the theory allows for many extensions including the description of very high supersaturations (small clusters), multiple order parameters and strong-noise effects to name a few. The theory is applied to homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation of a model globular protein in a confined volume and it is found that nucleation depends critically on the existence of long-wavelength, small-amplitude density fluctuations.

  7. Modelling the effect of acoustic waves on the thermodynamics and kinetics of phase transformation in a solution: Including mass transportation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haqshenas, S R; Ford, I J; Saffari, N

    2018-01-14

    Effects of acoustic waves on a phase transformation in a metastable phase were investigated in our previous work [S. R. Haqshenas, I. J. Ford, and N. Saffari, "Modelling the effect of acoustic waves on nucleation," J. Chem. Phys. 145, 024315 (2016)]. We developed a non-equimolar dividing surface cluster model and employed it to determine the thermodynamics and kinetics of crystallisation induced by an acoustic field in a mass-conserved system. In the present work, we developed a master equation based on a hybrid Szilard-Fokker-Planck model, which accounts for mass transportation due to acoustic waves. This model can determine the kinetics of nucleation and the early stage of growth of clusters including the Ostwald ripening phenomenon. It was solved numerically to calculate the kinetics of an isothermal sonocrystallisation process in a system with mass transportation. The simulation results show that the effect of mass transportation for different excitations depends on the waveform as well as the imposed boundary conditions and tends to be noticeable in the case of shock waves. The derivations are generic and can be used with any acoustic source and waveform.

  8. Influence of silicon on void nucleation in irradiated alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esmailzadeh, B.; Kumar, A.; Garner, F.A.

    1984-01-01

    The addition of silicon to pure nickel, Ni-Cr alloys and Fe-Ni-Cr alloys raises the diffusivity of each of the alloy components. The resultant increase in the effective vacancy diffusion coefficient causes large reductions in the nucleation rate of voids during irradiation. This extends the transient regime of swelling, which is controlled not only by the amount of silicon in solution but also by the precipitation kinetics of precipitates rich in nickel and silicon

  9. Effects of La on the age hardening behavior and precipitation kinetics in the cast Al–Cu alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Dongming; Bai Zhihao; Qiu Feng; Li Yanjun; Jiang Qichuan

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► La addition enhances the hardness of the Al–Cu alloy. ► La addition facilitates the formation of the θ′ precipitates. ► La addition decreases the nucleation activation energy of the θ′ precipitates. - Abstract: The hardness and thermal stability are the important problems of the cast Al–Cu alloy related to the microstructural changes. In order to increase the possibilities of high temperature applications of the cast Al–Cu alloy, it is necessary to gain a more detail understanding of the correlation between the age hardening and the microstructure in the cast Al–Cu alloy, and the thermal stability of the θ′ precipitates at elevated temperatures. The aim of this work is to investigate the effects of La addition on the age hardening behavior and precipitation kinetics in the Al–Cu alloy in the temperature range from 435 to 523 K. The results indicated that La addition considerably increases the number of the θ′ precipitates and decreases their sizes, which results in the enhanced age hardening effect. The precipitation kinetics analysis showed that the activation energy (13 kJ/mol) of the θ′ precipitate nucleation of the modified alloy is smaller than that (19 kJ/mol) of the unmodified alloy. The decrease in the activation energy of the θ′ precipitate nucleation can be explained with both the enhanced nucleation process due to La/Cu/vacancy aggregating and the increased interaction between Al and Cu atoms.

  10. Protein crystal nucleation in pores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanev, Christo N; Saridakis, Emmanuel; Chayen, Naomi E

    2017-01-16

    The most powerful method for protein structure determination is X-ray crystallography which relies on the availability of high quality crystals. Obtaining protein crystals is a major bottleneck, and inducing their nucleation is of crucial importance in this field. An effective method to form crystals is to introduce nucleation-inducing heterologous materials into the crystallization solution. Porous materials are exceptionally effective at inducing nucleation. It is shown here that a combined diffusion-adsorption effect can increase protein concentration inside pores, which enables crystal nucleation even under conditions where heterogeneous nucleation on flat surfaces is absent. Provided the pore is sufficiently narrow, protein molecules approach its walls and adsorb more frequently than they can escape. The decrease in the nucleation energy barrier is calculated, exhibiting its quantitative dependence on the confinement space and the energy of interaction with the pore walls. These results provide a detailed explanation of the effectiveness of porous materials for nucleation of protein crystals, and will be useful for optimal design of such materials.

  11. Climate Impacts of Ice Nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gettelman, Andrew; Liu, Xiaohong; Barahona, Donifan; Lohmann, Ulrike; Chen, Celia

    2012-01-01

    Several different ice nucleation parameterizations in two different General Circulation Models (GCMs) are used to understand the effects of ice nucleation on the mean climate state, and the Aerosol Indirect Effects (AIE) of cirrus clouds on climate. Simulations have a range of ice microphysical states that are consistent with the spread of observations, but many simulations have higher present-day ice crystal number concentrations than in-situ observations. These different states result from different parameterizations of ice cloud nucleation processes, and feature different balances of homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation. Black carbon aerosols have a small (0.06 Wm(exp-2) and not statistically significant AIE when included as ice nuclei, for nucleation efficiencies within the range of laboratory measurements. Indirect effects of anthropogenic aerosols on cirrus clouds occur as a consequence of increasing anthropogenic sulfur emissions with different mechanisms important in different models. In one model this is due to increases in homogeneous nucleation fraction, and in the other due to increases in heterogeneous nucleation with coated dust. The magnitude of the effect is the same however. The resulting ice AIE does not seem strongly dependent on the balance between homogeneous and heterogeneous ice nucleation. Regional effects can reach several Wm2. Indirect effects are slightly larger for those states with less homogeneous nucleation and lower ice number concentration in the base state. The total ice AIE is estimated at 0.27 +/- 0.10 Wm(exp-2) (1 sigma uncertainty). This represents a 20% offset of the simulated total shortwave AIE for ice and liquid clouds of 1.6 Wm(sup-2).

  12. Effect of a Stepped Si(100) Surface on the Nucleation Process of Ge Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesin, M. Yu.; Nikiforov, A. I.; Timofeev, V. A.; Mashanov, V. I.; Tuktamyshev, A. R.; Loshkarev, I. D.; Pchelyakov, O. P.

    2018-03-01

    Nucleation of Ge islands on a stepped Si(100) surface is studied. It is shown by diffraction of fast electrons that at a temperature of 600°C, constant flux of Si, and deposition rate of 0.652 Å/s, a series of the 1×2 superstructure reflections completely disappears, if the Si (100) substrate deviated by an angle of 0.35° to the (111) face is preliminarily heated to 1000°C. The disappearance of the 1×2 superstructure reflexes is due to the transition from the surface with monoatomic steps to that with diatomic ones. Investigations of the Ge islands' growth were carried out on the Si(100) surface preliminarily annealed at temperatures of 800 and 1000°C. It is shown that the islands tend to nucleate at the step edges.

  13. Effect of ageing of K-feldspar on its ice nucleating efficiency in immersion, deposition and contact freezing modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peckhaus, Andreas; Bachmann, Felix; Hoffmann, Nadine; Koch, Michael; Kiselev, Alexei; Leisner, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Recently K-feldspar was identified as one of the most active atmospheric ice nucleating particles (INP) of mineral origin [1]. Seeking the explanation to this phenomena we have conducted extensive experimental investigation of the ice nucleating efficiency of K-feldspar in three heterogeneous freezing modes. The immersion freezing of K-feldspar was investigated with the cold stage using arrays of nanoliter-size droplets containing aqueous suspension of polydisperse feldspar particles. For contact freezing, the charged droplets of supercooled water were suspended in the laminar flow of the DMA-selected feldspar-containing particles, allowing for determination of freezing probability on a single particle-droplet contact [2]. The nucleation and growth of ice via vapor deposition on the crystalline surfaces of macroscopic feldspar particles have been investigated in the Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope (ESEM) under humidified nitrogen atmosphere. The ice nucleation experiments were supplemented with measurements of effective surface area of feldspar particles and ion chromatography (IC) analysis of the leached framework cations (K+, Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+). In this contribution we focus on the role of surface chemistry influencing the IN efficiency of K-feldspar, in particular the connection between the degree of surface hydroxylation and its ability to induce local structural ordering in the interfacial layer in water molecules (as suggested by recent modeling efforts). We mimic the natural process of feldspar ageing by suspending it in water or weak aqueous solution of carbonic acid for different time periods, from minutes to months, and present its freezing efficiency as a function of time. Our immersion freezing experiments show that ageing have a nonlinear effect on the freezing behavior of feldspar within the investigated temperature range (-40°C to -10°C). On the other hand, deposition nucleation of ice observed in the ESEM reveals clear different pattern

  14. The effect of specific beta-nucleation on morphology and mechanical behavior of isotactic polypropylene

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kotek, Jiří; Raab, Miroslav; Baldrian, Josef; Grellmann, W.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 85, č. 6 (2002), s. 1174-1184 ISSN 0021-8995 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/99/P011; GA ČR GA106/98/0718; GA AV ČR IAA4050904 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4050913 Keywords : polypropylene * morphology * beta-nucleation Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 0.927, year: 2002

  15. Sulfuric acid nucleation: power dependencies, variation with relative humidity, and effect of bases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. Zollner

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Nucleation of particles composed of sulfuric acid, water, and nitrogen base molecules was studied using a continuous flow reactor. The particles formed from these vapors were detected with an ultrafine condensation particle counter, while vapors of sulfuric acid and nitrogen bases were detected by chemical ionization mass spectrometry. Variation of particle numbers with sulfuric acid concentration yielded a power dependency on sulfuric acid of 5 ± 1 for relative humidities of 14–68% at 296 K; similar experiments with varying water content yielded power dependencies on H2O of ~7. The critical cluster contains about 5 H2SO4 molecules and a new treatment of the power dependency for H2O suggests about 12 H2O molecules for these conditions. Addition of 2-to-45 pptv of ammonia or methyl amine resulted in up to millions of times more particles than in the absence of these compounds. Particle detection capabilities, sulfuric acid and nitrogen base detection, wall losses, and the extent of particle growth are discussed. Results are compared to previous laboratory nucleation studies and they are also discussed in terms of atmospheric nucleation scenarios.

  16. Heterogeneous nucleation of calcium oxalate on native oxide surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, L.; Pattillo, M.J.; Graff, G.L.; Campbell, A.A.; Bunker, B.C.

    1994-04-01

    The aqueous deposition of calcium oxalate onto colloidal oxides has been studied as a model system for understanding heterogeneous nucleation processes of importance in biomimetic synthesis of ceramic thin films. Calcium oxalate nucleation has been monitored by measuring induction times for nucleation using Constant Composition techniques and by measuring nucleation densities on extended oxide surfaces using an atomic force microscope. Results show that the dependence of calcium oxalate nucleation on solution supersaturation fits the functional form predicted by classical nucleation theories. Anionic surfaces appear to promote nucleation better than cationic surfaces, lowering the effective energy barrier to heterogeneous nucleation

  17. Effect of surface free energies on the heterogeneous nucleation of water droplet: A molecular dynamics simulation approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, W.; Lan, Z.; Peng, B. L.; Wen, R. F.; Ma, X. H., E-mail: xuehuma@dlut.edu.cn [Liaoning Provincial Key Laboratory of Clean Utilization of Chemical Resources, Institute of Chemical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2015-02-07

    Heterogeneous nucleation of water droplet on surfaces with different solid-liquid interaction intensities is investigated by molecular dynamics simulation. The interaction potentials between surface atoms and vapor molecules are adjusted to obtain various surface free energies, and the nucleation process and wetting state of nuclei on surfaces are investigated. The results indicate that near-constant contact angles are already established for nano-scale nuclei on various surfaces, with the contact angle decreasing with solid-liquid interaction intensities linearly. Meanwhile, noticeable fluctuation of vapor-liquid interfaces can be observed for the nuclei that deposited on surfaces, which is caused by the asymmetric forces from vapor molecules. The formation and growth rate of nuclei are increasing with the solid-liquid interaction intensities. For low energy surface, the attraction of surface atoms to water molecules is comparably weak, and the pre-existing clusters can depart from the surface and enter into the bulk vapor phase. The distribution of clusters within the bulk vapor phase becomes competitive as compared with that absorbed on surface. For moderate energy surfaces, heterogeneous nucleation predominates and the formation of clusters within bulk vapor phase is suppressed. The effect of high energy particles that embedded in low energy surface is also discussed under the same simulation system. The nucleation preferably initiates on the high energy particles, and the clusters that formed on the heterogeneous particles are trapped around their original positions instead of migrating around as that observed on smooth surfaces. This feature makes it possible for the heterogeneous particles to act as fixed nucleation sites, and simulation results also suggest that the number of nuclei increases monotonously with the number of high energy particles. The growth of nuclei on high energy particles can be divided into three sub-stages, beginning with the formation

  18. Inference of some pharmacokinetic parameters of the C mitomycin, through the analysis of its micro nucleate polychromatic erythrocytes induction kinetics; Inferencia de algunos parametros farmacocineticos de la mitomicina C, mediante el analisis de su cinetica de induccion de eritrocitos policromaticos micronucleados

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales R, P.; Vallarino K, T.; Cruz V, V.; Delgadillo H, A. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    The objective of the present work was to establish pharmacokinetic parameters of the C Mitomycin (MMC) in vivo, comparing its kinetics of induction of polychromatic micro nucleate erythrocytes (EPGMN) with that of the gamma radiation. The used doses were of 0.75; 1.5 and 3. 0 {mu}moles/kg of MMC. It was observed that the MMC produces MN in the first cycle of cellular division and it is independent of the cytotoxic effect. This agent requires of a relatively long period of latency that is not compatible with her great reactivity, for what the pharmacokinetic values obtained in fact reflect the time that takes the processing of leisure in the DNA and the subsequent induction of ruptures that produce MN. (Author)

  19. Dynamics of homogeneous nucleation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toxværd, Søren

    2015-01-01

    The classical nucleation theory for homogeneous nucleation is formulated as a theory for a density fluctuation in a supersaturated gas at a given temperature. But molecular dynamics simulations reveal that it is small cold clusters which initiates the nucleation. The temperature in the nucleating...

  20. An investigation of nucleating flows of steam in a cascade of turbine blading: Effect of overall pressure ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakhtar, F.; Savage, R.A.

    1993-01-01

    In the course of expansion of steam in turbines the state path crosses the saturation line and the fluid becomes a two-phase mixture. To reproduce turbine nucleating and wet conditions realistically requires a supply of supercooled steam which can be obtained under blow down conditions. An experimental short duration cascade tunnel working on this principle has been constructed. The blade profile studied is that of a typical nozzle The paper is one of a set and describes the surface pressure measurements carried out to investigate the effect of the overall pressure ratio on the performance of the blade

  1. Nucleate and film pool boiling in R11: the effects of orientation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venart, J.E.S.; Sousa, A.C.M.; Jung, D.S.

    1985-01-01

    In order to understand and model the behaviour of LPG tanks in fires [1] it is necessary to characterize the internal flow and specify its boundary conditions. Tank storage and transport normally utilize horizontal cylinders or spheres and hence the interior fluid sees a variety of surfaces inclinations and heat fluxes. The purpose of this paper is to present results obtained in R11 as a function of heat flux (1-180 kW/m 2 ) and angle (0-80 o ) at pressures from 1 to 2 bars in the free convective, nucleate and film boiling regions. (author)

  2. The coke drum thermal kinetic effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldescu, Maria M.; Romero, Sim; Larson, Mel [KBC Advanced Technologies plc, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-01

    The coke drum thermal kinetic dynamics fundamentally affect the coker unit yields as well as the coke product properties and unit reliability. In the drum the thermal cracking and polymerization or condensation reactions take place in a semi-batch environment. Understanding the fundamentals of the foaming kinetics that occur in the coke drums is key to avoiding a foam-over that could result in a unit shutdown for several months. Although the most dynamic changes with time occur during drum filling, other dynamics of the coker process will be discussed as well. KBC has contributed towards uncovering and modelling the complexities of heavy oil thermal dynamics. (author)

  3. Experimental Investigation of the Combined Effects of Heat Exchanger Geometries on Nucleate Pool Boiling Heat Transfer in a Scaled IRWST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Myeong Gie; Chun, Moon Hyun

    1996-01-01

    In an effort to determine the combined effects of major parameters of heat exchanger tubes on the nucleate pool boiling heat transfer in the scaled in-containment refueling water storage tank (IRWST), a total of 1,966 data for q v ersus ΔT has been obtained using various combinations of tube diameters, surface roughness, and tube orientations. The experimental results show that (1) increased surface roughness enhances heat transfer for both horizontal and vertical tubes, (2) the two heat transfer mechanisms, i.e.,enhanced heat transfer for both horizontal and vertical tubes, (2) the two heat transfer mechanisms, i.e., enhanced heat transfer due to liquid agitation by bubbles generated and reduced heat transfer by the formation of large vapor slugs and bubble coalescence are different in two regions of low heat fluxes (q ≤ 50kW/m 2 ) and high heat fluxes (q > 50kW/m 2 ) depending on the orientation of tubes and the degree of surface roughness, and (3) the heat transfer rate decreases as the tube diameter is increased for both horizontal and vertical tubes, but the effect of tube diameter on the nucleate pool boiling heat transfer for vertical tubes is greater than that for horizontal tubes. Two empirical heat transfer correlations for q , one for horizontal tubes and the other for vertical tubes, are obtained in terms of surface roughness (ε) and tube diameter (D). In addition, a simple empirical correlation for nucleate pool boiling heat transfer coefficient (h b ) is obtained as a function of heat flux (q ) only. 9 figs., 4 tabs., 15 refs. (Author)

  4. Investigation of the effect of power ultrasound on the nucleation of water during freezing of agar gel samples in tubing vials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiani, Hossein; Sun, Da-Wen; Delgado, Adriana; Zhang, Zhihang

    2012-05-01

    Nucleation, as an important stage of freezing process, can be induced by the irradiation of power ultrasound. In this study, the effect of irradiation temperature (-2 °C, -3 °C, -4 °C and -5 °C), irradiation duration (0s, 1s, 3s, 5s, 10s or 15s) and ultrasound intensity (0.07 W cm(-2), 0.14 W cm(-2), 0.25 W cm(-2), 0.35 W cm(-2) and 0.42 W cm(-2)) on the dynamic nucleation of ice in agar gel samples was studied. The samples were frozen in an ethylene glycol-water mixture (-20 °C) in an ultrasonic bath system after putting them into tubing vials. Results indicated that ultrasound irradiation is able to initiate nucleation at different supercooled temperatures (from -5 °C to -2 °C) in agar gel if optimum intensity and duration of ultrasound were chosen. Evaluation of the effect of 0.25 W cm(-2) ultrasound intensity and different durations of ultrasound application on agar gels showed that 1s was not long enough to induce nucleation, 3s induced the nucleation repeatedly but longer irradiation durations resulted in the generation of heat and therefore nucleation was postponed. Investigation of the effect of ultrasound intensity revealed that higher intensities of ultrasound were effective when a shorter period of irradiation was used, while lower intensities only resulted in nucleation when a longer irradiation time was applied. In addition to this, higher intensities were not effective at longer irradiation times due to the heat generated in the samples by the heating effect of ultrasound. In conclusion, the use of ultrasound as a means to control the crystallization process offers promising application in freezing of solid foods, however, optimum conditions should be selected. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Stochastic simulation of nucleation in binary alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    L’vov, P. E.; Svetukhin, V. V.

    2018-06-01

    In this study, we simulate nucleation in binary alloys with respect to thermal fluctuations of the alloy composition. The simulation is based on the Cahn–Hilliard–Cook equation. We have considered the influence of some fluctuation parameters (wave vector cutoff and noise amplitude) on the kinetics of nucleation and growth of minority phase precipitates. The obtained results are validated by the example of iron–chromium alloys.

  6. On the effect of stress on nucleation and growth of precipitates in an Al-Cu-Mg-Ag alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrotzki, B.; Shiflet, G. J.; Starke, E. A.

    1996-11-01

    A study has been made of the effect of an externally applied tensile stress on Ω and Θ' precipitate nucleation and growth in an Al-Cu-Mg-Ag alloy and a binary Al-Cu alloy which was used as a model system. Both solutionized and solutionized and aged conditions were studied. The mechanical properties have been measured and the microstructures have been characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The volume fraction and number density, as well as the precipitate size, have been experimentally determined. It was found that for as-solutionized samples aged under stress, precipitation occurs preferentially parallel to the stress axis. A threshold stress has to be exceeded before this effect can be observed. The critical stress for influencing the precipitate habit plane is between 120 and 140 MPa for Ω and between 16 and 19 MPa for Θ' for the aging temperature of 160 °C. The major effect of the applied stress is on the nucleation process. The results are discussed in terms of the role of the lattice misfit between the matrix and the precipitate nucleus.

  7. Ion irradiation enhanced crystal nucleation in amorphous Si thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Im, J.S.; Atwater, H.A.

    1990-01-01

    The nucleation kinetics of the amorphous-to-crystal transition of Si films under 1.5 MeV Xe + irradiation have been investigated by means of in situ transmission electron microscopy in the temperature range T=500--580 degree C. After an incubation period during which negligible nucleation occurs, a constant nucleation rate was observed in steady state, suggesting that homogeneous nucleation occurred. Compared to thermal crystallization, a significant enhancement in the nucleation rate during high-energy ion irradiation (five to seven orders of magnitude) was observed with an apparent activation energy of 3.9±0.75 eV

  8. Effects of atomic hydrogen on the selective area growth of Si and Si1-xGex thin films on Si and SiO2 surfaces: Inhibition, nucleation, and growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, T.W.; Lam, A.M.; Ma, P.F.; Engstrom, J.R.

    2004-01-01

    Supersonic molecular beam techniques have been used to study the nucleation of Si and Si 1-x Ge x thin films on Si and SiO 2 surfaces, where Si 2 H 6 and GeH 4 have been used as sources. A particular emphasis of this study has been an examination of the effects of a coincident flux of atomic hydrogen. The time associated with formation of stable islands of Si or Si 1-x Ge x on SiO 2 surfaces--the incubation time--has been found to depend strongly on the kinetic energy of the incident molecular precursors (Si 2 H 6 and GeH 4 ) and the substrate temperature. After coalescence, thin film morphology has been found to depend primarily on substrate temperature, with smoother films being grown at substrate temperatures below 600 deg. C. Introduction of a coincident flux of atomic hydrogen has a large effect on the nucleation and growth process. First, the incubation time in the presence of atomic hydrogen has been found to increase, especially at substrate temperatures below 630 deg. C, suggesting that hydrogen atoms adsorbed on Si-like sites on SiO 2 can effectively block nucleation of Si. Unfortunately, in terms of promoting selective area growth, coincident atomic hydrogen also decreases the rate of epitaxial growth rate, essentially offsetting any increase in the incubation time for growth on SiO 2 . Concerning Si 1-x Ge x growth, the introduction of GeH 4 produces substantial changes in both thin film morphology and the rate nucleation of poly-Si 1-x Ge x on SiO 2 . Briefly, the addition of Ge increases the incubation time, while it lessens the effect of coincident hydrogen on the incubation time. Finally, a comparison of the maximum island density, the time to reach this density, and the steady-state polycrystalline growth rate strongly suggests that all thin films [Si, Si 1-x Ge x , both with and without H(g)] nucleate at special sites on the SiO 2 surface, and grow primarily via direct deposition of adatoms on pre-existing islands

  9. A Comparative Study of Nucleation Parameterizations: 2. Three-Dimensional Model Application and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Following the examination and evaluation of 12 nucleation parameterizations presented in part 1, 11 of them representing binary, ternary, kinetic, and cluster‐activated nucleation theories are evaluated in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Community Multiscale Air Quality ...

  10. Effect of Temperature on Nucleation of Nanocrystalline Indium Tin Oxide Synthesized by Electron-Beam Evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yan; Zhao, Yujun; Shen, Jianxing; Xu, Xiangang

    2017-07-01

    Indium tin oxide (ITO) has been widely applied as a transparent conductive layer and optical window in light-emitting diodes, solar cells, and touch screens. In this paper, crystalline nano-sized ITO dendrites are obtained using an electron-beam evaporation technique. The surface morphology of the obtained ITO was studied for substrate temperatures of 25°C, 130°C, 180°C, and 300°C. Nano-sized crystalline dendrites were synthesized only at a substrate temperature of 300°C. The dendrites had a cubic structure, confirmed by the results of x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The growth mechanism of the nano-crystalline dendrites could be explained by a vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth model. The catalysts of the VLS process were indium and tin droplets, confirmed by varying the substrate temperature, which further influenced the nucleation of the ITO dendrites.

  11. Shear zone nucleation and deformation transient: effect of heterogeneities and loading conditions in experimentally deformed calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, L. F. G.; Rybacki, E.; Dresen, G. H.; Kilian, R.

    2015-12-01

    In the Earth's middle to lower crust, strain is frequently localized along ductile shear zones, which commonly nucleate at structural and material heterogeneities. To investigate shear zone nucleation and development due to heterogeneities, we performed constant strain-rate (CSR) and constant stress (CS) simple shear (torsion) deformation experiments on Carrara marble samples containing weak (limestone) inclusions. The experiments were conducted in a Paterson-type gas deformation apparatus at 900 °C temperature and 400 MPa confining pressure and maximum bulk shear strains of 3. Peak shear stress was about 20 MPa for all the samples, followed by smooth weakening and steady state behavior. The strain is predominantly localized in the host marble within the process zone in front of the inclusion, defined by a zone of intense grain size reduction due to dynamic recrystallization. In CS tests a narrow shear zone developed in front of the inclusion, whereas in CSR experiments the deformation is more heterogeneously distributed, up to g=3.. In the later, secondary foliations oblique to the process zone and alternating thin, high-strain layers are common. In samples deformed at the same shear strain (g=1), the average recrystallized grain size in the process zone is similar for CS and CSR conditions. Crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) measurements shows that different grain sizes have slightly different CPO patterns. CPO strength varies for different grain sizes, with a CPO strength peak between 40-50 μm, decreasing progressively within smaller grain size, but with secondary peaks for different coarse-grained sizes. Our observations suggest that the initial formation and transient deformation of shear zones is strongly affected by loading conditions.

  12. Deconvoluting the effects of surface chemistry and nanoscale topography: Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm nucleation on Si-based substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Huang, Jinglin; Say, Carmen; Dorit, Robert L; Queeney, K T

    2018-06-01

    The nucleation of biofilms is known to be affected by both the chemistry and topography of the underlying substrate, particularly when topography includes nanoscale (topography vs. chemistry is complicated by concomitant variation in both as a result of typical surface modification techniques. Analyzing the behavior of biofilm-forming bacteria exposed to surfaces with systematic, independent variation of both topography and surface chemistry should allow differentiation of the two effects. Silicon surfaces with reproducible nanotopography were created by anisotropic etching in deoxygenated water. Surface chemistry was varied independently to create hydrophilic (OH-terminated) and hydrophobic (alkyl-terminated) surfaces. The attachment and proliferation of Psuedomonas aeruginosa to these surfaces was characterized over a period of 12 h using fluorescence and confocal microscopy. The number of attached bacteria as well as the structural characteristics of the nucleating biofilm were influenced by both surface nanotopography and surface chemistry. In general terms, the presence of both nanoscale features and hydrophobic surface chemistry enhance bacterial attachment and colonization. However, the structural details of the resulting biofilms suggest that surface chemistry and topography interact differently on each of the four surface types we studied. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A kinetic Monte Carlo simulation method of van der Waals epitaxy for atomistic nucleation-growth processes of transition metal dichalcogenides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Yifan; Liang, Chaoping; Cha, Pil-Ryung; Colombo, Luigi; Wallace, Robert M; Cho, Kyeongjae

    2017-06-07

    Controlled growth of crystalline solids is critical for device applications, and atomistic modeling methods have been developed for bulk crystalline solids. Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulation method provides detailed atomic scale processes during a solid growth over realistic time scales, but its application to the growth modeling of van der Waals (vdW) heterostructures has not yet been developed. Specifically, the growth of single-layered transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) is currently facing tremendous challenges, and a detailed understanding based on KMC simulations would provide critical guidance to enable controlled growth of vdW heterostructures. In this work, a KMC simulation method is developed for the growth modeling on the vdW epitaxy of TMDs. The KMC method has introduced full material parameters for TMDs in bottom-up synthesis: metal and chalcogen adsorption/desorption/diffusion on substrate and grown TMD surface, TMD stacking sequence, chalcogen/metal ratio, flake edge diffusion and vacancy diffusion. The KMC processes result in multiple kinetic behaviors associated with various growth behaviors observed in experiments. Different phenomena observed during vdW epitaxy process are analysed in terms of complex competitions among multiple kinetic processes. The KMC method is used in the investigation and prediction of growth mechanisms, which provide qualitative suggestions to guide experimental study.

  14. Warm ion effects on kinetic drift cyclotron loss cone instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Shichong; Shen Jiewu; Cai Shidong

    1988-01-01

    The effects of adding warm plasmas on the kinetic DCLC mode in high β loss cone plasmas are investigated in detail. It is found that when the fluid DCLC mode is stabilized by a small amount of warm plasma, the kinetic excitation still remains due to two different mechanisms, namely, (1) magnetic drift resonance dissipation excites the negative energy wave; (2) a new type of positive energy wave can become unstable as the resonance condition is met. Comparing with fluid approximation theory, more warm plasmas are needed to suppress the kinetic DCLC instabilities

  15. Chitosan and carboxymethyl-chitosan capping ligands: Effects on the nucleation and growth of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles for producing biocomposite membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Vitor C; Mansur, Alexandra A P; Carvalho, Sandhra M; Medeiros Borsagli, Fernanda G L; Pereira, Marivalda M; Mansur, Herman S

    2016-02-01

    Synthetic biomaterials based on calcium phosphates (CaP) have been widely studied for bone tissue reconstruction therapies, but no definitive solution that fulfills all of the required properties has been identified. Thus, this study reports the synthesis of composite membranes based on nanohydroxyapatite particles (nHA) embedded in chitosan (CHI) and O-carboxymethyl chitosan (CMC) matrices produced using a one-step co-precipitation method in water media. Biopolymers were used as capping ligands for simultaneously controlling the nucleation and growth of the nHA particles during the precipitation process and also to form the polymeric network of the biocomposites. The bionanocomposites were extensively characterized using light microscopy (LM), scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM/TEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray micro-CT analysis (μCT), andMTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazolyl-2)-2,5-diphenyltetrazoliumbromide) cell proliferation assays for cell cytotoxicity. The results demonstrated that the ligands used during the synthesis highly affected the composites produced, primarily due the changes in the mechanisms and kinetics of nucleation and growth of the HA particles at the nanoscale level. The SEMimages revealed that the use of carboxyl-functionalized chitosan (CMC) ligands significantly reduced the average size of theHA nanoparticles and caused the formation of a narrower size distribution (90±20nm) compared to theHAnanoparticles producedwith chitosan ligands (220±50nm). The same trend was verified by the AFM analysis,where the nHA particles were formed evenly dispersed in the polymer matrix. However, the CMC-based composites were more homogeneously distributed, which was endorsed by the images collected via X-ray micro-CT. The FTIR spectra and the XRD analysis indicated that nanosized hydroxyapatite was the predominant calcium

  16. Gas hydrate nucleation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    The overall aim of the project was to gain more knowledge about the kinetics of gas hydrate formation especially the early growth phase. Knowledge of kinetics of gas hydrate formation is important and measurements of gas hydrate particle size and concentration can contribute to improve this knowledge. An experimental setup for carrying out experimental studies of the nucleation and growth of gas hydrates has been constructed and tested. Multi wavelength extinction (MWE) was the experimental technique selected for obtaining particle diameter and concentration. The principle behind MWE is described as well as turbidity spectrum analysis that in an initial stage of the project was considered as an alternative experimental technique. Details of the experimental setup and its operation are outlined. The measuring cell consists of a 1 litre horizontal tube sustaining pressures up to 200 bar. Laser light for particle size determination can be applied through sapphire windows. A description of the various auxiliary equipment and of another gas hydrate cell used in the study are given. A computer program for simulation and analysis of gas hydrate experiments is based on the gas hydrate kinetics model proposed by Skovborg and Rasmussen (1993). Initial measurements showed that knowledge of the refractive index of gas hydrates was important in order to use MWE. An experimental determination of the refractive index of methane and natural gas hydrate is described. The test experiments performed with MWE on collectives of gas hydrate particles and experiments with ethane, methane and natural gas hydrate are discussed. Gas hydrate particles initially seem to grow mainly in size and at latter stages in number. (EG) EFP-94; 41 refs.

  17. Gas hydrate nucleation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    The overall aim of the project was to gain more knowledge about the kinetics of gas hydrate formation especially the early growth phase. Knowledge of kinetics of gas hydrate formation is important and measurements of gas hydrate particle size and concentration can contribute to improve this knowledge. An experimental setup for carrying out experimental studies of the nucleation and growth of gas hydrates has been constructed and tested. Multi wavelength extinction (MWE) was the experimental technique selected for obtaining particle diameter and concentration. The principle behind MWE is described as well as turbidity spectrum analysis that in an initial stage of the project was considered as an alternative experimental technique. Details of the experimental setup and its operation are outlined. The measuring cell consists of a 1 litre horizontal tube sustaining pressures up to 200 bar. Laser light for particle size determination can be applied through sapphire windows. A description of the various auxiliary equipment and of another gas hydrate cell used in the study are given. A computer program for simulation and analysis of gas hydrate experiments is based on the gas hydrate kinetics model proposed by Skovborg and Rasmussen (1993). Initial measurements showed that knowledge of the refractive index of gas hydrates was important in order to use MWE. An experimental determination of the refractive index of methane and natural gas hydrate is described. The test experiments performed with MWE on collectives of gas hydrate particles and experiments with ethane, methane and natural gas hydrate are discussed. Gas hydrate particles initially seem to grow mainly in size and at latter stages in number. (EG) EFP-94; 41 refs.

  18. Heterogeneous nucleation of entrained eutectic Si in high purity melt spun Al-Si alloys investigated by entrained droplet technique and DSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, J H; Schumacher, P; Albu, M; Hofer, F; Ludwig, T H; Arnberg, L

    2016-01-01

    Entrained droplet technique and DSC analyses were employed to investigate the influence of trace elements of Sr, Eu and P on the heterogeneous nucleation of entrained eutectic Si in high purity melt spun Al-5wt.% Si alloys. Sr and Eu addition was found to exert negative effects on the nucleation process, while an increased undercooling was observed. This can be attributed to the formation of phosphide compounds having a lower free energy and hence may preferentially form compared to AlP. Only a trace P addition was found to have a profound effect on the nucleation process. The nucleation kinetics is discussed on the basis of the classical nucleation theory and the free growth model, respectively. The estimated AlP patch size was found to be sufficient for the free growth of Si to occur within the droplets, which strongly indicates that the nucleation of Si on an AlP patch or AlP particle is a limiting step for free growth. The maximum nucleation site density within one droplet is directly related to the size distribution of AlP particles or AlP patches for Si nucleation, but is independent of the cooling rates. Although the nucleation conditions were optimized in entrained droplet experiments, the observed mechanisms are also valid at moderate cooling conditions, such as in shape casting. (paper)

  19. Glutathione reductase: solvent equilibrium and kinetic isotope effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, K.K.; Vanoni, M.A.; Blanchard, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    Glutathione reductase catalyzes the NADPH-dependent reduction of oxidized glutathione (GSSG). The kinetic mechanism is ping-pong, and we have investigated the rate-limiting nature of proton-transfer steps in the reactions catalyzed by the spinach, yeast, and human erythrocyte glutathione reductases using a combination of alternate substrate and solvent kinetic isotope effects. With NADPH or GSSG as the variable substrate, at a fixed, saturating concentration of the other substrate, solvent kinetic isotope effects were observed on V but not V/K. Plots of Vm vs mole fraction of D 2 O (proton inventories) were linear in both cases for the yeast, spinach, and human erythrocyte enzymes. When solvent kinetic isotope effect studies were performed with DTNB instead of GSSG as an alternate substrate, a solvent kinetic isotope effect of 1.0 was observed. Solvent kinetic isotope effect measurements were also performed on the asymmetric disulfides GSSNB and GSSNP by using human erythrocyte glutathione reductase. The Km values for GSSNB and GSSNP were 70 microM and 13 microM, respectively, and V values were 62 and 57% of the one calculated for GSSG, respectively. Both of these substrates yield solvent kinetic isotope effects greater than 1.0 on both V and V/K and linear proton inventories, indicating that a single proton-transfer step is still rate limiting. These data are discussed in relationship to the chemical mechanism of GSSG reduction and the identity of the proton-transfer step whose rate is sensitive to solvent isotopic composition. Finally, the solvent equilibrium isotope effect measured with yeast glutathione reductase is 4.98, which allows us to calculate a fractionation factor for the thiol moiety of GSH of 0.456

  20. Nucleation in ZBLAN glasses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Leede, G.L.A.; Waal, de H.

    1989-01-01

    Nucleation rates were detd. in a ZrF4-BaF2-NaF-LaF3-AlF3 glass (ZBLAN) using an optical method. The results were compared with a similar glass having a slightly different compn. The difference in the nucleation rate is explained by classical nucleation theory using calcd. free-energy differences

  1. Kinetics of hydrogen peroxide decomposition by catalase: hydroxylic solvent effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raducan, Adina; Cantemir, Anca Ruxandra; Puiu, Mihaela; Oancea, Dumitru

    2012-11-01

    The effect of water-alcohol (methanol, ethanol, propan-1-ol, propan-2-ol, ethane-1,2-diol and propane-1,2,3-triol) binary mixtures on the kinetics of hydrogen peroxide decomposition in the presence of bovine liver catalase is investigated. In all solvents, the activity of catalase is smaller than in water. The results are discussed on the basis of a simple kinetic model. The kinetic constants for product formation through enzyme-substrate complex decomposition and for inactivation of catalase are estimated. The organic solvents are characterized by several physical properties: dielectric constant (D), hydrophobicity (log P), concentration of hydroxyl groups ([OH]), polarizability (α), Kamlet-Taft parameter (β) and Kosower parameter (Z). The relationships between the initial rate, kinetic constants and medium properties are analyzed by linear and multiple linear regression.

  2. Crystal nucleation in binary hard-sphere mixtures: the effect of order parameter on the cluster composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ni, R.; Smallenburg, F.; Filion, L.C.; Dijkstra, M.

    2011-01-01

    We study crystal nucleation in a binary mixture of hard spheres and investigate the composition and size of the (non)critical clusters using Monte Carlo simulations. In order to study nucleation of a crystal phase in computer simulations, a one-dimensional order parameter is usually defined to

  3. Kinetic investigation of uranyl-uranophile complexation. 1. Macrocyclic kinetic effect and macrocyclic protection effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabushi, I.; Yoshizawa, A.

    1986-01-01

    Equilibria and rates of ligand-exchange reactions between uranyl tricarbonate and dithiocarbamates and between uranyl tris-(dithiocarbamates) and carbonate were studied under a variety of conditions. The dithiocarbamates used were acyclic diethyl-dithiocarbamate and macrocyclic tris(dithiocarbamate). The acyclic ligand showed a triphasic (successive three-step) equilibrium with three different equilibrium constants while the macrocyclic ligand showed a clear monophasic (one-step) equilibrium with a much larger stability constant for the dithiocarbamate-uranyl complex. The macrocyclic ligand showed the S/sub N/2-type ligand-exchange rate in the forward as well as reverse process, while the first step of the acyclic ligand-exchange reaction proceeded via the S/sub N/1-type mechanism. This kinetic macrocyclic effect on molecularity is interpreted as the result of a unique topological requirement of uranyl complexation. The macrocyclic ligand also exhibited a clear protection effect, leading to the large stability constant. 19 references, 10 figures, 2 tables

  4. Nucleation behavior of glutathione polymorphs in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Zhi; Dang, Leping; Li, Shuai; Wei, Hongyuan

    2013-01-01

    Nucleation behavior of glutathione (GSH) polymorphs in water was investigated by experimental method combined with classical nucleation theory. The solubility of α and β forms GSH in water at different temperatures, and the nucleation induction period at various supersaturations and temperatures were determined experimentally. The results show that, in a certain range of supersaturation, the nucleation of β form predominates at relatively higher temperature, while α form will be obtained at lower temperature. The nucleation kinetics parameters of α and β form were then calculated. To understand the crucial role of temperature on crystal forms, “hypothetic” nucleation parameters of β form at 283.15 K were deduced based on extrapolation method. The results show that the interfacial tension, critical free energy, critical nucleus radius and nucleus number of α form are smaller than that of β form in the same condition at 283.15 K, which implies that α form nucleates easier than β form at low temperature. This work may be useful for the control and optimization of GSH crystallization process in industry

  5. Nucleation in an ultra low ionization environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jens Olaf Pepke; Enghoff, Martin Andreas Bødker; Paling, Sean

    Atmospheric ions can enhance the nucleation of aerosols, as has been established by experiments, observation, and theory. In the clean marine atmosphere ionization is mainly caused by cosmic rays which in turn are controlled by the activity of the Sun, thus providing a potential link between solar...... activity and climate. In order to understand the effect ions may have on the production of cloud condensation nuclei the overall contribution of ion induced nucleation to the global production of secondary aerosols must be determined. One issue with determining this contribution is that several mechanisms...... for nucleation exist and it can be difficult to determine the relative importance of the various mechanisms in a given nucleation event when both ion induced and electrically neutral nucleation mechanisms are at work at the same time. We have carried out nucleation experiments in the Boulby Underground...

  6. Nucleation in the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegg, D A; Baker, M B

    2009-01-01

    Small particles play major roles in modulating radiative and hydrological fluxes in the atmosphere and thus they impact both climate (IPCC 2007) and weather. Most atmospheric particles outside clouds are created in situ through nucleation from gas phase precursors and most ice particles within clouds are formed by nucleation, usually from the liquid. Thus, the nucleation process is of great significance in the Earth's atmosphere. The theoretical examination of nucleation in the atmosphere has been based mostly on classical nucleation theory. While diagnostically very useful, the prognostic skill demonstrated by this approach has been marginal. Microscopic approaches such as molecular dynamics and density functional theory have also proven useful in elucidating various aspects of the process but are not yet sufficiently refined to offer a significant prognostic advantage to the classical approach, due primarily to the heteromolecular nature of atmospheric nucleation. An important aspect of the nucleation process in the atmosphere is that the degree of metastability of the parent phase for the nucleation is modulated by a number of atmospheric processes such as condensation onto pre-existing particles, updraft velocities that are the main driving force for supersaturation of water (a major factor in all atmospheric nucleation), and photochemical production rates of nucleation precursors. Hence, atmospheric nucleation is both temporally and spatially inhomogeneous

  7. Heterogeneous Nucleation and Growth of Nanoparticles at Environmental Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Young-Shin; Kim, Doyoon; Neil, Chelsea W

    2016-09-20

    Mineral nucleation is a phase transformation of aqueous components to solids with an accompanying creation of new surfaces. In this evolutional, yet elusive, process, nuclei often form at environmental interfaces, which provide remarkably reactive sites for heterogeneous nucleation and growth. Naturally occurring nucleation processes significantly contribute to the biogeochemical cycles of important components in the Earth's crust, such as iron and manganese oxide minerals and calcium carbonate. However, in recent decades, these cycles have been significantly altered by anthropogenic activities, which affect the aqueous chemistry and equilibrium of both surface and subsurface systems. These alterations can trigger the dissolution of existing minerals and formation of new nanoparticles (i.e., nucleation and growth) and consequently change the porosity and permeability of geomedia in subsurface environments. Newly formed nanoparticles can also actively interact with components in natural and engineered aquatic systems, including those posing a significant hazard such as arsenic. These interactions can bilaterally influence the fate and transport of both newly formed nanoparticles and aqueous components. Due to their importance in natural and engineered processes, heterogeneous nucleation at environmental interfaces has started to receive more attention. However, a lack of time-resolved in situ analyses makes the evaluation of heterogeneous nucleation challenging because the physicochemical properties of both the nuclei and surfaces significantly and dynamically change with time and aqueous chemistry. This Account reviews our in situ kinetic studies of the heterogeneous nucleation and growth behaviors of iron(III) (hydr)oxide, calcium carbonate, and manganese (hydr)oxide minerals in aqueous systems. In particular, we utilized simultaneous small-angle and grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS/GISAXS) to investigate in situ and in real-time the effects of

  8. Nucleation versus instability race in strained films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kailang; Berbezier, Isabelle; David, Thomas; Favre, Luc; Ronda, Antoine; Abbarchi, Marco; Voorhees, Peter; Aqua, Jean-Noël

    2017-10-01

    Under the generic term "Stranski-Krastanov" are grouped two different growth mechanisms of SiGe quantum dots. They result from the self-organized Asaro-Tiller-Grinfel'd (ATG) instability at low strain, while at high strain, from a stochastic nucleation. While these regimes are well known, we elucidate here the origin of the transition between these two pathways thanks to a joint theoretical and experimental work. Nucleation is described within the master equation framework. By comparing the time scales for ATG instability development and three-dimensional (3D) nucleation onset, we demonstrate that the transition between these two regimes is simply explained by the crossover between their divergent evolutions. Nucleation exhibits a strong exponential deviation at low strain while ATG behaves only algebraically. The associated time scale varies with exp(1 /x4) for nucleation, while it only behaves as 1 /x8 for the ATG instability. Consequently, at high (low) strain, nucleation (instability) occurs faster and inhibits the alternate evolution. It is then this different kinetic evolution which explains the transition from one regime to the other. Such a kinetic view of the transition between these two 3D growth regimes was not provided before. The crossover between nucleation and ATG instability is found to occur both experimentally and theoretically at a Ge composition around 50% in the experimental conditions used here. Varying the experimental conditions and/or the system parameters does not allow us to suppress the transition. This means that the SiGe quantum dots always grow via ATG instability at low strain and nucleation at high strain. This result is important for the self-organization of quantum dots.

  9. Kinetics of the deformation induced memory effect in polyamide-6

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drongelen, van M.; Stroeks, A.A.M.; Peters, G.W.M.

    2015-01-01

    Nascent polyamide-6 shows a peculiar and irreversible effect; the quiescent crystallization kinetics on cooling are accelerated upon deformation in the melt, even after full relaxation of the melt. This phenomenon, known as the orientation (or better, deformation) induced memory effect of polyamide

  10. Responses of Mixed-Phase Cloud Condensates and Cloud Radiative Effects to Ice Nucleating Particle Concentrations in NCAR CAM5 and DOE ACME Climate Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X.; Shi, Y.; Wu, M.; Zhang, K.

    2017-12-01

    Mixed-phase clouds frequently observed in the Arctic and mid-latitude storm tracks have the substantial impacts on the surface energy budget, precipitation and climate. In this study, we first implement the two empirical parameterizations (Niemand et al. 2012 and DeMott et al. 2015) of heterogeneous ice nucleation for mixed-phase clouds in the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model Version 5 (CAM5) and DOE Accelerated Climate Model for Energy Version 1 (ACME1). Model simulated ice nucleating particle (INP) concentrations based on Niemand et al. and DeMott et al. are compared with those from the default ice nucleation parameterization based on the classical nucleation theory (CNT) in CAM5 and ACME, and with in situ observations. Significantly higher INP concentrations (by up to a factor of 5) are simulated from Niemand et al. than DeMott et al. and CNT especially over the dust source regions in both CAM5 and ACME. Interestingly the ACME model simulates higher INP concentrations than CAM5, especially in the Polar regions. This is also the case when we nudge the two models' winds and temperature towards the same reanalysis, indicating more efficient transport of aerosols (dust) to the Polar regions in ACME. Next, we examine the responses of model simulated cloud liquid water and ice water contents to different INP concentrations from three ice nucleation parameterizations (Niemand et al., DeMott et al., and CNT) in CAM5 and ACME. Changes in liquid water path (LWP) reach as much as 20% in the Arctic regions in ACME between the three parameterizations while the LWP changes are smaller and limited in the Northern Hemispheric mid-latitudes in CAM5. Finally, the impacts on cloud radiative forcing and dust indirect effects on mixed-phase clouds are quantified with the three ice nucleation parameterizations in CAM5 and ACME.

  11. Kinetic isotope effect in the thermolysis of methylenecyclobutane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chickos, J.S.

    1979-01-01

    The intramolecular kinetic isotope effect for the thermolysis of equilibrated methylenecyclobutane-d 2 was investigated at 515 0 C as a function of pressure. A high-pressure value of k/sub H/k/sub D/ (ethylene/ethylene-d 2 ) = 0.9 was obtained at 13 cm of N 2 pressure. This value decreased to 0.86 at 70 μm total pressure. No intermolecular kinetic isotope effect was measured for the formation of ethylene from labeled and unlabeled methylenecyclobutane. The pressure and temperature dependence of the intramolecular kinetic isotope effect was used as evidence in establishing the inverse nature of the effect. The isotope effect observed was explained in terms of competing equilibrium and kinetic isotope effects in which the equilibrium isotope effects dominate. It was concluded on the bases of these results that an acyclic intermediate is involved in the fragmentation of methylenecyclobutane to ethylene and allene. The results also support the notion that deuterium prefers to accumulate at the methylene group with the greatest p character in the carbon--hydrogen bond. 1 figure, 4 tables

  12. Nucleate boiling heat transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saiz Jabardo, J.M. [Universidade da Coruna (Spain). Escola Politecnica Superior], e-mail: mjabardo@cdf.udc.es

    2009-07-01

    Nucleate boiling heat transfer has been intensely studied during the last 70 years. However boiling remains a science to be understood and equated. In other words, using the definition given by Boulding, it is an 'insecure science'. It would be pretentious of the part of the author to explore all the nuances that the title of the paper suggests in a single conference paper. Instead the paper will focus on one interesting aspect such as the effect of the surface microstructure on nucleate boiling heat transfer. A summary of a chronological literature survey is done followed by an analysis of the results of an experimental investigation of boiling on tubes of different materials and surface roughness. The effect of the surface roughness is performed through data from the boiling of refrigerants R-134a and R-123, medium and low pressure refrigerants, respectively. In order to investigate the extent to which the surface roughness affects boiling heat transfer, very rough surfaces (4.6 {mu}m and 10.5 {mu}m ) have been tested. Though most of the data confirm previous literature trends, the very rough surfaces present a peculiar behaviour with respect to that of the smoother surfaces (Ra<3.0 {mu}m). (author)

  13. Nucleate boiling heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saiz Jabardo, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Nucleate boiling heat transfer has been intensely studied during the last 70 years. However boiling remains a science to be understood and equated. In other words, using the definition given by Boulding, it is an 'insecure science'. It would be pretentious of the part of the author to explore all the nuances that the title of the paper suggests in a single conference paper. Instead the paper will focus on one interesting aspect such as the effect of the surface microstructure on nucleate boiling heat transfer. A summary of a chronological literature survey is done followed by an analysis of the results of an experimental investigation of boiling on tubes of different materials and surface roughness. The effect of the surface roughness is performed through data from the boiling of refrigerants R-134a and R-123, medium and low pressure refrigerants, respectively. In order to investigate the extent to which the surface roughness affects boiling heat transfer, very rough surfaces (4.6 μm and 10.5 μm ) have been tested. Though most of the data confirm previous literature trends, the very rough surfaces present a peculiar behaviour with respect to that of the smoother surfaces (Ra<3.0 μm). (author)

  14. Direct measurement of free-energy barrier to nucleation of crystallites in amorphous silicon thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Frank G.

    1994-01-01

    A method is introduced to measure the free-energy barrier W(sup *), the activation energy, and activation entropy to nucleation of crystallites in amorphous solids, independent of the energy barrier to growth. The method allows one to determine the temperature dependence of W(sup *), and the effect of the preparation conditions of the initial amorphous phase, the dopants, and the crystallization methds on W(sup *). The method is applied to determine the free-energy barrier to nucleation of crystallites in amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin films. For thermally induced nucleation in a-Si thin films with annealing temperatures in the range of from 824 to 983 K, the free-energy barrier W(sup *) to nucleation of silicon crystals is about 2.0 - 2.1 eV regardless of the preparation conditions of the films. The observation supports the idea that a-Si transforms into an intermediate amorphous state through the structural relaxation prior to the onset of nucleation of crystallites in a-Si. The observation also indicates that the activation entropy may be an insignificant part of the free-energy barrier for the nucleation of crystallites in a-Si. Compared with the free-energy barrier to nucleation of crystallites in undoped a-Si films, a significant reduction is observed in the free-energy barrier to nucleation in Cu-doped a-Si films. For a-Si under irradiation of Xe(2+) at 10(exp 5) eV, the free-energy barrier to ion-induced nucleation of crystallites is shown to be about half of the value associated with thermal-induced nucleation of crystallites in a-Si under the otherwise same conditions, which is much more significant than previously expected. The present method has a general kinetic basis; it thus should be equally applicable to nucleation of crystallites in any amorphous elemental semiconductors and semiconductor alloys, metallic and polymeric glasses, and to nucleation of crystallites in melts and solutions.

  15. Effect of Slag Composition on the Crystallization Kinetics of Synthetic CaO-SiO2-Al2O3-MgO Slags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esfahani, Shaghayegh; Barati, Mansoor

    2018-04-01

    The crystallization kinetics of CaO-SiO2-Al2O3-MgO (CSAM) slags was studied with the aid of single hot thermocouple technique (SHTT). Kinetic parameters such as the Avrami exponent ( n), rate coefficient ( K), and effective activation energy of crystallization ( E A ) were obtained by kinetic analysis of data obtained from in situ observation of glassy to crystalline transformation and image analysis. Also, the dependence of nucleation and growth rates of crystalline phases were quantified as a function of time, temperature, and slag basicity. Together with the observations of crystallization front, they facilitated establishing the dominant mechanisms of crystallization. In an attempt to predict crystallization rate under non-isothermal conditions, a mathematical model was developed that employs the rate data of isothermal transformation. The model was validated by reproducing an experimental continuous cooling transformation diagram purely from isothermal data.

  16. Ice nucleation triggered by negative pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcolli, Claudia

    2017-11-30

    Homogeneous ice nucleation needs supercooling of more than 35 K to become effective. When pressure is applied to water, the melting and the freezing points both decrease. Conversely, melting and freezing temperatures increase under negative pressure, i.e. when water is stretched. This study presents an extrapolation of homogeneous ice nucleation temperatures from positive to negative pressures as a basis for further exploration of ice nucleation under negative pressure. It predicts that increasing negative pressure at temperatures below about 262 K eventually results in homogeneous ice nucleation while at warmer temperature homogeneous cavitation, i. e. bubble nucleation, dominates. Negative pressure occurs locally and briefly when water is stretched due to mechanical shock, sonic waves, or fragmentation. The occurrence of such transient negative pressure should suffice to trigger homogeneous ice nucleation at large supercooling in the absence of ice-nucleating surfaces. In addition, negative pressure can act together with ice-inducing surfaces to enhance their intrinsic ice nucleation efficiency. Dynamic ice nucleation can be used to improve properties and uniformity of frozen products by applying ultrasonic fields and might also be relevant for the freezing of large drops in rainclouds.

  17. Effects of sequential helium and hydrogen ion irradiation on the nucleation and evolution of bubbles in tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Zhenyu; Zheng, Zhongcheng [Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory, Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-Structures of Ministry of Education and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430072 (China); Luo, Fengfeng [Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory, Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-Structures of Ministry of Education and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430072 (China); Institute of Applied Physics, Jiangxi Academy of Science, Nanchang, 330029 (China); Hu, Wenhui [Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory, Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-Structures of Ministry of Education and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430072 (China); Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, 230031 (China); Zhang, Weiping [Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory, Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-Structures of Ministry of Education and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430072 (China); Guo, Liping, E-mail: guolp@whu.edu.cn [Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory, Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-Structures of Ministry of Education and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430072 (China); Ren, Yaoyao [Center for Electron Microscopy, Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430072 (China)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • The effect of H{sup +} irradiation on formation and evolution of helium bubbles is explored. • The growth of hydrogen bubbles under He{sup +} irradiation is observed. • Mechanism of synergistic effect between He and H is discussed. - Abstract: Irradiations of He{sup +} and H{sup +} have been performed to investigate the effect of H{sup +} irradiation on existing helium bubbles and the effect of pre-irradiation of H{sup +} on the formation of helium bubbles in tungsten. The specimens were irradiated at 800 °C with either 10kev-H{sup +}, 20kev-He{sup +}, or sequentially irradiated with both H{sup +} and He{sup +}. After H{sup +} irradiation, the growth of existing helium bubbles was observed. It was also found that pre- or post- irradiation of H{sup +} enhanced the nucleation of helium bubbles. The growth of hydrogen bubbles was also observed after post irradiation of He{sup +}. The possible mechanism is discussed.

  18. Inferring the effects of compositional boundary layers on crystal nucleation, growth textures, and mineral chemistry in natural volcanic tephras through submicron-resolution imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg F. Zellmer

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Crystal nucleation and growth are first order processes captured in volcanic rocks and record important information about the rates of magmatic processes and chemical evolution of magmas during their ascent and eruption. We have studied glass-rich andesitic tephras from the Central Plateau of the Southern Taupo Volcanic Zone by electron- and ion-microbeam imaging techniques to investigate down to sub-micrometre scale the potential effects of compositional boundary layers (CBLs of melt around crystals on the nucleation and growth of mineral phases and the chemistry of crystal growth zones. We find that CBLs may influence the types of mineral phases nucleating and growing, and growth textures such as the development of swallowtails. The chemistry of the CBLs also has the capacity to trigger intermittent overgrowths of nanometre-scale bands of different phases in rapidly growing crystals, resulting in what we refer to as cryptic phase zoning. The existence of cryptic phase zoning has implications for the interpretation of microprobe compositional data, and the resulting inferences made on the conditions of magmatic evolution. Identification of cryptic phase zoning may in future lead to more accurate thermobarometric estimates and thus geospeedometric constraints. In future, a more quantitative characterization of CBL formation and its effects on crystal nucleation and growth may contribute to a better understanding of melt rheology and magma ascent processes at the onset of explosive volcanic eruptions, and will likely be of benefit to hazard mitigation efforts.

  19. Effect of inter-species selective interactions on the thermodynamics and nucleation free-energy barriers of a tessellating polyhedral compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escobedo, Fernando A.

    2016-01-01

    The phase behavior and the homogeneous nucleation of an equimolar mixture of octahedra and cuboctahedra are studied using thermodynamic integration, Gibbs-Duhem integration, and umbrella sampling simulations. The components of this mixture are modeled as polybead objects of equal edge lengths so that they can assemble into a space-filling compound with the CsCl crystal structure. Taking as reference the hard-core system where the compound crystal does not spontaneously nucleate, we quantified the effect of inter-species selective interactions on facilitating the disorder-to-order transition. Facet selective and facet non-selective inter-species attractions were considered, and while the former was expectedly more favorable toward the target tessellating structure, the latter was found to be similarly effective in nucleating the crystal compound. Ranges for the strength of attractions and degree of supersaturation were identified where the nucleation free-energy barrier was small enough to foretell a fast process but large enough to prevent spinodal fluctuations that can trap the system in dense metastable states lacking long-range order. At those favorable conditions, the tendency toward the local orientational order favored by packing entropy is amplified and found to play a key role seeding nuclei with the CsCl structure.

  20. Nucleation and cavitation in parahydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pi, Martí; Barranco, Manuel; Navarro, Jesús; Ancilotto, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We have constructed a density functional (DF) for parahydrogen between 14 and 32 K. ► The experimental equation of state and the surface tension are well reproduced. ► We have investigated nucleation and cavitations processes in the metastable phase. ► We have obtained the electron bubble explosion within the capillary model. - Abstract: We have used a density functional approach to investigate thermal homogeneous nucleation and cavitation in parahydrogen. The effect of electrons as seeds of heterogeneous cavitation in liquid parahydrogen is also discussed within the capillary model.

  1. Planar nucleation and crystallization in the annealing process of ion implanted silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Yimin; Chen Zhenhua; Chen Ding

    2010-01-01

    According to thermodynamic and kinetic theory, considering the variation of bulk free energy and superficial energy after nucleation as well as the migration of atoms, we study systematically the planar nucleation and crystallization that relate to two possible transition mechanisms in the annealing process of ion implanted Si: (1) liquid/solid transition: the critical nucleation work is equal to half the increased superficial energy and inversely proportional to the supercooling ΔT. Compared with bulk nucleation, the radius of the critical nucleus decreases by half, and the nucleation rate attains its maximum at T = T m /2. (2) amorphous/crystalline transition: the atoms contained in the critical nucleus and situated on its surface, as well as critical nucleation work, are all directly proportional to the height of the nucleus, and the nucleation barrier is equal to half the superficial energy too. In addition, we take SiGe semiconductor as a specific example for calculation; a value of 0.03 eV/atom is obtained for the elastic strain energy, and a more reasonable result can be gotten after taking into account its effect on transition Finally, we reach the following conclusion as a result of the calculation: for the annealing of ion implanted Si, no matter what the transition method is-liquid or solid planar nucleation-the recrystallization process is actually carried out layer by layer on the crystal substrate, and the probability of forming a 'rod-like' nucleus is much larger than that of a 'plate-like' nucleus. (semiconductor materials)

  2. Nanometer-scale mapping of irreversible electrochemical nucleation processes on solid Li-ion electrolytes

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Amit; Arruda, Thomas M.; Tselev, Alexander; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Lawton, Jamie S.; Zawodzinski, Thomas A.; Butyaev, Oleg; Zayats, Sergey; Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2013-01-01

    Electrochemical processes associated with changes in structure, connectivity or composition typically proceed via new phase nucleation with subsequent growth of nuclei. Understanding and controlling reactions requires the elucidation and control of nucleation mechanisms. However, factors controlling nucleation kinetics, including the interplay between local mechanical conditions, microstructure and local ionic profile remain inaccessible. Furthermore, the tendency of current probing technique...

  3. Effective potential kinetic theory for strongly coupled plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baalrud, Scott D.; Daligault, Jérôme

    2016-11-01

    The effective potential theory (EPT) is a recently proposed method for extending traditional plasma kinetic and transport theory into the strongly coupled regime. Validation from experiments and molecular dynamics simulations have shown it to be accurate up to the onset of liquid-like correlation parameters (corresponding to Γ ≃ 10-50 for the one-component plasma, depending on the process of interest). Here, this theory is briefly reviewed along with comparisons between the theory and molecular dynamics simulations for self-diffusivity and viscosity of the one-component plasma. A number of new results are also provided, including calculations of friction coefficients, energy exchange rates, stopping power, and mobility. The theory is also cast in the Landau and Fokker-Planck kinetic forms, which may prove useful for enabling efficient kinetic computations.

  4. Effect of Sacoglottis gabonensis and Alstonia boonei on the kinetics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sacoglottis gabonensis and Alstonia boonei are botanicals used for the preservation of palm wine in Southern Nigeria. This study investigated the effect of S. gabonensis (0.625%) and A. boonei (0.50%) on the kinetics of Saccharomyces cerevisiae isolated from palm wine (PW). Concentrations of the preservatives used in ...

  5. Deuterium secondary isotope kinetic effects in imine formation reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaral, L. do; Rossi, M.H.

    1986-01-01

    The kinetic α-deuterium isotope effects, K D /K H , for reaction mechanisms is studied. The reaction of pH function to m-bromobenzaldehyde, semicarbazide nucleophile, methoxy-amine and hydroxylamine are analysed. (M.J.C.) [pt

  6. Effect of deformation induced nucleation and phase mixing, a two phase model for the ductile deformation of rocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevillard, Benoit; Richard, Guillaume; Raimbourg, Hugues

    2017-04-01

    Rocks are complex materials and particularly their rheological behavior under geological stresses remains a long-standing question in geodynamics. To test large scale lithosphere dynamics numerical modeling is the main tool but encounter substantial difficulties to account for this complexity. One major unknown is the origin and development of the localization of deformation. This localization is observed within a large range of scales and is commonly characterized by sharp grain size reduction. These considerations argues for a control of the microscopical scale over the largest ones through one predominant variable: the mean grain-size. However, the presence of second phase and broad grain-size distribution may also have a important impact on this phenomenon. To address this question, we built a model for ductile rocks deformation based on the two-phase damage theory of Bercovici & Ricard 2012. We aim to investigate the role of grain-size reduction but also phase mixing on strain localization. Instead of considering a Zener-pining effect on damage evolution, we propose to take into account the effect of the grain-boundary sliding (GBS)-induced nucleation mechanism which is better supported by experimental or natural observations (Precigout et al 2016). This continuum theory allows to represent a two mineral phases aggregate with explicit log-normal grain-size distribution as a reasonable approximation for polymineralic rocks. Quantifying microscopical variables using a statistical approach may allow for calibration at small (experimental) scale. The general set of evolutions equations remains up-scalable provided some conditions on the homogenization scale. Using the interface density as a measure of mixture quality, we assume unlike Bercovici & Ricard 2012 that it may depend for some part on grain-size . The grain-size independent part of it is being represented by a "contact fraction" variable, whose evolution may be constrained by the dominant deformation

  7. Nuclear fragmentation by nucleation approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, K.C.

    1992-01-01

    The nucleation model is used to simulate nuclear fragmentation processes. The critical value of the effective interaction radius is shown to vary linearly with the expansion factor α. The calculated mass and charge distributions are compared with some experimental data. (author)

  8. Glass-crystal transformation under non-isothermal conditions: Kinetic analysis of the Ag{sub 0.16}As{sub 0.38}Se{sub 0.46} glassy alloy by using a new theoretical method based on nucleation and growth processes, which depend on time as a power law

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazquez, J., E-mail: jose.vazquez@uca.e [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cadiz, Apartado 40, 11510, Puerto Real (Cadiz) (Spain); Cardenas-Leal, J.L.; Garcia-G Barreda, D.; Gonzalez-Palma, R.; Lopez-Alemany, P.L.; Villares, P. [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cadiz, Apartado 40, 11510, Puerto Real (Cadiz) (Spain)

    2010-11-01

    A theoretical method, which we have published in two previous works, has been applied to the study of the glass-crystal transformation of the Ag{sub 0.16}As{sub 0.38}Se{sub 0.46} semiconductor glass under non-isothermal conditions. This method allows one to obtain an evolution equation with temperature for the actual volume fraction, to calculate the kinetic parameters of the quoted transformation, to establish the thermal process type, to determine the dimensionality of the crystal growth and to evaluate the exponents of the power laws of the time-dependence both for the nucleation frequency and for the crystal growth rate in non-isothermal transformations. The quoted method assumes the concept of extended volume of the transformed material, the condition of randomly located nuclei and the supposition of mutual interference of regions growing from separated nuclei, considering moreover the case presented in the practice of a kinetic exponent with a value larger than 4. To study the quoted case it is proposed that both the nucleation frequency and the crystal growth rate depend on time as a power law. The above-mentioned Ag{sub 0.16}As{sub 0.38}Se{sub 0.46} glassy alloy presents two exothermic peaks. The second peak gives for the kinetic exponent a value large enough than 4 and it is necessary to resort to the hypotheses of the considered method to justify the unexpectedly high value of the kinetic exponent. Following the quoted method it has been found that the thermal process type is continuous nucleation with three-dimensional growth for the two peaks of crystallization of the studied alloy. Moreover, the experimental curve of the transformed fraction shows a satisfactory agreement with the theoretical curve corresponding to the considered method, confirming the reliability of the quoted method in order to analyze the transformation kinetics of the above-mentioned alloy.

  9. A nucleator arms race: cellular control of actin assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campellone, Kenneth G; Welch, Matthew D

    2010-04-01

    For over a decade, the actin-related protein 2/3 (ARP2/3) complex, a handful of nucleation-promoting factors and formins were the only molecules known to directly nucleate actin filament formation de novo. However, the past several years have seen a surge in the discovery of mammalian proteins with roles in actin nucleation and dynamics. Newly recognized nucleation-promoting factors, such as WASP and SCAR homologue (WASH), WASP homologue associated with actin, membranes and microtubules (WHAMM), and junction-mediating regulatory protein (JMY), stimulate ARP2/3 activity at distinct cellular locations. Formin nucleators with additional biochemical and cellular activities have also been uncovered. Finally, the Spire, cordon-bleu and leiomodin nucleators have revealed new ways of overcoming the kinetic barriers to actin polymerization.

  10. Nucleation barrier reconstruction via the seeding method in a lattice model with competing nucleation pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lifanov, Yuri; Vorselaars, Bart; Quigley, David

    2016-12-07

    We study a three-species analogue of the Potts lattice gas model of nucleation from solution in a regime where partially disordered solute is a viable thermodynamic phase. Using a multicanonical sampling protocol, we compute phase diagrams for the system, from which we determine a parameter regime where the partially disordered phase is metastable almost everywhere in the temperature-fugacity plane. The resulting model shows non-trivial nucleation and growth behaviour, which we examine via multidimensional free energy calculations. We consider the applicability of the model in capturing the multi-stage nucleation mechanisms of polymorphic biominerals (e.g., CaCO 3 ). We then quantitatively explore the kinetics of nucleation in our model using the increasingly popular "seeding" method. We compare the resulting free energy barrier heights to those obtained via explicit free energy calculations over a wide range of temperatures and fugacities, carefully considering the propagation of statistical error. We find that the ability of the "seeding" method to reproduce accurate free energy barriers is dependent on the degree of supersaturation, and severely limited by the use of a nucleation driving force Δμ computed for bulk phases. We discuss possible reasons for this in terms of underlying kinetic assumptions, and those of classical nucleation theory.

  11. New trends in the nucleation research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anisimov, M. P.; Hopke, P. K.

    2017-09-01

    During the last half of century the most of efforts have been directed towards small molecule system modeling using intermolecular potentials. Summarizing the nucleation theory, it can be concluded that the nowadays theory is far from complete. The vapor-gas nucleation theory can produce values that deviate from the experimental results by several orders of magnitude currently. Experiments on the vapor-gas nucleation rate measurements using different devices show significant inconsistencies in the measured rates as well. Theoretical results generally are quite reasonable for sufficiently low vapor nucleation rates where the capillary approximation is applicable. In the present research the advantages and current problems of the vapor-gas nucleation experiments are discussed briefly and a view of the future studies is presented. Using the brake points of the first derivative for the nucleation rate surface as markers of the critical embryos phase change is fresh idea to show the gas-pressure effect for the nucleating vapor-gas systems. To test the accuracy of experimental techniques, it is important to have a standard system that can be measured over a range of nucleation conditions. Several results illustrate that high-pressure techniques are needed to study multi-channel nucleation. In practical applications, parametric theories can be used for the systems of interest. However, experimental measurements are still the best source of information on nucleation rates. Experiments are labor intensive and costly, and thus, it is useful to extend the value of limited experimental measurements to a broader range of nucleation conditions. Only limited experimental data one needs for use in normalizing the slopes of the linearized nucleation rate surfaces. The nucleation rate surface is described in terms of steady-state nucleation rates. It is supposed that several new measuring systems, such as High Pressure Flow Diffusion Chamber for pressure limit up to 150 bar will be

  12. The effect of cation:anion ratio in solution on the mechanism of barite growth at constant supersaturation: Role of the desolvation process on the growth kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowacz, M.; Putnis, C. V.; Putnis, A.

    2007-11-01

    The mechanism of barite growth has been investigated in a fluid cell of an Atomic Force Microscope by passing solutions of constant supersaturation ( Ω) but variable ion activity ratio ( r=a/a) over a barite substrate.The observed dependence of step-spreading velocity on solution stoichiometry can be explained by considering non-equivalent attachment frequency factors for the cation and anion. We show that the potential for two-dimensional nucleation changes under a constant thermodynamic driving force due to the kinetics of barium integration into the surface, and that the growth mode changes from preexisting step advancement to island spreading as the cation/anion activity ratio increases. Scanning electron microscopy studies of crystals grown in bulk solutions support our findings that matching the ion ratio in the fluid to that of the crystal lattice does not result in maximum growth and nucleation rates. Significantly more rapid rates correspond to solution stoichiometries where [Ba 2+] is in excess with respect to [ SO42-]. Experiments performed in dilute aqueous solutions of methanol show that even 0.02 molar fraction of organic cosolvent in the growth solution significantly accelerates step growth velocity and nucleation rates (while keeping Ω the same as in the reference solution in water). Our observations suggest that the effect of methanol on barite growth results first of all from reduction of the barrier that prevents the Ba 2+ from reaching the surface and corroborate the hypothesis that desolvation of the cation and of the surface is the rate limiting kinetic process for two-dimensional nucleation and for crystal growth.

  13. The effect of ion-beam induced strain on the nucleation density of chemical vapour deposited diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiser, P.S.; Prawer, S.; Nugent, K.W.; Bettiol, A.A.; Kostidis, L.I.; Jamieson, D.N.

    1995-01-01

    The effect of ion implantation on the nucleation of CVD diamond on silicon and diamond substrates has been investigated. The strategy employed is to create laterally confined regions of strain in the substrates by focused MeV implantation of light ions. Raman Microscopy has been employed to obtain spatially resolved maps of the strain in these implanted regions. On diamond substrates a homo-epitaxial CVD diamond film was grown on top of both the implanted and unimplanted regions of the substrate. Raman analysis of the film grown on top of the implanted region revealed it to be under slightly tensile strain as compared to that grown on the unimplanted diamond substrate. The film deposited on the implanted portion of the diamond showed a lower fluorescence background; indicating a lower concentration of incorporated defects. These results suggest that the strain and defects in the diamond substrate material have an important influence on the quality of the homo-epitaxially grown diamond films. 6 refs., 5 figs

  14. Communication: Nucleation of water on ice nanograins: Size, charge, and quantum effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marciante, Mathieu [Institut Lumière Matière, UMR5306 Université Lyon 1 – CNRS, Université de Lyon, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Calvo, Florent, E-mail: florent.calvo@ujf-grenoble.fr [Institut Lumière Matière, UMR5306 Université Lyon 1 – CNRS, Université de Lyon, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire de Physique, Rue de La Piscine, Campus Saint Martin d’Hères, 38000 Grenoble (France)

    2015-05-07

    The sticking cross sections of water molecules on cold size-selected water clusters have been simulated using classical and quantum (path-integral) molecular dynamics trajectories under realistic conditions. The integrated cross sections for charged clusters show significant size effects with comparable trends as in experiments, as well as essentially no sign effect. Vibrational delocalization, although it contributes to enlarging the geometric cross sections, leads to a counter-intuitive decrease in the dynamical cross section obtained from the trajectories. These results are interpreted based on the apparent reduction in the effective interaction between the projectile and the target owing to zero-point effects.

  15. Communication: Nucleation of water on ice nanograins: Size, charge, and quantum effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marciante, Mathieu; Calvo, Florent

    2015-01-01

    The sticking cross sections of water molecules on cold size-selected water clusters have been simulated using classical and quantum (path-integral) molecular dynamics trajectories under realistic conditions. The integrated cross sections for charged clusters show significant size effects with comparable trends as in experiments, as well as essentially no sign effect. Vibrational delocalization, although it contributes to enlarging the geometric cross sections, leads to a counter-intuitive decrease in the dynamical cross section obtained from the trajectories. These results are interpreted based on the apparent reduction in the effective interaction between the projectile and the target owing to zero-point effects

  16. Diamond Nucleation Using Polyethene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morell, Gerardo (Inventor); Makarov, Vladimir (Inventor); Varshney, Deepak (Inventor); Weiner, Brad (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The invention presents a simple, non-destructive and non-abrasive method of diamond nucleation using polyethene. It particularly describes the nucleation of diamond on an electrically viable substrate surface using polyethene via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique in a gaseous environment.

  17. Gyrofluid turbulence models with kinetic effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorland, W.; Hammett, G.W.

    1992-12-01

    Nonlinear gyrofluid equations are derived by taking moments of the nonlinear, electrostatic gyrokinetic equation. The principal model presented includes evolution equations for the guiding center n, u parallel, T parallel, and T perpendicular along with an equation expressing the quasineutrality constraint. Additional evolution equations for higher moments are derived which may be used if greater accuracy is desired. The moment hierarchy is closed with a Landau-damping model which is equivalent to a multi-pole approximation to the plasma dispersion function, extended to include finite Larmor radius effects. In particular, new dissipative, nonlinear terms are found which model the perpendicular phase-mixing of the distribution function along contours of constant electrostatic potential. These ''FLR phase-mixing'' terms introduce a hyperviscosity-like damping ∝ k perpendicular 2 |Φ rvec k rvec k x rvec k'| which should provide a physics-based damping mechanism at high k perpendicular ρ which is potentially as important as the usual polarization drift nonlinearity. The moments are taken in guiding center space to pick up the correct nonlinear FLR terms and the gyroaveraging of the shear. The equations are solved with a nonlinear, three dimensional initial value code. Linear results are presented, showing excellent agreement with linear gyrokinetic theory

  18. Evolution effects of the copper surface morphology on the nucleation density and growth of graphene domains at different growth pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedayat, Seyed Mahdi [Transport Phenomena & Nanotechnology Lab., School of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Karimi-Sabet, Javad, E-mail: j_karimi@alum.sharif.edu [NFCRS, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shariaty-Niassar, Mojtaba, E-mail: mshariat@ut.ac.ir [Transport Phenomena & Nanotechnology Lab., School of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-03-31

    Highlights: • Manipulation of the Cu surface morphology in a wide range by electropolishing treatment. • Comparison of the nucleation density of graphene at low pressure and atmospheric pressure CVD processes. • Controlling the evolution of the Cu surface morphology inside a novel confined space. • Growth of large-size graphene domains. - Abstract: In this work, we study the influence of the surface morphology of the catalytic copper substrate on the nucleation density and the growth rate of graphene domains at low and atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD and APCVD) processes. In order to obtain a wide range of initial surface morphology, precisely controlled electropolishing methods were developed to manipulate the roughntreess value of the as-received Cu substrate (RMS = 30 nm) to ultra-rough (RMS = 130 nm) and ultra-smooth (RMS = 2 nm) surfaces. The nucleation and growth of graphene domains show obviously different trends at LPCVD and APCVD conditions. In contrast to APCVD condition, the nucleation density of graphene domains is almost equal in substrates with different initial roughness values at LPCVD condition. We show that this is due to the evolution of the surface morphology of the Cu substrate during the graphene growth steps. By stopping the surface sublimation of copper substrate in a confined space saturated with Cu atoms, the evolution of the Cu surface was impeded. This results in the reduction of the nucleation density of graphene domains up to 24 times in the pre-smoothed Cu substrates at LPCVD condition.

  19. Evolution effects of the copper surface morphology on the nucleation density and growth of graphene domains at different growth pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedayat, Seyed Mahdi; Karimi-Sabet, Javad; Shariaty-Niassar, Mojtaba

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Manipulation of the Cu surface morphology in a wide range by electropolishing treatment. • Comparison of the nucleation density of graphene at low pressure and atmospheric pressure CVD processes. • Controlling the evolution of the Cu surface morphology inside a novel confined space. • Growth of large-size graphene domains. - Abstract: In this work, we study the influence of the surface morphology of the catalytic copper substrate on the nucleation density and the growth rate of graphene domains at low and atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD and APCVD) processes. In order to obtain a wide range of initial surface morphology, precisely controlled electropolishing methods were developed to manipulate the roughntreess value of the as-received Cu substrate (RMS = 30 nm) to ultra-rough (RMS = 130 nm) and ultra-smooth (RMS = 2 nm) surfaces. The nucleation and growth of graphene domains show obviously different trends at LPCVD and APCVD conditions. In contrast to APCVD condition, the nucleation density of graphene domains is almost equal in substrates with different initial roughness values at LPCVD condition. We show that this is due to the evolution of the surface morphology of the Cu substrate during the graphene growth steps. By stopping the surface sublimation of copper substrate in a confined space saturated with Cu atoms, the evolution of the Cu surface was impeded. This results in the reduction of the nucleation density of graphene domains up to 24 times in the pre-smoothed Cu substrates at LPCVD condition.

  20. Size effect on order-disorder transition kinetics of FePt nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Shuaidi; Qi, Weihong; Huang, Baiyun

    2014-01-01

    The kinetics of order-disorder transition of FePt nanoparticles during high temperature annealing is theoretically investigated. A model is developed to address the influence of large surface to volume ratio of nanoparticles on both the thermodynamic and kinetic aspect of the ordering process; specifically, the nucleation and growth of L1 0 ordered domain within disordered nanoparticles. The size- and shape-dependence of transition kinetics are quantitatively addressed by a revised Johnson-Mehl-Avrami equation that included corrections for deviations caused by the domination of surface nucleation in nanoscale systems and the non-negligible size of the ordered nuclei. Calculation results based on the model suggested that smaller nanoparticles are kinetically more active but thermodynamically less transformable. The major obstacle in obtaining completely ordered nanoparticles is the elimination of antiphase boundaries. The results also quantitatively confirmed the existence of a size-limit in ordering, beyond which, inducing order-disorder transitions through annealing is impossible. A good agreement is observed between theory, experiment, and computer simulation results

  1. Effect of monomer concentration on the kinetics of emulsifier-free emulsion polymerization of Vinyl Acetate and Methyl Acrylate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammad Beigi, H. R.

    2001-01-01

    The effect of monomer concentration on the kinetics of the emulsifier-free emulsion polymerization of vinyl acetate and methyl acrylate were studied. The polymerizations were carried out using potassium persulfate as the initiator. Form the electron micrographs of the resulting lattices, monodisperse PVAc and PMA lattices with particle diameters varying between 149-443 mm and 112-497 nm, respectively were processed. Uniformity of particle size indicated that nucleation of stable particle occurs early in the polymerization process. The polymerization rate was found to be proportional to the 0.88 and 1.5 power of the initial monomer concentration of vinyl acetate and methyl acrylate, respectively. Higher monomer concentration results in fewer particles and larger final particle diameter. With increasing monomer solubility in water the size of particle decreases and its distribution broadens

  2. Simple improvements to classical bubble nucleation models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kyoko K; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Angélil, Raymond; Diemand, Jürg

    2015-08-01

    We revisit classical nucleation theory (CNT) for the homogeneous bubble nucleation rate and improve the classical formula using a correct prefactor in the nucleation rate. Most of the previous theoretical studies have used the constant prefactor determined by the bubble growth due to the evaporation process from the bubble surface. However, the growth of bubbles is also regulated by the thermal conduction, the viscosity, and the inertia of liquid motion. These effects can decrease the prefactor significantly, especially when the liquid pressure is much smaller than the equilibrium one. The deviation in the nucleation rate between the improved formula and the CNT can be as large as several orders of magnitude. Our improved, accurate prefactor and recent advances in molecular dynamics simulations and laboratory experiments for argon bubble nucleation enable us to precisely constrain the free energy barrier for bubble nucleation. Assuming the correction to the CNT free energy is of the functional form suggested by Tolman, the precise evaluations of the free energy barriers suggest the Tolman length is ≃0.3σ independently of the temperature for argon bubble nucleation, where σ is the unit length of the Lennard-Jones potential. With this Tolman correction and our prefactor one gets accurate bubble nucleation rate predictions in the parameter range probed by current experiments and molecular dynamics simulations.

  3. Chemically assisted crack nucleation in zircaloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williford, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking models (proposed to explain fuel rod failures) generally address crack propagation and cladding rupture, but frequently neglect the necessary nucleation stage for microcracks small enough to violate fracture mechanics continuum requirements. Intergranular microcrack nucleation was modeled with diffusion-controlled grain-boundary cavitation concepts, including the effects of metal embrittlement by iodine species. Computed microcrack nucleation times and strains agree with experimental observation, but the predicted grain-boundary cavities are so small that detection may be difficult. Without a protective oxide film intergranular microcracks can nucleate within 30 s at even low stresses when the embrittler concentration exceeds a threshold value. Indications were found that intergranular microcrack nucleation may be caused by combined corrosive and embrittlement phenomena. (orig.)

  4. Role of stacking disorder in ice nucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupi, Laura; Hudait, Arpa; Peters, Baron; Grünwald, Michael; Gotchy Mullen, Ryan; Nguyen, Andrew H; Molinero, Valeria

    2017-11-08

    The freezing of water affects the processes that determine Earth's climate. Therefore, accurate weather and climate forecasts hinge on good predictions of ice nucleation rates. Such rate predictions are based on extrapolations using classical nucleation theory, which assumes that the structure of nanometre-sized ice crystallites corresponds to that of hexagonal ice, the thermodynamically stable form of bulk ice. However, simulations with various water models find that ice nucleated and grown under atmospheric temperatures is at all sizes stacking-disordered, consisting of random sequences of cubic and hexagonal ice layers. This implies that stacking-disordered ice crystallites either are more stable than hexagonal ice crystallites or form because of non-equilibrium dynamical effects. Both scenarios challenge central tenets of classical nucleation theory. Here we use rare-event sampling and free energy calculations with the mW water model to show that the entropy of mixing cubic and hexagonal layers makes stacking-disordered ice the stable phase for crystallites up to a size of at least 100,000 molecules. We find that stacking-disordered critical crystallites at 230 kelvin are about 14 kilojoules per mole of crystallite more stable than hexagonal crystallites, making their ice nucleation rates more than three orders of magnitude higher than predicted by classical nucleation theory. This effect on nucleation rates is temperature dependent, being the most pronounced at the warmest conditions, and should affect the modelling of cloud formation and ice particle numbers, which are very sensitive to the temperature dependence of ice nucleation rates. We conclude that classical nucleation theory needs to be corrected to include the dependence of the crystallization driving force on the size of the ice crystallite when interpreting and extrapolating ice nucleation rates from experimental laboratory conditions to the temperatures that occur in clouds.

  5. Species separation and kinetic effects in collisional plasma shocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellei, C., E-mail: bellei1@llnl.gov; Wilks, S. C.; Amendt, P. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Rinderknecht, H.; Zylstra, A.; Rosenberg, M.; Sio, H.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    The properties of collisional shock waves propagating in uniform plasmas are studied with ion-kinetic calculations, in both slab and spherical geometry and for the case of one and two ion species. Despite the presence of an electric field at the shock front—and in contrast to the case where an interface is initially present [C. Bellei et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 044702 (2013)]—essentially no ion reflection at the shock front is observed due to collisions, with a probability of reflection ≲10{sup −4} for the cases presented. A kinetic two-ion-species spherical convergent shock is studied in detail and compared against an average-species calculation, confirming effects of species separation and differential heating of the ion species at the shock front. The effect of different ion temperatures on the DT and D{sup 3}He fusion reactivity is discussed in the fluid limit and is estimated to be moderately important.

  6. Kinetic modeling of Nernst effect in magnetized hohlraums

    OpenAIRE

    Joglekar, A. S.; Ridgers, Christopher Paul; Kingham, R J; Thomas, A. G. R.

    2016-01-01

    We present nanosecond time-scale Vlasov-Fokker-Planck-Maxwell modeling of magnetized plasma transport and dynamics in a hohlraum with an applied external magnetic field, under conditions similar to recent experiments. Self-consistent modeling of the kinetic electron momentum equation allows for a complete treatment of the heat flow equation and Ohm's law, including Nernst advection of magnetic fields. In addition to showing the prevalence of nonlocal behavior, we demonstrate that effects such...

  7. Homogeneous nucleation in liquid nitrogen at negative pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baidakov, V. G., E-mail: baidakov@itp.uran.ru; Vinogradov, V. E.; Pavlov, P. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Thermal Physics, Ural Branch (Russian Federation)

    2016-10-15

    The kinetics of spontaneous cavitation in liquid nitrogen at positive and negative pressures has been studied in a tension wave formed by a compression pulse reflected from the liquid–vapor interface on a thin platinum wire heated by a current pulse. The limiting tensile stresses (Δp = p{sub s}–p, where p{sub s} is the saturation pressure), the corresponding bubble nucleation frequencies J (10{sup 20}–10{sup 22} s{sup –1} m{sup –3}), and temperature induced nucleation frequency growth rate G{sub T} = dlnJ/dT have been experimentally determined. At T = 90 K, the limiting tensile stress was Δp = 8.3 MPa, which was 4.9 MPa lower than the value corresponding to the boundary of thermodynamic stability of the liquid phase (spinodal). The measurement results were compared to classical (homogeneous) nucleation theory (CNT) with and without neglect of the dependence of the surface tension of critical bubbles on their dimensions. In the latter case, the properties of new phase nuclei were described in terms of the Van der Waals theory of capillarity. The experimental data agree well with the CNT theory when it takes into account the “size effect.”.

  8. Damage nucleation in Si during ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, O.W.; Fathy, D.; Narayan, J.

    1984-01-01

    Damage nucleation in single crystals of silicon during ion irradiation is investigated. Experimental results and mechanisms for damage nucleation during both room and liquid nitrogen temperature irradiation with different mass ions are discussed. It is shown that the accumulation of damage during room temperature irradiation depends on the rate of implantation. These dose rate effects are found to decrease in magnitude as the mass of the ions is increased. The significance of dose rate effects and their mass dependence on nucleation mechanisms is discussed

  9. The modelling of direct chemical kinetic effects in turbulent flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindstet, R.P. [Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2000-06-01

    Combustion chemistry-related effects have traditionally been of secondary importance in the design of gas turbine combustors. However, the need to deal with issues such as flame stability, relight and pollutant emissions has served to bring chemical kinetics and the coupling of finite rate chemistry with turbulent flow fields to the centre of combustor design. Indeed, improved cycle efficiency and more stringent environmental legislation, as defined by the ICAO, are current key motivators in combustor design. Furthermore, lean premixed prevaporized (LPP) combustion systems, increasingly used for power generation, often operate close to the lean blow-off limit and are prone to extinction/reignition type phenomena. Thus, current key design issues require that direct chemical kinetic effects be accounted for accurately in any simulation procedure. The transported probability density function (PDF) approach uniquely offers the potential of facilitating the accurate modelling of such effects. The present paper thus assesses the ability of this technique to model kinetically controlled phenomena, such as carbon monoxide emissions and flame blow-off, through the application of a transported PDF method closed at the joint scalar level. The closure for the velocity field is at the second moment level, and a key feature of the present work is the use of comprehensive chemical kinetic mechanisms. The latter are derived from recent work by Lindstedt and co-workers that has resulted in a compact 141 reactions and 28 species mechanism for LNG combustion. The systematically reduced form used here features 14 independent C/H/O scalars, with the remaining species incorporated via steady state approximations. Computations have been performed for hydrogen/carbon dioxide and methane flames. The former (high Reynolds number) flames permit an assessment of the modelling of flame blow-off, and the methane flame has been selected to obtain an indication of the influence of differential

  10. Ionic Strength-Controlled Mn (Hydr)oxide Nanoparticle Nucleation on Quartz: Effect of Aqueous Mn(OH)2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Haesung; Jun, Young-Shin

    2016-01-05

    The early formation of manganese (hydr)oxide nanoparticles at mineral-water interfaces is crucial in understanding how Mn oxides control the fate and transport of heavy metals and the cycling of nutrients. Using atomic force microscopy, we investigated the heterogeneous nucleation and growth of Mn (hydr)oxide under varied ionic strengths (IS; 1-100 mM NaNO3). Experimental conditions (i.e., 0.1 mM Mn(2+) (aq) concentration and pH 10.1) were chosen to be relevant to Mn remediation sites. We found that IS controls Mn(OH)2 (aq) formation, and that the controlled Mn(OH)2 (aq) formation can affect the system's saturation and subsequent Mn(OH)2 (s) and further Mn3O4 (s) nanoparticle formation. In 100 mM IS system, nucleated Mn (hydr)oxide particles had more coverage on the quartz substrate than those in 1 mM and 10 mM IS systems. This high IS also resulted in low supersaturation ratio and thus favor heterogeneous nucleation, having better structural matching between nucleating Mn (hydr)oxides and quartz. The unique information obtained in this work improves our understanding of Mn (hydr)oxide formation in natural as well as engineered aqueous environments, such as groundwater contaminated by natural leachate and acid mine drainage remediation.

  11. Effect of indentation size on the nucleation and propagation of tensile twinning in pure magnesium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sánchez-Martín, R.; Pérez-Prado, M.T.; Segurado, J.; Molina-Aldareguia, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Tensile twinning is a key deformation mode in magnesium and its alloys, as well as in other hcp metals. However, the fundamentals of this mechanism are still not fully understood. In this research, instrumented nanoindentation and crystal plasticity finite element simulations are utilized to investigate twin formation and propagation in pure Mg. With that purpose, several nanoindentations at different indentation depths were performed in pure Mg single crystals with a wide range of crystallographic orientations. A careful analysis of the deformation profile, by atomic force microscopy, and of the microtexture, by electron backscatter diffraction, in areas around and underneath the indents, reveals that twinning is subjected to strong size effects, i.e., that the relative activity of twinning increases dramatically with the indentation depth. Furthermore, the twin volume fraction is found to be related to the pile-up or sink-in areas close to the indentations. A decrease in hardness in orientations where the twinning activity is high was confirmed both experimentally and by crystal plasticity finite element simulations. Finally, our results support the thesis that twin activation is an energetic process that demands a concentration of high stresses in a certain activation volume

  12. Effect of Gas Flowrate on Nucleation Mechanism of MWCNTs for a Compound Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Shukrullah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Activation of the catalyst particles during a CVD process can be anticipated from the carbon feeding rate. In this study, Fe2O3/Al2O3 catalyst was synthesized with uniformly dispersed iron over alumina support for onward production of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs in a fluidized bed chemical CVD reactor. The effect of the ethylene flowrate on catalytic activity of the compound catalyst and morphology of the as-grown MWCNTs was also investigated in this study. The dispersed active phases of the catalyst and optimized gas flowrate helped in improving the tube morphology and prevented the aggregation of the as-grown MWCNTs. The flowrates, below 100 sccm, did not provide sufficient reactants to interact with the catalyst for production of defect-free CNT structures. Above 100 sccm, concentration of the carbon precursor did not show notable influence on decomposition rate of the gas molecules. The most promising results on growth and structural properties of MWCNTs were gained at ethylene flowrate of 100 sccm. At this flowrate, the ratio of G and D intensity peaks (IG/ID was deliberated about 1.40, which indicates the growth of graphitic structures of MWCNTs.

  13. Kinetic modeling of Nernst effect in magnetized hohlraums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joglekar, A S; Ridgers, C P; Kingham, R J; Thomas, A G R

    2016-04-01

    We present nanosecond time-scale Vlasov-Fokker-Planck-Maxwell modeling of magnetized plasma transport and dynamics in a hohlraum with an applied external magnetic field, under conditions similar to recent experiments. Self-consistent modeling of the kinetic electron momentum equation allows for a complete treatment of the heat flow equation and Ohm's law, including Nernst advection of magnetic fields. In addition to showing the prevalence of nonlocal behavior, we demonstrate that effects such as anomalous heat flow are induced by inverse bremsstrahlung heating. We show magnetic field amplification up to a factor of 3 from Nernst compression into the hohlraum wall. The magnetic field is also expelled towards the hohlraum axis due to Nernst advection faster than frozen-in flux would suggest. Nonlocality contributes to the heat flow towards the hohlraum axis and results in an augmented Nernst advection mechanism that is included self-consistently through kinetic modeling.

  14. A unified treatment of kinetic effects in a tokamak pedestal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catto, Peter J; Landreman, Matt; Kagan, Grigory; Pusztai, Istvan

    2011-01-01

    We consider the effects of a finite pedestal radial electric field on ion orbits using a unified approach. We then employ these modified orbit results to retain finite E x B drift departures from flux surfaces in an improved drift-kinetic equation. The procedure allows us to make a clear distinction between transit averages and flux surface averages when solving this kinetic equation. The technique outlined here is intended to clarify and unify recent evaluations of the banana regime decrease and plateau regime alterations in the ion heat diffusivity; the reduction and possible reversal of the poloidal flow in the banana regime, and its augmentation in the plateau regime; the increase in the bootstrap current; and the enhancement of the residual zonal flow regulation of turbulence.

  15. The Effect of Polymer Char on Nitridation Kinetics of Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Rickmond C.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    1994-01-01

    Effects of polymer char on nitridation kinetics of attrition milled silicon powder have been investigated from 1200 to 1350 C. Results indicate that at and above 1250 C, the silicon compacts containing 3.5 wt percent polymer char were fully converted to Si3N4 after 24 hr exposure in nitrogen. In contrast, the silicon compacts without polymer char could not be fully converted to Si3N4 at 1350 C under similar exposure conditions. At 1250 and 1350 C, the silicon compacts with polymer char showed faster nitridation kinetics than those without the polymer char. As the polymer char content is increased, the amount of SiC in the nitrided material is also increased. By adding small amounts (approx. 2.5 wt percent) of NiO, the silicon compacts containing polymer char can be completely nitrided at 1200 C. The probable mechanism for the accelerated nitridation of silicon containing polymer char is discussed.

  16. Effect of wind direction and speed on the dispersion of nucleation and accumulation mode particles in an urban street canyon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Prashant; Fennell, Paul; Britter, Rex

    2008-08-25

    There have been many studies concerning dispersion of gaseous pollutants from vehicles within street canyons; fewer address the dispersion of particulate matter, particularly particle number concentrations separated into the nucleation (10-30 nm or N10-30) or accumulation (30-300 nm or N30-300) modes either separately or together (N10-300). This study aimed to determine the effect of wind direction and speed on particle dispersion in the above size ranges. Particle number distributions (PNDs) and concentrations (PNCs) were measured in the 5-2738 nm range continuously (and in real-time) for 17 days between 7th and 23rd March 2007 in a regular (aspect ratio approximately unity) street canyon in Cambridge (UK), using a newly developed fast-response differential mobility spectrometer (sampling frequency 0.5 Hz), at 1.60 m above the road level. The PNCs in each size range, during all wind directions, were better described by a proposed two regime model (traffic-dependent and wind-dependent mixing) than by simply assuming that the PNC was inversely proportional to the wind speed or by fitting the data with a best-fit single power law. The critical cut-off wind speed (Ur,crit) for each size range of particles, distinguishing the boundary between these mixing regimes was also investigated. In the traffic-dependent PNC region (UrUrwind speed and direction. In the wind speed dependent PNC region (UrUr>Ur,critUr,crit), concentrations were inversely proportional to Ur irrespective of any particle size range and wind directions. The wind speed demarcating the two regimes (Ur,critUr,crit) was 1.23+/-0.55 m s(-1) for N10-300, (1.47+/-0.72 m s(-1)) for N10-30 but smaller (0.78+/-0.29 m s(-1)) for N30-300.

  17. Effects of local film properties on the nucleation and growth of tin whiskers and hillocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarobol, Pylin

    Whiskers and hillocks grow spontaneously on Pb-free Sn electrodeposited films as a response to thin film stresses. Stress relaxation occurs by atom deposition to specific grain boundaries in the plane of the film, with hillocks being formed when grain boundary migration accompanies growth out of the plane of the film. The implication for whisker formation in electronics is serious: whiskers can grow to be millimeters long, sometimes causing short circuiting between adjacent components and, thereby, posing serious electrical reliability risks. In order to develop more effective whisker mitigation strategies, a predictive physics-based model has been needed. A growth model is developed, based on grain boundary faceting, localized Coble creep, as well as grain boundary sliding for whiskers, and grain boundary sliding with shear induced grain boundary migration for hillocks. In this model of whisker formation, two mechanisms are important: accretion of atoms by Coble creep on grain boundary planes normal to the growth direction inducing a grain boundary shear and grain boundary sliding in the direction of whisker growth. The model accurately captures the importance of the geometry of "surface grains"---shallow grains on film surfaces whose depths are significantly less than their in-plane grain sizes. A critical factor in the analysis is the ratio of the grain boundary sliding coefficient to the in-plane film compressive stress. If the accretion-induced shear stresses are not coupled to grain boundary motion and sliding occurs, a whisker forms. If the shear stress is coupled to grain boundary migration, a hillock forms. Based on this model, long whiskers grow from shallow surface grains with easy grain boundary sliding in the direction of growth. Other observed growth morphologies will be discussed in light of our model. Additional insights into the preferred sites for whisker and hillock growth were developed based on elastic anisotropy, local film microstructure

  18. Quantum tunneling observed without its characteristic large kinetic isotope effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hama, Tetsuya; Ueta, Hirokazu; Kouchi, Akira; Watanabe, Naoki

    2015-06-16

    Classical transition-state theory is fundamental to describing chemical kinetics; however, quantum tunneling is also important in explaining the unexpectedly large reaction efficiencies observed in many chemical systems. Tunneling is often indicated by anomalously large kinetic isotope effects (KIEs), because a particle's ability to tunnel decreases significantly with its increasing mass. Here we experimentally demonstrate that cold hydrogen (H) and deuterium (D) atoms can add to solid benzene by tunneling; however, the observed H/D KIE was very small (1-1.5) despite the large intrinsic H/D KIE of tunneling (≳ 100). This strong reduction is due to the chemical kinetics being controlled not by tunneling but by the surface diffusion of the H/D atoms, a process not greatly affected by the isotope type. Because tunneling need not be accompanied by a large KIE in surface and interfacial chemical systems, it might be overlooked in other systems such as aerosols or enzymes. Our results suggest that surface tunneling reactions on interstellar dust may contribute to the deuteration of interstellar aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons, which could represent a major source of the deuterium enrichment observed in carbonaceous meteorites and interplanetary dust particles. These findings could improve our understanding of interstellar physicochemical processes, including those during the formation of the solar system.

  19. Heat transfer enhancement on nucleate boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuang, M.; Guibai, L.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on enhancement of nucleate boiling heat transfer with additives that was investigated experimentally. More than fifteen kinds of additives were chosen and tested. Eight kinds of effective additives which can enhance nucleate boiling heat transfer were selected. Experimental results showed that boiling heat transfer coefficient of water was increased by 1 to 5 times and that of R-113 was increased by 1 to 4 times when trace amount additives were put in the two boiling liquids. There exist optimum concentrations for the additives, respectively, which can enhance nucleate boiling heat transfer rate best. In order to analyze the mechanism of the enhancement of boiling heat transfer with additives, the surface tension and the bubble departure diameter were measured. The nucleation sites were investigated by use of high-speed photograph. Experimental results showed that nucleation sites increase with additive amount increasing and get maximum. Increasing nucleation sites is one of the most important reason why nucleate boiling heat transfer can be enhanced with additives

  20. Sensitivity of ice-nucleating bacteria to ultraviolet irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obata, Hitoshi; Tanahashi, Shinji; Kawahara, Hidehisa (Kansai Univ., Suita, Osaka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering)

    1992-01-01

    The effect of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation on the ice-nucleating activity of the ice-nucleating bacteria was examined. Bacterial suspension was irradiated with UV (254 nm, 6Wx2) for 5 min at a distance of 20 cm from UV source. Although no viable cells were detected, the ice-nucreating activity of the cells was not affected. Furthermore, after UV irradiation for 3 hr, the ice-nucleating activity of Pseudomonas fluorescens and P. syringae was only slightly decreased, although that of P. viridiflava and Erwinia herbicola was significantly lowered. We succeeded in killing the ice-nucleating bacteria, while retaining their ice-nucleating activity with UV irradiation. (author).

  1. The effect of Ca and RE elements on the precipitation kinetics of Mg17Al12 phase during artificial aging of magnesium alloy AZ91

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amir Esgandari, B.; Mehrjoo, H.; Nami, B.; Miresmaeili, S.M.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Ca and RE elements decrease the precipitation rate during aging of AZ91 alloy. → Precipitation kinetics and mechanism during aging of the alloys were studied. → Effect of Ca and RE on creep properties of age hardened AZ91 alloy was studied. - Abstract: The effect of simultaneous alloying with Ca and rare earth (RE) elements on the age hardening kinetics of AZ91 was studied through the fitting of the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (JMA) equation. The results showed that the addition of both Ca and RE elements not only suppress discontinuous precipitation of the Mg 17 Al 12 phase during the age hardening process, but also decrease the alloy hardness. Fitting the JMA equation to the experimental data indicated that the phase transformation during age hardening of an alloy variant containing both Ca and RE (at 170 deg. C and 190 deg. C) and standard AZ91 (at 170 deg. C) takes place by the nucleation of precipitates on dislocations. In contrast, the precipitation during age hardening of AZ91 at 190 deg. C occurs via nucleation at grain boundaries. Although it was observed that the creep strength of age hardened specimens are lower than that of the as cast specimens, but age hardening treatment has lower deleterious influence on the creep resistance of the alloy containing Ca and RE in comparison with conventional AZ91. This may be ascribed to the decreased precipitation rate resulting from the addition of both Ca and RE elements.

  2. Phase-field simulation of nucleation and growth of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbide and ferromagnetic phases during creep deformation in Type 304 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukada, Yuhki, E-mail: tsukada@silky.numse.nagoya-u.ac.j [Department of Materials, Physics and Energy Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Shiraki, Atsuhiro; Murata, Yoshinori [Department of Materials, Physics and Energy Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Takaya, Shigeru [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Narita-cho, O-arai-machi, Higashi-ibaraki-gun, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan); Koyama, Toshiyuki [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Morinaga, Masahiko [Department of Materials, Physics and Energy Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2010-06-15

    A phase-field method was applied to the simulation of simultaneous nucleation and growth of both M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbide and ferromagnetic {alpha} phases during the creep process in Type 304 steel. Nucleation events of these product phases were explicitly introduced through a probabilistic Poisson seeding process based on local nucleation rates that were calculated as a function of local concentration. The defect energy of the creep dislocations near the carbides, which increases during creep, was integrated into the nucleation driving force for the {alpha} phase. The simulation used in this study accurately reproduced changes in the amounts of the precipitated phases as a function of creep time. Furthermore, we examine the effect of the dislocation density on precipitation of the {alpha} phase, and show that the phase-field method is useful for examining the stochastic and kinetic phenomenon of phase transformation.

  3. Effect of noise-induced nucleation on grain size distribution studied via the phase-field crystal method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubert, J; Cheng, M; Emmerich, H

    2009-01-01

    We contribute to the more detailed understanding of the phase-field crystal model recently developed by Elder et al (2002 Phys. Rev. Lett. 88 245701), by focusing on its noise term and examining its impact on the nucleation rate in a homogeneously solidifying system as well as on successively developing grain size distributions. In this context we show that principally the grain size decreases with increasing noise amplitude, resulting in both a smaller average grain size and a decreased maximum grain size. Despite this general tendency, which we interpret based on Panfilis and Filiponi (2000 J. Appl. Phys. 88 562), we can identify two different regimes in which nucleation and successive initial growth are governed by quite different mechanisms.

  4. Nucleation and Grain Refinement of 7A04 Aluminum Alloy Under a Low-Power Electromagnetic Pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Qingwei; Ma, Yonglin; Xing, Shuqing; Bao, Xinyu; Feng, Yanfei; Kang, Xiaolan

    2018-02-01

    The effects of a low-power electromagnetic pulse on the grain size and cooling curve of high-strength aluminum alloy 7A04 were investigated for various pulse duty cycles. This electromagnetic pulse treatment was found to effectively produce fine grains with globular crystals and a uniform microstructure for pulse duty cycles between 20 and 40%. The key factors that affected grain refinement under the electromagnetic pulse included the electromagnetic energy and the conversion frequency between \\varvec{B} and \\varvec{E} . The nucleation rate increased as the nucleation period was extended. A new kinetic condition of magnetic nucleation was explored by decreasing the critical Gibbs free energy in the electromagnetic pulse, which was more sensitive under low undercooling. In addition, the crystal orientation was controlled in such a solidification environment.

  5. Effect of nitrogen oxides (NO and NO2) and toluene on SO2 photooxidation, nucleation and growth: A smog chamber study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kangwei; Chen, Linghong; White, Stephen J.; Han, Ke; Lv, Biao; Bao, Kaiji; Wu, Xuecheng; Gao, Xiang; Azzi, Merched; Cen, Kefa

    2017-08-01

    The formation and growth of new particles has recently been shown to have a significant influence on Chinese haze pollution, and sulfuric acid has long been recognized as a major contributor to new particle formation. In this study, four comparison groups of experiments related to SO2 photooxidation, as well as aerosol nucleation and growth, have been conducted in the CAPS-ZJU (Complex Air Pollution Study-Zhejiang University) smog chamber. These were conducted either under SO2/NOx or SO2/toluene gas-phase environments in the absence of seed particles. During aerosol nucleation and growth process, several physical properties such as mass, size and effective density were measured simultaneously by Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) and Differential Mobility Analyzer-Aerosol Particle Mass Analyzer-Condensation Particle Counter (DMA-APM-CPC). The effective density of new particles decreased from 1.8 to 1.35 g/cm3 as the particle size increased from 20 to 65 nm. The single particle mass showed good power-law relationship with mobility diameter, with an average mass-mobility exponent of 2.885. A new algorithm and a reference density of 1.38 g/cm3 based on size-resolved single particle mass (SPM) were proposed to calculate the mass concentration of new particles. Two methods based on Log Normal and Max Concentration were applied to derive particle growth rate (GR), and data merging from both methods was implemented to decrease calculation uncertainty. Meanwhile, both continuous nucleation and inhibition of further growth in sub-20 nm size range were observed in different experiments depending on composition, and possible reasons were analyzed. The presence of NO was found to suppress nucleation and subsequent aerosol growth; while the presence of NO2 or toluene promoted it. It was concluded that decreasing NOx (NO or NO2) or increasing toluene may promote SO2 photooxidation, nucleation and subsequent aerosol growth, all of which is significant for deeper

  6. Nucleation of strange matter in dense stellar cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvath, J.E.; Benvenuto, O.G.; Vucetich, H.

    1992-01-01

    We investigate the nucleation of strange quark matter inside hot, dense nuclear matter. Applying Zel'dovich's kinetic theory of nucleation we find a lower limit of the temperature T for strange-matter bubbles to appear, which happens to be satisfied inside the Kelvin-Helmholtz cooling era of a compact star life but not much after it. Our bounds thus suggest that a prompt conversion could be achieved, giving support to earlier expectations for nonstandard type-II supernova scenarios

  7. Molecular-dynamics simulations of urea nucleation from aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvalaglio, Matteo; Perego, Claudio; Giberti, Federico; Mazzotti, Marco; Parrinello, Michele

    2015-01-06

    Despite its ubiquitous character and relevance in many branches of science and engineering, nucleation from solution remains elusive. In this framework, molecular simulations represent a powerful tool to provide insight into nucleation at the molecular scale. In this work, we combine theory and molecular simulations to describe urea nucleation from aqueous solution. Taking advantage of well-tempered metadynamics, we compute the free-energy change associated to the phase transition. We find that such a free-energy profile is characterized by significant finite-size effects that can, however, be accounted for. The description of the nucleation process emerging from our analysis differs from classical nucleation theory. Nucleation of crystal-like clusters is in fact preceded by large concentration fluctuations, indicating a predominant two-step process, whereby embryonic crystal nuclei emerge from dense, disordered urea clusters. Furthermore, in the early stages of nucleation, two different polymorphs are seen to compete.

  8. Molecular-dynamics simulations of urea nucleation from aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvalaglio, Matteo; Perego, Claudio; Giberti, Federico; Mazzotti, Marco; Parrinello, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Despite its ubiquitous character and relevance in many branches of science and engineering, nucleation from solution remains elusive. In this framework, molecular simulations represent a powerful tool to provide insight into nucleation at the molecular scale. In this work, we combine theory and molecular simulations to describe urea nucleation from aqueous solution. Taking advantage of well-tempered metadynamics, we compute the free-energy change associated to the phase transition. We find that such a free-energy profile is characterized by significant finite-size effects that can, however, be accounted for. The description of the nucleation process emerging from our analysis differs from classical nucleation theory. Nucleation of crystal-like clusters is in fact preceded by large concentration fluctuations, indicating a predominant two-step process, whereby embryonic crystal nuclei emerge from dense, disordered urea clusters. Furthermore, in the early stages of nucleation, two different polymorphs are seen to compete. PMID:25492932

  9. Structural Basis of Actin Filament Nucleation by Tandem W Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaorui; Ni, Fengyun; Tian, Xia; Kondrashkina, Elena; Wang, Qinghua; Ma, Jianpeng

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Spontaneous nucleation of actin is very inefficient in cells. To overcome this barrier, cells have evolved a set of actin filament nucleators to promote rapid nucleation and polymerization in response to specific stimuli. However, the molecular mechanism of actin nucleation remains poorly understood. This is hindered largely by the fact that actin nucleus, once formed, rapidly polymerizes into filament, thus making it impossible to capture stable multisubunit actin nucleus. Here, we report an effective double-mutant strategy to stabilize actin nucleus by preventing further polymerization. Employing this strategy, we solved the crystal structure of AMPPNP-actin in complex with the first two tandem W domains of Cordon-bleu (Cobl), a potent actin filament nucleator. Further sequence comparison and functional studies suggest that the nucleation mechanism of Cobl is probably shared by the p53 cofactor JMY, but not Spire. Moreover, the double-mutant strategy opens the way for atomic mechanistic study of actin nucleation and polymerization. PMID:23727244

  10. Energetics of dislocation nucleation under a nanoindenter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chuanli; Xu Guanshui

    2005-01-01

    We present an analysis of dislocation nucleation under an idealized nanoindenter based on the variational boundary integral formulation of the Peierls-Nabarro dislocation model. By solving the embryonic dislocation profiles, corresponding to the relative displacements between the two adjacent atomic layers along the slip plane, we have determined the critical conditions for athermal dislocation nucleation as well as the activation energies required to thermally activate embryonic dislocations from their stable to unstable saddle point configurations. The effect of the size of the indenter on the energetics of dislocation nucleation is quantitatively characterized. The result is compared with a simplified analysis based on the application of the Rice model for dislocation nucleation at a crack tip

  11. Energetics of dislocation nucleation under a nanoindenter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Chuanli [College of Mechanical Engineering, Yangtze University, Jingzhou, Hubei 434023 (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Xu Guanshui [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States)]. E-mail: guanshui.xu@ucr.edu

    2005-07-25

    We present an analysis of dislocation nucleation under an idealized nanoindenter based on the variational boundary integral formulation of the Peierls-Nabarro dislocation model. By solving the embryonic dislocation profiles, corresponding to the relative displacements between the two adjacent atomic layers along the slip plane, we have determined the critical conditions for athermal dislocation nucleation as well as the activation energies required to thermally activate embryonic dislocations from their stable to unstable saddle point configurations. The effect of the size of the indenter on the energetics of dislocation nucleation is quantitatively characterized. The result is compared with a simplified analysis based on the application of the Rice model for dislocation nucleation at a crack tip.

  12. MASS TRANSFER KINETICS AND EFFECTIVE DIFFUSIVITIES DURING COCOA ROASTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. M. BAGHDADI

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The current studies investigated the effects of temperature and moisture addition on the mass transfer kinetics of cocoa nibs during roasting. Experiments were carried out by roasting 500 gm of cocoa nibs inside an air ventilated oven at three temperature levels (120°C, 140°C and 160°C under medium air flowrate for one hour. Two types of samples were prepared namely the raw and soaked nib samples. The soaked nib samples were prepared by soaking the raw nibs in 200 ml of water at room temperature for 5 and 10 hours. Mathematical modelling was carried out to model the mass transfer process using semi-empirical models. Modelling showed that both Page and two-term models were able to give close fitting between the experimental and predicted values. Effective diffusivity values were estimated in the order of magnitude of 10-5 m2/s for the mass transfer process. Results obtained from these studies fill the current knowledge gap on the mass transfer kinetics of cocoa roasting.

  13. The effect of fractionated irradiation on cell kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laasonen, A.; Pyrhoenen, S.; Kouri, M.; Raety, J.; Holsti, L.R.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of single and split-dose irradiation were compared by in vitro experiments on HeLa cells. Changes in rate of cell proliferation were detected by flow cytometry, simultaneously determining the DNA content and the bromodeoxyuridine incorporation of individual cells. Cell cultures were irradiated with either a single dose of 1-6 Gy or with a corresponding dose divided into multiple fractions given at 1-6-h intervals. A dose-dependent accumulation of cells in G2/M phase was observed. The method was sensitive enough for the detection of G2/M block even after 1 Gy. The block disappeared completely within a 24-h follow-up time at dose levels up to 3 Gy. Interestingly, no differences in cell kinetics were observed between the single and split-dose regiments. This approach proves to be valuable in evaluating novel fractionation models and the effects of radiation on the cell kinetics of human tumor cells. (orig.)

  14. Kinetic isotope effects and how to describe them

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin Karandashev

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We review several methods for computing kinetic isotope effects in chemical reactions including semiclassical and quantum instanton theory. These methods describe both the quantization of vibrational modes as well as tunneling and are applied to the ⋅H + H2 and ⋅H + CH4 reactions. The absolute rate constants computed with the semiclassical instanton method both using on-the-fly electronic structure calculations and fitted potential-energy surfaces are also compared directly with exact quantum dynamics results. The error inherent in the instanton approximation is found to be relatively small and similar in magnitude to that introduced by using fitted surfaces. The kinetic isotope effect computed by the quantum instanton is even more accurate, and although it is computationally more expensive, the efficiency can be improved by path-integral acceleration techniques. We also test a simple approach for designing potential-energy surfaces for the example of proton transfer in malonaldehyde. The tunneling splittings are computed, and although they are found to deviate from experimental results, the ratio of the splitting to that of an isotopically substituted form is in much better agreement. We discuss the strengths and limitations of the potential-energy surface and based on our findings suggest ways in which it can be improved.

  15. Ice nucleation activity of polysaccharides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bichler, Magdalena; Felgitsch, Laura; Haeusler, Thomas; Seidl-Seiboth, Verena; Grothe, Hinrich

    2015-04-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation is an important process in the atmosphere. It shows direct impact on our climate by triggering ice cloud formation and therefore it has much influence on the radiation balance of our planet (Lohmann et al. 2002; Mishchenko et al. 1996). The process itself is not completely understood so far and many questions remain open. Different substances have been found to exhibit ice nucleation activity (INA). Due to their vast differences in chemistry and morphology it is difficult to predict what substance will make good ice nuclei and which will not. Hence simple model substances must be found and be tested regarding INA. Our work aims at gaining to a deeper understanding of heterogeneous ice nucleation. We intend to find some reference standards with defined chemistry, which may explain the mechanisms of heterogeneous ice nucleation. A particular focus lies on biological carbohydrates in regards to their INA. Biological carbohydrates are widely distributed in all kingdoms of life. Mostly they are specific for certain organisms and have well defined purposes, e.g. structural polysaccharides like chitin (in fungi and insects) and pectin (in plants), which has also water-binding properties. Since they are widely distributed throughout our biosphere and mostly safe to use for nutrition purposes, they are well studied and easily accessible, rendering them ideal candidates as proxies. In our experiments we examined various carbohydrates, like the already mentioned chitin and pectin, as well as their chemical modifications. Lohmann U.; A Glaciation Indirect Aerosol Effect Caused by Soot Aerosols; J. Geoph. Res.; Vol. 24 No.4; pp 11-1 - 11-4; 2002 Mishchenko M.I., Rossow W.B., Macke A., Lacis A. A.; Sensitivity of Cirrus Cloud Albedo, Bidirectional Reflectance and Optical Thickness Retrieval Accuracy to Ice Particle Shape, J. Geoph. Res.; Vol. 101, No D12; pp. 16,973 - 16,985; 1996

  16. Nucleation path of helium bubbles in metals during irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morishita, Kazunori

    2008-01-01

    Thermodynamical formalization is made for description of the nucleation and growth of helium bubbles in metals during irradiation. The proposed formalization is available or evaluating both microstructural changes in fusion first wall materials where helium is produced by (n, α) nuclear transmutation reactions, and those in fusion divertor materials where helium particles with low energy are directly implanted. Calculated nucleation barrier is significantly reduced by the presence of helium, showing that a helium bubble with an appropriate number of helium atoms depending on bubble size can nucleate without any large nucleation barriers, even at a condition where an empty void has very large nucleation barrier without helium. With the proposed thermodynamical formalization, the nucleation and growth process of helium bubbles in iron during irradiation is simulated by the kinetic Monte-Carlo (KMC) technique. It shows the nucleation path of a helium bubble on the (N He , N V ) space as functions of temperatures and the concentration of helium in the matrix, where N He and N V are the number of helium atoms and vacancies in the helium bubble, respectively. Bubble growth rates depend on the nucleation path and suggest that two different mechanisms operate for bubble growth: one is controlled by vacancy diffusion and the other is controlled by interstitial helium diffusion. (author)

  17. Protein Polymerization into Fibrils from the Viewpoint of Nucleation Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashchiev, Dimo

    2015-11-17

    The assembly of various proteins into fibrillar aggregates is an important phenomenon with wide implications ranging from human disease to nanoscience. Using general kinetic results of nucleation theory, we analyze the polymerization of protein into linear or helical fibrils in the framework of the Oosawa-Kasai (OK) model. We show that while within the original OK model of linear polymerization the process does not involve nucleation, within a modified OK model it is nucleation-mediated. Expressions are derived for the size of the fibril nucleus, the work for fibril formation, the nucleation barrier, the equilibrium and stationary fibril size distributions, and the stationary fibril nucleation rate. Under otherwise equal conditions, this rate decreases considerably when the short (subnucleus) fibrils lose monomers much more frequently than the long (supernucleus) fibrils, a feature that should be born in mind when designing a strategy for stymying or stimulating fibril nucleation. The obtained dependence of the nucleation rate on the concentration of monomeric protein is convenient for experimental verification and for use in rate equations accounting for nucleation-mediated fibril formation. The analysis and the results obtained for linear fibrils are fully applicable to helical fibrils whose formation is describable by a simplified OK model. Copyright © 2015 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The mechanism of deceleration of nucleation and crystal growth by the small addition of transition metals to lithium disilicate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieme, Katrin; Avramov, Isak; Rüssel, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The addition of small amounts of niobium or tantalum oxide to lithium disilicate glass provokes a drastic decrease of the steady-state nucleation rates and the crystal growth velocities. The viscosity of the residual glassy matrix is considered as a function of the crystallization degree in the course of a non-isothermal crystallization. For simplification, a homogeneous distribution of the added oxides in the glass matrix is assumed. While the viscosity initially decreases, it significantly increases again for higher crystallization degrees hindering crystal growth. However, it was shown that the additives are enriched at the crystal interface. Several possible reasons for the inhibition of nucleation and growth kinetics such as viscosity, interfacial energy crystal/glassy phase, thermodynamic driving force or impingement rate are discussed. Since the crystallization front is blocked by the additives the impingement rate is decreased with increasing additive concentration. Since small concentrations of Nb2O5 and Ta2O5 have a drastic effect on the nucleation, these components should be enriched at the interface crystal/glass. This will only take place, if it leads to a decrease in the interfacial energy. Since this effect alone should result in an increase of the nucleation rate, it must be overcompensated by kinetic effects. PMID:27150844

  19. Return to nucleate boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shumway, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents a collection of TMIN (temperature of return to nucleate boiling) correlations, evaluates them under several conditions, and compares them with a wide range of data. Purpose is to obtain the best one for use in a water reactor safety computer simulator known as TRAC-B. Return to nucleate boiling can occur in a reactor accident at either high or low pressure and flow rates. Most of the correlations yield unrealistic results under some conditions. A new correlation is proposed which overcomes many of the deficiencies

  20. Different arsenate and phosphate incorporation effects on the nucleation and growth of iron(III) (Hydr)oxides on quartz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neil, Chelsea W; Lee, Byeongdu; Jun, Young-Shin

    2014-10-21

    Iron(III) (hydr)oxides play an important role in the geochemical cycling of contaminants in natural and engineered aquatic systems. The ability of iron(III) (hydr)oxides to immobilize contaminants can be related to whether the precipitates form heterogeneously (e.g., at mineral surfaces) or homogeneously in solution. Utilizing grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS), we studied heterogeneous iron(III) (hydr)oxide nucleation and growth on quartz substrates for systems containing arsenate and phosphate anions. For the iron(III) only system, the radius of gyration (Rg) of heterogeneously formed precipitates grew from 1.5 to 2.5 (± 1.0) nm within 1 h. For the system containing 10(-5) M arsenate, Rg grew from 3.6 to 6.1 (± 0.5) nm, and for the system containing 10(-5) M phosphate, Rg grew from 2.0 to 4.0 (± 0.2) nm. While the systems containing these oxyanions had more growth, the system containing only iron(III) had the most nucleation events on substrates. Ex situ analyses of homogeneously and heterogeneously formed precipitates indicated that precipitates in the arsenate system had the highest water content and that oxyanions may bridge iron(III) hydroxide polymeric embryos to form a structure similar to ferric arsenate or ferric phosphate. These new findings are important because differences in nucleation and growth rates and particle sizes will impact the number of available reactive sites and the reactivity of newly formed particles toward aqueous contaminants.

  1. Effective-field theory on the kinetic Ising model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Xiaoling; Wei Guozhu; Li Lin

    2008-01-01

    As an analytical method, the effective-field theory (EFT) is used to study the dynamical response of the kinetic Ising model in the presence of a sinusoidal oscillating field. The effective-field equations of motion of the average magnetization are given for the square lattice (Z=4) and the simple cubic lattice (Z=6), respectively. The dynamic order parameter, the hysteresis loop area and the dynamic correlation are calculated. In the field amplitude h 0 /ZJ-temperature T/ZJ plane, the phase boundary separating the dynamic ordered and the disordered phase has been drawn, and the dynamical tricritical point has been observed. We also make the compare results of EFT with that given by using the mean field theory (MFT)

  2. Effects of apolipoproteins on the kinetics of cholesterol exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letizia, J.Y.; Phillips, M.C.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of apolipoproteins on the kinetics of cholesterol exchange have been investigated by monitoring the transfer of [ 14 C]cholesterol from donor phospholipid/cholesterol complexes containing human apolipoproteins A, B, or C. Negatively charged discoidal and vesicular particles containing purified apolipoproteins complexed with lipid and a trace of [ 14 C]cholesterol were incubated with a 10-fold excess of neutral, acceptor, small unilamellar vesicles. The donor and acceptor particles were separated by chromatogrphy of DEAE-Sepharose, and the rate of movement of labeled cholesterol was analyzed as a first-order exchange process. The kinetics of exchange of cholesterol from both vesicular and discoidal complexes that contain apoproteins are consistent with an aqueous diffusion mechanism, as has been established previously for PC/cholesterol SUV. Apolipoproteins A-I, A-II, reduced and carboxymethylated A-11, and B-100 present in SUV at the same lipid/protein (w/w) ratio all enhance the rate of cholesterol exchange to about the same degree. Cholesterol molecules exchange more rapidly from discoidal complexes. Generally, as the diameter of apoprotein/phospholipid/cholesterol discs decreases, t 1/2 for cholesterol exchange decreases. Since small bilayer discs have a relatively high ratio of boundary to face surface area, cholesterol molecules desorb more rapidly than from larger discs. The modulation of lipid packing by the apoprotein molecules present at the surface of lipoprotein particles affects the rate of cholesterol exchange from such particles

  3. Nonequilibrium thermodynamics of nucleation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schweizer, M.; Sagis, L.M.C.

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel approach to nucleation processes based on the GENERIC framework (general equation for the nonequilibrium reversible-irreversible coupling). Solely based on the GENERIC structure of time-evolution equations and thermodynamic consistency arguments of exchange processes between a

  4. Composition dependence of the synergistic effect of nucleating agent and plasticizer in poly(lactic acid: A Mixture Design study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. K. Fehri

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Blends consisting of commercial poly(lactic acid (PLA, poly(lactic acid oligomer (OLA8 as plasticizer and a sulfonic salt of a phthalic ester and poly(D-lactic acid as nucleating agents were prepared by melt extrusion, following a Mixture Design approach, in order to systematically study mechanical and thermal properties as a function of composition. The full investigation was carried out by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA and tensile tests. The crystallization half-time was also studied at 105 °C as a function of the blends composition. A range of compositions in which the plasticizer and the nucleation agent minimized the crystallization half-time in a synergistic way was clearly identified thanks to the application of the Mixture Design approach. The results allowed also the identification of a composition range to maximize the crystallinity developed during the rapid cooling below glass transition temperature in injection moulding, thus allowing an easier processing of PLA based materials. Moreover the mechanical properties were discussed by correlating them to the chemical structural features and thermal behaviour of blends.

  5. Surface roughness effects on onset of nucleate boiling and net vapor generation point in subcooled flow boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtake, Hiroyasu; Wada, Noriyoshi; Koizumi, Yasuo

    2003-01-01

    The ability to predict void formation and void fraction in subcooled flow boiling is of importance to the nuclear reactor technology because the presence of voids affects the steady state and transient response of a reactor. The onset of nucleate boiling and the point of net vapor generation on subcooled flow boiling, focusing on surface roughness, liquid subcooling and liquid velocity were investigated experimentally and analytically. Experiments were conducted using a copper thin-film and subcooled water in a range of the liquid velocity from 0.27 to 4.6 m/s at 0.10MPa; the liquid subcoolings were 20, 30 and 40K, respectively. The surface roughness on the test heater was observed by SEM. Experimental results showed that temperatures at the onset nucleate boiling increased with increasing the liquid subcoolings or the liquid velocities. The trend of increase in the temperature at the ONB was in good agreement with the present analytical result based on the stability theory of preexisting nuclei. The measured results for the net vapor generation point agreed well with the results of correlation by Saha and Zuber in the range of the present experiments. The temperature at the ONB decreased with an increasing size of surface roughness, while the NVG-point was independent on the surface roughness. The dependence on the ONB temperature of the roughness size was also represented well by the present analytical model

  6. Aerosol nucleation in an ultra-low ion density environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jens Olaf Pepke; Enghoff, Martin Andreas Bødker; Paling, Sean M.

    2012-01-01

    Ion-induced nucleation has been studied in a deep underground ultra-low background radiation environment where the role of ions can be distinguished from alternative neutral aerosol nucleation mechanisms. Our results demonstrate that ions have a significant effect on the production of small...... sulfuric acid–water clusters over a range of sulfuric acid concentrations although neutral nucleation mechanisms remain evident at low ionization levels. The effect of ions is found both to enhance the nucleation rate of stable clusters and the initial growth rate. The effects of possible contaminations...

  7. Combined Ideal and Kinetic Effects on Reversed Shear Alfven Eigenmodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorelenkov, N.N.; Kramer, G.J.; Nazikian, R.

    2011-01-01

    A theory of Reversed Shear Alfven Eigenmodes (RSAEs) is developed for reversed magnetic field shear plasmas when the safety factor minimum, qmin, is at or above a rational value. The modes we study are known sometimes as either the bottom of the frequency sweep or the down sweeping RSAEs. We show that the ideal MHD theory is not compatible with the eigenmode solution in the reversed shear plasma with qmin above integer values. Corrected by special analytic FLR condition MHD dispersion of these modes nevertheless can be developed. Large radial scale part of the analytic RSAE solution can be obtained from ideal MHD and expressed in terms of the Legendre functions. The kinetic equation with FLR effects for the eigenmode is solved numerically and agrees with the analytic solutions. Properties of RSAEs and their potential implications for plasma diagnostics are discussed.

  8. Combined ideal and kinetic effects on reversed shear Alfven eigenmodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorelenkov, N. N.; Kramer, G. J.; Nazikian, R.

    2011-01-01

    A reversed shear Alfven eigenmodes (RSAEs) theory has been developed for reversed magnetic field shear plasmas when the safety factor minimum, q min , is at or above a rational value. The modes we study are known sometimes as either the bottom of the frequency sweep or the down sweeping RSAEs. We show that, strictly speaking, the ideal MHD theory is not compatible with the eigenmode solution in the reversed shear plasma with q min above integer values. Corrected by a special analytic finite Larmor radius (FLR) condition, MHD dispersion of these modes nevertheless can be developed. Numerically, MHD structure can serve as a good approximation for the RSAEs.The large radial scale part of the analytic RSAE solution can be obtained from ideal MHD and expressed in terms of the Legendre functions. The kinetic equation with FLR effects for the eigenmode is solved numerically and agrees with the analytic solutions. Properties of RSAEs and their potential implications for plasma diagnostics are discussed.

  9. Effects of AlN nucleation layers on the growth of AlN films using high temperature hydride vapor phase epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balaji, M.; Claudel, A.; Fellmann, V.; Gélard, I.; Blanquet, E.; Boichot, R.; Pierret, A.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Growth of AlN Nucleation layers and its effect on high temperature AlN films quality were investigated. ► AlN nucleation layers stabilizes the epitaxial growth of AlN and improves the surface morphology of AlN films. ► Increasing growth temperature of AlN NLs as well as AlN films improves the structural quality and limits the formation of cracks. - Abstract: AlN layers were grown on c-plane sapphire substrates with AlN nucleation layers (NLs) using high temperature hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HT-HVPE). Insertion of low temperature NLs, as those typically used in MOVPE process, prior to the high temperature AlN (HT-AlN) layers has been investigated. The NLs surface morphology was studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and NLs thickness was measured by X-ray reflectivity. Increasing nucleation layer deposition temperature from 650 to 850 °C has been found to promote the growth of c-oriented epitaxial HT-AlN layers instead of polycrystalline layers. The growth of polycrystalline layers has been related to the formation of dis-oriented crystallites. The density of such disoriented crystallites has been found to decrease while increasing NLs deposition temperature. The HT-AlN layers have been characterized by X-ray diffraction θ − 2θ scan and (0 0 0 2) rocking curve measurement, Raman and photoluminescence spectroscopies, AFM and field emission scanning electron microscopy. Increasing the growth temperature of HT-AlN layers from 1200 to 1400 °C using a NL grown at 850 °C improves the structural quality as well as the surface morphology. As a matter of fact, full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of 0 0 0 2 reflections was improved from 1900 to 864 arcsec for 1200 °C and 1400 °C, respectively. Related RMS roughness also found to decrease from 10 to 5.6 nm.

  10. Homogeneous crystal nucleation in polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schick, C; Androsch, R; Schmelzer, J W P

    2017-11-15

    The pathway of crystal nucleation significantly influences the structure and properties of semi-crystalline polymers. Crystal nucleation is normally heterogeneous at low supercooling, and homogeneous at high supercooling, of the polymer melt. Homogeneous nucleation in bulk polymers has been, so far, hardly accessible experimentally, and was even doubted to occur at all. This topical review summarizes experimental findings on homogeneous crystal nucleation in polymers. Recently developed fast scanning calorimetry, with cooling and heating rates up to 10 6 K s -1 , allows for detailed investigations of nucleation near and even below the glass transition temperature, including analysis of nuclei stability. As for other materials, the maximum homogeneous nucleation rate for polymers is located close to the glass transition temperature. In the experiments discussed here, it is shown that polymer nucleation is homogeneous at such temperatures. Homogeneous nucleation in polymers is discussed in the framework of the classical nucleation theory. The majority of our observations are consistent with the theory. The discrepancies may guide further research, particularly experiments to progress theoretical development. Progress in the understanding of homogeneous nucleation is much needed, since most of the modelling approaches dealing with polymer crystallization exclusively consider homogeneous nucleation. This is also the basis for advancing theoretical approaches to the much more complex phenomena governing heterogeneous nucleation.

  11. Crystal nucleation and dendrite growth of metastable phases in undercooled melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herlach, Dieter

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Homogenous nucleation. → Effects of convection on dendrite growth kinetics. → Description of disorder trapping validated by experiment. - Abstract: An undercooled melt possesses an enhanced free enthalpy that opens up the possibility to crystallize metastable crystalline solids in competition with their stable counterparts. Crystal nucleation selects the crystallographic phase whereas the growth dynamics controls microstructure evolution. We apply containerless processing techniques such as electromagnetic and electrostatic levitation to containerlesss undercool and solidify metallic melts. Owing to the complete avoidance of heterogeneous nucleation on container-walls a large undercooling range becomes accessible with the extra benefit that the freely suspended drop is direct accessible for in situ observation of crystallization far away from equilibrium. Results of investigations of maximum undercoolability on pure zirconium are presented showing the limit of maximum undercoolability set by the onset of homogeneous nucleation. Rapid dendrite growth is measured as a function of undercooling by a high-speed camera and analysed within extended theories of non-equilibrium solidification. In such both supersaturated solid solutions and disordered superlattice structure of intermetallics are formed at high growth velocities. A sharp interface theory of dendrite growth is capable to describe the non-equilibrium solidification phenomena during rapid crystallization of deeply undercooled melts. Eventually, anomalous growth behaviour of Al-rich Al-Ni alloys is presented, which may be caused by forced convection.

  12. Aerosol nucleation induced by a high energy particle beam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enghoff, Martin Andreas Bødker; Pedersen, Jens Olaf Pepke; Uggerhøj, Ulrik I.

    The effect of ions in aerosol nucleation is a subject where much remains to be discovered. That ions can enhance nucleation has been shown by theory, observations, and experiments. However, the exact mechanism still remains to be determined. One question is if the nature of the ionization affects...... the nucleation. This is an essential question since many experiments have been performed using radioactive sources that ionize differently than the cosmic rays which are responsible for the majority of atmospheric ionization. Here we report on an experimental study of sulphuric acid aerosol nucleation under near...... atmospheric conditions using a 580 MeV electron beam to ionize the volume of the reaction chamber. We find a clear and significant contribution from ion induced nucleation and consider this to be an unambiguous observation of the ion-effect on aerosol nucleation using a particle beam under conditions not far...

  13. Do protein crystals nucleate within dense liquid clusters?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maes, Dominique; Vorontsova, Maria A.; Potenza, Marco A. C.; Sanvito, Tiziano; Sleutel, Mike; Giglio, Marzio; Vekilov, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of protein-rich clusters and nucleating crystals were characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS), confocal depolarized dynamic light scattering (cDDLS) and depolarized oblique illumination dark-field microscopy. Newly nucleated crystals within protein-rich clusters were detected directly. These observations indicate that the protein-rich clusters are locations for crystal nucleation. Protein-dense liquid clusters are regions of high protein concentration that have been observed in solutions of several proteins. The typical cluster size varies from several tens to several hundreds of nanometres and their volume fraction remains below 10 −3 of the solution. According to the two-step mechanism of nucleation, the protein-rich clusters serve as locations for and precursors to the nucleation of protein crystals. While the two-step mechanism explained several unusual features of protein crystal nucleation kinetics, a direct observation of its validity for protein crystals has been lacking. Here, two independent observations of crystal nucleation with the proteins lysozyme and glucose isomerase are discussed. Firstly, the evolutions of the protein-rich clusters and nucleating crystals were characterized simultaneously by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and confocal depolarized dynamic light scattering (cDDLS), respectively. It is demonstrated that protein crystals appear following a significant delay after cluster formation. The cDDLS correlation functions follow a Gaussian decay, indicative of nondiffusive motion. A possible explanation is that the crystals are contained inside large clusters and are driven by the elasticity of the cluster surface. Secondly, depolarized oblique illumination dark-field microscopy reveals the evolution from liquid clusters without crystals to newly nucleated crystals contained in the clusters to grown crystals freely diffusing in the solution. Collectively, the observations indicate that the protein-rich clusters in

  14. Theories of nucleation and growth of bubbles and voids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speight, M.V.

    1977-01-01

    The application of classical nucleation theory to the formation of voids from a supersaturated concentration of vacancies is reviewed. The effect of a dissolved concentration of barley soluble gas on the nucleation rate of voids is emphasized. Exposure to a damaging flux of irradiation is the most effective way of introducing a vacancy supersaturation, but interstitials are produced at an equal rate. The concentration of interstitials inhibits the nucleation of voids which can occur only in the presence of dislocations since they preferentially absorb interstitials. It is well known that a definite value of internal gas pressure is necessary to stabilize a bubble so that it shows no tendencies to either shrink or grow. The arguments are reviewed which conclude that this pressure is determined by the specific surface free energy of the solid rather than the surface tension. While the former property refers to the energy necessary to create new surface, the latter is a measure of the work done in elastically stretching a a given surface. The presence of an equilibrium gas bubble leaves the stresses in the surrounding solid unperturbed only when surface energy and surface tension are numerically equal. A bubble with internal pressure greater than the restraint offered by surface energy tends to grow to relieve the excess pressure. The mechanism of growth can involve the migration of vacancies from remote sources to the bubble surface or the plastic straining of the solid surrounding the bubble. The kinetics of both mechanisms are developed and compared. The theory of growth of grain-boundary voids by vacancy condensation under an applied stress is also considered. (author)

  15. Relativistic electron kinetic effects on laser diagnostics in burning plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirnov, V. V.; Den Hartog, D. J.

    2018-02-01

    Toroidal interferometry/polarimetry (TIP), poloidal polarimetry (PoPola), and Thomson scattering systems (TS) are major optical diagnostics being designed and developed for ITER. Each of them relies upon a sophisticated quantitative understanding of the electron response to laser light propagating through a burning plasma. Review of the theoretical results for two different applications is presented: interferometry/polarimetry (I/P) and polarization of Thomson scattered light, unified by the importance of relativistic (quadratic in vTe/c) electron kinetic effects. For I/P applications, rigorous analytical results are obtained perturbatively by expansion in powers of the small parameter τ = Te/me c2, where Te is electron temperature and me is electron rest mass. Experimental validation of the analytical models has been made by analyzing data of more than 1200 pulses collected from high-Te JET discharges. Based on this validation the relativistic analytical expressions are included in the error analysis and design projects of the ITER TIP and PoPola systems. The polarization properties of incoherent Thomson scattered light are being examined as a method of Te measurement relevant to ITER operational regimes. The theory is based on Stokes vector transformation and Mueller matrices formalism. The general approach is subdivided into frequency-integrated and frequency-resolved cases. For each of them, the exact analytical relativistic solutions are presented in the form of Mueller matrix elements averaged over the relativistic Maxwellian distribution function. New results related to the detailed verification of the frequency-resolved solutions are reported. The precise analytic expressions provide output much more rapidly than relativistic kinetic numerical codes allowing for direct real-time feedback control of ITER device operation.

  16. Decoding Nucleation and Growth of Zeolitic Imidazolate Framework Thin Films with Atomic Force Microscopy and Vibrational Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztürk, Zafer; Filez, Matthias; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2017-08-10

    The synthesis of metal-organic framework (MOF) thin films has garnered significant attention during the past decade. By better understanding the parameters governing the nucleation and growth of such thin films, their properties can be rationally tuned, empowering their application as (reactive) membranes. Here, a combined AFM-vibrational spectroscopy research strategy is employed to detail the chemistries governing the nucleation and growth of zeolitic imidazolate framework (ZIF) thin films, in particular isostructural Co-ZIF-67 and Zn-ZIF-8. First, a single step direct synthesis approach is used to investigate the influence of different synthesis parameters -metal/linker ratio, temperature, and metal type- on the thin film nucleation and growth behaviour. While the metal/linker ratio has a pronounced effect on the thin film nucleation rate, the temperature mainly influences the growth kinetics of nuclei forming the thin film. In addition, the nucleation and growth of ZIF thin films is shown to be highly dependent on the electronegativity of the metal type. Thin-film thickness control can be achieved by using a multistep synthesis strategy, implying repetitive applications of single step deposition under identical synthesis conditions, for which a growth mechanism is proposed. This study provides insight into the influence of synthesis parameters on the ZIF thin film properties, using tools at hand to rationally tune MOF thin film properties. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  17. Stabilization of kinetic internal kink mode by ion diamagnetic effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naitou, H.; Kuramoto, T.; Kobayashi, T.; Yagi, M.; Tokuda, S.; Matsumoto, T.

    2000-04-01

    Ion diamagnetic effects on the m=1 (poloidal mode number) and n=1 (toroidal mode number) kinetic internal kink mode are studied numerically by the three-field gyro-reduced-MHD code in the cylindrical coordinates, GRM3F-CY. In the derivation of the gryo-reduced-MHD model including the ion diamagnetic effects, finite gyroradius effects of ions are added to the gyrokinetic Poisson equation (quasi-neutral condition) and the convection term of the conservation law of the ion density. It is found that the long wavelength approximation, ksub(perpendicular) ρ ti ti is the thermal ion gyroradius, fails to reproduce the correct dispersion relation; the formulation valid even for ksub(perpendicular) ρ ti >> 1 is necessary. The results of numerical calculation coincide with the theory for |ω *e |+|ω *i | 0 , where the growth rate reduces as the density gradient increases. Here ω *e and ω *i are electron and ion diamagnetic angular frequencies estimated at the rational surface of q=1 (q is a safety factor), respectively, and γ 0 is the growth rate for the uniform density. Very weak instability, however, is observed for |ω *e |+|ω *i | 0 , where the theory predicts the complete stabilization. This residual instability appears since the region with the density gradient is limited in the radial direction and the stabilization by the outgoing drift-wave like mode becomes incomplete. (author)

  18. Kinetic isotope effect in dehydration of ionic solids. II. The kinetics of dehydration of calcium oxalate monohydrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manche, E.P.; Carroll, B.

    1977-01-01

    The kinetics of the isothermal dehydration of the protonated and deuterated monohydrate of calcium oxalate has been investigated at 120, 150, and 170 0 C. The rate of dehydration for these salts was found to be k/sub H//k/sub D/ = 1.025 +- 0.012. This result rules out the enormous kinetic isotope effect as given in the literature. An isotope effect of a few percent is not ruled out; this magnitude is in keeping with that found by Heinzinger in other dehydration processes. An estimated difference of about 150 cal/mol between the heat of desorption for H 2 O and D 2 O should have led to a ratio, k/sub h//k/sub D/ = 1.20. The smaller observed ratio has been explained on the basis of a compensation effect and may be considered an example of the Barclay--Butler correlation

  19. Energies controlling nucleation and growth processes: The case of Ag/W(110)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, G. W.; Marcano, J. M.; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    1990-01-01

    The nucleation density Nx(T) of Ag islands on the 2-monolayer-thick silver intermediate layer on W(110) is measured by UHV scanning electron microscopy and compared with kinetic nucleation equations. This yields a well-determined value of Ed+2Eb=0.65±0.03 eV, with pair-binding energy Eb=0...

  20. Bubble nucleation in an explosive micro-bubble actuator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van den Broek, D M; Elwenspoek, M

    2008-01-01

    Explosive evaporation occurs when a thin layer of liquid reaches a temperature close to the critical temperature in a very short time. At these temperatures spontaneous nucleation takes place. The nucleated bubbles instantly coalesce forming a vapour film followed by rapid growth due to the pressure impulse. In this paper we take a closer look at the bubble nucleation. The moment of bubble nucleation was determined by both stroboscopic imaging and resistance thermometry. Two nucleation regimes could be distinguished. Several different heater designs were investigated under heat fluxes of hundreds of W mm −2 . A close correspondence between current density in the heater and point of nucleation was found. This results in design rules for effective heaters

  1. Overview: Nucleation of clathrate hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrier, Pramod; Khan, M Naveed; Srivastava, Vishal; Maupin, C Mark; Koh, Carolyn A

    2016-12-07

    Molecular level knowledge of nucleation and growth of clathrate hydrates is of importance for advancing fundamental understanding on the nature of water and hydrophobic hydrate formers, and their interactions that result in the formation of ice-like solids at temperatures higher than the ice-point. The stochastic nature and the inability to probe the small length and time scales associated with the nucleation process make it very difficult to experimentally determine the molecular level changes that lead to the nucleation event. Conversely, for this reason, there have been increasing efforts to obtain this information using molecular simulations. Accurate knowledge of how and when hydrate structures nucleate will be tremendously beneficial for the development of sustainable hydrate management strategies in oil and gas flowlines, as well as for their application in energy storage and recovery, gas separation, carbon sequestration, seawater desalination, and refrigeration. This article reviews various aspects of hydrate nucleation. First, properties of supercooled water and ice nucleation are reviewed briefly due to their apparent similarity to hydrates. Hydrate nucleation is then reviewed starting from macroscopic observations as obtained from experiments in laboratories and operations in industries, followed by various hydrate nucleation hypotheses and hydrate nucleation driving force calculations based on the classical nucleation theory. Finally, molecular simulations on hydrate nucleation are discussed in detail followed by potential future research directions.

  2. Overview: Nucleation of clathrate hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrier, Pramod; Khan, M. Naveed; Srivastava, Vishal; Maupin, C. Mark; Koh, Carolyn A.

    2016-12-01

    Molecular level knowledge of nucleation and growth of clathrate hydrates is of importance for advancing fundamental understanding on the nature of water and hydrophobic hydrate formers, and their interactions that result in the formation of ice-like solids at temperatures higher than the ice-point. The stochastic nature and the inability to probe the small length and time scales associated with the nucleation process make it very difficult to experimentally determine the molecular level changes that lead to the nucleation event. Conversely, for this reason, there have been increasing efforts to obtain this information using molecular simulations. Accurate knowledge of how and when hydrate structures nucleate will be tremendously beneficial for the development of sustainable hydrate management strategies in oil and gas flowlines, as well as for their application in energy storage and recovery, gas separation, carbon sequestration, seawater desalination, and refrigeration. This article reviews various aspects of hydrate nucleation. First, properties of supercooled water and ice nucleation are reviewed briefly due to their apparent similarity to hydrates. Hydrate nucleation is then reviewed starting from macroscopic observations as obtained from experiments in laboratories and operations in industries, followed by various hydrate nucleation hypotheses and hydrate nucleation driving force calculations based on the classical nucleation theory. Finally, molecular simulations on hydrate nucleation are discussed in detail followed by potential future research directions.

  3. Heterogeneous ice nucleation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogdan, A. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Physics

    1994-12-31

    The classical theory of heterogenous ice nucleation is reviewed in detail. The modelling of ice nucleation in the adsorbed water films on natural particles by analogous ice nucleation in adsorbed water films on the walls of porous media is discussed. Ice nucleation in adsorbed films of purewater and the HNO{sub 3}/H{sub 2}0 binary system on the surface of porous aerosol (SiO{sub 2}) was investigated using the method of NMR spectroscopy. The median freezing temperature and freezing temperature region were shown to be highly sensitive both to the average thickness of the adsorbed films and to the amount of adsorbed nitric acid. The character of the ice phase formation tends to approach that of bulk liquid with increasing adsorbed film thickness. Under the given conditions the thickness of the adsorbed films decreases with an increasing amount of adsorbed nitric acid molecules The molar concentration of nitric acid in the adsorbed films is very small (of the order of 10{sup -}3 10{sup -}2 (M/l)). Nitric acid molecules tend to adsorb on the surface of aerosol to a greater extent than in subsequent layers. The concentration is greatest in layers situated close to the surface and sharply decreases with the distance from the surface. The difference between the median freezing temperatures for adsorbed pure water and for the binary system was found to be about 9 K for films of equal thickness. This is about 150 times greater than the difference between the median freezing temperatures of bulk pure water and a solution with the same concentration of nitric acid. (orig.)

  4. Nucleation in Synoptically Forced Cirrostratus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, R.-F.; Starr, D. OC.; Reichardt, J.; DeMott, P. J.

    2004-01-01

    Formation and evolution of cirrostratus in response to weak, uniform and constant synoptic forcing is simulated using a one-dimensional numerical model with explicit microphysics, in which the particle size distribution in each grid box is fully resolved. A series of tests of the model response to nucleation modes (homogeneous-freezing-only/heterogeneous nucleation) and heterogeneous nucleation parameters are performed. In the case studied here, nucleation is first activated in the prescribed moist layer. A continuous cloud-top nucleation zone with a depth depending on the vertical humidity gradient and one of the nucleation parameters is developed afterward. For the heterogeneous nucleation cases, intermittent nucleation zones in the mid-upper portion of the cloud form where the relative humidity is on the rise, because existent ice crystals do not uptake excess water vapor efficiently, and ice nuclei (IN) are available. Vertical resolution as fine as 1 m is required for realistic simulation of the homogeneous-freezing-only scenario, while the model resolution requirement is more relaxed in the cases where heterogeneous nucleation dominates. Bulk microphysical and optical properties are evaluated and compared. Ice particle number flux divergence, which is due to the vertical gradient of the gravity-induced particle sedimentation, is constantly and rapidly changing the local ice number concentration, even in the nucleation zone. When the depth of the nucleation zone is shallow, particle number concentration decreases rapidly as ice particles grow and sediment away from the nucleation zone. When the depth of the nucleation zone is large, a region of high ice number concentration can be sustained. The depth of nucleation zone is an important parameter to be considered in parametric treatments of ice cloud generation.

  5. Fatigue crack nucleation of type 316LN stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dae Whan; Kim, Woo Gon; Hong, Jun Hwa; Ryu, Woo Seog

    2000-01-01

    Low Cycle Fatigue (LCF) life decreases drastically with increasing temperature but increases with the addition of nitrogen at room and high temperatures. The effect of nitrogen on LCF life may be related to crack nucleation at high temperatures in austenitic stainless steel because the fraction of crack nucleation in LCF life is about 40%. The influence of nitrogen on the crack nucleation of LCF in type 316LN stainless steel is investigated by observations of crack population and crack depth after testing at 40% of fatigue life. Nitrogen increases the number of cycles to nucleate microcracks of 100 μm but decreases the crack population

  6. Test particle method for incorporation of the kinetic effects into the envelope simulations of Raman backscattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hur, Min Sup; Suk, Hyyong

    2007-01-01

    A new test particle method is presented for self-consistent incorporation of the kinetic effects into the fluid three-wave model. One of the most important kinetic effects is the electron trapping and it has been found that the trapping affects significantly the behavior of Raman backscatter and Raman backward laser amplification. The conventional fluid three-wave model cannot reproduce the kinetic simulations in the trapping regime. The test particle scheme utilizes the same equations for the laser evolution as in the three-wave model. However, the plasma wave is treated by the envelope-kinetic equation, which consists of envelope evolution and the kinetic term. The core of the new scheme is employing test particles to compute the kinetic term self-consistently. The benchmarking results against the averaged particle-in-cell (aPIC) code show excellent agreements, and the computation speed gain over the aPIC is from 2 to 20 depending on parameters

  7. Kinetics of Heterogeneous Reaction of Sulfur Dioxide on Authentic Mineral Dust: Effects of Relative Humidity and Hydrogen Peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Liubin; Zhao, Yue; Li, Huan; Chen, Zhongming

    2015-09-15

    Heterogeneous reaction of SO2 on mineral dust seems to be an important sink for SO2. However, kinetic data about this reaction on authentic mineral dust are scarce and are mainly limited to low relative humidity (RH) conditions. In addition, little is known about the role of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in this reaction. Here, we investigated the uptake kinetics of SO2 on three authentic mineral dusts (i.e., Asian mineral dust (AMD), Tengger desert dust (TDD), and Arizona test dust (ATD)) in the absence and presence of H2O2 at different RHs using a filter-based flow reactor, and applied a parameter (effectiveness factor) to the estimation of the effective surface area of particles for the calculation of the corrected uptake coefficient (γc). We found that with increasing RH, the γc decreases on AMD particles, but increases on ATD and TDD particles. This discrepancy is probably due to the different mineralogy compositions and aging extents of these dust samples. Furthermore, the presence of H2O2 can promote the uptake of SO2 on mineral dust at different RHs. The probable explanations are that H2O2 rapidly reacts with SO2 on mineral dust in the presence of adsorbed water, and OH radicals, which can be produced from the heterogeneous decomposition of H2O2 on the mineral dust, immediately react with adsorbed SO2 as well. Our results suggest that the removal of SO2 via the heterogeneous reaction on mineral dust is an important sink for SO2 and has the potential to alter the physicochemical properties (e.g., ice nucleation ability) of mineral dust particles in the atmosphere.

  8. Nucleation of voids in materials supersaturated with mobile interstitials, vacancies and divacancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfer, W.G.; Si-Ahmed, A.

    1982-01-01

    In previous void nucleation theories, the void size has been allowed to change only by one atomic volume through vacancy or interstitial absorption or through vacancy emission. To include the absorption of divacancies, the classical nucleation theory is here extended to include double-step transitions between clusters. The new nucleation theory is applied to study the effect of divacancies on void formation. It is found that the steady-state void nucleation rate is enhanced by several orders of magnitude as compared to results with previous void nucleation theories. However, to obtain void nucleation rates comparable to measured ones, the effect of impurities, segregation and insoluble gases must still be invoked. (author)

  9. A study of sodium oxide crystallization mechanisms and kinetics in cold traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latge, C.

    1984-04-01

    After showing up the present lack of data on crystallization mechanisms and kinetics, a number of tests were conducted on a sodium test loop equipped with two experimental cold traps. The effects of several geometric and thermohydraulic parameters on purification efficiency were also studied. The test results were used to develop a simulation model. An optimization code based on the model can be used to determine the nucleation and growth kinetics

  10. Effect of Dust Grains on Solitary Kinetic Alfven Wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yangfang; Wu, D. J.; Morfill, G. E.

    2008-01-01

    Solitary kinetic Alfven wave has been studied in dusty plasmas. The effect of the dust charge-to-mass ratio is considered. We derive the Sagdeev potential for the soliton solutions based on the hydrodynamic equations. A singularity in the Sagdeev potential is found and this singularity results in a bell-shaped soliton. The soliton solutions comprise two branches. One branch is sub-Alfvenic and the soliton velocities are much smaller than the Alfven speed. The other branch is super-Alfvenic and the soliton velocities are very close to or greater than the Alfven speed. Both compressive and rarefactive solitons can exist in each branch. For the sub-Alfvenic branch, the rarefactive soliton is a bell shape curve which is much narrower than the compressive one. In the super-Alfvenic branch, however, the compressive soliton is bell-shaped and the rarefactive one is broadened. We also found that the super-Alfvenic solitons can develop to other structures. When the charge-to-mass ratio of the dust grains is sufficiently high, the width of the rarefactive soliton will increase extremely and an electron density depletion will be observed. When the velocity is much higher than the Alfven speed, the bell-shaped soliton will transit to a cusped structure.

  11. Effects of electrostatic interactions on ligand dissociation kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbaş, Aykut; de la Cruz, Monica Olvera; Marko, John F.

    2018-02-01

    We study unbinding of multivalent cationic ligands from oppositely charged polymeric binding sites sparsely grafted on a flat neutral substrate. Our molecular dynamics simulations are suggested by single-molecule studies of protein-DNA interactions. We consider univalent salt concentrations spanning roughly a 1000-fold range, together with various concentrations of excess ligands in solution. To reveal the ionic effects on unbinding kinetics of spontaneous and facilitated dissociation mechanisms, we treat electrostatic interactions both at a Debye-Hückel (DH) (or implicit ions, i.e., use of an electrostatic potential with a prescribed decay length) level and by the more precise approach of considering all ionic species explicitly in the simulations. We find that the DH approach systematically overestimates unbinding rates, relative to the calculations where all ion pairs are present explicitly in solution, although many aspects of the two types of calculation are qualitatively similar. For facilitated dissociation (FD) (acceleration of unbinding by free ligands in solution) explicit-ion simulations lead to unbinding at lower free-ligand concentrations. Our simulations predict a variety of FD regimes as a function of free-ligand and ion concentrations; a particularly interesting regime is at intermediate concentrations of ligands where nonelectrostatic binding strength controls FD. We conclude that explicit-ion electrostatic modeling is an essential component to quantitatively tackle problems in molecular ligand dissociation, including nucleic-acid-binding proteins.

  12. On the Ice Nucleation Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barahona, D.

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a novel formulation of the ice nucleation spectrum, i.e. the function relating the ice crystal concentration to cloud formation conditions and aerosol properties. The new formulation is physically-based and explicitly accounts for the dependency of the ice crystal concentration on temperature, supersaturation, cooling rate, and particle size, surface area and composition. This is achieved by introducing the concepts of ice nucleation coefficient (the number of ice germs present in a particle) and nucleation probability dispersion function (the distribution of ice nucleation coefficients within the aerosol population). The new formulation is used to generate ice nucleation parameterizations for the homogeneous freezing of cloud droplets and the heterogeneous deposition ice nucleation on dust and soot ice nuclei. For homogeneous freezing, it was found that by increasing the dispersion in the droplet volume distribution the fraction of supercooled droplets in the population increases. For heterogeneous ice nucleation the new formulation consistently describes singular and stochastic behavior within a single framework. Using a fundamentally stochastic approach, both cooling rate independence and constancy of the ice nucleation fraction over time, features typically associated with singular behavior, were reproduced. Analysis of the temporal dependency of the ice nucleation spectrum suggested that experimental methods that measure the ice nucleation fraction over few seconds would tend to underestimate the ice nuclei concentration. It is shown that inferring the aerosol heterogeneous ice nucleation properties from measurements of the onset supersaturation and temperature may carry significant error as the variability in ice nucleation properties within the aerosol population is not accounted for. This work provides a simple and rigorous ice nucleation framework where theoretical predictions, laboratory measurements and field campaign data can be

  13. Ice nucleation onto Arizona test dust at cirrus temperatures: effect of temperature and aerosol size on onset relative humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanji, Z A; Abbatt, J P D

    2010-01-21

    The University of Toronto Continuous Flow Diffusion Chamber (UT-CFDC) was used to study ice formation onto monodisperse Arizona Test Dust (ATD) particles. The onset relative humidity with respect to ice (RH(i)) was measured as a function of temperature in the range 251-223 K for 100 nm ATD particles. It was found that for 0.1% of the particles to freeze, water saturation was required at all temperatures except 223 K where particles activated at RH(i) below water saturation. At this temperature, where deposition mode freezing is occurring, we find that the larger the particle size, the lower the onset RH(i). We also demonstrate that the total number of particles present may influence the onset RH(i) observed. The surface area for ice activation, aerosol size, and temperature must all be considered when reporting onset values of ice formation onto ATD mineral dust particles. In addition, we calculate nucleation rates and contact angles of ice germs with ATD aerosols which indicate that there exists a range of active sites on the surface with different efficiencies for activating ice formation.

  14. The effect of vanadium and grain refiner additions on the nucleation of secondary phases in 1XXX Al alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, C.M.; O' Reilly, K.A.Q.; Evans, P.V.; Cantor, B.

    1999-11-26

    High purity Al-0.3 wt% Fe-0.1 wt% Si alloys with different Si, V and grain refiner contents were melt spun to produce microstructures of submicron secondary phases entrained in a higher melting point Al matrix. On reheating, a dispersion of eutectic liquid droplets forms that represents an exaggerated version of the liquid puddles that solidify punched-off between Al dendrite arms during conventional casting. The subsequent resolidification of the droplets, analyzed using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), allows the nucleation-controlled aspects of secondary phase selection to be studied. The droplets solidify as the metastable FeAl{sub m} phase in ribbons containing {approx{underscore}equal}500 ppm V or {approx{underscore}equal}100 ppm V plus Al-Ti-B, Al-Ti-C or Al-B grain refiner. This phase contributes to the fir-tree surface defect in commercial sheet products. this work suggests that the combination of V and Al-Ti-B promotes FeAl{sub m} in commercial ingots, and confirms that solidification rate and bulk Si content also influence phase content.

  15. From Cellulose Nanospheres, Nanorods to Nanofibers: Various Aspect Ratio Induced Nucleation/Reinforcing Effects on Polylactic Acid for Robust-Barrier Food Packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hou-Yong; Zhang, Heng; Song, Mei-Li; Zhou, Ying; Yao, Juming; Ni, Qing-Qing

    2017-12-20

    The traditional approach toward improving the crystallization rate as well as the mechanical and barrier properties of poly(lactic acid) (PLA) is the incorporation of nanocelluloses (NCs). Unfortunately, little study has been focused on the influence of the differences in NC morphology and dimensions on the PLA property enhancement. Here, by HCOOH/HCl hydrolysis of lyocell fibers, microcrystalline cellulose (MCC), and ginger fibers, we unveil the preparation of cellulose nanospheres (CNS), rod-like cellulose nanocrystals (CNC), and cellulose nanofibers (CNF) with different aspect ratios, respectively. All the NC surfaces were chemically modified by Fischer esterification with hydrophobic formate groups to improve the NC dispersion in the PLA matrix. This study systematically compared CNS, CNC, and CNF as reinforcing agents to induce different kinds of heterogeneous nucleation and reinforce the effects on the properties of PLA. The incorporation of three NCs can greatly improve the PLA crystallization ability, thermal stability, and mechanical strength of nanocomposites. At the same NC loading level, the PLA/CNS showed the highest crystallinity (19.8 ± 0.4%) with a smaller spherulite size (33 ± 1.5 μm), indicating that CNS, with its high specific surface area, can induce a stronger heterogeneous nucleation effect on the PLA crystallization than CNC or CNF. Instead, compared to PLA, the PLA/CNF nanocomposites gave the largest Young's modulus increase of 350 %, due to the larger aspect ratio/rigidity of CNF and their interlocking or percolation network caused by filler-matrix interfacial bonds. Furthermore, taking these factors of hydrogen bonding interaction, increased crystallinity, and interfacial tortuosity into account, the PLA/CNC nanocomposite films showed the best barrier property against water vapor and lowest migration levels in two liquid food simulates (well below 60 mg kg -1 for required overall migration in packaging) than CNS- and CNF-based films

  16. Shaping the composition profiles in heteroepitaxial quantum dots: Interplay of thermodynamic and kinetic effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Georgiou

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Atomistic Monte Carlo simulations, coupling thermodynamic and kinetic effects, resolve a longstanding controversy regarding the origin of composition profiles in heteroepitaxial SiGe quantum dots. It is shown that profiles with cores rich in the unstrained (Si component derive from near-equilibrium processes and intraisland diffusion. Profiles with cores rich in the strained (Ge component are of nonequilibrium nature, i.e., they are strain driven but kinetically limited. They are shaped by the distribution of kinetic barriers of atomic diffusion in the islands. The diffusion pathways are clearly revealed for the first time. Geometrical kinetics play a minor role.

  17. Poly(butylene terephthalate)/montmorillonite nanocomposites: Effect of montmorillonite on the morphology, crystalline structure, isothermal crystallization kinetics and mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalkar, Arun K.; Deshpande, Vineeta D.; Vatsaraj, Bhakti S.

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Effect of amount of clay content, its dispersion on crystalline structure of PBT. • Regime break temperature shifts to lower temperature for PCN4 up to 197 °C. • Tensile modulus enhanced up to 95% for PCN3 compared to PBT. - Abstract: Nanocomposites (PCNs), based on poly(butylene terephthalte) (PBT) and organoclay (Cloisite-15A) MMT were prepared by melt intercalation compounding process. The nanoscale dispersion and the microcrystal structure studied qualitatively using; X-ray diffraction (XRD) and electron microscopy (SEM, TEM and AFM). The XRD results indicated that the crystal size is highly dependent on the crystallization temperature. The isothermal crystallization kinetics of PBT in PCNs analysis indicated that the overall crystallization of PBT involved heterogeneous nucleated three-dimensional spherical primary crystallization growth process. The crystallization rate, however, is dependent on the PCN-composition, crystallization temperature and the dispersion state of clay in PCNs. Further analysis, based on Hoffman-Lauritzen theory revealed that the neat PBT and PBT in PCNs crystallization follow regime-II kinetics for temperature 195 °C–205 °C and enters the regime-III kinetics in lower T c range, 185 °C–195 °C. The improvement in mechanical properties is highly dependent on the level of clay exfoliation in PBT matrix

  18. Effects of Tungsten on the Precipitation Kinetics of Secondary Phases and the Associated Susceptibility to Pitting Corrosion in Duplex Stainless Steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Chan Jin; Kwon, Hyuk Sang

    2006-01-01

    Effects of tungsten (W) on the precipitation kinetics of secondary phases and the associated resistance to pitting corrosion of 25% Cr duplex stainless steels were investigated through microstructural and electrochemical noise analyses. With the partial substitution of W for Mo in duplex stainless steel, the potential and current noises of the alloy were significantly decreased in chloride solution due to retardation of the σ phase precipitation. The preferential precipitation of the χ phase in the W-containing alloy during the early period of aging contributed to retarding the precipitation of the σ phase by depleting W and Mo along grain boundaries. In addition, the retardation of the nucleation and growth of the σ phase in the W-containing alloy appears to be attributed to the inherently low diffusivity of W compared with that of Mo

  19. Nucleation and growth of lead oxide particles in liquid lead-bismuth eutectic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladinez, Kristof; Rosseel, Kris; Lim, Jun; Marino, Alessandro; Heynderickx, Geraldine; Aerts, Alexander

    2017-10-18

    Liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) is an important candidate to become the primary coolant of future, generation IV, nuclear fast reactors and Accelerator Driven System (ADS) concepts. One of the main challenges with the use of LBE as a coolant is to avoid its oxidation which results in solid lead oxide (PbO) precipitation. The chemical equilibria governing PbO formation are well understood. However, insufficient kinetic information is currently available for the development of LBE-based nuclear technology. Here, we report the results of experiments in which the nucleation, growth and dissolution of PbO in LBE during temperature cycling are measured by monitoring dissolved oxygen using potentiometric oxygen sensors. The metastable region, above which PbO nucleation can occur, has been determined under conditions relevant for the operation of LBE cooled nuclear systems and was found to be independent of setup geometry and thus thought to be widely applicable. A kinetic model to describe formation and dissolution of PbO particles in LBE is proposed, based on Classical Nucleation Theory (CNT) combined with mass transfer limited growth and dissolution. This model can accurately predict the experimentally observed changes in oxygen concentration due to nucleation, growth and dissolution of PbO, using the effective interfacial energy of a PbO nucleus in LBE as a fitting parameter. The results are invaluable to evaluate the consequences of oxygen ingress in LBE cooled nuclear systems under normal operating and accidental conditions and form the basis for the development of cold trap technology to avoid PbO formation in the primary reactor circuit.

  20. Effect of nano-scaled styrene butadiene rubber based nucleating agent on the thermal, crystallization and physical properties of isotactic polypropylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petchwattana, Nawadon [Division of Polymer Materials Technology, Faculty of Agricultural Product Innovation and Technology, Srinakharinwirot University, Sukhumvit 23, Wattana, Bangkok 10110 (Thailand); Covavisaruch, Sirijutaratana, E-mail: sirijutaratana.c@chula.ac.th [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Chulalongkorn University, Pathumwan, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Sripanya, Panjapong [Thai Oleochemicals Company Limited (A Subsidiary of PTT Global Chemical Public Company Limited), Mueang Rayong, Rayong 21150 (Thailand)

    2014-01-05

    Highlights: • The effect of a SBR based β-NA on the properties iPP was investigated. • The addition of β-NA led to higher population of nuclei and smaller spherulites. • β to α phase transformation was observed when re-extrusion process was applied. • Impact strength was increased when the β-NA was added from 0.10 to 0.20 wt%. -- Abstract: The influence of a specific nano-scaled styrene butadiene rubber based β-nucleating agent (β-NA) on the properties of isotactic polypropylene (iPP) was investigated in the current research. β-NA was applied at the concentration ranged from 0.05 to 0.50 wt%. Microscopic observation revealed that the neat iPP crystals grew very slowly; they ranged in size from 100 to 200 μm. The addition of β-NA led to higher population of nuclei and smaller spherulites than those found in neat iPP. The addition of only 0.05 wt% β-NA significantly decreased the sizes of the spherulites down to 5 μm; the crystal grew very rapidly, leading to extremely fine morphology. Analysis by X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirmed that iPP/β-NA constituted mainly of β-crystal structure. The transformation of β to α phase was observed upon re-extrusion, it was verified by the lowered fraction of the β-crystalline phase (K{sub β}) although the total degree of crystallinity remained unchanged. A significant improvement in the impact strength of the iPP/β-NA was observed when the β-NA was employed from 0.10 to 0.20 wt%, leading to the formation of tough β-crystals in the β-NA nucleated iPP. The color measurement implied that the iPP nucleated with β-NA was superior in terms of whiteness but it was less transparent, as was evident by the increased haze.

  1. Nucleation phenomena at Suzuki phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acosta-Najarro, D.; Jose Y, M.

    1982-01-01

    Crystal of NaCl doped with Mn present regions with an increase in nucleation densities when observed by surface gold decoration; this increase is related to the nucleation of the Suzuki phases which are induced by cooling of the crystal matrix. Calculations based on atomistic nucleation theory are developed to explain the increased nucleation density. Experiments were made to compare with the theoretical results. In particular the density of nuclei was measured as a function of the rate or arrival of atoms to the surface. Therefore, the changes in the nucleation densities are explained in terms of change in migration energies between the Suzuki phase and the NaCl matrix excluding the possibility of nucleation induced by point defects. (author)

  2. Viscous organic aerosol particles in the upper troposphere: diffusivity-controlled water uptake and ice nucleation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. Lienhard

    2015-12-01

    secondary organic aerosol (SOA material produced by oxidation of α-pinene and in a number of organic/inorganic model mixtures (3-methylbutane-1,2,3-tricarboxylic acid (3-MBTCA, levoglucosan, levoglucosan/NH4HSO4, raffinose are presented. These indicate that water diffusion coefficients are determined by several properties of the aerosol substance and cannot be inferred from the glass transition temperature or bouncing properties. Our results suggest that water diffusion in SOA particles is faster than often assumed and imposes no significant kinetic limitation on water uptake and release at temperatures above 220 K. The fast diffusion of water suggests that heterogeneous ice nucleation on a glassy core is very unlikely in these systems. At temperatures below 220 K, model simulations of SOA particles suggest that heterogeneous ice nucleation may occur in the immersion mode on glassy cores which remain embedded in a liquid shell when experiencing fast updraft velocities. The particles absorb significant quantities of water during these updrafts which plasticize their outer layers such that these layers equilibrate readily with the gas phase humidity before the homogeneous ice nucleation threshold is reached. Glass formation is thus unlikely to restrict homogeneous ice nucleation. Only under most extreme conditions near the very high tropical tropopause may the homogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficient be reduced as a consequence of slow condensed-phase water diffusion. Since the differences between the behavior limited or non limited by diffusion are small even at the very high tropical tropopause, condensed-phase water diffusivity is unlikely to have significant consequences on the direct climatic effects of SOA particles under tropospheric conditions.

  3. An experimental study of dislocation loop nucleation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bounaud, J.Y.; Leteurtre, J.

    1975-01-01

    The nucleation of dislocation loops is experimentally studied by observing the demixion of the Burgers vectors of dislocation loops nucleated in copper whiskers irradiated in flexion by fission fragments at room temperature. The demixion of Burgers vectors is observed by the dimensional effects of dislocation loops: after irradiation, the applied stress is removed; the whisker shows a residual strain that is due to loops because, after an annealing treatment to evaporate dislocation loops, each whisker recovers its initial straight shape. Everywhere along the whisker, the radius of curvature is measured and plotted vs the max. applied stress. Estimations of the interstitial and vacancy dislocation loop nuclei are derived [fr

  4. The effect of coal-fired power-plant SO2 and NOx control technologies on aerosol nucleation in the source plumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Knipping

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Nucleation in coal-fired power-plant plumes can greatly contribute to particle number concentrations near source regions. The changing emissions rates of SO2 and NOx due to pollution-control technologies over recent decades may have had a significant effect on aerosol formation and growth in the plumes with ultimate implications for climate and human health. We use the System for Atmospheric Modeling (SAM large-eddy simulation model with the TwO-Moment Aerosol Sectional (TOMAS microphysics algorithm to model the nucleation in plumes of coal-fired plants. We test a range of cases with varying emissions to simulate the implementation of emissions-control technologies between 1997 and 2010. We start by simulating the W. A. Parish power plant (near Houston, TX during this time period, when NOx emissions were reduced by ~90% and SO2 emissions decreased by ~30%. Increases in plume OH (due to the reduced NOx produced enhanced SO2 oxidation and an order-of-magnitude increase in particle nucleation in the plume despite the reduction in SO2 emissions. These results suggest that NOx emissions could strongly regulate particle nucleation and growth in power-plant plumes. Next, we test a range of cases with varying emissions to simulate the implementation of SO2 and NOx emissions-control technologies. Particle formation generally increases with SO2 emission, while NOx shows two different regimes: increasing particle formation with increasing NOx under low-NOx emissions and decreasing particle formation with increasing NOx under high-NOx emissions. Next, we compare model results with airborne measurements made in the W. A. Parish power-plant plume in 2000 and 2006, confirming the importance of NOx emissions on new particle formation and highlighting the substantial effect of background aerosol loadings on this process (the more polluted background of the 2006 case caused more than an order-of-magnitude reduction in particle formation in the plume compared to

  5. Effect of surfactant on kinetics of thinning of capillary bridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Emilia; Kovalchuk, Nina; Simmons, Mark

    2015-11-01

    Kinetics of thinning of capillary bridges is of great scientific and industrial interest being of vital importance for example in various emulsification and microfluidic processes. It is well known that the rate of bridge thinning is proportional to the interfacial tension. Therefore it is expected that the process should slow down by addition of surfactant. The kinetics of capillary bridges in the presence of surfactant was studied by the dripping of liquid from a capillary tip under conditions of nearly zero flow rate (We personal care products. The viscosity, surfactant activity and adsorption kinetics have been controlled by addition of glycerol and sodium chloride. The study has shown that the kinetics of capillary bridges are determined by dynamic surface tension rather than by its equilibrium value. In particular, the kinetics of the bridge thinning for the 0.1 g L-1 aqueous SLES solution is practically the same as that of pure water despite twice lower equilibrium surface tension. EPSRC Programme Grant, MEMPHIS, EP/K0039761/1.

  6. Nucleation of domains under the influence of temperature in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. It is found that the nucleation of domains can take place in Ba5Ti2O7Cl4 under the influence of temperature unlike in many other ferroelectrics. The nucleated domain can also be removed from the structure under the randomizing effect of tem- perature. These observations have been explained on the basis of a ...

  7. Heterogeneous primary nucleation of ice in water and aqueous solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijssen, H.A.C.; Vorstman, M.A.G.; Roels, J.A.

    1968-01-01

    The effect of the volume of the liquid sample, the degree of turbulence in the liquid, and the rate of cooling upon the probability of nucleation has been studied for water and aqueous solutions. Nucleation rates were measured for droplets nearly instantaneously cooled to a predetermined

  8. Evaluating the effect of potassium on cellulose pyrolysis reaction kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trendewicz, Anna; Evans, Robert; Dutta, Abhijit; Sykes, Robert; Carpenter, Daniel; Braun, Robert

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes modifications to an existing cellulose pyrolysis mechanism in order to include the effect of potassium on product yields and composition. The changes in activation energies and pre-exponential factors due to potassium were evaluated based on the experimental data collected from pyrolysis of cellulose samples treated with different levels of potassium (0–1% mass fraction). The experiments were performed in a pyrolysis reactor coupled to a molecular beam mass spectrometer (MBMS). Principal component analysis (PCA) performed on the collected data revealed that cellulose pyrolysis products could be divided into two groups: anhydrosugars and other fragmentation products (hydroxyacetaldehyde, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural, acetyl compounds). Multivariate curve resolution (MCR) was used to extract the time resolved concentration score profiles of principal components. Kinetic tests revealed that potassium apparently inhibits the formation of anhydrosugars and catalyzes char formation. Therefore, the oil yield predicted at 500 ° C decreased from 87.9% from cellulose to 54.0% from cellulose with 0.5% mass fraction potassium treatment. The decrease in oil yield was accompanied by increased yield of char and gases produced via a catalyzed dehydration reaction. The predicted char and gas yield from cellulose were 3.7% and 8.4%, respectively. Introducing 0.5% mass fraction potassium treatment resulted in an increase of char yield to 12.1% and gas yield to 33.9%. The validation of the cellulose pyrolysis mechanism with experimental data from a fluidized-bed reactor, after this correction for potassium, showed good agreement with our results, with differences in product yields of up to 5%

  9. Effect of surface modification of nanofibres with glutamic acid peptide on calcium phosphate nucleation and osteogenic differentiation of marrow stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaman, Ozan; Kumar, Ankur; Moeinzadeh, Seyedsina; He, Xuezhong; Cui, Tong; Jabbari, Esmaiel

    2016-02-01

    Biomineralization is mediated by extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins with amino acid sequences rich in glutamic acid. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of calcium phosphate deposition on aligned nanofibres surface-modified with a glutamic acid peptide on osteogenic differentiation of rat marrow stromal cells. Blend of EEGGC peptide (GLU) conjugated low molecular weight polylactide (PLA) and high molecular weight poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) was electrospun to form aligned nanofibres (GLU-NF). The GLU-NF microsheets were incubated in a modified simulated body fluid for nucleation of calcium phosphate crystals on the fibre surface. To achieve a high calcium phosphate to fibre ratio, a layer-by-layer approach was used to improve diffusion of calcium and phosphate ions inside the microsheets. Based on dissipative particle dynamics simulation of PLGA/PLA-GLU fibres, > 80% of GLU peptide was localized to the fibre surface. Calcium phosphate to fibre ratios as high as 200%, between those of cancellous (160%) and cortical (310%) bone, was obtained with the layer-by-layer approach. The extent of osteogenic differentiation and mineralization of marrow stromal cells seeded on GLU-NF microsheets was directly related to the amount of calcium phosphate deposition on the fibres prior to cell seeding. Expression of osteogenic markers osteopontin, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), osteocalcin and type 1 collagen increased gradually with calcium phosphate deposition on GLU-NF microsheets. Results demonstrate that surface modification of aligned synthetic nanofibres with EEGGC peptide dramatically affects nucleation and growth of calcium phosphate crystals on the fibres leading to increased osteogenic differentiation of marrow stromal cells and mineralization. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Combined effects of radiation damage and He accumulation on bubble nucleation in Gd{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Caitlin A., E-mail: ctayl105@vols.utk.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Patel, Maulik K. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Aguiar, Jeffery A. [Fuel Performance and Design Department, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-6188 (United States); Material Science Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO 80220 (United States); Zhang, Yanwen [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Crespillo, Miguel L. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Wen, Juan [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, Gansu 730000 (China); Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Xue, Haizhou [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Wang, Yongqiang [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Weber, William J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Pyrochlores have long been considered as host phases for long-term immobilization of radioactive waste nuclides that would undergo α-decay for hundreds of thousands of years. This work utilizes ion-beam irradiations to examine the combined effects of radiation damage and He accumulation on bubble formation in Gd{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} over relevant waste-form timescales. Helium bubbles are not observed in pre-damaged Gd{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} implanted with 2 × 10{sup 16} He/cm{sup 2}, even after post-implantation irradiations with 7 MeV Au{sup 3+} at 300, 500, and 700 K. However, He bubbles with average diameters of 1.5 nm and 2.1 nm are observed in pre-damaged (amorphous) Gd{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} and pristine Gd{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7}, respectively, after implantation of 2 × 10{sup 17} He/cm{sup 2}. The critical He concentration for bubble nucleation in Gd{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} is estimated to be 6 at.% He. - Highlights: • He bubbles not formed in amorphous Gd{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} implanted with 2 × 10{sup 16} He/cm{sup 2}, even after additional irradiation at 300 to 700 K. • He bubbles, 1.5 and 2.1 nm diameter, respectively, observed in amorphous and pristine Gd{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} implanted to 2 × 10{sup 17} He/cm{sup 2}. • The critical He dose for bubble nucleation is estimated to be 6 at.% He.

  11. Nucleation of superconductivity under rapid cycling of an electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Malay

    2008-01-01

    The effect of an externally applied high-frequency oscillating electric field on the critical nucleation field of superconductivity in the bulk as well as at the surface of a superconductor is investigated in detail in this work. Starting from the linearized time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau (TDLG) theory, and using the variational principle, I have shown the analogy between a quantum harmonic oscillator with that of the nucleation of superconductivity in the bulk and a quantum double oscillator with that of the nucleation at the surface of a finite sample. The effective Hamiltonian approach of Cook et al (1985 Phys. Rev. A 31 564) is employed to incorporate the effect of an externally applied highly oscillating electric field. The critical nucleation field ratio is also calculated from the ground state energy method. The results obtained from these two approximate theories agree very well with the exact results for the case of an undriven system, which establishes the validity of these two approximate theories. It is observed that the highly oscillating electric field actually increases the bulk critical nucleation field (H c 2 ) as well as the surface critical nucleation field (H c 3 ) of superconductivity as compared to the case of absent electric field (ε 0 = 0). But the externally applied rapidly oscillating electric field accentuates the surface critical nucleation field more than the bulk critical nucleation field, i.e. the increase of H c 3 is 1.6592 times larger than that of H c 2

  12. Monomer-dependent secondary nucleation in amyloid formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linse, Sara

    2017-08-01

    Secondary nucleation of monomers on the surface of an already existing aggregate that is formed from the same kind of monomers may lead to autocatalytic amplification of a self-assembly process. Such monomer-dependent secondary nucleation occurs during the crystallization of small molecules or proteins and self-assembled materials, as well as in protein self-assembly into fibrous structures. Indications of secondary nucleation may come from analyses of kinetic experiments starting from pure monomers or monomers supplemented with a low concentration of pre-formed aggregates (seeds). More firm evidence requires additional experiments, for example those employing isotope labels to distinguish new aggregates arising from the monomer from those resulting from fragmentation of the seed. In cases of amyloid formation, secondary nucleation leads to the formation of toxic oligomers, and inhibitors of secondary nucleation may serve as starting points for therapeutic developments. Secondary nucleation displays a high degree of structural specificity and may be enhanced by mutations or screening of electrostatic repulsion.

  13. The Nucleation of Protein Aggregates - From Crystals to Amyloid Fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buell, Alexander K

    2017-01-01

    The condensation and aggregation of individual protein molecules into dense insoluble phases is of relevance in such diverse fields as materials science, medicine, structural biology and pharmacology. A common feature of these condensation phenomena is that they usually are nucleated processes, i.e. the first piece of the condensed phase is energetically costly to create and hence forms slowly compared to its subsequent growth. Here we give a compact overview of the differences and similarities of various protein nucleation phenomena, their theoretical description in the framework of colloid and polymer science and their experimental study. Particular emphasis is put on the nucleation of a specific type of filamentous protein aggregates, amyloid fibrils. The current experimentally derived knowledge on amyloid fibril nucleation is critically assessed, and we argue that it is less advanced than is generally believed. This is due to (I) the lack of emphasis that has been put on the distinction between homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation in experimental studies (II) the use of oversimplifying and/or inappropriate theoretical frameworks for the analysis of kinetic data of amyloid fibril nucleation. A strategy is outlined and advocated of how our understanding of this important class of processes can be improved in the future. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The scales of brane nucleation processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alwis, S.P. de

    2007-01-01

    The scales associated with Brown-Teitelboim-Bousso-Polchinski processes of brane nucleation, which result in changes of the flux parameters and the number of D-branes, are discussed in the context of type IIB models with all moduli stabilized. It is argued that such processes are unlikely to be described by effective field theory

  15. Early stage crystallization kinetics in metallic glass-forming alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louzguine-Luzgin, Dmitri V.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Heterogeneous nucleation may precede the homogeneous one in an alloy. • High kinetic constants and the nucleation rate at the initial stage. • Metallic glasses have heterogeneous nucleation sites which saturate later. -- Abstract: The crystallization kinetics and structural changes of a few metallic glassy alloys were monitored using X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, differential scanning and isothermal calorimetry methods. Microstructural observations were used to estimate the nucleation and growth rates. A clear comparison of the differences in the crystallization kinetics in the metallic glassy samples is observed at the early and later crystallization stages

  16. Nature of Y1Ba2Cu3O7 nucleation centers on ceria buffers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solovyov, Vyacheslav F; Li Qiang; Qing Jie; Zhou Juan; Develos-Bagarinao, Katherine

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to enhance properties of the second-generation wires by increasing the density of Y 1 Ba 2 Cu 3 O 7 (YBCO) nucleation centers on the surface of the ceria buffer. To identify the nature of the nucleation centers, we compare nucleation kinetics and performance of YBCO layers deposited by the metal-organic process on a standard RABiTS tape to YBCO on ceria buffers with well-controlled structure and surface morphology. The structure of the YBCO layer at the early stage of nucleation and growth is determined by high-flux synchrotron x-ray diffraction. It is shown that the best buffers exhibit high YBCO nucleation rates and produce YBCO nuclei with the least cation disorder. The high YBCO nucleation rate is associated with a high density of threading dislocation outcrops. A strategy for buffer optimization is identified.

  17. Kinetic isotope effects in reaction of ferment oxidation of tritium-labelled D-galactosamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akulov, G.P.; Korsakova, N.A.

    1992-01-01

    Primary, secondary and intramolecular kinetic isotopic effects in reaction of ferment oxidation of D-galactosamine labelled by tritium in position 6, were measured. When comparing values of the effects with previously obtained results for similar reaction D-[6- 3 H]galactose, it was ascertained that the presence of aminogroup in galactopyranosyl mainly affects kinetics of substrate-ferment complex formation stage. The possibility to use kinetic isotope effects for increase in molar activity of D-galactosamine, labelled by tritium in position 6, is shown

  18. Calcite growth kinetics: Modeling the effect of solution stoichiometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolthers, M.; Nehrke, G.; Gustafsson, J.P.; Van Cappellen, P.

    2012-01-01

    Until recently the influence of solution stoichiometry on calcite crystal growth kinetics has attracted little attention, despite the fact that in most aqueous environments calcite precipitates from non-stoichiometric solution. In order to account for the dependence of the calcite crystal growth

  19. Immobilized Pd-Ag bimetallic nanoparticles on polymeric nanofibers as an effective catalyst: effective loading of Ag with bimetallic functionality through Pd nucleated nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugam Ranjith, Kugalur; Celebioglu, Asli; Uyar, Tamer

    2018-06-01

    Here, we present a precise process for synthesizing Pd-Ag bimetallic nanoparticles (NPs) onto polymeric nanofibers by decorating Pd-NPs through atomic layer deposition followed by a chemical reduction process for tagging Ag nanostructures with bimetallic functionality. The results show that Pd-NPs act as a nucleation platform for tagging Ag and form Pd-Ag bimetallic NPs with a monodisperse nature with significant catalytic enhancement to the reaction rate over the bimetallic nature of the Pd-Ag ratio. A Pd-NP decorated polymeric nanofibrous web acts as an excellent platform for the encapsulation or interaction of Ag, which prevents agglomeration and promotes the interaction of Ag ions only on the surface of the Pd-NPs. We observed an effective reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) to 4-aminophenol (4-AP) by sodium borohydride (NaBH4) to access the catalytic activity of Pd-Ag bimetallic NPs on a free-standing flexible polymeric nanofibrous web as a support. The captive formation of the polymeric nanofibrous web with Pd-Ag bimetallic functionality exhibited superior and stable catalytic performance with reduction rates of 0.0719, 0.1520, and 0.0871 min‑1 for different loadings of Ag on Pd decorated nanofibrous webs such as Pd/Ag(0.01), Pd/Ag(0.03), and Pd/Ag(0.05), respectively. The highly faceted Pd-Ag NPs with an immobilized nature improves the catalytic functionality by enhancing the binding energy of the 4-NP adsorbate to the surface of the NPs. With the aid of bimetallic functionality, the nanofibrous web was demonstrated as a hybrid heterogeneous photocatalyst with a 3.16-fold enhancement in the reaction rate as compared with the monometallic decorative nature of NaBH4 as a reducing agent. The effective role of the monodisperse nature of Pd ions with an ultralow content as low as 3 wt% and the tunable ratio of Ag on the nanofibrous web induced effective catalytic activity over multiple cycles.

  20. Homogeneous versus heterogeneous zeolite nucleation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dokter, W.H.; Garderen, van H.F.; Beelen, T.P.M.; Santen, van R.A.; Bras, W.

    1995-01-01

    Aggregates of fractal dimension were found in the intermediate gel phases that organize prior to nucleation and crystallization (shown right) of silicalite from a homogeneous reaction mixture. Small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering studies prove that for zeolites nucleation may be homogeneous or

  1. On Capillary Rise and Nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, R.

    2008-01-01

    A comparison of capillary rise and nucleation is presented. It is shown that both phenomena result from a balance between two competing energy factors: a volume energy and a surface energy. Such a comparison may help to introduce nucleation with a topic familiar to the students, capillary rise. (Contains 1 table and 3 figures.)

  2. Theory and Simulation of Nucleation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304832049

    2009-01-01

    Nucleation is the process where a stable nucleus spontaneously emerges in a metastable environment. Examples of nucleation abound, for instance the formation of droplets in undercooled gasses and of crystals in undercooled liquids. The process is thermally activated and is key to understanding

  3. Controlling the crystal polymorph by exploiting the time dependence of nucleation rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Laurie J; King, Alice A K; Sear, Richard P; Keddie, Joseph L

    2017-10-14

    Most substances can crystallise into two or more different crystal lattices called polymorphs. Despite this, there are no systems in which we can quantitatively predict the probability of one competing polymorph forming instead of the other. We address this problem using large scale (hundreds of events) studies of the competing nucleation of the alpha and gamma polymorphs of glycine. In situ Raman spectroscopy is used to identify the polymorph of each crystal. We find that the nucleation kinetics of the two polymorphs is very different. Nucleation of the alpha polymorph starts off slowly but accelerates, while nucleation of the gamma polymorph starts off fast but then slows. We exploit this difference to increase the purity with which we obtain the gamma polymorph by a factor of ten. The statistics of the nucleation of crystals is analogous to that of human mortality, and using a result from medical statistics, we show that conventional nucleation data can say nothing about what, if any, are the correlations between competing nucleation processes. Thus we can show that with data of our form it is impossible to disentangle the competing nucleation processes. We also find that the growth rate and the shape of a crystal depend on it when nucleated. This is new evidence that nucleation and growth are linked.

  4. Effect of antenna size on electron kinetics in inductively coupled plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyo-Chang; Chung, Chin-Wook [Department of Electrical Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    Spatially resolved measurements of electron energy distribution functions (EEDFs) are investigated in inductively coupled plasmas with two planar antenna coils. When the plasma is sustained by the antenna with a diameter of 18 cm, the nonlocal kinetics is preserved in the argon gas pressure range from 2 mTorr to 20 mTorr. However, electron kinetics transit from nonlocal kinetics to local kinetics in discharge sustained by the antenna coil with diameter 34 cm. The results suggest that antenna size as well as chamber length are important parameters for the transition of the electron kinetics. Spatial variations of plasma potential, effective electron temperature, and EEDF in terms of total electron energy scale are also presented.

  5. Dynamics of ice nucleation on water repellent surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, Azar; Yamada, Masako; Li, Ri; Shang, Wen; Otta, Shourya; Zhong, Sheng; Ge, Liehui; Dhinojwala, Ali; Conway, Ken R; Bahadur, Vaibhav; Vinciquerra, A Joseph; Stephens, Brian; Blohm, Margaret L

    2012-02-14

    Prevention of ice accretion and adhesion on surfaces is relevant to many applications, leading to improved operation safety, increased energy efficiency, and cost reduction. Development of passive nonicing coatings is highly desirable, since current antiicing strategies are energy and cost intensive. Superhydrophobicity has been proposed as a lead passive nonicing strategy, yet the exact mechanism of delayed icing on these surfaces is not clearly understood. In this work, we present an in-depth analysis of ice formation dynamics upon water droplet impact on surfaces with different wettabilities. We experimentally demonstrate that ice nucleation under low-humidity conditions can be delayed through control of surface chemistry and texture. Combining infrared (IR) thermometry and high-speed photography, we observe that the reduction of water-surface contact area on superhydrophobic surfaces plays a dual role in delaying nucleation: first by reducing heat transfer and second by reducing the probability of heterogeneous nucleation at the water-substrate interface. This work also includes an analysis (based on classical nucleation theory) to estimate various homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation rates in icing situations. The key finding is that ice nucleation delay on superhydrophobic surfaces is more prominent at moderate degrees of supercooling, while closer to the homogeneous nucleation temperature, bulk and air-water interface nucleation effects become equally important. The study presented here offers a comprehensive perspective on the efficacy of textured surfaces for nonicing applications.

  6. Aerosol nucleation induced by a high energy particle beam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enghoff, Martin Andreas Bødker; Pedersen, Jens Olaf Pepke; Uggerhøj, Ulrik I.

    2011-01-01

    We have studied sulfuric acid aerosol nucleation in an atmospheric pressure reaction chamber using a 580 MeV electron beam to ionize the volume of the reaction chamber. We find a clear contribution from ion-induced nucleation and consider this to be the first unambiguous observation of the ion......-effect on aerosol nucleation using a particle beam under conditions that resemble the Earth's atmosphere. By comparison with ionization using a gamma source we further show that the nature of the ionizing particles is not important for the ion-induced component of the nucleation. This implies that inexpensive...... ionization sources - as opposed to expensive accelerator beams - can be used for investigations of ion-induced nucleation....

  7. An Integrated Modeling Suite for Simulating the Core Induction and Kinetic Effects in Mercury's Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, X.; Slavin, J.; Chen, Y.; Poh, G.; Toth, G.; Gombosi, T.

    2018-05-01

    We present results from state-of-the-art global models of Mercury's space environment capable of self-consistently simulating the induction effect at the core and resolving kinetic physics important for magnetic reconnection.

  8. A kinetic model of droplet heating and evaporation: Effects of inelastic collisions and a non-unity evaporation coefficient

    KAUST Repository

    Sazhin, Sergei S.; Xie, Jianfei; Shishkova, Irina N.; Elwardani, Ahmed Elsaid; Heikal, Morgan Raymond

    2013-01-01

    The previously developed kinetic model for droplet heating and evaporation into a high pressure air is generalised to take into account the combined effects of inelastic collisions between molecules in the kinetic region, a non-unity evaporation

  9. Damage instability and Earthquake nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionescu, I. R.; Gomez, Q.; Campillo, M.; Jia, X.

    2017-12-01

    Earthquake nucleation (initiation) is usually associated to the loss of the stability of the geological structure under a slip-weakening friction acting on the fault. The key parameters involved in the stability of the fault are the stress drop, the critical slip distance but also the elastic stiffness of the surrounding materials (rocks). We want to explore here how the nucleation phenomena are correlated to the material softening during damage accumulation by dynamic and/or quasi-static processes. Since damage models are describing micro-cracks growth, which is generally an unstable phenomenon, it is natural to expect some loss of stability on the associated micro-mechanics based models. If the model accurately captures the material behavior, then this can be due to the unstable nature of the brittle material itself. We obtained stability criteria at the microscopic scale, which are related to a large class of damage models. We show that for a given continuous strain history the quasi-static or dynamic problems are instable or ill-posed (multiplicity of material responses) and whatever the selection rule is adopted, shocks (time discontinuities) will occur. We show that the quasi-static equilibria chosen by the "perfect delay convention" is always stable. These stability criteria are used to analyze how NIC (Non Interacting Crack) effective elasticity associated to "self similar growth" model work in some special configurations (one family of micro-cracks in mode I, II and III and in plane strain or plain stress). In each case we determine a critical crack density parameter and critical micro-crack radius (length) which distinguish between stable and unstable behaviors. This critical crack density depends only on the chosen configuration and on the Poisson ratio.

  10. Ultrasound assisted nucleation and growth characteristics of glycine polymorphs--a combined experimental and analytical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renuka Devi, K; Raja, A; Srinivasan, K

    2015-05-01

    For the first time, the effect of ultrasound in the diagnostic frequency range of 1-10 MHz on the nucleation and growth characteristics of glycine has been explored. The investigation employing the ultrasonic interferometer was carried out at a constant insonation time over a wide range of relative supersaturation from σ=-0.09 to 0.76 in the solution. Ultrasound promotes only α nucleation and completely inhibits both the β and γ nucleation in the system. The propagation of ultrasound assisted mass transport facilitates nucleation even at very low supersaturation levels in the solution. The presence of ultrasound exhibits a profound effect on nucleation and growth characteristics in terms of decrease in induction period, increase in nucleation rate and decrease in crystal size than its absence in the solution. With an increase in the frequency of ultrasound, a further decrease in induction period, increase in nucleation rate and decrease in the size of the crystal is noticed even at the same relative supersaturation levels. The increase in the nucleation rate explains the combined dominating effects of both the ultrasound frequency and the supersaturation in the solution. Analytically, the nucleation parameters of the nucleated polymorph have been deduced at different ultrasonic frequencies based on the classical nucleation theory and correlations with the experimental results have been obtained. Structural affirmation of the nucleated polymorph has been ascertained by powder X-ray diffraction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The effects of one-dimensional glide on the reaction kinetics of interstitial clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinisch, H.L.; Singh, B.N.; Golubov, S.I.

    2000-01-01

    is therefore 'mixed 1D/3D migration' along a 3D path consisting of 1D segments, The defect reaction kinetics under mixed 1D/3D diffusion are different from pure 1D diffusion and pure 3D diffusion, both of which can be formulated within analytical rate theory models of microstructure evolution under irradiation....... Atomic-scale kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) defect migration simulations are used to investigate the effects of mixed 1D/3D migration on defect reaction kinetics as a guide for implementing mixed 1D/3D migration into the analytical rate theory. The functional dependence of the sink strength on the size...

  12. Inhibition of nucleation and growth of ice by poly(vinyl alcohol) in vitrification solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hai-Yan; Inada, Takaaki; Funakoshi, Kunio; Lu, Shu-Shen

    2009-08-01

    Control of ice formation is crucial in cryopreservation of biological substances. Successful vitrification using several additives that inhibit ice nucleation in vitrification solutions has previously been reported. Among these additives, here we focused on a synthetic polymer, poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), and investigated the effects of PVA on nucleation and growth of ice in 35% (w/w) aqueous 1,2-propanediol solution by using a differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) system equipped with a cryomicroscope. First, the freezing temperature of the solution was measured using the DSC system, and then the change in ice fraction in the solution during cooling was evaluated based on images obtained using the cryomicroscope, at different concentrations of PVA between 0% and 3% (w/w). Based on the ice fraction, the change in residual solution concentration during cooling was also evaluated and then plotted on the state diagram of aqueous 1,2-propanediol solution. Results indicated that, when the partially glassy and partially frozen state was intentionally allowed, the addition of PVA effectively inhibited not only ice nucleation but also ice growth in the vitrification solution. The effect of PVA on ice growth in the vitrification solution was explained based on kinetic limitations mainly due to mass transport. The interfacial kinetics also might limit ice growth in the vitrification solution only when the ice growth rate decreased below a critical value. This coincides with the fact that PVA exhibits a unique antifreeze activity in the same manner as antifreeze proteins when ice growth rate is lower than a critical value.

  13. Superheating in nucleate boiling calculated by the heterogeneous nucleation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerum, E.; Straub, J.; Grigull, U.

    1979-01-01

    With the heterogeneous nucleation theory the superheating of the liquid boundary layer in nucleate boiling is described not only for the onset of nuclear boiling but also for the boiling crisis. The rate of superheat depends on the thermodynamic stability of the metastable liquid, which is influenced by the statistical fluctuations in the liquid and the nucleation at the solid surface. Because of the fact that the cavities acting as nuclei are too small for microscopic observation, the size and distribution function of the nuclei on the surface necessary for the determination of the probability of bubble formation cannot be detected by measuring techniques. The work of bubble formation reduced by the nuclei can be represented by a simple empirical function whose coefficients are determined from boiling experiments. Using this the heterogeneous nucleation theory describes the superheating of the liquid. Several fluids including refrigerants, liquid gases, organic liquids and water were used to check the theory. (author)

  14. Homogeneous ice nucleation from aqueous inorganic/organic particles representative of biomass burning: water activity, freezing temperatures, nucleation rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knopf, Daniel A; Rigg, Yannick J

    2011-02-10

    Homogeneous ice nucleation plays an important role in the formation of cirrus clouds with subsequent effects on the global radiative budget. Here we report on homogeneous ice nucleation temperatures and corresponding nucleation rate coefficients of aqueous droplets serving as surrogates of biomass burning aerosol. Micrometer-sized (NH(4))(2)SO(4)/levoglucosan droplets with mass ratios of 10:1, 1:1, 1:5, and 1:10 and aqueous multicomponent organic droplets with and without (NH(4))(2)SO(4) under typical tropospheric temperatures and relative humidities are investigated experimentally using a droplet conditioning and ice nucleation apparatus coupled to an optical microscope with image analysis. Homogeneous freezing was determined as a function of temperature and water activity, a(w), which was set at droplet preparation conditions. The ice nucleation data indicate that minor addition of (NH(4))(2)SO(4) to the aqueous organic droplets renders the temperature dependency of water activity negligible in contrast to the case of aqueous organic solution droplets. The mean homogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficient derived from 8 different aqueous droplet compositions with average diameters of ∼60 μm for temperatures as low as 195 K and a(w) of 0.82-1 is 2.18 × 10(6) cm(-3) s(-1). The experimentally derived freezing temperatures and homogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficients are in agreement with predictions of the water activity-based homogeneous ice nucleation theory when taking predictive uncertainties into account. However, the presented ice nucleation data indicate that the water activity-based homogeneous ice nucleation theory overpredicts the freezing temperatures by up to 3 K and corresponding ice nucleation rate coefficients by up to ∼2 orders of magnitude. A shift of 0.01 in a(w), which is well within the uncertainty of typical field and laboratory relative humidity measurements, brings experimental and predicted freezing temperatures and homogeneous ice

  15. Metadynamics studies of crystal nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giberti, Federico; Salvalaglio, Matteo; Parrinello, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Crystallization processes are characterized by activated events and long timescales. These characteristics prevent standard molecular dynamics techniques from being efficiently used for the direct investigation of processes such as nucleation. This short review provides an overview on the use of metadynamics, a state-of-the-art enhanced sampling technique, for the simulation of phase transitions involving the production of a crystalline solid. In particular the principles of metadynamics are outlined, several order parameters are described that have been or could be used in conjunction with metadynamics to sample nucleation events and then an overview is given of recent metadynamics results in the field of crystal nucleation. PMID:25866662

  16. Metadynamics studies of crystal nucleation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Giberti

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Crystallization processes are characterized by activated events and long timescales. These characteristics prevent standard molecular dynamics techniques from being efficiently used for the direct investigation of processes such as nucleation. This short review provides an overview on the use of metadynamics, a state-of-the-art enhanced sampling technique, for the simulation of phase transitions involving the production of a crystalline solid. In particular the principles of metadynamics are outlined, several order parameters are described that have been or could be used in conjunction with metadynamics to sample nucleation events and then an overview is given of recent metadynamics results in the field of crystal nucleation.

  17. Review: The nucleation of disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cahn, R.W.; Johnson, W.L.

    1986-01-01

    Four types of phase transformation that involve the conversion of crystalline phases into more disordered forms are reviewed: melting, disordering of superlattices, amorphization by diffusion between crystalline phases, and irradation amorphization. In the review emphasis is placed on evidence for the heterogeneous nucleation of the product phases; in this connection, the role of surfaces, antiphase domain boundaries, dislocations, vacancies, and grain boundaries is specifically discussed. All of these features have been either observed, or hypothesized, to play a role as heterogeneous nucleation sites in one or more of the four transformations. An attempt is made to draw parallels between nucleation mechanisms in the various processes

  18. Effects of thigh holster use on kinematics and kinetics of active duty police officers

    OpenAIRE

    Larsen, Louise B.; Tranberg, Roy; Ramstrand, Nerrolyn

    2016-01-01

    Background: Body armour, duty belts and belt mounted holsters are standard equipment used by the Swedish police and have been shown to affect performance of police specific tasks, to decrease mobility and to potentially influence back pain. This study aimed to investigate the effects on gait kinematics and kinetics associated with use of an alternate load carriage system incorporating a thigh holster. Methods: Kinematic, kinetic and temporospatial data were collected using three dimensional g...

  19. Effective computation of stochastic protein kinetic equation by reducing stiffness via variable transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lijin, E-mail: ljwang@ucas.ac.cn [School of Mathematical Sciences, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2016-06-08

    The stochastic protein kinetic equations can be stiff for certain parameters, which makes their numerical simulation rely on very small time step sizes, resulting in large computational cost and accumulated round-off errors. For such situation, we provide a method of reducing stiffness of the stochastic protein kinetic equation by means of a kind of variable transformation. Theoretical and numerical analysis show effectiveness of this method. Its generalization to a more general class of stochastic differential equation models is also discussed.

  20. Novel Design Integrating a Microwave Applicator into a Crystallizer for Rapid Temperature Cycling. A Direct Nucleation Control Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kacker, R.; Radoiu, Marilena; Kramer, H.J.M.

    2017-01-01

    The control of nucleation in crystallization processes is a challenging task due to the often lacking knowledge on the process kinetics. Inflexible (predetermined) control strategies fail to grow the nucleated crystals to the desired quality because of the variability in the process conditions,

  1. Experimental study of ion-induced nucleation by radon decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, F.; Hopke, P.K.

    1993-01-01

    In the environment, the presence of ions from natural radioactivity may increase the rate of new particle formation through ion-induced nucleation. A thermal diffusion cloud chamber (TDCC) has been built to experimentally study ion-induced nucleation where the ions are produced by gaseous radioactive sources. The critical supersaturation values and nucleation rates for methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, and 1-butanol vapors on ions produced within the volume of the chamber by alpha decay of 222 Rn have been measured quantitatively at various radioactivity concentrations and supersaturations. The presence of ion tracks and the effect of an external electric field were also investigated. The alpha tracks and ion-induced nucleation formed by 222 Rn decay become visible at the critical supersaturation that is below the value needed for homogeneous nucleation. At this supersaturation, the nucleation rates increase substantially with increasing 222 Rn at low activity concentrations, but attain limiting values at higher concentrations. The experimental results indicate that the ionization by radon decay will promote ion-cluster formation and lower the free energy barriers. The formation of visible droplets is strongly dependent on the supersaturation. This study also confirms that the external electric field has a significant effect on the observed rates of nucleation

  2. Computer simulation of chemical nucleation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, J.S.

    1979-01-01

    The problem of nucleation at chemical instabilities is investigated by means of microscopic computer simulation. The first-order transition of interest involves a new kind of nucleation arising from chemical transformations rather than physical forces. Here it is the chemical state of matter, and not matter itself, which is spatially localized to form the nucleus for transition between different chemical states. First, the concepts of chemical instability, nonequilibrium phase transition, and dissipative structure are reviewed briefly. Then recently developed methods of reactive molecular dynamics are used to study chemical nucleation in a simple model chemical reactions. Finally, the connection of these studies to nucleation and condensation processes involving physical and chemical interactions is explored. (orig.)

  3. Heparin kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swart, C.A.M. de.

    1983-01-01

    The author has studied the kinetics of heparin and heparin fractions after intravenous administration in humans and in this thesis the results of this study are reported. Basic knowledge about the physico-chemical properties of heparin and its interactions with proteins resulting in anticoagulant and lipolytic effects are discussed in a review (chapter II), which also comprises some clinical aspects of heparin therapy. In chapter III the kinetics of the anticoagulant effect are described after intravenous administration of five commercial heparin preparations. A mathematical model is presented that fits best to these kinetics. The kinetics of the anticoagulant and lipolytic effects after intravenous injection of various 35 S-radiolabelled heparin fractions and their relationship with the disappearance of the radiolabel are described in chapter IV. Chapter V gives a description of the kinetics of two radiolabels after injection of in vitro formed complexes consisting of purified, 125 I-radiolabelled antithrombin III and various 35 S-radiolabelled heparin fractions. (Auth.)

  4. Nucleation at hardness indentations in cold rolled Al

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, C.L.; Zhang, Yubin; Wu, G.L.

    2015-01-01

    Nucleation of recrystallization near hardness indentations has been investigated in slightly cold rolled high purity aluminium. Samples were cold rolled to 12% and 20% reductions in thickness and indentations were done with two different loads (500 g and 2000 g). The samples were annealed at 300 °C...... for 1 h and nuclei were identified. It is found that the indentations are preferential nucleation sites. With EBSD maps around indentation tips, the orientation relationship between nuclei and matrix is analyzed. Finally, effects of rolling reduction and indentation load on local misorientations...... and stored energy distributions and thus on nucleation are discussed....

  5. Non-self-averaging nucleation rate due to quenched disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sear, Richard P

    2012-01-01

    We study the nucleation of a new thermodynamic phase in the presence of quenched disorder. The quenched disorder is a generic model of both impurities and disordered porous media; both are known to have large effects on nucleation. We find that the nucleation rate is non-self-averaging. This is in a simple Ising model with clusters of quenched spins. We also show that non-self-averaging behaviour is straightforward to detect in experiments, and may be rather common. (fast track communication)

  6. Ice nucleation activity of diesel soot particles at cirrus relevant temperature conditions: Effects of hydration, secondary organics coating, soot morphology, and coagulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Gourihar; China, Swarup; Liu, Shang; Nandasiri, Manjula; Sharma, Noopur; Wilson, Jacqueline; Aiken, Allison C.; Chand, Duli; Laskin, Alexander; Mazzoleni, Claudio; Pekour, Mikhail; Shilling, John; Shutthanandan, Vaithiyalingam; Zelenyuk, Alla; Zaveri, Rahul A.

    2016-04-01

    Ice formation by diesel soot particles was investigated at temperatures ranging from -40 to -50°C. Size-selected soot particles were physically and chemically aged in an environmental chamber, and their ice nucleating properties were determined using a continuous flow diffusion type ice nucleation chamber. Bare (freshly formed), hydrated, and compacted soot particles, as well as α-pinene secondary organic aerosol (SOA)-coated soot particles at high relative humidity conditions, showed ice formation activity at subsaturation conditions with respect to water but below the homogeneous freezing threshold conditions. However, SOA-coated soot particles at dry conditions were observed to freeze at homogeneous freezing threshold conditions. Overall, our results suggest that heterogeneous ice nucleation activity of freshly emitted diesel soot particles are sensitive to some of the aging processes that soot can undergo in the atmosphere.

  7. Heterogeneous nucleation of protein crystals on fluorinated layered silicate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keita Ino

    Full Text Available Here, we describe an improved system for protein crystallization based on heterogeneous nucleation using fluorinated layered silicate. In addition, we also investigated the mechanism of nucleation on the silicate surface. Crystallization of lysozyme using silicates with different chemical compositions indicated that fluorosilicates promoted nucleation whereas the silicates without fluorine did not. The use of synthesized saponites for lysozyme crystallization confirmed that the substitution of hydroxyl groups contained in the lamellae structure for fluorine atoms is responsible for the nucleation-inducing property of the nucleant. Crystallization of twelve proteins with a wide range of pI values revealed that the nucleation promoting effect of the saponites tended to increase with increased substitution rate. Furthermore, the saponite with the highest fluorine content promoted nucleation in all the test proteins regardless of their overall net charge. Adsorption experiments of proteins on the saponites confirmed that the density of adsorbed molecules increased according to the substitution rate, thereby explaining the heterogeneous nucleation on the silicate surface.

  8. Unique effects of microwave heating on polymerization kinetics of poly(methyl methacrylate) composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spasojević, Pavle [Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, University of Belgrade, Karnegijeva 4, 11120 Belgrade (Serbia); Jovanović, Jelena, E-mail: jelenaj@ffh.bg.ac.rs [Faculty of Physical Chemistry, University of Belgrade, Studentski trg 12-16, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); Adnadjevic, Borivoj [Faculty of Physical Chemistry, University of Belgrade, Studentski trg 12-16, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2013-09-16

    The effects of heating mode (conventional and microwave) on the kinetics of isothermal polymerization of MMA composite materials were investigated. Isothermal kinetics curves at temperature range from 343 K to 363 K for both conventional (CH) and microwave heating (MWH) were determined. It was found that the polymerization of MMA composite materials was kinetically elementary reaction for both CH and MWH. The kinetics of CH polymerization can be described by the model of phase-boundary controlled process (contracting volume), whereas the kinetics of MWH polymerization can be described by the model of first-order chemical reaction. The kinetics parameters (E{sub a} and ln A) of the polymerization under microwave heating are lower than for conventional heating. The established decreases in the activation energy and pre-exponential factor under the MWH compared to the CH is explained with the increase in the energy of ground vibrational level of the C–O valence vibrations (ν = 987 cm{sup −1}) in methyl methacrylate molecule and with the decrease in its anharmonicity factor which is caused with the selective resonant transfer of energy from the energetic reservoir to the oscillators in methyl methacrylate molecules. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • The MWH speeds the MMA material polymerization and changes the kinetics model. • A novel concept of MWH action based on activation complexes formation is presented. • The Selective Energy Transfer model is used to explain the effects of MWH. • The kinetics parameters under MWH are lower than for CH. • The activation energy for both MWH and CH polymerization is quantized.

  9. Role of nucleation in nanodiamond film growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lifshitz, Y.; Lee, C.H.; Wu, Y.; Zhang, W.J.; Bello, I.; Lee, S.T.

    2006-01-01

    Nanodiamond films were deposited using different microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition schemes following several nucleation pretreatment methods. The nucleation efficiency and the films structure were investigated using scanning and transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. C 2 dimer growth (CH 4 and H 2 in 90% Ar) cannot nucleate diamond and works only on existing diamond surfaces. The methyl radical process (up to 20% CH 4 in H 2 ) allows some nucleation probability on appropriate substrates. Prolonged bias enhanced nucleation initiates both diamond nucleation and growth. C 2 dimer growth results in pure nanodiamond free of amorphous carbon, while prolonged bias enhanced nucleation forms an amorphous carbon/nanodiamond composite

  10. Preparation and nucleation of spherical metallic droplet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing-ge Zhao

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The preparation and solidification of metallic droplets attract more and more attention for their significance in both engineering and scientific fields. In this paper, the preparation and characterization of Sn-based alloy droplets using different methods such as atomization and consumable electrode direct current arc (CDCA technique are reviewed. The morphology and structure of these droplets were determined by optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The solidification behavior of single droplet was systematically studied by means of scanning calorimetry (DSC, and the nucleation kinetics was also calculated. In particular, the development of fast scanning calorimetry (FSC made it possible to investigate the evolution of undercooling under ultrafast but controllable heating and cooling conditions. The combination of CDCA technique and FSC measurements opens up a new door for quantitative studies on droplet solidification, which is accessible to demonstrate some theories by experiments.

  11. Solid-state drawing of β-nucleated polypropylene : effect of additives on drawability and mechanical properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijsterburg, B.J.; Jobse, P.; Hermida Merino, D.; Peijs, A.A.J.M.; Goossens, J.G.P.

    2014-01-01

    Isotactic polypropylene can crystallize in different crystal modifications. In this paper, the effect of sepiolite (1D) and carbon black (3D) fillers on the solid-state drawability of i-PP is discussed. The cross-hatched structure of thermodynamically most stable a-crystal phase in isotactic i-PP

  12. Influence of mixing and solid concentration on sodium bicarbonate secondary nucleation rate in stirred tank

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wylock, C.; Debaste, F.; Haut, B. [Transfers, Interfaces and Processes - Chemical Engineering Unit, ULB, Brussels (Belgium); Gutierrez, V.; Delplancke-Ogletree, M.P. [Chemicals and Materials Department, ULB, Brussels (Belgium); Cartage, T. [Solvay SA, Brussels (Belgium)

    2010-09-15

    This work aims to investigate the influence of the solid concentration in suspension on the contact secondary nucleation rate of sodium bicarbonate crystallization in a stirred tank crystallizer and to show the necessity of a local description of the mixing for a nucleation rate influence study. Experiments and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations are realized. Crystallization kinetic parameters are extracted from experimental data using a mass distribution fitting approach. CFD and the experimental results allow identifying that a mixing property correlated with the measurements of the secondary nucleation rate in the stirred tank crystallizer appears to be the turbulent dissipation rate on the edge of the impeller. Its influence and the influence of the solid concentration in the suspension on the secondary nucleation rate are estimated by the evaluation of their exponents in a kinetic law. The obtained exponent values are then discussed qualitatively. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  13. Nanometer-scale mapping of irreversible electrochemical nucleation processes on solid Li-ion electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amit; Arruda, Thomas M.; Tselev, Alexander; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Lawton, Jamie S.; Zawodzinski, Thomas A.; Butyaev, Oleg; Zayats, Sergey; Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2013-01-01

    Electrochemical processes associated with changes in structure, connectivity or composition typically proceed via new phase nucleation with subsequent growth of nuclei. Understanding and controlling reactions requires the elucidation and control of nucleation mechanisms. However, factors controlling nucleation kinetics, including the interplay between local mechanical conditions, microstructure and local ionic profile remain inaccessible. Furthermore, the tendency of current probing techniques to interfere with the original microstructure prevents a systematic evaluation of the correlation between the microstructure and local electrochemical reactivity. In this work, the spatial variability of irreversible nucleation processes of Li on a Li-ion conductive glass-ceramics surface is studied with ~30 nm resolution. An increased nucleation rate at the boundaries between the crystalline AlPO4 phase and amorphous matrix is observed and attributed to Li segregation. This study opens a pathway for probing mechanisms at the level of single structural defects and elucidation of electrochemical activities in nanoscale volumes. PMID:23563856

  14. Kinetics of niobium carbide precipitation in ferrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gendt, D.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a NbC precipitation modelling in ferrite. This theoretical study is motivated by the fact it considers a ternary system and focus on the concurrence of two different diffusion mechanisms. An experimental study with TEP, SANS and Vickers micro-hardening measurements allows a description of the NbC precipitation kinetics. The mean radius of the precipitates is characterized by TEM observations. To focus on the nucleation stage, we use the Tomographic Atom Probe that analyses, at an atomistic scale, the position of the solute atoms in the matrix. A first model based on the classical nucleation theory and the diffusion-limited growth describes the precipitation of spherical precipitates. To solve the set of equations, we use a numerical algorithm that furnishes an evaluation of the precipitated fraction, the mean radius and the whole size distribution of the particles. The parameters that are the interface energy, the solubility product and the diffusion coefficients are fitted with the data available in the literature and our experimental results. It allows a satisfactory agreement as regards to the simplicity of the model. Monte Carlo simulations are used to describe the evolution of a ternary alloy Fe-Nb-C on a cubic centred rigid lattice with vacancy and interstitial mechanisms. This is realized with an atomistic description of the atoms jumps and their related frequencies. The model parameters are fitted with phase diagrams and diffusion coefficients. For the sake of simplicity, we consider that the precipitation of NbC is totally coherent and we neglect any elastic strain effect. We can observe different kinetic paths: for low supersaturations, we find an expected precipitation of NbC but for higher supersaturations, the very fast diffusivity of carbon atoms conducts to the nucleation of iron carbide particles. We establish that the occurrence of this second phenomenon depends on the vacancy arrival kinetics and can be related

  15. The kinetics for ammonium and nitrite oxidation under the effect of hydroxylamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xinyu; Xiao, Pengying; Zhang, Daijun; Lu, Peili; Yao, Zongbao; He, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    The kinetics for ammonium (NH4(+)) oxidation and nitrite (NO2(-)) oxidation under the effect of hydroxylamine (NH2OH) were studied by respirometry using the nitrifying sludge from a laboratory-scale sequencing batch reactor. Modified models were used to estimate kinetics parameters of ammonia and nitrite oxidation under the effect of hydroxylamine. An inhibition effect of hydroxylamine on the ammonia oxidation was observed under different hydroxylamine concentration levels. The self-inhibition coefficient of hydroxylamine oxidation and noncompetitive inhibition coefficient of hydroxylamine for nitrite oxidation was estimated by simulating exogenous oxygen-uptake rate profiles, respectively. The inhibitive effect of NH2OH on nitrite-oxidizing bacteria was stronger than on ammonia-oxidizing bacteria. This work could provide fundamental data for the kinetic investigation of the nitrification process.

  16. Homogeneous nucleation limit on the bulk formation of metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drehman, A.J.

    1983-01-01

    Glassy Pd 82 Si 18 spheres, of up to 1 mm diameter, were formed in a drop tube filled with He gas. The largest spheres were successfully cooled to a glass using a cooling rate of less than 800 K/sec. Even at this low cooling rate, crystallization (complete or partial) was the result of heterogeneous nucleation at a high temperature, relative to the temperature at which copious homogeneous nucleation would commence. Bulk underscoring experiments demonstrated that this alloy could be cooled to 385 K below its eutectic melting temperature (1083 K) without the occurrence of crystallization. If heterogeneous nucleation can be avoided, it is estimated that a cooling rate of at most 100 K/sec would be required to form this alloy in the glassy state. Ingots of glassy Pd 40 Ni 40 P 20 were formed from the liquid by cooling at a rate of only 1 K/sec. It was found that glassy samples of this alloy could be heated well above the glass transition temperature without the occurrence of rapid divitrification. This is a result due, in part of the low density of pre-existing nuclei, but, more importantly, due to the low homogeneous nucleation rate and the slow crystal growth kinetics. Based on the observed devitrification kinetics, the steady-state homogeneous nucleation rate is approximately 1 nuclei/cm 3 sec at 590 K (the temperature at which the homogeneous nucleation rate is estimated to be a maximum). Two iron-nickel based glass-forming alloys (Fe 40 Ni 40 P 14 B 6 and Fe 40 Ni 40 B 20 , were not successfully formed into glassy spheres, however, microstructural examination indicates that crystallization was not the result of copious homogeneous nucleation. In contrast, glass forming iron based alloys (Fe 80 B 20 and Fe/sub 79.3/B/sub 16.4/Si/sub 4.0/C/sub 0.3/) exhibit copious homogeneous nucleation when cooled at approximately the same rate

  17. Experimental study of the effect of the reduced graphene oxide films on nucleate boiling performances of inclined surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji Hoon; Kong, Byeong Tak [Incheon National University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ji Min [POSTECH, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2016-05-15

    For the enhancing the CHF, surface coating techniques are available. Yang et al. performed small scale boiling experiments for the vessel lower head, which was coated by aluminum/copper micro particles. Recently, graphene has received much attention for applications in thermal engineering due to its large thermal conductivity. Ahn et al. used a silicon dioxide substrate, which was coated graphene films, as a heating surface during pool boiling experiments. The graphene films inhibited the formation of hot spots, increasing the CHF. For applying novel material 'Graphene' in nuclear industry, here we investigated the effects of graphene film coatings on boiling performances. The experimental pool boiling facility, copying the geometry of lower head of reactor, was designed for verifying orientation effects. The effects of graphene films coating on varied inclined heater surfaces were investigated. The CHF values were increased at every case, but the increased amounts were decreased for downward heater surfaces. At the downward-facing region, however, coating the RGO films would change the CHF mechanisms and boiling heat transfer performances. Generally, RGO films, made by colloidal fabrication, has defects on each flakes.

  18. Experimental study of the effect of the reduced graphene oxide films on nucleate boiling performances of inclined surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ji Hoon; Kong, Byeong Tak; Kim, Ji Min

    2016-01-01

    For the enhancing the CHF, surface coating techniques are available. Yang et al. performed small scale boiling experiments for the vessel lower head, which was coated by aluminum/copper micro particles. Recently, graphene has received much attention for applications in thermal engineering due to its large thermal conductivity. Ahn et al. used a silicon dioxide substrate, which was coated graphene films, as a heating surface during pool boiling experiments. The graphene films inhibited the formation of hot spots, increasing the CHF. For applying novel material 'Graphene' in nuclear industry, here we investigated the effects of graphene film coatings on boiling performances. The experimental pool boiling facility, copying the geometry of lower head of reactor, was designed for verifying orientation effects. The effects of graphene films coating on varied inclined heater surfaces were investigated. The CHF values were increased at every case, but the increased amounts were decreased for downward heater surfaces. At the downward-facing region, however, coating the RGO films would change the CHF mechanisms and boiling heat transfer performances. Generally, RGO films, made by colloidal fabrication, has defects on each flakes.

  19. Vapor nucleation paths in lyophobic nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinti, Antonio; Giacomello, Alberto; Casciola, Carlo Massimo

    2018-04-19

    liquids in mesoporous materials of characteristic size of ca. 4nm, the nanoscale effects reported for smaller pores have a minor role. The atomistic estimates for the nucleation free-energy barrier are in qualitative accord with those that can be obtained using a macroscopic, capillary-based nucleation theory.

  20. Dynamic Modeling of Cell-Free Biochemical Networks Using Effective Kinetic Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph A. Wayman

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cell-free systems offer many advantages for the study, manipulation and modeling of metabolism compared to in vivo processes. Many of the challenges confronting genome-scale kinetic modeling can potentially be overcome in a cell-free system. For example, there is no complex transcriptional regulation to consider, transient metabolic measurements are easier to obtain, and we no longer have to consider cell growth. Thus, cell-free operation holds several significant advantages for model development, identification and validation. Theoretically, genome-scale cell-free kinetic models may be possible for industrially important organisms, such as E. coli, if a simple, tractable framework for integrating allosteric regulation with enzyme kinetics can be formulated. Toward this unmet need, we present an effective biochemical network modeling framework for building dynamic cell-free metabolic models. The key innovation of our approach is the integration of simple effective rules encoding complex allosteric regulation with traditional kinetic pathway modeling. We tested our approach by modeling the time evolution of several hypothetical cell-free metabolic networks. We found that simple effective rules, when integrated with traditional enzyme kinetic expressions, captured complex allosteric patterns such as ultrasensitivity or non-competitive inhibition in the absence of mechanistic information. Second, when integrated into network models, these rules captured classic regulatory patterns such as product-induced feedback inhibition. Lastly, we showed, at least for the network architectures considered here, that we could simultaneously estimate kinetic parameters and allosteric connectivity from synthetic data starting from an unbiased collection of possible allosteric structures using particle swarm optimization. However, when starting with an initial population that was heavily enriched with incorrect structures, our particle swarm approach could converge

  1. UV-cured methacrylic-silica hybrids: Effect of oxygen inhibition on photo-curing kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corcione, C. Esposito; Striani, R.; Frigione, M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The kinetic behavior of novel photopolymerizable organic–inorganic hybrid system was studied as a function of the composition and of the atmosphere for reactions. • The UV-curing reaction of the hybrid mixture was found fast and complete. • The combined presence of thiol monomer and nanostructured silica allows to reduce the effect of inhibition of oxygen towards the radical photopolymerization. - Abstract: The kinetic behavior of innovative photopolymerizable UV-cured methacrylic–silica hybrid formulations, previously developed, was studied and compared to that of a reference control system. The organic–inorganic (O–I) hybrids proposed in this study are obtained from organic precursors with a high siloxane content mixed with tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) in such a way to produce co-continuous silica nano-domains dispersed within a cross-linked organic phase, as a result of the hydrolysis and condensation reactions. The kinetics of the radical photopolymerization mechanism induced by UV-radiations, in presence of a suitable photoinitiator, was studied by calorimetric, FTIR and Raman spectroscopic analyses, by varying the composition of the mixtures and the atmosphere for reactions. The well known effect of oxygen on the kinetic mechanism of the free radical photopolymerization of the methacrylic–siloxane based monomers was found to be strongly reduced in the hybrid system, especially when a proper thiol was used. The experimental calorimetric data were fitted using a simple kinetic model for radical photopolymerization reactions, obtaining a good agreement between the experimental data and the theoretical model. From the comparison of the kinetic constants calculated for control and hybrid systems, it was possible to assess the effect of the composition, as well as of the atmosphere used during the photo-polymerization process, on the kinetic of photopolymerization reaction

  2. Effect of starting microstructure upon the nucleation sites and distribution of graphite particles during a graphitising anneal of an experimental medium-carbon machining steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inam, A., E-mail: aqil.ceet@pu.edu.pk; Brydson, R., E-mail: mtlrmdb@leeds.ac.uk; Edmonds, D.V., E-mail: d.v.edmonds@leeds.ac.uk

    2015-08-15

    The potential for using graphite particles as an internal lubricant during machining is considered. Graphite particles were found to form during graphitisation of experimental medium-carbon steel alloyed with Si and Al. The graphite nucleation sites were strongly influenced by the starting microstructure, whether ferrite–pearlite, bainite or martensite, as revealed by light and electron microscopy. Favourable nucleation sites in the ferrite–pearlite starting microstructure were, not unexpectedly, found to be located within pearlite colonies, no doubt due to the presence of abundant cementite as a source of carbon. In consequence, the final distribution of graphite nodules in ferrite–pearlite microstructures was less uniform than for the bainite microstructure studied. In the case of martensite, this study found a predominance of nucleation at grain boundaries, again leading to less uniform graphite dispersions. - Highlights: • Metallography of formation of graphite particles in experimental carbon steel. • Potential for using graphite in steel as an internal lubricant during machining. • Microstructure features expected to influence improved machinability studied. • Influence of pre-anneal starting microstructure on graphite nucleation sites. • Influence of pre-anneal starting microstructure on graphite distribution. • Potential benefit is new free-cutting steel compositions without e.g. Pb alloying.

  3. Steady-state molecular dynamics simulation of vapor to liquid nucleation with Mc Donald's demon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horsch, M.; Miroshnichenko, S.; Vrabec, J.

    2009-01-01

    Grand canonical MD with McDonald's demon is discussed in the present contribution and applied for sampling both nucleation kinetics and steady-state properties of a supersaturated vapor. The idea behind the new approach is to simulate the production of clusters up to a given size for a specified supersaturation. The classical nucleation theory is found to overestimate the free energy of cluster formation and deviate by two orders of magnitude from the nucleation rate below the triple point at high supersaturations.

  4. Physical characterization of diesel exhaust nucleation mode particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahde, T.

    2013-11-01

    An increasing concern of the adverse health effects of aerosol particles is forcing the combustion engine industry to develop engines with lower particle emissions. The industry has put most of their efforts into soot control and has achieved a significant reduction in diesel exhaust particle mass. Nevertheless, it is not clear that the large particles, dominating the mass, cause the harmfulness of the exhaust particles in the biological interaction. Nowadays, the harmful potential of diesel exhaust particles often connects with the particle surface area, and the view has turned to particle number below 100 nm size range. Unfortunately, the achieved low exhaust particle mass does not necessarily imply a low particle number. This text focuses on the physical characteristics of diesel exhaust nucleation model particles. The volatility characteristics and the electrical charge state of the particles are studied first. Second, the relation between the nonvolatile nucleation mode emissions and the soot, the nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions and the engine parameters are covered. The nucleation mode particles had distinctively different physical characteristics with different after-treatment systems. The nucleation mode was volatile and electrically neutral with a diesel particle filter after-treatment system. Without an after-treatment system or with an after-treatment system with low particle removal efficiency, the nucleation mode was partly nonvolatile and included an electrical charge. The difference suggests different formation routes for the nucleation particles with different after-treatment systems. The existence of the nonvolatile nucleation mode particles also affected the soot mode charge state. The soot charge state was positively biased when the nonvolatile nucleation mode was detected but slightly negatively biased when the nonvolatile nucleation mode was absent. The nonvolatile nucleation mode was always negatively biased. This electrical charge

  5. Effect of chemical mixing state on the hygroscopicity and cloud nucleation properties of calcium mineral dust particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Sullivan

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric mineral dust particles can alter cloud properties and thus climate by acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN that form cloud droplets. The CCN activation properties of various calcium mineral dust particles were studied experimentally to investigate the consequences of field observations showing the segregation of sulphate from nitrate and chloride between individual aged Asian dust particles, and the enrichment of oxalic acid in Asian dust. Each mineral's observed apparent hygroscopicity was primarily controlled by its solubility, which determines the degree to which the mineral's intrinsic hygroscopicity can be expressed. The significant increase in hygroscopicity caused by mixing soluble hygroscopic material with insoluble mineral particles is also presented. Insoluble minerals including calcium carbonate, representing fresh unprocessed dust, and calcium sulphate, representing atmospherically processed dust, had similarly small apparent hygroscopicities. Their activation is accurately described by a deliquescence limit following the Kelvin effect and corresponded to an apparent single-hygroscopicity parameter, κ, of ~0.001. Soluble calcium chloride and calcium nitrate, representing atmospherically processed mineral dust particles, were much more hygroscopic, activating similar to ammonium sulphate with κ~0.5. Calcium oxalate monohydrate (κ=0.05 was significantly less CCN-active than oxalic acid (κ=0.3, but not as inactive as its low solubility would predict. These results indicate that the common assumption that all mineral dust particles become more hygroscopic and CCN-active after atmospheric processing should be revisited. Calcium sulphate and calcium oxalate are two realistic proxies for aged mineral dust that remain non-hygroscopic. The dust's apparent hygroscopicity will be controlled by its chemical mixing state, which is determined by its mineralogy and the chemical reaction pathways it experiences

  6. Investigating heterogeneous nucleation in peritectic materials via the phase-field method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emmerich, Heike; Siquieri, Ricardo

    2006-01-01

    Here we propose a phase-field approach to investigate the influence of convection on peritectic growth as well as the heterogeneous nucleation kinetics of peritectic systems. For this purpose we derive a phase-field model for peritectic growth taking into account fluid flow in the melt, which is convergent to the underlying sharp interface problem in the thin interface limit (Karma and Rappel 1996 Phys. Rev. E 53 R3017). Moreover, we employ our new phase-field model to study the heterogeneous nucleation kinetics of peritectic material systems. Our approach is based on a similar approach towards homogeneous nucleation in Granasy et al (2003 Interface and Transport Dynamics (Springer Lecture Notes in Computational Science and Engineering vol 32) ed Emmerich et al (Berlin: Springer) p 190). We applied our model successfully to extend the nucleation rate predicted by classical nucleation theory for an additional morphological term relevant for peritectic growth. Further applications to understand the mechanisms and consequences of heterogeneous nucleation kinetics in more detail are discussed

  7. The Effect of Thermal History on the Fast Crystallization of Poly(l-Lactide with Soluble-Type Nucleators and Shear Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianfeng Shen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The N1,N1ʹ-(ethane-1,2-diylbis(N2-phenyloxalamide (OXA is a soluble-type nucleator with a dissolving temperature of 230 °C in poly(l-lactic acid (PLLA matrix. The effect of thermal history and shear flow on the crystallization behavior of the PLLA/OXA samples was investigated by rheometry, polarized optical microscopy (POM, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The crystallization process of the PLLA/OXA-240 sample (i.e., pre-melted at 240 °C was significantly promoted by applying a shear flow, e.g., the onset crystallization time (tonset of the PLLA at 155 °C was reduced from 1600 to 200 s after shearing at 0.4 rad/s for even as short as 1.0 s, while the crystallinity (Xc was increased to 40%. Moreover, the tonset of the PLLA/OXA-240 sample is 60%–80% lower than that of the PLLA/OXA-200 sample (i.e., pre-melted at 200 °C with a total shear angle of 2 rad, indicating a much higher crystallization rate of the PLLA/OXA-240 sample. A better organization and uniformity of OXA fibrils can be obtained due to a complete pre-dissolution in the PLLA matrix followed by shear and oscillation treatments. The well dispersed OXA fibrils and flow-induced chain orientation are mainly responsible for the fast crystallization of the PLLA/OXA-240 samples. In addition, the shear flow created some disordered α′-form crystals in the PLLA/OXA samples regardless of the thermal history (200 or 240 °C.

  8. Amines are likely to enhance neutral and ion-induced sulfuric acid-water nucleation in the atmosphere more effectively than ammonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Kurtén

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the structure and formation thermodynamics of dimer clusters containing H2SO4 or HSO4 together with ammonia and seven different amines possibly present in the atmosphere, using the high-level ab initio methods RI-MP2 and RI-CC2. As expected from e.g. proton affinity data, the binding of all studied amine-H2SO4 complexes is significantly stronger than that of NH3•H2SO4, while most amine-HSO4 complexes are only somewhat more strongly bound than NH3•HSO4. Further calculations on larger cluster structures containing dimethylamine or ammonia together with two H2SO4 molecules or one H2SO4 molecule and one HSO4 ion demonstrate that amines, unlike ammonia, significantly assist the growth of not only neutral but also ionic clusters along the H2SO4 co-ordinate. A sensitivity analysis indicates that the difference in complexation free energies for amine- and ammonia-containing clusters is large enough to overcome the mass-balance effect caused by the fact that the concentration of amines in the atmosphere is probably 2 or 3 orders of magnitude lower than that of ammonia. This implies that amines might be more important than ammonia in enhancing neutral and especially ion-induced sulfuric acid-water nucleation in the atmosphere.

  9. Investigation of ammonium nitrate effect on kinetics and mechanism of thermal decomposition of ammonium polyuranates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karelin, A.I.; Lobas, O.P.; Zhiganov, A.N.; Vasil'ev, K.F.; Zhiganova, A.A.

    1987-01-01

    A study was made on ammonium nitrate effect on the mechanism and kinetics of dehydration and thermal decomposition of ammonium polyuranates. Sufficient effect of nitrate ion content in ammonium polyuranate samples on their thermal stability was noted. Kinetic parameters of thermal decomposition of ammonium polyuranates were evaluated. Mechanism of dehydration and thermal decomposition of ammonium polyuranates in the presence of ammonium nitrate was suggested. It was shown that increase of ammonium nitrate content in ammonium polyuranate precipitate resulted to reduction of the specific surface of prepared uranium mixed oxide

  10. Use of the Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) as a pre-filter for ice nucleation measurements: effect of particle mixing state and determination of SP2 conditions to fully vaporize refractory black carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schill, Gregory P.; DeMott, Paul J.; Levin, Ezra J. T.; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.

    2018-05-01

    Ice nucleation is a fundamental atmospheric process that impacts precipitation, cloud lifetimes, and climate. Challenges remain to identify and quantify the compositions and sources of ice-nucleating particles (INPs). Assessment of the role of black carbon (BC) as an INP is particularly important due to its anthropogenic sources and abundance at upper-tropospheric cloud levels. The role of BC as an INP, however, is unclear. This is, in part, driven by a lack of techniques that directly determine the contribution of refractory BC (rBC) to INP concentrations. One previously developed technique to measure this contribution uses the Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) as a pre-filter to an online ice-nucleating particle counter. In this technique, rBC particles are selectively heated to their vaporization temperature in the SP2 cavity by a 1064 nm laser. From previous work, however, it is unclear under what SP2 conditions, if any, the original rBC particles were fully vaporized. Furthermore, previous work also left questions about the effect of the SP2 laser on the ice-nucleating properties of several INP proxies and their mixtures with rBC.To answer these questions, we sampled the exhaust of an SP2 with a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer and a Continuous Flow Diffusion Chamber. Using Aquadag® as an rBC proxy, the effect of several SP2 instrument parameters on the size distribution and physical properties of particles in rBC SP2 exhaust were explored. We found that a high SP2 laser power (930 nW/(220 nm PSL)) is required to fully vaporize a ˜ 0.76 fg rBC particle. We also found that the exhaust particle size distribution is minimally affected by the SP2 sheath-to-sample ratio; the size of the original rBC particle, however, greatly influences the size distribution of the SP2 exhaust. The effect of the SP2 laser on the ice nucleation efficiency of Snomax®, NX-illite, and Suwannee River Fulvic Acid was studied; these particles acted as proxies for biological, illite

  11. Spray structure as generated under homogeneous flash boiling nucleation regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, M.; Levy, Y.; Sher, E.

    2014-01-01

    We show the effect of the initial pressure and temperature on the spatial distribution of droplets size and their velocity profile inside a spray cloud that is generated by a flash boiling mechanism under homogeneous nucleation regime. We used TSI's Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer (PDPA) to characterize the spray. We conclude that the homogeneous nucleation process is strongly affected by the initial liquid temperature while the initial pressure has only a minor effect. The spray shape is not affected by temperature or pressure under homogeneous nucleation regime. We noted that the only visible effect is in the spray opacity. Finally, homogeneous nucleation may be easily achieved by using a simple atomizer construction, and thus is potentially suitable for fuel injection systems in combustors and engines. - Highlights: • We study the characteristics of a spray that is generated by a flash boiling process. • In this study, the flash boiling process occurs under homogeneous nucleation regime. • We used Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer (PDPA) to characterize the spray. • The SMD has been found to be strongly affected by the initial liquid temperature. • Homogeneous nucleation may be easily achieved by using a simple atomizer unit

  12. A note on the nucleation with multiple steps: Parallel and series nucleation

    OpenAIRE

    Iwamatsu, Masao

    2012-01-01

    Parallel and series nucleation are the basic elements of the complex nucleation process when two saddle points exist on the free-energy landscape. It is pointed out that the nucleation rates follow formulas similar to those of parallel and series connection of resistors or conductors in an electric circuit. Necessary formulas to calculate individual nucleation rates at the saddle points and the total nucleation rate are summarized and the extension to the more complex nucleation process is su...

  13. Kinetics and compensation effects during steam gasification of Fujian anthracite using viscose liquor as catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin Ju; Zhang Ji-yu; Zhong Xue-qing [Fuzhou University, Fuzhou (China). Institute of Chemical Engineering and Technology

    2009-08-15

    Catalytic steam gasification kinetics of Fujian Youxi anthracite using viscose liquor as catalyst was investigated in an isothermal thermo-gravimetric analyzer under ambient pressure. Coal conversions versus reaction time with different viscose liquor concentrations (0-12% NaOH) were measured at the temperature range from 850 to 950{sup o}C. The research shows that the viscose liquor can greatly improve the gasification rate and carbon conversion. The Loading Saturation Level (LSL) of the viscose liquor within the experimental conditions was also determined. The catalytic steam gasification reaction can be well fitted by a shrinking-core model (SCM) and the reaction rate constants are obtained. The kinetic analysis indicates that the catalytic gasification exhibits a prominent compensation effect between the activation energy and the pre-exponential factor. The kinetic equation including the compensation effects for the catalytic steam gasification of Fujian Youxi anthracite using viscose liquor as catalyst is presented. 23 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Effects of relaxation of gluten network on rehydration kinetics of pasta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Takenobu; Hasegawa, Ayako; Adachi, Shuji

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of the relaxation of the gluten network on pasta rehydration kinetics. The moisture content of pasta, under conditions where the effects of the diffusion of water on the moisture content were negligible, was estimated by extrapolating the average moisture content of pasta of various diameters to 0 mm. The moisture content of imaginary, infinitely thin pasta did not reach equilibrium even after 1 h of rehydration. The rehydration of pasta made of only gluten was also measured. The rate constants estimated by the Long and Richman equation for both the pasta indicated that the rehydration kinetics of infinitely thin pasta were similar to those of gluten pasta. These results suggest that the swelling of starch by fast gelatinization was restricted by the honeycomb structural network of gluten and the relaxation of the gluten network controlled pasta rehydration kinetics.

  15. Kinetic approach to the explanation of fatigue effect in ferroelectric materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shur, V.Ya.; Rumyantsev, E.L.; Nikolaeva, E.V.; Shishkin, E.I.; Baturin, I.S.

    2002-01-01

    The new kinetic approach to explanation of the fatigue effect in the ferroelectrics consistent change in the area and geometry of the switched-over part of the sample by the cyclic switch-over, accompanied by the origination and growth of the kinetic frozen domains, is considered. It is supposed, that the fatigue effect is conditioned by the self-organizing formation of the spatially nonuniform internal shift field due to the delay of the voluminous scanning of the depolarizing field. The changes in the value of the switched charge and the switch-over current amplitude, calculated through the computerized simulation of the domains kinetics by the cyclic switch-over are in good agreement with the experimental data, obtained in thin films of the lead zirconate-titanate [ru

  16. Effect of quenching rate on precipitation kinetics in AA2219 DC cast alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elgallad, E.M., E-mail: eelgalla@uqac.ca; Zhang, Z.; Chen, X.-G.

    2017-06-01

    Slow quenching of direct chill (DC) cast aluminum ingot plates used in large mold applications is often used to decrease quench-induced residual stresses, which can deteriorate the machining performance of these plates. Slow quenching may negatively affect the mechanical properties of the cast plates when using highly quench-sensitive aluminum alloys because of its negative effect on the precipitation hardening behavior of such alloys. The effect of the quenching rate on precipitation kinetics in AA2219 DC cast alloy was systematically studied under water and air quenching conditions using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) technique. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was also used to characterize the precipitate microstructure. The results showed that the precipitation kinetics of the θ′ phase in the air-quenched condition was mostly slower than that in the water-quenched one. Air quenching continuously increased the precipitation kinetics of the θ phase compared to water quenching. These results revealed the contributions of the inadequate precipitation of the strengthening θ′ phase and the increased precipitation of the equilibrium θ phase to the deterioration of the mechanical properties of air-quenched AA2219 DC cast plates. The preexisting GP zones and quenched-in dislocations affected the kinetics of the θ′ phase, whereas the preceding precipitation of the θ′ phase affected the kinetics of the θ phase by controlling its precipitation mechanism.

  17. Compensation effect in H 2 permeation kinetics of PdAg membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Zeng, Gaofeng

    2012-08-30

    Knowledge about the (inter)dependence of permeation kinetic parameters on the stoichiometry of H 2-selective alloys is still rudimentary, although uncovering the underlying systematic correlations will greatly facilitate current efforts into the design of novel high-performance H 2 separation membranes. Permeation measurements with carefully engineered, 2-7 μm thick supported Pd 100-xAg x membranes reveal that the activation energy and pre-exponential factor of H 2 permeation laws vary systematically with alloy composition, and both kinetic parameters are strongly correlated for x ≤ 50. We show that this permeation kinetic compensation effect corresponds well with similar correlations in the hydrogen solution thermodynamics and diffusion kinetics of PdAg alloys that govern H 2 permeation rates. This effect enables the consistent description of permeation characteristics over wide temperature and alloy stoichiometry ranges, whereas hydrogen solution thermodynamics may play a role, too, as a yet unrecognized source of kinetic compensation in, for example, H 2-involving reactions over metal catalysts or hydrogenation/ dehydrogenation of hydrogen storage materials. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  18. Nucleation and Crystal Growth in the Formation of Hierarchical Three-Dimensional Nanoarchitecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xudong [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2018-02-02

    This project is to obtain fundamental understandings of the operation of the Ostwald-Lussac (OL) Law and the oriented attachment (OA) mechanism in nucleation and growth of TiO2 nanorods (NR) via surface-reaction-limited pulsed chemical vapor deposition (SPCVD) process. Three-dimensional (3D) NW networks are a unique type of mesoporous architecture that offers extraordinary surface area density and superior transport properties of electrons, photons, and phonons. It is exceptionally promising for advancing the design and application of functional materials for photovoltaic devices, catalysts beds, hydrogen storage systems, sensors, and battery electrodes. Our group has developed the SPCVD technique by mimicking the mechanism of atomic layer deposition (ALD), which effectively decoupled the crystal growth from precursor concentration while retaining anisotropic 1D growth. For the first time, this technique realized a 3D NW architecture with ultrahigh density and achieved ~4-5 times enhancement on photo-conversion efficiency. Through the support of our current DOE award, we revealed the governing role of the OL Law in the nucleation stage of SPCVD. The formation of NR morphology in SPCVD was identified following the OA mechanism. We also discovered a unique vapor-phase Kirkendall effect in the evolution of tubular or core-shell NR structures. These understandings opened many new opportunities in designing 3D NW architectures with improved properties or new functionalities. Specifically, our accomplishments from this project include five aspects: (1) Observation of the Ostwald-Lussac Law in high-temperature ALD. (2) Observation of vapor-solid Kirkendall effect in ZnO-to-TiO2 nanostructure conversion. (3) Development of highly-efficient capillary photoelectrochemical (PEC) solar-fuel generation. (4) Development of efficient and stable electrochemical protections for black silicon PEC electrodes. (5) Development of doped polymers with tunable electrical properties. This

  19. Enhancement of the droplet nucleation in a dense supersaturated Lennard-Jones vapor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhukhovitskii, D. I., E-mail: dmr@ihed.ras.ru [Joint Institute of High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Izhorskaya 13, Bd. 2, 125412 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-05-14

    The vapor–liquid nucleation in a dense Lennard-Jones system is studied analytically and numerically. A solution of the nucleation kinetic equations, which includes the elementary processes of condensation/evaporation involving the lightest clusters, is obtained, and the nucleation rate is calculated. Based on the equation of state for the cluster vapor, the pre-exponential factor is obtained. The latter diverges as a spinodal is reached, which results in the nucleation enhancement. The work of critical cluster formation is calculated using the previously developed two-parameter model (TPM) of small clusters. A simple expression for the nucleation rate is deduced and it is shown that the work of cluster formation is reduced for a dense vapor. This results in the nucleation enhancement as well. To verify the TPM, a simulation is performed that mimics a steady-state nucleation experiments in the thermal diffusion cloud chamber. The nucleating vapor with and without a carrier gas is simulated using two different thermostats for the monomers and clusters. The TPM proves to match the simulation results of this work and of other studies.

  20. Nucleation behavior of melted Bi films at cooling rates from 101 to 104 K/s studied by combining scanning AC and DC nano-calorimetry techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, Kechao; Vlassak, Joost J.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We proposed a general data reduction scheme that combines scanning AC and DC calorimetry results for the study of reaction kinetics. • Calorimetry measurements at cooling rates ranging from 30 K/s to 20,000 K/s were achieved. • Upon initial melting, the Bi thin-film sample breaks up into thousands of isolated islands, and highly repeatable nucleation behavior is observed. • The nucleation rate of melted Bi is calculated, which can be well described by classical nucleation theory over a wide range of cooling rates. - Abstract: We study the nucleation behavior of undercooled liquid Bi at cooling rates ranging from 10 1 to 10 4 K/s using a combination of scanning DC and AC nano-calorimetry techniques. Upon initial melting, the Bi thin-film sample breaks up into silicon nitride-coated isolated islands. The number of islands in a typical sample is sufficiently large that highly repeatable nucleation behavior is observed, despite the stochastic nature of the nucleation process. We establish a data reduction technique to evaluate the nucleation rate from DC and AC calorimetry results. The results show that the driving force for the nucleation of melted Bi is well described by classical nucleation theory over a wide range of cooling rates. The proposed technique provides a unique and efficient way to examine nucleation kinetics with cooling rates over several orders of magnitude. The technique is quite general and can be used to evaluate reaction kinetics in other materials

  1. Aspartate beta-decarboxylase from Alcaligenes faecalis: carbon-13 kinetic isotope effect and deuterium exchange experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenberg, R.M.; O'Leary, M.H.

    1985-01-01

    The authors have measured the 13 C kinetic isotope effect at pH 4.0, 5.0, 6.0, and 6.5 and in D 2 O at pH 5.0 and the rate of D-H exchange of the alpha and beta protons of aspartic acid in D 2 O at pH 5.0 for the reaction catalyzed by the enzyme aspartate beta-decarboxylase from Alcaligenes faecalis. The 13 C kinetic isotope effect, with a value of 1.0099 +/- 0.0002 at pH 5.0, is less than the intrinsic isotope effect for the decarboxylation step, indicating that the decarboxylation step is not entirely rate limiting. The authors have been able to estimate probable values of the relative free energies of the transition states of the enzymatic reaction up to and including the decarboxylation step from the 13 C kinetic isotope effect and the rate of D-H exchange of alpha-H. The pH dependence of the kinetic isotope effect reflects the pKa of the pyridine nitrogen of the coenzyme pyridoxal 5'-phosphate but not that of the imine nitrogen. A mechanism is proposed for the exchange of aspartate beta-H that is consistent with the stereochemistry suggested earlier

  2. Effects of molecular confinement and crowding on horseradish peroxidase kinetics using a nanofluidic gradient mixer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichert, William R A; Han, Donghoon; Bohn, Paul W

    2016-03-07

    The effects of molecular confinement and crowding on enzyme kinetics were studied at length scales and under conditions similar to those found in biological cells. These experiments were carried out using a nanofluidic network of channels constituting a nanofluidic gradient mixer, providing the basis for measuring multiple experimental conditions simultaneously. The 100 nm × 40 μm nanochannels were wet etched directly into borosilicate glass, then annealed and characterized with fluorescein emission prior to kinetic measurements. The nanofluidic gradient mixer was then used to measure the kinetics of the conversion of the horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-catalyzed conversion of non-fluorescent Amplex Red (AR) to the fluorescent product resorufin in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The design of the gradient mixer allows reaction kinetics to be studied under multiple (five) unique solution compositions in a single experiment. To characterize the efficiency of the device the effects of confinement on HRP-catalyzed AR conversion kinetics were studied by varying the starting ratio of AR : H2O2. Equimolar concentrations of Amplex Red and H2O2 yielded the highest reaction rates followed by 2 : 1, 1 : 2, 5 : 1, and finally 1 : 5 [AR] : [H2O2]. Under all conditions, initial reaction velocities were decreased by excess H2O2. Crowding effects on kinetics were studied by increasing solution viscosity in the nanochannels in the range 1.0-1.6 cP with sucrose. Increasing the solution viscosities in these confined geometries decreases the initial reaction velocity at the highest concentration from 3.79 μM min(-1) at 1.00 cP to 0.192 μM min(-1) at 1.59 cP. Variations in reaction velocity are interpreted in the context of models for HRP catalysis and for molecular crowding.

  3. Design and properties of a novel nucleating agent for isotactic polypropylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lv, Zhiping; Yang, Yunfei; Wu, Ran; Tong, Yuchao

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Three new nucleating agents which is structurally similar to Al-PTBBA were prepared. ► These three nucleating agents were very effective in increasing T c and X c of iPP. ► Great improvement of mechanical properties of nucleated iPP was also obtained. ► Nucleating agent TSD was the most effective nucleating agent for iPP. -- Abstract: Three new nucleating agents TB, TD and TSD (titanate of benzoate or 4-tert-Butylbenzoate) were prepared. Isotactic polypropylene (iPP) nucleated were studied by using thermogravimetry analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and polarized light microscopy (PLM). The mechanical properties and Vicat softening temperature (VST) of iPP were also tested. The results indicated that these three nucleating agents were very effective in increasing the crystallization temperature (T c ) and crystallinity (X c ) of iPP. Mechanical properties of nucleated iPP were improved remarkably, especially nucleating agent TSD.

  4. Effect of ketamine, pentobarbital, and morphine on Tc-99m-DISIDA hepatobiliary kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durakovic, A.; Dubois, A.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate hapatobiliary kinetics of Tc-99m-DISIDA in dogs after administration of anesthetic sedative or narcotic agents. Four groups of six male Beagle dogs were studied as a non-treated control group and after parenteral administration of ketamine (30 mg/kg IM), pentobarbital (25 mg/kg IV) or morphine (1 mg/kg IV). Each animal was injected with 4 mCi Tc-99m-DISIDA and hepatobiliary scintigraphic studies were obtained using a gamma camera with parallel hole multipurpose collimator and an A/sup 3/ MDS computer. The authors determined; peak activity of Tc-99m-DISIDA in the liver, visualization and peak activity of gallbladder, and intestinal visualization of Tc-99m-DISIDA. Total bilirubin, LDH, SGOT and SGPT were not modified significantly after any drug compared to control. The results showed that two commonly used anesthetics and sedatives (ketamine and pentobarbital) have dramatic and opposite effects on extrahepatic biliary kinetics. Furthermore, ketamine, but not pentobarbital, significantly accelerates intrahepatic biliary kinetics. Finally, as expected, morphine delayed extrahepatic biliary kinetics. Thus, studies of biliary kinetics should be interpreted with caution when measurements are made after administration of anesthetic, sedative or narcotic agents

  5. Surface Area, and Oxidation Effects on Nitridation Kinetics of Silicon Powder Compacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, R. T.; Palczer, A. R.

    1998-01-01

    Commercially available silicon powders were wet-attrition-milled from 2 to 48 hr to achieve surface areas (SA's) ranging from 1.3 to 70 sq m/g. The surface area effects on the nitridation kinetics of silicon powder compacts were determined at 1250 or 1350 C for 4 hr. In addition, the influence of nitridation environment, and preoxidation on nitridation kinetics of a silicon powder of high surface area (approximately equals 63 sq m/g) was investigated. As the surface area increased, so did the percentage nitridation after 4 hr in N2 at 1250 or 1350 C. Silicon powders of high surface area (greater than 40 sq m/g) can be nitrided to greater than 70% at 1250 C in 4 hr. The nitridation kinetics of the high-surface-area powder compacts were significantly delayed by preoxidation treatment. Conversely, the nitridation environment had no significant influence on the nitridation kinetics of the same powder. Impurities present in the starting powder, and those accumulated during attrition milling, appeared to react with the silica layer on the surface of silicon particles to form a molten silicate layer, which provided a path for rapid diffusion of nitrogen and enhanced the nitridation kinetics of high surface area silicon powder.

  6. [Effect of IV hydration with sodium bicarbonate on high-dose methotrexate disposition kinetics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, N; Goto, M; Konishi, H; Yamashina, H

    1984-04-01

    Following two-compartment kinetic analysis, the effect of loading of transfusion with sodium bicarbonate on methotrexate disposition was investigated in 13 cases with malignant tumor, being treated with high-dose methotrexate. The mean values of total body clearance, when administered at doses 50 mg and 100 mg per kg body weight, were 0.369 and 0.402 (l/h) per kg, respectively. No significant relationship was observed between alpha value and total amount of transfusion, of urine or dosage of sodium bicarbonate. The other kinetic parameters on elimination, beta value, K10 and total body clearance, did not also correlate with those values described above. These results suggest that the elimination profile of methotrexate show linear kinetics, and that massive administration of transfusion with sodium bicarbonate be not necessary if pH value of urine exceeds 7.0.

  7. Kinetic equations for clean superconductors: Application to the flux flow hall effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopnin, N.B.

    1994-01-01

    The kinetic equations for clean superconductors (l>>ζ) are derived. expanding the equations for the time dependent Green functions in the quasiclassical parameter, the new contributions are found which contain the derivatives of the distribution functions with respect to the quasiparticle momentum. The transition from the ultra-clean case (no relaxation) to a relaxation-dominated behavior, for which the kinetic equations coincide with the usual quasiclassical approximation, occurs for the relaxation time of the order of ℎE F /Δ 2 . The kinetic equations can be used for various dynamic processes in superconductors including the flux-flow Hall effect. The derived equations, after necessary modifications for the p-wave pairing, are especially suitable for nonstationary problems in the theory of superfluidity of 3 He

  8. Hydration kinetics modeling of Portland cement considering the effects of curing temperature and applied pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Feng; Meyer, Christian

    2009-01-01

    A hydration kinetics model for Portland cement is formulated based on thermodynamics of multiphase porous media. The mechanism of cement hydration is discussed based on literature review. The model is then developed considering the effects of chemical composition and fineness of cement, water-cement ratio, curing temperature and applied pressure. The ultimate degree of hydration of Portland cement is also analyzed and a corresponding formula is established. The model is calibrated against the experimental data for eight different Portland cements. Simple relations between the model parameters and cement composition are obtained and used to predict hydration kinetics. The model is used to reproduce experimental results on hydration kinetics, adiabatic temperature rise, and chemical shrinkage of different cement pastes. The comparisons between the model reproductions and the different experimental results demonstrate the applicability of the proposed model, especially for cement hydration at elevated temperature and high pressure.

  9. Effect of urea additive on the thermal decomposition kinetics of flame retardant greige cotton nonwoven fabric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunghyun Nam; Brian D. Condon; Robert H. White; Qi Zhao; Fei Yao; Michael Santiago Cintrón

    2012-01-01

    Urea is well known to have a synergistic action with phosphorus-based flame retardants (FRs) in enhancing the FR performance of cellulosic materials, but the effect of urea on the thermal decomposition kinetics has not been thoroughly studied. In this study, the activation energy (Ea) for the thermal decomposition of greige...

  10. [Synergistic effect of cell kinetics-directed chemo-endocrine therapy on experimental mammary tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueki, H

    1987-11-01

    We tried to demonstrate that the cell kinetics-directed chemoendocrine therapy is more effective on hormone dependent breast cancer than empirical combination of the endocrine therapy and chemotherapy. Cell kinetics of each tumor was measured by flow cytometric analysis. Estrogen dependent human breast cancer cell line MCF-7 was used in vitro. In vivo, androgen dependent SC-115 carcinoma was transplanted to DDS mice. In vitro, tamoxifen was administered as the endocrine therapy. In vivo, we carried out testectomy on DDS mice. Effect of the endocrine therapy on the cell kinetics of the tumor was thought to be G1-S depression. High density 5FU was administered as the chemotherapeutic agents, whose content was 1 microgram/ml in vitro and 40 mg/kg in vivo. 5FU brought temporary decrease of cells in S phase. Only anteceding 5FU administration had synergistic effect in combination of 5FU and the endocrine therapy. 5FU was convinced to act more effectively on cells in S phase, so it was shown that cell kinetics-directed schedule was superior to the empirical treatment schedule in chemoendocrine therapy.

  11. Investigation of ion kinetic effects in direct-drive exploding-pusher implosions at the NIF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, M. J., E-mail: mrosenbe@mit.edu; Zylstra, A. B.; Séguin, F. H.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Sio, H.; Waugh, C. J.; Sinenian, N.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); McKenty, P. W.; Hohenberger, M.; Radha, P. B.; Delettrez, J. A.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Betti, R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Knauer, J. P.; Sangster, T. C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); and others

    2014-12-15

    Measurements of yield, ion temperature, areal density (ρR), shell convergence, and bang time have been obtained in shock-driven, D{sub 2} and D{sup 3}He gas-filled “exploding-pusher” inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions at the National Ignition Facility to assess the impact of ion kinetic effects. These measurements probed the shock convergence phase of ICF implosions, a critical stage in hot-spot ignition experiments. The data complement previous studies of kinetic effects in shock-driven implosions. Ion temperature and fuel ρR inferred from fusion-product spectroscopy are used to estimate the ion-ion mean free path in the gas. A trend of decreasing yields relative to the predictions of 2D DRACO hydrodynamics simulations with increasing Knudsen number (the ratio of ion-ion mean free path to minimum shell radius) suggests that ion kinetic effects are increasingly impacting the hot fuel region, in general agreement with previous results. The long mean free path conditions giving rise to ion kinetic effects in the gas are often prevalent during the shock phase of both exploding pushers and ablatively driven implosions, including ignition-relevant implosions.

  12. Kinetic secondary deuterium isotope effect in addition of nucleophile to m-bromobenzaldehyde

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaral, L. do; Rossi, M.H.

    1985-01-01

    The kinetic secondary deuterium isotope effects, KD/KH for hydrated proton catalyzed addition of semicarbazide, methoxyamine and hydroxylamine to m-bromobenzaldehyde is studied. The nature of the nucleophile, addition of the carbonyl group and the chemical reactions are evaluated. (M.J.C.) [pt

  13. STEREOCHEMICAL ASPECTS OF HYDRATION OF CARBOHYDRATES IN AQUEOUS-SOLUTIONS .2. KINETIC MEDIUM EFFECTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GALEMA, SA; BLANDAMER, MJ; ENGBERTS, JBFN

    1992-01-01

    Rate constants for the hydrolysis of 1-benzoyl-3-phenyl-1,2,4-triazole in aqueous solutions of carbohydrates have been measured as a function of molality and nature of added mono- and disaccharides. The kinetic medium effects induced by the carbohydrates originate from hydration sphere overlap

  14. Kinetic isotope effect in the reaction of dehydration of fructose into 5-hydroxymethylfurfural

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grin', S.A.; Tsimbaliev, S.R.; Gel'fand, S.Yu.

    1993-01-01

    Kinetic isotopic effect in the reaction of fructose dehydration into 5- hydroxymethylfurfural was determined. The results suggest hydrogen participation in the limiting stage of the process. The assumption that proton addition to 4, 5, 6 -trihydroxy - 2- on - hexal is the limiting stage is made

  15. Effect of pre-heating on the thermal decomposition kinetics of cotton

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effect of pre-heating at low temperatures (160-280°C) on the thermal decomposition kinetics of scoured cotton fabrics was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis under nonisothermal conditions. Isoconversional methods were used to calculate the activation energies for the pyrolysis after one-...

  16. The Effects of Muscular Fatigue on the Kinetics of Sprint Running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprague, Paul; Mann, Ralph V.

    1983-01-01

    To compare the kinematic and kinetic effects of fatigue on the biomechanics of sprint running, male subjects were filmed performing a short maximal exertion sprint and a long fatiguing sprint. Observable differences in the productive muscular activity of the better and the poorer sprinters occurred during the ground-phase of their strides.…

  17. A calorimetric study of solute effects on the kinetic stability of a-amylase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Søren Nymand; Andersen, Kim Bruno; Øgendal, Lars Holm

    2009-01-01

    In this study we evaluated the applications of isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) to Study solute effects on the kinetics of irreversible protein denaturation. More specifically, denaturation of Bacillus Halmapalus alpha-amylase (BHA) was initiated by addition of EDTA to the calorimetric cell...

  18. Doping kinetics of organic semiconductors investigated by field-effect transistors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maddalena, F.; Meijer, E.J.; Asadi, K.; Leeuw, D.M. de; Blom, P.W.M.

    2010-01-01

    The kinetics of acid doping of the semiconductor regioregular poly-3-hexylthiophene with vaporized chlorosilane have been investigated using field-effect transistors. The dopant density has been derived as a function of temperature and exposure time from the shift in the pinch-off voltage, being the

  19. Numerical investigation of nucleate pool boiling heat transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanović Andrijana D.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Multidimensional numerical simulation of the atmospheric saturated pool boiling is performed. The applied modelling and numerical methods enable a full representation of the liquid and vapour two-phase mixture behaviour on the heated surface, with included prediction of the swell level and heated wall temperature field. In this way the integral behaviour of nucleate pool boiling is simulated. The micro conditions of bubble generation at the heated wall surface are modelled by the bubble nucleation site density, the liquid wetting contact angle and the bubble grow time. The bubble nucleation sites are randomly located within zones of equal size, where the number of zones equals the nucleation site density. The conjugate heat transfer from the heated wall to the liquid is taken into account in wetted heated wall areas around bubble nucleation sites. The boiling curve relation between the heat flux and the heated wall surface temperature in excess of the saturation temperature is predicted for the pool boiling conditions reported in the literature and a good agreement is achieved with experimentally measured data. The influence of the nucleation site density on the boiling curve characteristic is confirmed. In addition, the influence of the heat flux intensity on the spatial effects of vapour generation and two-phase flow are shown, such as the increase of the swell level position and the reduced wetting of the heated wall surface by the heat flux increase. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR-33018 i br. OI-174014

  20. Three-dimensional investigation of recrystallization nucleation in a particle-containing Al alloy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yonghao; Juul Jensen, Dorte; Zhang, Yubin

    2012-01-01

    The effects of an inhomogeneous distribution of second-phase particles on nucleation of recrystallization in a particle-containing aluminum alloy are investigated by 3-D serial sectioning. Clusters and bands of big intermetallic particles are the dominating nucleation sites, but other sites...... are also active. The effects of nucleation sites and the inhomogeneous particle distribution on the orientation and size of the nuclei are investigated and their relationships are discussed. 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  1. Transient competitive complexation in biological kinetic isotope fractionation explains nonsteady isotopic effects: Theory and application to denitrification in soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggi, Federico; Riley, William J.

    2009-12-01

    The theoretical formulation of biological kinetic isotope fractionation often assumes first-order or Michaelis-Menten kinetics, the latter solved under the quasi-steady state assumption. Both formulations lead to a constant isotope fractionation factor, therefore they may return incorrect estimations of isotopic effects and misleading interpretations of isotopic signatures when fractionation is not a steady process. We have analyzed the isotopic signature of denitrification in biogeochemical soil systems by Menyailo and Hungate (2006) in which high and variable 15N-N2O enrichment during N2O production and inverse isotope fractionation during N2O consumption could not be explained with first-order kinetics and the Rayleigh equation, or with Michaelis-Menten kinetics. When Michaelis-Menten kinetics were coupled to Monod kinetics to describe biomass and enzyme dynamics, and the quasi-steady state assumption was relaxed, transient Michaelis-Menten-Monod kinetics accurately reproduced the observed concentrations, and variable and inverse isotope fractionations. These results imply a substantial revision in modeling isotopic effects, suggesting that steady state kinetics such as first-order, Rayleigh, and classic Michaelis-Menten kinetics should be superseded by transient kinetics in conjunction with biomass and enzyme dynamics.

  2. Influence of titanium oxide films on copper nucleation during electrodeposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Hyun K.; Choe, Byung-Hak; Lee, Jong K.

    2005-01-01

    Copper electrodeposition has an important industrial role because of various interconnects used in electronic devices such as printed wire boards. With an increasing trend in device miniaturization, in demand are void-free, thin copper foils of 10 μm thick or less with a very low surface profile. In accordance, nucleation kinetics of copper was studied with titanium cathodes that were covered with thin, passive oxide films of 2-3 nm. Such an insulating oxide layer with a band gap of 3 eV is supposed to nearly block charge transfer from the cathode to the electrolyte. However, significant nucleation rates of copper were observed. Pipe tunneling mechanism along a dislocation core is reasoned to account for the high nucleation kinetics. A dislocation core is proposed to be a high electron tunneling path with a reduced energy barrier and a reduced barrier thickness. In supporting the pipe tunneling mechanism, both 'in situ' and 'ex situ' scratch tests were performed to introduce extra dislocations into the cathode surface, that is, more high charge paths via tunneling, before electrodeposition

  3. Kinetic isotope effects and aliphatic diazo-compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albery, W.J.; Conway, C.W.; Hall, J.A.

    1976-01-01

    Results are reported for the variation of the rate of decomposition of ethyl diazomalonate (EDM) and diazomalonate anions with pH and for the deuterium solvent isotope effect for EDM. The shape of the pH profile is explained by successive protonations of the anions. Ethyl diazoacetate is observed as an intermediate in the decomposition of EDM. The degree of proton transfer in the EDM transition state is deduced from the solvent isotope effect and the results together with those for other aliphatic diazo-compounds are discussed in terms of the Marcus theory. (author)

  4. Nucleation, growth and transport modelling of helium bubbles under nuclear irradiation in lead–lithium with the self-consistent nucleation theory and surface tension corrections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fradera, J.; Cuesta-López, S.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The work presented in this manuscript provides a reliable computational tool to quantify the He complex phenomena in a HCLL. • A model based on the self-consistent nucleation theory (SCT) is exposed. It includes radiation induced nucleation modelling and surface tension corrections. • Results informed reinforce the necessity of conducting experiments to determine nucleation conditions and bubble transport parameters in LM breeders. • Our findings and model provide a good qualitative insight into the helium nucleation phenomenon in LM systems for fusion technology and can be used to identify key system parameters. -- Abstract: Helium (He) nucleation in liquid metal breeding blankets of a DT fusion reactor may have a significant impact regarding system design, safety and operation. Large He production rates are expected due to tritium (T) fuel self-sufficiency requirement, as both, He and T, are produced at the same rate. Low He solubility, local high concentrations, radiation damage and fluid discontinuities, among other phenomena, may yield the necessary conditions for He nucleation. Hence, He nucleation may have a significant impact on T inventory and may lower the T breeding ratio. A model based on the self-consistent nucleation theory (SCT) with a surface tension curvature correction model has been implemented in OpenFOAM ® CFD code. A modification through a single parameter of the necessary nucleation condition is proposed in order to take into account all the nucleation triggering phenomena, specially radiation induced nucleation. Moreover, the kinetic growth model has been adapted so as to allow for the transition from a critical cluster to a macroscopic bubble with a diffusion growth process. Limitations and capabilities of the models are shown by means of zero-dimensional simulations and sensitivity analyses to key parameters under HCLL breeding unit conditions. Results provide a good qualitative insight into the helium nucleation

  5. Nucleation, growth and transport modelling of helium bubbles under nuclear irradiation in lead–lithium with the self-consistent nucleation theory and surface tension corrections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fradera, J., E-mail: jfradera@ubu.es; Cuesta-López, S., E-mail: scuesta@ubu.es

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • The work presented in this manuscript provides a reliable computational tool to quantify the He complex phenomena in a HCLL. • A model based on the self-consistent nucleation theory (SCT) is exposed. It includes radiation induced nucleation modelling and surface tension corrections. • Results informed reinforce the necessity of conducting experiments to determine nucleation conditions and bubble transport parameters in LM breeders. • Our findings and model provide a good qualitative insight into the helium nucleation phenomenon in LM systems for fusion technology and can be used to identify key system parameters. -- Abstract: Helium (He) nucleation in liquid metal breeding blankets of a DT fusion reactor may have a significant impact regarding system design, safety and operation. Large He production rates are expected due to tritium (T) fuel self-sufficiency requirement, as both, He and T, are produced at the same rate. Low He solubility, local high concentrations, radiation damage and fluid discontinuities, among other phenomena, may yield the necessary conditions for He nucleation. Hence, He nucleation may have a significant impact on T inventory and may lower the T breeding ratio. A model based on the self-consistent nucleation theory (SCT) with a surface tension curvature correction model has been implemented in OpenFOAM{sup ®} CFD code. A modification through a single parameter of the necessary nucleation condition is proposed in order to take into account all the nucleation triggering phenomena, specially radiation induced nucleation. Moreover, the kinetic growth model has been adapted so as to allow for the transition from a critical cluster to a macroscopic bubble with a diffusion growth process. Limitations and capabilities of the models are shown by means of zero-dimensional simulations and sensitivity analyses to key parameters under HCLL breeding unit conditions. Results provide a good qualitative insight into the helium

  6. Kinetic description of the total photoabsorption cross section: correlation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira Filho, L.G.; Nemes, M.C.

    1986-02-01

    It is shown that the inclusion of correlation effects in describing the nuclear photoabsorption cross section leads to a Breit-Wigner type curve with energy dependent width. It is also shown that a very slow energy dependence is enough to reproduce the data up to ∼ 139 MeV. (Author) [pt

  7. Reversed phase HPLC analysis of stability and microstructural effects on degradation kinetics of β-carotene encapsulated in freeze-dried maltodextrin-emulsion systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnkarnsujarit, Nathdanai; Charoenrein, Sanguansri; Roos, Yrjö H

    2012-09-26

    Degradation of dispersed lipophilic compounds in hydrophilic solids depends upon matrix stability and lipid physicochemical properties. This study investigated effects of solid microstructure and size of lipid droplets on the stability of dispersed β-carotene in freeze-dried systems. Emulsions of β-carotene in sunflower oil were dispersed in maltodextrin systems (M040/DE6, M100/DE11, and M250/DE25.5) (8% w/w oil) and prefrozen at various freezing conditions prior to freeze-drying to control nucleation and subsequent pore size and structural collapse of freeze-dried solids. The particle size, physical state, and β-carotene contents of freeze-dried emulsions were measured during storage at various water activity (a(w)) using a laser particle size analyzer, differential scanning calorimeter, and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), respectively. The results showed that M040 stabilized emulsions in low temperature freezing exhibited lipid crystallization. Collapse of solids in storage at a(w) which plasticized systems to the rubbery state led to flow and increased the size of oil droplets. Degradation of β-carotene analyzed using a reversed-phase C(30) column followed first-order kinetics. Porosity of solids had a major effect on β-carotene stability; however, the highest stability was found in fully plasticized and collapsed solids.

  8. Mechanistic models enable the rational use of in vitro drug-target binding kinetics for better drug effects in patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Witte, Wilhelmus E A; Wong, Yin Cheong; Nederpelt, Indira; Heitman, Laura H; Danhof, Meindert; van der Graaf, Piet H; Gilissen, Ron A H J; de Lange, Elizabeth C M

    2016-01-01

    Drug-target binding kinetics are major determinants of the time course of drug action for several drugs, as clearly described for the irreversible binders omeprazole and aspirin. This supports the increasing interest to incorporate newly developed high-throughput assays for drug-target binding kinetics in drug discovery. A meaningful application of in vitro drug-target binding kinetics in drug discovery requires insight into the relation between in vivo drug effect and in vitro measured drug-target binding kinetics. In this review, the authors discuss both the relation between in vitro and in vivo measured binding kinetics and the relation between in vivo binding kinetics, target occupancy and effect profiles. More scientific evidence is required for the rational selection and development of drug-candidates on the basis of in vitro estimates of drug-target binding kinetics. To elucidate the value of in vitro binding kinetics measurements, it is necessary to obtain information on system-specific properties which influence the kinetics of target occupancy and drug effect. Mathematical integration of this information enables the identification of drug-specific properties which lead to optimal target occupancy and drug effect in patients.

  9. Nucleation and growth in alkaline zinc electrodeposition An Experimental and Theoretical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Divyaraj

    The current work seeks to investigate the nucleation and growth of zinc electrodeposition in alkaline electrolyte, which is of commercial interest to alkaline zinc batteries for energy storage. The morphology of zinc growth places a severe limitation on the typical cycle life of such batteries. The formation of mossy zinc leads to a progressive deterioration of battery performance while zinc dendrites are responsible for sudden catastrophic battery failure. The problems are identified as the nucleation-controlled formation of mossy zinc and the transport-limited formation of dendritic zinc. Consequently, this thesis work seeks to investigate and accurately simulate the conditions under which such morphologies are formed. The nucleation and early-stage growth of Zn electrodeposits is studied on carbon-coated TEM grids. At low overpotentials, the morphology develops by aggregation at two distinct length scales: ~5 nm diameter monocrystalline nanoclusters form ~50nm diameter polycrystalline aggregates, and second, the aggregates form a branched network. Epitaxial (0002) growth above a critical overpotential leads to the formation of hexagonal single-crystals. A kinetic model is provided using the rate equations of vapor solidification to simulate the evolution of the different morphologies. On solving these equations, we show that aggregation is attributed to cluster impingement and cluster diffusion while single-crystal formation is attributed to direct attachment. The formation of dendritic zinc is investigated using in-operando transmission X-ray microscopy which is a unique technique for imaging metal electrodeposits. The nucleation density of zinc nuclei is lowered using polyaniline films to cover the active nucleation sites. The effect of overpotential is investigated and the morphology shows beautiful in-operando formation of symmetric zinc crystals. A linear perturbation model was developed to predict the growth and formation of these crystals to first

  10. Ice nucleation properties of mineral dusts

    OpenAIRE

    Steinke, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    Ice nucleation in clouds has a significant impact on the global hydrological cycle as well as on the radiative budget of the Earth. The AIDA cloud chamber was used to investigate the ice nucleation efficiency of various atmospherically relevant mineral dusts. From experiments with Arizona Test Dust (ATD) a humidity and temperature dependent ice nucleation active surface site density parameterization was developed to describe deposition nucleation at temperatures above 220 K. Based...

  11. Nucleation in Polymers and Soft Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaofei; Ting, Christina L.; Kusaka, Isamu; Wang, Zhen-Gang

    2014-04-01

    Nucleation is a ubiquitous phenomenon in many physical, chemical, and biological processes. In this review, we describe recent progress on the theoretical study of nucleation in polymeric fluids and soft matter, including binary mixtures (polymer blends, polymers in poor solvents, compressible polymer-small molecule mixtures), block copolymer melts, and lipid membranes. We discuss the methodological development for studying nucleation as well as novel insights and new physics obtained in the study of the nucleation behavior in these systems.

  12. Effects of reaction-kinetic parameters on modeling reaction pathways in GaN MOVPE growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong; Zuo, Ran; Zhang, Guoyi

    2017-11-01

    In the modeling of the reaction-transport process in GaN MOVPE growth, the selections of kinetic parameters (activation energy Ea and pre-exponential factor A) for gas reactions are quite uncertain, which cause uncertainties in both gas reaction path and growth rate. In this study, numerical modeling of the reaction-transport process for GaN MOVPE growth in a vertical rotating disk reactor is conducted with varying kinetic parameters for main reaction paths. By comparisons of the molar concentrations of major Ga-containing species and the growth rates, the effects of kinetic parameters on gas reaction paths are determined. The results show that, depending on the values of the kinetic parameters, the gas reaction path may be dominated either by adduct/amide formation path, or by TMG pyrolysis path, or by both. Although the reaction path varies with different kinetic parameters, the predicted growth rates change only slightly because the total transport rate of Ga-containing species to the substrate changes slightly with reaction paths. This explains why previous authors using different chemical models predicted growth rates close to the experiment values. By varying the pre-exponential factor for the amide trimerization, it is found that the more trimers are formed, the lower the growth rates are than the experimental value, which indicates that trimers are poor growth precursors, because of thermal diffusion effect caused by high temperature gradient. The effective order for the contribution of major species to growth rate is found as: pyrolysis species > amides > trimers. The study also shows that radical reactions have little effect on gas reaction path because of the generation and depletion of H radicals in the chain reactions when NH2 is considered as the end species.

  13. An efficient technique for the point reactor kinetics equations with Newtonian temperature feedback effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nahla, Abdallah A.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → An efficient technique for the nonlinear reactor kinetics equations is presented. → This method is based on Backward Euler or Crank Nicholson and fundamental matrix. → Stability of efficient technique is defined and discussed. → This method is applied to point kinetics equations of six-groups of delayed neutrons. → Step, ramp, sinusoidal and temperature feedback reactivities are discussed. - Abstract: The point reactor kinetics equations of multi-group of delayed neutrons in the presence Newtonian temperature feedback effects are a system of stiff nonlinear ordinary differential equations which have not any exact analytical solution. The efficient technique for this nonlinear system is based on changing this nonlinear system to a linear system by the predicted value of reactivity and solving this linear system using the fundamental matrix of the homogenous linear differential equations. The nonlinear point reactor kinetics equations are rewritten in the matrix form. The solution of this matrix form is introduced. This solution contains the exponential function of a variable coefficient matrix. This coefficient matrix contains the unknown variable, reactivity. The predicted values of reactivity in the explicit form are determined replacing the exponential function of the coefficient matrix by two kinds, Backward Euler and Crank Nicholson, of the rational approximations. The nonlinear point kinetics equations changed to a linear system of the homogenous differential equations. The fundamental matrix of this linear system is calculated using the eigenvalues and the corresponding eigenvectors of the coefficient matrix. Stability of the efficient technique is defined and discussed. The efficient technique is applied to the point kinetics equations of six-groups of delayed neutrons with step, ramp, sinusoidal and the temperature feedback reactivities. The results of these efficient techniques are compared with the traditional methods.

  14. Identification & Characterization of Fungal Ice Nucleation Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheel, Jan Frederik; Kunert, Anna Theresa; Kampf, Christopher Johannes; Mauri, Sergio; Weidner, Tobias; Pöschl, Ulrich; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, Janine

    2016-04-01

    Freezing of water at relatively warm subfreezing temperatures is dependent on ice nucleation catalysis facilitated by ice nuclei (IN). These IN can be of various origins and although extensive research was done and progress was achieved, the nature and mechanisms leading to an effective IN are to date still poorly understood. Some of the most important processes of our geosphere like the water cycle are highly dependent on effective ice nucleation at temperatures between -2°C - -8°C, a temperature range which is almost exclusively covered by biological IN (BioIN). BioIN are usually macromolecular structures of biological polymers. Sugars as well as proteins have been reported to serve as IN and the best characterized BioIN are ice nucleation proteins (IN-P) from gram negative bacteria. Fungal strains from Fusarium spp. were described to be effective IN at subfreezing temperatures up to -2°C already 25 years ago and more and more fungal species are described to serve as efficient IN. Fungal IN are also thought to be proteins or at least contain a proteinaceous compound, but to date the fungal IN-P primary structure as well as their coding genetic elements of all IN active fungi are unknown. The aim of this study is a.) to identify the proteins and their coding genetic elements from IN active fungi (F. acuminatum, F. avenaceum, M. alpina) and b.) to characterize the mechanisms by which fungal IN serve as effective IN. We designed an interdisciplinary approach using biological, analytical and physical methods to identify fungal IN-P and describe their biological, chemical, and physical properties.

  15. Fast kinetics of the oxygen effect in irradiated mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watts, M.E.; Maughan, R.L.; Michael, B.D.

    1978-01-01

    A technique using a fast gas transfer with a single pulse of electrons (the gas-explosion technique) has been used to investigate the time-dependence of the dose-modifying action of oxygen in irradiated V79 Chinese hamster cells. Oxygen did not significantly alter the shapes of the survival curves. The dose-modifying factor between the fully oxic and fully hypoxic (oxygen at 9000 ms) curve was 2.6. The dose-modifying factor for the survival curve drawn for oxygen contact at 0.3 ms after irradiation was 1.5 relative to the hypoxic curve. The duration of the post-effect (oxygen contact after irradiation) indicated that oxygen-dependent damage has a lifetime extending into the ms time-range. In the pre-effect time region (oxygen contact before irradiation) 1 to 2 ms oxygen contact was required to achieve the full sensitization. The results are discussed with reference to the diffusion time for oxygen to reach the sensitive site within the cell. (U.K.)

  16. Effect of austenitization conditions on kinetics of isothermal transformation of austenite of structural steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konopleva, E.V.; Bayazitov, V.M.; Abramov, O.V.; Kozlova, A.G.

    1987-01-01

    Effect of austenization of kinetics of pearlite and bainite transformations for steels with different carbon content differing by alloying character and degree has been investigated. Austenization temperature increase is shown to leads to retardation of ferrite-pearlite transformation in low- and medium-carbon alloyed steels. Step-like holding in the region of austenite stable state (850, 950 deg) after high-temperature heating (1100 deg C) increases the rate of transformation partially recovering its kinetics and decomposition velocity after low-temperature heating in steels alloyed advantageously with carbide-forming elements (08Kh2G2F, 30Kh3) and does not affect kinetics in the 35Kh, 30KhGSN2A, 45N5 steels. Increase of heating temperature and growth of an austenite grain cause considerable acceleration of bainite transformation, increase of the temperaure of bainite transformation beginning and increase of the transformation amplitude in the 08Kh2G2F, 30Kh3 steels and affect weakly kinetics in steels with mixed alloying (30KhGSN2A) or low-alloy one (35Kh). The bainite transformation rate in the 45N5 steelite does not depend on austenization. The effect of additional acceleration of bainite transformation as a result holding after high-temperature heating in those steels, where activation of transformation occurs with increase of heating temperature

  17. Kinetics of Uranium(VI) Desorption from Contaminated Sediments: Effect of Geochemical Conditions and Model Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Chongxuan; Shi, Zhenqing; Zachara, John M.

    2009-01-01

    Stirred-flow cell experiments were performed to investigate the kinetics of uranyl (U(VI)) desorption from a contaminated sediment collected from the Hanford 300 Area at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site, Washington. Three influent solutions of variable pH, Ca and carbonate concentrations that affected U(VI) aqueous and surface speciation were used under dynamic flow conditions to evaluate the effect of geochemical conditions on the rate of U(VI) desorption. The measured rate of U(VI) desorption varied with solution chemical composition that evolved as a result of thermodynamic and kinetic interactions between the influent solutions and sediment. The solution chemical composition that led to a lower equilibrium U(VI) sorption to the solid phase yielded a faster desorption rate. The experimental results were used to evaluate a multi-rate, surface complexation model (SCM) that has been proposed to describe U(VI) desorption kinetics in the Hanford sediment that contained complex sorbed U(VI) species in mass transfer limited domains. The model was modified and supplemented by including multi-rate, ion exchange reactions to describe the geochemical interactions between the solutions and sediment. With the same set of model parameters, the modified model reasonably well described the evolution of major ions and the rates of U(VI) desorption under variable geochemical and flow conditions, implying that the multi-rate SCM is an effective way to describe U(VI) desorption kinetics in subsurface sediments

  18. Homogeneous nucleation of water in synthetic air

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fransen, M.A.L.J.; Sachteleben, E.; Hruby, J.; Smeulders, D.M.J.; DeMott, P.J.; O'Dowd, C.D.

    2013-01-01

    Homogeneous nucleation rates for water vapor in synthetic air are measured by means of a Pulse-Expansion Wave Tube (PEWT). A comparison of the experimental nucleation rates with the Classical Nucleation Theory (CNT) shows that a more elaborated model is necessary to describe supercooled water

  19. A classical view on nonclassical nucleation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, P.J.M.; Finney, A.R.; Habraken, W.J.E.M.; Nudelman, F.; Friedrich, H.; Laven, J.; De Yoreo, J.J.; Rodger, P.M.; Sommerdijk, N.A.J.M.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding and controlling nucleation is important for many crystallization applications. Calcium carbonate (CaCO3) is often used as a model system to investigate nucleation mechanisms. Despite its great importance in geology, biology, and many industrial applications, CaCO3 nucleation is still a

  20. Inhibition of crystal nucleation and growth by water-soluble polymers and its impact on the supersaturation profiles of amorphous drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaki, Shunsuke; Kushida, Ikuo; Yamashita, Taro; Hasebe, Takashi; Shirai, Osamu; Kano, Kenji

    2013-07-01

    The impact of water-soluble polymers on drug supersaturation behavior was investigated to elucidate the role of water-soluble polymers in enhancing the supersaturation levels of amorphous pharmaceuticals. Hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC), polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), and Eudragit L-100 (Eudragit) were used as representative polymers, and griseofulvin and danazol were used as model drugs. Supersaturation profiles of amorphous drugs were measured in biorelevant dissolution tests. Crystal growth rate was measured from the decrease in dissolved drug concentration in the presence of seed crystals. Nucleation kinetics was evaluated by measuring the induction time for nucleation. All experiments were performed in the presence and absence of polymers. The degree of supersaturation of the amorphous model drugs increased with an increase in the inhibitory efficiency of polymers against crystal nucleation and growth (HPMC > PVP > Eudragit). In the presence of HPMC, the addition of seed crystals diminished the supersaturation ratio dramatically for griseofulvin and moderately for danazol. The results demonstrated that the polymers contributed to drug supersaturation by inhibiting both nucleation and growth. The effect of the polymers was drug dependent. The detailed characterization of polymers would allow selection of appropriate crystallization inhibitors and a planned quality control strategy for the development of supersaturable formulations. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Numerical Simulation of the Kinetic Critical Nucleus

    OpenAIRE

    Sanada, Masaaki; Nishioka, Kazumi; Okada, Masahumi; Maksimov, Igor, L.

    1997-01-01

    Our main interest is to see whether the number density indicates a peak at the kinetically stable critical nucleus due to its kinetical stability. We have numerically calculated the time evolution of the number densities of clusters in the case of water vapor nucleation. We employ the condition in which the difference between the size of the thermodynamic crtitical nucleus and that of the kinetic one is appreciable. The results show that the peak does not appear in the number densities of clu...

  2. Effect of impurities on kinetic transport processes in fusion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, Stefanie

    2010-12-10

    Within the framework of this thesis, different problems arising in connection with impurities have been investigated. Collisional damping of zonal flows in tokamaks: Since the Coulomb collision frequency increases with increasing ion charge, heavy, highly charged impurities play an important role in this process. The effect of such impurities on the linear response of the plasma to an external potential perturbation, as caused by zonal flows, is calculated with analytical methods. In comparison with a pure plasma, the damping of the flows occurs, as expected, considerably faster; for experimentally relevant parameters, the enhancement exceeds the effective charge Z{sub eff} of the plasma. Impurity transport driven by microturbulence in tokamaks: With regard to impurities, it is especially important whether the resulting flows are directed inwards or outwards, since they are deleterious for core energy confinement on the one hand, but on the other hand help protecting plasma-facing components from too high energy fluxes in the edge region. A semi-analytical model is presented describing the resulting impurity fluxes and the stability boundary of the underlying mode. The main goal is to bridge the gap between, on the one hand, costly numerical simulations, which are applicable to a broad range of problems but yield scarcely traceable results, and, on the other hand, analytical theory, which might ease the interpretation of the results but is so far rather rudimentary. The model is based on analytical formulae whenever possible but resorts to a numerical treatment when the approximations necessary for an analytical solution would lead to a substantial distortion of the results. Both the direction of the impurity flux and the stability boundary are found to depend sensitively on the plasma parameters such as the impurity density and the temperature gradient. Pfirsch-Schlueter transport in stellarators: Due to geometry effects, collisional transport plays a much more

  3. Transformation kinetics for nucleus clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villa, Elena; Rios, Paulo R.

    2009-01-01

    A rigorous mathematical approach based on stochastic geometry concepts is presented to extend previous Johnson-Mehl, Avrami, Kolmogorov treatment of transformation kinetics to situations in which nuclei are not homogeneously located in space but are located in clusters. An exact analytical solution is presented here for the first time assuming that nucleation sites follow a Matern cluster process. The influence of Matern cluster process parameters on subsequent growth kinetics and the microstructural path are illustrated by means of numerical examples. Moreover, using the superposition principle, exact analytical solutions are also obtained when nucleation takes place by a combination of a Matern cluster process and an inhomogeneous Poisson point process. The new solutions presented here significantly increase the number of exactly solvable cases available to formal kinetics.

  4. The nucleation of vorticity by ions in superfluid 4He

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muirhead, C.M.; Vinen, W.F.; Donnelly, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    The theory developed in Part I is extended to include a discussion of nucleation by negative ions in the presence of dissolved 3 He at a concentration such that at a low temperature the negative ion bubble is likely to have adsorbed on its surface either one or two 3 He atoms. It is argued that the adsorbed 3 He atom can change the nucleation rate for two reasons: the atom can modify the perturbation applied to the helium at the surface of the ions; and it can act as a source of energy. The second of these effects is explored in some detail. It is shown that the 3 He atom is probably less strongly bound to the ion than it would be to the core of a vortex line; furthermore the atom adsorbed onto the surface of the ion can exist in a number of excited states (Shikin states), which are thermally populated even at quite low temperatures. Therefore, when nucleation of a vortex takes place, the 3 He atom might move from the ion surface to the core of the vortex or simply from one Shikin state to another of lower energy; in either case there is a release of energy. The existence of this energy release means, first, that nucleation becomes energetically possible at a reduced ionic velocity and secondly, that the energy barrier opposing nucleation is reduced in size. Therefore the critical velocity for vortex nucleation is reduced, and, for a given supercritical velocity, the rate of nucleation is increased. Addition of a second 3 He atom would have a similar effect. Further experiments are required to check the detailed predictions of the theory. (author)

  5. Compressibility effects on ideal and kinetic ballooning modes and elimination of finite Larmor radius stabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotschenreuther, M.

    1985-07-01

    The dynamics of ideal and kinetic ballooning modes are considered analytically including parallel ion dynamics, but without electron dissipation. For ideal modes, parallel dynamics predominantly determine the growth rate when β is within approx.30% of the ideal threshold, resulting in a substantial reduction in growth rate. Compressibility also eliminates the stabilization effects of finite Larmor radius (FLR); FLR effects (when temperature gradients are neglected) can even increase the growth rate above the MHD value. Temperature gradients accentuate this by adding a new source of free energy independent of the MHD drive, in this region of ballooning coordinate corresponding in MHD to the continuum. Analytic dispersion relations are derived demonstrating the effects above; the formalism emphasizes the similarities between the ideal MHD and kinetic cases

  6. Iterative Addition of Kinetic Effects to Cold Plasma RF Wave Solvers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, David; Berry, Lee; RF-SciDAC Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    The hot nature of fusion plasmas requires a wave vector dependent conductivity tensor for accurate calculation of wave heating and current drive. Traditional methods for calculating the linear, kinetic full-wave plasma response rely on a spectral method such that the wave vector dependent conductivity fits naturally within the numerical method. These methods have seen much success for application to the well-confined core plasma of tokamaks. However, quantitative prediction of high power RF antenna designs for fusion applications has meant a requirement of resolving the geometric details of the antenna and other plasma facing surfaces for which the Fourier spectral method is ill-suited. An approach to enabling the addition of kinetic effects to the more versatile finite-difference and finite-element cold-plasma full-wave solvers was presented by where an operator-split iterative method was outlined. Here we expand on this approach, examine convergence and present a simplified kinetic current estimator for rapidly updating the right-hand side of the wave equation with kinetic corrections. This research used resources of the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, which is supported by the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  7. Effects of fatigue on kinematics and kinetics during overground running: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Sara; Gordon, Susan; Watt, Kerrianne

    2017-06-01

    Understanding kinematic and kinetic changes with fatigue during running is important to assess changes that may influence performance and injury. The aim of this systematic review was to identify, critique and summarize literature about the effects of fatigue on kinematics and kinetics during a fatiguing overground run and present the reported influence on performance and injury. An electronic search was conducted of MEDLINE, SPORTDiscus, CINAHL and PubMed databases. Two reviewers assessed articles for inclusion, and evaluated the quality of articles included using a modified version of the Downs and Black Quality Index. A total of twelve articles were identified for review. The mean quality assessment score was seven out of a possible 12. Kinematic and kinetic changes reported to affect performance included decreased speed, step or stride frequency and length, increased trunk flexion, lower leg position at heel strike, mediolateral acceleration, changes in hip and knee ranges, and decreased stride regularity, heel lift, maximum knee rotation and backward ankle velocity. Alterations reported to increase risk of injury included decreased step frequency, increased upper body rotation and lower leg position at heel strike, and decreased knee flexion during stance. Reduced risk of injury has been linked to decreased step length and hip ranges, and increased trunk flexion. This review found limited evidence regarding changes in kinematic and kinetic during a fatiguing run in relation to performance and injury. Higher quality studies are warranted, with a larger sample of homogenous runners, and type of run carefully selected to provide quality information for runners, coaches and clinicians.

  8. Effects of prophylactic knee bracing on knee joint kinetics and kinematics during netball specific movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Jonathan K; Vincent, Hayley; Richards, Jim D

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the effects of a prophylactic knee brace on knee joint kinetics and kinematics during netball specific movements. Repeated measures. Laboratory. Twenty university first team level female netball players. Participants performed three movements, run, cut and vertical jump under two conditions (brace and no-brace). 3-D knee joint kinetics and kinematics were measured using an eight-camera motion analysis system. Knee joint kinetics and kinematics were examined using 2 × 3 repeated measures ANOVA whilst the subjective ratings of comfort and stability were investigated using chi-squared tests. The results showed no differences (p > 0.05) in knee joint kinetics. However the internal/external rotation range of motion was significantly (p < 0.05) reduced when wearing the brace in all movements. The subjective ratings of stability revealed that netballers felt that the knee brace improved knee stability in all movements. Further study is required to determine whether reductions in transverse plane knee range of motion serve to attenuate the risk from injury in netballers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of feeding on the plasma disposition kinetics of the anthelmintic albendazole in laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bistoletti, M; Alvarez, L; Lanusse, C; Moreno, L

    2014-01-01

    1. To optimise the use of albendazole (ABZ) as an anthelmintic in hens, the effects of fasting and type of diet on the plasma kinetics of ABZ and its metabolites were evaluated. 2. Twenty-four hens were distributed into 4 groups: In experiment I the Fed group were fed ad libitum, while the Fasted group was fasted over a 12-h period. In experiment II the Pelleted group was fed with pelleted commercial food, while the Grain group was fed with cereal grains. All the groups were treated with ABZ by oral route. Blood samples were taken and plasma analysed by HPLC. 3. ABZ and its metabolites albendazole-sulphoxide (ABZSO) and albendazole-sulphone (ABZSO2) were recovered in plasma in all the groups. The 12-h fasting period did not modify the disposition kinetics of ABZ in hens. The type of feed affected ABZ kinetics. ABZSO concentration profile was higher and detected for longer in the Grain group compared to the Pelleted group. Statistical differences were not found for AUC0-∞ values, whereas the T1/2for and T1/2el were different between groups. 4. Factors affecting ABZ kinetic behaviour should be taken into account to optimise its use to ensure the sustainability of the limited available anthelmintic therapeutic tools in avian parasite control.

  10. A prominent anchoring effect on the kinetic control of drug release from mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Vy Anh; Lee, Sang-Wha

    2018-01-15

    This work demonstrated kinetically controlled release of model drugs (ibuprofen, FITC) from well-tailored mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) depending on the surface charges and molecular sizes of the drugs. The molecular interactions between entrapped drugs and the pore walls of MSNs controlled the release of the drugs through the pore channels of MSNs. Also, polydopamine (PDA) layer-coated MSNs (MSNs@PDA) was quite effective to retard the release of large FITC, in contrast to a slight retardation effect on relatively small Ibuprofen. Of all things, FITC (Fluorescein isothiocyanate)-labeled APTMS (3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane) (APTMS-FITC conjugates) grafted onto the MSNs generate a pinch-effect on the pore channel (so-called a prominent anchoring effect), which was highly effective in trapping (or blocking) drug molecules at the pore mouth of the MSNs. The anchored APTMS-FITC conjugates provided not only tortuous pathways to the diffusing molecules, but also sustained release of the ibuprofen over a long period of time (∼7days). The fast release kinetics was predicted by an exponential equation based on Fick's law, while the slow release kinetics was predicted by Higuchi model. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The Lack of Chemical Equilibrium does not Preclude the Use of the Classical Nucleation Theory in Circumstellar Outflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquette, John A.; Nuth, Joseph A., III

    2011-01-01

    Classical nucleation theory has been used in models of dust nucleation in circumstellar outflows around oxygen-rich asymptotic giant branch stars. One objection to the application of classical nucleation theory (CNT) to astrophysical systems of this sort is that an equilibrium distribution of clusters (assumed by CNT) is unlikely to exist in such conditions due to a low collision rate of condensable species. A model of silicate grain nucleation and growth was modified to evaluate the effect of a nucleation flux orders of magnitUde below the equilibrium value. The results show that a lack of chemical equilibrium has only a small effect on the ultimate grain distribution.

  12. Effect of an isoenergetic traditional Mediterranean diet on apolipoprotein A-I kinetic in men with metabolic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    The impact of the Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) on high-density lipoprotein (HDL) kinetics has not been studied to date. The objective of this study was therefore to investigate the effect of the MedDiet in the absence of changes in body weight on apolipoprotein (apo) A-I kinetic in men with metaboli...

  13. Using Beads and Divided Containers to Study Kinetic and Equilibrium Isotope Effects in the Laboratory and in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Dean J.; Brewer, Emily R.; Martinez, Keri A.; Fitzjarrald, Tamara J.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this laboratory experiment is to study fundamental concepts of kinetics and equilibria and the isotope effects associated with both of these concepts. The concepts of isotopes in introductory and general chemistry courses are typically used within the contexts of atomic weights and radioactivity. Kinetic and equilibrium isotope…

  14. Study of the effect of anions and mixed solvents on the kinetics of reduction of Eu(III)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandrasekaran, V.R.; Sundaram, A.K.

    1983-01-01

    The kinetics of reduction of Eu(III) to Eu(II) in aqueous solutions of perchlorate, chloride, sulphate, acetate and lactate anions and water-methanol and water-acetone mixtures containing potassium chloride as the inert electrolyte is reported and the effect of anions and solvent on the kinetics is studied. (author)

  15. Revision of nucleated boiling mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Converti, J.; Balino, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    The boiling occurrence plays an important role in the power reactors energy transfer. But still, there is not a final theory on the boiling mechanisms. This paper presents a critical analysis of the most important nucleated boiling models that appear in literature. The conflicting points are identified and experiments are proposed to clear them up. Some of these experiments have been performed at the Thermohydraulics laboratory (Bariloche Atomic Center). (Author)

  16. Mechanisms of nucleation in flashing flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, F.; Giot, M.

    1989-01-01

    The mechanisms of nucleation have been analysed. Starting from the assumption that the activation of micro-cavities in the wall surfaces is the most probable nucleation mechanism in practical flashing system, the authors study in detail the nucleation in a micro-cavity. A three step nucleation criterion is proposed, namely: trapping cavity, activable cavity and active cavity. Then, a new nucleation model is presented. The output of the model is the prediction of the bubble departure frequency versus the thermodynamic state of the liquid and the geometry of the cavity. The model can also predict the nucleation site density if the nature of the wall and the surface roughness are know. The prediction have been successfully compared with some preliminary experimental results. By combining the present model with Jones'theory, the flashing inception is correctly predicted. The use of this nucleation model for the complete modelling of a flashing non-equilibrium flow is in progress

  17. Modeling of helium bubble nucleation and growth in neutron irradiated boron doped RAFM steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dethloff, Christian; Gaganidze, Ermile; Svetukhin, Vyacheslav V.; Aktaa, Jarir

    2012-01-01

    Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels are promising candidates for structural materials in future fusion technology. In addition to other irradiation defects, the transmuted helium is believed to strongly influence material hardening and embrittlement behavior. A phenomenological model based on kinetic rate equations is developed to describe homogeneous nucleation and growth of helium bubbles in neutron irradiated RAFM steels. The model is adapted to different 10 B doped EUROFER97 based heats, which already had been studied in past irradiation experiments. Simulations yield bubble size distributions, whereby effects of helium generation rate, surface energy, helium sinks and helium density are investigated. Peak bubble diameters under different conditions are compared to preliminary microstructural results on irradiated specimens. Helium induced hardening was calculated by applying the Dispersed Barrier Hardening model to simulated cluster size distributions. Quantitative microstructural investigations of unirradiated and irradiated specimens will be used to support and verify the model.

  18. Modeling of helium bubble nucleation and growth in neutron irradiated boron doped RAFM steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dethloff, Christian, E-mail: christian.dethloff@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Applied Materials, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Gaganidze, Ermile [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Applied Materials, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Svetukhin, Vyacheslav V. [Ulyanovsk State University, Leo Tolstoy Str. 42, 432970 Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation); Aktaa, Jarir [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Applied Materials, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2012-07-15

    Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels are promising candidates for structural materials in future fusion technology. In addition to other irradiation defects, the transmuted helium is believed to strongly influence material hardening and embrittlement behavior. A phenomenological model based on kinetic rate equations is developed to describe homogeneous nucleation and growth of helium bubbles in neutron irradiated RAFM steels. The model is adapted to different {sup 10}B doped EUROFER97 based heats, which already had been studied in past irradiation experiments. Simulations yield bubble size distributions, whereby effects of helium generation rate, surface energy, helium sinks and helium density are investigated. Peak bubble diameters under different conditions are compared to preliminary microstructural results on irradiated specimens. Helium induced hardening was calculated by applying the Dispersed Barrier Hardening model to simulated cluster size distributions. Quantitative microstructural investigations of unirradiated and irradiated specimens will be used to support and verify the model.

  19. Mineralization of LCFA associated with anaerobic sludge: Kinetics, enhancement of methanogenic activity, and effect of VFA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, M A; Sousa, D Z; Mota, M; Alves, M M

    2004-11-20

    Long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) associated with anaerobic sludge by mechanisms of precipitation, adsorption, or entrapment can be biodegraded to methane. The mineralization kinetics of biomass-associated LCFA were established according to an inhibition model based on Haldane's enzymatic inhibition kinetics. A value around 1,000 mg COD-LCFA..g VSS(-1) was obtained for the optimal specific LCFA content that allowed the maximal mineralization rate. For sludge with specific LCFA contents of 2,838 +/- 63 and 4,571 +/- 257 mg COD-LCFA..g VSS(-1), the specific methanogenic activities in the presence of acetate, butyrate, and H(2)/CO(2) were significantly enhanced after the mineralization of the biomass-associated LCFA. For sludge with a specific LCFA content near the optimal value defined by the kinetic model, the effect of adding VFA to the medium was studied during the mineralization of the biomass-associated LCFA. Different patterns were obtained for each individual substrate. Acetate and butyrate were preferentially consumed by the consortium, but in the case of propionate no evidence of a sequential consumption pattern could be withdrawn. It was concluded that LCFA do not exert a bactericidal neither a permanent toxic effect toward the anaerobic consortia. A discussion is addressed to the relative roles of a reversible inhibitory effect and a transport limitation effect imposed by the LCFA surrounding the cells. (c) 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc

  20. Thermodynamic Derivation of the Activation Energy for Ice Nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barahona, D.

    2015-01-01

    Cirrus clouds play a key role in the radiative and hydrological balance of the upper troposphere. Their correct representation in atmospheric models requires an understanding of the microscopic processes leading to ice nucleation. A key parameter in the theoretical description of ice nucleation is the activation energy, which controls the flux of water molecules from the bulk of the liquid to the solid during the early stages of ice formation. In most studies it is estimated by direct association with the bulk properties of water, typically viscosity and self-diffusivity. As the environment in the ice-liquid interface may differ from that of the bulk, this approach may introduce bias in calculated nucleation rates. In this work a theoretical model is proposed to describe the transfer of water molecules across the ice-liquid interface. Within this framework the activation energy naturally emerges from the combination of the energy required to break hydrogen bonds in the liquid, i.e., the bulk diffusion process, and the work dissipated from the molecular rearrangement of water molecules within the ice-liquid interface. The new expression is introduced into a generalized form of classical nucleation theory. Even though no nucleation rate measurements are used to fit any of the parameters of the theory the predicted nucleation rate is in good agreement with experimental results, even at temperature as low as 190 K, where it tends to be underestimated by most models. It is shown that the activation energy has a strong dependency on temperature and a weak dependency on water activity. Such dependencies are masked by thermodynamic effects at temperatures typical of homogeneous freezing of cloud droplets; however, they may affect the formation of ice in haze aerosol particles. The new model provides an independent estimation of the activation energy and the homogeneous ice nucleation rate, and it may help to improve the interpretation of experimental results and the

  1. Effect of dissolution kinetics on flotation response of calcite with oleate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. G. Horta

    Full Text Available Abstract Phosphate flotation performance can be influenced by the dissolution kinetics of the minerals that compose the ore. The purpose of this work was to investigate the effect of dissolution kinetics on flotation response with oleate (collector of calcites from different origins and genesis. The calcite samples were first purified and characterized by x-ray Fluorescence (XRF and the Rietveld method applied to x-ray Diffractometry data (RXD. Experiments of calcite dissolution and microflotationwere performed at pH 8 and pH 10.The pH effect on the calcite dissolution and flotation indicates the possible influence of the carbonate/bicarbonate ions provided by the CO2 present in the air. In addition, the flotation response is greater as the dissolution increases, making more Ca2+ ions available to interact with collector molecules. This result corroborates the surface precipitation mechanism proposed foroleate adsorption on the calcite surface.

  2. The kinetic energy operator for distance-dependent effective nuclear masses: Derivation for a triatomic molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoma, Mykhaylo; Jaquet, Ralph

    2017-09-21

    The kinetic energy operator for triatomic molecules with coordinate or distance-dependent nuclear masses has been derived. By combination of the chain rule method and the analysis of infinitesimal variations of molecular coordinates, a simple and general technique for the construction of the kinetic energy operator has been proposed. The asymptotic properties of the Hamiltonian have been investigated with respect to the ratio of the electron and proton mass. We have demonstrated that an ad hoc introduction of distance (and direction) dependent nuclear masses in Cartesian coordinates preserves the total rotational invariance of the problem. With the help of Wigner rotation functions, an effective Hamiltonian for nuclear motion can be derived. In the derivation, we have focused on the effective trinuclear Hamiltonian. All necessary matrix elements are given in closed analytical form. Preliminary results for the influence of non-adiabaticity on vibrational band origins are presented for H 3 + .

  3. Hot deformation effect on the kinetics of austenite transformation under continuous cooling conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernshtejn, M.L.; Zajmovskij, V.A.; Kisteh, N.V.; Samedov, O.V.; Faldin, S.A.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of hot deformation on the kinetics of austenite transformations in the commercial 4040Kh 40KhN, and 40KhNMA steels on continuous cooling was studied. The transformations were studied using a dilatometer of a special design which permits a specimen to be fixed quickly in holders after hot deformation. It is stated that in hot-deformed austenite the pearlite transformation proceeds at higher temperatures and in a narrower temperature range. Austenite deformation provides an opportunity to obtain a more fine ferrite-pearlite structure and ensures a uniform distribution of a structurally free ferrite in the steel bulk. The effect of hot deformation on the structure of ferrite decomposition products in the 40KhN and 40KhNMA steels is more complicated, which is connected with a substantial change in the kinetics of pearlite and intermediate transformations

  4. Thermo-Kinetic Investigation of Comparative Ligand Effect on Cysteine Iron Redox Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masood Ahmad Rizvi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Transition metal ions in their free state bring unwanted biological oxidations generating oxidative stress. The ligand modulated redox potential can be indispensable in prevention of such oxidative stress by blocking the redundant bio-redox reactions. In this study we investigated the comparative ligand effect on the thermo-kinetic aspects of biologically important cysteine iron (III redox reaction using spectrophotometric and potentiometric methods. The results were corroborated with the complexation effect on redox potential of iron(III-iron(II redox couple. The selected ligands were found to increase the rate of cysteine iron (III redox reaction in proportion to their stability of iron (II complex (EDTA < terpy < bipy < phen. A kinetic profile and the catalytic role of copper (II ions by means of redox shuttle mechanism for the cysteine iron (III redox reaction in presence of 1,10-phenanthroline (phen ligand is also reported.

  5. Kinetic, volumetric and structural effects induced by liquid Ga penetration into ultrafine grained Al

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naderi, Mehrnoosh; Peterlechner, Martin; Schafler, Erhard; Divinski, Sergiy V.; Wilde, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Kinetic, volumetric and structural effects induced by penetration of liquid Ga in ultrafine grained (UFG) Al produced by severe plastic deformation using high-pressure torsion were studied by isothermal dilatometric measurements, electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Severe plastic deformation changed the distribution of impurities and their segregation was revealed by transmission electron microscopy. Two-stage length changes of UFG Al were observed which are explained by counteracting effects of expansion due to grain boundary segregation of Ga and contraction due to precipitation and recrystallization. After applying Ga, the kinetics of the liquid Ga penetration in UFG Al is studied in-situ in the electron microscope by the “first appearance” method and the time scales are in agreement with those inducing the volumetric changes

  6. Crystal nucleation in metallic alloys using x-ray radiography and machine learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arteta, Carlos; Lempitsky, Victor

    2018-01-01

    The crystallization of solidifying Al-Cu alloys over a wide range of conditions was studied in situ by synchrotron x-ray radiography, and the data were analyzed using a computer vision algorithm trained using machine learning. The effect of cooling rate and solute concentration on nucleation undercooling, crystal formation rate, and crystal growth rate was measured automatically for thousands of separate crystals, which was impossible to achieve manually. Nucleation undercooling distributions confirmed the efficiency of extrinsic grain refiners and gave support to the widely assumed free growth model of heterogeneous nucleation. We show that crystallization occurred in temporal and spatial bursts associated with a solute-suppressed nucleation zone. PMID:29662954

  7. Heterogeneous Nucleation of Methane Hydrate in a Water-Decane-Methane Emulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shestakov, V. A.; Kosyakov, V. I.; Manakov, A. Yu.; Stoporev, A. S.; Grachev, E. V.

    2018-07-01

    Heterogeneous nucleation in disperse systems with metastable disperse phases plays an important role in the mechanisms of environmental and technological processes. The effect the concentration and activity of particles that initiate the formation of a new phase have on nucleation processes in such systems is considered. An approach is proposed that allows construction of a spectrum of particle activity characterizing the features of nucleation in a sample, based on the fraction of crystallized droplets depending on the level of supercooling and the use of Weibull's distribution. The proposed method is used to describe experimental data on the heterogeneous nucleation of methane hydrate in an emulsion in a water-decane-methane system.

  8. Effect of Polarization on the Mobility of C60: A Kinetic Monte Carlo Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpi, Riccardo; Kottravel, Sathish; Nørby, Morten Steen; Stafström, Sven; Linares, Mathieu

    2016-02-09

    We present a study of mobility field and temperature dependence for C60 with Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. We propose a new scheme to take into account polarization effects in organic materials through atomic induced dipoles on nearby molecules. This leads to an energy correction for the single site energies and to an external reorganization happening after each hopping. The inclusion of polarization allows us to obtain a good agreement with experiments for both mobility field and temperature dependence.

  9. Kinetic tritium isotopic effects in the position 2 for 5'-hydroxy-L-tryptophane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boroda, E.; Kanska, M.

    2006-01-01

    Tryptophanase converts 5'-hydroxy-L-tryptophane to pyrogronic acid and ammonia, however there are known conditions for the reversed reaction. Mechanism of the processes are not known till now. Kinetic isotopic effect (KIE) permits finding the rate determining stage in the multistage process. In presented communication, 5'-hydroxy-[2- 3 H]-L-tryptophane was synthesized and the KIE in the room temperature determined for different reaction stages

  10. Relative rate study of the kinetic isotope effect in the 13CH3D + Cl reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joelsson, Lars Magnus Torvald; Forecast, Roslyn; Schmidt, Johan Albrecht

    2014-01-01

    The 13CH3D/12CH4kinetic isotope effect, α13CH3D, of CH4 + Cl is determined for the first time, using the relative rate technique and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. α13CH3D is found to be 1.60 ± 0.04. In addition, a quantum chemistry/transition state theory model with tunneling...

  11. Effects of Fishmeal or Urea Supplementation on Ruminal Fibre Digestion and Passage Kinetics in Bali Cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    I.G.N, Jelantik; C., Leo-Penu; J., Jeremias

    2010-01-01

    Five non-pregnant Bali cows were used in a 5x5 latin square experimental design with the objective to study the effects of supplementation of graded levels of urea or fishmeal on fibre intake and digestion kinetics in Bali cows consuming low quality tropical grass hay. The animals were given ad...... to improve the intake of low quality fibrous tropical grass hay in Bali cows were 152 g/d and 74 g/d, respectively....

  12. Thermo-Kinetic Investigation of Comparative Ligand Effect on Cysteine Iron Redox Reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Rizvi, Masood Ahmad; Teshima, Norio; Maqsood, Syed Raashid; Akhoon, Showket Ahmad; Peerzada, Ghulam Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Transition metal ions in their free state bring unwanted biological oxidations generating oxidative stress. The ligand modulated redox potential can be indispensable in prevention of such oxidative stress by blocking the redundant bio-redox reactions. In this study we investigated the comparative ligand effect on the thermo-kinetic aspects of biologically important cysteine iron (III) redox reaction using spectrophotometric and potentiometric methods. The results were corroborated...

  13. Kinetic Isotope Effects (KIE) and Density Functional Theory (DFT): A Match Made in Heaven?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Niels Johan; Fristrup, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Determination of experimental kinetic isotope effects (KIE) is one of the most useful tools for the exploration of reaction mechanisms in organometallic chemistry. The approach has been further strengthened during the last decade with advances in modern computational chemistry. This allows for th...... reaction). The approach is highlighted by using recent examples from both stoichiometric and catalytic reactions, homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis, and enzyme catalysis to illustrate the expected accuracy and utility of this approach....

  14. Granular activated carbon as nucleating agent for aerobic sludge granulation: Effect of GAC size on velocity field differences (GAC versus flocs) and aggregation behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jia-Heng; Zhao, Hang; Hu, Miao; Yu, Hai-Tian; Xu, Xiang-Yang; Vidonish, Julia; Alvarez, Pedro J J; Zhu, Liang

    2015-12-01

    Initial cell aggregation plays an important role in the formation of aerobic granules. In this study, three parallel aerobic granular sludge reactors treating low-strength wastewater were established using granular activated carbon (GAC) of different sizes as the nucleating agent. A novel visual quantitative evaluation method was used to discern how GAC size affects velocity field differences (GAC versus flocs) and aggregation behavior during sludge granulation. Results showed that sludge granulation was significantly enhanced by addition of 0.2mm GAC. However, there was no obvious improvement in granulation in reactor amended with 0.6mm GAC. Hydraulic analysis revealed that increase of GAC size enhanced the velocity field difference between flocs and GAC, which decreased the lifecycle and fraction of flocs-GAC aggregates. Overall, based on analysis of aggregation behavior, GAC of suitable sizes (0.2mm) can serve as the nucleating agent to accelerate flocs-GAC coaggregation and formation of aerobic granules. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of Surface Modification of Nanodiamond Particles for Nucleation Enhancement during Its Film Growth by Microwave Plasma Jet Chemical Vapour Deposition Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chii-Ruey Lin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The seedings of the substrate with a suspension of nanodiamond particles (NDPs were widely used as nucleation seeds to enhance the growth of nanostructured diamond films. The formation of agglomerates in the suspension of NDPs, however, may have adverse impact on the initial growth period. Therefore, this paper was aimed at the surface modification of the NDPs to enhance the diamond nucleation for the growth of nanocrystalline diamond films which could be used in photovoltaic applications. Hydrogen plasma, thermal, and surfactant treatment techniques were employed to improve the dispersion characteristics of detonation nanodiamond particles in aqueous media. The seeding of silicon substrate was then carried out with an optimized spin-coating method. The results of both Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering measurements demonstrated that plasma treated diamond nanoparticles possessed polar surface functional groups and attained high dispersion in methanol. The nanocrystalline diamond films deposited by microwave plasma jet chemical vapour deposition exhibited extremely fine grain and high smooth surfaces (~6.4 nm rms on the whole film. These results indeed open up a prospect of nanocrystalline diamond films in solar cell applications.

  16. A UNIFIED KINETIC APPROACH TO BINARY NUCLEATION. (R826768)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  17. Nonlinear Dynamics and Nucleation Kinetics in Near-Critical Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patashinski, Alexander Z.; Ratner, Mark A.; Pines, Vladimir

    1996-01-01

    The objective of our study is to model the nonlinear behavior of a near-critical liquid following a rapid change of the temperature and/or other thermodynamic parameters (pressure, external electric or gravitational field). The thermodynamic critical point is manifested by large, strongly correlated fluctuations of the order parameter (particle density in liquid-gas systems, concentration in binary solutions) in the critical range of scales. The largest critical length scale is the correlation radius r(sub c). According to the scaling theory, r(sub c) increases as r(sub c) = r(sub 0)epsilon(exp -alpha) when the nondimensional distance epsilon = (T - T(sub c))/T(sub c) to the critical point decreases. The normal gravity alters the nature of correlated long-range fluctuations when one reaches epsilon approximately equal to 10(exp -5), and correspondingly the relaxation time, tau(r(sub c)), is approximately equal to 10(exp -3) seconds; this time is short when compared to the typical experimental time. Close to the critical point, a rapid, relatively small temperature change may perturb the thermodynamic equilibrium on many scales. The critical fluctuations have a hierarchical structure, and the relaxation involves many length and time scales. Above the critical point, in the one-phase region, we consider the relaxation of the liquid following a sudden temperature change that simultaneously violates the equilibrium on many scales. Below T(sub c), a non-equilibrium state may include a distribution of small scale phase droplets; we consider the relaxation of such a droplet following a temperature change that has made the phase of the matrix stable.

  18. Nucleation and growth kinetics of palladium nanoparticles on thin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    transmission electron microscopy (TEM), related to the first quantitative study on the ... density of clusters decreases when the substrate temperature increases following Arrhenius law. ... in two terms classical thermodynamics and atomistic.

  19. Deuterium kinetic isotope effects in the 1,4-dimethylenecyclohexane boat cope rearrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gajewski, J.J.; Jimenez, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    In order to examine the extent of bond making in the boat-like 3,3-sigmatropic shift transition states, trans-2,3-dimethyl-1,4-dimethylenecyclohexane (T) and its exomethylene tetradeuteria derivative (TXD) were prepared. The 3,3-shift of TXD at 305 0 C results in interconversion of starting material, 5,5,6,6-tetradeuterio-trans-2,3-dimethyl-1,4-dimethylene-cyclohexane (TND), and 2,2,3,3-tetradeuterio-anti-1,4-diethylidenecyclohexane (AD). A kinetic analysis of the first-order rate equations for the three-component system in both protio and deuterio species by numerical integration of the data and simplex minimization of the rate constants with symmetry and the assumption of no equilibrium or kinetic isotope effect on the TND-AD reaction gives a bond making kinetic isotope effect of 1/1.04 (0.04). The equilibrium isotope effects observed are 1/1.16 (0.04) so that the extent of bond formation in this boat-like bicyclo[2.2.2]octyl transition state is roughly 25%, a value to be compared with ca. 67% in chair-like acyclic 3,3-shift transition states. This rules out significant intervention of a bicyclo[2.2.2]octane-1,4-diyl intermediate or transition state. 30 references, 6 figures, 4 tables

  20. Kinetic-Scale Magnetic Turbulence and Finite Larmor Radius Effects at Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uritsky, V. M.; Slavin, J. A.; Khazanov, G. V.; Donovan, E. F.; Boardsen, S. A.; Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.

    2011-01-01

    We use a nonstationary generalization of the higher-order structure function technique to investigate statistical properties of the magnetic field fluctuations recorded by MESSENGER spacecraft during its first flyby (01/14/2008) through the near-Mercury space environment, with the emphasis on key boundary regions participating in the solar wind - magnetosphere interaction. Our analysis shows, for the first time, that kinetic-scale fluctuations play a significant role in the Mercury's magnetosphere up to the largest resolvable timescale (approx.20 s) imposed by the signal nonstationariry, suggesting that turbulence at this plane I is largely controlled by finite Larmor radius effects. In particular, we report the presence of a highly turbulent and extended foreshock system filled with packets of ULF oscillations, broad-band intermittent fluctuations in the magnetosheath, ion-kinetic turbulence in the central plasma sheet of Mercury's magnetotail, and kinetic-scale fluctuations in the inner current sheet encountered at the outbound (dawn-side) magnetopause. Overall, our measurements indicate that the Hermean magnetosphere, as well as the surrounding region, are strongly affected by non-MHD effects introduced by finite sizes of cyclotron orbits of the constituting ion species. Physical mechanisms of these effects and their potentially critical impact on the structure and dynamics of Mercury's magnetic field remain to be understood.

  1. The influence of glass fibers on the morphology of β-nucleated isotactic polypropylene evaluated by differential scanning calorimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janevski Aco

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of fillers/fibers can significantly affect the polymorphic behavior of semi-crystalline polymers. The influence of glass fibers on morphology of β-nucleated iPP during isothermal and nonisothermal crystallization was analyzed in detail by DSC, and the kinetics and thermodynamic parameters were determined for the systems containing 10-60 % glass fibers. The presence of glass fibers in model composites with β-iPP has insignificant effect on the morphology of the polymer. Thermodynamic and kinetics parameters of crystallization of iPP in model composites are close to those obtained for the nucleated polymer. The relative content of β-crystalline phase is slightly affected by increasing glass fiber’s content from 10 % mas to 60 % mas, due to appearance of α-crystallites. However, the stability of β-crystalline phase is decreased by the increasing glass fibers content and there appeared certain amount of β1 and β2 phases which are known as disposed to recrystallization.

  2. Thermogravimetric kinetic study of agricultural residue biomass pyrolysis based on combined kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xun; Hu, Mian; Hu, Wanyong; Chen, Zhihua; Liu, Shiming; Hu, Zhiquan; Xiao, Bo

    2016-11-01

    Pyrolytic kinetic of an agricultural residue (AR) feedstock, a mixture of plants (cotton, wheat, rich, corn) stems, was investigated based on combined kinetics. The most suitable mechanism for AR one-step pyrolysis was f(α)=(1-α)(1.1816)α(-1.8428) with kinetic parameters of: apparent activation energy 221.7kJ/mol, pre-exponential factor 4.17E16s(-1). Pyrolysis of AR feedstock could not be described by one-step reaction attributes to heterogeneous features of pyrolysis processes. Combined kinetics three-parallel-reaction (CK-TPR) model fitted the pyrolysis experimental data very well. Reaction mechanisms for pseudo hemicelluloses, cellulose, lignin in CK-TPR model was f(α)=(1-α)(1.6244)α(-0.3371)[-ln(1-α)](-0.0515), f(α)=(1-α)(1.0597)α(-0.6909)[-ln(1-α)](0.9026) and f(α)=(1-α)(2.9577)α(-4.7719), respectively. Apparent activation energy of three pseudo components followed the order of Elignin(197.3kJ/mol)>Ecellulose(176.3kJ/mol)>Ehemicelluloses (151.1kJ/mol). Mechanism of hemicelluloses pyrolysis could be further expressed as f(α)=(1-α)(1.4). The pyrolytic mechanism of cellulose met the Nucleation well. However, mechanism of lignin pyrolysis was complex, which possibly was the combined effects of Nucleation, Diffusion, Geometrical contraction, and Power law. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of Mineral Nutrients on the Kinetics of Methane Utilization by Methanotrophs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boiesen, Anette; Arvin, Erik; Broholm, Kim

    1993-01-01

    The effect of different mineral nutrients on the kinetics of methane biodegradation by a mixed culture of methanotrophic bacteria was studied. The substrate factors examined were ammonia, iron, copper, manganese, phosphate, and sulphide. The presence of iron in the growth medium had a strong effect...... was the only nitrogen source. The observed Monod constant for methane utilization increased with increasing concentration of ammonia. This shows that ammonia is a weak competitive inhibitor as observed by other researchers. Relatively high levels of both ammonia (70 mg/l) and copper (300 mu-g/l) inhibited...... the methane degradation, probably due to the toxic effect of copper-amine complexes....

  4. The barrier to ice nucleation in monatomic water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestipino, Santi

    2018-03-01

    Crystallization from a supercooled liquid initially proceeds via the formation of a small solid embryo (nucleus), which requires surmounting an activation barrier. This phenomenon is most easily studied by numerical simulation, using specialized biased-sampling techniques to overcome the limitations imposed by the rarity of nucleation events. Here, I focus on the barrier to homogeneous ice nucleation in supercooled water, as represented by the monatomic-water model, which in the bulk exhibits a complex interplay between different ice structures. I consider various protocols to identify solidlike particles on a computer, which perform well enough for the Lennard-Jones model, and compare their respective impact on the shape and height of the nucleation barrier. It turns out that the effect is stronger on the nucleus size than on the barrier height. As a by-product of the analysis, I determine the structure of the nucleation cluster, finding that the relative amount of ice phases in the cluster heavily depends on the method used for classifying solidlike particles. Moreover, the phase which is most favored during the earlier stages of crystallization may happen, depending on the nucleation coordinate adopted, to be different from the stable polymorph. Therefore, the quality of a reaction coordinate cannot be assessed simply on the basis of the barrier height obtained. I explain how this outcome is possible and why it just points out the shortcoming of collective variables appropriate to simple fluids in providing a robust method of particle classification for monatomic water.

  5. Thermodynamic and Dynamic Aspects of Ice Nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barahona, Donifan

    2018-01-01

    It is known that ice nucleating particles (INP) immersed within supercooled droplets promote the formation of ice. Common theoretical models used to represent this process assume that the immersed particle lowers the work of ice nucleation without significantly affecting the dynamics of water in the vicinity of the particle. This is contrary to evidence showing that immersed surfaces significantly affect the viscosity and diffusivity of vicinal water. To study how this may affect ice formation this work introduces a model linking the ice nucleation rate to the modification of the dynamics and thermodynamics of vicinal water by immersed particles. It is shown that INP that significantly reduce the work of ice nucleation also pose strong limitations to the growth of the nascent ice germs. This leads to the onset of a new ice nucleation regime, called spinodal ice nucleation, where the dynamics of ice germ growth instead of the ice germ size determines the nucleation rate. Nucleation in this regime is characterized by an enhanced sensitivity to particle area and cooling rate. Comparison of the predicted ice nucleation rate against experimental measurements for a diverse set of species relevant to cloud formation suggests that spinodal ice nucleation may be common in nature.

  6. Critical Nuclei Size, Rate, and Activation Energy of H2 Gas Nucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    German, Sean R; Edwards, Martin A; Ren, Hang; White, Henry S

    2018-03-21

    Electrochemical measurements of the nucleation rate of individual H 2 bubbles at the surface of Pt nanoelectrodes (radius = 7-41 nm) are used to determine the critical size and geometry of H 2 nuclei leading to stable bubbles. Precise knowledge of the H 2 concentration at the electrode surface, C H 2 surf , is obtained by controlled current reduction of H + in a H 2 SO 4 solution. Induction times of single-bubble nucleation events are measured by stepping the current, to control C H 2 surf , while monitoring the voltage. We find that gas nucleation follows a first-order rate process; a bubble spontaneously nucleates after a stochastic time delay, as indicated by a sudden voltage spike that results from impeded transport of H + to the electrode. Hundreds of individual induction times, at different applied currents and using different Pt nanoelectrodes, are used to characterize the kinetics of phase nucleation. The rate of bubble nucleation increases by four orders of magnitude (0.3-2000 s -1 ) over a very small relative change in C H 2 surf (0.21-0.26 M, corresponding to a ∼0.025 V increase in driving force). Classical nucleation theory yields thermodynamic radii of curvature for critical nuclei of 4.4 to 5.3 nm, corresponding to internal pressures of 330 to 270 atm, and activation energies for nuclei formation of 14 to 26 kT, respectively. The dependence of nucleation rate on H 2 concentration indicates that nucleation occurs by a heterogeneous mechanism, where the nuclei have a contact angle of ∼150° with the electrode surface and contain between 35 and 55 H 2 molecules.

  7. Effect of heating and cooling rate on the kinetics of allotropic phase changes in uranium: A differential scanning calorimetry study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rai, Arun Kumar; Raju, S.; Jeyaganesh, B.; Mohandas, E.; Sudha, R.; Ganesan, V.

    2009-01-01

    The kinetic aspects of allotropic phase changes in uranium are studied as a function of heating/cooling rate in the range 10 0 -10 2 K min -1 by isochronal differential scanning calorimetry. The transformation arrest temperatures revealed a remarkable degree of sensitivity to variations of heating and cooling rate, and this is especially more so for the transformation finish (T f ) temperatures. The results obtained for the α → β and β → γ transformations during heating confirm to the standard Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (KJMA) model for a nucleation and growth mediated process. The apparent activation energy Q eff for the overall transformation showed a mild increase with increasing heating rate. In fact, the heating rate normalised Arrhenius rate constant, k/β reveals a smooth power law decay with increasing heating rate (β). For the α → β phase change, the observed DSC peak profile for slower heating rates contained a distinct shoulder like feature, which however is absent in the corresponding profiles found for higher heating rates. The kinetics of γ → β phase change on the other hand, is best described by the two-parameter Koistinen-Marburger empirical relation for the martensitic transformation

  8. Effect and kinetic mechanism of ultrasonic vibration on solidification of 7050 aluminum alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ripeng Jiang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The work described in this paper dealt with the effect of ultrasonic vibration on the solidification of 7050 aluminum alloy. Two experiments were carried out through introducing ultrasound into the semi-continuous direct-chill (DC casting of aluminum alloy and into alloy solidifying in a crucible, respectively. Results show that ultrasonic vibration can refine grains in the whole cross-section of a billet in the first experiment and is able to increase the cooling rate within the temperature range from 625 °C to 590 °C in the other one. The mechanism of particle resonance caused by ultrasonic vibration was illustrated on the basis of theoretical analysis of the kinetics and energy conversion during the solidification. It is demonstrated that the kinetic energy of resonant particles are mainly from the latent heat energy of solidification, which can shorten the cooling time, inhibit the crystal growth and then lead to the grain refinement.

  9. Kinetic effects in Alfven wave heating Part 2 propagation and absorption with a single minority species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Wann-Quan; Ross, D.W.; Mahajan, Swadesh M.

    1989-06-01

    Kinetic effects of Alfven wave spatial resonances near the plasma edge are investigated numerically and analytically in a cylindrical tokamak model. In Part 1, cold plasma surface Alfven eigenmodes (SAE's) in a pure plasma are examined. Numerical calculations of antenna-driven waves exhibiting absorption resonances at certain discrete frequencies are first reviewed. From a simplified kinetic equation, an analytical dispersion relation is then obtained with the antenna current set equal to zero. The real and imaginary parts of its roots, which are the complex eigenfrequencies, agree with the central frequencies and widths, respectively, of the numerical antenna-driven resonances. These results serve as an introduction to the companion paper, in which it is shown that, in the presence of a minority species, certain SAE's, instead of heating the plasma exterior, can dissipate substantial energy in the two-ion hybrid layer near the plasma center. 11 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  10. Kinetics of silver release from microfuel with taking into account the limited-solubility effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, A. S.; Rusinkevich, A. A.

    2014-12-01

    The effect of a limited solubility of silver in silicon carbide on silver release from a microfuel with a TRISO coating is studied. It is shown that a limited solubility affects substantially both concentration profiles and silver release from a microfuel over a broad range of temperatures. A procedure is developed for obtaining fission-product concentration profiles in a microfuel and graphs representing the flow and integrated release of fission products on the basis of data from neutron-physics calculations and results obtained by calculating thermodynamics with the aid of the Ivtanthermo code and kinetics with the aid of the FP-Kinetics code. This procedure takes into account a limited solubility of fission products in protective coatings of microfuel.

  11. Plasma kinetic effects on atomistic mix in one dimension and at structured interfaces (II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albright, Brian; Yin, Lin; Cooley, James; Haack, Jeffrey; Douglas, Melissa

    2017-10-01

    The Marble campaign seeks to develop a platform for studying mix evolution in turbulent, inhomogeneous, high-energy-density plasmas at the NIF. Marble capsules contain engineered CD foams, the pores of which are filled with hydrogen and tritium. During implosion, hydrodynamic stirring and plasma diffusivity mix tritium fuel into the surrounding CD plasma, leading to both DD and DT fusion neutron production. In this presentation, building upon prior work, kinetic particle-in-cell simulations using the VPIC code are used to examine kinetic effects on thermonuclear burn in Marble-like settings. Departures from Maxwellian distributions are observed near the interface and TN burn rates and inferred temperatures from synthetic neutron time of flight diagnostics are compared with those from treating the background species as Maxwellian. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by the Los Alamos National Security, LLC Los Alamos National Laboratory and supported by the ASC and Science programs.

  12. Kinetics of BaSO4 crystal growth and effect in formation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wat, R.M.S.; Sorbie, K.S.; Todd, A.C.; Chen, P.; Jiang, P.

    1992-01-01

    In the North Sea, due to the extensive use of water injection for oil displacement and pressure maintenance, many reservoirs experience the problem of scale deposition when injection water starts to breakthrough. In most cases the scaled-up wells are caused by the formation of sulphate scales of Barium and Strontium. Due to their relative hardness and low solubility, there are limited processes available for their removal and the preventative measure such as the squeeze inhibitor treatment has to be taken. It is therefore important to have a proper understanding of the kinetics of scale formation and its detrimental effect on formation damage under both inhibited and uninhibited environment. In this paper, the authors present results of BaSO 4 formation kinetics in both beaker tests and in highly reproducible sandpacks which simulates the flow in porous medium

  13. Effect of microwave-assisted heating on chalcopyrite leaching of kinetics, interface temperature and surface energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Wen

    Full Text Available The microwave-assisted leaching was a new approach to intensify the copper recovery from chalcopyrite by hydrometallurgy. In this work, the effect of microwave-assisted heating on chalcopyrite leaching of kinetics, interfacial reaction temperature and surface energy were investigated. The activation energy of chalcopyrite leaching was affected indistinctively by the microwave-assisted heating (39.1 kJ/mol compared with the conventional heating (43.9 kJ/mol. However, the boiling point of the leaching system increased through microwave-assisted heating. Because of the improved boiling point and the selective heating of microwave, the interfacial reaction temperature increased significantly, which gave rise to the increase of the leaching recovery of copper. Moreover, the surface energy of the chalcopyrite through microwave-assisted heating was also enhanced, which was beneficial to strengthen the leaching of chalcopyrite. Keywords: Microwave-assisted heating, Chalcopyrite, Leaching kinetics, Interface temperature, Surface energy

  14. Effects of catalysts on combustion characteristics and kinetics of coal-char blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yingjie; Wang, Zhiqiang; Cheng, Xingxing; Liu, Ming; Ma, Chunyuan

    2018-04-01

    The effects of Fe2O3, CaO, and MnO2 on the combustion characteristics and kinetics of coal-char blends were investigated using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The results indicated that catalysts exhibited positive effects on the combustion characteristics of coal-char blends, especially in the initial period of coal-char blends combustion. With catalysts addition (mass 1.5%), it could improves volatile matter release, and reduces ignition point, promotes char to begin burning under lower temperature. The ignition index (C) was increased, respectively, by 27% for Fe2O3, 6% for CaO, 11.3% for MnO2, and the combustion characteristic index ( S ) was increased respectively, by 29% for Fe2O3, 5% for CaO, 8.3% for MnO2. In addition, two kinetic models (R2 and F1) were adopted to calculate the kinetic parameters in different stage of combustion processes. The results showed that with Fe2O3 or CaO addition, the activation energy at second stage decreases from 86.0 KJ/mol to 76.92 KJ/mol and 75.12 KJ/mol, respectively. There are no obvious decreases at the third stage of samples combustion process.

  15. Effects of thigh holster use on kinematics and kinetics of active duty police officers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Louise Bæk; Tranberg, Roy; Ramstrand, Nerrolyn

    2016-08-01

    Body armour, duty belts and belt mounted holsters are standard equipment used by the Swedish police and have been shown to affect performance of police specific tasks, to decrease mobility and to potentially influence back pain. This study aimed to investigate the effects on gait kinematics and kinetics associated with use of an alternate load carriage system incorporating a thigh holster. Kinematic, kinetic and temporospatial data were collected using three dimensional gait analysis. Walking tests were conducted with nineteen active duty police officers under three different load carriage conditions: a) body armour and duty belt, b) load bearing vest, body armour and thigh holster and c) no equipment (control). No significant differences between testing conditions were found for temporospatial parameters. Range of trunk rotation was reduced for both load carriage conditions compared to the control condition (p<0.017). Range of hip rotation was more similar to the control condition when wearing thigh holster rather than the belt mounted hip holster (p<0.017). Moments and powers for both left and right ankles were significantly greater for both of the load carriage conditions compared to the control condition (p<0.017). This study confirms that occupational loads carried by police have a significant effect on gait kinematics and kinetics. Although small differences were observed between the two load carriage conditions investigated in this study, results do not overwhelmingly support selection of one design over the other. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Diffusion-kinetic theories for LET effects on the radiolysis of water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pimblott, S.M.; LaVerne, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    Diffusion-kinetic methods are used to investigate the effects of incident particle linear energy transfer (LET) on the radiolysis of water and aqueous solutions. Chemically realistic deterministic diffusion-kinetic calculations examining the scavenging capacity dependences of the scavenged yield of e aq - and of OH demonstrate that the scavenged yields are related to the underlying time-dependent kinetics in the absence of the scavenger by a simple Laplace transform relationship. This relationship is also shown to link the effect of an e eq - scavenger on the formation of H 2 with the time dependence of H 2 production in the absence of the scavenger. The simple Laplace relationship does not work well when applied to H 2 O 2 formation in high-LET particle tracks even though such a relationship is valid with low-LET particles. It is found that while the secondary reaction of H 2 O 2 with e aq - can be neglected in low-LET particle radiolysis, it is of considerable significance in the tracks produced by high-LET particles. The increased importance of this reaction with increasing LET is the major reason for the failure of the Laplace relationship for H 2 O 2 . 55 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs

  17. A note on the nucleation with multiple steps: parallel and series nucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamatsu, Masao

    2012-01-28

    Parallel and series nucleation are the basic elements of the complex nucleation process when two saddle points exist on the free-energy landscape. It is pointed out that the nucleation rates follow formulas similar to those of parallel and series connection of resistors or conductors in an electric circuit. Necessary formulas to calculate individual nucleation rates at the saddle points and the total nucleation rate are summarized, and the extension to the more complex nucleation process is suggested. © 2012 American Institute of Physics

  18. Statistical model of a flexible inextensible polymer chain: The effect of kinetic energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pergamenshchik, V. M.; Vozniak, A. B.

    2017-01-01

    Because of the holonomic constraints, the kinetic energy contribution in the partition function of an inextensible polymer chain is difficult to find, and it has been systematically ignored. We present the first thermodynamic calculation incorporating the kinetic energy of an inextensible polymer chain with the bending energy. To explore the effect of the translation-rotation degrees of freedom, we propose and solve a statistical model of a fully flexible chain of N +1 linked beads which, in the limit of smooth bending, is equivalent to the well-known wormlike chain model. The partition function with the kinetic and bending energies and correlations between orientations of any pair of links and velocities of any pair of beads are found. This solution is precise in the limits of small and large rigidity-to-temperature ratio b /T . The last exact solution is essential as even very "harmless" approximation results in loss of the important effects when the chain is very rigid. For very high b /T , the orientations of different links become fully correlated. Nevertheless, the chain does not go over into a hard rod even in the limit b /T →∞ : While the velocity correlation length diverges, the correlations themselves remain weak and tend to the value ∝T /(N +1 ). The N dependence of the partition function is essentially determined by the kinetic energy contribution. We demonstrate that to obtain the correct energy and entropy in a constrained system, the T derivative of the partition function has to be applied before integration over the constraint-setting variable.

  19. Crystallization kinetics of poly-(lactic acid) with and without talc: Optical microscopy and calorimetric analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refaa, Z.; Boutaous, M.; Rousset, F.; Fulchiron, R.; Zinet, M.; Xin, S.; Bourgin, P.

    2014-05-01

    Poly-(lactic acid) or PLA is a biodegradable polymer synthesized from renewable resources. Recently, the discovery of new polymerization routes has allowed increasing the produced volumes. As a consequence, PLA is becoming of great interest for reducing the dependence on petroleum-based plastics. Because of its interesting mechanical properties, PLA is seen as a potential substitute for some usual polymers. However, its relatively slow crystallization kinetics can be a disadvantage with regard to industrial applications. The crystallization kinetics of PLA can be enhanced by adding nucleating agents, which also influences on crystalline morphology and rheological behavior. In the present work, the isothermal quiescent crystallization kinetics of both neat PLA and PLA/talc composite (5 wt% talc) are investigated. The effects of talc on the overall crystallization kinetics and on the crystalline morphology are analyzed using both optical microscopy measurements and thermal analysis by differential scanning calorimetry.

  20. Kinetic effects on the propagation of surface waves and their relevance to the heating of the solar corona

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuperus, M.; Heyvaerts, J.

    1980-01-01

    The MHD oscillations of the Alfven type running along surfaces of discontinuity generate motions in the discontinuity region which come rapidly out of phase. It is shown how the mathematical theory of this phase detuning predicts that surface wave should suffer dissipationless damping. Real damping is actually achieved by viscosity or kinetic effects. When detuning has grown to a large enough level, however, oscillations must be described by kinetic theory. Kinetic Alfven waves differ from perfect MHD Alfven waves in that they are able to propagate across the field. A theory of kinetic type oscillations in a finite thickness boundary is described, which predicts that surface waves generate intense kinetic Alfven waves in this boundary. The subsequent dissipation of these waves may be a powerful heating mechanism [fr

  1. Protection of nucleated bone marrow cells of mice against effect of radiation-induced micronucleus formation by using polysaccharides extracted from 'Zi Zhi' (a ganoderma)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu Fang; Luo Houliang; Luo Gui; Chen Shunle; Liu Zhifang

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the influence of polysaccharides extracted from 'Zi Zhi' (Ganoderma Sinese Zhao, Xu et Zhang) on the frequency of micronucleated cells induced by 60 Co gamma irradiation at different doses in bone marrow of mice. These polysaccharides of 'Zi Zhi' were shown to be of ability to protect nucleated bone marrow cells from micronucleus formation in irradiated mice. For Swiss mice, a dose reduction factor (DRF) was found to be 1.72 in the range of 0 to 4.728 Gy and for LACA mice, to be 1.73 in the range of 0 to 3.152 Gy. Such findings indicate that these polysaccharides are comparable to L-cysteine in their effeciency of protection

  2. Visualization of nucleate pool boiling of freon 113

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afify, M.A.; Fruman, D.H.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to give a fine description of the behaviour of vapour bubbles in nucleate pool boiling at sites of known sizes using high speed photography. The shapes and growth history of isolated bubbles were determined for a variety of experimental conditions. Coalescence effects between two adjacent or consecutive bubbles were also visualized and the occurrence of vapour patches and continuous vapour columns was demonstrated. Quantitative analysis of the films allows to determine the history and nucleation characteristics of bubbles as a function of various parameters such as heat flux, liquid subcooling and size and nature of nucleation sites. These results are in good agreement with those found in the literature

  3. Crosslinked Aspartic Acids as Helix-Nucleating Templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hui; Liu, Qi-Song; Geng, Hao; Tian, Yuan; Cheng, Min; Jiang, Yan-Hong; Xie, Ming-Sheng; Niu, Xiao-Gang; Jiang, Fan; Zhang, Ya-Ou; Lao, Yuan-Zhi; Wu, Yun-Dong; Xu, Nai-Han; Li, Zi-Gang

    2016-09-19

    Described is a facile helix-nucleating template based on a tethered aspartic acid at the N-terminus [terminal aspartic acid (TD)]. The nucleating effect of the template is subtly influenced by the substituent at the end of the side-chain-end tether as indicated by circular dichroism, nuclear magnetic resonance, and molecular dynamics simulations. Unlike most nucleating strategies, the N-terminal amine is preserved, thus enabling further modification. Peptidomimetic estrogen receptor modulators (PERMs) constructed using this strategy show improved therapeutic properties. The current strategy can be regarded as a good complement to existing helix-stabilizing methods. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Ion-induced nucleation of pure biogenic particles

    CERN Document Server

    Kirkby, Jasper; Sengupta, Kamalika; Frege, Carla; Gordon, Hamish; Williamson, Christina; Heinritzi, Martin; Simon, Mario; Yan, Chao; Almeida, João; Tröstl, Jasmin; Nieminen, Tuomo; Ortega, Ismael K; Wagner, Robert; Adamov, Alexey; Amorim, Antonio; Bernhammer, Anne-Kathrin; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Brilke, Sophia; Chen, Xuemeng; Craven, Jill; Dias, antonio; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C; Franchin, Alessandro; Fuchs, Claudia; Guida, Roberto; Hakala, Jani; Hoyle, Christopher R; Jokinen, Tuija; Junninen, Heikki; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kim, Jaeseok; Krapf, Manuel; Kürten, andreas; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; Molteni, Ugo; Onnela, antti; Peräkylä, Otso; Piel, Felix; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud P; Pringle, Kirsty; Rap, Alexandru; Richards, Nigel A D; Riipinen, Ilona; Rissanen, Matti P; Rondo, Linda; Sarnela, Nina; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Scott, Catherine E; Seinfeld, John H; Sipilä, Mikko; Steiner, Gerhard; Stozhkov, Yuri; Stratmann, Frank; Tomé, Antonio; Virtanen, Annele; Vogel, Alexander L; Wagner, Andrea C; Wagner, Paul E; Weingartner, Ernest; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M; Ye, Penglin; Zhang, Xuan; Hansel, Armin; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M; Worsnop, Douglas R; Baltensperger, Urs; Kulmala, Markku; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Curtius, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols and their effect on clouds are thought to be important for anthropogenic radiative forcing of the climate, yet remain poorly understood. Globally, around half of cloud condensation nuclei originate from nucleation of atmospheric vapours. It is thought that sulfuric acid is essential to initiate most particle formation in the atmosphere and that ions have a relatively minor role. Some laboratory studies, however, have reported organic particle formation without the intentional addition of sulfuric acid, although contamination could not be excluded. Here we present evidence for the formation of aerosol particles from highly oxidized biogenic vapours in the absence of sulfuric acid in a large chamber under atmospheric conditions. The highly oxygenated molecules (HOMs) are produced by ozonolysis of $\\alpha$-pinene. We find that ions from Galactic cosmic rays increase the nucleation rate by one to two orders of magnitude compared with neutral nucleation. Our experimental findings are supported...

  5. Kinetics and

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Ahmadi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The aqueous degradation of Reactive Yellow 84 (RY84 by potassium peroxydisulfate (K2S2O8 has been studied in laboratory scale experiments. The effect of the initial concentrations of potassium peroxydisulfate and RY84, pH and temperature on RY84 degradation were also examined. Experimental data were analyzed using first and second-order kinetics. The degradation kinetics of RY84 of the potassium peroxydisulfate process followed the second-order reaction kinetics. These rate constants have an extreme values similar to of 9.493 mM−1min−1 at a peroxydisulfate dose of 4 mmol/L. Thermodynamic parameters such as activation (Ea and Gibbs free energy (ΔG° were also evaluated. The negative value of ΔGo and Ea shows the spontaneous reaction natural conditions and exothermic nature.

  6. Earthquake nucleation in weak subducted carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurzawski, Robert M.; Stipp, Michael; Niemeijer, André R.; Spiers, Christopher J.; Behrmann, Jan H.

    2016-09-01

    Ocean-floor carbonate- and clay-rich sediments form major inputs to subduction zones, especially at low-latitude convergent plate margins. Therefore, knowledge of their frictional behaviour is fundamental for understanding plate-boundary earthquakes. Here we report results of mechanical tests performed on simulated fault gouges prepared from ocean-floor carbonates and clays, cored during IODP drilling offshore Costa Rica. Clay-rich gouges show internal friction coefficients (that is, the slope of linearized shear stress versus normal stress data) of μint = 0.44 - 0.56, irrespective of temperature and pore-fluid pressure (Pf). By contrast, μint for the carbonate gouge strongly depends on temperature and pore-fluid pressure, with μint decreasing dramatically from 0.84 at room temperature and Pf = 20 MPa to 0.27 at T = 140 °C and Pf = 120 MPa. This effect provides a fundamental mechanism of shear localization and earthquake generation in subduction zones, and makes carbonates likely nucleation sites for plate-boundary earthquakes. Our results imply that rupture nucleation is prompted by a combination of temperature-controlled frictional instability and temperature- and pore-pressure-dependent weakening of calcareous fault gouges.

  7. Intermediate Nucleation State of GaN Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, L. X.; Xie, M. H.; Tong, S. Y.

    2001-03-01

    Homoexpitaxial nucleation of GaN during molecular-beam epitaxy is followed by scanning tunneling microcopy (STM). We observe a metastable nucleation state, which manifests as “ghost” islands in STM images. These “ghost” islands can be irreversibly driven into normal islands by continuous STM imaging. It is further established that the “ghost” island formation is related to the presence of excess Ga atoms on the surface: Normal islands are only seen under the N-rich or stoichiometric flux condition, whereas “ghost” islands are observed under Ga-rich conditions. For intermediate excess-Ga coverages, both normal and “ghost” islands are present, however, they show distinctly different sizes, suggesting different nucleation states for the two. A growth model is proposed to account for the formation of metastable, “ghost” islands. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulation is carried out and main features of the surface are reproduced. We acknowledge financial support from HK RGC under grant Nos. 7396/00P, 7142/99P, and 7121/00P.

  8. Microstructure and refinement performance of Al-Ti-C master alloy: Effect of excess Ti on the growth and nucleating ability of TiC particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svynarenko, Kateryna; Zhang, Yubo; Jie, Jinchuan; Kutsova, Valentyna; Li, Tingju

    2017-09-01

    Al-5Ti-0.2C, Al-0.8Ti-0.2C, Al-8Ti-2C, and Al-10Ti master alloys were prepared and used to investigate the influence of excess Ti on the growth of TiC particles and its ability to nucleate Al-grains. The results of a microstructure analysis of TiC-containing alloys and refined CPAl were interrelated to the results of a refinement test. It was found that the presence of excess Ti is essential at the stage of master alloy preparation, as it facilitates the growth and uniform distribution of TiC within the structure. In Al-5Ti-0.2C alloy containing excess Ti, carbide particles grow faster and to a higher extent (from 0.29 μm to 0.44 μm) compared to Al-0.8Ti-0.2C alloy produced without excess Ti (from 0.29 μm to 0.32 μm). The results support the "Ti-transition zone theory" as the mechanism of grain refinement by TiC-containing master alloys. The refinement performance of Al-5Ti-0.2C is superior compared to the one achieved by adding Al-8Ti-2C and Al-10Ti master alloys in corresponding concentrations. For the TiC particles to become favourable nucleating sites, they must undergo certain interaction with excess Ti at the stage of master alloy preparation.

  9. Kovacs effect and fluctuation-dissipation relations in 1D kinetically constrained models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buhot, Arnaud

    2003-01-01

    Strong and fragile glass relaxation behaviours are obtained simply changing the constraints of the kinetically constrained Ising chain from symmetric to purely asymmetric. We study the out-of-equilibrium dynamics of these two models focusing on the Kovacs effect and the fluctuation-dissipation (FD) relations. The Kovacs or memory effect, commonly observed in structural glasses, is present for both constraints but enhanced with the asymmetric ones. Most surprisingly, the related FD relations satisfy the FD theorem in both cases. This result strongly differs from the simple quenching procedure where the asymmetric model presents strong deviations from the FD theorem

  10. Effect of Temperature and Sheet Temper on Isothermal Solidification Kinetics in Clad Aluminum Brazing Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Michael J.; Whitney, Mark A.; Wells, Mary A.; Winkler, Sooky

    2016-09-01

    Isothermal solidification (IS) is a phenomenon observed in clad aluminum brazing sheets, wherein the amount of liquid clad metal is reduced by penetration of the liquid clad into the core. The objective of the current investigation is to quantify the rate of IS through the use of a previously derived parameter, the Interface Rate Constant (IRC). The effect of peak temperature and initial sheet temper on IS kinetics were investigated. The results demonstrated that IS is due to the diffusion of silicon (Si) from the liquid clad layer into the solid core. Reduced amounts of liquid clad at long liquid duration times, a roughened sheet surface, and differences in resolidified clad layer morphology between sheet tempers were observed. Increased IS kinetics were predicted at higher temperatures by an IRC model as well as by experimentally determined IRC values; however, the magnitudes of these values are not in good agreement due to deficiencies in the model when applied to alloys. IS kinetics were found to be higher for sheets in the fully annealed condition when compared with work-hardened sheets, due to the influence of core grain boundaries providing high diffusivity pathways for Si diffusion, resulting in more rapid liquid clad penetration.

  11. Kinetic study on the effect of temperature on biogas production using a lab scale batch reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepanraj, B; Sivasubramanian, V; Jayaraj, S

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, biogas production from food waste through anaerobic digestion was carried out in a 2l laboratory-scale batch reactor operating at different temperatures with a hydraulic retention time of 30 days. The reactors were operated with a solid concentration of 7.5% of total solids and pH 7. The food wastes used in this experiment were subjected to characterization studies before and after digestion. Modified Gompertz model and Logistic model were used for kinetic study of biogas production. The kinetic parameters, biogas yield potential of the substrate (B), the maximum biogas production rate (Rb) and the duration of lag phase (λ), coefficient of determination (R(2)) and root mean square error (RMSE) were estimated in each case. The effect of temperature on biogas production was evaluated experimentally and compared with the results of kinetic study. The results demonstrated that the reactor with operating temperature of 50°C achieved maximum cumulative biogas production of 7556ml with better biodegradation efficiency. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of sepsis on VLDL kinetics: responses in basal state and during glucose infusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfe, R.R.; Shaw, J.H.; Durkot, M.J.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of gram-negative sepsis on the kinetics and oxidation of very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) fatty acids was assessed in conscious dogs in the normal state and 24 h after infusion of live Escherichia coli. VLDL, labeled with [2- 3 H]glycerol and [1- 14 C]palmitic acid, was used to trace VLDL kinetics and oxidation, and [1- 13 C]palmitic acid bound to albumin was infused simultaneously to quantify kinetics and oxidation of free fatty acid (FFA) in plasma. Sepsis caused a fivefold increase in the rate of VLDL production (RaVLDL). In the control dogs, the direct oxidation of VLDL-fatty acids was not an important contributor to their overall energy metabolism, but in dogs with sepsis, 17% of the total rate of CO2 production could be accounted for by VLDL-fatty acid oxidation. When glucose was infused into dogs with insulin and glucagon levels clamped at basal levels (by means of infusion of somatostatin and replacement of the hormones), RaVLDL increased significantly in the control dogs, but it did not increase further in dogs with sepsis. The authors conclude that the increase in triglyceride concentration in fasting dogs with gram-negative sepsis is the result of an increase in VLDL production and that the fatty acids in VLDL can serve as an important source of energy in sepsis

  13. Effect of a 1-hour single bout of moderate-intensity exercise on fat oxidation kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenevière, Xavier; Borrani, Fabio; Ebenegger, Vincent; Gojanovic, Boris; Malatesta, Davide

    2009-12-01

    The present study aimed to examine the effects of a prior 1-hour continuous exercise bout (CONT) at an intensity (Fat(max)) that elicits the maximal fat oxidation (MFO) on the fat oxidation kinetics during a subsequent submaximal incremental test (IncrC). Twenty moderately trained subjects (9 men and 11 women) performed a graded test on a treadmill (Incr), with 3-minute stages and 1-km.h(-1) increments. Fat oxidation was measured using indirect calorimetry and plotted as a function of exercise intensity. A mathematical model (SIN) including 3 independent variables (dilatation, symmetry, and translation) was used to characterize the shape of fat oxidation kinetics and to determine Fat(max) and MFO. On a second visit, the subjects performed CONT at Fat(max) followed by IncrC. After CONT performed at 57% +/- 3% (means +/- SE) maximal oxygen uptake (Vo(2max)), the respiratory exchange ratio during IncrC was lower at every stage compared with Incr (P rates from 35% to 70% Vo(2max) (P .05), whereas symmetry tended to be greater in IncrC (P = .096). This study showed that the prior 1-hour continuous moderate-intensity exercise bout increased Fat(max), MFO, and fat oxidation rates over a wide range of intensities during the postexercise incremental test. Moreover, the shape of the postexercise fat oxidation kinetics tended to have a rightward asymmetry.

  14. Relative Role of Gas Generation and Displacement Rates in Cavity Nucleation and Growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Bachu Narain; Foreman, A. J E.

    1984-01-01

    Problems of helium diffusion and clustering during irradiation are analysed. Using the “homogeneous” nucleation theory , the effect of damage rate on cavity density is calculated for different gas generation to damage rate ratios. The influence of gas mobility on cavity nucleation has been...

  15. HOUSEHOLD NUCLEATION, DEPENDENCY AND CHILD HEALTH OUTCOMES IN GHANA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annim, Samuel Kobina; Awusabo-Asare, Kofi; Amo-Adjei, Joshua

    2015-09-01

    This study uses three key anthropometric measures of nutritional status among children (stunting, wasting and underweight) to explore the dual effects of household composition and dependency on nutritional outcomes of under-five children in Ghana. The objective is to examine changes in household living arrangements of under-five children to explore the interaction of dependency and nucleation on child health outcomes. The concept of nucleation refers to the changing structure and composition of household living arrangements, from highly extended with its associated socioeconomic system of production and reproduction, social behaviour and values, towards single-family households - especially the nuclear family, containing a husband and wife and their children alone. A negative relationship between levels of dependency, as measured by the number of children in the household, and child health outcomes is premised on the grounds that high dependency depletes resources, both tangible and intangible, to the disadvantage of young children. Data were drawn from the last four rounds of the Ghana Demographic and Health Surveys (GDHSs), from 1993 to 2008, for the first objective - to explore changes in household composition. For the second objective, the study used data from the 2008 GDHS. The results show that, over time, households in Ghana have been changing towards nucleation. The main finding is that in households with the same number of dependent children, in nucleated households children under age 5 have better health outcomes compared with children under age 5 in non-nucleated households. The results also indicate that the effect of dependency on child health outcomes is mediated by household nucleation and wealth status and that, as such, high levels of dependency do not necessarily translate into negative health outcomes for children under age 5, based on anthropometric measures.

  16. Effect of burn and first-pass splanchnic leucine extraction on protein kinetics in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlstad, M.D.; DeMichele, S.J.; Istfan, N.; Blackburn, G.L.; Bistrian, B.R.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of burn and first-pass splanchnic leucine extraction (FPE) on protein kinetics and energy expenditure were assessed by measuring O 2 consumption, CO 2 production, nitrogen balance, leucine kinetics, and tissue fractional protein synthetic rates (FSR-%/day) in enterally fed rats. Anesthetized male rats (200 g) were scalded on their dorsum with boiling water (25-30% body surface area) and enterally fed isovolemic diets that provided 60 kcal/day and 2.4 g of amino acids/day for 3 days. Controls were not burned. An intravenous or intragastric infusion of L-[1- 14 C]leucine was used to assess protein kinetics on day 3. FPE was taken as the ratio of intragastric to intravenous plasma leucine specific activity. There was a 69% reduction in cumulative nitrogen balance (P less than 0.001) and a 17-19% increase in leucine oxidation (P less than 0.05) and total energy expenditure (P less than 0.01) in burned rats. A 15% decrease in plasma leucine clearance (P less than 0.05) was accompanied by a 20% increase in plasma [leucine] (P less than 0.01) in burned rats. Burn decreased rectus muscle FSR from 5.0 +/- 0.4 to 3.5 +/- 0.5 (P less than 0.05) and increased liver FSR from 19.0 +/- 0.5 to 39.2 +/- 3.4 (P less than 0.01). First pass extraction of dietary leucine by the splanchnic bed was 8% in controls and 26% in burned rats. Leucine kinetics corrected for FPE showed increased protein degradation with burn that was not evident without FPE correction. This hypermetabolic burn model can be useful in the design of enteral diets that optimize rates of protein synthesis and degradation

  17. Effect of ionic strength on the kinetics of ionic and micellar reactions in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dung, M.H.; Kozak, J.J.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of electrostatic forces on the rate of reaction between ions in aqueous solutions of intermediate ionic strength is studied in this paper. We consider the kinetics of reactions involving simple ionic species (1--1 and 2--2 electrolyte systems) as well as kinetic processes mediated by the presence of micellar ions (or other charged organizates). In the regime of ionic strength considered, dielectric saturation of the solvent in the vicinity of the reacting ions must be taken into account and this is done by introducing several models to describe the recovery of the solvent from saturation to its continuum dielectric behavior. To explore the effects of ion size, charge number, and ionic strength on the overall rate constant for the process considered, we couple the traditional theory of ionic reactions in aqueous solution with calculations of the electrostatic potential obtained via solution of the nonlinear Poisson--Boltzmann equation. The great flexibility of the nonlinear Poisson--Boltzmann theory allows us to explore quantitatively the influence of each of these effects, and our simulations show that the short-range properties of the electrostatic potential affect primarily kinetically controlled processes (to varying degrees, depending on the ionic system considered) whereas the down-range properties of the potential play a (somewhat) greater role in influencing diffusion-controlled processes. A detailed examination is made of ionic strength effects over a broad range of ionic concentrations. In the regime of low ionic strength, the limiting slope and intercept of the curve describing the dependence of log k/sub D/ on I/sup 1/2//(1+I/sup 1/2/) may differ considerably from the usual Debye--Hueckel limiting relations, depending on the particular model chosen to describe local saturation effects

  18. Effect of the porous structure of activated carbon on the adsorption kinetics of gold(I) cyanide complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibragimova, P. I.; Grebennikov, S. F.; Gur'yanov, V. V.; Fedyukevich, V. A.; Vorob'ev-Desyatovskii, N. V.

    2014-06-01

    The effect the porous structure of activated carbons obtained from furfural and coconut shells has on the kinetics of [Au(CN)2]- ion adsorption is studied. Effective diffusion coefficients for [Au(CN)2]- anions in transport and adsorbing pores and mass transfer coefficients in a transport system of the pores and in microporous zones are calculated using the statistical moments of the kinetic curve.

  19. Effect of Heating Rate on Pyrolysis Behavior and Kinetic Characteristics of Siderite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolong Zhang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The pyrolysis characteristics of siderite at different heating rates under the neutral atmosphere were investigated using various tools, including comprehensive thermal analyzer, tube furnace, X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscope (SEM, energy-dispersive spectrometry (EDS and vibrating specimen magnetometer (VSM measurements. The reaction of siderite pyrolysis followed the one-step reaction under the neutral atmosphere: FeCO3 → Fe3O4 + CO2 + CO. As the increasing of heating rate, the start and end pyrolysis temperatures and temperate where maximum weight loss rate occurred increased, while the total mass loss were essentially the same. Increasing heating rate within a certain range was in favor of shortening the time of each reaction stage, and the maximum conversion rate could be reached with a short time. The most probable mechanism function for non-isothermal pyrolysis of siderite at different heating rates was A1/2 reaction model (nucleation and growth reaction. With increasing heating rate, the corresponding activation energies and the pre-exponential factors increased, from 446.13 to 505.19 kJ∙mol−1, and from 6.67 × 10−18 to 2.40 × 10−21, respectively. All siderite was transformed into magnetite with a porous structure after pyrolysis, and some micro-cracks were formed into the particles. The magnetization intensity and specific susceptibility increased significantly, which created favorable conditions for the further effective concentration of iron ore.

  20. Kinetic Effects on the Stability Properties of Field-reversed Configurations: I. Linear Stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elena V. Belova; Ronald C. Davidson; Hantao Ji; Masaaki Yamada

    2003-01-28

    New computational results are presented which advance the understanding of the stability properties of the Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC). We present results of hybrid and two-fluid (Hall-MHD) simulations of prolate FRCs. The n = 1 tilt instability mechanism and growth rate reduction mechanisms are investigated in detail including resonant particle effects, finite Larmor radius and Hall stabilization, and profile effects. It is shown that the Hall effect determines the mode rotation and the change in the linear mode structure in the kinetic regime; however, the reduction in the growth rate is mostly due to finite Larmor radius effects. Resonant wave-particle interactions are studied as a function of (a) elongation, (b) the kinetic parameter S*, which is proportional to the ratio of the separatrix radius to the thermal ion Larmor radius, and (c) the separatrix shape. It is demonstrated that, contrary to the usually assumed stochasticity of the ion orbits in the FRC, a large fraction of the orbits are regular in long configurations when S* is small. A stochasticity condition is found, and a scaling with the S* parameter is presented. Resonant particle effects are shown to maintain the instability in the large gyroradius regime regardless of the separatrix shape.