WorldWideScience

Sample records for nucleation field distributions

  1. Nucleation of lysozyme crystals under external electric and ultrasonic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanev, Christo N.; Penkova, Anita

    2001-11-01

    Preferred orientation along c-axis of hen-egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) crystals has been observed in an external electric field. Besides, the HEWL crystals grew predominantly on the cathode side of the glass cell. These facts were explained on the basis of a concept for specific spatial distribution of the positive electric charges on the individual HEWL molecules, and thus attributed to the (preferred) orientation of individual HEWL molecules in the solution, under these conditions. Ultrasonic field redoubles the nucleation rate of HEWL crystals, but does not change the number of building units in the critical nucleus. Taking into account the intermolecular binding energy, we conclude that ultrasonic field accelerates nucleation due to breaking of the protein crystals.

  2. Geometrical Dependence of Domain-Wall Propagation and Nucleation Fields in Magnetic-Domain-Wall Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borie, B.; Kehlberger, A.; Wahrhusen, J.; Grimm, H.; Kläui, M.

    2017-08-01

    We study the key domain-wall properties in segmented nanowire loop-based structures used in domain-wall-based sensors. The two reasons for device failure, namely, distribution of the domain-wall propagation field (depinning) and the nucleation field are determined with magneto-optical Kerr effect and giant-magnetoresistance (GMR) measurements for thousands of elements to obtain significant statistics. Single layers of Ni81 Fe19 , a complete GMR stack with Co90 Fe10 /Ni81Fe19 as a free layer, and a single layer of Co90 Fe10 are deposited and industrially patterned to determine the influence of the shape anisotropy, the magnetocrystalline anisotropy, and the fabrication processes. We show that the propagation field is influenced only slightly by the geometry but significantly by material parameters. Simulations for a realistic wire shape yield a curling-mode type of magnetization configuration close to the nucleation field. Nonetheless, we find that the domain-wall nucleation fields can be described by a typical Stoner-Wohlfarth model related to the measured geometrical parameters of the wires and fitted by considering the process parameters. The GMR effect is subsequently measured in a substantial number of devices (3000) in order to accurately gauge the variation between devices. This measurement scheme reveals a corrected upper limit to the nucleation fields of the sensors that can be exploited for fast characterization of the working elements.

  3. Phase-field modeling of submonolayer growth with the modulated nucleation regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, X.L.; Xing, H.; Chen, C.L., E-mail: chenchl@nwpu.edu.cn; Wang, J.Y.; Jin, K.X.

    2015-10-16

    In this letter, we perform the phase-field simulations to investigate nucleation regime of submonolayer growth via a quantified nucleation term. Results show that the nucleation related kinetic coefficients have changed the density of islands and critical sizes to modulate the nucleation regime. The scaling behavior of the island density can be agreed with the classical theory only when effects of modulations have been quantified. We expect to produce the quantitative descriptions of nucleation for submonolayer growth in phase-field models. - Highlights: • The phase-field simulations are systematically compared with the classical nucleation rate theory. • The modulations of nucleation regime by the different kinetic coefficients have been studied. • Appropriate kinetic coefficients contribute to the agreed nucleation regime with the scaling law.

  4. Phase-field Modeling of the Influence of Elastic Field on the Nucleation and Microstructure Evolution in Precipitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yu-xiang; WANG Jin-cheng; YANG Yu-juan; YANG Gen-cang; ZHOU Yao-he

    2007-01-01

    A phase-field method was employed to study the influence of elastic field on the nucleation and microstructure evolution. Two kinds of nucleation process were considered: one using fixed nucleation probability and the other calculated from the classical nucleation theory. In the latter case, the simulated results show that the anisotropic elastic strain field yields significant effects on the behavior of nucleation. With a large lattice misfit between the matrixes and the precipitates, the nucleation process does not appear fully random but displays some spatial correlation and has a preference for the elastic soft direction. However, with a small lattice misfit, this bias does not look quite clean On the contrary, in the case of fixed nucleation probability, the elastic field has no influence on the nucleation process. The lattice mismatch also exerts influences on the microstructure morphology: with lattice mismatch becoming larger, the microstructure proves to align along the elastic soft direction.

  5. Reexamination of Correlations for Nucleate Site Distribution on Boiling Surface by Fractal Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YangChunxin

    1997-01-01

    Nucleate site distribution plays an essential role in nucleate boiling process.In this paper,it is pointed out that the size and spatial distributioin density of nucleate sites presented on real boiling surface can be described by the normalized fractal distribution function,and the physical meaning of parameters involved in some experimental correlations proposed by early investigations are identified according to fractal distribution function.It is further suggested that the surface micro geometry characteristics such as the shape of cavities should be described and analyzed qualitatively by using fractal theory.

  6. Cumulative distribution functions associated with bubble-nucleation processes in cavitation

    KAUST Repository

    Watanabe, Hiroshi

    2010-11-15

    Bubble-nucleation processes of a Lennard-Jones liquid are studied by molecular dynamics simulations. Waiting time, which is the lifetime of a superheated liquid, is determined for several system sizes, and the apparent finite-size effect of the nucleation rate is observed. From the cumulative distribution function of the nucleation events, the bubble-nucleation process is found to be not a simple Poisson process but a Poisson process with an additional relaxation time. The parameters of the exponential distribution associated with the process are determined by taking the relaxation time into account, and the apparent finite-size effect is removed. These results imply that the use of the arithmetic mean of the waiting time until a bubble grows to the critical size leads to an incorrect estimation of the nucleation rate. © 2010 The American Physical Society.

  7. Time-dependent domain wall nucleation probability in field-coupled nanomagnets with perpendicular anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitkreutz, Stephan; Fischer, Andreas; Kaffah, Silmi; Weigl, Stephanie; Eichwald, Irina; Ziemys, Grazvydas; Schmitt-Landsiedel, Doris; Becherer, Markus

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, the domain wall (DW) nucleation time and the DW nucleation probability of field-coupled magnets with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy are measured by experiment. A well-established Arrhenius model based on thermally activated magnetization reversal is applied to describe the time-dependent DW nucleation probability. Magneto-optical microscopy(MOKE) is used in the experiments to determine the DW nucleation time and the DW nucleation probability in a pNML inverter structure. The DW propagation speed is measured in order to calculate the required DW propagation time for entire magnetization reversal of pNML logic gates. Experimental results are compared to the derived model. Our results show that the interaction in pNML logic gates plays a significant role for the time-dependent DW nucleation probability and therefore for the reliability of field-coupled circuits.

  8. An inverse modeling procedure to determine particle growth and nucleation rates from measured aerosol size distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Verheggen

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Classical nucleation theory is unable to explain the ubiquity of nucleation events observed in the atmosphere. This shows a need for an empirical determination of the nucleation rate. Here we present a novel inverse modeling procedure to determine particle nucleation and growth rates based on consecutive measurements of the aerosol size distribution. The particle growth rate is determined by regression analysis of the measured change in the aerosol size distribution over time, taking into account the effects of processes such as coagulation, deposition and/or dilution. This allows the growth rate to be determined with a higher time-resolution than can be deduced from inspecting contour plots ('banana-plots''. Knowing the growth rate as a function of time enables the evaluation of the time of nucleation of measured particles of a certain size. The nucleation rate is then obtained by integrating the particle losses from time of measurement to time of nucleation. The regression analysis can also be used to determine or verify the optimum value of other parameters of interest, such as the wall loss or coagulation rate constants. As an example, the method is applied to smog chamber measurements. This program offers a powerful interpretive tool to study empirical aerosol population dynamics in general, and nucleation and growth in particular.

  9. Tuning of the nucleation field in nanowires with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimling, Judith; Gerhardt, Theo; Kobs, Andre; Vogel, Andreas; Peter Oepen, Hans; Merkt, Ulrich; Meier, Guido [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik und Zentrum fuer Mikrostrukturforschung Hamburg, Universitaet Hamburg, Jungiusstr. 11, 20355 Hamburg (Germany); Wintz, Sebastian [Institut fuer Ionenstrahlphysik und Materialforschung, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Im, Mi-Young; Fischer, Peter [Center for X-ray Optics, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2013-04-28

    We report on domain nucleation in nanowires consisting of Co/Pt multilayers with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy that are patterned by electron-beam lithography, sputter deposition, and lift-off processing. It is found that the nucleation field can be tuned by changing the geometry of the wire ends. A reduction of the nucleation field by up to 60% is achieved when the wire ends are designed as tips. This contrasts with the behavior of wires with in-plane anisotropy where the nucleation field increases when triangular-pointed ends are used. In order to clarify the origin of the reduction of the nucleation field, micromagnetic simulations are employed. The effect cannot be explained by the lateral geometrical variation but is attributable to a local reduction of the perpendicular anisotropy caused by shadowing effects due to the resist mask during sputter deposition of the multilayer.

  10. Availability analysis for heterogeneous nucleation in a uniform electric field

    CERN Document Server

    Saidi, M H

    2003-01-01

    Industrial demands for more compact heat exchangers are a motivation to find new technology features. Electrohydrodynamics (EHD) is introduced as a promising phenomenon for heat transfer enhancement mechanisms. Similar to any new technology, EHD has not been understood completely yet and require more fundamental studies. In boiling phase change phenomena, nucleation is the dominant mechanism in heat transfer. Because of higher performance in heat transfer, nucleate boiling is considered as the main regime in thermal components. Hence, bubble dynamic investigation is a means to evaluate heat transfer. This study investigate bubble formation, including homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation, from a thermodynamic point of view. Change in availability due to bubble embryo nucleation is discussed. Stability criteria for these systems are theoretically studied and results are discussed considering experimental data. In addition, a conceptual discussion on entropy generation in a thermodynamic system under electri...

  11. Atmospheric aging of dust ice nucleating particles - a combined laboratory and field approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boose, Yvonne; Rodríguez, Sergio; García, M. Isabel; Linke, Claudia; Schnaiter, Martin; Zipori, Assaf; Crawford, Ian; Lohmann, Ulrike; Kanji, Zamin A.; Sierau, Berko

    2016-04-01

    We present INP data measured in-situ at two mostly free tropospheric locations: the High Altitude Research Station Jungfraujoch (JFJ) in the Swiss Alps, located at 3580 m above sea level (asl) and the Izaña observatory on Tenerife, off the West African shore (2373 m asl). INP concentrations were measured online with the Portable Ice Nucleation Chamber, PINC, at the Jungfraujoch in the winters of 2012, 2013 and 2014 and at Izaña in the summers of 2013 and 2014. Each measurement period lasted between 2 to 6 weeks. During summer, Izaña is frequently within the Saharan Air Layer and thus often exposed to Saharan dust events. Saharan dust also reaches the Jungfraujoch mainly during spring. For offline ice nucleation analysis in the laboratory under similar thermodynamic conditions, airborne dust was collected a) at Izaña with a cyclone directly from the air and b) collected from the surface of the Aletsch glacier close to the JFJ after deposition. Supporting measurements of aerosol particle size distributions and fluorescence were conducted at both locations, as well as cloud water isotope analysis at the Jungfraujoch and aerosol chemistry at Izaña. For both locations the origin of the INPs was investigated with a focus on dust and biological particles using back trajectories and chemical signature. Results show that dust aerosol is the dominant INP type at both locations at a temperature of 241 K. In addition to Saharan dust, also more local, basaltic dust is found at the Jungfraujoch. Biological particles are not observed to play a role for ice nucleation in clouds during winter at Jungfraujoch but are enriched in INP compared to the total aerosol at Izaña also during dust events. The comparison of the laboratory and the field measurements at Izaña indicates a good reproducibility of the field data by the collected dust samples. Field and laboratory data of the dust samples from both locations show that the dust arriving at JFJ is less ice nucleation active

  12. Flow Field Effects on Nucleation in a Reacting Mixture Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-11-01

    chemically reacting flows has been analysed by Fendell (1965) who considered the effect of the straining motion in a stagnation point flow on ignition...stagnation point diffusion flame ( Fendell , 1965, Linan, 1974). In the present study the effect of the strain rate or velocity gradient on nucleation kinetics...Symposium (International) on Corn- bustion, 799-810, Academic Press. Fendell , F. E. (1965). Ignition and extinction in combustion of initially unmixed

  13. Externally applied electric fields up to 1.6 × 10(5) V/m do not affect the homogeneous nucleation of ice in supercooled water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stan, Claudiu A; Tang, Sindy K Y; Bishop, Kyle J M; Whitesides, George M

    2011-02-10

    The freezing of water can initiate at electrically conducting electrodes kept at a high electric potential or at charged electrically insulating surfaces. The microscopic mechanisms of these phenomena are unknown, but they must involve interactions between water molecules and electric fields. This paper investigates the effect of uniform electric fields on the homogeneous nucleation of ice in supercooled water. Electric fields were applied across drops of water immersed in a perfluorinated liquid using a parallel-plate capacitor; the drops traveled in a microchannel and were supercooled until they froze due to the homogeneous nucleation of ice. The distribution of freezing temperatures of drops depended on the rate of nucleation of ice, and the sensitivity of measurements allowed detection of changes by a factor of 1.5 in the rate of nucleation. Sinusoidal alternation of the electric field at frequencies from 3 to 100 kHz prevented free ions present in water from screening the electric field in the bulk of drops. Uniform electric fields in water with amplitudes up to (1.6 ± 0.4) × 10(5) V/m neither enhanced nor suppressed the homogeneous nucleation of ice. Estimations based on thermodynamic models suggest that fields in the range of 10(7)-10(8) V/m might cause an observable increase in the rate of nucleation.

  14. Vortex-antivortex nucleation in magnetically nanotextured superconductors: Magnetic-field-driven and thermal scenarios

    OpenAIRE

    Milosevic, M. V; Peeters, F. M.

    2005-01-01

    Within the Ginzburg-Landau formalism, we predict two novel mechanisms of vortex-antivortex nucleation in a magnetically nanostructured superconductor. Although counterintuitive, nucleation of vortex-antivortex pairs can be activated in a superconducting (SC) film covered by arrays of submicron ferromagnets (FMs) when exposed to an external homogeneous magnetic field. In another scenario, we predict the thermal induction of vortex-antivortex configurations in SC/FM samples. This phenomenon lea...

  15. Tailoring nucleation and growth conditions for narrow compositional distributions in colloidal synthesized FePt nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Chandan; Nikles, David E.; Thompson, Gregory B.

    2008-11-01

    To eliminate compositional and size variabilities between individual binary nanoparticles, it is essential to control the mechanistic steps involved in nanoparticle synthesis. A common method for synthesizing FePt nanoparticles involves the simultaneous decomposition and reduction in iron and platinum precursors, respectively. This simultaneous nucleation and growth method yields wide composition and size distributions. This paper describes and experimentally validates a methodology needed to tighten composition and size distributions for this process. By engineering the surfactant chemistry with tertiary phosphines to tightly bind the iron atoms in the iron precursor, uniform platinum rich seeds form during the initial stages of the synthesis. A thermodynamically preferred heterogeneous nucleation of iron atoms into these uniform platinum seeds in the subsequent stages produces a final dispersion with uniform particle-to-particle compositions. The paper addresses the understanding for optimizing the nucleation and growth sequences for compositional control in FePt nanoparticles.

  16. Report on the Implementation of Homogeneous Nucleation Scheme in MARMOT-based Phase Field Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yulan; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Sun, Xin

    2013-09-30

    In this report, we summarized our effort in developing mesoscale phase field models for predicting precipitation kinetics in alloys during thermal aging and/or under irradiation in nuclear reactors. The first part focused on developing a method to predict the thermodynamic properties of critical nuclei such as the sizes and concentration profiles of critical nuclei, and nucleation barrier. These properties are crucial for quantitative simulations of precipitate evolution kinetics with phase field models. Fe-Cr alloy was chosen as a model alloy because it has valid thermodynamic and kinetic data as well as it is an important structural material in nuclear reactors. A constrained shrinking dimer dynamics (CSDD) method was developed to search for the energy minimum path during nucleation. With the method we are able to predict the concentration profiles of the critical nuclei of Cr-rich precipitates and nucleation energy barriers. Simulations showed that Cr concentration distribution in the critical nucleus strongly depends on the overall Cr concentration as well as temperature. The Cr concentration inside the critical nucleus is much smaller than the equilibrium concentration calculated by the equilibrium phase diagram. This implies that a non-classical nucleation theory should be used to deal with the nucleation of Cr precipitates in Fe-Cr alloys. The growth kinetics of both classical and non-classical nuclei was investigated by the phase field approach. A number of interesting phenomena were observed from the simulations: 1) a critical classical nucleus first shrinks toward its non-classical nucleus and then grows; 2) a non-classical nucleus has much slower growth kinetics at its earlier growth stage compared to the diffusion-controlled growth kinetics. 3) a critical classical nucleus grows faster at the earlier growth stage than the non-classical nucleus. All of these results demonstrated that it is critical to introduce the correct critical nuclei into phase

  17. Aerosol size distribution modeling with the Community Multiscale Air Quality modeling system in the Pacific Northwest: 2. Parameterizations for ternary nucleation and nucleation mode processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elleman, Robert A.; Covert, David S.

    2009-06-01

    In order to test Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model performance for ultrafine particle concentrations in the Pacific Northwest, CMAQ v4.4 was modified for ternary NH3-H2SO4-H2O nucleation and for atmospheric processing of ultrafine particles. Sulfuric acid from sulfur dioxide oxidation is iteratively partitioned into gaseous sulfuric acid, newly condensed aerosol sulfate, and aerosol sulfuric acid contained in new 1 nm particles. Freshly nucleated particles are either coagulated to larger particles or grown by sulfuric acid condensation to 10 nm at which point they are included in CMAQ's existing Aitken mode. Multiple nucleation parameterizations were implemented into CMAQ, and one other was investigated in a sensitivity analysis. For a case study in the Pacific Northwest where aerosol number concentration and size distributions were measured, standard binary nucleation in CMAQ produces nearly no particles for this case study. Ternary nucleation can produce millions of 1 nm particles per cm3, but few of these particles survive coagulation loss and grow to 10 nm and into the Aitken mode. There are occasions when the additions to CMAQ increase the number of particles to within an order of magnitude of observations, but it is more common for number concentrations to remain underpredicted by, on average, one order of magnitude. Significant particle nucleation in CMAQ successfully produces a distinct Aitken and accumulation mode and an Aitken mode that is more prominent than the accumulation mode, although errors in the size distribution remain. A more recent ternary nucleation scheme including ammonium bisulfate clusters does not nucleate an appreciable number of particles.

  18. Length distributions of nanowires: Effects of surface diffusion versus nucleation delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubrovskii, Vladimir G.

    2017-04-01

    It is often thought that the ensembles of semiconductor nanowires are uniform in length due to the initial organization of the growth seeds such as lithographically defined droplets or holes in the substrate. However, several recent works have already demonstrated that most nanowire length distributions are broader than Poissonian. Herein, we consider theoretically the length distributions of non-interacting nanowires that grow by the material collection from the entire length of their sidewalls and with a delay of nucleation of the very first nanowire monolayer. The obtained analytic length distribution is controlled by two parameters that describe the strength of surface diffusion and the nanowire nucleation rate. We show how the distribution changes from the symmetrical Polya shape without the nucleation delay to a much broader and asymmetrical one for longer delays. In the continuum limit (for tall enough nanowires), the length distribution is given by a power law times an incomplete gamma-function. We discuss interesting scaling properties of this solution and give a recipe for analyzing and tailoring the experimental length histograms of nanowires which should work for a wide range of material systems and growth conditions.

  19. Particle Characterization and Ice Nucleation Efficiency of Field-Collected Aerosol Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, B.; Gilles, M. K.; Laskin, A.; Moffet, R.; Nizkorodov, S.; Roedel, T.; Sterckx, L.; Tivanski, A.; Knopf, D. A.

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric ice formation by heterogeneous nucleation is one of the least understood processes resulting in cirrus and mixed-phase clouds which affect the global radiation budget, the hydrological cycle, and water vapor distribution. In particular, how organic aerosol affect ice nucleation is not well understood. Here we report on heterogeneous ice nucleation from particles collected during the CalNex campaign at the Caltech campus site, Pasadena, on May 19, 2010 at 6am-12pm (A2) and 12pm-6pm (A3) and May 23 at 6am-12pm (B2) and 6pm-12am (B4). The ice nucleation onsets and water uptake were determined as a function of temperature (200-273 K) and relative humidity with respect to ice (RHice). The ice nucleation efficiency was related to the particle chemical composition. Single particle characterization was provided by using computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). The STXM/NEXAFS analysis indicates that the morning sample (A2) constitutes organic particles and organic particles with soot and inorganic inclusions. The afternoon sample (A3) is dominated by organic particles with a potentially higher degree of oxidation associated with soot. The B2 sample shows a higher number fraction of magnesium-containing particle indicative of a marine source and ~93% of the particles contained sulfur besides oxygen and carbon as derived from CCSEM/EDX analysis. The B4 sample lacks the strong marine influence and shows higher organic content. Above 230 K, we observed water uptake followed by condensation freezing at mean RH of 93-100% and 89-95% for A2 and A3, respectively. This indicates that the aged A3 particles are efficient ice nuclei (IN) for condensation freezing. Below 230 K A2 and A3 induced deposition ice nucleation between 125-155% RHice (at mean values of 134-150% RHice). The B2 and B4

  20. Snow-borne nanosized particles: Abundance, distribution, composition, and significance in ice nucleation processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel-Alvarado, Rodrigo Benjamin; Nazarenko, Yevgen; Ariya, Parisa A.

    2015-11-01

    Physicochemical processes of nucleation constitute a major uncertainty in understanding aerosol-cloud interactions. To improve the knowledge of the ice nucleation process, we characterized physical, chemical, and biological properties of fresh snow using a suite of state-of-the-art techniques based on mass spectrometry, electron microscopy, chromatography, and optical particle sizing. Samples were collected at two North American Arctic sites, as part of international campaigns (2006 and 2009), and in the city of Montreal, Canada, over the last decade. Particle size distribution analyses, in the range of 3 nm to 10 µm, showed that nanosized particles are the most numerous (38-71%) in fresh snow, with a significant portion (11 to 19%) less than 100 nm in size. Particles with diameters less than 200 nm consistently exhibited relatively high ice-nucleating properties (on average ranged from -19.6 ± 2.4 to -8.1 ± 2.6°C). Chemical analysis of the nanosized fraction suggests that they contain bioorganic materials, such as amino acids, as well as inorganic compounds with similar characteristics to mineral dust. The implication of nanoparticle ubiquity and abundance in diverse snow ecosystems are discussed in the context of their importance in understanding atmospheric nucleation processes.

  1. AMUSE-Field II. Nucleation of early-type galaxies in the field vs. cluster environment

    CERN Document Server

    Baldassare, Vivienne F; Miller, Brendan P; Plotkin, Richard M; Treu, Tommaso; Valluri, Monica; Woo, Jong-Hak

    2014-01-01

    The optical light profiles of nearby early type galaxies are known to exhibit a smooth transition from nuclear light deficits to nuclear light excesses with decreasing galaxy mass, with as much as 80 per cent of the galaxies with stellar masses below 10^10 Msun hosting a massive nuclear star cluster. At the same time, while all massive galaxies are thought to harbor nuclear super-massive black holes (SMBHs), observational evidence for SMBHs is slim at the low end of the mass function. Here, we explore the environmental dependence of the nucleation fraction by comparing two homogeneous samples of nearby field vs. cluster early type galaxies with uniform Hubble Space Telescope (HST) coverage. Existing Chandra X-ray Telescope data for both samples yield complementary information on low-level accretion onto nuclear SMBHs. Specifically, we report on dual-band (F475W & F850LP) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) imaging data for 28 out of the 103 field early type galaxies that compose the AMUSE-Field Chandra surv...

  2. Nucleation of bulk superconductivity close to critical magnetic fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fournais, Søren; Kachmar, Ayman

    2011-01-01

    threshold value of the applied magnetic field for which bulk superconductivity contributes to the leading order of the energy. Furthermore, the energy of the bulk is related to that of the Abrikosov problem in a periodic lattice. A key ingredient of the proof is a novel L∞ -bound which is of independent...

  3. Distributional fixed-point equations for island nucleation in one dimension: a retrospective approach for capture-zone scaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulheran, P A; O'Neill, K P; Grinfeld, M; Lamb, W

    2012-11-01

    The distributions of interisland gaps and captures zones for islands nucleated on a one-dimensional substrate during submonolayer deposition are considered using a novel retrospective view. This provides an alternative perspective on why scaling occurs in this continuously evolving system. Distributional fixed-point equations for the gaps are derived both with and without a mean-field approximation for nearest neighbor gap-size correlation. Solutions to the equations show that correct consideration of fragmentation bias justifies the mean-field approach, which can be extended to provide closed-from equations for the capture zones. Our results compare favorably to Monte Carlo data for both point and extended islands using a range of critical island size i=0,1,2,3. We also find satisfactory agreement with theoretical models based on more traditional fragmentation theory approaches.

  4. Influence of Pressure Field in Melts on the Primary Nucleation in Solidification Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakita, Milan; Han, Qingyou

    2017-10-01

    It is well known that external fields applied to melts can cause nucleation at lower supercoolings, fragmentation of growing dendrites, and forced convection around the solidification front. All these effects contribute to a finer microstructure of solidified material. In this article, we analyze how the pressure field created with ultrasonic vibrations influences structure refinement in terms of supercooling. It is shown that only high cavitation pressures of the order of 104 atmospheres are capable of nucleating crystals at minimal supercoolings. We demonstrate the possibility of sononucleation even in superheated liquid. Simulation and experiments with water samples show that very high cavitation pressures occur in a relatively narrow zone where the drive acoustic field has an appropriate combination of pressure amplitude and frequency. In order to accurately predict the microstructure formed by ultrasonically assisted solidification of metals, this article calls for the development of equations of state that would describe the pressure-dependent behavior of molten metals.

  5. Heterogeneous nucleation promotes carrier transport in solution-processed organic field-effect transistors

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Ruipeng

    2012-09-04

    A new way to investigate and control the growth of solution-cast thin films is presented. The combination of in situ quartz crystal microbalance measurements with dissipation capabilities (QCM-D) and in situ grazing-incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering (GIWAXS) in an environmental chamber provides unique quantitative insights into the time-evolution of the concentration of the solution, the onset of nucleation, and the mode of growth of the organic semiconductor under varied drying conditions. It is demonstrated that careful control over the kinetics of solution drying enhances carrier transport significantly by promoting phase transformation predominantly via heterogeneous nucleation and sustained surface growth of a highly lamellar structure at the solid-liquid interface at the expense of homogeneous nucleation. A new way to investigate and control the growth of drop-cast thin films is presented. The solution-processing of small-molecule thin films of TIPS-pentacene is investigated using time-resolved techniques to reveal the mechanisms of nucleation and growth leading to solid film formation. By tuning the drying speed of the solution, the balance between surface and bulk growth modes is altered, thereby controlling the lamellar formation and tuning the carrier mobility in organic field-effect transistors Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Aerosol particle size distributions in the lower Fraser Valley: evidence for particle nucleation and growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mozurkewich

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Particle size distributions from 9 to 640nm diameter were measured at Eagle Ridge in the lower Fraser Valley from 13 August to 1 September 2001 as part of the Pacific 2001 Air Quality Study. The site was on top of a ridge, about 300m above the valley floor, in a predominantly agricultural area about 70km ESE of Vancouver. To further characterize the particles, their hygroscopic properties (affinity for water were measured. The maximum of the number distributions was generally between 40 and 100nm diameter, but the number distribution was sometimes dominated by ultrafine particles with diameters below 40nm. These ultrafine particles, which appeared to some extent on all days, were frequently associated with elevated levels of CO and NOx, as expected for fresh vehicular emissions. The appearance of these fresh emissions was most pronounced when the growing mixed layer reached the altitude of the site. In contrast, pronounced nucleation events occurred on the five cleanest days; these resulted in particle number concentrations as high as 5x104 particles cm-3 and growth rates of 5 to 10nmhr-1. Nucleation appears to have been triggered when the UV flux reached about 25Wm-2. The growth of these newly formed particles was probably driven by the photochemical oxidation of biogenic organic compounds. Dramatic growth events were also observed on the afternoons of the more polluted days; these produced an extremely narrow mode σ<0.3 at a diameter of about 40nm. Rainy days showed low number concentrations with the size distributions shifted to small sizes. On one of these days there was evidence of nucleation not far from the site; this may have been occurring in the vicinity of the clouds.

  7. Nucleation and evaporation of domains due to electric field at room temperature in BaTiO3 single crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C M Dudhe; P R Arjunwadkar

    2015-09-01

    A study of nucleation and evaporation of 90° and 180° domains by external direct current (dc) electric field at room temperature in barium titanate single crystals has been carried out using reflecting microscope. It was observed that both the 90° and 180° domains were nucleated at some sites, while evaporated at some other sites of the crystal surface. The 90° domain follows the mechanism of micro-domain wall nucleation as well as the evaporation based on impurity dipoles, like reported for KNbO3. The mechanism of the 180° domain nucleation is not established yet. However, in both cases, nucleation and evaporation are operative simultaneously by the same electric field, which seems to be quite interesting and which can be attributed to the different critical lengths of the domains.

  8. Ice nucleation properties of atmospheric aerosol particles collected during a field campaign in Cyprus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yordanova, Petya; Maier, Stefanie; Lang-Yona, Naama; Tamm, Alexandra; Meusel, Hannah; Pöschl, Ulrich; Weber, Bettina; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, Janine

    2017-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles, including desert and soil dust as well as marine aerosols, are well known to act as ice nuclei (IN) and thus have been investigated in numerous ice nucleation studies. Based on their cloud condensation nuclei potential and their impacts on radiative properties of clouds (via scattering and absorption of solar radiation), aerosol particles may significantly affect the cloud and precipitation development. Atmospheric aerosols of the Eastern Mediterranean have been described to be dominated by desert dust, but only little is known on their composition and ice nucleating properties. In this study we investigated the ice nucleating ability of total suspended particles (TSP), collected at the remote site Agia Marina Xyliatou on Cyprus during a field campaign in April 2016. Airborne TSP samples containing air masses of various types such as African (Saharan) and Arabian dust and European and Middle Eastern pollution were collected on glass fiber filters at 24 h intervals. Sampling was performed ˜5 m above ground level and ˜521 m above sea level. During the sampling period, two major dust storms (PM 10max 118 μg/m3 and 66 μg/m3) and a rain event (rainfall amount: 3.4 mm) were documented. Chemical and physical characterizations of the particles were analyzed experimentally through filtration, thermal, chemical and enzyme treatments. Immersion freezing experiments were performed at relatively high subzero temperatures (-1 to -15˚ C) using the mono ice nucleation array. Preliminary results indicate that highest IN particle numbers (INPs) occurred during the second dust storm event with lower particle concentrations. Treatments at 60˚ C lead to a gradual IN deactivation, indicating the presence of biological INPs, which were observed to be larger than 300 kDa. Additional results originating from this study will be shown. Acknowledgement: This work was funded by the DFG Ice Nuclei Research Unit (INUIT).

  9. Ginzburg-Landau-type multiphase field model for competing fcc and bcc nucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, G I; Morris, J R; Gránásy, L

    2011-01-28

    We address crystal nucleation and fcc-bcc phase selection in alloys using a multiphase field model that relies on Ginzburg-Landau free energies of the liquid-fcc, liquid-bcc, and fcc-bcc subsystems, and determine the properties of the nuclei as a function of composition, temperature, and structure. With a realistic choice for the free energy of the fcc-bcc interface, the model predicts well the fcc-bcc phase-selection boundary in the Fe-Ni system.

  10. Field Detection of Microcracks to Define the Nucleation Stage of Earthquake Occurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Fujinawa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Main shocks of natural earthquakes are known to be accompanied by preshocks which evolve following the modified Ohmori’s law in average over many samples. Individual preshock activity, however, is far less systematic for predictive purposes. On the other hand, the microcracks in laboratory rock experiments are always preceded to final rupture. And, previous investigations of field acoustic emissions showed that the activity increases prominently before and after the main shock. But there is no detection of any phenomena to identify the nucleation stage. Here we show that a special underground electric field measurement could detect microcracks. Pulse-like variations were classified into three groups (A, B, C by frequency. The B-type is suggested to define the nucleation period: activity increases sharply following the modified Omori’s law before the main shock and there is no activity afterward. The B-type is subgrouped into three types possibly corresponding to crack-rupture modes. The variations are supposed to be induced by crack occurrence through electrokinetic effects in the elastic-porous medium. The detection distance is suggested to be several orders larger than that of the acoustic emission due to the effective smallness of dissipation rate, and the waveform can be used to infer the rupture mode.

  11. On the origin of logarithmic-normal distributions: An analytical derivation, and its application to nucleation and growth processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Ralf B.; Bill, Andreas

    2008-06-01

    The logarithmic-normal (lognormal) distribution is one of the most frequently observed distributions in nature and describes a large number of physical, biological and even sociological phenomena. The origin of this distribution is therefore of broad interest but a general derivation from basic principles is still lacking. Using random nucleation and growth to describe crystallization processes we derive the time development of grain-size distributions. Our derivation provides, for the first time, an analytical expression of the size distribution in the form of a lognormal type distribution. We apply our results to the grain-size distribution of solid phase crystallized Si-films.

  12. Ambient in-situ immersion freezing measurements - findings from the ZAMBIS 2014 field campaign for three ice nucleation techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohn, Monika; Atkinson, James D.; Lohmann, Ulrike; Kanji, Zamin A.

    2015-04-01

    To estimate the influence of clouds on the Earth's radiation budget, it is crucial to understand cloud formation processes in the atmosphere. A key process, which significantly affects cloud microphysical properties and the initiation of precipitation thus contributing to the hydrological cycle, is the prevailing type of ice nucleation mechanism. In mixed-phase clouds immersion freezing is the dominant ice crystal forming mechanism, whereby ice nucleating particles (INP) first act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and are activated to cloud droplets followed by freezing upon supercooling. There are a number of experimental methods and techniques to investigate the ice nucleating ability in the immersion mode, however most techniques are offline for field sampling or only suitable for laboratory measurements. In-situ atmospheric studies are needed to understand the ice formation processes of 'real world' particles. Laboratory experiments simulate conditions of atmospheric processes like ageing or coating but are still idealized. Our method is able to measure ambient in-situ immersion freezing on single immersed aerosol particles. The instrumental setup consists of the recently developed portable immersion mode cooling chamber (PIMCA) as a vertical extension to the portable ice nucleation chamber (PINC, [1]), where the frozen fraction of activated aerosol particles are detected by the ice optical depolarization detector (IODE, [2]). Two additional immersion freezing techniques based on a droplet freezing array [3,4] are used to sample ambient aerosol particles either in a suspension (fraction larger ~0.6 μm) or on PM10-filters to compare different ice nucleation techniques. Here, we present ambient in-situ measurements at an urban forest site in Zurich, Switzerland held during the Zurich ambient immersion freezing study (ZAMBIS) in spring 2014. We investigated the ice nucleating ability of natural atmospheric aerosol with the PIMCA/PINC immersion freezing setup as

  13. Generalisation of Levine's prediction for the distribution of freezing temperatures of droplets: a general singular model for ice nucleation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. P. Sear

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Models without an explicit time dependence, called singular models, are widely used for fitting the distribution of temperatures at which water droplets freeze. In 1950 Levine developed the original singular model. His key assumption was that each droplet contained many nucleation sites, and that freezing occurred due to the nucleation site with the highest freezing temperature. The fact that freezing occurs due to the maximum value out of large number of nucleation temperatures, means that we can apply the results of what is called extreme-value statistics. This is the statistics of the extreme, i.e., maximum or minimum, value of a large number of random variables. Here we use the results of extreme-value statistics to show that we can generalise Levine's model to produce the most general singular model possible. We show that when a singular model is a good approximation, the distribution of freezing temperatures should always be given by what is called the generalised extreme-value distribution. In addition, we also show that the distribution of freezing temperatures for droplets of one size, can be used to make predictions for the scaling of the median nucleation temperature with droplet size, and vice versa.

  14. Generalisation of Levine's prediction for the distribution of freezing temperatures of droplets: a general singular model for ice nucleation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. P. Sear

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Models without an explicit time dependence, called singular models, are widely used for fitting the distribution of temperatures at which water droplets freeze. In 1950 Levine developed the original singular model. His key assumption was that each droplet contained many nucleation sites, and that freezing occurred due to the nucleation site with the highest freezing temperature. The fact that freezing occurs due to the maximum value out of a large number of nucleation temperatures, means that we can apply the results of what is called extreme-value statistics. This is the statistics of the extreme, i.e. maximum or minimum, value of a large number of random variables. Here we use the results of extreme-value statistics to show that we can generalise Levine's model to produce the most general singular model possible. We show that when a singular model is a good approximation, the distribution of freezing temperatures should always be given by what is called the generalised extreme-value distribution. In addition, we also show that the distribution of freezing temperatures for droplets of one size, can be used to make predictions for the scaling of the median nucleation temperature with droplet size, and vice versa.

  15. Thin interface analysis of a phase-field model for epitaxial growth with nucleation and Ehrlich-Schwoebel effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, X. L.; Xing, H.; Chen, C. L.; Luo, B. C.; Chen, Z.; Zhang, R. L.; Jin, K. X.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we perform thin interface analysis of a quantitative phase field model for epitaxial growth where nucleation and the Ehrlich-Schwoebel barrier have been considered. Results show that once the nucleation term is introduced into the phase-field model, modification must be carried out to get rid of the extrinsic “kinetic nucleation effect”. While in the ES effect, the asymmetric diffusivity accounts for an irrational step motion that leads the model to deviate from the sharp-interface approximation, hence another modification for the attachment time should be carried. Attributed to these modifications, the phase-field model is more quantitative in describing step flow dynamics in the sharp-interface limit, as well as exhibiting the more convergence of the steady-state velocity with respect to the step width for larger scale simulations. Our analysis and modifications explore the quantitative linking between atom motions and step dynamics.

  16. Sensitivity of aerosol concentrations and cloud properties to nucleation and secondary organic distribution in ECHAM5-HAM global circulation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Makkonen

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The global aerosol-climate model ECHAM5-HAM was modified to improve the representation of new particle formation in the boundary layer. Activation-type nucleation mechanism was introduced to produce observed nucleation rates in lower troposphere. A simple and computationally efficient model for biogenic secondary organic aerosol (BSOA formation was implemented. We studied the sensitivity of aerosol and cloud droplet number concentrations (CDNC to these additions. Activation-type nucleation significantly increases aerosol number concentrations in the boundary layer. Increased particle number concentrations have a significant effect also on cloud droplet number concentrations and therefore on cloud properties. We performed calculations with activation nucleation coefficient values of 2×10-7 s−1, 2×10-6 s-1 and 2×10-5 s−1 to evaluate the sensitivity to this parameter. For BSOA we have used yields of 0.025, 0.07 and 0.15 to estimate the amount of monoterpene oxidation products available for condensation. The dynamic SOA scheme induces large regional changes to size distribution of organic carbon, and therefore affects particle optical properties and cloud droplet number concentrations locally. Comparison with satellite observation shows that activation-type nucleation significantly decreases the differences between observed and modeled values of cloud top CDNC.

  17. Field measurements of hygroscopic properties and state of mixing of nucleation mode particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Väkevä

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available An Ultrafine Tandem Differential Mobility Analyser (UF-TDMA has been used in several field campaigns over the last few years. The investigations were focused on the origin and properties of nucleation event aerosols, which are observed frequently in various environments. This paper gives a summary of the results of 10 nm and 20 nm particle hygroscopic properties from different measurement sites: an urban site, an urban background site and a forest site in Finland and a coastal site in western Ireland. The data can be classified in four hygroscopic growth classes: hydrofobic, less-hygroscopic, more-hygroscopic and sea-salt. Similar classification has been earlier presented for Aitken and accumulation mode particles. In urban air, the summertime 10 nm particles showed varying less-hygroscopic growth behaviour, while winter time 10 nm and 20 nm particles were externally mixed with two different hygroscopic growth modes. The forest measurements revealed diurnal behaviour of hygroscopic growth, with high growth factors at day time and lower during night. The urban background particles had growth behaviour similar to the urban and forest measurement sites depending on the origin of the observed particles. The coastal measurements were strongly affected by air mass history. Both 10 nm and 20 nm particles were hygroscopic in marine background air. The 10 nm particles produced during clean nucleation burst periods were hydrofobic. Diurnal variation and higher growth factors of 10 nm particles were observed in air affected by other source regions. External mixing was occasionally observed at all the sites, but incidents with more than two growth modes were extremely rare.

  18. Generalisation of Levine's prediction for the distribution of freezing temperatures of droplets: A general singular model for ice nucleation

    CERN Document Server

    Sear, Richard P

    2013-01-01

    Models without an explicit time dependence, called singular models, are widely used for fitting the distribution of temperatures at which water droplets freeze. In 1950 Levine developed the original singular model. His key assumption was that each droplet contained many nucleation sites, and that freezing occurred due to the nucleation site with the highest freezing temperature. The fact that freezing occurs due to the maximum value out of large number of nucleation temperatures, means that we can apply the results of what is called extreme-value statistics. This is the statistics of the extreme, i.e., maximum or minimum, value of a large number of random variables. Here we use the results of extreme-value statistics to show that we can generalise Levine's model to produce the most general singular model possible. We show that when a singular model is a good approximation, the distribution of freezing temperatures should always be given by what is called the generalised extreme-value distribution. In addition...

  19. Heterogeneous ice nucleation and water uptake by field-collected atmospheric particles below 273 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Bingbing; Laskin, Alexander; Roedel, Tobias R.; Gilles, Marry K.; Moffet, Ryan C.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Knopf, Daniel A.

    2012-09-25

    Atmospheric ice formation induced by particles with complex chemical and physical properties through heterogeneous nucleation is not well understood. Heterogeneous ice nucleation and water uptake by ambient particles collected from urban environments in Los Angeles and Mexico City are presented. Using a vapour controlled cooling system equipped with an optical microscopy, the range of onset conditions for ice nucleation and water uptake by the collected particles was determined as a function of temperature (200{273 K) and relative humidity with respect to ice (RHice) up to water saturation. Three distinctly different types of authentic atmospheric particles were investigated including soot particles associated with organics/inorganics, inorganic particles of marine origin coated with organic material, and Pb/Zn containing inorganic particles apportioned to anthropogenic emissions relevant to waste incineration. Single particle characterization was provided by micro-spectroscopic analyses using computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption ne structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). Above 230 K, signicant differences in water uptake and immersion freezing effciencies of the different particle types were observed. Below 230 K, the particles exhibited high deposition ice nucleation effciencies and formed ice at RHice values well below homogeneous ice nucleation limits. The data show that the chemical composition of these eld{collected particles plays an important role in determining water uptake and immersion freezing. Heterogeneous ice nucleation rate coeffcients, cumulative ice nuclei (IN) spectrum, and IN activated fraction for deposition ice nucleation are derived. The presented ice nucleation data demonstrate that anthropogenic and marine particles comprising of various chemical and physical properties exhibit distinctly different ice

  20. The Carbon Aerosol / Particles Nucleation with a Lidar: Numerical Simulations and Field Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miffre, Alain; Anselmo, Christophe; Francis, Mirvatte; David, Gregory; Rairoux, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    In this contribution, we present the results of two recent papers [1,2] published in Optics Express, dedicated to the development of two new lidar methodologies. In [1], while the carbon aerosol (for example, soot particles) is recognized as a major uncertainty on climate and public health, we couple lidar remote sensing with Laser-Induced-Incandescence (LII) to allow retrieving the vertical profile of very low thermal radiation emitted by the carbon aerosol, in agreement with Planck's law, in an urban atmosphere over several hundred meters altitude. In paper [2], awarded as June 2014 OSA Spotlight, we identify the optical requirements ensuring an elastic lidar to be sensitive to new particles formation events (NPF-events) in the atmosphere, while, in the literature, all the ingredients initiating nucleation are still being unrevealed [3]. Both papers proceed with the same methodology by identifying the optical requirements from numerical simulation (Planck and Kirchhoff's laws in [1], Mie and T-matrix numerical codes in [2]), then presenting lidar field application case studies. We believe these new lidar methodologies may be useful for climate, geophysical, as well as fundamental purposes.

  1. Heterogeneous ice nucleation and water uptake by field-collected atmospheric particles below 273 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bingbing; Laskin, Alexander; Roedel, Tobias; Gilles, Mary K.; Moffet, Ryan C.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Knopf, Daniel A.

    2012-09-01

    Ice formation induced by atmospheric particles through heterogeneous nucleation is not well understood. Onset conditions for heterogeneous ice nucleation and water uptake by particles collected in Los Angeles and Mexico City were determined as a function of temperature (200-273 K) and relative humidity with respect to ice (RHice). Four dominant particle types were identified including soot associated with organics, soot with organic and inorganics, inorganic particles of marine origin coated with organic material, and Pb/Zn-containing particles apportioned to emissions relevant to waste incineration. Single particle characterization was provided by micro-spectroscopic analyses using computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). Above 230 K, significant differences in onsets of water uptake and immersion freezing of different particle types were observed. Below 230 K, particles exhibited high deposition ice nucleation efficiencies and formed ice atRHicewell below homogeneous ice nucleation limits. The data suggest that water uptake and immersion freezing are more sensitive to changes in particle chemical composition compared to deposition ice nucleation. The data demonstrate that anthropogenic and marine influenced particles, exhibiting various chemical and physical properties, possess distinctly different ice nucleation efficiencies and can serve as efficient IN at atmospheric conditions typical for cirrus and mixed-phase clouds.

  2. Case Study of Particle Number Fluxes and Size Distributions during Nucleation Events in Southeastern Italy in the Summer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianna Conte

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Concentrations, size distributions and particle number vertical turbulent fluxes were measured by the eddy-covariance method at an urban background site in southeastern Italy during the summer. CO2/H2O concentrations and fluxes were also determined together with meteorological parameters. Time series show that particles could be divided into two size classes with negatively-correlated temporal trends in diurnal hours: nanoparticles (diameter Dp < 50 nm and larger particles (Dp > 50 nm. Larger particles include part of the Aitken mode and the accumulation mode. Nanoparticles peaked in diurnal hours due to the presence of several days with nucleation events when particles Dp > 50 nm were at minimum concentrations. Nucleation increased diurnal total particle concentration by a factor of 2.5, reducing mean and median diameters from Dmean = 62.3 ± 1.2 nm and Dmedian = 29.1 ± 1.3 nm on non-event days to Dmean = 35.4 ± 0.6 nm and Dmedian = 15.5 ± 0.3 nm on event days. During nucleation events, particle deposition increased markedly (i.e., downward fluxes, but no significant changes in CO2 concentrations and fluxes were observed. This is compatible with new particle formation above the measurement height and a consequent net transport towards the surface. Correlation with meteorology shows that the formation of new particles is correlated with solar radiation and favored at high wind velocity.

  3. Observation of propane cluster size distributions during nucleation and growth in a Laval expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreiro, Jorge J.; Chakrabarty, Satrajit; Schläppi, Bernhard; Signorell, Ruth

    2016-12-01

    We report on molecular-level studies of the condensation of propane gas and propane/ethane gas mixtures in the uniform (constant pressure and temperature) postnozzle flow of Laval expansions using soft single-photon ionization by vacuum ultraviolet light and mass spectrometric detection. The whole process, from the nucleation to the growth to molecular aggregates of sizes of several nanometers (˜5 nm), can be monitored at the molecular level with high time-resolution (˜3 μs) for a broad range of pressures and temperatures. For each time, pressure, and temperature, a whole mass spectrum is recorded, which allows one to determine the critical cluster size range for nucleation as well as the kinetics and mechanisms of cluster-size specific growth. The detailed information about the size, composition, and population of individual molecular clusters upon condensation provides unique experimental data for comparison with future molecular-level simulations.

  4. Phase field theory of interfaces and crystal nucleation in a eutectic system of fcc structure: II. Nucleation in the metastable liquid immiscibility region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, Gyula I; Gránásy, László

    2007-08-21

    In the second part of our paper, we address crystal nucleation in the metastable liquid miscibility region of eutectic systems that is always present, though experimentally often inaccessible. While this situation resembles the one seen in single component crystal nucleation in the presence of a metastable vapor-liquid critical point addressed in previous works, it is more complex because of the fact that here two crystal phases of significantly different compositions may nucleate. Accordingly, at a fixed temperature below the critical point, six different types of nuclei may form: two liquid-liquid nuclei: two solid-liquid nuclei; and two types of composite nuclei, in which the crystalline core has a liquid "skirt," whose composition falls in between the compositions of the solid and the initial liquid phases, in addition to nuclei with concentric alternating composition shells of prohibitively high free energy. We discuss crystalline phase selection via exploring/identifying the possible pathways for crystal nucleation.

  5. Electric field distribution of electron emitter surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagawa, M.; Takenobu, S.; Ohmae, N.; Umeno, M.

    1987-03-01

    The electric field distribution of a tungsten field emitter surface and a LaB6 thermionic emitter surface has been studied. The computer simulation of electric field distribution on the emitter surface was carried out with a charge simulation method. The electric field distribution of the LaB6 thermionic emitter was experimentally evaluated by the Schottky plot. Two independent equations are necessary for obtaining local electric field and work function; the Fowler-Nordheim equation and the equation of total energy distribution of emitted electron being used to evaluate the electric field distribution of the tungsten field emitter. The experimental results agreed with the computer simulation.

  6. Dynamics of homogeneous nucleation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toxværd, Søren

    2015-01-01

    The classical nucleation theory for homogeneous nucleation is formulated as a theory for a density fluctuation in a supersaturated gas at a given temperature. But molecular dynamics simulations reveal that it is small cold clusters which initiates the nucleation. The temperature in the nucleating...... clusters fluctuates, but the mean temperature remains below the temperature in the supersaturated gas until they reach the critical nucleation size. The critical nuclei have, however, a temperature equal to the supersaturated gas. The kinetics of homogeneous nucleation is not only caused by a grow...... or shrink by accretion or evaporation of monomers only but also by an exponentially declining change in cluster size per time step equal to the cluster distribution in the supersaturated gas....

  7. Measurements in a highly polluted Asian mega city: observations of aerosol number size distribution, modal parameters and nucleation events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Mönkkönen

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Diurnal variation of number size distribution (particle size 3–800 nm and modal parameters (geometric standard deviation, geometric mean diameter and modal aerosol particle concentration in a highly polluted urban environment was investigated during October and November 2002 in New Delhi, India. Continuous monitoring for more than two weeks with the time resolution of 10 min was conducted using a Differential Mobility Particle Sizer (twin DMPS. The results indicated clear increase in Aitken mode (25–100 nm particles during traffic peak hours, but towards the evenings there were more Aitken mode particles compared to the mornings. Also high concentrations of accumulation mode particles (>100 nm were detected in the evenings only. In the evenings, biomass/refuse burning and cooking are possible sources beside the traffic. We have also shown that nucleation events are possible in this kind of atmosphere even though as clear nucleation events as observed in rural sites could not be detected. The formation rate of 3 nm particles (J3 of the observed events varied from 3.3 to 13.9 cm−3s−1 and the growth rate varied from 11.6 to 18.1 nmh−1 showing rapid growth and high formation rate, which seems to be typical in urban areas.

  8. Measurements in a highly polluted Asian mega city: observations of aerosol number size distribution, modal parameters and nucleation events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Mönkkönen

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Diurnal variation of number size distribution (particle size 3-800nm and modal parameters (geometric standard deviation, geometric mean diameter and modal aerosol particle concentration in a highly polluted urban environment was investigated during October and November 2002 in New Delhi, India. Continuous monitoring for more than two weeks with the time resolution of 10min was conducted using a Differential Mobility Particle Sizer (twin DMPS. The results indicated clear increase in Aitken mode (25-100nm particles during traffic peak hours, but towards the evenings there were more Aitken mode particles compared to the mornings. Also high concentrations of accumulation mode particles (>100nm were detected in the evenings only. In the evenings, biomass/refuse burning and cooking are possible sources beside the traffic. We have also shown that nucleation events are possible in this kind of atmosphere even though as clear nucleation events as observed in rural sites could not be detected. The formation rate of 3nm particles (J3 of the observed events varied from 3.3 to 13.9cm-3s-1 and the growth rate varied from 11.6 to 18.1nmh-1 showing rapid growth and high formation rate, which seems to be typical in urban areas.

  9. Addressing the ice nucleating abilities of marine aerosol: A combination of deposition mode laboratory and field measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladino, L. A.; Yakobi-Hancock, J. D.; Kilthau, W. P.; Mason, R. H.; Si, M.; Li, J.; Miller, L. A.; Schiller, C. L.; Huffman, J. A.; Aller, J. Y.; Knopf, D. A.; Bertram, A. K.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2016-05-01

    This study addresses, through two types of experiments, the potential for the oceans to act as a source of atmospheric ice-nucleating particles (INPs). The INP concentration via deposition mode nucleation was measured in situ at a coastal site in British Columbia in August 2013. The INP concentration at conditions relevant to cirrus clouds (i.e., -40 °C and relative humidity with respect to ice, RHice = 139%) ranged from 0.2 L-1 to 3.3 L-1. Correlations of the INP concentrations with levels of anthropogenic tracers (i.e., CO, SO2, NOx, and black carbon) and numbers of fluorescent particles do not indicate a significant influence from anthropogenic sources or submicron bioaerosols, respectively. Additionally, the INPs measured in the deposition mode showed a poor correlation with the concentration of particles with sizes larger than 500 nm, which is in contrast with observations made in the immersion freezing mode. To investigate the nature of particles that could have acted as deposition INP, laboratory experiments with potential marine aerosol particles were conducted under the ice-nucleating conditions used in the field. At -40 °C, no deposition activity was observed with salt aerosol particles (sodium chloride and two forms of commercial sea salt: Sigma-Aldrich and Instant Ocean), particles composed of a commercial source of natural organic matter (Suwannee River humic material), or particle mixtures of sea salt and humic material. In contrast, exudates from three phytoplankton (Thalassiosira pseudonana, Nanochloris atomus, and Emiliania huxleyi) and one marine bacterium (Vibrio harveyi) exhibited INP activity at low RHice values, down to below 110%. This suggests that the INPs measured at the field site were of marine biological origins, although we cannot rule out other sources, including mineral dust.

  10. Application of scaling and kinetic equations to helium cluster size distributions: Homogeneous nucleation of a nearly ideal gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaiken, J; Goodisman, J; Kornilov, Oleg; Peter Toennies, J

    2006-08-21

    A previously published model of homogeneous nucleation [Villarica et al., J. Chem. Phys. 98, 4610 (1993)] based on the Smoluchowski [Phys. Z. 17, 557 (1916)] equations is used to simulate the experimentally measured size distributions of 4He clusters produced in free jet expansions. The model includes only binary collisions and does not consider evaporative effects, so that binary reactive collisions are rate limiting for formation of all cluster sizes despite the need for stabilization of nascent clusters. The model represents these data very well, accounting in some cases for nearly four orders of magnitude in variation in abundance over cluster sizes ranging up to nearly 100 atoms. The success of the model may be due to particularities of 4He clusters, i.e., their very low coalescence exothermicity, and to the low temperature of 6.7 K at which the data were collected.

  11. Nucleation process on the 180^o domain wall of PbTiO3 by the external electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Young-Han; Grinberg, Ilya; Chen, I.-Wei; Rappe, Andrew

    2006-03-01

    Ferroelectric oxides are extremely useful as nonvolatile memory storage materials, and the speed at which polar domains can be reversed is a critical characteristic for future development of these materials. However, the size of the critical nucleus during the polarization reversal is still unknown experimentally. If we assume that the magnitudes of local polarizations are the same and their directions are along the external field, it will be triangular and the height of the nucleus along the external field should be much larger than its width following the Miller and Weinreich's study in 1960s. We made an atomic potential for perovskite ferroelectrics based on the first-principles calculation, and performed molecular-dynamics simulations to understand the nucleation and growth process of ferroelectric domains. We find that its shape is close to a square not a triangle and its size much smaller than Miller and Weinreich's. It stems from the small polarizations and the voltex-like flow around the nucleus. To increase the system size we used the stochastic study using the nucleation and growth rates which were obtained from the molecular dynamics simulations. The overall speed of the domain wall motion can be estimated from this stochastic calculation.

  12. Nucleation in food colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povey, Malcolm J. W.

    2016-12-01

    Nucleation in food colloids has been studied in detail using ultrasound spectroscopy. Our data show that classical nucleation theory (CNT) remains a sound basis from which to understand nucleation in food colloids and analogous model systems using n-alkanes. Various interpretations and modifications of CNT are discussed with regard to their relevance to food colloids. Much of the evidence presented is based on the ultrasound velocity spectrometry measurements which has many advantages for the study of nucleating systems compared to light scattering and NMR due to its sensitivity at low solid contents and its ability to measure true solid contents in the nucleation and early crystal growth stages. Ultrasound attenuation spectroscopy also responds to critical fluctuations in the induction region. We show, however, that a periodic pressure fluctuation such as a quasi-continuous (as opposed to a pulse comprising only a few pressure cycles) ultrasound field can alter the nucleation process, even at very low acoustic intensity. Thus care must be taken when using ultrasound techniques that the measurements do not alter the studied processes. Quasi-continuous ultrasound fields may enhance or suppress nucleation and the criteria to determine such effects are derived. The conclusions of this paper are relevant to colloidal systems in foods, pharmaceuticals, agro-chemicals, cosmetics, and personal products.

  13. A Distributed Activation Energy Model of Thermodynamically Inhibited Nucleation and Growth Reactions and its Application to the beta-delta Phase Transition of HMX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnham, A K; Weese, R K; Weeks, B L

    2004-06-18

    Detailed and global models are presented for thermodynamically inhibited nucleation-growth reactions and applied to the {beta}-{delta} Phase Transition of HMX (nitramine octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine). The detailed model contains separate kinetic parameters for the nucleation process, including an activation energy distribution resulting from a distribution of defect energies, and for movement of the resulting reaction interface within a single particle. A thermodynamic inhibition term is added to both processes so that the rates go to zero at the transition temperature. The global model adds the thermodynamic inhibition term to the extended Prout-Tompkins nucleation-growth formalism for single particles or powders. Model parameters are calibrated from differential scanning calorimetry data. The activation energy for nucleation (333 kJ/mol) is substantially higher than that for growth (29.3 kJ/mol). Use of a small activation energy distribution ({approx}400 J/mol) for the defects improves the fit to a powered sample for both the early and late stages of the transition. The effective overall activation energy for the global model (208.8 kJ/mol) is in between that of nucleation and growth. Comparison of the two models with experiment indicates the thermodynamic inhibition term is more important than the energy distribution feature for this transition. Based on the applicability of the Prout-Tompkins kinetics approach to a wide range of organic and inorganic materials, both models should have equally broad applicability for thermodynamically constrained reactions.

  14. A Distributed Activation Energy Model of Thermodynamically Inhibited Nucleation and Growth Reactions and its Application to the Phase Transition of HMX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnham, A K; Weese, R K; Weeks, B L

    2004-07-20

    Detailed and global models are presented for thermodynamically inhibited nucleation-growth reactions and applied to the {beta}-{delta} Phase Transition of HMX (nitramine octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine). The detailed model contains separate kinetic parameters for the nucleation process, including an activation energy distribution resulting from a distribution of defect energies, and for movement of the resulting reaction interface within a single particle. A thermodynamic inhibition term is added to both processes so that the rates go to zero at the transition temperature. The global model adds the thermodynamic inhibition term to the extended Prout-Tompkins nucleation-growth formalism for single particles or powders. Model parameters are calibrated from differential scanning calorimetry data. The activation energy for nucleation (333 kJ/mol) is substantially higher than that for growth (29.3 kJ/mol). Use of a small activation energy distribution ({approx}400 J/mol) for the defects improves the fit to a powered sample for both the early and late stages of the transition. The effective overall activation energy for the global model (208.8 kJ/mol) is in between that of nucleation and growth. Comparison of the two models with experiment indicates the thermodynamic inhibition term is more important than the energy distribution feature for this transition. Based on the applicability of the Prout-Tompkins kinetics approach to a wide range of organic and inorganic materials, both models should have equally broad applicability for thermodynamically constrained reactions.

  15. Effect of starting microstructure upon the nucleation sites and distribution of graphite particles during a graphitising anneal of an experimental medium-carbon machining steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inam, A., E-mail: aqil.ceet@pu.edu.pk; Brydson, R., E-mail: mtlrmdb@leeds.ac.uk; Edmonds, D.V., E-mail: d.v.edmonds@leeds.ac.uk

    2015-08-15

    The potential for using graphite particles as an internal lubricant during machining is considered. Graphite particles were found to form during graphitisation of experimental medium-carbon steel alloyed with Si and Al. The graphite nucleation sites were strongly influenced by the starting microstructure, whether ferrite–pearlite, bainite or martensite, as revealed by light and electron microscopy. Favourable nucleation sites in the ferrite–pearlite starting microstructure were, not unexpectedly, found to be located within pearlite colonies, no doubt due to the presence of abundant cementite as a source of carbon. In consequence, the final distribution of graphite nodules in ferrite–pearlite microstructures was less uniform than for the bainite microstructure studied. In the case of martensite, this study found a predominance of nucleation at grain boundaries, again leading to less uniform graphite dispersions. - Highlights: • Metallography of formation of graphite particles in experimental carbon steel. • Potential for using graphite in steel as an internal lubricant during machining. • Microstructure features expected to influence improved machinability studied. • Influence of pre-anneal starting microstructure on graphite nucleation sites. • Influence of pre-anneal starting microstructure on graphite distribution. • Potential benefit is new free-cutting steel compositions without e.g. Pb alloying.

  16. Simulation of particle size distribution with a global aerosol model: contribution of nucleation to aerosol and CCN number concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Yu

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available An advanced particle microphysics model with a number of computationally efficient schemes has been incorporated into a global chemistry transport model (GEOS-Chem to simulate particle number size distributions and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN concentrations in the atmosphere. Size-resolved microphysics for secondary particles (i.e., those formed from gaseous species and sea salt has been treated in the present study. The growth of nucleated particles through the condensation of sulfuric acid vapor and equilibrium uptake of nitrate, ammonium, and secondary organic aerosol is explicitly simulated, along with the scavenging of secondary particles by primary particles (dust, black carbon, organic carbon, and sea salt. We calculate secondary particle formation rate based on ion-mediated nucleation (IMN mechanism and constrain the parameterizations of primary particle emissions with various observations. Our simulations indicate that secondary particles formed via IMN appear to be able to account for the particle number concentrations observed in many parts of troposphere. A comparison of the simulated annual mean concentrations of condensation nuclei larger than 10 nm (CN10 with those measured values show very good agreement (within a factor of two in near all 22 sites around the globe that have at least one full year of CN10 measurements. Secondary particles appear to dominate the number abundance in most parts of the troposphere. Calculated CCN concentration at supersaturation of 0.4% (CCN0.4 and the fraction of CCN0.4 that is secondary (fCCNsec have large spatial variations. Over the middle latitude in the Northern Hemisphere, zonally averaged CCN0.4 decreases from ~400–700 cm−3 in the boundary layer (BL to below 100 cm−3 above altitude of ~4 km, the corresponding fCCNsec values change from 50–60% to above ~70%. In the Southern Hemisphere, the zonally

  17. Simulation of particle size distribution with a global aerosol model: contribution of nucleation to aerosol and CCN number concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Yu

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available An advanced particle microphysics model with a number of computationally efficient schemes has been incorporated into a global chemistry transport model (GEOS-Chem to simulate particle number size distributions and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN concentrations in the atmosphere. Size-resolved microphysics for secondary particles (i.e., those formed from gaseous species and sea salt has been treated in the present study. The growth of nucleated particles through the condensation of sulfuric acid vapor and equilibrium uptake of nitrate, ammonium, and secondary organic aerosol is explicitly simulated, along with the scavenging of secondary particles by primary particles (dust, black carbon, organic carbon, and sea salt. We calculate secondary particle formation rate based on ion-mediated nucleation (IMN mechanism and constrain the parameterizations of primary particle emissions with various observations. Our simulations indicate that secondary particles formed via IMN appear to be able to account for the particle number concentrations observed in many parts of the troposphere. A comparison of the simulated annual mean concentrations of condensation nuclei larger than 10 nm (CN10 with those measured values show very good agreement (within a factor of two in near all 22 sites around the globe that have at least one full year of CN10 measurements. Secondary particles appear to dominate the number abundance in most parts of the troposphere. Calculated CCN concentration at supersaturation of 0.4% (CCN0.4 and the fraction of CCN0.4 that is secondary (fsecCCN have large spatial variations. Over the middle latitude in the Northern Hemisphere, zonally averaged CCN0.4 decreases from ~400–700 cm−3 in the boundary layer (BL to below 100 cm−3 above altitude of ~4 km, the corresponding fsecCCN values change from 50–60% to above ~70%. In the Southern Hemisphere, the zonally

  18. Effect of damage rate on the kinetics of void nucleation and growth by phase field modeling for materials under irradiations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xuejian; Zhao, Jiejiang; Huang, Hao; Ding, Shurong; Huo, Yongzhong

    2016-11-01

    The void formation and growth in materials under irradiations is studied by a modified Cahn-Hilliard equation coupled with the explicit nucleation algorithm. Through the numerical simulations, the stages of incubation, nucleation, growth and coalescence of the irradiation induced voids are clearly observed with a faster kinetics for stronger damage rate. There seems to exist a critical damage rate g˙vc at which the kinetics speeds up significantly. For smaller damage rates, very few voids can be nucleated. But the nucleated voids can grow rather large with its average radius growing as Rv ∝t1/d. For stronger irradiations, much more voids could be nucleated, but they cannot grow very large before coarsening. The growth follows a much faster kinetics as Rv ∝t2/d. The critical damage rate g˙vc should be determined by the competition of the rate of diffusion and the rate of vacancy production due to irradiations.

  19. Detached Melt Nucleation during Diffusion Brazing of a Technical Ni-based Superalloy: A Phase-Field Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttger, B.; Apel, M.; Laux, B.; Piegert, S.

    2015-06-01

    Advanced solidification processes like welding, soldering, and brazing are often characterized by their specific solidification conditions. But they also may include different types of melting processes which themselves are strongly influenced by the initial microstructures and compositions of the applied materials and therefore are decisive for the final quality and mechanical properties of the joint. Such melting processes are often not well- understood because - compared to other fields of solidification science - relatively little research has been done on melting by now. Also, regarding microstructure simulation, melting has been strongly neglected in the past, although this process is substantially different from solidification due to the reversed diffusivities of the involved phases. In this paper we present phase-field simulations showing melting, solidification and precipitation of intermetallic phases during diffusion brazing of directionally solidified and heat-treated high-alloyed Ni- based gas turbine blade material using different boron containing braze alloys. Contrary to the common belief, melting of the base material is not always planar and can be further accompanied by detached nucleation and growth of a second liquid phase inside the base material leading to polycrystalline morphologies of the joint after solidification. These findings are consistent with results from brazed laboratory samples, which were characterized by EDX and optical microscopy, and can be explained in terms of specific alloy thermodynamics and inter-diffusion kinetics. Consequences of the gained new understanding for brazing of high- alloyed materials are discussed.

  20. Field distribution of epidural electrical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiaobo; Cui, Hong yan; Xu, Shengpu; Hu, Yong

    2013-11-01

    Epidural electrical stimulation has been applied in clinics for many years. However, there is still a concern about possible injury to spinal nerves. This study investigated electrical field and current density distribution during direct epidural electrical stimulation. Field distribution models were theoretically deduced, while the distribution of potentials and current were analyzed. The current density presented an increase of 70-80%, with one peak value ranging from -85° to 85° between the two stimulated poles. The effect of direct epidural electrical stimulation is mainly on local tissue surrounding the electrodes, concentrated around the two stimulated positions. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Transverse field-induced nucleation pad switching modes during domain wall injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryan, M. T.; Fry, P. W.; Schrefl, T.; Gibbs, M. R. J.; Allwood, D. A.; Im, M.-Y.; Fischer, P.

    2010-03-12

    We have used magnetic transmission X-ray microscopy (M-TXM) to image in-field magnetization configurations of patterned Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} domain wall 'injection pads' and attached planar nanowires. Comparison with micromagnetic simulations suggests that the evolution of magnetic domains in rectangular injection pads depends on the relative orientation of closure domains in the remanent state. The magnetization reversal pathway is also altered by the inclusion of transverse magnetic fields. These different modes explain previous results of domain wall injection into nanowires. Even more striking was the observation of domain walls injecting halfway across the width of wider (>400 nm wide) wires but over wire lengths of several micrometers. These extended Neel walls can interact with adjacent nanowires and cause a switching in the side of the wire undergoing reversal as the domain wall continues to expand.

  2. Field distribution analysis in deflecting structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paramonov, V.V. [Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-02-15

    Deflecting structures are used now manly for bunch rotation in emittance exchange concepts, bunch diagnostics and to increase the luminosity. The bunch rotation is a transformation of a particles distribution in the six dimensional phase space. Together with the expected transformations, deflecting structures introduce distortions due to particularities - aberrations - in the deflecting field distribution. The distributions of deflecting fields are considered with respect to non linear additions, which provide emittance deteriorations during a transformation. The deflecting field is treated as combination of hybrid waves HE{sub 1} and HM{sub 1}. The criteria for selection and formation of deflecting structures with minimized level of aberrations are formulated and applied to known structures. Results of the study are confirmed by comparison with results of numerical simulations.

  3. Phase field theory of interfaces and crystal nucleation in a eutectic system of fcc structure: I. Transitions in the one-phase liquid region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, Gyula I; Gránásy, László

    2007-08-21

    The phase field theory (PFT) has been applied to predict equilibrium interfacial properties and nucleation barrier in the binary eutectic system Ag-Cu using double well and interpolation functions deduced from a Ginzburg-Landau expansion that considers fcc (face centered cubic) crystal symmetries. The temperature and composition dependent free energies of the liquid and solid phases are taken from CALculation of PHAse Diagrams-type calculations. The model parameters of PFT are fixed so as to recover an interface thickness of approximately 1 nm from molecular dynamics simulations and the interfacial free energies from the experimental dihedral angles available for the pure components. A nontrivial temperature and composition dependence for the equilibrium interfacial free energy is observed. Mapping the possible nucleation pathways, we find that the Ag and Cu rich critical fluctuations compete against each other in the neighborhood of the eutectic composition. The Tolman length is positive and shows a maximum as a function of undercooling. The PFT predictions for the critical undercooling are found to be consistent with experimental results. These results support the view that heterogeneous nucleation took place in the undercooling experiments available at present. We also present calculations using the classical droplet model [classical nucleation theory (CNT)] and a phenomenological diffuse interface theory (DIT). While the predictions of the CNT with a purely entropic interfacial free energy underestimate the critical undercooling, the DIT results appear to be in a reasonable agreement with the PFT predictions.

  4. The Field White Dwarf Mass Distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Tremblay, P -E; Kalirai, J S; Gaensicke, B T; Gentile-Fusillo, N; Raddi, R

    2016-01-01

    We revisit the properties and astrophysical implications of the field white dwarf mass distribution in preparation of Gaia applications. Our study is based on the two samples with the best established completeness and most precise atmospheric parameters, the volume-complete survey within 20 pc and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) magnitude-limited sample. We explore the modelling of the observed mass distributions with Monte Carlo simulations, but find that it is difficult to constrain independently the initial mass function (IMF), the initial-to-final-mass relation (IFMR), the stellar formation history (SFH), the variation of the Galactic disk vertical scale height as a function of stellar age, and binary evolution. Each of these input ingredients has a moderate effect on the predicted mass distributions, and we must also take into account biases owing to unidentified faint objects (20 pc sample), as well as unknown masses for magnetic white dwarfs and spectroscopic calibration issues (SDSS sample). Never...

  5. Measurement of the nucleation and propagation field in a single Co/Pt multilayer dot by anomalous Hall effect.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de J.; Delalande, M.Y.; Abelmann, L.; Lodder, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    It has been suggested that the reversal mechanism in highly exchange coupled systems, like Co/Pt multilayers, takes place by nucleation of a reversed domain, followed by domain wall movement. Based on magnetic force microscopy (MFM) and anomalous Hall effect (AHE) measurements, we show that this mod

  6. Control of effect on the nucleation rate for hen egg white lysozyme crystals under application of an external ac electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, H; Uda, S; Fujiwara, K; Nozawa, J

    2011-07-05

    The effect of an external ac electric field on the nucleation rate of hen egg white lysozyme crystals increased with an increase in the concentration of the precipitant used, which enabled the design of an electric double layer (EDL) formed at the inner surface of the drop in the oil. This is attributed to the thickness of the EDL controlled by the ionic strength of the precipitant used. Control of the EDL formed at the interface between the two phases is important to establishing this novel technique for the crystallization of proteins under the application of an external ac electric field. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  7. Spatial and temporal distributions of ice nucleating particles during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Cloud Aerosol Precipitation Experiment (ACAPEX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, E. J.; DeMott, P. J.; Suski, K. J.; Boose, Y.; Hill, T. C. J.; McCluskey, C. S.; Schill, G. P.; Duncan, D.; Al-Mashat, H.; Prather, K. A.; Sedlacek, A. J., III; Tomlinson, J. M.; Mei, F.; Hubbe, J. M.; Pekour, M. S.; Leung, L. R.; Kreidenweis, S. M.

    2016-12-01

    California is currently under drought conditions and changes in precipitation due to future climate change scenarios are uncertain. Thus, understanding the controlling factors for precipitation in this region, and having the capability to accurately model these scenarios, is important. A crucial area in understanding precipitation is in the interplay between atmospheric moisture and aerosols. Specifically, ice nucleation in clouds is an important process controlling precipitation formation. A major component of CA's yearly precipitation comes from wintertime atmospheric river (AR) events which were the focus of the 2015 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Cloud Aerosol Precipitation Experiment (ACAPEX) and CalWater 2 campaigns. These two campaigns provided sampling platforms on four aircraft, including the ARM Aerial Facility G-1, as well as the NOAA Ron Brown research vessel and at a ground station at Bodega Bay, CA. Measurements of ice nucleating particles (INPs) were made with the Colorado State University (CSU) Continuous Flow Diffusion Chamber (CFDC) aboard the G-1 and at Bodega Bay, and using aerosol filter collections on these platforms as well as the Ron Brown for post-processing via immersion freezing in the CSU Ice Spectrometer. Aerosol composition was measured aboard the G-1 with the Aerosol Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (ATOFMS). Both the CFDC and ATOFMS sampled off of an isokinetic inlet when flying in clear air and a counter-flow virtual impactor in clouds to capture ice crystal and cloud droplet residuals. In this presentation we present ice nucleating particle concentrations before, during and after an AR event from air, ground and ocean-based measurements. We also examine INP concentration variability in orographic clouds and in clear air at altitude along the Sierra Nevada range, in the marine boundary layer and through the Central Valley, and relate these INP measurements to other aerosol physical and chemical properties.

  8. PARTICLE DISTRIBUTION IN CENTRIFUGAL ACCELERATING FIELDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Sirong; Zhang Xinping; He Zhenming; Liu Yaohui

    2003-01-01

    Based on continuum theory and moving law of particles, a model is presented to obtain gradient distribution of particles in centrifugal accelerating field, by which the particle distribution in gradient composite material can be predicted. The simulation shows with increases in rotating time, four regions gradually appear from the internal periphery to the external one, they are free region, transition region, steady region and surface reinforced region,and the latest three regions are defined as a rich region. Finally, the steady region disappears, and the rich region only includes transition region and surface reinforced region. The influences of centrifugal acceleration coefficient G,primary volume fraction (0,pouring temperature (p and density difference between the particle and the metal matrix on particles gradient distribution are studied in detail. The results of the theoretical analysis agree with experiment ones. Both of analysis and experiment results indicate that with the increase in G and (p, the particle distribution becomes more centralized and the consistence of particle in the surface periphery becomes larger.

  9. Improving Newspaper Distribution with Mobile Field Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Rehn

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the information, which is exchanged among the field workers and the operation center in morning newspaper distribution, is described. This information exchange is made via telephone calls and stationary computers, but is also paper based. This study was conducted to find how this information exchange could be improved with a mobile field system and handheld electronic devices.The results showed that there are technologies available today that can be used for electronic information exchange and that this could improve the safety for the truck drivers and carriers. Moreover, the time for solving problems will increase when the information exchange is improved. However, this electronic information exchange will require new working methods for the personnel involved.

  10. The field white dwarf mass distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, P.-E.; Cummings, J.; Kalirai, J. S.; Gänsicke, B. T.; Gentile-Fusillo, N.; Raddi, R.

    2016-09-01

    We revisit the properties and astrophysical implications of the field white dwarf mass distribution in preparation of Gaia applications. Our study is based on the two samples with the best established completeness and most precise atmospheric parameters, the volume-complete survey within 20 pc and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) magnitude-limited sample. We explore the modelling of the observed mass distributions with Monte Carlo simulations, but find that it is difficult to constrain independently the initial mass function (IMF), the initial-to-final-mass relation (IFMR), the stellar formation history (SFH), the variation of the Galactic disc vertical scale height as a function of stellar age, and binary evolution. Each of these input ingredients has a moderate effect on the predicted mass distributions, and we must also take into account biases owing to unidentified faint objects (20 pc sample), as well as unknown masses for magnetic white dwarfs and spectroscopic calibration issues (SDSS sample). Nevertheless, we find that fixed standard assumptions for the above parameters result in predicted mean masses that are in good qualitative agreement with the observed values. It suggests that derived masses for both studied samples are consistent with our current knowledge of stellar and Galactic evolution. Our simulations overpredict by 40-50 per cent the number of massive white dwarfs (M > 0.75 M⊙) for both surveys, although we can not exclude a Salpeter IMF when we account for all biases. Furthermore, we find no evidence of a population of double white dwarf mergers in the observed mass distributions.

  11. Dynamics of homogeneous nucleation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toxværd, Søren

    2015-01-01

    The classical nucleation theory for homogeneous nucleation is formulated as a theory for a density fluctuation in a supersaturated gas at a given temperature. But molecular dynamics simulations reveal that it is small cold clusters which initiates the nucleation. The temperature in the nucleating...

  12. A study of conditions for dislocation nucleation in coarser-than-atomistic scale models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Akanksha; Acharya, Amit; Maloney, Craig E.

    2015-02-01

    We perform atomistic simulations of dislocation nucleation in defect free crystals in 2 and 3 dimensions during indentation with circular (2D) or spherical (3D) indenters. The kinematic structure of the theory of Field Dislocation Mechanics (FDM) is shown to allow the identification of a local feature of the atomistic velocity field in these simulations as indicative of dislocation nucleation. It predicts the precise location of the incipient spatially distributed dislocation field, as shown for the cases of the Embedded Atom Method potential for Al and the Lennard-Jones pair potential. We demonstrate the accuracy of this analysis for two crystallographic orientations in 2D and one in 3D. Apart from the accuracy in predicting the location of dislocation nucleation, the FDM based analysis also demonstrates superior performance than existing nucleation criteria in not persisting in time beyond the nucleation event, as well as differentiating between phase boundary/shear band and dislocation nucleation. Our analysis is meant to facilitate the modeling of dislocation nucleation in coarser-than-atomistic scale models of the mechanics of materials.

  13. Short review on Controlled Nucleation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Anuj

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Freeze-drying (also known as lyophilization or cryodesiccation is a dehydration process mainly used to preserve for perishable material and this method make the material more convenient for transport. Freezedrying works by freezing the material and then reducing the surrounding pressure and giving sufficient heat to allow the frozen water into the material to sublime directly from the solid phase to gas phase. Sublimation is the transition of a substance from the solid to the vapor state, without first passing through an intermediate liquid phase. A method to achieve controlled ice nucleation during the freeze-drying process using an ice fog, vial treatment, ultrasound, additives and electro freezing technique was demonstrated in an earlier report. And by the potential of a high electric field was utilized to induce ice nucleus formation in aqueous solutions. Using this technique it was possible to reduce the primary drying time during lyophilization. [1] Many technical issues surrounding the freeze-drying process have been addressed over the past several decades. Better understanding of critical formulation characteristics and cycle conditions. There are two types of technique for nucleation 1 Uncontrolled Nucleation, 2 Controlled Nucleation. The objectives of the present study simply introduce controlled Nucleation is the rapid ice nucleation in freeze drying technique. [2

  14. Effects of clustered nucleation on recrystallization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storm, Søren; Juul Jensen, Dorte

    2009-01-01

    Computer simulations are used to study effects of an experimentally determined 3D distribution of nucleation sites on the recrystallization kinetics and on the evolution of the recrystallized microstructure as compared to simulations with random nucleation. It is found that although the experimen......Computer simulations are used to study effects of an experimentally determined 3D distribution of nucleation sites on the recrystallization kinetics and on the evolution of the recrystallized microstructure as compared to simulations with random nucleation. It is found that although...... the experimentally observed clustering is not very strong, it changes the kinetics and the recrystallized microstructural morphology plus leads to a recrystallized grain size distribution, which is significantly broadened compared to that of random nucleation simulations. (C) 2009 Published by Elsevier Ltd...

  15. Classical nucleation theory from a dynamical approach to nucleation

    CERN Document Server

    Lutsko, James F

    2013-01-01

    It is shown that diffusion-limited classical nucleation theory (CNT) can be recovered as a simple limit of the recently proposed dynamical theory of nucleation based on fluctuating hydrodynamics (Lutsko, JCP 136, 034509 (2012)). The same framework is also used to construct a more realistic theory in which clusters have finite interfacial width. When applied to the dilute solution/dense solution transition in globular proteins, it is found that the extension gives corrections to the the nucleation rate even for the case of small supersaturations due to changes in the monomer distribution function and to the excess free energy. It is also found that the monomer attachement/detachment picture breaks down at high supersaturations corresponding to clusters smaller than about 100 molecules. The results also confirm the usual assumption that most important corrections to CNT can be acheived by means of improved estimates of the free energy barrier. The theory also illustrates two topics that have received considerab...

  16. Fractal tracer distributions in turbulent field theories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J. Lundbek; Bohr, Tomas

    1998-01-01

    We study the motion of passive tracers in a two-dimensional turbulent velocity field generated by the Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation. By varying the direction of the velocity-vector with respect to the field-gradient we can continuously vary the two Lyapunov exponents for the particle motion and t...

  17. Analysis of Void Fraction Distribution and Departure from Nucleate Boiling in Single Subchannel and Bundle Geometries Using Subchannel, System, and Computational Fluid Dynamics Codes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taewan Kim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to assess the accuracy and validity of subchannel, system, and computational fluid dynamics codes, the Paul Scherrer Institut has participated in the OECD/NRC PSBT benchmark with the thermal-hydraulic system code TRACE5.0 developed by US NRC, the subchannel code FLICA4 developed by CEA, and the computational fluid dynamic code STAR-CD developed by CD-adapco. The PSBT benchmark consists of a series of void distribution exercises and departure from nucleate boiling exercises. The results reveal that the prediction by the subchannel code FLICA4 agrees with the experimental data reasonably well in both steady-state and transient conditions. The analyses of single-subchannel experiments by means of the computational fluid dynamic code STAR-CD with the CD-adapco boiling model indicate that the prediction of the void fraction has no significant discrepancy from the experiments. The analyses with TRACE point out the necessity to perform additional assessment of the subcooled boiling model and bulk condensation model of TRACE.

  18. Size distribution and structure of Barchan dune fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Durán

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Barchans are isolated mobile dunes often organized in large dune fields. Dune fields seem to present a characteristic dune size and spacing, which suggests a cooperative behavior based on dune interaction. In Duran et al. (2009, we propose that the redistribution of sand by collisions between dunes is a key element for the stability and size selection of barchan dune fields. This approach was based on a mean-field model ignoring the spatial distribution of dune fields. Here, we present a simplified dune field model that includes the spatial evolution of individual dunes as well as their interaction through sand exchange and binary collisions. As a result, the dune field evolves towards a steady state that depends on the boundary conditions. Comparing our results with measurements of Moroccan dune fields, we find that the simulated fields have the same dune size distribution as in real fields but fail to reproduce their homogeneity along the wind direction.

  19. Size distribution and structure of Barchan dune fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duran, O.; Schwämmle, Veit; Lind, P. G.;

    2011-01-01

    Barchans are isolated mobile dunes often organized in large dune fields. Dune fields seem to present a characteristic dune size and spacing, which suggests a co-operative behavior based on dune interaction. In Duran et al. (2009), we propose that the redistribution of sand by collisions between...... dunes is a key element for the stability and size selection of barchan dune fields. This approach was based on a mean-field model ignoring the spatial distribution of dune fields. Here, we present a simplified dune field model that includes the spatial evolution of individual dunes as well...... as their interaction through sand exchange and binary collisions. As a result, the dune field evolves towards a steady state that depends on the boundary conditions. Comparing our results with measurements of Moroccan dune fields, we find that the simulated fields have the same dune size distribution as in real fields...

  20. Asynchronous Distributed Execution of Fixpoint-Based Computational Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lluch Lafuente, Alberto; Loreti, Michele; Montanari, Ugo

    2016-01-01

    Coordination is essential for dynamic distributed systems whose components exhibit interactive and autonomous behaviors. Spatially distributed, locally interacting, propagating computational fields are particularly appealing for allowing components to join and leave with little or no overhead....... Computational fields are a key ingredient of aggregate programming, a promising software engineering methodology particularly relevant for the Internet of Things. In our approach, space topology is represented by a fixed graph-shaped field, namely a network with attributes on both nodes and arcs, where arcs...

  1. Distributions of Personalities Within Occupations and Fields of Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, John L.; Holland, Joan E.

    1977-01-01

    Self Directed Search (SDS) and Vocational Preference Inventory (VPI) results occupations and fields of study were organized to show the distributions of personalities within an occupation or field of study. The results show that single fields tolerate several types, but some types occur only infrequently. (Author)

  2. Particlelike distributions of the Higgs field nonminimally coupled to gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Füzfa, André; Rinaldi, Massimiliano; Schlögel, Sandrine

    2013-09-20

    When the Higgs field is nonminimally coupled to gravity, there exists a family of spherically symmetric particlelike solutions to the field equations. These monopoles are the only globally regular and asymptotically flat distributions with finite energy of the Higgs field around compact objects. Moreover, spontaneous scalarization is strongly amplified for specific values of their mass and compactness.

  3. 电磁场对碳酸钙反应结晶成核影响的研究%Research on the effect of electromagnetic field on calcium carbonate crystallization nucleation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王建国; 陆帅; 李松

    2014-01-01

    Based on the self-made experimental device used for measuring the critical supersaturation of CaCO3 so-lution,the effects of electromagnetic field action on the CaCO3 supersaturation and nucleation induction period has been studied by comparative tests with magnetism and without magnetism on calcium carbonate solution conductivi-ty-titration fluid volume. The influence of magnetic field effect on CaCO3 on the supersaturation and nucleation in-duction period is studied. The changes of CaCO3 supersaturation and nucleation induction period,under different frequencies and magnetic fields action,are observed. A large number of experimental results show that under the ac-tion of electromagnetic field,the supersaturation of CaCO3 decreases,nucleation speed increases,and nucleation in-duction period decreases.%基于自制CaCO3溶液临界过饱和度实验装置,通过测量加磁与未加磁对比实验的碳酸钙溶液电导率-滴定液容积,研究了电磁场作用对CaCO3过饱和度及成核诱导期的影响。在不同频率的电磁场作用下观察了CaCO3过饱和度及成核诱导期的变化,大量实验结果表明:在电磁场作用下,CaCO3的过饱和度减小,成核速率加快,成核诱导期减小。

  4. A Brownian Model for Crystal Nucleation

    CERN Document Server

    Durán-Olivencia, Miguel A

    2013-01-01

    In this work a phenomenological Stochastic Differential Equation (SDE) is proposed for modelling the time-evolution of the radius of a pre-critical molecular cluster during nucleation (the classical order parameter). Such a SDE constitutes the basis for the calculation of the (nucleation) induction time under the Kramers' theory of thermally activated escape processes. Considering the nucleation stage as a Poisson's rare-event, analytical expressions for the induction time statistics are deduced for both steady and unsteady conditions, the latter assuming the semiadiabatic limit. These expressions can be used to identify the underlying mechanism of molecular cluster formation (distinguishing between homogeneous or heterogeneous nucleation from the nucleation statistics is possible) as well as to predict induction times and induction time distributions. The predictions of this model are in good agreement with experimentally measured induction times at constant temperature but agreement is not so good for induc...

  5. Particle Nucleation and Growth During the NIFTy Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthelmie, R. J.; Pryor, S. C.; Spaulding, A. M.; Rossner, A.; Crimmins, B.; Hopke, P. K.; Mauldin, L.; Jobson, T.; Petaja, T.

    2008-12-01

    The measurements presented herein are being collected in order to assess the frequency and characteristics of nucleation events and high ultra-fine particle concentrations in this rural (but regionally polluted) setting, including the chemical composition of the ultra-fine particles, the principal mechanisms of nucleation, limitations on nucleation and growth and the ultimate fate of the resulting ultra-fine particles. We present a year of data from continuous measurements of particle size distributions (6 to 400 nm) at three- levels above and within a deciduous forest in southern Indiana (in the Ohio River Valley). These data are collected using two SMPS and one FMPS, and are supplemented with data concerning the spatial extent and the composition of ultra-fine particles using samples collected during May 2008 as part of the Nucleation In ForesTs (NIFTY) campaign. The long-term measurements indicate evidence of class A nucleation events on approximately 1 day in 5, and lesser magnitude or less well defined events on another 15% of days. These data indicate nucleation is most frequently observed in spring, but occurs in all seasons and subsequent growth is more rapid during leaf-on. During the NIFTY field experiment we enhanced the ongoing data collection at the forest site to include sulfuric acid, ammonia and VOC concentrations, and particle composition using two MOUDI-nano-MOUDI combinations. Preliminary analyses of these data indicate that the sub-32 nm diameter particles are almost completely ammonium-sulfate or ammonium-bisulfate and associated water but there is evidence that continued growth is aided by the addition of condensable organics. We further instrumented two additional sites - one directly south of the forest in a relatively rural setting, and one to the north in the city of Indianapolis. Results from these sites indicate strong evidence that the events are regional but the sites differ in terms of the magnitude of the events and the relative

  6. Dynamic density functional theory for nucleation: Non-classical predictions of mesoscopic nucleation theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran-Olivencia, Miguel A.; Yatsyshin, Peter; Lutsko, James F.; Kalliadasis, Serafim

    2016-11-01

    Classical density functional theory (DFT) for fluids and its dynamic extension (DDFT) provide an appealing mean-field framework for describing equilibrium and dynamics of complex soft matter systems. For a long time, homogeneous nucleation was considered to be outside the limits of applicability of DDFT. However, our recently developed mesoscopic nucleation theory (MeNT) based on fluctuating hydrodynamics, reconciles the inherent randomness of the nucleation process with the deterministic nature of DDFT. It turns out that in the weak-noise limit, the most likely path (MLP) for nucleation to occur is determined by the DDFT equations. We present computations of MLPs for homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation in colloidal suspensions. For homogeneous nucleation, the MLP obtained is in excellent agreement with the reduced order-parameter description of MeNT, which predicts a multistage nucleation pathway. For heterogeneous nucleation, the presence of impurities in the fluid affects the MLP, but remarkably, the overall qualitative picture of homogeneous nucleation persists. Finally, we highlight the use of DDFT as a simulation tool, which is especially appealing as there are no known applications of MeNT to heterogeneous nucleation. We acknowledge financial support from the European Research Council via Advanced Grant No. 247031 and from EPSRC via Grants No. EP/L020564 and EP/L025159.

  7. Side abutment pressure distribution by field measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Lian-guo; SONG Yang; HE Xing-hua; ZHANG Jian

    2008-01-01

    Given the 7123 working face in the Qidong Coal Mine of the Wanbei Mining Group, nine dynamic roof monitors were installed in the crossheading to measure the amount and velocity of roof convergence in different positions and at different times and three steel bored stress sensors were installed in the return airway to measure rock stress at depth. On the basis of this arrangement, the rule of change of the distribution of the side abutment pressure with the advance of the working face and movement of overlying strata was studied. The rule of change and the stability of rock stress at depth were measured. Secondly, the affected area and stability time of the side abutment pressure were also studied. The results show that: 1) During working, the face advanced distance was from 157 m to 99 m, the process was not effected by mining induced pressure. When the distance was 82 m, the position of peak stress was 5 m away from the coal wall. When the distance was 37 m, the position of peak stress away from the coal wall was about 15 m to 20 m and finally reached a steady state; 2) the time and the range of the peak of side rock pressure obtained from stress sensors were consistent with the results from the dynamic roof monitors; 3) the position of the peak pressure was 25 m away from the coal wall.

  8. Gravimetric Measurement of Magnetic Field Gradient Spatial Distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Arutunian, S G; Egiazarian, S L; Mailian, M R; Sinenko, I G; Sinjavski, A V; Vasiniuk, I E

    1999-01-01

    Magnetic interaction between a weighing sample and an external magnetic field allows to measure characteristics of magnetic field (a sample with known magnetic characteristics), as well as the magnetic properties of a sample (a known magnetic field). Measurement of materials magnetic permeability is a well known application of this method. In this paper we restrict ourselves to the measurement of magnetic field spatial distribution, which was achieved by scanning of samples from known materials along the vertical axis. Field measurements by Hall detector were done to calibrate obtained data. Such measurements are of great interest in some branches of physics, in particular, in accelerator physics, where the quality of magnetic system parts eventually determine the quality of accelerated bunches. Development of a simple and cheep device for measurement of magnetic field spatial distribution is an urgent problem. The developed system for gravimetric measurement of magnetic field gradients partially solves this ...

  9. ANALYTIC EXPRESSION OF MAGNETIC FIELD DISTRIBUTION OF RECTANGULAR PERMANENT MAGNETS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苟晓凡; 杨勇; 郑晓静

    2004-01-01

    From the molecular current viewpoint,an analytic expression exactly describing magnetic field distribution of rectangular permanent magnets magnetized sufficiently in one direction was derived from the Biot-Savart's law. This expression is useful not only for the case of one rectangular permanent magnet bulk, but also for that of several rectangular permanent magnet bulks. By using this expression,the relations between magnetic field distribution and the size of rectangular permanent magnets as well as the magnitude of magnetic field and the distance from the point in the space to the top (or bottom) surface of rectangular permanent magnets were discussed in detail. All the calculating results are consistent with experimental ones. For transverse magnetic field which is a main magnetic field of rectangular permanent magnets,in order to describe its distribution,two quantities,one is the uniformity in magnitude and the other is the uniformity in distribution of magnetic field,were defined. Furthermore, the relations between them and the geometric size of the magnet as well as the distance from the surface of permanent magnets were investigated by these formulas. The numerical results show that the geometric size and the distance have a visible influence on the uniformity in magnitude and the uniformity in distribution of the magnetic field.

  10. Poisson distributions for sharp-time fields antidote for triviality

    CERN Document Server

    Klauder, J R

    1995-01-01

    Standard lattice-space formulations of quartic self-coupled Euclidean scalar quantum fields become trivial in the continuum limit for sufficiently high space-time dimensions, and in particular the moment generating functional for space-time smeared fields becomes a Gaussian appropriate to that of a (possibly generalized) free field. For sharp-time fields this fact implies that the ground-state expectation functional also becomes Gaussian in the continuum limit. To overcome these consequences of the central limit theorem, an auxiliary, nonclassical potential is appended to the original lattice form of the model and parameters are tuned so that a generalized Poisson field distribution emerges in the continuum limit for the ground-state probability distribution. As a consequence, the sharp-time expectation functional is infinitely divisible, but the Hamiltonian operator is such, in the general case, that the generating functional for the space-time smeared field is not infinitely divisible in Minkowski space. Th...

  11. Study on Magnetic Field-Assisted Polishing (2nd Report): Effect of Magnetic Field Distribution on Removal Distribution

    OpenAIRE

    鈴木, 浩文; 小寺, 直; 松永, 博之; 黒部, 利次

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the effect of the magnetic field distribution on the removal distribution of the workpiece surface in the magnetic field-assisted polishing method. In case of applying this method to the curved (aspheric) surface polishing, the next process is suitable. The designed shapes are first generated precisely by turning or grinding, and then the surfaces are finished only to improve the smoothness, with the previous form accuracy being maintained. Therefore, in order to carry ou...

  12. Magneto-optical color imaging of magnetic field distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosuke Nagakubo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The magneto-optical (MO imaging technique allows magnetic field distributions to be observed in real-time. In this paper, we demonstrate a MO color imaging technique that allows quantitative values of magnetic fields to be determined by the naked eye. MO color imaging is realized using a MO imaging plate, which contains a bismuth-substituted iron garnet film. The imaging plate was prepared by the metal organic decomposition method, and a light source consisting of green and yellow light-emitting diodes or a white light-emitting diode. MO color imaging of the magnetic field distribution of a commercial ferrite magnet is demonstrated.

  13. Transmission and Distribution of Optical Field in Prism Coupler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, C Q; Chen, M [College of Physics and Electronics Information, Hunan Institute of Science and Technology, Yueyang 414006 (China); Liu, J; Wan, Z M; Luo, Z M [College of Information and Communication Engineering, Hunan Institute of Science and Technology, Yueyang 414006 (China); Tian, P, E-mail: namecqh@yahoo.com.cn [College of Optoelectronic Science and Engineering, Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, 430074 (China)

    2011-02-01

    Transmission and distribution characteristics of optical field in prism coupler are studies, and the phase matching function of prism coupler is deduced based on coupled wave theory. It is shown that the stable light field distribution and mode pattern are determined by its own geometric and dielectric parameters, but have nothing to do with the categories of incident light sources. It is also found that the coupling effect would generate between waveguides through evanescent field. Our numerical simulation is based on the finite difference time domain method with perfectly matched layer absorbing boundary condition. The simulation program is compiled in MATLAB. The simulation results are analyzed carefully.

  14. Modeling distributed axonal delays in mean-field brain dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, J. A.; Robinson, P. A.

    2008-11-01

    The range of conduction delays between connected neuronal populations is often modeled as a single discrete delay, assumed to be an effective value averaging over all fiber velocities. This paper shows the effects of distributed delays on signal propagation. A distribution acts as a linear filter, imposing an upper frequency cutoff that is inversely proportional to the delay width. Distributed thalamocortical and corticothalamic delays are incorporated into a physiologically based mean-field model of the cortex and thalamus to illustrate their effects on the electroencephalogram (EEG). The power spectrum is acutely sensitive to the width of the thalamocortical delay distribution, and more so than the corticothalamic distribution, because all input signals must travel along the thalamocortical pathway. This imposes a cutoff frequency above which the spectrum is overly damped. The positions of spectral peaks in the resting EEG depend primarily on the distribution mean, with only weak dependences on distribution width. Increasing distribution width increases the stability of fixed point solutions. A single discrete delay successfully approximates a distribution for frequencies below a cutoff that is inversely proportional to the delay width, provided that other model parameters are moderately adjusted. A pair of discrete delays together having the same mean, variance, and skewness as the distribution approximates the distribution over the same frequency range without needing parameter adjustment. Delay distributions with large fractional widths are well approximated by low-order differential equations.

  15. Nucleation and Crystallization in nucleated Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schick, Christoph; Zhuravlev, Evgeny; Wurm, Andreas

    2012-02-01

    Crystallization is commonly considered as nucleation followed by a growth process. Here we apply the recently developed technique, differential fast scanning calorimetry (DFSC), for a unique, new look at the crystal growth of poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) and PCL carbon nanotube composites from 185 K, below the glass transition temperature, to 330 K, close to the equilibrium melting temperature. The DFSC allows temperature control of the sample and determination of its heat capacity during temperature treatments by employing cooling and heating rates from 50 to 50,000 K/s. First, the crystal nucleation and overall crystallization half times were determined simultaneously in the range of temperatures where crystallization of PCL occurs. After attempting to analyze the experiments with the classical nucleation and growth model a new methodology is described, which addresses the specific problems of crystallization of flexible linear macromolecules. The structures seem to range from having practically unmeasurable latent heats of ordering (nuclei) to being clearly-recognizable, ordered species with rather sharp disordering endotherms at temperatures from the glass transition to equilibrium melting (increasingly perfect and larger crystals). The mechanisms and kinetics of growth (if any) involve a detailed understanding of the interaction with the surrounding rigid amorphous fraction (RAF) in dependence of crystal size and perfection. E. Zhuravlev, J.W.P. Schmelzer, B. Wunderlich and C. Schick, Kinetics of nucleation and crystallization in poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL), Polymer 52 (2011) 1983-1997.

  16. TRANSFORMATION KINETICS FOR NUCLEATION ON RANDOM PLANES AND LINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Villa

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Birth and growth processes are known in materials science as nucleation and growth processes. In crystalline materials nucleation almost always takes place in an internal crystalline defect. These defects are classified according to their dimensionality: point, line or planar defects. Therefore, investigating nucleation on sets of dimensionality lower than the set in which the transformation takes place is of paramount importance. Cahn (1956 in a classical work derived expressions for transformation kinetics when nucleation took place on random planes and on random straight lines. He used these expressions to describe nucleation in polycrystalline materials. He considered that nucleation on grain faces could be treated as nucleation on random planes and, likewise, nucleation on grain edges could be treated as nucleation on random lines. The present work revisits and generalizes Cahn’s treatment of nucleation on planes and lines. First a general expression for the case of nucleation on lower dimensional sets is obtained. After that general expressions for nucleation on random planes and random lines are given. This paper provides the mathematical basis for the development of more specific expressions to be used in practical applications. Although this work has been done bearing applications to materials science in mind the results obtained here may be applied to birth and growth processes in any field of science.

  17. Analysis of magnetic electron lens with secant hyperbolic field distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Pany, S S; Dubey, B P

    2014-01-01

    Electron-optical imaging instruments like Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) use specially designed solenoid electromagnets for focusing of electron beam probe. Indicators of imaging performance of these instruments, like spatial resolution, have strong correlation with focal characteristics of the magnetic lenses which in turn have been shown to be functions of the spatial distribution of axial magnetic field generated by them. Owing to complicated design of practical lenses, empirical mathematical expressions are deemed convenient for use in physics based calculations of their focal properties. So, degree of closeness of such models to the actual field distribution determines accuracy of the calculations. Mathematical models proposed by Glaser[1] and Ramberg[1] have historically been put into extensive use. In this paper the authors discuss one such model with secant-hyperbolic type magnetic field distribution function, and present a comparison among these models, ...

  18. Nucleation and crystal growth in a suspension of charged colloidal silica spheres with bi-modal size distribution studied by time-resolved ultra-small-angle X-ray scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornfeck, Wolfgang; Menke, Dirk; Forthaus, Martin; Subatzus, Sebastian; Franke, Markus; Schöpe, Hans-Joachim; Palberg, Thomas; Perlich, Jan; Herlach, Dieter

    2014-12-07

    A suspension of charged colloidal silica spheres exhibiting a bi-modal size distribution of particles, thereby mimicking a binary mixture, was studied using time-resolved ultra-small-angle synchrotron X-ray scattering (USAXS). The sample, consisting of particles of diameters d(A) = (104.7 ± 9.0) nm and d(B) = (88.1 ± 7.8) nm (d(A)/d(B) ≈ 1.2), and with an estimated composition A(0.6(1))B(0.4(1)), was studied with respect to its phase behaviour in dependance of particle number density and interaction, of which the latter was modulated by varying amounts of added base (NaOH). Moreover, its short-range order in the fluid state and its eventual solidification into a long-range ordered colloidal crystal were observed in situ, allowing the measurement of the associated kinetics of nucleation and crystal growth. Key parameters of the nucleation kinetics such as crystallinity, crystallite number density, and nucleation rate density were extracted from the time-resolved scattering curves. By this means an estimate on the interfacial energy for the interface between the icosahedral short-range ordered fluid and a body-centered cubic colloidal crystal was obtained, comparable to previously determined values for single-component colloidal systems.

  19. Ice nucleation activity of polysaccharides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bichler, Magdalena; Felgitsch, Laura; Haeusler, Thomas; Seidl-Seiboth, Verena; Grothe, Hinrich

    2015-04-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation is an important process in the atmosphere. It shows direct impact on our climate by triggering ice cloud formation and therefore it has much influence on the radiation balance of our planet (Lohmann et al. 2002; Mishchenko et al. 1996). The process itself is not completely understood so far and many questions remain open. Different substances have been found to exhibit ice nucleation activity (INA). Due to their vast differences in chemistry and morphology it is difficult to predict what substance will make good ice nuclei and which will not. Hence simple model substances must be found and be tested regarding INA. Our work aims at gaining to a deeper understanding of heterogeneous ice nucleation. We intend to find some reference standards with defined chemistry, which may explain the mechanisms of heterogeneous ice nucleation. A particular focus lies on biological carbohydrates in regards to their INA. Biological carbohydrates are widely distributed in all kingdoms of life. Mostly they are specific for certain organisms and have well defined purposes, e.g. structural polysaccharides like chitin (in fungi and insects) and pectin (in plants), which has also water-binding properties. Since they are widely distributed throughout our biosphere and mostly safe to use for nutrition purposes, they are well studied and easily accessible, rendering them ideal candidates as proxies. In our experiments we examined various carbohydrates, like the already mentioned chitin and pectin, as well as their chemical modifications. Lohmann U.; A Glaciation Indirect Aerosol Effect Caused by Soot Aerosols; J. Geoph. Res.; Vol. 24 No.4; pp 11-1 - 11-4; 2002 Mishchenko M.I., Rossow W.B., Macke A., Lacis A. A.; Sensitivity of Cirrus Cloud Albedo, Bidirectional Reflectance and Optical Thickness Retrieval Accuracy to Ice Particle Shape, J. Geoph. Res.; Vol. 101, No D12; pp. 16,973 - 16,985; 1996

  20. Nonequilibrium thermodynamics of nucleation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schweizer, M., E-mail: marco.schweizer@math.ethz.ch [ETH Zurich, Department of Materials, Polymer Physics, Vladimir-Prelog-Weg 2, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Sagis, L. M. C., E-mail: leonard.sagis@wur.nl [ETH Zurich, Department of Materials, Polymer Physics, Vladimir-Prelog-Weg 2, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Food Physics Group, Wageningen University, Bornse Weilanden, 6708 WG Wageningen (Netherlands)

    2014-12-14

    We present a novel approach to nucleation processes based on the GENERIC framework (general equation for the nonequilibrium reversible-irreversible coupling). Solely based on the GENERIC structure of time-evolution equations and thermodynamic consistency arguments of exchange processes between a metastable phase and a nucleating phase, we derive the fundamental dynamics for this phenomenon, based on continuous Fokker-Planck equations. We are readily able to treat non-isothermal nucleation even when the nucleating cores cannot be attributed intensive thermodynamic properties. In addition, we capture the dynamics of the time-dependent metastable phase being continuously expelled from the nucleating phase, and keep rigorous track of the volume corrections to the dynamics. Within our framework the definition of a thermodynamic nuclei temperature is manifest. For the special case of nucleation of a gas phase towards its vapor-liquid coexistence, we illustrate that our approach is capable of reproducing recent literature results obtained by more microscopic considerations for the suppression of the nucleation rate due to nonisothermal effects.

  1. Use of the truncated shifted Pareto distribution in assessing size distribution of oil and gas fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    The truncated shifted Pareto (TSP) distribution, a variant of the two-parameter Pareto distribution, in which one parameter is added to shift the distribution right and left and the right-hand side is truncated, is used to model size distributions of oil and gas fields for resource assessment. Assumptions about limits to the left-hand and right-hand side reduce the number of parameters to two. The TSP distribution has advantages over the more customary lognormal distribution because it has a simple analytic expression, allowing exact computation of several statistics of interest, has a "J-shape," and has more flexibility in the thickness of the right-hand tail. Oil field sizes from the Minnelusa play in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana, are used as a case study. Probability plotting procedures allow easy visualization of the fit and help the assessment. ?? 1988 International Association for Mathematical Geology.

  2. Evolution of the magnetic field distribution of active regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacie, S.; Démoulin, P.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, L.; Long, D. M.; Baker, D.; Janvier, M.; Yardley, S. L.; Pérez-Suárez, D.

    2016-12-01

    Aims: Although the temporal evolution of active regions (ARs) is relatively well understood, the processes involved continue to be the subject of investigation. We study how the magnetic field of a series of ARs evolves with time to better characterise how ARs emerge and disperse. Methods: We examined the temporal variation in the magnetic field distribution of 37 emerging ARs. A kernel density estimation plot of the field distribution was created on a log-log scale for each AR at each time step. We found that the central portion of the distribution is typically linear, and its slope was used to characterise the evolution of the magnetic field. Results: The slopes were seen to evolve with time, becoming less steep as the fragmented emerging flux coalesces. The slopes reached a maximum value of -1.5 just before the time of maximum flux before becoming steeper during the decay phase towards the quiet-Sun value of -3. This behaviour differs significantly from a classical diffusion model, which produces a slope of -1. These results suggest that simple classical diffusion is not responsible for the observed changes in field distribution, but that other processes play a significant role in flux dispersion. Conclusions: We propose that the steep negative slope seen during the late-decay phase is due to magnetic flux reprocessing by (super)granular convective cells.

  3. Atmospheric nucleation: highlights of the EUCAARI project and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.-M. Kerminen

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Within the project EUCAARI (European Integrated project on Aerosol Cloud Climate and Air Quality interactions, atmospheric nucleation was studied by (i developing and testing new air ion and cluster spectrometers, (ii conducting homogeneous nucleation experiments for sulphate and organic systems in the laboratory, (iii investigating atmospheric nucleation mechanism under field conditions, and (iv applying new theoretical and modelling tools for data interpretation and development of parameterisations. The current paper provides a synthesis of the obtained results and identifies the remaining major knowledge gaps related to atmospheric nucleation. The most important technical achievement of the project was the development of new instruments for measuring sub-3 nm particle populations, along with the extensive application of these instruments in both the laboratory and the field. All the results obtained during EUCAARI indicate that sulphuric acid plays a central role in atmospheric nucleation. However, also vapours other than sulphuric acid are needed to explain the nucleation and the subsequent growth processes, at least in continental boundary layers. Candidate vapours in this respect are some organic compounds, ammonia, and especially amines. Both our field and laboratory data demonstrate that the nucleation rate scales to the first or second power of the nucleating vapour concentration(s. This agrees with the few earlier field observations, but is in stark contrast with classical thermodynamic nucleation theories. The average formation rates of 2-nm particles were found to vary by almost two orders of magnitude between the different EUCAARI sites, whereas the formation rates of charged 2-nm particles varied very little between the sites. Overall, our observations are indicative of frequent, yet moderate, ion-induced nucleation usually outweighed by much stronger neutral nucleation events in the continental lower troposphere. The most concrete

  4. Surface effects in nucleation

    CERN Document Server

    Alekseechkin, Nikolay V

    2016-01-01

    The classical nucleation theory (CNT) concept of a nucleus as a fragment of the bulk new phase fails for nanosized nuclei. An extension of CNT taking into account the properties of the transition region between coexisting bulk phases is proposed. For this purpose, the finite-thickness layer method which is an alternative to the Gibbs one is used; the transition region is considered as a separate (surface) phase. An equation for the nucleation work is derived which is basic for the multivariable theory of nucleation.

  5. Ice nucleation terminology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Vali

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Progress in the understanding of ice nucleation is being hampered by the lack of uniformity in how some terms are used in the literature. This even extends to some ambiguity of meanings attached to some terms. Suggestions are put forward here for common use of terms. Some are already well established and clear of ambiguities. Others are less engrained and will need a conscious effort in adoption. Evolution in the range of systems where ice nucleation is being studied enhances the need for a clear nomenclature. The ultimate limit in the clarity of definitions is, of course, the limited degree to which ice nucleation processes are understood.

  6. Analysis of transverse field distributions in Porro prism resonators

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Litvin, IA

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available at the apexes of the porro prisms. Experimental work on a particular system showed some interested correlations between the time domain behavior of the resonator and the transverse field output. These findings are presented and discussed. Key words: porro... prism resonator, petal (spot) transverse field distribution, second pulse 1. INTRODUCTION Right angle prisms, often referred to as Porro prisms, have the useful property that all incident rays on the prism are reflected back parallel to the initial...

  7. Investigating fault propagation and segment linkage using throw distribution analysis within the Agbada formation of Ewan and Oloye fields, northwestern Niger delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durogbitan, Abimbola Adewole

    2016-08-01

    Throw distribution analysis of the key stratigraphic surfaces (sequence boundaries and maximum flooding surfaces) across faults has allowed detailed investigation of the tectonic history within the Ewan and Oloye fields, northwestern Niger delta. The structure in the studied area is dominated by growth fault systems which are listric in cross section and concave to the basin in plan-view. Generally, the faults are active down to 2000 m depth before they die out or sole into the underlying shale. The hanging-wall blocks of growth faults are deformed into broad rollover anticlines, with some synthetic and antithetic faults initiated from the anticline crests, and fault splays off major faults, further complicating these structures. Stratigraphic key surfaces within the syn-faulting succession range in age from 16.7 to 10.35 Ma. Periods of maximum and minimum throw are established from 2-Dimensional throw distribution on the growth fault plane. Throw distribution allows analysis of growth fault nucleation, propagation and linkage. Each fault nucleated at different and a distinct interval within the stratigraphic section, as a result of the paleo-stress distribution between the interacting faults. Nucleation and linkage positions can be identified at points of maximum and minimum throw respectively. Following nucleation, faults propagated radially and linked to form the present geometry. Within the study area, fault propagation and segment linkage (lateral and vertical) are important features of the fault system. Understanding of growth fault evolution and linkage has greatly improved prediction of seal potential, trap geometry and migration. The accurate timing of the segment linkage has helped to evaluate the seal risk.

  8. Random field distributed Heisenberg model on a thin film geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akıncı, Ümit, E-mail: umit.akinci@deu.edu.tr

    2014-11-15

    The effects of the bimodal random field distribution on the thermal and magnetic properties of the Heisenberg thin film have been investigated by making use of a two spin cluster with the decoupling approximation. Particular attention has been devoted to the obtaining of phase diagrams and magnetization behaviors. The physical behaviors of special as well as tricritical points are discussed for a wide range of selected Hamiltonian parameters. For example, it is found that when the strength of a magnetic field increases, the locations of the special point (which is the ratio of the surface exchange interaction and the exchange interaction of the inner layers that makes the critical temperature of the film independent of the thickness) in the related plane decrease. Moreover, tricritical behavior has been obtained for higher values of the magnetic field, and influences of the varying Hamiltonian parameters on its behavior have been elucidated in detail in order to have a better understanding of the mechanism underlying the considered system. - Highlights: • Effect of bimodal random field distribution within the Heisenberg model is investigated. • Phase diagrams of the random field Heisenberg model in a thin film geometry are obtained. • Effect of the random field on the magnetic properties is obtained. • Variation of the special point with random field is determined. • Variation of the tricritical point with random field is determined.

  9. Homogeneous crystal nucleation in Ni droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kožíšek, Zdeněk; Demo, Pavel

    2017-10-01

    Crystal nucleation kinetics is often represented by induction times or metastable zone widths (Kulkarni et al., 2013; Bokeloh et al., 2011). Repeating measurements of supercooling or time delay, at which phase transition is detected, are statistically processed to determine the so-called survivorship function, from which nucleation rate is computed. The size distribution of nuclei is difficult to measure near the critical size directly, and it is not clear which amount of nuclei is formed at the moment when the phase transition is detected. In the present paper, kinetic nucleation equations are solved for the crystal nucleation in Ni liquid droplet to determine the number of nuclei formed within a considered system. Analysis of supercooling experimental data, based on the classical nucleation theory CNT), computes appropriate values of the nucleation rate. However, CNT underestimates the number of nuclei F (F ≪ 1 for supercritical sizes). Taking into account the dependence of the surface energy on nucleus size to data analysis overcomes this discrepancy and leads to reasonable values of the size distribution of nuclei.

  10. Electric Field-Induced Fluid Velocity Field Distribution in DNA Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ling-Yun; WANG Peng-Ye

    2008-01-01

    We present an analytical solution for fluid velocity field distribution of polyelectrolyte DNA. Both the electric field force and the viscous force in the DNA solution are considered under a suitable boundary condition. The solution of electric potential is analytically obtained by using the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation. The fluid velocity along the electric field is dependent on the cylindrical radius and concentration. It is shown that the electric field-induced fluid velocity will be increased with the increasing cylindrical radius, whose distribution also varies with the concentration

  11. Surface Bubble Nucleation Stability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seddon, James Richard Thorley; Kooij, Ernst S.; Poelsema, Bene; Zandvliet, Henricus J.W.; Lohse, Detlef

    2011-01-01

    Recent research has revealed several different techniques for nanoscopic gas nucleation on submerged surfaces, with findings seemingly in contradiction with each other. In response to this, we have systematically investigated the occurrence of surface nanobubbles on a hydrophobized silicon substrate

  12. Study on Electromagnetic Field Influence on Nucleation Induction Period of Calcium Carbonate%电磁场对碳酸钙成核诱导期影响的实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王建国; 李松; 朱和升

    2013-01-01

    基于电导率随滴定液容积变化特征与碳酸钙结晶过程的对比分析,研究了电磁场作用对碳酸钙结晶过程中成核诱导期的影响.在不同频率的电磁场作用下观察了碳酸钙溶液临界过饱和度及成核诱导期的变化,大量实验结果表明:电磁场作用能够降低碳酸钙溶液临界过饱和度,加速碳酸钙成核,缩短成核诱导期.通过机理分析,电磁场对碳酸钙成核过程的主要作用为:在洛伦兹力的影响下,溶液中的Ca2+及CO32-等带电离子运动方向要向相反方向偏离,增加了Ca2+和CO32-离子间的碰撞几率,加快新相晶核的生成.%Based on analyzing the conductivity which changing with titration volume and comparing the calcium carbonate fouling process,the electromagnetic field influence on nucleation induction period of calcium carbonate crystallization was analyzed; and the changes of critical supersaturation ratio and nucleation induction period of calcium carbonate solution were observed at the electromagnetic field with different frequencies.Experiment results show that:the electromagnetic field influence can decrease the critical supersaturation ratio,and can speed up the nucleation rate and shorten nucleation induction period.The mechanism analysis shows that the main influence of electromagnetic field on calcium carbonate nucleation process is under the Lorentz force,the charge ions like Ca2+ and CO32-can move in opposite direction so as to increase collision probability of Ca2+ and CO32-and to speeded up the formation of new phase crystal nucleus.

  13. Reconstruction of quasiprobability distribution functions of the cavity field considering field and atomic decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdanpanah, N.; Tavassoly, M. K.; Juárez-Amaro, R.; Moya-Cessa, H. M.

    2017-10-01

    We study the possibility of reconstructing the quantum state of light in a cavity subject to dissipation. We pass atoms, also subject to decay, through the cavity and surprisingly show that both decays allow the measurement of s-parametrized quasiprobability distributions. In fact, if we consider only atomic decay, we show that the Wigner function may be reconstructed. Because these distributions contain whole information of the initial field state, it is possible to recover information after both atomic and field decays occur.

  14. Miniature sensor for two-dimensional magnetic field distributions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fluitman, J.H.J.; Krabbe, H.W.

    1972-01-01

    Describes a simple method of production of a sensor for two-dimensional magnetic field distributions. The sensor consists of a strip of Ni-Fe(81-19), of which the magnetoresistance is utilized. Typical dimensions of the strip, placed at the edge of a glass substrate, are: length 100 mu m, width 2 or

  15. Field emission energy distributions from individual multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransen, M. J.; van Rooy, Th. L.; Kruit, P.

    1999-05-01

    We measured field emission energy distributions of electrons emitted from individual multiwalled carbon nanotubes mounted on tungsten tips. The shape of the energy distribution is strongly sample dependent. Some nanotube emitters exhibit an almost metallic behaviour, while others show sharply peaked energy distributions. The smallest half-width we measured was only 0.11 eV, without correction for the broadening of the energy analyzer. A common feature of both types of carbon nanotube energy spectra is that the position of the peaks in the spectrum depends linearly on the extraction voltage, unlike metallic emitters, where the position stays in the vicinity of the Fermi level. With a small modification to the field emission theory for metals we extract the distance between the highest filled energy level of the nanotube and the vacuum potential, the field on the emitter surface, the emitter radius and the emitting area, from the energy distribution and the Fowler-Nordheim plot. The last two parameters are in good agreement with transmission electron micrographs of such samples. The sharply-peaked energy distributions from other samples indicate that resonant states can exist at the top of the nanotube.

  16. Evolution of the Magnetic Field Distribution of Active Regions

    CERN Document Server

    Dacie, Sally; van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia; Long, David; Baker, Deb; Janvier, Miho; Yardley, Stephanie; Pérez-Suárez, David

    2016-01-01

    Aims. Although the temporal evolution of active regions (ARs) is relatively well understood, the processes involved continue to be the subject of investigation. We study how the magnetic field of a series of ARs evolves with time to better characterise how ARs emerge and disperse. Methods. We examine the temporal variation in the magnetic field distribution of 37 emerging ARs. A kernel density estimation plot of the field distribution was created on a log-log scale for each AR at each time step. We found that the central portion of the distribution is typically linear and its slope was used to characterise the evolution of the magnetic field. Results. The slopes were seen to evolve with time, becoming less steep as the fragmented emerging flux coalesces. The slopes reached a maximum value of ~ -1.5 just before the time of maximum flux before becoming steeper during the decay phase towards the quiet Sun value of ~ -3. This behaviour differs significantly from a classical diffusion model, which produces a slope...

  17. Non-Gaussian distribution of galaxies gravitational fields

    CERN Document Server

    Stephanovich, V A

    2016-01-01

    We perform a theoretical analysis of the observational relation between angular momentum and mass (richness) of the galaxy clusters. For that we calculate the distribution function of astronomical objects (like galaxies and/or smooth halos of different kinds) gravitational fields due to their tidal interaction. Within the statistical method of Chandrasekhar we are able to show that the distribution function is determined by the form of interaction between objects and for multipole (tidal) interaction it is never Gaussian. Our calculation permits to demonstrate that alignment of galaxies angular momenta increases with the cluster richness. The specific form of the corresponding dependence is due to assumptions made about cluster morphology.

  18. Distributed optical fiber dynamic magnetic field sensor based on magnetostriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoudi, Ali; Newson, Trevor P

    2014-05-01

    A distributed optical fiber sensor is introduced which is capable of quantifying multiple magnetic fields along a 1 km sensing fiber with a spatial resolution of 1 m. The operation of the proposed sensor is based on measuring the magnetorestrictive induced strain of a nickel wire attached to an optical fiber. The strain coupled to the optical fiber was detected by measuring the strain-induced phase variation between the backscattered Rayleigh light from two segments of the sensing fiber. A magnetic field intensity resolution of 0.3 G over a bandwidth of 50-5000 Hz was demonstrated.

  19. Simulation of 2D Fields of Raindrop Size Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berne, A.; Schleiss, M.; Uijlenhoet, R.

    2008-12-01

    The raindrop size distribution (DSD hereafter) is of primary importance for quantitative applications of weather radar measurements. The radar reflectivity~Z (directly measured by radar) is related to the power backscattered by the ensemble of hydrometeors within the radar sampling volume. However, the rain rate~R (the flux of water to the surface) is the variable of interest for many applications (hydrology, weather forecasting, air traffic for example). Usually, radar reflectivity is converted into rain rate using a power law such as Z=aRb. The coefficients a and b of the Z-R relationship depend on the DSD. The variability of the DSD in space and time has to be taken into account to improve radar rain rate estimates. Therefore, the ability to generate a large number of 2D fields of DSD which are statistically homogeneous provides a very useful simulation framework that nicely complements experimental approaches based on DSD data, in order to investigate radar beam propagation through rain as well as radar retrieval techniques. The proposed approach is based on geostatistics for structural analysis and stochastic simulation. First, the DSD is assumed to follow a gamma distribution. Hence a 2D field of DSDs can be adequately described as a 2D field of a multivariate random function consisting of the three DSD parameters. Such fields are simulated by combining a Gaussian anamorphosis and a multivariate Gaussian random field simulation algorithm. Using the (cross-)variogram models fitted on data guaranties that the spatial structure of the simulated fields is consistent with the observed one. To assess its validity, the proposed method is applied to data collected during intense Mediterranean rainfall. As only time series are available, Taylor's hypothesis is assumed to convert time series in 1D range profile. Moreover, DSD fields are assumed to be isotropic so that the 1D structure can be used to simulate 2D fields. A large number of 2D fields of DSD parameters are

  20. The effectiveness of mean-field theory for avalanche distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Edward; Raju, Archishman; Sethna, James

    We explore the mean-field theory of the pseudogap found in avalanche systems with long-range anisotropic interactions using analytical and numerical tools. The pseudogap in the density of low-stability states emerges from the competition between stabilizing interactions between spins in an avalanche and the destabilizing random movement towards the threshold caused by anisotropic couplings. Pazmandi et al. have shown that for the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model, the pseudogap scales linearly and produces a distribution of avalanche sizes with exponent t=1 in contrast with that predicted from RFIM t=3/2. Lin et al. have argued that the scaling exponent ? of the pseudogap depends on the tail of the distribution of couplings and on non-universal values like the strain rate and the magnitude of the coupling strength. Yet others have argued that the relationship between the pseudogap scaling and the distribution of avalanche sizes is dependent on dynamical details. Despite the theoretical arguments, the class of RFIM mean-field models is surprisingly good at predicting the distribution of avalanche sizes in a variety of different magnetic systems. We investigate these differences with a combination of theory and simulation.

  1. Local Field Distribution Function and High Order Field Moments for metal-dielectric composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genov, Dentcho A.; Sarychev, Andrey K.; Shalaev, Vladimir M.

    2001-11-01

    In a span of two decades the physics of nonlinear optics saw vast improvement in our understanding of optical properties for various inhomogeneous mediums. One such medium is the metal-dielectric composite, where the metal inclusions have a surface coverage fraction of p, while the rest (1-p) is assumed to represent the dielectric host. The computations carried out by using different theoretical models and the experimental data show existence of giant local electric and magnetic field fluctuations. In this presentation we will introduce a new developed 2D model that determines exactly the Local Field Distribution Function (LFDF) and all other relevant parameters of the film. The LFDF for small filling factors will be shown to transform from lognormal distribution into a single-dipole distribution function. We also will confirm the predictions of the scaling theory for the high field moments, which have a power law dependence on the loss factor.

  2. Mapping Nanoscale Electromagnetic Near-Field Distributions Using Optical Forces

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Fei; Mardy, Zahra; Burdett, Jonathan; Wickramasinghe, H Kumar

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate the application of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) based optical force microscopy to map the optical near-fields with nanometer resolution, limited only by the AFM probe geometry. We map the electric field distributions of tightly focused laser beams with different polarizations and show that the experimentally measured data agrees well with the theoretical predictions from a dipole-dipole interaction model, thereby validating our approach. We further validate the proposed technique by evaluating the optical electric field scattered by a spherical nanoparticle by measuring the optical forces between the nanoparticle and gold coated AFM probe. The technique allows for wavelength independent, background free, thermal noise limited mechanical imaging of optical phenomenon with sensitivity limited by AFM performance. Optical forces due to both electric and magnetic dipole-dipole interactions can be measured using this technique.

  3. Colloids and Nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerson, Bruce

    1997-01-01

    The objectives of the work funded under this grant were to develop a microphotographic technique and use it to monitor the nucleation and growth of crystals of hard colloidal spheres. Special attention is given to the possible need for microgravity studies in future experiments. A number of persons have been involved in this work. A masters student, Keith Davis, began the project and developed a sheet illumination apparatus and an image processing system for detection and analysis. His work on a segmentation program for image processing was sufficient for his master's research and has been published. A post doctoral student Bernie Olivier and a graduate student Yueming He, who originally suggested the sheet illumination, were funded by another source but along with Keith made photographic series of several samples (that had been made by Keith Davis). Data extraction has been done by Keith, Bernie, Yueming and two undergraduates employed on the grant. Results are published in Langmuir. These results describe the sheet lighting technique as one which illuminates not only the Bragg scattering crystal, but all the crystals. Thus, accurate crystal counts can be made for nucleation rate measurements. The strange crystal length scale reduction, observed in small angle light scattering (SALS) studies, following the initial nucleation and growth period, has been observed directly. The Bragg scattering (and dark) crystal size decreases in the crossover region. This could be an effect due to gravitational forces or due to over- compression of the crystal during growth. Direct observations indicate a complex morphology for the resulting hard sphere crystals. The crystal edges are fairly sharp but the crystals have a large degree of internal structure. This structure is a result of (unstable) growth and not aggregation. As yet unpublished work compares growth exponents data with data obtained by SALS. The nucleation rate density is determined over a broad volume fraction range

  4. Effects of shear flow on phase nucleation and crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mura, Federica; Zaccone, Alessio

    2016-04-01

    Classical nucleation theory offers a good framework for understanding the common features of new phase formation processes in metastable homogeneous media at rest. However, nucleation processes in liquids are ubiquitously affected by hydrodynamic flow, and there is no satisfactory understanding of whether shear promotes or slows down the nucleation process. We developed a classical nucleation theory for sheared systems starting from the molecular level of the Becker-Doering master kinetic equation and we analytically derived a closed-form expression for the nucleation rate. The theory accounts for the effect of flow-mediated transport of molecules to the nucleus of the new phase, as well as for the mechanical deformation imparted to the nucleus by the flow field. The competition between flow-induced molecular transport, which accelerates nucleation, and flow-induced nucleus straining, which lowers the nucleation rate by increasing the nucleation energy barrier, gives rise to a marked nonmonotonic dependence of the nucleation rate on the shear rate. The theory predicts an optimal shear rate at which the nucleation rate is one order of magnitude larger than in the absence of flow.

  5. Distributed estimation of a parametric field with random sensor placements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhweldi, Marwan; Cao, Zhicheng; Schmid, Natalia A.

    2015-05-01

    This paper considers a problem of distributed function estimation in the case when sensor locations are modeled as Gaussian random variables. We consider a scenario where sensors are deployed in clusters with cluster centers known a priori (or estimated by a high performance GPS) and the average quadratic spread of sensors around the cluster center also known. Distributed sensors make noisy observations about an unknown parametric field generated by a physical object of interest (for example, magnetic field generated by a ferrous object and sensed by a network of magnetometers). Each sensor then performs local signal processing of its noisy observation and sends it to a central processor (called fusion center) in the wireless sensor network over parallel channels corrupted by fading and additive noise. The central processor combines the set of received signals to form an estimate of the unknown parametric field. In our numerical analysis, we involve a field shaped as a Gaussian bell. We experiment with the size of sensor clusters and with their number. A mean square error between the estimated parameters of the field and the true parameters used in simulations is involved as a performance measure. It can be shown that a relatively good estimate of the field can be obtained with only a small number of clusters. As the number of clusters increases, the estimation performance steadily improves. The results also indicate that, on the average, the number of clusters has more impact on the performance than the number of sensors per cluster, given the same size of the total network.

  6. Nucleation at hardness indentations in cold rolled Al

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, C.L.; Zhang, Yubin; Wu, G.L.

    2015-01-01

    Nucleation of recrystallization near hardness indentations has been investigated in slightly cold rolled high purity aluminium. Samples were cold rolled to 12% and 20% reductions in thickness and indentations were done with two different loads (500 g and 2000 g). The samples were annealed at 300 ...... and stored energy distributions and thus on nucleation are discussed....

  7. Modeling of electric field distribution in tissues during electroporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corovic, Selma; Lackovic, Igor; Sustaric, Primoz; Sustar, Tomaz; Rodic, Tomaz; Miklavcic, Damijan

    2013-02-21

    Electroporation based therapies and treatments (e.g. electrochemotherapy, gene electrotransfer for gene therapy and DNA vaccination, tissue ablation with irreversible electroporation and transdermal drug delivery) require a precise prediction of the therapy or treatment outcome by a personalized treatment planning procedure. Numerical modeling of local electric field distribution within electroporated tissues has become an important tool in treatment planning procedure in both clinical and experimental settings. Recent studies have reported that the uncertainties in electrical properties (i.e. electric conductivity of the treated tissues and the rate of increase in electric conductivity due to electroporation) predefined in numerical models have large effect on electroporation based therapy and treatment effectiveness. The aim of our study was to investigate whether the increase in electric conductivity of tissues needs to be taken into account when modeling tissue response to the electroporation pulses and how it affects the local electric distribution within electroporated tissues. We built 3D numerical models for single tissue (one type of tissue, e.g. liver) and composite tissue (several types of tissues, e.g. subcutaneous tumor). Our computer simulations were performed by using three different modeling approaches that are based on finite element method: inverse analysis, nonlinear parametric and sequential analysis. We compared linear (i.e. tissue conductivity is constant) model and non-linear (i.e. tissue conductivity is electric field dependent) model. By calculating goodness of fit measure we compared the results of our numerical simulations to the results of in vivo measurements. The results of our study show that the nonlinear models (i.e. tissue conductivity is electric field dependent: σ(E)) fit experimental data better than linear models (i.e. tissue conductivity is constant). This was found for both single tissue and composite tissue. Our results of

  8. Effect of Air Injection on Nucleation Rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Capellades Mendez, Gerard; Kiil, Søren; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    2017-01-01

    to study the effects on formation of the first crystal and subsequent turbidity buildup. To account for the typically large sample-to-sample variation, nucleation rates were evaluated for a large number of replicates using probability distributions of induction times. The slope and the intercept...... was reduced from 69 to 13 min, and the mean induction time decreased from 128 to 36 min. The effect on aqueous solutions of l-arginine was less apparent, with a detection delay reduction from 15 to 3 min, and no significant changes on the rate of primary nucleation. These results demonstrate the potential...

  9. Nucleation of Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinero, Valeria

    2009-03-01

    The freezing of water into ice is a ubiquitous transformation in nature, yet the microscopic mechanism of homogeneous nucleation of ice has not yet been elucidated. One of the reasons is that nucleation happens in time scales that are too fast for an experimental characterization and two slow for a systematic study with atomistic simulations. In this work we use coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations with the monatomic model of water mW[1] to shed light into the mechanism of homogeneous nucleation of ice and its relationship to the thermodynamics of supercooled water. Cooling of bulk water produces either crystalline ice or low- density amorphous ice (LDA) depending on the quenching rate. We find that ice crystallization occurs faster at temperatures close to the liquid-liquid transition, defined as the point of maximum inflection of the density with respect to the temperature. At the liquid-liquid transition, the time scale of nucleation becomes comparable to the time scale of relaxation within the liquid phase, determining --effectively- the end of the metastable liquid state. Our results imply that no ultraviscous liquid water can exist at temperatures just above the much disputed glass transition of water. We discuss how the scenario is changed when water is in confinement, and the relationship of the mechanism of ice nucleation to that of other liquids that present the same phase behavior, silicon [2] and germanium [3]. [4pt] [1] Molinero, V. & Moore, E. B. Water modeled as an intermediate element between carbon and silicon. Journal of Physical Chemistry B (2008). Online at http://pubs.acs.org/cgi- bin/abstract.cgi/jpcbfk/asap/abs/jp805227c.html [0pt] [2] Molinero, V., Sastry, S. & Angell, C. A. Tuning of tetrahedrality in a silicon potential yields a series of monatomic (metal-like) glass formers of very high fragility. Physical Review Letters 97, 075701 (2006).

  10. The role of the perch effect on the nucleation process in Mediterranean semi-arid oldfields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pausas, Juli G.; Bonet, Andreu; Maestre, Fernando T.; Climent, Anna

    2006-05-01

    Oldfield succession in Mediterranean ecosystems has been studied extensively in mesic conditions. However, this phenomenon is still poorly understood in semi-arid Mediterranean areas, where reduced plant cover, the importance of facilitation processes and the role of abiotic factors make these environments distinct. We first test whether the carob tree ( Ceratonia siliqua) generates nucleation patterns in semi-arid oldfields, and to what extent such patterns change with abandonment age. Then we test to what extent nucleation can be explained by the perch effect. And finally, we test whether the nucleated pattern around carob trees is a source of diversity in the oldfields studied. To answer these questions we located oldfields abandoned 25 and 50 years ago (20 in each case) in the Alacant Province (SE Spain, Iberian Peninsula) on the basis of aerial photographs and personal interviews with local landowners and managers. In each oldfield woody plant density and richness were sampled on two microsites: under the carob tree and in the open field. Analysis was performed on all woody plants and by separating the species in two functional groups: fleshy-fruited (with fleshy mesocarp) and non-fleshy-fruited species. The results suggest that woody vegetation colonising abandoned C. siliqua fields in SE Spain is not randomly distributed but follows a nucleation pattern with higher plant density under the trees. However, the nucleation pattern is only significant for fleshy-fruited species, suggesting that facilitative interactions alone cannot explain the nucleation pattern and that the perch effect plays an important role. The results also show that the nucleation pattern (total plant density and density of non-fleshy-fruited plants) did not increase with abandonment age, while the perch effect (density of fleshy-fruited plants) did increase significantly. Furthermore, the results also show that the nucleation pattern is not only a loci of high plant density but also a

  11. Distribution of electric field for carbon nanotube assembly: Simulation (Ⅰ)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Soon-Geun KWON; Soo-Hyun KIM; Kwang-Ho KIM; Myung-Chang KANG; Hyung-Woo LEE

    2011-01-01

    The distribution of electric field for the alignment and attachment of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was simulated. To be attached at the desired place. the aligned and attracted CNTs should be stayed in the desired area called the stable region or the quasi-stable region for an instant where the change of electric field is minimized. Since the conical electrode has the very narrow sized quasi-stable region, few CNTs can be attached. The rectangular electrodes have a wide stable region, so lots of CNTs can be attached. The results indicate that the round electrode which has a proper sized quasi-stable region is more effective for aligning and attaching a single CNT than the conical or rectangular shaped electrodes.

  12. Prediction of the Field Distribution in CERN-PS Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Schoerling, D

    2014-01-01

    The CERN Proton Synchrotron (PS) has a circumference of 628m and operates at an energy of up to 26 GeV. It uses one hundred combined function magnets, with pole shapes designed to create a dipolar and a quadrupolar field component. Each magnet is equipped with a main current circuit and five auxiliary current-circuits, which allows controlling the linear and non-linear magnetic fields. These magnets were installed in the 1950s, and part of the compensating circuits have been added or modified since then, resulting in the fact that detailed measurements of the field distribution in each individual magnet as a function of the six currents are not available. This study is performed to estimate, through deterministic and stochastic calculations, the expected mean value and standard deviation of the field harmonics of the installed magnets as input for beam dynamics simulations. The relevant results can be used to design correction schemes to minimise beam losses in the PS and to enable the acceleration of higher ...

  13. Homogeneous crystal nucleation in polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schick, Christoph; Androsch, R; Schmelzer, Juern W P

    2017-07-14

    The pathway of crystal nucleation significantly influences the structure and properties of semi-crystalline polymers. Crystal nucleation is normally heterogeneous at low supercooling, and homogeneous at high supercooling, of the polymer melt. Homogeneous nucleation in bulk polymers has been, so far, hardly accessible experimentally, and was even doubted to occur at all. This topical review summarizes experimental findings on homogeneous crystal nucleation in polymers. Recently developed fast scanning calorimetry, with cooling and heating rates up to 106 K s-1, allows for detailed investigations of nucleation near and even below the glass transition temperature, including analysis of nuclei stability. As for other materials, the maximum homogeneous nucleation rate for polymers is located close to the glass transition temperature. In the experiments discussed here, it is shown that polymer nucleation is homogeneous at such temperatures. Homogeneous nucleation in polymers is discussed in the framework of classical nucleation theory. The majority of our observations are consistent with the theory. The discrepancies may guide further research, particularly experiments to progress theoretical development. Progress in the understanding of homogeneous nucleation is much needed, since most of the modelling approaches dealing with polymer crystallization exclusively consider homogeneous nucleation. This is also the basis for advancing theoretical approaches to the much more complex phenomena governing heterogeneous nucleation. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  14. Analytic solution of field distribution and demagnetization function of ideal hollow cylindrical field source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaonong; Lu, Dingwei; Xu, Xibin; Yu, Yang; Gu, Min

    2017-09-01

    The Halbach type hollow cylindrical permanent magnet array (HCPMA) is a volume compact and energy conserved field source, which have attracted intense interests in many practical applications. Here, using the complex variable integration method based on the Biot-Savart Law (including current distributions inside the body and on the surfaces of magnet), we derive analytical field solutions to an ideal multipole HCPMA in entire space including the interior of magnet. The analytic field expression inside the array material is used to construct an analytic demagnetization function, with which we can explain the origin of demagnetization phenomena in HCPMA by taking into account an ideal magnetic hysteresis loop with finite coercivity. These analytical field expressions and demagnetization functions provide deeper insight into the nature of such permanent magnet array systems and offer guidance in designing optimized array system.

  15. Martensitic nucleation mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈奇志; 桑灿; 吴杏芳; 柯俊

    1997-01-01

    A sort of special dislocation configuration was deformation-induced in an Fe-Ni-V-C alloy by in-situ elongation tests of TEM. The cooling in-situ observations, as well as the SADPs from the region of the special dislocation configurations, proved that they are martensitic nuclei. In martensitic transformation, a nucleus changed into a small martensitic sub-plate, and a group of parallel sub-plates that formed from a group of parallel nuclei made up a big martensitic plate Martensitic transformation involved opposite shear between adjacent martensitic nuclei. By using the reduced-cell method, the crystallographic structure of observed martensitic nuclei was indexed as a face-centered orthogonal (FCO) lattice, which was explained by the nucleation mechanism proposed by the present authors. The crystallographic analysis confirmed that the defect faulting involved in martensitic nucleation took place among three close pakked planes, instead of between two adjacent planes as an ordinary stacking fault.

  16. The field line topology of a uniform magnetic field superposed on the field of a distributed ring current

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chance, M.S. (Princeton Univ., NJ (USA). Plasma Physics Lab.); Greene, J.M.; Jensen, T.H. (General Atomics, San Diego, CA (USA))

    1991-07-01

    A magnetic field line topology with nulls, generated by superimposing a uniform magnetic field onto the field from a distributed ring current, is analyzed. This simple model is amenable to substantial analytical progress and also facilitates the visualization of the three dimensional field geometry. Four nulls are seen to exist and representative field lines and tubes of flux found by numerical integration are presented. An infinite number of topologically distinct flux bundles is found. A convenient mapping is defined which proves very useful in distinguishing between and following the paths of the different tubes of flux as they traverse through the null system. The complexities already present in this simple but nontrivial configuration serve to emphasize the difficulties in analyzing more complicated geometries, but the intuition gained from this study proves beneficial in those cases. One such example is the application to a model of plasmoid formations in the earth's magnetotail. 7 refs., 19 figs.

  17. Translational invariance in nucleation theories: Theoretical formulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drossinos, Y.; Kevrekidis, P. G.; Georgopoulos, P. G.

    2001-03-01

    The consequences of spontaneously broken translational invariance on the nucleation-rate statistical prefactor in theories of first-order phase transitions are analyzed. A hybrid, semiphenomenological approach based on field-theoretic analyses of condensation and modern density-functional theories of nucleation is adopted to provide a unified prescription for the incorporation of translational-invariance corrections to nucleation-rate predictions. A connection between these theories is obtained starting from a quantum-mechanical Hamiltonian and using methods developed in the context of studies on Bose-Einstein condensation. An extremum principle is used to derive an integro-differential equation for the spatially nonuniform mean-field order-parameter profile; the appropriate order parameter becomes the square root of the fluid density. The importance of the attractive intermolecular potential is emphasized, whereas the repulsive two-body potential is approximated by considering hard-sphere collisions. The functional form of the degenerate translational eigenmodes in three dimensions is related to the mean-field order parameter, and their contribution to the nucleation-rate prefactor is evaluated. The solution of the Euler-Lagrange variational equation is discussed in terms of either a proposed variational trial function or the complete numerical solution of the associated boundary-value integro-differential problem. Alternatively, if the attractive potential is not explicitly known, an approach that allows its formal determination from its moments is presented.

  18. Overview: Nucleation of clathrate hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrier, Pramod; Khan, M. Naveed; Srivastava, Vishal; Maupin, C. Mark; Koh, Carolyn A.

    2016-12-01

    Molecular level knowledge of nucleation and growth of clathrate hydrates is of importance for advancing fundamental understanding on the nature of water and hydrophobic hydrate formers, and their interactions that result in the formation of ice-like solids at temperatures higher than the ice-point. The stochastic nature and the inability to probe the small length and time scales associated with the nucleation process make it very difficult to experimentally determine the molecular level changes that lead to the nucleation event. Conversely, for this reason, there have been increasing efforts to obtain this information using molecular simulations. Accurate knowledge of how and when hydrate structures nucleate will be tremendously beneficial for the development of sustainable hydrate management strategies in oil and gas flowlines, as well as for their application in energy storage and recovery, gas separation, carbon sequestration, seawater desalination, and refrigeration. This article reviews various aspects of hydrate nucleation. First, properties of supercooled water and ice nucleation are reviewed briefly due to their apparent similarity to hydrates. Hydrate nucleation is then reviewed starting from macroscopic observations as obtained from experiments in laboratories and operations in industries, followed by various hydrate nucleation hypotheses and hydrate nucleation driving force calculations based on the classical nucleation theory. Finally, molecular simulations on hydrate nucleation are discussed in detail followed by potential future research directions.

  19. Bleb Nucleation through Membrane Peeling

    CERN Document Server

    Alert, Ricard

    2016-01-01

    We study the nucleation of blebs, i.e., protrusions arising from a local detachment of the membrane from the cortex of a cell. Based on a simple model of elastic linkers with force-dependent kinetics, we show that bleb nucleation is governed by membrane peeling. By this mechanism, the growth or shrinkage of a detached membrane patch is completely determined by the linker kinetics, regardless of the energetic cost of the detachment. We predict the critical nucleation radius for membrane peeling and the corresponding effective energy barrier. These may be typically smaller than those predicted by classical nucleation theory, implying a much faster nucleation. We also perform simulations of a continuum stochastic model of membrane-cortex adhesion to obtain the statistics of bleb nucleation times as a function of the stress on the membrane. The determinant role of membrane peeling changes our understanding of bleb nucleation and opens new directions in the study of blebs.

  20. Cauchy magnetic field component and magnitude distribution studied by the zero-field muon spin relaxation technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan Xuewen; Kossler, William J.; Stronach, Carey E.; Noakes, David R. [College of William and Mary, Physics Department (United States)

    1999-11-15

    Zero-field muon spin relaxation (ZF-{mu}SR) data for dilute spin magnetic systems have been widely interpreted with what is called a Kubo-Toyabe form based on a Lorentzian distribution of local field components. We derive here the proper magnetic field magnitude distribution using independent and uncorrelated component distributions. Our result is then compared to the previously accepted formula for ZF-{mu}SR. We discuss the origins of the magnetic field component and magnitude distributions. Further, we found that after rescaling the magnetic field, the differences that are amenable to experimental examination are quite small, although the interpretations behind them are quite different.

  1. Field-in-Field Technique to Improve Dose Distribution in the Junction of the Field with Head and Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seon Myeong; Lee, Yeong Cheol; Jeong, Daek Yang; Kim, Young Bum [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Korea University Guro Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-03-15

    In treating head and neck cancer, it is very important to irradiate uniform dose on the junction of the bilateral irradiation field of the upper head and neck and the anterior irradiation field of the lower neck. In order to improve dose distribution on the junction, this study attempted to correct non uniform dose resulting from under dose and over dose using the field-in-field technique in treating the anterior irradiation field of the lower neck and to apply the technique to the treatment of head and neck cancer through comparison with conventional treatment. In order to examine dose difference between the entry point and the exit point where beam diffusion happens in bilateral irradiation on the upper head and neck, we used an anthropomorphic phantom. Computer Tomography was applied to the anthropomorphic phantom, the dose of interest points was compared in radiation treatment planning, and it was corrected by calculating the dose ratio at the junction of the lower neck. Dose distribution on the junction of the irradiated field was determined by placing low-sensitivity film on the junction of the lower neck and measuring dose distribution on the conventional bilateral irradiation of the upper head and neck and on the anterior irradiation of the lower neck. In addition, using the field-in-field technique, which takes into account beam diffusion resulting from the bilateral irradiation of the upper head and neck, we measured difference in dose distribution on the junction in the anterior irradiation of the lower neck. In order to examine the dose at interest points on the junction, we compared and analyzed the change of dose at the interest points on the anthropomorphic phantom using a thermoluminescence dosimeter. In case of dose sum with the bilateral irradiation of the upper head and neck when the field-in-field technique is applied to the junction of the lower neck in radiation treatment planning, The dose of under dose areas increased by 4.7-8.65%. The dose

  2. Temperature distribution in the Cerro Prieto geothermal field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo B, F.; Bermejo M, F.J.; Domiguez A, B.; Esquer P, C.A.; Navarro O, F.J.

    1981-01-01

    A series of temperature and pressure logs and flow rate measurements was compiled for each of the geothermal wells drilled to different reservoir depths between October 1979 and December 1980. Based on the valuable information obtained, a series of graphs showing the thermal characteristics of the reservoir were prepared. These graphs clearly show the temperature distribution resulting from the movement of fluids from the deep regions toward the higher zones of the reservoir, thus establishing more reliable parameters for locating new wells with better production zones. Updated information based on data from new deep wells drilled in the geothermal field is presented here. This new information does not differ much from earlier estimates and theories. However, the influence of faulting and fracturing on the hydrothermal recharge of the geothermal reservoir is seen more clearly.

  3. Analytic expression for in-field scattered light distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Gary L.

    2004-01-01

    Light that is scattered from lenses and mirrors in an optical system produces a halo of stray light around bright objects within the field of view. The angular distribution of scattered light from any one component is usually described by the Harvey model. This paper presents analytic expressions for the scattered irradiance at a focal plane from optical components that scatter light in accordance with the Harvey model. It is found that the irradiance is independent of the location of an optical element within the system, provided the element is not located at or near an intermediate image plane. It is also found that the irradiance has little or no dependence on the size of the element.

  4. Distribution of Helical Properties of Solar Magnetic Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kirill M. Kuzanyan; Victor G. Lamburt; Hong-Qi Zhang; Shu-Dong Bao

    2003-01-01

    We summarize studies of helical properties of solar magnetic fieldssuch as current helicity and twist of magnetic fields in solar active regions (ARs),that are observational tracers of the alpha-effect in the solar convective zone (SCZ).Information on their spatial distribution is obtained by analysis of systematic mag-netographic observations of active regions taken at Huairou Solar Observing Stationof National Astronomical Observatories of Chinese Academy of Sciences. The mainproperty is that the tracers of the alpha-effect are antisymmetric about the solarequator. Identifying longitudinal migration of active regions with their individualrotation rates and taking into account the internal differential rotation law withinthe SCZ known from helioseismology, we deduce the distribution of the effect overdepth. We have found evidence that the alpha-effect changes its value and signnear the bottom of the SCZ, and this is in accord with the theoretical studies andnumerical simulations. We discuss other regularities which can be revealed by fur-ther analysis such as possible dependence on longitude, time, and magnetic fieldstrength, etc.

  5. Optimizing the configuration patterns for heterogeneous distributed sensor fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wettergren, Thomas A.; Costa, Russell

    2012-06-01

    When unmanned distributed sensor fields are developed for rapid deployment in hostile areas, the deployment may consist of multiple sensor types. This occurs because of the variations in expected threats and uncertainties about the details of the local environmental conditions. As more detailed information is available at deployment, the quantity and types of sensors are given and fixed, yet the specific pattern for the configuration of their deployment is still variable. We develop a new optimization approach for planning these configurations for this resource constrained sensor application. Our approach takes into account the variety of sensors available and their respective expected performance in the environment, as well as the target uncertainty. Due to the large dimensionality of the design space for this unmanned sensor planning problem, heuristic-based optimizations will provide very sub-optimal solutions and gradient-based methods lack a good quality initialization. Instead, we utilize a robust optimization procedure that combines genetic algorithms with nonlinear programming techniques to create numerical solutions for determining the optimal spatial distribution of sensing effort for each type of sensor. We illustrate the effectiveness of the approach on numerical examples, and also illustrate the qualitative difference in the optimal patterns as a function of the relative numbers of available sensors of each type. We conclude by using the optimization results to discuss the benefits of interspersing the different sensor types, as opposed to creating area sub-segmentations for each type.

  6. Characterisation of neutron fields: challenges in assessing the directional distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauwels, Vanessa; Vanhavere, Filip; Reginatto, Marcel

    2014-10-01

    The SCK·CEN has carried out neutron field characterisation campaigns at several nuclear reactors. The main goal of these measurement campaigns was to evaluate the performance of different neutron personal dosemeters. To be able to evaluate the performance of neutron personal dosemeters in terms of Hp(10), knowledge of the directional distribution is indispensable. This distribution was estimated by placing several personal dosemeters on all six sides of a slab phantom. The interpretation and conversion of this information into a reliable value for Hp(10) requires great care. The data were analysed using three methods. In the first approach, a linear interpolation was performed on three perpendicular axes. In the other two approaches, an icosahedron was used to model the angle of incidence of the neutrons and a linear interpolation or a Bayesian analysis was performed. This study describes the limitations and advantages of each of these methods and provides recommendations for their use to estimate the personal dose equivalent Hp(10) for neutron dosimetry. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Distributional sources for Newman's holomorphic Coulomb field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaiser, Gerald [Center for Signals and Waves, Austin, TX (United States)

    2004-09-10

    Newman (1973 J. Math. Phys. 14 102-3) considered the holomorphic extension E-tilde(z) of the Coulomb field E(x) in R{sup 3}. From an analysis of its multipole expansion, he concluded that the real and imaginary parts E(x+iy){identical_to}Re E-tilde(x+iy), H(x+iy){identical_to}Im E-tilde(x+iy), viewed as functions of x, are the electric and magnetic fields generated by a spinning ring of charge R. This represents the EM part of the Kerr-Newman solution to the Einstein-Maxwell equations (Newman E T and Janis A I 1965 J. Math. Phys. 6 915-7; Newman E T et al 1965 J. Math. Phys. 6 918-9). As already pointed out in Newman and Janis (1965 J. Math. Phys. 6 915-7), this interpretation is somewhat problematic since the fields are double-valued. To make them single-valued, a branch cut must be introduced so that R is replaced by a charged disc D having R as its boundary. In the context of curved spacetime, D becomes a spinning disc of charge and mass representing the singularity of the Kerr-Newman solution. Here we confirm the above interpretation of E and H without resorting to asymptotic expansions, by computing the charge and current densities directly as distributions in R{sup 3} supported in D. This will show that D spins rigidly at the critical rate so that its rim R moves at the speed of light.

  8. Some ice nucleation characteristics of Asian and Saharan desert dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. R. Field

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The large (7 m×4 m cylinder, 84 m3 AIDA (Aerosol Interactions and Dynamics in the Atmosphere cloud chamber facility at Forschungszentrum, Karlsruhe, Germany was used to test the ice nucleating ability of two desert dust samples from the Sahara and Asia. Aerosol samples were lognormally distributed with a mode diameter of 0.4(±0.1 μm and geometric standard deviation of ~1.7(±0.2. At temperatures warmer than −40°C droplets were formed before ice crystals formed and there was generally no deposition nucleation observed. At temperatures colder than −40°C both dust samples exhibited dual nucleation events that were observed during the same expansion experiment. The primary nucleation event occurred at ice saturation ratios of 1.1 to 1.3 and is likely to be a deposition nucleation mode. The secondary nucleation event occurred at ice saturation ratios between 1.35 and 1.5. We cannot categorically determine whether this ice nucleation event is via a further deposition mode or a condensation mode, but the presence of some soluble material in the dust samples leads us to favour the latter process. The activated fractions of desert dust ranged from ~5–10% at −20°C to 20–40% at temperatures colder than −40°C. There was no obvious difference between the nucleation behaviour of the two dust samples.

  9. Primary nucleation of lithium carbonate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuzhu SUN; Xingfu SONG; Jin WANG; Yan LUO; Jianguo YU

    2009-01-01

    A set of laser apparatus was used to explore the induction period and the primary nucleation of lithium carbonate. Results show that the induction period increases with the decrease of supersaturation, temperature and stirring speed. Through the classical theory of primary nucleation, many important properties involved in primary nucleation under different conditions were obtained quantitatively, including the interfacial tension between solid and liquid, contact angle, critical nucleus size, critical nuleation free energy etc.

  10. Surface nucleation in complex rheological systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herfurth, J.; Ulrich, J.

    2017-07-01

    Forced nucleation induced by suitable foreign seeds is an important tool to control the production of defined crystalline products. The quality of a surface provided by seed materials represents an important variable in the production of crystallizing layers that means for the nucleation process. Parameters like shape and surface structure, size and size distribution of the seed particles as well as the ability to hold up the moisture (the solvent), can have an influence on the nucleation process of different viscous supersaturated solutions. Here the properties of different starch powders as seeds obtained from corn, potato, rice, tapioca and wheat were tested. It could be found, that the best nucleation behavior of a sugar solution could be reached with the use of corn starch as seed material. Here the surface of the crystallized sugar layer is smooth, crystallization time is short (product is easily reproducible. Beneficial properties of seed materials are therefore an edged, uneven surface, small particle sizes as well as low moisture content at ambient conditions within the seed materials.

  11. Heterogeneous nucleation of aspartame from aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Noriaki; Kinno, Hiroaki; Shimizu, Kenji

    1990-03-01

    Waiting times, the time from the instant of quenching needed for a first nucleus to appear, were measured at constant supercoolings for primary nucleation of aspartame (α-L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methylester) from aqueous solutions, which were sealed into glass ampoules (solution volume = 3.16 cm 3). Since the waiting time became shorter by filtering the solution prior to quenching, the nucleation was concluded to be heterogeneously induced. The measured waiting time consisted of two parts: time needed for the nucleus to grow to a detactable size (growth time) and stochastic time needed for nucleation (true waiting time). The distribution of the true waiting time, is well explained by a stochastic model, in which nucleation is regarded to occur heterogeneously and in a stochastic manner by two kinds of active sites. The active sites are estimated to be located on foreign particles in which such elements as Si, Al and Mg were contained. The amount of each element is very small in the order of magnitude of ppb (mass basis) of the whole solution. The growth time was correlated with the degree of supercooling.

  12. Nucleation Mechanism for Bainite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Based on the experimental results that solute-depleted zone was observed in Cu-28Zn-4Al (mass fraction) at 523 K,△G is calculated as a positive according to the thermodynamic criteria for the spinodal decomposition of a ternarysystems. So, the solute-depleted zone cannot be formed by spinodal decomposition. Dislocation density requiredby the formation of solute-depleted zone is estimated greater than 7.89×109 cm-2 according to the segregationof solute atoms around dislocations, which is not consistent with the practical situation for the alloy at 523 K.Associated with the internal friction experimental fact that internal friction peaks appear within the incubation forbainitic transformation in Cu-Zn-Al alloy, the equilibrium temperature, T0, is evaluated as 433 K for solute-depletedCu-25Zn-3.4Al, which is lower than the experimental temperature 523 K. Thus, nucleation by shear mechanism isimpossible in this circumstance. Therefore, it is concluded that , like bainite in steels and Ag-Cd, bainite in Cu-Zn-Alalloys nucleates by diffusional mechanism, just implied by the experimental existence of solute-depleted zone.

  13. Nucleate boiling heat transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saiz Jabardo, J.M. [Universidade da Coruna (Spain). Escola Politecnica Superior], e-mail: mjabardo@cdf.udc.es

    2009-07-01

    Nucleate boiling heat transfer has been intensely studied during the last 70 years. However boiling remains a science to be understood and equated. In other words, using the definition given by Boulding, it is an 'insecure science'. It would be pretentious of the part of the author to explore all the nuances that the title of the paper suggests in a single conference paper. Instead the paper will focus on one interesting aspect such as the effect of the surface microstructure on nucleate boiling heat transfer. A summary of a chronological literature survey is done followed by an analysis of the results of an experimental investigation of boiling on tubes of different materials and surface roughness. The effect of the surface roughness is performed through data from the boiling of refrigerants R-134a and R-123, medium and low pressure refrigerants, respectively. In order to investigate the extent to which the surface roughness affects boiling heat transfer, very rough surfaces (4.6 {mu}m and 10.5 {mu}m ) have been tested. Though most of the data confirm previous literature trends, the very rough surfaces present a peculiar behaviour with respect to that of the smoother surfaces (Ra<3.0 {mu}m). (author)

  14. Localized domain wall nucleation dynamics in asymmetric ferromagnetic rings revealed by direct time-resolved magnetic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Kornel; Krone, Andrea; Mawass, Mohamad-Assaad; Krüger, Benjamin; Weigand, Markus; Stoll, Hermann; Schütz, Gisela; Kläui, Mathias

    2016-07-01

    We report time-resolved observations of field-induced domain wall nucleation in asymmetric ferromagnetic rings using single direction field pulses and rotating fields. We show that the asymmetric geometry of a ring allows for controlling the position of nucleation events, when a domain wall is nucleated by a rotating magnetic field. Direct observation by scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) reveals that the nucleation of domain walls occurs through the creation of transient ripplelike structures. This magnetization state is found to exhibit a surprisingly high reproducibility even at room temperature and we determine the combinations of field strengths and field directions that allow for reliable nucleation of domain walls and directly quantify the stability of the magnetic states. Our analysis of the processes occurring during field induced domain wall nucleation shows how the effective fields determine the nucleation location reproducibly, which is a key prerequisite toward using domain walls for spintronic devices.

  15. Lightning Performance on Overhead Distribution Lines : After Improvement Field Observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reynaldo Zoro

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Two feeders of 20 kV overhead distribution lines which are located in a high lightning density area are chosen to be observed as a field study due to their good lightning performance after improvement of lightning protection system. These two feeders used the new overhead ground wire and new line arrester equipped with lightning counter on the main lines. The significant reduced of lines outages are reported. Study was carried out to observe these improvements by comparing to the other two feeders line which are not improved and not equipped yet with the ground wire and line arrester. These two feeders located in the nearby area. Two cameras were installed to record the trajectory of the lightning strikes on the improved lines. Lightning peak currents are measured using magnetic tape measurement system installed on the grounding lead of lightning arrester. Lightning overvoltage calculations are carried out by using several scenarios based on observation results and historical lightning data derived from lightning detection network. Lightning overvoltages caused by indirect or direct strikes are analyzed to get the lightning performance of the lines. The best scenario was chosen and performance of the lines were improved significantly by installing overhead ground wire and improvement of lightning arrester installation.

  16. Distribution of electric field for carbon nanotube assembly: Experiments (Ⅱ)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Soongeun KWON; Soo-Hyun KIM; Kwang-ho KIM; Myung-chang KANG; Hyung-woo LEE

    2011-01-01

    The distribution effect of electric field on the alignment and attachment of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were investigated.The experimental results were compared with the simulation results according to three different shaped electrodes. In previous simulation, the round shaped electrodes were expected to be more effective for aligning and attaching a single CNT between two electrodes than conical or rectangular shaped electrodes. To verify the simulation results, three different shaped electrodes were introduced and a single multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT) was attached. The optimal conditions for aligning and attaching MWNTs such as the frequency, applied voltage and concentration of MWNTs solution were investigated. Through repeated experiments, frequency of 100 kHz-10 MHz, applied voltage of 0.3-1.3 Vrms/μm, concentration of 5 μg/mL in MWNTs solution were obtained as a possible condition range to attach MWNTs. Under these conditions, the yield of MWNTs attachment between two electrodes was up to 70%. In previous simulation, furthermore, it was verified that the size of the stable or quasi-stable region made CNTs aligned and attached on different shaped electrodes from the comparison of the experimental and simulation results. Most single MWNT attachment was accomplished on the round shaped electrodes.

  17. Estimation of the nucleation rate by differential scanning calorimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelton, Kenneth F.

    1992-01-01

    A realistic computer model is presented for calculating the time-dependent volume fraction transformed during the devitrification of glasses, assuming the classical theory of nucleation and continuous growth. Time- and cluster-dependent nucleation rates are calculated by modeling directly the evolving cluster distribution. Statistical overlap in the volume fraction transformed is taken into account using the standard Johnson-Mehl-Avrami formalism. Devitrification behavior under isothermal and nonisothermal conditions is described. The model is used to demonstrate that the recent suggestion by Ray and Day (1990) that nonisothermal DSC studies can be used to determine the temperature for the peak nucleation rate, is qualitatively correct for lithium disilicate, the glass investigated.

  18. Estimation of the nucleation rate by differential scanning calorimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelton, Kenneth F.

    1992-01-01

    A realistic computer model is presented for calculating the time-dependent volume fraction transformed during the devitrification of glasses, assuming the classical theory of nucleation and continuous growth. Time- and cluster-dependent nucleation rates are calculated by modeling directly the evolving cluster distribution. Statistical overlap in the volume fraction transformed is taken into account using the standard Johnson-Mehl-Avrami formalism. Devitrification behavior under isothermal and nonisothermal conditions is described. The model is used to demonstrate that the recent suggestion by Ray and Day (1990) that nonisothermal DSC studies can be used to determine the temperature for the peak nucleation rate, is qualitatively correct for lithium disilicate, the glass investigated.

  19. On Barnes Beta Distributions and Applications to the Maximum Distribution of the 2D Gaussian Free Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrovsky, Dmitry

    2016-09-01

    A new family of Barnes beta distributions on (0, ∞) is introduced and its infinite divisibility, moment determinacy, scaling, and factorization properties are established. The Morris integral probability distribution is constructed from Barnes beta distributions of types (1, 0) and (2, 2), and its moment determinacy and involution invariance properties are established. For application, the maximum distributions of the 2D gaussian free field on the unit interval and circle with a non-random logarithmic potential are conjecturally related to the critical Selberg and Morris integral probability distributions, respectively, and expressed in terms of sums of Barnes beta distributions of types (1, 0) and (2, 2).

  20. Gluon field fluctuations in nuclear collisions: Multiplicity and eccentricity distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Schenke, Björn; Venugopalan, Raju

    2013-01-01

    We discuss different sources of fluctuations in nuclear collisions and their realization in the IP-Glasma model. We present results for multiplicity distributions in p+p and p+A collisions and compare eccentricity distributions in A+A collisions to the flow harmonic distributions in 10 centrality classes measured by the ATLAS collaboration.

  1. Nucleation of Crystals in Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vekilov, Peter G.

    2010-07-01

    Solution crystallization is an essential part of processes in the chemical and pharmaceutical industries and a major step in physiological and pathological phenomena. Crystallization starts with nucleation and control of nucleation is crucial for the control of the number, size, perfection, polymorphism and other characteristics of the crystalline materials. Recently, there have been significant advances in the understanding of the mechanism of nucleation of crystals in solution. The most significant of these is the two-step mechanism of nucleation, according to which the crystalline nucleus appears inside pre-existing metastable clusters of size several hundred nanometers, which consist of dense liquid and are suspended in the solution. While initially proposed for protein crystals, the applicability of this mechanism has been demonstrated for small molecule organic materials, colloids, and biominerals. This mechanism helps to explain several long-standing puzzles of crystal nucleation in solution: nucleation rates which are many orders of magnitude lower than theoretical predictions, nucleation kinetic dependencies with steady or receding parts at increasing supersaturation, the role of heterogeneous substrates for polymorph selection, the significance of the dense protein liquid, and others. More importantly, this mechanism provides powerful tools for control of the nucleation process by varying the solution thermodynamic parameters so that the volume occupied by the dense liquid shrinks or expands.

  2. Preferential Nucleation during Polymorphic Transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, H.; Sietsma, J.; Offerman, S. E.

    2016-08-01

    Polymorphism is the ability of a solid material to exist in more than one phase or crystal structure. Polymorphism may occur in metals, alloys, ceramics, minerals, polymers, and pharmaceutical substances. Unresolved are the conditions for preferential nucleation during polymorphic transformations in which structural relationships or special crystallographic orientation relationships (OR’s) form between the nucleus and surrounding matrix grains. We measured in-situ and simultaneously the nucleation rates of grains that have zero, one, two, three and four special OR’s with the surrounding parent grains. These experiments show a trend in which the activation energy for nucleation becomes smaller - and therefore nucleation more probable - with increasing number of special OR’s. These insights contribute to steering the processing of polymorphic materials with tailored properties, since preferential nucleation affects which crystal structure forms, the average grain size and texture of the material, and thereby - to a large extent - the final properties of the material.

  3. Uniform Magnetic Field Between Face-to-Face HTS Bulk Magnets Combining Concave and Convex Magnetic Field Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, T.; Takahashi, Y.; Yaginuma, S.; Ogawa, J.; Fukui, S.; Sato, T.; Yokoyama, K.; Nakamura, T.

    The authors have been attempting to obtain the uniform magnetic field distribution in the space between the face-to-face HTS bulk magnets. The magnetic poles containing the HTS bulk magnets are usually characterized as non-uniform magnetic field distribution. Since the distributions show the conical or convex shapes, it is difficult to obtain the uniform magnetic field spaces even when the magnetic poles would be placed face-to-face. The authors have modified the shape of the distribution of one-side magnetic pole by attaching an iron plate on the surface, and formed the concave magnetic field distribution on the pole surface. The steep concave or convex distributions at each pole surface change to be flat with increasing distance from the pole surface. After the experimental result recording the best uniformity of 358 ppm by combining the concave and convex field distributions face-to-face, we attempted to simulate the feasible performance in this configuration. In the numerical simulation, the concave field distribution modified by attaching an imaginary spiral coil on the pole surface was coupled with the original convex field. We succeeded in obtaining the best uniformity of 30 ppm at 1.1 T in 4 x 4 mm2x-y plane at 7 mm distant from the pole surface in the gap of 30 mm. This result suggests that the concave and convex magnetic field distributions compensate the field uniformity with each other with keeping the magnetic field strength in the gap, and also suggests the novel compact NMR/MRI devices in the future.

  4. Gluon field fluctuations in nuclear collisions: Multiplicity and eccentricity distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schenke, Björn [Physics Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Tribedy, Prithwish [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, 1/AF Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Venugopalan, Raju [Physics Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2014-06-15

    We discuss different sources of fluctuations in nuclear collisions and their realization in the IP-Glasma model. We present results for multiplicity distributions in p+p and p+A collisions and compare eccentricity (ε{sub 2}, ε{sub 3}, ε{sub 4}) distributions in A + A collisions to the v{sub n} distributions in 10 centrality classes measured by the ATLAS Collaboration.

  5. Flow Structures Around Micro-bubbles During Subcooled Nucleate Boiling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hao; PENG Xiao-Feng; David M. Christopher; WANG Bu-Xuan

    2005-01-01

    The flow structures were investigated around micro bubbles on extremely thin wires during subcooled nucleate boiling. Jet flows emanating from the bubbles were observed visually with the fluid field measurement using high-speed photography and a PIV system. The jet flows induced a strong pumping effect around a bubble. The multi-jet structure was further observed experimentally, indicating the evolution of flow structure around micro bubbles. Numerical simulations explore that the jet flows were induced by a strong Marangoni effect due to high temperature gradients near the wire. The bubble interface with multi-jet structure has abnormal temperature distribution such that the coolest parts were observed at two sides of a bubble extending into the subcooled bulk liquid rather than at the top. Evaporation and condensation on the bubble interface play important roles not only in controlling the intensity of the jet flow, but also in bringing out the multi-jet structure.

  6. Surface Nanobubble Nucleation Visualized with TIRF Microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Chan, Chon U

    2012-01-01

    Nanobubbles are observed with optical microscopy using the total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) excitation. We report on TIRF visualization using Rhodamine 6G at 5$\\mu\\,$M concentration which results to strongly contrasted pictures. The preferential absorption and the high spatial resolution allow to detect nanobubbles with diameters of 230\\,nm and above. We present a study of the nucleation dynamics from the water-ethanol-water exchange and report the size distributions. Nanobubble nucleation is observed within 4 min after the exchange, later a stable population of nanobubbles with a surface density of 0.55 bubbles\\,/$\\mu$m$^2$ is formed. Interestingly, unstable, slowly dissolving nanobubbles are observed during the first stage of water-ethanol exchange; only after the ethanol-water exchange stable nanobubbles appear.

  7. Investigation of electric field distribution on FAC-IR-300 ionization chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, S. M.; Tavakoli-Anbaran, H.; Zeinali, H. Z.

    2016-07-01

    One of the important parameters for establishing charge particle equilibrium (CPE) conditions of free-air ionization chamber is an electric field distribution. In this paper, electric field distribution inside the ionization chamber was investigated by finite element method. For this purpose, the effects of adding guard plate and guard strips on the electric field distribution in the ionization chamber were studied. it is necessary to apply a lead box around the ionization chamber body to avoid of scattered radiation effects on the ionization chamber operation, but the lead box changes the electric field distribution. In the following, the effect of lead box on the electric field distribution was studied. Finally, electric field distribution factor (kfield) was calculated by the simulation. The results of the simulation showed that presence of the guard plate and guard strips, and applying a suitable potential to lead box, a convergence of kfield to 1 was achieved.

  8. Impact of tumor position, conductivity distribution and tissue homogeneity on the distribution of tumor treating fields in a human brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korshoej, Anders Rosendal; Hansen, Frederik Lundgaard; Thielscher, Axel

    2017-01-01

    BackgroundTumor treating fields (TTFields) are increasingly used in the treatment of glioblastoma. TTFields inhibit cancer growth through induction of alternating electrical fields. To optimize TTFields efficacy, it is necessary to understand the factors determining the strength and distribution...... of TTFields. In this study, we provide simple guiding principles for clinicians to assess the distribution and the local efficacy of TTFields in various clinical scenarios.MethodsWe calculated the TTFields distribution using finite element methods applied to a realistic head model. Dielectric property...... estimates were taken from the literature. Twentyfour tumors were virtually introduced at locations systematically varied relative to the applied field. In addition, we investigated the impact of central tumor necrosis on the induced field.ResultsLocal field "hot spots" occurred at the sulcal fundi...

  9. Do protein crystals nucleate within dense liquid clusters?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, Dominique; Vorontsova, Maria A; Potenza, Marco A C; Sanvito, Tiziano; Sleutel, Mike; Giglio, Marzio; Vekilov, Peter G

    2015-07-01

    Protein-dense liquid clusters are regions of high protein concentration that have been observed in solutions of several proteins. The typical cluster size varies from several tens to several hundreds of nanometres and their volume fraction remains below 10(-3) of the solution. According to the two-step mechanism of nucleation, the protein-rich clusters serve as locations for and precursors to the nucleation of protein crystals. While the two-step mechanism explained several unusual features of protein crystal nucleation kinetics, a direct observation of its validity for protein crystals has been lacking. Here, two independent observations of crystal nucleation with the proteins lysozyme and glucose isomerase are discussed. Firstly, the evolutions of the protein-rich clusters and nucleating crystals were characterized simultaneously by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and confocal depolarized dynamic light scattering (cDDLS), respectively. It is demonstrated that protein crystals appear following a significant delay after cluster formation. The cDDLS correlation functions follow a Gaussian decay, indicative of nondiffusive motion. A possible explanation is that the crystals are contained inside large clusters and are driven by the elasticity of the cluster surface. Secondly, depolarized oblique illumination dark-field microscopy reveals the evolution from liquid clusters without crystals to newly nucleated crystals contained in the clusters to grown crystals freely diffusing in the solution. Collectively, the observations indicate that the protein-rich clusters in lysozyme and glucose isomerase solutions are locations for crystal nucleation.

  10. Equilibrium poloidal field distributions in reversed-field-pinch toroidal discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, D.A.; Mann, L.W.; Schoenberg, K.F.

    1982-04-01

    A comparison between the analytic formulae of Shafranov for equilibrium in axisymmetric toroidal reversed field pinch (RFP) systems and fully toroidal numerical solutions of the Grad-Shafranov equation is presented as a function of poloidal beta, internal plasma inductance, and aspect ratio. The Shafranov formula for the equilibrium poloidal field distribution is accurate to within 5% for aspect ratios greater than 2, poloidal betas less than 50%, and for plasma current channels that exceed one-third of the minor toroidal radius. The analytic description for the center shift of the innermost flux surface that encloses the plasma current (the Shafranov shift) is accurate to within 15% for aspect ratios greater than 2 and poloidal betas below 50%, provided the shift does not exceed one-tenth of the minor conducting boundary radius. The behavior of the magnetic axis shift as a function of plasma parameters is included. The Shafranov formulae provide a convenient method for describing the equilibrium behavior of an RFP discharge. Examples illustrating the application of the analytic formulae to the Los Alamos ZT-40M RFP experiment are given.

  11. Climate Impacts of Ice Nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gettelman, Andrew; Liu, Xiaohong; Barahona, Donifan; Lohmann, Ulrike; Chen, Celia

    2012-01-01

    Several different ice nucleation parameterizations in two different General Circulation Models (GCMs) are used to understand the effects of ice nucleation on the mean climate state, and the Aerosol Indirect Effects (AIE) of cirrus clouds on climate. Simulations have a range of ice microphysical states that are consistent with the spread of observations, but many simulations have higher present-day ice crystal number concentrations than in-situ observations. These different states result from different parameterizations of ice cloud nucleation processes, and feature different balances of homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation. Black carbon aerosols have a small (0.06 Wm(exp-2) and not statistically significant AIE when included as ice nuclei, for nucleation efficiencies within the range of laboratory measurements. Indirect effects of anthropogenic aerosols on cirrus clouds occur as a consequence of increasing anthropogenic sulfur emissions with different mechanisms important in different models. In one model this is due to increases in homogeneous nucleation fraction, and in the other due to increases in heterogeneous nucleation with coated dust. The magnitude of the effect is the same however. The resulting ice AIE does not seem strongly dependent on the balance between homogeneous and heterogeneous ice nucleation. Regional effects can reach several Wm2. Indirect effects are slightly larger for those states with less homogeneous nucleation and lower ice number concentration in the base state. The total ice AIE is estimated at 0.27 +/- 0.10 Wm(exp-2) (1 sigma uncertainty). This represents a 20% offset of the simulated total shortwave AIE for ice and liquid clouds of 1.6 Wm(sup-2).

  12. Trapped Field Characteristics of Stacked YBCO Thin Plates for Compact NMR Magnets: Spatial Field Distribution and Temporal Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Seungyong; Kim, Seok Beom; Ahn, Min Cheol; Voccio, John; Bascuñán, Juan; Iwasa, Yukikazu

    2010-06-01

    This paper presents experimental and analytical results of trapped field characteristics of a stack of square YBCO thin film plates for compact NMR magnets. Each YBCO plate, 40 mm × 40 mm × 0.08 mm, has a 25-mm diameter hole at its center. A total of 500 stacked plates were used to build a 40-mm long magnet. Its trapped field, in a bath of liquid nitrogen, was measured for spatial field distribution and temporal stability. Comparison of measured and analytical results is presented: the effects on trapped field characteristics of the unsaturated nickel substrate and the non-uniform current distribution in the YBCO plate are discussed.

  13. Distributional Dimension of Fractal Sets in Local Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua QIU; Wei Yi SU

    2008-01-01

    The distributional dimension of fractal sets in Rn has been systematically studied by Triebel by virtue of the theory of function spaces.In this paper,we .rst discuss some important properties about the B type spaces and the F type spaces on local .elds,then we give the de .nition of the distributional dimension dim D in local .elds and study the relations between distributional dimension and Hausdor .dimension.Moreover,the analysis expression of the Hausdor .dimension is given.Lastly,we de .ne the Fourier dimension in local .elds,and obtain the relations among all the three dimensions.

  14. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulation of the classical nucleation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipponi, A.; Giammatteo, P.

    2016-12-01

    We implemented a kinetic Monte Carlo computer simulation of the nucleation process in the framework of the coarse grained scenario of the Classical Nucleation Theory (CNT). The computational approach is efficient for a wide range of temperatures and sample sizes and provides a reliable simulation of the stochastic process. The results for the nucleation rate are in agreement with the CNT predictions based on the stationary solution of the set of differential equations for the continuous variables representing the average population distribution of nuclei size. Time dependent nucleation behavior can also be simulated with results in agreement with previous approaches. The method, here established for the case in which the excess free-energy of a crystalline nucleus is a smooth-function of the size, can be particularly useful when more complex descriptions are required.

  15. Non-invasively measured cardiac magnetic field maps improve the estimation of the current distribution

    OpenAIRE

    Kosch, Olaf; Steinhoff, Uwe; Trahms, Lutz; Trontelj, Zvonko; Jazbinšek, Vojko

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensive body surface potential mapping (BSPM) and magnetic field mapping (MFM) measurements have been carried out in order to improve the estimation of the current distribution generated by the human heart. Electric and magnetic fields and also the planar gradient of the magnetic field during the QRS complex were imaged as a time series of field maps. A model of the current distribution should explain the features of both BSPM and MFM. Simulated maps generated by a single dipole or a st...

  16. Mesogranulation and the solar surface magnetic field distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Chaouche, L Yelles; Pillet, V Martínez; Wiegelmann, T; Bonet, J A; Knölker, M; Rubio, L R Bellot; Iniesta, J C del Toro; Barthol, P; Gandorfer, A; Schmidt, W; Solanki, S K

    2010-01-01

    The relation of the solar surface magnetic field with mesogranular cells is studied using high spatial (~ 100 km) and temporal (~ 30 sec) resolution data obtained with the IMaX instrument aboard SUNRISE. First, mesogranular cells are identified using Lagrange tracers (corks) based on horizontal velocity fields obtained through Local Correlation Tracking. After ~ 20 min of integration, the tracers delineate a sharp mesogranular network with lanes of width below about 280 km. The preferential location of magnetic elements in mesogranular cells is tested quantitatively. Roughly 85% of pixels with magnetic field higher than 100 G are located in the near neighborhood of mesogranular lanes. Magnetic flux is therefore concentrated in mesogranular lanes rather than intergranular ones. Secondly, magnetic field extrapolations are performed to obtain field lines anchored in the observed flux elements. This analysis, therefore, is independent of the horizontal flows determined in the first part. A probability density fun...

  17. Distribution Characteristics of Newly Discovered Gas Fields in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Yantai

    1997-01-01

    @@ The new gasfields and the increased gas reserves discovered in the last ten years (1986~1995) in China are characterized by zonation and relatively concentrated distribution both in plane and vertical directions.

  18. Structural modification of nanocrystalline diamond films via positive/negative bias enhanced nucleation and growth processes for improving their electron field emission properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravanan, A.; Huang, B. R.; Sankaran, K. J.; Keiser, G.; Kurian, J.; Tai, N. H.; Lin, I. N.

    2015-06-01

    Electron field emission (EFE) properties of nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) films synthesized by the bias-enhanced growth (beg) process under different bias voltages were investigated. The induction of the nanographitic phases is presumed to be the prime factor in enhancing the EFE properties of negative biased NCD films. Transmission electron microscopic investigations reveal that a negative bias voltage of -300 V increases the rate of growth for NCD films with the size of the grains changing from nano to ultranano size. This effect also is accompanied by the induction of nanographitic filaments in the grain boundaries of the films. The turn-on field (E0) for the EFE process then effectively gets reduced. The EFE process of the beg-NCD-300V films can be turned on at E0 = 3.86 V/μm, and the EFE current density achieved is 1.49 mA/cm2 at an applied field of 7.85 V/μm. On the other hand, though a positive-bias beg process (+200 V) results in the reduction of grain size, it does not induce sufficient nanographitic phases to lower the E0 value of the EFE process. Moreover, the optical emission spectroscopic investigation indicates that one of the primary causes that changes the granular structure of the NCD films is the increase in the proportion of C2 and CH species induced in the growing plasma. The polarity of the bias voltage is of less importance in the microstructural evolution of the films.

  19. Nucleating quark droplets in the core of magnetars

    CERN Document Server

    Kroff, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    To assess the possibility of homogeneous nucleation of quark matter in magnetars, we investigate the formation of chirally symmetric droplets in a cold and dense environment in the presence of an external magnetic field. As a framework, we use the one-loop effective potential of the two-flavor quark-meson model. Within the thin-wall approximation, we extract all relevant nucleation parameters and provide an estimate for the typical time scales for the chiral phase conversion in magnetized compact star matter. We show how the critical chemical potential, critical radius, correlation length and surface tension are affected, and how their combination to define the nucleation time seems to allow for nucleation of quark droplets in magnetar matter even for not so small values of the surface tension.

  20. Nucleating quark droplets in the core of magnetars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroff, D.; Fraga, E. S.

    2015-01-01

    To assess the possibility of homogeneous nucleation of quark matter in magnetars, we investigate the formation of chirally symmetric droplets in a cold and dense environment in the presence of an external magnetic field. As a framework, we use the one-loop effective potential of the two-flavor quark-meson model. Within the thin-wall approximation, we extract all relevant nucleation parameters and provide an estimate for the typical time scales for the chiral phase conversion in magnetized compact star matter. We show how the critical chemical potential, critical radius, correlation length and surface tension are affected, and how their combination to define the nucleation time seems to allow for nucleation of quark droplets in magnetar matter even for not so small values of the surface tension.

  1. Preface: Special Topic on Nucleation: New Concepts and Discoveries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelton, K. F.; Frenkel, Daan

    2016-12-01

    Many phenomena in the world around us depend on infrequent, yet short-lived, events that completely alter how a system subsequently develops in time. In the physical sciences, there are many examples of such crucial "rare events." Among the most important of these are nucleation processes, in which, due to a rare fluctuation, a new phase forms spontaneously within a meta-stable parent phase. Because nucleation processes are both rare and rapid and happen on a microscopic spatial scale, their experimental study is challenging. In recent years, there have been major developments both in the experimental study of nucleation phenomena and in the numerical simulation of such processes. As the articles in this special issue demonstrate, these recent advances in the ability to probe nucleation phenomena have transformed our understanding of the field.

  2. Quantum Nucleation of Antiferromagnetic Bubbles with Tetragonal and Hexagonal Symmetries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Hui; ZHU Jia-Lin; L(U) Rong

    2004-01-01

    We study the quantum nucleation in a nanometer-scale antiferromagnet placed in a magnetic field at an arbitrary angle. We consider the magnetocrystalline anisotropy with tetragonal symmetry and that with hexagonal symmetry, respectively. Different structures of the tunneling barriers can be generated by the magnitude and the orientation of the magnetic field. We use the instanton method in the spin-coherent-state path-integral representation to calculate the dependence of the rate of quantum nucleation and the crossover temperature on the orientation and strength of the field for bulk solids and two-dimensional films of antiferromagnets, respectively. We find that the rate of quantum nucleation and the crossover temperature from thermal-to-quantum transitions depend on the orientation and strength of the external magnetic field distinctly, which can be tested by use of existing experimental techniques.

  3. Binary nucleation beyond capillarity approximation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalikmanov, V.I.

    2010-01-01

    Large discrepancies between binary classical nucleation theory (BCNT) and experiments result from adsorption effects and inability of BCNT, based on the phenomenological capillarity approximation, to treat small clusters. We propose a model aimed at eliminating both of these deficiencies. Adsorption

  4. Strategies to initiate and control the nucleation behavior of bimetallic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Gopi; de Graaf, Sytze; Ten Brink, Gert H; Persson, Per O Å; Kooi, Bart J; Palasantzas, George

    2017-06-22

    In this work we report strategies to nucleate bimetallic nanoparticles (NPs) made by gas phase synthesis of elements showing difficulty in homogeneous nucleation. It is shown that the nucleation assisted problem of bimetallic NP synthesis can be solved via the following pathways: (i) selecting an element which can itself nucleate and act as a nucleation center for the synthesis of bimetallic NPs; (ii) introducing H2 or CH4 as an impurity/trace gas to initiate nucleation during the synthesis of bimetallic NPs. The latter can solve the problem if none of the elements in a bimetallic NP can initiate nucleation. We illustrate the abovementioned strategies for the case of Mg based bimetallic NPs, which are interesting as hydrogen storage materials and exhibit both nucleation and oxidation issues even under ultra-high vacuum conditions. In particular, it is shown that adding H2 in small proportions favors the formation of a solid solution/alloy structure even in the case of immiscible Mg and Ti, where normally phase separation occurs during synthesis. In addition, we illustrate the possibility of improving the nucleation rate, and controlling the structure and size distribution of bimetallic NPs using H2/CH4 as a reactive/nucleating gas. This is shown to be associated with the dimer bond energies of the various formed species and the vapor pressures of the metals, which are key factors for NP nucleation.

  5. RF Field Distribution Tuning of Drift Tube Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Han Sung; Kwon, Hyeok Jung; Jang, Ji Ho; Cho, Yong Sub [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    To make a design field profile, we performed the RF tuning process for a 100-MeV drift tube linac (DTL) of Korea Multipurpose Accelerator Complex (KOMAC). The tuning process includes the field flatness tuning by using the slug tuners and the tilt sensitivity tuning by using the post couplers. The target values of the tuning process are like followings; - Field uniformity: better than 2% - Tilt sensitivity: less than 150%/MHz. During the tilt sensitivity tuning, we found that the slug tuners prevented the field stabilization if they were inserted too much. However, if the slug tuner positions were limited, then it was not possible to tune the DTL tank to the right resonant frequency. To solve the problem, we attached the tuning rings around each post couplers, which compensate the frequency gap caused by the slug tuner position limitations. We present the tuning process and results in this paper.

  6. Pilot Field Demonstration of Alternative Fuels in Force Projection Petroleum and Water Distribution Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-04

    UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED PILOT FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF ALTERNATIVE FUELS IN FORCE PROJECTION PETROLEUM AND WATER DISTRIBUTION EQUIPMENT...Fort Belvoir, Virginia 22060- 6218. Disposition Instructions Destroy this report when no longer needed. Do not return it to the originator ...UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED PILOT FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF ALTERNATIVE FUELS IN FORCE PROJECTION PETROLEUM AND WATER DISTRIBUTION EQUIPMENT

  7. Images and properties of individual nucleated particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Németh, Zoltán; Pósfai, Mihály; Nyirő-Kósa, Ilona; Aalto, Pasi; Kulmala, Markku; Salma, Imre

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles were collected in Budapest, Hungary in April-June onto lacey Formvar substrates by using an electrostatic precipitator during the beginning phase of the particle growth process in ten nucleation and growth events. Median contribution of the nucleated particles - expressed as the concentration of particles with a diameter between 6 and 25 nm to the total particle number concentration - was 55%, and the median electrical mobility diameter of the particles was approximately 20 nm. The sample was investigated using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. Major types of individual particles such as soot, sulphate/organic and tar ball particles were identified in the sample. In addition, particles with an optical diameter range of 10-30 nm were also observed. They clearly differed from the other particle types, showed homogeneous contrast in the bright-field TEM images, and evaporated within tens of seconds when exposed to the electron beam. They were interpreted as representatives of freshly nucleated particles.

  8. Education, Income Distribution and Intergenerational Mobility: Findings from Field Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Alekha Chandra

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of widespread poverty and the increasing inequality in income distribution across nations point to the failure of the trickle-down theory. The long-held faith in the growth of income as the sole policy instrument to achieve the national objective of growth with equity has been put to the test. The increasing numbers of the poor,…

  9. Analytical form of EM fields radiated by circular aperture antennas of various current distributions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Le-Wei Li; Qun Wu

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, the electromagnetic radiation by circular aperture antennas fed by circular waveguides is considered. Electromagnetic fields radiated by the aperture antennas are formulated in detail and two aperture field distributions are considered, one being the uniform distribution and the other being the TE11-mode distribution. Some mistakes existing in the literature are pointed out. The detailed derivations for the fields by the TE11-mode distribution aperture were not commonly available in the public literature, although the solution is available. The analytical results obtained here are useful for antenna designers and antenna engineering education.

  10. Spatial distribution of the internal and near-field intensities of large cylindrical and spherical scatterers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benincasa, Daniel S.; Barber, Peter W.; Zhang, Jian-Zhi; Hsieh, Wen-Feng; Chang, Richard K.

    1987-04-01

    Spatial distributions of the near-field and internal electromagnetic intensities have been calculated and experimentally observed for dielectric cylinders and spheres which are large relative to the incident wavelength. Two prominent features of the calculated results are the high intensity peaks which exist in both the internal and near fields of these objects, even for nonresonant conditions, and the well-defined shadow behind the objects. Such intensity distributions were confirmed by using the fluorescence from iodine vapor to image the near-field intensity distribution and the fluorescence from ethanol droplets impregnated with rhodamine 590 to image the internal-intensity distribution.

  11. Enhancement and suppression of protein crystal nucleation due to electrically driven convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penkova, Anita; Gliko, Olga; Dimitrov, Ivaylo L.; Hodjaoglu, Feyzim V.; Nanev, Christo; Vekilov, Peter G.

    2005-02-01

    We investigated the effects of the constant electric fields from 2.0 to 6.0 kV cm -1 on the nucleation of ferritin, apoferritin and lysozyme crystals. For this, supersaturated solutions of the three proteins were held between electrodes separated by 1.0 cm in batch and sitting drop geometries without contact between electrodes and solutions. The nucleation rate was characterized by the number of crystals appearing after a certain time (1-3 days). We show that in sitting drop arrangements, weak electric fields (<4 kV cm -1) either suppress or have no effect on the nucleation rate of ferritin and apoferritin, while electric fields of 5 or 6 kV cm -1 reproducibly enhance crystal nucleation of both proteins. Electric fields of all tested strengths consistently enhance lysozyme crystal nucleation. All batch experiments showed no effect of the electric field on the nucleation rates. Since the solutions contain high electrolyte concentrations and are conductive, the electric field strengths within them are negligible. We show that the electric field causes solution stirring with rates of up to 100 μm s -1, depending of the field strength. Thus, our observations indicate that at slow solution flow rates, the rates of nucleation of ferritin and apoferritin crystal are suppressed, while faster stirring enhances crystal nucleation of these proteins. All solution flow rates enhance lysozyme crystal nucleation. Our results suggest that solution convection may strongly affect nucleation, and that for some systems, an optimal convection velocity, leading to fastest nucleation, exists.

  12. The ice nucleation activity of biological aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grothe, H.; Pummer, B.; Bauer, H.; Bernardi, J.

    2012-04-01

    Primary Biological Aerosol Particles (PBAPs), including bacteria, spores and pollen may be important for several atmospheric processes. Particularly, the ice nucleation caused by PBAPs is a topic of growing interest, since their impact on ice cloud formation and thus on radiative forcing, an important parameter in global climate is not yet fully understood. In laboratory model studies we investigated the ice nucleation activity of selected PBAPs. We studied the immersion mode freezing using water-oil emulsion, which we observed by optical microscopy. We particularly focused on pollen. We show that pollen of different species strongly differ in their ice nucleation behavior. The average freezing temperatures in laboratory experiments range from 240 K to 255 K. As the most efficient nuclei (silver birch, Scots pine and common juniper pollen) have a distribution area up to the Northern timberline, their ice nucleation activity might be a cryoprotective mechanism. For comparison the ice nucleation activity of Snomax, fungal spores, and mushrooms will be discussed as well. In the past, pollen have been rejected as important atmospheric IN, as they are not as abundant in the atmosphere as bacteria or mineral dust and are too heavy to reach higher altitudes. However, in our experiments (Pummer et al. 2011) it turned out that water, which had been in contact with pollen and then been separated from the bodies, nucleates as good as the pollen grains themselves. So the ice nuclei have to be easily-suspendable macromolecules (100-300 kDa) located on the pollen. Once extracted, they can be distributed further through the atmosphere than the heavy pollen grains and so augment the impact of pollen on ice cloud formation even in the upper troposphere. It is widely known, that material from the pollen, like allergens and sugars, can indeed leave the pollen body and be distributed independently. The most probable mechanism is the pollen grain bursting by rain, which releases

  13. Making Sense of Distributed Leadership: Exploring the Multiple Usages of the Concept in the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayrowetz, David

    2008-01-01

    Background: The term "distributed leadership" is now widely used among scholars and practitioners in the field of educational leadership. Major actors in the nonprofit sector promote and financially support the development of distributed leadership. Unfortunately, there is confusion and ambiguity about what "distributed leadership" means, and…

  14. Phase-field Simulation of Interface Effect During Grain Nucleation%晶粒生长拓扑学的相场法模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    霍菲; 梁军浩; 赵继伟

    2012-01-01

    A phase field model which based on Ginzburg-Landau theory was used to analyze the topological phenomena during grain growth. The simulation results show that there are two topological transformations during grain growth. They are neighbor switching and grain annihilation, and four different kinds of topological events are found during the disappearance of grains: direct vanishing of 3-sided grains, 4-sided grains, and 5-sided grains, and neighbor switching, which are right with classical topological theory and Euler formula, and the simulation results are similar with the experiments. A new topological translation was observed during simulation, it is the separation of four junctions, which can fall short of euler formula.%基于金兹堡-朗道理论,采用连续相场模型,研究了晶粒生长的拓扑学.结果表明,晶粒生长过程中存在两种拓扑转变机制,即近邻切换机制和晶粒消失机制;发现三边晶粒、四边晶粒、五边晶粒直接消失以及晶粒近邻切换现象,符合经典拓扑公式和欧拉公式,模拟结果与实验结果吻合.研究还发现了新的拓扑转变机制,四叉点直接分离,这种拓扑转变与经典欧拉公式存在差异.

  15. Evolution of optical vortex distributions in stochastic vortex fields

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Roux, FS

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available dipole,? Opt. Commun. 236, 433?440 (2004). [23] Dana, I. and Freund, I., ?Vortex-lattice wave fields,? Opt. Commun. . [24] Jenkins, R., Banerji, J., and Davies, A., ?The generation of optical vortices and shape preserving vortex arrays in hollow...

  16. Nucleation in the chiral transition with an inhomogeneous background

    CERN Document Server

    Taketani, B G; Taketani, Bruno G.; Fraga, Eduardo S.

    2007-01-01

    We consider an approximation procedure to evaluate the finite-temperature one-loop fermionic density in the presence of a chiral background field which systematically incorporates effects from inhomogeneities in the chiral field through a derivative expansion. Modifications in the effective potential and their consequences for the bubble nucleation process are discussed.

  17. Relationship of heterogeneous nucleation and condensational growth on aerosol nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smorodin, Vladimir Y.; Hopke, Philip K.

    2006-12-01

    Heterogeneous nucleation and condensation of dibutylphthalate, octadecane, octadecanol, and octadecanoic acid vapors at various pressures on insoluble AgCl and Ag nanoparticles in a turbulent mixing condensation nuclei counter (TMCNC) have been studied theoretically. A method to interpret the particle size distributions measured with a DMA and estimate the parameters for nucleation on single particles is proposed. Based on this semi-empirical method, the Gibbs free energy is calculated and a rate of heterogeneous nucleation on single particles is estimated directly from the experimental "condensation spectra" of inactive and active CN using the DMA data. In some cases, the dependence of the Gibbs nucleation energy on the vapor supersaturation had two maximums and one minimum, instead of one maximum as described by Gibbs' classical thermodynamics of phase transitions. This phenomenon, called "double barrier nucleation" (DBN) is caused by the surface heterogeneity of nano-CN; this is first experimental verification of DBN that had been previously predicted theoretically. Two types of heterogeneity may be present: topographic or energetic. Focusing on energetic heterogeneity, a theoretical model of DBN for spherical geometry is developed. The surface heterogeneity for insoluble nano-sized CN is shown to be critical to explaining the unusual transformation of a monomodal size distribution of inactive CN into a bimodal distribution of activated CN when coagulation is excluded. Future studies will be directed toward more data for further refining the theory and developing a model that simultaneously accounts for both types of surface heterogeneity of nano-CN.

  18. Nonexistence of interactions between axially symmetric massive scalar field and perfect fluid distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarachand, R.K.; Singh, N.I.

    1988-07-01

    Considering the axially symmetric Einstein-Rosen metric, the problem of massive scalar field interactions in the presence of perfect fluid distribution has been studied, and it has been observed that there cannot exist any solution for the coupled massive scalar field and perfect fluid distribution for the metric. The problem reduces to the finding of interactions between zero-mass scalar field and stiff fluid.

  19. Comprehensive theory for star-like polymer micelles; combining classical nucleation and polymer brush theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprakel, Joris; Leermakers, Frans A M; Cohen Stuart, Martien A; Besseling, Nicolaas A M

    2008-09-14

    A comprehensive theory is proposed that combines classical nucleation and polymer brush theory to describe star-like polymer micelles. With a minimum of adjustable parameters, the model predicts properties such as critical micelle concentrations and micellar size distributions. The validity of the present theory is evidenced in direct comparison to experiments; this revealed that the proportionality constant in the Daoud-Cotton model is of the order of unity and that the star-limit is valid down to relatively short corona chains. Furthermore, we show that the predicted saddle points in the free energy correspond to those solutions that are accessible with self-consistent field methods for self-assembly.

  20. Gravitation Field Calculations on a Dynamic Lattice by Distributed Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mähönen, Petri; Punkka, Veikko

    A new method of calculating numerically time evolution of a gravitational field in General Relatity is introduced. Vierbein (tetrad) formalism, dynamic lattice and massively parallelized computation are suggested as they are expected to speed up the calculations considerably and facilitate the solution of problems previously considered too hard to be solved, such as the time evolution of a system consisting of two or more black holes or the structure of worm holes.

  1. Gravitational field calculations on a dynamic lattice by distributed computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mähönen, P.; Punkka, V.

    A new method of calculating numerically time evolution of a gravitational field in general relativity is introduced. Vierbein (tetrad) formalism, dynamic lattice and massively parallelized computation are suggested as they are expected to speed up the calculations considerably and facilitate the solution of problems previously considered too hard to be solved, such as the time evolution of a system consisting of two or more black holes or the structure of worm holes.

  2. Pion production via proton synchrotron radiation in strong magnetic fields in relativistic field theory: Scaling relations and angular distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Tomoyuki; Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Kajino, Toshitaka; Mathews, Grant J.

    2016-06-01

    We study pion production by proton synchrotron radiation in the presence of a strong magnetic field when the Landau numbers of the initial and final protons are ni,f ∼104-105. We find in our relativistic field theory calculations that the pion decay width depends only on the field strength parameter which previously was only conjectured based upon semi-classical arguments. Moreover, we also find new results that the decay width satisfies a robust scaling relation, and that the polar angular distribution of emitted pion momenta is very narrow and can be easily obtained. This scaling implies that one can infer the decay width in more realistic magnetic fields of 1015 G, where ni,f ∼1012-1013, from the results for ni,f ∼104-105. The resultant pion intensity and angular distributions for realistic magnetic field strengths are presented and their physical implications discussed.

  3. The COSMOS density field: a reconstruction using both weak lensing and galaxy distributions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amara, A.; Lilly, S.; Kovač, K.; Rhodes, J.; Massey, R.; Zamorani, G.; Carollo, C. M.; Contini, T.; Kneib, J.-P.; Le Fevre, O.; Mainieri, V.; Renzini, A.; Scodeggio, M.; Bardelli, S.; Bolzonella, M.; Bongiorno, A.; Caputi, K.; Cucciati, O.; de la Torre, S.; de Ravel, L.; Franzetti, P.; Garilli, B.; Iovino, A.; Kampczyk, P.; Knobel, C.; Lamareille, F.; Le Borgne, J.-F.; Le Brun, V.; Maier, C.; Mignoli, M.; Pello, R.; Peng, Y.; Montero, E. Perez; Presotto, V.; Silverman, J.; Tanaka, M.; Tasca, L.; Tresse, L.; Vergani, D.; Zucca, E.; Barnes, L.; Bordoloi, R.; Cappi, A.; Cimatti, A.; Coppa, G.; Koekoemoer, A.; López-Sanjuan, C.; McCracken, H. J.; Moresco, M.; Nair, P.; Pozzetti, L.; Welikala, N.

    2012-01-01

    The COSMOS field has been the subject of a wide range of observations, with a number of studies focusing on reconstructing the 3D dark matter density field. Typically, these studies have focused on one given method or tracer. In this paper, we reconstruct the distribution of mass in the COSMOS field

  4. The COSMOS density field : a reconstruction using both weak lensing and galaxy distributions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amara, A.; Lilly, S.; Kovač, K.; Rhodes, J.; Massey, R.; Zamorani, G.; Carollo, C. M.; Contini, T.; Kneib, J. -P; Le Fevre, O.; Mainieri, V.; Renzini, A.; Scodeggio, M.; Bardelli, S.; Bolzonella, M.; Bongiorno, A.; Caputi, K.; Cucciati, O.; de la Torre, S.; de Ravel, L.; Franzetti, P.; Garilli, B.; Iovino, A.; Kampczyk, P.; Knobel, C.; Lamareille, F.; Le Borgne, J. -F; Le Brun, V.; Maier, C.; Mignoli, M.; Pello, R.; Peng, Y.; Montero, E. Perez; Presotto, V.; Silverman, J.; Tanaka, M.; Tasca, L.; Tresse, L.; Vergani, D.; Zucca, E.; Barnes, L.; Bordoloi, R.; Cappi, A.; Cimatti, A.; Coppa, G.; Koekoemoer, A.; López-Sanjuan, C.; McCracken, H. J.; Moresco, M.; Nair, P.; Pozzetti, L.; Welikala, N.

    2012-01-01

    The COSMOS field has been the subject of a wide range of observations, with a number of studies focusing on reconstructing the 3D dark matter density field. Typically, these studies have focused on one given method or tracer. In this paper, we reconstruct the distribution of mass in the COSMOS field

  5. Magnetic field and element surface distribution of the CP2 star $\\alpha^2$ CVn

    CERN Document Server

    Glagolevskij, Y V; Hildebrandt, G; Lehmann, H; Scholz, G; Glagolevskij, Yu.V.

    1998-01-01

    We investigate the radial velocity and the magnetic field of the CP star alpha^2 CVn. The observed variation of the magnetic field is compared with that of our model. We search for a relation between the magnetic field and the distribution of the chemical elements. The period in the radial velocities is constant over a time interval of about 100 years.

  6. Numerical investigation of nucleate pool boiling heat transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanović Andrijana D.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Multidimensional numerical simulation of the atmospheric saturated pool boiling is performed. The applied modelling and numerical methods enable a full representation of the liquid and vapour two-phase mixture behaviour on the heated surface, with included prediction of the swell level and heated wall temperature field. In this way the integral behaviour of nucleate pool boiling is simulated. The micro conditions of bubble generation at the heated wall surface are modelled by the bubble nucleation site density, the liquid wetting contact angle and the bubble grow time. The bubble nucleation sites are randomly located within zones of equal size, where the number of zones equals the nucleation site density. The conjugate heat transfer from the heated wall to the liquid is taken into account in wetted heated wall areas around bubble nucleation sites. The boiling curve relation between the heat flux and the heated wall surface temperature in excess of the saturation temperature is predicted for the pool boiling conditions reported in the literature and a good agreement is achieved with experimentally measured data. The influence of the nucleation site density on the boiling curve characteristic is confirmed. In addition, the influence of the heat flux intensity on the spatial effects of vapour generation and two-phase flow are shown, such as the increase of the swell level position and the reduced wetting of the heated wall surface by the heat flux increase. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR-33018 i br. OI-174014

  7. Reconstruction of far-field tsunami amplitude distributions from earthquake sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geist, Eric L.; Parsons, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    The probability distribution of far-field tsunami amplitudes is explained in relation to the distribution of seismic moment at subduction zones. Tsunami amplitude distributions at tide gauge stations follow a similar functional form, well described by a tapered Pareto distribution that is parameterized by a power-law exponent and a corner amplitude. Distribution parameters are first established for eight tide gauge stations in the Pacific, using maximum likelihood estimation. A procedure is then developed to reconstruct the tsunami amplitude distribution that consists of four steps: (1) define the distribution of seismic moment at subduction zones; (2) establish a source-station scaling relation from regression analysis; (3) transform the seismic moment distribution to a tsunami amplitude distribution for each subduction zone; and (4) mix the transformed distribution for all subduction zones to an aggregate tsunami amplitude distribution specific to the tide gauge station. The tsunami amplitude distribution is adequately reconstructed for four tide gauge stations using globally constant seismic moment distribution parameters established in previous studies. In comparisons to empirical tsunami amplitude distributions from maximum likelihood estimation, the reconstructed distributions consistently exhibit higher corner amplitude values, implying that in most cases, the empirical catalogs are too short to include the largest amplitudes. Because the reconstructed distribution is based on a catalog of earthquakes that is much larger than the tsunami catalog, it is less susceptible to the effects of record-breaking events and more indicative of the actual distribution of tsunami amplitudes.

  8. Reconstruction of Far-Field Tsunami Amplitude Distributions from Earthquake Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geist, Eric L.; Parsons, Tom

    2016-04-01

    The probability distribution of far-field tsunami amplitudes is explained in relation to the distribution of seismic moment at subduction zones. Tsunami amplitude distributions at tide gauge stations follow a similar functional form, well described by a tapered Pareto distribution that is parameterized by a power-law exponent and a corner amplitude. Distribution parameters are first established for eight tide gauge stations in the Pacific, using maximum likelihood estimation. A procedure is then developed to reconstruct the tsunami amplitude distribution that consists of four steps: (1) define the distribution of seismic moment at subduction zones; (2) establish a source-station scaling relation from regression analysis; (3) transform the seismic moment distribution to a tsunami amplitude distribution for each subduction zone; and (4) mix the transformed distribution for all subduction zones to an aggregate tsunami amplitude distribution specific to the tide gauge station. The tsunami amplitude distribution is adequately reconstructed for four tide gauge stations using globally constant seismic moment distribution parameters established in previous studies. In comparisons to empirical tsunami amplitude distributions from maximum likelihood estimation, the reconstructed distributions consistently exhibit higher corner amplitude values, implying that in most cases, the empirical catalogs are too short to include the largest amplitudes. Because the reconstructed distribution is based on a catalog of earthquakes that is much larger than the tsunami catalog, it is less susceptible to the effects of record-breaking events and more indicative of the actual distribution of tsunami amplitudes.

  9. Reconstruction of Far-Field Tsunami Amplitude Distributions from Earthquake Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geist, Eric L.; Parsons, Tom

    2016-12-01

    The probability distribution of far-field tsunami amplitudes is explained in relation to the distribution of seismic moment at subduction zones. Tsunami amplitude distributions at tide gauge stations follow a similar functional form, well described by a tapered Pareto distribution that is parameterized by a power-law exponent and a corner amplitude. Distribution parameters are first established for eight tide gauge stations in the Pacific, using maximum likelihood estimation. A procedure is then developed to reconstruct the tsunami amplitude distribution that consists of four steps: (1) define the distribution of seismic moment at subduction zones; (2) establish a source-station scaling relation from regression analysis; (3) transform the seismic moment distribution to a tsunami amplitude distribution for each subduction zone; and (4) mix the transformed distribution for all subduction zones to an aggregate tsunami amplitude distribution specific to the tide gauge station. The tsunami amplitude distribution is adequately reconstructed for four tide gauge stations using globally constant seismic moment distribution parameters established in previous studies. In comparisons to empirical tsunami amplitude distributions from maximum likelihood estimation, the reconstructed distributions consistently exhibit higher corner amplitude values, implying that in most cases, the empirical catalogs are too short to include the largest amplitudes. Because the reconstructed distribution is based on a catalog of earthquakes that is much larger than the tsunami catalog, it is less susceptible to the effects of record-breaking events and more indicative of the actual distribution of tsunami amplitudes.

  10. Entropy for the Quantized Field in the Atom-Field Interaction: Initial Thermal Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Amilca Andrade-Morales

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We study the entropy of a quantized field in interaction with a two-level atom (in a pure state when the field is initially in a mixture of two number states. We then generalise the result for a thermal state; i.e., an (infinite statistical mixture of number states. We show that for some specific interaction times, the atom passes its purity to the field and therefore the field entropy decreases from its initial value.

  11. Immersion freezing of ice nucleation active protein complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Hartmann

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Utilising the Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator (LACIS, the immersion freezing behaviour of droplet ensembles containing monodisperse particles, generated from a Snomax™ solution/suspension, was investigated. Thereto ice fractions were measured in the temperature range between −5 °C to −38 °C. Snomax™ is an industrial product applied for artificial snow production and contains Pseudomonas syringae} bacteria which have long been used as model organism for atmospheric relevant ice nucleation active (INA bacteria. The ice nucleation activity of such bacteria is controlled by INA protein complexes in their outer membrane. In our experiments, ice fractions increased steeply in the temperature range from about −6 °C to about −10 °C and then levelled off at ice fractions smaller than one. The plateau implies that not all examined droplets contained an INA protein complex. Assuming the INA protein complexes to be Poisson distributed over the investigated droplet populations, we developed the CHESS model (stoCHastic modEl of similar and poiSSon distributed ice nuclei which allows for the calculation of ice fractions as function of temperature and time for a given nucleation rate. Matching calculated and measured ice fractions, we determined and parameterised the nucleation rate of INA protein complexes exhibiting class III ice nucleation behaviour. Utilising the CHESS model, together with the determined nucleation rate, we compared predictions from the model to experimental data from the literature and found good agreement. We found that (a the heterogeneous ice nucleation rate expression quantifying the ice nucleation behaviour of the INA protein complex is capable of describing the ice nucleation behaviour observed in various experiments for both, Snomax™ and P. syringae bacteria, (b the ice nucleation rate, and its temperature dependence, seem to be very similar regardless of whether the INA protein complexes inducing ice

  12. Quantum entanglement distribution using a magnetic field sensor

    CERN Document Server

    Schaffry, Marcus; Matsuzaki, Yuichiro

    2011-01-01

    Sensors based on crystal defects, especially nitrogen vacancy (NV) centres in nanodiamond, can achieve detection of single magnetic moments. Here we show that this exquisite control can be utilized to entangle remote electronic spins for applications in quantum computing; the mobile sensor provides a `flying' qubit while the act of sensing the local field constitutes a two-qubit projective measurement. Thus the tip mediates entanglement between an array of well-separated (and thus well controlled) qubits. Our calculations establish that such a device would be remarkably robust against realistic issues such as dephasing and multimodal vibrations in the sensor tip. We also provide calculations establishing the feasibility of performing a demonstrator experiment with a fixed sensor in the immediate future.

  13. Role of connectivity and fluctuations in the nucleation of calcium waves in cardiac cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Hernandez, Gonzalo; Alvarez-Lacalle, Enric; Shiferaw, Yohannes

    2015-11-01

    Spontaneous calcium release (SCR) occurs when ion channel fluctuations lead to the nucleation of calcium waves in cardiac cells. This phenomenon is important since it has been implicated as a cause of various cardiac arrhythmias. However, to date, it is not understood what determines the timing and location of spontaneous calcium waves within cells. Here, we analyze a simplified model of SCR in which calcium release is modeled as a stochastic processes on a two-dimensional network of randomly distributed sites. Using this model we identify the essential parameters describing the system and compute the phase diagram. In particular, we identify a critical line which separates pinned and propagating fronts, and show that above this line wave nucleation is governed by fluctuations and the spatial connectivity of calcium release units. Using a mean-field analysis we show that the sites of wave nucleation are predicted by localized eigenvectors of a matrix representing the network connectivity of release sites. This result provides insight on the interplay between connectivity and fluctuations in the genesis of SCR in cardiac myocytes.

  14. Application of the anisotropy field distribution method to arrays of magnetic nanowires

    OpenAIRE

    De La Torre Medina, Joaquin; Darques, Michaël; Piraux, Luc; Encinas, Armando

    2009-01-01

    The applicability of the anisotropy field distribution method and the conditions required for an accurate determination of the effective anisotropy field in arrays of magnetic nanowires have been evaluated. In arrays of magnetic nanowires that behave as ideal uniaxial systems having only magnetostatic contributions to the effective anisotropy field, i.e., shape anisotropy and magnetostatic coupling, the method yields accurate values of the average anisotropy field at low-moderate dipolar coup...

  15. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the Nucleation of Water: Determining the Sticking Probability and Formation Energy of a Cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Tanaka, Kyoko K; Tanaka, Hidekazu

    2014-01-01

    We performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the nucleation of water vapor in order to test nucleation theories. Simulations were performed for a wide range of supersaturation ratios (S = 3-25) and water temperatures (Tw=300-390K). We obtained the nucleation rates and the formation free energies of a subcritical cluster from the cluster size distribution. The classical nucleation theory (CNT) and the modified classical nucleation theory (MCNT) overestimate the nucleation rates in all cases. The semi-phenomenological (SP) model, which corrects the MCNT prediction using the second virial coefficient of a vapor, reproduces the formation free energy of a cluster with the size < 20 to within 10 % and the nucleation rate and cluster size distributions to within one order of magnitude. The sticking probability of the vapor molecules to the clusters was also determined from the growth rates of the clusters. The sticking probability rapidly increases with the supersaturation ratio S, which is similar to the ...

  16. A fractal study for nucleate pool boiling heat transfer of nanofluids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a fractal model for nucleate pool boiling heat transfer of nanofluids is developed based on the fractal distribution of nanoparticles and nucleation sites on boiling surfaces. The model shows the dependences of the heat flux on nanoparticle size and the nanoparticle volume fraction of the suspension, the fractal dimension of the nanoparticle and nucleation site, temperature of nanofluids and properties of fluids. The fractal model predictions show that the natural convection stage continues relatively longer in the case of nanofluids. The addition of nanoparticles causes a decrease of the pool nucleate boiling heat transfer. The nucleate pool boiling heat transfer coefficient is decreased by increasing particle concentration. An excellent agreement between the proposed model predictions and experimental data is found. The validity of the fractal model for nucleate pool boiling heat transfer is thus verified.

  17. Size dependence of volume and surface nucleation rates for homogeneous freezing of supercooled water droplets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Kuhn

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the relative roles of volume and surface nucleation in the freezing of water droplets. Nucleation experiments were carried out in a cryogenic laminar aerosol flow tube using supercooled liquid water aerosols with radii between about 1 and 3 μ m. Temperature- and size-dependent values of volume- and surface-based homogeneous nucleation rate between 234.8 and 236.2 K are derived with help of a microphysical model from aerosol compositions and size distributions based on infrared extinction measurements in the aerosol flow tube. The results show that the contribution from nucleation at the droplet surface increases with decreasing droplet radius and dominates over nucleation in the bulk droplet volume for droplets with radii smaller than approximately 5 μm. This is interpreted in terms of a lowered free energy of ice germ formation in the surface-based process and has implications for the parameterization of homogeneous ice nucleation in numerical models.

  18. Nucleation and growth during recrystallization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Rangel Rios

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The evolution in the understanding of the recrystallization phenomena is summarized in this paper. Initially the main developments concerning recrystallization are presented from a historical perspective. Definitions and concepts involving recrystallization are presented regarding it as a solid-state reaction that occurs by nucleation and growth. The recrystallization nucleation mechanisms are subsequently discussed. Finally, the growth step is highlighted, emphasizing boundary and sub-boundary mobilities and the forces acting on the high angle grain boundaries that sweep the microstructure during recrystallization.

  19. The retest distribution of the visual field summary index mean deviation is close to normal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Andrew J; Cheng, Allan C Y; Lau, Samantha; Le-Pham, Anne; Liu, Victor; Rahman, Farahnaz

    2016-09-01

    When modelling optimum strategies for how best to determine visual field progression in glaucoma, it is commonly assumed that the summary index mean deviation (MD) is normally distributed on repeated testing. Here we tested whether this assumption is correct. We obtained 42 reliable 24-2 Humphrey Field Analyzer SITA standard visual fields from one eye of each of five healthy young observers, with the first two fields excluded from analysis. Previous work has shown that although MD variability is higher in glaucoma, the shape of the MD distribution is similar to that found in normal visual fields. A Shapiro-Wilks test determined any deviation from normality. Kurtosis values for the distributions were also calculated. Data from each observer passed the Shapiro-Wilks normality test. Bootstrapped 95% confidence intervals for kurtosis encompassed the value for a normal distribution in four of five observers. When examined with quantile-quantile plots, distributions were close to normal and showed no consistent deviations across observers. The retest distribution of MD is not significantly different from normal in healthy observers, and so is likely also normally distributed - or nearly so - in those with glaucoma. Our results increase our confidence in the results of influential modelling studies where a normal distribution for MD was assumed. © 2016 The Authors Ophthalmic & Physiological Optics © 2016 The College of Optometrists.

  20. Three-dimensional investigation of recrystallization nucleation in a particle-containing Al alloy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yonghao; Juul Jensen, Dorte; Zhang, Yubin;

    2012-01-01

    The effects of an inhomogeneous distribution of second-phase particles on nucleation of recrystallization in a particle-containing aluminum alloy are investigated by 3-D serial sectioning. Clusters and bands of big intermetallic particles are the dominating nucleation sites, but other sites...

  1. Dynamic wave field synthesis: enabling the generation of field distributions with a large space-bandwidth product

    OpenAIRE

    Kamau, Edwin Ngugi

    2016-01-01

    The generation and manipulation of electromagnetic field distributions plays an essential role in physics in general, and particularly in the vast field of physical optics. In the current state of the art, one of the most convenient methods of performing this task is provided by either static or dynamic diffractive as well as holographic optical elements. Currently available dynamic optical elements, such as spatial light modulators, do offer on the one hand high temporal flexibility. They ho...

  2. Dynamic wave field synthesis: enabling the generation of field distributions with a large space-bandwidth product

    OpenAIRE

    Kamau, Edwin Ngugi

    2016-01-01

    The generation and manipulation of electromagnetic field distributions plays an essential role in physics in general, and particularly in the vast field of physical optics. In the current state of the art, one of the most convenient methods of performing this task is provided by either static or dynamic diffractive as well as holographic optical elements. Currently available dynamic optical elements, such as spatial light modulators, do offer on the one hand high temporal flexibility. They ho...

  3. Optimal Value of Series Capacitors for Uniform Field Distribution in Transmission Line MRI Coils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhurbenko, Vitaliy

    2016-01-01

    Transmission lines are often used as coils in high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Due to the distributed nature of transmission lines, coils based on them produce inhomogeneous field. This work investigates application of series capacitors to improve field homogeneity along the coil....... The equations for optimal values of evenly distributed capacitors are derived and expressed in terms of the implemented transmission line parameters.The achieved magnetic field homogeneity is estimated under quasistatic approximation and compared to the regular transmission line resonator. Finally, a more...... practical case of a microstrip line coil with two series capacitors is considered....

  4. Environmental Controls on Hopanoid Distributions: Field and Culture Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, H. L.; Freeman, K. H.; Macalady, J. L.

    2008-12-01

    Hopanoid biomarkers play an important role in reconstructions of the earth's past biogeochemistry and evolution. Despite their excellent preservation potential and utility for microbial paleontology, relatively little of the earth's modern microbial biosphere has been explored with respect to hopanoid production. Due to the fact that hopanoids are used by bacteria to tune the physical properties of their cell membranes, geochemical gradients in nature may be associated with systematic changes in hopanoid diversity and abundances. Bacteriohopanpolyols (BHPs) are produced by both sulfur-oxidizing and sulfur-reducing bacteria. We hypothesize that BHPs are important for microbial adaptation to pH and sulfide concentrations in sulfur-oxidizing microbial communities. We investigated this hypothesis using both pure laboratory cultures and with samples of natural biofilms collected across oxygen and sulfide concentration gradients in the field. Samples were collected from the sulfidic Frasassi cave system, Italy, where the geomicrobiology of abundant sulfur cycling biofilms has previously been studied in detail (Macalady et al. 2007, Macalady et al. 2008). Culturing experiments were performed with two sulfur-oxidizing bacteria, an Acidithiobacillus sp. isolated from extremely acidic (pH 0-1) snotittes, and Beggiatoa alba, a neutrophilic sulfur oxidizer with close relatives in the Frasassi biofilms. Cultures were grown at range of pH and sulfide concentrations, harvested, freeze-dried and analyzed by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (APCI- LC/MS). We observed six different BHPs for the Acidithiobacillus sp. including one novel structure. Acidithiobacillus BHPs change in response to changes in the pH of the growth medium, becoming more polar and more abundant at lower pH. These observations are consistent with the production of less fluid, more polar membranes to counteract proton leakage into cells as pH decreases. Macalady, J

  5. A comparison of modal electromagnetic field distributions in analytical and numerical solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miloš Davidović

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a detailed comparison of modalelectromagnetic field distribution in two canonical microwavecavities, obtained via analytical and recently introducednumerical approaches, is presented and discussed. While theanalyzed problems, namely, those of a spherical cavity and aridged cavity are relatively simple, they still provide valuablebenchmarks for novel numerical methods, allowing for earlyestimates of accuracy, efficiency, and convergence properties ofthe method. Furthermore, study of field distributions mayprovide useful insights about strengths and weaknesses of theapproximating vector spaces which are otherwise not possible.

  6. Extended parametric gain range in photonic crystal fibers with strongly frequency-dependent field distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Sidsel R; Alkeskjold, Thomas T; Olausson, Christina B; Lægsgaard, Jesper

    2014-08-15

    The parametric gain range of a degenerate four-wave mixing process is determined in the undepleted pump regime. The gain range is considered with and without taking the mode field distributions of the four-wave mixing components into account. It is found that the mode field distributions have to be included to evaluate the parametric gain correctly in dispersion-tailored speciality fibers and that mode profile engineering can provide a way to increase the parametric gain range.

  7. Investigation of spatial distribution of radiocesium in a paddy field as a potential sink.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuya Tanaka

    Full Text Available Surface soils, under various land uses, were contaminated by radionuclides that were released by the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. Because paddy fields are one of the main land uses in Japan, we investigated the spatial distribution of radiocesium and the influence of irrigation water in a paddy field during cultivation. Soil core samples collected at a paddy field in Fukushima showed that plowing had disturbed the original depth distribution of radiocesium. The horizontal distribution of radiocesium did not show any evidence for significant influence of radiocesium from irrigation water, and its accumulation within the paddy field, since the original amount of radiocesium was much larger than was added into the paddy field by irrigation water. However, it is possible that rainfall significantly increases the loading of radiocesium.

  8. Nucleation pathway in coherent precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippe, T.; Blavette, D.

    2011-12-01

    The non-classical nucleation pathway of coherent precipitates has been computed through minimisation of the nucleation barrier in the composition (c)-size (R) space to predict the evolution of nucleus composition. The generalized Gibbs model, developed by Schmelzer et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 112 (2000) p.3820; J. Colloid Interface Sci. 272 (2004) p.109], has been extended to include misfit elastic energy. The composition of critical embryos c* was found to be independent of the interfacial constant. The composition of critical nuclei (c*) decreased with supersaturation. The elastic energy increased both c* and the nucleation barrier, as well as R*. The evolution of nucleus composition (c) as a function of size (R) along the minimum energy pathway was computed. Nucleation only starts when a size threshold is exceeded. Then, rapid enrichment to the expected composition (c β) precedes a constant composition regime. However, for small supersaturations, the change in cluster composition can occur sharply for a very small radius and then the composition slowly increased with a significant change in size. Coherency misfit energy was found to slow down the evolution of nuclei composition with R. The model was compared to experimental results.

  9. Ice Nucleation in Deep Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Eric; Ackerman, Andrew; Stevens, David; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The processes controlling production of ice crystals in deep, rapidly ascending convective columns are poorly understood due to the difficulties involved with either modeling or in situ sampling of these violent clouds. A large number of ice crystals are no doubt generated when droplets freeze at about -40 C. However, at higher levels, these crystals are likely depleted due to precipitation and detrainment. As the ice surface area decreases, the relative humidity can increase well above ice saturation, resulting in bursts of ice nucleation. We will present simulations of these processes using a large-eddy simulation model with detailed microphysics. Size bins are included for aerosols, liquid droplets, ice crystals, and mixed-phase (ice/liquid) hydrometers. Microphysical processes simulated include droplet activation, freezing, melting, homogeneous freezing of sulfate aerosols, and heterogeneous ice nucleation. We are focusing on the importance of ice nucleation events in the upper part of the cloud at temperatures below -40 C. We will show that the ultimate evolution of the cloud in this region (and the anvil produced by the convection) is sensitive to these ice nucleation events, and hence to the composition of upper tropospheric aerosols that get entrained into the convective column.

  10. Numerical simulation of temperature distribution of deep field in high temperature mine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Shu-guang; TANG Li-juan; XU Yi-hong

    2008-01-01

    In order to study the temperature distribution of deep field, mathematical models of temperature field in field and surrounding rock were built based on heat transfer and seepage theory. Combined test data with mathematical model, the temperature distribution under heat-transfer and underground-water coupling was studied by using Golden Software Surfer and Matlab. The results show that distribution law of most isothermal lines is very similar in deep field, and temperature gradient is equal in general. At the same time,temperature distribution is influenced by underground-water and fault. In surrounding rock,seepage changes symmetrical distribution of temperature field and vector, and the temperature field may divide into inward-diffusion area and outward-diffusion area. Peripheral temperature of working will approach to the temperature of airflow. In inward diffusion area,the distribution of temperature and temperature vector is symmetric, and the direction of temperature vector point to the center of working. The action of airflow is stronger than seepage in inward diffusion area, however, the case opposite is true in outward diffusion area.

  11. Exponential Distribution for the Occurrence of Rare Patterns in Gibbsian Random Fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abadi, M.; Chazottes, J.-R.; Redig, F.; Verbitskiy, E.

    2004-01-01

    We study the distribution of the occurrence of rare patterns in sufficiently mixing Gibbs random fields on the lattice Z^d, d ≥ 2. A typical example is the high temperature Ising model. This distribution is shown to converge to an exponential law as the size of the pattern diverges. Our analysis not

  12. Nucleation and Growth of Atomizing Droplets during Spray Forming

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, the behaviors of nucleation and growth of atomizing droplets were investigated by means of microstructure observation and theoretical analysis. The results showed that, there is a unique heterogeneous nucleation mechanism for atomizing process that pre-solid smaller particles colliding with and embedding in liquid-state larger ones act as heterogeneous nuclei. In addition, the reasons of presenting the dendritic growth was analyzed based on the nonequilibrium solute distribution theory, and the relationship between the microstructural refinement and the cooling rate of the material was given.

  13. Distribution of Electrical Field Energy for Conversion of Methane to C2 Hydrocarbons via Dissymmetrical Electric Field Enhanced Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Baowei Wang; Genhui Xu; Hongwei Sun

    2006-01-01

    Direct conversion of methane into C2 hydrocarbons through alternating current electric field enhanced plasma was studied under room temperature, atmospheric pressure and low power conditions.The distribution of electrical field intensity and distribution of energy were calculated with software that was developed by us according to the charge simulation method. The results indicated that the energy of tip of electrode was 0.36 J/mm3 and it was higher than the methane dissociation energy (0.0553 J/mm3).The methane located at this area can be activated easily. The higher-energy particles produced by dissociation collided with molecules around them and initiated consecutive reactions between free radicals and molecules. The method was proved to be valided and could be taken as a basis for the electrical field study concerned.

  14. The dune size distribution and scaling relations of barchan dune fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Durán, O.; Schwämmle, V.; Lind, P.G.; Herrmann, H.J.

    2009-01-01

    Barchan dunes emerge as a collective phenomena involving the generation of thousands of them in so called barchan dune fields. By measuring the size and position of dunes in Moroccan barchan dune fields, we find that these dunes tend to distribute uniformly in space and follow an unique size distrib

  15. Magnetic field distribution and element concentration on the CP2 star CU Virginis

    CERN Document Server

    Glagolevskij, Y V; Hildebrandt, G; Scholz, G; Glagolevskij, Yu.V.

    1998-01-01

    We search for a relation between the published distributions of different elements and the calculated magnetic field structure, following from a dipole-quadrupole configuration, of the CP2 star CU Vir. The highest concentration of individual chemical elements on the stellar surface coincides obviously with the regions of the highest values of the magnetic field strength.

  16. Tsunami Size Distributions at Far-Field Locations from Aggregated Earthquake Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geist, E. L.; Parsons, T.

    2015-12-01

    The distribution of tsunami amplitudes at far-field tide gauge stations is explained by aggregating the probability of tsunamis derived from individual subduction zones and scaled by their seismic moment. The observed tsunami amplitude distributions of both continental (e.g., San Francisco) and island (e.g., Hilo) stations distant from subduction zones are examined. Although the observed probability distributions nominally follow a Pareto (power-law) distribution, there are significant deviations. Some stations exhibit varying degrees of tapering of the distribution at high amplitudes and, in the case of the Hilo station, there is a prominent break in slope on log-log probability plots. There are also differences in the slopes of the observed distributions among stations that can be significant. To explain these differences we first estimate seismic moment distributions of observed earthquakes for major subduction zones. Second, regression models are developed that relate the tsunami amplitude at a station to seismic moment at a subduction zone, correcting for epicentral distance. The seismic moment distribution is then transformed to a site-specific tsunami amplitude distribution using the regression model. Finally, a mixture distribution is developed, aggregating the transformed tsunami distributions from all relevant subduction zones. This mixture distribution is compared to the observed distribution to assess the performance of the method described above. This method allows us to estimate the largest tsunami that can be expected in a given time period at a station.

  17. Finite-element simulations of field and current distributions in multifilamentary superconducting films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucarelli, Andrea [Laboratorium fuer Festkoerperphysik, ETH-Zuerich, CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland); Grilli, Francesco [Ecole Polytechnique Montreal, Montreal (Canada); Luepke, Gunter [Department of Applied Science, The College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23187-8795 (United States); Haugan, Timothy J; Barnes, Paul N [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH 45433-7919 (United States)

    2009-10-15

    We present a finite-element model for computing current and field distributions in multifilamentary superconducting thin films subjected to simultaneous effects of a transport ac current and a perpendicularly applied dc field. The model is implemented in the finite-element software package COMSOL Multiphysics and this solves Maxwell equations using a highly nonlinear resistivity to describe electrical superconducting characteristics. The time-dependent magnetic flux, current distributions, and ac losses are studied for different distances between filaments. We find that increasing the interfilamentary distance affects the transport and screening current distributions, reducing both the magnetic coupling and ac losses.

  18. Repairing the first nucleation theorem: Precritical cluster losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malila, Jussi; McGraw, Robert; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtinen, Kari E. J.

    2013-05-01

    We have extended the kinetic derivation of the first nucleation theorem to account for losses of precritical clusters. Model calculations with coagulation scavenging show that if unaccounted for, these losses can lead to substantial errors in the interpretation of experimental data from laboratory and field measurements.

  19. Toward a quantitative model of metamorphic nucleation and growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaidies, F.; Pattison, D. R. M.; de Capitani, C.

    2011-11-01

    The formation of metamorphic garnet during isobaric heating is simulated on the basis of the classical nucleation and reaction rate theories and Gibbs free energy dissipation in a multi-component model system. The relative influences are studied of interfacial energy, chemical mobility at the surface of garnet clusters, heating rate and pressure on interface-controlled garnet nucleation and growth kinetics. It is found that the interfacial energy controls the departure from equilibrium required to nucleate garnet if attachment and detachment processes at the surface of garnet limit the overall crystallization rate. The interfacial energy for nucleation of garnet in a metapelite of the aureole of the Nelson Batholith, BC, is estimated to range between 0.03 and 0.3 J/m2 at a pressure of ca. 3,500 bar. This corresponds to a thermal overstep of the garnet-forming reaction of ca. 30°C. The influence of the heating rate on thermal overstepping is negligible. A significant feedback is predicted between chemical fractionation associated with garnet formation and the kinetics of nucleation and crystal growth of garnet giving rise to its lognormal—shaped crystal size distribution.

  20. An analytical model of the electric field distributions of buried superjunction devices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Haimeng; Chen Xingbi

    2013-01-01

    An analytical model of the electric field distributions of buried superjunction structures,based on the charge superposition method and Green's function approach,is derived.An accurate approximation of the exact analytical model of the vertical electric field is also proposed and demonstrated by numerical simulation.The influence of the dimension and doping concentration of each layer on the electric field is discussed in detail,and the breakdown voltage is demonstrated by simulations.

  1. Simulation of multi-frequency EPR spectra for a distribution of the zero-field splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarkh, Mykhailo; Groenen, Edgar J. J.

    2015-06-01

    We present a numerical procedure called 'grid-of-errors' to extract the distribution of magnetic interactions from continuous-wave electron-paramagnetic-resonance (EPR) spectra at multiple microwave frequencies. The approach is based on the analysis of the lineshape of the spectra and explicitly worked out for high-spin systems for which the lineshape is determined by a distribution of the zero-field splitting. Initial principal values of the zero-field splitting tensor are obtained from the EPR spectrum at a microwave frequency in the high-field limit, and the initial distribution is taken Gaussian. Subsequently, the grid-of-errors procedure optimizes this distribution, without any restriction to its shape, taking into account spectra at various microwave frequencies. The numerical procedure is illustrated for the Fe(III)-EDTA complex. An optimized distribution of the zero-field splitting is obtained, which provides a proper description of the EPR spectra at 9.5, 34, 94, and 275 GHz. The proposed approach can be used as well for distributions of magnetic interactions other than the zero-field splitting.

  2. A NUMERICAL MODEL OF FAR-FIELD COD CONCENTRATION DISTRIBUTION FOR NATURAL RIVER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A far-field numerical model is developed to simulate jet pollution into natural rivers. Its character is to compute the velocity and pollution concentration separately. The velocity is computed by SIMPLEC algorithm in boundary-fitted coordinate systems. The pollution concentration distribution is computed by developed QUAL-IIm and QAIIL 2D program. The present model was applied to the Xiantao section of the Hanjiang River a tributary of Yangtze River, and Xiangjiang River. The flow field and COD distribution are in good agreement with field data.

  3. Analytical Modeling of Electric Field Distribution in Dual Material Junctionless Surrounding Gate MOSFETs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Suveetha Dhanaselvam

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, electric field distribution of the junctionless dual material surrounding gate MOSFETs (JLDMSG is developed. Junctionless is a device that has similar characteristics like junction based devices, but junctionless has a positive flatband voltage with zero electric field. In Surrounding gate MOSFETs gate material surrounds the channel in all direction , therefore it can overcome the short channel effects effectively than other devices. In this paper, surface potential and electric field distribution is modelled. The proposed surface potential model is compared with the existing central potential model. It is observed that the short channel effects (SCE is reduced and the performance is better than the existing method.

  4. Light fields with an axially expanded intensity distribution for stable three-dimensional optical trapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwick, Susanne; Schaub, Christian; Haist, Tobias; Osten, Wolfgang

    2010-09-13

    We introduce a new kind of light field to improve and simplify the trapping process of axially displaced particles. To this end we employ a light field with an axially expanded intensity distribution, which at the same time enables stable axial trapping. We present simulations of the axial intensity distribution of the novel trapping field and first experimental results, which demonstrate the improvement of the reliability of the axial trapping process. The method can be used to automate trapping of particles that are located outside of the focal plane of the microscope.

  5. Urediospores of Puccinia spp. and other rusts are warm-temperature ice nucleators and harbor ice nucleation active bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Moukahel

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In light of various features of the biology of the rust fungi and of the epidemiology of the plant diseases they cause that illustrate the important role of rainfall in their life history, we have characterized the ice nucleation activity (INA of the aerially disseminated spores (urediospores of this group of fungi. Urediospores of this obligate plant parasite were collected from natural infections from 7 species of weeds in France, from coffee in Brazil and from field and greenhouse-grown wheat in France, the USA, Turkey and Syria. Immersion freezing was used to determine freezing onset temperatures and the abundance of ice nuclei in suspensions of washed spores. Microbiological analyses of spores and subsequent tests of the ice nucleation activity of the bacteria associated with spores were deployed to quantify the contribution of bacteria to the ice nucleation activity of the spores. All samples of spores were ice nucleation active having freezing onset temperatures as warm as −4 °C. Spores in most of the samples carried cells of ice nucleation-active strains of the bacterium Pseudomonas syringae (at rates of less than 1 bacterial cell per 100 urediospores, but bacterial INA accounted for only a small fraction of the INA observed in spore suspensions. Changes in the INA of spore suspensions after treatment with lysozyme suggest that the INA of urediospores involves a polysaccharide. Based on data from the literature, we have estimated the concentrations of urediospores in air at cloud height and in rainfall. These quantities are very similar to those reported for other biological ice nucleators in these same substrates. We suggest that air sampling techniques have ignored the spatial and temporal variability of atmospheric concentrations that occur under conditions propitious for precipitation that could increase their local abundance intermittently. Nevertheless, we propose that the relative low abundance of warm-temperature biological

  6. Urediospores of Puccinia spp. and other rusts are warm-temperature ice nucleators and harbor ice nucleation active bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, C. E.; Sands, D. C.; Glaux, C.; Samsatly, J.; Asaad, S.; Moukahel, A. R.; Gonçalves, F. L. T.; Bigg, E. K.

    2012-10-01

    In light of various features of the biology of the rust fungi and of the epidemiology of the plant diseases they cause that illustrate the important role of rainfall in their life history, we have characterized the ice nucleation activity (INA) of the aerially disseminated spores (urediospores) of this group of fungi. Urediospores of this obligate plant parasite were collected from natural infections from 7 species of weeds in France, from coffee in Brazil and from field and greenhouse-grown wheat in France, the USA, Turkey and Syria. Immersion freezing was used to determine freezing onset temperatures and the abundance of ice nuclei in suspensions of washed spores. Microbiological analyses of spores and subsequent tests of the ice nucleation activity of the bacteria associated with spores were deployed to quantify the contribution of bacteria to the ice nucleation activity of the spores. All samples of spores were ice nucleation active having freezing onset temperatures as warm as -4 °C. Spores in most of the samples carried cells of ice nucleation-active strains of the bacterium Pseudomonas syringae (at rates of less than 1 bacterial cell per 100 urediospores), but bacterial INA accounted for only a small fraction of the INA observed in spore suspensions. Changes in the INA of spore suspensions after treatment with lysozyme suggest that the INA of urediospores involves a polysaccharide. Based on data from the literature, we have estimated the concentrations of urediospores in air at cloud height and in rainfall. These quantities are very similar to those reported for other biological ice nucleators in these same substrates. We suggest that air sampling techniques have ignored the spatial and temporal variability of atmospheric concentrations that occur under conditions propitious for precipitation that could increase their local abundance intermittently. Nevertheless, we propose that the relative low abundance of warm-temperature biological ice nucleators in the

  7. Distribution of Si particles in hypereutectic aluminum alloy tubes prepared under electromagnetic field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhi-qing; LI Qiu-lin; LIU Wei; LIU Qing

    2006-01-01

    Hypereutectic Al-Si alloy tubes were produced by centrifugal casting process using an electromagnetic field (EMF). A gradient distribution of the primary Si particles was formed along the tube thickness direction. In the absence of EMF the primary Si moves to inner periphery with increasing rotation speed. The distribution of primary Si can be controlled by the EMF. With increasing electromagnetic field intensity, the primary Si moves from the inner periphery to the outer periphery of the tubes. Most of the primary Si can be driven to the outer if the electromagnetic field intensity is increased to a certain value. It is found that the particle distribution and local volume fraction vary with both the rotation speed and the electromagnetic field intensity.

  8. ANALYSIS ON THE DYNAMICS OF SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION PATTERN OF MIXED SPIDER POPULATION IN RICE FIELD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhiWang; Zhe-mingYuan; Da-xiangSong; Ming-shengZhu

    2004-01-01

    The results make it clear that there are total 11 families, 29 genera and 43 species of spiders in the rice field of Dong Fang Hong Farm. Among them, there are 8 families, 19 genera and 28 species in the early rice field, and 10 families, 27 genera and 36 species in the late rice field. The spatial distribution pattern of mixed spider populations in rice fields was different during different development stages of rice plant. During the prophase, metaphase and anaphase of early rice plant development, the spatial distribution pattern of mixed spider populations was aggregative, random and aggregative respectively. During the prophase, metaphase and anaphase of late rice plant development, the spatial distribution pattern was uniform, aggregative and uniform respectively.

  9. Switching field distribution of exchange coupled ferri-/ferromagnetic composite bit patterned media

    CERN Document Server

    Oezelt, Harald; Fischbacher, Johann; Matthes, Patrick; Kirk, Eugenie; Wohlhüter, Phillip; Heyderman, Laura Jane; Albrecht, Manfred; Schrefl, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the switching field distribution and the resulting bit error rate of exchange coupled ferri-/ferromagnetic bilayer island arrays by micromagnetic simulations. Using islands with varying microstructure and anisotropic properties, the intrinsic switching field distribution is computed. The dipolar contribution to the switching field distribution is obtained separately by using a model of a hexagonal island array resembling $1.4\\,\\mathrm{Tb/in}^2$ bit patterned media. Both contributions are computed for different thickness of the soft exchange coupled ferrimagnet and also for ferromagnetic single phase FePt islands. A bit patterned media with a bilayer structure of FeGd($5\\,\\mathrm{nm}$)/FePt($5\\,\\mathrm{nm}$) shows a bit error rate of $10^{-4}$ with a write field of $1.2\\,\\mathrm{T}$.

  10. Spatial and Height Distribution of Harvested Rupestrian Field Species in Preserved and Cultivated Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique Nery Cipriani

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study aimed to compare the spatial and the height distribution of three plant species between two rupestrian field communities, one preserved (A and the other cultivated (B. One 50 × 100 m plot was delimited in each community and the populations of Eremanthus incanus, Lychnophora pinaster and Vellozia caruncularis were assessed for height and spatial distribution (using the Ripleys’s L-function. In community A, 4,098 individuals were counted, mostly L. pinaster, against 220 individuals in community B, prevailing E. incanus. An inverted-J pattern was observed for height distribution in both communities, however, with lower frequencies in B. Regular spatial distribution was found for E. incanus and V. caruncularis in community A, whereas the pattern for L. pinaster depended on the scale of analysis. The spatial distribution of all species differed between communities. The Ecological Park Quedas do Rio Bonito contributes to the conservation of these rupestrian field species.

  11. Laser-nucleated acoustic cavitation in focused ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerold, Bjoern; Kotopoulis, Spiros; McDougall, Craig; McGloin, David; Postema, Michiel; Prentice, Paul

    2011-04-01

    Acoustic cavitation can occur in therapeutic applications of high-amplitude focused ultrasound. Studying acoustic cavitation has been challenging, because the onset of nucleation is unpredictable. We hypothesized that acoustic cavitation can be forced to occur at a specific location using a laser to nucleate a microcavity in a pre-established ultrasound field. In this paper we describe a scientific instrument that is dedicated to this outcome, combining a focused ultrasound transducer with a pulsed laser. We present high-speed photographic observations of laser-induced cavitation and laser-nucleated acoustic cavitation, at frame rates of 0.5×10(6) frames per second, from laser pulses of energy above and below the optical breakdown threshold, respectively. Acoustic recordings demonstrated inertial cavitation can be controllably introduced to the ultrasound focus. This technique will contribute to the understanding of cavitation evolution in focused ultrasound including for potential therapeutic applications.

  12. Distribution of Cathode Spots in Vacuum Arc Under Nonuniform Axial Magnetic Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Zong-qian; JIA Shen-li; WANG Li-jun; LI Xing-wen; WANG Zheng

    2007-01-01

    Recent results on the distribution of vacuum arc cathode spots (CSs) in nonuniform axial magnetic field (AMF) are presented.Based on previous studies,we deem that two contrary influences of AMF,inward effect and outward effect,are attributed to CSs distribution.With this notion,we have analyzed the controlling effectiveness of nonuniform AMF on CSs distribution. Experiments were conducted in a detachable vacuum chamber with iron-style AMF electrodes.Images of vacuum arc column and the distribution of CSs were photographed with a high-speed charge coupled device (CCD) camera. Experimental results agreed well with the theoretical analysis.

  13. Single molecule mapping of the optical field distribution of probes for near-field microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veerman, J.A.; Garcia Parajo, M.F.; Kuipers, L.; van Hulst, N.F.

    1999-01-01

    The most difficult task in near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) is to make a high quality subwavelength aperture probe, Recently we have developed high definition NSOM probes by focused ion beam (FIB) milling. These probes have a higher brightness, better polarization characteristics,

  14. Single molecule mapping of the optical field distribution of probes for near-field microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veerman, J.A.; Garcia-Parajo, M.F.; Kuipers, L.; Hulst, van N.F.

    1999-01-01

    The most difficult task in near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) is to make a high quality subwavelength aperture probe, Recently we have developed high definition NSOM probes by focused ion beam (FIB) milling. These probes have a higher brightness, better polarization characteristics, bette

  15. Green's function formalism in semi-infinite composites: an investigation of local field distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chen; Gu, Ying; Dai, Bing; Gong, Qi-Huang

    2004-11-01

    In the resonant composites, the formerly developed Green's function formalism (GFF) can be used to compute the local field distribution near resonance. In this paper, we extend the GFF in the infinite network to the semi-infinite networks by the method of image. Using the formalism, we investigate the local field distribution near resonance for the impurity clusters with admittance epsilon0 embedded in one semi-infinite network with epsilon1. With varying the admittance epsilon2 of another semi-infinite network, we find that the local fields in the boundary experience great changes, especially at epsilon2 = -epsilon1. The existence of the boundary enhances the localization of the fields within and around the metallic clusters. Therefore, the intensity of local field is influenced by the arrangement of impurity metallic bonds and its distance from the boundary.

  16. Green's function formalism in semi-infinite composites:an investigation of local field distribution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Chen; Gu Ying; Dai Bing; Gong Qi-Huang

    2004-01-01

    In the resonant composites, the formerly developed Green's function formalism (GFF) can be used to compute the local field distribution near resonance. In this paper, we extend the GFF in the infinite network to the semi-infinite networks by the method of image. Using the formalism, we investigate the local field distribution near resonance for the impurity clusters with admittance ∈0 embedded in one semi-infinite network with ∈1. With varying the admittance ∈2 of another semi-infinite network, we find that the local fields in the boundary experience great changes, especially at ∈2= -∈1. The existence of the boundary enhances the localization of the fields within and around the metallic clusters.Therefore, the intensity of local field is influenced by the arrangement of impurity metallic bonds and its distance from the boundary.

  17. Electron momentum distributions and photoelectron spectra of atoms driven by intense spatially inhomogeneous field

    CERN Document Server

    Ciappina, M F; Shaaran, T; Roso, L; Lewenstein, M

    2013-01-01

    We use three dimensional time-dependent Schr\\"odinger equation (3D--TDSE) to calculate angular electron momentum distributions and photoelectron spectra of atoms driven by spatially inhomogeneous fields. An example for such inhomogeneous fields is the locally enhanced field induced by resonant plasmons, appearing at surfaces of metallic nanoparticles, nanotips and gold bow-tie shape nanostructures. Our studies show that the inhomogeneity of the laser electric field plays an important role in the above threshold ionization process in the tunneling regime, causing significant modifications to the electron momentum distributions and photoelectron spectra, while its effects in the multiphoton regime appear to be negligible. Indeed, through tunneling ATI process, one can obtain higher energy electrons as well as high degree of asymmetry in the momentum space map. In this study we consider near infrared laser fields with intensities in the mid-$10^{14}$ W/cm$^{2}$ range and we use linear approximation to describe t...

  18. Observer dependence of bubble nucleation and Schwinger pair production

    CERN Document Server

    Garriga, Jaume; Sasaki, Misao; Soda, Jiro; Vilenkin, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Pair production in a constant electric field is closely analogous to bubble nucleation in a false vacuum. The classical trajectories of the pairs are Lorentz invariant, but it appears that this invariance should be broken by the nucleation process. Here, we use a model detector, consisting of other particles interacting with the pairs, to investigate how pair production is seen by different Lorentzian observers. We focus on the idealized situation where a constant external electric field is present for an infinitely long time, and we consider the in-vacuum state for a charged scalar field that describes the nucleating pairs. The in-vacuum is defined in terms of modes which are positive frequency in the remote past. Even though the construction uses a particular reference frame and a gauge where the vector potential is time dependent, we show explicitly that the resulting quantum state is Lorentz invariant. We then introduce a "detector" particle which interacts with the nucleated pairs, and show that all Lore...

  19. Analysis of the electric field distribution in the diseased ovaries of cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Вадим Сергеевич Попрядухин

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available  This article is focused on solving the problem of the electromagnetic radiation distribution inside the ovaries of cattle. As a result of theoretical studies integral equation was obtained based on vector fields and integral formulas of vector field theory. Solving of the equation allowed to obtain formulas for the calculation of the electric field mean value inside of diseased ovaries. Mean value of the electric field is necessary for calculation of biotropic parameters for treatment of inflammation of ovaries

  20. Researches on the distribution law of vector sound field in elastic wedge bottom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Haigang; PIAO Shengchun; YANG Shi'e; AN Xudong

    2011-01-01

    The method based on elastic parabolic equation method for calculating the sound vector field has been studied. The vector field in water and corresponding seismic wave field had been calculated for infra-sound in oceanic environment with elastic wedge bottom. The effects on sound field distribution for different frequency and depth of sound source had been researched, result shows that there is sound energy leakage into the bottom, the position where leakage occurred can be determined by the ratio of the ocean depth to the wavelength, as compared with normal mode theory.

  1. Ice nucleation properties of agricultural soil dusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinke, Isabelle; Funk, Roger; Busse, Jacqueline; Iturri, Antonela; Kirchen, Silke; Leue, Martin; Möhler, Ottmar; Schwartz, Thomas; Sierau, Berko; Toprak, Emre; Ulrich, Andreas; Hoose, Corinna; Leisner, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Soil dust particles emitted from agricultural areas contain large amounts of organic material such as fungi, bacteria and plant debris. Being carrier for potentially highly ice-active biological particles, agricultural soil dusts are candidates for being very ice-active as well. In this work, we present ice nucleation experiments conducted in the AIDA cloud chamber. We investigated the ice nucleation efficiency of four types of soil dust from different regions of the world. Results are presented for the immersion freezing and the deposition nucleation mode: all soil dusts show higher ice nucleation efficiencies than desert dusts, especially at temperatures above 254 K. For one soil dust sample, the effect of heat treatments was investigated. Heat treatments did not affect the ice nucleation efficiency which presumably excludes primary biological particles as the only source of the increased ice nucleation efficiency. Therefore, organo-mineral complexes or organic compounds may contribute substantially to the high ice nucleation activity of agricultural soil dusts.

  2. Sigmoid kinetics of protein crystal nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanev, Christo N.; Tonchev, Vesselin D.

    2015-10-01

    A non-linear differential equation expressing the new phase nucleation rate in the different steps of the process (non-stationary and stationary nucleation and in the plateau region) is derived from basic principles of the nucleation theory. It is shown that one and the same sigmoid (logistic) function describes both nucleation scenarios: the one according to the classical theory, and the other according to the modern two-stage mechanism of protein crystal formation. Comparison to experimental data on both insulin crystal nucleation kinetics and on bovine β-lactoglobulin crystallization indicates a good agreement with the sigmoidal prediction. Experimental data for electrochemical nucleation and glass crystallization obey the same sigmoid time dependence, and suggest universality of this nucleation kinetics law.

  3. Numerical Modeling of Plasmas in which Nanoparticles Nucleate and Grow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Pulkit

    Dusty plasmas refer to a broad category of plasmas. Plasmas such as argon-silane plasmas in which particles nucleate and grow are widely used in semiconductor processing and nanoparticle manufacturing. In such dusty plasmas, the plasma and the dust particles are strongly coupled to each other. This means that the presence of dust particles significantly affects the plasma properties and vice versa. Therefore such plasmas are highly complex and they involve several interesting phenomena like nucleation, growth, coagulation, charging and transport. Dusty plasma afterglow is equally complex and important. Especially, residual charge on dust particles carries special significance in several industrial and laboratory situations and it has not been well understood. A 1D numerical model was developed of a low-pressure capacitively-coupled plasma in which nanoparticles nucleate and grow. Polydispersity of particle size distributions can be important in such plasmas. Sectional method, which is well known in aerosol literature, was used to model the evolving particle size and charge distribution. The numerical model is transient and one-dimensional and self consistently accounts for nucleation, growth, coagulation, charging and transport of dust particles and their effect on plasma properties. Nucleation and surface growth rates were treated as input parameters. Results were presented in terms of particle size and charge distribution with an emphasis on importance of polydispersity in particle growth and dynamics. Results of numerical model were compared with experimental measurements of light scattering and light emission from plasma. Reasonable qualitative agreement was found with some discrepancies. Pulsed dusty plasma can be important for controlling particle production and/or unwanted particle deposition. In this case, it is important to understand the behavior of the particle cloud during the afterglow following plasma turn-off. Numerical model was modified to self

  4. Determination of the strain generated in InAs/InP quantum wires: prediction of nucleation sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molina, S I [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e I.M. y Q.I., Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cadiz, Campus RIo San Pedro, s/n, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Ben, T [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e I.M. y Q.I., Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cadiz, Campus RIo San Pedro, s/n, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Sales, D L [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e I.M. y Q.I., Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cadiz, Campus RIo San Pedro, s/n, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Pizarro, J [Departamento de Lenguajes y Sistemas Informaticos, CASEM, Universidad de Cadiz, Campus RIo San Pedro, s/n, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Galindo, P L [Departamento de Lenguajes y Sistemas Informaticos, CASEM, Universidad de Cadiz, Campus RIo San Pedro, s/n, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Varela, M [Condensed Matter Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Pennycook, S J [Condensed Matter Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Fuster, D [Instituto de Microelectronica de Madrid (CNM, CSIC), Isaac Newton 8, 28760 Tres Cantos, Madrid (Spain); Gonzalez, Y [Instituto de Microelectronica de Madrid (CNM, CSIC), Isaac Newton 8, 28760 Tres Cantos, Madrid (Spain); Gonzalez, L [Instituto de Microelectronica de Madrid (CNM, CSIC), Isaac Newton 8, 28760 Tres Cantos, Madrid (Spain)

    2006-11-28

    The compositional distribution in a self-assembled InAs(P) quantum wire grown by molecular beam epitaxy on an InP(001) substrate has been determined by electron energy loss spectrum imaging. We have determined the strain and stress fields generated in and around this wire capped with a 5 nm InP layer by finite element calculations using as input the compositional map experimentally obtained. Preferential sites for nucleation of wires grown on the surface of this InP capping layer are predicted, based on chemical potential minimization, from the determined strain and stress fields on this surface. The determined preferential sites for wire nucleation agree with their experimentally measured locations. The method used in this paper, which combines electron energy loss spectroscopy, high-resolution Z contrast imaging, and elastic theory finite element calculations, is believed to be a valuable technique of wide applicability for predicting the preferential nucleation sites of epitaxial self-assembled nano-objects.

  5. Simultaneous imaging of magnetic field and temperature distributions by magneto optical indicator microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hanju; Jeon, Sunghoon; Friedman, Barry; Lee, Kiejin

    2017-01-01

    We report a simultaneous imaging method of the temperature and the magnetic field distributions based on the magneto optical indicator microscopy. The present method utilizes an optical indicator composed of a bismuth-substituted yttrium iron garnet thin film, and visualizes the magnetic field and temperature distributions through the magneto-optical effect and the temperature dependent optical absorption of the garnet thin film. By using a printed circuit board that carries an electric current as a device under test, we showed that the present method can visualize the magnetic field and temperature distribution simultaneously with a comparable temperature sensitivity (0.2 K) to that of existing conventional thermal imagers. The present technique provides a practical way to get a high resolution magnetic and thermal image at the same time, which is valuable in investigating how thermal variation results in a change of the operation state of a micrometer sized electronic device or material. PMID:28252018

  6. Calculations using the circuit equation for current and field distributions of type II superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tominaka, Toshiharu [Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT), 2-5-1, Marunouchi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100-8959 (Japan)

    2006-10-15

    The current distributions of untwisted infinitely long superconductors have been studied during the current sweep and under an external field, using the inductance matrix among superconducting finite elements which are generated from a superconductor. The self- and mutual inductances of general polygonal conductors with a uniform current density over each cross section are precisely calculated from the analytical expressions for the geometrical mean distances. The current distributions among each superconducting element are obtained by solving the circuit equation with the Bean model and a nonlinear E-J relation based on the power law. In addition, the magnetic field and vector potential distributions of an untwisted superconducting composite are also obtained, using the analytical expressions for the magnetic field and vector potential due to polygonal conductors.

  7. Electric field distribution around the chain of composite nanoparticles in ferrofluids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan Chun-Zhen; Wang Jun-Qiao; Cheng Yong-Guang; Ding Pei; Liang Er-Jun; Huang Ji-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Composite nanoparticles (NPs) have the ability of combining materials with different properties together,thus receiving extensive attention in many fields.Here we theoretically investigate the electric field distribution around core/shell NPs (a type of composite NPs) in ferrofluids under the influence of an external magnetic field.The NPs are made of cobalt (ferromagnetic) coated with gold (metallic).Under the influence of the external magnetic field,these NPs will align along the direction of this field,thus forming a chain of NPs.According to Laplace's equations,we obtain electric fields inside and outside the NPs as a function of the incident wavelength by taking into account the mutual interaction between the polarized NPs.Our calculation results show that the electric field distribution is closely related to the resonant incident wavelength,the metallic shell thickness,and the inter-particle distance.These analytical calculations agree well with our numerical simulation results.This kind of field-induced anisotropic soft-matter systems offers the possibility of obtaining an enhanced Raman scattering substrate due to enhanced electric fields.

  8. Calculation of the integral magnetic field of a star accounting for the surface distribution of elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerth, E.; Glagolevskij, Yu. V.

    The observable magnetic field of a star is the result of integration over its visible hemisphere, related to the information transferring medium: the spectral line profile. The hitherto practised simple integration of the magnetic field strength neglects the spotty face of the star and is physically wrong. Because of the topographically distributed line-generating elements in the stellar atmosphere, the contribution of all parts of the surface to the integration is different. For an effective computation, both the magnetic field and the element distribution are transformed from globes to Mercator maps and arranged as right-angled matrices. The numerical evaluation is performed by a special computer program, which uses matrices and vector algebra. The theory is based on the mathematical derivation of convolution integrals for the rotation of the star and the line profiles formed in its atmosphere, whereby the radiation from all surface areas in direction to the observer is integrated, accounting for the geometrical and radiation transfer conditions of the disk-like visible hemisphere and the element distribution of chemically peculiar (CP) stars. The computation starts from a given magnetic field structure on the surface of a star and progresses straightforward over convolution integrals to the phase curves of the integral magnetic field strength. The calculation procedure is independent of a special generation model of the stellar magnetic field and possesses common validity. In consideration of other approaches to the problem of field structure analysis, also the inversion of the convolution is discussed.

  9. Distributed scientific communication in the European information society: Some cases of "Mode 2" fields of research

    CERN Document Server

    Heimeriks, Gaston; Besselaar, Peter Van den

    2010-01-01

    Can self-organization of scientific communication be specified by using literature-based indicators? In this study, we explore this question by applying entropy measures to typical "Mode-2" fields of knowledge production. We hypothesized these scientific systems to be developing from a self-organization of the interaction between cognitive and institutional levels: European subsidized research programs aim at creating an institutional network, while a cognitive reorganization is continuously ongoing at the scientific field level. The results indicate that the European system develops towards a stable level of distribution of cited references and title-words among the European member states. We suggested that this distribution could be a property of the emerging European system. In order to measure to degree of specialization with respect to the respective distributions of countries, cited references and title words, the mutual information among the three frequency distributions was calculated. The so-called t...

  10. Optimization by Estimation of Distribution with DEUM Framework Based on Markov Random Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Siddhartha Shakya; John McCall

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a Markov random field (MRP) approach to estimating and sampling the probability distribution in populations of solutions. The approach is used to define a class of algorithms under the general heading distribution estimation using Markov random fields (DEUM). DEUM is a subclass of estimation of distribution algorithms (EDAs) where interaction between solution variables is represented as an undirected graph and the joint probability of a solution is factorized as a Gibbs distribution derived from the structure of the graph. The focus of this paper will be on describing the three main characteristics of DEUM framework, which distinguishes it from the traditional EDA. They are: 1) use of MRF models, 2) fitness modeling approach to estimating the parameter of the model and 3) Monte Carlo approach to sampling from the model.

  11. Aggregate geometry in amyloid fibril nucleation

    CERN Document Server

    Irbäck, A; Linnemann, N; Linse, B; Wallin, S; 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.058101

    2013-01-01

    We present and study a minimal structure-based model for the self-assembly of peptides into ordered beta-sheet-rich fibrils. The peptides are represented by unit-length sticks on a cubic lattice and interact by hydrogen bonding and hydrophobicity forces. By Monte Carlo simulations with >100,000 peptides, we show that fibril formation occurs with sigmoidal kinetics in the model. To determine the mechanism of fibril nucleation, we compute the joint distribution in length and width of the aggregates at equilibrium, using an efficient cluster move and flat-histogram techniques. This analysis, based on simulations with 256 peptides in which aggregates form and dissolve reversibly, shows that the main free-energy barriers that a nascent fibril has to overcome are associated with changes in width.

  12. Salt distribution under mulched drip irrigation in a cotton field of northwestern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z.; Tian, F.; Hu, H.; Yao, X.; Zhong, R.; Hu, H.

    2012-12-01

    A 3-year experiment was conducted in Xinjiang, northwestern China, to investigate the specific pattern of salt distribution and accumulation associated with mulched drip irrigation in a cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) field. The experimental site was divided into three fields according to their distinct features of soil particle size distribution, and three replicators were designed in every field. Above 30,000 soil samples were collected throughout the experimental years, and this large number of soil samples help to answer the strong heterogeneity of soil salinity at the field scale and get the continuous salinity data under the destructive salinity measurement method. The results indicate that the soil salt migrates with water flux and accumulates at the periphery of the wetted soil mass, and the ration of the EC value in inter-film zone to wide-row zone at the end of growth period are 2.34, 1.78 and 1.24 for the three fields, respectively, which implies soil salt would transport to and accumulate in the inter film zone (IFM) more easily for sandy soil than clay soil along the horizontal direction. The field experiment shows the soil salt tends to build up at the interface of soil texture (where the soil texture changes rapidly from sandy at the upper layer to clay at the lower) , which means that layered pattern of soil particle size distribution dominates the vertical distribution pattern of soil salinity. The dimensionless index representing the specific salt distribution pattern associated with mulched drip irrigation was also introduced and modified, and the study shows that the index can well delineate the salt qualitative distribution along the vertical direction.

  13. Electrostatic field generated by a charge polynomial distribution in an elliptic beam; Champ electrostatique genere par une distribution de charge polynomiale dans un faisceau de section elliptique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coacolo, J.L

    1999-07-01

    In this work, the electrostatic field generated from a polynomial charge distribution with an elliptic outline, has been calculated. One of the interests of this calculation is the introduction of the field analytical expression, in a space charge routine of a beam dynamic simulation particle code. The field analytical expression calculated here is exact only for a continuous field. (A.L.B.)

  14. International Workshop on Comparing Ice Nucleation Measuring Systems 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cziczo, Daniel [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2016-04-30

    The relationship of ambient aerosol particles to the formation of ice-containing clouds is one of the largest uncertainties in understanding the Earth’s climate. The uncertainty is due to several poorly understood processes and measurements including, but not limited to: (1) the microphysics of how particles nucleate ice, (2) the number of ice forming particles as a function of atmospheric properties such as temperature and relative humidity, (3) the atmospheric distribution of ice forming particles and (4) the role of anthropogenic activities in producing or changing the behavior of ice forming particles. The ways in which ice forming particles can impact climate is also multi-faceted. More ice forming particles can lead to clouds with more ice crystals and different optical properties than clouds with less ice forming particles. More effective ice forming particles can lead to ice at higher temperature and/or lower saturation, resulting in clouds at lower altitude or latitude which also changes the Earth’s radiative balance. Ice nucleation also initiates most of the Earth’s precipitation, even in the mid- and low-latitudes, since cloud-top temperatures are often below freezing. The limited measurements and lack of understanding directly translates to restrictions in our ability to model atmospheric ice formation and project changes into the future. The importance of ice nucleation research is further exemplified by Figure 1 which shows the publications per decade and citations per year on the topic of ice nucleation [DeMott et al., 2011]. After a lull at the end of the last century, there has been a dramatic increase in both publications and citations related to ice nucleation; this directly corresponds to the importance of ice nucleation on the Earth’s climate and the uncertainty in this area noted by the Solomon [2007].

  15. Effects of spectral linewidth of ultrashort pulses on the spa-tiotemporal distribution of diffraction fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The spatiotemporal characteristics of electromagnetic pulses with ultrabroad spectral bandwidth in the far field are analyzed by using classical scalar diffraction theory. The effects of the ratio of the frequency width to the central frequency on the diffraction spatial distribution are discussed. It is concluded that the diffraction spatial dis-tribution of the pulsed radiation gets narrower than a mono-chromatic wave when the frequency width of the pulse is comparable to or larger than its central frequency.

  16. Direct correlation of internal gradients and pore size distributions with low field NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Xiao, Lizhi; Liao, Guangzhi; Blümich, Bernhard

    2016-06-01

    Internal magnetic field gradients Gint, which arise from the magnetic susceptibility difference Δχ between solid matrix and fluid in porous media relate to the pore geometry. However, this relationship is complex and not well understood. Here we correlate internal-gradient distributions to pore-size distributions directly to examine internal gradients in detail at low field NMR. The pore-size distributions were obtained by the method of Decay due to Diffusion in the Internal Field (DDIF), and the internal-gradient distributions were measured with the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) method. The internal-gradient-pore-size distributions correlation maps were obtained for water in packs of glass beads with different diameter and in a sandstone sample. The relationship between internal gradients and pore structure is analyzed in detail by considering the restricted diffusion of fluids in porous samples. For each case diffusion regimes are assigned by plotting normalized CPMG data and comparing the diffusion lengths, the dephasing lengths and pore diameters. In the free-diffusion limit, the correlation maps reveal the true relationship between pore structure and internal gradients so that Δχ can be approximated from the correlation maps. This limit is met most easily at low field. It provides information about porous media, which is expected to benefit the oil industry, in particular NMR well logging.

  17. Numerical modeling calculation for the spatial distribution characteristics of horizontal field transfer functions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Applying 3-dimension finite difference method, the distribution characteristics of horizontal field transfer func-tions for rectangular conductor have been computed, and the law of distribution for Re-part and Im-part has been given. The influences of source field period, the conductivity, the buried depth and the length of the conductor on the transfer functions were studied. The extrema of transfer functions appear at the center, the four corners and around the edges of conductor, and move with the edges. This feature demonstrates that around the edges are best places for transfer functions¢ observation.

  18. Radiation quantities: significance of the angular and energy distribution of the radiation field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, M.; Perks, C.A. (AEA Corporate Safety Directorate, Harwell (United Kingdom)); Thomas, D.J.; Naismith, O.F. (National Physical Lab., Teddington (United Kingdom))

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses the effects of changing from the old to new (ICRP 60 and ICRU 47) dosimetric quantities, and the relationship between quantities, as a function of the energy and angular distribution, for practical radiation fields. It considers: X rays, gamma rays, neutrons and beta rays; reviews the limited data on practical energy and angular distributions for photons and neutrons in the workplace; and calculates relevant dosimetric quantities based on realistic assumptions. The results are used to illustrate how the relationship between quantities might vary in practical fields and to draw conclusions about the implications of recent ICRP and ICRU publications. (Author).

  19. Local field distribution and configuration of CO molecules adsorbed on the nanostructure platinum surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Xiao-Jing; He Su-Zhen; Wu Chen-Xu

    2006-01-01

    This paper shows that the local electric field distribution near the nanostructure metallic surface is obtained by solving the Laplace equation, and furthermore, the configuration of CO molecules adsorbed on a Pt nanoparticle surface is obtained by using Monte Carlo simulation. It is found that the uneven local electric field distribution induced by the nanostructure surface can influence the configuration of carbon monoxide (CO) molecules by a force, which drags the adsorbates to the poles of the nanoparticles. This result, together with our results obtained before, may explain the experimental results that the nanostructure metallic surface can lead to abnormal phenomena such as anti-absorption infrared effects.

  20. Extended parametric gain range in photonic crystal fibers with strongly frequency-dependent field distributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Sidsel Rübner; Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard; Olausson, Christina Bjarnal Thulin

    2014-01-01

    The parametric gain range of a degenerate four-wave mixing process is determined in the undepleted pump regime. The gain range is considered with and without taking the mode field distributions of the four-wave mixing components into account. It is found that the mode field distributions have...... to be included to evaluate the parametric gain correctly in dispersion-tailored speciality fibers and that mode profile engineering can provide a way to increase the parametric gain range. (C) 2014 Optical Society of America...

  1. Optimizing the optical field distribution of solid immersion lens system by a continuous phase filter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuehua Ye; Yaoju Zhang; Junfeng Chen

    2007-01-01

    In solid immersion lens (SIL) microscopy systems with high numerical aperture (NA), there always exists the aberration produced by Fresnel effects at the interface between SIL and the sample. This aberration may cause the degradation of the image of sample. We design a continuous phase filter and optimize the optical field distribution of SIL system. The numerical results show that when the continuous phase filter is used, the field distribution of SIL system can be optimized, and the focal depth and intensity of transmitted light can be increased. At the same time, the intensity of side-lobe and the resolution are kept almost unchanged.

  2. Communication: Kinetics of scavenging of small, nucleating clusters: First nucleation theorem and sum rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malila, Jussi; McGraw, Robert; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtinen, Kari E. J.

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent advances in monitoring nucleation from a vapor at close-to-molecular resolution, the identity of the critical cluster, forming the bottleneck for the nucleation process, remains elusive. During past twenty years, the first nucleation theorem has been often used to extract the size of the critical cluster from nucleation rate measurements. However, derivations of the first nucleation theorem invoke certain questionable assumptions that may fail, e.g., in the case of atmospheric new particle formation, including absence of sub-critical cluster losses and heterogeneous nucleation on pre-existing nanoparticles. Here, we extend the kinetic derivation of the first nucleation theorem to give a general framework to include such processes, yielding sum rules connecting the size dependent particle formation and loss rates to the corresponding loss-free nucleation rate and the apparent critical size from a naïve application of the first nucleation theorem that neglects them.

  3. Phase diagram of the classical Heisenberg model in a trimodal random field distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Filho, A.; Albuquerque, D. F. de; Santos-Filho, J. B.; Batista, T. S. Araujo

    2016-11-01

    The classical spin 1 / 2 Heisenberg model on a simple cubic lattice, with fluctuating bond interactions between nearest neighbors and in the presence of a random magnetic field, is investigated by effective field theory based on two-spin cluster. The random field is drawn from the asymmetric and anisotropic trimodal probability distribution. The fluctuating bond is extracted from the symmetric and anisotropic bimodal probability. We estimate the transition temperatures, and the phase diagram in the Tc- h, Tc- p and Tc - α planes. We observe that the temperature of the tricritical point decreases with the increase of disorder in exchange interactions until the system ceases to display tricritical behavior. The disorder of the interactions and reentrant phenomena depends on the trimodal distribution of the random field.

  4. High-resolution distributed sampling of bandlimited fields with fixed-precision sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Animesh; Ramchandran, Kannan

    2007-01-01

    The problem of sampling a discrete-time sequence of spatially bandlimited fields with a bounded dynamic range, in a distributed, communication-constrained, processing environment is addressed. A central unit, having access to the data gathered by a dense network of fixed-precision sensors, operating under stringent inter-node communication constraints, is required to reconstruct the field snapshots to maximum accuracy. Both deterministic and stochastic field models are considered. For stochastic fields, results are established in the almost-sure sense. The feasibility of having a flexible tradeoff between the oversampling rate (sensor density) and the analog-to-digital converter (ADC) precision, while achieving an exponential accuracy in the number of bits per Nyquist-interval is demonstrated. This exposes an underlying ``conservation of bits'' principle: the bit-budget per Nyquist-interval per snapshot (the rate) can be distributed along the amplitude axis (sensor-precision) and space (sensor density) in an ...

  5. Relativistic Mechanics in Gravitational Fields Exterior to Rotating Homogeneous Mass Distributions within Spherical Geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chifu E. N.

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available General Relativistic metric tensors for gravitational fields exterior to homogeneous spherical mass distributions rotating with constant angular velocity about a fixed di- ameter are constructed. The coeffcients of affine connection for the gravitational field are used to derive equations of motion for test particles. The laws of conservation of energy and angular momentum are deduced using the generalized Lagrangian. The law of conservation of angular momentum is found to be equal to that in Schwarzschild’s gravitational field. The planetary equation of motion and the equation of motion for a photon in the vicinity of the rotating spherical mass distribution have rotational terms not found in Schwarzschild’s field.

  6. Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon 2014/15. Nanoparticle Size Distribution (NPSD) Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuang, C [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Artaxo, P [University of Sao Paulo (Brazil); Martin, S [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States); Wang, J [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Aerosol nucleation and initial growth were investigated during the Green Ocean Amazon (GoAmazon) 2014/15 campaign. Aerosol sampling occurred during the wet and dry seasons of 2014, and took place at the T3 measurement site, downwind of the city of Manaus, Brazil. Characterization of the aerosol size distribution from 10 to 500 nm was accomplished through the deployment of a conventional Scanning Mobility Particle Spectrometer (SMPS) and a fine condensation particle counter (> 10 nm). In order to directly measure aerosol nucleation and initial growth, a Nano SMPS (1.5-20 nm) was also deployed, consisting of a condensation particle counter-based electrical mobility spectrometer that was modified for the detection of sub-3 nm aerosol. Measurements of the aerosol size distribution from 1.5 nm to 10 nm were obtained during the first observational period, and from 3 nm to 15 nm during the second observational period. Routine, stable measurement in this size range was complicated due to persistent water condensation in the Nano SMPS and diffusional transport losses

  7. Strength distribution of solar magnetic fields in photospheric quiet Sun regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez Vélez, J. C.; López Ariste, A.; Semel, M.

    2008-08-01

    Context: The magnetic topology of the solar photosphere in its quietest regions is hidden by the difficulties to disentangle magnetic flux through the resolution element from the field strength of unresolved structures. The observation of spectral lines with strong coupling with hyperfine structure, like the observed Mn i line at 553.7 nm, allows such differentiation. Aims: To analyse the distribution of field strengths in the network and intranetwork of the solar photosphere through inversion of the Mn i line at 553.7 nm. Methods: An inversion code for the magnetic field using the principal component analysis (PCA) has been developed. Statistical tests are run on the code to validate it. The code has to draw information from the small-amplitude spectral feature appearing in the core of the Stokes V profile of the observed line for field strengths below a certain threshold, coinciding with lower limit of the Paschen-Back effect in the fine structure of the involved atomic levels. Results: The inversion of the observed profiles, using the circular polarisation (V) and the intensity (I), shows the presence of magnetic fields strengths in a range from 0 to 2 kG, with predominant weak strength values. Mixed regions with mean strength field values of 1130 and 435 Gauss are found associated with the network and intranetwork, respectively. Conclusions: The Mn i line at 553 nm probes the field strength distribution in the quiet sun and shows the predominance of weak, hectoGauss fields in the intranetwork, and strong, kiloGauss fields in the network. It also shows that both network and intranetwork are to be understood at our present spatial resolutions as field distributions, of which we hint at the mean properties.

  8. Simulation studies of nucleation of ferroelectric polarization reversal.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brennecka, Geoffrey L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Winchester, Benjamin Michael [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Electric field-induced reversal of spontaneous polarization is the defining characteristic of a ferroelectric material, but the process(es) and mechanism(s) associated with the initial nucleation of reverse-polarity domains are poorly understood. This report describes studies carried out using phase field modeling of LiTaO3, a relatively simple prototype ferroelectric material, in order to explore the effects of either mechanical deformation or optically-induced free charges on nucleation and resulting domain configuration during field-induced polarization reversal. Conditions were selected to approximate as closely as feasible those of accompanying experimental work in order to provide not only support for the experimental work but also ensure that additional experimental validation of the simulations could be carried out in the future. Phase field simulations strongly support surface mechanical damage/deformation as effective for dramatically reducing the overall coercive field (Ec) via local field enhancements. Further, optically-nucleated polarization reversal appears to occur via stabilization of latent nuclei via the charge screening effects of free charges.

  9. Plasma physics on auroral field lines - The formation of ion conic distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashour-Abdalla, M.; Okuda, H.

    1983-01-01

    The formation of the conical distribution function and the acceleration of ions on aurora field lines are considered. Ion cyclotron waves were assumed to be excited by drifting electrons associated with the return current in the auroral zone. A theoretical analysis of ion cyclotron waves is given, and a simulation model is described. Simulation results are presented. The heating of ions and the evolution of ion cyclotron waves on auroral field lines and in the magnetosphere are discussed.

  10. Application of Spatially Distributed Field of Electric Impulses for Correction of Angiogenesis in Ischemic Muscular Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kublanov, V.S.; Danilova, I.G.; Goette, I.F.; Brykina, I.A.; Shalyagin, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    Influence of spatially distributed field of electric impulses in a projection to cervical ganglions of the sympathetic nervous system on angiogenesis in ischemic muscular tissue of a rat’s shin has been studied. It is revealed that blood supply of animals, influenced by the field, is restored through increase in quantity of capillaries in ischemic tissues, and number of products of endogenous intoxication is reduced. PMID:23675207

  11. A method of analysis of distributions of local electric fields in composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesnikov, V. I.; Yakovlev, V. B.; Bardushkin, V. V.; Lavrov, I. V.; Sychev, A. P.; Yakovleva, E. N.

    2016-03-01

    A method of prediction of distributions of local electric fields in composite media based on analysis of the tensor operators of the concentration of intensity and induction is proposed. Both general expressions and the relations for calculating these operators are obtained in various approximations. The analytical expressions are presented for the operators of the concentration of electric fields in various types of inhomogeneous structures obtained in the generalized singular approximation.

  12. THE STATISTICAL EVALUATION OF THE POSSIBLE EFFECTS OF ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS ON AN ELECTRIC DISTRIBUTION COMPANY EMPLOYEES

    OpenAIRE

    Coşkun, Özlem; AKÇA, Begüm

    2016-01-01

    Transmission of electrical energy and that might affect the environment and people in order to use electromagnetic fields. Strong at 50-60 Hz fields has to live with for a long time in human, animal and plants as possible with the aim to determine the physiological and biological effects of both experimental and epidemiological studies. In this study running a working electricity distribution firm in male workers exposed to electromagnetic transformer-induced effect and determination of possi...

  13. Crystallographic Analysis of Nucleation at Hardness Indentations in High-Purity Aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chaoling; Zhang, Yubin; Lin, Fengxiang; Wu, Guilin; Liu, Qing; Juul Jensen, Dorte

    2016-12-01

    Nucleation at Vickers hardness indentations has been studied in high-purity aluminum cold-rolled 12 pct. Electron channeling contrast was used to measure the size of the indentations and to detect nuclei, while electron backscattering diffraction was used to determine crystallographic orientations. It is found that indentations are preferential nucleation sites. The crystallographic orientations of the deformed grains affect the hardness and the nucleation potentials at the indentations. Higher hardness gives increased nucleation probabilities. Orientation relationships between nuclei developed at different indentations within one original grain are analyzed and it is found that the orientation distribution of the nuclei is far from random. It is suggested that it relates to the orientations present near the indentation tips which in turn depend on the orientation of the selected grain in which they form. Finally, possible nucleation mechanisms are briefly discussed.

  14. Preparation and nucleation of spherical metallic droplet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing-ge Zhao

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The preparation and solidification of metallic droplets attract more and more attention for their significance in both engineering and scientific fields. In this paper, the preparation and characterization of Sn-based alloy droplets using different methods such as atomization and consumable electrode direct current arc (CDCA technique are reviewed. The morphology and structure of these droplets were determined by optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The solidification behavior of single droplet was systematically studied by means of scanning calorimetry (DSC, and the nucleation kinetics was also calculated. In particular, the development of fast scanning calorimetry (FSC made it possible to investigate the evolution of undercooling under ultrafast but controllable heating and cooling conditions. The combination of CDCA technique and FSC measurements opens up a new door for quantitative studies on droplet solidification, which is accessible to demonstrate some theories by experiments.

  15. Force-field functor theory: classical force-fields which reproduce equilibrium quantum distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babbush, Ryan; Parkhill, John; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2013-01-01

    Feynman and Hibbs were the first to variationally determine an effective potential whose associated classical canonical ensemble approximates the exact quantum partition function. We examine the existence of a map between the local potential and an effective classical potential which matches the exact quantum equilibrium density and partition function. The usefulness of such a mapping rests in its ability to readily improve Born-Oppenheimer potentials for use with classical sampling. We show that such a map is unique and must exist. To explore the feasibility of using this result to improve classical molecular mechanics, we numerically produce a map from a library of randomly generated one-dimensional potential/effective potential pairs then evaluate its performance on independent test problems. We also apply the map to simulate liquid para-hydrogen, finding that the resulting radial pair distribution functions agree well with path integral Monte Carlo simulations. The surprising accessibility and transferability of the technique suggest a quantitative route to adapting Born-Oppenheimer potentials, with a motivation similar in spirit to the powerful ideas and approximations of density functional theory.

  16. Force-Field Functor Theory: Classical Force-Fields which Reproduce Equilibrium Quantum Distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan eBabbush

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Feynman and Hibbs were the first to variationally determine an effective potential whose associated classical canonical ensemble approximates the exact quantum partition function. We examine the existence of a map between the local potential and an effective classical potential which matches the exact quantum equilibrium density and partition function. The usefulness of such a mapping rests in its ability to readily improve Born-Oppenheimer potentials for use with classical sampling. We show that such a map is unique and must exist. To explore the feasibility of using this result to improve classical molecular mechanics, we numerically produce a map from a library of randomly generated one-dimensional potential/effective potential pairs then evaluate its performance on independent test problems. We also apply the map to simulate liquid para-hydrogen, finding that the resulting radial pair distribution functions agree well with path integral Monte Carlo simulations. The surprising accessibility and transferability of the technique suggest a quantitative route to adapting Born-Oppenheimer potentials, with a motivation similar in spirit to the powerful ideas and approximations of density functional theory.

  17. Weight Distributions of Regular Low-Density Parity-Check Codes over Finite Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Shengtian; Chen, Yan; Zhang, Zhaoyang; Qiu, Peiliang

    2010-01-01

    The average weight distribution of a regular low-density parity-check (LDPC) code ensemble over a finite field is thoroughly analyzed. In particular, a precise asymptotic approximation of the average weight distribution is derived for the small-weight case, and a series of fundamental qualitative properties of the asymptotic growth rate of the average weight distribution are proved. Based on this analysis, a general result, including all previous results as special cases, is established for the minimum distance of individual codes in a regular LDPC code ensemble.

  18. Mean field mutation dynamics and the continuous Luria-Delbrück distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashdan, Eugene; Pareschi, Lorenzo

    2012-12-01

    The Luria-Delbrück mutation model has a long history and has been mathematically formulated in several different ways. Here we tackle the problem in the case of a continuous distribution using some mathematical tools from nonlinear statistical physics. Starting from the classical formulations we derive the corresponding differential models and show that under a suitable mean field scaling they correspond to generalized Fokker-Planck equations for the mutants distribution whose solutions are given by the corresponding Luria-Delbrück distribution. Numerical results confirming the theoretical analysis are also presented. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Mean field mutation dynamics and the continuous Luria-Delbr\\"uck distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Kashdan, Eugene

    2011-01-01

    The Luria-Delbr\\"uck mutation model has a long history and has been mathematically formulated in several different ways. Here we tackle the problem in the case of a continuous distribution using some mathematical tools from nonlinear statistical physics. Starting from the classical formulations we derive the corresponding differential models and show that under a suitable mean field scaling they correspond to generalized Fokker-Planck equations for the mutants distribution whose solutions are given by the corresponding Luria-Delbr\\"uck distribution. Numerical results confirming the theoretical analysis are also presented.

  20. The Mechanical Analysis of the Biofilm Streamer Nucleation and Geometry Characterization in Microfluidic Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoling Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria can form biofilm streamers in microfluidic channels with various geometries. Experiments show that the streamer geometry, such as its shape or thickness, depends on the fluid velocity and the geometry and curvature of the microfluidic channel. In the paper, a mechanical analysis of the flow field is made in different channels, which shows that the secondary flow in the channel is the reason for streamer nucleation and that the shear stress distribution decides the streamer geometry including shape and thickness. Through a finite elements simulation, we obtain the secondary flow forming positions in both static and rotating channels: positions that are the location of nucleation of the streamer. Thick or wide biofilm streamers occur at the points of minimum shear stress in static channels. Furthermore, in rotating channels, spiral-like streamers form, due to the helical shape of the minimum shear stress distribution. The findings may allow the prevention of biofilm formation and also the removal of bacteria adhered onto certain surfaces in channels with small cross sections. The analysis also indicates how one can obtain desirable biofilm streamers by control of the channel geometry and the loading conditions.

  1. Numerical Modeling of an RF Argon-Silane Plasma with Dust Particle Nucleation and Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girshick, Steven; Agarwal, Pulkit

    2012-10-01

    We have developed a 1-D numerical model of an RF argon-silane plasma in which dust particles nucleate and grow. This model self-consistently couples a plasma module, a chemistry module and an aerosol module. The plasma module solves population balance equations for electrons and ions, the electron energy equation under the assumption of a Maxwellian velocity distribution, and Poisson's equation for the electric field. The chemistry module treats silane dissociation and reactions of silicon hydrides containing up to two silicon atoms. The aerosol module uses a sectional method to model particle size and charge distributions. The nucleation rate is equated to the rates of formation of anions containing two Si atoms, and a heterogeneous reaction model is used to model particle surface growth. Aerosol effects considered include particle charging, coagulation, and particle transport by neutral drag, ion drag, electric force, gravity and Brownian diffusion. Simulation results are shown for the case of a 13.56 MHz plasma at a pressure of 13 Pa and applied RF voltage of 100 V (amplitude), with flow through a showerhead electrode. These results show the strong coupling between the plasma and the spatiotemporal evolution of the nanoparticle cloud.

  2. Laboratory studies of H2SO4/H2O binary homogeneous nucleation from the SO2+OH reaction: evaluation of the experimental setup and preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kulmala

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Binary homogeneous nucleation (BHN of sulphuric acid and water (H2SO4/H2O is one of the most important atmospheric nucleation processes, but laboratory observations of this nucleation process are very limited and there are also large discrepancies between different laboratory studies. The difficulties associated with these experiments include wall loss of H2SO4 and uncertainties in estimation of H2SO4 concentration ([H2SO4] involved in nucleation. We have developed a new laboratory nucleation setup to study H2SO4/H2O BHN kinetics and provide relatively constrained [H2SO4] needed for nucleation. H2SO4 is produced from the SO2+OH→HSO3 reaction and OH radicals are produced from water vapor UV absorption. The residual [H2SO4] were measured at the end of the nucleation reactor with a chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS. Wall loss factors (WLFs of H2SO4 were estimated by assuming that wall loss is diffusion limited and these calculated WLFs were in good agreement with simultaneous measurements of the initial and residual [H2SO4] with two CIMSs. The nucleation zone was estimated from numerical simulations based on the measured aerosol sizes (particle diameter, Dp and [H2SO4]. The measured BHN rates (J ranged from 0.01–220 cm−3 s−1 at the initial and residual [H2SO4] from 108−1010 cm−3, a temperature of 288 K and relative humidity (RH from 11–23%; J increased with increasing [H2SO4] and RH. J also showed a power dependence on [H2SO4] with the exponential power of 3–8. These power dependences are consistent with other laboratory studies under similar [H2SO4] and RH, but different from atmospheric field observations which showed that particle number concentrations are often linearly dependent on [H2SO4]. These results, together with a higher [H2SO4] threshold (108–109 cm−3 needed to produce the unit J measured from the laboratory studies compared to the atmospheric conditions (106–107 cm−3, imply that H2SO4/H2O BHN alone is

  3. A note on the nucleation with multiple steps: parallel and series nucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamatsu, Masao

    2012-01-28

    Parallel and series nucleation are the basic elements of the complex nucleation process when two saddle points exist on the free-energy landscape. It is pointed out that the nucleation rates follow formulas similar to those of parallel and series connection of resistors or conductors in an electric circuit. Necessary formulas to calculate individual nucleation rates at the saddle points and the total nucleation rate are summarized, and the extension to the more complex nucleation process is suggested. © 2012 American Institute of Physics

  4. Contribution of feldspar and marine organic aerosols to global ice nucleating particle concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara-Temprado, Jesús; Murray, Benjamin J.; Wilson, Theodore W.; O'Sullivan, Daniel; Browse, Jo; Pringle, Kirsty J.; Ardon-Dryer, Karin; Bertram, Allan K.; Burrows, Susannah M.; Ceburnis, Darius; DeMott, Paul J.; Mason, Ryan H.; O'Dowd, Colin D.; Rinaldi, Matteo; Carslaw, Ken S.

    2017-03-01

    Ice-nucleating particles (INPs) are known to affect the amount of ice in mixed-phase clouds, thereby influencing many of their properties. The atmospheric INP concentration changes by orders of magnitude from terrestrial to marine environments, which typically contain much lower concentrations. Many modelling studies use parameterizations for heterogeneous ice nucleation and cloud ice processes that do not account for this difference because they were developed based on INP measurements made predominantly in terrestrial environments without considering the aerosol composition. Errors in the assumed INP concentration will influence the simulated amount of ice in mixed-phase clouds, leading to errors in top-of-atmosphere radiative flux and ultimately the climate sensitivity of the model. Here we develop a global model of INP concentrations relevant for mixed-phase clouds based on laboratory and field measurements of ice nucleation by K-feldspar (an ice-active component of desert dust) and marine organic aerosols (from sea spray). The simulated global distribution of INP concentrations based on these two species agrees much better with currently available ambient measurements than when INP concentrations are assumed to depend only on temperature or particle size. Underestimation of INP concentrations in some terrestrial locations may be due to the neglect of INPs from other terrestrial sources. Our model indicates that, on a monthly average basis, desert dusts dominate the contribution to the INP population over much of the world, but marine organics become increasingly important over remote oceans and they dominate over the Southern Ocean. However, day-to-day variability is important. Because desert dust aerosol tends to be sporadic, marine organic aerosols dominate the INP population on many days per month over much of the mid- and high-latitude Northern Hemisphere. This study advances our understanding of which aerosol species need to be included in order to

  5. Contribution of feldspar and marine organic aerosols to global ice nucleating particle concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vergara-Temprado, Jesús; Murray, Benjamin J.; Wilson, Theodore W.; O& amp; apos; Sullivan, Daniel; Browse, Jo; Pringle, Kirsty J.; Ardon-Dryer, Karin; Bertram, Allan K.; Burrows, Susannah M.; Ceburnis, Darius; DeMott, Paul J.; Mason, Ryan H.; O& amp; apos; Dowd, Colin D.; Rinaldi, Matteo; Carslaw, Ken S.

    2017-01-01

    Ice-nucleating particles (INPs) are known to affect the amount of ice in mixed-phase clouds, thereby influencing many of their properties. The atmospheric INP concentration changes by orders of magnitude from terrestrial to marine environments, which typically contain much lower concentrations. Many modelling studies use parameterizations for heterogeneous ice nucleation and cloud ice processes that do not account for this difference because they were developed based on INP measurements made predominantly in terrestrial environments without considering the aerosol composition. Errors in the assumed INP concentration will influence the simulated amount of ice in mixed-phase clouds, leading to errors in top-of-atmosphere radiative flux and ultimately the climate sensitivity of the model. Here we develop a global model of INP concentrations relevant for mixed-phase clouds based on laboratory and field measurements of ice nucleation by K-feldspar (an ice-active component of desert dust) and marine organic aerosols (from sea spray). The simulated global distribution of INP concentrations based on these two species agrees much better with currently available ambient measurements than when INP concentrations are assumed to depend only on temperature or particle size. Underestimation of INP concentrations in some terrestrial locations may be due to the neglect of INPs from other terrestrial sources. Our model indicates that, on a monthly average basis, desert dusts dominate the contribution to the INP population over much of the world, but marine organics become increasingly important over remote oceans and they dominate over the Southern Ocean. However, day-to-day variability is important. Because desert dust aerosol tends to be sporadic, marine organic aerosols dominate the INP population on many days per month over much of the mid- and high-latitude Northern Hemisphere. This study advances our understanding of which aerosol species need to be included in order to

  6. Predicting the electric field distribution in the brain for the treatment of glioblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Pedro C.; Mekonnen, Abeye; Salvador, Ricardo; Basser, Peter J.

    2014-08-01

    The use of alternating electric fields has been recently proposed for the treatment of recurrent glioblastoma. In order to predict the electric field distribution in the brain during the application of such tumor treating fields (TTF), we constructed a realistic head model from MRI data and placed transducer arrays on the scalp to mimic an FDA-approved medical device. Values for the tissue dielectric properties were taken from the literature; values for the device parameters were obtained from the manufacturer. The finite element method was used to calculate the electric field distribution in the brain. We also included a ‘virtual lesion’ in the model to simulate the presence of an idealized tumor. The calculated electric field in the brain varied mostly between 0.5 and 2.0 V cm - 1 and exceeded 1.0 V cm - 1 in 60% of the total brain volume. Regions of local field enhancement occurred near interfaces between tissues with different conductivities wherever the electric field was perpendicular to those interfaces. These increases were strongest near the ventricles but were also present outside the tumor’s necrotic core and in some parts of the gray matter-white matter interface. The electric field values predicted in this model brain are in reasonably good agreement with those that have been shown to reduce cancer cell proliferation in vitro. The electric field distribution is highly non-uniform and depends on tissue geometry and dielectric properties. This could explain some of the variability in treatment outcomes. The proposed modeling framework could be used to better understand the physical basis of TTF efficacy through retrospective analysis and to improve TTF treatment planning.

  7. Predicting the electric field distribution in the brain for the treatment of glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Pedro C; Mekonnen, Abeye; Salvador, Ricardo; Basser, Peter J

    2014-08-01

    The use of alternating electric fields has been recently proposed for the treatment of recurrent glioblastoma. In order to predict the electric field distribution in the brain during the application of such tumor treating fields (TTF), we constructed a realistic head model from MRI data and placed transducer arrays on the scalp to mimic an FDA-approved medical device. Values for the tissue dielectric properties were taken from the literature; values for the device parameters were obtained from the manufacturer. The finite element method was used to calculate the electric field distribution in the brain. We also included a 'virtual lesion' in the model to simulate the presence of an idealized tumor. The calculated electric field in the brain varied mostly between 0.5 and 2.0 V cm( - 1) and exceeded 1.0 V cm( - 1) in 60% of the total brain volume. Regions of local field enhancement occurred near interfaces between tissues with different conductivities wherever the electric field was perpendicular to those interfaces. These increases were strongest near the ventricles but were also present outside the tumor's necrotic core and in some parts of the gray matter-white matter interface. The electric field values predicted in this model brain are in reasonably good agreement with those that have been shown to reduce cancer cell proliferation in vitro. The electric field distribution is highly non-uniform and depends on tissue geometry and dielectric properties. This could explain some of the variability in treatment outcomes. The proposed modeling framework could be used to better understand the physical basis of TTF efficacy through retrospective analysis and to improve TTF treatment planning.

  8. Effect of TiAl_3 on distribution of TiC particles in aluminum matrix and nucleation of α(Al) grain%TiAl_3对TiC粒子在铝基体中分布及α(Al)晶粒形核的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏天东; 丁万武; 赵文军; 王晓军; 徐仰涛

    2009-01-01

    研究TiC和TiAl_3细化工业纯铝时TiAl_3的存在对TiC在铝基体中分布及α(Al)晶粒形核的影响,分析Al-Ti-C晶粒细化机制.结果表明:TiC单独作为工业纯铝的晶粒细化剂时,大量TiC被α(Al)晶粒推向树枝晶的晶界处,从而限制了TiC的异质形核作用;当TiC和TiAl_3共同作为晶粒细化剂时,在α(Al)晶粒内部出现了大量TiC粒子,大量的TiC粒子成为了α(Al)的结晶核心,并且在TiC颗粒和铝基体的界面处存在"富Ti过渡区";TiAl_3在铝熔体中分解释放出Ti原子并向TiC粒子周围偏聚,形成的"TiC/铝熔体界面富Ti过渡区" 改善了TiC与α(Al)的结构适应性,降低了TiC粒子的表面张力,促进了TiC粒子在铝熔体中的均匀分布,提高了其形核能力.%The effect of TiAl_3 on the distribution of TiC particles in aluminum matrix and nucleation of α(Al) grain was studied when the TiC and TiAl_3 refining industry aluminum, and the nucleation mechanism of Al-Ti-C grain refiner were discussed. The results show that when TiC alone is used as the nucleation phase, most of the TiC is pushed into the grain boundaries by the α(Al) dendrites and the nucleation of TiC is restricted. On the other hand, when TiC and TiAl_3 refine the industry aluminum together, most of the TiC particles are found within the α(Al) grains and nucleation occurs on TiC particles, and there is a Ti transition zone between TiC and aluminum interface. TiAl_3 releases Ti atoms in aluminum melt, Ti atoms congregate to the TiC surface, and ultimately forming TiC/aluminum interface Ti transition zone, which not only improves the structure of adaptability and wettability between TiC and Al , but also reduces the surface tension of TiC particles, which making a lot of TiC particles can be uniformly distributed in the aluminum melt, which advance α(Al) core and heterogeneous nucleation in the aluminum melt solidification.

  9. Nucleation and Atmospheric Aerosols 17th International Conference, Galway, Ireland, 2007

    CERN Document Server

    O'Dowd, Colin D

    2007-01-01

    Atmospheric particles are ubiquitous in the atmosphere: they form the seeds for cloud droplets and they form haze layers, blocking out incoming radiation and contributing to a partial cooling of our climate. They also contribute to poor air quality and health impacts. A large fraction of aerosols are formed from nucleation processes – that is a phase transition from vapour to liquid or solid particles. Examples are the formation of stable clusters about 1 nm in size from molecular collisions and these in turn can grow into larger (100 nm or more) haze particles via condensation to the formation of ice crystals in mixed phase or cold clouds. This book brings together the leading experts from the nucleation and atmospheric aerosols research communities to present the current state-of-the-art knowledge in these related fields. Topics covered are: Nucleation Experiment & Theory, Binary, Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Nucleation, Ion & Cluster Properties During Nucleation, Aerosol Characterisation & P...

  10. Homogeneous SPC/E water nucleation in large molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angélil, Raymond; Diemand, Jürg; Tanaka, Kyoko K; Tanaka, Hidekazu

    2015-08-14

    We perform direct large molecular dynamics simulations of homogeneous SPC/E water nucleation, using up to ∼ 4 ⋅ 10(6) molecules. Our large system sizes allow us to measure extremely low and accurate nucleation rates, down to ∼ 10(19) cm(-3) s(-1), helping close the gap between experimentally measured rates ∼ 10(17) cm(-3) s(-1). We are also able to precisely measure size distributions, sticking efficiencies, cluster temperatures, and cluster internal densities. We introduce a new functional form to implement the Yasuoka-Matsumoto nucleation rate measurement technique (threshold method). Comparison to nucleation models shows that classical nucleation theory over-estimates nucleation rates by a few orders of magnitude. The semi-phenomenological nucleation model does better, under-predicting rates by at worst a factor of 24. Unlike what has been observed in Lennard-Jones simulations, post-critical clusters have temperatures consistent with the run average temperature. Also, we observe that post-critical clusters have densities very slightly higher, ∼ 5%, than bulk liquid. We re-calibrate a Hale-type J vs. S scaling relation using both experimental and simulation data, finding remarkable consistency in over 30 orders of magnitude in the nucleation rate range and 180 K in the temperature range.

  11. Bubble nucleation in simple and molecular liquids via the largest spherical cavity method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, Miguel A., E-mail: m.gonzalez12@imperial.ac.uk [Departamento de Química Física, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Department of Chemistry, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Abascal, José L. F.; Valeriani, Chantal [Departamento de Química Física, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Bresme, Fernando [Department of Chemistry, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Department of Chemistry, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway)

    2015-04-21

    In this work, we propose a methodology to compute bubble nucleation free energy barriers using trajectories generated via molecular dynamics simulations. We follow the bubble nucleation process by means of a local order parameter, defined by the volume of the largest spherical cavity (LSC) formed in the nucleating trajectories. This order parameter simplifies considerably the monitoring of the nucleation events, as compared with the previous approaches which require ad hoc criteria to classify the atoms and molecules as liquid or vapor. The combination of the LSC and the mean first passage time technique can then be used to obtain the free energy curves. Upon computation of the cavity distribution function the nucleation rate and free-energy barrier can then be computed. We test our method against recent computations of bubble nucleation in simple liquids and water at negative pressures. We obtain free-energy barriers in good agreement with the previous works. The LSC method provides a versatile and computationally efficient route to estimate the volume of critical bubbles the nucleation rate and to compute bubble nucleation free-energies in both simple and molecular liquids.

  12. Stochastic analysis of nucleation rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Jonas

    2016-02-01

    We show that approximating the Becker-Döring equations with a Langevin equation results in multiplicative noise, which in turn leads to a family of possible Fokker-Planck equations according to the Ito-Stratonovich dilemma. Using a simple and general model for the attachment and detachment rates, we find that the Ito choice approximates the nucleation rate best and also coincides with the Fokker-Planck equation resulting from the common way to Taylor expand the original set of rate equations.

  13. Coherent Control of Photofragment Distributions Using Laser Phase Modulation in the Weak-Field Limit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia-Vela, Alberto; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    2015-01-01

    The possibility of quantum interference control of the final state distributions of photodissociation fragments by means of pure phase modulation of the pump laser pulse in the weak-field regime is demonstrated theoretically for the first time. The specific application involves realistic wave pac...

  14. Modeling the UT effect in global distribution of ionospheric electric fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukianova, R.; Christiansen, Freddy

    2008-01-01

    A new approach for modeling the global distribution of ionospheric electric potentials utilizing high-precision maps of field-aligned currents (FACs) derived from measurements by the Orsted and Magsat satellites as input to a comprehensive numerical scheme is presented. We simulate the universal ...

  15. Modeling the current distribution in HTS tapes with transport current and applied magnetic field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yazawa, Takashi; Rabbers, Jan-Jaap; Shevchenko, Oleg A.; Haken, ten Bennie; Kate, ten Herman H.J.; Maeda, Hideaki

    1999-01-01

    A numerical model is developed for the current distribution in a high temperature superconducting (HTS) tape, (Bi,Pb)2Sr2 Ca2Cu3Ox-Ag, subjected to a combination of a transport current and an applied magnetic field. This analysis is based on a two-dimensional formulation of Maxwell's equations in te

  16. Field measurements give biased estimates of functional response parameters, but help explain foraging distributions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijns, S.; Knot, I.E.; Piersma, T.; van Gils, J.A.

    2015-01-01

    1.Mechanistic insights and predictive understanding of the spatial distributions of foragers are typically derived by fitting either field measurements on intake rates and food abundance, or observations from controlled experiments, to functional response models. It has remained unclear, however, wh

  17. Technology as enabler for empowerment in distributed teams - a field study on leadership attitudes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bayerl, P.S.; Lauche, K.

    2009-01-01

    In this field study on distributed teams we examined the impact of communication media on attitudes towards empowerment and integration of remote subgroups. Using Q-methodology, interviews and questionnaires we compared attitudes of team members and managers in low and high media-rich environments.

  18. Electric field measurement on time domain generated by corona on insulators on distribution systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frota Mattos, M.A. da; Biagioni, P.H.; Bassi, W. [Univ. of Sao Paulo (Brazil). Inst. de Electrotecnica e Energia

    1996-12-31

    Radio interference and TV interference are being a problem in urban and rural areas. This interference is generated by high voltage transmission lines as well as distribution lines. The radio noise can be produced by polluted or damaged insulators, and by metal parts of the distribution lines. The corona effect on the surface of the dielectric material produces high frequency electromagnetic fields during the ionization and during the recombination period. Fields of different intensity are produced by positive voltage and negative voltage. The insulator flashover (leaking current) also produces electromagnetic fields. A new technique to measure these fields was developed. This technique measures the radiated fields on time domain and on frequency domain. This permits us to characterize the radiated field and thus identify the type of the source. Several measurements were done varying the type of the RF generator, i.e., new insulator and broken insulator. A digitizing oscilloscope was used to observe the electric field on a monopole antenna and the ac voltage applied to the insulator.

  19. Nucleation and growth of new particles in Po Valley, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hamed

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol number distribution measurements are reported at San Pietro Capofiume (SPC station (44°39' N, 11°37' E for the time period 2002–2005. The station is located in Po Valley, the largest industrial, trading and agricultural area in Italy with a high population density. New particle formation was studied based on observations of the particle size distribution, meteorological and gas phase parameters. The nucleation events were classified according to the event clarity based on the particle number concentrations, and the particle formation and growth rates. Out of a total of 769 operational days from 2002 to 2005 clear events were detected on 36% of the days whilst 33% are clearly non-event days. The event frequency was high during spring and summer months with maximum values in May and July, whereas lower frequency was observed in winter and autumn months. The average particle formation and growth rates were estimated as ~6 cm−3 s−1 and ~7 nm h−1, respectively. Such high growth and formation rates are typical for polluted areas. Temperature, wind speed, solar radiation, SO2 and O3 concentrations were on average higher on nucleation days than on non-event days, whereas relative and absolute humidity and NO2 concentration were lower; however, seasonal differences were observed. Backtrajectory analysis suggests that during majority of nucleation event days, the air masses originate from northern to eastern directions. We also study previously developed nucleation event correlations with environmental variables and show that they predict Po Valley nucleation events with variable success.

  20. Dislocation nucleation in heteroepitaxial semiconducting films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pichaud, B.; Burle, N.; Texier, M.; Alfonso, C.; Gailhanou, M.; Thibault-Penisson, J. [IM2NP UMR6242 CNRS, Aix-Marseille University, Marseille (France); Fontaine, C. [LAAS CNRS, Toulouse (France); Vdovin, V.I. [Institute for Chemical Problems of Microelectronics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2009-08-15

    The nucleation of dislocation in semiconductors is still a matter of debate and especially in heteroepitaxial films. To understand this nucleation process the classical models of dislocation nucleation are presented and criticized. Two main points are then developed: emission of dislocations from surface steps and the role of point defects agglomeration on dislocation nucleation. Recent atomic simulation of half loops emission from surface steps and experimental evidences of anisotropic relaxation of GaInAs films deposited on vicinal (111)GaAs substrates strongly support surface steps as preferential sites for nucleation. In low temperature buffer layer structures (SiGe/Si) an original dislocation structure is observed which corresponds to the dislocation emission in different glide systems by a unique nucleation centre. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  1. Simple improvements to classical bubble nucleation models

    CERN Document Server

    Tanaka, Kyoko K; Angélil, Raymond; Diemand, Jürg

    2015-01-01

    We revisit classical nucleation theory (CNT) for the homogeneous bubble nucleation rate and improve the classical formula using a new prefactor in the nucleation rate. Most of the previous theoretical studies have used the constant prefactor determined by the bubble growth due to the evaporation process from the bubble surface. However, the growth of bubbles is also regulated by the thermal conduction, the viscosity, and the inertia of liquid motion. These effects can decrease the prefactor significantly, especially when the liquid pressure is much smaller than the equilibrium one. The deviation in the nucleation rate between the improved formula and the CNT can be as large as several orders of magnitude. Our improved, accurate prefactor and recent advances in molecular dynamics simulations and laboratory experiments for argon bubble nucleation enable us to precisely constrain the free energy barrier for bubble nucleation. Assuming the correction to the CNT free energy is of the functional form suggested by T...

  2. Probability Distributions of Random Electromagnetic Fields in the Presence of a Semi-Infinite Isotropic Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Arnaut, L R

    2006-01-01

    Using a TE/TM decomposition for an angular plane-wave spectrum of free random electromagnetic waves and matched boundary conditions, we derive the probability density function for the energy density of the vector electric field in the presence of a semi-infinite isotropic medium. The theoretical analysis is illustrated with calculations and results for good electric conductors and for a lossless dielectric half-space. The influence of the permittivity and conductivity on the intensity, random polarization, statistical distribution and standard deviation of the field is investigated, both for incident plus reflected fields and for refracted fields. External refraction is found to result in compression of the fluctuations of the random field.

  3. Transmission of electric fields due to distributed cloud charges in the atmosphere-ionosphere system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Suman; De, S. S.; Haldar, D. K.; Guha, G.

    2017-10-01

    The transmission of electric fields in the lower atmosphere by thunder clouds with a suitable charge distribution profile has been modeled. The electromagnetic responses of the atmosphere are presented through Maxwell's equations together with a time-varying source charge distribution. The conductivities are taken to be exponentially graded function of altitude. The radial and vertical electric field components are derived for isotropic, anisotropic and thundercloud regions. The analytical solutions for the total Maxwell's current which flows from the cloud into the ionosphere under DC and quasi-static conditions are obtained for isotropic region. We found that the effect of charge distribution in thunderclouds produced by lightning discharges diminishes rapidly with increasing altitudes. Also, it is found that time to reach Maxwell's currents a maximum is higher for higher altitudes.

  4. Microbial ice nucleators scavenged from the atmosphere during simulated rain events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanlon, Regina; Powers, Craig; Failor, Kevin; Monteil, Caroline L.; Vinatzer, Boris A.; Schmale, David G.

    2017-08-01

    Rain and snow collected at ground level have been found to contain biological ice nucleators. These ice nucleators have been proposed to have originated in clouds, where they may have participated in the formation of precipitation via ice phase nucleation. We conducted a series of field experiments to test the hypothesis that at least some of the microbial ice nucleators (prokaryotes and eukaryotes) present in rain may not originate in clouds but instead be scavenged from the lower atmosphere by rainfall. Thirty-three simulated rain events were conducted over four months off the side of the Smart Road Bridge in Blacksburg, VA, USA. In each event, sterile water was dispensed over the side of the bridge and recovered in sterile containers in an open fallow agricultural field below (a distance of ∼55 m). Microbes scavenged from the simulated rain events were cultured and their ice nucleation activity was examined. Putative microbial ice nucleators were cultured from 94% (31/33) of the simulated rain events, and represented 1.5% (121/8331) of the total colonies assayed. Putative ice nucleators were subjected to additional droplet freezing assays, and those confirmed through these repeated assays represented 0.4% (34/8331) of the total. Mean CFUs scavenged by simulated rain ranged from 2 to 267 CFUs/mL. Scavenged ice nucleators belong to a number of taxa including the bacterial genera Pseudomonas, Pantoea, and Xanthomonas, and the fungal genera Fusarium, Humicola, and Mortierella. An ice-nucleating strain of the fungal genus Penicillium was also recovered from a volumetric air sampler at the study site. This work expands our knowledge of the scavenging properties of rainfall, and suggests that at least some ice nucleators in natural precipitation events may have been scrubbed from the atmosphere during rainfall, and thus are not likely to be involved in precipitation.

  5. Truncated Dual-Cap Nucleation Site Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, Douglas M.; Sander, Paul J.

    2012-01-01

    During heterogeneous nucleation within a metastable mushy-zone, several geometries for nucleation site development must be considered. Traditional spherical dual cap and crevice models are compared to a truncated dual cap to determine the activation energy and critical cluster growth kinetics in ternary Fe-Cr-Ni steel alloys. Results of activation energy results indicate that nucleation is more probable at grain boundaries within the solid than at the solid-liquid interface.

  6. Lexicographical structuring: the number and types of fields, data distribution, searching and data presentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergenholtz, Henning; Pedersen, Heidi Agerbo

    2015-01-01

    in an existing dictionary. This part of the lexicographical work is what we call structuring, which encompasses a number of various lexicographical decisions. One of these is choosing the fields that a database should contain. Typically, for some of these field types, it will be easy to distribute data......This contribution will not describe the structure in existing dictionaries. Instead, it will focus on the decisions that lexicographers make when they draw up the concept for and carry out the production of one or more new dictionaries, or when they consider making changes in the data presentation......, but for other fields it will require long considerations as there are several distribution options with different outcomes of varying usefulness. A second type of lexicographical decision to be made by the lexicographer is the predefined searching, which involves in what order searches are to be made...

  7. Ice Nucleation on Carbon Surface Supports the Classical Theory for Heterogeneous Nucleation

    CERN Document Server

    Cabriolu, Raffaela

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of heterogeneous nucleation in nature was explained qualitatively by the classical theory for heterogeneous nucleation established over more than 60 years ago, but the quantitative validity and the key conclusions of the theory have remained unconfirmed. Employing the forward flux sampling method and the coarse-grained water model mW, we explicitly computed the heterogeneous ice nucleation rates in the supercooled water on a graphitic surface at various temperatures. The independently calculated ice nucleation rates were found to fit well according to the classical theory for heterogeneous nucleation. The fitting procedure further yields the estimate of the potency factor which measures the ratio of the heterogeneous nucleation barrier to the homogeneous nucleation barrier. Remarkably, the estimated potency factor agrees quantitatively with the volumetric ratio of the critical nuclei between the heterogeneous and homogeneous nucleation. Our numerical study thus provides a strong support to the ...

  8. The SERMON project: 48 new field Blazhko stars and an investigation of modulation-period distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Skarka, Marek; Auer, Reinhold F; Prudil, Zdeněk; Juráňová, Anna; Sódor, Ádam

    2016-01-01

    We investigated 1234 fundamental mode RR Lyrae stars observed by the All Sky Automated Survey (ASAS) to identify the Blazhko (BL) effect. A sample of 1547 BL stars from the literature was collected to compare the modulation-period distribution with stars newly identified in our sample. A classical frequency spectra analysis was performed using Period04 software. Data points from each star from the ASAS database were analysed individually to avoid confusion with artificial peaks and aliases. Statistical methods were used in the investigation of the modulation-period distribution. Altogether we identified 87 BL stars (48 new detections), 7 candidate stars, and 22 stars showing long-term period variations. The distribution of modulation periods of newly identified BL stars corresponds well to the distribution of modulation periods of stars located in the Galactic field, Galactic bulge, Large Magellanic Cloud, and globular cluster M5 collected from the literature. As a very important by-product of this comparison...

  9. Dendritic Actin Filament Nucleation Causes Traveling Waves and Patches

    CERN Document Server

    Carlsson, Anders E

    2010-01-01

    The polymerization of actin via branching at a cell membrane containing nucleation-promoting factors is simulated using a stochastic-growth methodology. The polymerized-actin distribution displays three types of behavior: a) traveling waves, b) moving patches, and c) random fluctuations. Increasing actin concentration causes a transition from patches to waves. The waves and patches move by a treadmilling mechanism which does not require myosin II. The effects of downregulation of key proteins on actin wave behavior are evaluated.

  10. Nucleation, aggregation, annealing, and disintegration of granular clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Gutiérrez, Jorge; Carrillo-Estrada, J. L.; Ruiz-Suárez, J. C.

    2014-05-01

    The processes of nucleation, aggregation, annealing, and disintegration of clusters of non-Brownian paramagnetic beads in a vibrofluidized system are experimentally investigated. The interaction among the beads is induced by a magnetic seed composed of two dipoles allocated outside the container cell. We observe a clearly differentiated nucleation stage, whose evolution (nucleation time versus acceleration strength) follows a power law. Thereafter, the beads aggregate forming 2D disordered clusters around the nucleus. Both processes (nucleation and aggregation) are determined by the competition between magnetic forces and the drag produced by a thermal bath created by glass particles. Once the agglomerates reach a final state (shape and length), they are annealed by increasing and decreasing the granular temperature. We found that the fractal dimension and the lacunarity index clearly describe the structural variations of the clusters. Our discussion on this phenomenon is addressed, making a rough analogy with the glass transition in a super-cooled liquid. Finally, we study the disintegration of the clusters as a function of time and the density of the surrounding gas. The question is not if, but how they disintegrate upon removing the external field; we find that the disintegration follows an exponential decay.

  11. Nucleation and growth of nanoscaled one-dimensional materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Hongtao

    Nanoscaled one-dimensional materials have attracted great interest due to their novel physical and chemical properties. The purpose of this dissertation is to study the nucleation and growth mechanisms of carbon nanotubes and silicon nitride nanowires with their field emission applications in mind. As a result of this research, a novel methodology has been developed to deposit aligned bamboo-like carbon nanotubes on substrates using a methane and ammonia mixture in microwave plasma enhanced chemical deposition. Study of growth kinetics suggests that the carbon diffusion through bulk catalyst particles controls growth in the initial deposition process. Microstructures of carbon nanotubes are affected by the growth temperature and carbon concentration in the gas phase. High-resolution transmission electron microscope confirms the existence of the bamboo-like structure. Electron diffraction reveals that the iron-based catalyst nucleates and sustains the growth of carbon nanotubes. A nucleation and growth model has been constructed based upon experimental data and observations. In the study of silicon nitride nanoneedles, a vapor-liquid-solid model is employed to explain the nucleation and growth processes. Ammonia plasma etching is proposed to reduce the size of the catalyst and subsequently produce the novel needle-like nanostructure. High-resolution transmission electron microscope shows the structure is well crystallized and composed of alpha-silicon nitride. Other observations in the structure are also explained.

  12. Crystal nucleation as the ordering of multiple order parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, John; Tanaka, Hajime

    2016-12-01

    Nucleation is an activated process in which the system has to overcome a free energy barrier in order for a first-order phase transition between the metastable and the stable phases to take place. In the liquid-to-solid transition, the process occurs between phases of different symmetry, and it is thus inherently a multi-dimensional process, in which all symmetries are broken at the transition. In this Focus Article, we consider some recent studies which highlight the multi-dimensional nature of the nucleation process. Even for a single-component system, the formation of solid crystals from the metastable melt involves fluctuations of two (or more) order parameters, often associated with the decoupling of positional and orientational symmetry breaking. In other words, we need at least two order parameters to describe the free-energy of a system including its liquid and crystalline states. This decoupling occurs naturally for asymmetric particles or directional interactions, focusing here on the case of water, but we will show that it also affects spherically symmetric interacting particles, such as the hard-sphere system. We will show how the treatment of nucleation as a multi-dimensional process has shed new light on the process of polymorph selection, on the effect of external fields on the nucleation process and on glass-forming ability.

  13. Analysis of nucleation using mean first-passage time data from molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, David A.; Rutledge, Gregory C.

    2016-04-01

    We introduce a method for the analysis of nucleation using mean first-passage time (MFPT) statistics obtained by molecular dynamics simulation. The method is based on the Becker-Döring model for the dynamics of a nucleation-mediated phase change and rigorously accounts for the system size dependence of first-passage statistics. It is thus suitable for the analysis of systems in which the separation between time scales for nucleation and growth is small, due to either a small free energy barrier or a large system size. The method is made computationally practical by an approximation of the first-passage time distribution based on its cumulant expansion. Using this approximation, the MFPT of the model can be fit to data from molecular dynamics simulation in order to estimate valuable kinetic parameters, including the free energy barrier, critical nucleus size, and monomer attachment pre-factor, as well as the steady-state rates of nucleation and growth. The method is demonstrated using a case study on nucleation of n-eicosane crystals from the melt. For this system, we found that the observed distribution of first-passage times do not follow an exponential distribution at short times, rendering it incompatible with the assumptions made by some other methods. Using our method, the observed distribution of first-passage times was accurately described, and reasonable estimates for the kinetic parameters and steady-state rates of nucleation and growth were obtained.

  14. Tsallis Distributions and the q-Triplet of the Magnetic Field in the Heliosheath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlaga, L. F.

    2014-12-01

    The Tsallis distribution (which is proportional to the q-exponential function and is related to the κ-distribution) was derived from an entropy function, inspired by multifractals, which gives a generalization of Boltzmann-Gibbs statistical mechanics. A Tsallis distribution describes the distribution of increments of daily averages of the magnetic field strength B observed by Voyager 2 (V2) in the heliosheath during 2010 in association with exceptionally low solar activity. A parameter q derived from this distribution is qstat = 1.75. The correlation function of B(t) is a power law on scales from 1 to 16 days, and from the exponent one obtains the parameter qrel = 3.9. The fluctuations of B are described by a multifractal spectrum f(α) on scales from 1 to 8 days, from which one obtains qsen = 1.75. The "q-triplet" (qsen, qrel, qstat) defines basic observable properties of an open, driven system in a meta-equilibrium state, which strongly constrains physical models of the system. The distribution of B is Gaussian, probably related to the unipolar region in which V2 was located. A 1/f spectrum of B was observed on scales from 1 to 100 days. The Tsallis distribution also describes the "turbulence" observed on very small scales, from 48 sec to several hours, observed by V2 behind the termination shock from day 245 - 301, 2007.

  15. Distribution of the Crustal Magnetic Field in Sichuan-Yunnan Region, Southwest China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunhua Bai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the new and higher degree geomagnetic model NGDC-720-V3, we have investigated the spatial distribution, the altitude decay characteristics of the crustal magnetic anomaly, the contributions from different wavelength bands to the anomaly, and the relationship among the anomaly, the geological structure, and the geophysical field in Sichuan-Yunnan region of China. It is noted that the most outstanding feature in this area is the strong positive magnetic anomaly in Sichuan Basin, a geologically stable block. Contrasting with this feature, a strong negative anomaly can be seen nearby in Longmen Mountain block, an active block. This contradiction implies a possible relationship between the magnetic field and the geological activity. Completely different feature in magnetic field distribution is seen in the central Yunnan block, another active region, where positive and negative anomalies distribute alternatively, showing a complex magnetic anomaly map. Some fault belts, such as the Longmen Mountain fault, Lijiang-Xiaojinhe fault, and the Red River fault, are the transitional zones of strong and weak or negative and positive anomalies. The corresponding relationship between the magnetic anomaly and the geophysical fields was confirmed.

  16. Recovering the nonlinear density field from the galaxy distribution with a Poisson-Lognormal filter

    CERN Document Server

    Kitaura, Francisco S; Metcalf, R Benton

    2009-01-01

    We present a general expression for a lognormal filter given an arbitrary nonlinear galaxy bias. We derive this filter as the maximum a posteriori solution assuming a lognormal prior distribution for the matter field with a given mean field and modeling the observed galaxy distribution by a Poissonian process. We have performed a three-dimensional implementation of this filter with a very efficient Newton-Krylov inversion scheme. Furthermore, we have tested it with a dark matter N-body simulation assuming a unit galaxy bias relation and compared the results with previous density field estimators like the inverse weighting scheme and Wiener filtering. Our results show good agreement with the underlying dark matter field for overdensities even above delta~1000 which exceeds by one order of magnitude the regime in which the lognormal is expected to be valid. The reason is that for our filter the lognormal assumption enters as a prior distribution function, but the maximum a posteriori solution is also conditione...

  17. Distributed Sensor Fusion for Scalar Field Mapping Using Mobile Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La, Hung Manh; Sheng, Weihua

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, autonomous mobile sensor networks are deployed to measure a scalar field and build its map. We develop a novel method for multiple mobile sensor nodes to build this map using noisy sensor measurements. Our method consists of two parts. First, we develop a distributed sensor fusion algorithm by integrating two different distributed consensus filters to achieve cooperative sensing among sensor nodes. This fusion algorithm has two phases. In the first phase, the weighted average consensus filter is developed, which allows each sensor node to find an estimate of the value of the scalar field at each time step. In the second phase, the average consensus filter is used to allow each sensor node to find a confidence of the estimate at each time step. The final estimate of the value of the scalar field is iteratively updated during the movement of the mobile sensors via weighted average. Second, we develop the distributed flocking-control algorithm to drive the mobile sensors to form a network and track the virtual leader moving along the field when only a small subset of the mobile sensors know the information of the leader. Experimental results are provided to demonstrate our proposed algorithms.

  18. Strong Langmuir turbulence generated by electron beams - Electric-field distributions and electron scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, P. A.; Newman, D. L.

    1990-01-01

    Strong turbulence and transit-time scattering theory are applied here to calculate the statistical distribution of intense Langmuir fields and the consequent beam scattering in plasma turbulence driven by an electron beam. The experimentally observed electric-field distributions are compared with predictions of strong-turbulence theory, concentrating on the wave levels, the Gaussian tail of the high-field distribution observed in one experiment, the arrest scale of collapse, and the fractional volume occupied by the highest fields. The Guassian form of the tail is confirmed, and the results imply that the collapse is arrested at a scale where the peak electrostatic energy density is of the same order as the thermal energy density. The theory of transit-time interactions is generalized to include relativistic particle dynamics and is applied to predict the scattering of the beam electrons in energy and angle as they pass through strong Langmuir turbulence. The results support the validity of the recently developed scaling theory of strong turbulence.

  19. The distribution of 3D superconductivity near the second critical field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachmar, Ayman; Nasrallah, Marwa

    2016-09-01

    We study the minimizers of the Ginzburg-Landau energy functional with a uniform magnetic field in a three dimensional bounded domain. The functional depends on two positive parameters, the Ginzburg-Landau parameter and the intensity of the applied magnetic field, and acts on complex-valued functions and vector fields. We establish a formula for the distribution of the L 2-norm of the minimizing complex-valued function (order parameter). The formula is valid in the regime where the Ginzburg-Landau parameter is large and the applied magnetic field is close to and strictly below the second critical field—the threshold value corresponding to the transition from the superconducting to the normal phase in the bulk of the sample. Earlier results are valid in 2D domains and for the L 4-norm in 3D domains.

  20. Energy distribution for undergate-type triode carbon nanotube field emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, SeGi; Yi, Whikun; Lee, Jeonghee; Jeong, Taewon; Jin, Sunghwan; Heo, Jungna; Kang, J. H.; Choi, Y. S.; Lee, Chang Soo; Yoo, Ji-Beom; Kim, J. M.

    2002-05-01

    Field emission energy distribution (FEED) has been measured for undergate-type triode carbon nanotube (CNT) field emitters where the gate electrodes are located underneath the cathode electrodes. The diode-type emission for these CNT emitters was found to follow the Fowler-Nordheim relation, whereas the triode-type emission exhibited the deviation from this relation. The FEED peaks for the undergate CNT emitters under the triode-type emission shifted to lower energy as the gate voltage increased, indicating nonmetallic behavior for the CNT emitters. There exist two different characteristic FEED peaks, where their peak energy shifts as a function of the gate voltage belong to two different slopes. From the difference in the position and intensity of the peaks, it was found that one was field emission directly from CNTs and the other might be emitted from CNTs through glass powders which were added during the CNT field emitter fabrication process.

  1. Mean-field approximation for spacing distribution functions in classical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Diego Luis; Pimpinelli, Alberto; Einstein, T. L.

    2012-01-01

    We propose a mean-field method to calculate approximately the spacing distribution functions p(n)(s) in one-dimensional classical many-particle systems. We compare our method with two other commonly used methods, the independent interval approximation and the extended Wigner surmise. In our mean-field approach, p(n)(s) is calculated from a set of Langevin equations, which are decoupled by using a mean-field approximation. We find that in spite of its simplicity, the mean-field approximation provides good results in several systems. We offer many examples illustrating that the three previously mentioned methods give a reasonable description of the statistical behavior of the system. The physical interpretation of each method is also discussed.

  2. A Novel Method to Obtain Wires Distribution Considering the Shape of Generated Electromagnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Hong, Tianqi

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a method to calculate the wires distribution for generating required electromagnetic field. Instead of solving the distribution of wires directly, we formulate the problem into zero-one programming form. By applying the proposed algorithm to solve the zero-one programming problem, a practical solution can be obtained. Two practical examples are proposed to illustrate detailed calculation steps of the novel method. The comparison between binary particle swarm optimization searching algorithm and the pro-posed algorithm is provided and discussed. All the design results are validated with FEM calculation results.

  3. Theory of Distribution Estimation of Hyperparameters in Markov Random Field Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Hirotaka; Nakanishi-Ohno, Yoshinori; Okada, Masato

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the performance of distribution estimation of hyperparameters in Markov random field models proposed by Nakanishi-Ohno et al., http://doi.org/10.1088/1751-8113/47/4/045001, J. Phys. A 47, 045001 (2014) when used to evaluate the confidence of data. We analytically calculated the configurational average, with respect to data, of the negative logarithm of the posterior distribution, which is called free energy based on an analogy with statistical mechanics. This configurational average of free energy shrinks as the amount of data increases. Our results theoretically confirm the numerical results from that previous study.

  4. Tar mats and residual oil distribution in a giant oil field offshore Abu Dhabi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpentier, Bernard [Institut Francais du Petrole and 4 Av. de Bois Preau, 92852 Rueil-Malmaison Cedex (France); Arab, Hani [ZADCO P.O. Box 46808, Abu Dhabi(United Arab Emirates); Pluchery, Eric; Chautru, Jean-Marc [Beicip-Franlab 232, Av. Napoleon Bonaparte, BP 213, 92502 Rueil-Malmaison Cedex (France)

    2007-09-15

    This paper describes how geochemical data (Rock Eval analysis, SARA composition) combined with wireline log interpretation allows for the recognition of the distribution and continuity of bitumens in a main reservoir of an offshore giant field in Abu Dhabi. The integration of new geochemical data with data and field information provided by the oil company ZADCO allows for the recognition of two types of bitumen rich levels in the main reservoir of the field: (a) one corresponding to bitumen rich main reservoir intervals associated with high resistivity and high oil saturation, these intervals can be called 'tar mats', (b) the other corresponding to low oil saturated intervals, and can be classified as 'heavy residual oil'. In terms of lateral and vertical distribution, the tar mats are found at the crestal area of the Present-day structure and are located at the base of the reservoir unit above a tight limestone which plays a role of being a vertical permeability barrier. The tar mats seem to be independent of the Present-day OWC and are not related to biodegradation processes. The heavy residual oil is mainly located in the Northeast and the Southeast parts of the field and close to the OWC but it is also present all around the field except (1) in the west, in the area of the spill point and (2) in the Northwest area where direct contact between mobile oil and water is detected. Study of the structural evolution demonstrates that a tilting of the field began at Dammam age time (Eocene). The tilting of the structure led to a reduction of the structural closure in the West followed by the leakage of part of the originally trapped oil. Numerical modeling of such a geological scenario leads to a distribution of fluids (water, movable oil and residual oil) very close to the one observed at Present-day time in the field. This modeling allows a prediction of the extension and distribution of the residual heavy oil within the studied reservoir and can

  5. Ex Vivo and In Silico Feasibility Study of Monitoring Electric Field Distribution in Tissue during Electroporation Based Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranjc, Matej; Bajd, Franci; Sersa, Igor; Woo, Eung Je; Miklavcic, Damijan

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) was recently proposed for determining electric field distribution during electroporation in which cell membrane permeability is temporary increased by application of an external high electric field. The method was already successfully applied for reconstruction of electric field distribution in agar phantoms. Before the next step towards in vivo experiments is taken, monitoring of electric field distribution during electroporation of ex vivo tissue ex vivo and feasibility for its use in electroporation based treatments needed to be evaluated. Sequences of high voltage pulses were applied to chicken liver tissue in order to expose it to electric field which was measured by means of MREIT. MREIT was also evaluated for its use in electroporation based treatments by calculating electric field distribution for two regions, the tumor and the tumor-liver region, in a numerical model based on data obtained from clinical study on electrochemotherapy treatment of deep-seated tumors. Electric field distribution inside tissue was successfully measured ex vivo using MREIT and significant changes of tissue electrical conductivity were observed in the region of the highest electric field. A good agreement was obtained between the electric field distribution obtained by MREIT and the actual electric field distribution in evaluated regions of a numerical model, suggesting that implementation of MREIT could thus enable efficient detection of areas with insufficient electric field coverage during electroporation based treatments, thus assuring the effectiveness of the treatment. PMID:23029212

  6. Ex vivo and in silico feasibility study of monitoring electric field distribution in tissue during electroporation based treatments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matej Kranjc

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT was recently proposed for determining electric field distribution during electroporation in which cell membrane permeability is temporary increased by application of an external high electric field. The method was already successfully applied for reconstruction of electric field distribution in agar phantoms. Before the next step towards in vivo experiments is taken, monitoring of electric field distribution during electroporation of ex vivo tissue ex vivo and feasibility for its use in electroporation based treatments needed to be evaluated. Sequences of high voltage pulses were applied to chicken liver tissue in order to expose it to electric field which was measured by means of MREIT. MREIT was also evaluated for its use in electroporation based treatments by calculating electric field distribution for two regions, the tumor and the tumor-liver region, in a numerical model based on data obtained from clinical study on electrochemotherapy treatment of deep-seated tumors. Electric field distribution inside tissue was successfully measured ex vivo using MREIT and significant changes of tissue electrical conductivity were observed in the region of the highest electric field. A good agreement was obtained between the electric field distribution obtained by MREIT and the actual electric field distribution in evaluated regions of a numerical model, suggesting that implementation of MREIT could thus enable efficient detection of areas with insufficient electric field coverage during electroporation based treatments, thus assuring the effectiveness of the treatment.

  7. Droplet Nucleation: Physically-Based Parameterizations and Comparative Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve Ghan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the greatest sources of uncertainty in simulations of climate and climate change is the influence of aerosols on the optical properties of clouds. The root of this influence is the droplet nucleation process, which involves the spontaneous growth of aerosol into cloud droplets at cloud edges, during the early stages of cloud formation, and in some cases within the interior of mature clouds. Numerical models of droplet nucleation represent much of the complexity of the process, but at a computational cost that limits their application to simulations of hours or days. Physically-based parameterizations of droplet nucleation are designed to quickly estimate the number nucleated as a function of the primary controlling parameters: the aerosol number size distribution, hygroscopicity and cooling rate. Here we compare and contrast the key assumptions used in developing each of the most popular parameterizations and compare their performances under a variety of conditions. We find that the more complex parameterizations perform well under a wider variety of nucleation conditions, but all parameterizations perform well under the most common conditions. We then discuss the various applications of the parameterizations to cloud-resolving, regional and global models to study aerosol effects on clouds at a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. We compare estimates of anthropogenic aerosol indirect effects using two different parameterizations applied to the same global climate model, and find that the estimates of indirect effects differ by only 10%. We conclude with a summary of the outstanding challenges remaining for further development and application.

  8. AGN Activity in Nucleated Galaxies as Measured by Chandra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foord, Adi; Gallo, Elena; Hodges-Kluck, Edmund; Miller, Brendan P.; Baldassare, Vivienne F.; Gültekin, Kayhan; Gnedin, Oleg Y.

    2017-05-01

    Motivated by theoretical expectations that nuclear star clusters (NSCs) in galactic centers may provide a favorable environment for supermassive black holes to form and/or efficiently grow, we set out to measure the fraction of nearby nucleated galaxies that also host an active galactic nucleus. We targeted a distance-limited sample of 98 objects with the Chandra X-ray Telescope, down to a uniform X-ray luminosity threshold of ˜1038 erg s-1. The sample is composed of 47 late-types and 51 early-types, enabling us to further investigate the active fraction as a function of galactic morphology. After correcting for contamination to the nuclear X-ray signal from bright X-ray binaries, we measure an active fraction f=11.2{ % }-4.9+7.4 (1σ C.L.) across the whole sample, in agreement with previous estimates based on a heterogeneous combination of optical, X-ray, and radio diagnostics, by Seth et al. After accounting for the different stellar mass distributions in our samples, we find no statistically significant difference in the active fraction of early- versus late-type nucleated galaxies, with f=10.6{ % }-4.9+11.9 and 10.8{ % }-6.3+11.3, respectively. For the early-type nucleated galaxies, we are able to carry out a controlled comparison with a parent sample of non-nucleated galaxies covering the same stellar mass range, again finding no statistically significant difference in the active fraction. Taken at face value, our findings suggest that the presence of an NSC does not facilitate or enhance accretion-powered emission from a nuclear supermassive black hole. This is true even for late-type nucleated galaxies, home to bluer NSCs and arguably larger gas reservoirs.

  9. Computation of Magnetic Field Distribution by Using an Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Dhana Lakshmi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a set of mathematical models presenting magnetic fields caused by operations of an extra high voltage (EHV transmission line under normal loading and short-circuit condi t ions . The mathematical model s are expressed in second-order partial differential equations derived by analyzing magnetic field distribution around a 500- kV power transmission line. The problem of study is intentionally two-dimensional due to the property of long line field distribution. To verify its use, i single-circuit and ii double-circuit, 500-kV power transmission lines have been employed for test. Finite element methods (FEM for solving wave equations have been exploited. The computer simulation based on the use of the FEM has been developed in MATLAB programming environment. This paper presents novel approach based on the use of adaptive network-based fuzzy inference system (ANFIS to estimate magnetic fields around an overhead power transmission lines. The ANFIS approach learns the rules and membership functions from training data. The hybrid system is tested by the use of the validation data. From all test cases, the calculation line of 1.0m above the ground level is set to investigate the magnetic fields acting on a human in c o m p a r a t i v e with ICNIRP standard.

  10. Pressure Distribution Characters of Flow Field around High-Speed Train

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Based on incompressible viscous fluid Navier-Stokes equation and k-ε 2-equationsturbulent model, an investigation on 3D turbulent flow field around four kinds of train models has been made by finite element method. From the calculation, the pressure distribution characters of flow field around high-speed trains have been obtained. It is significant for strength design of the high-speed train body, for resisting wind design of the facilities beside the high-speed railways and for determining the aerodynamic force of induced air to the human body near the railways.

  11. The effect of concentrator field layout on the performance of point-focus distributed receiver systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pons, R. L.; Dugan, A. F.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of concentrator field layout on the technical-economic performance of a point-focusing distributed receiver (PFDR) solar thermal power plant is presented. The plant design is based on the small community prototype system currently under development for JPL/DOE; parabolic dish concentrators are employed, and small heat engines are used to generate electricity at each dish. The effect of field size, array proportions, dish-to-dish spacing and packing fraction (concentrator-land area ratio) are presented for typical PFDR layouts. Economic analyses are carried out to determine optimum packing fraction as a function of site cost.

  12. Simple improvements to classical bubble nucleation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kyoko K.; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Angélil, Raymond; Diemand, Jürg

    2015-08-01

    We revisit classical nucleation theory (CNT) for the homogeneous bubble nucleation rate and improve the classical formula using a correct prefactor in the nucleation rate. Most of the previous theoretical studies have used the constant prefactor determined by the bubble growth due to the evaporation process from the bubble surface. However, the growth of bubbles is also regulated by the thermal conduction, the viscosity, and the inertia of liquid motion. These effects can decrease the prefactor significantly, especially when the liquid pressure is much smaller than the equilibrium one. The deviation in the nucleation rate between the improved formula and the CNT can be as large as several orders of magnitude. Our improved, accurate prefactor and recent advances in molecular dynamics simulations and laboratory experiments for argon bubble nucleation enable us to precisely constrain the free energy barrier for bubble nucleation. Assuming the correction to the CNT free energy is of the functional form suggested by Tolman, the precise evaluations of the free energy barriers suggest the Tolman length is ≃0.3 σ independently of the temperature for argon bubble nucleation, where σ is the unit length of the Lennard-Jones potential. With this Tolman correction and our prefactor one gets accurate bubble nucleation rate predictions in the parameter range probed by current experiments and molecular dynamics simulations.

  13. Systematic coarse-graining in nucleation theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schweizer, M.; Sagis, L.M.C.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we show that the standard method to obtain nucleation rate-predictions with the aid of atomistic Monte Carlo simulations leads to nucleation rate predictions that deviate 3 - 5 orders of magnitude from the recent brute-force molecular dynamics simulations [Diemand et al., J. Chem. Phys

  14. Tuning Ice Nucleation with Supercharged Polypeptides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Huige; Ma, Chao; Li, Kaiyong; Liu, Kai; Loznik, Mark; Teeuwen, Rosalie; van Hest, Jan C M; Zhou, Xin; Herrmann, Andreas; Wang, Jianjun

    2016-01-01

    Supercharged unfolded polypeptides (SUPs) are exploited for controlling ice nucleation via tuning the nature of charge and charge density of SUPs. The results show that positively charged SUPs facilitate ice nucleation, while negatively charged ones suppress it. Moreover, the charge density of the S

  15. Advances in Understanding the Role of Aerosols on Ice Clouds from the Fifth International Ice Nucleation (FIN) Workshops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cziczo, D. J.; Moehler, O.; DeMott, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    The relationship of ambient aerosol particles to the formation of ice-containing clouds is one of the largest uncertainties in understanding climate. This is due to several poorly understood processes including the microphysics of how particles nucleate ice, the number of effective heterogeneous ice nuclei and their atmospheric distribution, the role of anthropogenic activities in producing or changing the behavior of ice forming particles and the interplay between effective heterogeneous ice nuclei and homogeneous ice formation. Our team recently completed a three-part international workshop to improve our understanding of atmospheric ice formation. Termed the Fifth International Ice Nucleation (FIN) Workshops, our motivation was the limited number of measurements and a lack of understanding of how to compare data acquired by different groups. The first activity, termed FIN1, addressed the characterization of ice nucleating particle size, number and chemical composition. FIN2 addressed the determination of ice nucleating particle number density. Groups modeling ice nucleation joined FIN2 to provide insight on measurements critically needed to model atmospheric ice nucleation and to understand the performance of ice chambers. FIN1 and FIN2 took place at the Aerosol Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere (AIDA) chamber at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. A particular emphasis of FIN1 and FIN2 was the use of 'blind' intercomparisons using a highly characterized, but unknown to the instrument operators, aerosol sample. The third activity, FIN3, took place at the Desert Research Institute's Storm Peak Laboratory (SPL). A high elevation site not subject to local emissions, SPL allowed for a comparison of ice chambers and subsequent analysis of the ice residuals under the challenging conditions of low particle loading, temperature and pressure found in the atmosphere. The presentation focuses on the improvement in understanding how mass spectra from different

  16. On the theoretical description of nucleation in confined space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürn W. P. Schmelzer

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In a recent paper, Kozisek et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 134, 094508 (2011] have demonstrated for four different cases of phase formation that the work of formation of critical clusters required to form in the system in some given time a first experimentally measurable cluster of the new phase depends in a logarithmic way on the volume of the system. This result was obtained based on the numerical solution of the kinetic equations describing nucleation and growth processes and the obtained in this way steady-state cluster size distributions. Here a straightforward alternative analytical interpretation of this result is proposed by computing directly the mean expectation times of formation of supercritical clusters. It is proven strictly that this result is generally independent of the kind of nucleation (homogeneous or heterogeneous or specific realization (condensation, cavitation, crystallization, segregation, etc. considered. It is shown that such behavior is simply a consequence of the linear dependence of the steady-state nucleation rate on the volume of the system, neither time-lag or primary depletion (due to the establishment of steady-state cluster size distributions for subcritical clusters or secondary depletion (caused by the change of the state of the ambient phase due to the formation and growth of supercritical clusters and connected with finite size effects are required for the interpretation of such result. In a second step, this analytical result is extended accounting for the growth of the supercritical cluster to directly measurable sizes. Finally, an analytical foundation of the method of determination of the critical supersaturation as employed by Kozisek et al. is developed and the results obtained via the computation and analysis of steady-state cluster size distributions and calculation of mean expectation times for formation of the first supercritical clusters are compared. Some further general problems of nucleation and

  17. The Leipzig Ice Nucleation chamber Comparison (LINC): An overview of ice nucleation measurements observed with four on-line ice nucleation devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohn, Monika; Wex, Heike; Grawe, Sarah; Hartmann, Susan; Hellner, Lisa; Herenz, Paul; Welti, André; Stratmann, Frank; Lohmann, Ulrike; Kanji, Zamin A.

    2016-04-01

    Mixed-phase clouds (MPCs) are found to be the most relevant cloud type leading to precipitation in mid-latitudes. The formation of ice crystals in MPCs is not completely understood. To estimate the effect of aerosol particles on the radiative properties of clouds and to describe ice nucleation in models, the specific properties of aerosol particles acting as ice nucleating particles (INPs) still need to be identified. A number of devices are able to measure INPs in the lab and in the field. However, methods can be very different and need to be tested under controlled conditions with respect to aerosol generation and properties in order to standardize measurement and data analysis approaches for subsequent ambient measurements. Here, we present an overview of the LINC campaign hosted at TROPOS in September 2015. We compare four ice nucleation devices: PINC (Portable Ice Nucleation Chamber, Chou et al., 2011) and SPIN (SPectrometer for Ice Nuclei) are operated in deposition nucleation and condensation freezing mode. LACIS (Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator, Hartmann et al., 2011) and PIMCA (Portable Immersion Mode Cooling chamber) measure in the immersion freezing mode. PIMCA is used as a vertical extension to PINC and allows activation and droplet growth prior to exposure to the investigated ice nucleation temperature. Size-resolved measurements of multiple aerosol types were performed including pure mineral dust (K-feldspar, kaolinite) and biological particles (Birch pollen washing waters) as well as some of them after treatment with sulfuric or nitric acid prior to experiments. LACIS and PIMCA-PINC operated in the immersion freezing mode showed very good agreement in the measured frozen fraction (FF). For the comparison between PINC and SPIN, which were scanning relative humidity from below to above water vapor saturation, an agreement was found for the obtained INP concentration. However, some differences were observed, which may result from ice

  18. Sensitivity field distributions for segmental bioelectrical impedance analysis based on real human anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilov, A. A.; Kramarenko, V. K.; Nikolaev, D. V.; Rudnev, S. G.; Salamatova, V. Yu; Smirnov, A. V.; Vassilevski, Yu V.

    2013-04-01

    In this work, an adaptive unstructured tetrahedral mesh generation technology is applied for simulation of segmental bioimpedance measurements using high-resolution whole-body model of the Visible Human Project man. Sensitivity field distributions for a conventional tetrapolar, as well as eight- and ten-electrode measurement configurations are obtained. Based on the ten-electrode configuration, we suggest an algorithm for monitoring changes in the upper lung area.

  19. Correlating Microstructure with Switching Field Distribution in Nanomagnetic Systems with Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-01

    Journal of Applied Physics , vol. 99, p. 08R702, Apr...magnetic properties of Co/Pd multilayers," Journal of Applied Physics , vol. 89, pp. 7531-7533, Jun 2001. [5] K. J. Kirk, J. N. Chapman, S. McVitie, P. R...Aitchison, and C. D. W. Wilkinson, "Interactions and switching field distributions of nanoscale magnetic elements," Journal of Applied Physics ,

  20. Distribution of induced electromagnetic fields in the MHD-channel with electrodes and its integral characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavrent' yev, I.V.

    1982-01-01

    A solution is provided to the task of distributing electromagnetic fields in the MHD channel with nonconducting partitions of finite length with random magnetic Reynolds numbers. Local and integral characteristics of these channels are obtained. It is indicated that their high effectiveness can be guaranteed only by arranging partitions at the inlet to the channel at a certain distance from the electronic zone which must be greater the greater the magnetic Reynolds number.

  1. Measurement and modeling of electric field and space-charge distributions in obstructed helium discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fendel, Peter [Thorlabs, 56 Sparta Avenue, Newton, New Jersey 07860 (United States); Ganguly, Biswa N.; Bletzinger, Peter [Air Force Research Laboratory, WPAFB, Ohio 45433 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Axial and radial variations of electric field have been measured in dielectric shielded 0.025 m diameter parallel plate electrode with 0.0065 m gap for 1.6 mA, 2260 V helium dc discharge at 1.75 Torr. The axial and radial electric field profiles have been measured from the Stark splitting of 2{sup 1}S→11 {sup 1}P transition through collision induced fluorescence from 4{sup 3}D→2{sup 3}P. The electric field values showed a strong radial variation peaking to 500 kV/m near the cathode radial boundary, and decreasing to about 100 kV/m near the anode edge, suggesting the formation of an obstructed discharge for this low nd condition, where n is the gas density and d is the gap distance. The off-axis Stark spectra showed that the electric field vector deviates from normal to the cathode surface which permits longer path electron trajectories in the inter-electrode gap. Also, the on-axis electric field gradient was very small and off-axis electric field gradient was large indicating a radially non-uniform current density. In order to obtain information about the space charge distribution in this obstructed discharge, it was modeled using the 2-d axisymmetric Poisson solver with the COMSOL finite element modeling program. The best fit to the measured electric field distribution was obtained with a space charge variation of ρ(r) = ρ{sub 0}(r/r{sub 0}){sup 3}, where ρ(r) is the local space charge density, ρ{sub 0} = 6 × 10{sup −3} Coulomb/m{sup 3}, r is the local radial value, and r{sub 0} is the radius of the electrode.

  2. Magnetic droplet nucleation boundary in orthogonal spin-torque nano-oscillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Sunjae; Eklund, Anders; Iacocca, Ezio; Mohseni, Seyed Majid; Sani, Sohrab R; Bookman, Lake; Hoefer, Mark A; Dumas, Randy K; Åkerman, Johan

    2016-04-18

    Static and dynamic magnetic solitons play a critical role in applied nanomagnetism. Magnetic droplets, a type of non-topological dissipative soliton, can be nucleated and sustained in nanocontact spin-torque oscillators with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy free layers. Here, we perform a detailed experimental determination of the full droplet nucleation boundary in the current-field plane for a wide range of nanocontact sizes and demonstrate its excellent agreement with an analytical expression originating from a stability analysis. Our results reconcile recent contradicting reports of the field dependence of the droplet nucleation. Furthermore, our analytical model both highlights the relation between the fixed layer material and the droplet nucleation current magnitude, and provides an accurate method to experimentally determine the spin transfer torque asymmetry of each device.

  3. First passage times in homogeneous nucleation: Dependence on the total number of particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yvinec, Romain [PRC INRA UMR85, CNRS UMR7247, Université François Rabelais de Tours, IFCE, F-37380 Nouzilly (France); Bernard, Samuel; Pujo-Menjouet, Laurent [Université de Lyon, CNRS, Université Lyon 1, Institut Camille Jordan UMR5208, 69622 Villeurbanne (France); INRIA Team Dracula, Inria Center Grenoble Rhône-Alpes, Grenoble (France); Hingant, Erwan [Departamento de Matemática, Universidad Federal de Campina Grande, Campina Grande, PB (Brazil)

    2016-01-21

    Motivated by nucleation and molecular aggregation in physical, chemical, and biological settings, we present an extension to a thorough analysis of the stochastic self-assembly of a fixed number of identical particles in a finite volume. We study the statistics of times required for maximal clusters to be completed, starting from a pure-monomeric particle configuration. For finite volumes, we extend previous analytical approaches to the case of arbitrary size-dependent aggregation and fragmentation kinetic rates. For larger volumes, we develop a scaling framework to study the first assembly time behavior as a function of the total quantity of particles. We find that the mean time to first completion of a maximum-sized cluster may have a surprisingly weak dependence on the total number of particles. We highlight how higher statistics (variance, distribution) of the first passage time may nevertheless help to infer key parameters, such as the size of the maximum cluster. Finally, we present a framework to quantify formation of macroscopic sized clusters, which are (asymptotically) very unlikely and occur as a large deviation phenomenon from the mean-field limit. We argue that this framework is suitable to describe phase transition phenomena, as inherent infrequent stochastic processes, in contrast to classical nucleation theory.

  4. Solution to Shape Identification of Unsteady Natural Convection Fields to Control Temperature Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katamine, Eiji; Imai, Shinya; Mathmatical design Team; Computational mechanics Team

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents a numerical solution to shape identification of unsteady natural convection fields to control temperature to a prescribed distribution. The square error integral between the actual temperature distributions and the prescribed temperature distributions on the prescribed sub-boundaries during the specified period of time is used as the objective functional. Shape gradient of the shape identification problem is derived theoretically using the Lagrange multiplier method, adjoint variable method, and the formulae of the material derivative. Reshaping is carried out by the traction method proposed as an approach to solving shape optimization problems. Numerical analyses program for the shape identification is developed based on FreeFem++, and the validity of proposed method is confirmed by results of 2D numerical analyses.

  5. Recent progress on weight distributions of cyclic codes over finite fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai Q. Dinh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic codes are an interesting type of linear codes and have wide applications in communication and storage systems due to their efficient encoding and decoding algorithms. In coding theory it is often desirable to know the weight distribution of a cyclic code to estimate the error correcting capability and error probability. In this paper, we present the recent progress on the weight distributions of cyclic codes over finite fields, which had been determined by exponential sums. The cyclic codes with few weights which are very useful are discussed and their existence conditions are listed. Furthermore, we discuss the more general case of constacyclic codes and give some equivalences to characterize their weight distributions.

  6. Ice Water Classification Using Statistical Distribution Based Conditional Random Fields in RADARSAT-2 Dual Polarization Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.; Li, F.; Zhang, S.; Hao, W.; Zhu, T.; Yuan, L.; Xiao, F.

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, Statistical Distribution based Conditional Random Fields (STA-CRF) algorithm is exploited for improving marginal ice-water classification. Pixel level ice concentration is presented as the comparison of methods based on CRF. Furthermore, in order to explore the effective statistical distribution model to be integrated into STA-CRF, five statistical distribution models are investigated. The STA-CRF methods are tested on 2 scenes around Prydz Bay and Adélie Depression, where contain a variety of ice types during melt season. Experimental results indicate that the proposed method can resolve sea ice edge well in Marginal Ice Zone (MIZ) and show a robust distinction of ice and water.

  7. Nucleation in an Ultra Low Ionization Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, J. O.; Enghoff, M. B.; Paling, S.; Svensmark, H.

    2010-12-01

    Atmospheric ions can enhance the nucleation of aerosols, as has been established by experiments, observation, and theory. In the clean marine atmosphere ionization is mainly caused by cosmic rays which in turn are controlled by the activity of the Sun, thus providing a potential link between solar activity and climate. In order to understand the effect ions may have on the production of cloud condensation nuclei the overall contribution of ion induced nucleation to the global production of secondary aerosols must be determined. One issue with determining this contribution is that several mechanisms for nucleation exist and it can be difficult to determine the relative importance of the various mechanisms in a given nucleation event when both ion induced and electrically neutral nucleation mechanisms are at work at the same time. We have carried out nucleation experiments in the Boulby Underground Laboratory, located 1100 meters below ground, thus reducing the flux of ionizing cosmic radiation by six orders of magnitude. Similarly we have reduced the gamma background by shielding the experiment in lead and copper. Finally we have used air stored for several weeks and passed through an active charcoal filter in order to reduce the Radon concentration. In this way we have been able to make nucleation experiments with very low ionizing background, meaning that we can rule out ion induced nucleation as a contributing mechanism. Our experimental setup is a 50 L electropolished stainless steel reactor at near atmospheric conditions. The chamber contains clean air with the addition of water vapor, ozone, and SO2. Using UV lights at 254 nm ozone is photolyzed, leading to the production of sulfuric acid and thus aerosols. An 18 MBq Caesium-137 gamma ray source with various amounts of lead in front allows us to alter the ionization in our chamber. By making series of nucleation bursts with varying amounts of ionizing radiation we then gauge the relative importance of ion

  8. Particle Simulations of the Guard Electrode Effects on the Photoelectron Distribution Around an Electric Field Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Y.; Usui, H.; Kojima, H.

    2010-12-01

    In tenuous space plasma environment, photoelectrons emitted due to solar illumination produce a high-density photoelectron cloud localized in the vicinity of a spacecraft body and an electric field sensor. The photoelectron current emitted from the sensor has also received considerable attention because it becomes a primary factor in determining floating potentials of the sunlit spacecraft and sensor bodies. Considering the fact that asymmetric photoelectron distribution between sunlit and sunless sides of the spacecraft occasionally causes a spurious sunward electric field, we require quantitative evaluation of the photoelectron distribution around the spacecraft and its influence on electric field measurements by means of a numerical approach. In the current study, we applied the Particle-in-Cell plasma simulation to the analysis of the photoelectron environment around spacecraft. By using the PIC modeling, we can self-consistently consider the plasma kinetics. This enables us to simulate the formation of the photoelectron cloud as well as the spacecraft and sensor charging in a self-consistent manner. We report the progress of an analysis on photoelectron environment around MEFISTO, which is an electric field instrument for the BepiColombo/MMO spacecraft to Mercury’s magnetosphere. The photoelectron guard electrode is a key technology for ensuring an optimum photoelectron environment. We show some simulation results on the guard electrode effects on surrounding photoelectrons and discuss a guard operation condition for producing the optimum photoelectron environment. We also deal with another important issue, that is, how the guard electrode can mitigate an undesirable influence of an asymmetric photoelectron distribution on electric field measurements.

  9. Direct correlation of diffusion and pore size distributions with low field NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Xiao, Lizhi; Liao, Guangzhi; Song, Yi-Qiao

    2016-08-01

    The time-dependent diffusion coefficient (D) is a powerful tool to probe microstructure in porous media, and can be obtained by the NMR method. In a real porous sample, molecular diffusion is very complex. Here we present a new method which directly measures the relationship between effective diffusion coefficients and pore size distributions without knowing surface relaxivity. This method is used to extract structural information and explore the relationship between D and a in porous media having broad pore size distributions. The diffusion information is encoded by the Pulsed Field Gradient (PFG) method and the pore size distributions are acquired by the Decay due to Diffusion in the Internal Field (DDIF) method. Two model samples were measured to verify this method. Restricted diffusion was analyzed, and shows that most fluid molecules experience pore wall. The D(a) curves obtained from correlation maps were fitted to the Padé approximant equation and a good agreement was found between the fitting lines and the measured data. Then a sandstone sample with unknown structure was measured. The state of confined fluids was analyzed and structural information, such as pore size distributions, were extracted. The D - T1 correlation maps were also obtained using the same method, which yielded surface relaxivities for different samples. All the experiments were conducted on 2 MHz NMR equipment to obtain accurate diffusion information, where internal gradients can be neglected. This method is expected to have useful applications in the oil industry, particularly for NMR logging in the future.

  10. The effect of reconnection electric field on crescent and U-shaped distribution functions in asymmetric reconnection with no guide field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessho, N.; Chen, L.-J.; Hesse, M.; Wang, S.

    2017-07-01

    Electron distribution functions in the electron diffusion region in asymmetric reconnection without a guide field are studied by means of theory and 2-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. The effect of the reconnection electric field on crescent-shaped distribution functions is to broaden the thickness of the crescent. We express the thickness of the crescent as a function of field strengths, the distance from the X-line, and the time electrons spend executing meandering orbits. The electron distribution at the reconnection X-line exhibits a U-shaped structure with an opening angle in the direction of the reconnection electric field. We predict the opening angle of the U-shaped distribution by considering acceleration of the meandering electrons by the reconnection electric field. Results from particle tracing in PIC simulations and theoretical analysis agree. The above predictions provide guidance to interpret measurements by spacecraft from electron diffusion regions in asymmetric reconnection.

  11. Effect of different magnetic field distributions on laminar ferroconvection heat transfer in horizontal tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheikhnejad, Yahya; Hosseini, Reza, E-mail: hoseinir@aut.ac.ir; Saffar-avval, Majid

    2015-09-01

    The forced convection heat transfer of ferrofluid steady state laminar flow through a circular axisymmetric horizontal pipe under different magnetic field is the focus of this study. The pipe is under constant heat flux while different linear axial magnetic fields were applied on the ferrofluid with equal magnetic energy. In this scenario, viscosity of ferrofluid is temperature dependent, to capture ferrofluid real behavior a nonlinear Langevin equation was considered for equilibrium magnetization. For this purpose, the set of nonlinear governing PDEs was solved using proper CFD techniques: the finite volume method and SIMPLE algorithm were used to discretize and numerically solve the governing equation in order to obtain thermohydrodynamic flow characteristics. The numerical results show a promising enhancement of up to 135.7% in heat transfer as a consequence of the application of magnetic field. The magnetic field also increases pressure loss of up to 77% along the pipe; but effectiveness (favorable to unfavorable effect ratio) of the magnetic field as a performance index economically justifies its application such that higher magnetic field intensity causes higher effectiveness of up to 1.364. - Highlights: • In this numerical study, the thermohydrodynamic characteristics of a laminar steady state ferroconvection was investigated in circular axisymmetric pipe under constant heat flux. • A magnetic field causes an increase in both pressure loss and heat transfer such that performance index remain acceptable for all linear distributions. • In constant total magnetic energy, an increase of magnetic field gradient tends to decrease the effectiveness slightly. • Magnetic field of lower gradient with high intensity is the best choice for both saving energy and heat transfer enhancement increase of up to 1.3638 and 135.65% respectively.

  12. Potential effect of fiddler crabs on organic matter distribution: A combined laboratory and field experimental approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natálio, Luís F.; Pardo, Juan C. F.; Machado, Glauco B. O.; Fortuna, Monique D.; Gallo, Deborah G.; Costa, Tânia M.

    2017-01-01

    Bioturbators play a key role in estuarine environments by modifying the availability of soil elements, which in turn may affect other organisms. Despite the importance of bioturbators, few studies have combined both field and laboratory experiments to explore the effects of bioturbators on estuarine soils. Herein, we assessed the bioturbation potential of fiddler crabs Leptuca leptodactyla and Leptuca uruguayensis in laboratory and field experiments, respectively. We evaluated whether the presence of fiddler crabs resulted in vertical transport of sediment, thereby altering organic matter (OM) distribution. Under laboratory conditions, the burrowing activity by L. leptodactyla increased the OM content in sediment surface. In the long-term field experiment with areas of inclusion and exclusion of L. uruguayensis, we did not observe influence of this fiddler crab in the vertical distribution of OM. Based on our results, we suggest that small fiddler crabs, such as the species used in these experiments, are potentially capable of alter their environment by transporting sediment and OM but such effects may be masked by environmental drivers and spatial heterogeneity under natural conditions. This phenomenon may be related to the small size of these species, which affects how much sediment is transported, along with the way OM interacts with biogeochemical and physical processes. Therefore, the net effect of these burrowing organisms is likely to be the result of a complex interaction with other environmental factors. In this sense, we highlight the importance of performing simultaneous field and laboratory experiments in order to better understanding the role of burrowing animals as bioturbators.

  13. Principles for transformation of scalp EEG from potential field into source distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjorth, B

    1991-10-01

    Tracings representing simultaneously recorded values of EEG potentials from different positions on the scalp surface describe how the instantaneous potential field over the scalp surface changes with time. Each instantaneous distribution of potential can be seen as resulting from spatial integration of primary components into the potential field. These components may be derived by means of the reverse procedure: subjecting the data from the potential field to spatial differentiation as provided by the Laplacian source operator. The result is a "deblurred," i.e., a more differentiated, distribution of source components hypothetically associated with the generators of the potential field. The Laplacian source operator can be implemented as a linear combination of the instantaneous potential values, either by means of very simple electronic circuitry or in a computer. The linear combination is a standard operation in matrix algebra and is widely applied in signal processing. The formalism of matrix algebra simplifies a precise evaluation of the method in relation to conventional derivation techniques and provides further methods for analysis of the EEG data.

  14. An improved model of homogeneous nucleation for high supersaturation conditions: aluminum vapor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savel'ev, A M; Starik, A M

    2016-12-21

    A novel model of stationary nucleation, treating the thermodynamic functions of small clusters, has been built. The model is validated against the experimental data on the nucleation rate of water vapor obtained in a broad range of supersaturation values (S = 10-120), and, at high supersaturation values, it reproduces the experimental data much better than the traditional classical nucleation model. A comprehensive analysis of the nucleation of aluminum vapor with the usage of developed stationary and non-stationary nucleation models has been performed. It has been shown that, at some value of supersaturation, there exists a double potential nucleation barrier. It has been revealed that the existence of this barrier notably delayed the establishment of a stationary distribution of subcritical clusters. It has also been demonstrated that the non-stationary model of the present work and the model of liquid-droplet approximation predict different values of nucleation delay time, τs. In doing so, the liquid-droplet model can underestimate notably (by more than an order of magnitude) the value of τs.

  15. Oxygen precipitation in silicon: Experimental studies and theoretical investigations within the classical theory of nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelton, K. F.; Falster, R.; Gambaro, D.; Olmo, M.; Cornara, M.; Wei, P. F.

    1999-06-01

    Quantitative measurements of the oxygen precipitate rate as a function of annealing were made in Czochralski-grown silicon wafers that contained different initial concentrations of oxygen. All wafers were annealed at 1000 °C for 15 min to ensure that the initial cluster-size distributions were identical in all samples of the same composition prior to the multi-step annealing treatments used for the precipitation studies. The experimental data are compared with numerical predictions for time-dependent nucleation within the classical theory of nucleation. Quantitative agreement is obtained between the measured and calculated densities of oxygen precipitates for nucleation temperatures greater than 600 °C, but only over a narrow range of oxygen composition. Below 600 °C, the measured density for all samples is orders of magnitude larger than is predicted from the model. Further, the measured data show an anomalously small temperature dependence for the induction time for nucleation that does not scale with the diffusion coefficient, as expected from the classical theory of nucleation. Fundamentally, the classical theory of nucleation cannot explain the time-dependent nucleation of oxygen precipitates for temperatures below 650 °C. A possible reason is given.

  16. Homogeneous SPC/E water nucleation in large molecular dynamics simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Angelil, R; Tanaka, K; Tanaka, H

    2015-01-01

    We perform direct large molecular dynamics simulations of homogeneous SPC/E water nucleation, using up to $\\sim 4\\cdot 10^6$ molecules. Our large system sizes allow us to measure extremely low and accurate nucleation rates, down to $\\sim 10^{19}\\,\\textrm{cm}^{-3}\\textrm{s}^{-1}$, helping close the gap between experimentally measured rates $\\sim 10^{17}\\,\\textrm{cm}^{-3}\\textrm{s}^{-1}$. We are also able to precisely measure size distributions, sticking efficiencies, cluster temperatures, and cluster internal densities. We introduce a new functional form to implement the Yasuoka-Matsumoto nucleation rate measurement technique (threshold method). Comparison to nucleation models shows that classical nucleation theory over-estimates nucleation rates by a few orders of magnitude. The semi-phenomenological nucleation model does better, under-predicting rates by at worst, a factor of 24. Unlike what has been observed in Lennard-Jones simulations, post-critical clusters have temperatures consistent with the run avera...

  17. Electric-field distribution near rectangular microstrip radiators for hyperthermia heating: theory versus experiment in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, H R; Peterson, A F; Magin, R L

    1992-02-01

    A rectangular microstrip antenna radiator is investigated for its near-zone radiation characteristics in water. Calculations of a cavity model theory are compared with the electric-field measurements of a miniature nonperturbing diode-dipole E-field probe whose 3 mm tip was positioned by an automatic three-axis scanning system. These comparisons have implications for the use of microstrip antennas in a multielement microwave hyperthermia applicator. Half-wavelength rectangular microstrip patches were designed to radiate in water at 915 MHz. Both low (epsilon r = 10) and high (epsilon r = 85) dielectric constant substrates were tested. Normal and tangential components of the near-zone radiated electric field were discriminated by appropriate orientation of the E-field probe. Low normal to transverse electric-field ratios at 3.0 cm depth indicate that the radiators may be useful for hyperthermia heating with an intervening water bolus. Electric-field pattern addition from a three-element linear array of these elements in water indicates that phase and amplitude adjustment can achieve some limited control over the distribution of radiated power.

  18. Local field distribution near corrugated interfaces: Green function formalism versus effective medium theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, C. W.; Xiao, J. J.; Yu, K. W.

    2007-05-01

    The recent Green function formalism (GFF) has been used to study the local field distribution near a periodic interface separating two homogeneous media of different dielectric constants. In the GFF, the integral equations can be solved conveniently because of the existence of an analytic expression for the kernel (Greenian). However, due to a severe singularity in the Greenian, the formalism was formerly applied to compute the electric fields away from the interface region. In this work, we have succeeded in extending the GFF to compute the electric field inside the interface region by taking advantage of a sum rule. To our surprise, the strengths of the electric fields are quite similar in both media across the interface, despite of the large difference in dielectric constants. Moreover, we propose a simple effective medium approximation (EMA) to compute the electric field inside the interface region. We show that the EMA can indeed give an excellent description of the electric field, except near a surface plasmon resonance.

  19. Effects of gully terrain on stress field distribution and ground pressure behavior in shallow seam mining

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Jianwei; Liu Changyou; Zhao Tong

    2016-01-01

    This study proposes a novel approach to study stress field distribution and overlying ground pressure behavior in shallow seam mining in gully terrain. This approach combines numerical simulations and field tests based on the conditions of gully terrain in the Chuancao Gedan Mine. The effects of gully ter-rain on the in situ stress field of coal beds can be identified by the ratio of self-weight stress to vertical stress (g) at the location corresponding to the maximum vertical stress. Based on the function g=f(h), the effect of gully terrain on the stress field of overlying strata of the entire field can be characterized as a significantly affected area, moderately affected area, or non-affected area. Working face 6106 in the Chuancao Gedan Mine had a coal bed depth<80 m and was located in what was identified as a signifi-cantly affected area. Hence, mining may cause sliding of the gully slope and increased loading (including significant dynamic loading) on the roof strata. Field tests suggest that significant dynamic pressures were observed at the body and foot of the gully slope, and that dynamic loadings were observed upslope of the working face expansion, provided that the expanding direction of the working face is parallel to the gully.

  20. The latitudinal distribution of the baseline geomagnetic field during the March 17, 2015 geomagnetic storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberti, Tommaso; Piersanti, Mirko; Lepreti, Fabio; Vecchio, Antonio; De Michelis, Paola; Villante, Umberto; Carbone, Vincenzo

    2016-04-01

    Geomagnetic storms (GS) are global geomagnetic disturbances that result from the interaction between magnetized plasma that propagates from the Sun and plasma and magnetic fields in the near-Earth space plasma environment. The Dst (Disturbance Storm Time) global Ring Current index is still taken to be the definitive representation for geomagnetic storm and is used widely by researcher. Recent in situ measurements by satellites passing through the ring-current region (i.e. Van Allen probes) and computations with magnetospheric field models showed that there are many other field contributions on the geomagnetic storming time variations at middle and low latitudes. Appling the Empirical Mode Decomposition [Huang et al., 1998] to magnetospheric and ground observations, we detect the different magnetic field contributions during a GS and introduce the concepts of modulated baseline and fluctuations of the geomagnetic field. In this work, we apply this method to study the latitudinal distribution of the baseline geomagnetic field during the St. Patrick's Day Geomagnetic Storm 2015 in order to detect physical informations concerning the differences between high-latitude and equatorial ground measurements.

  1. Distributional and regularized radiation fields of non-uniformly moving straight dislocations, and elastodynamic Tamm problem

    CERN Document Server

    Pellegrini, Yves-Patrick

    2016-01-01

    This work introduces original explicit solutions for the elastic fields radiated by non-uniformly moving, straight, screw or edge dislocations in an isotropic medium, in the form of time-integral representations in which acceleration-dependent contributions are explicitly separated out. These solutions are obtained by applying an isotropic regularization procedure to distributional expressions of the elastodynamic fields built on the Green tensor of the Navier equation. The obtained regularized field expressions are singularity-free, and depend on the dislocation density rather than on the plastic eigenstrain. They cover non-uniform motion at arbitrary speeds, including faster-than-wave ones. A numerical method of computation is discussed, that rests on discretizing motion along an arbitrary path in the plane transverse to the dislocation, into a succession of time intervals of constant velocity vector over which time-integrated contributions can be obtained in closed form. As a simple illustration, it is app...

  2. On the angular distribution of cosmic rays from an individual source in a turbulent magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Harari, Diego; Roulet, Esteban

    2015-01-01

    We obtain the angular distribution of the cosmic rays reaching an observer from an individual source and after propagation through a turbulent magnetic field, for different ratios between the source distance and the diffusion length. We study both the high-energy quasi-rectilinear regime as well as the transition towards the diffusive regime at lower energies where the deflections become large. We consider the impact of energy losses, showing that they tend to enhance the anisotropy of the source at a given energy. We also discuss lensing effects, in particular those that could result from the regular galactic magnetic field component, and show that the effect of the turbulent extragalactic magnetic fields can smooth out the divergent magnification peaks that would result for point-like sources in the limit of no turbulent deflections.

  3. Density and Distribution of Citemene Fields in a Miombo Woodland Environment in Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprague; Oyama

    1999-09-01

    / The Bemba people of northern Zambia practice citemene shifting cultivation. We utilized Landsat satellite images from 1984 and 1992 to map the distribution of citemene fields in those two years and to assess changes in the spatial sustainability of citemene cultivation in a miombo woodland study area. The citemene fields were concentrated within about 5-6 km of roads. Between 1984 and 1992, there was a decrease in the number of fields, and an increase in the average distance from the road. These changes may have been due to the introduction of semipermanent maize farming in the intervening years. The estimated cycle times for woodland utilization may have been long enough to maintain sustainability under traditional citemene cultivation practices. However, cycle times may be too short to maintain sustainability within the woodlands along roads.KEY WORDS: Shifting agriculture; GIS; Sustainability; Citemene; Miombo; Zambiahttp://link.springer-ny.com/link/service/journals/00267/bibs/24n2p273.html

  4. On the Distribution of Neutral and Charged Pions through the Production of a Classical Pion Field

    CERN Document Server

    Anselm, A A; Bander, Myron

    1994-01-01

    High energy reactions may produce a state around the collision point that is best described by a classical pion field. Such a field might be an isospin rotated vacuum of the chiral $\\sigma$-model or, as discussed in this work, a solution of the equations of motion resultinng from the coupling of fields of this model to quarks produced in the collision. In such configurations all directions in isospin space are allowed leading to a sizable probability of events with, essentially, only charged particles (Centauros) or all neutral particles (anti-Centauros). (In more common statistical models of multiparticle production, the probability of such events is suppressed exponentially by the total multiplicity.) We find that the isospin violation due to the mass difference of the up and down quarks has a significant effect on these distributions and enhances the production of events consisting predominantly of neutral particles.

  5. Urediospores of rust fungi are ice nucleation active at > −10 °C and harbor ice nucleation active bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. E. Morris

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Various features of the biology of the rust fungi and of the epidemiology of the plant diseases they cause illustrate the important role of rainfall in their life history. Based on this insight we have characterized the ice nucleation activity (INA of the aerially disseminated spores (urediospores of this group of fungi. Urediospores of this obligate plant parasite were collected from natural infections of 7 species of weeds in France, from coffee in Brazil and from field and greenhouse-grown wheat in France, the USA, Turkey and Syria. Immersion freezing was used to determine freezing onset temperatures and the abundance of ice nuclei in suspensions of washed spores. Microbiological analyses of spores from France, the USA and Brazil, and subsequent tests of the ice nucleation activity of the bacteria associated with spores were deployed to quantify the contribution of bacteria to the ice nucleation activity of the spores. All samples of spores were ice nucleation active, having freezing onset temperatures as high as −4 °C. Spores in most of the samples carried cells of ice nucleation-active strains of the bacterium Pseudomonas syringae (at rates of less than 1 bacterial cell per 100 urediospores, but bacterial INA accounted for only a small fraction of the INA observed in spore suspensions. Changes in the INA of spore suspensions after treatment with lysozyme suggest that the INA of urediospores involves a polysaccharide. Based on data from the literature, we have estimated the concentrations of urediospores in air at cloud height and in rainfall. These quantities are very similar to those reported for other biological ice nucleators in these same substrates. However, at cloud level convective activity leads to widely varying concentrations of particles of surface origin, so that mean concentrations can underestimate their possible effects on clouds. We propose that spatial and temporal concentrations of biological ice nucleators active at

  6. Urediospores of rust fungi are ice nucleation active at > -10 °C and harbor ice nucleation active bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, C. E.; Sands, D. C.; Glaux, C.; Samsatly, J.; Asaad, S.; Moukahel, A. R.; Gonçalves, F. L. T.; Bigg, E. K.

    2013-04-01

    Various features of the biology of the rust fungi and of the epidemiology of the plant diseases they cause illustrate the important role of rainfall in their life history. Based on this insight we have characterized the ice nucleation activity (INA) of the aerially disseminated spores (urediospores) of this group of fungi. Urediospores of this obligate plant parasite were collected from natural infections of 7 species of weeds in France, from coffee in Brazil and from field and greenhouse-grown wheat in France, the USA, Turkey and Syria. Immersion freezing was used to determine freezing onset temperatures and the abundance of ice nuclei in suspensions of washed spores. Microbiological analyses of spores from France, the USA and Brazil, and subsequent tests of the ice nucleation activity of the bacteria associated with spores were deployed to quantify the contribution of bacteria to the ice nucleation activity of the spores. All samples of spores were ice nucleation active, having freezing onset temperatures as high as -4 °C. Spores in most of the samples carried cells of ice nucleation-active strains of the bacterium Pseudomonas syringae (at rates of less than 1 bacterial cell per 100 urediospores), but bacterial INA accounted for only a small fraction of the INA observed in spore suspensions. Changes in the INA of spore suspensions after treatment with lysozyme suggest that the INA of urediospores involves a polysaccharide. Based on data from the literature, we have estimated the concentrations of urediospores in air at cloud height and in rainfall. These quantities are very similar to those reported for other biological ice nucleators in these same substrates. However, at cloud level convective activity leads to widely varying concentrations of particles of surface origin, so that mean concentrations can underestimate their possible effects on clouds. We propose that spatial and temporal concentrations of biological ice nucleators active at temperatures > -10

  7. New Ion-Nucleation Mechanism Relevant for the Earth's Atmosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsh, N.D.; Svensmark, Henrik; Pedersen, Jens Olaf Pepke

    stages of particle coagulation and condensation have been performed and compared with the experimental results. The simulations indicate that a stable distribution of sub 3nm particles exists that cannot be detected using standard techniques for measuring atmospheric aerosol, and that the nucleation rate......Experimental studies of ultra-fine aerosol nucleation in clean atmospheric air, containing trace amounts of ozone, sulphur dioxide, and water vapour suggest that the production rate of critical clusters is sensitive to ionisation. To assess this sensitivity numerical simulations of the initial...... particles with the potential to influence the transparency of Earth's atmosphere. This is consistent with a number of recent studies indicating that variations in the density of cosmic rays arriving at Earth have affected climate over a wide range of time scales....

  8. Bypass transition and spot nucleation in boundary layers

    CERN Document Server

    Kreilos, Tobias; Schlatter, Philipp; Duguet, Yohann; Henningson, Dan S; Eckhardt, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    The spatio-temporal aspects of the transition to turbulence are considered in the case of a boundary layer flow developing above a flat plate exposed to free-stream turbulence. Combining results on the receptivity to free-stream turbulence with the nonlinear concept of a transition threshold, a physically motivated model suggests a spatial distribution of spot nucleation events. To describe the evolution of turbulent spots a probabilistic cellular automaton is introduced, with all parameters directly fitted from numerical simulations of the boundary layer. The nucleation rates are then combined with the cellular automaton model, yielding excellent quantitative agreement with the statistical characteristics for different free-stream turbulence levels. We thus show how the recent theoretical progress on transitional wall-bounded flows can be extended to the much wider class of spatially developing boundary-layer flows.

  9. Bypass transition and spot nucleation in boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreilos, Tobias; Khapko, Taras; Schlatter, Philipp; Duguet, Yohann; Henningson, Dan S.; Eckhardt, Bruno

    2016-08-01

    The spatiotemporal aspects of the transition to turbulence are considered in the case of a boundary-layer flow developing above a flat plate exposed to free-stream turbulence. Combining results on the receptivity to free-stream turbulence with the nonlinear concept of a transition threshold, a physically motivated model suggests a spatial distribution of spot nucleation events. To describe the evolution of turbulent spots a probabilistic cellular automaton is introduced, with all parameters directly obtained from numerical simulations of the boundary layer. The nucleation rates are then combined with the cellular automaton model, yielding excellent quantitative agreement with the statistical characteristics for different free-stream turbulence levels. We thus show how the recent theoretical progress on transitional wall-bounded flows can be extended to the much wider class of spatially developing boundary-layer flows.

  10. Space charge, plasma potential and electric field distributions in HiPIMS discharges of varying configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebig, B.; Bradley, J. W.

    2013-08-01

    An electron-emitting (emissive) probe has been used to study the temporal and spatial distribution of the plasma potential during high-power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharges with various substrate and magnetic field configurations. The average power was 700 W, with a repetition frequency of 100 Hz and pulse duration of 100 µs. Strongly negative plasma potentials exceeding -300 V and electric fields up to 10 kV m-1, caused by strong separation of charges with net charge carrier densities Δn of about 1014 m-3, were observed during the ignition of the discharge. The spatial distribution of the plasma potential in the stable stage of the discharge showed values consistently 5 V more negative for a floating substrate compared with a grounded one, so enhancing electron transport around the insulated substrate to grounded walls. However, this change in the electrical configuration of the plasma does not alter significantly the fraction of ionized sputtered particles (of about 30%) that can potentially reach the substrate. By changing the degree of unbalance of the sputtering source, we find a strong correlation between the electric field strength in the magnetic trap (created through charge separation) and the absolute value (and shape) of the magnetic field. For the more unbalanced magnetron, a flattening of the plasma potential structure (decrease in the axial electric field) was observed close to the target. Our findings show in principle that manipulation of the potential barrier close to the target through changing the magnetic field can regulate the proportion of sputtered and ionized species reaching the substrate.

  11. Comparison of the SAWNUC model with CLOUD measurements of sulphuric acid-water nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrhart, Sebastian; Ickes, Luisa; Almeida, Joao; Amorim, Antonio; Barmet, Peter; Bianchi, Federico; Dommen, Josef; Dunne, Eimear M.; Duplissy, Jonathan; Franchin, Alessandro; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kirkby, Jasper; Kürten, Andreas; Kupc, Agnieszka; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Nieminen, Tuomo; Riccobono, Francesco; Rondo, Linda; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Steiner, Gerhard; Tomé, António; Wimmer, Daniela; Baltensperger, Urs; Wagner, Paul E.; Curtius, Joachim

    2016-10-01

    Binary nucleation of sulphuric acid-water particles is expected to be an important process in the free troposphere at low temperatures. SAWNUC (Sulphuric Acid Water Nucleation) is a model of binary nucleation that is based on laboratory measurements of the binding energies of sulphuric acid and water in charged and neutral clusters. Predictions of SAWNUC are compared for the first time comprehensively with experimental binary nucleation data from the CLOUD chamber at European Organization for Nuclear Research. The experimental measurements span a temperature range of 208-292 K, sulphuric acid concentrations from 1·106 to 1·109 cm-3, and distinguish between ion-induced and neutral nucleation. Good agreement, within a factor of 5, is found between the experimental and modeled formation rates for ion-induced nucleation at 278 K and below and for neutral nucleation at 208 and 223 K. Differences at warm temperatures are attributed to ammonia contamination which was indicated by the presence of ammonia-sulphuric acid clusters, detected by an Atmospheric Pressure Interface Time of Flight (APi-TOF) mass spectrometer. APi-TOF measurements of the sulphuric acid ion cluster distributions ((H2SO4)i·HSO4- with i = 0, 1, ..., 10) show qualitative agreement with the SAWNUC ion cluster distributions. Remaining differences between the measured and modeled distributions are most likely due to fragmentation in the APi-TOF. The CLOUD results are in good agreement with previously measured cluster binding energies and show the SAWNUC model to be a good representation of ion-induced and neutral binary nucleation of sulphuric acid-water clusters in the middle and upper troposphere.

  12. Dynamic wave field synthesis: enabling the generation of field distributions with a large space-bandwidth product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamau, Edwin N; Heine, Julian; Falldorf, Claas; Bergmann, Ralf B

    2015-11-02

    We present a novel approach for the design and fabrication of multiplexed computer generated volume holograms (CGVH) which allow for a dynamic synthesis of arbitrary wave field distributions. To achieve this goal, we developed a hybrid system that consists of a CGVH as a static element and an electronically addressed spatial light modulator as the dynamic element. We thereby derived a new model for describing the scattering process within the inhomogeneous dielectric material of the hologram. This model is based on the linearization of the scattering process within the Rytov approximation and incorporates physical constraints that account for voxel based laser-lithography using micro-fabrication of the holograms in a nonlinear optical material. In this article we demonstrate that this system basically facilitates a high angular Bragg selectivity on the order of 1°. Additionally, it allows for a qualitatively low cross-talk dynamic synthesis of predefined wave fields with a much larger space-bandwidth product (SBWP ≥ 8.7 × 10(6)) as compared to the current state of the art in computer generated holography.

  13. Investigation of nucleation processes during dynamic recrystallization of ice using cryo-EBSD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauve, T.; Montagnat, M.; Barou, F.; Hidas, K.; Tommasi, A.; Mainprice, D.

    2017-02-01

    Nucleation mechanisms occurring during dynamic recrystallization play a crucial role in the evolution of microstructures and textures during high temperature deformation. In polycrystalline ice, the strong viscoplastic anisotropy induces high strain heterogeneities between grains which control the recrystallization mechanisms. Here, we study the nucleation mechanisms occurring during creep tests performed on polycrystalline columnar ice at high temperature and stress (T=-5°C;σ=0.5 MPa) by post-mortem analyses of deformation microstructures using cryogenic electron backscatter diffraction. The columnar geometry of the samples enables discrimination of the nuclei from the initial grains. Various nucleation mechanisms are deduced from the analysis of the nuclei relations with the dislocation sub-structures within grains and at grain boundaries. Tilt sub-grain boundaries and kink bands are the main structures responsible for development of polygonization and mosaic sub-structures. Nucleation by bulging at serrated grain boundaries is also an efficient nucleation mechanism near the grain boundaries where strain incompatibilities are high. Observation of nuclei with orientations not related to the `parent' ones suggests the possibility of `spontaneous' nucleation driven by the relaxation of the dislocation-related internal stress field. The complexity of the nucleation mechanisms observed here emphasizes the impact of stress and strain heterogeneities on dynamic recrystallization mechanisms. This article is part of the themed issue 'Microdynamics of ice'.

  14. Homogenous nucleation of sulfuric acid and water at close to atmospherically relevant conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brus, D.; Neitola, K.; Hyvärinen, A.-P.; Petäjä, T.; Vanhanen, J.; Sipilä, M.; Paasonen, P.; Kulmala, M.; Lihavainen, H.

    2011-06-01

    In this study the homogeneous nucleation rates in the system of sulfuric acid and water were measured by using a flow tube technique. The goal was to directly compare particle formation rates obtained from atmospheric measurements with nucleation rates of freshly nucleated particles measured with particle size magnifier (PSM) which has detection efficiency of unity for particles having mobility diameter of 1.5 nm. The gas phase sulfuric acid concentration in this study was measured with the chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS), commonly used in field measurements. The wall losses of sulfuric acid were estimated from measured concentration profiles along the flow tube. The initial concentrations of sulfuric acid estimated from loss measurements ranged from 108 to 3 × 109 molecules cm-3. The nucleation rates obtained in this study cover about three orders of magnitude from 10-1 to 102 cm-3 s-1 for commercial ultrafine condensation particle counter (UCPC) TSI model 3025A and from 101 to 104 cm-3 s-1 for PSM. The nucleation rates and the slopes (dlnJ/dln [H2SO4]) show satisfactory agreement when compared to empirical kinetic and activation models and the latest atmospheric nucleation data. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first experimental work providing temperature dependent nucleation rate measurements using a high efficiency particle counter with a cut-off-size of 1.5 nm together with direct measurements of gas phase sulfuric acid concentration.

  15. Formation and growth of nucleated particles: observational constraints on cloud condensation nuclei budgets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. Westervelt

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol nucleation occurs frequently in the atmosphere and is an important source of particle number. Observations suggest that nucleated particles are capable of growing to sufficiently large sizes that they act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN, but some global models have reported that CCN concentrations are only modestly sensitive to large changes in nucleation rates. Here we present a novel approach for using long-term size distribution observations to evaluate the contribution of nucleation and growth to the tropospheric CCN budget. We derive from observations at five locations nucleation-relevant metrics such as nucleation rate of particles at diameter of 3 nm (J3, diameter growth rate (GR, particle survival probability (SP, condensation and coagulation sinks, and CCN formation rate. These quantities are also derived for a global microphysical model and compared to the observations on a daily basis to evaluate the model's CCN budget. Using the GEOS-Chem-TOMAS global aerosol model we simulate nucleation events predicted by ternary (with a 10−5 tuning factor or activation nucleation over one year and find that the model does not understate the contribution of boundary layer nucleation to CCN concentrations. Model-predicted annual-average formation rates of 50 nm and 100 nm particles due to nucleation are always within 50% and show a slight tendency to over-estimate the observations. Because it is rare for observations to track the growth of a nucleation mode across several days, it is difficult to assess CCN formation when growth requires multiple days. To address multi-day growth, we present three cases of survival of particles beyond one day: single-day growth, partial multi-day survival, and total multi-day survival. For the single-day growth case, only particles that reach a CCN size (50 or 100 nm on the same day are counted as contributing to the CCN budget, which represents a low estimate of CCN

  16. Evaluation of electric field distribution in electromagnetic stimulation of human femoral head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yukun; Souffrant, Robert; Kluess, Daniel; Ellenrieder, Martin; Mittelmeier, Wolfram; van Rienen, Ursula; Bader, Rainer

    2014-12-01

    Electromagnetic stimulation is a common therapy used to support bone healing in the case of avascular necrosis of the femoral head. In the present study, we investigated a bipolar induction screw system with an integrated coil. The aim was to analyse the influence of the screw parameters on the electric field distribution in the human femoral head. In addition, three kinds of design parameters (the shape of the screw tip, position of the screw in the femoral head, and size of the screw insulation) were varied. The electric field distribution in the bone was calculated using the finite element software Comsol Multiphysics. Moreover, a validation experiment was set up for an identical bone specimen with an implanted screw. The electric potential of points inside and on the surface of the bone were measured and compared to numerical data. The electric field distribution within the bone was clearly changed by the different implant parameters. Repositioning the screw by a maximum of 10 mm and changing the insulation length by a maximum of 4 mm resulted in electric field volume changes of 16% and 7%, respectively. By comparing the results of numerical simulation with the data of the validation experiment, on average, the electric potential difference of 19% and 24% occurred when the measuring points were at a depth of approximately 5 mm within the femoral bone and directly on the surface of the femoral bone, respectively. The results of the numerical simulations underline that the electro-stimulation treatment of bone in clinical applications can be influenced by the implant parameters. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Heterogeneous nucleation in solutions: generalized Gibbs' approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abyzov, Alexander S; Schmelzer, Jürn W P

    2014-06-28

    Heterogeneous nucleation in solutions on planar solid surfaces is modeled taking into account changes of the state parameters of the critical clusters in dependence on supersaturation. The account of the variation of the state parameters of the cluster phase on nucleation is performed in the framework of the generalized Gibbs' approach. A regular solution is chosen as a model for the analysis of the basic qualitative characteristics of the process. It is shown that, employing the generalized Gibbs approach, contact angle and catalytic activity factor for heterogeneous nucleation become dependent on the degree of metastability (supersaturation) of the solution. For the case of formation of a cluster in supersaturated solutions on a surface of low wettability (the macroscopic equilibrium contact angles being larger than 90°), the solid surface has only a minor influence on nucleation. In the alternative case of high wettability (for macroscopic equilibrium contact angles being less than 90°), nucleation is significantly enhanced by the solid surface. Effectively, the existence of the solid surface results in a significant shift of the spinodal to lower supersaturations as compared with homogeneous nucleation. Qualitatively, the same behavior is observed now near the new (solid surface induced) limits of instability of the solution as compared with the behavior near to the spinodal curve in the case of homogeneous nucleation.

  18. Generalized Gibbs' approach in heterogeneous nucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abyzov, Alexander S; Schmelzer, Jürn W P

    2013-04-28

    Heterogeneous nucleation (condensation and boiling) on planar solid surfaces is described taking into account changes of the state parameters of the critical clusters in dependence on supersaturation. The account of the variation of the state parameters of the cluster phase on nucleation is performed in the framework of the generalized Gibbs' approach. One-component van der Waals fluids are chosen as a model for the analysis of the basic qualitative characteristics of the process. The analysis is performed for both hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces and similarities and differences between condensation and boiling processes are discussed for the two different cases. It is shown that, in the generalized Gibbs' approach, contact angle and catalytic factor for heterogeneous nucleation become dependent on the degree of metastability (undercooling or superheating) of the fluid. For the case of formation of a droplet in supersaturated vapor on a hydrophobic surface and bubble formation in a liquid on a hydrophilic surface the solid surface has only a minor influence on nucleation. In the alternative cases of condensation of a droplet on a hydrophilic surface and of bubble formation in a liquid on a hydrophobic surface, nucleation is significantly enhanced by the solid. Effectively, the existence of the solid surface results in a significant shift of the spinodal to lower supersaturations as compared with homogeneous nucleation. Qualitatively the same behavior is observed now near the new (solid surface induced) limits of instability of the fluid as compared with the behavior near to the spinodal curve in the case of homogeneous nucleation.

  19. Numerical study and control method of interaction of nucleation and boundary layer separation in condensing flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liansuo AN; Zhi WANG; Zhonghe HAN

    2009-01-01

    The spontaneous nucleation flow in turbine cascade was numerically studied. The model was imple-mented within a full Navier-Stokes viscous flow solution procedure and the process of condensation was calculated by the quadrature method of moments that shows good accuracy with very broad size distributions.Results were presented for viscous and inviscous flow,showing the influence of boundary layer separation and wake vortices on spontaneous nucleation. The results show that the degree of flow separation in wet steam flow is greater than that in superheated steam flow due to condensation shock and that the loss cannot be neglected.Furthermore, the impact of boundary layer separation and wake vortices on velocity profiles and its implications for profile loss were considered. The calculations showed that layer separation and wake vortices influence nucleation rate, leading to different droplet distributions. A method for controlling homogeneous nucleation and for reducing degree of flow separation in high-speed transonic wet steam flow was presented. The liquid phase parameter distribution is sensitive to the suction side profile of turbine cascade, which impacts the nucleation rate distribution leading to different droplet distributions and affects the degree of flow separation. The numerical study provides a practical design method for turbine blade to reduce wetness losses.

  20. Nucleation for Lennard-Jones Fluid by Density Functional Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Dong

    2005-01-01

    @@ A non-mean field density functional theory is employed to investigate the vapour-liquid nucleation. The excess Helmholtz free energy functional is formulated in terms of a local density approximation for short ranged repulsion and a density-gradient expansion for long-ranged attractions. An analytical expression for the direct correlation function of a Lennard-Jones fluid is utilized to take into account the effect of long-ranged attractions on intermolecular correlations. With the predicted bulk properties and surface tension as input, the nucleation properties including density profile, work of formation and number of particles at the reduced temperatures T* = 0.694 and 0.741 are inuestigated. The obtained number of particles in the critical nucleus agrees well with the simulation data.

  1. Evaluation and interpretation of bubble size distributions in pulsed megasonic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauptmann, M.; Struyf, H.; De Gendt, S.; Glorieux, C.; Brems, S.

    2013-05-01

    The occurrence of acoustic cavitation is incorporating a multitude of interdependent effects that strongly depend on the bubble size. Therefore, bubble size control would be beneficial for biological and industrial processes that rely on acoustic cavitation. A pulsed acoustic field can result in bubble size control and the repeated dissolution and reactivation ("recycling") of potentially active bubbles. As a consequence, a pulsed field can strongly enhance cavitation activity. In this paper, we present a modified methodology for the evaluation of the active bubble size distribution by means of a combination of cavitation noise measurements and ultrasonic pulsing. The key component of this modified methodology is the definition of an upper size limit, below which bubbles—in between subsequent pulses—have to dissolve, in order to be sustainably recycled. This upper limit makes it possible to explain and link the enhancement of cavitation activity to a bubble size distribution. The experimentally determined bubble size distributions for different power densities are interpreted in the frame of numerical calculations of the oscillatory responses of the bubbles to the intermittent driving sound field. The distributions are found to be shaped by the size dependent interplay between bubble pulsations, rectified diffusion, coalescence, and the development of parametrically amplified shape instabilities. Also, a phenomenological reactivation-deactivation model is proposed to explain and quantify the observed enhancement of cavitation activity under pulsed, with respect to continuous sonication. In this model, the pulse-duration determines the magnitude of the reactivation of partially dissolved bubbles and the deactivation of activated bubbles by coalescence. It is shown that the subsequent recycling of previously active bubbles leads to an accumulation of cavitation activity, which saturates after a certain number of pulses. The model is fitted to the experimental

  2. Distributional and regularized radiation fields of non-uniformly moving straight dislocations, and elastodynamic Tamm problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Markus; Pellegrini, Yves-Patrick

    2016-11-01

    This work introduces original explicit solutions for the elastic fields radiated by non-uniformly moving, straight, screw or edge dislocations in an isotropic medium, in the form of time-integral representations in which acceleration-dependent contributions are explicitly separated out. These solutions are obtained by applying an isotropic regularization procedure to distributional expressions of the elastodynamic fields built on the Green tensor of the Navier equation. The obtained regularized field expressions are singularity-free, and depend on the dislocation density rather than on the plastic eigenstrain. They cover non-uniform motion at arbitrary speeds, including faster-than-wave ones. A numerical method of computation is discussed, that rests on discretizing motion along an arbitrary path in the plane transverse to the dislocation, into a succession of time intervals of constant velocity vector over which time-integrated contributions can be obtained in closed form. As a simple illustration, it is applied to the elastodynamic equivalent of the Tamm problem, where fields induced by a dislocation accelerated from rest beyond the longitudinal wave speed, and thereafter put to rest again, are computed. As expected, the proposed expressions produce Mach cones, the dynamic build-up and decay of which is illustrated by means of full-field calculations.

  3. Amended Electric Field Distribution: A Reliable Technique for Electrical Performance Improvement in Nano scale SOI MOSFETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramezani, Zeinab; Orouji, Ali A.

    2017-04-01

    To achieve reliable transistors, we propose a new silicon-on-insulator (SOI) metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) with an amended electric field in the channel for improved electrical and thermal performance, with an emphasis on current leakage improvement. The amended electric field leads to lower electric field crowding and thereby we assume enhanced reliability, leakage current, gate-induced drain leakage (GIDL), and electron temperature. To modify the electric field distribution, an additional rectangular metal region (RMR) is utilized in the buried oxide of the SOI MOSFET. The location and dimensions of the RMR have been carefully optimized to achieve the best results. The electrical, thermal, and radiofrequency characteristics of the proposed structure were analyzed using two-dimensional (2-D) numerical simulations and compared with the characteristics of the conventional, fully depleted SOI MOSFET (C-SOI). Also, critical short-channel effects (SCEs) such as threshold voltage, drain-induced barrier lowering (DIBL), subthreshold slope degradation, hot-carrier effect, GIDL, and leakage power consumption are improved. According to the results obtained, the proposed nano SOI MOSFET is a reliable device, especially for use in low-power and high-temperature applications.

  4. A Magnetic Disturbance Compensation Method Based on Magnetic Dipole Magnetic Field Distributing Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Yun-tao; SHI Zhi-yong; L(U) Jian-gang; GUAN Zhen-zhen

    2009-01-01

    The interference of carrier magnetic field to geomagnetic field has been a difficult problem for a long time, which influences on the deviation of navigation compass and the error of geomagnetic measurement. To increase the geomagnetic measuring accuracy required for the geomagnetic matching localization, the strategy to eliminate the effect of connatural and induced magnetic fields of carrier on the geomagnetic measuring accuracy is investigated. The magnetic-dipoles magnetic field distributing theory is used to deduce the magnetic composition in the position of the sensor installed on the carrier. A geomagnetic measurement model is established by using the measuring data with the ideal sensor. Considering the magnetic disturbance of carrier and the error of sensor, a geomagnetic measuring compensation model is built. This model can be used to compensate the errors of carrier magnetic field and magnetic sensor in any case and its parameters have clear or specific physical meaning. The experimented results show that the model has higher geomagnetic measuring accuracy than that of others.

  5. Magnetic field topology and chemical spot distributions in the extreme Ap star HD 75049

    CERN Document Server

    Kochukhov, O; Valenti, J A; Stempels, H C; Snik, F; Rodenhuis, M; Piskunov, N; Makaganiuk, V; Keller, C U; Johns-Krull, C M

    2014-01-01

    Intermediate-mass, magnetic chemically peculiar (Ap) stars provide a unique opportunity to study the topology of stellar magnetic fields in detail and to investigate magnetically driven processes of spot formation. Here we aim to derive the surface magnetic field geometry and chemical abundance distributions for the extraordinary Ap star HD 75049. This object hosts a surface field of ~30 kG, one of the strongest known for any non-degenerate star. We used time-series of high-resolution HARPS intensity and circular polarisation observations. These data were interpreted with the help of magnetic Doppler imaging and model atmospheres incorporating effects of a non-solar chemical composition and a strong magnetic field. We refined the rotational period of HD 75049 to Prot=4.048267+/-0.000036 d. We also derived basic stellar parameters, Teff=10250+/-250 K and logg=4.3+/-0.1. Magnetic Doppler imaging revealed that the field topology of HD 75049 is poloidal and dominated by a dipolar contribution with a peak surface ...

  6. Field line distribution of density at L=4.8 inferred from observations by CLUSTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Schäfer

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available For two events observed by the CLUSTER spacecraft, the field line distribution of mass density ρ was inferred from Alfvén wave harmonic frequencies and compared to the electron density ne from plasma wave data and the oxygen density nO+ from the ion composition experiment. In one case, the average ion mass M≈ρ/ne was about 5 amu (28 October 2002, while in the other it was about 3 amu (10 September 2002. Both events occurred when the CLUSTER 1 (C1 spacecraft was in the plasmatrough. Nevertheless, the electron density ne was significantly lower for the first event (ne=8 cm−3 than for the second event (ne=22 cm−3, and this seems to be the main difference leading to a different value of M. For the first event (28 October 2002, we were able to measure the Alfvén wave frequencies for eight harmonics with unprecedented precision, so that the error in the inferred mass density is probably dominated by factors other than the uncertainty in frequency (e.g., magnetic field model and theoretical wave equation. This field line distribution (at L=4.8 was very flat for magnetic latitude |MLAT|≲20° but very steeply increasing with respect to |MLAT| for |MLAT|≳40°. The total variation in ρ was about four orders of magnitude, with values at large |MLAT| roughly consistent with ionospheric values. For the second event (10 September 2002, there was a small local maximum in mass density near the magnetic equator. The inferred mass density decreases to a minimum 23% lower than the equatorial value at |MLAT|=15.5°, and then steeply increases as one moves along the field line toward the ionosphere. For this event we were also able to examine the spatial dependence of the electron density using measurements of ne from all four CLUSTER spacecraft. Our analysis indicates that the density varies with L at L~5 roughly like L−4, and that ne is also locally peaked at the magnetic equator, but with a smaller peak. The value of ne reaches a density minimum

  7. Heterogeneity in the distribution of genetically modified and conventional oilseed rape within fields and seed lots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begg, Graham S; Elliott, Martin J; Cullen, Danny W; Iannetta, Pietro P M; Squire, Geoff R

    2008-10-01

    The implementation of co-existence in the commercialisation of GM crops requires GM and non-GM products to be segregated in production and supply. However, maintaining segregation in oilseed rape will be made difficult by the highly persistent nature of this species. An understanding of its population dynamics is needed to predict persistence and develop potential strategies for control, while to ensure segregation is being achieved, the production of GM oilseed rape must be accompanied by the monitoring of GM levels in crop or seed populations. Heterogeneity in the spatial distribution of oilseed rape has the potential to affect both control and monitoring and, although a universal phenomenon in arable weeds and harvested seed lots, spatial heterogeneity in oilseed rape populations remains to be demonstrated and quantified. Here we investigate the distribution of crop and volunteer populations in a commercial field before and during the cultivation of the first conventional oilseed rape (winter) crop since the cultivation of a GM glufosinate-tolerant oilseed rape crop (spring) three years previously. GM presence was detected by ELISA for the PAT protein in each of three morphologically distinguishable phenotypes: autumn germinating crop-type plants (3% GM), autumn-germinating 'regrowths' (72% GM) and spring germinating 'small-type' plants (17% GM). Statistical models (Poisson log-normal and binomial logit-normal) were used to describe the spatial distribution of these populations at multiple spatial scales in the field and of GM presence in the harvested seed lot. Heterogeneity was a consistent feature in the distribution of GM and conventional oilseed rape. Large trends across the field (50 x 400 m) and seed lot (4 x 1.5 x 1.5 m) were observed in addition to small-scale heterogeneity, less than 20 m in the field and 20 cm in the seed lot. The heterogeneity was greater for the 'regrowth' and 'small' phenotypes, which were likely to be volunteers and included most

  8. Impact of Organic-Liquid Distribution and Flow-Field Heterogeneity on Reductions in Mass Flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Difilippo, Erica L.; Carroll, Kenneth C.; Brusseau, Mark L.

    2010-06-07

    A series of flow-cell experiments was conducted to investigate the impact of organic-liquid distribution and flow-field heterogeneity on the relationship between source-zone mass removal and reductions in contaminant mass flux from the source zone. Changes in source-zone architecture were quantified using image analysis, allowing explicit examination of their impact on the mass-flux-reduction/mass-removal behavior. The results showed that there was minimal reduction in mass flux until a large fraction of mass was removed for systems wherein organic liquid was present solely as residual saturation in regions that were hydraulically accessible. Conversely, significant reductions in mass flux occurred with relatively minimal mass removal for systems wherein organic liquid was present at both residual and higher saturations. The latter systems exhibited multi-step mass-flux-reduction/mass-removal behavior, and characterization of the organic-liquid saturation distribution throughout flushing allowed identification of the cause of the nonideal behavior. The age of the source zone (time from initial emplacement to time of initial characterization) significantly influenced the observed mass-flux-reduction/mass-removal behavior. The results of this study illustrate the impact of both organic-liquid distribution and flow-field heterogeneity on mass-removal and mass-flux processes.

  9. Validation of a Hot Water Distribution Model Using Laboratory and Field Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backman, C.; Hoeschele, M.

    2013-07-01

    Characterizing the performance of hot water distribution systems is a critical step in developing best practice guidelines for the design and installation of high performance hot water systems. Developing and validating simulation models is critical to this effort, as well as collecting accurate input data to drive the models. In this project, the ARBI team validated the newly developed TRNSYS Type 604 pipe model against both detailed laboratory and field distribution system performance data. Validation efforts indicate that the model performs very well in handling different pipe materials, insulation cases, and varying hot water load conditions. Limitations of the model include the complexity of setting up the input file and long simulation run times. In addition to completing validation activities, this project looked at recent field hot water studies to better understand use patterns and potential behavioral changes as homeowners convert from conventional storage water heaters to gas tankless units. Based on these datasets, we conclude that the current Energy Factor test procedure overestimates typical use and underestimates the number of hot water draws. This has implications for both equipment and distribution system performance. Gas tankless water heaters were found to impact how people use hot water, but the data does not necessarily suggest an increase in usage. Further study in hot water usage and patterns is needed to better define these characteristics in different climates and home vintages.

  10. Validation of a Hot Water Distribution Model Using Laboratory and Field Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backman, C. [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), Davis, CA (United States); Hoeschele, M. [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), Davis, CA (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Characterizing the performance of hot water distribution systems is a critical step in developing best practice guidelines for the design and installation of high performance hot water systems. Developing and validating simulation models is critical to this effort, as well as collecting accurate input data to drive the models. In this project, the Building America research team ARBI validated the newly developed TRNSYS Type 604 pipe model against both detailed laboratory and field distribution system performance data. Validation efforts indicate that the model performs very well in handling different pipe materials, insulation cases, and varying hot water load conditions. Limitations of the model include the complexity of setting up the input file and long simulation run times. This project also looked at recent field hot water studies to better understand use patterns and potential behavioral changes as homeowners convert from conventional storage water heaters to gas tankless units. The team concluded that the current Energy Factor test procedure overestimates typical use and underestimates the number of hot water draws, which has implications for both equipment and distribution system performance. Gas tankless water heaters were found to impact how people use hot water, but the data does not necessarily suggest an increase in usage. Further study in hot water usage and patterns is needed to better define these characteristics in different climates and home vintages.

  11. Nuclear signature effect on spatial distribution of molecular harmonic in the presence of spatial inhomogeneous field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Liqiang; Li, Wenliang

    2017-01-01

    Spatial distribution of the molecular harmonic spectra from \\text{H}\\text{2}+ in the presence of inhomogeneous field has been theoretically investigated. It shows that (i) the harmonic intensities from the negative-H nucleus play the dominating role in harmonic emission spectra. (ii) Through the investigations of the nuclear signature effect on the spatial distribution of the molecular harmonic spectra, the differences of the harmonic intensities between the negative-H nucleus and the positive-H nucleus can be enhanced and reduced with the introduction of the higher vibrational state and the heavy nucleus (i.e. \\text{D}2+ ), respectively. The time-frequency analyses of the harmonic spectra, the time-dependent wave function and the electron localization have been shown to explain the harmonic spatial distribution and the electron motion. (iii) Due to the plasmon-resonance-enhancement near the metallic nanostructure, the harmonic cutoff can be remarkably enhanced as the spatial position of the inhomogeneous field moving away from the gap center. The ionization probabilities have been shown to explain the harmonic cutoff extension.

  12. The GIRAFFE Inner Bulge Survey (GIBS) III. Metallicity distributions and kinematics of 26 Galactic bulge fields

    CERN Document Server

    Zoccali, M; Gonzalez, O A; Valenti, E; Rojas-Arriagada, A; Minniti, J; Rejkuba, M; Minniti, D; McWilliam, A; Babusiaux, C; Hill, V; Renzini, A

    2016-01-01

    Several recent studies have demonstrated that the Galactic bulge hosts two components with different mean metallicities, and possibly different spatial distribution and kinematics. As a consequence, both the metallicity distribution and the radial velocity of bulge stars vary across different line of sights. We present here the metallicity distribution function of red clump stars in 26 fields spread across a wide area of the bulge, with special emphasis on fields close to Galactic plane, at latitudes b=-2 and b=-1, that were not explored before. This paper includes new metallicities from a sample of about 5000 K giant stars, observed at spectral resolution R=6500, in the Calcium II Triplet region. They are the main dataset of the GIRAFFE Inner Bulge Survey. As part of the same survey we have previously published results for a sample of about 600 K giant stars, at latitude b=-4 , derived from higher resolution spectra (R=22,500). Results. The combined sample allows us to trace and characterize the metal poor a...

  13. Case studies of particle formation events observed in boreal forests: implications for nucleation mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Yu

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol nucleation events observed worldwide may have significant climatic and health implications. However, the specific nucleation mechanisms remain ambiguous. Here, we report case studies of eight nucleation events observed during an intensive field campaign at a boreal forest site (Hyytiälä, Finland in spring 2005. The present analysis is based on comprehensive kinetic simulations using an ion-mediated nucleation (IMN model in which the key physical and chemical parameters are constrained by a variety of recent measurements. Out of the 22 days of the campaign on which nucleation events were observed, eight major events were selected for detailed analysis on the basis of indications that the observed air masses were relatively homogeneous. In most of these cases, reasonable agreement is found between IMN predictions and field data for a range of variables, including critical nucleation sizes, size-dependent overcharging ratios, and the concentrations of 1.8–3 nm stable clusters and 3–6 nm particles, and their diurnal variations. The possible reasons leading to substantial differences between observation and theory in some cases are also explored. Statistically, roughly 80% of the nucleation events recorded during the Hyytiälä campaign exhibited mean size-dependent particle overcharging ratios within the range of, or exceeding, those predicted by the IMN model, suggesting that ion nucleation processes were significant during these events. The nucleation rates calculated using the IMN modeling approach are contrasted with those predicted by other theories/models, and key differences between the results are discussed. In particular, it is concluded that the ion nucleation model originally developed by Lovejoy et al. (2004 significantly under-predicts ion nucleation rates, and cannot explain the new observations from Hyytiälä regarding the electrical properties of nanoparticles. We also show that, for the well documented conditions of

  14. Nanowires and nanoneedles nucleation on vicinal substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xu, E-mail: zhangxubetter@gmail.com [Henan Key Laboratory of Laser and Opto-electric Information Technology, School of Information Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052 (China); Xie, Dan; Huang, Genling [Zhengzhou Railway Vocational and Technical College, Zhengzhou 450052 (China); Sun, Xiao-Hong [Henan Key Laboratory of Laser and Opto-electric Information Technology, School of Information Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052 (China)

    2015-01-01

    An analytic stress-driven nucleation model of nanowires (NWs) and nanoneedles (NNs) growing on a mismatched vicinal substrate is proposed. It is demonstrated that the formation enthalpy of NWs and NNs is a function of three independent variables, the base radius, aspect ratio and miscut angle of the vicinal surface. Theoretical analysis shows that the minimum nucleation barrier of an island decreases with increment of substrate misorientation, which means the nucleation of islands on a vicinal substrate is more favorable than that on a flat substrate.

  15. Nucleation and growth of geological faults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Stoyan

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We present a new model of fault nucleation and growth based on the Weibull theory, already widely used in fracture research engineering. We propose that, according to a birth-and-growth process, germs (nuclei are born at random instants at random spatial locations and then grow with time. This leads to a satisfactory formulation of fault length distribution, different from classical statistical laws. Especially, this formulation reconciles previous analyses of fault datasets displaying power-law and/or exponential behaviors. The Weibull parameters can be statistically estimated in a simple way. We show that the model can be successfully fitted to natural data in Kenya and Ethiopia. In contrast to existing descriptive models developed for geological fault systems, such as fractal approaches, the Weibull theory allows to characterize the strength of the material, i.e. its resistance to deformation. Since this model is very general, we expect that it can be applied in many situations, and for simulations of geological fracture processes. The model is independent of deformation intensity and type and therefore allows a better constraint of the seismic risk in threatened regions.

  16. Observation of the Field, Current and Force Distributions in an Optimized Superconducting Levitation with Translational Symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Chang-Qing; Ma, Guang-Tong; Liu, Kun; Wang, Jia-Su

    2016-08-01

    The superconducting levitation realized by immersing the high-temperature superconductors (HTSs) into nonuniform magnetic field is deemed promising in a wide range of industrial applications such as maglev transportation and kinetic energy storage. Using a well-established electromagnetic model to mathematically describe the HTS, we have developed an efficient scheme that is capable of intelligently and globally optimizing the permanent magnet guideway (PMG) with single or multiple HTSs levitated above for the maglev transportation applications. With maximizing the levitation force as the principal objective, we optimized the dimensions of a Halbach-derived PMG to observe how the field, current and force distribute inside the HTSs when the optimized situation is achieved. Using a pristine PMG as a reference, we have analyzed the critical issues for enhancing the levitation force through comparing the field, current and force distributions between the optimized and pristine PMGs. It was also found that the optimized dimensions of the PMG are highly dependent upon the levitated HTS. Moreover, the guidance force is not always contradictory to the levitation force and may also be enhanced when the levitation force is prescribed to be the principle objective, depending on the configuration of levitation system and lateral displacement.

  17. Observation of the Field, Current and Force Distributions in an Optimized Superconducting Levitation with Translational Symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Chang-Qing; Ma, Guang-Tong; Liu, Kun; Wang, Jia-Su

    2017-01-01

    The superconducting levitation realized by immersing the high-temperature superconductors (HTSs) into nonuniform magnetic field is deemed promising in a wide range of industrial applications such as maglev transportation and kinetic energy storage. Using a well-established electromagnetic model to mathematically describe the HTS, we have developed an efficient scheme that is capable of intelligently and globally optimizing the permanent magnet guideway (PMG) with single or multiple HTSs levitated above for the maglev transportation applications. With maximizing the levitation force as the principal objective, we optimized the dimensions of a Halbach-derived PMG to observe how the field, current and force distribute inside the HTSs when the optimized situation is achieved. Using a pristine PMG as a reference, we have analyzed the critical issues for enhancing the levitation force through comparing the field, current and force distributions between the optimized and pristine PMGs. It was also found that the optimized dimensions of the PMG are highly dependent upon the levitated HTS. Moreover, the guidance force is not always contradictory to the levitation force and may also be enhanced when the levitation force is prescribed to be the principle objective, depending on the configuration of levitation system and lateral displacement.

  18. Electron Beam Dose Distribution in the Presence of Non-Uniform Magnetic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Javad Tahmasebi-Birgani

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Magnetic fields are capable of altering the trajectory of electron beams andcan be used in radiation therapy.Theaim of this study was to produce regions with dose enhancement and reduction in the medium. Materials and Methods The NdFeB permanent magnets were arranged on the electron applicator in several configurations. Then, after the passage of the electron beams (9 and 15 MeV Varian 2100C/D through the non-uniform magnetic field, the Percentage Depth Dose(PDDs on central axis and dose profiles in three depths for each energy were measured in a 3D water phantom. Results For all magnet arrangements and for two different energies, the surface dose increment and shift in depth of maximum dose (dmax were observed. In addition, the pattern of dose distribution in buildup region was changed. Measurement of dose profile showed dose localization and spreading in some other regions. Conclusion The results of this study confirms that using magnetic field can alter the dose deposition patterns and as a result can produce dose enhancement as well as dose reduction in the medium using high-energy electron beams. These effects provide dose distribution with arbitrary shapes for use in radiation therapy.

  19. Containerless Liquid to Solid Nucleation Pathways in Two Representative Grades of Commercially Available Zirconium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rulison, A. J.; Rhim, W.-K.; Bayuzick, R.; Hofmeister, W.; Morton, C.

    1997-01-01

    Experimental measurements were conducted to determine the solid metal nucleation pathways of radiatively cooling, molten zirconium spheres of two different commercially available purity grades in a high-vacuum, high-temperature electrostatic levitator. The ensemble distribution of maximum undercooling temperatures was interpreted using Poisson statistics to determine the temperature dependence of the solid metal nucleation rate. For a sample of nominally 99.95% pure zirconium, the results are consistent with heterogeneous solid metal nucleation either on static catalyst particles at least approx. 30 nm diameter or on a surface coating. For a sample of nominally 99% pure zirconium, however, it appears that heterogeneous solid metal nucleation occurred either on a polydispersion of approx. 10 nm (mean diameter) static catalyst particles or on dynamic catalyst particles that precipitated from a solution that became supersaturated as the melt cooled.

  20. Analysis of experimental data for the nucleation rate of water droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashchiev, Dimo

    2006-07-01

    A formula for the stationary nucleation rate J is proposed and used for analysis of experimental data for the dependence of J on the supersaturation ratio S in isothermal homogeneous nucleation of water droplets in vapors. It is found that the experimental data are described quite successfully by the proposed formula which is based on (i) the Gibbs presentation of the nucleation work in terms of overpressure, (ii) the Girshick-Chiu [J. Chem. Phys. 93, 1273 (1990); 94, 826 (1991)] self-consistency correction to the equilibrium cluster size distribution, and (iii) the Reguera-Rubi [J. Chem. Phys. 115, 7100 (2001)] kinetic accounting of the nucleus translational-rotational motion. The formula, like that of Wölk and Strey [J. Phys. Chem. B 105, 11683 (2001)], could be used as a semiempirical relation describing the J(S ) dependence for nucleation in vapors of single-component droplets or crystals of substances with insufficiently well known equations of state.

  1. Cell edges accumulate gamma tubulin complex components and nucleate microtubules following cytokinesis in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Ambrose

    Full Text Available Microtubules emanate from distinct organizing centers in fungal and animal cells. In plant cells, by contrast, microtubules initiate from dispersed sites in the cell cortex, where they then self-organize into parallel arrays. Previous ultrastructural evidence suggested that cell edges participate in microtubule nucleation but so far there has been no direct evidence for this. Here we use live imaging to show that components of the gamma tubulin nucleation complex (GCP2 and GCP3 localize at distinct sites along the outer periclinal edge of newly formed crosswalls, and that microtubules grow predominantly away from these edges. These data confirm a role for cell edges in microtubule nucleation, and suggest that an asymmetric distribution of microtubule nucleation factors contributes to cortical microtubule organization in plants, in a manner more similar to other kingdoms than previously thought.

  2. Characteristics of the magnetic field distribution on compact NMR magnets using cryocooled HTS bulks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S.B., E-mail: kim@elec.okayama-u.ac.j [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Okayama University, 3-1-1, Tsushima Naka, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Takano, R.; Nakano, T.; Imai, M. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Okayama University, 3-1-1, Tsushima Naka, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Hahn, S.Y. [Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory, MIT, NW14-3117, 170 Albany Street, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2009-10-15

    Recently, the performance of high temperature superconducting (HTS) bulks such as critical current density, size, and mechanical strength has been improved rapidly. So, various applications using HTS bulks such as motors, bearings and flywheels have been investigated by many research groups. A compact nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) magnet is one of the new applications after a technique to enhance maximum trapped field of the HTS bulk more than 11.7 T (500 MHz {sup 1}H NMR frequency) has been developed. This new compact NMR magnet out of HTS bulks is cost-effective compared with conventional NMR magnets and then expected to be widely used in food and drug industry. In design and manufacture of the compact NMR magnets, spatial field homogeneity of the large trapped magnetic field in HTS bulk annuli is a crucial issue because the behavior of a trapped field is highly non-linear and, as a result, a technique to improve the field homogeneity such as active/passive shimming now becomes more challenging compared with that of the conventional counterparts. This paper presents the magnetic field distributions in single and three assembled HTS bulk annuli measured by a 3-axis and multi-arrayed Hall sensor under two different cryogenic environments: (1) in a bath of liquid nitrogen (LN{sub 2}) and (2) dry cooling by a cryocooler. The spatial homogeneity changes with various operating temperatures were investigated and the effect of critical current density enhancement by lowering the operating temperature on the field homogeneity improvement was discussed in detail.

  3. Analytical Calculation of the Magnetic Field distribution in a Flux-Modulated Permanent-Magnet Brushless Motor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xiaoxu; Liu, Xiao; Chen, Zhe

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a rapid approach to compute the magnetic field distribution in a flux-modulated permanent-magnet brushless motor. Partial differential equations are used to describe the magnet field behavior in terms of magnetic vector potentials. The whole computational domain is divided int...... magnetic field with those calculated by finite element method....

  4. The SERMON project: 48 new field Blazhko stars and an investigation of modulation-period distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarka, M.; Liška, J.; Auer, R. F.; Prudil, Z.; Juráňová, A.; Sódor, Á.

    2016-08-01

    Aims: We investigated 1234 fundamental mode RR Lyrae stars observed by the All Sky Automated Survey (ASAS) to identify the Blazhko (BL) effect. A sample of 1547 BL stars from the literature was collected to compare the modulation-period distribution with stars newly identified in our sample. Methods: A classical frequency spectra analysis was performed using Period04 software. Data points from each star from the ASAS database were analysed individually to avoid confusion with artificial peaks and aliases. Statistical methods were used in the investigation of the modulation-period distribution. Results: Altogether we identified 87 BL stars (48 new detections), 7 candidate stars, and 22 stars showing long-term period variations. The distribution of modulation periods of newly identified BL stars corresponds well to the distribution of modulation periods of stars located in the Galactic field, Galactic bulge, Large Magellanic Cloud, and globular cluster M5 collected from the literature. As a very important by-product of this comparison, we found that pulsation periods of BL stars follow Gaussian distribution with the mean period of 0.54 ± 0.07 d, while the modulation periods show log-normal distribution with centre at log (Pm [d]) = 1.78 ± 0.30 dex. This means that 99.7% of all known modulated stars have BL periods between 7.6 and 478 days. We discuss the identification of long modulation periods and show, that a significant percentage of stars showing long-term period variations could be classified as BL stars.

  5. Effect of sinter layer porosity distribution on flow and temperature fields in a sinter cooler

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jik-chang Leong; Kai-wun Jin; Jia-shyan Shiau; Tzer-ming Jeng; Chang-hsien Tai

    2009-01-01

    When sinters are filled into the sinter cooler from the sintering machine, it is commonly seen that, due to segregation ef-fects, sinters of larger size usually accumulate closer to the inner wall of the sinter cooler, whereas those of smaller size are to the outer wall. This nonuniform distribution of sinters has led to uneven cooling effect throughout the cooler. This causes the sinters leaving the cooler at a large temperature difference. This undesired temperature difference leads to the deformation and even the de-struction of the conveyors. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technique was used in the present work to investigate the heat and fluid flow phenomena within the sinter cooler corresponding to the different distribution of sinter layer porosity, which was highly dependent on the arrangement and orientation of sinters within the sinter cooler. It is confirmed that a high mass flow rate within the sinter layer causes a low temperature region and vice versa. The flow fields for vertically reducing porosity distribution and random distribution are almost identical indicating the relative insignificance of convective heat transfer mechanism.

  6. Modeling of the near-field distribution of pollutants coming from a coastal outfall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. P. Lyubimova

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study concerns the 3-D distribution of pollutants emitted from a coastal outfall in the presence of strong sea currents. The problem is solved using the nonlinear Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes equations in the framework of the k-ε model. The constants of the logarithmic law for the vertical velocity profile in the bottom boundary layer are obtained by processing experimental data from acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs. The near-field distribution of pollutants at different distances from the diffuser is obtained in terms of the ambient flow velocity (steady or with tidal effect and outfall discharge characteristics. It is shown that even in the case where the effluent density is substantially lower than the ambient sea water density the plume can impact the seabed, creating a risk of pollution of removable bottom sediments.

  7. Field test of classical symmetric encryption with continuous variables quantum key distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouguet, Paul; Kunz-Jacques, Sébastien; Debuisschert, Thierry; Fossier, Simon; Diamanti, Eleni; Alléaume, Romain; Tualle-Brouri, Rosa; Grangier, Philippe; Leverrier, Anthony; Pache, Philippe; Painchault, Philippe

    2012-06-18

    We report on the design and performance of a point-to-point classical symmetric encryption link with fast key renewal provided by a Continuous Variable Quantum Key Distribution (CVQKD) system. Our system was operational and able to encrypt point-to-point communications during more than six months, from the end of July 2010 until the beginning of February 2011. This field test was the first demonstration of the reliability of a CVQKD system over a long period of time in a server room environment. This strengthens the potential of CVQKD for information technology security infrastructure deployments.

  8. Field Test of Classical Symmetric Encryption with Continuous Variable Quantum Key Distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Jouguet, Paul; Debuisschert, Thierry; Fossier, Simon; Diamanti, Eleni; Alléaume, Romain; Tualle-Brouri, Rosa; Grangier, Philippe; Leverrier, Anthony; Pache, Philippe; Painchault, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    We report on the design and performance of a point-to-point classical symmetric encryption link with fast key renewal provided by a Continuous Variable Quantum Key Distribution (CVQKD) system. Our system was operational and able to encrypt point-to-point communications during more than six months, from the end of July 2010 until the beginning of February 2011. This field test was the first demonstration of the reliability of a CVQKD system over a long period of time in a server room environment. This strengthens the potential of CVQKD for information technology security infrastructure deployments.

  9. Studies of the Electric Field Distribution in Biological Bodies - Experimental Dosimetry at Radiofrequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-12-05

    Absorption Rate Distribution In Simple Geometrica ~l Bodies at Radio Frequencies", M.A.Sc. Thesis, University of Ottawa. 24. G.H. Wong, S.S. Stuchly, A...desigted for operaion in air 12,4,51 or in the dielectric media • C2.7] can be used 1: our eysteia lo s a they coo- _ Cl three L-doperdeot aote-ra...dielectric media is detetaled by masuring the output voltage of the electric field probe, placed at varils locacioc 160 me1 208 3.9 NA I= a sphere made of tht

  10. Carrier distribution and electromechanical fields in a free piezoelectric semiconductor rod

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-li ZHANG; Xiao-yuan WANG; Wei-qiu CHEN; Jia-shi YANG

    2016-01-01

    We made a theoretical study of the carrier distribution and electromechanical fields in a free piezoelectric semicon-ductor rod of crystals of class 6 mm. Simple analytical expressions for the carrier distribution, electric potential, electric field, electric displacement, mechanical displacement, stress, and strain were obtained from a 1D nonlinear model reduced from the 3D equations for piezoelectric semiconductors. The distribution and fields were found to be either symmetric or antisymmetric about the center of the rod. They are qualitatively the same for electrons and holes. Numerical calculations show that the carrier distribution and the fields are relatively strong near the ends of the rod than in its central part. They are sensitive to the value of the carrier density near the ends of the rod.%中文概要题目:压电半导体杆中的机械场、电场与载流子分布研究目的:导出两端自由压电半导体杆在自平衡状态下内部的位移、电场和载流子的解析表达式,研究它们在杆内的分布规律。方法:从三维压电半导体基本方程出发,以 n-型半导体为例,导出考虑拉伸变形模式的一维模型方程。由平衡方程和电学高斯方程和平衡态下杆内电流为零的条件得到以电场为未知函数一阶非线性偏微分方程,再利用两端自由的边界条件解出位移、电场和载流子的分布函数。结论:压电半导体杆内位移、载流子和电势关于杆的几何中心对称分布,电场、应变则关于中心呈反对称分布形式;它们在半导体两端部的区域变化比在中心区域的变化剧烈。此外,半导体杆两端部的载流子浓度、位移和电场显著依赖于端部的初始载流子浓度。

  11. Field test of the wavelength-saving quantum key distribution network

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Shuang; Yin, Zhen-Qiang; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Tao; Li, Hong-Wei; Xu, Fang-Xing; Zhou, Zheng; Yang, Yang; Huang, Da-Jun; Zhang, Li-Jun; Li, Fang-Yi; Liu, Dong; Wang, Yong-Gang; Guo, Guang-Can; Han, Zheng-Fu

    2012-01-01

    We propose a wavelength-saving topology of quantum key distribution(QKD) network based on passive optical elements, and report the field test of this network on the commercial telecom optical fiber. In this network, 5 nodes are supported with 2 wavelengths, and every two nodes can share secure keys directly at the same time. All QKD links in the network operate at the frequency of 20 MHz. We also characterized the insertion loss and crosstalk effects on the point-to-point QKD system after introducing this QKD network.

  12. Coherent control of indirect photofragmentation in the weak-field limit: Control of transient fragment distributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shu, Chuan-Cun; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate theoretically that laser-induced coherent quantum interference control of asymptotic states of dissociating molecules is possible - even in the (one-photon) weak-field limit starting from a single vibrational eigenstate - when resonances are in play. This is illustrated for the Na......I molecule, where it is shown that the probability of observing atomic fragments as well as the distribution of their relative momenta can be changed by a phase modulated pulse with a fixed bandwidth. This type of control is restricted to finite times during the indirect fragmentation. (C) 2011 American...

  13. The cumulative overlap distribution function in spin glasses: mean field vs. three dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yllanes, David; Billoire, Alain; Maiorano, Andrea; Marinari, Enzo; Martin-Mayor, Victor

    2015-03-01

    We use a sample-dependent analysis, based on medians and quantiles, to analyze the behavior of the overlap probability distribution in spin glasses. Using analytical and numerical mean-field results for the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model, as well as data from toy models, we show that this approach is an effective tool to distinguish the low-temperature behavior of replica symmmetry breaking systems from that expected in the droplet picture. An application of the method to the three-dimensional Edwards-Anderson models shows agreement with the replica symmetry breaking predictions. Supported by ERC Grant No. 247328 and from MINECO (Spain), Contract No. FIS2012-35719-C02.

  14. Solution of distributive problems with synthesis of radar information fields parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. В. Нестеров

    1999-05-01

    Full Text Available Considered is the approach to solution of the problems of synthesis of radar and information fields parameters. It is proposed that, as the result of the synthesis, the structure of location of ground radar components should be determined. The optimal location of radar and information system is supposed to be determined by the results of the solution of the distribution problems. Considered are three sets of problems: method of linear programming, method of non-linear programming, method of scanning theory. Described are the distinctive features of each method, their advantages and disadvantages also the groups of determining parameters; an advice is given as to the use of particular approach

  15. The GIRAFFE Inner Bulge Survey (GIBS). III. Metallicity distributions and kinematics of 26 Galactic bulge fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoccali, M.; Vasquez, S.; Gonzalez, O. A.; Valenti, E.; Rojas-Arriagada, A.; Minniti, J.; Rejkuba, M.; Minniti, D.; McWilliam, A.; Babusiaux, C.; Hill, V.; Renzini, A.

    2017-02-01

    Context. Several recent studies have demonstrated that the Galactic bulge hosts two components with different mean metallicities, and possibly different spatial distribution and kinematics. As a consequence, both the metallicity distribution and the radial velocity of bulge stars vary across different lines of sight. Aims: We present here the metallicity distribution function of red clump stars in 26 fields spread across a wide area of the bulge, with special emphasis on fields close to Galactic plane, at latitudes b = -2° and b = -1°, that have not been explored before. Methods: This paper includes new metallicities from a sample of approximately 5000 K giant stars, observed at spectral resolution R 6500, in the Calcium II Triplet region. These represent the main dataset from the GIRAFFE Inner Bulge Survey. As part of the same survey we have previously published results for a sample of approximately 600 K giant stars, at latitude b -4°, derived from higher resolution spectra (R = 22 500). Results: The combined sample allows us to trace and characterize the metal poor and metal rich bulge populations down to the inner bulge. We present a density map for each of the two components. Contrary to expectations from previous works, we found the metal poor population to be more centrally concentrated than the metal rich one, and with a more axisymmetric spatial distribution. The metal rich population, on the other hand, is arranged in a boxy distribution, consistent with an edge-on bar. By coupling metallicities and radial velocities we show that the metal poor population has a velocity dispersion that varies rather mildly with latitude. On the contrary, the metal rich population has a low velocity dispersion far from the plane (b = -8.5°), yet has a steeper gradient with latitude, becoming higher than the metal poor one in the innermost field (b = -1°). Conclusions: This work provides new observational constraints on the actual chemodynamical properties of the

  16. Effect of oxygen on the bias-enhanced nucleation of diamond on silicon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schreck, M.; Christensen, Carsten; Stritzker, B.

    1999-01-01

    The influence of traces of oxygen in the process gas on the bias-enhanced nucleation (BEN) of diamond on silicon has been studied in the present work. CO2 in concentrations ranging from 0 to 3000 ppm was added during the nucleation procedure at U-bias = -200 V in microwave plasma chemical vapour......-covered substrate surface area with increasing CO2 concentration. At 3000 ppm, the nucleation was completely suppressed. An etching of diamond nuclei by the oxygen could be excluded from in-situ growth rate measurements under bias. Instead, optical emission spectra of the IIB Balmer line indicated a decrease...... in electrical field strength in the plasma above the substrate. For all gas compositions allowing diamond nucleation, epitaxially aligned films could be obtained, provided that the duration of the biasing step was chosen appropriately. Thus, traces of oxygen do not completely suppress epitaxy. However, the in...

  17. Lexicographical structuring: the number and types of fields, data distribution, searching and data presentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergenholtz, Henning; Pedersen, Heidi Agerbo

    2015-01-01

    This contribution will not describe the structure in existing dictionaries. Instead, it will focus on the decisions that lexicographers make when they draw up the concept for and carry out the production of one or more new dictionaries, or when they consider making changes in the data presentation...... in an existing dictionary. This part of the lexicographical work is what we call structuring, which encompasses a number of various lexicographical decisions. One of these is choosing the fields that a database should contain. Typically, for some of these field types, it will be easy to distribute data...... dictionaries. However, only by producing monofunctional dictionaries is it possible to avoid the type of information overload, which makes polyfunctional dictionaries close to useless on electronic devices such as tablets and smartphones. In the case of monofunctional dictionaries, lexicographical structuring...

  18. Field Emission and Radial Distribution Function Studies of Fractal-like Amorphous Carbon Nanotips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solá, F.; Biaggi-Labiosa, A.; Fonseca, L. F.; Resto, O.; Lebrón-Colón, M.; Meador, M. A.

    2009-05-01

    The short-range order of individual fractal-like amorphous carbon nanotips was investigated by means of energy-filtered electron diffraction in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). The nanostructures were grown in porous silicon substrates in situ within the TEM by the electron beam-induced deposition method. The structure factor S( k) and the reduced radial distribution function G( r) were calculated. From these calculations a bond angle of 124° was obtained which suggests a distorted graphitic structure. Field emission was obtained from individual nanostructures using two micromanipulators with sub-nanometer positioning resolution. A theoretical three-stage model that accounts for the geometry of the nanostructures provides a value for the field enhancement factor close to the one obtained experimentally from the Fowler-Nordheim law.

  19. Flow field distribution of liquid film of water lubricated bearing-rotor coupling systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Q. L.; Hu, J. N.; Ye, X. Y.; Zhang, D. S.; Zheng, J. B.

    2016-05-01

    According to the desalination high-pressure pump water lubricated bearing-rotor coupling systems flow field distribution of liquid film in the starting transient process and its power transmission mechanism can lay the foundation of further exploring and judging lubrication state at the boot process. By using the computational fluid dynamics Fluent secondary development platform and calling the relevant DEFINE macro function to achieve the translation and rotation movement of the journal, we will use the dynamic grid technique to realize the automatic calculation and grid update of water lubricated bearings 3d unsteady liquid film flow field, and finally we will dispose the results of numerical simulation and get the pressure. When the eccentricity is large, film thickness was negatively correlated with the pressure, and positive with the velocity. Differential pressure was negatively correlated with velocity. When the eccentricity is small, film thickness is no significant relationship with differential pressure and velocity. Differential pressure has little difference with velocity.

  20. On combining Thole's induced point dipole model with fixed charge distributions in molecular mechanics force fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antila, Hanne S; Salonen, Emppu

    2015-04-15

    The Thole induced point dipole model is combined with three different point charge fitting methods, Merz-Kollman (MK), charges from electrostatic potentials using a grid (CHELPG), and restrained electrostatic potential (RESP), and two multipole algorithms, distributed multipole analysis (DMA) and Gaussian multipole model (GMM), which can be used to describe the electrostatic potential (ESP) around molecules in molecular mechanics force fields. This is done to study how the different methods perform when intramolecular polarizability contributions are self-consistently removed from the fitting done in the force field parametrization. It is demonstrated that the polarizable versions of the partial charge models provide a good compromise between accuracy and computational efficiency in describing the ESP of small organic molecules undergoing conformational changes. For the point charge models, the inclusion of polarizability reduced the the average root mean square error of ESP over the test set by 4-10%.

  1. The $\\rho$-meson longitudinal leading-twist distribution amplitude within QCD background field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Fu, Hai-Bing; Cheng, Wei; Zhong, Tao

    2016-01-01

    We revisit the $\\rho$-meson longitudinal leading-twist distribution amplitude (DA) $\\phi_{2;\\rho}^\\|$ by using the QCD sum rules approach within the background field theory. To improve the accuracy of the sum rules for its moments $\\langle\\xi_{n;\\rho}^\\|\\rangle$, we include the next-to-leading order QCD correction to the perturbative part and keep all non-perturbative condensates up to dimension-six consistently within the background field theory. The first two moments read $\\langle \\xi_{2;\\rho}^\\| \\rangle|_{1{\\rm GeV}} = 0.241(28)$ and $\\langle \\xi_{4;\\rho}^\\| \\rangle|_{1{\\rm GeV}} = 0.108(27)$, indicating a double humped behavior for $\\phi_{2;\\rho}^\\|$ at low $q^2$-region. As an application, we apply them to the $B\\to \\rho $ transition form factors within the QCD light-cone sum rules, which are key components for the decay width $\\Gamma(B\\to \\rho \\ell \

  2. Observed oil and gas field size distributions: A consequence of the discovery process and prices of oil and gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, L.J.; Attanasi, E.D.; Schuenemeyer, J.H.

    1988-01-01

    If observed oil and gas field size distributions are obtained by random samplings, the fitted distributions should approximate that of the parent population of oil and gas fields. However, empirical evidence strongly suggests that larger fields tend to be discovered earlier in the discovery process than they would be by random sampling. Economic factors also can limit the number of small fields that are developed and reported. This paper examines observed size distributions in state and federal waters of offshore Texas. Results of the analysis demonstrate how the shape of the observable size distributions change with significant hydrocarbon price changes. Comparison of state and federal observed size distributions in the offshore area shows how production cost differences also affect the shape of the observed size distribution. Methods for modifying the discovery rate estimation procedures when economic factors significantly affect the discovery sequence are presented. A primary conclusion of the analysis is that, because hydrocarbon price changes can significantly affect the observed discovery size distribution, one should not be confident about inferring the form and specific parameters of the parent field size distribution from the observed distributions. ?? 1988 International Association for Mathematical Geology.

  3. Unraveling the "pressure effect" in nucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedekind, Jan; Hyvärinen, Antti-Pekka; Brus, David; Reguera, David

    2008-09-19

    The influence of the pressure of a chemically inert carrier gas on the nucleation rate is one of the biggest puzzles in the research of gas-liquid nucleation. Experiments can show a positive effect, a negative effect, or no effect at all. The same experiment may show both trends for the same substance depending on temperature, or for different substances at the same temperature. We show how this ambiguous effect naturally arises from the competition of two contributions: nonisothermal effects and pressure-volume work. Our model clarifies seemingly contradictory experimental results and quantifies the variation of the nucleation ability of a substance in the presence of an ambient gas. Our findings are corroborated by molecular dynamics simulations and might have important implications since nucleation in experiments, technical applications, and nature practically always occurs in the presence of an ambient gas.

  4. Systematic improvement of classical nucleation theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestipino, Santi; Laio, Alessandro; Tosatti, Erio

    2012-06-01

    We reconsider the applicability of classical nucleation theory (CNT) to the calculation of the free energy of solid cluster formation in a liquid and its use to the evaluation of interface free energies from nucleation barriers. Using two different freezing transitions (hard spheres and NaCl) as test cases, we first observe that the interface-free-energy estimates based on CNT are generally in error. As successive refinements of nucleation-barrier theory, we consider corrections due to a nonsharp solid-liquid interface and to a nonspherical cluster shape. Extensive calculations for the Ising model show that corrections due to a nonsharp and thermally fluctuating interface account for the barrier shape with excellent accuracy. The experimental solid nucleation rates that are measured in colloids are better accounted for by these non-CNT terms, whose effect appears to be crucial in the interpretation of data and in the extraction of the interface tension from them.

  5. Nucleation and superstabilization in small systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippe, T.

    2017-09-01

    Phase transitions are known to present peculiarities in small systems that are related to depletion effects of the ambient phase. Mass conservation affects the conditions of thermodynamic equilibrium between a nucleus of the new phase and the matrix as compared with nucleation in infinite systems. This finite-size effect is known to delay the phase transition but can also impede nucleation in very small systems as it stabilizes the initial state, originally metastable in infinite systems. In this work, we investigate this superstabilization effect in the context of classical nucleation theory in multicomponent solutions and we derive an analytical expression for the system size below which nucleation becomes thermodynamically impossible. Comparing with the exact solution, our simple result is shown to accurately predict the superstabilization effect, and can therefore be used, for instance, as a guideline for the design of novel nanomaterials.

  6. Augmentation of boiling heat transfer by utilizing the EHD effect. 1st report. ; Basic study on the enhancement of nucleate boiling heat transfer by applying electric field. EHD koka wo katsuyosuru futto dennetsu sokushin ni kansuru kenkyu. 1. ; Futto sokushin no kisoteki kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogata, J. (Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)); Yabe, A. (Mechanical Engineering Lab., Tsukuba (Japan)); Yamazaki, T. (The Tokyo Electric Power Co. Inc., Tokyo (Japan)); Hirao, Y. (Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

    1990-07-25

    What utilizes the effect of electrohydrodynamical technique (EHD), as one of heat transfer augmentation methods, is methodically frequented and partially prepared to be put to practical use. Then, the heat transfer augmentation effect on nucleate boiling, utilizing the EHD effect, was both experimentally and theoretically studied from both the applicative and basic viewpoints. By adding fleon with 2wt% ethyl alcohol, higher in electric conductivity, in order to have the mitigation time of electric charge correspond to the bubbling frequency of bubble, the heat transfer augmentation was enabled to be about 8.5 times as high as that without impressing the electric field. As a result of observing the behavior of bubble in the electric field, was observed a phenomenon of bubble, moving from place to place, without ascending, on the plane electrode plate, by which could be found one of causes of the heat transfer augmentation. From analyzing the electric field around the bubble, it was clear that the static electric field force of vertical component generates force to push the bubble down on the heat transfer surface, and that the horizontal component of static electric field force is more than four times as large as its vertical component, and gives force to have the bubble move and rotate easily on the heat transfer surface. 8 refs., 9 figs.

  7. Landscape models of brook trout abundance and distribution in lotic habitat with field validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, James E.; Johnson, James H.

    2011-01-01

    Brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis are native fish in decline owing to environmental changes. Predictions of their potential distribution and a better understanding of their relationship to habitat conditions would enhance the management and conservation of this valuable species. We used over 7,800 brook trout observations throughout New York State and georeferenced, multiscale landscape condition data to develop four regionally specific artificial neural network models to predict brook trout abundance in rivers and streams. Land cover data provided a general signature of human activity, but other habitat variables were resistant to anthropogenic changes (i.e., changing on a geological time scale). The resulting models predict the potential for any stream to support brook trout. The models were validated by holding 20% of the data out as a test set and by comparison with additional field collections from a variety of habitat types. The models performed well, explaining more than 90% of data variability. Errors were often associated with small spatial displacements of predicted values. When compared with the additional field collections (39 sites), 92% of the predictions were off by only a single class from the field-observed abundances. Among “least-disturbed” field collection sites, all predictions were correct or off by a single abundance class, except for one where brown trout Salmo trutta were present. Other degrading factors were evident at most sites where brook trout were absent or less abundant than predicted. The most important habitat variables included landscape slope, stream and drainage network sizes, water temperature, and extent of forest cover. Predicted brook trout abundances were applied to all New York streams, providing a synoptic map of the distribution of brook trout habitat potential. These fish models set benchmarks of best potential for streams to support brook trout under broad-scale human influences and can assist with planning and

  8. Radiofrequency Field Distribution Assessment in Indoor Areas Covered by Wireless Local Area Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HELBET, R.

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic environment becomes day by day more congested. Radio communication systems in the short range are now part of everyday life, and there is a need to also assess the pollution level due to their emission if we take into account human health and protection. There is consistent scientific evidence that environmental electromagnetic field may cause undesirable biological effects or even health hazards. Present paper aims at giving a view on exposure level due to wireless local area networks (WLAN emission solely, as part of environmental radiofrequency pollution. Highly accurate measurements were made indoor by using a frequency-selective measurement system and identifying the correct settings for an error-minimum assessment. We focused on analysis of the electric flux density distribution inside a room, in the far field of the emitting antennas, in case of a single network communication channel. We analyze the influence the network configuration parameters have on the field level. Distance from the source and traffic rate are also important parameters that affect the exposure level. Our measurements indicate that in the immediate vicinity of the WLAN stations the average field may reach as much as 13% from the present accepted reference levels given in the human exposure standards.

  9. Influence of tail-like magnetic field on O+ ion distribution in the Martian magnetosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Based on the comparison with the Earth, using the LB magneticfield model, the distribution of O+ ion originating from the ionosphere in the Martian magnetosphere is theoretically studied under different conditions of the tail-like magnetic field. The results show that the tail-like magnetic field has influence on the O+ ion flux in the Martian magnetotail: (ⅰ) the O+ ion flux in the Martian tail will increase if the tail-like magnetic field increases; when the tail-like magnetic field increases from 5 nT to 20 nT, the O+ ion flux increases 3 times in the region of 2.8 Rm in the Martian tail; and (ⅱ) the O+ ion flux decreases with increasing intrinsic moment; when the intrinsic moment increases about 5 times, the flux decreases to one fourth in the region of 2.8 Rm in the Martian tail. According to the data on the O+ ion flux and theoretical result in this paper, the deduced Martian intrinsic moment is about 2×1021 Gcm3. This is consistent with the most recent observation by the USA satellite MGS.

  10. Strength distribution of solar magnetic fields in photospheric quiet Sun regions

    CERN Document Server

    Velez, J C Ramirez; Semel, M

    2008-01-01

    The magnetic topology of the solar photosphere in its quietest regions is hidden by the difficulties to disentangle magnetic flux through the resolution element from the field strength of unresolved structures. The observation of spectral lines with strong coupling with hyperfine structure, like the observed MnI line at 553.7 nm, allows such differentiation. The main aim is to analyse the distribution of field strengths in the network and intranetwork of the solar photosphere through inversion of the MnI line at 553.7 nm. An inversion code for the magnetic field using the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) has been developed. Statistical tests are run on the code to validate it. The code has to draw information from the small-amplitude spectral feature oppearing in the core of the Stokes V profile of the observed line for field strengths below a certain threshold, coinciding with lower limit of the Paschen-Back effect in the fine structure of the involved atomic levels. The inversion of the observed profiles,...

  11. Nucleation speed limit on remote fluid-induced earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Tom; Malagnini, Luca; Akinci, Aybige

    2017-01-01

    Earthquakes triggered by other remote seismic events are explained as a response to long-traveling seismic waves that temporarily stress the crust. However, delays of hours or days after seismic waves pass through are reported by several studies, which are difficult to reconcile with the transient stresses imparted by seismic waves. We show that these delays are proportional to magnitude and that nucleation times are best fit to a fluid diffusion process if the governing rupture process involves unlocking a magnitude-dependent critical nucleation zone. It is well established that distant earthquakes can strongly affect the pressure and distribution of crustal pore fluids. Earth’s crust contains hydraulically isolated, pressurized compartments in which fluids are contained within low-permeability walls. We know that strong shaking induced by seismic waves from large earthquakes can change the permeability of rocks. Thus, the boundary of a pressurized compartment may see its permeability rise. Previously confined, overpressurized pore fluids may then diffuse away, infiltrate faults, decrease their strength, and induce earthquakes. Magnitude-dependent delays and critical nucleation zone conclusions can also be applied to human-induced earthquakes. PMID:28845448

  12. Nucleation speed limit on remote fluid induced earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Thomas E.; Akinci, Aybige; Malignini, Luca

    2017-01-01

    Earthquakes triggered by other remote seismic events are explained as a response to long-traveling seismic waves that temporarily stress the crust. However, delays of hours or days after seismic waves pass through are reported by several studies, which are difficult to reconcile with the transient stresses imparted by seismic waves. We show that these delays are proportional to magnitude and that nucleation times are best fit to a fluid diffusion process if the governing rupture process involves unlocking a magnitude-dependent critical nucleation zone. It is well established that distant earthquakes can strongly affect the pressure and distribution of crustal pore fluids. Earth’s crust contains hydraulically isolated, pressurized compartments in which fluids are contained within low-permeability walls. We know that strong shaking induced by seismic waves from large earthquakes can change the permeability of rocks. Thus, the boundary of a pressurized compartment may see its permeability rise. Previously confined, overpressurized pore fluids may then diffuse away, infiltrate faults, decrease their strength, and induce earthquakes. Magnitude-dependent delays and critical nucleation zone conclusions can also be applied to human-induced earthquakes.

  13. Nucleation Kinetics of Cis-Entacapone

    OpenAIRE

    Škalec Šamec, D.; Meštrović, E.; Sander, A.

    2012-01-01

    The solubility curve and the metastable zone width for the system cis-entacapone –2-propanol have been determined in defined process conditions. These results along with values of induction period for the constant feed concentration at different levels of supersaturation were used for evaluating interfacial energy according to the classical nucleation theory. The results obtained were used for calculation of the critical nucleus size, nucleation rate, and prediction of crystal growth mecha...

  14. Direct simulations of homogeneous bubble nucleation: Agreement with classical nucleation theory and no local hot spots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diemand, Jürg; Angélil, Raymond; Tanaka, Kyoko K; Tanaka, Hidekazu

    2014-11-01

    We present results from direct, large-scale molecular dynamics simulations of homogeneous bubble (liquid-to-vapor) nucleation. The simulations contain half a billion Lennard-Jones atoms and cover up to 56 million time steps. The unprecedented size of the simulated volumes allows us to resolve the nucleation and growth of many bubbles per run in simple direct micro-canonical simulations while the ambient pressure and temperature remain almost perfectly constant. We find bubble nucleation rates which are lower than in most of the previous, smaller simulations. It is widely believed that classical nucleation theory (CNT) generally underestimates bubble nucleation rates by very large factors. However, our measured rates are within two orders of magnitude of CNT predictions; only at very low temperatures does CNT underestimate the nucleation rate significantly. Introducing a small, positive Tolman length leads to very good agreement at all temperatures, as found in our recent vapor-to-liquid nucleation simulations. The critical bubbles sizes derived with the nucleation theorem agree well with the CNT predictions at all temperatures. Local hot spots reported in the literature are not seen: Regions where a bubble nucleation event will occur are not above the average temperature, and no correlation of temperature fluctuations with subsequent bubble formation is seen.

  15. Determination of High-Frequency Current Distribution Using EMTP-Based Transmission Line Models with Resulting Radiated Electromagnetic Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mork, B; Nelson, R; Kirkendall, B; Stenvig, N

    2009-11-30

    Application of BPL technologies to existing overhead high-voltage power lines would benefit greatly from improved simulation tools capable of predicting performance - such as the electromagnetic fields radiated from such lines. Existing EMTP-based frequency-dependent line models are attractive since their parameters are derived from physical design dimensions which are easily obtained. However, to calculate the radiated electromagnetic fields, detailed current distributions need to be determined. This paper presents a method of using EMTP line models to determine the current distribution on the lines, as well as a technique for using these current distributions to determine the radiated electromagnetic fields.

  16. Microbial ice nucleators are scavenged from the atmosphere during artificial rain events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanlon, Regina; Powers, Craig; Failor, Kevin; Vinatzer, Boris; Schmale, David

    2016-04-01

    Some microorganisms associated with rain may catalyze the nucleation of ice crystals at significantly warmer temperatures than would normally be required for ice formation, suggesting that they may play an important role in the onset of precipitation. Rain samples collected near the surface of the earth contain an array of microbial ice nucleators, but the little is known about their source(s) and life history. We conducted a series of field experiments to test the hypothesis that microbial ice nucleators are scavenged from the atmosphere by rainfall. Thirty three artificial rain events were conducted over four months (Nov 2014, Dec 2014, April 2015, and June 2015) off the side of the Smart Road Bridge in Blacksburg, VA, USA. In each event, sterile water was dispensed over the side of the bridge and recovered in sterile containers following gravitational settling from the bridge to an open fallow agricultural field below (a distance of ~55m). Microbes scavenged from the artificial rain events were cultured on six different types of agar media (R2A, TSA, CA; +/-cycloheximide), and the ice nucleation activity was examined for colonies cultured from the different media types. Mean CFUs scavenged by artificial rain ranged from 2 to 267 CFUs/mL. Microbial ice nucleators were cultured from 94% (31/33) of the simulated rain events, and represented 1.4% (121/8871) of the total number of colonies assayed. This percentage is similar to the percentage of culturable microbial ice nucleators occurring in about half of the natural rain events studied in Blacksburg, VA. Sequence-assisted identification of the repeatable microbial ice nucleators that were scavenged from the atmosphere showed a number of unique prokaryotic and eukaryotic taxa. This work expands our knowledge of the scavenging properties of rainfall, and suggests that at least some ice nucleators in natural precipitation events may have been scrubbed from the atmosphere during rainfall, and thus are not likely to be

  17. Generation of two-lobe light fields with a rotating intensity distribution under propagation for single emitter spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volostnikov, V. G.; Vorontsov, E. N.; Kotova, S. P.; Losevsky, N. N.; Prokopova, D. V.; Razueva, E. V.; Samagin, S. A.

    2016-12-01

    The paper outlines the results of studies on the generation of two-lobe light fields with the intensity distribution rotating during the field propagation. Such fields are needed to determine the depth of bedding of single emitters in spectral studies of substance properties. On the base of the spiral beam optics, the phase distributions were obtained for the synthesis of two-lobe fields with different speeds of rotation of the intensity distribution. The light fields have been formed by using a liquid-crystal spatial phase modulator HOLOEYE HEO-1080P. The influence of the illuminating beam parameters and the aberrations of the system on the quality of the formed light field was also studied.

  18. Generation of two-lobe light fields with a rotating intensity distribution under propagation for single emitter spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volostnikov V.G.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper outlines the results of studies on the generation of two-lobe light fields with the intensity distribution rotating during the field propagation. Such fields are needed to determine the depth of bedding of single emitters in spectral studies of substance properties. On the base of the spiral beam optics, the phase distributions were obtained for the synthesis of two-lobe fields with different speeds of rotation of the intensity distribution. The light fields have been formed by using a liquid-crystal spatial phase modulator HOLOEYE HEO-1080P. The influence of the illuminating beam parameters and the aberrations of the system on the quality of the formed light field was also studied.

  19. Role of nucleation of bile liquid crystal in gallstone formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Ming Yang; Jie Wu; Jin-Yi Li; Lin Gu; Min-Fei Zhou

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To explore the role of bile liquid crystal in the process of gallbladder stone formation and to provide bases for preventing and treating cholelithiasis.METHODS: 46 guinea pigs, half males and half females,were randomly divided into control group and stone-causing group. Normal feed and stoneleading feed were used respectively to raise guinea pigs in the control group and stone-causing group. The guinea pigs were killed in three batches during the raising period. Under polarizing microscope, the pattern changes of bile liquid crystal in the gallbladder biles of the guinea pigs in the control group and stone-causing group were dynamicly observed respectively in single-blind trial.RESULTS: It was found that there were few crystals in the guinea pigs′biles of the control group, and their Malta cross was small and scattered, and existed in single form. With the increase of the feeding days, bile liquid crystals grew and Malta cross became bigger with their distribution densified, denser somewhere, but always existed in single form. While those of the stone-causing group had more bile liquid crystals, Malta cross was big and merged in strings.With the increase of the feeding days, bile liquid crystals grew in amount and strings of Malta cross increased and became bigger. The crosses in strings were arranged more and more regularly and they gradually changed into stone crystals.CONCLUSION: Formation of gallbladder stone is a process of nucleation from different substances, and the causing-stone gallbladder bile is a constantly supersaturated solution, and bile liquid crystal is a nucleation factor in the formation of gallbladder stones. The process of nucleation includes gathering, merging and phase-changing of bile liquid crystals.The process of gathering, merging of bile liquid crystal is the key to nucleation.

  20. Charging of aerosol and nucleation in atmospheric pressure electrical discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borra, J. P.

    2008-12-01

    The paper focuses on applications of atmospheric pressure plasmas (dc corona, streamer, spark and ac dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs)) in aerosol processes for materials and environment. Since aerosol kinematics depends mainly on electric forces acting on charged particles, the two mechanisms of aerosol charging by the collection of ions are presented in corona, post-corona and DBDs. In such defined charging conditions, field and diffusion charging laws are depicted, with respect to applications of controlled kinematics of charged aerosol. Then key parameters controlling the formation by nucleation and the growth by coagulation of particles in plasmas are presented. Sources of vapor leading to nucleated nanoparticles are depicted in atmospheric pressure electrical discharges: (i) when filamentary dc streamer and spark as well as ac-DBDs interact with metal or dielectric surfaces and (ii) when discharges induce reactions with gaseous precursors in volume. In both cases, condensable gaseous species are produced, leading to nano-sized particles by physical and chemical routes of nucleation. The composition, size and structure of primary nanoparticles as well as the final size of agglomerates are related to plasma parameters (energy, number per unit surface and time and thermal gradients around each filament as well as the transit time).

  1. Adjoint based data assimilation for phase field model using second order information of a posterior distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Shin-Ichi; Nagao, Hiromichi; Yamanaka, Akinori; Tsukada, Yuhki; Koyama, Toshiyuki; Inoue, Junya

    Phase field (PF) method, which phenomenologically describes dynamics of microstructure evolutions during solidification and phase transformation, has progressed in the fields of hydromechanics and materials engineering. How to determine, based on observation data, an initial state and model parameters involved in a PF model is one of important issues since previous estimation methods require too much computational cost. We propose data assimilation (DA), which enables us to estimate the parameters and states by integrating the PF model and observation data on the basis of the Bayesian statistics. The adjoint method implemented on DA not only finds an optimum solution by maximizing a posterior distribution but also evaluates the uncertainty in the estimations by utilizing the second order information of the posterior distribution. We carried out an estimation test using synthetic data generated by the two-dimensional Kobayashi's PF model. The proposed method is confirmed to reproduce the true initial state and model parameters we assume in advance, and simultaneously estimate their uncertainties due to quality and quantity of the data. This result indicates that the proposed method is capable of suggesting the experimental design to achieve the required accuracy.

  2. Geostatistics applied to the study of the spatial distribution of Tibraca limbativentris in flooded rice fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliano de Bastos Pazini

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Tibraca limbativentris (rice stem bug is an insect highly injurious to the rice crop in Brazil. The aim of this research was to define the spatial distribution of the T. limbativentris and improve the sampling process by means of geostatistical application techniques and construction of prediction maps in a flooded rice field located in the "Planalto da Campanha" Region, Rio Grande do Sul (RS, Brazil. The experiments were conducted in rice crop in the municipality of Itaqui - RS, in the crop years of 2009/10, 2010/11 and 2011/12, counting fortnightly the number of nymphs and adults in a georeferenced grid with points spaced at 50m in the first year and in 10m in the another years. It was performed a geostatistical analysis by means adjusting semivariogram and interpolation of numeric data by kriging to verify the spatial dependence and the subsequent mapping population. The results obtained indicated that the rice stem bug, T. limbativentris, has a strong spatial dependence. The prediction maps allow estimating population density of the pest and visualization of the spatial distribution in flooded rice fields, enabling the improvement of the traditional method of sampling for rice stem bug

  3. Field measurements of efficiency and duct retrofit effectiveness in residential forced air distributions systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jump, D.A.; Walker, I.S.; Modera, M.P.

    1996-08-01

    Forced air distribution systems can have a significant impact on the energy consumed in residences. It is common practice in U.S. residential buildings to place such duct systems outside the conditioned space. This results in the loss of energy by leakage and conduction to the surroundings. In order to estimate the magnitudes of these losses, 24 houses in the Sacramento, California, area were tested before and after duct retrofitting. The systems in these houses included conventional air conditioning, gas furnaces, electric furnaces and heat pumps. The retrofits consisted of sealing and insulating the duct systems. The field testing consisted of the following measurements: leakage of the house envelopes and their ductwork, flow through individual registers, duct air temperatures, ambient temperatures, surface areas of ducts, and HVAC equipment energy consumption. These data were used to calculate distribution system delivery efficiency as well as the overall efficiency of the distribution system including all interactions with building load and HVAC equipment. Analysis of the test results indicate an average increase in delivery efficiency from 64% to 76% and a corresponding average decrease in HVAC energy use of 18%. This paper summarizes the pre- and post-retrofit efficiency measurements to evaluate the retrofit effectiveness, and includes cost estimates for the duct retrofits. The impacts of leak sealing and insulating will be examined separately. 8 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  4. Field-Scale Distributed Wireless Network for Monitoring Dynamic Hydrologic Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, C. S.; Crupper, J.; Brown, D. J.; Cobos, D. R.; Campbell, G. S.; Uberuaga, D.; Huggins, D. R.; Smith, J. L.; Gill, R. A.

    2007-12-01

    Measuring and monitoring field-scale hydrology is important to understanding the fate of water in the vadoze zone, especially in concert with pedological information. Historically, single point measurements of hydrologic and pedological information have been straightforward to obtain, while monitoring widely distributed locations over time has been more challenging, both in expense and labor. As radios have become more available, distributed wireless networks have been developed and constructed to meet this need. However, there remain relatively few commercially available, inexpensive, and simple options. The objective of this study was to test the viability of a distributed wireless network to monitor soil parameters (moisture, temperature, and electrical conductivity) across a growing season on the 36.5 hectare Cook Agronomy Farm in Eastern Washington. Using landscape analysis, 12 representative sites were selected using a stratified random procedure and sensors were installed at 30, 60, 90, 120, and 150 cm depths. Radio frequency wireless transmitters linked sensors to a central data station where data were made available anywhere in the world via a cell modem link. Data were analyzed to show relationships between soil features, crop type, and water use. Results show that a system can be assembled from commercially available components with excellent reliability across all communication links. Data from the system showed correlations between water use, directly sampled static soil features and crop type.

  5. Nucleation of protein crystals under the influence of solution shear flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penkova, Anita; Pan, Weichun; Hodjaoglu, Feyzim; Vekilov, Peter G

    2006-09-01

    Several recent theories and simulations have predicted that shear flow could enhance, or, conversely, suppress the nucleation of crystals from solution. Such modulations would offer a pathway for nucleation control and provide a novel explanation for numerous mysteries in nucleation research. For experimental tests of the effects of shear flow on protein crystal nucleation, we found that if a protein solution droplet of approximately 5 microL (2-3 mm diameter at base) is held on a hydrophobic substrate in an enclosed environment and in a quasi-uniform constant electric field of 2 to 6 kV cm(-1), a rotational flow with a maximum rate at the droplet top of approximately 10 microm s(-1) is induced. The shear rate varies from 10(-3) to 10(-1) s(-1). The likely mechanism of the rotational flow involves adsorption of the protein and amphiphylic buffer molecules on the air-water interface and their redistribution in the electric field, leading to nonuniform surface tension of the droplet and surface tension-driven flow. Observations of the number of nucleated crystals in 24- and 72-h experiments with the proteins ferritin, apoferritin, and lysozyme revealed that the crystals are typically nucleated at a certain radius of the droplet, that is, at a preferred shear rate. Variations of the rotational flow velocity resulted in suppression or enhancement of the total number of nucleated crystals of ferritin and apoferritin, while all solution flow rates were found to enhance lysozyme crystal nucleation. These observations show that shear flow may strongly affect nucleation, and that for some systems, an optimal flow velocity, leading to fastest nucleation, exists. Comparison with the predictions of theories and simulations suggest that the formation of ordered nuclei in a "normal" protein solution cannot be affected by such low shear rates. We conclude that the flow acts by helping or suppressing the formation of ordered nuclei within mesoscopic metastable dense liquid

  6. Predicting plant invasions under climate change: are species distribution models validated by field trials?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Christine S; Burns, Bruce R; Stanley, Margaret C

    2014-09-01

    Climate change may facilitate alien species invasion into new areas, particularly for species from warm native ranges introduced into areas currently marginal for temperature. Although conclusions from modelling approaches and experimental studies are generally similar, combining the two approaches has rarely occurred. The aim of this study was to validate species distribution models by conducting field trials in sites of differing suitability as predicted by the models, thus increasing confidence in their ability to assess invasion risk. Three recently naturalized alien plants in New Zealand were used as study species (Archontophoenix cunninghamiana, Psidium guajava and Schefflera actinophylla): they originate from warm native ranges, are woody bird-dispersed species and of concern as potential weeds. Seedlings were grown in six sites across the country, differing both in climate and suitability (as predicted by the species distribution models). Seedling growth and survival were recorded over two summers and one or two winter seasons, and temperature and precipitation were monitored hourly at each site. Additionally, alien seedling performances were compared to those of closely related native species (Rhopalostylis sapida, Lophomyrtus bullata and Schefflera digitata). Furthermore, half of the seedlings were sprayed with pesticide, to investigate whether enemy release may influence performance. The results showed large differences in growth and survival of the alien species among the six sites. In the more suitable sites, performance was frequently higher compared to the native species. Leaf damage from invertebrate herbivory was low for both alien and native seedlings, with little evidence that the alien species should have an advantage over the native species because of enemy release. Correlations between performance in the field and predicted suitability of species distribution models were generally high. The projected increase in minimum temperature and reduced

  7. Dynamics of protein aggregation and oligomer formation governed by secondary nucleation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michaels, Thomas C. T., E-mail: tctm3@cam.ac.uk; Lazell, Hamish W.; Arosio, Paolo; Knowles, Tuomas P. J., E-mail: tpjk2@cam.ac.uk [Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge, Lensfield Road, Cambridge CB2 1EW (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-07

    The formation of aggregates in many protein systems can be significantly accelerated by secondary nucleation, a process where existing assemblies catalyse the nucleation of new species. In particular, secondary nucleation has emerged as a central process controlling the proliferation of many filamentous protein structures, including molecular species related to diseases such as sickle cell anemia and a range of neurodegenerative conditions. Increasing evidence suggests that the physical size of protein filaments plays a key role in determining their potential for deleterious interactions with living cells, with smaller aggregates of misfolded proteins, oligomers, being particularly toxic. It is thus crucial to progress towards an understanding of the factors that control the sizes of protein aggregates. However, the influence of secondary nucleation on the time evolution of aggregate size distributions has been challenging to quantify. This difficulty originates in large part from the fact that secondary nucleation couples the dynamics of species distant in size space. Here, we approach this problem by presenting an analytical treatment of the master equation describing the growth kinetics of linear protein structures proliferating through secondary nucleation and provide closed-form expressions for the temporal evolution of the resulting aggregate size distribution. We show how the availability of analytical solutions for the full filament distribution allows us to identify the key physical parameters that control the sizes of growing protein filaments. Furthermore, we use these results to probe the dynamics of the populations of small oligomeric species as they are formed through secondary nucleation and discuss the implications of our work for understanding the factors that promote or curtail the production of these species with a potentially high deleterious biological activity.

  8. Internal electric-field-lines distribution in CdZnTe detectors measured using X-ray mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolotnikov,A.E.; , .; Camarda, G.S.; Cui, Y.; Hossain, A.; Yang, G.; Yao, H.W.; James, R.B.

    2009-10-19

    The ideal operation of CdZnTe devices entails having a uniformly distributed internal electric field. Such uniformity especially is critical for thick long-drift-length detectors, such as large-volume CPG and 3-D multi-pixel devices. Using a high-spatial resolution X-ray mapping technique, we investigated the distribution of the electric field in real devices. Our measurements demonstrate that in thin detectors, <5 mm, the electric field-lines tend to bend away from the side surfaces (i.e., a focusing effect). In thick detectors, >1 cm, with a large aspect ratio (thickness-to-width ratio), we observed two effects: the electric field lines bending away from or towards the side surfaces, which we called, respectively, the focusing field-line distribution and the defocusing field-line distribution. In addition to these large-scale variations, the field-line distributions were locally perturbed by the presence of extended defects and residual strains existing inside the crystals. We present our data clearly demonstrating the non-uniformity of the internal electric field.

  9. Depth distribution of cesium-137 in paddy fields across the Fukushima pollution plume in 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepage, Hugo; Evrard, Olivier; Onda, Yuichi; Lefèvre, Irène; Laceby, J Patrick; Ayrault, Sophie

    2015-09-01

    Large quantities of radiocesium were deposited across a 3000 km(2) area northwest of the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant after the March 2011 accident. Although many studies have investigated the fate of (137)Cs in soil in the months following the accident, the depth distribution of this radioactive contaminant in rice paddy fields requires further examination after the typhoons that occurred in this region. Such investigations will help minimize potential human exposure in rice paddy fields. Radionuclide activity concentrations, organic content and particle size were analysed in 10 soil cores sampled from paddy fields in November 2013, 20 km north of the Fukushima power plant. Our results demonstrate limited depth migration of (137)Cs with the majority concentrated in the uppermost layers of soils (accident, between 46.8 and 98.7% of the total (137)Cs inventories was found within the top 5 cm of the soil surface, despite cumulative rainfall totalling 3300 mm. Furthermore, there were no significant correlations between (137)Cs depth distribution and the other parameters. We attributed the maximum depth penetration of (137)Cs to grass cutting (73.6-98.5% of (137)Cs in the upper 5 cm) and farming operations (tillage - 46.8-51.6% of (137)Cs in the upper 5 cm). As this area is exposed to erosive events, ongoing decontamination works may increase soil erodibility. We therefore recommend the rapid removal of the uppermost - contaminated - layer of the soil after removing the vegetation to avoid erosion of contaminated material during the subsequent rainfall events. Further analysis is required to thoroughly understand the impacts of erosion on the redistribution of radiocesium throughout the Fukushima Prefecture.

  10. Nanoscale dynamics of Joule heating and bubble nucleation in a solid-state nanopore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Edlyn V.; Burns, Michael M.; Golovchenko, Jene A.

    2016-01-01

    We present a mathematical model for Joule heating of an electrolytic solution in a nanopore. The model couples the electrical and thermal dynamics responsible for rapid and extreme superheating of the electrolyte within the nanopore. The model is implemented numerically with a finite element calculation, yielding a time and spatially resolved temperature distribution in the nanopore region. Temperatures near the thermodynamic limit of superheat are predicted to be attained just before the explosive nucleation of a vapor bubble is observed experimentally. Knowledge of this temperature distribution enables the evaluation of related phenomena including bubble nucleation kinetics, relaxation oscillation, and bubble dynamics.

  11. Nanoscale dynamics of Joule heating and bubble nucleation in a solid-state nanopore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Edlyn V; Burns, Michael M; Golovchenko, Jene A

    2016-01-01

    We present a mathematical model for Joule heating of an electrolytic solution in a nanopore. The model couples the electrical and thermal dynamics responsible for rapid and extreme superheating of the electrolyte within the nanopore. The model is implemented numerically with a finite element calculation, yielding a time and spatially resolved temperature distribution in the nanopore region. Temperatures near the thermodynamic limit of superheat are predicted to be attained just before the explosive nucleation of a vapor bubble is observed experimentally. Knowledge of this temperature distribution enables the evaluation of related phenomena including bubble nucleation kinetics, relaxation oscillation, and bubble dynamics.

  12. Numerical Analysis of Influencing Factors on Temperature Field and Airflow Distribution of the Displacement Ventilation System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NA Yanling; XING Jincheng; TU Guangbei; YU Songbo

    2005-01-01

    Indoor air quality and thermal comfort are important features of indoor environment. In this paper, a numerical simulation based on the k-ε model of CFD is used to analyze factors such as loading, exterior-protected construction, blowing-in rate that play an important role in the temperature field and airflow field of the displacement ventilation system. Exterior-protected construction has little influence on indoor temperature distribution of displacement ventilation systems and the influence is limited only in a small area near the external wall when the indoor heat source is the main cooling load.The height of a room has little influence on indoor temperature field, and the temperature gradient of active region is basically unchanged. In the system combined with a displacement ventilation system and a cooling system, the height also has little influence. When the cooling load is high,the indoor heat source creates a strong convective plume, which will make the average indoor air age lower, the ventilation efficiency higher and the elimination of pollutant easier. Air supply rate plays an important role in displacement ventilation systems. The increase of air supply rate that can be realized by increasing the air supply velocity and enlarging the area of air inlet will increase the mass capability of the system and diminish the vertical temperature gradient. From the comparison between simulations and experiments, it is concluded that this simulation are creditable.

  13. Size dependence of volume and surface nucleation rates for homogeneous freezing of supercooled water droplets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Kuhn

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The relative roles of volume and surface nucleation were investigated for the homogeneous freezing of pure water droplets. Experiments were carried out in a cryogenic laminar aerosol flow tube using supercooled water aerosols with maximum volume densities at radii between 1 and 3 μm. Temperature- and size-dependent values of volume- and surface-based homogeneous nucleation rates between 234.8 and 236.2 K were derived using a microphysical model and aerosol phase compositions and size distributions determined from infrared extinction measurements in the flow tube. The results show that the contribution from nucleation at the droplet surface increases with decreasing droplet radius and dominates over nucleation in the bulk droplet volume for droplets with radii smaller than approximately 5 μm. This is interpreted in terms of a lowered free energy of ice germ formation in the surface-based process. The implications of surface nucleation for the parameterization of homogeneous ice nucleation in numerical models are considered.

  14. On the derivation of particle nucleation rates from experimental formation rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kürten

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric particle formation rates are usually measured at sizes larger than the critical size where nucleation occurs. Due to loss of particles during their growth to the detection threshold, the measured formation rate is often substantially smaller than the nucleation rate. For this reason a correction needs to be applied in order to determine the nucleation rate from the measured formation rate. An analytical formula for the correction factor is provided by Kerminen and Kulmala (2002. Their method was derived for atmospheric nucleation measurements and we show here that it has limited applicability to chamber nucleation studies. The reason for this limitation is that the particle loss rate generally has a different dependency on particle size in other environments. Here we propose an alternative, numerical method that allows precise nucleation rates to be determined in arbitrary experimental environments. The method requires knowledge of the particle size distribution above detection threshold, the particle growth rate, and the particle loss rates as a function of particle size.

  15. Sulfuric acid nucleation: An experimental study of the effect of seven bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasoe, W. A.; Volz, K.; Panta, B.; Freshour, N.; Bachman, R.; Hanson, D. R.; McMurry, P. H.; Jen, C.

    2015-03-01

    Nucleation of particles with sulfuric acid, water, and nitrogeneous bases was studied in a flow reactor. Sulfuric acid and water levels were set by flows over sulfuric acid and water reservoirs, respectively, and the base concentrations were determined from measured permeation rates and flow dilution ratios. Particle number distributions were measured with a nano-differential-mobility-analyzer system. Results indicate that the nucleation capability of NH3, methylamine, dimethylamine, and trimethylamine with sulfuric acid increases from NH3 as the weakest, methylamine next, and dimethylamine and trimethylamine the strongest. Three other bases were studied, and experiments with triethylamine showed that it is less effective than methylamine, and experiments with urea and acetamide showed that their capabilities are much lower than the amines with acetamide having basically no effect. When both NH3 and an amine were present, nucleation was more strongly enhanced than with just the amine present. Comparisons of nucleation rates to predictions and previous experimental work are discussed, and the sulfuric acid-base nucleation rates measured here are extrapolated to atmospheric conditions. The measurements suggest that atmospheric nucleation rates are significantly affected by synergistic interactions between ammonia and amines.

  16. The first estimates of global nucleation mode aerosol concentrations based on satellite measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kulmala

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric aerosols play a key role in the Earth's climate system by scattering and absorbing solar radiation and by acting as cloud condensation nuclei. Satellites are increasingly used to obtain information on properties of aerosol particles with a diameter larger than about 100 nm. However, new aerosol particles formed by nucleation are initially much smaller and grow into the optically active size range on time scales of many hours. In this paper we derive proxies, based on process understanding and ground-based observations, to determine the concentrations of these new particles and their spatial distribution using satellite data. The results are applied to provide seasonal variation of nucleation mode concentration. The proxies describe the concentration of nucleation mode particles over continents. The source rates are related to both regional nucleation and nucleation associated with more restricted sources. The global pattern of nucleation mode particle number concentration predicted by satellite data using our proxies is compared qualitatively against both observations and global model simulations.

  17. Duke Forest Particle Nucleation Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Particle size distribution expressed as number concentration per size bin. This dataset is associated with the following publications: Pillai, P., V. Aneja, J....

  18. Calculation of flow distribution in air reverse circulation bit interior fluid field by simplifying air flow model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuqing HAO; Hongwei HUANG; Kun YIN

    2007-01-01

    By simplifying the characters in the air reverse circulation bit interior fluid field, the authors used air dynamics and fluid mechanics to calculate the air distribution in the bit and obtained an equation of flow distribution with a unique resolution. This study will provide help for making certain the bit parameters of the bit structure effectively and study the air reverse circulation bit interior fluid field character deeply.

  19. Stochastic kinetics reveal imperative role of anisotropic interfacial tension to determine morphology and evolution of nucleated droplets in nematogenic films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Amit Kumar

    2017-01-01

    For isotropic fluids, classical nucleation theory predicts the nucleation rate, barrier height and critical droplet size by ac- counting for the competition between bulk energy and interfacial tension. The nucleation process in liquid crystals is less understood. We numerically investigate nucleation in monolayered nematogenic films using a mesoscopic framework, in par- ticular, we study the morphology and kinetic pathway in spontaneous formation and growth of droplets of the stable phase in the metastable background. The parameter κ that quantifies the anisotropic elastic energy plays a central role in determining the geometric structure of the droplets. Noncircular nematic droplets with homogeneous director orientation are nucleated in a background of supercooled isotropic phase for small κ. For large κ, noncircular droplets with integer topological charge, accompanied by a biaxial ring at the outer surface, are nucleated. The isotropic droplet shape in a superheated nematic background is found to depend on κ in a similar way. Identical growth laws are found in the two cases, although an unusual two-stage mechanism is observed in the nucleation of isotropic droplets. Temporal distributions of successive events indi- cate the relevance of long-ranged elasticity-mediated interactions within the isotropic domains. Implications for a theoretical description of nucleation in anisotropic fluids are discussed. PMID:28054600

  20. CFD modelling of most probable bubble nucleation rate from binary mixture with estimation of components' mole fraction in critical cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ban Zhen; Keong, Lau Kok; Shariff, Azmi Mohd

    2016-05-01

    The employment of different mathematical models to address specifically for the bubble nucleation rates of water vapour and dissolved air molecules is essential as the physics for them to form bubble nuclei is different. The available methods to calculate bubble nucleation rate in binary mixture such as density functional theory are complicated to be coupled along with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach. In addition, effect of dissolved gas concentration was neglected in most study for the prediction of bubble nucleation rates. The most probable bubble nucleation rate for the water vapour and dissolved air mixture in a 2D quasi-stable flow across a cavitating nozzle in current work was estimated via the statistical mean of all possible bubble nucleation rates of the mixture (different mole fractions of water vapour and dissolved air) and the corresponding number of molecules in critical cluster. Theoretically, the bubble nucleation rate is greatly dependent on components' mole fraction in a critical cluster. Hence, the dissolved gas concentration effect was included in current work. Besides, the possible bubble nucleation rates were predicted based on the calculated number of molecules required to form a critical cluster. The estimation of components' mole fraction in critical cluster for water vapour and dissolved air mixture was obtained by coupling the enhanced classical nucleation theory and CFD approach. In addition, the distribution of bubble nuclei of water vapour and dissolved air mixture could be predicted via the utilisation of population balance model.

  1. Stochastic kinetics reveal imperative role of anisotropic interfacial tension to determine morphology and evolution of nucleated droplets in nematogenic films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Amit Kumar

    2017-01-01

    For isotropic fluids, classical nucleation theory predicts the nucleation rate, barrier height and critical droplet size by ac- counting for the competition between bulk energy and interfacial tension. The nucleation process in liquid crystals is less understood. We numerically investigate nucleation in monolayered nematogenic films using a mesoscopic framework, in par- ticular, we study the morphology and kinetic pathway in spontaneous formation and growth of droplets of the stable phase in the metastable background. The parameter κ that quantifies the anisotropic elastic energy plays a central role in determining the geometric structure of the droplets. Noncircular nematic droplets with homogeneous director orientation are nucleated in a background of supercooled isotropic phase for small κ. For large κ, noncircular droplets with integer topological charge, accompanied by a biaxial ring at the outer surface, are nucleated. The isotropic droplet shape in a superheated nematic background is found to depend on κ in a similar way. Identical growth laws are found in the two cases, although an unusual two-stage mechanism is observed in the nucleation of isotropic droplets. Temporal distributions of successive events indi- cate the relevance of long-ranged elasticity-mediated interactions within the isotropic domains. Implications for a theoretical description of nucleation in anisotropic fluids are discussed.

  2. Parameterization of homogeneous ice nucleation for cloud and climate models based on classical nucleation theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Khvorostyanov

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A new analytical parameterization of homogeneous ice nucleation is developed based on extended classical nucleation theory including new equations for the critical radii of the ice germs, free energies and nucleation rates as the functions of the temperature and water saturation ratio simultaneously. By representing these quantities as separable products of the analytical functions of the temperature and supersaturation, analytical solutions are found for the integral-differential supersaturation equation and concentration of nucleated crystals. Parcel model simulations are used to illustrate the general behavior of various nucleation properties under various conditions, for justifications of the further key analytical simplifications, and for verification of the resulting parameterization.

    The final parameterization is based upon the values of the supersaturation that determines the current or maximum concentrations of the nucleated ice crystals. The crystal concentration is analytically expressed as a function of time and can be used for parameterization of homogeneous ice nucleation both in the models with small time steps and for substep parameterization in the models with large time steps. The crystal concentration is expressed analytically via the error functions or elementary functions and depends only on the fundamental atmospheric parameters and parameters of classical nucleation theory. The diffusion and kinetic limits of the new parameterization agree with previous semi-empirical parameterizations.

  3. The Many Faces of Heterogeneous Ice Nucleation: Interplay Between Surface Morphology and Hydrophobicity

    CERN Document Server

    Fitzner, Martin; Cox, Stephen J; Michaelides, Angelos

    2016-01-01

    What makes a material a good ice nucleating agent? Despite the importance of heterogeneous ice nucleation to a variety of fields, from cloud science to microbiology, major gaps in our understanding of this ubiquitous process still prevent us from answering this question. In this work, we have examined the ability of generic crystalline substrates to promote ice nucleation as a function of the hydrophobicity and the morphology of the surface. Nucleation rates have been obtained by brute-force molecular dynamics simulations of coarse-grained water on top of different surfaces of a model fcc crystal, varying the water-surface interaction and the surface lattice parameter. It turns out that the lattice mismatch of the surface with respect to ice, customarily regarded as the most important requirement for a good ice nucleating agent, is at most desirable but not a requirement. On the other hand, the balance between the morphology of the surface and its hydrophobicity can significantly alter the ice nucleation rate...

  4. The effect of trimethylamine on atmospheric nucleation involving H2SO4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.-H. Lee

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Field observations and quantum chemical calculations have shown that organic amine compounds may be important in new particle formation processes involving H2SO4. Here, we report laboratory observations that investigate the effect of trimethylamine (TMA on H2SO4-H2O nucleation made under aerosol precursor concentrations typically found in the lower troposphere ([H2SO4] of 106–107 cm−3; [TMA] of 180–1350 pptv. These results show that the threshold [H2SO4] needed to produce the unity nucleation rate ([H2SO4] of 106–107 cm−3 and the number of precursor molecules in the critical cluster (nH2SO4 = 4–6; nTMA = 1 are surprisingly similar to those found in the ammonia (NH3 ternary nucleation study (Benson et al., 2010a. At lower RH, however, enhancement in nucleation rates due to TMA was up to an order of magnitude greater than that due to NH3. These findings imply that both amines and NH3 are important nucleation species, but under dry atmospheric conditions, amines may have stronger effects on H2SO4 nucleation than NH3. Aerosol models should therefore take into account inorganic and organic bases together to fully understand the widespread new particle formation events in the lower troposphere.

  5. Focus Article: Theoretical aspects of vapor/gas nucleation at structured surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meloni, Simone; Giacomello, Alberto; Casciola, Carlo Massimo

    2016-12-01

    Heterogeneous nucleation is the preferential means of formation of a new phase. Gas and vapor nucleation in fluids under confinement or at textured surfaces is central for many phenomena of technological relevance, such as bubble release, cavitation, and biological growth. Understanding and developing quantitative models for nucleation is the key to control how bubbles are formed and to exploit them in technological applications. An example is the in silico design of textured surfaces or particles with tailored nucleation properties. However, despite the fact that gas/vapor nucleation has been investigated for more than one century, many aspects still remain unclear and a quantitative theory is still lacking; this is especially true for heterogeneous systems with nanoscale corrugations, for which experiments are difficult. The objective of this focus article is analyzing the main results of the last 10-20 years in the field, selecting few representative works out of this impressive body of the literature, and highlighting the open theoretical questions. We start by introducing classical theories of nucleation in homogeneous and in simple heterogeneous systems and then discuss their extension to complex heterogeneous cases. Then we describe results from recent theories and computer simulations aimed at overcoming the limitations of the simpler theories by considering explicitly the diffuse nature of the interfaces, atomistic, kinetic, and inertial effects.

  6. Competitive heterogeneous nucleation onto a microscopic impurity in a Potts model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asuquo, Cletus C.; McArthur, Danielle; Bowles, Richard K.

    2016-08-01

    Many metastable systems can nucleate to multiple competing stable or intermediate metastable states. In this work, a Potts model, subject to external fields, is used to study the competitive nucleation of two phases attempting to grow on a microscopic impurity. Monte Carlo simulations are used to calculate the free energy surfaces for the system under different conditions, where the relative stability of the phases is adjusted by changing the interaction parameters, and the nucleation rates obtained using multicomponent transition state theory (TST) are compared with the rates measured using the survival probability method. We find that the two methods predict similar nucleation rates when the free energy barrier used in the transition state theory is defined as the work required to form a critical embryo from the metastable phase. An analysis of the free energy surfaces also reveals that the competition between the nucleating phases leads to an effective drying of the impurity which slows down the nucleation rate compared to the single phase case.

  7. Homogenous nucleation of sulfuric acid and water at atmospherically relevant conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brus, D.; Neitola, K.; Petäjä, T.; Vanhanen, J.; Hyvärinen, A.-P.; Sipilä, M.; Paasonen, P.; Lihavainen, H.; Kulmala, M.

    2010-11-01

    In this study the homogeneous nucleation rates of sulfuric acid and water were measured by using a flow tube technique. The goal was to directly compare particle formation rates obtained from atmospheric measurements with nucleation rates of freshly nucleated particles measured with particle size magnifier (PSM) which has detection efficiency of unity for particles having mobility diameter of 1.5 nm. The gas phase sulfuric acid concentration in this study was measured with the chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS), commonly used in field measurements. The wall losses of sulfuric acid were estimated from measured concentration profiles along the flow tube. The initial concentrations of sulfuric acid estimated from loss measurements ranged from 108 to 3×109 molecules cm-3. The nucleation rates obtained in this study cover about three orders of magnitude from 10-1 to 102 cm3 s-1 for commercial ultrafine condensation particle counter (UCPC) TSI model 3025A and from 101 to 104 cm3 s-1 for PSM. The nucleation rates and the slopes (dlnJ/dln[H2SO4]) show satisfactory agreement when compared to empirical kinetic and activation models and the latest atmospheric nucleation data.

  8. Vapour–to–liquid nucleation: Nucleation theorems for nonisothermal–nonideal case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malila, J.; McGraw, R.; Napari, I.; Laaksonen, A.

    2010-08-29

    Homogeneous vapour-to-liquid nucleation, a basic process of aerosol formation, is often considered as a type example of nucleation phenomena, while most treatment of the subject introduce several simplifying assumptions (ideal gas phase, incompressible nucleus, isothermal kinetics, size-independent surface free energy...). During last decades, nucleation theorems have provided new insights into properties of critical nuclei facilitating direct comparison between laboratory experiments and molecular simulations. These theorems are, despite of their generality, often applied in forms where the aforementioned assumptions are made. Here we present forms of nucleation theorems that explicitly take into account these effects and allow direct estimation of their importance. Only assumptions are Arrhenius-type kinetics of nucleation process and exclusion carrier gas molecules from the critical nucleus.

  9. Validity of commonly used formula of nucleation work for bubble nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Atsushi

    2013-08-01

    Nishioka and Kusaka [Journal of Chemical Physics 96 (1992) 5370] showed that the commonly used formula, W=n(μα-μβ)+γA, for work of formation of critical nucleus is derived by integrating the isothermal Gibbs-Duhem relation for the incompressible nucleating phase, such as an incompressible liquid phase nucleation in a vapor phase. In their paper as well as in a subsequent paper [Li, Nishioka, Holcomb, Journal of Crystal Growth 171 (1997) 259] it was stated that the commonly used formula was valid for an incompressible nucleating phase and no longer held for such as a bubble nucleation. In this paper, we will amend this statement; that is, the commonly used formula is shown to hold for incompressible parent phase, such as a bubble nucleation in an incompressible parent phase.

  10. Molecular Ice Nucleation Activity of Birch Pollen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felgitsch, Laura; Bichler, Magdalena; Häusler, Thomas; Weiss, Victor U.; Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina; Allmaier, Günter; Grothe, Hinrich

    2015-04-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation plays a major part in ecosystem and climate. Due to the triggering of ice cloud formation it influences the radiation balance of the earth, but also on the ground it can be found to be important in many processes of nature. So far the process of heterogeneous ice nucleation is not fully understood and many questions remain to be answered. Biological ice nucleation is hereby from great interest, because it shows the highest freezing temperatures. Several bacteria and fungi act as ice nuclei. A famous example is Pseudomonas syringae, a bacterium in commercial use (Snomax®), which increases the freezing from homogeneous freezing temperatures of approx. -40° C (for small volumes as in cloud droplets) to temperatures up to -2° C. In 2001 it was found that birch pollen can trigger ice nucleation (Diehl et al. 2001; Diehl et al. 2002). For a long time it was believed that this is due to macroscopic features of the pollen surface. Recent findings of Bernhard Pummer (2012) show a different picture. The ice nuclei are not attached on the pollen surface directly, but on surface material which can be easily washed off. This shows that not only the surface morphology, but also specific molecules or molecular structures are responsible for the ice nucleation activity of birch pollen. With various analytic methods we work on elucidating the structure of these molecules as well as the mechanism with which they trigger ice nucleation. To solve this we use various instrumental analytic techniques like Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy (NMR), Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-MS), and Gas-phase Electrophoretic Mobility Molecular Analysis (GEMMA). Also standard techniques like various chromatographic separation techniques and solvent extraction are in use. We state here that this feature might be due to the aggregation of small molecules, with agglomerates showing a specific surface structure. Our results

  11. The levitation characteristics of the magnetic substances using trapped HTS bulk annuli with various magnetic field distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S.B., E-mail: kim@ec.okayama-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Okayama University, 3-1-1, Tsushima-Naka, Kita-ku, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Ikegami, T.; Matsunaga, J.; Fujii, Y. [Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Okayama University, 3-1-1, Tsushima-Naka, Kita-ku, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Onodera, H. [Japan Science and Technology Agency–Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology (JST–CREST), Tokyo 102-0076 (Japan)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •The spherical solenoid magnet can make a various magnetic field distributions. •We generated a large magnetic gradient at inner space of HTS bulks. •The levitation height of samples was improved by the reapplied field method. •The levitation height depends on the variation rate of magnetic field gradient. -- Abstract: We have been investigating the levitation system without any mechanical contact which is composed of a field-cooled ring-shaped high temperature superconducting (HTS) bulks [1]. In this proposed levitation system, the trapped magnetic field distributions of stacked HTS bulk are very important. In this paper, the spherical solenoid magnet composed of seven solenoid coils with different inner and outer diameters was designed and fabricated as a new magnetic source. The fabricated spherical solenoid magnet can easily make a homogeneous and various magnetic field distributions in inner space of stacked HTS bulk annuli by controlling the emerging currents of each coil. By using this spherical solenoid magnet, we tried to make a large magnetic field gradient in inner space of HTS bulk annuli, and it is very important on the levitation of magnetic substances. In order to improve the levitation properties of magnetic substances with various sizes, the external fields were reapplied to the initially trapped HTS bulk magnets. We could generate a large magnetic field gradient along the axial direction in inner space of HTS bulk annuli, and obtain the improved levitation height of samples by the proposed reapplied field method.

  12. Atmospheric Ion-induced Aerosol Nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtius, J.; Lovejoy, E. R.; Froyd, K. D.

    2006-08-01

    Ion-induced nucleation has been suggested to be a potentially important mechanism for atmospheric aerosol formation. Ions are formed in the background atmosphere by galactic cosmic rays. A possible connection between galactic cosmic rays and cloudiness has been However, the predictions of current atmospheric nucleation models are highly uncertain because the models are usually based on the liquid drop model that estimates cluster thermodynamics based on bulk properties (e.g., liquid drop density and surface tension). Sulfuric acid (H2SO4) and water are assumed to be the most important nucleating agents in the free troposphere. Measurements of the molecular thermodynamics for the growth and evaporation of cluster ions containing H2SO4 and H2O were performed using a temperature-controlled laminar flow reactor coupled to a linear quadrupole mass spectrometer as well as a temperature-controlled ion trap mass spectrometer. The measurements were complemented by quantum chemical calculations of the cluster ion structures. The analysis yielded a complete set of H2SO4 and H2O binding thermodynamics extending from molecular cluster ions to the bulk, based on experimental thermodynamics for the small clusters. The data were incorporated into a kinetic aerosol model to yield quantitative predictions of the rate of ion-induced nucleation for atmospheric conditions. The model predicts that the negative ion-H2SO4-H2O nucleation mechanism is an efficient source of new particles in the middle and upper troposphere.

  13. Graphite Nucleation in Cast Iron Melts Based on Solidification Experiments and Microstructure Simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andreia Sommerfeld; Bernd B(o)ttger; Babette Tonn

    2008-01-01

    Microstructure strongly influences the mechanical properties of cast iron. By inoculating the melt with proper inoculants, foreign substrates are brought into the melt and eventually the graphite can crystallize on them. The elements and substrates that really play a role for nucleation are yet unknown. Until now there is very little knowledge about the fundamentals of nucleation, such as composition and morphology of nuclei[1,2]. In this work we utilized EN-GJL-200 as a base material and examined several produced specimens. The specimens were cast with and without inoculants and quenched at different solidification states. Specimens were also examined with a high and low oxygen concentration, but the results showed that different oxygen contents have no influence on the nucleation in cast iron melts. Our research was focused on the microscopic examination and phase-field simulations. For studying the samples we applied different analytical methods, where SEM-EDS, -WDS were proved to be most effective. The simulations were conducted by using the software MICRESS(R)[3], which is based on a multiphase-field model and has been coupled directly to the TCFE3 thermodynamic database from TCAB. On the basis of the experimental investigations a nucleation mechanism is proposed, which claims MnS precipitates as the preferred site for graphite nucleation. This theory is supported by the results of the phase-field simulations.

  14. Restructuring of plasmonic nanoparticle aggregates with arbitrary particle size distribution in pulsed laser fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ershov, A. E.; Gavrilyuk, A. P.; Karpov, S. V.; Polyutov, S. P.

    2016-11-01

    We have studied processes of interaction of pulsed laser radiation with resonant groups of plasmonic nanoparticles (resonant domains) in large colloidal nanoparticle aggregates having different interparticle gaps and particle size distributions. These processes are responsible for the origin of nonlinear optical effects and photochromic reactions in multiparticle aggregates. To describe photo-induced transformations in resonant domains and alterations in their absorption spectra remaining after the pulse action, we introduce the factor of spectral photomodification. Based on calculation of changes in thermodynamic, mechanical, and optical characteristics of the domains, the histograms of the spectrum photomodification factor have been obtained for various interparticle gaps, an average particle size, and the degree of polydispersity. Variations in spectra have been analyzed depending on the intensity of laser radiation and various combinations of size characteristics of domains. The obtained results can be used to predict manifestation of photochromic effects in composite materials containing different plasmonic nanoparticle aggregates in pulsed laser fields.

  15. Revisiting the Twist-3 Distribution Amplitudes of K Meson Within the QCD Background Field Approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟涛; 吴兴刚; 韩华勇; 廖其力; 付海斌; 方祯云

    2012-01-01

    In the present paper, we investigate the kaon twist-3 distribution amplitudes (DAs)Cp within the QCD background field approach. The SUf (3)-breaking effects are studied in detail under a systematical way, especiaJ1y the sum rules for the moments of are obtained by keeping all the mass terms in the s-quark propagator consistently. After adding all the uncertainties in quadrature, the first two Gegenbauler moments of are a GeV. A detailed discussion on the properties tion parameters moments shows that the higher-order s-quark mass terms can indeed provide sizable contributions. Fhrthermore, based on the newly obtained moments, a model for the kaon twist-3 wavefunction with a better end-point behavior is constructed, which shall be useful for perturbative QCD calculations. As a byproduct, we make a discussion on the properties of the pion twist-3 DAs.

  16. Empirically based gamma-distributed random wall pressure field in silo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlevsen, Ove Dalager; Berntsen, Kasper Nikolaj

    1999-01-01

    Measurements show that silo wall pressures exhibit large fluctuations in time and space during discharge of the silo. This observation is important for the design of the silowall because spatial pressure variations may impose substantial bending moments in the silo wall that otherwise may be small...... or vanishing do to the carrying ability of the membrane forces in the silo wall. Information about the stochastic properties of this pressure variation cannot be obtained from any existing continuum model for the silo medium flowing within the confinement of the silo walls. Therefore the modeling must...... presently be tied to statistical analysis of the empirical evidence combined with simple mechanical rinciples. It is shown that an explicitely constructed gamma distribution type of field in equilibrium with itself fits well to themeasurements made in the Swedish Karpalund silo....

  17. Simulation on electrical field distribution and fiber falls in melt electrospinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Liu, Yong; Zhang, Chi; An, Ying; He, Xuetao; Yang, Weimin

    2013-07-01

    Electrospinning is now a typical way of direct and consecutive producing nanofibers. In order to comprehensively understand the change of fiber chains in falling process of electrospinning, the article import dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) mesoscale simulation method into electrospinning study. In current work, an electrical force formula is proposed after simulation of the distribution of electrostatic field in electrospinning using Finite Element Method. Then, various electrostatic force, temperature and viscosity in electrospinning system are qualitatively simulated by DPD simulation. Results showed that the falling velocity of fiber increased with the increase of electrostatic force. It was found that the lower the polymer viscosity, the quicker the fiber falls. And the diameter of fiber significantly increased with augment of viscosity. Both of above are agree with experimental results. We also found that the falling velocity of fiber is in contrast with length of polymer chains, which has not been found in experiments.

  18. Photoelectron angular distributions from photodetachment of negative ions in strong laser fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai Lihua; Liu Yuheng; Cui Tingting; Wang Yan; Zhang Huifang; Deng Dongmei [Department of Physics, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Ren Xianghe, E-mail: lhbai@163.com [Institute of Advance Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto, 611-0011 (Japan)

    2011-02-01

    Using a nonperturbative scattering theory, the photoelectron angular distributions (PADs) of negative ions irradiated by intense laser fields are studied. Various PADs are obtained. Similar to that of atoms, PADs of negative ions show main lobes and jet-like structures. Here, the main lobe means the formation of the detached photoelectrons around the direction of laser polarization, while the jet-like structure means a peaked-out formation of photoelectrons emitted from the waist between the two main lobes. For a set of above-threshold-detachment peaks, with one-more-photon absorption, the number of the jet-like structures is not always increased by one, which verifies that the jet-like structures are irrelevant to photoelectron angular momentum.

  19. Electrical analysis of wideband and distributed windows using time-dependent field codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, C. C.; Caplan, M.; Nickel, H. U.; Thumm, M.

    1993-09-01

    Windows, which provide the barrier to maintain the vacuum envelope in a microwave tube, are critical components in high-average-power microwave sources, especially at millimeter wavelengths. As RF power levels approach the 100's of kWs to 1 MW range (CW), the window assembly experiences severe thermal and mechanical stresses. Depending on the source, the bandwidth of the window may be less than 1 GHz for gyrotron oscillators or up to approximately 20 GHz for the FOM Institute's fast-tunable, free-electron-maser. The bandwidth requirements give rise to a number of window configurations where the common goal is locally distributed heat dissipation. In order to better understand the transmission and RF properties of these microwave structures, the authors use detailed time-dependent field solvers.

  20. Filaments from the galaxy distribution and from the velocity field in the local universe

    CERN Document Server

    Libeskind, Noam I; Hoffman, Yehuda; Tully, R Brent; Courtois, Helene

    2015-01-01

    The cosmic web that characterizes the large-scale structure of the Universe can be quantified by a variety of methods. For example, large redshift surveys can be used in combination with point process algorithms to extract long curvilinear filaments in the galaxy distribution. Alternatively, given a full 3D reconstruction of the velocity field, kinematic techniques can be used to decompose the web into voids, sheets, filaments and knots. In this paper we look at how two such algorithms - the Bisous model and the velocity shear web - compare with each other in the local Universe (within 100 Mpc), finding good agreement. This is both remarkable and comforting, given that the two methods are radically different in ideology and applied to completely independent and different data sets. Unsurprisingly, the methods are in better agreement when applied to unbiased and complete data sets, like cosmological simulations, than when applied to observational samples. We conclude that more observational data is needed to i...