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Sample records for nuclear world bwr

  1. BWR type nuclear plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Yoshio; Okano, Kimifumi; Sasaki, Hiroshi; Okura, Minoru

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides a BWR plant capable of reducing the size of the reactor building while maintaining reliability of a pool water cooling and cleaning facility even when two fuel storage pools are disposed in the reactor building. Namely, in the reactor building, two fuel storage pools, a temporality storing pool for temporary storing incore structures and a suppression pool are disposed. A primary cleaning facility for cooling and cleaning pool water for each of fuel storage pools comprises a serge tank, a pump, a heat exchanger and a filtration desalting device. A secondary cleaning facility for cleaning pool water in the suppression pool comprises a pump and a filtration desalting device. The first cleaning facility can be switched to be used for the secondary cleaning facility. Specifically, upstream and downstream of the pump of the primary cleaning facility and those of the pump of the secondary cleaning facility are connected by communication pipelines. (I.S.)

  2. Operator training simulator for BWR nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Tadasu

    1988-01-01

    For the operation management of nuclear power stations with high reliability and safety, the role played by operators is very important. The effort of improving the man-machine interface in the central control rooms of nuclear power stations is energetically advanced, but the importance of the role of operators does not change. For the training of the operators of nuclear power stations, simulators have been used from the early stage. As the simulator facilities for operator training, there are the full scope simulator simulating faithfully the central control room of an actual plant and the small simulator mainly aiming at learning the plant functions. For BWR nuclear power stations, two full scope simulators are installed in the BWR Operator Training Center, and the training has been carried out since 1974. The plant function learning simulators have been installed in respective electric power companies as the education and training facilities in the companies. The role of simulators in operator training, the BTC No.1 simulator of a BWR-4 of 780 MWe and the BTC No.2 simulator of a BWR-5 of 1,100 MWe, plant function learning simulators, and the design of the BTC No.2 simulator and plant function learning simulators are reported. (K.I.)

  3. Determination of BWR Spent Nuclear Fuel Assembly Effective Thermal Conductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthew D. Hinds

    2001-10-17

    The purpose of this calculation is to provide an effective thermal conductivity for use in predicting peak cladding temperatures in boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies with 7x7,8x8, and 9x9 rod arrays. The first objective of this calculation is to describe the development and application of a finite element representation that predicts peak spent nuclear fuel temperatures for BWR assemblies. The second objective is to use the discrete representation to develop a basis for determining an effective thermal conductivity (described later) for a BWR assembly with srneared/homogeneous properties and to investigate the thermal behavior of a spent fuel assembly. The scope of this calculation is limited to a steady-state two-dimensional representation of the waste package interior region. This calculation is subject to procedure AP-3.124, Calculations (Ref. 27) and guided by the applicable technical work plan (Ref. 14). While these evaluations were originally developed for the thermal analysis of conceptual waste package designs emplaced in the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, the methodology applies to storage and transportation thermal analyses as well. Note that the waste package sketch in Attachment V depicts a preliminary design, and should not be interpreted otherwise.

  4. Reduction of radiation exposure in Japanese BWR Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morikawa, Yoshitake [ISOGO Nuclear Engineering Center, Yokohama (Japan)

    1995-03-01

    The reduction of occupational exposure to radiation during the annual inspection and maintenance outages of Japanese boiling water reactors (BWR) is one of the most important objectives for stable and reliable operation. It was shown that this radiation exposure is caused by radionuclides, such as Co-60, Co-58 and Mn-54 which are produced from the metal elements Co, Ni, and Fe present in the corrosion products of structural materials that had been irradiated by neutrons. Therefore, to reduce radiation sources and exposures in Japanese BWRs, attempts have been reinforced to remove corrosion products and activated corrosion products from the primary coolant system. This paper describes the progress of the application of these measures to Japanese BWRs. Most Japanese BWR-4 and BWR-5 type nuclear power plants started their commercial operations during the 1970s. With the elapse of time during operations, a problem came to the forefront, namely that occupational radiation exposure during plant outages gradually increased, which obstructed the smooth running of inspections and maintenance work. To overcome this problem, extensive studies to derive effective countermeasures for radiation exposure reduction were undertaken, based on the evaluation of the plants operation data.

  5. Reduction of radiation exposure in Japanese BWR Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morikawa, Yoshitake

    1995-01-01

    The reduction of occupational exposure to radiation during the annual inspection and maintenance outages of Japanese boiling water reactors (BWR) is one of the most important objectives for stable and reliable operation. It was shown that this radiation exposure is caused by radionuclides, such as Co-60, Co-58 and Mn-54 which are produced from the metal elements Co, Ni, and Fe present in the corrosion products of structural materials that had been irradiated by neutrons. Therefore, to reduce radiation sources and exposures in Japanese BWRs, attempts have been reinforced to remove corrosion products and activated corrosion products from the primary coolant system. This paper describes the progress of the application of these measures to Japanese BWRs. Most Japanese BWR-4 and BWR-5 type nuclear power plants started their commercial operations during the 1970s. With the elapse of time during operations, a problem came to the forefront, namely that occupational radiation exposure during plant outages gradually increased, which obstructed the smooth running of inspections and maintenance work. To overcome this problem, extensive studies to derive effective countermeasures for radiation exposure reduction were undertaken, based on the evaluation of the plants operation data

  6. Controlling device for BWR type nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekimizu, Koichi

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To enable to operate BWR type nuclear power plants while entirely drawing control rods upon stationary operation near the rated power. Method: Upon stationary operation of nuclear power plants near the rated power, an excess reactivity of nuclear fuels is controlled by entirely withdrawing control rods, and varying the feedwater enthalpy thereby changing the void amount. For this purpose, a feedwater heater is additionally disposed between a high pressure feedwater heater of a feedwater pipeway and a nuclear reactor pressure vessel, in which steams used for rising the temperature of the feedwater are introduced to the high temperature side of the high pressure feedwater heater and used again for the heating of the feedwater. In this case, the feedwater enthalpy can be increased approximately to the saturation enthalpy by adjusting such that about 30 % of the main steams are introduced to the high temperature side of the feedwater heater by a steam flow rate control valve, which enables to control the stationary operation without using control rods. (Horiuchi, T.)

  7. Design and axial optimization of nuclear fuel for BWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia V, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    In the present thesis, the modifications made to the axial optimization system based on Tabu Search (BT) for the axial design of BWR fuel type are presented, developed previously in the Nuclear Engineering Group of the UNAM Engineering Faculty. With the modifications what is mainly looked is to consider the particular characteristics of the mechanical design of the GE12 fuel type, used at the moment in the Laguna Verde Nucleo electric Central (CNLV) and that it considers the fuel bars of partial longitude. The information obtained in this thesis will allow to plan nuclear fuel reloads with the best conditions to operate in a certain cycle guaranteeing a better yield and use in the fuel burnt, additionally people in charge in the reload planning will be favored with the changes carried out to the system for the design and axial optimization of nuclear fuel, which facilitate their handling and it reduces their execution time. This thesis this developed in five chapters that are understood in the following way in general: Chapter 1: It approaches the basic concepts of the nuclear energy, it describes the physical and chemical composition of the atoms as well as that of the uranium isotopes, the handling of the uranium isotope by means of the nuclear fission until arriving to the operation of the nuclear reactors. Chapter 2: The nuclear fuel cycle is described, the methods for its extraction, its conversion and its enrichment to arrive to the stages of the nuclear fuel management used in the reactors are described. Beginning by the radial design, the axial design and the core design of the nuclear reactor related with the fuel assemblies design. Chapter 3: the optimization methods of nuclear fuel previously used are exposed among those that are: the genetic algorithms method, the search methods based on heuristic rules and the application of the tabu search method, which was used for the development of this thesis. Chapter 4: In this part the used methodology to the

  8. Design and axial optimization of nuclear fuel for BWR reactors; Diseno y optimizacion axial de combustible nuclear para reactores BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia V, M.A

    2006-07-01

    In the present thesis, the modifications made to the axial optimization system based on Tabu Search (BT) for the axial design of BWR fuel type are presented, developed previously in the Nuclear Engineering Group of the UNAM Engineering Faculty. With the modifications what is mainly looked is to consider the particular characteristics of the mechanical design of the GE12 fuel type, used at the moment in the Laguna Verde Nucleo electric Central (CNLV) and that it considers the fuel bars of partial longitude. The information obtained in this thesis will allow to plan nuclear fuel reloads with the best conditions to operate in a certain cycle guaranteeing a better yield and use in the fuel burnt, additionally people in charge in the reload planning will be favored with the changes carried out to the system for the design and axial optimization of nuclear fuel, which facilitate their handling and it reduces their execution time. This thesis this developed in five chapters that are understood in the following way in general: Chapter 1: It approaches the basic concepts of the nuclear energy, it describes the physical and chemical composition of the atoms as well as that of the uranium isotopes, the handling of the uranium isotope by means of the nuclear fission until arriving to the operation of the nuclear reactors. Chapter 2: The nuclear fuel cycle is described, the methods for its extraction, its conversion and its enrichment to arrive to the stages of the nuclear fuel management used in the reactors are described. Beginning by the radial design, the axial design and the core design of the nuclear reactor related with the fuel assemblies design. Chapter 3: the optimization methods of nuclear fuel previously used are exposed among those that are: the genetic algorithms method, the search methods based on heuristic rules and the application of the tabu search method, which was used for the development of this thesis. Chapter 4: In this part the used methodology to the

  9. Panorama of the BWR reactors - Evolution of the concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novotny, C.; Uhrig, E. [AREVA NP GmbH, Safety Engineering Department - PEPS-G (Germany)

    2012-01-15

    Nowadays, a fleet of more than 50 boiling water reactors (BWR) are in operation in the world. This article gives a short overview on the developments of nuclear power plants of the BWR type, with a focus on the European builds. It describes the technical bases from the early designs in the fifties, sketches the innovations of the sixties and seventies in the types BWR 69 and 72 (Baulinie 69 and 72) and gives an outlook of a possible next generation BWR. A promising approach in recent BWR developments is the the combination of passive safety systems with established design basis

  10. World nuclear energy developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hore-Lacy, Ian

    2013-01-01

    Presentation covers world nuclear power reactors in operation, fuels used for electricity generation, electricity markets in South Australia, UK, China, Germany, US, Vietnam, and the French nuclear reactor fleet. Also global perspective of world uranium supply and demand, resources, costs and production, types of new generation nuclear reactors, hydrogen economy and Generation IV reactors.

  11. BWR Spent Nuclear Fuel Interfacial Bonding Efficiency Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jiang, Hao [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-04-30

    The objective of this project is to perform a systematic study of spent nuclear fuel (SNF, also known as “used nuclear fuel” [UNF]) integrity under simulated transportation environments using the Cyclic Integrated Reversible-Bending Fatigue Tester (CIRFT) hot-cell testing technology developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in August 2013. Under Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sponsorship, ORNL completed four benchmark tests, four static tests, and twelve dynamic or cycle tests on H. B. Robinson (HBR) high burn-up (HBU) fuel. The clad of the HBR fuels was made of Zircaloy-4. Testing was continued in fiscal year (FY) 2014 using Department of Energy (DOE) funds. Additional CIRFT testing was conducted on three HBR rods; two specimens failed, and one specimen was tested to over 2.23 × 107 cycles without failing. The data analysis on all the HBR SNF rods demonstrated that it is necessary to characterize the fatigue life of the SNF rods in terms of (1) the curvature amplitude and (2) the maximum absolute of curvature extremes. The maximum extremes are significant because they signify the maximum tensile stress for the outer fiber of the bending rod. CIRFT testing has also addressed a large variation in hydrogen content on the HBR rods. While the load amplitude is the dominant factor that controls the fatigue life of bending rods, the hydrogen content also has an important effect on the lifetime attained at each load range tested. In FY 15, eleven SNF rod segments from the Limerick BWR were tested using the ORNL CIRFT equipment; one test under static conditions and ten tests under dynamic loading conditions. Under static unidirectional loading, a moment of 85 N·m was obtained at a maximum curvature of 4.0 m-1. The specimen did not show any sign of failure during three repeated loading cycles to a similar maximum curvature. Ten cyclic tests were conducted with amplitudes varying from 15.2 to 7.1 N·m. Failure was observed in nine of

  12. Study of the Utilization BWR Type Nuclear Power Reactor for Desalination Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itjeu Karliana; Sumijanto; Dhandhang Purwadi, M.

    2008-01-01

    The needs of fresh water increased by rapid population growth and industrials expansion, but these demands can not be prepared naturally. Following this case, seawater desalination becomes the primer option which can fulfill the need through the nuclear desalination technology. The coupled nuclear power reactor enables to supply thermal energy for auxiliary equipment and pumps operation. The utilization study of power reactor type BWR coupled with desalination process has been performed. The goal of study is to obtain characteristic data of desalted water specification which desalination system coupling with nuclear power plant produced energy for desalination process. The study is carried out by browsing data and information, and comprehensive review of thermal energy correlation between NPP with desalination process installation. According to reviewing are found that the thermal energy and electric power utilization from the nuclear power reactor are enable to remove the seawater to produce desalted water and also to operate auxiliary equipments. The assessment results is VK-300 reactor prototype, BWR type 250 MW(e) power are cogeneration unit can supplied hot steam temperature 285 °C to the extraction turbine to empower 150 MW electric power, and a part of hot steam 130 °C is use to operate desalination process and remind heat is distribute to the municipal and offices at that region. The coupled of VK-300 reactor power type BWR with desalination installation of MED type enable to produce desalted water with high quality distillate. Based on the economic calculation that the VK-300 reactor power of BWR type produced water distillate capacity is 300.000 m 3 /hour with cost US$ 0.58/m 3 . The coupling VK-300 reactor power type BWR with MED desalination plant is competitive economically. (author)

  13. Development and recent trend of disign of BWR nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kani, Jiro

    1977-01-01

    Many improvements have been carried out in BWR nuclear power plants from BWR-1, represented by Dresden No. 1 plant, to the present BWR-6 as the capacity has increased. In Japan, the plants up to BWR-5 have been constructed. In addition, further fine design improvements are being performed in the complete domestic manufacturing of BRWs based on the operational experiences to date. A variety of investigations on the standardization of nuclear power facilities have been progressing under the leadership of Japanese Ministry of International Trade and Industry since 1975. In this standardization, it is intended to forward the plant design taking eight concrete items into consideration, mainly aiming at carrying cut unerringly the maintenance and inspection, reduction of exposure of employees to radiation, and improvements of the rate of operation of plants and equipment reliability. The containment vessel has been developed in three forms, from Mark 1 through 3, adopting the pressure control system consistently since BWR-2. Mark 1 and 2 were constructed in Japan. However, these designs sacrificed the workability and increased radiation exposure during maintenance as a result of placing emphasis on the safety facilities, therefore Toshiba Electric has investigated the advanced Mark 1 type. Its features are the design for improving the work efficiency in a containment vessel, reducing the radiation exposure of workers, shortening plant construction period, and considering the aseismatic capability. In addition, the following themes are being planned as future standardization: (1) electrically driven control rod driving system, (2) improved design of reactor core, and (3) internal pump system as compared with external re-circulation. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  14. Development of advanced BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyota, Masatoshi

    1982-01-01

    The Japanese technology and domestic production of BWR type nuclear power plants have been established through the experiences in the construction and operation of BWRs in addition to the technical agreement with the General Electric Co. In early days, the plants experienced some trouble such as stress corrosion cracking and some inconvenience in the operation and maintenance. The government, electric power companies and BWR manufacturers have endeavored to standardize and improve the design of LWRs for the purpose of improving the safety, reliability and the rate of operation and reducing the radiation exposure dose of plant workers. The first and second stages of the standardization and improvement of LWRs have been completed. Five manufacturers of BWRs in the world have continued the conceptual design of a new version of BWR power plants. It was concluded that this is the most desirable version of BWR nuclear power stations, but the technical and economic evaluation must be made before the commercial application. Six electric power companies and three manufacturers of BWRs in Japan set up the organization to develop the technology in cooperation. The internal pump system, the new control rod drive mechanism and others are the main features. (Kako, I.)

  15. World nuclear energy paths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connolly, T.J.; Hansen, U.; Jaek, W.; Beckurts, K.H.

    1979-01-01

    In examing the world nuclear energy paths, the following assumptions were adopted: the world economy will grow somewhat more slowly than in the past, leading to reductions in electricity demand growth rates; national and international political impediments to the deployment of nuclear power will gradually disappear over the next few years; further development of nuclear power will proceed steadily, without serious interruption but with realistic lead times for the introduction of advanced technologies. Given these assumptions, this paper attempts a study of possible world nuclear energy developments, disaggregated on a regional and national basis. The scenario technique was used and a few alternative fuel-cycle scenarios were developed. Each is an internally consistent model of technically and economically feasible paths to the further development of nuclear power in an aggregate of individual countries and regions of the world. The main purpose of this modeling exercise was to gain some insight into the probable international locations of reactors and other nuclear facilities, the future requirements for uranium and for fuel-cycle services, and the problems of spent-fuel storage and waste management. The study also presents an assessment of the role that nuclear power might actually play in meeting future world energy demand

  16. World status - nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, A.

    1984-01-01

    The problems of nuclear power are not so much anti-nuclear public opinion, but more the decrease of electricity consumption growth rate and the high cost of building reactors. Because of these factors, forecasts of world nuclear capacity have had to be reduced considerably over the last three years. The performance of reactors is considered. The CANDU reactor remains the world's best performer and overall tends to out-perform larger reactors. The nuclear plant due to come on line in 1984 are listed by country; this shows that nuclear capacity will increase substantially over a short period. At a time of stagnant demand this will make nuclear energy an important factor in the world energy balance. Nuclear power stations in operation and under construction in 1983 are listed and major developments in commercial nuclear power in 1983 are taken country by country. In most, the report is the same; national reactor ordering cut back because the expected increase in energy demand has not happened. Also the cost-benefit of nuclear over other forms of energy is no longer as favourable. The export opportunities have also declined as many of the less developed countries are unable to afford reactors. (U.K.)

  17. Development of a coordinated control system for BWR nuclear power plant and HVDC transmission system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, M.; Hara, T.; Hirayama, K.; Sekiya, K.

    1986-01-01

    The combined use of dc and ac transmissions or so-called hybrid transmission was under study, employing both dc and ac systems to enable stable transmission of 10,000 MW of electric power generated by the BWR nuclear plant, scheduled to be built about 800 km away from the center of the load. It was thus necessary to develop a hybrid power transmission control system, the hybrid power transmission system consisting of a high voltage dc transmission system (HVDC) and an ultrahigh ac transmission system (UHVAC). It was also necessary to develop a control system for HVDC transmission which protects the BWR nuclear power plant from being influenced by any change in transmission mode that occurs as a result of faults on the UHVAC side when the entire power of the BWR plant is being sent by the HVDC transmission. This paper clarifies the requirements for the HVDC system control during hybrid transmission and also during dc transmission. The control method that satisfies these requirements was studied to develop a control algorithm

  18. World nuclear outlook 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-29

    As part of the EIA program to provide energy information, this analysis report presents the current status and projections through 2015 of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries in the world using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. It also contains information and forecasts of developments in the uranium market. Long-term projections of US nuclear capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharges for two different scenarios through 2040 are developed for the Department of Energy`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). In turn, the OCRWM provides partial funding for preparation of this report. The projections of uranium requirements are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) for preparation of the Nuclear Energy Agency/OECD report, Summary of Nuclear Power and Fuel Cycle Data in OECD Member Countries.

  19. World nuclear outlook 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-01

    As part of the EIA program to provide energy information, this analysis report presents the current status and projections through 2010 of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries in the world using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. It also contains information and forecasts of developments in the uranium market. Long-term projections of US nuclear capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharges for three different scenarios through 2040 are developed for the Department of Energy`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). In turn, the OCRWM provides partial funding for preparation of this report. The projections of uranium requirements are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) for preparation of the Nuclear Energy Agency/OECD report, Summary of Nuclear Power and Fuel Cycle Data in OECD Member Countries.

  20. World nuclear outlook 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    As part of the EIA program to provide energy information, this analysis report presents the current status and projections through 2015 of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries in the world using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. It also contains information and forecasts of developments in the uranium market. Long-term projections of US nuclear capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharges for two different scenarios through 2040 are developed for the Department of Energy's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). In turn, the OCRWM provides partial funding for preparation of this report. The projections of uranium requirements are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) for preparation of the Nuclear Energy Agency/OECD report, Summary of Nuclear Power and Fuel Cycle Data in OECD Member Countries

  1. World nuclear outlook 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-12-01

    As part of the EIA program to provide energy information, this analysis report presents the current status and projections through 2010 of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries in the world using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. It also contains information and forecasts of developments in the uranium market. Long-term projections of US nuclear capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharges for three different scenarios through 2040 are developed for the Department of Energy's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). In turn, the OCRWM provides partial funding for preparation of this report. The projections of uranium requirements are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) for preparation of the Nuclear Energy Agency/OECD report, Summary of Nuclear Power and Fuel Cycle Data in OECD Member Countries

  2. A World Nuclear University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanev, Y.

    2004-01-01

    The paper discusses the mission and tasks of the World Nuclear University (WNU) established to build worldwide knowledge and support the effective use of nuclear techniques for solving the global human and environmental problems of 21 century and thereby support the global sustainable development. In this respect the WNU would build Human resources, Technical knowledge and Public Support. A Network of educational and research institutions with strong programmes in nuclear science and engineering will be created. The WNU Head quarters and Regional Centers will: 1) Facilitate agreement on curriculum and WNU certification curriculum 2) Develop and administer scholarships; 3) Foster educational exchanges within WNU family institutions; 4) Build core faculty for summer 1/2 year Masters degrees; 5) Co-ordinate research, grants and knowledge management research; 6) Operate think tank and public information service; 7) Emphasise key areas such as safeguards systems and the nuclear-renewable-hydrogen economy; 8) Oversee world-wide human resources pool; 9) Orchestrate alumni support for nuclear technology. The possible participants and possible location of the Regional Centres are given

  3. Analysis of the integrity of the pressure vessel of the BWR type nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Luna, O.

    1982-01-01

    The presssure vessel of a BWR type reactor was monitored for cracking during alternating events of its in-service life. The monitoring was to determine criticality of fractures catastrophic fractures and the velocity of fracture propagation. Detected cracks were evaluated as specified in ASME code section XI, of a minimum wall thickness of 2.5% crack growths were compared a) of 1/10 of the critical maximum size and b) at in-service inspection intervals according to ASME recommendations to be established at the Laguna Verde nuclear plant. Finally conclusions are made and discussed. (author)

  4. Recent control and instrumentation systems for BWR nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Hiroaki; Higashikawa, Yuichi; Sato, Hideyuki

    1990-01-01

    For the needs of the more stable operation of nuclear power stations, the upgrading of the measurement and control system for BWRs has been promoted by positively introducing remarkably advancing electronic technology. Further, it is aimed at to construct the synthetic digitized measurement and control system for nuclear power stations to heighten the operation reliability in ABWRs. As the first step of the development in the synthetic digitization, the monitoring and control system for radioactive waste treatment was put in practical use for No.5 plant of Kashiwazaki, Kariwa Nuclear Power Station, Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc. Hitachi Ltd. has promoted the development and the application to actual plants of the measurement and control system for BWRs, in which digital control technology, optical information transmission technology and the operation-supporting technology using a computer were utilized. Hereafter, it is intended to expand the application of digital measurement and control aiming at improving the reliability, operation performance and maintainability. The nuclear power plant control complex with advanced man-machine interface-90 (NUCAMM-90) was developed, and its application to actual plants is planned. (K.I.)

  5. BUTREN-RC an hybrid system for the recharges optimization of nuclear fuels in a BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz S, J.J.; Castillo M, J.A.; Valle G, E. del

    2004-01-01

    The obtained results with the hybrid system BUTREN-RC are presented that obtains recharges of nuclear fuel for a BWR type reactor. The system has implemented the methods of optimization heuristic taboo search and neural networks. The optimization it carried out with the technique of taboo search, and the neural networks, previously trained, were used to predict the behavior of the recharges of fuel, in substitution of commercial codes of reactor simulation. The obtained recharges of nuclear fuel correspond to 5 different operation cycles of the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power plant, Veracruz in Mexico. The obtained results were compared with the designs of this cycles. The energy gain with the recharges of fuel proposals is of approximately 4.5% with respect to those of design. The time of compute consumed it was considerably smaller that when a commercial code for reactor simulation is used. (Author)

  6. From the nuclear world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2015-01-01

    This document gathers pieces of information concerning nuclear industry worldwide. The most relevant are the following ones. China has announced the construction between 2020 and 2025 of the biggest particle accelerator in the world. The Finn government has agreed with the project of a spent fuel storage center, it was the last administrative step before the launching of the construction works. The quality of the steel of the pressure vessel of the Olkiluoto EPR has been assessed by the Finn nuclear safety authority (STUK). The French nuclear safety authority (ASN) has launched a test program for assessing the resistance of the pressure vessel of the Flamanville EPR as a consequence of the recent discovery of defects in the composition of the steel. A robot called SX1 has been designed to measure radiation in a continuous way by strolling about in a nuclear facility. As a consequence of a tense relationship with Russia, the Turkish government has stopped the construction (by Rosatom) of the Akkuyu nuclear plant. The Belgian government and the Electrabel company have signed an agreement for a 10 year extension of the operating life of the Doel 1 and 2 reactors. Chinese authorities have approved the construction of 4 new third generation reactors. (A.C.)

  7. Basic evaluation on nuclear characteristics of BWR high burnup MOX fuel and core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagano, M.; Sakurai, S.; Yamaguchi, H.

    1997-01-01

    MOX fuel will be used in existing commercial BWR cores as a part of reload fuels with equivalent operability, safety and economy to UO 2 fuel in Japan. The design concept should be compatible with UO 2 fuel design. High burnup UO 2 fuels are being developed and commercialized step by step. The MOX fuel planned to be introduced in around year 2000 will use the same hardware as UO 2 8 x 8 array fuel developed for a second step of UO 2 high burnup fuel. The target discharge exposure of this MOX fuel is about 33 GWd/t. And the loading fraction of MOX fuel is approximately one-third in an equilibrium core. On the other hand, it becomes necessary to minimize a number of MOX fuels and plants utilizing MOX fuel, mainly due to the fuel economy, handling cost and inspection cost in site. For the above reasons, it needed to developed a high burnup MOX fuel containing much Pu and a core with a large amount of MOX fuels. The purpose of this study is to evaluate basic nuclear fuel and core characteristics of BWR high burnup MOX fuel with batch average exposure of about 39.5 GWd/t using 9 x 9 array fuel. The loading fraction of MOX fuel in the core is within a range of about 50% to 100%. Also the influence of Pu isotopic composition fluctuations and Pu-241 decay upon nuclear characteristics are studied. (author). 3 refs, 5 figs, 3 tabs

  8. Brave nuclear world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pockley, P.

    1999-01-01

    Two announcements have confirmed that the current Australian government intends to realize the unfulfilled dream of the Menzies era for Australia to become a 'nuclear nation' by approving a new 'research reactor' and a new uranium mine. Meanwhile, the government is working hard to overturn UNESCO's recommendation to stop the development of the Jabiluka uranium mine. And, an international proposal to store in Australia stockpiles of high level waste from the world's power stations and decommissioned nuclear weapons has finally come into the open with the revelation that Pangea Resources Australia Pty Ltd has presented a summary proposal to the government. Though rejected, the plan remains active. Central to the rush to capitalise on Australia's uranium resources is Environment Minister, Senator Robert Hill, whose formal approvals for the reactor and the mine have been legally essential

  9. Nuclear fuel activity with minor actinides after their useful life in a BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez C, E.; Ramirez S, J. R.; Alonso V, G.

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear fuel used in nuclear power reactors has a life cycle, in which it provides energy, at the end of this cycle is withdrawn from the reactor core. This used fuel is known as spent nuclear fuel, a strong problem with this fuel is that when the fuel was irradiated in a nuclear reactor it leaves with an activity of approximately 1.229 x 10 15 Bq. The aim of the transmutation of actinides from spent nuclear fuel is to reduce the activity of high level waste that must be stored in geological repositories and the lifetime of high level waste; these two achievements would reduce the number of necessary repositories, as well as the duration of storage. The present work is aimed at evaluating the activity of a nuclear fuel in which radioactive actinides could be recycled to remove most of the radioactive material, first establishing a reference of actinides production in the standard nuclear fuel of uranium at end of its burning in a BWR, and a fuel rod design containing 6% of actinides in an uranium matrix from the enrichment tails is proposed, then 4 standard uranium fuel rods are replaced by 4 actinide bars to evaluate the production and transmutation of the same, finally the reduction of actinide activity in the fuel is evaluated. (Author)

  10. Quantitative evaluation for training results of nuclear plant operator on BWR simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Takao; Sato, Tatsuaki; Onishi, Hiroshi; Miyakita, Kohji; Mizuno, Toshiyuki

    1985-01-01

    Recently, the reliability of neclear power plants has largely risen, and the abnormal phenomena in the actual plants are rarely encountered. Therefore, the training using simulators becomes more and more important. In BWR Operator Training Center Corp., the training of the operators of BWR power plants has been continued for about ten years using a simulator having the nearly same function as the actual plants. The recent high capacity ratio of nuclear power plants has been mostly supported by excellent operators trained in this way. Taking the opportunity of the start of operation of No.2 simulator, effort has been exerted to quantitatively grasp the effect of training and to heighten the quality of training. The outline of seven training courses is shown. The technical ability required for operators, the items of quantifying the effect of training, that is, operational errors and the time required for operation, the method of quantifying, the method of collecting the data and the results of the application to the actual training are described. It was found that this method is suitable to quantify the effect of training. (Kako, I.)

  11. BWR 90: The ABB advanced BWR design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haukeland, S.; Ivung, B.; Pedersen, T.

    1999-01-01

    ABB has two evolutionary advanced fight water reactors available today - the BWR 90 boiling water reactor and the System 80+ pressurised water reactor. The BWR 90 is based on the design, construction, commissioning and operation of the BWR 75 plants. The operation experience of the six plants of this advanced design has been very good. The average annual energy availability is above 90%, and the total power generation costs have been low. In the development of BWR 90 specific changes were introduced to the reference design, to adapt to technological progress, new safety requirements and to achieve cost savings. The thermal power rating of BWR 90 is 3800 MWth (providing a nominal 1374 MWe net), slightly higher dim that of the reference plant ABB Atom has taken advantage of margins gained using a new generation of its SVEA fuel to attain this power rating without major design modifications. The BWR 90 design was completed and offered to the TVO utility in Finland in 1991, as one of the contenders for the fifth Finnish nuclear power plant project. Thus, the design is available today for deployment in new plant projects. Utility views were incorporated through co-operation with the Finnish utility TVO, owner and operator of the two Olkiluoto plants of BWR 75 design. A review against the European Utility Requirement (EUR) set of requirements has been performed, since the design, in 1997, was selected by the EUR Steering Committee to be the first BWR to be evaluated against the EUR documents. The work is scheduled for completion in 1998. It will be the subject of an 'EUR Volume 3 Subset for BWR 90' document. ABB is continuing its BWR development work with the 'evolutionary' design BWR 90+. The primary design goal is to develop the BWR as a competitive option for the anticipated revival of the market for new nuclear plants beyond the turn of the century, as well as feeding ideas and inputs to the continuous modernisation efforts at operating plants. The development is

  12. Operational experience of human-friendly control and instrumentation systems for BWR nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makino, M.; Watanabe, T.; Suto, O.; Asahi, R.

    1987-01-01

    In recent BWR nuclear power plants in Japan, an advanced centralized monitoring and control system PODIA (Plant Operation by Displayed Information and Automation), which incorporates many operator aid functions, has been in operation since 1985. Main functions of the PODIA system as a computerized operator aid system are as follows. CRT displays for plant monitoring. Automatic controls and operation guides for plant operation. Stand-by status monitoring for engineered safety features during normal operation. Surveillance test procedure guides for engineered safety features. Integrated alarm display. The effectiveness of these functions have been proved through test and commercial operation. It has been obtained that operators have preferred PODIA much more than conventional monitoring and control systems

  13. Nuclear energy in the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grippi, Sidney

    2006-01-01

    The chapter reports the nuclear energy beginning in the world including a chronology of the atomic bomb birth, the annual growth rate of electronuclear energy in the world, a comparison of energy production in thermoelectric bases

  14. World nuclear performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhlheim, M.D.

    1992-01-01

    This update, which appears regularly in each issue of Nuclear Safety, surveys the operations of those power reactors in the world, which have been issued operating licenses. Table I shows the number of such reactors and their net capacities as of June 30, 1992, the end of the three-month period covered in this report Table 2 lists the unit capacity and forced outage rate for each licensed reactor for each of the three-months covered in each report and the cumulative values of these parameters at the end of the covered quarter since the beginning of commercial operation. The Maximum Dependable Capacity (MDC) Unit Capacity (in percent) is defined as follows: (Net electrical energy generated during the reporting period x 100) divided by the product of the number of hours in the reporting period and the MDC of the reactor in question. The forced outage rate (in percent) is defined as: (The total number of hours in the reporting period during which the unit was inoperable as the result of a forced outage x 100) divided by the sum (forced outage hours + operating hours)

  15. Stability analysis of BWR nuclear-coupled thermal-hyraulics using a simple model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karve, A.A.; Rizwan-uddin; Dorning, J.J. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    A simple mathematical model is developed to describe the dynamics of the nuclear-coupled thermal-hydraulics in a boiling water reactor (BWR) core. The model, which incorporates the essential features of neutron kinetics, and single-phase and two-phase thermal-hydraulics, leads to simple dynamical system comprised of a set of nonlinear ordinary differential equations (ODEs). The stability boundary is determined and plotted in the inlet-subcooling-number (enthalpy)/external-reactivity operating parameter plane. The eigenvalues of the Jacobian matrix of the dynamical system also are calculated at various steady-states (fixed points); the results are consistent with those of the direct stability analysis and indicate that a Hopf bifurcation occurs as the stability boundary in the operating parameter plane is crossed. Numerical simulations of the time-dependent, nonlinear ODEs are carried out for selected points in the operating parameter plane to obtain the actual damped and growing oscillations in the neutron number density, the channel inlet flow velocity, and the other phase variables. These indicate that the Hopf bifurcation is subcritical, hence, density wave oscillations with growing amplitude could result from a finite perturbation of the system even where the steady-state is stable. The power-flow map, frequently used by reactor operators during start-up and shut-down operation of a BWR, is mapped to the inlet-subcooling-number/neutron-density (operating-parameter/phase-variable) plane, and then related to the stability boundaries for different fixed inlet velocities corresponding to selected points on the flow-control line. The stability boundaries for different fixed inlet subcooling numbers corresponding to those selected points, are plotted in the neutron-density/inlet-velocity phase variable plane and then the points on the flow-control line are related to their respective stability boundaries in this plane.

  16. Experiences with monitoring and control of microbiological growth in the standby service water system of a BWR nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zisson, P.S.; Whitaker, J.M.; Neilson, H.L.; Mayne, L.L.

    1995-01-01

    In 1989, the Unites States Nuclear Regulatory Commission formally recognized the potential for nuclear accidents resulting from microbiological causes. Such causes range from loss of heat transfer due to microbiological fouling, to loss of system integrity caused by microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC). As a result of these potential problems, monitoring, mitigation, and control procedures must be developed by all regulated plants. In developing a control and mitigation strategy for the standby service water system of a boiling water reactor (BWR) nuclear power plant, numerous monitoring techniques were employed to evaluate effectiveness. This paper describes the monitoring techniques that were evaluated, and those that ultimately proved to be effective

  17. Safety Evaluation Report related to the final design approval of the GESSAR II BWR/6 Nuclear Island Design (Docket No. 50-447). Supplement No. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    Supplement 3 to the Safety Evaluation Report (SER) for the application filed by General Electric Company for the final design approval for the GE BWR/6 nuclear island design has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This report supplements the GESSAR II SER (NUREG-0979), issued in April 1983, summarizing the results of the staff's safety review of the GESSAR II BWR/6 nuclear island design. Subject to favorable resolution of the items discussed in this supplement, the staff concludes that the GESSAR II design satisfactorily addresses the severe-accident concerns described in draft NUREG-1070

  18. The unstoppable world nuclear development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominguez, M. T.

    2009-01-01

    To meet energy needs and curb climate change, the number of reactors will continue to increase because more and more countries are going the need nuclear power. At present, there are 436 nuclear reactors in the world that produce 16% of the electricity, and another 48 units are under construction in all, 31 countries in the world use nuclear power to produce electricity, and some countries that do not have reactors, e.g. Poland and Italy, are seriously planning to include nuclear power in their energy mix. Global nuclear development is a reality; energy and environmental challenges have led to new support for nuclear power, which is a safe, stable emission-free source. (Author)

  19. A virtual nuclear world?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salve, R.

    1998-01-01

    The way in which virtual reality technology has so dramatically developed over the last few years has opened up the possibility of its application to various industrial processes. This article describes the possible uses of such a technique in nuclear power plants in various phases such as design, construction, operation or dismantling. (Author)

  20. World nuclear performance report 2017

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cobb, Jonathan [World Nuclear Association, London (United Kingdom)

    2017-08-15

    World Nuclear Association recently published the 2017 edition of the World Nuclear Performance Report. The report presents key metrics that illustrate current performance, both of reactors currently operating and those under construction. The article highlights some of the most important findings of the report. The pace of new build will need to accelerate if nuclear energy is going to make a growing contribution to the global electricity generation mix, a requirement of many projections of future scenarios that aim to meet the objective of limiting the rise average temperatures to below two degrees Celsius, while at the same time meeting the growing worldwide demand for electricity.

  1. World supply of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pecqueur, Michel.

    1981-01-01

    At the end of 1980 nuclear energy accounted for 9% of the world production of electricity stemming from 262 power stations, utilising mainly the process of water reactors and representing an installed capacity of 142 GWe. This production, apparently limited, already represents the equivalent of 150 million TOE. The 600 nuclear power stations in service, under construction or ordered represent a total of 450 GWe. In 1985, their production ought to cover 15% of the world requirements of electricity, which corresponds to a doubling of the share of nuclear energy within 6 years. During these recent years, the development of nuclear energy has undergone a significant slowing down and the number of orders for new nuclear power stations has dropped considerably in particular in the United States. Considering the time required and the available industrial capacity, the accumulated capacity which could be installed worlwide by 1990 could attain 530 GWe, equivalent to 650 MTOE covering 24% of the world production of electricity and 7% of the world consumption of primary energy. A determined effort for the end of this century could end up by the installation of 1200 GWe of capacity, generating 1.5 GTOE. The share of nuclear energy would then represent 35% of the production of electricity [fr

  2. Analysis of the accident at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in an A BWR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escorcia O, D.; Salazar S, E.

    2016-09-01

    The present work aims to recreate the accident occurred at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan on March 11, 2011, making use of an academic simulator of forced circulation of the A BWR reactor provided by the IAEA to know the scope of this simulator. The simulator was developed and distributed by the IAEA for academic purposes and contains the characteristics and general elements of this reactor to be able to simulate transients and failures of different types, allowing also to observe the general behavior of the reactor, as well as several phenomena and present systems in the same. Is an educational tool of great value, but it does not have a scope that allows the training of plant operators. To recreate the conditions of the Fukushima accident in the simulator, we first have to know what events led to this accident, as well as the actions taken by operators and managers to reduce the consequences of this accident; and the sequence of events that occurred during the course of the accident. Differences in the nuclear power plant behavior are observed and interpreted throughout the simulation, since the Fukushima plant technology and the simulator technology are not the same, although they have several elements in common. The Fukushima plant had an event that by far exceeded the design basis, which triggered in an accident that occurred in the first place by a total loss of power supply, followed by the loss of cooling systems, causing a level too high in temperature, melting the core and damaging the containment accordingly, allowing the escape of hydrogen and radioactive material. As a result of the simulation, was determined that the scope of the IAEA academic simulator reaches the entrance of the emergency equipment, so is able to simulate almost all the events occurred at the time of the earthquake and the arrival of the tsunami in the nuclear power plant of Fukushima Daiichi. However, due to its characteristics, is not able to simulate later

  3. Study of environmental noise in a BWR plant like the Nuclear Power Plant Laguna Verde

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tijerina S, F.; Cruz G, M.; Amador C, C.

    2013-10-01

    In all industry type the health costs generated by the noise are high, because the noise can cause nuisance and to harm the capacity to work when causing tension and to perturb the concentration, and in more severe cases to reach to lose the sense of the hearing in the long term. The noise levels in the industry have been designated for the different types of use like residential, commercial, and industrial and silence areas. The noise can cause accidents when obstructing the communications and alarm signs. For this reason the noise should be controlled and mitigated, at a low level as reasonably is possible, taking into account that the noise is an acoustic contamination. The present study determines a bases line of the environmental noise levels in a nuclear power plant BWR-5 as Laguna Verde, (like reference) to be able to determine and to give pursuit to the possible solutions to eliminate or to limit the noise level in the different job areas. The noise levels were registered with a meter of integrative noise level (sonometer) and areas of noise exposure levels mapping the general areas in the buildings were established, being the registered maximum level of 96.94 dba in the building of the Reactor-elevation 0.65 m under the operation conditions of Extended Power Up rate (EPU) of 120% PTN. Knowing that the exposition to noises and the noise dose in the job place can influence in the health and in the safety of the workers, are extensive topics that they should be analyzed for separate as they are: to) the effects in the health of the exposure to the noise, b) how measuring the noise, c) the methods and technologies to combat and to control the noise in the industry by part of engineering area and d) the function of the industrial safety bodies as delegates of the health and safety in the task against the noise in the job. (author)

  4. BWR Spent Nuclear Fuel Integrity Research and Development Survey for UKABWR Spent Fuel Interim Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bevard, Bruce Balkcom [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mertyurek, Ugur [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Belles, Randy [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Scaglione, John M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this report is to identify issues and support documentation and identify and detail existing research on spent fuel dry storage; provide information to support potential R&D for the UKABWR (United Kingdom Advanced Boiling Water Reactor) Spent Fuel Interim Storage (SFIS) Pre-Construction Safety Report; and support development of answers to questions developed by the regulator. Where there are gaps or insufficient data, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has summarized the research planned to provide the necessary data along with the schedule for the research, if known. Spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from nuclear power plants has historically been stored on site (wet) in spent fuel pools pending ultimate disposition. Nuclear power users (countries, utilities, vendors) are developing a suite of options and set of supporting analyses that will enable future informed choices about how best to manage these materials. As part of that effort, they are beginning to lay the groundwork for implementing longer-term interim storage of the SNF and the Greater Than Class C (CTCC) waste (dry). Deploying dry storage will require a number of technical issues to be addressed. For the past 4-5 years, ORNL has been supporting the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in identifying these key technical issues, managing the collection of data to be used in issue resolution, and identifying gaps in the needed data. During this effort, ORNL subject matter experts (SMEs) have become expert in understanding what information is publicly available and what gaps in data remain. To ensure the safety of the spent fuel under normal and frequent conditions of wet and subsequent dry storage, intact fuel must be shown to: 1.Maintain fuel cladding integrity; 2.Maintain its geometry for cooling, shielding, and subcriticality; 3.Maintain retrievability, and damaged fuel with pinhole or hairline cracks must be shown not to degrade further. Where PWR (pressurized water reactor) information is

  5. Technical Basis for Peak Reactivity Burnup Credit for BWR Spent Nuclear Fuel in Storage and Transportation Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, William BJ J [ORNL; Ade, Brian J [ORNL; Bowman, Stephen M [ORNL; Gauld, Ian C [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Mertyurek, Ugur [ORNL; Radulescu, Georgeta [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission have initiated a multiyear project to investigate application of burnup credit for boiling-water reactor (BWR) fuel in storage and transportation casks. This project includes two phases. The first phase (1) investigates applicability of peak reactivity methods currently used in spent fuel pools (SFPs) to storage and transportation systems and (2) evaluates validation of both reactivity (keff) calculations and burnup credit nuclide concentrations within these methods. The second phase will focus on extending burnup credit beyond peak reactivity. This paper documents the first phase, including an analysis of lattice design parameters and depletion effects, as well as both validation components. Initial efforts related to extended burnup credit are discussed in a companion paper. Peak reactivity analyses have been used in criticality analyses for licensing of BWR fuel in SFPs over the last 20 years. These analyses typically combine credit for the gadolinium burnable absorber present in the fuel with a modest amount of burnup credit. Gadolinium burnable absorbers are used in BWR assemblies to control core reactivity. The burnable absorber significantly reduces assembly reactivity at beginning of life, potentially leading to significant increases in assembly reactivity for burnups less than 15–20 GWd/MTU. The reactivity of each fuel lattice is dependent on gadolinium loading. The number of gadolinium-bearing fuel pins lowers initial lattice reactivity, but it has a small impact on the burnup and reactivity of the peak. The gadolinium concentration in each pin has a small impact on initial lattice reactivity but a significant effect on the reactivity of the peak and the burnup at which the peak occurs. The importance of the lattice parameters and depletion conditions are primarily determined by their impact on the gadolinium depletion. Criticality code validation for BWR burnup

  6. BUTREN-RC an hybrid system for the recharges optimization of nuclear fuels in a BWR; BUTREN-RC un sistema hibrido para la optimizacion de recargas de combustible nuclear en un BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz S, J.J.; Castillo M, J.A. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca Km. 36.5, 52045 Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Valle G, E. del [IPN, ESFM, 07738 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    The obtained results with the hybrid system BUTREN-RC are presented that obtains recharges of nuclear fuel for a BWR type reactor. The system has implemented the methods of optimization heuristic taboo search and neural networks. The optimization it carried out with the technique of taboo search, and the neural networks, previously trained, were used to predict the behavior of the recharges of fuel, in substitution of commercial codes of reactor simulation. The obtained recharges of nuclear fuel correspond to 5 different operation cycles of the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power plant, Veracruz in Mexico. The obtained results were compared with the designs of this cycles. The energy gain with the recharges of fuel proposals is of approximately 4.5% with respect to those of design. The time of compute consumed it was considerably smaller that when a commercial code for reactor simulation is used. (Author)

  7. Experimental and analytical studies for a BWR nuclear reactor building. Evaluation of soil-structure interaction behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuno, N.; Tsushima, Y.

    1975-01-01

    This paper evaluates the spatial characteristics of dynamic properties, especially soil-structure interaction behaviour, of the BWR nuclear building by experimental and analytical studies. It is well known that the damping effects in soil-structure interaction are remarkable on the building with short periods by the dissipation of vibrational energy to the soil. The authors have previously reported an analytical method for estimating the damping effects the properties of which are characterized as follows: 1) The complex damping is used, because the so-called structural damping may be more suitable for estimating the damping effects of an elastic structure. 2) H. Tajimi's theory is used for estimating the dynamical soil-foundation stiffness with the dissipation of vibrational energy on the elastic half-space soil. In this paper, an approximate explanation is presented in regard to the more developmental mathematical method for estimating the damping effects than the above-mentioned previous method, which is 'Modes Superposition Method for Multi-Degrees of Freedom System' with the constant complex stiffness showing the structural damping effects and the dynamical soil-foundation stiffness approximated by the linear or quadratic functions of the eigenvalues. An approximate explanation is presented in regard to the experimental results of the No. 1 reactor building (BWR) of Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station, The Chubu Electric Power Co., Ltd. (Auth.)

  8. Nuclear power. 2008 world report - evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2010-01-01

    In 2008, 438 nuclear power plants were available for power supply in 31 countries, 1 plant less than in 2007. No unit was commissioned for the first time, 1 nuclear power plant was decommissioned for good in 2008. At a cumulated gross power of 392,597 MWe and a cumulated net power of 372,170 MWe, respectively, worldwide nuclear generating capacity has reached a high level. Nine different reactor lines are operated in commercial plants: PWR, PWR-VVER, BWR, CANDU, D2O PWR, GCR, AGR, LWGR, and LMFBR. Light water reactors (PWR and BWR) continue to top the list with 358 plants. By the end of 2008, in 14 countries 43 nuclear power plants with an aggregate gross power of 39,211 MWe and an aggregate net power of 36,953 MWe were under construction. Of these, 37 are light water reactors, 3 are CANDU-type reactors, 2 are fast breeder and 1 D2O-PWR. 124 commercial reactors with an aggregate power in excess of 5 MWe have so far been decommissioned in 19 countries. Most of them are prototype plants of low power. About 70% of the nuclear power plants in operation, namely 304 plants, were commissioned in the eighties and nineties. The energy availability and operating availability factors of the nuclear power plants reached good levels: 80.80% for operating availability and 80,00% for energy availability. The four nuclear power plants in Finland continuecontinue to be in the lead worldwide with a cumulated average operating capacity factor of 91,60%. (orig.)

  9. Nuclear power: 2006 world report - evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2007-01-01

    Last year, 2006, 437 nuclear power plants were available for power supply in 31 countries, 7 plants less than in 2005. One unit was commissioned for the first time, 8 nuclear power plants were decommissioned for good in 2006. At a cumulated gross power of 389,488 MWe and a cumulated net power of 370,441 MWe, respectively, worldwide nuclear generating capacity has reached a high level so far. Nine different reactor lines are operated in commercial plants: PWR, PWR-VVER, BWR, CANDU, D 2 O PWR, GCR, AGR, LWGR, and LMFBR. Light water reactors (PWR and BWR) continue to top the list with 358 plants. By the end of the year, 10 countries operated 29 nuclear power plants with an aggregate gross power of 25,367 MWe and an aggregate net power of 23,953 MWe, respectively. Of these, 21 are light water reactors, 5 are CANDU-type reactors, 2 are fast breeder and 1 a LWGR. 123 commercial reactors with an aggregate power in excess of 5 MWe have so far been decommissioned in 19 countries. Most of them are prototype plants of low power. About 70% of the nuclear power plants in operation, namely 304 plants, were commissioned in the eighties and nineties. The energy availability and operating availability factors of the nuclear power plants again reached peak levels: 82% for energy availability, and 83% for operating availability. The 4 nuclear power plants in Finland continue to be in the lead worldwide with a cumulated average operating capacity factor of 94%. (orig.)

  10. Impact analysis of modifying the composition of the nuclear fuel of a BWR with beryllium oxide; Analisis del impacto de modificar la composicion del combustible nuclear de un BWR con oxido de berilio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallardo V, J. M.; Morales S, J. B., E-mail: euqrop@hotmail.com [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2013-10-15

    The beryllium oxide (Be O) presents excellent physical properties, especially its high thermal conductivity that contrasts clearly with that of the uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}) used at the present as fuel in a great number of nuclear plants. The present work models a nuclear reactor cooled by light water in boiling with two external recirculation loops (BWR/5) using the code for the transitory analysis and postulated accidents Trac-B F1, implementing a UO{sub 2} mixture and different fractions of Be O, with the objective of improving the thermal conductivity of the fuel. The numeric results and the realized analyses indicate that when adding a fraction in volume of 10% the central temperature decreases in 30.4% in stationary state, while during the large break loss of coolant accident the peak cladding temperature diminishes in 7%. Although the real interaction of the mixture has not been determined experimentally, the obtained results are promising. (Author)

  11. Nuclear fuel activity with minor actinides after their useful life in a BWR; Actividad del combustible nuclear con actinidos menores despues de su vida util en un reactor BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez C, E.; Ramirez S, J. R.; Alonso V, G., E-mail: eduardo.martinez@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2016-09-15

    Nuclear fuel used in nuclear power reactors has a life cycle, in which it provides energy, at the end of this cycle is withdrawn from the reactor core. This used fuel is known as spent nuclear fuel, a strong problem with this fuel is that when the fuel was irradiated in a nuclear reactor it leaves with an activity of approximately 1.229 x 10{sup 15} Bq. The aim of the transmutation of actinides from spent nuclear fuel is to reduce the activity of high level waste that must be stored in geological repositories and the lifetime of high level waste; these two achievements would reduce the number of necessary repositories, as well as the duration of storage. The present work is aimed at evaluating the activity of a nuclear fuel in which radioactive actinides could be recycled to remove most of the radioactive material, first establishing a reference of actinides production in the standard nuclear fuel of uranium at end of its burning in a BWR, and a fuel rod design containing 6% of actinides in an uranium matrix from the enrichment tails is proposed, then 4 standard uranium fuel rods are replaced by 4 actinide bars to evaluate the production and transmutation of the same, finally the reduction of actinide activity in the fuel is evaluated. (Author)

  12. 2006 nuclear power world report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2007-01-01

    At the turn of 2006/2007, 437 nuclear power plants were available for energy supply, or were being commissioned, in 31 countries of the world. This is seven plants less than at the turn of 2005/2006. The aggregate gross power of the plants amounted to approx. 389.5 GWe, the aggregate net power, to 370.5 GWe. This indicates a slight decrease of gross power by some 0.15 GWe compared to the level the year before, while the available net power increased, also slightly, by approx. 0.2 GWe. The Tarapur 3 nuclear generating unit in India, a D 2 O PWR of 540 MWe gross power, was newly commissioned. In 2006, 8 nuclear power plants in Europe (4 in the United Kingdom, 2 in Bulgaria, 1 each in the Slovak Republic and in Spain) discontinued power operation for good. 29 nuclear generating units, i.e. 6 plants more than at the end of 2005, were under construction in late 2006 in 9 countries with an aggregate gross power of approx. 25.5 GWe. Worldwide, some 40 new nuclear power plants are in the concrete project design, planning, and licensing phases; in some of these cases, contracts have already been signed. Net electricity generation in nuclear power plants worldwide in 2006 achieved another top ranking level of approx. 2,660 billion kWh (2005: approx. 2,750 billion kWh). Since the first generation of electricity in a nuclear power plant in the EBR-1 fast breeder (USA) on December 20, 1951, cumulated gross production has reached approx. 56,875 billion kWh, and operating experience has grown to some 12,399 reactor years. (orig.)

  13. World's trends in nuclear education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lartigue, J.; Martinez, T.

    2005-01-01

    Since the exhort of the International Atomic Energy Agency, in 1955, to promote the pacific uses of nuclear energy, countries that had developed military nuclear programs extended their research and training programs to cover pacific uses. Consequently, many programs on Nuclear Engineering and Nuclear Chemistry were established in those countries as well as in many others interested exclusively in the civil applications. Obviously, the new graduated curricula had the purpose to fulfil the manpower requirements of the growing nuclear market, so much in the power as in the applications fields, always keeping the high academic level required by the research and development of this technology. The slowing down in the nuclear power demand, evident in the nineties, caused a diminution in the matriculation in Nuclear Engineering degrees while that in Nuclear and Radiochemistry remained almost constant. Anyway, countries with defined nucleo electric programs took the necessary steps calling, frequently, for foreign personnel. Besides the nuclear power stagnation, the global growing of environmental pollution compelled several countries to transform their old Nuclear Centers in new Centers for Energy and Environmental Research, with the purpose to promote the research and development of all types of primary energy; in general, these new centers maintain their support to Nuclear and Radiochemistry activities. An important characteristic of these organisations (discussed in this work) is the collaboration they offer to universities for thesis work and experimental courses in these increasingly related fields. In fact, before the immediate world's problems of greenhouse and water scarcity, as well as the future demand of electricity, nuclear power returns as the long term solution and a bridge toward the Hydrogen Economy; however, better reactor's designs are required to fulfil such objectives. By now, analytical nuclear methods have proved their usefulness for pollutants

  14. Evaluation of the cracking by stress corrosion in nuclear reactor environments type BWR; Evaluacion del agrietamiento por corrosion bajo esfuerzo en ambientes de reactores nucleares tipo BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arganis J, C. R.

    2010-07-01

    The stress corrosion cracking susceptibility was studied in sensitized, solution annealed 304 steel, and in 304-L welded with a heat treatment that simulated the radiation induced segregation, by the slow strain rate test technique, in a similar environment of a boiling water reactor (BWR), 288 C, 8 MPa, low conductivity and a electrochemical corrosion potential near 200 mV. vs. standard hydrogen electrode (She). The electrochemical noise technique was used for the detection of the initiation and propagation of the cracking. The steels were characterized by metallographic studies with optical and scanning electronic microscopy and by the electrochemical potentiodynamic reactivation of single loop and double loop. In all the cases, the steels present delta ferrite. The slow strain rate tests showed that the 304 steel in the solution annealed condition is susceptible to transgranular stress corrosion cracking (TGSCC), such as in a normalized condition showed granulated. In the sensitized condition the steel showed intergranular stress corrosion cracking, followed by a transition to TGSCC. The electrochemical noise time series showed that is possible associated different time sequences to different modes of cracking and that is possible detect sequentially cracking events, it is means, one after other, supported by the fractographic studies by scanning electron microscopy. The parameter that can distinguish between the different modes of cracking is the re passivation rate, obtained by the current decay rate -n- in the current transients. This is due that the re passivation rate is a function of the microstructure and the sensitization. Other statistic parameters like the localized index, Kurtosis, Skew, produce results that are related with mixed corrosion. (Author)

  15. 2010 nuclear power world report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2011-01-01

    At the end of 2010, 443 nuclear power plants were available for energy supply in 30 countries of the world. This are 6 plants more than at the end of 2009. The aggregate gross power of the plants amounted to approx. 396,118 MWe, the aggregate net power, to 375,947 MWe. This capacity numbers are a little bit more than one year before (gross: 391,551 MWe, net: 371,331 MWe). Six unites were commissioned in 2010; 2 units in China and India each and one unit in the Republic of Korea and Russia each. One unit, the Fast Breeder Pilot Reactor Monju in Japan, was connected to the grid after a long-term shutdown. One nuclear power plant, the Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor Phenix in France, was shut down permanently in 2010. 62 nuclear generating units, i.e. 9 plants more than at the end of 2009, were under construction in late 2010 in 15 countries with an aggregate gross power of approx. 63,998 MWe. Worldwide, some 90 new nuclear power plants are in the concrete project design, planning, and licensing phases; in some of these cases license applications have been submitted or contracts have already been signed. Some 120 further projects are planned. Net electricity generation in nuclear power plants worldwide in 2010 achieved another reasonable ranking level of approx. 2,627.5 billion kWh (2009: approx. 2,558 billion kWh). Since the first generation of electricity in a nuclear power plant in the EBR-I fast breeder (USA) on December 20, 1951, cumulated net production has reached approx. 63,100 billion kWh, and operating experience has grown to some 14,400 reactor years. (orig.)

  16. BWR water chemistry guidelines in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, Hideo; Usui, Naoshi; Kitajima, Hideaki

    2014-01-01

    Through Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) operations for more than 40 years in Japan, sustainable developments of water chemistry technologies, including state-of-the-art and unique R and D results, have been developed to achieve the highest performance of maintaining NPP reactor and coolant system component integrity and fuel reliability and excellent dose rate reduction in the world. Based on this long-term operational experience, Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) utilities have established effective and reasonable water chemistry parameters with reference to safety regulations and municipal laws. However, only a few parameters are regulated by control target to ensure the long-term reliability of the reactor and coolant system. After the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station accident, it is even more necessary to improve the safety levels of plant operation and increase the transparency of plant management in order to recover the public's confidence forward nuclear energy. Based on these situations, the BWR water chemistry guidelines task group has been working to establish the guidelines under the Standards Committee of Atomic Energy Society of Japan (AESJ). The draft will be deliberated on and approved by the Standards Committee after it receives public comments. The Japanese BWR water chemistry guidelines should provide the world-class strategies for maintaining the long-term integrity of materials and fuel. Concretely, the guidelines should provide reasonable 'control values', 'diagnostic values' and 'action levels' for multiple parameters and suggest the necessary actions to exceed the action levels. This paper provides a framework for the preliminary guidelines for BWR primary water chemistry. (author)

  17. Safety Evaluation Report related to the final design approval of the GESSAR II BWR/6 nuclear island design (Docket No. 50-447). Supplement No. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-07-01

    Supplement 4 to the Safety Evaluation Report (SER) for the application filed by General Electric Company for the final design approval for the GE BWR/6 nuclear island design (GESSAR II) has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This report supplements the GESSAR II SER (NUREG-0979) issued in April 1983 summarizing the results of the staff's safety review of the GESSAR II BWR/6 nuclear island design; Supplement 1, issued in July 1983; Supplement 2, issued in November 1984; and Supplement 3, issued in January 1985. Subject to favorable resolution of the items discussed in this supplement, the staff concludes that the GESSAR II design satisfactorily addresses the severe-accident concerns described in the Commission's Policy Statement on Severe Reactor Accidents Regarding Future Designs and Existing Plants

  18. Clean energy : nuclear energy world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-10-01

    This book explains the nuclear engineering to kids with easy way. There are explanations of birth of nuclear energy such as discover of nuclear and application of modern technology of nuclear energy, principles and structure of nuclear power plant, fuel, nuclear waste management, use of radiation for medical treatment, food supplies, industry, utilization of neutron. It indicates the future of nuclear energy as integral nuclear energy and nuclear fusion energy.

  19. Validations of BWR nuclear design code using ABWR MOX numerical benchmark problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takano, Shou; Sasagawa, Masaru; Yamana, Teppei; Ikehara, Tadashi; Yanagisawa, Naoki

    2017-01-01

    BWR core design code package (the HINES assembly code and the PANACH core simulator), being used for full MOX-ABWR core design, has been benchmarked against the high-fidelity numerical solutions as references, for the purpose of validating its capability of predicting the BWR core design parameters systematically from UO 2 to 100% MOX cores. The reference solutions were created by whole core critical calculations using MCNPs with the precisely modeled ABWR cores both in hot and cold conditions at BOC and EOC of the equilibrium cycle. A Doppler-Broadening Rejection Correction (DCRB) implemented MCNP5-1.4 with ENDF/B-VII.0 was mainly used to evaluate the core design parameters, except for effective delayed neutron fraction (β eff ) and prompt neutron lifetime (l) with MCNP6.1. The discrepancies in the results between the design codes HINES-PANACH and MCNPs for the core design parameters such as the bundle powers, hot pin powers, control rod worth, boron worth, void reactivity, Doppler reactivity, β eff and l, are almost within target accuracy, leading to the conclusion that HINES-PANACH has sufficient fidelity for application to full MOX-ABWR core design. (author)

  20. BWR 90 and BWR 90+: Two advanced BWR design generations from ABB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haukeland, S.; Ivung, B.; Pedersen, T.

    1999-01-01

    ABB has two evolutionary advanced light water reactors available today - the BWR 90 boiling water reactor and the System 80+ pressurised water reactor. The BWR 90 is based on the design, construction, commissioning and operation of the BWR 75 plants. The operation experience of the six plants of this advanced design has been very good. The average annual energy availability is above 90%, and total power generation costs have been low. When developing the BWR 90 specific changes were introduced to a reference design, to adapt to technological progress, new safety requirements and to achieve cost savings. The thermal power rating of BWR 90 is 3800 MWth (providing a nominal 1374 MWe net), slightly higher than that of the reference plant ABB Atom has taken advantage of margins gained using a new generation of its SVEA fuel to attain this power rating without major design modifications. The BWR 90 design was completed and offered to the TVO utility in Finland in 1991, as one of the contenders for the fifth Finnish nuclear power plant project. Hence, the design is available today for deployment in new plant projects. Utility views were incorporated through co-operation with the Finnish utility TVO, owner and operator of the two Olkiluoto plants of BWR 75 design. A review against the European Utility Requirement (EUR) set of requirements has been performed, since the design, in 1997, was selected by the EUR Steering Committee to be the first BWR to be evaluated against the EUR documents. The review work was completed in 1998. It will be the subject of an 'EUR Volume 3 Subset for BWR 90' document. ABB is continuing its BWR development work with an 'evolutionary' design called BWR 90+, which aims at developing the BWR as a competitive option for the anticipated revival of the market for new nuclear plants beyond the turn of the century, as well as feeding ideas and inputs to the continuous modernisation efforts at operating plants. The development is performed by ABB Atom

  1. Serpent: an alternative for the nuclear fuel cells analysis of a BWR; SERPENT: una alternativa para el analisis de celdas de combustible nuclear de un BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva A, L.; Del Valle G, E. [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, Av. Instituto Politecnico Nacional s/n, U.P. Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Edificio 9, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Gomez T, A. M., E-mail: lidi.s.albarran@gmail.com [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2013-10-15

    In the last ten years the diverse research groups in nuclear engineering of the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico and Instituto Politecnico Nacional (UNAM, IPN), as of research (Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, ININ) as well as the personnel of the Nuclear Plant Management of the Comision Federal de Electricidad have been using the codes Helios and /or CASMO-4 in the generation of cross sections (X S) of nuclear fuel cells of the cores corresponding to the Units 1 and 2 of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde. Both codes belong to the Studsvik-Scandpower Company who receives the payment for the use and their respective maintenance. In recent years, the code Serpent appears among the nuclear community distributed by the OECD/Nea which does not has cost neither in its use neither in its maintenance. The code is based on the Monte Carlo method and makes use of the processing in parallel. In the Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas of the IPN, the personnel has accumulated certain experience in the use of Serpent under the direction of personal of the ININ; of this experience have been obtained for diverse fuel burned, the infinite multiplication factor for three cells of nuclear fuel, without control bar and with control bar for a known thermodynamic state fixed by: a) the fuel temperature (T{sub f}), b) the moderator temperature (T{sub m}) and c) the vacuums fraction (α). Although was not realized any comparison with the X S that the codes Helios and CASMO-4 generate, the results obtained for the infinite multiplication factor show the prospective tendencies with regard to the fuel burned so much in the case in that is not present the control bar like when it is. The results are encouraging and motivate to the study group to continue with the X S generation of a core in order to build the respective library of nuclear data as a following step and this can be used for the codes PARCS, of USA NRC, DYN3D of HZDR, or others developed locally

  2. Safety Evaluation Report related to the final design approval of the GESSAR II BWR/6 Nuclear Island design, Docket No. 50-447

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-04-01

    The Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by General Electric Company for the Final Design Approval for the General Electric Standard Safety Analysis Report (GESSAR II FSAR) has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This report summarizes the results of the staff's safety review of the GESSAR II BWR/6 Nuclear Island Design. Subject to favorable resolution of items discussed in the Safety Evaluation Report, the staff concludes that the facilities referencing GESSAR II, subject to approval of the balance-of-plant design, can conform with the provisions of the Act and the regulations of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission

  3. Emerging nuclear suppliers in the Third World

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stahl, K.

    1990-01-01

    The emergence of new supplier states of nuclear technology within the Third World has raised concern, if those nuclear supplier states will promote an unrestricted and uncontrolled transfer of nuclear technology to developing countries and augment the risk of nuclear weapons proliferation. The article analyses the nuclear export capacities, nuclear exports and the export policy of Argentina, Brazil and India. Argentina is considered as the most important emerging nuclear supplier state in the Third World. Nuclear exports have to be authorisized by the government in all three states and will be covered by IAEA-safeguards in the recipient country. The three states will exercise restraint in the transfer of sensitive nuclear technology. Nuclear exports of Argentina, Brazil and India so far will not augment the danger of nuclear weapons proliferation. (orig./HSCH) [de

  4. Nuclear Power Plants in the World

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Industrial Forum (JAIF) used every year to summarize a trend survey on the private nuclear power plants in the world in a shape of the 'Nuclear power plants in the world'. In this report, some data at the end of 2002 was made up on bases of answers on questionnaires from 65 electric power companies and other nuclear organizations in 28 countries and regions around the world by JAIF. This report is comprised of 19 items, and contains generating capacity of the plants; current status of Japan; trends of generating capacity of operating the plants, the plant orders and generating capacity of the plants; world nuclear capacity by reactor type; status of MOX use in the world; location of the plants; the plants in the world; directory of the plants; nuclear fuel cycle facilities; and so forth. (J.P.N.)

  5. Nuclear power plants in the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Industrial Forum, Inc. (JAIF) used every year to summarize a trend survey on the private nuclear power plants in the world in a shape of the 'Nuclear power plants in the world'. In this report, some data at the end of 2007/2008 was made up on bases of answers on questionnaires from electric power companies and other nuclear organizations around the world by JAIF. This report is comprised of 18 items, and contains generating capacity of the plants; effect of the Niigata-ken chuetsu-oki earthquake; current status of Japan; trends of generating capacity of operating the plants, the plant orders and generating capacity of the plants; world nuclear capacity by reactor type; status of MOX use in the world; location of the plants; the plants in the world; directory of the plants; nuclear fuel cycle facilities, and so forth. (J.P.N.)

  6. Nuclear power plants in the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Industrial Forum, Inc. (JAIF) used every year to summarize a trend survey on the private nuclear power plants in the world in a shape of the 'Nuclear power plants in the world'. In this report, some data at the end of 2005 was made up on bases of answers on questionnaires from electric power companies and other nuclear organizations around the world by JAIF. This report is comprised of 18 items, and contains generating capacity of the plants; current status of Japan; trends of generating capacity of operating the plants, the plant orders and generating capacity of the plants; world nuclear capacity by reactor type; status of MOX use in the world; location of the plants; the plants in the world; directory of the plants; nuclear fuel cycle facilities, and so forth. (J.P.N.)

  7. Nuclear Power Plants in the World

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Industrial Forum, Inc. (JAIF) used every year to summarize a trend survey on the private nuclear power plants in the world in a shape of the 'Nuclear power plants in the world'. In this report, some data at the end of 2003 was made up on bases of answers on questionnaires from 81 electric power companies and other nuclear organizations in 33 countries and regions around the world by JAIF. This report is comprised of 19 items, and contains generating capacity of the plants; current status of Japan; trends of generating capacity of operating the plants, the plant orders and generating capacity of the plants; world nuclear capacity by reactor type; status of MOX use in the world; location of the plants; the plants in the world; directory of the plants; nuclear fuel cycle facilities; and so forth. (J.P.N.)

  8. The World Nuclear Industry Status Report: 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flavin, Christopher; Lenssen, Nicholas; Froggatt, Antony; Willis, John; Kondakji, Assad; Schneider, Mycle

    1992-05-01

    The World Nuclear Industry Status Report provides a comprehensive overview of nuclear power plant data, including information on operation, production and construction. The WNISR assesses the status of new-build programs in current nuclear countries as well as in potential newcomer countries. This first WNISR Report was issued in 1992 in a joint publication with WISE-Paris, Greenpeace International and the World Watch Institute, Washington

  9. The World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Mycle; Froggatt, Antony; Hosokawa, Komei; Thomas, Steve; Yamaguchi, Yukio; Hazemann, Julie; Bradford, Peter A.

    2013-07-01

    Two years after the Fukushima disaster started unfolding on 11 March 2011, its impact on the global nuclear industry has become increasingly visible. Global electricity generation from nuclear plants dropped by a historic 7 percent in 2012, adding to the record drop of 4 percent in 2011. This World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2013 (WNISR) provides a global overview of the history, the current status and the trends of nuclear power programs worldwide. It looks at nuclear reactor units in operation and under construction. Annex 1 provides 40 pages of detailed country-by-country information. A specific chapter assesses the situation in potential newcomer countries. For the second time, the report looks at the credit-rating performance of some of the major nuclear companies and utilities. A more detailed chapter on the development patterns of renewable energies versus nuclear power is also included. Annex 6 provides an overview table with key data on the world nuclear industry by country. The 2013 edition of the World Nuclear Industry Status Report also includes an update on nuclear economics as well as an overview of the status, on-site and off-site, of the challenges triggered by the Fukushima disaster. However, this report's emphasis on recent post-Fukushima developments should not obscure an important fact: as previous editions (see www.WorldNuclearReport.org) detail, the world nuclear industry already faced daunting challenges long before Fukushima, just as the U.S. nuclear power industry had largely collapsed before the 1979 Three Mile Island accident. The nuclear promoters' invention that a global nuclear renaissance was flourishing until 3/11 is equally false: Fukushima only added to already grave problems, starting with poor economics. The performance of the nuclear industry over the year from July 2012 to July 2013 is summed up in this report

  10. Forced vibration test of BWR type nuclear reactor buildings considering through-soil coupling between adjacent buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuno, Norihiro; Moribe, Isamu; Sugiyama, Nobuo; Tsushima, Yoshiyuki; Kushida, Hiroshi

    1980-01-01

    The forced vibration test on two adjacent BWR type reactor buildings in the Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station, Chubu Electric Power Co., Inc., was carried out in 1977. The experiment on No. 1 reactor building had been made in 1973 and 1974 to evaluate the dissipation of vibrational energy to the earth. In 1977, No. 2 reactor building was under construction and nearly completed adjacently to the No. 1 reactor building, in which the reactor has been in operation since 1975. Three large vibration exciters with maximum exciting force of 150 tons each were installed on the 5th floor of the No. 2 reactor building, and the vibration ranging from 1 to 20 Hz was applied to the building in north-south, east-west and vertical directions. For obtaining the responses of the buildings, 24 and 33 pickups were placed on the floors of No. 1 and No. 2 buildings, respectively, and 17 dynamic earth pressure cells buried under the foundation of the No. 2 building were also employed. The natural frequency, viscous damping ratio and natural mode were analyzed by the regression analysis of many degrees of freedom, using the resonance curves with complex forms and many peaks. The vibrational behaviors of two adjacent reactor buildings coupled through the earth were given as the result of experiment. (J.P.N.)

  11. Nuclear World Order and Nonproliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joeck, N

    2007-02-05

    The decision by India and Pakistan in May 1998 to conduct nuclear weapon tests and declare themselves as nuclear weapon states challenged South Asian regional stability calculations, US nonproliferation policy, and prevailing assumptions about international security. A decade later, the effects of those tests are still being felt and policies are still adjusting to the changed global conditions. This paper will consider non- and counter-proliferation policy options for the United States and Pakistan as they work as partners to prevent the transfer of nuclear technology and further nuclear proliferation.

  12. Assessment and management of ageing of major nuclear power plant components important to safety: Metal components of BWR containment systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-10-01

    At present, there are over four hundred operational nuclear power plants (NPPs) in IAEA Member States. Operating experience has shown that ineffective control of the ageing degradation of the major NPP components (e.g. caused by unanticipated phenomena and by operating, maintenance or manufacturing errors) can jeopardize plant safety and also plant life. Ageing in these NPPs must therefore be effectively managed to ensure the availability of design functions throughout the plant service life. From the safety perspective, this means controlling within acceptable limits the ageing degradation and wear-out of plant components important to safety so that adequate safety margins remain, i.e. integrity and functional capability in excess of normal operating requirements. This TECDOC is one in a series of reports on the assessment and management of ageing of the major NPP components important to safety. The reports are based on experience and practices of NPP operators, regulators, designers, manufacturers, and technical support organizations and a widely accepted Methodology for the Management of Ageing of NPP Components Important to Safety, which was issued by the IAEA in 1992. The current practices for the assessment of safety margins (fitness for service) and the inspection, monitoring and mitigation of ageing degradation of selected components of Canada deuterium-uranium (CANDU) reactors, boiling water reactors (BWRs), pressurized water reactors (PWRs), and water moderated, water cooled energy reactors (WWERs) are documented in the reports. These practices are intended to help all involved directly and indirectly in ensuring the safe operation of NPPs, and to provide a common technical basis for dialogue between plant operators and regulators when dealing with age related licensing issues. The guidance reports are directed toward technical experts from NPPs and from regulatory, plant design, manufacturing and technical support organizations dealing with specific

  13. Evaluation of the cracking by stress corrosion in nuclear reactor environments type BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arganis J, C. R.

    2010-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking susceptibility was studied in sensitized, solution annealed 304 steel, and in 304-L welded with a heat treatment that simulated the radiation induced segregation, by the slow strain rate test technique, in a similar environment of a boiling water reactor (BWR), 288 C, 8 MPa, low conductivity and a electrochemical corrosion potential near 200 mV. vs. standard hydrogen electrode (She). The electrochemical noise technique was used for the detection of the initiation and propagation of the cracking. The steels were characterized by metallographic studies with optical and scanning electronic microscopy and by the electrochemical potentiodynamic reactivation of single loop and double loop. In all the cases, the steels present delta ferrite. The slow strain rate tests showed that the 304 steel in the solution annealed condition is susceptible to transgranular stress corrosion cracking (TGSCC), such as in a normalized condition showed granulated. In the sensitized condition the steel showed intergranular stress corrosion cracking, followed by a transition to TGSCC. The electrochemical noise time series showed that is possible associated different time sequences to different modes of cracking and that is possible detect sequentially cracking events, it is means, one after other, supported by the fractographic studies by scanning electron microscopy. The parameter that can distinguish between the different modes of cracking is the re passivation rate, obtained by the current decay rate -n- in the current transients. This is due that the re passivation rate is a function of the microstructure and the sensitization. Other statistic parameters like the localized index, Kurtosis, Skew, produce results that are related with mixed corrosion. (Author)

  14. Quality assurance requirements for NSSS-equipment of a BWR-6, and quality levels in the stores of a manufacturer of primary-circuit nuclear components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, E.; Alamo, P.; Perez, A.; Cue, G.

    1982-01-01

    The first part of the paper describes the system used for determining the various levels of quality assurance for nuclear steam supply system (NSSS) equipment of the BWR-6 reactors which General Electric is now building in Spain. It also shows the procedure followed by the General Electric Technical Services Company (GETSCO) for the purchase and fabrication of equipment in Spain, paying due attention to the existing quality assurance requirements. The second part of the paper describes the instrumentation of the various quality assurance levels in the storage system of Equipos Nucleares, S.A. (ENSA), the Spanish manufacturer of the primary components of the NSSS. (author)

  15. The World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Mycle; Froggatt, Antony

    2004-12-01

    Fifty years ago, in September 1954, the head of the US Atomic Energy Commission stated that nuclear energy would become 'too cheap to meter': The cost to produce energy by nuclear power plants would be so low that the investment into electricity meters would not be justified. By coincidence the US prophecy came within three months of the announcement of the world's first nuclear power plant being connected to the grid in.. the then Soviet Union. In June 2004, the international nuclear industry celebrated the anniversary of the grid connection at the site of the world's first power reactor in Obninsk, Russia, under the original slogan '50 Years of Nuclear Power - The Next 50 Years'. This report aims to provide a solid basis for analysis into the prospects for the nuclear power industry. Twelve years ago, the Worldwatch Institute in Washington, WISE-Paris and Greenpeace International published the World Nuclear Industry Status Report 1992. In the current international atmosphere of revival of the nuclear revival debate - it has been a periodically recurring phenomenon for the past twenty years - two of the authors of the 1992 report, now independent consultants, have carried out an updated review of the status of the world nuclear industry. The performance of the nuclear industry over the past year is summed up in this report

  16. World nuclear directory. 6. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, C.W.J.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of the directory is to provide a comprehensive, worldwide guide to organizations which conduct, promote, or encourage research into atomic energy. The term research is interpreted fairly generously. The directory is intended to be a reference source useful to scientists and administrators in the nuclear field, to information workers, librarians, journalists, market researchers, and others. It therefore includes nuclear research institutes; government departments; public corporations; industrial firms; electricity generating boards; learned and professional societies; and universities, polytechnics, and other institutes of higher education with nuclear departments. (author)

  17. World nuclear power plant capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This report provides the background information for statistics and analysis developed by NUKEM in its monthly Market Report on the Nuclear Fuel Cycle. The assessments in this Special Report are based on the continuous review of individual nuclear power plant projects. This Special Report begins with tables summarizing a variety of nuclear power generating capacity statistics for 1990. It continues with a brief review of the year's major events regarding each country's nuclear power program. The standard NUKEM Market Report tables on nuclear plant capacity are given on pages 24 and 25. Owing to space limitations, the first year shown is 1988. Please refer to previous Special Reports for data covering earlier years. Detailed tables for each country list all existing plants as well as those expected by NUKEM to be in commercial operation by the end of 2005. An Appendix containing a list of abbreviations can be found starting on page 56. Only nuclear power plants intended for civilian use are included in this Special Report. Reactor lifetimes are assumed to be 35 years for all light water reactors and 30 years for all other reactor types, unless other data or definite decommissioning dates have been published by the operators. (orig./UA) [de

  18. The World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Mycle; Froggatt, Antony; Hazemann, Julie

    2012-07-01

    Twenty years after its first edition, World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2012 portrays an industry suffering from the cumulative impacts of the world economic crisis, the Fukushima disaster, ferocious competitors and its own planning and management difficulties. The report provides a global overview of the history, the current status and trends of nuclear power programs in the world. It looks at units in operation and under construction. Annex 1 also provides detailed country-by-country information. A specific chapter assesses the situation in potential newcomer countries. For the first time, the report looks at the credit-rating performance of some of the major nuclear companies and utilities. A more detailed chapter on the development patterns of renewable energies versus nuclear power is also included. The performance of the nuclear industry over the 18 months since the beginning of 2011 is summed up in this report

  19. Toward a nuclear weapons free world?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maaranen, S.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Center for International Security Affairs

    1996-09-01

    Doubts about the wisdom of relying on nuclear weapons are as old as nuclear weapons themselves. But despite this questioning, nuclear weapons came to be seen as the indispensable element of American (indeed Western) security during the Cold War. By the 1970s and 1980s, however, discontent was growing about the intense US-Soviet nuclear arms competition, as it failed to provide any enduring improvement in security; rather, it was seen as creating ever greater risks and dangers. Arms control negotiations and limitations, adopted as a means to regulate the technical competition, may also have relieved some of the political pressures and dangers. But the balance of terror, and the fears of it, continued. The Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) under President Reagan was a very different approach to escaping from the precarious protection of nuclear weapons, in that it sought a way to continue to defend the US and the West, but without the catastrophic risks of mutual deterrence. As such, SDI connoted unhappiness with the precarious nuclear balance and, for many, with nuclear weapons in general. The disappearance of the Warsaw Pact, the disintegration of the Soviet Union, and the sudden end of the Cold War seemed to offer a unique opportunity to fashion a new, more peaceful world order that might allow for fading away of nuclear weapons. Scholars have foreseen two different paths to a nuclear free world. The first is a fundamental improvement in the relationships between states such that nuclear weapons are no longer needed. The second path is through technological development, e.g., missile defenses which could provide effective protection against nuclear attacks. The paper discusses nuclear weapon policy in the US, views of other nuclear states, the future of nuclear weapons, and issues in a less-nuclear world.

  20. Study of environmental noise in a BWR plant like the Nuclear Power Plant Laguna Verde; Estudio de ruido ambiental en una planta BWR como la Central Nuclear Laguna Verde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tijerina S, F.; Cruz G, M.; Amador C, C., E-mail: francisco.tijerina@cfe.gob.mx [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Central Nucleoelectrica Laguna Verde, Subgerencia de Ingenieria, Carretera Cardel-Nautla Km. 42.5, Alto Lucero, Veracruz (Mexico)

    2013-10-15

    In all industry type the health costs generated by the noise are high, because the noise can cause nuisance and to harm the capacity to work when causing tension and to perturb the concentration, and in more severe cases to reach to lose the sense of the hearing in the long term. The noise levels in the industry have been designated for the different types of use like residential, commercial, and industrial and silence areas. The noise can cause accidents when obstructing the communications and alarm signs. For this reason the noise should be controlled and mitigated, at a low level as reasonably is possible, taking into account that the noise is an acoustic contamination. The present study determines a bases line of the environmental noise levels in a nuclear power plant BWR-5 as Laguna Verde, (like reference) to be able to determine and to give pursuit to the possible solutions to eliminate or to limit the noise level in the different job areas. The noise levels were registered with a meter of integrative noise level (sonometer) and areas of noise exposure levels mapping the general areas in the buildings were established, being the registered maximum level of 96.94 dba in the building of the Reactor-elevation 0.65 m under the operation conditions of Extended Power Up rate (EPU) of 120% PTN. Knowing that the exposition to noises and the noise dose in the job place can influence in the health and in the safety of the workers, are extensive topics that they should be analyzed for separate as they are: to) the effects in the health of the exposure to the noise, b) how measuring the noise, c) the methods and technologies to combat and to control the noise in the industry by part of engineering area and d) the function of the industrial safety bodies as delegates of the health and safety in the task against the noise in the job. (author)

  1. Changing world of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godlewski, N.Z.; Payne, J.; Tompkins, B.

    1987-01-01

    Efforts to integrate the Washington meetings of the American Nuclear Society and the Atomic Industrial Forum included joint plenary sessions and combined criticism of DOE actions regarding the selection of a second repository for radioactive wastes. The meetings also looked beyond the Chernobyl accident to point out that some countries can no longer reject nuclear power, but the industry must develop post-accident plans for plants in order to reduce risks. Speakers warned against over-reacting and the need to keep emergency planning flexible. Other speakers concluded that the Chernobyl design was not so much at fault as the decision to build larger versions of the standardized design. The pursuit of excellence in plant design and performance, the need to resolve regulatory problems involving the inclusion of nuclear plants in utility rate bases, and the economics of low-level waste disposal, were other topics covered

  2. World Integrated Nuclear Evaluation System: Model documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-12-01

    The World Integrated Nuclear Evaluation System (WINES) is an aggregate demand-based partial equilibrium model used by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to project long-term domestic and international nuclear energy requirements. WINES follows a top-down approach in which economic growth rates, delivered energy demand growth rates, and electricity demand are projected successively to ultimately forecast total nuclear generation and nuclear capacity. WINES could be potentially used to produce forecasts for any country or region in the world. Presently, WINES is being used to generate long-term forecasts for the United States, and for all countries with commercial nuclear programs in the world, excluding countries located in centrally planned economic areas. Projections for the United States are developed for the period from 2010 through 2030, and for other countries for the period starting in 2000 or 2005 (depending on the country) through 2010. EIA uses a pipeline approach to project nuclear capacity for the period between 1990 and the starting year for which the WINES model is used. This approach involves a detailed accounting of existing nuclear generating units and units under construction, their capacities, their actual or estimated time of completion, and the estimated date of retirements. Further detail on this approach can be found in Appendix B of Commercial Nuclear Power 1991: Prospects for the United States and the World

  3. Elecnuc. Nuclear power plants in the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This 2003 version of Elecnuc contents information, data and charts on the nuclear power plants in the world and general information on the national perspectives concerning the electric power industry. The following topics are presented: 2002 highlights; characteristics of main reactor types and on order; map of the French nuclear power plants; the worldwide status of nuclear power plants on 2002/12/3; units distributed by countries; nuclear power plants connected to the Grid by reactor type groups; nuclear power plants under construction; capacity of the nuclear power plants on the grid; first electric generations supplied by a nuclear unit; electrical generation from nuclear plants by country at the end 2002; performance indicator of french PWR units; trends of the generation indicator worldwide from 1960 to 2002; 2002 cumulative Load Factor by owners; nuclear power plants connected to the grid by countries; status of license renewal applications in Usa; nuclear power plants under construction; Shutdown nuclear power plants; exported nuclear power plants by type; exported nuclear power plants by countries; nuclear power plants under construction or order; steam generator replacements; recycling of Plutonium in LWR; projects of MOX fuel use in reactors; electricity needs of Germany, Belgium, Spain, Finland, United Kingdom; electricity indicators of the five countries. (A.L.B.)

  4. The World Nuclear University: New partnership in nuclear education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-07-01

    The important role which the IAEA plays in assisting Member States in the preservation and enhancement of nuclear knowledge and in facilitating international collaboration in this area has been recognized by the General Conference of the International Atomic Energy Agency in resolutions GC(46)/RES/11B, GC(47)/RES/10B, GC(48)/RES/13 and GC(50)/RES/13. A continued focus of IAEA activities in managing nuclear knowledge is to support Member States to secure and sustain human resources for the nuclear sector, comprising both the replacement of retiring staff and building of new capacity. The IAEA assists Member States, particularly developing ones, in their efforts to sustain nuclear education and training in all areas of nuclear technology for peaceful purposes, which is a necessary prerequisite for succession planning, in particular through the networking of nuclear education and training, including activities of the World Nuclear University (WNU) and the Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT). The report on the attached CD-ROM, The World Nuclear University: New Partnership in Nuclear Education, gives an overview of the history of the development of the World Nuclear University and related IAEA activities and contains an analysis and recommendations from the first WNU Summer Institute, held in 2005 in the USA

  5. Nuclear Power Plants in the World

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Industrial Forum (JAIF) used every year to summarize a trend survey on the private nuclear power plants in the world in a shape of the 'Developmental trends on nuclear power plants in the world'. In this report, some data at the end of 1999 was made up on bases of answers on questionnaires from 72 electric companies in 31 nations and regions in the world by JAIF. This report is comprised of 19 items, and contains generating capacity of the plants; current status of Japan; trends of generating capacity of operating the plants, the plant orders and generating capacity of the plants; world nuclear capacity by reactor type; location of the plants; the plants in the world; and so forth. And, it also has some survey results on the 'Liberalization of electric power markets and nuclear power generation' such as some 70% of respondents in nuclear power for future option, gas-thermal power seen as power source with most to gain from liberalization, merits on nuclear power generation (environmental considerations and supply stability), most commonly voiced concern about new plant orders in poor economy, and so forth. (G.K.)

  6. Serpent: an alternative for the nuclear fuel cells analysis of a BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva A, L.; Del Valle G, E.; Gomez T, A. M.

    2013-10-01

    In the last ten years the diverse research groups in nuclear engineering of the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico and Instituto Politecnico Nacional (UNAM, IPN), as of research (Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, ININ) as well as the personnel of the Nuclear Plant Management of the Comision Federal de Electricidad have been using the codes Helios and /or CASMO-4 in the generation of cross sections (X S) of nuclear fuel cells of the cores corresponding to the Units 1 and 2 of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde. Both codes belong to the Studsvik-Scandpower Company who receives the payment for the use and their respective maintenance. In recent years, the code Serpent appears among the nuclear community distributed by the OECD/Nea which does not has cost neither in its use neither in its maintenance. The code is based on the Monte Carlo method and makes use of the processing in parallel. In the Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas of the IPN, the personnel has accumulated certain experience in the use of Serpent under the direction of personal of the ININ; of this experience have been obtained for diverse fuel burned, the infinite multiplication factor for three cells of nuclear fuel, without control bar and with control bar for a known thermodynamic state fixed by: a) the fuel temperature (T f ), b) the moderator temperature (T m ) and c) the vacuums fraction (α). Although was not realized any comparison with the X S that the codes Helios and CASMO-4 generate, the results obtained for the infinite multiplication factor show the prospective tendencies with regard to the fuel burned so much in the case in that is not present the control bar like when it is. The results are encouraging and motivate to the study group to continue with the X S generation of a core in order to build the respective library of nuclear data as a following step and this can be used for the codes PARCS, of USA NRC, DYN3D of HZDR, or others developed locally in the

  7. Calculation of the neutron flux and fluence in the covering of the nucleus and the vessel of a BWR; Calculo del flujo neutronico y fluencia en la envolvente del nucleo y la vasija de un reactor nuclear BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez C, E.; Del Valle G, E. [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, U. P. Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Col. Lindavista, 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Longoria G, L. C., E-mail: evalle@esfm.ipn.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2011-11-15

    One of the main objectives related with the safety in any nuclear power plant, including the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde, is to guarantee the structural integrity of the pressure vessel of the reactor. To identify and quantifying the damage caused be neutron irradiation in the vessel of any nuclear reactor, is necessary to know as much the neutron flux as the fluence that it has been receiving during their time of operation life, since the observables damages by means of tests mechanics are products of micro-structural effects, induced by neutron irradiation, therefore, is important the study and prediction of the neutron flux to have a better knowledge of the damage that are receiving these materials. In our calculation the code DORT was used, which solves the transport equation in discreet coordinates and in two dimensions (x-y, r-{theta} and r-z), in accord to the regulator guide, it requires to make and approach of the neutron flux in three dimensions by means of the Synthesis Method. Whit this method is possible to achieve a representation of the flux in 3D combining or synthesizing the calculated fluxes by DORT code in r-{theta}, r-z and r. In this work the application of the Synthesis Method is presented, according to the Regulator Guide 1.190, to determine the fluxes 3D in the interns of a BWR using three different space meshes. (Author)

  8. World Health Organization on nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    A report published by the World Health Organization in cooperation with, and at the instigation of, the Belgian authorities, is summarised. The report was prepared by an international multidisciplinary working group, and concentrated on the somatic and genetic risks from ionising radiation, the environmental effects of nuclear power from the mining of uranium to the disposal of waste and the probability and consequences of accidents, sabotage and theft of nuclear materials. In general positive to nuclear power, the report nevertheless recommends for RESEARCH AND EVALUATION IN SEVERAL SECTORS: The duties of the authorities in providing full and open information on the consequences of the exploitation of nuclear power are emphasised. (JIW)

  9. The unstoppable world nuclear development; El imparable desarrollo nuclear mundial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dominguez, M. T.

    2009-07-01

    To meet energy needs and curb climate change, the number of reactors will continue to increase because more and more countries are going the need nuclear power. At present, there are 436 nuclear reactors in the world that produce 16% of the electricity, and another 48 units are under construction in all, 31 countries in the world use nuclear power to produce electricity, and some countries that do not have reactors, e.g. Poland and Italy, are seriously planning to include nuclear power in their energy mix. Global nuclear development is a reality; energy and environmental challenges have led to new support for nuclear power, which is a safe, stable emission-free source. (Author)

  10. BWR operation for life extension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stancavage, P.

    1987-01-01

    Most nuclear power plant life extension studies conducted to date focus on the technology, licensing, and economics of extended service life. The most significant factor in plant longevity, however, is proper operation and maintenance. This paper highlights the benefits of boiling water reactor (BWR) operation for life extension and discusses specific recommendations that will enhance the prospects for safe, reliable, and economic power production in the long term. The benefits of BWR operation for life extension include a lower cost of electric energy production, increased capacity and availability factors, a lower forced outage rate, and reduced occupational exposure to radiation. Operating experience and advanced in technology have provided a wealth of knowledge that can be used to develop specific recommendations for adding years to the expected life of BWR plants. This paper discusses key factors in operation for life extension

  11. Nuclear energy in a nuclear weapon free world

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilat, Joseph [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The prospect of a nuclear renaissance has revived a decades old debate over the proliferation and terrorism risks of the use of nuclear power. This debate in the last few years has taken on an added dimension with renewed attention to disarmament. Increasingly, concerns that proliferation risks may reduce the prospects for realizing the vision of a nuclear-weapon-free world are being voiced.

  12. Development of a dynamic model of a BWR nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nonboel, E.

    1975-12-01

    A description is given of a one-dimensional steady-state model of a high-pressure steam turbine, a low-pressure steam turbine, a moisture separator, a reheater, a condenser, feedwater heaters and feedwater pump for a nuclear power plant. The model is contained in the program ''TURBPLANT''. The dynamic part of this model is presented in part II of this report. (author)

  13. The World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Mycle; Froggatt, Antony; Hazemann, Julie; Katsuta, Tadahiro; Ramana, M.V.; Thomas, Steve; Porritt, Jonathon

    2015-07-01

    The World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2015 provides a comprehensive overview of nuclear power plant data, including information on operation, production and construction. The WNISR assesses the status of new-build programs in current nuclear countries as well as in potential newcomer countries. Japan without nuclear power for a full calendar year for the first time since the first commercial nuclear power plant started up in the country 50 years ago. Nuclear plant construction starts plunge from fifteen in 2010 to three in 2014. 62 reactors under construction - five fewer than a year ago - of which at least three-quarters delayed. In 10 of the 14 building countries all projects are delayed, often by years. Five units have been listed as 'under construction' for over 30 years. Share of nuclear power in global electricity mix stable at less than 11% for a third year in a row. AREVA, technically bankrupt, downgraded to 'junk' by Standard and Poor's, sees its share value plunge to a new historic low on 9 July 2015-a value loss of 90 percent since 2007 China, Germany, Japan-three of the world's four largest economies-plus Brazil, India, Mexico, the Netherlands, and Spain, now all generate more electricity from non-hydro renewables than from nuclear power. These eight countries represent more than three billion people or 45 percent of the world's population. In the UK, electricity output from renewable sources, including hydropower, overtook the output from nuclear. Compared to 1997, when the Kyoto Protocol on climate change was signed, in 2014 there was an additional 694 TWh per year of wind power and 185 TWh of solar photovoltaics- each exceeding nuclear's additional 147 TWh

  14. Studies on the aseismatic property of BWR type nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasai, Hiroaki

    1978-01-01

    The social requirements for the safety of nuclear power stations are very severe, and in Japan where earthquakes occur frequently, consideration is given so that reactors are shut off safely in case of very large earthquakes which scarcely occur and keep that state. Nuclear power stations are the integrated system combining numerous equipments so as to demonstrate the prescribed functions, and there is large difference in the roles regarding safety of respective equipments. Therefore it is important to maintain the overall safety effectively. All buildings, equipments and pipings are classified according to the degree of importance, and the design is carried out so as to give the aseismatic property corresponding to the degree of importance. The tests and researches concerning the aseismatic property are roughly divided into those for establishing reasonable design conditions, those concerning the improvement of accuracy of the analysis of earthquake response, and those concerning the demonstration of the maintenance of functions. In this paper, the recent state of typical examples is described, such as making of artificial earthquake waves, analysis of building-ground system, vibration experiment on fuel assemblies and demonstration test on control rod insertion. In case of carrying out the design with large earthquake acceleration, it is necessary to evaluate earthquake response accurately by the analysis close to reality. (Kako, I.)

  15. Institutional implications of establishing safety goals for nuclear power plants. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, F.A.; Hooper, R.L.

    1983-07-01

    The purpose of this project is to anticipate and address institutional problems that may arise from the adoption of NRC's proposed Policy Statement on Safety Goals for Nuclear Power Plants. The report emphasizes one particular category of institutional problems: the possible use of safety goals as a basis for legal challenges to NRC actions, and the resolution of such challenges by the courts. Three types of legal issues are identified and analyzed. These are, first, general legal issues such as access to the legal system, burden of proof, and standard of proof. Second is the particular formulation of goals. Involved here are such questions as sustainable rationale, definitions, avoided issues, vagueness of time and space details, and degree of conservatism. Implementation brings up the third set of issues which include interpretation and application, linkage to probabilistic risk assessment, consequences as compared to events, and the use of results.

  16. The World Nuclear University Summer Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivard, D.; McIntyre, M.

    2007-01-01

    The World Nuclear University (WNU) Summer Institute is a six weeks intensive training program aimed to develop a global leadership in the field of nuclear sciences and technologies. The topics covered include global setting, international regimes, technology innovation and nuclear industry operations. This event has been held annually since 2005. Mark McIntyre and Dominic Rivard attended this activity as a personal initiative. In this paper they will present the WNU and its Summer Institute, share their participation experience and discuss as well of some technical content covered during the Institute, highlighting the benefits this brought to their careers. (author)

  17. BWR zinc addition Sourcebook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Susan E.; Giannelli, Joseph F.; Jarvis, Alfred J.

    2014-01-01

    Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) have been injecting zinc into the primary coolant via the reactor feedwater system for over 25 years for the purpose of controlling primary system radiation fields. The BWR zinc injection process has evolved since the initial application at the Hope Creek Nuclear Station in 1986. Key transitions were from the original natural zinc oxide (NZO) to depleted zinc oxide (DZO), and from active zinc injection of a powdered zinc oxide slurry (pumped systems) to passive injection systems (zinc pellet beds). Zinc addition has continued through various chemistry regimes changes, from normal water chemistry (NWC) to hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) and HWC with noble metals (NobleChem™) for mitigation of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of reactor internals and primary system piping. While past reports published by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) document specific industry experience related to these topics, the Zinc Sourcebook was prepared to consolidate all of the experience gained over the past 25 years. The Zinc Sourcebook will benefit experienced BWR Chemistry, Operations, Radiation Protection and Engineering personnel as well as new people entering the nuclear power industry. While all North American BWRs implement feedwater zinc injection, a number of other BWRs do not inject zinc. This Sourcebook will also be a valuable resource to plants considering the benefits of zinc addition process implementation, and to gain insights on industry experience related to zinc process control and best practices. This paper presents some of the highlights from the Sourcebook. (author)

  18. Nuclear energy education scenario around the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barabas, Roberta de Carvalho; Sabundjian, Gaiane

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear energy has been used as a source of clean energy with many benefits. Nevertheless, it is still addressed with prejudice. The atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki during World War II (1945), the Three Mile Island accident (1979), Chernobyl accident (1986), the crash of the cesium-137 in Goiana, Brazil (1987), and the recent accident in Fukushima (2011) may have been responsible for the negative image of nuclear energy. Researches on education have been conducted with students concerning the conceptual and practical issues of nuclear energy. This work aims to review the literature about nuclear energy education around the world in both, elementary school and high school. Since most educational researches on nuclear energy were published after 1980, this literature review covered the researches that have been published since 1980. The data were presented in chronological order. The results from the literature review provided a clear visualization of the global nuclear energy educational scenario, showing that the theme is still addressed with prejudice due to an incorrect view of nuclear energy and a limited view of its benefits. Concerning the science textbooks, the literature reports that the theme should be better addressed, encouraging students to research more about it. The data from this literature review will serve as a reference for a future proposal for a teaching training program for Brazilian science/physics high school teachers using a new teaching approach. (author)

  19. Nuclear energy education scenario around the world

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barabas, Roberta de Carvalho; Sabundjian, Gaiane, E-mail: praroberta@uol.com.br, E-mail: gdjian@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Nuclear energy has been used as a source of clean energy with many benefits. Nevertheless, it is still addressed with prejudice. The atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki during World War II (1945), the Three Mile Island accident (1979), Chernobyl accident (1986), the crash of the cesium-137 in Goiana, Brazil (1987), and the recent accident in Fukushima (2011) may have been responsible for the negative image of nuclear energy. Researches on education have been conducted with students concerning the conceptual and practical issues of nuclear energy. This work aims to review the literature about nuclear energy education around the world in both, elementary school and high school. Since most educational researches on nuclear energy were published after 1980, this literature review covered the researches that have been published since 1980. The data were presented in chronological order. The results from the literature review provided a clear visualization of the global nuclear energy educational scenario, showing that the theme is still addressed with prejudice due to an incorrect view of nuclear energy and a limited view of its benefits. Concerning the science textbooks, the literature reports that the theme should be better addressed, encouraging students to research more about it. The data from this literature review will serve as a reference for a future proposal for a teaching training program for Brazilian science/physics high school teachers using a new teaching approach. (author)

  20. Risk Assessment Review Group report to the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, H.W.; Budnitz, R.J.; Kouts, H.J.C.; Loewenstein, W.B.; Rowe, W.D.; von Hippel, F.; Zachariasen, F.

    1978-09-01

    The Risk Assessment Review Group was organized by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission on July 1, 1977, with four elements to its charter: clarify the achievements and limitations of WASH-1400, the ''Rasmussen Report''; assess the peer comments thereon, and responses to those comments; study the present state of such risk assessment methodology; and recommend to the Commission how (and whether) such methodology can be used in the regulatory and licensing process. Areas of study include: risk assessment methodologies; statistical issues; completeness; the data base; and the WASH-1400 assessment of the damage to human health from radiation after a postulated accident. Specific items discussed include: Browns Ferry; common cause failure; human factors; format and scrutability; the peer review process; earthquakes; risk perception; allegations by UCS concerning WASH-1400 treatment of quality assurance and quality control; current role of probabilistic methods in the regulatory process; acts of violence; ATWS; influence of design defects in quality assurance failures; and calculation of population doses from given releases of radionuclides.

  1. Development of remote control decontamination machines for BWR nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyakawa, Minoru; Nozawa, Katsuro; Yamada, Masuji; Mizutani, Takeshi; Onozuka, Kazuaki

    1981-01-01

    The dose rate of radiation on the surfaces of equipments and in rooms tends to increase as radioactive substances accumulate with the continuous operation of nuclear power stations. The decontamination works to remove radioactive substances are carried out to prevent the exposure of workers in the case of inspection and repair. In order to reduce the exposure of decontamination workers, to save labor and to shorten decontamination time, Chubu Electric Power Co., Inc., has developed the decontamination machines for the walls of reactor wells, the walls and bottoms of equipment pits, the internal surfaces of suppression chambers, and the internal surfaces of tanks. The decontamination machines have several remote-handling functions: (a) brushing up with sprinkling against complicate surface such as a wall with step, (b) vertical transfer of brushing position with sucking force, (c) sucking out slurries under the water of storage pool or inside the pressure-supression pool, (d) horizontal transfer of suction position with electric motors. (J.P.N.)

  2. German nuclear expansion: state, capital, world market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galvan, C.G.

    1988-01-01

    This paper intends to discuss the technological development as it happened in Germany or, better, it places in the scene of world market, where it did. In the attention center is the big achievement of pacific use of atomic technology: the nuclear power plants, which the new energy is used in electric generation. (C.M.)

  3. Safe nuclear power for the Third World

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, W.R.; Lyon, C.F.; Redick, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    It is clear that using nuclear power for the generation of electricity is one way of reducing the emissions of CO 2 and other gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect. Equally clear is the fact that the reduction can be magnified by converting domestic, commercial, and industrial power-consuming activities from the direct use of fossil fuel sources to electrical energy. A major area for future progress in limiting CO 2 emissions is in the Third World, where population growth and expectations for a higher social and economic standard of living portend vast increases in future energy use. A number of problems come to mind as one contemplates the widespread expansion of nuclear energy use into the Third World. The authors propose a method involving the marriage of two currently evolving concepts by which nuclear electrical generation can be expanded throughout the world in a manner that will address these problems. The idea is to form multinational independent electric generating companies, or nuclear electric companies (NECs), that would design, build, operate, and service a standardized fleet of nuclear power plants. The plants would be of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) design, now under development at Argonne National Laboratory, and, in particular, a commercial conceptualization of the IFR sponsored by General Electric Company, the Power Reactor Inherently Safe Module (PRISM)

  4. Nuclear weapons and the World Court ruling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, J.

    1998-01-01

    based on the initiatives by non-governmental organizations, the World Health Organisation (WHO) Assembly asked the International Court of Justice for an advisory opinion in 1993 whether, considering the environmental and health consequences, the use of nuclear weapons by a state in war or other armed conflict would be a breach of its obligations under international law. The World Court decided that it was not able to give an advisory opinion as requested, because of the fact that questions of use of force and such like were beyond the scope of specialized agencies like the WHO. The Court has ruled that the international community, especially the five nuclear weapon states have not only an obligation to negotiate a treaty for total nuclear disarmament, but also have an obligation to conclude such treaty. We may expect that the nuclear weapon states will cynically disregard the ruling of the World Court as they have been doing to the basic obligation itself in pursuit of nuclear hegemony. But the remaining 150 countries or so also bear a responsibility to keep nudging the recalcitrant states into implementing their commitments to disarm

  5. The World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Mycle; Froggatt, Antony; Ayukawa, Yurika; Burnie, Shaun; Piria, Raffaele; Thomas, Steve; Hazemann, Julie; Suzuki, Tatsujiro

    2014-07-01

    The World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2014 provides a comprehensive overview of nuclear power plant data, including information on operation, production and construction. The WNISR assesses the status of new-build programs in current nuclear countries as well as in potential newcomer countries. A 20-page chapter on nuclear economics looks at the rapidly changing market conditions for nuclear power plants, whether operating, under construction, or in the planning stage. Reactor vendor strategies and the 'Hinkley Point C Deal' are analyzed in particular. The performance on financial markets of major utilities is documented. The WNISR2013 featured for the first time a Fukushima Status Report that triggered widespread media and analyst attention. The 2014 edition entirely updates that Fukushima chapter. The Nuclear Power vs. Renewable Energy chapter that provides comparative data on investment, capacity, and generation has been greatly extended by a section on system issues. How does nuclear power perform in systems with high renewable energy share? Is this the end of traditional baseload/ peak-load concepts? Finally, the 45-page Annex 1 provides a country-by-country overview of all 31 countries operating nuclear power plants, with extended Focus sections on China, Japan, and the United States

  6. Elecnuc. Nuclear power plants in the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    This small booklet summarizes in tables all the numerical data relative to the nuclear power plants worldwide. These data come from the French CEA/DSE/SEE Elecnuc database. The following aspects are reviewed: 1999 highlights; main characteristics of the reactor types in operation, under construction or on order; map of the French nuclear power plants; worldwide status of nuclear power plants at the end of 1999; nuclear power plants in operation, under construction and on order; capacity of nuclear power plants in operation; net and gross capacity of nuclear power plants on the grid and in commercial operation; grid connection forecasts; world electric power market; electronuclear owners and share holders in EU, capacity and load factor; first power generation of nuclear origin per country, achieved or expected; performance indicator of PWR units in France; worldwide trend of the power generation indicator; 1999 gross load factor by operator; nuclear power plants in operation, under construction, on order, planned, cancelled, shutdown, and exported; planning of steam generators replacement; MOX fuel program for plutonium recycling. (J.S.)

  7. Safety Evalution Report related to the final design approval of the GESSAR II BWR/6 nuclear island design (Docket No. 50-447)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-11-01

    This report supplements the GESSAR II SER (NUREG-0979), issued in April 1983, summarizing the results of the staff's safety review of the GESSAR II BWR/6 nuclear island design. The review is carried out in accordance with the procedures for demonstrating the acceptability of the design for the severe-accident concerns described in draft NUREG-1070, NRC Policy on Future Reactor Designs: Decisions on Severe Accident Issues in Nuclear Power Plant Regulation. Supplement 2 also provides more recent information regarding resolution or update of the confirmatory items and FDA-1 conditions identified in SSER 1. Subject to favorable resolution of the items discussed in this supplement, the staff concludes that the GESSAR II design satisfactorily addresses the severe-accident concerns described in draft NUREG-1070

  8. Development of a computer program of fast calculation for the pre design of advanced nuclear fuel 10 x 10 for BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perusquia, R.; Montes, J.L.; Ortiz, J.J.

    2005-01-01

    In the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) a methodology is developed to optimize the design of cells 10x10 of assemble fuels for reactors of water in boil or BWR. It was proposed a lineal calculation formula based on a coefficients matrix (of the change reason of the relative power due to changes in the enrichment of U-235) for estimate the relative powers by pin of a cell. With this it was developed the computer program of fast calculation named PreDiCeldas. The one which by means of a simple search algorithm allows to minimize the relative power peak maximum of cell or LPPF. This is achieved varying the distribution of U-235 inside the cell, maintaining in turn fixed its average enrichment. The accuracy in the estimation of the relative powers for pin is of the order from 1.9% when comparing it with results of the 'best estimate' HELIOS code. With the PreDiCeldas it was possible, at one minimum time of calculation, to re-design a reference cell diminishing the LPPF, to the beginning of the life, of 1.44 to a value of 1.31. With the cell design with low LPPF is sought to even design cycles but extensive that those reached at the moment in the BWR of the Laguna Verde Central. (Author)

  9. The World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2017

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Mycle; Froggatt, Antony; Hazemann, Julie; Katsuta, Tadahiro; Ramana, M.V.; Rodriguez, Juan C.; Ruedinger, Andreas; Stienne, Agnes

    2017-09-01

    The World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2017 (WNISR2017) provides a comprehensive overview of nuclear power plant data, including information on operation, production and construction. The WNISR assesses the status of new-build programs in current nuclear countries as well as in potential newcomer countries. The WNISR2017 edition includes a new assessment from an equity analyst view of the financial crisis of the nuclear sector and some of its biggest industrial players. The Fukushima Status Report provides not only an update on onsite and offsite issues six years after the beginning of the catastrophe, but also the latest official and new independent cost evaluations of the disaster. Focus chapters provide in-depth analysis of France, Japan, South Korea, the United Kingdom and the United States. The Nuclear Power vs. Renewable Energy chapter provides global comparative data on investment, capacity, and generation from nuclear, wind and solar energy. Finally, Annex 1 presents a country-by-country overview of all other countries operating nuclear power plants

  10. World nuclear fuel market. Seventeenth annual meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    The papers presented at the seventeenth World Nuclear Fuels Market meeting are cataloged individually. This volume includes information on the following areas of interest: historical and current aspects of the uranium and plutonium market with respect to supply and demand, pricing, spot market purchasing, and other market phenomena; impact of reprocessing and recycling uranium, plutonium, and mixed oxide fuels; role of individual countries in the market: Hungary, Germany, the Soviet Union, Czechoslovakia, France, and the US; the impact of public opinion and radioactive waste management on the nuclear industry, and a debate regarding long term versus short term contracting by electric utilities for uranium and enrichment services

  11. Australia and the world nuclear situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, Ron

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear energy remains the only large dispatchable source of low-carbon electricity, other than hydropower, which is in short supply. Each major analysis of world energy futures predicts increased use of nuclear power especially in developing countries and where greenhouse gas mitigation is a policy objective. For governments, it enhances security of supply, particularly in countries which have few indigenous resources or isolated grid systems. However do the economics of nuclear make sense, especially in Australia, and can nuclear overcome the major public concerns raised by nuclear accidents? This paper presents some of the actual and predicted uses of nuclear power and the associated challenges and opportunities. It considers the competing pressures on governments to provide secure, low-carbon and affordable energy and how different governments have responded to these pressures. It considers the economics of electricity generation – not just through plant level costs, but the costs to the electricity system of each source of large-scale production and how this assessment changes the economic choices available to governments. Such system impacts have become an issue of major concern due to the introduction of significant amounts of wind and solar energy, whose intermittency fundamentally affects the structure and the working of electricity systems. The paper takes a new look at the role and competitiveness of nuclear power in the light of the new realities of power markets in OECD countries. Finally, it outlines what role nuclear might play in Australia by reference to how nuclear is being developed in other countries and how electricity market reform or innovative financing can be used to allow the development of high capital-intensive but secure forms of electricity generation.

  12. Trouble at the world's nuclear dustbin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adkins, J.

    1984-01-01

    Radioactive discharges from the Windscale nuclear fuel reprocessing plant in England's lake district temporarily closed 15 miles of shoreline and continues to raise safety questions in this recreational area. The plant receives high-level radioactive wastes and spent fuel from 36 power plants around the world for reprocessing. The site is also a storage point for 1550 tons of oxide waste waiting for additional reprocessing capacity. Pipelines carry 2.2 million gallons of low-level wastes into the Irish Sea each day. Five hundred pounds of weapons grade plutonium also entered the sea from a World War II munitions depot. Accidents have also contributed to the radioactive debris that has accumulated on sandy beaches. Pressure from Greenpeace and the Barrow Action Group helped to expedite an extensive cleanup program, but activity on the beaches is still highly restricted. British Nuclear Fuels remains undaunted by its negative public relations problems. 4 figures

  13. World nuclear fuel cycle requirements 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This analysis report presents the projected requirements for uranium concentrate and uranium enrichment services to fuel the nuclear power plants expected to be operating under two nuclear supply scenarios. These two scenarios, the Lower Reference and Upper Reference cases, apply to the United States, Canada, Europe, the Far East, and other countries in the World Outside Centrally Planned Economic Areas (WOCA). A No New Orders scenarios is also presented for the Unites States. This report contains an analysis of the sensitivities of the nuclear fuel cycle projections to different levels and types of projected nuclear capacity, different enrichment tails assays, higher and lower capacity factors, changes in nuclear fuel burnup levels, and other exogenous assumptions. The projections for the United States generally extend through the year 2020, and the WOCA projections, which include the United States, are provided through 2010. The report also presents annual projections of spent nuclear fuel; discharges and inventories of spent fuel. Appendix D includes domestic spent fuel projections through the year 2020 for the Lower and Upper Reference cases and through 2036, the last year in which spent fuel is discharged, for the No New Orders case

  14. World nuclear performance report 2016. A new study by World Nuclear Association

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cobb, Jonathan [World Nuclear Association, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-15

    A larger number of nuclear power units are under construction than at any other time in the last 25 years, and with another ten new reactors coming online 2015 demonstrated improving new build performance all round. The existing global fleet, totally 439 by year-end, generated roughly 10 % of the world's electricity, making up around one-third of the world's low-carbon electricity supply. Nevertheless, there are challenges ahead for the global nuclear industry. The World Nuclear Association's vision for the future global electricity system consists of a diverse mix of low-carbon technologies - where renewables, nuclear and a fossil fuels work together in harmony to ensure a reliable, affordable and clean energy supply.

  15. World nuclear performance report 2016. A new study by World Nuclear Association

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cobb, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    A larger number of nuclear power units are under construction than at any other time in the last 25 years, and with another ten new reactors coming online 2015 demonstrated improving new build performance all round. The existing global fleet, totally 439 by year-end, generated roughly 10 % of the world's electricity, making up around one-third of the world's low-carbon electricity supply. Nevertheless, there are challenges ahead for the global nuclear industry. The World Nuclear Association's vision for the future global electricity system consists of a diverse mix of low-carbon technologies - where renewables, nuclear and a fossil fuels work together in harmony to ensure a reliable, affordable and clean energy supply.

  16. Connected analysis nuclear-thermo-hydraulic of parallel channels of a BWR reactor using distributed computation; Analisis acoplado nuclear-termohidraulico de canales paralelos de un reactor BWR empleando computacion distribuida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos Gonzalez, Rina Margarita

    2007-07-15

    This work consists of the integration of three models previously developed which are described widely in Literature: model of the thermo-hydraulic channel, model of the modal neutronic and the model of the recirculation bows. The tool used for this connection of models is the PVM system, Parallel Virtual Machine that allowed paralleling the model by means of the concept of distributed computation. The purpose of making this connection of models is the one of obtaining a more complete tool than better represents the real configuration and the phenomenology of the nucleus of a BWR reactor, thus obtaining better results. In addition to maintaining the flexibility to improve the resulting model at any time, since the very complex or sophisticated models are difficult to improve being impossible to modify the equations they use and can include variables that are not of primary importance in the tackled problem or that mask relations among variables due to the excess of results. Also maintaining the flexibility for adding component of models or systems of the BWR reactor, all of this following the modeling needs. The Swedish Ringhals power plant was chosen to characterize the resulting connected model for counting on a Stability Benchmark that offers the opportunity to count on real plant data. Besides that in case 9 of cycle 14 of this Benchamark oscillations outside phase appeared, which are from great interest because the detection systems that register the average of the power of the nucleus do not detect them. Additionally in this work the model of the recirculation bows as an independent module is obtained in an individual way, since this model belongs to another work and works connected to the reactor vessel. The model of the recirculation bows is able to model several transients of interest, as it is shown in the Appendix A of this work, among which are found the tripping of recirculation pumps or the transference at low or high velocity of them. The scope of the

  17. GARLIC-B. A digital code for real-time calculation of the transient behaviour of nodal and global core and plant parameters of BWR nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ercan, Y.; Hoeld, A.; Lupas, O.

    1982-04-01

    A program description of the code GARLIC-B is given. The code is based on a nonlinear transient model for BWR nuclear power plants which consist of a 3D-core, a top plenum, steam removal and feed water systems and a downcomer with main coolant recirculation pumps. The core is subdivided into a number of superboxes and flow channels with different coolant mass flow rates. Subcooled boiling within these channels has an important reactivity feed back effect and has to be taken also into account. The code computes the local and global core and plant transient situation as dependent on both the inherent core dynamics and external control actions, i.e., disturbances such as motions of control rod banks, changes of mass flow rates of coolant, feed water and steam outlet. The case of a pressure-controlled reactor operation is also considered. (orig./GL) [de

  18. The World Nuclear University: Addressing global needs. London, 4 September 2003. Inauguration ceremony, World Nuclear University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2003-01-01

    For some time, there has been a growing awareness of the need for succession planning in the nuclear industry, to ensure that we cultivate a new generation of young people with the proper education and skills to replace the aging nuclear workforce as its members retire. Today's inauguration of the 'World Nuclear University' (WNU) is the most substantive action taken to date to address this need. This is a challenge, because the widespread perception clearly exists that nuclear energy is a dying field. The IAEA, with its constituency of 135 Member States, is hopeful that this will truly become a World Nuclear University. Almost 2 billion people, nearly one third of the population of the planet, remain without access to modern energy supplies - a shortfall that could be addressed, at least in part, by nuclear energy. But any major expansion in the future use of nuclear power will only be feasible if the nuclear industry is successful in developing innovative reactor and fuel cycle technology - as well as operational and regulatory approaches - that effectively address concerns related to cost competitiveness, safety and security, proliferation resistance and waste disposal. And global development needs go well beyond the electricity sector. The IAEA's recognition of these situations underlies our assistance to Member States, through which we try to address areas of high national priority wherever nuclear technology provides the best option for success. A significant part of that effort lies in the development of human capacity - through training and education in how to apply nuclear technology safely and effectively. 'Atoms for Peace' is a vision nearly five decades old, focused on using nuclear science for the advancement of humankind. It is my hope that this 'World Nuclear University' can be an effective instrument towards the achievement of that vision

  19. The world nuclear industry status report 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, M.; Froggatt, A

    2007-11-15

    The status and perspectives of the nuclear industry in the world have been subject to a large number of publications and considerable media attention over the last few years. The present report attempts to provide solid elements of key information for intelligent analysis and informed decision-making. As of 1 November 2007 there are 439 nuclear reactors operating in the world. That is five less than five years ago. There are 32 units listed by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) as 'under construction'. That is about 20 less than in the late 1990's. In 1989 a total of 177 nuclear reactors had been operated in what are now the 27 EU Member States. That number shrank to 146 units as of 1 November 2007. In 1992 the Worldwatch Institute in Washington, WISE-Paris and Greenpeace International published the first World Nuclear Industry Status Report. As a first updated review in 2004 showed the 1992 analyses proved correct. In reality, the combined installed nuclear capacity of the 436 units operating in the world in the year 2000 was less than 352,000 megawatts - to be compared with the forecast of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) from the 1970's of up to 4,450,000 megawatts. Today the 439 worldwide operating reactors total 371,000 megawatts. Nuclear power plants provide 16% of the electricity, 6% of the commercial primary energy and 2-3% of the final energy in the world - the tendency is downwards - less than hydropower alone. Twenty-one of the 31 countries operating nuclear power plants decreased their share of nuclear power within the electricity mix if compared with 2003. The average age of the operating power plants is 23 years. Some nuclear utilities envisage reactor lifetimes of 40 years or more. Considering the fact that the average age of all 117 units that have already been closed is equally about 22 years, the doubling of the operational lifetime seems already rather optimistic. However, we have assumed an average

  20. The world nuclear industry status report 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, M.; Froggatt, A.

    2007-11-01

    The status and perspectives of the nuclear industry in the world have been subject to a large number of publications and considerable media attention over the last few years. The present report attempts to provide solid elements of key information for intelligent analysis and informed decision-making. As of 1 November 2007 there are 439 nuclear reactors operating in the world. That is five less than five years ago. There are 32 units listed by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) as 'under construction'. That is about 20 less than in the late 1990's. In 1989 a total of 177 nuclear reactors had been operated in what are now the 27 EU Member States. That number shrank to 146 units as of 1 November 2007. In 1992 the Worldwatch Institute in Washington, WISE-Paris and Greenpeace International published the first World Nuclear Industry Status Report. As a first updated review in 2004 showed the 1992 analyses proved correct. In reality, the combined installed nuclear capacity of the 436 units operating in the world in the year 2000 was less than 352,000 megawatts - to be compared with the forecast of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) from the 1970's of up to 4,450,000 megawatts. Today the 439 worldwide operating reactors total 371,000 megawatts. Nuclear power plants provide 16% of the electricity, 6% of the commercial primary energy and 2-3% of the final energy in the world - the tendency is downwards - less than hydropower alone. Twenty-one of the 31 countries operating nuclear power plants decreased their share of nuclear power within the electricity mix if compared with 2003. The average age of the operating power plants is 23 years. Some nuclear utilities envisage reactor lifetimes of 40 years or more. Considering the fact that the average age of all 117 units that have already been closed is equally about 22 years, the doubling of the operational lifetime seems already rather optimistic. However, we have assumed an average lifetime of 40 years

  1. Review of world nuclear power programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rippon, S.

    1978-01-01

    Political, economic and environmental decisions are still affecting the growth of nuclear power generation throughout the world, but there are signs that proven past performance and increasing prices of energy from conventional sources are becoming overriding factors. In the USA, some uncertainty has been created by the moratorium on reprocessing enacted by the 1978 Non-Proliferation Act. The uncertainty has spread to importers of nuclear fuel and technology, but there is increasing international acceptance of the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation. Isotope separation capacity to be installed by the US government, by the joint European organization Urenco and by the French Eurodif should ease the supply of fuel. There is little progress on waste-management policy in the USA, but in Germany a company (DWK) has been formed and a site for a rocksalt repository has been designated at Gorleben. In the UK the Windscale inquiry has a positive significance for nuclear energy generally as well as for reprocessing. An inquiry in Sweden has also come to positive conclusions. The status of nuclear energy in these and a number of other countries is discussed in terms of political and national policies. (N.D.H.)

  2. Development of next BWR plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriya, Kumiaki; Tanikawa, Naoshi; Kinoshita, Shoichiro; Utena, Shunsuke

    1995-01-01

    It is expected that BWR power generation will be main nuclear power generation for long period hereafter, and in the ABWRs being constructed at present, the safety, reliability, operation performance, economical efficiency and so on are further heightend as compared with conventional BWRs. On the other hand, in order to cope with future social change, the move to develop the next reactor type following ABWRs was begun already by the cooperation of electirc power companies and plant manufacturers. Hitachi Ltd. has advanced eagerly the development of new light water reactors. Also the objective of BWR power generation hereafter is to heighten the safety, reliability, operation performance and economical efficiency, and the development has been advanced, aiming at bearing the main roles of nuclear power generation. At present, ABWRs are under construction as No. 6 and 7 plants in Kashiwazaki Kariwa Nuclear Power Station, Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc. In order to let ABWRs take root, the further improvement of economy by the standardization, the rationalization by revising the specification and the improvement of machinery and equipment is necessary. As the needs of the development of next generation BWRs, the increase of power output, the heightening of safety and economical efficiency are discussed. The concept of the next generation BWR plant aiming at the start of operation around 2010 is shown. (K.I.)

  3. Development of next BWR plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriya, Kumiaki; Tanikawa, Naoshi; Kinoshita, Shoichiro; Utena, Shunsuke [Hitachi Ltd., Ibaraki (Japan). Hitachi Works

    1995-04-01

    It is expected that BWR power generation will be main nuclear power generation for long period hereafter, and in the ABWRs being constructed at present, the safety, reliability, operation performance, economical efficiency and so on are further heightend as compared with conventional BWRs. On the other hand, in order to cope with future social change, the move to develop the next reactor type following ABWRs was begun already by the cooperation of electirc power companies and plant manufacturers. Hitachi Ltd. has advanced eagerly the development of new light water reactors. Also the objective of BWR power generation hereafter is to heighten the safety, reliability, operation performance and economical efficiency, and the development has been advanced, aiming at bearing the main roles of nuclear power generation. At present, ABWRs are under construction as No. 6 and 7 plants in Kashiwazaki Kariwa Nuclear Power Station, Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc. In order to let ABWRs take root, the further improvement of economy by the standardization, the rationalization by revising the specification and the improvement of machinery and equipment is necessary. As the needs of the development of next generation BWRs, the increase of power output, the heightening of safety and economical efficiency are discussed. The concept of the next generation BWR plant aiming at the start of operation around 2010 is shown. (K.I.).

  4. Analysis of dose rates received around the storage pool for irradiated control rods in a BWR nuclear power plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ródenas, J; Abarca, A; Gallardo, S

    2011-08-01

    BWR control rods are activated by neutron reactions in the reactor. The dose produced by this activity can affect workers in the area surrounding the storage pool, where activated rods are stored. Monte Carlo (MC) models for neutron activation and dose assessment around the storage pool have been developed and validated. In this work, the MC models are applied to verify the expected reduction of dose when the irradiated control rod is hanged in an inverted position into the pool. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The situation of the nuclear energy in the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Jair Albo Marques de

    1996-12-01

    This work presents an overview of the nuclear energy in the world. It approaches the following main topics: kinds of nuclear power plants; operation experience of the nuclear plants; environmental and social aspects of the nuclear energy; economic aspects of the nuclear energy; development of the reactors technology and supply of the nuclear fuel

  6. The World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Mycle; Froggatt, Antony; Hazemann, Julie; Katsuta, Tadahiro; Ramana, M.V.; Fairlie, Ian; Maltini, Fulcieri; Thomas, Steve; Kaaberger, Tomas

    2016-07-01

    The World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2015 provides a comprehensive overview of nuclear power plant data, including information on operation, production and construction. The WNISR assesses the status of new-build programs in current nuclear countries as well as in potential newcomer countries. Nuclear power generation in the world increased by 1.3%, entirely due to a 31% increase in China. Ten reactors started up in 2015-more than in any other year since 1990-of which eight were in China. Construction on all of them started prior to the Fukushima disaster. Eight construction starts in the world in 2015-to which China contributed six-down from 15 in 2010 of which 10 were in China. No construction starts in the world in the first half of 2016. The number of units under construction is declining for the third year in a row, from 67 reactors at the end of 2013 to 58 by mid-2016, of which 21 are in China. China spent over US$100 billion on renewables in 2015, while investment decisions for six nuclear reactors amounted to US$18 billion. Eight early closure decisions taken in Japan, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan and the U.S. Nuclear phase-out announcements in the U.S. (California) and Taiwan. In nine of the 14 building countries all projects are delayed, mostly by several years. Six projects have been listed for over a decade, of which three for over 30 years. China is no exception here, at least 10 of 21 units under construction are delayed. With the exception of United Arab Emirates and Belarus, all potential newcomer countries delayed construction decisions. Chile suspended and Indonesia abandoned nuclear plans. AREVA has accumulated US$11 billion in losses over the past five years. French government decides euro 5.6 billion bailout and breaks up the company. Share value 95 percent below 2007 peak value. State utility EDF struggles with US$ 41.5 billion debt, downgraded by S and P. Chinese utility CGN, EDF partner for Hinkley Point C, loses 60% of its share value

  7. The World Nuclear University - A pillar of the nuclear renaissance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nigon, Jean-Louis

    2006-01-01

    The World Nuclear University was founded with the support of four leading international nuclear institutions - two of them inter-governmental organisations (IAEA and OECD/NEA), the other two bodies serving the industry and its operators (WNA and WANO). Inaugurated in September 2003 on the 50. anniversary of President Eisenhower's Atoms for Peace speech, the WNU started working a year later upon the arrival of the first staff members. Today there is a tremendous disparity in the nuclear industry between the pace of the unfolding nuclear renaissance, which is gathering momentum by the day, and the slower pace at which we are educating a new generation of nuclear scientists and engineers. The WNU aims to be instrumental in creating a network of leading institutions of nuclear learning in order to help fill this gap. The emerging worldwide partnership aims to: - Enhance nuclear education amongst its members, - Establish globally accepted standards in academic and professional qualification, and - Elevate the prestige of the nuclear profession. Prior to the establishment of WNU, many leading educational institutions of nuclear learning had already launched cooperation on a regional basis, as follows (country or region/network): United States/NEDHO (Nuclear Engineering Department Head Organization); Canada/UNENE (University Network of Excellence in Nuclear Engineering in Canada); Asia/ANENT (Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology); Europe/ENEN (European Nuclear Education Network); Russia/WNU Russian Branch. Thus the WNU can be seen to a certain extent as a 'network of networks', although it should be stressed that many of the current WNU members did not belong to already existing networks. By creating a global network, the WNU avoids the duplication of efforts and limits the total number of staff required. The WNU does not lose sight of the fact, however, that local problems should be solved locally. Ten Working Groups share between them the activities of the

  8. Strategies of operation cycles in BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molina, D.; Sendino, F.

    1996-01-01

    The article analyzes the operation cycles in BWR type reactors. The cycle size of operation is the consequence on the optimization process of the costs with the technical characteristics of nuclear fuel and the characteristics of demand and production. The authors analyze the cases of Garona NP and Cofrentes NP, both with BWR reactors. (Author)

  9. Storing the world's spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barkenbus, J.N.; Weinberg, A.M.; Alonso, M.

    1985-01-01

    Given the world's prodigious future energy requirements and the inevitable depletion of oil and gas, it would be foolhardy consciously to seek limitations on the growth of nuclear power. Indeed, the authors continue to believe that the global nuclear power enterprise, as measured by installed reactor capacity, can become much larger in the future without increasing proliferation risks. To accomplish this objective will require renewed dedication to the non-proliferation regime, and it will require some new initiatives. Foremost among these would be the establishment of a spent fuel take-back service, in which one or a few states would retrieve spent nuclear fuel from nations generating it. The centralized retrieval of spent fuel would remove accessible plutonium from the control of national leaders in non-nuclear-weapons states, thereby eliminating the temptation to use this material for weapons. The Soviets already implement a retrieval policy with the spent fuel generated by East European allies. The authors believe that it is time for the US to reopen the issue of spent-fuel retrieval, and thus to strengthen its non-proliferation policies and the nonproliferation regime in general. 7 references

  10. From the nuclear world, no.5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2016-01-01

    This document gathers information from around the world and concerning nuclear industry. The most relevant is the following. The British government has given its agreement for the construction of 2 EPR by EDF Energy at Hinkley Point. The Hinkley Point project will generate more than 1700 jobs in France. The EPR being built in Finland will operate in 2018. The electrical car is sustainable only in the countries where low-carbon electricity production is important which is the case of France thanks to nuclear energy. In the framework of the ICERR cooperation, 2 research reactors of CEA: Isis (Saclay) and RJH (being built at Cadarache) and their experimental facilities will be used by Slovenia, Tunisia and Morocco through joint research projects. In China 6 AP1000 units will be built on 3 sites in the Yangtze region. China and Turkey have signed an agreement concerning the organisation of nuclear safety authority. In Turkey a site for a 3. nuclear power plant is being selected. (A.C.)

  11. BWR type reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatemichi, Shin-ichiro.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To eliminate the variation in the power distribution of a BWR type reactor core in the axial direction even if the flow rate is increased or decreased by providing a difference in the void coefficient between the upper part and the lower parts of the reactor core, and increasing the void coefficient at the lower part of the reactor core. Constitution: The void coefficient of the lower region from the center to the lower part along the axial direction of a nuclear fuel assembly is increased to decrease the dependence on the flow rate of the axial power distribution of the nuclear fuel assembly. That is, a water/fuel ratio is varied, the water in non-boiled region is increased or the neutron spectrum is varied so as to vary the void coefficient. In order to exemplify it, the rate of the internal pellets of the fuel rod of the nuclear fuel assembly or the shape of the channel box is varied. Accordingly, the power does not considerably vary even if the flow rate is altered since the power is varied in the power operation. (Yoshihara, H.)

  12. Cost and implications of a middle-term program for storage of spent fuel in a nuclear power station (BWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mochon, J.L.; Quintana, R.

    1978-01-01

    The experience gained with the Cofrentes Nuclear Power Station Project is presented. Originally the station had two spent fuel storage pools, in the fuel building, plus a little pool inside the containment, and all were to be fitted with extensive aluminium storage racks with a total capacity for 1+-1/3 cores. Due to the present world situation with regard to the ''back-end''of the fuel cycle, it was decided to enlarge the pools size and to change the design of the racks, to obtain a final storage capacity of 5+-1/4 cores, so covering over 18 years of operation. The changes introduced in the project, as well as its costs, and the possibilities of election still open are examined in the paper. (author)

  13. Cost and implications of a middle-term program for storage of spent fuel in a nuclear power station (BWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mochon, J.L.; Quintana, R.

    1978-01-01

    The paper is based on the experience gained with the Cofrentes Nuclear Power Station Project. Originally, the station had two spent fuel storage pools, in the fuel building, plus a little pool inside the containment, and all were to be fitted with extensive aluminum storage racks with a total capacity for 1+1/3 cores. Due to the present world situation with regard to the 'back-end' of the fuel cycle, it was decided to enlarge the pools' size and to change the design of the racks, to obtain a final storage capacity of 5+1/4 cores, so covering over 18 years of operation. The changes introduced in the project, as well as its costs, and the possibilities of election still open are examined in the paper

  14. Stepping towards a nuclear-weapon-free world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynolds, R.

    1997-01-01

    In order to reach zero nuclear weapons, the role of nuclear weapons must change. As long as nuclear weapons are seen as an important factor preventing war, their continued existence will be assured. This does not mean that the nuclear-weapon-free world will not occur or that intermediate steps towards zero are not important. In the past five years the world has seen agreements to sharply reduce the number of warheads, significant progress towards a Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty, and renewed support for the Non-proliferation Treaty including several surprise new members. The next five years will probably bring the world closer to nuclear-weapon-free world

  15. BWR control blade replacement strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennard, M.W.; Harbottle, J.E.

    2000-01-01

    The reactivity control elements in a BWR, the control blades, perform three significant functions: provide shutdown margin during normal and accident operating conditions; provide overall core reactivity control; and provide axial power shaping control. As such, the blades are exposed to the core's neutron flux, resulting in irradiation of blade structural and absorber materials. Since the absorber depletes with time (if B 4 C is used, it also swells) and the structural components undergo various degradation mechanisms (e.g., embrittlement, corrosion), the blades have limits on their operational lifetimes. Consequently, BWR utilities have implemented strategies that aim to maximize blade lifetimes while balancing operational costs, such as extending a refuelling outage to shuffle high exposure blades. This paper examines the blade replacement strategies used by BWR utilities operating in US, Europe and Asia by assembling information related to: the utility's specific blade replacement strategy; the impact the newer blade designs and changes in core operating mode were having on those strategies; the mechanical and nuclear limits that determined those strategies; the methods employed to ensure that lifetime limits were not exceeded during operation; and blade designs used (current and replacement blades). (author)

  16. Synergistic failure of BWR internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ware, A. G.; Chang, T.Y.

    1999-01-01

    Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) core shrouds and other reactor internals important to safety are experiencing intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission has followed the problem, and as part of its investigations, contracted with the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory to conduct a risk assessment. The overall project objective is to assess the potential consequences and risks associated with the failure of IGSCC-susceptible BWR vessel internals, with specific consideration given to potential cascading and common mode effects. An initial phase has been completed in which background material was gathered and evaluated, and potential accident sequences were identified. A second phase is underway to perform a simplified, quantitative probabilistic risk assessment on a representative high-power BWR/4. Results of the initial study conducted on the jet pumps show that any cascading failures would not result in a significant increase in the core damage frequency. The methodology is currently being extended to other major reactor internals components

  17. GPE-BWR and the containment venting and filtering issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palomo, J.; Santiago, J. de

    1988-01-01

    The Spanish Boiling Water Reactor Owner's Group (GPE-BWR) is formed by three utilities, owning four units: Santa Maria de Garona (46 MWe, BWR3, Mark I containment), Cofrentes (975 MWe, BWR6, Mark III containment) and Valdecaballeros (2x975 MWe, BWR6, Mark III containment) - all of the reactors having been supplied by General Electric. One of the GPE-BWR's several committees is the Safety and Licensing Committee, which follows up the evolution of severe accident topics and particularly the containment venting and filtering issue. In September 1987, the Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear (CSN), the Spanish Regulatory Body, asked the GPE-BWR to define its position on the installation of a containment venting system. The GPE-BWR created a Working Group which presented a Report on Containment Venting to the CSN in January 1987 gathered from: the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); some US utilities; and several European countries, especially France, Germany and Sweden. CSN's review of the containment venting Report and the Action Plan proposed by the GPE-BWR finished in April 1988. The conclusion of the Report and the proposed Action Plan take into account the US NRC's identified open items on severe accidents and the R and D programs scheduled to close these items

  18. Summary of nuclear fuel reprocessing activities around the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mellinger, P.J.; Harmon, K.M.; Lakey, L.T.

    1984-11-01

    This review of international practices for nuclear fuel reprocessing was prepared to provide a nontechnical summary of the current status of nuclear fuel reprocessing activities around the world. The sources of information are widely varied

  19. INTERNET and information about nuclear sciences. The world wide web virtual library: nuclear sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuruc, J.

    1999-01-01

    In this work author proposes to constitute new virtual library which should centralize the information from nuclear disciplines on the INTERNET, in order to them to give first and foremost the connection on the most important links in set nuclear sciences. The author has entitled this new virtual library The World Wide Web Library: Nuclear Sciences. By constitution of this virtual library next basic principles were chosen: home pages of international organizations important from point of view of nuclear disciplines; home pages of the National Nuclear Commissions and governments; home pages of nuclear scientific societies; web-pages specialized on nuclear problematic, in general; periodical tables of elements and isotopes; web-pages aimed on Chernobyl crash and consequences; web-pages with antinuclear aim. Now continue the links grouped on web-pages according to single nuclear areas: nuclear arsenals; nuclear astrophysics; nuclear aspects of biology (radiobiology); nuclear chemistry; nuclear company; nuclear data centres; nuclear energy; nuclear energy, environmental aspects of (radioecology); nuclear energy info centres; nuclear engineering; nuclear industries; nuclear magnetic resonance; nuclear material monitoring; nuclear medicine and radiology; nuclear physics; nuclear power (plants); nuclear reactors; nuclear risk; nuclear technologies and defence; nuclear testing; nuclear tourism; nuclear wastes; nuclear wastes. In these single groups web-links will be concentrated into following groups: virtual libraries and specialized servers; science; nuclear societies; nuclear departments of the academic institutes; nuclear research institutes and laboratories; centres, info links

  20. Secondary systems of PWR and BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schindler, N.

    1981-01-01

    The secondary systems of a nuclear power plant comprises the steam, condensate and feedwater cycle, the steam plant auxiliary or ancillary systems and the cooling water systems. The presentation gives a general review about the main systems which show a high similarity of PWR and BWR plants. (orig./RW)

  1. BWR plant analyzer development at BNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, H.S.; Wulff, W.; Mallen, A.N.; Lekach, S.V.; Stritar, A.; Cerbone, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    Advanced technology for high-speed interactive nuclear power plant simulations is of great value for timely resolution of safety issues, for plant monitoring, and for computer-aided emergency responses to an accident. Presented is the methodology employed at BNL to develop a BWR plant analyzer capable of simulating severe plant transients at much faster than real-time process speeds. Five modeling principles are established and a criterion is given for selecting numerical procedures and efficient computers to achieve the very high simulation speeds. Typical results are shown to demonstrate the modeling fidelity of the BWR plant analyzer

  2. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    This digest document was written by members of the union of associations of ex-members and retired people of the Areva group (UARGA). It gives a comprehensive overview of the nuclear industry world, starting from radioactivity and its applications, and going on with the fuel cycle (front-end, back-end, fuel reprocessing, transports), the nuclear reactors (PWR, BWR, Candu, HTR, generation 4 systems), the effluents from nuclear facilities, the nuclear wastes (processing, disposal), and the management and safety of nuclear activities. (J.S.)

  3. A BWR fuel channel tracking system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynolds, R.S.

    1987-01-01

    A relational database management system with a query language, Reference 1, has been used to develop a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel channel tracking system on a microcomputer. The software system developed implements channel vendor and Nuclear Regulatory Commission recommendations for in-core channel movements between reactor operating cycles. A BWR Fuel channel encloses the fuel bundle and is typically fabricated using Ziracoly-4. The channel serves three functions: (1) it provides a barrier to separate two parallel flow paths, one inside the fuel assembly and the other in the bypass region outside the fuel assembly and between channels; (2) it guides the control rod as it moves between fuel assemblies and provides a bearing surface for the blades; and (3) it provides rigidity for the fuel bundle. All of these functions are necessary in typical BWR core designs. Fuel channels are not part of typical Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) core designs

  4. Analysis of the microstructural evolution of the damage by neutron irradiation in the pressure vessel of a nuclear power reactor BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moranchel y R, M.

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear reactor pressure vessel type BWR, installed in Mexico and in many other countries, are made of an alloy of low carbon steel. The American Society for Testing and Materials (Astm) classifies this alloy as A533-B, class 1. Both the vessel and other internal structures are continuously exposed to the neutron flux from the reactions of fission in nuclear fuel. A large number of neutrons reach the vessel and penetrate certain depth depending on their energy. Its penetration in the neutron collides with the nuclei of the atoms out of their positions in the crystal lattice of steel, producing vacancies, interstitial, segregations, among other defects, capable of affecting its mechanical properties. Analyze the micro-structural damage to the vessel due to neutron irradiation, is essential for reasons of integrity of this enclosure and safety of any nuclear power plant. The objective of this thesis work is theoretical and experimentally determine the microstructural damage of a type nuclear reactor vessel steel BWR, due to neutron radiation from the reactor core, using microscopic and spectroscopic techniques as well as Monte Carlo simulation. Microscopy Optical, Scanning Electron Microscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy, Energy Dispersion of X-rays Spectrometry and X-rays Diffractometry were the techniques used in this research. These techniques helped in the characterization of both the basis of design of pressure vessel steel and steel irradiated, after eight years of neutron irradiation on the vessel, allowing know the surface morphology and crystal structures of the previous steel and post-irradiation, analyze the change in the microstructure of the steel vessel, morphological damage to surface level in an irradiated sample, among which are cavities in the order of microns produced by Atomic displacements due to the impact of neutronic, above all in the first layers of thickness of the vessel, the effect of swelling, regions of greater damage and Atomic

  5. Study and characterization of noble metal deposits on similar rusty surfaces to those of the reactor U-1 type BWR of nuclear power station of Laguna Verde

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flores S, V. H.

    2011-01-01

    In the present investigation work, were determined the parameters to simulate the conditions of internal oxidation reactor circulation pipes of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde in Veracruz. We used 304l stainless steel cylinders with two faces prepared with abrasive paper of No. 600, with the finality to obtain similar surface to the internal circulation piping nuclear reactor. Oxides was formed within an autoclave (Autoclave MEX-02 unit B), which is a device that simulates the working conditions of the nuclear reactor, but without radiation generated by the fission reaction within the reactor. The oxidation conditions were a temperature of 280 C and pressure of 8 MPa, similar conditions to the reactor operating in nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde in Veracruz, Mexico (BWR conditions), with an average conductivity of 4.58 ms / cm and 2352 ppb oxygen to simulate normal water chemistry NWC. Were obtained deposits of noble metal oxides formed on 304l stainless steel samples, in a 250 ml autoclave at a temperature range of 180 to 200 C. The elements that were used to deposit platinum-rhodium (Pt-Rh) with aqueous Na 2 Pt (OH) 6 and Na 3 Rh (NO 2 ) 6 , Silver (Ag) with an aqueous solution of AgNO 3 , zirconium (Zr) with aqueous Zr O (NO 3 ) and ZrO 2 , and zinc (Zn) in aqueous solution of Zn (NO 3 ) 2 under conditions of normal water chemistry. Also there was the oxidation of 304l stainless steel specimens in normal water chemistry with a solution of Zinc (Zn) (NWC + Zn). Oxidation of the specimens in water chemistry with a solution of zinc (Zn + NWC) was prepared in two ways: within the MEX-02 autoclave unit A in a solution of zinc and a flask at constant temperature in zinc solution. The oxides formed and deposits were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, elemental field analysis and X-ray diffraction. By other hand was evaluated the electrochemical behavior of the oxides formed on the surface of 304l stainless steel

  6. BWR crack control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Immel, R.

    1981-01-01

    Cooperative research by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the Boiling Water Reactor Owners Group (BWROG) may be finding a solution to the problem of stress corrosion cracking in reactor piping, which had caused 254 cracks in BWRs around the world by 1981. Welded joints of type-304 stainless steel in BWR recirculation systems are particularly vulnerable to microscopic stress corrosion cracking, which differs from fatigue cracking because it occurs when electrochemical processes break down the protective film in the zones affected by welding heat. The cracking is not hazardous to the public because it takes place within the containment building and causes leaks that are quickly detected. About one percent of welds crack, causing downtime and personnel exposure. The EPRI-BWROG project used a model of stress, water condition, and steel sensitization to find out the causes, develop remedies, and get the remedies into the field. Among the remedies are the adaptive learning network, an automated, microprocessor-controlled ultrasonic testing system that is scheduled for field testing and utility application in 1982. 2 figures

  7. World nuclear fuel cycle requirements 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The nuclear fuel cycle consists of mining and milling uranium ore, processing the uranium into a form suitable for generating electricity, ''burning'' the fuel in nuclear reactors, and managing the resulting spent nuclear fuel. This report presents projections of domestic and foreign requirements for natural uranium and enrichment services as well as projections of discharges of spent nuclear fuel. These fuel cycle requirements are based on the forecasts of future commercial nuclear power capacity and generation published in a recent Energy Information Administration (EIA) report. Also included in this report are projections of the amount of spent fuel discharged at the end of each fuel cycle for each nuclear generating unit in the United States. The International Nuclear Model is used for calculating the projected nuclear fuel cycle requirements. 14 figs., 38 tabs

  8. World nuclear fuel cycle requirements 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-10-10

    The nuclear fuel cycle consists of mining and milling uranium ore, processing the uranium into a form suitable for generating electricity, burning'' the fuel in nuclear reactors, and managing the resulting spent nuclear fuel. This report presents projections of domestic and foreign requirements for natural uranium and enrichment services as well as projections of discharges of spent nuclear fuel. These fuel cycle requirements are based on the forecasts of future commercial nuclear power capacity and generation published in a recent Energy Information Administration (EIA) report. Also included in this report are projections of the amount of spent fuel discharged at the end of each fuel cycle for each nuclear generating unit in the United States. The International Nuclear Model is used for calculating the projected nuclear fuel cycle requirements. 14 figs., 38 tabs.

  9. Nuclear power and international cooperation - perceptions of the third world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.A.

    1983-01-01

    The views of the Third World that need to be given consideration in international nuclear policy-making are presented in the following topical sections: background summary of developing countries energy needs and sources, incentives for nuclear power development in developing countries, the need for nuclear cooperation, the Non-proliferation Treaty, erosion of confidence of the recipient states in the reliability of international cooperation agreements, and perceptions of the Third World regarding energy and proliferation

  10. World nuclear power generation market and prospects of industry reorganization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Tomoko

    2007-01-01

    In late years there are many trends placing nuclear energy with important energy in various countries in the world due to a remarkable rise to an energy price, importance of energy security and a surge of recognition to a global environment problem. Overseas nuclear industry's acquisition by a Japanese nuclear power plant maker and its capital or business tie-up with an overseas company, were announced in succession in 2006. A nuclear power plant maker has played an extremely important role supporting wide technology in all stages of a design, construction, operation and maintenance in a nuclear power generation business. After having surveyed the recent trend of world nuclear power generation situation, a background and the summary of these acquisition/tie-ups made were investigated and analyzed to consider the influence that movement of such an industry gives a world nuclear power generation market. (T. Tanaka)

  11. Nuclear technology and the developing world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walsh, Kathleen

    2005-01-01

    The early 21st century has magnified the dangers posed by proliferation of weapons of mass destruction (WMD). Nonetheless, cooperative efforts to thwart this trade have grown considerably more difficult and the challenges more complicated. The ubiquitous nature of dual-use technology, the application of terrorist tactics for mass destruction on 9/11, the emergence of a more unilateralist US foreign policy, and the world's ever-expanding economic relations have all made more arduous the task of stemming proliferation of WMD, their precursors, and delivery systems. All of these challenges have been highlighted in recent years, but it is the last of these - the changing nature of the global economy- that is perhaps least analyzed but also most essential to improving international cooperation on nonproliferation. Many of today's proliferation concerns are familiar problems exacerbated by accelerating levels of international trade and investment. For example, controlling sensitive exports has become more complicated as officials, industry leaders, and nonproliferation experts must struggle simultaneously to find ways to ensure the flow of exports to legitimate buyers and supply chain partners who increasingly span the globe. Similarly, competitive enterprises today place a premium on rapid delivery and the speed of transactions. This in turn has increased pressures placed on officials around the world to reduce the time they spend evaluating each licensing decision, even as these assessments become more difficult as global investors move deeper into the developing world. Furthermore, the emergence of developing economies as second-tier suppliers with the potential to transship critically sensitive technologies to third parties is another complicating factor and a consequence of the globalizing economy. Science, technology, and industry research and development activities with dual-use applications are also becoming increasingly international endeavors, facilitated

  12. Nuclear threshold countries in the Third World

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stahl, K.

    1990-01-01

    The article analyses the nuclear-technological capacities and the danger of nuclear weapons proliferation in the six nuclear threshold countries: Argentina, Brazil, India, Pakistan, Israel and South Africa. All six states have developed sensitive nuclear facilities that are not covered by IAEA-safeguards. The risk of nuclear proliferation in Argentina and Brazil is considered at present as non-existent. The economic and especially the nuclear cooperation between the two states and the mutual visits of the unsafeguarded nuclear facilities has promoted a process of confidence building and political detente between them. The risk of nuclear weapons proliferation in the Middle East is considered high. It is estimated that Israel already has built up a nuclear weapons arsenal. The growing political influence of nationalistic groups in India and Pakistan, that favour a course of confrontation between the two states, have augmented the risk of nuclear proliferation in both states. South Africa is economically and militarily clearly dominating its black ruled neighbours. The Apartheid-regime is at present negociating with the nuclear weapons states about its adherence to the NPT, but demands political, economic and military concessions in exchange for its adherence to the treaty. (orig./HSCH) [de

  13. An analytical study on excitation of nuclear-coupled thermal-hydraulic instability due to seismically induced resonance in BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirano, Masashi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)

    1997-07-01

    This paper describes the results of a scoping study on seismically induced resonance of nuclear-coupled thermal-hydraulic instability in BWRs, which was conducted by using TRAC-BF1 within a framework of a point kinetics model. As a result of the analysis, it is shown that a reactivity insertion could occur accompanied by in-surge of coolant into the core resulted from the excitation of the nuclear-coupled instability by the external acceleration. In order to analyze this phenomenon more in detail, it is necessary to couple a thermal-hydraulic code with a three-dimensional nuclear kinetics code.

  14. Organizational analysis and safety for utilities with nuclear power plants: an organizational overview. Volume 1. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osborn, R.N.; Olson, J.; Sommers, P.E.; McLaughlin, S.D.; Jackson, M.S.; Scott, W.G.; Connor, P.E.

    1983-08-01

    This two-volume report presents the results of initial research on the feasibility of applying organizational factors in nuclear power plant (NPP) safety assessment. A model is introduced for the purposes of organizing the literature review and showing key relationships among identified organizational factors and nuclear power plant safety. Volume I of this report contains an overview of the literature, a discussion of available safety indicators, and a series of recommendations for more systematically incorporating organizational analysis into investigations of nuclear power plant safety.

  15. Directory of nuclear power plants in the world, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Haruo

    1985-01-01

    This book presents technical information and estimates trends of load factors and construction costs of nuclear power plants. Particularly road maps indicating plants are drawn in, which would be practical in visiting them. The data used here are directly confirmed by operators in every part of the world. Therefore, they reflect up-to-date nuclear power developments and its future. This allows wide and exact understanding of world's nuclear power. Chapter 1 presents nuclear power growth around the world and estimates forecasts based on information from electric power companies: nuclear power growths and the growths in the number of reactors around the world, in WOCA (World outside the Centrally Planned Economies Area), in CPEA (Centrally Planned Economies Area) are analyzed in detail. Chapter 2 presents nuclear power plants on maps by country. The maps show exact locations of nuclear power plants with local cities around them, rivers and lakes. For convenience, symbols are given to aid in identifying the types of reactors. Chapter 3 presents general information of nuclear power plants. Also the addresses of operators, all segments of nuclear power supply industries and nuclear organizations are included. For convenience, the index of nuclear power plants is added. Chapter 4 presents technical information, road maps in large scales and photographs of nuclear power plants in the world. The road maps show exact locations of plants. Chapter 5 presents operating experiences, load factors, refuelling and maintenance outages. The trends of data are analyzed both regionally (WOCA, CPEA) and world-widely. Chapter 6 presents trends of construction costs, component costs as percent of total construction costs and direct costs, and construction durations. (J.P.N.)

  16. Current nuclear programmes in third world countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillespie, Anna.

    1992-01-01

    Since 1964, when China became the fifth declared nuclear weapons state NWS (joining the US, Soviet Union, Britain and France), no other state has openly declared a nuclear capacity. But four states - Israel, South Africa, India and Pakistan - are now believed to have such a capacity. This chapter will briefly document the nuclear weapons programmes of these four 'threshold' countries which possess the industrial infrastructure to enable them to produce nuclear weapons' but assiduously refrain from publicly expressing any interest in acquiring such weapons. The chapter will go on to discuss those states which are not on the threshold but which are attempting to become nuclear-capable through building the necessary technology or acquiring it on the international market. The political motivation for these countries to 'go nuclear', and the assistance they have received in this endeavour from the NWSs themselves, will also be discussed. (author)

  17. Organizational analysis and safety for utilities with nuclear power plants: perspectives for organizational assessment. Volume 2. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osborn, R.N.; Olson, J.; Sommers, P.E.; McLaughlin, S.D.; Jackson, M.S.; Nadel, M.V.; Scott, W.G.; Connor, P.E.; Kerwin, N.; Kennedy, J.K. Jr.

    1983-08-01

    This two-volume report presents the results of initial research on the feasibility of applying organizational factors in nuclear power plant (NPP) safety assessment. Volume 1 of this report contains an overview of the literature, a discussion of available safety indicators, and a series of recommendations for more systematically incorporating organizational analysis into investigations of nuclear power plant safety. The six chapters of this volume discuss the major elements in our general approach to safety in the nuclear industry. The chapters include information on organizational design and safety; organizational governance; utility environment and safety related outcomes; assessments by selected federal agencies; review of data sources in the nuclear power industry; and existing safety indicators.

  18. The role of nuclear power in the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, E.I.

    1977-01-01

    The role of nuclear energy in the world is discussed from the near term and long term. For the period through the mid 1980s sufficient nuclear capacity is considered critical to forestall serious shortages of oil and possible high prices leading to economic stagnation. Over the next 30-35 years it is estimated that world nuclear power will reach a capacity of approx. 3 million megawatts electrical when world electrical capacity will be about 8 million megawatts. With this nuclear capacity and if a annual growth rate of 5% is achieved for coal, oil and gas would remain at their present rate of consumption and would be increasingly reserved for specialized uses where substitution is not feasible. Caution is stressed, however, especially in using long term forecasts except for overall guidance and even in short term projections frequent up-dating and revision is recommended. The factors which have inhibited nuclear power growth are discussed including: 1) rapidly rising capital costs and financing problems, 2) rising and uncertain fuel cycle costs, 3) uncertainties in licensing and public acceptance. Despite the foregoing, nuclear power still retains an economic edge over fossil-fired units in substantial portions of the world. Assuming satisfactory solution of its major problems it is estimated that about 27-40% of the electrical capacity of developing countries will be nuclear by the year 2000. This nuclear capacity will comprise approx. 20% of the world's total nuclear power capacity around the turn of the century. (orig.) [de

  19. BWR and PWR chemistry operating experience and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fruzzetti, K.; Garcia, S.; Lynch, N.; Reid, R.

    2014-01-01

    It is well recognized that proper control of water chemistry plays a critical role in ensuring the safe and reliable operation of Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) and Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). State-of-the-art water chemistry programs reduce general and localized corrosion of reactor coolant system, steam cycle equipment, and fuel cladding materials; ensure continued integrity of cycle components; and reduce radiation fields. Once a particular nuclear plant component has been installed or plant system constructed, proper water chemistry provides a global tool to mitigate materials degradation problems, thereby reducing the need for costly repairs or replacements. Recognizing the importance of proper chemistry control and the value in understanding the relationship between chemistry guidance and actual operating experience, EPRI continues to collect, monitor, and evaluate operating data from BWRs and PWRs around the world. More than 900 cycles of valuable BWR and PWR operating chemistry data has been collected, including online, startup and shutdown chemistry data over more than 10 years (> 20 years for BWRs). This paper will provide an overview of current trends in BWR and PWR chemistry, focusing on plants in the U.S.. Important chemistry parameters will be highlighted and discussed in the context of the EPRI Water Chemistry Guidelines requirements (i.e., those parameters considered to be of key importance as related to the major goals identified in the EPRI Guidelines: materials integrity; fuel integrity; and minimizing plant radiation fields). Perspectives will be provided in light of recent industry initiatives and changes in the EPRI BWR and PWR Water Chemistry Guidelines. (author)

  20. Radiological effects of a nuclear power plant on a river system, as demonstrated by the Gundremmingen BWR on the Danube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, H.; Ruf, M.; Huebel, K.; Luensmann, W.

    1975-01-01

    The Gundremmingen Nuclear Power Plant (boiling water reactor, 237 MW(e)), on the Upper Danube, has been in operation since 1967. Radiological data have been collected throughout its period of operation. The behaviour of the radioactive waste products in the ecological system of the Upper Danube (water, sediments, suspended solids, water-plants, fish) has been analysed in connection with environmental contamination, the uptake capacity of the Danube, and the possible pathways to man. As a result of the investigations, it seems possible to build further nuclear power plants on the Danube, if their rates of release of radioactivity are similar to those at Gundremmingen. (author)

  1. India major player in nuclear world

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "Scientists dealing in particle physics world-over have decided to build a precision machine, the proposed International Linear Collider (ILC), to explore some of the most fundamental questions about the universe. It will be the world's next largest accelerator after the one being built at CERN in Switzerlan. India is an important collaborator for ILC." (1 page)

  2. RELAP4/MOD5: a computer program for transient thermal-hydraulic analysis of nuclear reactors and related systems. User's manual. Volume I. RELAP4/MOD5 description. [PWR and BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-09-01

    RELAP4 is a computer program written in FORTRAN IV for the digital computer analysis of nuclear reactors and related systems. It is primarily applied in the study of system transient response to postulated perturbations such as coolant loop rupture, circulation pump failure, power excursions, etc. The program was written to be used for water-cooled (PWR and BWR) reactors and can be used for scale models such as LOFT and SEMISCALE. Additional versatility extends its usefulness to related applications, such as ice condenser and containment subcompartment analysis. Specific options are available for reflood (FLOOD) analysis and for the NRC Evaluation Model.

  3. Development of BWR [boiling water reactor] and PWR [pressurized water reactor] event descriptions for nuclear facility simulator training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, R.J.; Bovell, C.R.

    1987-01-01

    A number of tools that can aid nuclear facility training developers in designing realistic simulator scenarios have been developed. This paper describes each of the tools, i.e., event lists, events-by-competencies matrices, and event descriptions, and illustrates how the tools can be used to construct scenarios

  4. Can the World Stand a Nuclear Iran?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pearson, John H

    2005-01-01

    .... With the end of the cold war strategic alliances and the former Soviet Union's ability to manage and control stockpiles of nuclear weapons the threat has gone from mutually assured destruction to use by terrorists...

  5. The Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty: Regulating Nuclear Weapons around the World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Tiffany Willey

    2010-01-01

    In May 2010, scientists, national security experts, and state delegates from nations around the world will convene in New York for the 2010 Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty Review Conference. They will review current guidelines for nuclear testing and possession of nuclear weapons in accordance with the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty of 1968,…

  6. Nuclear power plants 1995 - a world survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1996-01-01

    The atw Statistics Report compiled by atw lists 428 nuclear power plants with 363 397 gross MWe in operation in 30 countries in late 1995. Another 62 units with 55 180 gross MWe were under construction in 18 countries. This adds up to a total of 490 units with an aggregate 418 577 MWe. In the course of 1995 four units in four countries started commercial operation. In the survey of electricity generation in 1995 for which no information was made available from China and Kasachstan, a total of 417 nuclear power plants were covered. In the year under review they generated an aggregate 2 282 614 GWH, which is 3.4% more than in the previous year. The highest nuclear generation again was recorded in the USA with 705 771 GWh, followed by France with 377 021 GWh. The Grohnde power station in Germany attained the maximum annual production figure of 11 359 GWh. The survey includes nine tables indicating the generating performance of each nuclear power plant, the development of electricity generation in nuclear plants, and status of nuclear power plants at the end of 1995 arranged by countries, types of reactors, and reactor manufacturers. (orig.) [de

  7. A nuclear-weapon-free world and true disarmament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvini, G.

    1999-01-01

    This preliminary note about is important to consider when discussing hopes of achieving a nuclear-weapon-free world. Without a serious effort to establish intelligent, powerful bodies to control and judge the behavior of the nations on Earth, whatever they future weapons may be, the objective to reach a nuclear-weapon-free world may even succeed, but it is not enough to stop wars and death. Even more than that: if taken alone, as the 'Great Way', it could prove negative, for it could slow down the general effort to achieve peace on out planet. A nuclear-weapon-free world is of course a very good idea but two points must be discussed: how to achieve the nuclear-weapon-free world; and what will happen afterwards. Some considerations on the second point are made

  8. Development status of compact containment BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heki, H.; Nakamaru, M.; Mori, H.; Sekiguchi, K.; Kuroki, M.; Arai, K.; Hida, T.

    2005-01-01

    In Japan, increase of nuclear plant unit capacity has been promoted to take advantage of economies of scale while further enhancing safety and reliability. As a result, more than 50 units of nuclear power plants are playing important role in electric power generation. However, the factors, such as stagnant growth in the recent electricity demand, limitation in electricity grid capacity and limited in initial investment avoiding risk, will not be in favor of large plant outputs. The reactor concept considered in this paper has a small power output, a compact containment and a simplified BWR configuration with comprehensive safety features. The Compact Containment Boiling Water Reactor (CCR), which is being developed with matured BWR technologies together with innovative systems/components, will provide attractiveness for the energy market in the world due to its flexibility in energy demands as well as in site conditions, its high potential in reducing investment risk and its safety feature facilitating public acceptance. The flexibility is achieved by CCR's mid/small power output of 400 MWe class and capability of long operating cycle (refueling intervals). The high investment potential is expected from CCR's simplification/innovation in design such as natural circulation core cooling with the bottom located short core, top mounted upper entry control rod drives (CRDs) with ring-type dryers and simplified ECCS system with high pressure resistible primary containment vessel (PCV) concept. The natural circulation core eliminates recirculation pumps as well as needs for maintenance of such pumps. The top mounted upper entry CRDs enable the bottom located short core in RPV. The safety feature mainly consists of large water inventory above the core without large penetration below the top of the core, passive cooling system by isolation condenser (IC), high pressure resistible PCV and in-vessel retention (IVR) capability. The large inventory increases the system response

  9. After the world court opinion: Towards a world without nuclear weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, D.

    1998-01-01

    With the World Court advisory opinion on the treat or use of nuclear weapons, a new moment has arrived in the 51-year history of atomic bomb. The highest legal body in the world has said that governments must not only pursue but conclude negotiations leading to total nuclear disarmament. Both a sharp focus and a comprehensive action are required in developing public support and political action towards a safer, more peaceful world. Three-pronged interrelated course of action is proposed: a Nuclear Weapon Convention; reduction in conventional arms and control of arms trade; and new spending priorities or sustainable development

  10. Thermal performance of a buried nuclear waste storage container storing a hybrid mix of PWR and BWR spent fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, G.L.

    1988-09-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory will design, model, and test nuclear waste packages for use at the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. One such package would store lightly packed spent fuel rods from both pressurized and boiling water reactors. The storage container provides the primary containment of the nuclear waste and the spent fuel rod cladding provides secondary containment. A series of transient conduction and radiation heat transfer analyses was run to determine for the first 1000 yr of storage if the temperature of the tuff at the borehole wall ever falls below 97/degree/C and whether the cladding of the stored spent fuel ever exceeds 350/degree/C. Limiting the borehole to temperatures of 97/degree/C or greater helps minimize corrosion by assuring that no condensed water collects on the container. The 350/degree/C cladding limit minimizes the possibility of creep-related failure in the spent fuel rod cladding. For a series of packages stored in a 8 x 30 m borehole grid where each package contains 10-yr-old spent fuel rods generating 4.74 kW or more, the borehole wall stays above 97/degree/C for the full 1000-yr analysis period

  11. Can world answer the new nuclear necessity?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finon, D.

    2003-09-01

    Thanks to climatic change policies and to the prospective studies about the depletion of oil and gas reserves, a new chance will be given to nuclear energy. However, even if the nuclear industry has become more transparent, more attentive to the public preoccupations, and permanently looking for a demonstration of its safety, the institutional bases of its re-start up (the participating decision processes and the competing framework of electric markets) are much less favourable than those of its initial technological development. The future of nuclear energy is not warranted except if a strong consensus happens in dominating countries about the real or assumed catastrophic consequences of the greenhouse effect and if this sudden awareness changes the public opinion about the specific risks of nuclear energy and radioactive wastes. The uncertainty which will remain during, at least, the next 15 years will greatly complicate the choices of the nuclear industry and of the governments. For this reason, a paradoxical effort has to be made for the promotion of energy efficiency and renewable energy sources. (J.S.)

  12. BWR consolidation system final design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, G.L.; Kelly, M.J.; Larsen, W.R.

    1993-05-01

    Because of delays in the opening of a permanent geologic repository to accept spent fuel from nuclear reactor plants, several utilities are seeking additional off-site storage to avert premature shutdown. Fuel rod consolidation is a proven, viable option for pressurized water reactor (PWR) plants, but until now, no consolidation system addressed boiling water reactor (BWR) spent-fuel assemblies.The purpose of this project, jointly funded by the Empire State Electric Energy Research Company (ESEERCO) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), is to develop a system for consolidating BWR spent fuel assemblies. This design will provide more efficient storage in reactor spent-fuel pools. The design goal is a 2:1 consolidation of the fuel rods and a minimum 10:1 compaction of the non-fuel bearing components. in addition, the consolidation system must be operationally compatible with BWR reactor plants and be economically viable with other forms of supplementary on-site storage. The work began in Lynchburg, Virginia on May 6, 1991 and concluded on September 30, 1992 with the delivery of the final report. The design achieves all of the project goals. Furthermore, consolidation of BWR spent-fuel assemblies is feasible, compatible with reactor plant operations and potentially the lowest cost option for a utility seeking to add oil-site storage capacity

  13. Nuclear safeguards and security in a changing world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badolato, E.V.

    1986-01-01

    Two major crises of 1986 - the Chernobyl nuclear accident and international terrorism have had the effect of making what everyone does even more critically important for U.S. national security and for the security of the world. Chernobyl can be a starting point for efforts to make nuclear power systems safer and more benign. It also poses very basic questions for nuclear arms control activities. A fundamental objective of the Administration's arms control policy is to achieve substantial and equitable reductions in U.S. and Soviet nuclear forces with effective verification. However, Chernobyl served to remind the U.S. once again of the obsessive secretiveness of the Soviet Union and the difficulties of obtaining information on Soviet nuclear weapon activities. All of this points to the importance of developing improved monitoring technologies and obtaining Soviet agreement on on-site inspection. Nuclear safeguards and security developments in response to a changing world are the topic of discussion in this paper

  14. Thermal performance of a buried nuclear waste storage container storing a hybrid mix of PWR and BWR spent fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, G.L.

    1991-11-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory will design, model, and test nuclear waste packages for use at the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. On such package would store tightly packed spent fuel rods from both pressurized and boiling water reactors. The storage container provides the primary containment of the nuclear waste and the spent fuel rod cladding provides secondary containment. A series of transient conduction and radiation heat transfer analyses was run to determine for the first 1000 yr of storage if the temperature of the tuff at the borehole wall ever falls below 97 degrees C and whether the cladding of the stored spent fuel ever exceeds 350 degrees C. Limiting the borehole to temperatures of 97 degrees C or greater helps minimize corrosion by assuring that no condensed water collects on the container. The 350 degrees C cladding limit minimizes the possibility of creep- related failure in the spent fuel rod cladding. For a series of packages stored in a 8 x 30 m borehole grid where each package contains 10-yr-old spent fuel rods generating 4.74 kW or more, the borehole wall stays above 97 degrees C for the full 10000-yr analysis period. For the 4.74-kW load, the peak cladding temperature rises to just below the 350 degrees C limit about 4 years after emplacement. If the packages are stored using the spacing specified in the Site Characterization Plan (15 ft x 126 ft), a maximum of 4.1 kW per container may be stored. If the 0.05-m-thick void between the container and the borehole wall is filled with loosely packed bentonite, the peak cladding temperature rises more than 40 degrees C above the allowed cladding limit. In all cases the dominant heat transfer mode between container components is thermal radiation

  15. Great expectations. Projections of nuclear power around the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, Alan; Rogner, Hans-Holger; Gritsevskyi, Andrii

    2009-01-01

    In its 2008 edition of Energy, Electricity and Nuclear Power Estimates for the Period to 2030, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has again revised its projections for nuclear power upwards. Every year since 1981 the IAEA has published 2 updated projections for the world's nuclear power generating capacity, a low projection and a high projection. The low projection is a down to earth, business-as-usual projection. The high projection takes into account government and corporate announcements about longer-term plans for nuclear investments as well as potential new national policies, e.g., to combat climate change. The results for the 2008 projections are presented. In the low projection, the projected nuclear power capacity in 2030 is 473 GW(e), some 27% higher than today's 372 GW(e). In the high projection, nuclear capacity in 2030 is 748 GW(e), double today's capacity. But while projections for nuclear power's future rose, its share of the world's electricity generation today dropped from 15% in 2006 to 14% in 2007. The main reason is that while total global electricity generation rose 4.8% from 2007 to 2008, nuclear electricity actually dropped slightly. The overall message from the IAEA's 2008 edition of Energy, Electricity and Nuclear Power Estimates for the Period to 2030 is that global electricity use will grow significantly, that nuclear power will have to expand more rapidly than it has done recently in order to maintain its share, and that nuclear power can meet the challenge. (orig.)

  16. Nuclear power development around the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rippon, Simon.

    1986-01-01

    In 1985, in the world as a whole, 43 power reactors with a total capacity of 42.7 GWe entered into regular commercial operation. Such is the dearth of orders, that by 1992 there may be no power reactors commissioned in the non-communist world, yet there are some encouraging prospects for the mid to late nineties. Performance, developments, prospects and political climate in the following areas are considered: USA, Western Europe, Eastern Europe, Finland, Japan, Taiwan, Republic of Korea, India, China, USSR, Egypt, Turkey and South America

  17. Brave new worlds for nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassels, Derek.

    1979-01-01

    This article of a general nature discusses the radioisotopes produced by the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited Commercial Products Division. Cobalt treatment units are being used successfully throughout the world and cobalt units are becoming increasingly important in sterilizing medical supplies. This technology may be extended to kill bacteria and insects responsible for food spoilage. (TI)

  18. Paths to a nuclear world with reliable safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zebroski, E.L.

    1978-01-01

    The effectiveness of safeguards in the nuclear industry in reducing proliferation is surveyed. Several basic topics relative to proliferation which are discussed are: (1) ''the recognition that 'proliferation' encompasses at least four different issues which may require distinct approaches and policies;'' (2) ''in the context of the regulatory process by which the perceived risks to society are managed;'' (3) ''in the context of the realistic options and objectives for an attainable world nuclear structure;'' and (4) ''in the perception of the public and of decision-makers of the attainable reduction in risks - and at what costs - and the recognition of the extent to which some costs have already been accrued.'' Options open to the world are: (1) a structured nuclear world, (2) an unstructured nuclear world, or (3) a benign energy world. Current US policy of denial of nuclear energy by indefinite delay is seen as indirectly pointing the US toward option 1 or 3, as the basic cause of American economic decline, and as a root cause of many international tensions resulting from the US decline. Certain alternate approaches to a breeder-type reactor program or to fuel reprocessing which should contribute to a more proliferation-resistant nuclear program are briefly discussed

  19. Procedures for using expert judgment to estimate human-error probabilities in nuclear power plant operations. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seaver, D.A.; Stillwell, W.G.

    1983-03-01

    This report describes and evaluates several procedures for using expert judgment to estimate human-error probabilities (HEPs) in nuclear power plant operations. These HEPs are currently needed for several purposes, particularly for probabilistic risk assessments. Data do not exist for estimating these HEPs, so expert judgment can provide these estimates in a timely manner. Five judgmental procedures are described here: paired comparisons, ranking and rating, direct numerical estimation, indirect numerical estimation and multiattribute utility measurement. These procedures are evaluated in terms of several criteria: quality of judgments, difficulty of data collection, empirical support, acceptability, theoretical justification, and data processing. Situational constraints such as the number of experts available, the number of HEPs to be estimated, the time available, the location of the experts, and the resources available are discussed in regard to their implications for selecting a procedure for use.

  20. INIS: Nuclear information helping the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atieh, T.

    2005-01-01

    The International Nuclear Information System of the IAEA, called INIS is the leading information source on peaceful application of nuclear sciences and technology. It is based on international cooperation and decentralized responsibilities. The INIS secretariat cooperates with 114 national and 19 international centres. INIS comprises more than 2.6 mill bibliographic references and more than 600 non-conventional full text papers. INIS assists the user to locate information in his/her field of interest over the time and informs about colleagues as well as the locations of research. INIS offers a single point of access to current and historical information, reliable and value-added information, ensures worldwide visibility for the researcher and addresses the need of developing and developed countries

  1. Analysis of the microstructural evolution of the damage by neutron irradiation in the pressure vessel of a nuclear power reactor BWR; Analisis de la evolucion microestructural del dano por irradiacion neutronica en la vasija de presion de un reactor nuclear de potencia BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moranchel y R, M.

    2012-07-01

    Nuclear reactor pressure vessel type BWR, installed in Mexico and in many other countries, are made of an alloy of low carbon steel. The American Society for Testing and Materials (Astm) classifies this alloy as A533-B, class 1. Both the vessel and other internal structures are continuously exposed to the neutron flux from the reactions of fission in nuclear fuel. A large number of neutrons reach the vessel and penetrate certain depth depending on their energy. Its penetration in the neutron collides with the nuclei of the atoms out of their positions in the crystal lattice of steel, producing vacancies, interstitial, segregations, among other defects, capable of affecting its mechanical properties. Analyze the micro-structural damage to the vessel due to neutron irradiation, is essential for reasons of integrity of this enclosure and safety of any nuclear power plant. The objective of this thesis work is theoretical and experimentally determine the microstructural damage of a type nuclear reactor vessel steel BWR, due to neutron radiation from the reactor core, using microscopic and spectroscopic techniques as well as Monte Carlo simulation. Microscopy Optical, Scanning Electron Microscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy, Energy Dispersion of X-rays Spectrometry and X-rays Diffractometry were the techniques used in this research. These techniques helped in the characterization of both the basis of design of pressure vessel steel and steel irradiated, after eight years of neutron irradiation on the vessel, allowing know the surface morphology and crystal structures of the previous steel and post-irradiation, analyze the change in the microstructure of the steel vessel, morphological damage to surface level in an irradiated sample, among which are cavities in the order of microns produced by Atomic displacements due to the impact of neutronic, above all in the first layers of thickness of the vessel, the effect of swelling, regions of greater damage and Atomic

  2. World nuclear capacity and fuel cycle requirements 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-12-01

    This analysis report presents the current status and projections of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries in the world using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. Long-term projections of US nuclear capacity, generation, fuel cycle requirements, and spent fuel discharges for three different scenarios through 2030 are provided in support of the Department of Energy's activities pertaining to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (as amended in 1987). The projections of uranium requirements also support the Energy Information Administration's annual report, Domestic Uranium Mining and Milling Industry: Viability Assessment for the Lower and Upper Reference case scenarios were obtained from the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting, Energy Information Administration. Most of these projections were developed using the World Integrated Nuclear Evaluation System (WINES) model

  3. Status and Trends of Nuclear Power World-wide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gueorguiev, B.; Spiegelberg-Planer, R.

    1996-01-01

    The reliable and adequate supply of energy, especially electricity, is necessary not only for economic development but to enhance the quality of life. Nuclear power is a proven technology which already supplies about 17% of the world''s electricity generation. In 1995, seven countries produce more than 40% of their electricity from nuclear power plants: Lithuanian, France, Belgium, Sweden, Bulgaria, Slovak and Hungary. It is quite clear that many countries are heavily reliant on nuclear power and are well beyond the point where nuclear power could be replaced by some other source, so, nuclear power remains one of the few technologically proven, economically promising and environmentally benign energy sources. An important factor in the continued development of nuclear power is the extent to which nuclear generated electricity remains economically competitive. Factors such as plant availability, standardisation of systems, components and equipment, as well as the cost of equipment to meet safety and environmental regulations play also an important role in determining the relative competitiveness of nuclear power plants. Many operating organizations have already impressive results in the reduction of plant unavailability. The number of nuclear power plants currently operating with annual availability factor exceeding 85% is increasing. Good performance of some operators should establish performance targets for operators everywhere. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has the only international and almost complete information system, the Power Reactor Information System (PRIS) with nuclear power plant status and performance data. This paper presents the current status of nuclear power plants, according to information contained in the IAEA. It discusses the plant performance indicators available in PRIS and the improvement trend in the performance of nuclear power plants based on these indicators. It also presents the future trends of nuclear power focusing

  4. Fuel cycle cost projections. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, L.L.; Chockie, A.D.

    1979-12-01

    This report estimates current and future costs associated with the light water reactor nuclear fuel cycle for both once-through and thermal recycle cases. Using a range of future nuclear power generating scenarios, process flows are developed for each segment of the nuclear fuel cycle. Capital and operating costs are estimated and are combined with the process flows to generate unit cost projections for each fuel cycle segment. The unit costs and process flows are combined in the NUCOST program to estimate fuel cycle power costs through the year 2020. The unit costs are also used to estimate the fuel costs of an individual model PWR and BWR.

  5. World nuclear capacity and fuel cycle requirements, November 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-11-30

    This analysis report presents the current status and projections of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries in the world using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. Long-term projections of US nuclear capacity, generation, fuel cycle requirements, and spent fuel discharges for three different scenarios through 2030 are provided in support of the Department of Energy`s activities pertaining to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (as amended in 1987). The projections of uranium requirements also support the Energy Information Administration`s annual report, Domestic Uranium Mining and Milling Industry: Viability Assessment.

  6. World nuclear capacity and fuel cycle requirements, November 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This analysis report presents the current status and projections of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries in the world using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. Long-term projections of US nuclear capacity, generation, fuel cycle requirements, and spent fuel discharges for three different scenarios through 2030 are provided in support of the Department of Energy's activities pertaining to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (as amended in 1987). The projections of uranium requirements also support the Energy Information Administration's annual report, Domestic Uranium Mining and Milling Industry: Viability Assessment

  7. World list of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    Twice each year Nuclear News sends a questionnaire to each utility or agency on this list, asking for corrections or additions to the information listed. In cases where a response is not received, we try to follow up by phone or facsimile, though this is not always possible for plants outside the United States. The criterion for listing a unit is that either an order or a letter of intent has been signed for the reactor. In cases where the definition of open-quotes letter of intentclose quotes may be ambiguous, or where a special situation exists, the judgment of the utility is followed as to whether a plant should be included

  8. Nuclear weapons proliferation as a world order problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falk, R.

    1977-01-01

    World-order concerns have intensified recently in light of mounting evidence that a weapons capability will soon be within easy reach of more and more governments and of certain nongovernmental groupings as well. One reliable source estimates that by 1985 as many as fifty countries could ''produce enough plutonium each year for at least several dozen nuclear explosives.'' In an even more immediate sense, ''economic competition among nuclear suppliers today could soon lead to a world in which twenty or more nations are but a few months from a nuclear weapons force.'' Three developments have created this ''world order'' sense of concern: (1) increased pace of civilian nuclear power deployment globally as a consequence of rising oil prices, unreliability of oil supplies, and reality of dwindling oil reserves in any case; (2) actuality of India's nuclear explosion in May 1974 which demonstrated vividly how any state that pursues a ''civilian'' program can also develop its own weapons capability; and (3) the intensification of competition for international nuclear sales which makes it increasingly evident that nonproliferation goals are no longer compatible with the pursuit of national commercial advantage; essentially, this reality has emerged from a break in the American monopoly over civilian nuclear technology and the willingness of French and German suppliers to provide all elements of the nuclear fuel cycle, including enrichment and reprocessing facilities,to any nation that feels it can afford to buy them; the German-Brazilian deal (worth at least $4 billion) has proven to be the equivalent in the commercial realm of India's ''peaceful'' nuclear explosion. Such developments disclose the alarming prospect that easier access to nuclear technology will make it relatively simple and thus more likely for a beleaguered government or a desperate political actor of any sort to acquire and possibly use nuclear weapons

  9. Assessment and management of ageing of major nuclear power plant components important to safety: BWR pressure vessel internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-10-01

    At present, there are over four hundred operational nuclear power plants (NPPs) in IAEA Member States. Operating experience has shown that ineffective control of the ageing degradation of the major NPP components (caused for instance by unanticipated phenomena and by operating maintenance or manufacturing errors) can jeopardize plant safety and also plant life. Ageing in these NPPs must be therefore effectively managed to ensure the availability of design functions throughout the plant service life. From the safety perspective, this means controlling, within acceptable limits, the ageing degradation and ware out of components important to safety so that adequate safety margins remain, i.e. integrity and functional capability in excess of normal operating requirements. This TECDOC is one in a series of guidance reports on the assessment and management of ageing of the major NPP components important to safety. The reports are based on experience and practices of NPP operators, regulators, designers, manufacturers, and technical support organizations and a widely accepted Methodology for the Management of Ageing of NPP Components Important to Safety, which was issued by the IAEA in 1992. Since the reports are written from a safety perspective, they do not address life or life cycle management of plant components, which involves economic considerations. The current practices for the assessment of safety margins (fitness for service) and the inspection, monitoring and mitigation of ageing degradation of selected components of heavy water moderated reactors (HWRs), boiling water reactors (BWRs), pressurized water reactors (PWRs), and water moderated, water cooled energy reactors (WWERs) are documented in the reports. These practices are intended to help all involved directly and indirectly in ensuring the safe operation of NPPs, and also to provide a common technical basis for dialogue between plant operators and regulators when dealing with age related licensing issues

  10. Assessment and management of ageing of major nuclear power plant components important to safety: BWR pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-10-01

    At present, there are over four hundred operational nuclear power plants (NPPs) in IAEA Member States. Operating experience has shown that ineffective control of the ageing degradation of the major NPP components (caused for instance by unanticipated phenomena and by operating, maintenance or manufacturing errors) can jeopardize plant safety and also plant life. Ageing in these NPPs must be therefore effectively managed to ensure the availability of design functions throughout the plant service life. From the safety perspective, this means controlling, within acceptable limits, the ageing degradation and wear out of plant components important to safety so that adequate safety margins remain, i.e. integrity and functional capability in excess of normal operating requirements. This TECDOC is one in a series of reports on the assessment and management of ageing of the major NPP components important to safety. The reports are based on experience and practices of NPP operators, regulators, designers, manufacturers and technical support organizations and a widely accepted Methodology for the Management of Ageing of NPP Components Important to Safety, which was issued by the IAEA in 1992. Since the reports are written from a safety perspective, they do not address life or life cycle management of plant components, which involves economic considerations. The current practices for the assessment of safety margins (fitness for service) and the inspection, monitoring and mitigation of ageing degradation of selected components of Canada deuterium-uranium (CANDU) reactors, boiling water reactors (BWRs), pressurized water reactors (PWRs), and water moderated, water cooled energy reactors (WWERs) are documented in the reports. These practices are intended to help all involved directly and indirectly in ensuring the safe operation of NPPs, and also to provide a common technical basis for dialogue between plant operators and regulators when dealing with age related licensing issues

  11. Managing nuclear weapons in a changing world: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-31

    The Center for Security and Technology Studies was established at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to support long-range technical studies on issues of importance to US national security. An important goal of the Center is to bring together Laboratory staff and the broader outside community through a program of technical studies, visitors, symposia, seminars, workshops, and publications. With this in mind, the Center and LLNL`s Defense Systems Program sponsored a conference on Managing Nuclear Weapons in a Changing World held on November 17--18,1992. The first day of the meeting focused on nuclear weapons issues in the major geographical areas of the world. On the second day, the conference participants discussed what could be done to manage, control, and account for nuclear weapons in this changing world. Each of the talks and the concluding panel discussion are being indexed as separate documents.

  12. Managing nuclear weapons in a changing world: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The Center for Security and Technology Studies was established at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to support long-range technical studies on issues of importance to US national security. An important goal of the Center is to bring together Laboratory staff and the broader outside community through a program of technical studies, visitors, symposia, seminars, workshops, and publications. With this in mind, the Center and LLNL's Defense Systems Program sponsored a conference on Managing Nuclear Weapons in a Changing World held on November 17--18,1992. The first day of the meeting focused on nuclear weapons issues in the major geographical areas of the world. On the second day, the conference participants discussed what could be done to manage, control, and account for nuclear weapons in this changing world. Each of the talks and the concluding panel discussion are being indexed as separate documents

  13. Neutron activation analysis and activity in the vessel steel of a BWR reactor for their study without radiological risks in microscopy and spectrometry; Analisis de activacion neutronica y actividad en el acero de la vasija de un reactor nuclear tipo BWR para su estudio sin riesgos radiologicos en microscopia y espectrometria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moranchel, M.; Garcia B, A. [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, Departamento de Fisica, Unidad Profesional Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Zacatenco, 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Longoria G, L. C., E-mail: mmoranchel@ipn.mx [IAEA, Department of Technical Cooperation, Division for Latin America, Room B1109 Wagramerstrasse 5, PO Box 100, A-1400, Vienna (Austria)

    2012-07-01

    The vessel material of nuclear reactors is subject to irradiation damage induced by the bombardment of neutrons coming from the reactor core. Neutrons are classified as fast and thermal, which produce different effects. Fast neutrons cause damage to the material by dislocation or displacement of atoms in the crystal structure, while the effect of thermal neutrons is a nuclear transmutation that can significantly change the properties of the material. The type and intensity of damage is based on the characteristics of the material, the flow of neutrons and the modes of neutrons interaction with the atomic structures of the material, among others. This work, alluding to nuclear transmutation, makes an analysis of neutron activation of all isotopes in a steel boiling water nuclear reactor (BWR) vessel. An analytical expression is obtained in order to model activity of steel, on the basis of the weight percentage of its atomic components. Its activity is theoretically estimated in a witness sample of the same material as that of the vessel, placed within the nuclear reactor since the beginning of its commercial operation in April 1995, up to August 2010. It was theoretically determined that the witness sample, with a 0.56 g mass (1 x 1 x 0.07 cm{sup 3} dimensions or equivalent) does not present a radiological risks during the stage of preparation, observation and analysis of it in electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction equipment s. The theoretical results were checked experimentally by measuring the activity of the sample by means of gamma spectrometry, measurement of the exposure levels around the sample, as well as the induced level to whole body and limbs, using thermo-luminescent dosimetry (TLD). As a result of the theoretical analysis, new chemical elements are predicted, as a result of the activation phenomena and radioactive decay, whose presence can be a fundamental factor of change in the properties of the vessel. This work is a preamble to the

  14. BWR stability analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valtonen, K.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this study has been to examine TVO-I oscillation incident, which occured in February 22.1987 and to find out safety implications of oscillations in ATWS incidents. Calculations have been performed with RAMONA-3B and TRAB codes. RAMONA-3B is a BWR transient analysis code with three-dimencional neutron kinetics and nonequilibrium, nonhomogeneous thermal hydraulics. TRAB code is a one-dimencional BWR transient code which uses methods similar to RAMONA-3B. The results have shown that both codes are capable of analyzing of the oscillation incidents. Both out-of-phase and in-phase oscillations are possible. If the reactor scram fails (ATWS) during oscillations the severe fuel failures are always possible and the reactor core may exceed the prompt criticality

  15. Nuclear energy - stabilising factor in the world economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legassov, V.; Feoktistov, L.; Kouzmine, I.

    1986-01-01

    One of the most important factors for international stability is the development of the economy, reducing the risk of local armed conflicts which could escalate into world-wide nuclear war. Economic progress which plays such a vital part is in turn heavily dependent on energy supplies. The article takes a brief look at the role of nuclear power in this context. (B.M.S.)

  16. The Application of Nuclear Technology for a Better World

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ita, E.B.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear Technology is widely used in different areas and sector of our economy to better man kind and his environment. Peaceful applications of nuclear technology have several benefits to the world today. It is widely believed that nuclear technology is mainly used mainly for the production of electricity (Nuclear Power Plants – NPPs). Many are not aware of the other numerous benefits of nuclear technology. Nuclear technology can be applied in different fields for numerous benefits. Different sectors Nuclear Technology application can improve the living standard of man and his environment: – Food and Agriculture; – Medicine; – Industrial; – Energy; – Education; — Research and Development; – Environment. The benefits of the application of nuclear technology cannot be over emphasised. These benefits range from the improved quality of purified water we drink, the textiles we wear, improved quality of stored grains for preservation of foods, water analyses, improved transportation system work, drugs production, medical tests and analysis, clean environment through radioisotope techniques etc. The application of nuclear technology also gives a safer, greener, healthier and pollution free environment and atmosphere for human habitation. In my poster, the numerous benefits of the various applications of Nuclear Technology will be clearly enumerated and heighted. (author)

  17. Recent developments in BWR water chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water chemistry is of critical importance to the operation and economic viability of the Boiling Water Reactor (BWR). A successful water chemistry program will satisfy the following goals: - Minimize the incidence and growth of SCC/IASCC, - Minimize plant radiation fields controllable by chemistry, -Maintain fuel integrity by minimizing cladding corrosion, - Minimize flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC) in balance-of-plant components. The impact of water chemistry on each of these goals is discussed in more detail in this paper. It should be noted that water chemistry programs also include surveillance and operating limits for other plant water systems (e.g., service water, closed cooling water systems, etc.) but these are out of the scope of this paper. This paper reviews developments in water chemistry guidelines for U.S. BWR nuclear power plants. (author). 2 figs., 2 tabs., 7 refs

  18. BWR mechanics and materials technology update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiss, E.

    1983-01-01

    This paper discusses technical results obtained from a variety of important programs underway at General Electric's Nuclear Engineering Division. The principal objective of these programs is to qualify and improve BWR product related technologies that fall broadly under the disciplines of Applied Mechanics and Materials Engineering. The paper identifies and deals with current technical issues that are of general importance to the LWR industry albeit the specific focus is directed to the development and qualification of analytical predictive methods and criteria, and improved materials for use in the design of the BWR. In this paper, specific results and accomplishments are summarized to provide a braod perspective of technology advances. Results are presented in sections which discuss: dynamic analysis and modeling; fatigue and fracture evaluation; materials engineering advances; and flow induced vibration. (orig.)

  19. TRAC-BWR development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weaver, W.L.; Rouhani, S.Z.

    1983-01-01

    The TRAC-BD1/MOD1 code containing many new or improved models has been assembled and is undergoing developmental assessment and testing and should be available shortly. The preparation of the manual for this code version is underway and should be available to the USNRC and their designated contractors by April of 1984. Finally work is currently underway on a fast running version of TRAC-BWR which will contain a one-dimensional neutron kinetics model

  20. World Nuclear Association Design Change Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waddington, John Geoffrey

    2013-01-01

    This presentation treats of design change management in the regulation of nuclear fleets. It covers activities of the WNA/CORDEL/Design Change Management Task Force, including views on the roles of vendors, owner's groups, utility and design authority, WANO and the regulators. The presentation highlights differences of capabilities between large utilities with strong technical staff and smaller utilities that require support and expertise from others. It also notes the current expectation that licensees are solely responsible for the safety of the design and operation of their plants and for maintaining a full understanding and knowledge of the design within licensee's own organization in an internal entity called design authority. It encourages regulators to re-examine this expectation for design changes, arguing that while large utilities maybe be able to deal with design changes, the smaller utilities may be challenged due to their small size and lack of appropriate expertise. It further notes that the original designer must be involved in the management of design changes. In addition, the presentation emphasizes benefits of standardization in design and regulatory expectations internationally, including the benefits of increasing safety and economy. The author provides that the CORDEL Working Group uses international standardization to mean that each vendor's design can be built by a vendor, and ordered by a utility, in every country and be able to meet national regulations without significant changes other than adaptations to meet site requirements. In this discussion, he highlights the aircraft industry as an example and notes the need for internationally agreed mechanisms for design change as well as the need for formal, agreed (internationally) role for the designer to play throughout the fleet lifetime

  1. Nuclear energy; Le nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    This digest document was written by members of the union of associations of ex-members and retired people of the Areva group (UARGA). It gives a comprehensive overview of the nuclear industry world, starting from radioactivity and its applications, and going on with the fuel cycle (front-end, back-end, fuel reprocessing, transports), the nuclear reactors (PWR, BWR, Candu, HTR, generation 4 systems), the effluents from nuclear facilities, the nuclear wastes (processing, disposal), and the management and safety of nuclear activities. (J.S.)

  2. World-wide termination of nuclear energy application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quirin, W.

    1991-01-01

    It is easy to require the widely discussed termination of nuclear energy application, but it is hardly possible to realise it, unless one is prepared to accept enormous economic and ecological problems. The article investigates, whether the other energy carriers or energy saving methods, respectively, would be in a position to replace the nuclear energy. Thereby the aspects of securing the supply and its economy are of considerable importance. The author describes furthermore the effects of terminating nuclear energy on the growing world population and the economy of trading countries. Ecological problems that may also be aggravated are dealt with, too. (orig.) [de

  3. Simulation of Irradiated BWR fuel rod (TS) test in NSRR using FRAP-T6 and NSR-77

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Takehiko; Murofushi, Akira; Hosoyamada, Ryuji.

    1994-03-01

    Series of pulse irradiation tests have been performed in the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) to investigate irradiated fuel rod performance under the Reactivity Initiated Accident (RIA) conditions. Five tests, called Tests TS-1 through TS-5, were conducted in a period from 1989 to 1993 with irradiated 7x7 type BWR fuel rods provided from a commercial power plant. Simulation calculations of the TS tests were carried out with the FRAP-T6 code, which is widely used in the world to estimate fuel performance under various accident conditions, and with the NSR77 code, which describes fresh fuel rod performance well in the NSRR tests. Results of the calculation are compiled in this report and applicability of the codes to the irradiated BWR fuel rod tests is discussed. (author)

  4. Data feature: World nuclear power plant capacity 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-11-01

    At this point, the future of the nuclear power industry remains largely in doubt. The gloomy predictions about global warming have done little to convince politicians and the public of the benefits of nuclear power. Meanwhile, the setbacks to nuclear have continued apace: The United States has failed to take the expected lead in ordering new nuclear plants. And President-elect Bill Clinton does not consider nuclear a major part of his energy strategy. The situation looks equally bleak in other countries. Canada's biggest utility, Ontario Hydro, was forced under intense political pressure to defer its ambitious nuclear expansion program until after the year 2010. In Europe, the suspension of France's Superphenix fast-breeder reactor in June could stop progress on the technology indefinitely. And the Finnish parliament dropped plans for expansion of nuclear power from its national energy strategy. Developing and semi-industrialized countries, such as Brazil and Argentina, have shown little progress, taking upwards of twenty years to complete plants already under construction. Nuclear's problems seem always to hinge on economics. Nuclear has little chance of revival during the current global recession, especially in countries fighting for their long-term economic survival. That is why NUKEM believes nuclear power will not grow much in the CIS and Eastern Europe beyond the projects already in the advanced stages of construction. What's more, the longer countries such as Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, Switzerland and Finland keep their nuclear expansion plans on hold, the harder it will be to get the political support to restart them. So far in 1992, only two nuclear plants, with a combined capacity of 1,520 MWe, have gone into commercial operation. One more 1,330 MWe reactor may start up by year's end. By then, NUKEM expects world nuclear plant capacity to stand at 330.3 GWe.

  5. Data feature: World nuclear power plant capacity 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    At this point, the future of the nuclear power industry remains largely in doubt. The gloomy predictions about global warming have done little to convince politicians and the public of the benefits of nuclear power. Meanwhile, the setbacks to nuclear have continued apace: The United States has failed to take the expected lead in ordering new nuclear plants. And President-elect Bill Clinton does not consider nuclear a major part of his energy strategy. The situation looks equally bleak in other countries. Canada's biggest utility, Ontario Hydro, was forced under intense political pressure to defer its ambitious nuclear expansion program until after the year 2010. In Europe, the suspension of France's Superphenix fast-breeder reactor in June could stop progress on the technology indefinitely. And the Finnish parliament dropped plans for expansion of nuclear power from its national energy strategy. Developing and semi-industrialized countries, such as Brazil and Argentina, have shown little progress, taking upwards of twenty years to complete plants already under construction. Nuclear's problems seem always to hinge on economics. Nuclear has little chance of revival during the current global recession, especially in countries fighting for their long-term economic survival. That is why NUKEM believes nuclear power will not grow much in the CIS and Eastern Europe beyond the projects already in the advanced stages of construction. What's more, the longer countries such as Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, Switzerland and Finland keep their nuclear expansion plans on hold, the harder it will be to get the political support to restart them. So far in 1992, only two nuclear plants, with a combined capacity of 1,520 MWe, have gone into commercial operation. One more 1,330 MWe reactor may start up by year's end. By then, NUKEM expects world nuclear plant capacity to stand at 330.3 GWe

  6. Nuclear Science Outreach in the World Year of Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahan, Margaret

    2006-04-01

    The ability of scientists to articulate the importance and value of their research has become increasingly important in the present climate of declining budgets, and this is most critical in the field of nuclear science ,where researchers must fight an uphill battle against negative public perception. Yet nuclear science encompasses important technical and societal issues that should be of primary interest to informed citizens, and the need for scientists trained in nuclear techniques are important for many applications in nuclear medicine, national security and future energy sources. The NSAC Education Subcommittee Report [1] identified the need for a nationally coordinated effort in nuclear science outreach, naming as its first recommendation that `the highest priority for new investment in education be the creation by the DOE and NSF of a Center for Nuclear Science Outreach'. This talk will review the present status of public outreach in nuclear science and highlight some specific efforts that have taken place during the World Year of Physics. [1] Education in Nuclear Science: A Status Report and Recommendations for the Beginning of the 21^st Century, A Report of the DOE/NSF Nuclear Science Advisory Committee Subcommittee on Education, November 2004, http://www.sc.doe.gov/henp/np/nsac/docs/NSACCReducationreportfinal.pdf.

  7. World electricity generation, nuclear power, and oil markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    Striking changes have characterized the world's production and use of energy over the past 15 years. Most prominent have been the wide price fluctuations, politicization of world oil prices and supply, along with profound changes in patterns of production and consumption. This report, based on a study by energy analysts at Science Concepts, Inc., in the United States, traces changes in world energy supply since 1973-74 - the time of the first oil ''price shocks''. In so doing, it identifies important lessons for the future. The study focused in particular on the role of the electric power sector because the growth in fuel use in it has been accomplished without oil. Instead, the growth has directly displaced oil. In the pre-1973 era, the world relied increasingly on oil for many energy applications, including the production of electricity. By 1973, more than on-fourth of the world's electricity was produced by burning oil. By 1987, however, despite a large increase in electric demand, the use of oil was reigned back to generating less than 10% of the world's electricity. Nuclear power played a major role in this turnaround. From 1973-87, analysts at Science Concepts found, nuclear power displaced the burning of 11.7 billion barrels of oil world-wide and avoided US $323 billion in oil purchases

  8. World energy needs and their impact on nuclear reactor development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foell, W.K.

    1977-01-01

    This presentation will place primary emphasis upon energy demand. The presentation will cover the following areas: energy reserves and resources; energy demand: past and future (mid-and long-term); industrialized regions of the world; developing countries: Mexico and Iran as examples; and potential impact on nuclear development

  9. BWR Stability Issues in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideaki Ikeda

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper reviews activates relevant to the boiling water reactor (BWR stability phenomenon, which has a coupled neutronic and thermal-hydraulic nature, from the viewpoint of model and code developments and their applications to the BWR stability solution methodology in Japan.

  10. An experience in World Nuclear University-Summer Institute 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzilawati Mohd Sarowi

    2013-01-01

    Full-text: World Nuclear University-Summer Institute (WNU-SI) has been held annually since 2005 in Cristchurh College, Oxford, London. This six weeks course is attended by 80-90 young professionals, or fellow from 20-25 countries across the world. The WNU-SI is designed not only to discuss the full spectrum of issues surrounding nuclear energy, but also emphasis on team building, cultural awareness and the development of leadership potential in multinational environment. Interestingly, the mentors play their role base on their experience in leading the nuclear industry throughout the globe. At the end of the course, the participant could understand the most important issues address in the industry with global perspective, experience and learn from practical teamwork internationally. Finally, this course is believed to be a step in developing a worldwide network among the fellows to support each other in their careers. This paper will discuss the experience gained in WNU-SI 2012. (author)

  11. Seismic risk assessment of a BWR: status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuang, T.Y.; Bernreuter, D.L.; Wells, J.E.; Johnson, J.J.

    1985-02-01

    The seismic risk methodology developed in the US NRC Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) was demonstrated by its application to the Zion nuclear power plant, a pressurized water reactor (PWR). A detailed model of Zion, including systems analysis models (initiating events, event trees, and fault trees), SSI and structure models, and piping models was developed and analyzed. The SSMRP methodology can equally be applied to a boiling water reactor (BWR). To demonstrate its applicability, to identify fundamental differences in seismic risk between a PWR and a BWR, and to provide a basis of comparison of seismic risk between a PWR and a BWR when analyzed with comparable methodology and assumptions, a seismic risk analysis is being performed on the LaSalle County Station nuclear power plant

  12. BWR recirculation pump diagnostic expert system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiang, S.C.; Morimoto, C.N.; Torres, M.R.

    2004-01-01

    At General Electric (GE), an on-line expert system to support maintenance decisions for BWR recirculation pumps for nuclear power plants has been developed. This diagnostic expert system is an interactive on-line system that furnishes diagnostic information concerning BWR recirculation pump operational problems. It effectively provides the recirculation pump diagnostic expertise in the plant control room continuously 24 hours a day. The expert system is interfaced to an on-line monitoring system, which uses existing plant sensors to acquire non-safety related data in real time. The expert system correlates and evaluates process data and vibration data by applying expert rules to determine the condition of a BWR recirculation pump system by applying knowledge based rules. Any diagnosis will be automatically displayed, indicating which pump may have a problem, the category of the problem, and the degree of concern expressed by the validity index and color hierarchy. The rules incorporate the expert knowledge from various technical sources such as plant experience, engineering principles, and published reports. These rules are installed in IF-THEN formats and the resulting truth values are also expressed in fuzzy terms and a certainty factor called a validity index. This GE Recirculation Pump Expert System uses industry-standard software, hardware, and network access to provide flexible interfaces with other possible data acquisition systems. Gensym G2 Real-Time Expert System is used for the expert shell and provides the graphical user interface, knowledge base, and inference engine capabilities. (author)

  13. Decontamination techniques for BWR power generation plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, Susumu

    1990-01-01

    The present report describes various techniques used for decontamination in BWR power generation plants. Objectives and requirements for decontamination in BWR power plants are first discussed focusing on reduction in dose, prevention of spread of contamination, cleaning of work environments, exposure of equipment parts for inspection, re-use of decontaminated resources, and standards for decontamination. Then, the report outlines major physical, chemical and electrochemical decontamination techniques generally used in BWR power generation plants. The physical techniques include suction of deposits in tanks, jet cleaning, particle blast cleaning, ultrasonic cleaning, coating with special paints, and flushing cleaning. The chemical decontamination techniques include the use of organic acids etc. for dissolution of oxidized surface layers and treatment of secondary wastes such as liquids released from primary decontamination processes. Other techniques are used for removal of penetrated contaminants, and soft and hard cladding in and on equipment and piping that are in direct contact with radioactive materials used in nuclear power generation plants. (N.K.)

  14. Estimate of radiation-induced steel embrittlement in the BWR core shroud and vessel wall from reactor-grade MOX/UOX fuel for the nuclear power plant at Laguna Verde, Veracruz, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, Lisa Rene

    The government of Mexico has expressed interest to utilize the Laguna Verde boiling water reactor (BWR) nuclear power plant for the disposition of reprocessed spent uranium oxide (UOX) fuel in the form of reactor-grade mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel. MOX fuel would replace spent UOX fuel as a fraction in the core from 18--30% depending on the fuel loading cycle. MOX fuel is expected to increase the neutron fluence, flux, fuel centerline temperature, reactor core pressure, and yield higher energy neutrons. There is concern that a core with a fraction of MOX fuel (i.e., increased 239Pu wt%) would increase the radiation-induced steel embrittlement within the core shroud and vessel wall as compared to only conventional, enriched UOX fuel in the core. The evaluation of radiation-induced steel embrittlement within the core shroud and vessel wall is a concern because of the potentially adverse affect to plant and public safety, environment, and operating life of the reactor. This dissertation provides computational results of the neutron fluence, flux, energy spectrum, and radiation damage displacements per atom per second (dpa-s-1) in steel within the core shroud and vessel wall of the Laguna Verde Unit 1 BWR. The results were computed using the nuclear data processing code NJOY99 and the continuous energy Monte Carlo Neutral Particle transport code MCNP4B. The MCNP4B model of the reactor core was for maximum core loading fractions of ⅓ MOX and ⅔ UOX reactor-grade fuel in an equilibrium core. The primary conclusion of this dissertation was that the addition of the maximum fraction of ⅓ MOX fuel to the LV1 BWR core did significantly accelerate the radiation-induced steel embrittlement such that without mitigation of steel embrittlement by periodic thermal annealing or reduction in operating parameters such as, neutron fluence, core temperature and pressure, it posed a potentially adverse affect to the plant and public safety, environment, and operating life of the reactor.

  15. The HAMBO BWR simulator of HAMMLAB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlsson, Tommy; Jokstad, Haakon; Meyer, Brita D.; Nihlwing, Christer; Norrman, Sixten; Puska, Eija Karita; Raussi, Pekka; Tiihonen, Olli

    2001-02-15

    Modernisation of control rooms of the nuclear power plants has been a major issue in Sweden and Finland the last few years, and this will continue in the years to come. As an aid in the process of introducing new technology into the control rooms, the benefit of having an experimental simulator where proto typing of solutions can be performed, has been emphasised by many plants. With this as a basis, the BWR plants in Sweden and Finland decided to fund, in co-operation with the Halden Project, an experimental BWR simulator based on the Forsmark 3 plant in Sweden. The BWR simulator development project was initiated in January 1998. VTT Energy in Finland developed the simulator models with the aid of their APROS tool, while the operator interface was developed by the Halden Project. The simulator was thoroughly tested by experienced HRP personnel and professional Forsmark 3 operators, and accepted by the BWR utilities in June 2000. The acceptance tests consisted of 19 well-defined transients, as well as the running of the simulator from full power down to cold shutdown and back up again with the use of plant procedures. This report describes the HAMBO simulator, with its simulator models, the operator interface, and the underlying hardware and software infrastructure. The tools used for developing the simulator, APROS, Picasso-3 and the Integration Platform, are also briefly described. The acceptance tests are described, and examples of the results are presented, to illustrate the level of validation of the simulator. The report concludes with an indication of the short-term usage of the simulator. (Author)

  16. Nuclear astrophysics of worlds in the string landscape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogan, Craig J.

    2006-01-01

    Motivated by landscape models in string theory, cosmic nuclear evolution is analyzed allowing the standard model Higgs expectation value w to take values different from that in our world (w≡1), while holding the Yukawa couplings fixed. Thresholds are estimated, and astrophysical consequences are described, for several sensitive dependences of nuclear behavior on w. The dependence of the neutron-proton mass difference on w is estimated based on recent calculations of strong isospin symmetry breaking, and is used to derive the threshold of neutron-stable worlds, w≅0.6±0.2. The effect of a stable neutron on nuclear evolution in the big bang and stars is shown to lead to radical differences from our world, such as a predominance of heavy r-process and s-process nuclei and a lack of normal galaxies, stars, and planets. Rough estimates are reviewed of w thresholds for deuteron stability and the pp and pep reactions dominant in many stars. A simple model of nuclear resonances is used to estimate the w dependence of overall carbon and oxygen production during normal stellar nucleosynthesis; carbon production is estimated to change by a fraction ≅15(1-w). Radical changes in astrophysical behavior seem to require changes in w of more than a few percent, even for the most sensitive phenomena

  17. The bomb, the dark side of the nuclear world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collin, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    The reality of the nuclear world can be summarized in few words: a world arsenal of 26000 bombs, enough uranium and plutonium and the know-how to make much more, multiple non-proliferation and weapons limitation treaties which have troubles regulating the diffusion of this technology, indelible environmental and sanitary marks left by 2059 tests, governments secretly wishing to assume this supreme power attribute, a black market, spies and dealers, but also: opponents, political leaders, local representatives and non-governmental organizations who militate for a nuclear weapon-free world. However, this burning question paradoxically remains obscure to citizens and its obscure aspect is relayed by media and politicians. This book aims at decoding the wheels of the international nuclear weapons situation: from the five official nuclear powers to the proliferation actors, from the defense policies to the risks of accidents and the stakes of disarmament, from the bomb fabrication to its devastating effects. It shows how this ultimate weapon has durably pervaded the defense policies and strategies of countries who own it, and how difficult it will be to reconsider this situation

  18. Necessity of nuclear energy in energetic world context

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Rodriguez, M.

    1981-01-01

    Different opinions on nuclear energy make the middle citizen feel confounded and wonder hundreds of questions to wwhich an easy reply is not found. May be if nuclear energy is really necessary, the first of these questions, without noticing that necessity is a vague concept with a double interpretation. To some, those support a total change in the actual society into more primitive situations, the energy pattern the world has chosen -both the East and West models- is annoying, and they consider a pattern based on ''soft energies''to be the solution to the social scheme they imagined. To others, those who think on an economic, industrial and social development in the countries, it should be based on a strong energy pattern, which could supply what the world needs more and more, nuclear energy is, at least nowadays, an unavoidable necessity and an inevitable option. The document shown has been prepared on the conclusions of the most recent works on the subject, and it is deduced from all of them what everybody considers to be the future energy demand for the year 2000 and its distribution into energy sources, nuclear energy includes. The two basic parameters for tAe valuation of this demand are the increasing of population and gross national product. Available energy resources are mentioned on the document and, mainly, the nuclear capacity of each country. (author) [es

  19. World order and nuclear energy in the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vendryes, G.

    1993-01-01

    The future use of nuclear energy is determined by demoscopic, economic and ecological developments. At the threshold to the third millenium, a large part of the world's population is still living in poverty. A new world order is needed to achieve peace, freedom, and health for each individual. In the first self-sustaining nuclear fission chain reaction, Enrico Fermi in 1942 pointed the way into a future with a secure energy supply. He has put into the hands of the following generations the key to overcoming need. It is important now that uranium, an inexhaustible source of energy if used the right way, is put to use and not allowed to turn into a finite kind of energy, like fossil sources of energy, merely as a consequence of shortsighted neglect. (orig.) [de

  20. A Physicist's Journey In The Nuclear Power World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starr, Chauncey

    2000-03-01

    As a participant in the development of civilian nuclear power plants for the past half century, the author presents some of his insights to its history that may be of interest to today's applied physicists. Nuclear power development has involved a mixture of creative vision, science, engineering, and unusual technical, economic, and social obstacles. Nuclear power programs were initiated during the euphoric era of public support for new science immediately following World War II -- a support that lasted almost two decades. Subsequently, nuclear power has had to face a complex mix of public concerns and criticism. The author's involvment in some of these circumstances will be anecdotally described. Although the physics of fission and its byproducts remains at the heart of all nuclear reactor designs, its embodiment in practical energy sources has been shaped by the limitations of engineering primarily and economics secondarily. Very influential has been the continuing interplay with the military's weapons and propulsion programs, and the government's political policies. In this respect, nuclear power's history provides a learning experience that may be applicable to some of the large scale demonstration projects that physicists pursue today.

  1. Dissolution experiments of commercial PWR (52 MWd/kgU) and BWR (53 MWd/kgU) spent nuclear fuel cladded segments in bicarbonate water under oxidizing conditions. Experimental determination of matrix and instant release fraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Robles, E.; Serrano-Purroy, D.; Sureda, R.; Casas, I.; de Pablo, J.

    2015-10-01

    The denominated instant release fraction (IRF) is considered in performance assessment (PA) exercises to govern the dose that could arise from the repository. A conservative definition of IRF comprises the total inventory of radionuclides located in the gap, fractures, and the grain boundaries and, if present, in the high burn-up structure (HBS). The values calculated from this theoretical approach correspond to an upper limit that likely does not correspond to what it will be expected to be instantaneously released in the real system. Trying to ascertain this IRF from an experimental point of view, static leaching experiments have been carried out with two commercial UO2 spent nuclear fuels (SNF): one from a pressurized water reactor (PWR), labelled PWR, with an average burn-up (BU) of 52 MWd/kgU and fission gas release (FGR) of 23.1%, and one from a boiling water reactor (BWR), labelled BWR, with an average BU of and 53 MWd/kgU and FGR of 3.9%. One sample of each SNF, consisting of fuel and cladding, has been leached in bicarbonate water during one year under oxidizing conditions at room temperature (25 ± 5)°C. The behaviour of the concentration measured in solution can be divided in two according to the release rate. All radionuclides presented an initial release rate that after some days levels down to a slower second one, which remains constant until the end of the experiment. Cumulative fraction of inventory in aqueous phase (FIAPc) values has been calculated. Results show faster release in the case of the PWR SNF. In both cases Np, Pu, Am, Cm, Y, Tc, La and Nd dissolve congruently with U, while dissolution of Zr, Ru and Rh is slower. Rb, Sr, Cs and Mo, dissolve faster than U. The IRF of Cs at 10 and 200 days has been calculated, being (3.10 ± 0.62) and (3.66 ± 0.73) for PWR fuel, and (0.35 ± 0.07) and (0.51 ± 0.10) for BWR fuel.

  2. Survey of the world's nuclear power plants for 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadrousek, Z.

    1977-01-01

    The total number of nuclear power plants in the world in the middle of 1976 and the output thereof is tabulated and a survey is given for the individual countries in the alphabetical order. The tables show the names (sites) of the plants, operated, constructed or projected plants, reactor types, reactor manufacturers, output in MWe, the year of commissioning, and the total power production in GWh. The meaning of abbreviations is also explained. (J.B.)

  3. BWR shutdown analyzer using artificial intelligence (AI) techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cain, D.G.

    1986-01-01

    A prototype alarm system for detecting abnormal reactor shutdowns based on artificial intelligence technology is described. The system incorporates knowledge about Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) plant design and component behavior, as well as knowledge required to distinguish normal, abnormal, and ATWS accident conditions. The system was developed using a software tool environment for creating knowledge-based applications on a LISP machine. To facilitate prototype implementation and evaluation, a casual simulation of BWR shutdown sequences was developed and interfaced with the alarm system. An intelligent graphics interface for execution and control is described. System performance considerations and general observations relating to artificial intelligence application to nuclear power plant problems are provided

  4. World: 2508 nuclear tera-watts hour in 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2000-01-01

    In 1999, the nuclear power plants have produced 2508 tera-watts hour, that is to say 16% of the normal electricity production or 35% of the European electric production. At the end of 1999, 443 reactors were in operation, 53 were in building and 13 put in an order in the world. 5 reactors have been coupled to the network in South Korea, in France, in India, in Slovakia and 2 have been definitively stopped (Kazakhstan and Sweden). 1999 has seen the beginning of construction for 8 reactors (China, South Korea, Japan and Taiwan). The nuclear power has covered 40 % of needs for 8 countries: France (75%), Lithuania (73%) Belgium (58%), Sweden (46%), Slovakia (45%), Ukraine (43.5%), South Korea ( 43%), Bulgaria ( 41.5%). 18 countries have used nuclear energy to cover at least 25% of their needs. (N.C.)

  5. The BWR owners' group planning guide for life extension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, S.K.; Lehnert, D.F.; Locke, R.K.

    1991-01-01

    Extending the operating life of a commercial nuclear power plant has been shown to be economically beneficial to both the utility and the electric customer. As such, many utilities are planning and implementing plant life extension (PLEX) programs. A document has been developed which provides guidance to utilities in formulating a PLEX program plant for one or more boiling water reactor (BWR) plants. The guide has been developed by the BWR Owners' Group Plant Life Extension Committee. The principal bases for this guide were the BWR Pilot and Lead Plant Programs. These programs were used as models to develop the 'base plan' described in this guide. By formulating their program plant utilizing the base plan, utilities will be able to maximize the use of existing evaluations and results. The utility planner will build upon the base plan by adding any tasks or features that are unique to their programs. (author)

  6. From the nuclear stalemate to a nuclear-weapon free world. In memory of Klaus Fuchs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flach, Guenter; Fuchs-Kittowski, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    The following topics were dealt with: The first soviet atomic bomb and Klaus Fuchs, in illusory worlds of Andrei Sakharov, Edward Teller, and Klaus Fuchs, Klaus Fuchs as grandfather of the hydrogen bomb, memories of and thinking about Klaus Fuchs, the Scottish years of Klaus Fuchs 1937-1941, Klaus Fuchs in the mirror of the Venona documents, Gernot Zippe and the ultracentrifuge or east-west technology transfer in the cold war, secret impulses for the soviet nuclear project, responsibility of knowledge with anti-facism, philosophy, and science as well as peace as the first human right in the work of Klaus Fuchs, the request of Klaus Fuchs for a lasting peace, Klaus Fuchs in Daniel Granin's roman ''Escape to Russia'', ways to a nuclear-weapon free world, Otto Hahn and the declarations of Mainau and Goettingen, nuclear winter, initiatives of the GDR for the prohibition of weapons of mass destruction, nuclear weapons in negative entropy, militarism and antimilitarism of the nuclear age, contributions of the young Klaus Fuchs to statistical physics, nuclear disarmament and the peaceful use of nuclear energy, the responsibility of the scientists for a socially effective and efficient energy change, Berlin-Bucher contributions to a world free of biological weapons. (HSI)

  7. Improvement for BWR operator training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurisu, Takanori; Takahashi, Yoshitaka; Harada, Mitsuhiro; Takahashi, Iwao.

    1988-01-01

    BWR Operator Training Center was founded in April, 1971, and in April, 1974, training was begun, since then, 13 years elapsed. During this period, the curriculum and training facilities were strengthened to meet the training needs, and the new training techniques from different viewpoint were developed, thus the improvement of training has been done. In this report, a number of the training techniques which have been developed and adopted recently, and are effective for the improvement of the knowledge and skill of operators are described. Recently Japanese nuclear power stations have been operated at stable high capacity factor, accordingly the chance of experiencing the occurrence of abnormality and the usual start and stop of plants decreased, and the training of operators using simulators becomes more important. The basic concept on training is explained. In the standard training course and the short period fundamental course, the development of the guide for reviewing lessons, the utilization of VTRs and the development of the techniques for diagnosing individual degree of learning were carried out. The problems, the points of improvement and the results of these are reported. (Kako, I.)

  8. Nuclear power plant life management in a changing business world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    At the end of 1999, there were 348 nuclear power plants connected to the grid in OECD Member countries, representing a total capacity of 296 GWe and generating some 24% of their electricity. One third of these nuclear power plants had been in operation for over 20 years. The demand for electricity throughout OECD countries is increasing steadily but the construction of new nuclear power plants has become increasingly difficult. Many utilities would like to keep existing nuclear power plants operating for as long as they can continue to function safely and economically because. extending the lifetime of nuclear power plants is a substitute to constructing new plants. Therefore, nuclear plant life management (PLIM) has been carried out in many OECD Member countries and has played a very important role in the nuclear generation field. Nuclear power plant owners seek to economically optimise the output from their plants, taking into consideration internal and external influences, as well as equipment reliability and maintenance workload. Nuclear power plant life management and extension is generally an attractive option for utilities supplying electricity because of its low marginal cost and low investment risk. PLIM has become an important issue in the context of changing business circumstances caused by regulatory reform of the electricity market. Specifically, the economic aspect of PLIM has become an important focus in the competitive electricity market. The international workshop on 'Plant Life Management in a Changing Business World' was hosted by the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) in co-operation with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) in Washington, DC, on 26-27 June 2000. Some 50 senior utility executives and policy makers from 12 Member countries, the International Energy Agency (IEA) and the European Commission (EC) attended the meeting. The objective of the workshop was to examine the status of

  9. World atlas of nuclear industry: civil and military

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexandre, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    Todays, with the energy supplies and global warming concerns, nuclear energy in making a come-back, witness the numerous nuclear programs launched or re-launched in the US, in Europe, China and India. In parallel, on the military side, the deterrence strategy remains in the center of security politics of big powers. This atlas takes stock of the overall issues linked with the nuclear technology: production, civil applications (power generation, medicine etc..), military usages (naval propulsion, weapons). It answers the main questions of this complex world, often dominated by secrecy: who does what in the nuclear domain in France? Is an accident, like the Chernobyl's one, possible today in Europe? What solutions for radioactive wastes? Do we take risks when we export our reactor technologies to Middle-East countries? Are we at the dawn of a new arms rush? What do international agreements foresee in this domain? Taking into account the costs, the hazards and the advantages of nuclear industry, the atlas shows that it is possible to establish solid technical and legal barriers between its civil and military sides. (J.S.)

  10. Nuclear weapons proliferation and the new world order

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, J.

    1994-01-01

    The proliferation of nuclear weapons has become the priority safety problem since the end of the cold war. The danger that new nuclear states may arise from the former Soviet Union, the limited effectiveness of existing control systems, the increased attractiveness of nuclear weapons for countries in which a 'safety vacuum' has developed since the withdrawal of American and Russian forces, as well as the danger that additional nuclear states (China, India, Pakistan) may become unstable or disintegrate, make it necessary to explore and show the ensuing risks. The study contains analyses from well-respected experts from Germany, Russia, Japan and the USA. They show how the changes in regional security situations could lead to nuclear risks under certain circumstances, and the likely international consequences. A second point of emphasis consens the feasibility of new approaches or instruments in international non-proliferatic policy. New possibilities for the improvement of excisting control systems and the extension of international consensus on an intensification of the non-proliferation regime are offered by the changes in world politics. (orig.) [de

  11. New Nuclear Fuel Disposition Opportunities in a Changed World

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, L.H.

    2006-01-01

    The world's economic, security, environmental, and technological situation has changed significantly in the last several years and these changes bring new opportunities for substantial policy improvements and redirections in the used nuclear fuel management arena. The passage of new energy legislation; the need for more US nuclear energy; growing state, national and international momentum for carbon emission and other air pollutant reductions; post September 11. Homeland Security threat reduction improvements; desires to improve global nuclear security; rapidly emerging needs for clean electricity supplies in developing countries; and the technological advancements in advanced fuel cycle technologies provide a substantial foundation for future enhancements and improvements in current used nuclear fuel management programs. Past progress, lessons learned, and new used fuel/waste management technological innovations coupled with current and future economic, security, and environmental issues can create new approaches that can help the Federal government meet its obligations while simultaneously addressing many of the difficult regional/state issues that have historically hindered progress. This paper will examine and integrate the synergy of these issues to explore options and discuss possible new opportunities in the vitally important area of spent fuel management and the entire back end of the nuclear fuel cycle. (authors)

  12. The situation of the nuclear energy in the world; A situacao da energia nucleoeletrica no mundo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Jair Albo Marques de [and others

    1996-12-01

    This work presents an overview of the nuclear energy in the world. It approaches the following main topics: kinds of nuclear power plants; operation experience of the nuclear plants; environmental and social aspects of the nuclear energy; economic aspects of the nuclear energy; development of the reactors technology and supply of the nuclear fuel.

  13. Simplified compact containment BWR plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heki, H.; Nakamaru, M.; Tsutagawa, M.; Hiraiwa, K.; Arai, K.; Hida, T.

    2004-01-01

    The reactor concept considered in this paper has a small power output, a compact containment and a simplified BWR configuration with comprehensive safety features. The Compact Containment Boiling Water Reactor (CCR), which is being developed with matured BWR technologies together with innovative systems/components, is expected to prove attractive in the world energy markets due to its flexibility in regard to both energy demands and site conditions, its high potential for reducing investment risk and its safety features facilitating public acceptance. The flexibility is achieved by CCR's small power output of 300 MWe class and capability of long operating cycle (refueling intervals). CCR is expected to be attractive from view point of investment due to its simplification/innovation in design such as natural circulation core cooling with the bottom located short core, internal upper entry control rod drives (CRDs) with ring-type dryers and simplified ECCS system with high pressure containment concept. The natural circulation core eliminates recirculation pumps and the maintenance of such pumps. The internal upper entry CRDs reduce the height of the reactor vessel (RPV) and consequently reduce the height of the primary containment vessel (PCV). The safety features mainly consist of large water inventory above the core without large penetration below the top of the core, passive cooling system by isolation condenser (IC), passive auto catalytic recombiner and in-vessel retention (IVR) capability. The large inventory increases the system response time in the case of design-base accidents, including loss of coolant accidents. The IC suppresses PCV pressure by steam condensation without any AC power. The recombiner decreases hydrogen concentration in the PCV in the case of a severe accident. Cooling the molten core inside the RPV if the core should be damaged by loss of core coolability could attain the IVR. The feasibility of CCR safety system has been confirmed by LOCA

  14. Review of nuclear power costs around the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, L.L.; Karousakis, P.M.; Moynet, G.

    1983-01-01

    This paper presents highlights of nuclear power costs around the world from studies carried out by the IAEA and by UNIPEDE. Emphasis is placed on trends within each country of key parameters which affect both investment costs and total power generation costs, including construction and project durations, size of units, regulatory environment, scope of project, fuel cycle costs and general economic conditions. A synthesis of these trends, taking into consideration both nuclear and coal-fired plant capital and fuel costs as they are estimated to evolve in the near and medium term, is presented in terms of nuclear-to-coal cost ratios for both plant investment costs and total generating costs. The plant investment costs are expressed as ''overnight'' or ''fore'' costs, in constant money, for plants expected to enter commercial operation in the early 1990s. Pertinent assumptions are based on conditions prevailing in the particular country under review. These studies indicate that in most countries nuclear plant investment costs are rising more rapidly than the costs for coal-fired plants. A major cause for the rapid rise in nuclear plant costs is the drastic lengthening of project duration in most countries. France, as a notable exception, has been able to maintain a stable and reasonably short project time. In spite of the rapidly escalating nuclear plant investment costs, nuclear electricity generation has an economic advantage over coal in Europe and Canada and is competitive with coal in the eastern and midwestern parts of the United States of America (USA). The availability of abundant, low-cost coal gives coal-fired generation an economic advantage in the western USA. (author)

  15. Study and characterization of noble metal deposits on similar rusty surfaces to those of the reactor U-1 type BWR of nuclear power station of Laguna Verde; Estudio y caracterizacion de depositos de metales nobles sobre superficies oxidadas similares a las del reactor de la Central de Laguna Verde (CNLV) U1 del tipo BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores S, V. H.

    2011-07-01

    In the present investigation work, were determined the parameters to simulate the conditions of internal oxidation reactor circulation pipes of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde in Veracruz. We used 304l stainless steel cylinders with two faces prepared with abrasive paper of No. 600, with the finality to obtain similar surface to the internal circulation piping nuclear reactor. Oxides was formed within an autoclave (Autoclave MEX-02 unit B), which is a device that simulates the working conditions of the nuclear reactor, but without radiation generated by the fission reaction within the reactor. The oxidation conditions were a temperature of 280 C and pressure of 8 MPa, similar conditions to the reactor operating in nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde in Veracruz, Mexico (BWR conditions), with an average conductivity of 4.58 ms / cm and 2352 ppb oxygen to simulate normal water chemistry NWC. Were obtained deposits of noble metal oxides formed on 304l stainless steel samples, in a 250 ml autoclave at a temperature range of 180 to 200 C. The elements that were used to deposit platinum-rhodium (Pt-Rh) with aqueous Na{sub 2}Pt (OH){sub 6} and Na{sub 3}Rh (NO{sub 2}){sub 6}, Silver (Ag) with an aqueous solution of AgNO{sub 3}, zirconium (Zr) with aqueous Zr O (NO{sub 3}) and ZrO{sub 2}, and zinc (Zn) in aqueous solution of Zn (NO{sub 3}){sub 2} under conditions of normal water chemistry. Also there was the oxidation of 304l stainless steel specimens in normal water chemistry with a solution of Zinc (Zn) (NWC + Zn). Oxidation of the specimens in water chemistry with a solution of zinc (Zn + NWC) was prepared in two ways: within the MEX-02 autoclave unit A in a solution of zinc and a flask at constant temperature in zinc solution. The oxides formed and deposits were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, elemental field analysis and X-ray diffraction. By other hand was evaluated the electrochemical behavior of the oxides

  16. From the Old to the New World of Nuclear Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuewer, Roger H.

    Physicists passed from the Old to the New World of Nuclear Physics in the two decades between the first and second world wars. The transition occurred against the background of the Great War, the postwar hyperinflation in Germany and Austria, and the greatest intellection migrations in history after the Nazi Civil Service law of 1933, the Anschlussof Austria in March 1938, and the Fascist anti-Semitic laws that fall. It involved Rutherford's discovery of artificial disintegration, Pettersson and Kirsch's challenge of it, and the concomitant rise and fall of Rutherford's satellite model of the nucleus; Gamow's quantum-mechanical theory of alpha decay and his liquid-drop model of the nucleus; the discoveries of deuterium and the deuteron, neutron, and positron, and the inventions of the Cockcroft-Walton accelerator and the cyclotron; the influence of the seventh Solvay Conference; Joliot and Curie's discovery of artificial radioactivity; Pauli's neutrino hypothesis, Fermi's theory of beta decay, and his discovery of the efficacy of slow neutrons in producing nuclear reactions; Bohr's theory of the compound nucleus and Breit and Wigner's theory of neutron-nucleus resonances; and the discovery of nuclear fission, Meitner and Frisch's interpretation of it, and Bohr and Fermi revelation of both in America.

  17. Progress to a nuclear-weapon-free world through tactical nuclear arms control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matseiko, Youri

    1999-01-01

    At a time when, after some years of passivity, nuclear disarmament is becoming more of an urgent item on the international agenda and receiving accordingly more attention on the part of politicians and non-governmental experts. This is partly reflected in the Report of the Canberra Commission, and the statement on nuclear weapons by international generals and admirals. At the same time some developments such as uncertainties with START II ratification and the process of NATO enlargement make the task of nuclear arms control even more demanding. What is needed now is to pursue at last without any further delay negotiations on effective measures relating to the cessation of the nuclear arms race and to nuclear disarmament. And these effective measures must include both strategic and tactical nuclear weapons. Only a sustained commitment at the highest political level will legitimate serious discussions of the elimination option and ensure that resources and personnel are devoted to finding solutions to the problems associated with moving to zero, and to crafting appropriate transition strategies. In the absence of such a commitment, the nations of the world may never reach the point at which the desirability and feasibility of a nuclear-free world can be evaluated with greater certainty. This Pugwash Conference is trying to make a modest contribution in helping to make possible such a vitally important commitment

  18. Virtual nuclear capabilities and deterrence in a world without nuclear weapons. VERTIC research report no. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paloczi-Horvath, G.

    1998-01-01

    'Virtual nuclear capabilities' (VNC) can be defined as the ability of a state not equipped wth nuclear weapons to produce them within a matter of months or years, using fissile material and/or technological skills and materials available to it. 'Virtual nuclear deterrence' (VND) would use these capabilities to a specific end. It could be a temporary posture adopted by former nuclear weapon states as a guarantee against nuclear weapon 'break out'. VND could hence reinforce a temporary security architecture, even if in this instance 'temporary' might mean up to around ten years. In the context of getting to 'zero', VND could not be an end in itself, but rather serve as an element of the security architecture of a world free of nuclear weapons. VND would only be adopted by the acknowledged nuclear weapon states (NWS) - China, France, the Russian Federation, the United Kingdom and the United States of America - after the commit to complete nuclear disarmament, sign the appropriate treaties and perceive the temporary adoption of this form of deterrence to be in their political and security interests. As with the NWS, VND will only be accepted as an interim form of security by the de facto nuclear weapon states (DFNWS) - India, Israel and Pakistan - when they can be assured that their virtual security interests would be guaranteed by other means after they sign a nuclear disarmament treaty. There are several alternative approaches to VND. These range from various types of precise or explicit virtual deterrence to more implicit or tacit forms. An explicit VND posture might allow materials and capabilities relevant to the construction of a nuclear weapon to be retained under verified arrangements for a limited time. This report explains why explicit VND would not be a reliable tool for reinforcing a nuclear disarmament treaty, as it could undermine the treaty's whole purpose. An implicit VND posture would not permit the retention of any weapons-related fissile material or

  19. Russian nuclear industry and the perspectives on the world market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nefedov, G. F.

    2008-01-01

    The development of the NPP capacities in Russia is presented. Federal Target Program 'Development of the Nuclear Power Industry of Russia in 2007-2010 and till 2015' (Government Decree of October 06 2006) is adopted. The scope of financing under the Program till 2015 is €41bill., of which budget financing is €19 bln. The goals are: to launch 10 new NPP units and to start 10 more projects by 2015; to actively promote the Russian nuclear fuel cycle organizations production on the world markets; to expand NPP construction and and operation outside Russia. The institutional reform to meet the goals is presented. NPP with russian VVER projects worldwide are presented

  20. How many nuclear stocks in the world in 2015?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Guelte, G.

    2005-01-01

    The examination conference of the non-proliferation treaty which will take place in May 2, 2005, will be corrupted by the unanimous reprobation against the 5 states which are still perennializing their nuclear stocks, while they committed themselves to eliminate them. The sustain of the non-proliferation policy is crumbling down and the possibilities of clandestine activities are growing up. Instead of explaining their join reprobation against the policy of these states, the participants will probably spread the image of a divided, disillusioned, ineffective and at a loss world. It is not excluded that in the next 10 or 15 years, about 20 states will still have their nuclear weapons. (J.S.)

  1. The world's nuclear future - built on material success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ion, Sue

    2010-07-01

    In our energy hungry world of the twenty-first century, the future of electricity generation must meet the twin challenges of security of supply and reduced carbon emissions. The expectations for nuclear power programmes to play a part in delivering success on both counts, grows ever higher. The nuclear industry is poised on a renaissance likely to dwarf the heady days of the 1960s and early 1970s. Global supply chain and project management challenges abound, now just as then. The science and engineering of materials will be key to the successful deployment and operation of a new generation of reactor systems and their associated fuel cycles. Understanding and predicting materials performance will be key to achieving life extension of existing assets and underpinning waste disposal options, as well as giving confidence to the designers, their financial backers and governments across the globe, that the next generation of reactors will deliver their full potential.

  2. Nuclear power reactors in the world. April 1990 ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This is the tenth edition of Reference Data Series No. 2, Nuclear Power Reactors in the World, which is published once per year, to present the most recent reactor data available to the Agency. It contains the following summarized information: General information as of the end of 1989 on power reactors operating or under construction, and shut down; Performance data on reactors operating in the Agency's Member States, as reported to the IAEA. The information is collected by the Agency by circulating questionnaires to the Member States through the designated national correspondents. The replies are used to maintain computerized files on general and design data of, and operating experience with, power reactors. The Agency's power reactor information system (PRIS) comprising the above files provides all the information and data previously published in the Agency's Power Reactors in Member States and currently published in the Agency's Operating Experience with Nuclear Power Stations in Member States

  3. Nuclear power reactors in the world. Apr 1991 ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This is the eleventh edition of Reference Data Series No. 2, Nuclear Power Reactors in the World, which is published once per year, to present the most recent reactor data available to the Agency. It contains the following summarized information: General information as of the end of 1990, on power reactors operating or under construction, and shut down; performance data on reactors operating in the Agency's Member States, as reported to the IAEA. This information is collected by the Agency by circulating questionnaires to the Member States through the designated national correspondents. The replies are used to maintain computerized files on general and design data of, and operating experience with, power reactors. The Agency's Power Reactor Information System (PRIS) comprising the above files provides all the information and data previously published in the Agency's Power Reactors in Member States and currently published in the Agency's Operating Experience with Nuclear Power Stations in Member States. 5 figs, 19 tabs

  4. China and the post-cold-war nuclear world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakatsuji, Keiji

    1997-01-01

    On May 15, 1995, only a few days after the indefinite extension of the Non-Proliferation Treaty, China tested a nuclear bomb. The rapid growth in China's defence spending is also alarming. Against the spirit of international non-proliferation regimes, China has sold missile components to Pakistan, a research reactor and an electromagnetic isotope separation facility to Iran. In addition to the repression of human rights domestically, in China as well as in Tibet, no one can ignore the possibility of a serious international conflict over the Spratly Islands. This paper examines whether China will pose a grave future threat to world peace or whether, fearing international isolation, it will become a guardian of the international non-proliferation regime. In other words, the paper aims to set straight the record of China's recent nuclear policy

  5. A BWR licensing experience in the USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, J.; Ogura, C. [Toshiba America Nuclear Energy, Charlotte, North Carolina (United States); Arai, K. [Toshiba Corporation, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Thomas, S.; Mookhoek, B., E-mail: jim.powers@toshiba.com [Nuclear Innovation North America, Lake Jackson, Texas (United States)

    2015-09-15

    The US-Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (A BWR), certified by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC), is a third generation, evolutionary boiling water reactor design which is the reference for the South Texas Project Units 3 and 4 (STP3-4) Combined License Application (Cola). Nuclear Innovation North America (Nina) is the License Applicant for this new build project, and Toshiba is the selected primary technology contractor. The STP3-4 project has finished the US NRC technical review of the Cola through the final meeting of the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS), and the Final Safety Evaluation Report (FSER) is scheduled to be issued by the US NRC in the middle of 2015. The next steps are to support the Mandatory Hearing process, and voting by the NRC commissioners on the motion to grant the Combined License, which is scheduled beginning of 2016 according to US NRC schedule as of March 30, 2015. This paper summarizes the history and progress of the US-A BWR licensing, including the experiences of the Licensee, Nina, and Toshiba as the Epc team worked through the Code of Federal Regulations Title 10 (10-Cfr) Part 52 process, and provides some perspectives on how the related licensing material would also be of value within a 10-Cfr Part 50, two-step process to minimize schedule and financial risks which could arise from ongoing technical developments and regulatory reviews. (Author)

  6. A BWR licensing experience in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, J.; Ogura, C.; Arai, K.; Thomas, S.; Mookhoek, B.

    2015-09-01

    The US-Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (A BWR), certified by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC), is a third generation, evolutionary boiling water reactor design which is the reference for the South Texas Project Units 3 and 4 (STP3-4) Combined License Application (Cola). Nuclear Innovation North America (Nina) is the License Applicant for this new build project, and Toshiba is the selected primary technology contractor. The STP3-4 project has finished the US NRC technical review of the Cola through the final meeting of the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS), and the Final Safety Evaluation Report (FSER) is scheduled to be issued by the US NRC in the middle of 2015. The next steps are to support the Mandatory Hearing process, and voting by the NRC commissioners on the motion to grant the Combined License, which is scheduled beginning of 2016 according to US NRC schedule as of March 30, 2015. This paper summarizes the history and progress of the US-A BWR licensing, including the experiences of the Licensee, Nina, and Toshiba as the Epc team worked through the Code of Federal Regulations Title 10 (10-Cfr) Part 52 process, and provides some perspectives on how the related licensing material would also be of value within a 10-Cfr Part 50, two-step process to minimize schedule and financial risks which could arise from ongoing technical developments and regulatory reviews. (Author)

  7. Decay heat measurements and predictions of BWR spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinnon, M.A.; Heeb, C.M.; Creer, A.M.

    1986-06-01

    Pre-calorimetry decay heat predictions obtained with the ORIGEN2 computer code were compared to calorimeter data obtained for eleven boiling water reactor (BWR) spent fuel assemblies using General Electric, Morris Operation's in-pool calorimeter. Ten of the 7 x 7 BWR spent fuel assemblies were obtained from Nebraska Public Power District's Cooper Nuclear Station. The remaining BWR assembly was from Commonwealth Edison's Dresden Nuclear Power Plant. The assemblies had burnups ranging from 5.3 to 27.6 GWD/MTU and had been removed from their respective reactors for 2 or more years. The majority of the assemblies had burnups of between 20 and 28 GWD/MTU and had been out of the reactor 2 to 4 years. The assemblies represent spent fuel that has been continuously burned and fuel that has been reinserted. Comparisons of ORIGEN2 pre-calorimetry decay heat predictions with calorimeter data showed that predictions agreed with data within the precision/repeatibility of the experimental data (+-15 Watts or 5% for a 300 Watt BWR assembly). Comparisons of predicted axial gamma profiles based on core-averaged axial burnups with measured profiles showed difference. These differences may be explained by reactor operation with partially inserted control rods

  8. The first Summer Institute of the World Nuclear University - a personal record

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denk, W.; Fischer, C.; Seidl, M.

    2005-01-01

    The first World Nuclear University Summer Institute was held at Idaho Falls, USA, between July 9 and August 20, 2005. The event was hosted by the Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering of Idaho State University (ISU) and by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), which has been planned to be the central nuclear technology research institution in the United States. The World Nuclear University (WNU) was founded in 2003 by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD-NEA), the World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO), and the World Nuclear Association (WNA) as a global association fo scientific and educational institutions in the nuclear field. The first WNU Summer Institute was designed at IAEA in Vienna in the course of the following year and planned by the WNU Coordinating Centre in London. The six weeks of lectures and presentations arranged by the World nuclear University in Idaho Falls are described in detail from the participants' perspective. (orig.)

  9. High Fidelity BWR Fuel Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Su Jong [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-08-01

    This report describes the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) work conducted for completion of the Thermal Hydraulics Methods (THM) Level 3 milestone THM.CFD.P13.03: High Fidelity BWR Fuel Simulation. High fidelity computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation for Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) was conducted to investigate the applicability and robustness performance of BWR closures. As a preliminary study, a CFD model with simplified Ferrule spacer grid geometry of NUPEC BWR Full-size Fine-mesh Bundle Test (BFBT) benchmark has been implemented. Performance of multiphase segregated solver with baseline boiling closures has been evaluated. Although the mean values of void fraction and exit quality of CFD result for BFBT case 4101-61 agreed with experimental data, the local void distribution was not predicted accurately. The mesh quality was one of the critical factors to obtain converged result. The stability and robustness of the simulation was mainly affected by the mesh quality, combination of BWR closure models. In addition, the CFD modeling of fully-detailed spacer grid geometry with mixing vane is necessary for improving the accuracy of CFD simulation.

  10. Maximum thermal loading test of BWR fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Yoshitaka; Yoshimura, Kunihiro; Nakamura, Satoshi; Ishizuka, Takao.

    1987-01-01

    Various proving tests on the reliability of nuclear power plants have been conducted at the Nuclear Power Engineering Test Center and at the Japan Power Plant Engineering and Inspection Corporation. The tests were initiated at the request of the Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI). Toshiba undertook one of the proving tests on the reliability of nuclear fuel assembly; the maximum thermal loading test of BWR fuel assembly from the Nuclear Power Engineering Test Center. These tests are part of the proving tests mentioned above, and their purpose is to confirm the reliability of the thermal hydraulic engineering techniques. Toshiba has been engaged for the past nine years in the design, fabrication and testing of the equipment. For the project, a test model fuel assembly was used to measure the critical power of the BWR fuel assembly and the void and fluidity of the coolant. From the test results, it has been confirmed that the heat is transferred safely from the fuel assembly to the coolant in the BWR nuclear power plant. In addition, the propriety and reliability of the thermal hydraulic engineering techniques for the fuel assembly have been proved. (author)

  11. Estimation of dose rate around the spent control rods of a BWR; Estimacion de la rapidez de dosis alrededor de las barras de control gastadas de un BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cancino P, G.

    2016-10-01

    The energy can come from fossil renewable sources (solar (natural gas, oil), wind, hydro, tidal, geothermal, biomass, bio energy and nuclear. Nuclear power can be obtained by fission reactions and fusion (still under investigation) atomic nuclei. Fission, is a partition of a very heavy nucleus (Uranium 235, for example) into two lighter nuclei. Much of the world's electric power is generated from the energy released by fission processes. In a nuclear power reactor, light water as the BWR, there are many important elements that allow safe driving operation, one of them are the elements or control systems, the burnable poison or neutron absorber inherently allow control power reactor. The control rods, which consist mostly of stainless steel and absorbing elements (such as boron carbide, hafnium, cadmium, among others) of thermal neutrons is able to initiate, regulate or stop the reactor power. These, due to the use of depleted burned or absorbing material and therefore reach their lifespan, which can be 15 years or have other values depending on the manufacturer. Control rods worn should be removed, stored or confined in expressly places. Precisely at this stage arises the importance of knowing their radiological condition to manipulate safely and without incident to the people health responsible for conducting these proceedings state arises. This thesis consists in the estimation of the dose rate in spent control rod made of boron carbide, from a typical BWR reactor. It will be estimated by direct radiation measurements with measurement equipment for radiotherapy ionization chamber, in six spent control rods, which were taken at different reactor operating cycles and are in a spent fuel pool. Using bracket electromechanical and electronic equipment for positioning and lifting equipment for radiation measurement around the control rod in the axial and radial arrangement for proper scanning. Finally will be presented a graphic corresponding to the dose

  12. Reactor safety study. An assessment of accident risks in U. S. commercial nuclear power plants. Executive summary: main report. [PWR and BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1975-10-01

    Information is presented concerning the objectives and organization of the reactor safety study; the basic concepts of risk; the nature of nuclear power plant accidents; risk assessment methodology; reactor accident risk; and comparison of nuclear risks to other societal risks.

  13. Nuclear Society of Russia: Ten years in the world nuclear community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponomarev-Stepnoi, N.N.; Gagarinski, A.Yu.

    2000-01-01

    nuclear energy production trends and--most importantly for relations with the mass media and the public--crisis information (latest examples: Tokaimura, the virtual Y2K crisis, etc.), have become important sources of information for the NSR. It should be emphasized that the financial participation of the Russian Minatom (maintained at the insistent request of the NSR) in the NucNet system provides sufficiently wide dissemination of operative nuclear information not only through the NSR headquarters but also via its regional branches and separate enterprises. From its side, NSR has assumed the responsibility for the adequate flow of information on Russian nuclear events to NucNet. As a living and developing organism, the NSR wants to respond to its time's challenges. Several prospective directions could be among the NSR information exchange plans: (1) Independent international analysis of the problems of the use of nuclear energy, which is presently in a stagnation period but with future large-scale development, is as possible today as it never had been before. (2) In the field of public relations, many achievements of Russian and US specialists (in the form of articles, analyzing nuclear energy on the popular and highly professional level) stay inaccessible to others because of the language barrier. A possible joint ANS/NSR project on selection, translation, and exchange of such materials, with their further wide publication, represents an obvious reserve in their societies' information activities. (3) The International Youth Nuclear Congress project (proposed by the Russian nuclear youth and supported by ANS and ENS), conceived as a bridge between generations and a forum for opinion exchange between young nuclear specialists from various countries, deserves further development and appropriation of permanent status in the activities of the world nuclear societies

  14. Nuclear Power, Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Sustainable Development in a Changing World

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arakawa, Yoshitaka

    2000-01-01

    Important changes concerning nuclear energy are coming to the fore, such as economic competitiveness compared to other energy resources, requirement for severe measures to mitigate man-made greenhouse gas (GHG) emission, due to the rise of energy demand in Central and Eastern Europe and Asia and to the greater public concern with respect to the nuclear safety, particularly related to spent fuel and radioactive waste disposal. Global safety culture, as well as well focused nuclear research and development programs for safer and more efficient nuclear technology manifest themselves in a stronger and effective way. Information and data on nuclear technology and safety are disseminated to the public in timely, accurate and understandable fashion. Nuclear power is an important contributor to the world's electricity needs. In 1999, it supplied roughly one sixth of global electricity. The largest regional percentage of electricity generated through nuclear power last year was in western Europe (30%). The nuclear power shares in France, Belgium and Sweden were 75%, 58% and 47%, respectively. In North America, the nuclear share was 20% for the USA and 12% for Canada. In Asia, the highest figures were 43% for the Republic of Korea and 36% for Japan. In 1998, twenty-three nations produced uranium of which, the ten biggest producers (Australia, Canada, Kazakhstan, Namibia, Niger, the Russian Federation, South Africa, Ukraine, USA and Uzbekistan) supplied over 90% of the world's output. In 1998, world uranium production provided only about 59% of world reactor requirements. In OECD countries, the 1998 production could only satisfy 39% of the demand. The rest of the requirements were satisfied by secondary sources including civilian and military stockpiles, uranium reprocessing and re-enrichment of depleted uranium. With regard to the nuclear fuel industry, an increase in fuel burnup, higher thermal rates, longer fuel cycle and the use of mixed uranium-plutonium oxide (MOX

  15. Phenomenology of BWR fuel assembly degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurata, Masaki; Barrachin, Marc; Haste, Tim; Steinbrueck, Martin

    2018-03-01

    Severe accidents occurred at the Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (FDNPS) which required an immediate re-examination of fuel degradation phenomenology. The present paper reviews the updated knowledge on the phenomenology of the fuel degradation, focusing mainly on the BWR fuel assembly degradation at the macroscopic scale and that of the individual interactions at the meso-scale. Oxidation of boron carbide (B4C) control rods potentially generates far larger amounts of heat and hydrogen under BWR accident conditions. All integral tests with B4C control rods or control blades have shown early failure, liquefaction, relocation and oxidation of B4C starting at temperatures around 1250 °C, well below the significant interaction temperatures of UO2-Zry. These interactions or reactions potentially influence the progress of fuel degradation in the early phase. The steam-starved conditions, which are being discussed as a likely scenario at the FDNPS accident, highly influence the individual interactions and potentially lead the fuel degradation in non-prototypical directions. The detailed phenomenology of individual interactions and their influence on the transient and on the late phase of the severe accidents are also discussed.

  16. BWR Assembly Optimization for Minor Actinide Recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maldonado, G. Ivan; Christenson, John M.; Renier, J.P.; Marcille, T.F.; Casal, J.

    2010-01-01

    The Primary objective of the proposed project is to apply and extend the latest advancements in LWR fuel management optimization to the design of advanced boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies specifically for the recycling of minor actinides (MAs). A top-level objective of the Advanced Fuel Cycle Systems Analysis program element of the DOE NERI program is to investigate spent fuel treatment and recycling options for current light water reactors (LWRs). Accordingly, this project targets to expand the traditional scope of nuclear fuel management optimization into the following two complementary specific objectives: (1) To develop a direct coupling between the pin-by-pin within-bundle loading control variables and core-wide (bundle-by-bundle) optimization objectives, (2) to extend the methodology developed to explicitly encompass control variables, objectives, and constraints designed to maximize minor actinide incineration in BWR bundles and cycles. The first specific objective is projected to 'uncover' dormant thermal margin made available by employing additional degrees of freedom within the optimization process, while the addition of minor actinides is expected to 'consume' some of the uncovered thermal margin. Therefore, a key underlying goal of this project is to effectively invest some of the uncovered thermal margin into achieving the primary objective.

  17. Fuel gases generation in the primary contention during a coolant loss accident in a nuclear power plant with reactor type BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salaices, M.; Salaices, E.; Ovando, R.; Esquivias, J.

    2011-11-01

    During an accident design base of coolant loos, the hydrogen gas can accumulate inside the primary contention as a result of several generation mechanisms among those that are: 1) the reaction metal-water involving the zirconium of the fuel cladding and the reactor coolant, 2) the metals corrosion for the solutions used in the emergency cooling and dew of the contention, and 3) the radio-decomposition of the cooling solutions of post-accident emergency. In this work the contribution of each generation mechanism to the hydrogen total in the primary contention is analyzed, considering typical inventories of zirconium, zinc, aluminum and fission products in balance cycle of a reactor type BWR. In the analysis the distribution model of fission products and hydrogen production proposed in the regulator guide 1.7, Rev. 2 of the US NRC was used. The results indicate that the mechanism that more contributes to the hydrogen generation at the end of a period of 24 hours of initiate the accident is the radio-decomposition of the cooling solutions of post-accident emergency continued by the reaction metal-water involving the zirconium of the fuel cladding with the reactor coolant, and lastly the aluminum and zinc oxidation present in the primary contention. However, the reaction metal-water involving the zirconium of the fuel cladding and the reactor coolant is the mechanism that more contributes to the hydrogen generation in the first moments after the accident. This study constitutes the first part of the general analysis of the generation, transport and control of fuel gases in the primary contention during a coolant loss accident in BWRs. (Author)

  18. Nuclear power reactors in the world. April 2005 ed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    This is the twenty-fifth edition of Reference Data Series No. 2, Nuclear Power Reactors in the World, which is published once per year, to present the most recent reactor data available to the Agency. It contains the following summarized information: - General information as of the end of 2004 on power reactors operating or under construction, and shut down; - Performance data on reactors operating in the Agency's Member States, as reported to the IAEA. The information is collected by the Agency by circulating questionnaires to Member States through the designated national correspondents. The replies are used to maintain computerized files on general and design data of, and operating experience with, power reactors. The Agency's Power Reactor Information System (PRIS) comprising the above files provides all the information and data previously published in the Agency's Power Reactors in Member States and currently published in the Agency's Operating Experience with Nuclear Power Stations in Member States and available at the Internet address http://www.iaea.org/programmes/a2

  19. A world class nuclear research reactor complex for South Africa's nuclear future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keshaw, Jeetesh

    2008-01-01

    South Africa recently made public its rather ambitious goals pertaining to nuclear energy developments in a Draft Policy and Strategy issued for public comment. Not much attention was given to an important tool for nuclear energy research and development, namely a well equipped and maintained research reactor, which on its own does not do justice to its potential, unless it is fitted with all the ancillaries and human resources as most first world countries have. In South Africa's case it is suggested to establish at least one Nuclear Energy Research and Development Centre at such a research reactor, where almost all nuclear energy related research can be carried out on par with some of the best in the world. The purpose of this work is to propose how this could be done, and motivate why it is important that it be done with great urgency, and with full involvement of young professionals, if South Africa wishes to face up to the challenges mentioned in the Draft Strategy and Policy. (authors)

  20. A world class nuclear research reactor complex for South Africa's nuclear future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keshaw, Jeetesh [South African Young Nuclear Professional Society, PO Box 9396, Centurion, 0157 (South Africa)

    2008-07-01

    South Africa recently made public its rather ambitious goals pertaining to nuclear energy developments in a Draft Policy and Strategy issued for public comment. Not much attention was given to an important tool for nuclear energy research and development, namely a well equipped and maintained research reactor, which on its own does not do justice to its potential, unless it is fitted with all the ancillaries and human resources as most first world countries have. In South Africa's case it is suggested to establish at least one Nuclear Energy Research and Development Centre at such a research reactor, where almost all nuclear energy related research can be carried out on par with some of the best in the world. The purpose of this work is to propose how this could be done, and motivate why it is important that it be done with great urgency, and with full involvement of young professionals, if South Africa wishes to face up to the challenges mentioned in the Draft Strategy and Policy. (authors)

  1. Reactor safety study. An assessment of accident risks in U. S. commercial nuclear power plants. Appendices VII, VIII, IX, and X. [PWR and BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1975-10-01

    Information is presented concerning the release of radioactivity in reactor accidents; physical processes in reactor meltdown accidents; safety design rationale for nuclear power plants; and design adequacy.

  2. New nuclear weapon states and their impact on Third World regional conflicts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazrui, A.A.

    1986-01-01

    The paper examines the new nuclear weapon states and their impact on third world regional conflicts. Nuclear technology in South Africa, nuclear terrorism and the Arab/Israeli conflict, Islam and the nuclear age, Egypt and the Non-Proliferation Treaty, and the 'masculinity' of warfare, are all discussed. (UK)

  3. Development of a computer program of fast calculation for the pre design of advanced nuclear fuel 10 x 10 for BWR type reactors; Desarrollo de un program de computo de calculo rapido para el prediseno de celdas de combustible nuclear avanzado 10 x 10 para reactores de agua en ebullicion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perusquia, R.; Montes, J.L.; Ortiz, J.J. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: mrpc@nuclear.inin.mx

    2005-07-01

    In the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) a methodology is developed to optimize the design of cells 10x10 of assemble fuels for reactors of water in boil or BWR. It was proposed a lineal calculation formula based on a coefficients matrix (of the change reason of the relative power due to changes in the enrichment of U-235) for estimate the relative powers by pin of a cell. With this it was developed the computer program of fast calculation named PreDiCeldas. The one which by means of a simple search algorithm allows to minimize the relative power peak maximum of cell or LPPF. This is achieved varying the distribution of U-235 inside the cell, maintaining in turn fixed its average enrichment. The accuracy in the estimation of the relative powers for pin is of the order from 1.9% when comparing it with results of the 'best estimate' HELIOS code. With the PreDiCeldas it was possible, at one minimum time of calculation, to re-design a reference cell diminishing the LPPF, to the beginning of the life, of 1.44 to a value of 1.31. With the cell design with low LPPF is sought to even design cycles but extensive that those reached at the moment in the BWR of the Laguna Verde Central. (Author)

  4. Manufacturing technology and process for BWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Shigeru

    1996-01-01

    Following recent advanced technologies, processes and requests of the design changes of BWR fuel, Nuclear Fuel Industries, Ltd. (NFI) has upgraded the manufacturing technology and honed its own skills to complete its brand-new automated facility in Tokai in the latter half of 1980's. The plant uses various forms of automation throughout the manufacturing process: the acceptance of uranium dioxide powder, pelletizing, fuel rod assembling, fuel bundle assembling and shipment. All processes are well computerized and linked together to establish the integrated control system with three levels of Production and Quality Control, Process Control and Process Automation. This multi-level system plays an important role in the quality assurance system which generates the highest quality of fuels and other benefits. (author)

  5. Advanced technology for BWR operator training simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibuya, Akira; Fujita, Eimitsu; Nakao, Toshihiko; Nakabaru, Mitsugu; Asaoka, Kouchi.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes an operator training simulator for BWR nuclear power plants which went into service recently. The simulator is a full scope replica type simulator which faithfully replicates the control room environment of the reference plant with six main control panels and twelve auxiliary ones. In comparison with earlier simulators, the scope of the simulation is significantly extended in both width and depth. The simulation model is also refined in order to include operator training according to sympton-based emergency procedure guidelines to mitigate the results in accident cases. In particular, the core model and the calculational model of the radiation intensity distribution, if radioactive materials were released, are improved. As for simulator control capabilities by which efficient and effective training can be achieved, various advanced designs are adopted allowing easy use of the simulators. (author)

  6. Evaluation of internal flooding in a BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiu, K.; Papazoglou, I.A.; Sun, Y.H.; Anavim, E.; Ilberg, D.

    1985-01-01

    Flooding inside a nuclear power station is capable of concurrently disabling redundant safety systems. This paper presents the results of a recent review study performed on internally-generated floods inside a boiling water reactor (BWR) reactor building. The study evaluated the flood initiator frequency due to either maintenance or ruptures using Markovian models. A time phased event tree approach was adopted to quantify the core damage frequency based on the flood initiator frequency. It is found in the study that the contribution to the total core damage due to internal flooding events is not insignificant and is comparable to other transient contributors. The findings also indicate that the operator plays an important role in the prevention as well as the mitigation of a flooding event

  7. Analysis of the accident at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in an A BWR reactor; Analisis del accidente de la planta nucleoelectrica de Fukushima Daiichi en un reactor tipo ABWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escorcia O, D. [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico); Salazar S, E., E-mail: daniel.escorcia.ortiz@gmail.com [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Laboratorio de Analisis en Ingenieria de Reactores Nucleares, 62250 Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)

    2016-09-15

    The present work aims to recreate the accident occurred at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan on March 11, 2011, making use of an academic simulator of forced circulation of the A BWR reactor provided by the IAEA to know the scope of this simulator. The simulator was developed and distributed by the IAEA for academic purposes and contains the characteristics and general elements of this reactor to be able to simulate transients and failures of different types, allowing also to observe the general behavior of the reactor, as well as several phenomena and present systems in the same. Is an educational tool of great value, but it does not have a scope that allows the training of plant operators. To recreate the conditions of the Fukushima accident in the simulator, we first have to know what events led to this accident, as well as the actions taken by operators and managers to reduce the consequences of this accident; and the sequence of events that occurred during the course of the accident. Differences in the nuclear power plant behavior are observed and interpreted throughout the simulation, since the Fukushima plant technology and the simulator technology are not the same, although they have several elements in common. The Fukushima plant had an event that by far exceeded the design basis, which triggered in an accident that occurred in the first place by a total loss of power supply, followed by the loss of cooling systems, causing a level too high in temperature, melting the core and damaging the containment accordingly, allowing the escape of hydrogen and radioactive material. As a result of the simulation, was determined that the scope of the IAEA academic simulator reaches the entrance of the emergency equipment, so is able to simulate almost all the events occurred at the time of the earthquake and the arrival of the tsunami in the nuclear power plant of Fukushima Daiichi. However, due to its characteristics, is not able to simulate later

  8. Estimation of dose rate around the spent control rods of a BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancino P, G.

    2016-01-01

    The energy can come from fossil renewable sources (solar (natural gas, oil), wind, hydro, tidal, geothermal, biomass, bio energy and nuclear. Nuclear power can be obtained by fission reactions and fusion (still under investigation) atomic nuclei. Fission, is a partition of a very heavy nucleus (Uranium 235, for example) into two lighter nuclei. Much of the world's electric power is generated from the energy released by fission processes. In a nuclear power reactor, light water as the BWR, there are many important elements that allow safe driving operation, one of them are the elements or control systems, the burnable poison or neutron absorber inherently allow control power reactor. The control rods, which consist mostly of stainless steel and absorbing elements (such as boron carbide, hafnium, cadmium, among others) of thermal neutrons is able to initiate, regulate or stop the reactor power. These, due to the use of depleted burned or absorbing material and therefore reach their lifespan, which can be 15 years or have other values depending on the manufacturer. Control rods worn should be removed, stored or confined in expressly places. Precisely at this stage arises the importance of knowing their radiological condition to manipulate safely and without incident to the people health responsible for conducting these proceedings state arises. This thesis consists in the estimation of the dose rate in spent control rod made of boron carbide, from a typical BWR reactor. It will be estimated by direct radiation measurements with measurement equipment for radiotherapy ionization chamber, in six spent control rods, which were taken at different reactor operating cycles and are in a spent fuel pool. Using bracket electromechanical and electronic equipment for positioning and lifting equipment for radiation measurement around the control rod in the axial and radial arrangement for proper scanning. Finally will be presented a graphic corresponding to the dose

  9. An A BWR demonstration simulator for training and developing technical staff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, J. [Toshiba America Nuclear Energy, Charlotte, North Carolina (United States); Yonezawa, H.; Aoyagi, Y.; Kataoka, K., E-mail: jim.powers@toshiba.com [Toshiba Corporation, Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2015-09-15

    The US-Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (A BWR), certified by the US NRC, is a third generation, evolutionary boiling water reactor design which is the reference for the South Texas Project Units 3 and 4 (STP3-4) Combined License Application (Cola). Nuclear Innovation North America (Nina) is the License Applicant for this new build project, and Toshiba is the selected primary technology contractor. Toshiba has developed a Demonstration Simulator of the A BWR control room that provides a realistic experience for training and education on BWR principles and operations fundamentals. The Demonstration Simulator is located in the Toshiba America Nuclear Energy (Tane) office in Charlotte, North Carolina and is composed of standard office computer equipment set up in a specific arrangement that is representative of the layout of an A BWR control room. The Demonstration Simulator is not intended for licensed operator training, but can provide a framework for encouraging entry level technically oriented nuclear workers to enter the operations field; strengthening the linkage between university energy field curricula and real-life application of theory; and, improving understanding of integrated plant operations for developing station technical staff. This paper describes the A BWR Demonstration Simulator and its applications for training and educating future nuclear workers. (Author)

  10. An A BWR demonstration simulator for training and developing technical staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, J.; Yonezawa, H.; Aoyagi, Y.; Kataoka, K.

    2015-09-01

    The US-Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (A BWR), certified by the US NRC, is a third generation, evolutionary boiling water reactor design which is the reference for the South Texas Project Units 3 and 4 (STP3-4) Combined License Application (Cola). Nuclear Innovation North America (Nina) is the License Applicant for this new build project, and Toshiba is the selected primary technology contractor. Toshiba has developed a Demonstration Simulator of the A BWR control room that provides a realistic experience for training and education on BWR principles and operations fundamentals. The Demonstration Simulator is located in the Toshiba America Nuclear Energy (Tane) office in Charlotte, North Carolina and is composed of standard office computer equipment set up in a specific arrangement that is representative of the layout of an A BWR control room. The Demonstration Simulator is not intended for licensed operator training, but can provide a framework for encouraging entry level technically oriented nuclear workers to enter the operations field; strengthening the linkage between university energy field curricula and real-life application of theory; and, improving understanding of integrated plant operations for developing station technical staff. This paper describes the A BWR Demonstration Simulator and its applications for training and educating future nuclear workers. (Author)

  11. Nuclear power plants in the world - 2010 edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This small booklet summarizes in tables all data relative to the nuclear power plants worldwide. These data come from the IAEA's PRIS and AREVA-CEA's GAIA databases. The following aspects are reviewed: 2009 highlights, Main characteristics of reactor types, Map of the French nuclear power plants on 2010/01/01, Worldwide status of nuclear power plants (12/31/2009), Units distributed by countries, Nuclear power plants connected to the Grid- by reactor type groups, Nuclear power plants under construction on 2009, Evolution of nuclear power plants capacities connected to the grid, First electric generations supplied by a nuclear unit in each country, Electrical generation from nuclear power plants by country at the end 2009, Performance indicator of french PWR units, Evolution of the generation indicators worldwide by type, Nuclear operator ranking according to their installed capacity, Units connected to the grid by countries at 12/31/2009, Status of licence renewal applications in USA, Nuclear power plants under construction at 12/31/2009, Shutdown reactors, Exported nuclear capacity in net MWe, Exported and national nuclear capacity connected to the grid, Exported nuclear power plants under construction, Exported and national nuclear capacity under construction, Nuclear power plants ordered at 12/31/2009, Long term shutdown units at 12/31/2009, COL applications in the USA, Recycling of Plutonium in reactors and experiences, Mox licence plants projects, Appendix - historical development, Meaning of the used acronyms, Glossary

  12. Nuclear power plants in the world. 3. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    In principle, this survey covers only the reactors with gross output of 30 MWe and more. Only the reactors, of which the information was available, were listed. The main sources of information are given. Plant status is divided into reactors in operation, under construction, on order and planned. This survey gives the information as of the end of 1984. There were 324 reactors in operation of 223,612 MWe capacity, 195 reactors under construction of 189,646 MWe capacity, 7 reactors on order of 6,537 MWe capacity, and 121 reactors planned of 122,736 MWe capacity. In total, there were 647 reactors of 542,531 MWe capacity in the world. 27 reactors of 25,841 MWe capacity started the operation in 1984, and the construction of 20 reactors with 17,939 MWe capacity began in 1984. By the end of 1984, the countries listed achieved the total operation experience of about 3,360 reactor-years. The reactors started operation in 1984 were 6 reactors in France, 4 reactors each in USA and USSR, 3 reactors each in Japan and Canada, and 1 reactor each in FRG, Taiwan, Spain, Switzerland, Czechoslovakia, South Africa and Hungary. There were 25 countries where nuclear power plants have been operated. (Kako, I.)

  13. New competition in the world market of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finon, D.

    2005-01-01

    As nuclear orders are picking up a little, there are strengths competing against one another in the world industry of reactors, an industry that has been deeply affected for twenty years, by the smallness of the market and the reorganization of the electromechanical industry. Competition remains particularly difficult, even though, in terms of exports, national markets in industrialized countries such as the American market and European market are now open to foreign newcomers. One of the reasons of the difficulty is the increased commercial competition based on advanced reactor techniques untested due to strong faith in technology leading to forget the learning difficulties of older reactor types. On a narrow market, demanding and with very specific political interference, the reasoning is not like on an ordinary capital equipment market. Each builder tries to sell by relying on the assets it has in addition to the offered price and related services: industrial reputation and experience that play confusedly when untested advanced reactors are competing with one another, credit terms offered by the State and the government's influence on the market of emerging economies, the backing o the State's financial insurance in the event of risks taken in the sale of turnkey untested reactors. In the competition of the five manufacturers in the export market, American builders do not seem to have the best place, though even the leading position of Framatome ANP shows some limits. (author)

  14. Phenomenology of severe accidents in BWR type reactors. First part; Fenomenologia de accidentes severos en reactores nucleares de agua en ebullicion. Primera parte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandoval V, S. [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Gerencia de Energia Nuclear, Av. Reforma 113, Col. Palmira, 62490 Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    A Severe Accident in a nuclear power plant is a deviation from its normal operating conditions, resulting in substantial damage to the core and, potentially, the release of fission products. Although the occurrence of a Severe Accident on a nuclear power plant is a low probability event, due to the multiple safety systems and strict safety regulations applied since plant design and during operation, Severe Accident Analysis is performed as a safety proactive activity. Nuclear Power Plant Severe Accident Analysis is of great benefit for safety studies, training and accident management, among other applications. This work describes and summarizes some of the most important phenomena in Severe Accident field and briefly illustrates its potential use based on the results of two generic simulations. Equally important and abundant as those here presented, fission product transport and retention phenomena are deferred to a complementary work. (Author)

  15. The cold and the dark: The world after nuclear war

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrlich, P.R.; Sagan, C.; Kennedy, D.; Roberts, W.O.

    1984-01-01

    This book contains the following three selections: The Atmospheric and Climatic Consequences of Nuclear War; The Biological Consequences of Nuclear War; and The Moscow Link: A Diaglogue between U.S. and Soviet Scientists

  16. Recent developments in ultrasonic inspection of BWR pipes in USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behravesh, M.; Dau, G.J.

    1985-01-01

    Following the 1982 discovery of widespread intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in the recirculation piping system at the Nine Mile Point unit 1 plant, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) made the requirement that the operating BWR plants demonstrate the effectiveness of their ultrasonic testing procedures. Since that time, the detection, identification, and sizing of IGSCC in BWR pipes has received an even greater amount of attention. Initially EPRI through its NDE Center in Charlotte took an active role in providing a mechanism whereby the affected utilities could demonstrate the required capabilities. This effort was soon followed with the development and regular offering of a one week course on IGSCC detection whose final exam was patterned after the requirements of the US NRC Bulletin IE 83-02 on performance capability demonstration

  17. Highlights of the IAEA scientific forum: Nuclear science: Physics helping the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, B.

    2005-01-01

    The conclusions drawn at the Scientific Forum during the 49th regular Session of the IAEA General Conference entitled 'Nuclear Physics: Helping the World' are as follows. Physics is indeed helping the world and the IAEA, applications of nuclear are continuing to grow, nuclear power is likely to increase dramatically, work on 'Beyond Kyoto' should begin and nuclear should be part of any 'Clean Development Mechanism'. IAEA should look again at the role of R and D in safeguards, IAEA should look at safety issues in newly nuclear countries, internationalizing the fuel cycle is right IF one can do it

  18. The Three Mile Island accident, a world premiere for nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouvier, Yves

    2015-01-01

    When it happened on 28 March 1979, the accident at the Three Mile Island nuclear power station in Pennsylvania took experts and operators by surprise. Although human losses were minor, this world shaking media event significantly changed public attitudes towards nuclear energy and put a definitive stop to the development of nuclear power in the USA. (author)

  19. Decommissioning of nuclear facilities: a growing activity in the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anasco, Raul

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear power plants and nuclear facilities are no different from normal buildings and factories. Eventually, they become worn-out or old fashioned, too expensive to maintain or remodel. Decommissioning a nuclear facility is different from retiring other types because of the radioactivity involved. The most important consideration in nuclear decommissioning is to protect workers and the public from exposure to harmful levels of radiation. General criteria and strategies for the decommissioning of nuclear facilities are described as well as the present decommissioning activities of the Argentine CNEA (author)

  20. Nuclear Power, its Waste in the World and in Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Temiz, Fatih

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear power plants were born in 1950s. Taking only 30 grams of used fuel annually for a person’s energy consumption many countries built their own nuclear power plants. In this story, there is the fuel on one hand and the waste on the other. In general sense, used up fuel rods from nuclear reactors and the waste from reprocessing plants are referred to as nuclear waste. These wastes can be stored for decades in the cooling pools of nuclear reacto...

  1. Updating of the costs of the nuclear fuels of the equilibrium reloading of the A BWR and EPR reactors; Actualizacion de los costos de combustible nuclear de la recarga de equilibrio de los reactores ABWR y EPR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega C, R.F. [FI-UNAM, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)]. e-mail: rortega@fi-b.unam.mx

    2008-07-01

    In the last two and a half years, the price of the uranium in the market spot has ascended of US$20.00 dollars by lb U{sub 3O}8 in January, 2005 to a maximum of US$137.00 dollars by Ib U{sub 3}O{sub 8} by the middle of 2007. At the moment this price has been stabilized in US$90.00 dollars by Ib U{sub 3}O{sub 8} such for the market spot, like for the long term contracts. In this work the reasons of this increment are analyzed, as well as their impact in the fuel prices of the balance recharge of the advanced reactors of boiling water (A BWR) and of the advanced water at pressure reactors (EPR). (Author)

  2. Complete BWR--EM LOCA analysis using the WRAP--EM system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckmeyer, R.R.; Gregory, M.V.; Buckner, M.R.

    1979-01-01

    The Water Reactor Analysis Package, Evaluation Model (WRAP--EM), provides a complete analysis of postulated loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCA's) in light--water nuclear power reactors. The system is being developed at the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) for use by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to interpret and evaluate reactor vendor, evaluation model (EM) analyses. The initial version of the WRAP--EM system for analysis of boiling water reactors (BWR's) is operational. To demonstrate the complete capability of the WRAP--BWR--EM system, a LOCA analysis has been performed for the Hope Creek Plant

  3. For a world governance of the civil and military nuclear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gere, Francois

    2010-04-01

    This report first proposes an overview of the history of the emergence of the civil and military nuclear activities, of their relationship and of their distinction. It notably refers to some initiatives like Atoms for Peace in 1953, and the ups and downs of arms control. It discusses the relationship between the power of States and their nuclear capacities, the motivations for the acquisition of nuclear weapons, the disturbance created by nuclear weapons, the emergence of the notion of non proliferation and the evolution of the perception of the national interest. It comments the relationship between war and military nuclear, the role of military nuclear in peace keeping, the role of civil nuclear for peace through sustainable development and compensation of inequalities, the relationship between nuclear and terrorism. The second part describes the evolutions for the century to come (end of Cold War, new energy needs, preservation of the planet) and discusses the possible ban of nuclear weapons. Several proposals are then formulated to strengthen the foundations of a new diplomacy, to act at the institutional level (notably through existing or proposed bodies, for verification and financing), and to elaborate a new social contract about the nuclear

  4. A world-class design for the Chinese Nuclear Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz, A.; Valero, E.

    1999-01-01

    Under the name Grupo Nuclear SEPI, the companies BWE, ENDESA, ENSA, ENRESA, ENUSA and INITEC, in a partnership in SEPI and with extensive experience in the nuclear sector, have in the last few years been coordinating technical and commercial actions targeted primarily at the Chinese nuclear market. These actions have been carried out under Westinghouse's leadership, for the purpose of providing a 1000 MWe nuclear Power plant design tailored to the local requirements defined by experts and authorities of the People's Republic of China (project CPWR 1000). (Author)

  5. Tritium in liquid phase in a BWR-5 like Laguna Verde; Tritio en fase liquida en un BWR-5 como Laguna Verde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tijerina S, F.; Vargas A, A.; Cardenas J, J., E-mail: francisco.tijerina@cfe.gob.mx [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Central Nucleoelectrica Laguna Verde, Subgerencia de Ingenieria, Carretera Veracruz-Medellin Km 7.5, Veracruz (Mexico)

    2011-11-15

    In boiling water reactors (BWR), the tritium (H{sub 3}) takes place mainly as a result of ternary fissions in the nuclear reactors, of those which 75% are in gaseous form and 25% in liquid form. In the liquid phase, the tritium is transported to the pipes of the primary coolant toward condensed tanks or tanks of drainage excesses of radioactive equipment, located in external areas of a BWR, as well as to the processes of radioactive wastes to be able to be directed to the liquid effluents. For that reason, is necessary to know the possible routes of the transport and processes of the tritium in a BWR to control this radioisotope in the site of the event of leaks in equipment s and buried pipes, avoiding that emigrates toward underground flowing and an impact to the environment and to the people in general. (Author)

  6. Results of the Simulator smart against synthetic signals using a model of reduced order of BWR with additive and multiplicative noise; Resultados del simulador smart frente a senales sinteticas utilizando un modelo de orden reducido de BWR con ruido aditivo y multiplicativo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz-Cobo, J. L.; Montesino, M. E.; Pena, J.; Escriva, A.; Melara, J.

    2011-07-01

    Results of SMART-simulator front of synthetic signals with models of reduced order of BWR with additive and multiplicative noise Under the SMART project, which aims to monitor the signals Cofrentes nuclear plant, we have developed a signal generator of synthetics BWR that will allow together real signals of plant the validation of the monitor.

  7. BWR Steam Dryer Alternating Stress Assessment Procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morante, R. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hambric, S. A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ziada, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-12-01

    This report presents an overview of Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) steam dryer design; the fatigue cracking failures that occurred at the Quad Cities (QC) plants and their root causes; a history of BWR Extended Power Uprates (EPUs) in the USA; and a discussion of steam dryer modifications/replacements, alternating stress mechanisms on steam dryers, and structural integrity evaluations (static and alternating stress).

  8. Stability of transition to a world without nuclear weapons: Technical problems of verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhigalov, V.

    1998-01-01

    A serious psychological barrier to acceptance of the concept for achieving the nuclear-weapon-free world is fear of facing the prospect that one or more nations or extremist political groups might develop their own nuclear weapons. Actually this is a question of stability of the nuclear-weapon-free world. From this point of view the most effective system of verification is an absolute necessity. This system must ensure detection of so called undeclared nuclear activity at early stage. Scientists of Russian nuclear centers are working today on solving this problem. This paper is considered to be a comprehensive attempt to analyze the technical and organizational aspects of the problems of transition to a nuclear-weapons-free world, setting aside the difficulties of resolving purely political problems

  9. The role of nuclear power in the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csik, B.J.

    1976-01-01

    A forecast, going beyond the year 2000, is made of the development of the various energy carriers, in particular nuclear energy. The further development of nuclear energy, as one of the main pillars in future energy supply, is shown to be inevitable. (UA) [de

  10. Reactor safety study. An assessment of accident risks in U. S. commercial nuclear power plants. Appendices III and IV. [PWR and BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1975-10-01

    The items listed below summarize the detail sections which follow: a listing of definitions and a discussion of the general treatment of data within the random variable approach as utilized by the study; a tabulation of the assessed data base containing failure classifications, final assessed ranges utilized in quantification and reference source values considered in determining the ranges; a discussion of nuclear power plant experience that was used to validate the data assessment by testing its applicability as well as to check on the adequacy of the model to incorporate typical real incidents; an expanded presentation of the data assessment giving information on applicability considerations; a discussion of test and maintenance data including comparisons of models with experience data; and special topics, including assessments required for the initiating event probabilities and human error data and modeling.

  11. Standard Technical Specifications, General Electric plants, BWR/4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    This NUREG contains improved Standard Technical Specifications (STS) for General Electric Plants, BWR/6, and documents the positions of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission based on the BWR Owners Group's proposed STS. This document is the result of extensive technical meetings and discussions among the NRC staff, the Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) Owners Groups, the NSSS vendors, and the Nuclear Management and Resources Council (NUMARC). The improved STS were developed based on the criteria in the interim Commission Policy Statement on Technical Specification Improvements for Nuclear Power Reactors, dated February 6, 1987. The improved STS will be used as the basis for individual nuclear power plant licensees to develop improved plant-specific technical specifications. This report contains three volumes. This document Volume 1 contains the Specifications for all chapters and sections of the improved STS. Volume 2 contains the Bases for Chapters 2.0 and 3.0, and Sections 3.1--3.3 of the improved STS. Volume 3 contains the Bases for Sections 3.4--3.10 of the improved STS

  12. Integrated Electronic Microscopy Method to Characterize BWR Crud Deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pop, Mike G.; Lockamon, Brian; Howe, James M.; Oleshko, Vladimir P.

    2007-01-01

    The primary objective of this paper is to present the best combination of analytical Electron Microscopy (EM) techniques suited for studying Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel crud deposits in their 'as found' condition, for example un-adulterated portions of the deposits located in crevices at the surface of deposit. The secondary objective of the paper is to suggest a strategy to connect the analytical EM results with the Power Diffraction File (PDF-4) crystal database to ultimately explain crystal growth phenomena in crevices. The samples analyzed as part of this work were collected from steam generators in Nuclear Power Plants. These samples were selected as segregates for BWR deposits due to their similar structures and because they were freely releasable for study in the University labs. The samples were analyzed extensively through various EM techniques at magnifications up to 150,000 X. Subsequent evaluation of the analysis results demonstrated that the selected samples exhibited characteristics that were very close to second-burned fuel crud deposits from operating BWR plants. (authors)

  13. Seismic proving test of BWR primary loop recirculation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, H.; Shigeta, M.; Karasawa, Y.

    1987-01-01

    The seismic proving test of BWR Primary Loop Recirculation system is the second test to use the large-scale, high-performance vibration table of Tadotsu Engineering Laboratory. The purpose of this test is to prove the seismic reliability of the primary loop recirculation system (PLR), one of the most important safety components in the BWR nuclear plants, and also to confirm the adequacy of seismic analysis method used in the current seismic design. To achieve the purpose, the test was conducted under conditions and scale as near as possible to actual systems. The strength proving test was carried out with the test model mounted on the vibration table in consideration of basic design earthquake ground motions and other conditions to confirm the soundness of structure and the strength against earthquakes. Detailed analysis and analytic evaluation of the data obtained from the test was conducted to confirm the adequacy of the seismic analysis method and earthquake response analysis method used in the current seismic design. Then, on the basis of the results obtained, the seismic safety and reliability of BWR primary loop recirculation of the actual plants was fully evaluated

  14. Elecnuc. Nuclear power plants in the world. 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maubacq, F.; Tailland, C.

    1997-04-01

    This small booklet provides information about all type of nuclear power plants worldwide. It is based on the data taken from the CEA/DSE/SEE Elecnuc database. The content comprises: the 1996 highlights, the main characteristics of the different type of reactors in operation or under construction, the map of the French nuclear power plant sites, the worldwide status of nuclear power plants at the end of 1996, the nuclear power plants in operation, under construction or on order (by groups of reactor-types), the power capacity evolution of power plants in operation, the net and gross capacity of the power plants on the grid, the commercial operation and grid connection forecasts, the first achieved or expected power generation supplied by a nuclear reactor for each country and the power generation from nuclear reactors, the performance indicator of the PWR units in France, the trends of the power generation indicator worldwide, the nuclear power plants in operation, under construction, on order, planned, cancelled, decommissioned and exported worldwide, the schedule of steam generator replacements, and the MOX fuel plutonium recycling programme. (J.S.)

  15. Nuclear proliferation and terrorism in the post-9/11 world

    CERN Document Server

    Hafemeister, David

    2016-01-01

    This book fills a clear gap in the literature for a technically-focused book covering nuclear proliferation and related issues post-9/11. Using a concept-led approach which serves a broad readership, it provides detailed overview of nuclear weapons, nuclear proliferation and international nuclear policy. The author addresses topics including offensive and defensive missile systems, command and control, verification, weapon effects, and nuclear testing. A chronology of nuclear arms is presented including detailed discussion of the Cold War, proliferation, and arms control treaties. The book is tailored to courses on nuclear proliferation, and the general reader will also find it a fascinating introduction to the science and strategy behind international nuclear policy in the modern era. “Finally, a spritely, accessible overview of the nuclear world in historical context from someone who has both seen it from the U.S. State Department and Congressional policy trenches and taught it for 43 years. A gift to bot...

  16. Nuclear Insurance Pools: World-wide Practice and Prospective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reitsma, S. M. S.

    2000-01-01

    The following paper explains why Nuclear Insurance Pools were established, how they operate and what insurance protection they offer to the operations of nuclear installations. It will be shown that the clear interrelationship of the Pool-insurance operations, both on a national and an international level, has resulted in a transparency of each individual Pool-Member's exposure, which enables him to make the highest possible commitment to nuclear risks. Finally, some views will be given as regards the future prospective for the long proven method of pooling this particularly sensitive class of business. (author)

  17. Design of a mixed recharge with MOX assemblies of greater relation of moderation for a BWR reactor; Diseno de una recarga mixta con ensambles MOX de mayor relacion de moderacion para un reactor BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez S, J.R.; Alonso V, G.; Palacios H, J. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca Km. 36.5, 52045 Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: jrrs@nuclear.inin.mx

    2004-07-01

    The study of the fuel of mixed oxides of uranium and plutonium (MOX) it has been topic of investigation in many countries of the world and those are even discussed in many places the benefits of reprocessing the spent fuel to extract the plutonium created during the irradiation of the fuel in the nuclear power reactors. At the moment those reactors that have been loaded partially with MOX fuel, are mainly of the type PWR where a mature technology has been achieved in some countries like they are France, Belgium and England, however the experience with reactors of the type BWR is more limited and it is continued studying the best way to introduce this type of fuel in BWRs, one of the main problems to introduce MOX in reactors BWR is the neutronic design of the same one, existing different concepts to introduce the plutonium in the assemblies of fuel and one of them is the one of increasing the relationship of moderation of the assemble. In this work a MOX fuel assemble design is presented and the obtained results so far in the ININ. These results indicate that the investigated concept has some exploitable advantages in the use of the MOX fuel. (Author)

  18. Thermohydraulic stability coupled to the neutronic in a BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calleros M, G.; Zapata Y, M.; Gomez H, R.A.; Mendez M, A.; Castlllo D, R.

    2006-01-01

    In a BWR type reactor the phenomenon of the nuclear fission is presented, in which are liberated in stochastic form neutrons, originating that the population of the same ones varies in statistic form around a mean value. This variation will cause that when the neutron flow impacts on the neutron detectors, its are had as a result neutron flow signals with fluctuations around an average value. In this article it is shown that it conforms it lapses the time, this variations in the neutron flow (and therefore, in the flow signal due only to the fission), they presented oscillations inside a stable range, which won't be divergent. Considering that the BWR is characterized because boiling phenomena are presented, which affect the moderation of the neutrons, additional variations will be had in the signal coming from the neutron detectors, with relationship to the fission itself, which will be influenced by the feedback of the moderator's reactivity and of the temperature of the fuel pellet. Also, as the BWR it has coupled control systems to maintain the coolant level one and of the thermal power of the reactor, for each control action it was affected the neutron population. This means that the reactor could end up straying of a stable state condition. By it previously described, the study of the thermohydraulic stability coupled to the neutronic is complex. In this work it is shown the phenomenology, the mathematical models and the theoretical behavior associated to the stability of the BWR type reactor; the variables that affect it are identified, the models that reproduce the behavior of the thermohydraulic stability coupled to the neutronic, the way to maintain stable the reactor and the instrumentation that can settle to detect and to suppress uncertainties is described. In particular, is make reference to the evolution of the methods to maintain the stability of the reactor and the detection system and suppression of uncertainties implemented in the Laguna Verde

  19. Recent technology for BWR operator training simulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Takao; Hashimoto, Shigeo; Kato, Kanji; Mizuno, Toshiyuki; Asaoka, Koichi.

    1990-01-01

    As one of the important factors for maintaining the high capacity ratio in Japanese nuclear power stations, the contribution of excellent operators is pointed out. BWR Operation Training Center has trained many operators using two full scope simulators for operation training modeling BWRs. But in order to meet the demands of the recent increase of training needs and the upgrading of the contents, it was decided to install the third simulator, and Hitachi Ltd. received the order to construct the main part, and delivered it. This simulator obtained the good reputation as its range of simulation is wide, and the characteristics resemble very well those of the actual plants. Besides, various new designs were adopted in the control of the simulator, and its handling became very easy. Japanese nuclear power plants are operated at constant power output, and the unexpected stop is very rare, therefore the chance of operating the plants by operators is very few. Accordingly, the training using the simulators which can simulate the behavior of the plants with computers, and can freely generate abnormal phenomena has become increasingly important. The mode and positioning of the simulators for operation training, the full scope simulator BTC-3 and so on are reported. (K.I.)

  20. Statistical analysis in the design of nuclear fuel cells and training of a neural network to predict safety parameters for reactors BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jauregui Ch, V.

    2013-01-01

    In this work the obtained results for a statistical analysis are shown, with the purpose of studying the performance of the fuel lattice, taking into account the frequency of the pins that were used. For this objective, different statistical distributions were used; one approximately to normal, another type X 2 but in an inverse form and a random distribution. Also, the prediction of some parameters of the nuclear reactor in a fuel reload was made through a neuronal network, which was trained. The statistical analysis was made using the parameters of the fuel lattice, which was generated through three heuristic techniques: Ant Colony Optimization System, Neuronal Networks and a hybrid among Scatter Search and Path Re linking. The behavior of the local power peak factor was revised in the fuel lattice with the use of different frequencies of enrichment uranium pines, using the three techniques mentioned before, in the same way the infinite multiplication factor of neutrons was analyzed (k..), to determine within what range this factor in the reactor is. Taking into account all the information, which was obtained through the statistical analysis, a neuronal network was trained; that will help to predict the behavior of some parameters of the nuclear reactor, considering a fixed fuel reload with their respective control rods pattern. In the same way, the quality of the training was evaluated using different fuel lattices. The neuronal network learned to predict the next parameters: Shutdown Margin (SDM), the pin burn peaks for two different fuel batches, Thermal Limits and the Effective Neutron Multiplication Factor (k eff ). The results show that the fuel lattices in which the frequency, which the inverted form of the X 2 distribution, was used revealed the best values of local power peak factor. Additionally it is shown that the performance of a fuel lattice could be enhanced controlling the frequency of the uranium enrichment rods and the variety of the gadolinium

  1. Cooperative Security: The Nuclear Strategy for an Uncertain World

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wilkinson, John L

    1996-01-01

    Nuclear weapons must be dramatically reduced, if not eliminated, and greater reliance must be placed on conventional capabilities But the reduction question is how deep, how fast, and how much risk...

  2. Current status and prospects of France's nuclear sector and France's vision of the nuclear renaissance throughout the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bugat, Alain

    2007-01-01

    Industrial companies are merging of forging alliances, and are competing for the securing of a stable supply of uranium resources; different states are discussing in order to establish partnership or cooperation agreements, on both the bilateral or multilateral side. in other words, the nuclear scene is more changing and active than ever. This burst of activity is motivated by the renewed interest in the nuclear energy throughout the world. In order to meet the expectation of more and more people wanting to have access to energy, nuclear energy has to face important challenges: the highest level of safety is required, the nuclear waste must be dealt with in a responsible and sustainable way, and the trust and acceptance of the public must be consolidated. France, being a long time supporter of nuclear energy is of course an actor of this Renaissance, and is strengthening its nuclear sector in order to meet the criteria expressed above. i will detail in my speech what are the steps taken in france in order to do so, and share my view of what should be a sustainable development of nuclear energy in the world, providing electricity while keeping a clean record on safety and non proliferation matters. We are clearly at a turning point in the history of nuclear energy, perfectly illustrated by the shift in the position of a quite large number of environmentalists, considering now nuclear as a sound option in order to produce base load energy without emitting greenhouse effect gas. Given the constraints at stake, it seems clear that more and more countries will turn to nuclear for their energy needs. It is up to us, the advanced countries in this field, gathered here today in Korea, to help this happen. It is up to us to lead the way, and show the world that electricity can be produced from nuclear with the highest standards of safety at competitive come along with no additional threat regarding non proliferation issues. All the major nuclear countries, including of

  3. Design of a mixed recharge with MOX assemblies of greater relation of moderation for a BWR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez S, J.R.; Alonso V, G.; Palacios H, J.

    2004-01-01

    The study of the fuel of mixed oxides of uranium and plutonium (MOX) it has been topic of investigation in many countries of the world and those are even discussed in many places the benefits of reprocessing the spent fuel to extract the plutonium created during the irradiation of the fuel in the nuclear power reactors. At the moment those reactors that have been loaded partially with MOX fuel, are mainly of the type PWR where a mature technology has been achieved in some countries like they are France, Belgium and England, however the experience with reactors of the type BWR is more limited and it is continued studying the best way to introduce this type of fuel in BWRs, one of the main problems to introduce MOX in reactors BWR is the neutronic design of the same one, existing different concepts to introduce the plutonium in the assemblies of fuel and one of them is the one of increasing the relationship of moderation of the assemble. In this work a MOX fuel assemble design is presented and the obtained results so far in the ININ. These results indicate that the investigated concept has some exploitable advantages in the use of the MOX fuel. (Author)

  4. BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Shoichi

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To inhibit the lowering of the neutron moderation effect due to voids in the upper portion of the reactor core, thereby flatten the axial power distribution. Constitution: Although it has been proposed to enlarge the diameter at the upper portion of a water rod thereby increasing the moderator in the upper portion, since the water rod situates within the channel box, the increase in the capacity thereof is has certain limit. In the present invention, it is designed such that the volume of the region at the outside of the channel box for the fuel assembly to which non-boiling water in the non-boiling water region can enter is made greater in the upper portion than in the lower portion of the reactor core. Thus, if the moderator density in the upper portion of the reactor core should be decreased due to the generation of the voids, the neutron moderating effect in the upper portion of the reactor core is not lowered as compared with the lower portion of the reactor core and, accordingly, the axial power distribution can be flattening more as compared with that in the conventional nuclear reactors. (Takahashi, M.)

  5. Thermohydraulic stability coupled to the neutronic in a BWR; Estabilidad termohidraulica acoplada a la neutronica en un BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calleros M, G.; Zapata Y, M.; Gomez H, R.A.; Mendez M, A. [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Central Nucleoelectrica de Laguna Verde, Carretera Cardel-Nautla Km. 42.5, Mpio. Alto Lucero, Veracruz (Mexico); Castlllo D, R. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca Km 36.5, La Marquesa, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: gcm9acpp@cfe.gob.mx

    2006-07-01

    In a BWR type reactor the phenomenon of the nuclear fission is presented, in which are liberated in stochastic form neutrons, originating that the population of the same ones varies in statistic form around a mean value. This variation will cause that when the neutron flow impacts on the neutron detectors, its are had as a result neutron flow signals with fluctuations around an average value. In this article it is shown that it conforms it lapses the time, this variations in the neutron flow (and therefore, in the flow signal due only to the fission), they presented oscillations inside a stable range, which won't be divergent. Considering that the BWR is characterized because boiling phenomena are presented, which affect the moderation of the neutrons, additional variations will be had in the signal coming from the neutron detectors, with relationship to the fission itself, which will be influenced by the feedback of the moderator's reactivity and of the temperature of the fuel pellet. Also, as the BWR it has coupled control systems to maintain the coolant level one and of the thermal power of the reactor, for each control action it was affected the neutron population. This means that the reactor could end up straying of a stable state condition. By it previously described, the study of the thermohydraulic stability coupled to the neutronic is complex. In this work it is shown the phenomenology, the mathematical models and the theoretical behavior associated to the stability of the BWR type reactor; the variables that affect it are identified, the models that reproduce the behavior of the thermohydraulic stability coupled to the neutronic, the way to maintain stable the reactor and the instrumentation that can settle to detect and to suppress uncertainties is described. In particular, is make reference to the evolution of the methods to maintain the stability of the reactor and the detection system and suppression of uncertainties implemented in the

  6. BWR Source Term Generation and Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.C. Ryman

    2003-07-31

    This calculation is a revision of a previous calculation (Ref. 7.5) that bears the same title and has the document identifier BBAC00000-01717-0210-00006 REV 01. The purpose of this revision is to remove TBV (to-be-verified) -41 10 associated with the output files of the previous version (Ref. 7.30). The purpose of this and the previous calculation is to generate source terms for a representative boiling water reactor (BWR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) assembly for the first one million years after the SNF is discharged from the reactors. This calculation includes an examination of several ways to represent BWR assemblies and operating conditions in SAS2H in order to quantify the effects these representations may have on source terms. These source terms provide information characterizing the neutron and gamma spectra in particles per second, the decay heat in watts, and radionuclide inventories in curies. Source terms are generated for a range of burnups and enrichments (see Table 2) that are representative of the waste stream and stainless steel (SS) clad assemblies. During this revision, it was determined that the burnups used for the computer runs of the previous revision were actually about 1.7% less than the stated, or nominal, burnups. See Section 6.6 for a discussion of how to account for this effect before using any source terms from this calculation. The source term due to the activation of corrosion products deposited on the surfaces of the assembly from the coolant is also calculated. The results of this calculation support many areas of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR), which include thermal evaluation, radiation dose determination, radiological safety analyses, surface and subsurface facility designs, and total system performance assessment. This includes MGR items classified as Quality Level 1, for example, the Uncanistered Spent Nuclear Fuel Disposal Container (Ref. 7.27, page 7). Therefore, this calculation is subject to the requirements of the

  7. Status update of the BWR cask simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindgren, Eric R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Durbin, Samuel G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The performance of commercial nuclear spent fuel dry storage casks are typically evaluated through detailed numerical analysis of the system's thermal performance. These modeling efforts are performed by the vendor to demonstrate the performance and regulatory compliance and are independently verified by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Carefully measured data sets generated from testing of full sized casks or smaller cask analogs are widely recognized as vital for validating these models. Numerous studies have been previously conducted. Recent advances in dry storage cask designs have moved the storage location from above ground to below ground and significantly increased the maximum thermal load allowed in a cask in part by increasing the canister helium pressure. Previous cask performance validation testing did not capture these parameters. The purpose of the investigation described in this report is to produce a data set that can be used to test the validity of the assumptions associated with the calculations presently used to determine steady-state cladding temperatures in modern dry casks. These modern cask designs utilize elevated helium pressure in the sealed canister or are intended for subsurface storage. The BWR cask simulator (BCS) has been designed in detail for both the above ground and below ground venting configurations. The pressure vessel representing the canister has been designed, fabricated, and pressure tested for a maximum allowable pressure (MAWP) rating of 24 bar at 400 C. An existing electrically heated but otherwise prototypic BWR Incoloy-clad test assembly is being deployed inside of a representative storage basket and cylindrical pressure vessel that represents the canister. The symmetric single assembly geometry with well-controlled boundary conditions simplifies interpretation of results. Various configurations of outer concentric ducting will be used to mimic conditions for above and below ground storage configurations

  8. Perspectives of development of the nuclear market in the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-09-01

    Since the end of the second oil shock, the context has never been as favorable as today for a re-launching of nuclear energy. The growth of energy demand requires heavy investments in new power production capacities. The explosion of fossil fuel prices and the implementation of the carbon trade market in Europe have burdened the competitiveness and price of electricity generated from these energy sources. New and renewable energies will not be capable to take up the challenge of production capacities and thus the nuclear power appears as the inevitable solution, despite the investments needed and the problem of wastes management. Moreover, most nuclear plants in operation today were built during the 1970-1980 era and, despite their lifetime extension, the USA, France, Japan, Russia and Germany will have to replace 80 to 100% of their nuclear park within the next 20 years. Taking into account the administrative and construction delays, the investment decisions will have to be taken in the coming years. This study answers the following questions: what reactor technologies dominate the market today? What are the forces in presence at each sector of the nuclear industry? What is the weight of each market segment? Who are the operators positioned in the market of 3. generation reactors? What will be the size of the market by 2030? What are the most attractive markets? Who are the best positioned groups to capture these markets? This study is based on the analysis of 14 representative groups of the nuclear sector: vertically integrated operators, fuel cycle front-end specialists, reactor construction specialists and atypical nuclear fuel companies. (J.S.)

  9. Commercial nuclear power: prospects for the United States and the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This analysis report presents the current status and outlook for commercial nuclear power reactors for all countries in the world outside centrally planned economic areas (WOCA). Information regarding operable reactors in countries with centrally planned economies is presented in an appendix. The report provides documentation of the US nuclear capacity and generation projections through 1995. Projections for US nuclear capacity and generation through 2020 are presented for various nuclear power supply scenarios. These long-term projections are provided in support of the Department of Energy's activities pertaining to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 and are used to produce the projections of fuel cycle requirements and spent fuel discharges

  10. From the nuclear world. May-Jun 2016, no.3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2016-01-01

    This document gathers pieces of information concerning nuclear industry worldwide. The most relevant are the following ones. EDF wants to give more flexibility to its reactor fleet in order to back the development of renewable energies. The amount of the compensation that EDF will receive for the decommissioning of the Fessenheim plant will be set by third-party experts. In the United-Kingdom the Low-carbon energy sector (energy efficiency, nuclear power, renewable energies,...) employs 238.000 people. IEA recommends Belgium to postpone its nuclear phase-out policy (initially 2025) to ensure its security of supply. The first reactor AP1000 of the Sanmen nuclear power plant (China) has completed the cold hydrostatic test (CHT), this success opens the way for the hot functional test and the initial fuel load. In Australia the Barndioota site has been pre-selected for the possibility of storing nuclear wastes. According to a study published by the Arab Petroleum Investments Corporation (APICORP) Middle-East and North Africa countries will have to invest 334 billions dollars in the power sector for the next 5 years in order to cope with the growing demand for electricity. (A.C.)

  11. Current Status of World Nuclear Fuel Cycle Technology (I): Canada and Latin America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hang Bok; Ko, Won Il

    2007-05-15

    Canada produces about one third of the world's uranium mine output, most of it from two new mines. After 2007 Canadian production is expected to increase further as more new mines come into production. About 15% of Canada's electricity comes from nuclear power, using indigenous technology, and 18 reactors provide over 12,500 MWe of power. Mexico has two nuclear reactors generating almost 5% of its electricity. Its first commercial nuclear power reactor began operating in 1989. There is some government support for expanding nuclear energy to reduce reliance on natural gas. Argentina has two nuclear reactors generating nearly one tenth of its electricity. Its first commercial nuclear power reactor began operating in 1974. Brazil has two nuclear reactors generating 4% of its electricity. Its first commercial nuclear power reactor began operating in 1982.

  12. Analysis of reactor strategies to meet world nuclear energy demands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ligon, D.M.; Brogli, R.H.

    1979-07-01

    A number of reactor deployment strategies for long-term nuclear system development are analyzed from a global perspective in terms of resource utilization and economic benefits. Two time frames are chosen: 1975 - 2025 and 1975 - 2050. Uranium demand for various strategies is compared with uranium supply assuming different production capabilities and resource base. The analysis shows that a given reactor deployment strategy could strongly influence the extent of uranium exploration and production. Power systems cost comparisons are made to identify clearly competitive or non-competitive reactors. The sensitivity of power cost to different uranium price projections and nuclear demands is also examined. The results indicate that breeders are necessary to support a long-term nuclear power system. Advanced converter-breeder symbiotic systems, particularly those operating on the Th/U-233 cycle, have clear advantages in terms of resources and economics

  13. BWR core melt progression phenomena: Experimental analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, L.J.

    1992-01-01

    In the BWR Core Melt in Progression Phenomena Program, experimental results concerning severe fuel damage and core melt progression in BWR core geometry are used to evaluate existing models of the governing phenomena. These include control blade eutectic liquefaction and the subsequent relocation and attack on the channel box structure; oxidation heating and hydrogen generation; Zircaloy melting and relocation; and the continuing oxidation of zirconium with metallic blockage formation. Integral data have been obtained from the BWR DF-4 experiment in the ACRR and from BWR tests in the German CORA exreactor fuel-damage test facility. Additional integral data will be obtained from new CORA BWR test, the full-length FLHT-6 BWR test in the NRU test reactor, and the new program of exreactor experiments at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) on metallic melt relocation and blockage formation. an essential part of this activity is interpretation and use of the results of the BWR tests. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed experiment-specific models for analysis of the BWR experiments; to date, these models have permitted far more precise analyses of the conditions in these experiments than has previously been available. These analyses have provided a basis for more accurate interpretation of the phenomena that the experiments are intended to investigate. The results of posttest analyses of BWR experiments are discussed and significant findings from these analyses are explained. The ORNL control blade/canister models with materials interaction, relocation and blockage models are currently being implemented in SCDAP/RELAP5 as an optional structural component

  14. Elecnuc. Nuclear power plants in the world; Elecnuc. Les centrales nucleaires dans le monde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    This 2003 version of Elecnuc contents information, data and charts on the nuclear power plants in the world and general information on the national perspectives concerning the electric power industry. The following topics are presented: 2002 highlights; characteristics of main reactor types and on order; map of the French nuclear power plants; the worldwide status of nuclear power plants on 2002/12/3; units distributed by countries; nuclear power plants connected to the Grid by reactor type groups; nuclear power plants under construction; capacity of the nuclear power plants on the grid; first electric generations supplied by a nuclear unit; electrical generation from nuclear plants by country at the end 2002; performance indicator of french PWR units; trends of the generation indicator worldwide from 1960 to 2002; 2002 cumulative Load Factor by owners; nuclear power plants connected to the grid by countries; status of license renewal applications in Usa; nuclear power plants under construction; Shutdown nuclear power plants; exported nuclear power plants by type; exported nuclear power plants by countries; nuclear power plants under construction or order; steam generator replacements; recycling of Plutonium in LWR; projects of MOX fuel use in reactors; electricity needs of Germany, Belgium, Spain, Finland, United Kingdom; electricity indicators of the five countries. (A.L.B.)

  15. Meeting world energy needs. The economic and environmental aspects of the nuclear option

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, D.P.; Chalpin, D.M.

    1994-01-01

    Tabulated capital, operating, and overall production costs for nuclear, coal, and gas-fuelled power show that nuclear power is a viable option for meeting the world's energy needs. The advantage of nuclear, otherwise limited to certain markets, is seen to be much greater when credit is taken for environmental factors, namely emissions of carbon dioxide and acidic gases by fossil-fuelled plants. 5 figs

  16. Radiation exposure and lung disease in today's nuclear world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deas, Steven D; Huprikar, Nikhil; Skabelund, Andrew

    2017-03-01

    Ionizing radiation poses important health risks. The per capita annual dose rate has increased in the United States and there is increasing concern for the risks posed by low-dose occupational exposure among workers in nuclear industries and healthcare. Recent nuclear accidents and concern for terrorism have heightened concern for catastrophic, high-dose ionizing radiation exposure. This review will highlight recent research into the risks to lung health posed by ionizing radiation exposure and into potential treatments. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and some antioxidants have shown promise as mitigators, to decrease pneumonitis and fibrosis when given after exposure. Studies of survivors of nuclear catastrophes have shown increased risk for lung cancer, especially in nonsmokers. There is evidence for increased lung cancer risk in industrial radiation workers, especially those who process plutonium and may inhale radioactive particles. There does not seem to be an increased risk of lung cancer in healthcare workers who perform fluoroscopic procedures. High-dose ionizing radiation exposure causes pneumonitis and fibrosis, and more research is needed to develop mitigators to improve outcomes in nuclear catastrophes. Long-term, low-dose occupational radiation may increase lung cancer risk. More research to better define this risk could lead to improved safety protocols and screening programs.

  17. Preliminary study on seismic proving test of BWR core internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watabe, M.; Shibata, H.; Sato, H.; Kawakami, S.; Ohno, T.; Ichiki, T.; Sasaki, Y.

    1989-01-01

    A series of seismic proving tests for PWR and BWR facilities have been programmed and conducted. The seismic design of nuclear plants is based on criteria far more stringent than applied to non-nuclear installations. Seismic design involves the complex, advanced and sophisticated calculations. The validity of the techniques employed for these calculations is not susceptible to easy comprehension and acceptance by the population at large. It has become important to demonstrate the seismic strength and functional reliability of currently designed and existing nuclear power facilities. This paper deals with an experimental research project to demonstrate the seismic reliability proving tests for nuclear power plant facilities. The seismic proving test described in this report was conducted from 1986 to 1988 for the boiling water reactor core internals

  18. Outlook for world nuclear power generation and long-term energy supply and demand situations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, Yuhji

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author presents a long-term outlook for the world's nuclear generating capacity, taking into account the nuclear policy changes after Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident. World primary energy demand will grow from 11.2 billion tons of oil equivalent (toe) in 2009 to 17.3 billion toe in 2035. Along with this rapid increase in global energy consumption, the world's nuclear generating capacity will grow from 392 GW in 2010 to 484 GW in 2020 and 574 GW in 2035 in the 'Reference scenario'. Even in the 'Low nuclear scenario', where the maximum impact of Fukushima accident to the nuclear policies of each government is assumed, it will continue to grow in the future, exceeding 500 GW in 2035. In particular, Asian countries such as China and India will lead the growth both in the energy demand and in the nuclear power capacity. Therefore, it is essential to better ensure the safety of nuclear power generation. It is important for technologically developed countries, including Japan, to make active contributions to the establishment of a global nuclear safety control system. On the other hand, energy security and global warming will continue to be major issues, which will make it indispensable to make the best effort to save energy and expand renewable energy utilization. Japan is competitive in energy-saving and environmental conservation technologies, thus further development and utilization of there technologies should be a key option of Japan's growth growth strategy in the future. (author)

  19. The World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2010-2011. Nuclear Power in a Post-Fukushima World. 25 years after the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Mycle; Froggatt, Antony; Thomas, Steve; Hazemann, Julie; Mastny, Lisa

    2011-04-01

    The report provides the reader with the basic quantitative and qualitative facts about nuclear power plants in operation, under construction, and in planning phases throughout the world. It assesses the economic performance of past and current nuclear projects and compares their development to that of leading renewable energy sources. An extensive annex provides a country-by-country analysis of nuclear programs around the world. The report also includes the first published overview of reactions to the catastrophe in Japan. But developments even prior to March 11, when the Fukushima crisis began, illustrate that the international nuclear industry has been unable to stop the slow decline of nuclear energy. Not enough new units are coming online, and the world's reactor fleet is aging quickly. Moreover, it is now evident that nuclear power development cannot keep up with the pace of its renewable energy competitors. Annual renewables capacity additions have been outpacing nuclear start-ups for 15 years. In the United States, the share of renewables in new capacity additions skyrocketed from 2 percent in 2004 to 55 percent in 2009, with no new nuclear coming on line. In 2010, for the first time, worldwide cumulated installed capacity of wind turbines (193 GW), small hydro (80 GW, excluding large hydro) biomass and waste-to-energy plants (65 GW), and solar power (43 GW) reached 381 GW, outpacing the installed nuclear capacity of 375 GW prior to the Fukushima disaster. Total investment in renewable energy technologies has been estimated at $243 billion in 2010. As of April 1, 2011, there were 437 nuclear reactors operating in the world-seven fewer than in 2002. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) currently lists 64 reactors as 'under construction' in 14 countries. By comparison, at the peak of the industry's growth phase in 1979, there were 233 reactors being built concurrently. In 2008, for the first time since the beginning of the nuclear

  20. Neutron dosimetry. Environmental monitoring in a BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavera D, L.; Camacho L, M.E.

    1991-01-01

    The measurements carried out on reactor dosimetry are applied mainly to the study on the effects of the radiation in 108 materials of the reactor; little is on the environmental dosimetry outside of the primary container of BWR reactors. In this work the application of a neutron spectrometer formed by plastic detectors of nuclear traces manufactured in the ININ, for the environmental monitoring in penetrations around the primary container of the unit I of the Laguna Verde central is presented. The neutron monitoring carries out with purposes of radiological protection, during the operational tests of the reactor. (Author)

  1. BWR Water Chemistry Guidelines: 1993 Revision, Normal and hydrogen water chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlberg, G.; Goddard, C.; Fitzpatrick, S.

    1994-02-01

    The goal of water chemistry control is to extend the operating life of the reactor and rector coolant system, balance-of-plant components, and turbines while simultaneously controlling costs to safeguard the continued economic viability of the nuclear power generation investment. To further this goal an industry committee of chemistry personnel prepared guidelines to identify the benefits, risks, and costs associated with water chemistry in BWRs and to provide a template for an optimized water chemistry program. This document replaces the BWR Normal Water Chemistry Guidelines - 1986 Revision and the BWR Hydrogen Water Chemistry Guidelines -- 1987 Revision. It expands on the previous guidelines documents by covering the economic implications of BWR water chemistry control

  2. Key Parameters for Operator Diagnosis of BWR Plant Condition during a Severe Accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clayton, Dwight A [ORNL; Poore III, Willis P [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this research is to examine the key information needed from nuclear power plant instrumentation to guide severe accident management and mitigation for boiling water reactor (BWR) designs (specifically, a BWR/4-Mark I), estimate environmental conditions that the instrumentation will experience during a severe accident, and identify potential gaps in existing instrumentation that may require further research and development. This report notes the key parameters that instrumentation needs to measure to help operators respond to severe accidents. A follow-up report will assess severe accident environmental conditions as estimated by severe accident simulation model analysis for a specific US BWR/4-Mark I plant for those instrumentation systems considered most important for accident management purposes.

  3. Method of operating BWR type power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyama, Kazuaki.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the operation efficiency of BWR type reactors by reducing the time from the start-up of the reactor to the start-up of the turbine and electrical generator, as well as decrease the pressure difference in each of the sections of the pressure vessel to thereby extend its life span. Method: The operation comprises switching the nuclear reactor from the shutdown mode to the start-up mode, increasing the reactor power to a predetermined level lower than a rated power while maintaining the reactor pressure to a predetermined level lower than a rated pressure, starting up a turbine and an electrical generator in the state of the predetermined reactor pressure and the reactor power to connect the electrical generator to the power transmission system and, thereafter, increasing the reactor pressure and the reactor power to the predetermined rated pressure and rated power respectively. This can shorten the time from the start-up of the reactor to the start of the power transmission system, whereby the operation efficiency of the power plant can be improved. (Moriyama, K.)

  4. IAEA world survey on nuclear power plant personnel training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Training of personnel is acknowledged to be essential for safe and reliable operation of nuclear power plants. The preparation of this TECDOC was recommended by the IAEA International Working group on Nuclear Power Plant Personnel Training and Qualification and represents a unique compilation of information including all aspects of NPP personnel training from 23 Member States and 129 training organizations. The basic aims of this survey are: to provide a worldwide overview of all aspects of NPP personnel training; to foster both national and international cooperation between organizations involved in nuclear training; to provide the means of exchange of experiences and practices in systematic approach to training (SAT). The survey provides information for each corresponding country on the: national system and organization of training; job positions for which SAT is used; training programmes for key operations, maintenance, instructor and other jobs; role of management and the regulatory body; training facilities; recommended training practices; availability of training personnel from organizations outside the country; and contact points. The three main parts of the publication are the summary, the analysis of training programmes for each job position and the analysis of training resources, and the country reports

  5. Managing the aging of BWR control rod drive systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, R.H.; Farmer, W.S.

    1992-01-01

    This Phase I Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) study examines the aging phenomena associated with BWR control and rod drive mechanisms (CRDMs) and assesses the merits of various methods of ''imaging'' this aging. Information for this study was acquired from (1) the results of a special CRDM aging questionnaire distributed to each US BWR utility, (2) a first-of-its-kind workshop held to discuss CRDM aging and maintenance concerns, (3) an analysis of the Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System (NPRDS) failure cases attributed to the control rod drive (CRD) system, and (4) personal information exchange with nuclear industry CRDM maintenance experts. The report documenting the findings of this research, NUREG-5699, will be published this year. Nearly 23% of the NPRDS CRD system component failure reports were attributed to the CRDM. The CRDM components most often requiring replacement due to aging are the Graphitar seals. The predominant causes of aging for these seals are mechanical wear and thermal embrittlement. More than 59% of the NPRDS CRD system failure reports were attributed to components that comprise the hydraulic control unit (HCU). The predominant HCU components experiencing the effects of service wear and aging are value seals, discs, seats, stems, packing, and diaphragms

  6. Utility experience with the BWR power shape monitoring system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emrich, W.J. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The Oyster Creek Nuclear Generating Station has used the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) boiling water reactor (BWR) power shape monitoring system (PSMS) for approximately one cycle of power operation. During this time, the PSMS was used for both on-line core monitoring and off-line core simulation. The ability to obtain core power distributions in near real time and the ability to simulate anticipated core maneuvers has enabled site personnel to avoid difficult operational situations and to more easily detect problems when they occur. The PSMS is an integrated set of computer codes used to monitor and predict the nuclear and thermal-hydraulic behavior of a BWR code. The PSMS uses a three-dimensional, one-energy-group nodal model similar to the General Electric FLARE code to estimate the core power distribution. The PSMS contains four major modules: (1) data acquisition and storage module: collects plant data; (2) duty cycle approximation module; performs three-dimensional nuclear and thermal-hydraulic calculations; (3) model calibration module: performs all statistical evaluations; and (4) data display module: responsible for displaying PSMS data. The PSMS also has the ability to perform useful predictive calculations. These include: power, flow, or control rod searches; control rod pattern optimizations; and fast approximate predictions.

  7. Investigation of Burnup Credit Modeling Issues Associated with BWR Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, J.C.

    2000-10-12

    Although significant effort has been dedicated to the study of burnup-credit issues over the past decade, U.S. studies to-date have primarily focused on spent pressurized-water-reactor (PWR) fuel. The current licensing approach taken by the U.S. Department of Energy for burnup credit in transportation seeks approval for PWR fuel only. Burnup credit for boiling-water-reactor (BWR) fuel has not yet been formally sought. Burnup credit for PWR fuel was pursued first because: (1) nearly two-thirds (by mass) of the total discharged commercial spent fuel in the United States is PWR fuel, (2) it can substantially increase the fuel assembly capacity with respect to current designs for PWR storage and transportation casks, and (3) fuel depletion in PWRs is generally less complicated than fuel depletion in BWRs. However, due to international needs, the increased enrichment of modern BWR fuels, and criticality safety issues related to permanent disposal within the United States, more attention has recently focused on spent BWR fuel. Specifically, credit for fuel burnup in the criticality safety analysis for long-term disposal of spent nuclear fuel enables improved design efficiency, which, due to the large mass of fissile material that will be stored in the repository, can have substantial financial benefits. For criticality safety purposes, current PWR storage and transportation canister designs employ flux traps between assemblies. Credit for fuel burnup will eliminate the need for these flux traps, and thus, significantly increase the PWR assembly capacity (for a fixed canister volume). Increases in assembly capacity of approximately one-third are expected. In contrast, current BWR canister designs do not require flux traps for criticality safety, and thus, are already at their maximum capacity in terms of physical storage. Therefore, benefits associated with burnup credit for BWR storage and transportation casks may be limited to increasing the enrichment capacity and

  8. Neutron dosimetry. Environmental monitoring in a BWR type reactor; Dosimetria de neutrones. Monitoreo ambiental en un reactor del tipo BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavera D, L.; Camacho L, M.E

    1991-01-15

    The measurements carried out on reactor dosimetry are applied mainly to the study on the effects of the radiation in 108 materials of the reactor; little is on the environmental dosimetry outside of the primary container of BWR reactors. In this work the application of a neutron spectrometer formed by plastic detectors of nuclear traces manufactured in the ININ, for the environmental monitoring in penetrations around the primary container of the unit I of the Laguna Verde central is presented. The neutron monitoring carries out with purposes of radiological protection, during the operational tests of the reactor. (Author)

  9. BWR Assembly Optimization for Minor Actinide Recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Ivan Maldonado; John M. Christenson; J.P. Renier; T.F. Marcille; J. Casal

    2010-03-22

    The Primary objective of the proposed project is to apply and extend the latest advancements in LWR fuel management optimization to the design of advanced boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies specifically for the recycling of minor actinides (MAs).

  10. International nuclear technology transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cartwright, P.; Rocchio, J.P.

    1978-01-01

    Light water reactors (LWRs), originally developed in the United States, became the nuclear workhorses for utilities in Europe and Japan largely because the U.S. industry was willing and able to transfer its nuclear know-how abroad. In this international effort, the industry had the encouragement and support of the U.S. governement. In the case of the boiling water reactor (BWR) the program for technology transfer was developed in response to overseas customer demands for support in building local designs and manufacturing capabilities. The principal vehicles have been technology exchange agreements through which complete engineering and manufacturing information is furnished covering BWR systems and fuel. Agreements are held with companies in Germany, Japan, Italy, and Sweden. In recent years, a comprehensive program of joint technology development with overseas manufacturers has begun. The rapidly escalating cost of nuclear research and development make it desirable to minimize duplication of effort. These joint programs provide a mechanism for two or more parties jointly to plan a development program, assign work tasks among themselves, and exchange test results. Despite a slower-than-hoped-for start, nuclear power today is playing a significant role in the economic growth of some developing countries, and can continue to do so. Roughly half of the 23 free world nations that have adopted LWRs are developing countries

  11. The radiance of France; nuclear power and national identity after world war 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hecht, G.

    2004-01-01

    This book discusses the early history of French nuclear power within its social and political context from the end of world war 2 to 1970. The author describes the creation of the nuclear reactors, the work at the reactor sites, and the impact of nuclear power on local communities. Information on the French atomic bomb program is also included. The conflicts and negotiations surrounding the nuclear programs are detailed, and the importance of the programs to French national identity is made clear. An excellent bibliography and extensive footnotes are provided

  12. Commercial nuclear power 1988: Prospects for the United States and the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This report presents historical data on commercial nuclear power in the United States, with projections of domestic nuclear capacity and generation through the year 2020. The report also gives country-specific projections of nuclear capacity and generation through the year 2010 for other countries in the world outside centrally planned economic areas (WOCA). Information is also presented regarding operable reactors and those under construction in countries with centrally planned economies. This report presents three different nuclear supply scenarios. The Optimistic-case scenario, included in previous issues of this report, has been deleted. 7 figs; 36 tabs

  13. Reducing BWR O and M costs through on-line performance monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonas, T.; Gross, R.; Logback, F.; Josyula, R.

    1995-01-01

    Competition in the electric power industry has placed significant emphasis on reducing operating and maintenance (O and M) costs at nuclear facilities. Therefore, on-line performance monitoring to locate power losses for boiling water reactor (BWR) plants is creating tremendous interest. In addition, the ability to automate activities such as data collection, analysis, and reporting increases the efficiency of plant engineers and gives them more time to concentrate on solving plant efficiency problems. This capability is now available with a unique software product called GEBOPS. GE Nuclear Energy, in conjunction with Joint Venture partner Black and Veatch, has undertaken development of the General Electric/Black and Veatch On-line Performance System (GEBOPS), an on-line performance monitoring system for BWR plants. The experience and expertise of GE Nuclear Energy with BWR plants, coupled with the proven on-line monitoring software development experience and capability of Black and Veatch, provide the foundation for a unique product which addresses the needs of today's BWR plants

  14. Advanced Construction of Compact Containment BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, M.; Maruyama, T.; Mori, H.; Hoshino, K.; Hijioka, Y.; Heki, H.; Nakamaru, M.; Hoshi, T.

    2006-01-01

    The reactor concept considered in this paper has a mid/small power output, a compact containment and a simplified BWR configuration with comprehensive safety features. Compact Containment BWR (CCR) is being developed with matured BWR technologies together with innovative systems/components, will provide attractiveness for the energy market in the world due to its flexibility in energy demands as well as in site conditions, its high potential in reducing investment risk and its safety feature facilitating public acceptance. The flexibility is achieved by CCR's mid/small power output of 400 MWe class and capability of long operating cycle (refueling intervals). The high investment potential is expected from CCR's simplification/innovation in design such as natural circulation core cooling with the bottom located short core, top mounted upper entry control rod drives (CRDs) with ring-type dryers and simplified safety system with high pressure resistible primary containment vessel (PCV) concept. The natural circulation core eliminates recirculation pumps as well as needs for maintenance of such pumps. The top mounted upper entry CRDs enable the bottom located short core in RPV. The safety feature mainly consists of large water inventory above the core without large penetration below the top of the core, passive cooling system by isolation condenser (IC), high pressure resistible PCV and in-vessel retention (IVR) capability. The large inventory increases the system response time in case of design base accidents including loss of coolant accidents. The IC suppresses PCV pressure by steam condensation without any AC power. Cooling the molten core inside the RPV if the core should be damaged by loss of core coolability could attain the IVR. CCR's specific self-standing steel high pressure resistible PCV is designed to contain minimum piping and valves inside with reactor pressure vessel (RPV), only 13 m in diameter and 24 m in height. This compact PCV makes it possible to

  15. The World After Proliferation, Deterrence and Disarmament if the Nuclear Taboo is Broken

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzpatrick, M.

    2009-01-01

    he nuclear taboo is customarily seen as a black and white norm, separating the world of the familiar from that of an unknowable afterlife.1 Nina Tannenwald argues that 'once the threshold between use and non-use is crossed, one is immediately in a new world with all the unimaginable consequences that could follow'. It is not correct, however, to say that the consequences are 'unimaginable'. They are certainly unpredictable, but one can imagine at least some of the consequences. This article attempts to do so with regard to consequences for proliferation, deterrence and disarmament. If the nuclear taboo were broken, whether by design, accident, miscalculation, or a breakdown of command and control, one of the more easily imagined consequences would be the collapse of the Nuclear Non- Proliferation Treaty (NPT). It is safe to assume that the use of nuclear weapons in war for the first time since 1945 would be a transformational event. But would nuclear use spell the failure of deterrence and doom the prospects of a nuclear-weapons free world, making obsolete much of the current thinking about nuclear disarmament and nuclear deterrence? Not every nuclear use scenario would necessarily break the lock on the nuclear Pandora's Box. A 'demonstration shot', for example, would not have the same impact as nuclear obliteration of a city. Both would be breaches of the taboo, but the use of a single nuclear bomb probably would not disrupt the status quo as thoroughly as would a massive attack or a two-way exchange. Breaching the taboo would not necessarily reverse the powerful norm and tradition that has developed in the last 60+ years against use of nuclear weapons. There is no compelling logic to assume that nuclear weapons would thereby become re-legitimized as instruments of war. The breaking of the nuclear taboo could actually spur either or both of two opposite reactions: an increased salience of nuclear weapons and a stimulus to disarmament. Which impulse prevails will

  16. Present state and long term planning on nuclear power plants in principal countries in the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Junichi

    1978-01-01

    The situation of nuclear power stations and the long term planning in each major country in the world were summarized, but the situation is changing from time to time, therefore it is difficult to make the long term prediction. The advanced countries in terms of nuclear power established the long term plans to adopt nuclear power generation largely owing to the oil crisis, but thereafter the revision was carried out again and again in respective countries. The developing countries already started the operation of nuclear power generation occupy only 2 to 3% of the total installed capacity in the world, but the countries constructing or planning nuclear power generation are many, and if the operation will be started as scheduled, their capacity will reach 30 million kW by 1985, and occupy about 10% of the total installed capacity of nuclear power generation in the world. As for the range of investigation of this report, the countries where the long term plans are unknown or the number of construction is small, Japan, Great Britain, USA and communist countries are excluded. As a rule, the light water reactors with power output of more than 200,000 kW are listed. The number of nuclear power plants in operation, under construction and in planning stage, national situation, long term plan, and others in each country are described. (Kako, I.)

  17. Commercial Nuclear Power 1984: prospects for the United States and the World

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gielecki, M.; Diedrich, R.; Hewlett, J.; Murphy, T.

    1984-01-01

    This analysis report presents the current status and outlook for commercial nuclear power reactors for all countries in the world outside centrally planned economic areas (WOCA). The report provides documentation of the US nuclear capacity and generation projections through 1995 that are presented in the Annual Energy Outlook 1983. Additionally, US nuclear capacity and generation projections through 2020 are presented for various nuclear power supply scenarios. These long-term projections are provided in support of the Department of Energy's activities pertaining to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. The projections for foreign nuclear capacity through 1990 supplant the preliminary foreign WOCA projection presented in the Annual Energy Outlook 1983 and are supplemented by WOCA country-specific projections through 2000

  18. Current status of nuclear power in the United States and around the world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKlveen, J W

    1990-09-01

    Nuclear energy's share of the world electricity market has been growing over the past 35 years. In 1989, eight generating units entered commercial operation abroad and three new units were licensed in the U.S. In early 1990, Mexico became the 26th country to produce electricity from nuclear power. Currently the 426 operating reactors supply one sixth of the world's total electrical capacity. Fourteen countries have now operated nuclear plants for 20 or more years. Since 1980, France has been the leader in the use of nuclear power and currently generates three quarters of its electricity from 54 nuclear plants. The U.S. has 112 nuclear plants, the largest number of any country in the world. These plants satisfy almost 20 percent of U.S. electrical energy requirements. Last year Three Mile Island, the would-be icon for everything that is wrong with the nuclear industry was rated as the most efficient nuclear plant in the world. The worldwide trend toward acceptance of nuclear is improving slightly, but many political and societal issues need to be resolved. Whereas recent polls indicate that a majority of the people realize nuclear must be a major contributor to the energy mix of the future, many are reluctant to support the technology until the issue of waste disposal has been resolved. Fears of another Chernobyl, lack of capital, and a new anti-nuclear campaign by Greenpeace will keep the nuclear debate alive in many countries. Additional stumbling blocks in the U.S. include the need to develop a new generation of improved reactor designs which emphasize passive safety features, standardized designs and a stream-lined federal licensing process. Nuclear power is really not dead. Even environmentalists are starting to give it another look. A nuclear renaissance will occur in the U.S. How soon or under what conditions remain to be seen. The next crisis in the U.S. will not be a shortage of energy, rather a shortage of electricity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. IAEA safeguards: Stemming the spread of nuclear weapons. As the world's nuclear inspectorate, the IAEA performs an indispensable role in furthering nuclear non-proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    Following the completion of the Treaty on the Non- Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) in 1968, the IAEA has become the instrument with which to verify that the peaceful use commitments made under the NPT or similar agreements are kept through performing what is known as its safeguards role. Under the NPT, governments around the world have committed to three common objectives: preventing the proliferation of nuclear weapons; pursuing nuclear disarmament; and promoting the peaceful uses of nuclear energy. The NPT has made it obligatory for all its non-nuclear weapon State parties to submit all nuclear material in nuclear activities to IAEA safeguards, and to conclude a comprehensive safeguards agreement with the Agency. With all but a handful of the world community as State parties, the NPT is by far the most widely adhered to legal agreement in the field of disarmament and non-proliferation. The IAEA takes account of all source and special fissionable material in countries under safeguards. Monitoring and verification activities focus on those types of nuclear material that are the most crucial and relevant to nuclear weapons manufacturing. This includes plutonium-239, uranium-233 and -235 and any material containing one or more of these. Safeguards activities are applied routinely at over 900 facilities in 71 countries. In 2001 alone, more than 21,000 calendar days in the field were devoted to verifying hundreds of tons of special fissionable material by more than IAEA 250 inspectors

  20. BWR online monitoring system based on noise analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz-Villafuerte, Javier; Castillo-Duran, Rogelio; Alonso, Gustavo; Calleros-Micheland, Gabriel

    2006-01-01

    A monitoring system for during operation early detection of an anomaly and/or faulty behavior of equipment and systems related to the dynamics of a boiling water reactor (BWR) has been developed. The monitoring system is based on the analysis of the 'noise' or fluctuations of a signal from a sensor or measurement device. An efficient prime factor algorithm to compute the fast Fourier transform allows the continuous, real-time comparison of the normalized power spectrum density function of the signal against previously stored reference patterns in a continuously evolving matrix. The monitoring system has been successfully tested offline. Four examples of the application of the monitoring system to the detection and diagnostic of faulty equipment behavior are presented in this work: the detection of two different events of partial blockage at the jet pump inlet nozzle, miss-calibration of a recirculation mass flow sensor, and detection of a faulty data acquisition card. The events occurred at the two BWR Units of the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant. The monitoring system and its possible coupling to the data and processing information system of the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant are described. The signal processing methodology is presented along with the introduction of the application of the evolutionary matrix concept for determining the base signature of reactor equipment or component and the detection of off normal operation conditions

  1. BWR Servicing and Refueling Improvement Program: Phase I summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, D.R.

    1978-09-01

    Under the U.S. Department of Energy sponsorship, General Electric Co. (GE) undertook a study of boiling water reactor (BWR) refueling outages for the purpose of recommending the development and demonstration of critical path time savings improvements. The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) joined the study as a subcontractor, providing monitoring assistance and making the Browns Ferry Site available for improvement demonstrations. Agreement was also reached with Georgia Power Co., Power Authority of the State of New York, and Commonwealth Edison Co. for monitoring and data collection at Hatch 1, FitzPatrick, and Quad Cities 1 nuclear plants, respectively. The objective was to identify, develop, and demonstrate improved refueling, maintenance, and inspection procedures and equipment. The improvements recommended in this study are applicable to BWR nuclear plants currently in operation as well as those in the design and construction phases. The recommendations and outage information can be used as a basis to plan and conduct the first outages of new plants and to improve the planning and facilities of currently operating plants. Many of the recommendations can readily be incorporated in plants currently in the design and construction phases as well as in the design of future plants. Many of these recommended improvements can be implemented immediately by utilities without further technical development.

  2. BWR Servicing and Refueling Improvement Program: Phase I summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, D.R.

    1978-09-01

    Under the U.S. Department of Energy sponsorship, General Electric Co. (GE) undertook a study of boiling water reactor (BWR) refueling outages for the purpose of recommending the development and demonstration of critical path time savings improvements. The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) joined the study as a subcontractor, providing monitoring assistance and making the Browns Ferry Site available for improvement demonstrations. Agreement was also reached with Georgia Power Co., Power Authority of the State of New York, and Commonwealth Edison Co. for monitoring and data collection at Hatch 1, FitzPatrick, and Quad Cities 1 nuclear plants, respectively. The objective was to identify, develop, and demonstrate improved refueling, maintenance, and inspection procedures and equipment. The improvements recommended in this study are applicable to BWR nuclear plants currently in operation as well as those in the design and construction phases. The recommendations and outage information can be used as a basis to plan and conduct the first outages of new plants and to improve the planning and facilities of currently operating plants. Many of the recommendations can readily be incorporated in plants currently in the design and construction phases as well as in the design of future plants. Many of these recommended improvements can be implemented immediately by utilities without further technical development

  3. Sophistication of operator training using BWR plant simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohshiro, Nobuo; Endou, Hideaki; Fujita, Eimitsu; Miyakita, Kouji

    1986-01-01

    In Japanese nuclear power stations, owing to the improvement of fuel management, thorough maintenance and inspection, and the improvement of facilities, high capacity ratio has been attained. The thorough training of operators in nuclear power stations also contributes to it sufficiently. The BWR operator training center was established in 1971, and started the training of operators in April, 1974. As of the end of March, 1986, more than 1800 trainees completed training. At present, in the BWR operator training center, No.1 simulator of 800 MW class and No.2 simulator of 1100 MW class are operated for training. In this report, the method, by newly adopting it, good result was obtained, is described, that is, the method of introducing the feeling of being present on the spot into the place of training, and the new testing method introduced in retraining course. In the simulator training which is apt to place emphasis on a central control room, the method of stimulating trainees by playing the part of correspondence on the spot and heightening the training effect of multiple monitoring was tried, and the result was confirmed. The test of confirmation on the control board was added. (Kako, I.)

  4. BWR containments license renewal industry report; revision 1. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, S.; Gregor, F.

    1994-07-01

    The U.S. nuclear power industry, through coordination by the Nuclear Management and Resources Council (NUMARC), and sponsorship by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), has evaluated age-related degradation effects for a number of major plant systems, structures, and components, in the license renewal technical Industry Reports (IR's). License renewal applicants may choose to reference these IR's in support of their plant-specific license renewal applications as an equivalent to the integrated plant assessment provisions of the license renewal rule (IOCFR54). The scope of the IR provides the technical basis for license renewal for U.S. Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) containments. The scope of the report includes containments constructed of reinforced or prestressed concrete with steel liners and freestanding stell containments. Those domestic BWR containments designated as Mark I, Mark II or Mark III are covered, but no containments are addressed before these designs. The report includes those items within the jurisdictional boundaries for metal and concrete containments defined by Section III of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Division 1, Subsection NE (Class MC) and Division 2 (Class CC) and their supports, but excluding snubbers

  5. Statement to Conference for a Nuclear-Weapons-Free World, 12 October 2011, Astana, Kazakhstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: It is a great honour for me to address this Conference for a Nuclear-Weapons-Free World. Astana is a highly appropriate venue for this Conference. Kazakhstan has made a very important contribution to nuclear non-proliferation and disarmament. Under the leadership of President Nursultan Nazarbayev, Kazakhstan renounced the nuclear weapons which it inherited from the Soviet Union and closed the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site, where over 450 underground and atmospheric nuclear tests had been conducted. It joined the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) as a non-nuclear-weapon State and has concluded both a safeguards agreement and an additional protocol with the IAEA. Kazakhstan played a significant role in establishing a nuclear-weapon-free zone in Central Asia in 2009. The treaty creating this nuclear-weapon-free zone established an important precedent as it is the only arms control treaty to date that requires its parties to bring into force an additional protocol to their IAEA safeguards agreements. The treaty, which was supported by the IAEA, forbids the development, manufacture, stockpiling, acquisition or possession of any nuclear explosive device within the zone. Peaceful uses of nuclear energy are permitted if placed under enhanced IAEA safeguards. The treaty also requires Parties to meet international standards regarding security of nuclear facilities. This is intended to reduce the risk of nuclear terrorism and prevent smuggling of nuclear and radioactive materials in the region. Today, the scientific and technical facilities at Semipalatinsk are being converted to peaceful uses under the jurisdiction of the National Nuclear Centre of the Republic of Kazakhstan. IAEA is pleased to have assisted in this work. Shutting down the nuclear test range at Semipalatinsk sends a strong signal of support for the nuclear non-proliferation and disarmament regime. It contributes both directly and symbolically to the goals of the

  6. C-14: radiological world output by nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkart, W.

    1977-01-01

    The properties and production types of C-14 are reviewed. Present and future production and release rates and environmental C-14 contents are estimated and applied to models for the global carbon cycle. Radiation exposures of the population due to C-14 are estimated by use of the C-14/C-12 ratio, and concentration limits for air and food are calculated, followed by a comparison with other radionuclides and a discussion of the technical possibilities for C-14 retention. Assuming an extreme increase of nuclear power production the C-14 production rate could equal or exceed the natural rate towards the end of this century and would then produce individual annual doses of a few mrem. Relatively simple retention techniques could reduce these values to about a fifth. Due to the increase of fossil fuel combustion the C-14/C-12 ratio should not increase very much until the beginning of the next century. As carbon dioxide conversion to organic material followed by food consumption is the main path for C-14 uptake into the human body, the corresponding limit for C-14 concentration in air is about a factor of 400 lower than the ICRP limit for inhalation of carbon dioxide. (Auth.)

  7. Sustaining the future: the role of nuclear power in meeting future world energy needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffey, R.; Sun, Y.

    2003-01-01

    A description is given of recently informed analyses showing the potential that nuclear power has in meeting global energy demands. For both the electricity and transportation sectors, we can quantify the beneficial effects on the environment, and we show how nuclear power deserves credit for its role in assisting future world energy, environmental and economic sustainability. The continuing expansion of the world's and Asia's energy needs, coupled with the need to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) and other emissions, will require new approaches for large scale energy production and use. This is particularly important for China and Asia with respect to meeting both the energy demand and sustainability challenges. We show and explore the role of nuclear power for large-scale energy applications, including electricity production and hydrogen for transportation. Advanced nuclear technologies, such as those like CANDU's next generation ACR, can meet future global energy market needs, avoid emissions, and mitigate the potential for global climate change. We use the latest IPCC Scenarios out to the year 2100 as a base case, but correct them to examine the sensitivity to large scale nuclear and hydrogen fuel penetration. We show a significant impact of nuclear energy on energy market penetration, and in reducing GHGs and other emissions in the coming century, particularly in the industrial developing world and in Asia. This is achieved without needing emissions credits, as are used or needed as economic support for other sources, or for subsidies via emissions trading schemes. Nuclear power offers the relatively emissions-free means, both to provide electricity for traditional applications and, by electrolytic production of hydrogen, to extend its use deep into the transportation sector. For the published IPCC Marker Scenarios for Asia we show the reduction in GHG emissions when electrolysis using electricity from nuclear power assists the introduction of hydrogen as a fuel

  8. World nuclear power once again in the spotlight. Comments on the 13th Pacfic Basin Nuclear Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zang Mingchang; Ruan Keqiang

    2004-01-01

    This paper comments on The 13th Pacific Basin Nuclear Conference held in Shenzhen, China, on October 21/25, 2002 and summarizes some key papers presented in the Conference and viewpoints from their following discussions, which indicates that nuclear power in the world is once again in the spotlight. The Conference shows that in the coming 50 years the roadmap to develop nuclear energy would be divided into two stages: Near-Term Deployment by 2010-2015, some advanced designs were developed for Utilities; Generation IV Program, its overall goal is to identify and develop next-generation nuclear power systems that could be deployed over the next 30 years to help meet the world's energy needs throughout the 21st century. Some visions is the future, such as co-generation of electricity and space heating or desalination, and combination of Generation IV and so-called Hydrogen Economy-the use of hydrogen in vehicle transport to replace petroleum, were presented. As a primary energy source nuclear power is particularly well suited to hydrogen production, offering the almost unique position of large-scale hydrogen production with near-zero emissions. (authors)

  9. Report on the BWR owners group radiation protection/ALARA Committee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldrich, L.R. [Commonwealth Edison Co., Downers Grove, IL (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Radiation protection programs at U.S. boiling water reactor (BWR) stations have evolved during the 1980s and early 1990s from a regulatory adherence-based endeavor to a proactive, risk-based radiation protection and prevention mission. The objectives are no longer to merely monitor and document exposure to radiation and radioactive materials. The focus of the current programs is the optimization of radiation protection of occupational workers consistent with the purpose of producing cost-effective electric power. The newly revised 10 CFR 20 defines the term ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) to take into account the state of technology, the economics of improvements in relation to the state of the technology, and the benefits to the public health and safety. The BWR Owners Group (BWROG) initially formed the Radiation Protection/ALARA Committee in January 1990 to evaluate methods of reducing occupational radiation exposure during refueling outages. Currently, twenty U.S. BWR owner/operators (representing 36 of the operational 37 domestic BWR units), as well as three foreign BWR operators (associate members), have broadened the scope to promote information exchange between BWR radiation protection professionals and develop good practices which will affect optimization of their radiation protection programs. In search of excellence and the challenge of becoming {open_quotes}World Class{close_quotes} performers in radiation protection, the BWROG Radiation Protection/ALARA Committee has recently accepted a role in assisting the member utilities in improving radiation protection performance in a cost-effective manner. This paper will summarize the recent activities of this Committee undertaken to execute their role of exchanging information in pursuit of optimizing the improvement of their collective radiation protection performance.

  10. Report on the BWR owners group radiation protection/ALARA Committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldrich, L.R.

    1995-01-01

    Radiation protection programs at U.S. boiling water reactor (BWR) stations have evolved during the 1980s and early 1990s from a regulatory adherence-based endeavor to a proactive, risk-based radiation protection and prevention mission. The objectives are no longer to merely monitor and document exposure to radiation and radioactive materials. The focus of the current programs is the optimization of radiation protection of occupational workers consistent with the purpose of producing cost-effective electric power. The newly revised 10 CFR 20 defines the term ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) to take into account the state of technology, the economics of improvements in relation to the state of the technology, and the benefits to the public health and safety. The BWR Owners Group (BWROG) initially formed the Radiation Protection/ALARA Committee in January 1990 to evaluate methods of reducing occupational radiation exposure during refueling outages. Currently, twenty U.S. BWR owner/operators (representing 36 of the operational 37 domestic BWR units), as well as three foreign BWR operators (associate members), have broadened the scope to promote information exchange between BWR radiation protection professionals and develop good practices which will affect optimization of their radiation protection programs. In search of excellence and the challenge of becoming open-quotes World Classclose quotes performers in radiation protection, the BWROG Radiation Protection/ALARA Committee has recently accepted a role in assisting the member utilities in improving radiation protection performance in a cost-effective manner. This paper will summarize the recent activities of this Committee undertaken to execute their role of exchanging information in pursuit of optimizing the improvement of their collective radiation protection performance

  11. Nuclear power plants in the world as of June 30, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Industrial Forum, Inc., has carried out the survey twice every year on the nuclear power stations in operation, under construction, ordered and in planning stage in the world, and this report is the summary of the results. In this survey as of June 30, 1980, the nuclear power stations in operation in the world were 233 plants, those under construction were 229 plants, those ordered were 52 plants, and those in planning stage were 130 plants. The total was 644 plants with the total capacity of 542.2 million kWe. As compared with the number at the end of 1979, 8 nuclear power stations with 5.79 million kWe capacity started the operation in six months. The cancellation of nuclear power station projects occurred only in U.S.A., and 3 plants under construction and 5 ordered plants were cancelled. It was decided to close down one plant each in West Germany, France and U.S.A. The countries surveyed this time were 41, same as before. The countries where nuclear power stations have been operated were 22. In terms of the installed capacity of nuclear power stations in operation, U.S.A. was the leader, followed by Japan, USSR, France, West Germany and Great Britain in this order. Communist countries have strong ambition to construct nuclear power stations. On the trend of respective countries in the first half of 1980, the outline is described. (Kako, I.)

  12. Fundamentals of boiling water reactor (BWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozzola, S.

    1982-01-01

    These lectures on fundamentals of BWR reactor physics are a synthesis of known and established concepts. These lectures are intended to be a comprehensive (even though descriptive in nature) presentation, which would give the basis for a fair understanding of power operation, fuel cycle and safety aspects of the boiling water reactor. The fundamentals of BWR reactor physics are oriented to design and operation. In the first lecture general description of BWR is presented, with emphasis on the reactor physics aspects. A survey of methods applied in fuel and core design and operation is presented in the second lecture in order to indicate the main features of the calculational tools. The third and fourth lectures are devoted to review of BWR design bases, reactivity requirements, reactivity and power control, fuel loading patterns. Moreover, operating limits are reviewed, as the actual limits during power operation and constraints for reactor physics analyses (design and operation). The basic elements of core management are also presented. The constraints on control rod movements during the achieving of criticality and low power operation are illustrated in the fifth lecture. Some considerations on plant transient analyses are also presented in the fifth lecture, in order to show the impact between core and fuel performance and plant/system performance. The last (sixth) lecture is devoted to the open vessel testing during the startup of a commercial BWR. A control rod calibration is also illustrated. (author)

  13. Changing the world with hydrogen and nuclear: From past successes to shaping the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carre, F.

    2010-01-01

    This presentation reviews the past history of hydrogen and nuclear energy, while considering how they had been important forever, how they have been used to change the world when they were discovered and understood, and how they will likely shape our future to face specific challenges of the 21. century. Content: 1 - hydrogen and nuclear reactions at the origin of the universe: the universe and supernovae, the sun, the blue planet, the evolution of man; 2 - understanding and first uses of hydrogen: the discovery of hydrogen, hydrogen balloons, airships or dirigibles, the discovery of the electrolysis and the fuel cell, Jules Vernes; 3 - development of nuclear over the 20. century: pioneers of nuclear energy, Fermi reactor, EBR-1; 4 - development of hydrogen over the 20. century, expanding uses of hydrogen over the second half of the 20. century; 5 - four major endeavours gathering hydrogen and nuclear: light water reactors, naval reactors, nuclear rockets, controlled fusion, the PNP-500 project; 6 - stakes in hydrogen and nuclear production in the 21. century: energy challenge for the 21. century, peaking of fossil fuel production, renaissance of nuclear energy, changes in transportation model, hydrogen market, technologies for nuclear hydrogen production, carbon taxes, the path forward: international demonstrations towards industrialisation, a new generation of scientists for our dreams come true

  14. Natural convection type BWR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobimatsu, Toshimi.

    1990-01-01

    In a natural convection type BWR reactor, a mixed stream of steams and water undergo a great flow resistance. In particular, pressure loss upon passing from an upper plenum to a stand pipe and pressure loss upon passing through rotational blades are great. Then, a steam dryer comprising laminated dome-like perforated plates and a drain pipe for flowing down separated water to a downcomer are disposed above a riser. The coolants heated in the reactor core are boiled, uprise in the riser as a gas-liquid two phase flow containing voids, release steams containing droplets from the surface of the gas-liquid two phase, flow into the steam dryer comprising the perforated plates and are separated into a gas and a liquid. The dried steams flow to a turbine passing through a main steam pipe and the condensated droplets flow down through the drain pipe and the downcomer to the lower portion of the reactor core. In this way, the conventional gas-liquid separator can be saved without lowering the quality of steam drying to reduce the pressure loss and to improve the operation performance. (N.H.)

  15. Fuel relocation effects in BWR LOCA conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raul Orive Moreno; Ines Gallego Cabezon; Pablo Julio Garcia Sedano; Yolanda Tofino Gomez; Pedro Mata Alonso

    2005-01-01

    One of the objectives of the EPRI's Fuel Reliability Program is to establish the bases for the licensing of nuclear fuel to burnup levels beyond the current licensed value of 62 GWd/MT rod average burnup. One of the licensing points of concern is the behavior of the high burnup fuel in LOCA conditions. To respond to this concern a series of LOCA experiments are being performed at Argonne National Laboratory using fuel rods from Limerick NPP at 57 GWd/MT and H.B. Robinson at 67 GWd/MT. ANL LOCA tests indicate potential fuel relocation during LOCA. This could result in an increase of LHGR during a real plant LOCA. This report presents the LOCA analyses performed by IBERDROLA (Spanish utility), using results from the Cofrentes NPP (BWR-6) LOCA evaluations with GE-14 fuel design for the whole exposure range, quantifying fuel relocation impact. This effect has been modeled and implemented in FRAP-T6/APK (vendor independent IBERDROLA licensing thermomechanical code), as well as the wall-to-fluid heat transfer area increase in the ballooned region. Separate and combined impacts on PCT and ECR values can be evaluated with this modified code version. A new hoop strain versus rupture temperature curve is implemented in code, starting from NUREG-0630 model data base, but with a more best-estimate fit, in order to reproduce expected experimental values. The increase of heat transfer in the ballooned region has been validated with Halden LOCA tests. Preliminary results indicate that the effect of fuel relocation is expected to be compensated by the increased heat transfer area. This effect is to be confirmed with the Halden LOCA tests in progress. (author)

  16. Study of transient turbine shot without bypass in a BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallejo Q, J. A.; Martin del Campo M, C.; Fuentes M, L.; Francois L, J. L.

    2015-09-01

    The study and analysis of operational transients are important for predicting the behavior of a system to short-terms events and the impact that would cause this transition. For the nuclear industry these studies are indispensable due to economic, environmental and social impacts that could result in an accident during the operation of a nuclear reactor. In this paper the preparation, simulation and analysis of results of a turbine shot transient, which is not taken into operation the bypass is presented. The study is realized for a BWR of 2027 MWt, to an intermediate cycle life and using the computer code Simulate-3K a depressurization stage of the vessel is created which shows the response of other security systems and gives a coherent prediction to the event presented type. (Author)

  17. Achieving world's highest level of nuclear safety learning from overseas nuclear trouble events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okumoto, Masaru

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear Information Research Project of Institute of Nuclear Safety System, Incorporated (INSS) had acquired trouble information of nuclear power plants (NPPs) up to annual several thousand events issued by overseas regulatory agencies for more than 20 years since INSS established and analyzed it in details respectively after the screening. Lessons extracted from the analysis were offered as suggestions to electric utilities having PWRs in Japan. Such activities would surely contribute to maintain and improve nuclear safety with no objection. However, they could not prevent the occurrence of accident of Fukushima Daiichi NPPs. Thus the project had reviewed usefulness of past activities and how improved could be by listening sincerely to outside opinions. This report introduced outlines of recent activities. Competent suggestions to electric utilities might be made with improved reflection of lessons to needed rules, deepened information sharing within the project and raised awareness of the problem. (T. Tanaka)

  18. Actual state of the nuclear industry in Japan and trends of nuclear development in the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1999-01-01

    Nuclear industry in Japan established a fixed foundation as a large complex system industry by elapsing about forty years since beginning of its development at top of 1930s. For Japan with little energy resources, nuclear power generation is one of essential choices because not only of keeping energy security but also of response to global warming problem such as global warming protection. Then, in order to intend to promote sound development of the nuclear industry in Japan, further upgrading of technology aimed at maintenance and improvement of safety and formation of understanding and agreement of the peoples must be established. Here was introduced a report on actual state of the nuclear industry in Japan in 1997 fiscal year prepared on February, 1999 by the Japan Atomic Industrial Forum. (G.K.)

  19. Dissolution experiments of commercial PWR (52 MWd/kgU) and BWR (53 MWd/kgU) spent nuclear fuel cladded segments in bicarbonate water under oxidizing conditions. Experimental determination of matrix and instant release fraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    González-Robles, E., E-mail: ernesto.gonzalez-robles@kit.edu [CTM Centre Tecnològic, Plaça de la Ciència 2, 08243 Manresa (Spain); Serrano-Purroy, D. [European Commission - EC, Joint Research Centre (JRC), Institute for Transuranium Elements - ITU, Postfach 2340, D-76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Sureda, R. [CTM Centre Tecnològic, Plaça de la Ciència 2, 08243 Manresa (Spain); Casas, I. [Chemical Engineering Department, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Pablo, J. de [CTM Centre Tecnològic, Plaça de la Ciència 2, 08243 Manresa (Spain); Chemical Engineering Department, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-10-15

    The denominated instant release fraction (IRF) is considered in performance assessment (PA) exercises to govern the dose that could arise from the repository. A conservative definition of IRF comprises the total inventory of radionuclides located in the gap, fractures, and the grain boundaries and, if present, in the high burn-up structure (HBS). The values calculated from this theoretical approach correspond to an upper limit that likely does not correspond to what it will be expected to be instantaneously released in the real system. Trying to ascertain this IRF from an experimental point of view, static leaching experiments have been carried out with two commercial UO{sub 2} spent nuclear fuels (SNF): one from a pressurized water reactor (PWR), labelled PWR, with an average burn-up (BU) of 52 MWd/kgU and fission gas release (FGR) of 23.1%, and one from a boiling water reactor (BWR), labelled BWR, with an average BU of and 53 MWd/kgU and FGR of 3.9%. One sample of each SNF, consisting of fuel and cladding, has been leached in bicarbonate water during one year under oxidizing conditions at room temperature (25 ± 5)°C. The behaviour of the concentration measured in solution can be divided in two according to the release rate. All radionuclides presented an initial release rate that after some days levels down to a slower second one, which remains constant until the end of the experiment. Cumulative fraction of inventory in aqueous phase (FIAP{sub c}) values has been calculated. Results show faster release in the case of the PWR SNF. In both cases Np, Pu, Am, Cm, Y, Tc, La and Nd dissolve congruently with U, while dissolution of Zr, Ru and Rh is slower. Rb, Sr, Cs and Mo, dissolve faster than U. The IRF of Cs at 10 and 200 days has been calculated, being (3.10 ± 0.62) and (3.66 ± 0.73) for PWR fuel, and (0.35 ± 0.07) and (0.51 ± 0.10) for BWR fuel.

  20. World energy economy, demand and reserves - possible contribution of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kugler, K.

    1994-01-01

    Despite of economy measures in energy saving in the industrial countries, the world wide demand for energy will severely rise due to the enormous increase of the world population in the future. The basicly possible options of energy economy to cover these demands: fossil fuels, nuclear fusion, solar energy, nuclear fission will be discussed and valued with regard to their application and availability in the comming decades. If the CO 2 -question is seriously included in these considerations, nuclear fission will be applied world wide to a large extent in the future. Conditions are analyzed for a future catastrophe-free nuclear fission, that means for plants where fission products remain inside the reactor plant at all accidents. The solutions of a new european pressurized water reactor and the high temperature reactor which are discussed today are explained considering the defined demand. Chances are detectable to realize nuclear fission at a generally accepted safety standard, it appropriate further developments are carried out and neccessary proofs have been adducted. This is probably also valid for the direct disposal of burned fuel elements. (orig.) [de

  1. Future industrialization of the world and the necessity of nuclear power; how limited are resources?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jovanovic, J.

    1996-01-01

    Will the future world be forever divided into an industrial, developed and 'rich' on one side, and primitive, undeveloped, and poor on the other? Is an industrial, affluent and sustainable world of 10-15 billion people owning 5-10 billion cars physically possible to exist. Can the world have enough food, minerals and energy to support such a widespread affluence in a sustainable manner? In previous papers i have argued that even without any major breakthroughs in science and technology, an industrialized, sustainable and affluent world can be created within the next half century, but only if breeder nuclear power is widely used throughout the world. In this paper i elaborate on the question of future availability of some basic natural resources. 18 refs. 3 figs. 1 tabs

  2. Statistical analysis in the design of nuclear fuel cells and training of a neural network to predict safety parameters for reactors BWR; Analisis estadistico en el diseno de celdas de combustible nuclear y entrenamiento de una red neuronal para predecir parametros de seguridad para reactores BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jauregui Ch, V.

    2013-07-01

    In this work the obtained results for a statistical analysis are shown, with the purpose of studying the performance of the fuel lattice, taking into account the frequency of the pins that were used. For this objective, different statistical distributions were used; one approximately to normal, another type X{sup 2} but in an inverse form and a random distribution. Also, the prediction of some parameters of the nuclear reactor in a fuel reload was made through a neuronal network, which was trained. The statistical analysis was made using the parameters of the fuel lattice, which was generated through three heuristic techniques: Ant Colony Optimization System, Neuronal Networks and a hybrid among Scatter Search and Path Re linking. The behavior of the local power peak factor was revised in the fuel lattice with the use of different frequencies of enrichment uranium pines, using the three techniques mentioned before, in the same way the infinite multiplication factor of neutrons was analyzed (k..), to determine within what range this factor in the reactor is. Taking into account all the information, which was obtained through the statistical analysis, a neuronal network was trained; that will help to predict the behavior of some parameters of the nuclear reactor, considering a fixed fuel reload with their respective control rods pattern. In the same way, the quality of the training was evaluated using different fuel lattices. The neuronal network learned to predict the next parameters: Shutdown Margin (SDM), the pin burn peaks for two different fuel batches, Thermal Limits and the Effective Neutron Multiplication Factor (k{sup eff}). The results show that the fuel lattices in which the frequency, which the inverted form of the X{sup 2} distribution, was used revealed the best values of local power peak factor. Additionally it is shown that the performance of a fuel lattice could be enhanced controlling the frequency of the uranium enrichment rods and the variety of

  3. ABB advanced BWR and PWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junkrans, S.; Helmersson, S.; Andersson, S.

    1999-01-01

    Fuel designed and fabricated by ABB is now operating in 40 PWRs and BWRs in Europe, the United States and Korea. An excellent fuel reliability track record has been established. High burnups are proven for both BWR and PWR. Thermal margin improving features and advanced burnable absorber concepts enable the utilities to adopt demanding duty cycles to meet new economic objectives. In particular we note the excellent reliability record of ABB PWR fuel equipped with Guardian TM debris filter, proven to meet the -6 rod-cycles fuel failure goal, and the out-standing operating record of the SVEA 10x10 BWR fuel, where ABB is the only vendor to date with multi batch experience to high burnup. ABB is dedicated to maintain high fuel reliability as well as continually improve and develop a broad line of BWR and PWR products. ABB's development and fuel follow-up activities are performed in close co-operation with its customers. (orig.)

  4. Elecnuc. Nuclear power plants in the world; Elecnuc. Les centrales nucleaires dans le monde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    This small booklet summarizes in tables all the numerical data relative to the nuclear power plants worldwide. These data come from the French CEA/DSE/SEE Elecnuc database. The following aspects are reviewed: 1999 highlights; main characteristics of the reactor types in operation, under construction or on order; map of the French nuclear power plants; worldwide status of nuclear power plants at the end of 1999; nuclear power plants in operation, under construction and on order; capacity of nuclear power plants in operation; net and gross capacity of nuclear power plants on the grid and in commercial operation; grid connection forecasts; world electric power market; electronuclear owners and share holders in EU, capacity and load factor; first power generation of nuclear origin per country, achieved or expected; performance indicator of PWR units in France; worldwide trend of the power generation indicator; 1999 gross load factor by operator; nuclear power plants in operation, under construction, on order, planned, cancelled, shutdown, and exported; planning of steam generators replacement; MOX fuel program for plutonium recycling. (J.S.)

  5. Are world uranium resources sufficient to fuel global growth in nuclear generating capacity?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, R.; Vance, R.E.

    2012-01-01

    Increased uranium prices since 2003 have produced more activity in the sector than the previous 20 years. Nuclear reactor construction is proceeding in some countries, ambitious expansion plans have been announced in others and several, particularly in the developing world, are considering introducing nuclear power as a means of meeting rising electricity demand without increasing greenhouse gas emissions. Others have recently decided to either withdraw from the use of nuclear power or not proceed with development plans following the accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Japan in March 2011. Since the mid-1960, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency have jointly prepared a comprehensive update of global uranium resources, production and demand (commonly known as the 'Red Book'. The Red Book is based on government responses to a questionnaire that requests information on uranium exploration and mine development activity, resources and plans for nuclear development to 2035. This presentation provides an overview of the global situation based on the recently published 2011 edition. It features a compilation of global uranium resources, projected mine development and production capability in all the countries currently producing uranium or with plans to do so in the near future. This is compared to updated, post-Fukushima demand projections, reflecting nuclear phase-out plans announced in some countries and ambitious expansion plans of others. The 2011 Red Book shows that currently defined uranium resources are sufficient to meet high case projections of nuclear power development to 2035. (authors)

  6. Aging assessment of BWR control rod drive systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, R.H.

    1991-01-01

    This study examines the aging phenomena associated with boiling water reactor (BWR) control rod drive mechanisms (CRDMs) and assess the merits of various methods of managing this aging. Information for this study was acquired from (1) the results of a special CRDM aging questionnaire distributed to each US BWR utility, (2) a first-of-its-kind workshop held to discuss CRDM aging and maintenance concerns, (3) an analysis of Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System (NPRDS) failure cases attributed to the CRD system, and (4) personal information exchange with industry experts. As part of this study, nearly 3500 NPRDS failure reports have been analyzed to examine the prevailing failure trends for CRD system components. An investigation was conducted to summarize the occurrence frequency of these component failures, discovery methods, reported failure causes, their respective symptoms, and actions taken by utilities to restore component and system service. The results of this research have identified the predominant CRDM failure modes and causes. In addition, recommendations are presented that identify specific actions utilities can implement to mitigate CRDM aging. An evaluation has also been made of certain maintenance practices and tooling which have enabled some utilities to reduce ALARA exposures received from routine CRDM replacement and rebuilding activities. 5 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Logical model for the control of a BWR turbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas O, Y.; Amador G, R.; Ortiz V, J.; Castillo D, R.

    2009-01-01

    In this work a design of a logical model is presented for the turbine control of a nuclear power plant with a BWR like energy source. The model is sought to implement later on inside the thermal hydraulics code of better estimate RELAP/SCDAPSIM. The logical model is developed for the control and protection of the turbine, and the consequent protection to the BWR, considering that the turbine control will be been able to use for one or several turbines in series. The quality of the present design of the logical model of the turbine control is that it considers the most important parameters in the operation of a turbine, besides that they have incorporated to the logical model the secondary parameters that will be activated originally as true when the turbine model is substituted by a detailed model. The development of the logical model of a turbine will be of utility in the short and medium term to carry out analysis on the turbine operation with different operation conditions, of vapor extraction, specific steps of the turbine to feed other equipment s, in addition to analyze the separate and the integrated effect. (Author)

  8. Radiation buildup and control in BWR recirculation piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, W.; Wood, R.M.; Rao, T.V.; Vook, R.W.

    1987-01-01

    Boiling water nuclear reactors (BWRs) employ stainless steel (Types 304 or 316 NG) pipes in which high-purity water at temperatures of ∼ 275 0 C are circulated. Various components of the system, such as valves and bearings, often contain hard facing metal alloys such as Stellite-6. These components, along with the stainless steel tubing and feedwater, serve as sources of 59 Co. This cobalt, along with other soluble and insoluble impurities, is carried along with the circulating water to the reactor core where it is converted to radioactive 60 Co. After reentering the circulating water, the 60 Co can be incorporated into a complex corrosion layer in the form of CoCr 2 O 4 and/or CoFe 2 O 4 . The presence of even small amounts of 60 Co on the walls of BWR cooling systems is the dominant contributor to inplant radiation levels. Thus BWR owners and their agents are expending significant time and resources in efforts to reduce both the rate and amount of 60 Co buildup. The object of this research is twofold: (a) to form a thin diffusion barrier against the outward migration of cobalt from a cobalt-containing surface and (b) to prevent the growth of a 60 Co-containing corrosion film. The latter goal was the more important since most of the radioactive cobalt will originate from sources other than the stainless steel piping itself

  9. System control model of a turbine for a BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas O, Y.; Amador G, R.; Ortiz V, J.; Castillo D, R.; Delfin L, A.

    2009-10-01

    In this work is presented a design of a control system of a turbine for a nuclear power plant with a BWR like energy source. The model seeks to implement later on at thermal hydraulics code of better estimate RELAP/SCDAPSIM. The model is developed for control and protection of turbine, and the consequent protection to the BWR, considering that the turbine control could be employed for one or several turbines in series. The quality of present designs of control pattern of turbine it is that it considers the parameters more important in the operation of a turbine besides that is has incorporated at control the secondary parameters that will be activated originally as true when the turbine model is substituted by a model more detailed. The development of control model of a turbine will be good in short and medium term to realize analysis about the operation of turbine with different operation conditions, of vapor extraction specific steps of turbine to feed other equipment s, besides analyzing the separate effect and integrated effect. (Author)

  10. General Electric's training program for BWR chemists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborn, R.N.; Lim, W.

    1981-01-01

    This paper describes the development and implementation of the General Electric boiling water reactor chemistry training program from 1959 to the present. The original intention of this program was to provide practical hands on type training in radiochemistry to BWR chemistry supervisors with fossil station experience. This emphasis on radiochemistry has not changed through the years, but the training has expanded to include the high purity water chemistry of the BWR and has been modified to include new commission requirements, engineering developments and advanced instrumentation. Student and instructor qualifications are discussed and a description of the spin off courses for chemistry technicians and refresher training is presented

  11. Improvement for BWR operator training, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noji, Kunio; Toeda, Susumu; Saito, Genhachi; Suzuki, Koichi

    1990-01-01

    BWR Operator Training Center Corporation (BTC) is conducting training for BWR plant operators using Full-scope Simulators. There are several courses for individual operators and one training course for shift crew (Family Training Course) in BTC. Family Training is carried out by all members of the operating shift-crew. BTC has made efforts to improve the Family Training in order to acquire more effective training results and contribute to up-grade team performance of all crews. This paper describes some items of our efforts towards Family Training improvement. (author)

  12. Staying ahead of the game [The world's nuclear regime is being tested like never before

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinonen, O.J.

    2007-01-01

    The nuclear non-proliferation regime today faces a number of challenges. Not all would agree that the system is 'in crisis', but we can confidently say that the regime is certainly being tested. It goes without saying that the reported nuclear test by DPRK in October 2006 has not made the situation easier. So we should begin to find innovative solutions to overcome vulnerabilities or the international nuclear safeguards regime will become obsolete. The Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) was ratified more than 30 years ago. Since then the world has undergone rapid social, political and economic changes, which have resulted in a changed non-proliferation landscape. Developments in the three pillars of the NPT -disarmament, technology transfer and verification- have not necessarily been even. The IAEA has a role to play, in particular, in the latter two pillars. Although one might argue that there has been slow progress with regards to disarmament, it is my belief that we should continue to improve nuclear verification methods and techniques to keep up with the changing non-proliferation landscape. If we fail to do so, we might not only impact international safeguards, but also the future prospects of peaceful nuclear applications. During the last two decades we have seen three major developments related to nuclear non-proliferation: the increased dissemination of nuclear technology and nuclear know-how, particularly in light of renewed interest in nuclear power; a renewed drive on the part of a few States to acquire technology suitable for nuclear weapons purpose; the emergence of clandestine procurement networks. Under the NPT regime, there is nothing illegal about any State having enrichment or reprocessing technology. However, we ought to ensure that nuclear material and infrastructure is not used for illicit and non-peaceful purposes. Better control of access to nuclear fuel cycle technology is being explored through initiatives such as

  13. Framatome advanced nuclear power-benefits for our clients from the new company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, P.

    2001-01-01

    Framatome ANP (Advanced Nuclear Power) merges the complementary strengths of two global nuclear industry leaders Framatome and Siemens - offering clients the best technological solutions for safe, reliable and economical plant performance. With a combined workforce of 13,300 skilled individuals, Framatome ANP is now the nuclear industry's leading supplier. Serving as Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) for more than 90 reactors that provide about 30% of the world's total installed nuclear power capacity, our experienced resources remain focused on the local needs of individual clients, wherever in the world they may be. The Company main business used to be turnkey construction of complete Nuclear Power plants, BWR and PWR capabilities, heavy equipment manufacturing, comprehensive I and C capabilities, and also expertise and knowledge of VVER. Framatome ANP will benefit in all of its fields of activity of the experience gained through Framatome and Siemens' collaboration on the next generation reactor, the EPR, as well as on steam generators replacements and or modernization of VVER. Framatome ANP nuclear fuel designs for both PWR and BWR plants provide innovative features and world-leading performance. Framatome ANP is organized according a matrix organization with: - 4 Business Groups (Project and Engineering, Service, Nuclear Fuel, Mechanical Equipment) - 3 Regional Divisions (Framatome Advanced Nuclear Power S.A.S., France; Framatome Advanced Nuclear Power GmbH, Germany; Framatome Advanced Nuclear Power Inc., USA). By 30th January 2001 Siemens Nuclear Power GmbH, founded in 2000 as successor of the Nuclear Division of Siemens Power Generation Group (KWU), was renamed to Framatome Advanced Nuclear Power GmbH forming the German part of the world wide acting company. Over the past 40 years 23 nuclear power plants all around the world - not only pressurized and boiling water reactors, but also two heavy-watermoderated reactors have been designed, constructed and

  14. Our concept of the world is changed by nuclear power. Veraenderung unseres Weltbildes durch die Kernenergie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knizia, K. (Vereinigte Elektrizitaetswerke Westfalen AG (VEW), Dortmund (Germany). Vorstand)

    1993-01-01

    In the absence of a positive agreement on the use of nuclear power mankind will not be able to live in peace. Viability is endagered by worldwide battles for energy. In the long term, the peaceful utilization of nuclear power must be given priority because the reserves of fossil energy resources will have been consumed in a few generations' time and renewable energy sources do not produce a yield high enough to meet the demand for energy of a continuously increasing world population. Creativity and captial must ensure sufficient and sustainable supplies of energy and goods for everybody. Environmental protection is facilitated by the use of nuclear power, for nuclear power is a source of energy whose waste can be removed from the biosphere completely and safely. (orig.).

  15. Identification and assessment of BWR in-vessel severe accident mitigation strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodge, S.A.; Kress, T.S.; Cleveland, J.C.; Petek, M.

    1992-01-01

    This paper briefly describes the results of work carried out in support of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Accident Management Research Program to evaluate the effectiveness and feasibility of current and proposed strategies for BWR severe accident management. These results are described in detail in the just-released report Identification and Assessment of BWR In-Vessel Severe Accident Mitigation Strategies, NUREG/CR-5869, which comprises three categories of findings. First, an assessment of the current status of accident management strategies for the mitigation of in-vessel events for BWR severe accident sequences is combined with a review of the BWR Owners' Group Emergency Procedure Guidelines (EPGs) to determine the extent to which they currently address the characteristic events of an unmitigated severe accident. Second, where considered necessary, new candidate accident management strategies are proposed for mitigation of the late-phase (after core damage has occurred) events. Finally, two of the four candidate strategies identified by this effort are assessed in detail. These are (1) preparation of a boron solution for reactor vessel refill should control blade damage occur during a period of temporary core dryout and (2) containment flooding to maintain the core debris within the reactor vessel if the injection systems cannot be restored

  16. Plutonium and Minor Actinides Recycling in Standard BWR using Equilibrium Burnup Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Waris

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Plutonium (Pu and minor actinides (MA recycling in standard BWR with equilibrium burnup model has been studied. We considered the equilibrium burnup model as a simple time independent burnup method, which can manage all possible produced nuclides in any nuclear system. The equilibrium burnup code was bundled with a SRAC cell-calculation code to become a coupled cell-burnup calculation code system. The results show that the uranium enrichment for the criticality of the reactor, the amount of loaded fuel and the required natural uranium supply per year decrease for the Pu recycling and even much lower for the Pu & MA recycling case compared to those of the standard once-through BWR case. The neutron spectra become harder with the increasing number of recycled heavy nuclides in the reactor core. The total fissile rises from 4.77% of the total nuclides number density in the reactor core for the standard once-through BWR case to 6.64% and 6.72% for the Plutonium recycling case and the Pu & MA recycling case, respectively. The two later data may become the main basis why the required uranium enrichment declines and consequently diminishes the annual loaded fuel and the required natural uranium supply. All these facts demonstrate the advantage of plutonium and minor actinides recycling in BWR.

  17. The World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2009. With Particular Emphasis on Economic Issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Mycle; Thomas, Steve; Froggatt, Antony; Koplow, Doug; Hazemann, Julie

    2009-08-01

    The World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2009 provides the reader with the basic quantitative and qualitative facts on the nuclear power plants in operation, under construction and in planning phases throughout the world. A detailed overview assesses the economic performance of past and current nuclear projects. As of 1 August 2009 there are 435 nuclear reactors operating in the world, nine less than in 2002. There are 52 units listed by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) as 'under construction'. At the peak of the nuclear industry's growth phase in 1979 there were 233 reactors being built concurrently. Even at the end of 1987, there were still 120 reactors in process. Much has changed. For the first time since commercial use of nuclear energy began in the middle of the 1950's no new nuclear plant was connected to the grid in 2008. In fact, no start-up has been reported for the past two years, since Cernavoda-2 was connected to the grid on 7 August 2007, after 24 years of construction. In 1989 a total of 177 nuclear reactors had been operated in what are now the 27 EU Member States, but as of 1 August 2009 only 144 units were in operation. Today the worldwide operating reactors total 370,000 megawatts (370 GW), about 1,600 MW less than one year ago. In 2007 nuclear power plants generated about 2,600 TWh and provided 14% of the world's electricity. After an unprecedented drop in electricity generation of 2% in 2007, nuclear power plants' output lost another half percentage point in 2008. Nuclear power provided 5.5% of the commercial primary energy production and about 2% of the final energy in the world, and has trended downwards for several years. Twenty-seven of the 31 countries operating nuclear power plants maintained or decreased their share of nuclear power within the electricity mix in 2008 relative to 2007. Four countries (Czech Republic, Lithuania, Romania, Slovakia) increased their share. In addition to the 52 units

  18. System control model of a turbine for a BWR; Modelo del sistema de control de una turbina para un BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas O, Y. [Universidad del Valle de Mexico, Campus Toluca, Av. Las Palmas No. 136, Col. San Jorge Pueblo Nuevo, 52140 Metepec, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Amador G, R.; Ortiz V, J.; Castillo D, R.; Delfin L, A. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)], e-mail: rodolfo.amador@inin.gob.mx

    2009-10-15

    In this work is presented a design of a control system of a turbine for a nuclear power plant with a BWR like energy source. The model seeks to implement later on at thermal hydraulics code of better estimate RELAP/SCDAPSIM. The model is developed for control and protection of turbine, and the consequent protection to the BWR, considering that the turbine control could be employed for one or several turbines in series. The quality of present designs of control pattern of turbine it is that it considers the parameters more important in the operation of a turbine besides that is has incorporated at control the secondary parameters that will be activated originally as true when the turbine model is substituted by a model more detailed. The development of control model of a turbine will be good in short and medium term to realize analysis about the operation of turbine with different operation conditions, of vapor extraction specific steps of turbine to feed other equipment s, besides analyzing the separate effect and integrated effect. (Author)

  19. Nuclear power at present and in the future. Sweden and the rest of the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-06-01

    The report provides by no means a complete picture of nuclear power. There are a number of issues not covered, such as environmental impacts caused by the nuclear plants used (with the exception of the greenhouse gases that highlights some of report), the link with nuclear weapons and waste disposal. The share of nuclear power in Sweden in 2010 is higher than the average for the world The global net installed power of nuclear power in early 2010 was just over 370 GW e distributed over 436 nuclear power plants. In 2007, global electricity generation from nuclear power was about 14 percent of total electricity generation, compared with 44 percent in Sweden. The average availability for nuclear power plants was about 82 percent between 2005 and 2007. During the same period the availability in Swedish plants was lose to 84 percent. The Swedish availability has fallen, in 2004 the availability was comparable to that in Finland, which amounted to just over 94 percent between 2005 and 2007. The expansion of nuclear power may be limited by technical challenges in manufacturing infrastructure and a shortage of skilled labor. There is only a few reactor suppliers in the market and the quality demand of the material is much higher than for other major projects. Whether nuclear power is competitive with alternative investments or not is uncertain. The investment costs for building new reactors is high but the operational and maintenance costs are low compared to many other types of power sources. In an Emission Trading System nuclear power competitivity with fossil options increases. Nuclear power is a power source with low greenhouse gas emissions over its life cycle. Uranium is a limited resource and like other natural resources limited to a number of countries. Most nuclear reactors are also dependent on enrichment of the natural uranium. If an open or closed nuclear fuel cycle is used is crucial for how long the uranium reserves will last and how nuclear energy can grow

  20. World energy supply and demand and the future of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lantzke, U.

    1977-01-01

    The author discusses the OECD's report ''World Energy Outlook'', which concluded that a severe energy gap could, and probably would, develop by the mid-1980s if present energy policies continue. Should nuclear power fail to make a substantial contribution, this situation is predicted to become even worse. The author states that an energy gap can only be realistically avoided by a combination of (a) deep energy conservation, (b) even greater use of coal, and (c) nuclear power. New energy technologies cannot realistically be expected to make a significant contribution much before the end of the century. Conservation and coal alone, however, will not be sufficient. It is difficult to envisage energy savings of more than 10% without reducing economic activity to a degree that becomes politically unacceptable. Greater use of coal is undoubtedly feasible, but the potential is severely constrained in the medium term for economic, technological and environmental reasons. Nuclear power must also make a significant contribution. However, estimates of OECD nuclear energy supply for 1985 have been scaled drastically downwards during 1976 owing to: uncertainty in the utility sector over future growth in electricity demand; continued, and in some cases increased, opposition to nuclear power; and delays and uncertainties in government nuclear policies and programmes. The author concludes that we cannot afford any further shortfall and we must move urgently to: (a) give strong and unswerving support to thermal nuclear reactor programmes (requiring that governments adopt clear and coherent nuclear policies, taking into account the legitimate concern expressed by the public); (b) develop stable and long-term international arrangements so that the necessary nuclear fuel facilities can be made available on a secure basis for peaceful uses of nuclear power; (c) decide what the real proliferation risk is and agree on action to avoid it; and (d) make renewed and stronger efforts to solve

  1. World Nuclear University School of Uranium Production: Eight years' experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trojacek, J.

    2014-01-01

    The World Nuclear University School of Uranium Production was established by DIAMO, state enterprise in 2006 year under the auspices of the World Nuclear University in London in partnership with international nuclear organizations – OECD/NEA and IAEA. Using the expertise and infrastructure of DIAMO State Enterprise, in conjuction with national and international universities, scientific institutions, regulatory authorities and other individual experts, the “school” covers its mission with the aim to provide world-class training on all aspects of uranium production cycle to equip operators, regulators and executives with the knowledge and expertise needed to provide expanded, environmentally-sound uranium mining throughout the world: • to educate students on all aspects of uranium production cycle including exploration, planning, development, operation, remediation and closure of uranium production facilities; • to improve the state of the art of uranium exploration, mining and mine remediation through research and development; • to provide a forum for the exchange of information on the latest uranium mining technologies and experiences – best practices.

  2. The world energetic demand, one key challenge for the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graber, U.

    2009-01-01

    A reappraisal of nuclear power is currently underway worldwide , with an increase in the use of nuclear energy for power generation predicted. The reasons for this global renaissance include a growing demand for electric power throughout the world, awareness the our fossil resources are limited,d protection of the environment and the need for further development of various renewable energy technologies to ensure their competitiveness and base-load capability. Leading energy agencies are predicting an increase in nuclear capacity worldwide from the current figure of 370 GW to 415 -833 GW by the year 2030. Numerous countries have decided to build new nuclear power plants or are planning to do so, even countries that have not used nuclear energy in the past. The nuclear industry is rising to this challenge by offering advanced Generation III+reactors, y building up staffing levels and investing in production facilities and the fuel cycle. Standardizing technology, progressively harmonizing safety requirements across national borders and setting un long-term cooperation agreements between vendors and plant operators are options that can help turn the global renaissance of nuclear power into a sustainable success. (Author)

  3. Nuclear power in the world. Its present status and development trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, L.

    1994-01-01

    A summary of the most important data about the nuclear power reactors in operation and under construction as of the end of 1993 is given: their capacity, share of world capacity, growth of nuclear electricity generation since 1970 and its distribution by country. Nuclear prospects in the medium (2015) and long term (2025) are connected with a broad range of factors: development of advanced reactors ensuring high level of safety, implementation of high level waste repositories, enhancing the public acceptance of nuclear power. The issue of the cost of electricity generation is also discussed. Nuclear capacity projections to 2015 by region are given with 'low' and 'high' estimates. The low case reflects the continuation of the present trend of stagnation in nuclear power development due to public opposition and low economic growth in OECD countries, uncertainties in Eastern Europe and lack of finding in developing countries. The high case reflects a moderate revival of nuclear power development in the light of a more comprehensive assessment of the macro-economic and environmental aspects of the different options available for electricity generation. 7 figs., 5 tabs. (R.T.)

  4. Life extension of nuclear power plants. World situation and the USA case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leon, Pablo T.; Cuesta, Loreto; Serra, Eduardo; Yaguee, Luis

    2010-01-01

    Life extension of Nuclear Power Plants above 40 years of operation is an important issue in many countries. The Kyoto limits for CO 2 emissions, the security of supply, the costs and predictability of renewable energy, etc., are putting nuclear energy in the agenda of many countries all around the world. The delay, due to the economic crisis, of the new nuclear projects in many countries, push governments to continue operation of nuclear plants above the 40 years design life. This is the case in the USA, where 59 units have obtained the extension of operation license from 40 to 60 years, and currently have 19 units are in the reviewing process. The life extension of these plants permits savings in CO 2 emissions and in the consumption of additional amounts of fossil fuels. In this paper, the position of the different nuclear countries about the Extension of Life will be reviewed, with a special emphasis on the situation in the USA. In this last case, the NRC approach for operation licenses above 40 years will be explained, and actions taken by nuclear companies in the country will be reviewed. In this country, the debate about life extension over 40 years has been surpassed, and the new technical discussion focuses on the operation of nuclear power plants above 60 years. (authors)

  5. International Seminar on Nuclear policy in Argentina and the world: present and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The 25 and April 26, 2013 was held in Buenos Aires the International Seminar 'Nuclear Politics in Argentina and the world: present and perspectives', organized by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN), the National University of San Martin (UNSAM) and University of San Andres (UdeSA). With the main objective of creating an area for reflection and discussion on the state of the global nuclear policy, its impact on the region and in our country, and raised as an area of interaction between the academic and those working in the sector policies. The seminar consisted of six thematic panels, in addition to the opening session, in which academics and researchers exposed renowned in dialogue with officials and professionals of the nuclear sector. In this seminar were presented some papers of the following topics: historical approaches to nuclear policy in emerging contexts; nuclear policy and civil society; discussion and perspectives on proliferation and non-proliferation, security in the post-Fukushima: discussion and perspectives; Argentina-Brazil: from competition to cooperation, present and prospects for the nuclear industry.

  6. Applied methods for mitigation of damage by stress corrosion in BWR type reactors; Metodos aplicados para la mitigacion del dano por corrosion bajo esfuerzo en reactores BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez C, R.; Diaz S, A.; Gachuz M, M.; Arganis J, C. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Gerencia de Ciencia de Materiales, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1998-07-01

    The Boiling Water nuclear Reactors (BWR) have presented stress corrosion problems, mainly in components and pipes of the primary system, provoking negative impacts in the performance of energy generator plants, as well as the increasing in the radiation exposure to personnel involucred. This problem has caused development of research programs, which are guided to find solution alternatives for the phenomena control. Among results of greater relevance the control for the reactor water chemistry stands out particularly in the impurities concentration and oxidation of radiolysis products; as well as the supervision in the materials selection and the stresses levels reduction. The present work presents the methods which can be applied to diminish the problems of stress corrosion in BWR reactors. (Author)

  7. Australia's uranium industry, its contribution to world nuclear energy development, and the roles of ANSTO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnett, H.M.

    1996-01-01

    Currently and for the near future, Australia has no proposal to use nuclear power. Nonetheless, as a result of its major uranium mineral deposits, Australia plays a substantial role in world nuclear energy development. Hence, there is a requirement for Australia to maintain an advanced level of nuclear technical expertise to ensure it can responsibly fulfil this role. The present Government has abandoned the ''three mines policy'' that limited the uranium production, and will assess new development applications on the basis of environmental impact and the adherence to strict nuclear safeguard requirements. Australia has 30% of the known low cost uranium resources in the world, but only 11% share of uranium production. In 1995, the uranium production increased for the first time. The opportunity to increase the market share and enhance its export income exists, and some existing producers plan to increase the production. The resources, production and exports, and the recent development of new mines are reported. The activities of Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization and the environmental impact assessment at uranium mine sites are described. (K.I.)

  8. BWR vessel and internals project (BWRVIP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilanin, W.J.; Dyle, R.L.

    1996-01-01

    Recent Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) inspections indicate that Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking (IGSCC) is a significant technical issue for some BWR internals. IN response, the Boiling Water Reactor Vessel and Internals Project (BWRVIP) was formed by an associated of domestic and international utilities which own and operate BWRs. The project is identifying or developing generic, cost-effective strategies for managing degradation of reactor internals from which each utility can select the alternative most appropriate for their plant. The Electric Power Research Institute manages the technical program, implementing the utility defined programs. The BWRVIP is organized into four technical tasks: Assessment, Inspection, Repair and Mitigation. An Integration task coordinates the work. The goal of the Assessment task is to develop methodologies for evaluation of vessel and internal components in support of decisions for operation, inspection, mitigation or repair. The goal of the Inspection task is to develop and assess effective and predictable inspection techniques which can be used to determine the condition of BWR vessel and internals that are potentially susceptible to service-related SCC degradation. The goal of the Repair task is to assure the availability of cost-effective repair/replacement alternatives. The goal of the Mitigation task is to develop and demonstrate countermeasures for SCC degradation. This paper summarizes the BWRVIP approach for addressing BWR internals SCC degradation and illustrates how utilities are utilizing BWRVIP products to successfully manage the effect of SCC on core shrouds

  9. Assessment of two BWR accident management strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodge, S.A.; Petek, M.

    1991-01-01

    Candidate mitigative strategies for management of in-vessel events during the late phase (after core degradation has occurred) of postulated BWR severe accidents were considered at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during 1990. The identification of new strategies was subject to the constraint that they should, to the maximum extent possible, make use of the existing equipment and water resources of the BWR facilities and not require major equipment modifications or additions. As a result of this effort, two of these candidate strategies were recommended for additional assessment. The first is a strategy for containment flooding to maintain the core and structural debris within the reactor vessel in the event that vessel injection cannot be restored to terminate a severe accident sequence. The second strategy pertains to the opposite case, for which vessel injection would be restored after control blade melting had begun; its purpose is to provide an injection source of borated water at the concentration necessary to preclude criticality upon recovering a damaged BWR core. Assessments of these two strategies have been performed during 1991 under the auspices of the Detailed Assessment of BWR In-Vessel Strategies Program. This paper provides a discussion of the motivation for and purpose of these strategies and the potential for their success. 33 refs., 9 figs

  10. Nuclear power plants: structure and function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendrie, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    Topics discussed include: steam electric plants; BWR type reactors; PWR type reactors; thermal efficiency of light water reactors; other types of nuclear power plants; the fission process and nuclear fuel; fission products and reactor afterheat; and reactor safety

  11. From the first nuclear power plant to fourth-generation nuclear power installations [on the 60th anniversary of the World's First nuclear power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachkov, V. I.; Kalyakin, S. G.; Kukharchuk, O. F.; Orlov, Yu. I.; Sorokin, A. P.

    2014-05-01

    Successful commissioning in the 1954 of the World's First nuclear power plant constructed at the Institute for Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE) in Obninsk signaled a turn from military programs to peaceful utilization of atomic energy. Up to the decommissioning of this plant, the AM reactor served as one of the main reactor bases on which neutron-physical investigations and investigations in solid state physics were carried out, fuel rods and electricity generating channels were tested, and isotope products were bred. The plant served as a center for training Soviet and foreign specialists on nuclear power plants, the personnel of the Lenin nuclear-powered icebreaker, and others. The IPPE development history is linked with the names of I.V. Kurchatov, A.I. Leipunskii, D.I. Blokhintsev, A.P. Aleksandrov, and E.P. Slavskii. More than 120 projects of various nuclear power installations were developed under the scientific leadership of the IPPE for submarine, terrestrial, and space applications, including two water-cooled power units at the Beloyarsk NPP in Ural, the Bilibino nuclear cogeneration station in Chukotka, crawler-mounted transportable TES-3 power station, the BN-350 reactor in Kazakhstan, and the BN-600 power unit at the Beloyarsk NPP. Owing to efforts taken on implementing the program for developing fast-neutron reactors, Russia occupied leading positions around the world in this field. All this time, IPPE specialists worked on elaborating the principles of energy supertechnologies of the 21st century. New large experimental installations have been put in operation, including the nuclear-laser setup B, the EGP-15 accelerator, the large physical setup BFS, the high-pressure setup SVD-2; scientific, engineering, and technological schools have been established in the field of high- and intermediate-energy nuclear physics, electrostatic accelerators of multicharge ions, plasma processes in thermionic converters and nuclear-pumped lasers, physics of compact

  12. Nuclear power and the global challenges of energy security, 6 September 2007, London, England, World Nuclear Association Annual Symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2007-01-01

    In the Atoms for Peace speech given by US President Eisenhower in 1953 - the speech that paved the way for the creation of the IAEA - he declared that a special purpose of Atoms for Peace would be 'to provide abundant electrical energy in the power-starved areas of the world'. That vision has yet to be realized. And it should not be taken to mean that nuclear power is the solution for all countries, or for all developing countries. But I would reiterate what I said at the outset - that the global challenges of security and development are interlinked, and that addressing the energy security needs of all countries will be a key to progress on both fronts. It is incumbent upon us to see to it that nuclear power will fulfil its potential in addressing these challenges

  13. Standard Technical Specifications, General Electric plants, BWR/4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    This NUREG contains improved Standard Technical Specifications (STS) for General Electric Plants, BWR/6, and documents the positions of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission based on the B ampersand W Owners Group's proposed STS. This document is the result of extensive technical meetings and discussions among the NRC staff, the Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) Owners Groups, the NSSS vendors, and the Nuclear Management and Resources Council (NUMARC). The improved STS were developed based on the criteria in the interim Commission Policy Statement on Technical Specification Improvements for Nuclear Power Reactors, dated February 6, 1987. The improved STS will be used as the basis for individual nuclear power plant licensees to develop improved plant-specific technical specifications. This report contains three volumes. Volume 1 contains the Specifications for all chapters and sections of the improved STS. Volume 2 contains the Bases for Chapters 2.0 and 3.0, and Sections 3.1--3.3 of the improved STS. This document Volume 3, contains the Bases for Sections 3.4--3.10 of the improved STS

  14. Standard Technical Specifications, General Electric Plants, BWR/6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    This NUREG contains improved Standard Technical Specifications (STS) for General Electric Plants, BWR/6, and documents the positions of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission based on the B ampersand W Owners Group's proposed STS. This document is the result of extensive technical meetings and discussions among the NRC staff, the Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) Owners Groups, the NSSS vendors, and the Nuclear Management and Resources Council (NUMARC). The improved STS were developed based on the criteria in the interim Commission Policy Statement on Technical Specification Improvements for Nuclear Power Reactors, dated February 6, 1987. The improved STS will be used as the basis for individual nuclear power plant licensees to develop improved plant-specific technical specifications. This report contains three volumes. This document Volume 1, contains the Specifications for all chapters and sections of the improved STS. Volume 2 contains the Bases for Chapters 2.0 and 3.0, and Sections 3.1--3.3 of the improved STS. Volume 3 contains the Bases for Sections 3.4--3.10 of the improved STS

  15. Water chemistry control and decontamination experience with TEPCO BWR`s and the measures planned for the future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, N.; Miyamaru, K. [Tokyo Electric Power Co. (Japan)

    1995-03-01

    The new TEPCO BWR`s are capable of having the occupational radiation exposure controlled successfully at a low level by selecting low cobalt steel, using corrosion-resistant steel, employing dual condensate polishing systems, and controlling Ni/Fe ratio during operation. The occupational radiation exposure of the old BWR`s, on the other hand, remains high though reduced substantially through the use of low cobalt replacement steel and the partial addition of a filter in the condensate polishing system. Currently under review is the overall decontamination procedure for the old BWR`s to find out to measures needed to reduce the amount of crud that is and has been carried over into the nuclear reactor. The current status of decontamination is reported below.

  16. Role of Halden Reactor Project for world-wide nuclear energy development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGrath, M.A.; Volkov, B.

    2011-01-01

    The great interest for utilization of nuclear materials to produce energy in the middle of last century needed special investigations using first class research facilities. Common problems in the area of nuclear fuel development motivated the establishment of joint research efforts. The OECD Halden Reactor Project (HRP) is a good example of such a cooperative research effort, which has been performing for more than 50 years. During that time, the Halden Reactor evolved from a prototype heavy water reactor envisaged as a power source for different applications to a research reactor that is able to simulate in-core conditions of modern commercial power reactors. The adaptability of the Halden Reactor enables the HRP to be an important international test facility for nuclear fuels and materials development. The long-term international cooperation is based on the flexible HRP organizational structure which also provides the continued success. [1,2] This paper gives a brief history of the Halden Reactor Project and its contribution to world-wide nuclear energy development. Recent expansion of the Project to the East and Asian countries may also assist and stimulate the development of a nuclear industry within these countries. The achievements of the HRP rely on the versatility of the research carried out in the reactor with reliable testing techniques and in-pile instrumentation. Diversification of scientific activity in the areas of development of alternative energy resources and man-machine technology also provide the HRP with a stable position as one of the leaders in the world scientific community. All of these aspects are described in this paper together with current experimental works, including the investigation of ULBA (Kazakhstan) production fuel in comparison with other world fuel suppliers, as well as other future and prospective plans of the Project.(Author)

  17. Flex concept for US-A BWR extended loss of AC power events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, J. [Toshiba America Nuclear Energy, Charlotte, North Carolina (United States); Aoyagi, Y.; Kataoka, K. [Toshiba Corporation, Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan); Thomas, S.; Mookhoek, B., E-mail: jim.powers@toshiba.com [Nuclear Innovation North America, Lake Jackson, Texas (United States)

    2015-09-15

    The US-Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (US-A BWR), certified by the US NRC, is a third generation, evolutionary boiling water reactor design which is the reference for the South Texas Project Units 3 and 4 (Stp 3 and 4) Combined License Application (Cola) and incorporates numerous design and technology enhancements for improved safety performance. Nuclear Innovation North America (NINA) is the License Applicant for this new build project, and Toshiba is the selected primary technology contractor. The Stp 3 and 4 project has finished the US NRC technical review of the Cola, and the final safety evaluation report (FSER) is scheduled to be issued by the US NRC in 2015. Following the accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi plant, the US-A BWR was reviewed for Beyond Design Basis Event (BDBE) safety using industry and regulatory guidance for US NRC Order EA-12-049 Order Modifying Licenses with Regard to Requirements for Mitigation of Beyond Design Basis External Events (BDBEE). By virtue of the design approach, the US-A BWR is capable of providing an indefinite coping period for a station blackout. The use of installed systems with extended coping times is a significant advantage of the US-A BWR compared to most of the plants currently operating in the U.S. In addition, the Stp 3 and 4 design incorporates enhancements consistent with the current US industry Diverse and Flexible Coping Strategies (Flex) initiative. The final technical topic requiring review by the US NRC Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards was the Flex Integrated Plan submitted by NINA, and this review was successfully completed. This paper summarizes the progress of the US-A BWR in licensing the Flex Integrated Plan for the project, and describes the technology and features of the US-A BWR design that contribute to safety post-Fukushima. It also provides an informational comparison of the design capabilities of the US-A BWR for extreme external events, and relates these capabilities to re

  18. Flex concept for US-A BWR extended loss of AC power events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, J.; Aoyagi, Y.; Kataoka, K.; Thomas, S.; Mookhoek, B.

    2015-09-01

    The US-Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (US-A BWR), certified by the US NRC, is a third generation, evolutionary boiling water reactor design which is the reference for the South Texas Project Units 3 and 4 (Stp 3 and 4) Combined License Application (Cola) and incorporates numerous design and technology enhancements for improved safety performance. Nuclear Innovation North America (NINA) is the License Applicant for this new build project, and Toshiba is the selected primary technology contractor. The Stp 3 and 4 project has finished the US NRC technical review of the Cola, and the final safety evaluation report (FSER) is scheduled to be issued by the US NRC in 2015. Following the accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi plant, the US-A BWR was reviewed for Beyond Design Basis Event (BDBE) safety using industry and regulatory guidance for US NRC Order EA-12-049 Order Modifying Licenses with Regard to Requirements for Mitigation of Beyond Design Basis External Events (BDBEE). By virtue of the design approach, the US-A BWR is capable of providing an indefinite coping period for a station blackout. The use of installed systems with extended coping times is a significant advantage of the US-A BWR compared to most of the plants currently operating in the U.S. In addition, the Stp 3 and 4 design incorporates enhancements consistent with the current US industry Diverse and Flexible Coping Strategies (Flex) initiative. The final technical topic requiring review by the US NRC Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards was the Flex Integrated Plan submitted by NINA, and this review was successfully completed. This paper summarizes the progress of the US-A BWR in licensing the Flex Integrated Plan for the project, and describes the technology and features of the US-A BWR design that contribute to safety post-Fukushima. It also provides an informational comparison of the design capabilities of the US-A BWR for extreme external events, and relates these capabilities to re

  19. CO2 and the world energy system: The role of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fulkerson, W.; Jones, J.E. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The greenhouse effect, and other transnational and global environment, health and safety issues, require energy system planning on an international scale. Consideration of equity between nations and regions, particularly between the industrialized and developing countries, is an essential ingredient. For the immediate future, the next several decades at least, fossil fuels will remain the predominant energy sources. More efficient use of energy seems to be the only feasible strategy for the near to mid-term to provide growing energy services for the world economy while moderating the increasing demand for fossil fuels. In the longer term, nonfossil sources are essential for a sustainable world energy system, and nuclear power can play an important, if not dominant, role. The challenge is to design and implement a safe and economic nuclear power world enterprise which is socially acceptable and is complimentary to other nonfossil sources. The elements of such an enterprise seem clear and include: much safer reactors, preferably passively safe, which can be developed at various scales; development of economic resource extension technologies; effective and permanent waste management strategies; and strengthened safeguards against diversion of nuclear materials to weapons. All of these elements can best be developed as cooperative international efforts. In the process, institutional improvements are equally as important as technological improvements; the two must proceed hand-in-hand. 14 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  20. Discussion on life extension of nuclear power plant around the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The very Paper introduces the concept, basic working flow and fundamental elements of the life extension of nuclear power plant (NPP) around the world; and it generally collects and summarizes the status datum of life extension of NPPs. Afterwards, the Paper analyses the present status of life extension of NPP in various countries with strong nuclear power industry, i.e. the United States, France, Germany, Russia Federation, Japan, South Korea and Canada. At the end, the Paper make a conclusion that whether an operating NPP will adopt life extension at the end of its design life, this issue depends on the factor of economy, safety and technical feasibility of life extension on the NPP. According to latest datum collected in 2009, the nuclear power units around the world, which have exceeded the design lives or are close to design life ends, most of them (about 64%) have selected to extend their service lives; based on this statistical data, we concludes that when an operating nuclear unit is facing with the issue of to extend life or to retire itself, it will be apt to make life extension. (authors)

  1. The IAEA technical cooperation programme and nuclear medicine in the developing world: objectives, trends, and contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas-Zamora, Juan Antonio; Kashyap, Ridhi

    2013-05-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency's technical cooperation (TC) programme helps Member States in the developing world with limited infrastructure and human resource capacity to harness the potential of nuclear technologies in meeting socioeconomic development challenges. As a part of its human health TC initiatives, the Agency, through the TC mechanism, has the unique role of promoting nuclear medicine applications of fellowships, scientific visits, and training courses, via technology procurement, and in the past decade has contributed nearly $54 million through 180 projects in supporting technology procurement and human resource capacity development among Member States from the developing world (low- and middle-income countries). There has been a growing demand in nuclear medicine TC, particularly in Africa and ex-Soviet Union States where limited infrastructure presently exists, based on cancer and cardiovascular disease management projects. African Member States received the greatest allocation of TC funds in the past 10 years dedicated to building new or rehabilitating obsolete nuclear medicine infrastructure through procurement support of single-photon emission computed tomography machines. Agency support in Asia and Latin America has emphasized human resource capacity building, as Member States in these regions have already acquired positron emission tomography and hybrid modalities (positron emission tomography/computed tomography and single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography) in their health systems. The strengthening of national nuclear medicine capacities among Member States across different regions has enabled stronger regional cooperation among developing countries who through the Agency's support and within the framework of regional cooperative agreements are sharing expertise and fostering the sustainability and productive integration of nuclear medicine within their health systems. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  2. Under fire: Is the world's treaty against the spread of nuclear weapons strong enough?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klerk, P. de

    2003-01-01

    Fifteen years into the 'atoms for peace' era, Ireland in 1968 took the historic first step to sign the global treaty against tile spread of nuclear weapons. Since then, more than 180 other countries without nuclear weapons have joined the pact, most of them during the cold war period. They see their security in not having (lie bomb, and bind themselves to work for nuclear disarmament everywhere. Their shared commitments make the global Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) the most accepted arms-control agreement in history, a cornerstone of nuclear cooperation, countries that join it renounce the military atom, and they must accept IAEA safeguards on their nuclear activities to verify it. But the Treaty is under fire, and some critics think it no longer fits the times. They say it cannot prevent Treaty countries from breaking out at will, or ensure that those having nuclear ambitions or arsenals are actually honouring their pledges. Neither has it attracted three key countries - India and Pakistan, which have tested atomic bombs, and Israel, which is suspected of having them - to its ranks of members. Not everyone agrees that the NPT is outdated. But it is clear that the Treaty and its associated regime are under stress, and that its fragile condition needs urgent care. The debate is important and timely - the Treaty comes up for international review in 2005 and countries already are preparing for it. A major question today is whether the NPT is strong enough to keep the lid on nuclear weapons in the world's changed security environment. A former senior official at the IAEA looks at the challenging picture

  3. Results of the benchmarking in radiological protection practices during fuel reloads in the nuclear power plants of Limerick (BWR) and Ginna (PWR) in the United States of North America; Resultados del benchmarking en practicas de proteccion radiologica durante recargas de combustible en las centrales nucleoelectricas de Limerick (BWR) y Ginna (PWR) en los Estados Unidos de Norteamerica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lara H, M. A., E-mail: marco.lara@cfe.gob.mx [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Central Nucleoelectrica Laguna Verde, Carretera Cardel-Nautla Km 42.5, Alto Lucero, Veracruz (Mexico)

    2011-11-15

    The nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde, unique in our country, has been imposed several goals related with the continuous improvement of their acting; increase in the quantity of continuous days for operation cycle, improvement in the chemical indexes of the reactor coolant, improvement in the indexes of nuclear security, improvement in the indicators of industrial security, improvement in the standards of radiological protection, etc.; in this last item is precisely where is necessary to search creative solutions to be able to maintain the collective doses of the personnel so low as reasonably it is possible (ALARA) especially due to the last projects of extension of useful life of the nuclear power plant (zinc injection, noble metals and hydrogen) and of power increment of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde, same that represent in the short period an increment of collective dose and of exposition levels (until 200%) in very specific points of the primary systems of the reactor. (Author)

  4. Integrating Nuclear and Renewable Electricity in a Low-Carbon World: MIT-Japan Future of Nuclear Power Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haratyk, Geoffrey; Komiyama, Ryoichi; Forsberg, Charles; Fujii, Yasumasa; Omoto, Akira; Taniguchi, Tomihiro; Curtis, Daniel; Sepulveda, Nestor

    2017-01-01

    Affordable reliable energy made possible a large middle class in the industrial world. Concerns about climate change require a transition to nuclear, wind, and solar—but these energy sources in current forms do not have the capability to meet the requirements for variable affordable energy. Researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the University of Tokyo, the Tokyo Institute of Technology and the Institute for Energy Economics are undertaking a series of studies to address how to make this transition to a low carbon world. Three areas are being investigated. The first area is the development of electricity grid models to understand the impacts of different choices of technologies and different limits on greenhouse gas emissions. The second area is the development of technologies to enable variable electricity to the grid while capital-intensive nuclear, wind and solar generating plants operate at full capacity to minimize costs. Technologies to enable meeting variable electricity demand while operating plants at high-capacity factors include use of heat and hydrogen storage. The third area is the development of electricity market rules to enable transition to a low-carbon grid.

  5. Analysis CFD for the hydrogen transport in the primary containment of a BWR; Analisis CFD para el transporte de hidrogeno en la contencion primaria de un reactor BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez P, D. A.; Del Valle G, E. [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, Av. IPN s/n, Edificio 9, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Gomez T, A. M., E-mail: guerreroazteca_69@hotmail.com [ININ, Departamento de Sistemas Nucleares, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    This study presents a qualitative and quantitative comparison among the CFD GASFLOW and OpenFOAM codes which are related with the phenomenon of hydrogen transport and other gases in the primary containment of a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR). GASFLOW is a commercial license code that is well validated and that was developed in Germany for the analysis of the gases transport in containments of nuclear reactors. On the other hand, OpenFOAM is an open source code that offers several evaluation solvers for different types of phenomena; in this case, the solver reacting-Foam is used to analyze the hydrogen transport inside the primary containment of the BWR. The results that offer the solver reacting-Foam of OpenFOAM are evaluated in the hydrogen transport calculation and the results are compared with those of the program of commercial license GASFLOW to see if is viable the use of the open source code in the case of the hydrogen transport in the primary containment of a BWR. Of the obtained results so much quantitative as qualitative some differences were identified between both codes, the differences (with a percentage of maximum error of 4%) in the quantitative results are small and they are considered acceptable for this analysis type, also, these differences are attributed mainly to the used transport models, considering that OpenFOAM uses a homogeneous model and GASFLOW uses a heterogeneous model. (Author)

  6. Major changes in the world's nuclear power at the beginning of the new century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumitrache, Ion

    2002-01-01

    In the last decade of the 20th century the world nuclear power recorded some characteristic trends among which one can mention the following: - Almost total absence of investments in new NPPs in the industrialized countries except Japan and South Korea; - Policy of some governments to decrease the nuclear power sector in their countries up to a complete stop of electricity production in a foreseeable future (as in case of Sweden, Germany, Nederland and Belgium); - Projections indicating a steady decline of nuclear share in the national power production as for instance in USA, Germany, Great Britain, and other industrialized countries; - pressures upon countries late owners of soviet type NPPs in order to shut down completely the RBMK and WWER reactors; - a drastic reduction of the funds afforded for research dedicated to fission reactors of new concept, except Japan and South Korea; - almost negligible effects of the Kyoto protocol upon nuclear power, hopes being directed towards renewable energy sources. After second half of the year 1998 modest signals of future changes in the energy policy occurred. The US government admitted on basis of performance assessments and projections that the important role of nuclear power in US will be extended still for long after the years 2020-2030. Consequently, research concerning the future demand for fission based power began be financed. Gradually the countries of EU and Canada modified also their official position towards the role of nuclear fission in ensuring the electric energy needs of the future. The beginning of the new century was marked by a significant acceleration of changes of opinions in favor of nuclear power. Japan and South Korea stated that at least in the first half of the 21th century the fission NPP's will play a major role. Russia promoted new WWER reactor types of safety standards equivalent or higher than the western ones. Also China and India launched ambitious plans for building new NPPs. These new

  7. Nuclear accident: the EPR, the most dangerous reactor in the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large, John

    2007-02-01

    After a brief description of the operation of a nuclear reactor, this document outlines the complexity of this machine and the problems which may happen and result in radioactive releases. It also briefly recalls past accidents (Chernobyl, Three Mile Island) and serious incidents (Fosmark in Sweden, Blayais in France). The author then describes how the nuclear industry and nuclear safety authorities tend to deny the risk, notably as far as the EPR is concerned. He outlines that the hypotheses retained by EDF and safety authorities for the quantity of radioactivity released in case of accident might be under-assessed as it appears when they are compared with data obtained by different models and in reality. The author considers that the use of MOX introduces difficulties to ensure nuclear safety, and that the EPR will therefore be the most dangerous nuclear reactor in the world. Based on a simulation, he shows that, in case of accident in of the EPR in Flamanville, radioactive fallouts will occur at the continental scale in less than two days. He proposes an assessment of consequences for the population in terms of deaths, cancers, evacuation. He indicates the different exposure modes for the population, and the countermeasures to be implemented in case of accident (he proposes an assessment of consequences in terms of morbidity with or without countermeasures)

  8. EPRI BWR Water Chemistry Guidelines Revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Susan E.; Giannelli, Joseph F.

    2014-01-01

    BWRVIP-190: BWR Water Chemistry Guidelines – 2008 Revision has been revised. The revision committee consisted of U.S. and non-U.S. utilities (members of the BWR Vessel and Internals Protection (BWRVIP) Mitigation Committee), reactor system manufacturers, fuel suppliers, and EPRI and industry experts. The revised document, BWRVIP-190 Revision 1, was completely reformatted into two volumes, with a simplified presentation of water chemistry control, diagnostic and good practice parameters in Volume 1 and the technical bases in Volume 2, to facilitate use. The revision was developed in parallel and in coordination with preparation of the Fuel Reliability Guidelines Revision 1: BWR Fuel Cladding Crud and Corrosion. Guidance is included for plants operating under normal water chemistry (NWC), moderate hydrogen water chemistry (HWC-M), and noble metal application (GE-Hitachi NobleChem™) plus hydrogen injection. Volume 1 includes significant changes to BWR feedwater and reactor water chemistry control parameters to provide increased assurance of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) mitigation of reactor materials and fuel reliability during all plant conditions, including cold shutdown (≤200°F (93°C)), startup/hot standby (>200°F (93°C) and ≤ 10%) and power operation (>10% power). Action Level values for chloride and sulfate have been tightened to minimize environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) of all wetted surfaces, including those not protected by hydrogen injection, with or without noble metals. Chemistry control guidance has been enhanced to minimize shutdown radiation fields by clarifying targets for depleted zinc oxide (DZO) injection while meeting requirements for fuel reliability. Improved tabular presentations of parameter values explicitly indicate levels at which actions are to be taken and required sampling frequencies. Volume 2 provides the technical bases for BWR water chemistry control for control of EAC, flow accelerated corrosion

  9. The immediate need for US universities to promote research related to a nuclear-weapon-free world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionno, S.

    1999-01-01

    If disarmament is a goal, then the requisite skills must be fostered in academic research. Too many students today view nuclear weapons as a non-issue. It is crucial that those people in positions of influence encourage more young people to explore in-depth the political, scientific, and social changes that a nuclear-weapon-free world will require. The data presented are based on a search of nuclear-weapons-related keywords in the UMI Dissertation Abstracts Database which includes work from over 1000 North American graduate schools and European Universities. The search was focused on US Phd dissertations between 1987 and 1996. There was no PhDs focused on issues such as: zero-level nuclear-weapons-free world; nuclear-weapons-free zones; decreasing nuclear alert status; a nuclear weapons convention; no-first-use or-no use against non-nuclear-weapons-states; START; French nuclear weapons; a possible 'Eurobomb'; peace groups outside the USA, UK, and Germany; nuclear-weapons secrecy; funding disarmament; the role od UN in a nuclear-weapons-free world; an so on

  10. The need for nuclear power. Viewpoint on the world's challenging energy future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhodes, R.; Beller, D.

    2000-01-01

    To meet the world's growing need for energy, the Royal Society and Royal Academy report proposes 'the formation of an international body for energy research and development, funded by contributions from individual nations on the basis of Gross Domestic Product (GDP) or total national energy consumption'. The body would be 'a funding agency supporting research, development and demonstrators elsewhere, not a research center itself'. Its budget might build to an annual level of some $25 billion, 'roughly 1% of the total global energy budget'. If it truly wants to develop efficient and responsible energy supplies, such a body should focus on the nuclear option, on establishing a secure international nuclear-fuel storage and reprocessing system, and on providing expertise for siting, financing, and licensing modular nuclear power systems to developing nations. According to authors, who study the dynamics of energy technologies, 'the share of energy supplied by electricity is growing rapidly in most countries and worldwide'. Throughout history, humankind has gradually decarbonized its dominant fuels, moving steadily away from the more polluting, carbon-rich sources. Thus the world has gone from coal (which has one hydrogen atom per carbon atom and was dominant from 1880 to 1950) to oil (with two hydrogens per carbon, dominant from 1950 to today). Natural gas (four hydrogens per carbon) is steadily increasing its market share. But nuclear fission produces no carbon at all. Physical reality - not arguments about corporate greed, hypothetical risks, radiation exposure, or waste disposal - ought to inform decisions vital to the future of the world. Because diversity and redundancy are important for safety and security, renewable energy sources ought to retain a place in the energy economy of the century to come. But nuclear power should be central. Despite its outstanding record, it has instead been relegated by its opponents to the same twilight zone of contentious

  11. Highlights Lecture of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine and the World Federation of Nuclear Medicine and Biology Congress, Berlin 1998. Where next and how?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Britton, K.E.

    1998-01-01

    Nuclear medicine benefits not only the people of developed countries but also those who are in developing or deteriorating countries. The combination of diagnostic imaging, tissue characterisation, function measurement and targeted therapy is powerful and cost-effective. This congress provides a sample of nuclear medicine's contribution to the world. (orig.)

  12. Development of a computerized operator support system for BWR power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monta, K.; Sekimizu, K.; Sato, N.; Araki, T.; Mori, N.

    1985-01-01

    A computerized operator support system for BWR power plant has been developed since 1980 supported by the Japanese government. The main functions of the systems are post trip operational guidance, disturbance analysis, standby system management, operational margin monitoring and control rod operational guidance. The former two functions aim at protection against incidents during operation of nuclear power plants and the latter three functions aim at their prevention. As the final stage of the development, these functions are combined with the plant supervision function and are organized as an advanced man-machine interface for BWR power plant. During the above process, operator task analyses are performed to enable synthesis of these support functions for right fit to operator tasks and to realize a hierarchical structure for CRT displays for right fit to operators cognitive needs. (author)

  13. Applied methods for mitigation of damage by stress corrosion in BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez C, R.; Diaz S, A.; Gachuz M, M.; Arganis J, C.

    1998-01-01

    The Boiling Water nuclear Reactors (BWR) have presented stress corrosion problems, mainly in components and pipes of the primary system, provoking negative impacts in the performance of energy generator plants, as well as the increasing in the radiation exposure to personnel involucred. This problem has caused development of research programs, which are guided to find solution alternatives for the phenomena control. Among results of greater relevance the control for the reactor water chemistry stands out particularly in the impurities concentration and oxidation of radiolysis products; as well as the supervision in the materials selection and the stresses levels reduction. The present work presents the methods which can be applied to diminish the problems of stress corrosion in BWR reactors. (Author)

  14. Decontamination as a precursor to decommissioning. Status report Task 2: process evaluation. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Divine, J.R.; Woodruff, E.M.; McPartland, S.A.; Zima, G.E.

    1983-05-01

    As part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's program to reduce occupational exposure and waste volumes, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory is studying decontamination as a precursor to decommissioning. Eleven processes or solvents were examined for their behavior in decontaminating BWR carbon steel samples. The solvents included NS-1, a proprietary solvent of Dow Chemical Corporation, designed for BWR use, and AP-Citrox, a well-known, two-step process designed for PWR stainless steel; it was used to provide a reference for later comparison to other systems and processes. The decontamination factors observed in the tests performed in a small laboratory scale recirculating loop ranged from about 1 (no effect) to 222 (about 99.6% of the initial activity removed. Coordinated corrosion measurements were made using twelve chemical solvents and eight metal alloys found in a range of reactor types.

  15. Possible development of the world-wide improvement of nuclear energy considering economical, social and political aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaek, W.

    1981-01-01

    Accepting the fact that the growing world energy demand cannot be met in the long term without an increasing use of nuclear energy one has to pay more attention to its possible expansion and consequently also to the geographical distribution of nuclear plants in the world. Due to future large scale deployment problems may arise in the areas of uranium supply, waste disposal, nonprofileration, safeguards, acceptability, and nuclear transfer. Based on the World Energy Conference (1977) global energy scenario a country-by-country analysis has been made to evaluate the possible contribution of nuclear energy in each country within the next 40 years. Against this background the problems of the head- and tail-end of the nuclear fuel cycle are discussed in detail and compared with the international trade of nonnuclear fuels. (orig.) [de

  16. Ship-Based Nuclear Energy Systems for Accelerating Developing World Socioeconomic Advance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petroski, Robert; Wood, Lowell

    2014-07-01

    Technological, economic, and policy aspects of supplying energy to newly industrializing and developing countries using ship-deployed nuclear energy systems are described. The approach analyzed comprises nuclear installations of up to gigawatt scale deployed within currently mass-produced large ship hulls which are capable of flexibly supplying energy for electricity, water desalination and district heating-&-cooling with low latencies and minimized shoreside capital expenditures. Nuclear energy is uniquely suited for mobile deployment due to its combination of extraordinary energy density and high power density, which enable enormous supplies of energy to be deployed at extremely low marginal costs. Nuclear installations on ships also confer technological advantages by essentially eliminating risk from earthquakes, tsunamis, and floods; taking advantage of assured access to an effectively unlimited amount of cooling water, and involving minimal onshore preparations and commitments. Instances of floating nuclear power stations that have been proposed in the past, some of which are currently being pursued, have generally been based on conventional LWR technology, moreover without flexibility or completeness of power output options. We consider nuclear technology options for their applicability to the unique opportunities and challenges of a marine environment, with special attention given to low-pressure, high thermal margin systems with continuous and assured afterheat dissipation into the ambient seawater. Such systems appear promising for offering an exceptionally high degree of safety while using a maximally simple set of components. We furthermore consider systems tailored to Developing World contexts, which satisfy societal requirements beyond electrification, e.g., flexible sourcing of potable water and HVAC services, servicing time-varying user requirements, and compatibility with the full spectrum of local renewable energy supplies, specifically including

  17. Towards a new world: The contributions of nuclear energy to a sustainable future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffey, R. B.; Miller, A. I.; Fehrenbach, P. J.; Kuran, S.; Tregunno, D.; Suppiah, S.

    2007-01-01

    Over the last few years, the world has seen growing concern about the sustainability of the Planet when supplying increasing energy use. The major issues are: increased energy prices in the world markets; growing energy demand in emerging economies; security and stability of oil and gas supply; potentially adverse climate change due to carbon-based emissions; and the need to deploy economic, sustainable and reliable alternates. Large undefined 'wedges' of alternate energy technologies are needed. In light of these major difficulties, there is renewed interest and need for a greater role for nuclear energy as a safe, sustainable and economic energy contributor. The shift has been, from being viewed by some as politically discounted, to being accepted as absolutely globally essential. We have carefully considered, and systematically, extensively and technically analyzed the contributions that nuclear energy can and should make to a globally sustainable energy future. These include restraining emissions, providing safe and secure power, operating synergistically with other sources, and being both socially and fiscally attractive. Therefore, we quantify in this paper the major contributions: a) The reduction in climate change potential and the global impact of future nuclear energy deployment through emissions reduction, using established analysis tools which varying the plausible future penetration and scale of nuclear energy. b) The minimization of economic costs and the maximization of global benefits, including investment requirements, carbon price implications, competitive market penetration, and effect of variable daily pricing. c) The introduction of fuel switching, including base-load nuclear energy synergistically enabling both hydrogen production and the introduction of significant wind power. d) The management and reduction of waste streams, utilizing intelligent designs and fuel cycles that optimize fuel resource use and minimize emissions, waste disposal

  18. Life extension of nuclear power plants: world situation and the Usa case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leon, P.T.; Cuesta, L.; Serra, E.; Yague, L.

    2010-01-01

    Life extension of nuclear power plants above 40 years of operation is an important issue in many countries. The Kyoto limits for CO 2 emissions, the security of supply, the costs of renewable energies and the economic crisis have pushed governments to continue operation of nuclear plants over the 40 years design life. In the Usa 59 units have obtained the extension of operation license from 40 to 60 years, and currently 19 units are in the reviewing process. The situation in the rest of the world is different. A list of countries, where nuclear units with a service life over 30 years, are still operating has been drawn up. A few countries like Belgium, Germany, Spain and Sweden are opposed to life extension. Some countries like Finland, the Netherlands, Switzerland, India, Japan and Usa, have adopted a life extension policy for their nuclear fleet. Other countries like France, Russia, United-Kingdom, Pakistan, South-Korea and Argentina have not yet taken any final decision. United-Kingdom and France have a case by case policy. In some countries like Japan, Indian or Pakistan, the legislation makes no reference to a maximum operating time but the reactors are allowed to continue operating as long as they comply with established safety conditions. (A.C.)

  19. Nuclear proliferation in the Third World: an analysis of decision making in Indiana and Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gdaia, A.M.

    1985-01-01

    The causes of nuclear proliferation in the Third World are analyzed by examining the motives and forces that went into the nuclear decisions of India and Pakistan. A comprehensive framework is used that consists of five levels of analysis: international, societal, governmental, bureaucratic, and individual factors. The study examines how various potential motives that might impel a nation to acquire nuclear weapons operated through the different levels of analysis. It is concluded that the security motive was the primary determinant in each case as opposed to other motives such as desire for international status or economic considerations. However, security motives were joined by other values and constraints. Regional conflict combined with the lack of a superpower guarantee of security to persuade both countries to pursue nuclear weapons. Such domestic factors as the type of political systems, public opinion, and mass media seemed to play a very limited role in the decisions, although a larger role in India than in Pakistan. Finally, strong individual leadership was a relatively powerful determinant of policy in both countries

  20. Summary report of seismic PSA of BWR model plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-05-01

    This report presents a seismic PSA (Probabilistic Safety Assessment) methodology developed at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) for evaluating risks of nuclear power plants (NPPs) and the results from an application of the methodology to a BWR plant in Japan, which is termed Model Plant'. The seismic PSA procedures developed at JAERI are to evaluate core damage frequency (CDF) and have the following four steps: (1) evaluation of seismic hazard, (2) evaluation of realistic response, (3) evaluation of component capacities and failure probabilities, and (4) evaluation of conditional probability of system failure and CDF. Although these procedures are based on the methodologies established and used in the United States, they include several unique features: (1) seismic hazard analysis is performed with use of available knowledge and database on seismological conditions in Japan; (2) response evaluation is performed with a response factor method which is cost effective and associated uncertainties can be reduced with use of modern methods of design calculations; (3) capacity evaluation is performed with use of test results available in Japan in combination with design information and generic capacity data in the U.S.A.; (4) systems reliability analysis, performed with use of the computer code SECOM-2 developed at JAERI, includes identification of dominant accident sequences, importance analysis of components and systems as well as the CDF evaluation with consideration of the effect of correlation of failures by a newly developed method based on the Monte Carlo method. The effect of correlation has been recognized as an important issue in seismic PSAs. The procedures was used to perform a seismic PSA of a 1100 MWe BWR plant. Results are shown as well as the insights derived and future research needs identified in this seismic PSA. (J.P.N.)

  1. PWR and BWR spent fuel assembly gamma spectra measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccaro, S.; Tobin, S. J.; Favalli, A.; Grogan, B.; Jansson, P.; Liljenfeldt, H.; Mozin, V.; Hu, J.; Schwalbach, P.; Sjöland, A.; Trellue, H.; Vo, D.

    2016-10-01

    A project to research the application of nondestructive assay (NDA) to spent fuel assemblies is underway. The research team comprises the European Atomic Energy Community (EURATOM), embodied by the European Commission, DG Energy, Directorate EURATOM Safeguards; the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB); two universities; and several United States national laboratories. The Next Generation of Safeguards Initiative-Spent Fuel project team is working to achieve the following technical goals more easily and efficiently than in the past using nondestructive assay measurements of spent fuel assemblies: (1) verify the initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time of facility declaration; (2) detect the diversion or replacement of pins, (3) estimate the plutonium mass, (4) estimate the decay heat, and (5) determine the reactivity of spent fuel assemblies. This study focuses on spectrally resolved gamma-ray measurements performed on a diverse set of 50 assemblies [25 pressurized water reactor (PWR) assemblies and 25 boiling water reactor (BWR) assemblies]; these same 50 assemblies will be measured with neutron-based NDA instruments and a full-length calorimeter. Given that encapsulation/repository and dry storage safeguards are the primarily intended applications, the analysis focused on the dominant gamma-ray lines of 137Cs, 154Eu, and 134Cs because these isotopes will be the primary gamma-ray emitters during the time frames of interest to these applications. This study addresses the impact on the measured passive gamma-ray signals due to the following factors: burnup, initial enrichment, cooling time, assembly type (eight different PWR and six different BWR fuel designs), presence of gadolinium rods, and anomalies in operating history. To compare the measured results with theory, a limited number of ORIGEN-ARP simulations were performed.

  2. Statement to World Association of Nuclear Operators Biennial General Meeting, 24 October 2011, Shenzhen, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Y.

    2011-01-01

    I am grateful for the opportunity to address this important gathering, which is taking place at a crucial time for the nuclear energy sector. I greatly value the experience and expertise of the World Association of Nuclear Operators and I welcome your decision to devote this biennial general meeting to the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in Japan. Together, WANO and the IAEA will play a key role in ensuring that the right lessons are learned from the accident and that the necessary improvements in nuclear operating safety are actually put into practice everywhere. We have been good partners since WANO was created in 1989. In the aftermath of Fukushima Daiichi, I believe our partnership must be deepened and intensified. Since the Fukushima Daiichi accident, the IAEA has worked hard to help Japan bring the situation at the site under control and to mitigate the consequences of the accident. The Agency's view is that all of the crippled reactors are now generally stable. The Japanese authorities are doing their utmost to achieve cold shutdown of all of them by the end of the year. I visited Japan a number of times for consultations with the Prime Minister and government ministers and went to the site of the accident in July. I dispatched international expert teams to assist in areas such as radiological monitoring and food safety. The Agency helped to channel international technical assistance to Japan and we also provided independent and factual reports on the situation to our Member States. We conducted a number of fact-finding missions, most recently on environmental remediation and related waste management issues. I convened a special IAEA Ministerial Conference on Nuclear Safety, devoted to the Fukushima Daiichi accident, which took place in Vienna in June. The Conference adopted a Ministerial Declaration aimed at strengthening nuclear safety, emergency preparedness, and radiation protection of people and the environment worldwide. That

  3. Terror weapons. Ridding the world of nuclear, biological and chemical weapons - Commission on mass destruction weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blix, H.; Journe, V.

    2010-01-01

    This book approaches in 8 chapters the ambitious challenge of ridding the world of all mass destruction weapons: 1 - re-launching disarmament; 2 - terror weapons: nature of threats and answers (weakness of traditional answers, counter-proliferation); 3 - nuclear weapons: preventing proliferation and terrorism, reducing threat and nuclear weapons number, from regulation to banning); 4 - biological or toxin weapons; 5 - chemical weapons; 6 - vectors, anti-missile defenses and space weapons; 7 - exports control, international assistance and non-governmental actors; 8 - respect, verification, enforcement and role of the United Nations. The recommendations and works of the Commission are presented in appendix together with the declaration adopted on April 30, 2009. (J.S.)

  4. Investigations on the thermal-hydraulics of a natural circulation cooled BWR fuel assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kok, H.V.; Hagen, T.H.J.J. van der; Mudde, R.F. [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands)

    1995-09-01

    A scaled natural circulation loop facility has been built after the Dodewaard Boiling Water Reactor, which is the only operating natural circulation cooled BWR in the world. The loop comprises one fuel assembly, a riser with a downcomer and a condenser with a cooling system. Freon-12 is used as a scaling liquid. This paper reports on the first measurements done with this facility. Quantities like the circulation flow, carry-under and the void-fraction have been measured as a function of power, pressure, liquid level, riser length, condensate temperature and friction factors. The behavior of the circulation flow can be understood by considering the driving force. Special attention has been paid to the carry-under, which has been shown to have a very important impact on the dynamics of a natural circulation cooled BWR.

  5. Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) and Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) are compared

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greneche, D.

    2014-01-01

    This article compares the 2 types of light water reactors that are used to produce electricity: the Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) and the Boiling Water Reactor (BWR). Historically the BWR concept was developed after the PWR concept. Today 80% of light water reactors operating in the world are of PWR-type. This comparison is comprehensive and detailed. First the main technical features are reviewed and compared: reactor architecture, core and fuel design, reactivity control, reactor vessel, cooling systems and reactor containment. Secondly, various aspects concerning reactor operations like reactor control, fuel management, maintenance, inspections, radiation protection, waste generation and reactor reliability are presented and compared for both reactors. As for the issue of safety, it is highlighted that the accidental situations are too different for the 2 reactors to be compared. The main features of reactor safety are explained for both reactors

  6. Nuclear power plants in the world, as of December 31, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This list of nuclear power plants is published twice every year by the Japan Atomic Industrial Forum, Inc. As of the end of 1986, the nuclear power plants in operation in the world were 376 plants of 276.975 million kW capacity, those under construction were 153 plants of 146.931 million kW capacity, and those in planning stage were 124 plants of 121.89 million kW capacity. The total was 653 plants of 545.796 million kW capacity. During the last one year, 25 plants of 22.955 million kW started the operation, and the construction of 7 plants of 5.872 million kW was begun. The operational experience of nuclear power plants in the world reached about 4050 reactor-year. The nuclear power plants which started the operation in 1986 were 6 plants of 7.311 million kW in USA, 3 plants each of 4.032 million kW in France, 1.992 million kW in UK, and 1.32 million kW in Czechoslovakia, 2 plants each of 1.9 million kW in ROK, 2 million kW in USSR, and 1.43 million kW in Canada, and one plant each in FRG, Spain, Hungary and India. 7 plants in USSR, 3 plants in USA, 2 plants in China and one plant in Philippines were removed from the list due to cancel or postponement. In Japan, 33 plants of 24.686 million kW were in operation, and the average capacity factor was 76.2 %. (Kako, I.)

  7. Nuclear development status in the world (4). Four new emerging countries (China, Russia, India, and South Korea) leading global nuclear development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Masaharu

    2017-01-01

    From the temporary stagnation immediately after the TEPCO Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station accident, many countries are restarting nuclear development. The emerging 4 countries of China, Russia, India, and South Korea account for the majority number of the world's nuclear power plants under construction. The common feature is that the project promoter is a state-owned enterprise, and these countries are promoting nuclear development under the state's solid nuclear policies. The policies of the completion of nuclear fuel cycle and development fast reactors are also common. China is committed to major nuclear power route, domestically targeting 58 million kW in 2020, also focusing on the export of nuclear energy to Pakistan, Romania, Argentina, and the UK as already scheduled. China also actively develops fast reactors, high-temperature gas reactors, and small reactors. Based on the nuclear export from Russia, plants are operating or under construction in Iran, China, India, Vietnam, Turkey, Belarus, etc. Furthermore, Russia is actively pursuing fast reactors and nuclear fuel cycle policy from the beginning. In India, in addition to imported nuclear reactors, it also develops domestic reactors to solve power shortage, targeting 63 million kW in 2032. South Korea is concentrating on nuclear development in order to depart from energy imports. In 2035, it plans 38.3 million kW of nuclear power generation. (A.O.)

  8. Psychosocial aspects of nuclear accidents: the role of the World Health Organisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Girolamo, G.

    1991-01-01

    Since the Chernobyl nuclear reactor incident in the USSR in 1986, the World Health Organisation (WHO) has devoted a large part of its activities and research towards improving both national and transnational capabilities for dealing with radiation emergencies. This presentation concentrates on the psychosocial aspects of radiation accidents and the measures which should be taken to combat them. Although public information was sparse during the Chernobyl disaster, afterwards there was a flood of conflicting information and rumours from a variety of organisations and governments resulting in an ''overload'' on the public and creating fear and mistrust of the authorities. The author argues that as the leading world organisation on health matters, WHO should be seen as the natural co-ordinator, authority and information-provider in ''transnational'' incidents such as this to avoid this public confusion and unnecessary ill-effects. (author)

  9. Assessment of nuclear energy embodied in international trade following a world multi-regional input–output approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortés-Borda, D.; Guillén-Gosálbez, G.; Jiménez, L.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear power can contribute to cover the increasing demand of energy while keeping the carbon emissions within the desired limits. Many countries are reluctant to implement nuclear technologies in their territories, but might still use them through imports of products that embody nuclear energy in their life cycle. This work quantifies the difference between the production-based (territorial) and consumption-based (global) nuclear energy use in the main 40 economies of the world (85% of the world's GDP) through the application of a multi-regional environmentally extended input–output model. The mismatch between the direct (territorial) and total (global) use of nuclear energy varies from −237% to 44% in the top economies. From a consumption-based viewpoint, 10 out of the 40 countries reduced the per-capita use of nuclear energy in the period 1995–2009, and 7 when following a production-based approach. The per-capita nuclear energy use could differ in up to 26.2 GJ/inhabitant·year, depending on whether the assessment is consumption or production based. It was also found that around 3.5% of the world's nuclear energy production is trade-embodied and that this amount is growing along with the global production of nuclear energy. Our findings might help to develop more effective environmental regulations worldwide. - Highlights: • Global and territorial nuclear energy could differ up to 237% in the main economies. • Trade-embodied nuclear energy has increased from 1.4% to 2.5% in 15 years. • Nuclear energy production has rised in tandem with trade-embodied nuclear energy. • Nuclear production decrease in 7 countries does not counteract the increase in others.

  10. Nuclear science for food security. IAEA says plant breeding technique can help beat world hunger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) today called for increased investment in a plant breeding technique that could bolster efforts aimed at pulling millions of people out of the hunger trap. IAEA scientists use radiation to produce improved high-yielding plants that adapt to harsh climate conditions such as drought or flood, or that are resistant to certain diseases and insect pests. Called mutation induction, the technique is safe, proven and cost-effective. It has been in use since the 1920s. 'The global nature of the food crisis is unprecedented. Families all around the world are struggling to feed themselves,' says Mohamed ElBaradei, Director General of the IAEA. 'To provide sustainable, long-term solutions, we must make use of all available resources. Selecting the crops that are better able to feed us is one of humankind's oldest sciences. But we've neglected to give it the support and investment it requires for universal application. The IAEA is urging a revival of nuclear crop breeding technologies to help tackle world hunger.' For decades the IAEA, in partnership with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), has assisted its Member States to produce more, better and safer food. In plant breeding and genetics, its expertise is helping countries around the world to achieve enhanced agricultural output using nuclear technology. Already more than 3000 crop varieties of some 170 different plant species have been released through the direct intervention of the IAEA: they include barley that grows at 5000 meters (16,400 ft) and rice that thrives in saline soil. These varieties provide much needed food as well as millions of dollars in economic benefits for farmers and consumers, especially in developing countries. But with increased investment and broader application, the technology could positively impact the health and livelihood of even greater numbers of people. And as world hunger grows, the need has never been more urgent

  11. The design and use of proficiency based BWR reactor maintenance and refuelling training mockups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, G.J.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the ABB experience with the design and use of boiling water reactor training facilities. The training programs were developed and implemented in cooperation with the nuclear utilities. ABB operates two facilities, the ABB ATOM Light Water Reactor Service Center located in Vasteras, Sweden, and the ABB Combustion Engineering Nuclear Operations BWR Training Center located in Chattanooga, Tennessee, USA. The focus of the training centers are reactor maintenance and refueling activities plus the capability to develop and qualify tools, procedures and repair techniques

  12. Biogeography of Old World emballonurine bats (Chiroptera: Emballonuridae) inferred with mitochondrial and nuclear DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruedi, Manuel; Friedli-Weyeneth, Nicole; Teeling, Emma C; Puechmaille, Sébastien J; Goodman, Steven M

    2012-07-01

    Extant bats of the genus Emballonura have a trans-Indian Ocean distribution, with two endemic species restricted to Madagascar, and eight species occurring in mainland southeast Asia and islands in the western Pacific Ocean. Ancestral Emballonura may have been more widespread on continental areas, but no fossil identified to this genus is known from the Old World. Emballonura belongs to the subfamily Emballonurinae, which occurs in the New and Old World. Relationships of all Old World genera of this subfamily, including Emballonura and members of the genera Coleura from Africa and western Indian Ocean islands and Mosia nigrescens from the western Pacific region, are previously unresolved. Using 1833 bp of nuclear and mitochondrial genes, we reconstructed the phylogenetic history of Old World emballonurine bats. We estimated that these lineages diverged around 30 million years ago into two monophyletic sister groups, one represented by the two taxa of Malagasy Emballonura, Coleura and possibly Mosia, and the other by a radiation of Indo-Pacific Emballonura, hence, rendering the genus Emballonura paraphyletic. The fossil record combined with these phylogenetic relationships suggest at least one long-distance dispersal event across the Indian Ocean, presumably of African origin, giving rise to all Indo-Pacific Emballonura species (and possibly Mosia). Cladogenesis of the extant Malagasy taxa took place during the Quaternary giving rise to two vicariant species, E. atrata in the humid east and E. tiavato in the dry west. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Analysis of results of AZTRAN and AZKIND codes for a BWR; Analisis de resultados de los codigos AZTRAN y AZKIND para un BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastida O, G. E.; Vallejo Q, J. A.; Galicia A, J.; Francois L, J. L. [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532, 62550 Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico); Xolocostli M, J. V.; Rodriguez H, A.; Gomez T, A. M., E-mail: gbo729@yahoo.com.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2016-09-15

    This paper presents an analysis of results obtained from simulations performed with the neutron transport code AZTRAN and the kinetic code of neutron diffusion AZKIND, based on comparisons with models corresponding to a typical BWR, in order to verify the behavior and reliability of the values obtained with said code for its current development. For this, simulations of different geometries were made using validated nuclear codes, such as CASMO, MCNP5 and Serpent. The results obtained are considered adequate since they are comparable with those obtained and reported with other codes, based mainly on the neutron multiplication factor and the power distribution of the same. (Author)

  14. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of two-phase flow in a BWR fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrey Ioilev; Maskhud Samigulin; Vasily Ustinenko; Simon Lo; Adrian Tentner

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The goal of this project is to develop an advanced Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) computer code (CFD-BWR) that allows the detailed analysis of the two-phase flow and heat transfer phenomena in a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel bundle under various operating conditions. This code will include more fundamental physical models than the current generation of sub-channel codes and advanced numerical algorithms for improved computational accuracy, robustness, and speed. It is highly desirable to understand the detailed two-phase flow phenomena inside a BWR fuel bundle. These phenomena include coolant phase changes and multiple flow regimes which directly influence the coolant interaction with fuel assembly and, ultimately, the reactor performance. Traditionally, the best analysis tools for the analysis of two-phase flow phenomena inside the BWR fuel assembly have been the sub-channel codes. However, the resolution of these codes is still too coarse for analyzing the detailed intra-assembly flow patterns, such as flow around a spacer element. Recent progress in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), coupled with the rapidly increasing computational power of massively parallel computers, shows promising potential for the fine-mesh, detailed simulation of fuel assembly two-phase flow phenomena. However, the phenomenological models available in the commercial CFD programs are not as advanced as those currently being used in the sub-channel codes used in the nuclear industry. In particular, there are no models currently available which are able to reliably predict the nature of the flow regimes, and use the appropriate sub-models for those flow regimes. The CFD-BWR code is being developed as a customized module built on the foundation of the commercial CFD Code STAR-CD which provides general two-phase flow modeling capabilities. The paper describes the model development strategy which has been adopted by the development team for the

  15. Coolant Density and Control Blade History Effects in Extended BWR Burnup Credit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ade, Brian J [ORNL; Marshall, William BJ J [ORNL; Bowman, Stephen M [ORNL; Gauld, Ian C [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Martinez-Gonzalez, Jesus S [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission have initiated a multiyear project to investigate the application of burnup credit (BUC) for boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel in storage and transportation casks. This project includes two phases. The first phase investigates the applicability of peak reactivity methods currently used for spent fuel pools to spent fuel storage and transportation casks and the validation of reactivity (keff) calculations and predicted spent fuel compositions. The second phase focuses on extending BUC beyond peak reactivity. This paper documents work performed to date investigating some aspects of extended BUC. (The technical basis for application of peak reactivity methods to BWR fuel in storage and transportation systems is presented in a companion paper.) Two reactor operating parameters are being evaluated to establish an adequate basis for extended BWR BUC: (1) the effect of axial void profile and (2) the effect of control blade utilization during operation. A detailed analysis of core simulator data for one cycle of a modern operating BWR plant was performed to determine the range of void profiles and the variability of the profile experienced during irradiation. Although a single cycle does not provide complete data, the data obtained are sufficient to determine the primary effects and to identify conservative modeling approaches. These data were used in a study of the effect of axial void profile. The first stage of the study was determination of the necessary moderator density temporal fidelity in depletion modeling. After the required temporal fidelity was established, multiple void profiles were used to examine the effect on cask reactivity. The results of these studies are being used to develop recommendations for conservatively modeling the void profile effects for BWR depletion calculations. The second operational parameter studied was control blade history. Control blades are inserted in

  16. Development of methodology for early detection of BWR instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alessandro Petruzzi; Shin Chin; Kostadin Ivanov; Asok Ray; Fan-Bill Cheung

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The objective of the work presented in this paper research, which is supported by the US Department of Energy under the NEER program, is to develop an early anomaly detection methodology in order to enhance safety, availability, and operational flexibility of Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) nuclear power plants. The technical approach relies on suppression of potential power oscillations in BWRs by detecting small anomalies at an early stage and taking appropriate prognostic actions based on an anticipated operation schedule. The model of coupled (two-phase) thermal-hydraulic and neutron flux dynamics, based on the US NRC coupled code TRACE/PARCS, is being utilized as a generator of time series data for anomaly detection at an early stage. The concept of the methodology is based on the fact that nonlinear systems show bifurcation, which is a change in the qualitative behavior as the system parameters vary. Some of these parameters may change on their own accord and account for the anomaly, while certain parameters can be altered in a controlled fashion. The non-linear, non-autonomous BWR system model considered in this research exhibits phenomena at two time scales. Anomalies occur at the slow time scale while the observation of the dynamical behavior, based on which inferences are made, takes place at the fast time scale. It is assumed that: (i) the system behavior is stationary at the fast time scale; and (ii) any observable non-stationary behavior is associated with parametric changes evolving at the slow time scale. The goal is to make inferences about evolving anomalies based on the asymptotic behavior derived from the computer simulation. However, only sufficient changes in the slowly varying parameter may lead to detectable difference in the asymptotic behavior. The need to detect such small changes in parameters and hence early detection of an anomaly motivate the utilized stimulus-response approach. In this approach, the model

  17. The nuclear fuel elements' world market and the position of the Argentine Republic as producer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biondo, C.D.

    1983-01-01

    The development of the nuclear fuel elements' industry is analyzed, both in the present and projected world market, up to the year 2000, in the light of the situation affecting the nucleoelectric industry. By means of the offer/demand function, an analysis is made of the behaviour of the fuel elements' market throughout the fuel cycle structure. The regional unbalances between availability and demand of uranium resources are considered, as well as the factors having an unfavorable incidence on the fuel cycle's economic equation. The economic structure to be used for the calculation of the nucleoelectric generating cost is presented, in order to situate, within said nuclear economy, the component corresponding to the fuel cycle cost. Emphasis is placed on the 'front end' stages of the fuel cycle, but also considering those stages belonging to the 'back end'. Argentina's fuel elements market and its present and projected nucleoelectric park are analyzed, indicating their relative position in the world market. (R.J.S.) [es

  18. Reviewing nuclear power station achievement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howles, L.R.

    1976-01-01

    For measurement of nuclear power station achievement against original purchase the usual gross output figures are of little value since the term loosely covers many different definitions. An authentically designed output figure has been established which relates to net design output plus house load at full load. Based on these figures both cumulative and moving annual load factors are measured, the latter measuring the achievement over the last year, thus showing trends with time. Calculations have been carried out for all nuclear stations in the Western World with 150 MW(e) gross design output and above. From these are shown: moving annual load factor indicating relative station achievements for all the plants; cumulative load factors from which return of investment can be calculated; average moving annual load factors for the four types of system Magnox, PWR, HWR, and BWR; and a relative comparison of achievement by country in a few cases. (U.K.)

  19. Availability performance of fossil-fired and nuclear power plants around the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glorian, D.; Aye, L.; Lefeuvre, P.; Bouget, Y.H.

    1996-01-01

    For future thermal electricity, the electricity producer facing needs for extension or renewal of his own generating capacity can choose among a large number of proven technologies. These technologies can be nuclear or conventional (fossil-fired): steam turbines, cogeneration or gas turbines. The economic competitiveness of these different types of installations over their entire lifetime is calculated on the basis of various cost assumptions and/or scenarios, taking into account capital investment, fuel, operating and maintenance costs.. Equally important are such factors as construction duration, discount rate, service lifetime, usage mode (base load, intermediate load or peak load). In addition, costs and hypotheses in relation to the environment should be taken into account, including the cost of dismantling nuclear power plants. Hypotheses concerning the service delivered to the grid, that is to say the expected availability of the plant, is one of the main factors governing the quality of service provided. This paper deals particularly with experience feedback in the area of availability factors for nuclear and conventional power plants (steam turbines) of over 100 MW around the world. The assumptions for future (i.e. new) plants are compared against experience feedback. In the second part, assumptions for new plants are presented. (authors)

  20. Today's trends of nuclear electricity in Europe and in the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leclercq, J.; David, J.; Hugonnard-Bruyere, S.

    2010-01-01

    This article is composed of 4 parts. The first part shows that the future of nuclear power is theoretically promising because of the unstoppable growth of the world demand for electricity but it appears that only 58 new reactors are being built worldwide while the concept of nuclear renaissance dates back to 5 years ago. The second part overviews the 3 ways of improving the 437 existing reactors: increasing the availability factor, extending the service life or increasing the output power. The third part is dedicated to the construction programs. It appears that China with 23 reactors being built, Russian Federation with 9 reactors, Korea with 6 reactors and India with 4 reactors are leading the demand in terms of technologies. It is absolutely not certain that developing countries will choose the last generation of reactors whose safety levels are the highest. The fourth part concerns prospective scenarios for the European Union, the most likely one predicts a share of 30% for nuclear power in the European power mix in 2030. (A.C.)

  1. Identification and assessment of BWR in-vessel severe accident mitigation strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodge, S.A.; Cleveland, J.C.; Kress, T.S.; Petek, M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1992-10-01

    This report provides the results of work carried out in support of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Accident Management Research Program to develop a technical basis for evaluating the effectiveness and feasibility of current and proposed strategies for boiling water reactor (BWR) severe accident management. First, the findings of an assessment of the current status of accident management strategies for the mitigation of in-vessel events for BWR severe accident sequences are described. This includes a review of the BWR Owners` Group Emergency Procedure Guidelines (EPGSs) to determine the extent to which they currently address the characteristic events of an unmitigated severe accident and to provide the basis for recommendations for enhancement of accident management procedures. Second, where considered necessary, new candidate accident management strategies are proposed for mitigation of the late-phase (after core damage has occurred) events. Finally, recommendations are made for consideration of additional strategies where warranted, and two of the four candidate strategies identified by this effort are assessed in detail: (1) preparation of a boron solution for reactor vessel refill should control blade damage occur during a period of temporary core dryout and (2) containment flooding to maintain the core debris within the reactor vessel if the injection systems cannot be restored.

  2. Analysis CFD for the hydrogen transport in the primary containment of a BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez P, D. A.; Del Valle G, E.; Gomez T, A. M.

    2014-10-01

    This study presents a qualitative and quantitative comparison among the CFD GASFLOW and OpenFOAM codes which are related with the phenomenon of hydrogen transport and other gases in the primary containment of a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR). GASFLOW is a commercial license code that is well validated and that was developed in Germany for the analysis of the gases transport in containments of nuclear reactors. On the other hand, OpenFOAM is an open source code that offers several evaluation solvers for different types of phenomena; in this case, the solver reacting-Foam is used to analyze the hydrogen transport inside the primary containment of the BWR. The results that offer the solver reacting-Foam of OpenFOAM are evaluated in the hydrogen transport calculation and the results are compared with those of the program of commercial license GASFLOW to see if is viable the use of the open source code in the case of the hydrogen transport in the primary containment of a BWR. Of the obtained results so much quantitative as qualitative some differences were identified between both codes, the differences (with a percentage of maximum error of 4%) in the quantitative results are small and they are considered acceptable for this analysis type, also, these differences are attributed mainly to the used transport models, considering that OpenFOAM uses a homogeneous model and GASFLOW uses a heterogeneous model. (Author)

  3. Managing BWR plant life extension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ianni, P.W.; Kiss, E.

    1985-01-01

    Recent studies have confirmed that extending the useful life of a large nuclear plant can be justified with very high cost benefit ratio. In turn, experience with large power plant systems and equipment has shown that a well-integrated and -managed plan is essential in order to achieve potential economic benefits. Consequently, General Electric's efforts have been directed at establishing a life extension plan that considers alternative options and cost-effective steps that can be taken in early life, those appropriate during middle life, and those required in late life. This paper briefly describes an approach designed to provide the plant owner a maximum of flexibility in developing a life extension plan

  4. Technology developments for Japanese BWR MOX fuel utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oguma, M.; Mochida, T.; Nomata, T.; Asahi, K.

    1997-01-01

    The Long-Term Program for Research, Development and Utilization of Nuclear Energy established by the Atomic Energy Commission of Japan asserts that Japan will promote systematic utilization of MOX fuel in LWRs. Based on this Japanese nuclear energy policy, we have been pushing development of MOX fuel technology aimed at future full scale utilization of this fuel in BWRs. In this paper, the main R and D topics are described from three subject areas, MOX core and fuel design, MOX fuel irradiation behaviour, and MOX fuel fabrication technology. For the first area, we explain the compatibility of MOX fuel with UO 2 core, the feasibility of the full MOX core, and the adaptability of MOX design methods based on a mock-up criticality experiment. In the second, we outline the Tsuruga MOX irradiation program and the DOMO program, and suggest that MOX fuel behaviour is comparable to ordinary BWR UO 2 fuel behaviour. In the third, we examine the development of a fully automated MOX bundle assembling apparatus and its features. (author). 14 refs, 11 figs, 3 tabs

  5. A New Method for Early Anomaly Detection of BWR Instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, K.N.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of the performed research is to develop an early anomaly detection methodology so as to enhance safety, availability, and operational flexibility of Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) nuclear power plants. The technical approach relies on suppression of potential power oscillations in BWRs by detecting small anomalies at an early stage and taking appropriate prognostic actions based on an anticipated operation schedule. The research utilizes a model of coupled (two-phase) thermal-hydraulic and neutron flux dynamics, which is used as a generator of time series data for anomaly detection at an early stage. The model captures critical nonlinear features of coupled thermal-hydraulic and nuclear reactor dynamics and (slow time-scale) evolution of the anomalies as non-stationary parameters. The time series data derived from this nonlinear non-stationary model serves as the source of information for generating the symbolic dynamics for characterization of model parameter changes that quantitatively represent small anomalies. The major focus of the presented research activity was on developing and qualifying algorithms of pattern recognition for power instability based on anomaly detection from time series data, which later can be used to formulate real-time decision and control algorithms for suppression of power oscillations for a variety of anticipated operating conditions. The research being performed in the framework of this project is essential to make significant improvement in the capability of thermal instability analyses for enhancing safety, availability, and operational flexibility of currently operating and next generation BWRs.

  6. A New Methodology for Early Anomaly Detection of BWR Instabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, K. N.

    2005-11-27

    The objective of the performed research is to develop an early anomaly detection methodology so as to enhance safety, availability, and operational flexibility of Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) nuclear power plants. The technical approach relies on suppression of potential power oscillations in BWRs by detecting small anomalies at an early stage and taking appropriate prognostic actions based on an anticipated operation schedule. The research utilizes a model of coupled (two-phase) thermal-hydraulic and neutron flux dynamics, which is used as a generator of time series data for anomaly detection at an early stage. The model captures critical nonlinear features of coupled thermal-hydraulic and nuclear reactor dynamics and (slow time-scale) evolution of the anomalies as non-stationary parameters. The time series data derived from this nonlinear non-stationary model serves as the source of information for generating the symbolic dynamics for characterization of model parameter changes that quantitatively represent small anomalies. The major focus of the presented research activity was on developing and qualifying algorithms of pattern recognition for power instability based on anomaly detection from time series data, which later can be used to formulate real-time decision and control algorithms for suppression of power oscillations for a variety of anticipated operating conditions. The research being performed in the framework of this project is essential to make significant improvement in the capability of thermal instability analyses for enhancing safety, availability, and operational flexibility of currently operating and next generation BWRs.

  7. Artificial intelligence applied to fuel management in BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz S, J.J.

    1998-01-01

    In this work two techniques of artificial intelligence, neural networks and genetic algorithms were applied to a practical problem of nuclear fuel management; the determination of the optimal fuel reload for a BWR type reactor. This is an important problem in the design of the operation cycle of the reactor. As a result of the application of these techniques, comparable or even better reloads proposals than those given by expert companies in the subject were obtained. Additionally, two other simpler problems in reactor physics were solved: the determination of the axial power profile and the prediction of the value of some variables of interest at the end of the operation cycle of the reactor. Neural networks and genetic algorithms have been applied to solve many problems of engineering because of their versatility but they have been rarely used in the area of fuel management. The results obtained in this thesis indicates the convenience of undertaking further work on this area and suggest the application of these techniques of artificial intelligence to the solution of other problems in nuclear reactor physics. (Author)

  8. Some studies for aseismic design of BWR power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasai, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Kihachiro; Takayanagi, Masaaki; Moriyama, Takeo; Kashimura, Yoshisada

    1978-01-01

    Nuclear power stations are constructed regarding the safety as the most important matter, and in Japan where earthquakes occur frequently, attention must be paid to the aseismatic characteristics in particular. BWR power generation facilities have high aseismatic performances on the basis of the experiences of construction and the design technology over many years. The tests and researches concerning the aseismatic characteristics are roughly divided into those of establishing reasonable design conditions, of improving the accuracy of the method of analyzing earthquake response, and of proving the maintenance of functions. Artificial earthquake waves are made by the method of correcting recorded waves or the method of sine wave synthesis. For the analysis of building-ground systems, the modeling method using finite element analysis has been studied. As for the researches on the aseismatic characteristics of core equipments, the vibration experiment on fuel assemblies and the proving test on the insertion of control rods were carried out. Especially in the proving test on the insertion of control rods, it was found that the stop of a nuclear reactor was able to be carried out without fail at the time of the earthquake far exceeding the maximum fuel amplitude estimated for the plants in Japan. Such results of researches are accumulated continuously and reflected to the design. (Kako, I.)

  9. Prevention of organic iodide formation in BWR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karjunen, T.; Laitinen, T.; Piippo, J.; Sirkiae, P.

    1996-01-01

    During an accident, many different forms of iodine may emerge. Organic iodides, such as methyl iodide and ethyl iodide, are relatively volatile, and thus their appearance leads to increased concentration of gaseous iodine. Since organic iodides are also relatively immune to most accident mitigation measures, such as sprays and filters, they can affect the accident source term significantly even when only a small portion of iodine is in organic form. Formation of organic iodides may not be limited by the amount of organic substances available. Excessive amounts of methane can be produced, for example, during oxidation of boron carbide, which is used in BWR's as a neutron absorber material. Another important source is cable insulation. In a BWR, a large quantity of cables is placed below the pressure vessel. Thus a large quantity of pyrolyse gases will be produced, should the vessel fail. Organic iodides can be formed as a result of many different reactions, but at least in certain conditions the main reaction takes place between an organic radical produced by radiolysis and elemental iodine. A necessary requirement for prevention of organic iodide production is therefore that the pH in the containment water pools is kept high enough to eliminate formation of elemental iodine. In a typical BWR the suppression pool water is usually unbuffered. As a result, the pH may be dominated by chemicals introduced during an accident. If no system for adding basic chemicals is operable, the main factor affecting pool water pH may be hydrochloric acid released during cable degradation. Should this occur, the conditions could be very favorable for production of elemental iodine and, consequently, formation of organic iodides. Although high pH is necessary for iodine retention, it could have also adverse effects. High pH may, for example, accelerate corrosion of containment materials and alter the characteristics of the solid corrosion products. (author) 6 figs., 1 tab., 13 refs

  10. Maintenance of BWR control rod drive mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, R.H.

    1991-01-01

    Control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) replacement and rebuilding is one of the highest dose, most physically demanding, and complicated maintenance activities routinely accomplished by BWR utilities. A recent industry workshop sponsored by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, which dealt with the effects of CRDM aging, revealed enhancements in maintenance techniques and tooling which have reduced ALARA, improved worker comfort and productivity, and have provided revised guidelines for CRDM changeout selection. Highlights of this workshop and ongoing research on CRDM aging are presented in this paper

  11. Design-by-analysis application to next generation BWR fuel thermal design method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Yasushi; Mitsutake, Toru

    2008-01-01

    For BWR core thermal design methods, the full mock-up thermal-hydraulic tests have been needed, such as the critical power measurement test, pressure drop measurement test and so on for more than thirty years since 1976. However, the full mock-up test required the high costs and large-scale test facility. Now, there are only a few test facilities in the world to perform the full mock-up thermal-hydraulic test. Moreover, for future BWR, the bundle size tends to be larger, because of reducing the plant construction costs and minimizing days taken for the periodic check. For instance, AB1600, improved ABWR, was proposed from Toshiba (Imaruoka et al., 2005), whose bundle size was 1.2 times larger than the conventional BWR fuel size. It is too expensive and far from realistic to perform the full mock-up thermal-hydraulic test for such a large size fuel bundle on every new bundle design. The new design procedure is exactly expected at reasonable costs and required to perform the large scale bundle design development, especially for the next generation BWR. Then, we propose a kind of Design by Analysis method combined with the alternative to the full mock-up tests. We called Practical Design-by-Analysis (PDBA) method even more effective and with better accuracy than Full Design-by-Analysis (FDBA). The PDBA method was applied successfully to produce the critical power correlation for the current 8x8 fuel. The estimation error was almost equal to that of the design correlation developed empirically with the full mock-up test data. (author)

  12. 1100 MW BWR power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    Now, the start-up test of No. 2 plant in Fukushima No. 2 Nuclear Power Station is smoothly in progress, and the start of its commercial operation is scheduled at the beginning of 1984. Here, the main features of No. 2 plant including piping design are explained. For No. 2 plant, many improving measures were adopted as the base plant of the improvement and standardization project of the Ministry of International Trade and Industry, such as the adoption of Mark-2 improved PCV, the adoption of an intermediate loop in the auxiliary cooling system, one-body forging of the lower end cover of the reactor pressure vessel, the adoption of many curved pipes, the adoption of large one-body structural components in reactor recirculation system piping and so on, which are related to the reduction of radiation exposure and the improvement of plant reliability in operation and regular inspection. Also, in order to do general adjustment in the arrangement of equipment and piping and in route design, and to establish the rational construction work plan, model engineering was adopted. In No. 2 plant, a remote-controlled automatic and semiautomatic ultrasonic flaw detection system was adopted to reduce radiation exposure in in-service inspection. Automatic welding was adopted to improve the quality. (Kako, I.)

  13. The realism project reconciling nuclear power and radiation policies with the real world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theodore Rockwell

    2006-01-01

    Let's get real. It is crazy to fear that one's health and life are threatened by entities known to be harmless, whether those entities are goblins under the bed or trivial levels of radiation from non-existent radiological catastrophes. The nuclear community is in that paranoid state, and no advice from public relations experts can cure it. Some people claim that overstating risk is a prudent thing to do, but in practice it may do harm. Let us recall what we have said and done to create this situation. Then let us look at what the real world tells us about those risks. And then we will consider what might be done to return to reason. (author)

  14. News of the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2014-01-01

    This article gathers pieces of information from the nuclear industry throughout the world. A digest follows. AREVA expects the end of the construction of the EPR at the Olkiluoto plant mid 2016 and its commissioning in 2018. The fast reactor Beloyarsk-4 reached went critical in july 2014 for the first time (its construction began in 1986 but was stopped when the Soviet Union collapsed and works resumed in 2004). The Chinese company CGN will build the units 3 and 4 of the Cernavoda plant in Romania. The NRC has approved the increase of power (+12%) of the units 2 and 3 of the Peach Bottom plant in the US, both reactors are 1140 MW BWR that were commissioned in 1974. A court ruling has obliged the American NRC to continue examining the operating license of the Yucca Mountain center despite the project was suspended in 2010 by Obama's Administration. A new line of fuel assembly production has been opened at Yibin (Sichuan - China) by a subsidiary of CNNC, the annual output is expected to reach 400 tonnes. Ukrainian authorities have announced that the foundations of the new sarcophagus surrounding the Chernobyl-4 damaged reactor have been completed. AREVA has won a contract for the dismantling of 2 research reactors R2-0 and R2 in Sweden. (A.C.)

  15. BWR-stability investigation at Forsmark 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergdahl, B.G.; Reisch, F.; Oguma, R.; Lorenzen, J.; Aakerhielm, F.

    1988-01-01

    A series of noise measurements have been conducted at Forsmark 1 during start-up operation after the revision summer '87. The main purpose was to investigate BWR-stability problems, i.e. resonant power oscillations of 0.5 Hz around 65% power and 4100 kg/s core flow, which tend to arise at high power and low core flow conditions. The analysis was performed to estimate the noise source which gives rise to the oscillation, to evaluate the measure of stability, i.e. the Decay Ratio (Dr) as well as to investigate other safety related problems. The result indicates that the oscillation is due to the dynamic coupling between the neutron kinetics and thermal hydraulics via void reactivity feedback. The Dr ranged between values of 0.7 and > 0.9, instead of expected 0.6 (Dr=1 is defined as instability). These high values imply that the core cannot suppress oscillations fast enough and a small perturbation can cause scram. Further it was found that the entire core is oscillating in phase (LPRM's) with varying strength where any connection to the consequences of different fuel (8x8, 9x9) being present simultaneously cannot be excluded. This report elucidates the importance of an on-line BWR-stability surveillance system with functions like stability condition monitoring and control system diagnosis. (orig.)

  16. CECP, Decommissioning Costs for PWR and BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bierschbach, M.C.

    1997-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: The Cost Estimating Computer Program CECP, designed for use on an IBM personal computer or equivalent, was developed for estimating the cost of decommissioning boiling water reactor (BWR) and light-water reactor (PWR) power stations to the point of license termination. 2 - Method of solution: Cost estimates include component, piping, and equipment removal costs; packaging costs; decontamination costs; transportation costs; burial volume and costs; and manpower staffing costs. Using equipment and consumables costs and inventory data supplied by the user, CECP calculates unit cost factors and then combines these factors with transportation and burial cost algorithms to produce a complete report of decommissioning costs. In addition to costs, CECP also calculates person-hours, crew-hours, and exposure person-hours associated with decommissioning. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The program is designed for a specific waste charge structure. The waste cost data structure cannot handle intermediate waste handlers or changes in the charge rate structures. The decommissioning of a reactor can be divided into 5 periods. 200 different items for special equipment costs are possible. The maximum amount for each special equipment item is 99,999,999$. You can support data for 10 buildings, 100 components each; ESTS1071/01: There are 65 components for 28 systems available to specify the contaminated systems costs (BWR). ESTS1071/02: There are 75 components for 25 systems available to specify the contaminated systems costs (PWR)

  17. LBB application in Swedish BWR design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kornfeldt, H.; Bjoerk, K.O.; Ekstroem, P. [ABB Atom, Vaesteras (Sweden)

    1997-04-01

    The protection against dynamic effects in connection with potential pipe breaks has been implemented in different ways in the development of BWR reactor designs. First-generation plant designs reflect code requirements in effect at that time which means that no piping restraint systems were designed and built into those plants. Modern designs have, in contrast, implemented full protection against damage in connection with postulated pipe breaks, as required in current codes and regulations. Moderns standards and current regulatory demands can be met for the older plants by backfitting pipe whip restraint hardware. This could lead to several practical difficulties as these installations were not anticipated in the original plant design and layout. Meeting the new demands by analysis would in this situation have great advantages. Application of leak-before-break criteria gives an alternative opportunity of meeting modem standards in reactor safety design. Analysis takes into account data specific to BWR primary system operation, actual pipe material properties, piping loads and leak detection capability. Special attention must be given to ensure that the data used reflects actual plant conditions.

  18. Hydrogen injection device in BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagi, Jun-ichi; Kubo, Koji.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the increasing ratio of main steam system dose rate due to N-16 activity due to excess hydrogen injection in the hydrogen injection operation of BWR type reactors. Constitution: There are provided a hydrogen injection mechanism for injecting hydrogen into primary coolants of a BWR type reactor, and a chemical injection device for injecting chemicals such as methanol, which makes nitrogen radioisotopes resulted in the reactor water upon hydrogen injection non-volatile, into the pressure vessel separately from hydrogen. Injected hydrogen and the chemicals are not reacted in the feedwater system, but the reaction proceeds due to the presence of radioactive rays after the injection into the pressure vessel. Then, hydrogen causes re-combination in the downcomer portion to reduce the dissolved oxygen concentration. Meanwhile, about 70 % of the chemicals is supplied by means of a jet pump directly to the reactor core, thereby converting the chemical form of N-16 in the reactor core more oxidative (non-volatile). (Kawakami, Y.)

  19. BWR normal water chemistry guidelines: 1986 revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-09-01

    Boiling water reactors (BWRs) have experienced stress corrosion cracking in the reactor cooling system piping resulting in adverse impacts on plant availability and personnel radiation exposure. The BWR Owners Group and EPRI have sponsored a major research and development program to provide remedies for this stress corrosion cracking problem. This work shows that the likelihood of cracking depends on the plant's water chemistry performance (environment) as well as on material condition and stress level. Plant experience and other research demonstrate that water quality also affects fuel performance and radiation field buildup in BWRs. This report,''BWR Normal Water Chemistry Guidelines: 1986 Revision,'' presents suggested generic water chemistry specifications, justifies the proposed water chemistry limits, suggests responses to out-of-specification water chemistry, discusses available chemical analysis methods as well as data management and surveillance schemes, and details the management philosophy required to successfully implement a water chemistry control program. An appendix contains recommendations for water quality of auxiliary systems. 73 refs., 20 figs., 9 tabs

  20. Phylogeny of eagles, Old World vultures, and other Accipitridae based on nuclear and mitochondrial DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Heather R L; Mindell, David P

    2005-11-01

    We assessed phylogenetic relationships for birds of prey in the family Accipitridae using molecular sequence from two mitochondrial genes (1047 bases ND2 and 1041 bases cyt-b) and one nuclear intron (1074 bases beta-fibrinogen intron 7). We sampled representatives of all 14 Accipitridae subfamilies, focusing on four subfamilies of eagles (booted eagles, sea eagles, harpy eagles, and snake eagles) and two subfamilies of Old World vultures (Gypaetinae and Aegypiinae) with nearly all known species represented. Multiple well-supported relationships among accipitrids identified with DNA differ from those traditionally recognized based on morphology or life history traits. Monophyly of sea eagles (Haliaeetinae) and booted eagles (Aquilinae) was supported; however, harpy eagles (Harpiinae), snake eagles (Circaetinae), and Old World vultures were found to be non-monophyletic. The Gymnogene (Polyboroides typus) and the Crane Hawk (Geranospiza caerulescens) were not found to be close relatives, presenting an example of convergent evolution for specialized limb morphology enabling predation on cavity nesting species. Investigation of named subspecies within Hieraaetus fasciatus and H. morphnoides revealed significant genetic differentiation or non-monophyly supporting recognition of H. spilogaster and H. weiskei as distinctive species.

  1. 6th world congress of Nuclear Medicine and Biology, October 23-28, 1994, Sydney, Australia. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    The supplement presents 962 abstracts of papers or posters presented at the 6th World Congress of Nuclear Medicine and Biology, held from 23-28 October 1994 in Sydney, Australia. The key subjects of the conference are diagnostic nuclear medicine, with emphasis on scintiscanning, SPET and PET in all fields of medicine. There is an alphabetical author index to facilitate retrieval of individual papers [de

  2. Development of new irradiation facility for BWR safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Yuji; Magome, Hirokatsu; Iida, Kazuhiro; Hanawa, Hiroshi; Ohmi, Masao

    2013-01-01

    In JAEA (Japan Atomic Energy Agency), about the irradiation embrittlement of the reactor pressure vessel and the stress corrosion cracking of reactor core composition apparatus concerning the long-term use of the light water reactor (BWR), in order to check the influence of the temperature, pressure, and water quality, etc on BWR condition. The water environmental control facility which performs irradiation assisted stress corrosion-cracking (IASCC) evaluation under BWR irradiation environment was fabricated in JMTR (Japan Materials Testing Reactor). This report is described the outline of manufacture of the water environmental control facility for doing an irradiation test using the saturation temperature capsule after JMTR re-operation. (author)

  3. Present supply and demand on the world uranium market and decision of the nuclear fuel cycle policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Luqing

    1994-01-01

    The present supply and demand relationship on the world uranium market due to the change of international situation in the last years is described and the falling price on the world uranium market is estimated. It is pointed out that the falling price would continue for a long time. Based on it the three different policy decisions on the back-end of nuclear fuel cycle are analysed

  4. Analysis of results of AZTRAN and AZKIND codes for a BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastida O, G. E.; Vallejo Q, J. A.; Galicia A, J.; Francois L, J. L.; Xolocostli M, J. V.; Rodriguez H, A.; Gomez T, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents an analysis of results obtained from simulations performed with the neutron transport code AZTRAN and the kinetic code of neutron diffusion AZKIND, based on comparisons with models corresponding to a typical BWR, in order to verify the behavior and reliability of the values obtained with said code for its current development. For this, simulations of different geometries were made using validated nuclear codes, such as CASMO, MCNP5 and Serpent. The results obtained are considered adequate since they are comparable with those obtained and reported with other codes, based mainly on the neutron multiplication factor and the power distribution of the same. (Author)

  5. Usage of industrial robots in nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, Yoshio; Hamada, Kenjiro

    1982-01-01

    Japan is now at the top level in the world in robot technology.Its application to nuclear power field is one of the most expected. However, their usage spreads over various types of nuclear power plants, their manufacture and operation, and other areas such as fuel reprocessing plants and reactor plant decommissioning. The robots as used for the operation of BWR nuclear power plants, already developed and under development, are described: features in the nuclear-power usage of robots, the robots used currently for automatic fuel exchange, the replacement of control rod drives and in-service inspection; the robots under development for travelling inspection device and the inspection of main steam-relief safety valves, future development of robots. By robot usage, necessary personnel, work period and radiation exposure can be greatly reduced, and safety and reliability are also raised. (Mori, K.)

  6. Timing criteria for supplemental BWR emergency response equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bickel, John H.

    2015-01-01

    The Great Tohuku Earthquake and subsequent Tsunami represented a double failure event which destroyed offsite power connections to Fukushima-Daiichi site and then destroyed on-site electrical systems needed to run decay heat removal systems. The accident could have been mitigated had there been supplemental portable battery chargers, supplemental pumps, and in-place piping connections to provide alternate decay heat removal. In response to this event in the USA, two national response centers, one in Memphis, Tennessee, and another in Phoenix, Arizona, will begin operation. They will be able to dispatch supplemental emergency response equipment to any nuclear plant in the U.S. within 24 hours. In order to define requirements for supplemental nuclear power plant emergency response equipment maintained onsite vs. in a regional support center it is necessary to confirm: (a) the earliest time such equipment might be needed depending on the specific scenario, (b) the nominal time to move the equipment from a storage location either on-site or within the region of a nuclear power plant, and (c) the time required to connect in the supplemental equipment to use it. This paper describes an evaluation process for a BWR-4 with a Mark I Containment starting with: (a) severe accident simulation to define best estimate times available for recovery based on the specific scenario, (b) identify the key supplemental response equipment needed at specific times to accomplish recovery of key safety functions, and (c) evaluate what types of equipment should be warehoused on-site vs. in regional response centers. (authors)

  7. World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilinc, M.; Beringer, J.; Hutley, L.; Kurioka, K.; Wood, S.; D'Argent, N.; Martin, D.; McHugh, I.; Tapper, N.; McGuire, D.

    2009-04-01

    Natural forests store vast amounts of carbon in the terrestrial biosphere, and play an important role in the global carbon cycle. Given the significance of natural forests, there is a lack of carbon accounting of primary forests that are undisturbed by human activities. One reason for this lack of interest stems from ecological orthodoxy that suggests that primary forests should be close to dynamic equilibrium, in that Net Ecosystem Production (NEP) approaches zero. However, recent results from the northern hemisphere and tropics, using eddy covariance flux towers, indicate that primary forests are a greater sink than first thought. The role of evergreen primary forests in Australian carbon balance studies remain uncertain and hence may function differently to their deciduous counterparts in the Northern Hemisphere. In order to address the lack of baseline carbon accounts, an undisturbed, 300 year old Mountain Ash (Eucalyptus regnans) ecosystem, located in the Central Highlands of Victoria (Australia) was selected as a permanent study site to investigate carbon and water budgets over diurnal, seasonal and annual cycles. Mountain Ash trees are the world's tallest angiosperms (flowering plants), and one of the largest carbon reservoirs in the biosphere, with an estimated 1900 tC ha-1. A 110 m tall micrometeorological tower that includes eddy covariance instrumentation was installed in August 2005. An independent biometric approach quantifying the annual net gain or loss of carbon was also made within close proximity to the flux tower. Analysis of NEP in 2006 suggests that the ecosystem acted as a carbon sink of 2.5 tC ha-1 yr-1. Woody and soil biomass increment for the same year was estimated to be 2.8 tC ha-1yr-1, in which nearly half of the biomass production was partitioned into the aboveground woody tissue. These results indicate that temperate primary forests act as carbon sinks, and are able to maintain their carbon sink status due to their uneven stand

  8. Evaluation of BWR emergency procedure guidelines for BWR ATWS using RAMONA-3B code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neymotin, L.; Slovik, G.; Cazzoli, E.; Saha, P.

    1985-01-01

    An MSIV Closure ATWS calculation for a typical BWR/4 (Browns Ferry, Unit 1) was performed using the RAMONA-3B code which is a BWR systems transient code combining three-dimensional neutronic core representation with multi-channel one-dimensional thermal hydraulics. The main objective of the study was to perform a best-estimate evaluation of the recently proposed Emergency Procedure Guidelines for Anticipated Transients Without Scram (ATWS). Emphasis was placed on evaluating the effects of lowering the downcomer water level to the Top of Active Fuel (TAF) and vessel depressurization. The calculation was run up to approximately 1200 seconds. Both actions, namely, lowering the water level and vessel depressurization, lowered the reactor power to some extent. However, the pressure suppression pool water temperature still reached approximately 90 0 C (potential High Pressure Coolant Injection (HPCI) pump seal failure temperature) in twenty minutes. Thus, other actions such as boron injection and/or manual control rod insertion are necessary to mitigate a BWR/4 Main Steam Isolation Valve (MSIV) closure ATWS. 19 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs

  9. CFD predictions of standby liquid control system mixing in lower plenum of a BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, Christopher; Skarda, Raymond

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Computational fluid dynamics analysis of BWR lower plenum. • Mixing and stratification of the standby liquid control system injection. • Scoping study highlights the expected flow paths and limitations of experiments. - Abstract: During an anticipated transient without scram (ATWS) scenario in certain boiling water reactor (BWR) systems, a standby liquid control system (SLCS) is used to inject a sodium pentaborate solution into the reactor system in order to quickly shut down (scram) the reactor without the use of the control rods. Some BWR designs utilize a SLCS that injects through a set of nozzles on a vertical pipe in the peripheral region of the lower plenum of the reactor vessel. During the scenario, system water levels are reduced and natural circulation flow rates down through the jet pump nozzles and up into the core are a small fraction of the rated system flow. It is during this period that the SLCS flows are considered. This work outlines some initial scoping studies completed by the staff at the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). An attempt at benchmarking the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach using a set of available test data from a small facility is outlined. Due to our lack of information related to specific details of the facility geometry along with the limited data available from the test, the benchmark exercise produced only a qualitative basis for selecting turbulence models and mesh density. A CFD model simulating a full-scale reactor system is developed for the lower plenum of a representative BWR/4 design and SLCS flows and mixing are studied under a range of flow conditions. The full-scale BWR simulation builds upon the lessons learned from the benchmark exercise. One challenge for this work is the large size of the domain and the relatively small size of the geometric details such as flow passages and gaps. The geometry is simplified to make meshing feasible by eliminating some of the small features. The

  10. Nuclear energy outlook: a GE perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, J.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Full text: As one of the world's leading suppliers of power generation and energy delivery technologies, GE Energy provides comprehensive solutions for coal, oil, natural gas and nuclear energy; renewable resources such as wind, solar and biogas, along with other alternative fuels. With the ever increasing demand for energy and pressures to decrease greenhouse gas emissions, global trends indicate a move towards building more base line nuclear generation capacity. As a reliable, cost-competitive option for commercial power generation, nuclear energy also addresses many of the issues the world faces when it comes to the environment. Since developing nuclear reactor technology in the 1950s, GE's Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) technology accounts for more than 90 operating plants in the world today. Building on that success, GE's ABWR design is now the first and only Generation 111 nuclear reactor in operation today. This advanced reactor technology, coupled with current construction experience and a qualified global supply chain, make ESBWR, GE's Generation III+ reactor design, an attractive option for owners considering adding nuclear generation capacity. In pursuit of new technologies, GE has teamed with Silex to develop, commercialize and license third generation laser enrichment technology. By acquiring the exclusive rights to develop and commercialize this technology, GE is positioned to support the anticipated global demands for enriched uranium. At GE, we are continuing to develop imaginative ideas and investing in products that are cost effective, increase productivity, limit greenhouse gas emissions, and improve safety and security for our customers

  11. World hazards and nuclear weapons: right and wrong answers. To reach a treaty of interdiction of nuclear weapons is possible

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durand, Daniel; Nivet, Roland

    2017-01-01

    A first article notices that modernisation of nuclear weapons are resumed with the emergence of new nuclear temptations: ambitious modernisation programme in the USA, catching-up race by Russia to be able to pierce antimissile defences, Chinese modernisation, renewal of the British Trident programme, doubling of nuclear military budgets in France, developments in India and Pakistan. However, the author discusses the possible emergence of new opportunities for a nuclear disarmament: humanitarian ICAN campaign for a treaty of interdiction of nuclear weapons. He highlights the need of a debate in France on these issues even though no politician dares to take a strong position in favour of nuclear disarmament. In a third article, a member of an activist association shows that, after the adoption of a U N resolution on favour of the elaboration of a treaty of interdiction of nuclear weapons, reaching such a treaty is possible. The action of civil society seems necessary

  12. Impact of metals recycling on a Swedish BWR decommissioning project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, Arne; Lidar, Per; Hedin, Gunnar; Bergh, Niklas

    2014-01-01

    Decommissioning of nuclear power plants generates large volumes of radioactive or potentially contaminated metals. By proper management of the waste streams significant amounts can be free released and recycled either directly or after decontamination and melting. A significant part of the required work should be performed early in the process to make the project run smoothly without costly surprises and delays. A large portion of the clearance activities can be performed on-site. This on-site work should focus on the so called low-risk for contamination material. Other material can be decontaminated and released on site if schedule and the available facility areas so allow. It should be noted that the on-site decontamination and clearance activities can be a significant bottle neck for a decommissioning project. The availability of and access to a specialized metals recycling facility is an asset for a decommissioning project. This paper will describe the forecasted positive impact of a well-structured metals characterisation, categorisation and clearance process for a BWR plant decommissioning project. The paper is based on recent studies, performed projects and recent in-house development. (authors)

  13. Kuosheng BWR/6 containment safety analysis with gothic code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Ansheng; Wang Jongrong; Yuann Rueyyng; Shih Chunkuan

    2011-01-01

    Kuosheng Nuclear Power Plant in Taiwan is a GE-designed twin-unit BWR/6 plant, each unit rated at 2894 MWt. In this study, we presented the calculated results of the containment pressure and temperature responses after the main steam line break accident, which is the design basis for the containment system. During the simulation, a power of SPU range (105.1%) was used and a model of the Mark III type containment was built using the containment thermal-hydraulic program GOTHIC. The simulation consists of short and long-term responses. The drywell pressure and temperature responses which display the maximum values in the early state of the LOCA were investigated in the short-term response; the primary containment pressure and temperature responses in the long-term response. The blowdown flow was provided by FSAR and used as boundary conditions in the short-term model; in the long-term model, the blowdown flow was calculated using a GOTHIC built-in homogeneous equilibrium model. In the long-term analysis, a simplifier RPV model was employed to calculate the blowdown flow. Finally, the calculated results, similar to the FSAR results, indicate the GOTHIC code has the capability to simulate the pressure/temperature response of Mark III containment to the main steam line break LOCA. (author)

  14. Application of TRAB to BWR transient and accident analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raety, H.

    1995-01-01

    TRAB is a one-dimensional reactor dynamics code developed at VTT (Technical Research Centre of Finland) for BWRs. It models the core and the main circulation system inside the reactor vessel, including the steam dome with related systems, steam lines, recirculation pumps, incoming and outgoing flows as well as control and protection systems. The core model includes a one-dimensional description of the geometry, neutronics, rod heat transfer, and thermal hydraulics, using presently at most three parallel axial hydraulic channels. A synthesis model in the neutronics allows to include radially asymmetric phenomena in the modelling. TRAB has been extensively used for analyses of the TVO ABB Atom type BWRs in Olkiluoto, including analyses of pump trip, overpressurization, rod drop, ATWS, and stability. Analyses by VTT have been carried out both for the TVO Power Company and the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK). The code is also used for BWR analyses at STUK. (orig.) (12 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.)

  15. Calculation device for fuel power history in BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakagami, Masaharu.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To enable calculations for power history and various variants of power change in the power history of fuels in a BWR type reactor or the like. Constitution: The outputs of the process computation for the nuclear reactor by a process computer are stored and the reactor core power distribution is judged from the calculated values for the reactor core power distribution based on the stored data. Data such as for thermal power, core flow rate, control rod position and power distribution are recorded where the changes in the power distribution exceed a predetermined amount, and data such as for thermal power and core flow rate are recorded where the changes are within the level of the predetermined amount, as effective data excluding unnecessary data. Accordingly, the recorded data are taken out as required and the fuel power history and the various variants in the fuel power are calculated and determined in a calculation device for fuel power history and variants for fuel power fluctuation. (Furukawa, Y.)

  16. Comparative analysis of results between CASMO, MCNP and Serpent for a suite of Benchmark problems on BWR reactors; Analisis comparativo de resultados entre CASMO, MCNP y SERPENT para una suite de problemas Benchmark en reactores BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xolocostli M, J. V.; Vargas E, S.; Gomez T, A. M. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Reyes F, M. del C.; Del Valle G, E., E-mail: vicente.xolocostli@inin.gob.mx [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, UP - Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Edif. 9, 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    In this paper a comparison is made in analyzing the suite of Benchmark problems for reactors type BWR between CASMO-4, MCNP6 and Serpent code. The Benchmark problem consists of two different geometries: a fuel cell of a pin and assembly type BWR. To facilitate the study of reactors physics in the fuel pin their nuclear characteristics are provided to detail, such as burnt dependence, the reactivity of selected nuclide, etc. With respect to the fuel assembly, the presented results are regarding to infinite multiplication factor for burning different steps and different vacuum conditions. Making the analysis of this set of Benchmark problems provides comprehensive test problems for the next fuels generation of BWR reactors with high extended burned. It is important to note that when making this comparison the purpose is to validate the methodologies used in modeling for different operating conditions, if the case is of other BWR assembly. The results will be within a range with some uncertainty, considering that does not depend on code that is used. Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas of Instituto Politecnico Nacional (IPN (Mexico) has accumulated some experience in using Serpent, due to the potential of this code over other commercial codes such as CASMO and MCNP. The obtained results for the infinite multiplication factor are encouraging and motivate the studies to continue with the generation of the X S of a core to a next step a respective nuclear data library is constructed and this can be used by codes developed as part of the development project of the Mexican Analysis Platform of Nuclear Reactors AZTLAN. (Author)

  17. BWR stability: history and state-of-the-art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadigaroglu, George

    2014-01-01

    The paper briefly recalls the historical developments, reviews the important phenomena, the analytical and simulation tools that are used for the analysis of BWR stability focussing on the linear, frequency domain methods

  18. Study of transient rod extraction failure without RBM in a BWR; Estudio del transitorio error de extraccion de barra sin RBM en un BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vallejo Q, J. A.; Martin del Campo M, C.; Fuentes M, L.; Francois L, J. L., E-mail: amhed_jvq@hotmail.com [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    The study and analysis of the operational transients are important for predicting the behavior of a system to short-term events and the impact that would cause this transient. For the nuclear industry these studies are indispensable due to economic, environmental and social impacts that could cause an accident during the operation of a nuclear reactor. In this paper the preparation, simulation and analysis results of the transient rod extraction failure in which not taken into operation the RBM is presented. The study was conducted for a BWR of 2027 MWt, in an intermediate cycle of its useful life and using the computer code Simulate-3K a scenario of anomalies was created in the core reactivity which gave a coherent prediction to the type of presented event. (Author)

  19. Study of transient turbine shot without bypass in a BWR; Estudio del transitorio disparo de turbina sin bypass en un BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vallejo Q, J. A.; Martin del Campo M, C.; Fuentes M, L.; Francois L, J. L., E-mail: amhed_jvq@hotmail.com [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    The study and analysis of operational transients are important for predicting the behavior of a system to short-terms events and the impact that would cause this transition. For the nuclear industry these studies are indispensable due to economic, environmental and social impacts that could result in an accident during the operation of a nuclear reactor. In this paper the preparation, simulation and analysis of results of a turbine shot transient, which is not taken into operation the bypass is presented. The study is realized for a BWR of 2027 MWt, to an intermediate cycle life and using the computer code Simulate-3K a depressurization stage of the vessel is created which shows the response of other security systems and gives a coherent prediction to the event presented type. (Author)

  20. Proceedings of the international specialist meeting on BWR-pressure suppression containment technology. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultheiss, G.F.

    1981-01-01

    In the frame of R + D-work for BWR-pressure suppression systems the GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH organized an international specialist meeting. All important safety relevant aspects of pressure suppression system technology have been included. About 60 experts from USA, Japan, Sweden, Italy, Netherlands and the Federal Republic of Germany participated. They came from licensing authorities, vendors, research centers and universities. In 24 papers they have shown the world-wide present status of theoretical and experimental know-how on pressure suppression system behaviour. In discussions and working groups recommendations for future work have been compiled. (orig.) [de

  1. Supporting project on international education and training in cooperated program for Radiation Technology with World Nuclear University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Byung Duk; Nam, Y. M.; Noh, S. P.; Shin, J. Y. [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-15

    The objective is promote national status and potential of Nuclear radiation industry, and take a world-wide leading role in radiation industry, by developing and hosting the first WNU Radiation Technology School. RI School (World Nuclear University Radioisotope School) is the three-week program designed to develop and inspire future international leaders in the field of radioisotope for the first time. The project would enable promote abilities of radioactive isotopes professions, and to build the human network with future leaders in the world-wide nuclear and radiation field. Especially by offering opportunity to construct human networks between worldwide radiation field leaders of next generation, intangible assets and pro-Korean human networks are secured among international radiation industry personnel. This might enhance the power and the status of Korean radiation industries, and establish the fundamental base for exporting of radiation technology and its products. We developed the performance measurement method for the school. This shows that 2010 WNU RI School was the first training program focusing on the radioisotope and very useful program for the participants in view of knowledge management and strengthening personal abilities. Especially, the experiences and a human network with world-wide future-leaders in radiation field are most valuable asset. It is expected that the participants could this experience and network developed in the program as a stepping stone toward the development of Korea's nuclear and radiation industry.

  2. Supporting project on international education and training in cooperated program for Radiation Technology with World Nuclear University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Byung Duk; Nam, Y. M.; Noh, S. P.; Shin, J. Y.

    2010-08-01

    The objective is promote national status and potential of Nuclear radiation industry, and take a world-wide leading role in radiation industry, by developing and hosting the first WNU Radiation Technology School. RI School (World Nuclear University Radioisotope School) is the three-week program designed to develop and inspire futur