WorldWideScience

Sample records for nuclear structure related

  1. Nuclear structure

    CERN Document Server

    Nazarewicz, W

    1999-01-01

    Current developments in nuclear structure are discussed from a theoretical perspective. The studies of the nuclear many-body system provide us with invaluable information about the nature of the nuclear interaction, nucleonic correlations at various energy-distance scales, and the modes of the nucleonic matter.

  2. Nuclear Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargano, Angela

    2003-04-01

    An account of recent studies in the field of theoretical nuclear structure is reported. These studies concern essentially research activities performed under the Italian project "Fisica Teorica del Nucleo e dei Sistemi a Molti Corpi". Special attention is addressed to results obtained during the last two years as regards the development of new many-body techniques as well as the interpretation of new experimental aspects of nuclear structure.

  3. Inspection of Nuclear Power Plant Structures - Overview of Methods and Related Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naus, Dan J [ORNL

    2009-05-01

    The objectives of this limited study were to provide an overview of the methods that are available for inspection of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete and metallic structures, and to provide an assessment of the status of methods that address inspection of thick, heavily-reinforced concrete and inaccessible areas of the containment metallic pressure boundary. In meeting these objectives a general description of nuclear power plant safety-related structures was provided as well as identification of potential degradation factors, testing and inspection requirements, and operating experience; methods for inspection of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures and containment metallic pressure boundaries were identified and described; and applications of nondestructive evaluation methods specifically related to inspection of thick-section reinforced concrete structures and inaccessible portions of containment metallic pressure boundaries were summarized. Recommendations are provided on utilization of test article(s) to further advance nondestructive evaluation methods related to thick-section, heavily-reinforced concrete and inaccessible portions of the metallic pressure boundary representative of nuclear power plant containments. Conduct of a workshop to provide an update on applications and needed developments for nondestructive evaluation of nuclear power plant structures would also be of benefit.

  4. Relation between molecular electronic structure and nuclear spin-induced circular dichroism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Štěpánek, Petr; Coriani, Sonia; Sundholm, Dage

    2017-01-01

    The recently theoretically described nuclear spin-induced circular dichroism (NSCD) is a promising method for the optical detection of nuclear magnetization. NSCD involves both optical excitations of the molecule and hyperfine interactions and, thus, it offers a means to realize a spectroscopy...... with spatially localized, high-resolution information. To survey the factors relating the molecular and electronic structure to the NSCD signal, we theoretically investigate NSCD of twenty structures of the four most common nucleic acid bases (adenine, guanine, thymine, cytosine). The NSCD signal correlates...... with the spatial distribution of the excited states and couplings between them, reflecting changes in molecular structure and conformation. This constitutes a marked difference to the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shift, which only reflects the local molecular structure in the ground electronic state...

  5. Structural Aging Program to evaluate continued performance of safety-related concrete structures in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Ellingwood, B.R. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)

    1994-03-01

    This report discusses the Structural Aging (SAG) Program which is being conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the United States Nuclear Regulatory commission (USNRC). The SAG Program is addressing the aging management of safety-related concrete structures in nuclear power plants for the purpose of providing improved technical bases for their continued service. The program is organized into three technical tasks: Materials Property Data Base, Structural Component Assessment/Repair Technologies, and Quantitative Methodology for continued Service Determinations. Objectives and a summary of recent accomplishments under each of these tasks are presented.

  6. Overview of activities in the U.S. related to continued service of nuclear power plant concrete structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naus D.J.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Safety-related nuclear power plant concrete structures are described and commentary on continued service assessments of these structures is provided. In-service inspection and testing requirements in the U.S. are summarized. The license renewal process in the U.S. is outlined and its current status noted. A summary of operating experience related to U.S. nuclear power plant concrete structures is presented. Several candidate areas are identified where additional research would be of benefit to aging management of NPP concrete structures. Finally current ORNL activities related to aging-management of concrete structures are outlined: development of operating experience database, application of structural reliability theory, and compilation of elevated temperature concrete material property data and information.

  7. Nuclear structure theory

    CERN Document Server

    Irvine, J M

    1972-01-01

    Nuclear Structure Theory provides a guide to nuclear structure theory. The book is comprised of 23 chapters that are organized into four parts; each part covers an aspect of nuclear structure theory. In the first part, the text discusses the experimentally observed phenomena, which nuclear structure theories need to look into and detail the information that supports those theories. The second part of the book deals with the phenomenological nucleon-nucleon potentials derived from phase shift analysis of nucleon-nucleon scattering. Part III talks about the phenomenological parameters used to de

  8. Specific dephosphorylation by phosphatases 1 and 2A of a nuclear protein structurally and immunologically related to nucleolin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, H R; Mieskes, G; Issinger, O G

    1989-01-01

    A new nuclear substrate (N-60) for phosphatase 1 and 2Ac has been described. In contrast to nucleolin (C23), to which it is structurally and immunologically related, N-60 becomes dephosphorylated to 51% and 41% by phosphatases 1 and 2Ac, respectively, within 10 min. Incubation up to 20 min led...

  9. Structure-function relationship of the nuclear localization signal sequence of parathyroid hormone-related protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshima, Keiichic; Takeda, Sachiyo; Hirose, Mariko; Akiyama, Yasuto; Iguchi, Kazuaki; Hoshino, Minoru; Yamaguchi, Ken; Mochizuki, Tohru

    2012-06-01

    Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) contains a nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequence within 87-107. NLS sequences are generally capable of penetrating cellular membranes due to a richness of basic amino acid residues, and thus have been used as cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) to translocate biologically active peptides/proteins into cells. The NLS sequence of PTHrP is not exception to this finding; however, PTHrP(87-107) contains 2 acidic glutamate residues at 99 and 101 within the basic amino acid stretch, which is not commonly observed in other CPPs such as HIV-1 Tat(48-60). In this study, we indicated structure-function relationship of the PTHrP NLS to understand the effect of acidic glutamate residues on cell permeability and intracellular localization. We chemically synthesized PTHrP(87-107) and its N-terminally truncated analogues. Their intracellular localization pattern was analyzed by microscopy, radioimmunoassay, and fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Although all analogues were translocated into cells, internalization by the cytoplasm and/or nucleus was length-dependent; specifically, PTHrP(97-107), PTHrP(95-107), and PTHrP(93-107) were more frequently localized in the cytoplasm. We assume that reduction in the net positive charge within PTHrP NLS analogues resulted in increased cytoplasm- translocation activity. We propose that PTHrP(97-107) is a useful carrier peptide for delivery and expression of cargo molecules in the cytoplasm.

  10. Nuclear structure and astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grawe, H [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Langanke, K [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); MartInez-Pinedo, G [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2007-09-15

    The nuclear structure in regions of the Segre chart which are of astrophysical importance is reviewed. The main emphasis is put on those nuclei that are relevant for stellar nucleosynthesis in fusion processes, and in slow neutron capture, both located close to stability, rapid neutron capture close to the neutron dripline and rapid proton capture near the proton dripline. The basic features of modern nuclear structure, their importance and future potential for astrophysics and their level of predictibility are critically discussed. Recent experimental and theoretical results for shell evolution far off the stability line and consequences for weak interaction processes, proton and neutron capture are reviewed.

  11. Equivalent linear and nonlinear site response analysis for design and risk assessment of safety-related nuclear structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolisetti, Chandrakanth, E-mail: cb76@buffalo.edu [University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, North Campus, 212 Ketter Hall, Amherst, NY 14260 (United States); Whittaker, Andrew S., E-mail: awhittak@buffalo.edu [University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, North Campus, 212 Ketter Hall, Amherst, NY 14260 (United States); Mason, H. Benjamin, E-mail: ben.mason@oregonstate.edu [Oregon State University, 101 Kearney Hall, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States); Almufti, Ibrahim, E-mail: ibrahim.almufti@arup.com [Advanced Technology + Research, ARUP, 560 Mission Street, Suite 700, San Francisco, CA (United States); Willford, Michael, E-mail: michael.willford@arup.com [Advanced Technology + Research, ARUP, 560 Mission Street, Suite 700, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Performed equivalent linear and nonlinear site response analyses using industry-standard numerical programs. • Considered a wide range of sites and input ground motions. • Noted the practical issues encountered while using these programs. • Examined differences between the responses calculated from different programs. • Results of biaxial and uniaxial analyses are compared. - Abstract: Site response analysis is a precursor to soil-structure interaction analysis, which is an essential component in the seismic analysis of safety-related nuclear structures. Output from site response analysis provides input to soil-structure interaction analysis. Current practice in calculating site response for safety-related nuclear applications mainly involves the equivalent linear method in the frequency-domain. Nonlinear time-domain methods are used by some for the assessment of buildings, bridges and petrochemical facilities. Several commercial programs have been developed for site response analysis but none of them have been formally validated for large strains and high frequencies, which are crucial for the performance assessment of safety-related nuclear structures. This study sheds light on the applicability of some industry-standard equivalent linear (SHAKE) and nonlinear (DEEPSOIL and LS-DYNA) programs across a broad range of frequencies, earthquake shaking intensities, and sites ranging from stiff sand to hard rock, all with a focus on application to safety-related nuclear structures. Results show that the equivalent linear method is unable to reproduce the high frequency acceleration response, resulting in almost constant spectral accelerations in the short period range. Analysis using LS-DYNA occasionally results in some unrealistic high frequency acceleration ‘noise’, which can be removed by smoothing the piece-wise linear backbone curve. Analysis using DEEPSOIL results in abrupt variations in the peak strains of consecutive soil layers

  12. The nuclear structure and related properties of some low-lying isomers of free-space O_n clusters (n=6, 8, 12)

    CERN Document Server

    Forte, G; March, N H; Pucci, R

    2013-01-01

    After some introductory comments relating to antiferromagnetism of crystalline O_2, and brief remarks on the geometry of ozone, Hartree-Fock (HF) theory plus second-order Moller-Plesset (MP2) corrections are used to predict the nuclear structure of low-lying isomers of free-space O_n clusters, for n=6, 8, and 12. The equilibrium nuclear-nuclear potential energy is also discussed in relation to the number n of oxygen atoms in the cluster.

  13. Inelastic seismic behavior of post-installed anchors for nuclear safety related structures: Generation of experimental database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahadik, Vinay, E-mail: vinay.mahadik@iwb.uni-stuttgart.de; Sharma, Akanshu; Hofmann, Jan

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • Experiments for evaluating seismic behavior of anchors were performed. • Two undercut anchor products in use in nuclear facilities were considered. • Monotonic tension, shear and cycling tension tests at different crack widths. • Crack cycling tests at constant, in-phase and out-of phase tension loads. • Characteristics for the two anchors as a function of crack width were identified. - Abstract: Post installed (PI) anchors are often employed for connections between concrete structure and components or systems in nuclear power plants (NPP) and related facilities. Standardized practices for nuclear related structures demand stringent criteria, which an anchor has to satisfy in order to qualify for use in NPP related structures. In NPP and related facilities, the structure–component interaction in the event of an earthquake depends on the inelastic behavior of the concrete structure, the component system and also the anchorage system that connects them. For analysis, anchorages are usually assumed to be rigid. Under seismic actions, however, it is known that anchors may undergo significant plastic displacement and strength degradation. Analysis of structure–component interaction under seismic loads calls for numerical models simulating inelastic behavior of anchorage systems. A testing program covering different seismic loading scenarios in a reasonably conservative manner is required to establish a basis for generating numerical models of anchorage systems. Currently there is a general lack of modeling techniques to consider the inelastic behavior of anchorages in structure–component interaction under seismic loads. In this work, in view of establishing a basis for development of numerical models simulating the inelastic behavior of anchors, seismic tests on two different undercut anchors qualified for their use in NPP related structures were carried out. The test program was primarily based on the DIBt-KKW-Leitfaden (2010) guidelines

  14. Theoretical studies in nuclear reactions and nuclear structure. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-05-01

    Research in the Maryland Nuclear Theory Group focusses on problems in four basic areas of current relevance. Hadrons in nuclear matter; the structure of hadrons; relativistic nuclear physics and heavy ion dynamics and related processes. The section on hadrons in nuclear matter groups together research items which are aimed at exploring ways in which the properties of nucleons and the mesons which play a role in the nuclear force are modified in the nuclear medium. A very interesting result has been the finding that QCD sum rules supply a new insight into the decrease of the nucleon`s mass in the nuclear medium. The quark condensate, which characterizes spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking of the late QCD vacuum, decreases in nuclear matter and this is responsible for the decrease of the nucleon`s mass. The section on the structure of hadrons contains progress reports on our research aimed at understanding the structure of the nucleon. Widely different approaches are being studied, e.g., lattice gauge calculations, QCD sum rules, quark-meson models with confinement and other hedgehog models. A major goal of this type of research is to develop appropriate links between nuclear physics and QCD. The section on relativistic nuclear physics represents our continuing interest in developing an appropriate relativistic framework for nuclear dynamics. A Lorentz-invariant description of the nuclear force suggests a similar decrease of the nucleon`s mass in the nuclear medium as has been found from QCD sum rules. Work in progress extends previous successes in elastic scattering to inelastic scattering of protons by nuclei. The section on heavy ion dynamics and related processes reports on research into the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} problem and heavy ion dynamics.

  15. Theoretical studies in nuclear reactions and nuclear structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-05-01

    Research in the Maryland Nuclear Theory Group focusses on problems in four basic areas of current relevance. Hadrons in nuclear matter; the structure of hadrons; relativistic nuclear physics and heavy ion dynamics and related processes. The section on hadrons in nuclear matter groups together research items which are aimed at exploring ways in which the properties of nucleons and the mesons which play a role in the nuclear force are modified in the nuclear medium. A very interesting result has been the finding that QCD sum rules supply a new insight into the decrease of the nucleon's mass in the nuclear medium. The quark condensate, which characterizes spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking of the late QCD vacuum, decreases in nuclear matter and this is responsible for the decrease of the nucleon's mass. The section on the structure of hadrons contains progress reports on our research aimed at understanding the structure of the nucleon. Widely different approaches are being studied, e.g., lattice gauge calculations, QCD sum rules, quark-meson models with confinement and other hedgehog models. A major goal of this type of research is to develop appropriate links between nuclear physics and QCD. The section on relativistic nuclear physics represents our continuing interest in developing an appropriate relativistic framework for nuclear dynamics. A Lorentz-invariant description of the nuclear force suggests a similar decrease of the nucleon's mass in the nuclear medium as has been found from QCD sum rules. Work in progress extends previous successes in elastic scattering to inelastic scattering of protons by nuclei. The section on heavy ion dynamics and related processes reports on research into the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} problem and heavy ion dynamics.

  16. Investigations of Nuclear Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarantites, Demetrios [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States); Reviol, W. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2015-07-15

    The proposal addresses studies of nuclear structure at low-energies and development of instrumentation for that purpose. The structure studies deal with features of neutron-rich nuclei with unexplored shapes (football- or pear-shaped nuclei). The regions of interest are: neutron rich nuclei like 132-138Sn, or 48-54Ca, and the Zr, Mo, and Ru isotopes. The tools used can be grouped as follows: either Gammasphere or Gretina multi-gamma detector arrays and auxiliary detectors (Microball, Neutron Shell, and the newly completed Phoswich Wall).The neutron-rich nuclei are accessed by radioactive-beam binary reactions or by 252Cf spontaneous fission. The experiments with heavy radioactive beams aim at exciting the beam nuclei by pick-up or transfer a neutron or a proton from a light target like 13C, 9Be, 11B or 14N .For these binary-reaction studies the Phoswich Wall detector system is essential. It is based on four multi-anode photomultiplier tubes on which CsI and thin fast-timing plastic scintillators are attached. Their signals are digitized with a high density microchip system.

  17. Identification and Assessment of Material Models for Age-Related Degradation of Structures and Passive Components in Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nie,J.; Braverman, J.; Hofmayer, C.; Kim, M. K.; Choi, I-K.

    2009-04-27

    When performing seismic safety assessments of nuclear power plants (NPPs), the potential effects of age-related degradation on structures, systems, and components (SSCs) should be considered. To address the issue of aging degradation, the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has embarked on a five-year research project to develop a realistic seismic risk evaluation system which will include the consideration of aging of structures and components in NPPs. Three specific areas that are included in the KAERI research project, related to seismic probabilistic risk assessment (PRA), are probabilistic seismic hazard analysis, seismic fragility analysis including the effects of aging, and a plant seismic risk analysis. To support the development of seismic capability evaluation technology for degraded structures and components, KAERI entered into a collaboration agreement with Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in 2007. The collaborative research effort is intended to continue over a five year period with the goal of developing seismic fragility analysis methods that consider the potential effects of age-related degradation of SSCs, and using these results as input to seismic PRAs. In the Year 1 scope of work BNL collected and reviewed degradation occurrences in US NPPs and identified important aging characteristics needed for the seismic capability evaluations that will be performed in the subsequent evaluations in the years that follow. This information is presented in the Annual Report for the Year 1 Task, identified as BNL Report-81741-2008 and also designated as KAERI/RR-2931/2008. The report presents results of the statistical and trending analysis of this data and compares the results to prior aging studies. In addition, the report provides a description of U.S. current regulatory requirements, regulatory guidance documents, generic communications, industry standards and guidance, and past research related to aging degradation of SSCs. This report

  18. Challenges in Nuclear Structure Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Nazarewicz, Witold

    2016-01-01

    The goal of nuclear structure theory is to build a comprehensive microscopic framework in which properties of nuclei and extended nuclear matter, and nuclear reactions and decays can all be consistently described. Due to novel theoretical concepts, breakthroughs in the experimentation with rare isotopes, increased exchange of ideas across different research areas, and the progress in computer technologies and numerical algorithms, nuclear theorists have been quite successful in solving various bits and pieces of the nuclear many-body puzzle and the prospects are exciting. This article contains a brief, personal perspective on the status of the field.

  19. Nuclear structure far from stability

    CERN Document Server

    Vretenar, D

    2005-01-01

    Modern nuclear structure theory is rapidly evolving towards regions of exotic short-lived nuclei far from stability, nuclear astrophysics applications, and bridging the gap between low-energy QCD and the phenomenology of finite nuclei. The principal objective is to build a consistent microscopic theoretical framework that will provide a unified description of bulk properties, nuclear excitations and reactions. Stringent constraints on the microscopic approach to nuclear dynamics, effective nuclear interactions, and nuclear energy density functionals, are obtained from studies of the structure and stability of exotic nuclei with extreme isospin values, as well as extended asymmetric nucleonic matter. Recent theoretical advances in the description of structure phenomena in exotic nuclei far from stability are reviewed.

  20. Nuclear structure far from stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vretenar, D.

    2005-04-01

    Modern nuclear structure theory is rapidly evolving towards regions of exotic shortlived nuclei far from stability, nuclear astrophysics applications, and bridging the gap between low-energy QCD and the phenomenology of finite nuclei. The principal objective is to build a consistent microscopic theoretical framework that will provide a unified description of bulk properties, nuclear excitations and reactions. Stringent constraints on the microscopic approach to nuclear dynamics, effective nuclear interactions, and nuclear energy density functionals, are obtained from studies of the structure and stability of exotic nuclei with extreme isospin values, as well as extended asymmetric nucleonic matter. Recent theoretical advances in the description of structure phenomena in exotic nuclei far from stability are reviewed.

  1. The nuclear structure and related properties of some low-lying isomers of free-space O{sub n} clusters (n=6,8,12)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forte, G. [Dipartimento di Scienze del Farmaco, Università di Catania, Viale A. Doria, 6, I-95126 Catania (Italy); Angilella, G.G.N., E-mail: giuseppe.angilella@ct.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Via S. Sofia, 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Scuola Superiore di Catania, Università di Catania, Via Valdisavoia, 9, I-95123 Catania (Italy); CNISM, UdR Catania, Via S. Sofia, 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy); INFN, Sez. Catania, Via S. Sofia, 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy); March, N.H. [Department of Physics, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan, 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Oxford University, Oxford (United Kingdom); Pucci, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Via S. Sofia, 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy); CNISM, UdR Catania, Via S. Sofia, 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy)

    2013-04-01

    After some introductory comments relating to antiferromagnetism of crystalline O{sub 2}, and brief remarks on the geometry of ozone, Hartree–Fock (HF) theory plus second-order Møller–Plesset (MP2) corrections are used to predict the nuclear structure of low-lying isomers of free-space O{sub n} clusters, for n=6,8, and 12. The equilibrium nuclear–nuclear potential energy is also discussed in relation to the number n of oxygen atoms in the cluster.

  2. Symmetries in nuclear structure

    CERN Document Server

    Allaart, K; Dieperink, A

    1983-01-01

    The 1982 summer school on nuclear physics, organized by the Nuclear Physics Division of the Netherlands' Physical Society, was the fifth in a series that started in 1963. The number of students attending has always been about one hundred, coming from about thirty countries. The theme of this year's school was symmetry in nuclear physics. This book covers the material presented by the enthusi­ astic speakers, who were invited to lecture on this subject. We think they have succeeded in presenting us with clear and thorough introductory talks at graduate or higher level. The time schedule of the school and the location allowed the participants to make many informal contacts during many social activities, ranging from billiards to surf board sailing. We hope and expect that the combination of a relaxed atmosphere during part of the time and hard work during most of the time, has furthered the interest in, and understanding of, nuclear physics. The organization of the summer school was made possible by substantia...

  3. Functional evolution of nuclear structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Scott C.

    2011-01-01

    The evolution of the nucleus, the defining feature of eukaryotic cells, was long shrouded in speculation and mystery. There is now strong evidence that nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) and nuclear membranes coevolved with the endomembrane system, and that the last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA) had fully functional NPCs. Recent studies have identified many components of the nuclear envelope in living Opisthokonts, the eukaryotic supergroup that includes fungi and metazoan animals. These components include diverse chromatin-binding membrane proteins, and membrane proteins with adhesive lumenal domains that may have contributed to the evolution of nuclear membrane architecture. Further discoveries about the nucleoskeleton suggest that the evolution of nuclear structure was tightly coupled to genome partitioning during mitosis. PMID:22006947

  4. 15th National Conference on Nuclear Structure in China

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Ning; Zhou, Shan-Gui; Nuclear Structure in China 2014; NSC2014

    2016-01-01

    This volume is a collection of the contributions to the 15th National Conference on Nuclear Structure in China (NSC2014), held on October 25-28, 2014 in Guilin, China and hosted by Guangxi Normal University. It provides an important updated resource in the nuclear physics literature for researchers and graduate students studying nuclear structure and related topics. Recent progress made in the study of nuclear spectroscopy of high-spin states, nuclear mass and half-life, nuclear astrophysics, super-heavy nuclei, unstable nuclei, density functional theory, neutron star and symmetry energy, nuclear matter, and nuclear shell model are covered.

  5. Review of Recent Aging-Related Degradation Occurrences of Structures and Passive Components in U.S. Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nie,J.; Braverman, J.; Hofmayer, C.; Choun, Y.-S.; Kim, M.K.; Choi, I.-K.

    2009-04-02

    The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) are collaborating to develop seismic capability evaluation technology for degraded structures and passive components (SPCs) under a multi-year research agreement. To better understand the status and characteristics of degradation of SPCs in nuclear power plants (NPPs), the first step in this multi-year research effort was to identify and evaluate degradation occurrences of SPCs in U.S. NPPs. This was performed by reviewing recent publicly available information sources to identify and evaluate the characteristics of degradation occurrences and then comparing the information to the observations in the past. Ten categories of SPCs that are applicable to Korean NPPs were identified, comprising of anchorage, concrete, containment, exchanger, filter, piping system, reactor pressure vessel, structural steel, tank, and vessel. Software tools were developed to expedite the review process. Results from this review effort were compared to previous data in the literature to characterize the overall degradation trends.

  6. Nuclear Quadrupole Moments and Nuclear Shell Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townes, C. H.; Foley, H. M.; Low, W.

    1950-06-23

    Describes a simple model, based on nuclear shell considerations, which leads to the proper behavior of known nuclear quadrupole moments, although predictions of the magnitudes of some quadrupole moments are seriously in error.

  7. Nuclear Structure at the Limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazarewicz, W.

    1998-01-12

    One of the frontiers of today�s nuclear science is the �journey to the limits� of atomic charge and nuclear mass, of neutron-to-proton ratio, and of angular momentum. The tour to the limits is not only a quest for new, exciting phenomena, but the new data are expected, as well, to bring qualitatively new information about the fundamental properties of the nucleonic many-body system, the nature of the nuclear interaction, and nucleonic correlations at various energy-distance scales. In this series of lectures, current developments in nuclear structure at the limits are discussed from a theoretical perspective, mainly concentrating on medium-mass and heavy nuclei.

  8. Nuclear structure with coherent states

    CERN Document Server

    Raduta, Apolodor Aristotel

    2015-01-01

    This book covers the essential features of a large variety of nuclear structure properties, both collective and microscopic in nature. Most of results are given in an analytical form thus giving deep insight into the relevant phenomena. Using coherent states as variational states, which allows a description in the classical phase space, or provides the generating function for a boson basis, is an efficient tool to account, in a realistic fashion, for many complex properties. A detailed comparison with all existing nuclear structure models provides readers with a proper framework and, at the same time, demonstrates the prospects for new developments. The topics addressed are very much of current concern in the field. The book will appeal to practicing researchers and, due to its self-contained account, can also be successfully read and used by new graduate students.

  9. Genetic Diversity and Population Structure in Vicia faba L. Landraces and Wild Related Species Assessed by Nuclear SSRs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Manuela; Lopes, Susana; Viegas, Wanda; Veloso, Maria Manuela

    2016-01-01

    Faba bean (Vicia faba L.) is a facultative cross-pollinating legume crop with a great importance for food and feed due to its high protein content as well as the important role in soil fertility and nitrogen fixation. In this work we evaluated genetic diversity and population structure of faba bean accessions from the Western Mediterranean basin and wild related species. For that purpose we screened 53 V. faba, 2 V. johannis and 7 V. narbonensis accessions from Portugal, Spain and Morocco with 28 faba bean Single Sequence Repeats (SSR). SSR genotyping showed that the number of alleles detected per locus for the polymorphic markers ranged between 2 and 10, with Polymorphic Information Content (PIC) values between 0.662 and 0.071, and heterozygosity (HO) between 0–0.467. Heterozygosity and inbreeding coefficient levels indicate a higher level of inbreeding in wild related species than in cultivated Vicia. The analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) showed a superior genetic diversity within accessions than between accessions even from distant regions. These results are in accordance to population structure analysis showing that individuals from the same accession can be genetically more similar to individuals from far away accessions, than from individuals from the same accession. In all three levels of analysis (whole panel of cultivated and wild accessions, cultivated faba bean accessions and Portuguese accessions) no population structure was observed based on geography or climatic factors. Differences between V. narbonensis and V. johannis are undetectable although these wild taxa are clearly distinct from V. faba accessions. Thus, a limited gene flow occurred between cultivated accessions and wild relatives. Contrastingly, the lack of population structure seems to indicate a high degree of gene flow between V. faba accessions, possibly explained by the partially allogamous habit in association with frequent seed exchange/introduction. PMID:27168146

  10. Nuclear relations in South Asia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joeck, N.

    1998-12-18

    The strategic landscape of South Asia changed dramatically in 1998. With the reciprocal testing of nuclear weapons, India and Pakistan emerged from the world of threshold status to an overt posture which has yet to be fully defined. Each claims the status of a nuclear weapon state, yet the contours of that status are unclear. A number of important strategic issues have been raised by these dramatic events. This paper will attempt to examine the implications of this new posture for each country and for the region. First and foremost, the decisions to test nuclear weapons are a product of each individual state making a sovereign decision about its national security needs. Both have made clear for a number of years that their attitudes toward nuclear weapons-and by default, toward nuclear nonproliferation-will not be directed by outsiders. They have rejected the global norms that oppose the further proliferation of nuclear weapons, embodied in the Treaty on the Non- Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT), and that embrace the ultimate elimination of nuclear weapons, captured in Article VI of that treaty. The decisions reached in New Delhi and lslamabad have been questioned by many, but the tests cannot be undone and it now falls on both countries to make further decisions about what strategies will best serve them, and what obligations they must now assume. Issues such as strategic planning, weaponization, deployment, and command and control, which heretofore were relegated to the back burner, may no longer be deferred.

  11. Nuclear structures in Tribolium castaneum oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogolyubov, Dmitry S; Batalova, Florina M; Kiselyov, Artyom M; Stepanova, Irina S

    2013-10-01

    The first ultrastructural and immunomorphological characteristics of the karyosphere (karyosome) and extrachromosomal nuclear bodies in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, are presented. The karyosphere forms early in the diplotene stage of meiotic prophase by the gathering of all oocyte chromosomes in a limited nuclear volume. Using the BrUTP assay, T. castaneum oocyte chromosomes united in the karyosphere maintain their transcriptional activity until the end of oocyte growth. Hyperphosphorylated RNA polymerase II and basal transcription factors (TFIID and TFIIH) were detected in the perichromatin region of the karyosphere. The T. castaneum karyosphere has an extrachromosomal capsule that separates chromosomes from the rest of the nucleoplasm. Certain structural proteins (F-actin, lamin B) were found in the capsule. Unexpectedly, the karyosphere capsule in T. castaneum oocytes was found to be enriched in TMG-capped snRNAs, which suggests that the capsule is not only a structural support for the karyosphere, but may be involved in biogenesis of snRNPs. We also identified the counterparts of 'universal' extrachromosomal nuclear domains, Cajal bodies (CBs) and interchromatin granule clusters (IGCs). Nuclear bodies containing IGC marker protein SC35 display some features unusual for typical IGCs. SC35 domains in T. castaneum oocytes are predominantly fibrillar complex bodies that do not contain trimethyl guanosine (TMG)-capped small nuclear (sn) RNAs. Microinjections of 2'-O-methyl (U)22 probes into the oocytes allowed revealing poly(A)+ RNAs in these nuclear domains. Several proteins related to mRNA export (heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein core protein A1, export adapters Y14 and Aly and export receptor NXF1) were also detected there. We believe that unusual SC35 nuclear domains of T. castaneum oocytes are possibly involved in mRNP but not snRNP biogenesis.

  12. Structure activity relationship of phenolic diterpenes from Salvia officinalis as activators of the nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischedick, Justin T; Standiford, Miranda; Johnson, Delinda A; Johnson, Jeffrey A

    2013-05-01

    Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor known to activate cytoprotective genes which may be useful in the treatment of neurodegenerative disease. In order to better understand the structure activity relationship of phenolic diterpenes from Salvia officinalis L., we isolated carnosic acid, carnosol, epirosmanol, rosmanol, 12-methoxy-carnosic acid, sageone, and carnosaldehyde using polyamide column, centrifugal partition chromatography, and semi-preparative high performance liquid chromatography. Isolated compounds were screened in vitro for their ability to active the Nrf2 and general cellular toxicity using mouse primary cortical cultures. All compounds except 12-methoxy-carnosic acid were able to activate the antioxidant response element. Furthermore both carnosol and carnoasldehyde were able to induce Nrf2-dependent gene expression as well as protect mouse primary cortical neuronal cultures from H(2)O(2) induced cell death.

  13. Functional evolution of nuclear structure

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Katherine L.; Dawson, Scott C.

    2011-01-01

    The evolution of the nucleus, the defining feature of eukaryotic cells, was long shrouded in speculation and mystery. There is now strong evidence that nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) and nuclear membranes coevolved with the endomembrane system, and that the last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA) had fully functional NPCs. Recent studies have identified many components of the nuclear envelope in living Opisthokonts, the eukaryotic supergroup that includes fungi and metazoan animals. These compo...

  14. Forging the link between nuclear reactions and nuclear structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickhoff, W. H.

    2016-06-01

    A review of the recent applications of the dispersive optical model (DOM) is presented. Emphasis is on the nonlocal implementation of the DOM that is capable of describing ground-state properties accurately when data like the nuclear charge density are available. The present understanding of the role of short- and long-range physics in determining proton properties near the Fermi energy for stable closed-shell nuclei has relied mostly on data from the (e, e' p) reaction. Hadronic tools to extract such spectroscopic information have been hampered by the lack of a consistent reaction description that provides unambiguous and undisputed results. The DOM, conceived by Claude Mahaux, provides a unified description of both elastic nucleon scattering and structure information related to single-particle properties below the Fermi energy. We have recently introduced a nonlocal dispersive optical potential for both the real and imaginary part. Nonlocal absorptive potentials yield equivalent elastic differential cross sections for 40Ca as compared to local ones but change the l-dependent absorption profile suggesting important consequences for the analysis of nuclear reactions. Below the Fermi energy, nonlocality is essential for an accurate representation of particle number and the nuclear charge density. Spectral properties implied by (e, e' p) and (p, 2p) reactions are correctly described, including the energy distribution of about 10% high-momentum protons obtained at Jefferson Lab. The nonlocal DOM allows a complete description of experimental data both above (up to 200 MeV) and below the Fermi energy in 40Ca. It is further demonstrated that elastic nucleon-nucleus scattering data constrain the spectral strength in the continuum of orbits that are nominally bound in the independent-particle model. Extension of this analysis to 48Ca allows a prediction of the neutron skin of this nucleus that is larger than most predictions made so far.

  15. Forging the link between nuclear reactions and nuclear structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dickhoff W. H.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A review of the recent applications of the dispersive optical model (DOM is presented. Emphasis is on the nonlocal implementation of the DOM that is capable of describing ground-state properties accurately when data like the nuclear charge density are available. The present understanding of the role of short- and long-range physics in determining proton properties near the Fermi energy for stable closed-shell nuclei has relied mostly on data from the (e, e′ p reaction. Hadronic tools to extract such spectroscopic information have been hampered by the lack of a consistent reaction description that provides unambiguous and undisputed results. The DOM, conceived by Claude Mahaux, provides a unified description of both elastic nucleon scattering and structure information related to single-particle properties below the Fermi energy. We have recently introduced a nonlocal dispersive optical potential for both the real and imaginary part. Nonlocal absorptive potentials yield equivalent elastic differential cross sections for 40Ca as compared to local ones but change the l-dependent absorption profile suggesting important consequences for the analysis of nuclear reactions. Below the Fermi energy, nonlocality is essential for an accurate representation of particle number and the nuclear charge density. Spectral properties implied by (e, e′ p and (p, 2p reactions are correctly described, including the energy distribution of about 10% high-momentum protons obtained at Jefferson Lab. The nonlocal DOM allows a complete description of experimental data both above (up to 200 MeV and below the Fermi energy in 40Ca. It is further demonstrated that elastic nucleon-nucleus scattering data constrain the spectral strength in the continuum of orbits that are nominally bound in the independent-particle model. Extension of this analysis to 48Ca allows a prediction of the neutron skin of this nucleus that is larger than most predictions made so far.

  16. Inspection of Nuclear Power Plant Containment Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graves, H.L.; Naus, D.J.; Norris, W.E.

    1998-12-01

    Safety-related nuclear power plant (NPP) structures are designed to withstand loadings from a number of low-probability external and interval events, such as earthquakes, tornadoes, and loss-of-coolant accidents. Loadings incurred during normal plant operation therefore generally are not significant enough to cause appreciable degradation. However, these structures are susceptible to aging by various processes depending on the operating environment and service conditions. The effects of these processes may accumulate within these structures over time to cause failure under design conditions, or lead to costly repair. In the late 1980s and early 1990s several occurrences of degradation of NPP structures were discovered at various facilities (e.g., corrosion of pressure boundary components, freeze- thaw damage of concrete, and larger than anticipated loss of prestressing force). Despite these degradation occurrences and a trend for an increasing rate of occurrence, in-service inspection of the safety-related structures continued to be performed in a somewhat cursory manner. Starting in 1991, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) published the first of several new requirements to help ensure that adequate in-service inspection of these structures is performed. Current regulatory in-service inspection requirements are reviewed and a summary of degradation experience presented. Nondestructive examination techniques commonly used to inspect the NPP steel and concrete structures to identify and quantify the amount of damage present are reviewed. Finally, areas where nondestructive evaluation techniques require development (i.e., inaccessible portions of the containment pressure boundary, and thick heavily reinforced concrete sections are discussed.

  17. Global nuclear-structure calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller, P.; Nix, J.R.

    1990-04-20

    The revival of interest in nuclear ground-state octupole deformations that occurred in the 1980's was stimulated by observations in 1980 of particularly large deviations between calculated and experimental masses in the Ra region, in a global calculation of nuclear ground-state masses. By minimizing the total potential energy with respect to octupole shape degrees of freedom in addition to {epsilon}{sub 2} and {epsilon}{sub 4} used originally, a vastly improved agreement between calculated and experimental masses was obtained. To study the global behavior and interrelationships between other nuclear properties, we calculate nuclear ground-state masses, spins, pairing gaps and {Beta}-decay and half-lives and compare the results to experimental qualities. The calculations are based on the macroscopic-microscopic approach, with the microscopic contributions calculated in a folded-Yukawa single-particle potential.

  18. Nuclear "pasta" structures in low-density nuclear matter and neutron star crust

    CERN Document Server

    Okamoto, Minoru; Yabana, Kazuhiro; Tatsumi, Toshitaka

    2013-01-01

    In neutron star crust, non-uniform structure of nuclear matter is expected, which is called the "pasta" structure. From the recent studies of giant flares in magnetars, these structures might be related to some observables and physical quantities of the neutron star crust. To investigate the above quantities, we numerically explore the pasta structures with a fully threedimensional geometry and study the properties of low-density nuclear matter, based on the relativistic mean-field model and the Thomas-Fermi approximation. We observe typical pasta structures for fixed proton number-fraction and two of them for cold catalyzed matter. We also discuss the crystalline configuration of "pasta".

  19. Nuclear Structure of 186Re

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-24

    186mRe isomer, absent from the adopted level scheme for 186Re, are needed to identify a means of depleting the isomer. Four experiments were performed...level scheme showing particle configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 15...energy densities of nuclear isomers are second only to fissile isotopes, but the means of depleting isomers, or inducing them to release their excess

  20. Nuclear effects in the structure functions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    E Marco; E Oset; S K Singh

    2003-11-01

    By using a relativistic framework and accurate nuclear spectral function the structure functions 2 and 3 of deep inelastic charged lepton and neutrino scattering are calculated in nuclei and results are presented.

  1. Electromagnetic studies of nuclear structure and reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersman, F. W.; Dawson, J. F.; Heisenberg, J. H.; Calarco, J. R.

    1990-06-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: giant resonance studies; deep inelastic scattering studies; high resolution nuclear structure work; and relativistic RPA; and field theory in the Schroedinger Representation.

  2. Progress on nuclear modifications of structure functions

    CERN Document Server

    Kumano, S

    2016-01-01

    We report progress on nuclear structure functions, especially on their nuclear modifications and a new tensor structure function for the deuteron. To understand nuclear structure functions is an important step toward describing nuclei and QCD matters from low to high densities and from low to high energies in terms of fundamental quark and gluon degrees of freedom beyond conventional hadron and nuclear physics. It is also practically important for understanding new phenomena in high-energy heavy-ion collisions at RHIC and LHC. Furthermore, since systematic errors of current neutrino-oscillation experiments are dominated by uncertainties of neutrino-nucleus interactions, such studies are valuable for finding new physics beyond current framework. Next, a new tensor-polarized structure function $b_1$ is discussed for the deuteron. There was a measurement by HERMES; however, its data are inconsistent with the conventional convolution estimate based on the standard deuteron model with D-state admixture. This fact ...

  3. Clustering aspects in nuclear structure functions

    CERN Document Server

    Hirai, M; Saito, K; Watanabe, T

    2010-01-01

    For understanding an anomalous nuclear effect experimentally observed for the beryllium-9 nucleus at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab), clustering aspects are studied in structure functions of deep inelastic lepton-nucleus scattering by using momentum distributions calculated in antisymmetrized (or fermionic) molecular dynamics (AMD) and also in a simple shell model for comparison. According to the AMD, the Be-9 nucleus consists of two alpha-like clusters with a surrounding neutron. The clustering produces high-momentum components in nuclear wave functions, which affects nuclear modifications of the structure functions. We investigated whether clustering features could appear in the structure function F_2 of Be-9 along with studies for other light nuclei. We found that nuclear modifications of F_2 are similar in both AMD and shell models within our simple convolution description although there are slight differences in Be-9. It indicates that the anomalous Be-9 result should be explain...

  4. Evolution: functional evolution of nuclear structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Katherine L; Dawson, Scott C

    2011-10-17

    The evolution of the nucleus, the defining feature of eukaryotic cells, was long shrouded in speculation and mystery. There is now strong evidence that nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) and nuclear membranes coevolved with the endomembrane system, and that the last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA) had fully functional NPCs. Recent studies have identified many components of the nuclear envelope in living Opisthokonts, the eukaryotic supergroup that includes fungi and metazoan animals. These components include diverse chromatin-binding membrane proteins, and membrane proteins with adhesive lumenal domains that may have contributed to the evolution of nuclear membrane architecture. Further discoveries about the nucleoskeleton suggest that the evolution of nuclear structure was tightly coupled to genome partitioning during mitosis.

  5. State-of-the-art of non-destructive testing methods and technologies for application to nuclear power plant safety-related concrete structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiggenhauser, Herbert [BAM - Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Berlin, D (Germany); Naus, Dan J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-02-18

    The inspection of nuclear power plant concrete structures presents challenges different from conventional civil engineering structures. Wall thicknesses can be in excess of one meter and the structures often have increased steel reinforcement density with more complex detailing. The accessibility for any testing method may be limited due to the presence of liners and other components and there can be a number of penetrations or cast-in-place items present. The objective of the report is to present the state-of-the art of non-destructive testing methods and technologies for the inspection of thick, heavily-reinforced nuclear power plant concrete cross-sections with particular respect to: •locating steel reinforcement and identification of its cover depth •locating tendon ducts and identification of the condition of the grout materials •detection of cracking, voids, delamination, and honeycombing in concrete structures •detection of inclusions of different materials or voids adjacent to the concrete side of the containment liner •methods capable of identification of corrosion occurrence on the concrete side of the containment liner.

  6. State-of-the-Art of Non-Destructive Testing Methods and Technologies for Application to Nuclear Power Plant Safety-Related Concrete Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiggenhauser, Dr. Herbert [Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM); Naus, Dan J [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    The inspection of nuclear power plant concrete structures presents challenges different from conventional civil engineering structures. Wall thicknesses can be in excess of one meter and the structures often have increased steel reinforcement density with more complex detailing. The accessibility for any testing method may be limited due to the presence of liners and other components and there can be a number of penetrations or cast-in-place items present. The objective of the report is to present the state-of-the art of non-destructive testing methods and technologies for the inspection of thick, heavily-reinforced nuclear power plant concrete cross-sections with particular respect to: locating steel reinforcement and identification of its cover depth locating tendon ducts and identification of the condition of the grout materials detection of cracking, voids, delamination, and honeycombing in concrete structures detection of inclusions of different materials or voids adjacent to the concrete side of the containment liner methods capable of identification of corrosion occurrence on the concrete side of the containment liner

  7. Report on aging of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Ellingwood, B.R. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1996-03-01

    The Structural Aging Program provides the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission with potential structural safety issues and acceptance criteria for use in continued service assessments of nuclear power plant safety-related concrete structures. The program was organized under four task areas: Program Management, Materials Property Data Base, Structural Component Assessment/Repair Technology, and Quantitative Methodology for Continued Service Determinations. Under these tasks, over 90 papers and reports were prepared addressing pertinent aspects associated with aging management of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures. Contained in this report is a summary of program results in the form of information related to longevity of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures, a Structural Materials Information Center presenting data and information on the time variation of concrete materials under the influence of environmental stressors and aging factors, in-service inspection and condition assessments techniques, repair materials and methods, evaluation of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures, and a reliability-based methodology for current and future condition assessments. Recommendations for future activities are also provided. 308 refs., 61 figs., 50 tabs.

  8. Theoretical nuclear structure. Progress report for 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazarewicz, W.; Strayer, M.R.

    1997-12-31

    This research effort is directed toward theoretical support and guidance for the fields of radioactive ion beam physics, gamma-ray spectroscopy, and the interface between nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics. The authors report substantial progress in all these areas. One measure of progress is publications and invited material. The research described here has led to more than 25 papers that are published, accepted, or submitted to refereed journals, and to 25 invited presentations at conferences and workshops.

  9. Creep of Structural Nuclear Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Will Windes; R.W. Lloyd

    2005-09-01

    A research program has been established to investigate fiber reinforced ceramic composites to be used as control rod components within a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design. Two candidate systems have been identified, carbon fiber reinforced carbon (Cf/C) and silicon carbide fiber reinforced silicon carbide (SiCf/SiC) composites. One of the primary degradation mechanisms anticipated for these core components is high temperature thermal and irradiation enhanced creep. As a consequence, high temperature test equipment, testing methodologies, and test samples for very high temperature (up to 1600º C) tensile strength and long duration creep studies have been established. Actual testing of both tubular and flat, "dog-bone"-shaped tensile composite specimens will begin next year. Since there is no precedence for using ceramic composites within a nuclear reactor, ASTM standard test procedures are currently being established from these high temperature mechanical tests.

  10. Nuclear Structure Research at Richmond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beausang, Cornelius W. [Univ. of Richmond, VA (United States)

    2015-04-30

    The goals for the final year were; (1) to continue ongoing efforts to develop and enhance GRETINA and work towards GRETA; (2) to investigate the structure of non-yrast states in shape transitional Sm and Gd nuclei; (3) to investigate the structure of selected light Cd nuclei; (4) to exploit the surrogate reaction technique to extract (n,f) cross sections for actinide nuclei, particularly the first measurement of the 236Pu and 237Pu(n,f) cross sections.

  11. Nuclear structure of $^{231}$Ac

    CERN Document Server

    Boutami, R; Mach, H; Kurcewicz, W; Fraile, L M; Gulda, K; Aas, A J; García-Raffi, L M; Løvhøiden, G; Martínez, T; Rubio, B; Taín, J L; Tengblad, O

    2008-01-01

    The low-energy structure of 231Ac has been investigated by means of gamma ray spectroscopy following the beta-decay of 231Ra. Multipolarities of 28 transitions have been established by measuring conversion electrons with a mini-orange electron spectrometer. The decay scheme of 231Ra --> 231Ac has been constructed for the first time. The Advanced Time Delayed beta-gamma-gamma(t) method has been used to measure the half-lives of five levels. The moderately fast B(E1) transition rates derived suggest that the octupole effects, albeit weak, are still present in this exotic nucleus.

  12. Progress on nuclear modifications of structure functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumano S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report progress on nuclear structure functions, especially on their nuclear modifications and a new tensor structure function for the deuteron. To understand nuclear structure functions is an important step toward describing nuclei and QCD matters from low to high densities and from low to high energies in terms of fundamental quark and gluon degrees of freedom beyond conventional hadron and nuclear physics. It is also practically important for understanding new phenomena in high-energy heavy-ion collisions at RHIC and LHC. Furthermore, since systematic errors of current neutrinooscillation experiments are dominated by uncertainties of neutrino-nucleus interactions, such studies are valuable for finding new physics beyond current framework. Next, a new tensor-polarized structure function b1 is discussed for the deuteron. There was a measurement by HERMES; however, its data are inconsistent with the conventional convolution estimate based on the standard deuteron model with D-state admixture. This fact suggests that a new hadronic phenomenon should exist in the tensor-polarized deuteron at high energies, and it will be experimentally investigated at JLab from the end of 2010’s.

  13. Investigation of Nuclear Partonic Structure. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, Henry J. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Engelage, J. M.

    2016-08-30

    Our research program had two primary goals during the period of this grant, to search for new and rare particles produced in high-energy nuclear collisions and to understand the internal structure of nuclear matter. We have developed electronics to pursue these goals at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) in the Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC (STAR) experiment and the AnDY experiment. Our results include discovery of the anti-hyper-triton, anti- 3Λ-barH, which opened a new branch on the chart of the nuclides, and the anti-alpha, anti- 4He, the heaviest form of anti-matter yet seen, as well as uncovering hints of gluon saturation in cold nuclear matter and observation of jets in polarized proton-proton collisions that will be used to probe orbital motion inside protons.

  14. Seismic analysis of nuclear power plant structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, J. C.

    1973-01-01

    Primary structures for nuclear power plants are designed to resist expected earthquakes of the site. Two intensities are referred to as Operating Basis Earthquake and Design Basis Earthquake. These structures are required to accommodate these seismic loadings without loss of their functional integrity. Thus, no plastic yield is allowed. The application of NASTRAN in analyzing some of these seismic induced structural dynamic problems is described. NASTRAN, with some modifications, can be used to analyze most structures that are subjected to seismic loads. A brief review of the formulation of seismic-induced structural dynamics is also presented. Two typical structural problems were selected to illustrate the application of the various methods of seismic structural analysis by the NASTRAN system.

  15. Relation between nuclear envelope and nuclear lamina in nuclear assembly in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡树涛; 翟中和

    1997-01-01

    Xenopus laevis egg extracts cell-free nuclear assembly system was used as an experimental model to study the process of nuclear lamina assembly in nuclear reconstitution in vitro. The experimental results showed that lamin was involved in the nuclear assembly in vitro. The assembly of nuclear lamina was preceded by the assembly of nuclear matrix, and probably, inner nuclear matrix assembly provided the basis for nuclear lamina assembly. Inhibition of normal assembly of nuclear lamina, by preincubating egg extracts cell-free system with anti-lamin antibodies, resulted in abnormal assembly of nuclear envelope, suggesting that nuclear envelope assembly is closely associated with nuclear lamina assembly.

  16. Structural integrity of nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knott, John F.

    2013-09-01

    The paper starts from concerns expressed by Sir Alan Cottrell, in the early 1970s, related to the safety of the pressurized water reactor (PWR) proposed at that time for the next phase of electrical power generation. It proceeds to describe the design and operation of nuclear generation plant and gives details of the manufacture of PWR reactor pressure vessels (RPVs). Attention is paid to stress-relief cracking and under-clad cracking, experienced with early RPVs, explaining the mechanisms for these forms of cracking and the means taken to avoid them. Particular note is made of the contribution of non-destructive inspection to structural integrity. Factors affecting brittle fracture in RPV steels are described: in particular, effects of neutron irradiation. The use of fracture mechanics to assess defect tolerance is explained, together with the failure assessment diagram embodied in the R6 procedure. There is discussion of the Master Curve and how it incorporates effects of irradiation on fracture toughness. Dangers associated with extrapolation of data to low probabilities are illustrated. The treatment of fatigue-crack growth is described, in the context of transients that may be experienced in the operation of PWR plant. Detailed attention is paid to the thermal shock associated with a large loss-of-coolant accident. The final section reviews the arguments advanced to justify 'Incredibility of Failure' and how these are incorporated in assessments of the integrity of existing plant and proposed 'new build' PWR pressure vessels.

  17. Nuclear Pore-Like Structures in a Compartmentalized Bacterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagulenko, Evgeny; Green, Kathryn; Yee, Benjamin; Morgan, Garry; Leis, Andrew; Lee, Kuo-Chang; Butler, Margaret K.; Chia, Nicholas; Pham, Uyen Thi Phuong; Lindgreen, Stinus; Catchpole, Ryan; Poole, Anthony M.; Fuerst, John A.

    2017-01-01

    Planctomycetes are distinguished from other Bacteria by compartmentalization of cells via internal membranes, interpretation of which has been subject to recent debate regarding potential relations to Gram-negative cell structure. In our interpretation of the available data, the planctomycete Gemmata obscuriglobus contains a nuclear body compartment, and thus possesses a type of cell organization with parallels to the eukaryote nucleus. Here we show that pore-like structures occur in internal membranes of G.obscuriglobus and that they have elements structurally similar to eukaryote nuclear pores, including a basket, ring-spoke structure, and eight-fold rotational symmetry. Bioinformatic analysis of proteomic data reveals that some of the G. obscuriglobus proteins associated with pore-containing membranes possess structural domains found in eukaryote nuclear pore complexes. Moreover, immunogold labelling demonstrates localization of one such protein, containing a β-propeller domain, specifically to the G. obscuriglobus pore-like structures. Finding bacterial pores within internal cell membranes and with structural similarities to eukaryote nuclear pore complexes raises the dual possibilities of either hitherto undetected homology or stunning evolutionary convergence. PMID:28146565

  18. Space nuclear power, propulsion, and related technologies.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berman, Marshall

    1992-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) is one of the nation's largest research and development (R&D) facilities, with headquarters at Albuquerque, New Mexico; a laboratory at Livermore, California; and a test range near Tonopah, Nevada. Smaller testing facilities are also operated at other locations. Established in 1945, Sandia was operated by the University of California until 1949, when, at the request of President Truman, Sandia Corporation was formed as a subsidiary of Bell Lab's Western Electric Company to operate Sandia as a service to the U.S. Government without profit or fee. Sandia is currently operated for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by AT&T Technologies, Inc., a wholly-owned subsidiary of AT&T. Sandia's responsibility is national security programs in defense and energy with primary emphasis on nuclear weapon research and development (R&D). However, Sandia also supports a wide variety of projects ranging from basic materials research to the design of specialized parachutes. Assets, owned by DOE and valued at more than $1.2 billion, include about 600 major buildings containing about 372,000 square meters (m2) (4 million square feet [ft2]) of floor space, located on land totalling approximately 1460 square kilometers (km2) (562 square miles [mi]). Sandia employs about 8500 people, the majority in Albuquerque, with about 1000 in Livermore. Approximately 60% of Sandia's employees are in technical and scientific positions, and the remainder are in crafts, skilled labor, and administrative positions. As a multiprogram national laboratory, Sandia has much to offer both industrial and government customers in pursuing space nuclear technologies. The purpose of this brochure is to provide the reader with a brief summary of Sandia's technical capabilities, test facilities, and example programs that relate to military and civilian objectives in space. Sandia is interested in forming partnerships with industry and government

  19. Nuclear structure and Indian Clover array

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    H C Jain

    2001-07-01

    A brief description of the nuclear structure studies performed with the 14-UD pelletron at TIFR has been presented. The experimental facilities developed for these studies are described. Some of the interesting results obtained for mass 70 to 80 nuclei are presented. The development of a recoil mass spectrometer and an Indian clover array for the study of high spin states in nuclei near drip lines is discussed.

  20. Steel plates and concrete filled composite shear walls related nuclear structural engineering: Experimental study for out-of-plane cyclic loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiaohu [The College of Architecture and Civil Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China); Li, Xiaojun, E-mail: beerli@vip.sina.com [The College of Architecture and Civil Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China); Institute of Geophysics, China Earthquake Administration, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2017-04-15

    Based on the program of CAP1400 nuclear structural engineering, the out-of-plane seismic behavior of steel plate and concrete infill composite shear walls (SCW) was investigated. 6 1/5 scaled specimens were conducted which consist of 5 SCW specimens and 1 reinforced concrete (RC) specimen. The specimens were tested under out-of-plane cyclic loading. The effect of the thickness of steel plate, vertical load and the strength grade of concrete on the out-of-plane seismic behavior of SCW were analyzed. The results show that the thickness of steel plate and vertical load have great influence on the ultimate bearing capacity and lateral stiffness, however, the influence of the strength grade of concrete was little within a certain range. SCW is presented to have a better ultimate capacity and lateral stiffness but have worse ductility in failure stage than that of RC. Based on the experiment, the cracking load of concrete infill SCW was analyzed in theory. The modified calculation formula of the cracking load was made, the calculated results showed good agreement with the test results. The formula can be used as the practical design for the design of cracking loads.

  1. Opportunities in nuclear structure and reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Filomena

    2015-10-01

    The last decade has seen important advances in the area of low energy nuclear physics. New measurements have provided crucial insight into the behavior of nuclei at the limits of stability, including the mapping of the neutron dripline up to Oxygen, investigations of unbound nuclear states, and the discovery of new super-heavy elements. In parallel we have seen a revolution in low-energy nuclear theory, moving toward quantified predictability, rooted in the underlying inter-nucleon forces. But the next decade offers even more opportunities with a new generation factory of rare isotopes, and the anticipated developments in high performance computing. The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams coupled with new state-of-the-art detectors will allow us to access a large fraction of the necessary information for the r-process responsible for making at least half of the heavy elements in our universe. FRIB will provide the needed intensities to study global nuclear properties, shell structure, and collective phenomena far from stability. Key measurements are anticipated, at various facilities, which will inform symmetry tests with rare isotopes. We expect to put strict constraints on the equation of state. These and many other opportunities will be highlighted in this overview talk.

  2. Electromagnetic studies of nucleon and nuclear structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heisenberg, J.H.; Calarco, J.R.; Hersman, F.W.; Dawson, J.F.

    1993-06-01

    Important objectives of the group are the study of subatomic structure through experimental measurements and the interpretation of the data through modeling. The common theme that unifies the studies of strong interactions and hadronic systems is the effort to determine the electromagnetic response as completely as possible. The general approach is coincidence detection of exclusive final states and determination of the dependence on the spin variables using polarized beams and targets and outgoing nucleon polarimetry. Direct reaction and giant resonance studies of electron quasi-elastic scattering on {sup 12}C and {sup 16}O are reported, as well as work on nuclear structure models and instrumentation development.

  3. Nuclear Structure Functions from Constituent Quark Model

    CERN Document Server

    Arash, F; Arash, Firooz; Atashbar-Tehrani, Shahin

    1999-01-01

    We have used the notion of the constituent quark model of nucleon, where a constituent quark carries its own internal structure, and applied it to determine nuclear structure functions ratios. It is found that the description of experimental data require the inclusion of strong shadowing effect for $x<0.01$. Using the idea of vector meson dominance model and other ingredients this effect is calculated in the context of the constituent quark model. It is rather striking that the constituent quark model, used here, gives a good account of the data for a wide range of atomic mass number from A=4 to A=204.

  4. Safety related events at nuclear installations in 1995

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsbech, Uffe C C

    1996-01-01

    Nuclear safety related events of significance at least corresponding to level 2 of the International Nuclear Event Scale are described. In 1995 only two events occured at nuclear power plants, and four events occured at plants using ionizing radiation for processing or research.......Nuclear safety related events of significance at least corresponding to level 2 of the International Nuclear Event Scale are described. In 1995 only two events occured at nuclear power plants, and four events occured at plants using ionizing radiation for processing or research....

  5. Structural Biology of Nuclear Auxin Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinesh, Dhurvas Chandrasekaran; Villalobos, Luz Irina A Calderón; Abel, Steffen

    2016-04-01

    Auxin coordinates plant development largely via hierarchical control of gene expression. During the past decades, the study of early auxin genes paired with the power of Arabidopsis genetics have unraveled key nuclear components and molecular interactions that perceive the hormone and activate primary response genes. Recent research in the realm of structural biology allowed unprecedented insight into: (i) the recognition of auxin-responsive DNA elements by auxin transcription factors; (ii) the inactivation of those auxin response factors by early auxin-inducible repressors; and (iii) the activation of target genes by auxin-triggered repressor degradation. The biophysical studies reviewed here provide an impetus for elucidating the molecular determinants of the intricate interactions between core components of the nuclear auxin response module.

  6. Structural Logical Relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schürmann, Carsten; Sarnat, Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    , such as Twelf, and yet they are often straightforward in proof assistants with stronger meta-logics. In this paper, we propose structural logical relations as a technique for conducting these proofs in systems with limited meta-logical strength by explicitly representing and reasoning about an auxiliary logic......Tait's method (a.k.a. proof by logical relations) is a powerful proof technique frequently used for showing foundational properties of languages based on typed lambda-calculi. Historically, these proofs have been extremely difficult to formalize in proof assistants with weak meta-logics...

  7. Fully ceramic nuclear fuel and related methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venneri, Francesco; Katoh, Yutai; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2016-03-29

    Various embodiments of a nuclear fuel for use in various types of nuclear reactors and/or waste disposal systems are disclosed. One exemplary embodiment of a nuclear fuel may include a fuel element having a plurality of tristructural-isotropic fuel particles embedded in a silicon carbide matrix. An exemplary method of manufacturing a nuclear fuel is also disclosed. The method may include providing a plurality of tristructural-isotropic fuel particles, mixing the plurality of tristructural-isotropic fuel particles with silicon carbide powder to form a precursor mixture, and compacting the precursor mixture at a predetermined pressure and temperature.

  8. Experimental test of nuclear magnetization distribution and nuclear structure models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beirsdorfer, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lopez-Urrutia, J Crespo R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Utter, S. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    1999-02-26

    Models exist that ascribe the nuclear magnetic fields to the presence of a single nucleon whose spin is not neutralized by pairing it up with that of another nucleon; other models assume that the generation of the magnetic field is shared among some or all nucleons throughout the nucleus. All models predict the same magnetic field external to the nucleus since this is an anchor provided by experiments. The models differ, however, in their predictions of the magnetic field arrangement within the nucleus for which no data exist. The only way to distinguish which model gives the correct description of the nucleus would be to use a probe inserted into the nucleus. The goal of our project was to develop exactly such a probe and to use it to measure fundamental nuclear quantities that have eluded experimental scrutiny. The need for accurately knowing such quantities extends far beyond nuclear physics and has ramifications in parity violation experiments on atomic traps and the testing of the standard model in elementary particle physics. Unlike scattering experiments that employ streams of free particles, our technique to probe the internal magnetic field distribution of the nucleus rests on using a single bound electron. Quantum mechanics shows that an electron in the innermost orbital surrounding the nucleus constantly dives into the nucleus and thus samples the fields that exist inside. This sampling of the nucleus usually results in only minute shifts in the electron' s average orbital, which would be difficult to detect. By studying two particular energy states of the electron, we can, however, dramatically enhance the effects of the distribution of the magnetic fields in the nucleus. In fact about 2% of the energy difference between the two states, dubbed the hyperfine splitting, is determined by the effects related to the distribution of magnetic fields in the nucleus, A precise measurement of this energy difference (better than 0.01%) would then allow us to

  9. Chiral nucleon-nucleon forces in nuclear structure calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coraggio L.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Realistic nuclear potentials, derived within chiral perturbation theory, are a major breakthrough in modern nuclear structure theory, since they provide a direct link between nuclear physics and its underlying theory, namely the QCD. As a matter of fact, chiral potentials are tailored on the low-energy regime of nuclear structure physics, and chiral perturbation theory provides on the same footing two-nucleon forces as well as many-body ones. This feature fits well with modern advances in ab-initio methods and realistic shell-model. Here, we will review recent nuclear structure calculations, based on realistic chiral potentials, for both finite nuclei and infinite nuclear matter.

  10. Chiral nucleon-nucleon forces in nuclear structure calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Coraggio, L; Holt, J W; Itaco, N; Machleidt, R; Marcucci, L E; Sammarruca, F

    2016-01-01

    Realistic nuclear potentials, derived within chiral perturbation theory, are a major breakthrough in modern nuclear structure theory, since they provide a direct link between nuclear physics and its underlying theory, namely the QCD. As a matter of fact, chiral potentials are tailored on the low-energy regime of nuclear structure physics, and chiral perturbation theory provides on the same footing two-nucleon forces as well as many-body ones. This feature fits well with modern advances in ab-initio methods and realistic shell-model. Here, we will review recent nuclear structure calculations, based on realistic chiral potentials, for both finite nuclei and infinite nuclear matter.

  11. Nuclear matrix - structure, function and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasąg, Piotr; Lenartowski, Robert

    2016-12-20

    The nuclear matrix (NM), or nuclear skeleton, is the non-chromatin, ribonucleoproteinaceous framework that is resistant to high ionic strength buffers, nonionic detergents, and nucleolytic enzymes. The NM fulfills a structural role in eukaryotic cells and is responsible for maintaining the shape of the nucleus and the spatial organization of chromatin. Moreover, the NM participates in several cellular processes, such as DNA replication/repair, gene expression, RNA transport, cell signaling and differentiation, cell cycle regulation, apoptosis and carcinogenesis. Short nucleotide sequences called scaffold/matrix attachment regions (S/MAR) anchor the chromatin loops to the NM proteins (NMP). The NMP composition is dynamic and depends on the cell type and differentiation stage or metabolic activity. Alterations in the NMP composition affect anchoring of the S/MARs and thus alter gene expression. This review aims to systematize information about the skeletal structure of the nucleus, with particular emphasis on the organization of the NM and its role in selected cellular processes. We also discuss several diseases that are caused by aberrant NM structure or dysfunction of individual NM elements.

  12. Global nuclear structure effects of tensor interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Zalewski, M; Rafalski, M; Satula, W; Werner, T R; Wyss, R A

    2009-01-01

    A direct fit of the isoscalar spin-orbit (SO) and both isoscalar and isovector tensor coupling constants to the f5/2-f7/2 SO splittings in 40Ca, 56Ni, and 48Ca nuclei requires a drastic reduction of the isoscalar SO strength and strong attractive tensor coupling constants. The aim of this work is to address further consequences of these strong attractive tensor and weak SO fields on binding energies, nuclear deformability, and high-spin states. In particular, we show that contribution to the nuclear binding energy due to the tensor field shows generic magic structure with tensorial magic numbers at N(Z)=14, 32, 56, or 90 corresponding to the maximum spin-asymmetries in 1d5/2, 1f7/2-2p3/2, 1g9/2-2d5/2 and 1h11/2-2f7/2 single-particle configurations and that these numbers are smeared out by pairing correlations and deformation effects. We also examine the consequences of strong attractive tensor fields and weak SO interaction on nuclear stability at the drip lines, in particular close to the tensorial doubly ma...

  13. Safety related events at nuclear installations in 1995

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsbech, Uffe C C

    1996-01-01

    Nuclear safety related events of significance at least corresponding to level 2 of the International Nuclear Event Scale are described. In 1995 only two events occured at nuclear power plants, and four events occured at plants using ionizing radiation for processing or research....

  14. R-ratios and moments of nuclear structure functions

    CERN Document Server

    Rinat, A S

    2000-01-01

    We study implications of a model, which links nuclear and nucleon structure functions. Computed Callen-Gross functions $\\kappa^A(x,Q^2)= 2xF_1^A(x,Q^2)/F_2^A(x,Q^2)$ appear for finite $Q^2$ to be close to their asymptotic value 1. Using those $\\kappa$, we compure $R$ ratios for $Q^2\\ge 5 GeV^2$. We review approximate methods in use for the extraction of $R$ from inclusive scattering and ENC data. Further we calcuate ratios of the moments of $F_k$ and find these to describe the data, in particular their $Q^2$ dependence. The above observables, as well as inclusive cross sections, are sensitive tests for the underlying relation between nucleonic and nuclear structure functions. In view of the overall agreement, we speculate that the above relation effectively circumvents a QCD calculation.

  15. Nuclear structure studies for the astrophysical r-process

    CERN Document Server

    Pfeiffer, B; Thielemann, F K; Walters, W B

    2001-01-01

    The production of the heaviest elements in nature occurs via the r-process, i.e. a combination of rapid neutron captures, the inverse photodisintegrations, and slower beta sup - -decays, beta-delayed processes as well as fission and possibly interactions with intense neutrino fluxes. A correct understanding and modeling requires the knowledge of nuclear properties far from stability and a detailed prescription of the astrophysical environment. Experiments at radioactive ion beam facilities have played a pioneering role in exploring the characteristics of nuclear structure in terms of masses and beta-decay properties. Initial examinations paid attention to highly unstable nuclei with magic neutron numbers and their beta-decay properties, related to the location and height of r-process peaks, while recent activities focus on the evolution of shell effects at large distances from the valley of stability. We show in site-independent applications the effect of both types of nuclear properties on r-process abundanc...

  16. Microscopic Approaches to Nuclear Structure: Configuration Interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ormand, W E

    2007-09-21

    The configuration interaction (CI) approach to solving the nuclear many-body problem, also known as the interacting shell model, has proven to be powerful tool in understanding the structure of nuclei. The principal criticism of past applications of the shell model is the reliance on empirical tuning to interaction matrix elements. If an accurate description of nuclei far from the valley of stability, where little or no data is available, a more fundamental approach is needed. This starts with recent ab initio approaches with effective interactions in the no-core shell model (NCSM). Using effective-field theory for guidance, fully ab initio descriptions of nuclei up to {sup 16}O with QCD based NN, NNN, and NNNN interactions will be possible within the next five years. An important task is then to determine how to use these NCSM results to develop effective interactions to describe heavier nuclei without the need to resort to an empirical retuning with every model space. Thus, it is likely that more traditional CI applications utilizing direct diagonalization and more fundamental interactions will be applicable to nuclei with perhaps up to one hundred constituents. But, these direct diagonalization CI applications will always be computationally limited due to the rapid increase in the number of configurations with particle number. Very recently, the shifted-contour method has been applied to the Auxiliary-field Monte Carlo approach to the Shell Model (AFMCSM), and preliminary applications exhibit a remarkable taming of the notorious sign problem. If the mitigation of the sign problem holds true, the AFMCSM will offer a method to compute quantum correlations to mean-field applications for just about all nuclei; giving exact results for CI model spaces that can approach 10{sup 20-25}. In these lectures, I will discuss modern applications of CI to the nuclear many-body problem that have the potential to guide nuclear structure theory into the next decade.

  17. Update on nuclear structure effects in light muonic atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Hernandez, Oscar Javier; Ji, Chen; Bacca, Sonia; Barnea, Nir

    2016-01-01

    We present calculations of the nuclear structure corrections to the Lamb shift in light muonic atoms, using state-of-the-art nuclear potentials. We outline updated results on finite nucleon size contributions.

  18. Update on nuclear structure effects in light muonic atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Oscar Javier; Dinur, Nir Nevo; Ji, Chen; Bacca, Sonia; Barnea, Nir

    2016-12-01

    We present calculations of the nuclear structure corrections to the Lamb shift in light muonic atoms, using state-of-the-art nuclear potentials. We outline updated results on finite nucleon size contributions.

  19. Update on nuclear structure effects in light muonic atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez, Oscar Javier, E-mail: javierh@triumf.ca; Dinur, Nir Nevo; Ji, Chen; Bacca, Sonia [TRIUMF (Canada); Barnea, Nir [The Hebrew University, Racah Institute of Physics (Israel)

    2016-12-15

    We present calculations of the nuclear structure corrections to the Lamb shift in light muonic atoms, using state-of-the-art nuclear potentials. We outline updated results on finite nucleon size contributions.

  20. Relativity Damps OPEP in Nuclear Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Manoj K.

    1998-09-01

    Using a relativistic Dirac--Brueckner analysis the OPEP contribution to the ground state energy of nuclear matter is studied. In the study the pion is derivative-coupled. We find that the role of the tensor force in the saturation mechanism is substantially reduced compared to its dominant role in a usual nonrelativistic treatment. We show that the damping of derivative-coupled OPEP is actually due to the decrease of M*/M with increasing density. We point out that if derivative-coupled OPEP is the preferred form of nuclear effective Lagrangian nonrelativistic treatment of nuclear matter is in trouble. Lacking the notion of M* it cannot replicate the damping. We suggest an examination of the feasibility of using pseudoscalar coupled πN interaction before reaching a final conclusion about nonrelativistic treatment of nuclear matter.

  1. Relativity Damps OPEP in Nuclear Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, M K

    1998-01-01

    Using a relativistic Dirac-Brueckner analysis the OPEP contribution to the ground state energy of nuclear matter is studied. In the study the pion is derivative-coupled. We find that the role of the tensor force in the saturation mechanism is substantially reduced compared to its dominant role in a usual nonrelativistic treatment. We show that the damping of derivative-coupled OPEP is actually due to the decrease of $M^*/M$ with increasing density. We point out that if derivative-coupled OPEP is the preferred form of nuclear effective lagrangian nonrelativistic treatment of nuclear matter is in trouble. Lacking the notion of $M^*$ it cannot replicate the damping. We suggest an examination of the feasibility of using pseudoscalar coupled $\\pi$N interaction before reaching a final conclusion about nonrelativistic treatment of nuclear matter.

  2. Nuclear Structure Near the Drip Lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazarewicz, W.

    1998-08-10

    Experiments with beams of unstable nuclei will make it possible to look closely into many aspects of the nuclear many-body problem. Theoretically, exotic nuclei represent a formidable challenge for the nuclear many-body theories and their power to predict nuclear properties in nuclear terra incognita.

  3. Malaysian public perception towards nuclear power energy-related issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misnon, Fauzan Amin; Hu, Yeoh Siong; Rahman, Irman Abd.; Yasir, Muhamad Samudi

    2017-01-01

    Malaysia had considered nuclear energy as an option for future electricity generation during the 9th Malaysia Development Plan. Since 2009, Malaysia had implemented a number of important preparatory steps towards this goal, including the establishment of Nuclear Power Corporation of Malaysia (MNPC) as first Nuclear Energy Programme Implementing Organization (NEPIO) in Malaysia. In light of the establishment of MNPC, the National Nuclear Policy was formulated in 2010 and a new comprehensive nuclear law to replace the existing Atomic Energy Licensing Act (Act 304) is currently in the pipeline. Internationally, public acceptance is generally used to gauge the acceptance of nuclear energy by the public whenever a government decides to engage in nuclear energy. A public survey was conducted in between 14 March 2016 to 10 May 2016 focusing on the Malaysian public acceptance and perception towards the implementation of nuclear energy in Malaysia. The methodology of this research was aim on finding an overview of the general knowledge, public-relation recommendation, perception and acceptance of Malaysian towards the nuclear power development program. The combination of information gathered from this study can be interpreted as an indication of the complexity surrounding the development of nuclear energy and its relationship with the unique background of Malaysian demography. This paper will focus mainly on energy-related section in the survey in comparison with nuclear energy.

  4. Investigations of nuclear structure and nuclear reactions induced by complex projectiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarantites, D.G.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses research in the following areas: nuclear structure; fusion reactions near and below the barrier; incomplete fusion and fragmentation reactions; and instrumentation and analysis. (LSP).

  5. The TRIUMF nuclear structure program and TIGRESS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrett, P.E. [Department of Physics, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, N1G2W1 (Canada) and TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T2A3 (Canada)]. E-mail: pgarrett@physics.uoguelph.ca; Andreyev, A. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T2A3 (Canada); Simon Frasier University, Burnaby, BC, V5A1S6 (Canada); Austin, R.A.E. [Department of Astronomy and Physics, Saint Mary' s University, Halifax, NS, B3H 3C3 (Canada)] (and others)

    2007-08-15

    The isotope separator and accelerator (ISAC) facility located at the TRIUMF laboratory in Vancouver, Canada, is one of the world's most advanced isotope separator on-line-type radioactive ion beam facilities. An extensive {gamma}-ray spectroscopy programme at ISAC is centred around two major research facilities: (i) the 8{pi} {gamma}-ray spectrometer for {beta}-delayed {gamma}-ray spectroscopy experiments with the low-energy beams from ISAC-I, and (ii) the next generation TRIUMF-ISAC gamma-ray escape suppressed spectrometer (TIGRESS) for in-beam experiments with the accelerated radioactive-ion beams. An overview of these facilities and recent results from the diverse programme of nuclear structure and fundamental interaction studies they support is presented.

  6. Nuclear weapons and NATO-Russia relations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornwell, G.C.

    1998-12-01

    Despite the development of positive institutional arrangements such as Russian participation in the NATO-led peacekeeping force in Bosnia and the NATO- Russia Permanent Joint Council, the strategic culture of Russia has not changed in any fundamental sense. Russian strategic culture has not evolved in ways that would make Russian policies compatible with those of NATO countries in the necessary economic, social, technological, and military spheres. On the domestic side, Russia has yet to establish a stable democracy and the necessary legal, judicial, and regulatory institutions for a free-market economy. Russia evidently lacks the necessary cultural traditions, including concepts of accountability and transparency, to make these adaptations in the short-term. Owing in part to its institutional shortcomings, severe socioeconomic setbacks have afflicted Russia. Russian conventional military strength has been weakened, and a concomitant reliance by the Russians on nuclear weapons as their ultimate line of defense has increased. The breakdown in the infrastructure that supports Russian early warning and surveillance systems and nuclear weapons stewardship defense, coupled with a tendency towards has exacerbated Russian anxiety and distrust toward NATO. Russia`s reliance on nuclear weapons as the ultimate line of defense, coupled with a tendency toward suspicion and distrust toward NATO, could lead to dangerous strategic miscalculation and nuclear catastrophe.

  7. Two-level convolution formula for nuclear structure function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Boqiang

    1990-05-01

    A two-level convolution formula for the nuclear structure function is derived in considering the nucleus as a composite system of baryon-mesons which are also composite systems of quark-gluons again. The results show that the European Muon Colaboration effect can not be explained by the nuclear effects as nucleon Fermi motion and nuclear binding contributions.

  8. Nuclear Dependence in Weak Structure Functions and the Determination of Weak Mixing Angle

    CERN Document Server

    Athar, M Sajjad; Simo, I Ruiz; Vacas, M J Vicente

    2013-01-01

    We have studied nuclear medium effects in the weak structure functions $F^A_2(x)$ and $F^A_3(x)$ and in the extraction of weak mixing angle using Paschos Wolfenstein(PW) relation. We have modified the PW relation for nonisoscalar nuclear target. We have incorporated the medium effects like Pauli blocking, Fermi motion, nuclear binding energy, nucleon correlations, pion $\\&$ rho cloud contributions, and shadowing and antishadowing effects.

  9. Review of concrete biodeterioration in relation to nuclear waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turick, Charles E; Berry, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    Storage of radioactive waste in concrete structures is a means of containing wastes and related radionuclides generated from nuclear operations in many countries. Previous efforts related to microbial impacts on concrete structures that are used to contain radioactive waste showed that microbial activity can play a significant role in the process of concrete degradation and ultimately structural deterioration. This literature review examines the research in this field and is focused on specific parameters that are applicable to modeling and prediction of the fate of concrete structures used to store or dispose of radioactive waste. Rates of concrete biodegradation vary with the environmental conditions, illustrating a need to understand the bioavailability of key compounds involved in microbial activity. Specific parameters require pH and osmotic pressure to be within a certain range to allow for microbial growth as well as the availability and abundance of energy sources such as components involved in sulfur, iron and nitrogen oxidation. Carbon flow and availability are also factors to consider in predicting concrete biodegradation. The microbial contribution to degradation of the concrete structures containing radioactive waste is a constant possibility. The rate and degree of concrete biodegradation is dependent on numerous physical, chemical and biological parameters. Parameters to focus on for modeling activities and possible options for mitigation that would minimize concrete biodegradation are discussed and include key conditions that drive microbial activity on concrete surfaces.

  10. Relativity Damps OPEP in Nuclear Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Banerjee, Manoj K.

    1998-01-01

    Using a relativistic Dirac-Brueckner analysis the OPEP contribution to the ground state energy of nuclear matter is studied. In the study the pion is derivative-coupled. We find that the role of the tensor force in the saturation mechanism is substantially reduced compared to its dominant role in a usual nonrelativistic treatment. We show that the damping of derivative-coupled OPEP is actually due to the decrease of $M^*/M$ with increasing density. We point out that if derivative-coupled OPEP...

  11. Forging the link between nuclear reactions and nuclear structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahzoon, M H; Charity, R J; Dickhoff, W H; Dussan, H; Waldecker, S J

    2014-04-25

    A comprehensive description of all single-particle properties associated with the nucleus Ca40 is generated by employing a nonlocal dispersive optical potential capable of simultaneously reproducing all relevant data above and below the Fermi energy. The introduction of nonlocality in the absorptive potentials yields equivalent elastic differential cross sections as compared to local versions but changes the absorption profile as a function of angular momentum suggesting important consequences for the analysis of nuclear reactions. Below the Fermi energy, nonlocality is essential to allow for an accurate representation of particle number and the nuclear charge density. Spectral properties implied by (e, e'p) and (p, 2p) reactions are correctly incorporated, including the energy distribution of about 10% high-momentum nucleons, as experimentally determined by data from Jefferson Lab. These high-momentum nucleons provide a substantial contribution to the energy of the ground state, indicating a residual attractive contribution from higher-body interactions for Ca40 of about 0.64  MeV/A.

  12. Nuclearity Related Properties in Operator Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kavruk, Ali Samil

    2011-01-01

    Some recent research on the tensor products of operator systems and ensuing nuclearity properties in this setting raised many stability problems. In this paper we examine the preservation of these nuclearity properties including exactness, local liftibility and double commutant expectation property under basic algebraic operations such as quotient, duality, coproducts and tensor products. We show that, in the ?finite dimensional case, exactness and lifting property are dual pairs, that is, an operator system $S$ is exact if and only if the dual operator system $S^d$ has the lifting property. Moreover, the lifting property is preserved under quotients by null subspaces. Again in the finite dimensional case we prove that every operator system has k-lifting property in the sense that whenever $f:S -> A/I$ is a ucp map, where A is a C*-algebra and I is an ideal, then $f$ possess a unital k-positive lift on A, for every k. This property provides a novel proof of a classical result of Smith and Ward on the preserva...

  13. Nuclear Structure References (NSR) file. [Mostly information for input

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewbank, W.B.

    1978-08-01

    The use of the Nuclear Structure References file by the Nuclear Data Project at ORNL is described. Much of the report concerns format information of interest only to those preparing input to the system or otherwise needing detailed knowledge of its internal structure. 17 figures. (RWR)

  14. Nuclear Structure and Nuclear Astrophysics Studies with Fast Heavy-Ion Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motobayashi, Tohru

    Collaboration between France and Japan on studies with fast RI (radioactive isotope) beams and related technical developments started in 1980s, when the GANIL accelerators and RIKEN cyclotron complex started operation and RI beam production technique was developed. Several examples of collaboration on nuclear physics and nuclear astrophysics experiments including related technical development are discussed.

  15. Relativistic density functional for nuclear structure

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book aims to provide a detailed introduction to the state-of-the-art covariant density functional theory, which follows the Lorentz invariance from the very beginning and is able to describe nuclear many-body quantum systems microscopically and self-consistently. Covariant density functional theory was introduced in nuclear physics in the 1970s and has since been developed and used to describe the diversity of nuclear properties and phenomena with great success. In order to provide an advanced and updated textbook of covariant density functional theory for graduate students and nuclear physics researchers, this book summarizes the enormous amount of material that has accumulated in the field of covariant density functional theory over the last few decades as well as the latest developments in this area. Moreover, the book contains enough details for readers to follow the formalism and theoretical results, and provides exhaustive references to explore the research literature.

  16. High resolution inelastic electron scattering and nuclear structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blok, H. B.; Heisenberg, J. H.

    Thanks to the improved characteristics of the experimental set-up electron scattering has become an excellent tool to study the structure of the nucleus. After describing globally how the nuclear structure enters in the formalism of (e,e') reactions and how the high experimental resolution is obtained, several examples of the use of electron scattering for the study of specific nuclear structure questions are discussed.

  17. Three-dimensional structure of low-density nuclear matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamoto, Minoru, E-mail: okamoto@nucl.ph.tsukuba.ac.jp [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Science, University of Tsukuba, Tennoudai 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Shirakata Shirane 2-4, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Maruyama, Toshiki, E-mail: maruyama.toshiki@jaea.go.jp [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Shirakata Shirane 2-4, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Graduate School of Pure and Applied Science, University of Tsukuba, Tennoudai 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Yabana, Kazuhiro, E-mail: yabana@nucl.ph.tsukuba.ac.jp [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Science, University of Tsukuba, Tennoudai 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Center of Computational Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tennoudai 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Tatsumi, Toshitaka, E-mail: tatsumi@ruby.scphys.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2012-07-09

    We numerically explore the pasta structures and properties of low-density nuclear matter without any assumption on the geometry. We observe conventional pasta structures, while a mixture of the pasta structures appears as a metastable state at some transient densities. We also discuss the lattice structure of droplets.

  18. Three dimensional structure of low-density nuclear matter

    CERN Document Server

    Okamoto, Minoru; Yabana, Kazuhiro; Tatsumi, Toshitaka

    2011-01-01

    We numerically explore the pasta structures and properties of low-density nuclear matter without any assumption on the geometry. We observe conventional pasta structures, while a mixture of the pasta structures appears as a metastable state at some transient densities. We also discuss the lattice structure of droplets.

  19. Regulation of eukaryotic DNA replication and nuclear structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WUJIARUI

    1999-01-01

    In eukaryote,nuclear structure is a key component for the functions of eukaryotic cells.More and more evidences show that the nuclear structure plays important role in regulating DNA replication.The nuclear structure provides a physical barrier for the replication licensing,participates in the decision where DNA replication initiates,and organizes replication proteins as replication factory for DNA replication.Through these works,new concepts on the regulation of DNA replication have emerged,which will be discussed in this minireview.

  20. Extracting nucleon spin structure functions from nuclear data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, A.W.; Afnan, I.R.; Bissey, F. [CSSM, University of Adelaide (Australia)

    2000-05-01

    The determination of the spin-dependent structure functions of the nucleons from nuclear data requires a knowledge of the changes induced by the nuclear medium. This is especially important for the neutron because there are no free neutron targets. We present the results of a study of the accuracy with which one can extract the neutron spin structure function from data on polarized {sup 3}He. This study is based on a three-body calculation of the wave function of the A=3 system, which is then used to calculate the nuclear structure functions including binding and off-shell effects. (author)

  1. Nuclear structure far off stability -Implications for nuclear astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grawe, H.; Gorska, M. [GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); Blazhev, A. [GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); University of Sofia, Sofia (Bulgaria); Grzywacz, R. [University of Tennessee, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Knoxville, TN (United States); Mach, H. [Uppsala University, ISV, Nykoeping (Sweden); Mukha, I. [GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); RRC Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Leuven (Belgium)

    2006-03-15

    The single-particle structure and shell gap of {sup 100}Sn as inferred from previous in-beam {gamma}-ray spectroscopy has been confirmed in recent studies of seniority and spin-gap isomers by {gamma}{gamma}, {beta}{gamma}, {beta}p{gamma}, p{gamma} and 2p{gamma} spectroscopy. The results for {sup 94,} {sup 95}Ag, {sup 98}Cd and its N=50 isotones {sup 96}Pd and {sup 94}Ru stress the importance of large-scale shell model calculations employing realistic interactions for the isomerism, np-nh excitations, seniority mixing and E2 polarisation of the {sup 100}Sn core. The strong monopole interaction of the {delta}l=0,1 spin/isospin-flip partners {pi}g{sub 9/2}-{nu}g{sub 7/2} along the N=50 isotones and the {pi}f{sub 5/2}- {nu}g{sub 9/2} pair of nucleons along the Z=28 Ni isotopes are decisive for the evolution of the shell structure towards {sup 100}Sn and {sup 78}Ni. It can be traced back to the tensor force in the effective nucleon-nucleon interaction and provides a straightforward explanation for new shells in neutron-rich light nuclei, implying qualitative predictions for new N=32,34 subshells in Ca isotopes, persistence of the {sup 78}Ni proton and neutron shell gaps and non-equivalence of the g{sub 9/2} valence mirror Ni isotopes and N=50 isotones. This is corroborated by recent experimental data on {sup 56,58}Cr and {sup 70-76}Ni. The implication of monopole driven shell evolution for apparent spin-orbit splitting towards N>>Z and structure along the astrophysical r-path between N=50 and N=82 is discussed. (orig.)

  2. Nuclear energy density optimization: Shell structure

    CERN Document Server

    Kortelainen, M; Nazarewicz, W; Olsen, E; Reinhard, P -G; Sarich, J; Schunck, N; Wild, S M; Davesne, D; Erler, J; Pastore, A

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear density functional theory is the only microscopical theory that can be applied throughout the entire nuclear landscape. Its key ingredient is the energy density functional. In this work, we propose a new parameterization UNEDF2 of the local Skyrme energy density functional. The functional optimization is carried out using the POUNDerS optimization algorithm within the framework of the Skyrme Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov theory. Compared to the previous parameterization UNEDF1, restrictions on the tensor term of the energy density have been lifted, yielding the most general form of the Skyrme energy density functional up to second order in derivatives of the one-body local density. In order to impose constraints on all the parameters of the functional, selected data on single-particle splittings in spherical doubly-magic nuclei have been included into the experimental dataset. The agreement with both bulk and spectroscopic nuclear properties achieved by the resulting UNEDF2 parameterization is comparable wi...

  3. Nuclear effects in the deuteron structure function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epele, L.N.; Fanchiotti, H.; Garcia Canal, C.A.; Sassot, R. (Lab. de Fisica Teorica, Dept. de Fisica, Univ. Nacional de La Plata (Argentina))

    1992-08-06

    An analysis of nuclear effects in the deuteron quark distributions is carried out in connection with the Gottfried sum rule (GSR), the Drell-Yan proton-neutron asymmetry and the Bjorken sum rule (BSR). It is shown that the small amount of nuclear effects necessary to saturate the GSR experimental data modifies the Drell-Yan asymmetry in an entirely different way as an asymmetric sea does. These effects are of little consequence in the convergence of the BSR to the expected value. (orig.).

  4. Correlations in nuclear energy recurrence relations

    CERN Document Server

    Buck, B; Perez, S M

    2013-01-01

    The excitation energies of states belonging to the ground state bands of heavy even-even nuclei are analysed using recurrence relations. Excellent agreement with experimental data at the 10 keV level is obtained by taking into account strong correlations which emerge in the analysis. This implies that the excitation energies can be written as a polynomial of maximum degree four in the angular momentum.

  5. Investigations of nuclear structure and nuclear reactions induced by complex projectiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarantites, D.G.

    1991-01-01

    The research program of our group touches five areas of nuclear physics: (1) Nuclear structure studies at high spin; (2) Studies at the interface between structure and reactions; (3) Production and study of hot nuclei; (4) Incomplete fusion and fragmentation reactions; and (5) Development and use of novel techniques and instrumentation in the above areas of research. The papers from these areas are discussed in this report.

  6. Direct Reactions for Nuclear Structure and Nuclear Astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Katherine Louise [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Experimental Low-Energy Nuclear Physics Group

    2014-12-18

    Direct reactions are powerful probes for studying the atomic nucleus. Modern direct reaction studies are illuminating both the fundamental nature of the nucleus and its role in nucleosynthetic processes occurring in the cosmos. This report covers experiments using knockout reactions on neutron-deficient fragmentation beams, transfer reactions on fission fragment beams, and theoretical sensitivity studies relating to the astrophysical r-process. Results from experiments on 108,106Sn at the NSCL, and on 131Sn at HRIBF are presented as well as the results from the nucleosynthesis study.

  7. Relations among several nuclear and electronic density functional reactivity indexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrent-Sucarrat, Miquel; Luis, Josep M.; Duran, Miquel; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro; Solà, Miquel

    2003-11-01

    An expansion of the energy functional in terms of the total number of electrons and the normal coordinates within the canonical ensemble is presented. A comparison of this expansion with the expansion of the energy in terms of the total number of electrons and the external potential leads to new relations among common density functional reactivity descriptors. The formulas obtained provide explicit links between important quantities related to the chemical reactivity of a system. In particular, the relation between the nuclear and the electronic Fukui functions is recovered. The connection between the derivatives of the electronic energy and the nuclear repulsion energy with respect to the external potential offers a proof for the "Quantum Chemical le Chatelier Principle." Finally, the nuclear linear response function is defined and the relation of this function with the electronic linear response function is given.

  8. Structural components of the nuclear body in nuclei of Allium cepa cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear bodies have long been noted in interphase nuclei of plant cells,but their structural component,origin and function are still unclear by now.The present work showed in onion cells the nuclear bodies appeared as a spherical structure about 0.3 to 0.8 μm in diameter.They possibly were formed in nucleolus and subsequently released,and entered into nucleoplasm.Observation through cytochemical staining method at the ultrastructural level confirmed that nuclear bodies consisted of ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) and silver-stainable proteins.Immunocytochemical results revealed that nuclear bodies contained no DNA and ribosomal gene transcription factor (UBF).Based on these data,we suggested that nuclear bodies are not related to the ribosome or other gene transcription activities,instead they may act as subnuclear structures for RNPs transport from nucleolus to cytoplasm,and may also be involved in splicing of pre-mRNAs.

  9. Structural plasticity of the nuclear envelope and the endoplasmic reticulum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheval E. V.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The nuclear envelope is a double membrane structure, continuous with endoplasmic reticulum, and the morphological organization of both these structures is quite conservative. However, nuclear envelope and endoplasmic reticulum demonstrate distinct structural plasticity, i. e., based on common organization, cells may form various non-canonical membrane structures that are observed only in specialized types of cells or appear in different pathologies. In this review, we will discuss the mechanisms of the biogenesis of such non-canonical structures, and the possible role of this plasticity in the development of pathological processes.

  10. Peer Relations of Adolescents from Nuclear and Separated Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noack, Peter; Krettek, Christine; Walper, Sabine

    2001-01-01

    Examined peer relations of young people from nuclear families, step families, and single-parent families. Findings suggest peer relations were affected by parental separation only to a minor extent as compared to, e.g. gender- or age-specific effects. A central aspect of friendship quality, however, namely admiration by friends, clearly suffered…

  11. Generalized Nuclear Data: A New Structure (with Supporting Infrastructure) for Handling Nuclear Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattoon, C.M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore CA (United States); Beck, B.R.; Patel, N.R.; Summers, N.C.; Hedstrom, G.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore CA (United States); Brown, D.A. [National Nuclear Data Center, Upton NY (United States)

    2012-12-15

    The Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENDF) format was designed in the 1960s to accommodate neutron reaction data to support nuclear engineering applications in power, national security and criticality safety. Over the years, the scope of the format has been extended to handle many other kinds of data including charged particle, decay, atomic, photo-nuclear and thermal neutron scattering. Although ENDF has wide acceptance and support for many data types, its limited support for correlated particle emission, limited numeric precision, and general lack of extensibility mean that the nuclear data community cannot take advantage of many emerging opportunities. More generally, the ENDF format provides an unfriendly environment that makes it difficult for new data evaluators and users to create and access nuclear data. The Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) has begun the design of a new Generalized Nuclear Data (or 'GND') structure, meant to replace older formats with a hierarchy that mirrors the underlying physics, and is aligned with modern coding and database practices. In support of this new structure, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has updated its nuclear data/reactions management package Fudge to handle GND structured nuclear data. Fudge provides tools for converting both the latest ENDF format (ENDF-6) and the LLNL Evaluated Nuclear Data Library (ENDL) format to and from GND, as well as for visualizing, modifying and processing (i.e., converting evaluated nuclear data into a form more suitable to transport codes) GND structured nuclear data. GND defines the structure needed for storing nuclear data evaluations and the type of data that needs to be stored. But unlike ENDF and ENDL, GND does not define how the data are to be stored in a file. Currently, Fudge writes the structured GND data to a file using the eXtensible Markup Language (XML), as it is ASCII based and can be viewed with any text editor. XML is a meta-language, meaning that it

  12. Generalized Nuclear Data: A New Structure (with Supporting Infrastructure) for Handling Nuclear Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattoon, C. M.; Beck, B. R.; Patel, N. R.; Summers, N. C.; Hedstrom, G. W.; Brown, D. A.

    2012-12-01

    The Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENDF) format was designed in the 1960s to accommodate neutron reaction data to support nuclear engineering applications in power, national security and criticality safety. Over the years, the scope of the format has been extended to handle many other kinds of data including charged particle, decay, atomic, photo-nuclear and thermal neutron scattering. Although ENDF has wide acceptance and support for many data types, its limited support for correlated particle emission, limited numeric precision, and general lack of extensibility mean that the nuclear data community cannot take advantage of many emerging opportunities. More generally, the ENDF format provides an unfriendly environment that makes it difficult for new data evaluators and users to create and access nuclear data. The Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) has begun the design of a new Generalized Nuclear Data (or 'GND') structure, meant to replace older formats with a hierarchy that mirrors the underlying physics, and is aligned with modern coding and database practices. In support of this new structure, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has updated its nuclear data/reactions management package Fudge to handle GND structured nuclear data. Fudge provides tools for converting both the latest ENDF format (ENDF-6) and the LLNL Evaluated Nuclear Data Library (ENDL) format to and from GND, as well as for visualizing, modifying and processing (i.e., converting evaluated nuclear data into a form more suitable to transport codes) GND structured nuclear data. GND defines the structure needed for storing nuclear data evaluations and the type of data that needs to be stored. But unlike ENDF and ENDL, GND does not define how the data are to be stored in a file. Currently, Fudge writes the structured GND data to a file using the eXtensible Markup Language (XML), as it is ASCII based and can be viewed with any text editor. XML is a meta-language, meaning that it

  13. Bremsstrahlung photons - an ideal tool in nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babilon, Mario [Institut fur Kernphysik, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows. Bremsstrahlung photons, produced by decelerating electrons, are a very useful probe to investigate current topics in nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics. The photon scattering facility of the superconducting electron accelerator S-DALINAC at the Darmstadt University of Technology allows for high resolution Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) experiments up to 10 MeV. One current topic of interest in nuclear structure is the investigation of Pygmy Dipole Resonances (PDR), which are located near the particle threshold. Recently, experiments have been carried out on Ca isotopes [1] as well as on several N=82 nuclei [2] in order to understand the structure of the PDR. Moreover, important astrophysical questions can be investigated using real photons (g,n) reaction rates, which play a major role in nucleosynthesis, can be measured at the S-DALINAC by simulating a quasi-stellar photon bath with variable temperature [3,4].

  14. Energy-range relations for hadrons in nuclear matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strugalski, Z.

    1985-01-01

    Range-energy relations for hadrons in nuclear matter exist similarly to the range-energy relations for charged particles in materials. When hadrons of GeV kinetic energies collide with atomic nuclei massive enough, events occur in which incident hadron is stopped completely inside the target nucleus without causing particle production - without pion production in particular. The stoppings are always accompanied by intensive emission of nucleons with kinetic energy from about 20 up to about 400 MeV. It was shown experimentally that the mean number of the emitted nucleons is a measure of the mean path in nuclear matter in nucleons on which the incident hadrons are stopped.

  15. The nuclear structure and low-energy reactions (NSLER) collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, D. J.; NSLER Collaboration

    2006-09-01

    The long-term vision of the Nuclear Structure and Low-Energy Reactions (NSLER) collaboration is to arrive at a comprehensive and unified description of nuclei and their reactions that is grounded in the interactions between the constituent nucleons. For this purpose, we will develop a universal energy density functional for nuclei and replace current phenomenological models of nuclear structure and reactions with a well-founded microscopic theory that will deliver maximum predictive power with minimal uncertainties that are well quantified. Nuclear structure and reactions play an essential role in the science to be investigated at rare isotope facilities, and in nuclear physics applications to the Science-Based Stockpile Stewardship Program, next-generation reactors, and threat reduction. We anticipate an expansion of the computational techniques and methods we currently employ, and developments of new treatments, to take advantage of petascale architectures and demonstrate the capability of the leadership class machines to deliver new science heretofore impossible.

  16. The nuclear matrix: a structural milieu for genomic function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezney, R; Mortillaro, M J; Ma, H; Wei, X; Samarabandu, J

    1995-01-01

    While significant progress has been made in elucidating molecular properties of specific genes and their regulation, our understanding of how the whole genome is coordinated has lagged behind. To understand how the genome functions as a coordinated whole, we must understand how the nucleus is put together and functions as a whole. An important step in that direction occurred with the isolation and characterization of the nuclear matrix. Aside from the plethora of functional properties associated with these isolated nuclear structures, they have enabled the first direct examination and molecular cloning of specific nuclear matrix proteins. The isolated nuclear matrix can be used for providing an in vitro model for understanding nuclear matrix organization in whole cells. Recent development of high-resolution and three-dimensional approaches for visualizing domains of genomic organization and function in situ has provided corroborative evidence for the nuclear matrix as the site of organization for replication, transcription, and post-transcriptional processing. As more is learned about these in situ functional sites, appropriate experiments could be designed to test molecular mechanisms with the in vitro nuclear matrix systems. This is illustrated in this chapter by the studies of nuclear matrix-associated DNA replication which have evolved from biochemical studies of in vitro nuclear matrix systems toward three-dimensional computer image analysis of replication sites for individual genes.

  17. Demonstrating Structural Adequacy of Nuclear Power Plant Containment Structures for Beyond Design-Basis Pressure Loadings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braverman, J.I.; Morante, R.

    2010-07-18

    ABSTRACT Demonstrating the structural integrity of U.S. nuclear power plant (NPP) containment structures, for beyond design-basis internal pressure loadings, is necessary to satisfy Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requirements and performance goals. This paper discusses methods for demonstrating the structural adequacy of the containment for beyond design-basis pressure loadings. Three distinct evaluations are addressed: (1) estimating the ultimate pressure capacity of the containment structure (10 CFR 50 and US NRC Standard Review Plan, Section 3.8) ; (2) demonstrating the structural adequacy of the containment subjected to pressure loadings associated with combustible gas generation (10 CFR 52 and 10 CFR 50); and (3) demonstrating the containment structural integrity for severe accidents (10 CFR 52 as well as SECY 90-016, SECY 93-087, and related NRC staff requirements memoranda (SRMs)). The paper describes the technical basis for specific aspects of the methods presented. It also presents examples of past issues identified in licensing activities related to these evaluations.

  18. A New Light Weight Structural Material for Nuclear Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabiei, Afsaneh [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    2016-01-14

    Radiation shielding materials are commonly used in nuclear facilities to attenuate the background ionization radiations to a minimum level for creating a safer workplace, meeting regulatory requirements and maintaining high quality performance. The conventional radiation shielding materials have a number of drawbacks: heavy concrete contains a high amount of elements that are not desirable for an effective shielding such as oxygen, silicon, and calcium; a well known limitation of lead is its low machinability and toxicity, which is causing a major environmental concern. Therefore, an effective and environmentally friendly shielding material with increased attenuation and low mass density is desirable. Close-cell composite metal foams (CMFs) and open-cell Al foam with fillers are light-weight candidate materials that we have studied in this project. Close-cell CMFs possess several suitable properties that are unattainable by conventional radiation shielding materials such as low density and high strength for structural applications, high surface area to volume ratio for excellent thermal isolation with an extraordinary energy absorption capability. Open-cell foam is made up of a network of interconnected solid struts, which allows gas or fluid media to pass through it. This unique structure provided a further motive to investigate its application as radiation shields by infiltrating original empty pores with high hydrogen or boron compounds, which are well known for their excellent neutron shielding capability. The resulting open-cell foam with fillers will not only exhibit light weight and high specific surface area, but also possess excellent radiation shielding capability and good processability. In this study, all the foams were investigated for their radiation shielding efficiency in terms of X-ray, gamma ray and neutron. X-ray transmission measurements were carried out on a high-resolution microcomputed tomography (microCT) system. Gamma-emitting sources: 3.0m

  19. Review of Concrete Biodeterioration in Relation to Buried Nuclear Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turick, C; Berry, C.

    2012-10-15

    Long-term storage of low level radioactive material in below ground concrete disposal units (DUs) (Saltstone Disposal Facility) is a means of depositing wastes generated from nuclear operations of the U.S. Department of Energy. Based on the currently modeled degradation mechanisms, possible microbial induced effects on the structural integrity of buried low level wastes must be addressed. Previous international efforts related to microbial impacts on concrete structures that house low level radioactive waste showed that microbial activity can play a significant role in the process of concrete degradation and ultimately structural deterioration. This literature review examines the recent research in this field and is focused on specific parameters that are applicable to modeling and prediction of the fate of concrete vaults housing stored wastes and the wastes themselves. Rates of concrete biodegradation vary with the environmental conditions, illustrating a need to understand the bioavailability of key compounds involved in microbial activity. Specific parameters require pH and osmotic pressure to be within a certain range to allow for microbial growth as well as the availability and abundance of energy sources like components involved in sulfur, iron and nitrogen oxidation. Carbon flow and availability are also factors to consider in predicting concrete biodegradation. The results of this review suggest that microbial activity in Saltstone, (grouted low level radioactive waste) is unlikely due to very high pH and osmotic pressure. Biodegradation of the concrete vaults housing the radioactive waste however, is a possibility. The rate and degree of concrete biodegradation is dependent on numerous physical, chemical and biological parameters. Results from this review point to parameters to focus on for modeling activities and also, possible options for mitigation that would minimize concrete biodegradation. In addition, key chemical components that drive microbial

  20. Global nuclear structure aspects of tensor interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Satula, W; Dobaczewski, J; Olbratowski, P; Rafalski, M; Werner, T R; Wyss, R A

    2008-01-01

    A direct fit of the isoscalar spin-orbit and both isoscalar and isovector tensor coupling constants to the f5/2-f7/2 SO splittings in 40Ca, 56Ni, and 48Ca requires: (i) a significant reduction of the standard isoscalar spin-orbit strength and (ii) strong attractive tensor coupling constants. The aim of this paper is to address the consequences of these strong attractive tensor and weak spin-orbit fields on total binding energies, two-neutron separation energies and nuclear deformability.

  1. Survey on the consciousness structure toward nuclear power generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, M.; Yoshida, T. (Nomura Research Institute, Kamakura, Kanagawa (Japan))

    1981-05-01

    A survey on the popular consciousness toward nuclear power generation was carried out by direct means of questionnaire to 1600 persons, ages from 20 to 69, in power demand areas (Tokyo and Osaka) and power supply areas (sites of nuclear power generation) from early February to early March, 1980, and the recovery rate was 74.4% (1190 persons). The results are described by way of their explanation. The purpose is to clarify the structure of popular consciousness toward nuclear energy, in particular nuclear power generation, and the nature of its acceptance. That is, it was surveyed how general people in the power supply and the power demand areas are taking nuclear power generation concerning its need and safety, and further how the attitudes are constituted and vary.

  2. Structuring Cooperative Nuclear RIsk Reduction Initiatives with China.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, Larry [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Reinhardt, Jason Christian [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Hecker, Siegfried [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2017-03-01

    The Stanford Center for International Security and Cooperation engaged several Chinese nuclear organizations in cooperative research that focused on responses to radiological and nuclear terrorism. The objective was to identify joint research initiatives to reduce the global dangers of such threats and to pursue initial technical collaborations in several high priority areas. Initiatives were identified in three primary research areas: 1) detection and interdiction of smuggled nuclear materials; 2) nuclear forensics; and 3) radiological (“dirty bomb”) threats and countermeasures. Initial work emphasized the application of systems and risk analysis tools, which proved effective in structuring the collaborations. The extensive engagements between national security nuclear experts in China and the U.S. during the research strengthened professional relationships between these important communities.

  3. Probing nuclear bubble structure via neutron star asteroseismology

    CERN Document Server

    Sotani, Hajime; Oyamatsu, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    We consider torsional oscillations that are trapped in a layer of spherical-hole (bubble) nuclear structure, which is expected to occur in the deepest region of the inner crust of a neutron star. Because this layer intervenes between the phase of slab nuclei and the outer core of uniform nuclear matter, torsional oscillations in the bubble phase can be excited separately from usual crustal torsional oscillations. We find from eigenmode analyses for various models of the equation of state of uniform nuclear matter that the fundamental frequencies of such oscillations are almost independent of the incompressibility of symmetric nuclear matter, but strongly depend on the slope parameter of the nuclear symmetry energy $L$. Although the frequencies are also sensitive to the entrainment effect, i.e., what portion of nucleons outside bubbles contribute to the oscillations, by having such a portion fixed, we can successfully fit the calculated fundamental frequencies of torsional oscillations in the bubble phase insi...

  4. Extrapolations of nuclear binding energies from new linear mass relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove, D.; Jensen, A. S.; Riisager, K.

    2013-01-01

    We present a method to extrapolate nuclear binding energies from known values for neighboring nuclei. We select four specific mass relations constructed to eliminate smooth variation of the binding energy as function nucleon numbers. The fast odd-even variations are avoided by comparing nuclei...

  5. Ab Initio Nuclear Structure and Reaction Calculations for Rare Isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Draayer, Jerry P. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

    2014-09-28

    We have developed a novel ab initio symmetry-adapted no-core shell model (SA-NCSM), which has opened the intermediate-mass region for ab initio investigations, thereby providing an opportunity for first-principle symmetry-guided applications to nuclear structure and reactions for nuclear isotopes from the lightest p-shell systems to intermediate-mass nuclei. This includes short-lived proton-rich nuclei on the path of X-ray burst nucleosynthesis and rare neutron-rich isotopes to be produced by the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB). We have provided ab initio descriptions of high accuracy for low-lying (including collectivity-driven) states of isotopes of Li, He, Be, C, O, Ne, Mg, Al, and Si, and studied related strong- and weak-interaction driven reactions that are important, in astrophysics, for further understanding stellar evolution, X-ray bursts and triggering of s, p, and rp processes, and in applied physics, for electron and neutrino-nucleus scattering experiments as well as for fusion ignition at the National Ignition Facility (NIF).

  6. QCD and a new paradigm for nuclear structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, A. W.

    2016-09-01

    We review the reasons why one might choose to seriously re-examine the traditional approach to nuclear theory where nucleons are treated as immutable. This examination leads us to argue that the modification of the structure of the nucleon when immersed in a nuclear medium is fundamental to how atomic nuclei are built. Consistent with this approach we suggest key experiments which should tell us unambiguously whether there is such a change in the structure of a bound nucleon. We also briefly report on extremely promising recent calculations of the structure of nuclei across the periodic table based upon this idea.

  7. Nuclear medium modification of the F2 structure function

    CERN Document Server

    Athar, M Sajjad; Vacas, M J Vicente

    2009-01-01

    We study the nuclear effects in the electromagnetic structure function $F_{2}(x, Q^2)$ in nuclei in the deep inelastic lepton nucleus scattering process by taking into account Fermi motion, binding, pion and rho meson cloud contributions. Calculations have been done in a local density approximation using relativistic nuclear spectral functions which include nucleon correlations for nuclear matter. The ratios $R_{F2}^A(x,Q^2)=\\frac{2F_2^A(x,Q^2)}{AF_{2}^{Deut}(x,Q^2)}$ are obtained and compared with the recent JLAB results for light nuclei that show a non trivial A dependence.

  8. The high burn-up structure in nuclear fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo V. Rondinella

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available During its operating life in the core of a nuclear reactor nuclear fuel is subjected to significant restructuring processes determined by neutron irradiation directly through nuclear reactions and indirectly through the thermo-mechanical conditions established as a consequence of such reactions. In today's light water reactors, starting after ∼4 years of operation the cylindrical UO2 fuel pellet undergoes a transformation that affects its outermost radial region. The discovery of a newly forming structure necessitated the answering of important questions concerning the safety of extended fuel operation and still today poses the fascinating scientific challenge of fully understanding the microstructural mechanisms responsible for its formation.

  9. Nucleoporins as components of the nuclear pore complex core structure and Tpr as the architectural element of the nuclear basket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krull, Sandra; Thyberg, Johan; Björkroth, Birgitta; Rackwitz, Hans-Richard; Cordes, Volker C

    2004-09-01

    The vertebrate nuclear pore complex (NPC) is a macromolecular assembly of protein subcomplexes forming a structure of eightfold radial symmetry. The NPC core consists of globular subunits sandwiched between two coaxial ring-like structures of which the ring facing the nuclear interior is capped by a fibrous structure called the nuclear basket. By postembedding immunoelectron microscopy, we have mapped the positions of several human NPC proteins relative to the NPC core and its associated basket, including Nup93, Nup96, Nup98, Nup107, Nup153, Nup205, and the coiled coil-dominated 267-kDa protein Tpr. To further assess their contributions to NPC and basket architecture, the genes encoding Nup93, Nup96, Nup107, and Nup205 were posttranscriptionally silenced by RNA interference (RNAi) in HeLa cells, complementing recent RNAi experiments on Nup153 and Tpr. We show that Nup96 and Nup107 are core elements of the NPC proper that are essential for NPC assembly and docking of Nup153 and Tpr to the NPC. Nup93 and Nup205 are other NPC core elements that are important for long-term maintenance of NPCs but initially dispensable for the anchoring of Nup153 and Tpr. Immunogold-labeling for Nup98 also results in preferential labeling of NPC core regions, whereas Nup153 is shown to bind via its amino-terminal domain to the nuclear coaxial ring linking the NPC core structures and Tpr. The position of Tpr in turn is shown to coincide with that of the nuclear basket, with different Tpr protein domains corresponding to distinct basket segments. We propose a model in which Tpr constitutes the central architectural element that forms the scaffold of the nuclear basket.

  10. PREFACE: Structure of Exotic Nuclei and Nuclear Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honma, Michio; Otsuka, Takaharu; Aoi, Nori

    2006-11-01

    The International Symposium on `Structure of Exotic Nuclei and Nuclear Forces' was held at The Koshiba Hall, University of Tokyo, on 9 - 12 March 2006. This symposium was organized as an activity of the Grant-in-Aid for the specially promoted area `Monte Carlo Shell Model' from the Ministry of Education, Science, Sports and Culture (MEXT) of Japan. The symposium was sponsored by the Center for Nuclear Study (CNS) and by RIKEN. The purpose of the symposium was to discuss theoretical and experimental developments in the study of the structure of exotic nuclei and its relationship with nuclear forces. There has been much progress recently in our understanding of what the structure of exotic nuclei is and how it can be linked to nuclear forces, with emerging intriguing perspectives. The following subjects were covered in this symposium Present status and future of the shell model Effective interaction theories Experimental results and perspectives Few-body methods including ab initio calculations Advancements of mean-fieeld models Transition between shell and cluster structure Nuclear astrophysics and nuclear structure Particle physics and the shell model Emphasis was placed on the interplay between many-body structures and nuclear forces, and on the experimental clarification of these topics. Around 80 participants attended the symposium and we enjoyed 34 excellent and lively invited talks and 26 oral presentations. The organizing committee consisted of B A Brown (MSU), S Fujii (CNS), M Honma (Aizu), T Kajino (NAO), T Mizusaki (Senshu), T Motobayashi (RIKEN), K Muto (TIT), T Otsuka (Chair, Tokyo/CNS/RIKEN), P Ring (TMU), N Shimizu (Scientific Secretary, Tokyo), S Shimoura (CNS), Y Utsuno (Scientific Secretary, JAEA). Finally, we would like to thank all the speakers and the participants as well as the other organizers for their contributions which made the symposium so successful.

  11. Structural integrity of materials in nuclear service: a bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heddleson, F.A.

    1977-06-07

    This report contains 679 abstracts from the Nuclear Safety Information Center (NSIC) computer file dated 1973 through 1976 covering material properties with respect to structural integrity. All materials important to the nuclear industry (except concrete) are covered for mechanical properties, chemical properties, corrosion, fracture or failure, radiation damage, creep, cracking, and swelling. Keyword, author, and permuted-title indexes are included for the convenience of the user.

  12. From nuclear structure to neutron stars

    CERN Document Server

    Gandolfi, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Recent progress in quantum Monte Carlo with modern nucleon-nucleon interactions have enabled the successful description of properties of light nuclei and neutron-rich matter. As a demonstration, we show that the agreement between theoretical calculations of the charge form factor of 12C and the experimental data is excellent. Applying similar methods to isospin-asymmetric systems allows one to describe neutrons confined in an external potential and homogeneous neutron-rich matter. Of particular interest is the nuclear symmetry energy, the energy cost of creating an isospin asymmetry. Combining these advances with recent observations of neutron star masses and radii gives insight into the equation of state of neutron-rich matter near and above the saturation density. In particular, neutron star radius measurements constrain the derivative of the symmetry energy.

  13. Structural Ceramic Composites for Nuclear Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William Windes; P.A. Lessing; Y. Katoh; L. L. Snead; E. Lara-Curzio; J. Klett; C. Henager, Jr.; R. J. Shinavski

    2005-08-01

    A research program has been established to investigate fiber reinforced ceramic composites to be used as control rod components within a Very High Temperature Reactor. Two candidate systems have been identified, carbon fiber reinforced carbon (Cf/C) and silicon carbide fiber reinforced silicon carbide (SiCf/SiC) composites. Initial irradiation stability studies to determine the maximum dose for each composite type have been initiated within the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Test samples exposed to 10 dpa irradiation dose have been completed with future samples to dose levels of 20 and 30 dpa scheduled for completion in following years. Mechanical and environmental testing is being conducted concurrently at the Idaho National Laboratory and at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. High temperature test equipment, testing methodologies, and test samples for high temperature (up to 1600º C) tensile strength and long duration creep studies have been established. Specific attention was paid to the architectural fiber preform design as well as the materials used in construction of the composites. Actual testing of both tubular and flat, "dog-bone" shaped tensile composite specimens will begin next year. Since there is no precedence for using ceramic composites within a nuclear reactor, ASTM standard test procedures will be established from these mechanical and environmental tests. Close collaborations between the U.S. national laboratories and international collaborators (i.e. France and Japan) are being forged to establish both national and international test standards to be used to qualify ceramic composites for nuclear reactor applications.

  14. The structural basis of nuclear function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, D A; Cook, P R

    1995-01-01

    Most models for transcription and replication involve polymerases that track along the template. We review here experiments that suggest an alternative in which polymerization occurs as the template slides past a polymerase fixed to a large structure in the eukaryotic nucleus--a "factory" attached to a nucleoskeleton. This means that higher-order structure dictates how and when DNA is replicated or transcribed.

  15. 3D Structure and Nuclear Targets

    CERN Document Server

    Dupré, R

    2015-01-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical ideas are laying the ground for a new era in the knowledge of the parton structure of nuclei. We report on two promising directions beyond inclusive deep inelastic scattering experiments, aimed at, among other goals, unveiling the three dimensional structure of the bound nucleon. The 3D structure in coordinate space can be accessed through deep exclusive processes, whose non-perturbative content is parametrized in terms of generalized parton distributions. In this way the distribution of partons in the transverse plane will be obtained, providing a pictorial view of the realization of the European Muon Collaboration effect. In particular, we show how, through the generalized parton distribution framework, non nucleonic degrees of freedom in nuclei can be unveiled. Analogously, the momentum space 3D structure can be accessed by studying transverse momentum dependent parton distributions in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering processes. The status of measurements is also...

  16. Rapidity Correlation Structure in Nuclear Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zin, Christopher; Gavin, Sean; Moschelli, George

    2016-09-01

    The forces that drive the nuclear collision system towards local thermal equilibrium leave few observable traces. Heavy ion experiments report a range of features widely attributed to the hydrodynamic flow of a near-equilibrium quark gluon plasma. In particular, measurements of azimuthal anisotropy provide the most comprehensive support for the hydrodynamic description of these systems. In search of the source of this flow, we turned to smaller proton-proton, proton-nucleus and deuterium-nucleus collisions, expecting to find this effect absent. Instead, these collisions show an azimuthal anisotropy that is comparable to the larger ion-ion systems. How can we learn about the mechanisms that give rise to hydrodynamics if every available collision system exhibits flow? We show that measurements of the rapidity dependence of transverse momentum correlations can be used to determine the characteristic time τπ that dictates the rate of isotropization of the stress energy tensor, as well as the shear viscosity ν = η / sT . We formulate methods for computing these correlations using second order dissipative hydrodynamics with noise. Current data are consistent with τπ / ν 10 but targeted measurements can improve this precision. NSF PHY-1207687.

  17. Structural Materials for Innovative Nuclear Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yvon, Pascal [Commissariat a l' energie atomique - CEA (France)

    2011-07-01

    This series of slides deal with: the goals for advanced fission reactor systems; the requirements for structural materials; a focus on two important types of materials: ODS and CMC; a focus on materials under irradiation (multiscale modelling, experimental simulation, 'smart' experiments in materials testing reactors); some concluding remarks.

  18. 78 FR 67206 - Qualification Tests for Safety-Related Actuators in Nuclear Power Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-08

    ... COMMISSION Qualification Tests for Safety-Related Actuators in Nuclear Power Plants AGENCY: Nuclear...-Related Actuators in Nuclear Power Plants.'' This RG is being revised to provide applicants and licensees with the most current information on testing safety-related actuators in nuclear power plants. This...

  19. Nuclear actin-related protein is required for chromosome segregation in Toxoplasma gondii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvorova, Elena S; Lehmann, Margaret M; Kratzer, Stella; White, Michael W

    2012-01-01

    Apicomplexa parasites use complex cell cycles to replicate that are not well understood mechanistically. We have established a robust forward genetic strategy to identify the essential components of parasite cell division. Here we describe a novel temperature sensitive Toxoplasma strain, mutant 13-20C2, which growth arrests due to a defect in mitosis. The primary phenotype is the mis-segregation of duplicated chromosomes with chromosome loss during nuclear division. This defect is conditional-lethal with respect to temperature, although relatively mild in regard to the preservation of the major microtubule organizing centers. Despite severe DNA loss many of the physical structures associated with daughter budding and the assembly of invasion structures formed and operated normally at the non-permissive temperature before completely arresting. These results suggest there are coordinating mechanisms that govern the timing of these events in the parasite cell cycle. The defect in mutant 13-20C2 was mapped by genetic complementation to Toxoplasma chromosome III and to a specific mutation in the gene encoding an ortholog of nuclear actin-related protein 4. A change in a conserved isoleucine to threonine in the helical structure of this nuclear actin related protein leads to protein instability and cellular mis-localization at the higher temperature. Given the age of this protist family, the results indicate a key role for nuclear actin-related proteins in chromosome segregation was established very early in the evolution of eukaryotes.

  20. Dynamical Structure of Nuclear Excitation in Continuum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Chun-Lei; ZHANG Huan-Qiao; ZHANG Xi-Zhen

    2005-01-01

    @@ Dynamical structures of collective excitation in continuum are studied by calculating the isoscalar and isovector strength as well as transition density of nuclei near the drip-line such as 28O and 34Ca. It is found that for some excited states in continuum the proton and neutron transition density calculated from isoscalar and isovector excitation at some given energies may be different, which will affect the calculation of the polarization for nuclei with N ≠ Z.

  1. The Structure Inventory of the Nuclear Pore Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Thomas U

    2016-05-22

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) is the principal gateway for molecular exchange between nucleus and cytoplasm across the nuclear envelope. Due to its sheer size of estimated 50-112MDa and its complex buildup from about 500-1000 individual proteins, it is a difficult object to study for structural biologists. Here, I review the extensive ensemble of high-resolution structures of the building blocks of the NPC. Concurrent with the increase in size and complexity, these latest, large structures and assemblies can now be used as the basis for hybrid approaches, primarily in combination with cryo-electron microscopic analysis, generating the first structure-based assembly models of the NPC. Going forward, the structures will be critically important for a detailed analysis of the NPC, including function, evolution, and assembly.

  2. Nuclear structure of {sup 231}Ac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boutami, R. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, Serrano 113 bis, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Borge, M.J.G. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, Serrano 113 bis, E-28006 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: borge@iem.cfmac.csic.es; Mach, H. [Department of Radiation Sciences, ISV, Uppsala University, SE-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden); Kurcewicz, W. [Department of Physics, University of Warsaw, Pl-00 681 Warsaw (Poland); Fraile, L.M. [Departamento Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Facultad CC. Fisicas, Universidad Complutense, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); ISOLDE, PH Department, CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Gulda, K. [Department of Physics, University of Warsaw, Pl-00 681 Warsaw (Poland); Aas, A.J. [Department of Chemistry, University of Oslo, PO Box 1033, Blindern, N-0315 Oslo (Norway); Garcia-Raffi, L.M. [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, CSIC - Universidad de Valencia, Apdo. 22805, E-46071 Valencia (Spain); Lovhoiden, G. [Department of Physics, University of Oslo, PO Box 1048, Blindern, N-0316 Oslo (Norway); Martinez, T.; Rubio, B.; Tain, J.L. [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, CSIC - Universidad de Valencia, Apdo. 22805, E-46071 Valencia (Spain); Tengblad, O. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, Serrano 113 bis, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); ISOLDE, PH Department, CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2008-10-15

    The low-energy structure of {sup 231}Ac has been investigated by means of {gamma} ray spectroscopy following the {beta}{sup -} decay of {sup 231}Ra. Multipolarities of 28 transitions have been established by measuring conversion electrons with a MINI-ORANGE electron spectrometer. The decay scheme of {sup 231}Ra {yields}{sup 231}Ac has been constructed for the first time. The Advanced Time Delayed {beta}{gamma}{gamma}(t) method has been used to measure the half-lives of five levels. The moderately fast B(E1) transition rates derived suggest that the octupole effects, albeit weak, are still present in this exotic nucleus.

  3. A-dependence of weak nuclear structure functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haider, H.; Athar, M. Sajjad [Department of Physics, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh-202 002 (India); Simo, I. Ruiz [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universitá degli studi di Trento Via Sommarive 14, Povo (Trento) I-38123 (Italy)

    2015-05-15

    Effect of nuclear medium on the weak structure functions F{sub 2}{sup A}(x, Q{sup 2}) and F{sub 3}{sup A}(x, Q{sup 2}) have been studied using charged current (anti)neutrino deep inelastic scattering on various nuclear targets. Relativistic nuclear spectral function which incorporate Fermi motion, binding and nucleon correlations are used for the calculations. We also consider the pion and rho meson cloud contributions calculated from a microscopic model for meson-nucleus self-energies. Using these structure functions, F{sub i}{sup A}/F{sub i}{sup proton} and F{sub i}{sup A}/F{sub i}{sup deuteron}(i=2,3, A={sup 12}C, {sup 16}O, CH and H{sub 2}O) are obtained.

  4. Nuclear structure aspects in A approximately 90

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucurescu, D.; Constantinescu, G.; Cutoiu, D.; Ivascu, M.; Zamfir, N.V.; Avrigeanu, M.

    1981-01-01

    A systematic review of the experimental studies on some neutron deficient nuclei in the A approximately 90 region performed at the Bucharest FN tandem is presented. After a brief account of the measurements, several transitionality aspects are evidenced, like a change of structure in the odd Sr isotopes from N = 48 to N = 46 and the occurence of decoupled g 9/2 bands. The description of these characteristics is discussed in connection with the triaxial rotor, with the VMI model, as well as the cluster-vibration and the interacting boson-fermion model. A systematics of the B(E2) values for the 8/sub 1//sup +/ state in the N = 46 isotones is also presented. 12 references.

  5. Interacting boson models of nuclear and nucleon structure

    CERN Document Server

    Bijker, R

    1998-01-01

    Interacting boson models provide an elegant and powerful method to describe collective excitations of complex systems by introducing a set of effective degrees of freedom. We review the interacting boson model of nuclear structure and discuss a recent extension to the nucleon and its excited states.

  6. Detailed requirements for a next generation nuclear data structure.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-07-05

    This document attempts to compile the requirements for the top-levels of a hierarchical arrangement of nuclear data such as found in the ENDF format. This set of requirements will be used to guide the development of a new data structure to replace the legacy ENDF format.

  7. Crystal Structure of the Herpesvirus Nuclear Egress Complex Provides Insights into Inner Nuclear Membrane Remodeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzviya Zeev-Ben-Mordehai

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Although nucleo-cytoplasmic transport is typically mediated through nuclear pore complexes, herpesvirus capsids exit the nucleus via a unique vesicular pathway. Together, the conserved herpesvirus proteins pUL31 and pUL34 form the heterodimeric nuclear egress complex (NEC, which, in turn, mediates the formation of tight-fitting membrane vesicles around capsids at the inner nuclear membrane. Here, we present the crystal structure of the pseudorabies virus NEC. The structure revealed that a zinc finger motif in pUL31 and an extensive interaction network between the two proteins stabilize the complex. Comprehensive mutational analyses, characterized both in situ and in vitro, indicated that the interaction network is not redundant but rather complementary. Fitting of the NEC crystal structure into the recently determined cryoEM-derived hexagonal lattice, formed in situ by pUL31 and pUL34, provided details on the molecular basis of NEC coat formation and inner nuclear membrane remodeling.

  8. Development of deterioration models and tests of structural materials for nuclear containment structures(III)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Byung Hwan [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea)

    2002-03-01

    The nuclear containment structures are very important infrastructures which require much cost for construction and maintenance. If these structures lose their functions and do not ensure their safety, great losses of human lives and properties will result. Therefore, the nuclear containment structures should secure appropriate safety and functions during these service lives. The nuclear concrete structures start to experience deterioration due to severe environmental condition, even though the concrete structures exhibit generally superior durability. It is, therefore, necessary to take appropriate actions at each stage of planning, design and construction to secure safety and functionability. Thorough examination of deterioration mechanism and comprehensive tests have been conducted to explore the durability characteristics of nuclear concrete structures. 88 refs., 70 figs., 12 tabs. (Author)

  9. Nuclear hormone receptor co-repressors: Structure and function

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Co-repressor proteins, such as SMRT and NCoR, mediate the repressive activity of unliganded nuclear receptors and other transcription factors. They appear to act as intrinsically disordered “hub proteins” that integrate the activities of a range of transcription factors with a number of histone modifying enzymes. Although these co-repressor proteins are challenging targets for structural studies due to their largely unstructured character, a number of structures have recently been determined ...

  10. In situ structural analysis of the human nuclear pore complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Appen, Alexander; Kosinski, Jan; Sparks, Lenore; Ori, Alessandro; DiGuilio, Amanda L; Vollmer, Benjamin; Mackmull, Marie-Therese; Banterle, Niccolo; Parca, Luca; Kastritis, Panagiotis; Buczak, Katarzyna; Mosalaganti, Shyamal; Hagen, Wim; Andres-Pons, Amparo; Lemke, Edward A; Bork, Peer; Antonin, Wolfram; Glavy, Joseph S; Bui, Khanh Huy; Beck, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear pore complexes are fundamental components of all eukaryotic cells that mediate nucleocytoplasmic exchange. Determining their 110-megadalton structure imposes a formidable challenge and requires in situ structural biology approaches. Of approximately 30 nucleoporins (Nups), 15 are structured and form the Y and inner-ring complexes. These two major scaffolding modules assemble in multiple copies into an eight-fold rotationally symmetric structure that fuses the inner and outer nuclear membranes to form a central channel of ~60 nm in diameter. The scaffold is decorated with transport-channel Nups that often contain phenylalanine-repeat sequences and mediate the interaction with cargo complexes. Although the architectural arrangement of parts of the Y complex has been elucidated, it is unclear how exactly it oligomerizes in situ. Here we combine cryo-electron tomography with mass spectrometry, biochemical analysis, perturbation experiments and structural modelling to generate, to our knowledge, the most comprehensive architectural model of the human nuclear pore complex to date. Our data suggest previously unknown protein interfaces across Y complexes and to inner-ring complex members. We show that the transport-channel Nup358 (also known as Ranbp2) has a previously unanticipated role in Y-complex oligomerization. Our findings blur the established boundaries between scaffold and transport-channel Nups. We conclude that, similar to coated vesicles, several copies of the same structural building block--although compositionally identical--engage in different local sets of interactions and conformations.

  11. Some Aspects of Nuclear Structure in Relativistic Approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAZhong-Yu; RONGJian; CAOLi-Gang; CHENBao-Qiu; LIULing

    2004-01-01

    The nucleon effective interaction in the nuclear medium is investigated in the framework of the DiracBrueckner-Hartree-Fock (DBHF) approach. A new decomposition of the Dirac structure of nucleon self-energy in the DBHF is adopted for asymmetric nuclear matter. The properties of finite nuclei are investigated with the nucleon effective interaction. The agreement with the experimental data is satisfactory. The relativistic microscopic optical potential in asymmetric nuclear matter is investigated in the DBHF approach. The proton scattering from nuclei is calculated and compared with the experimental data. A proper treatment of the resonant continuum for exotic nuclei is studied. The width effect of the resonant continuum on the pairing correlation is discussed. The quasiparticle relativistic random phase approximation based on the relativistic mean-field ground state in the response function formalism is also addressed.

  12. Final Technical Report: Investigation of Nuclear Partonic Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, Henry J. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-08-30

    Our research program had two primary goals during the period of this grant, to search for new and rare particles produced in high-energy nuclear collisions and to understand the internal structure of nuclear matter. We have developed electronics to pursue these goals at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) in the Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC (STAR) experiment and the AnDY experiment. Our results include discovery of the anti-hyper-triton, anti- 3Λ-barH, which opened a new branch on the chart of the nuclides, and the anti-alpha, anti- 4He, the heaviest form of anti-matter yet seen, as well as uncovering hints of gluon saturation in cold nuclear matter and observation of jets in polarized proton-proton collisions that will be used to probe orbital motion inside protons.

  13. Probing nuclear bubble structure via neutron star asteroseismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotani, Hajime; Iida, Kei; Oyamatsu, Kazuhiro

    2016-10-01

    We consider torsional oscillations that are trapped in a layer of spherical-hole (bubble) nuclear structure, which is expected to occur in the deepest region of the inner crust of a neutron star. Because this layer intervenes between the phase of slab nuclei and the outer core of uniform nuclear matter, torsional oscillations in the bubble phase can be excited separately from usual crustal torsional oscillations. We find from eigenmode analyses for various models of the equation of state of uniform nuclear matter that the fundamental frequencies of such oscillations are almost independent of the incompressibility of symmetric nuclear matter, but strongly depend on the slope parameter of the nuclear symmetry energy L. Although the frequencies are also sensitive to the entrainment effect, i.e., what portion of nucleons outside bubbles contribute to the oscillations, by having such a portion fixed, we can successfully fit the calculated fundamental frequencies of torsional oscillations in the bubble phase inside a star of specific mass and radius as a function of L. By comparing the resultant fitting formula to the frequencies of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) observed from the soft-gamma repeaters, we find that each of the observed low-frequency QPOs can be identified either as a torsional oscillation in the bubble phase or as a usual crustal oscillation, given generally accepted values of L for all the stellar models considered here.

  14. Nonuniform nuclear structures and QPOs in giant flares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sotani, Hajime [Division of Theoretical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2012-11-12

    We show that the shear modes in the neutron star crust are quite sensitive to the existence of nonuniform nuclear structures, the so-called 'pasta'. Due to the existence of pasta phase, the frequencies of shear modes are reduced. Since the torsional shear frequencies depend strongly on the structure of pasta phase, through the observations of stellar oscillations, one can probe the pasta structure in the crust. Additionally, considering the effect of pasta phase, we show the possibility to explain all the observed frequencies in the SGR 1806-20 with using only crust torsional oscillations.

  15. Radiation damage studies related to nuclear waste forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, W.J.; Wald, J.W.; Turcotte, R.P.

    1981-12-01

    Much of the previously reported work on alpha radiation effects on crystalline phases of importance to nuclear waste forms has been derived from radiation effects studies of composite waste forms. In the present work, two single-phase crystalline materials, Gd/sub 2/Ti/sub 2/O/sub 7/ (pyrochlore) and CaZrTi/sub 2/O/sub 7/ (zirconolite), of relative importance to current waste forms were studied independently by doping with /sup 244/Cm at the 3 wt % level. Changes in the crystalline structure measured by x-ray diffraction as a function of dose show that damage ingrowth follows an expected exponential relationship of the form ..delta..V/V/sub 0/ = A(1-exp(-BD)). In both cases, the materials became x-ray amorphous before the estimated saturation value was reached. The predicted magnitudes of the unit cell volume changes at saturation are 5.4% and 3.5%, respectively, for Gd/sub 2/Ti/sub 2/O/sub 7/ and CaZrTi/sub 2/O/sub 7/. The later material exhibited anisotropic behavior in which the expansion of the monoclinic cell in the c/sub 0/ direction was over five times that of the a/sub 0/ direction. The effects of transmutations on the properties of high-level waste solids have not been studied until now because of the long half-lives of the important fission products. This problem was circumvented in the present study by preparing materials containing natural cesium and then irradiating them with neutrons to produce /sup 134/Cs, which has only a 2y half-life. The properties monitored at about one year intervals following irradiation have been density, leach rate and microstructure. A small amount of x-ray diffraction work has also been done. Small changes in density and leach rate have been observed for some of the materials, but they were not large enough to be of any consequence for the final disposal of high level wastes.

  16. The nucleolus: a raft adrift in the nuclear sea or the keystone in nuclear structure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Justin M; Pai, Dave A; Cridge, Andrew G; Engelke, David R; Ganley, Austen R D

    2013-06-01

    The nucleolus is a prominent nuclear structure that is the site of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) transcription, and hence ribosome biogenesis. Cellular demand for ribosomes, and hence rRNA, is tightly linked to cell growth and the rRNA makes up the majority of all the RNA within a cell. To fulfill the cellular demand for rRNA, the ribosomal RNA (rDNA) genes are amplified to high copy number and transcribed at very high rates. As such, understanding the rDNA has profound consequences for our comprehension of genome and transcriptional organization in cells. In this review, we address the question of whether the nucleolus is a raft adrift the sea of nuclear DNA, or actively contributes to genome organization. We present evidence supporting the idea that the nucleolus, and the rDNA contained therein, play more roles in the biology of the cell than simply ribosome biogenesis. We propose that the nucleolus and the rDNA are central factors in the spatial organization of the genome, and that rapid alterations in nucleolar structure in response to changing conditions manifest themselves in altered genomic structures that have functional consequences. Finally, we discuss some predictions that result from the nucleolus having a central role in nuclear organization.

  17. Technology development on the assessment of structural integrity of nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Jeong Moon; Choun, Y. S.; Choi, I. K. and others

    1999-04-01

    Nuclear power plants in Korea show drop off in their performance and safety margin as the age of plants increase. The reevaluation of Kori-1 Unit on its performance and safety for life extension is expected in the near future. However, technologies and information related are insufficient to quantitatively estimate them. The final goal of this study is to develop the basic testing and evaluation techniques related with structural integrity of important nuclear equipment and structures. A part of the study includes development of equipment qualification technique. To ensure the structural integrity of structures, systems, and equipment in nuclear power plants, the following 5 research tasks were performed in the first year. - Analysis of dynamic characteristics of reactor internals - Analysis of engineering characteristics of instrumental earthquakes recorded in Korea - Analysis of ultimate pressure capacity and failure mode of containments building - Development of advanced NDE techniques using ultrasonic resonance scattering - Development of equipment qualification technique against vibration aging. These technologies developed in this study can be used to ensure the structural safety of operational nuclear power plants, and for the long-term life management. (author)

  18. Technology development on the assessment of structural integrity of nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Jeong Moon; Choun, Y. S.; Choi, I. K. and others

    1999-04-01

    Nuclear power plants in Korea show drop off in their performance and safety margin as the age of plants increase. The reevaluation of Kori-1 Unit on its performance and safety for life extension is expected in the near future. However, technologies and information related are insufficient to quantitatively estimate them. The final goal of this study is to develop the basic testing and evaluation techniques related with structural integrity of important nuclear equipment and structures. A part of the study includes development of equipment qualification technique. To ensure the structural integrity of structures, systems, and equipment in nuclear power plants, the following 5 research tasks were performed in the first year. - Analysis of dynamic characteristics of reactor internals - Analysis of engineering characteristics of instrumental earthquakes recorded in Korea - Analysis of ultimate pressure capacity and failure mode of containments building - Development of advanced NDE techniques using ultrasonic resonance scattering - Development of equipment qualification technique against vibration aging. These technologies developed in this study can be used to ensure the structural safety of operational nuclear power plants, and for the long-term life management. (author)

  19. EVALUATED NUCLEAR STRUCTURE DATA FILE -- A MANUAL FOR PREPARATION OF DATA SETS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TULI, J.K.

    2001-02-01

    This manual describes the organization and structure of the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF). This computer-based file is maintained by the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory for the international Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Network. For every mass number (presently, A {le} 293), the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) contains evaluated structure information. For masses A {ge} 44, this information is published in the Nuclear Data Sheets; for A < 44, ENSDF is based on compilations published in the journal Nuclear Physics. The information in ENSDF is updated by mass chain or by nuclide with a varying cycle time dependent on the availability of new information.

  20. Ab initio nuclear structure from lattice effective field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dean [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh NC 27695 (United States)

    2014-11-11

    This proceedings article reviews recent results by the Nuclear Lattice EFT Collaboration on an excited state of the {sup 12}C nucleus known as the Hoyle state. The Hoyle state plays a key role in the production of carbon via the triple-alpha reaction in red giant stars. We discuss the structure of low-lying states of {sup 12}C as well as the dependence of the triple-alpha reaction on the masses of the light quarks.

  1. 41 CFR 109-45.309-53 - Nuclear-related or proliferation sensitive property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Personal Property § 109-45.309-53 Nuclear-related or proliferation sensitive property. Nuclear-related or... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nuclear-related or proliferation sensitive property. 109-45.309-53 Section 109-45.309-53 Public Contracts and Property...

  2. 41 CFR 109-43.307-52 - Nuclear-related or proliferation-sensitive personal property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Excess § 109-43.307-52 Nuclear-related or proliferation-sensitive personal property. (a) Recognizing that... cards on file in the property office. (b) Nuclear-related and proliferation-sensitive personal property... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nuclear-related...

  3. 41 CFR 109-43.305-50 - Nuclear-related and proliferation-sensitive personal property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Excess § 109-43.305-50 Nuclear-related and proliferation-sensitive personal property. Nuclear-related and... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nuclear-related and proliferation-sensitive personal property. 109-43.305-50 Section 109-43.305-50 Public Contracts and...

  4. Unified ab initio approaches to nuclear structure and reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Navratil, Petr; Hupin, Guillaume; Romero-Redondo, Carolina; Calci, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    The description of nuclei starting from the constituent nucleons and the realistic interactions among them has been a long-standing goal in nuclear physics. In addition to the complex nature of the nuclear forces, with two-, three- and possibly higher many-nucleon components, one faces the quantum-mechanical many-nucleon problem governed by an interplay between bound and continuum states. In recent years, significant progress has been made in {\\em ab initio} nuclear structure and reaction calculations based on input from QCD-employing Hamiltonians constructed within chiral effective field theory. After a brief overview of the field, we focus on ab initio many-body approaches - built upon the No-Core Shell Model - that are capable of simultaneously describing both bound and scattering nuclear states, and present results for resonances in light nuclei, reactions important for astrophysics and fusion research. In particular, we review recent calculations of resonances in the $^6$He halo nucleus, of five- and six...

  5. Nuclear power plant life extension: How aging affects performance of containments & other structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robert A Dameron; Sun Junling

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on how aging can affect performance of safety-related structures in nuclear power plant (NPP).Knowledge and assessment of impacts of aging on structures are essential to plant life extension analysis,especially performance to severe loadings such as loss-of-coolant-accidents or major seismic events.Plant life extension issues are of keen interest in countries (like the United States) which have a large,aging fleet of NPPs.This paper addresses the overlap and relationship of structure aging to severe loading performance,with particular emphasis on containment structures.

  6. Nuclear structure studies in JUSTIPEN and EFES activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itagaki, Naoyuki

    2009-10-01

    JUSTIPEN: Japan-US Theory Institute for Physics with Exotic Nuclei was launched in June 2006. JUSTIPEN has been established in order to facilitate collaborations between U.S. and Japanese scientists whose main research thrust is in the area of the physics of exotic nuclei. More than 40 nuclear scientists in U.S. have visited Japan in three years, and the many collaborations are established. I briefly summarize the JUSTIPEN activity from the Japanese side. There is counterpart program for the Japanese scientists. International Research Network for Exotic Femto Systems (EFES) was selected as one of the Core-to-Core Programs of Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS). This is the program to send Japanese nuclear scientists to U.S., Germany, France, Italy, Norway, and Finland and to promote the international collaborations in the field of nuclear study. Many joint workshops were held with partner countries. To operate these international programs, University of Tokyo and RIKEN agreed to corporate with each other and established Todai-RIKEN Joint International Program for Nuclear Physics (TORIJIN) in June 2006. I summarize the activities in three years, and I also mention about the relation between these activities and my personal research -- many-body correlations in light nuclei.

  7. Ran-dependent nuclear export mediators: a structural perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güttler, Thomas; Görlich, Dirk

    2011-08-31

    Nuclear export is an essential eukaryotic activity. It proceeds through nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) and is mediated by soluble receptors that shuttle between nucleus and cytoplasm. RanGTPase-dependent export mediators (exportins) constitute the largest class of these carriers and are functionally highly versatile. All of these exportins load their substrates in response to RanGTP binding in the nucleus and traverse NPCs as ternary RanGTP-exportin-cargo complexes to the cytoplasm, where GTP hydrolysis leads to export complex disassembly. The different exportins vary greatly in their substrate range. Recent structural studies of both protein- and RNA-specific exporters have illuminated how exportins bind their cargoes, how Ran triggers cargo loading and how export complexes are disassembled in the cytoplasm. Here, we review the current state of knowledge and highlight emerging principles as well as prevailing questions.

  8. Nuclear-structure studies of exotic nuclei with MINIBALL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, P. A.; Cederkall, J.; Reiter, P.

    2017-04-01

    High-resolution γ-ray spectroscopy has been established at ISOLDE for nuclear-structure and nuclear-reaction studies with reaccelerated radioactive ion beams provided by the REX-ISOLDE facility. The MINIBALL spectrometer comprises 24 six-fold segmented, encapsulated high-purity germanium crystals. It was specially designed for highest γ-ray detection efficiency which is advantageous for low-intensity radioactive ion beams. The MINIBALL array has been used in numerous Coulomb-excitation and transfer-reaction experiments with exotic ion beams of energies up to 3 MeV A–1. The physics case covers a wide range of topics which are addressed with beams ranging from neutron-rich magnesium isotopes up to heavy radium isotopes. In the future the HIE-ISOLDE will allow the in-beam γ-ray spectroscopy program to proceed with higher secondary-beam intensity, higher beam energy and better beam quality.

  9. Nuclear structure studies with medium energy probes. [Northwestern Univ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seth, Kamal K.

    1980-01-01

    Progress in the continuing program of experimental research in nuclear structure with medium-energy probes during the year 1979-1980 is reviewed, and the research activities planned for the year 1980-1981 are discussed. In the study of pion-induced reactions emphasis is placed on investigation of isovector characteristics of nuclear excitations and on double charge exchange reactions. Pion production studies form the major part of the program of experiments with proton beams of 400 to 800 MeV at LAMPF. Current emphasis is on the bearing of these investigations on di-baryon existence. The study of high-spin states and magnetic scattering constitute the main goals of the electron scattering program at Bates. Representative results are presented; completed work is reported in the usual publications. (RWR)

  10. 78 FR 25488 - Qualification Tests for Safety-Related Actuators in Nuclear Power Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    ... COMMISSION Qualification Tests for Safety-Related Actuators in Nuclear Power Plants AGENCY: Nuclear..., ``Qualification Tests for Safety-Related Actuators in Nuclear Power Plants.'' DG-1235 is proposed Revision 1 of RG... Stations in order to demonstrate their ability to perform their intended safety functions under...

  11. Time-domain soil-structure interaction analysis of nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, Justin L., E-mail: justin.coleman@inl.gov [Idaho National Laboratory, 2525 Fremont Avenue, Idaho Falls, ID 83402 (United States); Bolisetti, Chandrakanth, E-mail: chandrakanth.bolisetti@inl.gov [Idaho National Laboratory, 2525 Fremont Avenue, Idaho Falls, ID 83402 (United States); Whittaker, Andrew S., E-mail: awhittak@buffalo.edu [University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, North Campus, 212 Ketter Hall, Amherst, NY 14260 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulation 10 CFR Part 50 Appendix S requires consideration of soil-structure interaction (SSI) in nuclear power plant (NPP) analysis and design. Soil-structure interaction analysis for NPPs is routinely carried out using guidance provided in the ASCE Standard 4-98 titled “Seismic Analysis of Safety-Related Nuclear Structures and Commentary”. This Standard, which is currently under revision, provides guidance on linear seismic soil-structure-interaction (SSI) analysis of nuclear facilities using deterministic and probabilistic methods. A new appendix has been added to the forthcoming edition of ASCE Standard 4 to provide guidance for time-domain, nonlinear SSI (NLSSI) analysis. Nonlinear SSI analysis will be needed to simulate material nonlinearity in soil and/or structure, static and dynamic soil pressure effects on deeply embedded structures, local soil failure at the foundation-soil interface, nonlinear coupling of soil and pore fluid, uplift or sliding of the foundation, nonlinear effects of gaps between the surrounding soil and the embedded structure and seismic isolation systems, none of which can be addressed explicitly at present. Appendix B of ASCE Standard 4 provides general guidance for NLSSI analysis but will not provide a methodology for performing the analysis. This paper provides a description of an NLSSI methodology developed for application to nuclear facilities, including NPPs. This methodology is described as series of sequential steps to produce reasonable results using any time-domain numerical code. These steps require some numerical capabilities, such as nonlinear soil constitutive models, which are also described in the paper.

  12. Nuclear Structure of the Heaviest Elements – Investigated at SHIP-GSI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heßberger Fritz Peter

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The quest for the heaviest nuclei that can exist is a basic topic in natural science as their stability is characterized by a delicate interplay of short range nuclear forces acting between the nucleons (protons and neutrons and long-range Coulomb forces acting solely between charged particles, i.e. the protons. As the stability of a nucleus is strongly correlated to its structure, understanding the nuclear structure of heaviest nuclei is presently a main challenge of experimental and theoretical investigations concerning the field of Superheavy Elements. At the velocity filter SHIP at GSI Darmstadt an extensive program on nuclear structure investigations has been started about a decade ago. The project covered both as well systematic investigations of single particle levels in odd-mass isotopes populated by α-decay as investigation of two- or fourquasi-particle states forming K isomers and was supplemented by direct mass measurements at SHIPTRAP and investigation of spontaneous fission properties. Recent experimental studies allowed to extend the systematics of low lying levels in N = 151 and N = 153 up to 255Rf and 259Sg, investigation of possible relations between nuclear structure and fission properties of odd-mass nuclei and investigation of shell strengths at N = 152 and towards N = 162.

  13. Structural control of the stability of nuclear waste glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calas, G.; Galoisy, L.; Cormier, L.; Bergeron, B.; Jollivet, P.

    2009-05-01

    Vitrification of liquid high-level radioactive waste in borosilicate glasses has received a great attention in several countries. The fundamental properties of the waste forms are their chemical and mechanical durability. We present an overview of the local structure of inactive analogs of the French nuclear glass, using structural information obtained by a combination of X-ray absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) and Wide Angle X-ray Scattering (WAXS). We will first contrast several classes of elements, such as Zr, Mo or Zn, which give nuclear glasses peculiar positive or adverse properties for the industrial process: enhanced chemical stability, phase separation, crystal nucleation and separation. These properties may be rationalized using Pauling rules, familiar to Mineralogists, as other properties are correctly modelled in simplified glass compositions using molecular dynamics. We will also point out the importance of the melt-to-glass transition and the consequence of the glass structural properties on the resistance of glassy matrices to irradiation. Glass alteration affects the long-term stability of the glass. It is characterized by an amorphous (glass)-amorphous (gel) transformation. Depending on alteration conditions, alteration layers may have or not a protective character, which will influence radionuclide retention over time. We will present the structural modification of the surface chemistry of the glass monoliths during short-term experiments and the evolution towards a gel, which forms progressively at the expense of the glass. The protective character of the gel, observed during glass leaching under near-saturated conditions, will be rationalized by its structural properties.

  14. Seismic margin analysis technique for nuclear power plant structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Jeong Moon; Choi, In Kil

    2001-04-01

    In general, the Seismic Probabilistic Risk Assessment (SPRA) and the Seismic Margin Assessment(SAM) are used for the evaluation of realistic seismic capacity of nuclear power plant structures. Seismic PRA is a systematic process to evaluate the seismic safety of nuclear power plant. In our country, SPRA has been used to perform the probabilistic safety assessment for the earthquake event. SMA is a simple and cost effective manner to quantify the seismic margin of individual structural elements. This study was performed to improve the reliability of SMA results and to confirm the assessment procedure. To achieve this goal, review for the current status of the techniques and procedures was performed. Two methodologies, CDFM (Conservative Deterministic Failure Margin) sponsored by NRC and FA (Fragility Analysis) sponsored by EPRI, were developed for the seismic margin review of NPP structures. FA method was originally developed for Seismic PRA. CDFM approach is more amenable to use by experienced design engineers including utility staff design engineers. In this study, detailed review on the procedures of CDFM and FA methodology was performed.

  15. Lipid quantification and structure determination of nuclear envelope precursor membranes in the sea urchin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnier-Lhomme, Marie; Dufourc, Erick J; Larijani, Banafshé; Poccia, Dominic

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear envelope assembly is a fundamental cellular process normally taking place once in every cell cycle in eukaryotes. The timing of fusion of nuclear membrane precursors to form the complete double membrane surrounding the chromosomes is tightly controlled, but much remains unclear concerning its regulation. Small amounts of material available and the high background of irrelevant cellular membranes have limited detailed analysis. We have employed several sensitive and high-resolution techniques to analyze the nuclear membrane structure, composition, and dynamics using purified membrane fractions and a cell-free system that results in nuclear envelope formation. We discuss the application of cholesterol and phospholipid colorimetric assays, fluorescent filipin labeling, electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry coupled to HPLC (HPLC-ESI/MS/MS), electron microscopy (EM), and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Colorimetric assays determine the amounts of inorganic phosphates from phospholipids and cholesterol/ cholesteryl esters present in membrane-containing fractions. Filipin staining of natural membranes allows the localization and relative quantification of cholesterol. HPLC-ESI/MS/MS determines the quantitative composition of membrane phospholipid species from small amounts of membranes. Cryosectioning of cryoprotected sperm cells facilitates EM verification of membrane domains existing in vivo. Deuterium solid-state NMR provides information about membrane rigidity and lipid-phase behavior. The sensitivity, quantification, and structural determinations provided by these techniques should prove useful in studying membrane dynamics in a variety of systems exhibiting membrane fusion.

  16. Survey on Issues related to National Nuclear Promotion Policy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Byungchool; Lee, Youngjoon; Lee, Youngcheol; Jeong, I. K.; Kim, Hyunjun; Kim, Youngsoo; Yun, Sungwon; Moon, Keehwan; Chung, Whansam

    2013-06-15

    Ο Major issues surrounding nuclear are including suspicions about nuclear safety, spent-fuel management, acquiring the advanced R and D capabilities and making the nuclear a creative industry Ο Solid measures for securing safety should be formulated and implemented for reducing public anxiety of nuclear use Ο The long-term R and D performance system from a scientific perspective should be established for expanding Research and Development for safer use of nuclear Ο The spent-fuel management policy should be determined through publicizing process Ο Establishing small and medium enterprises-oriented supply system of reactors and SMRs and Encouraging the radiation fusion technology industrialization for promoting creative industry utilizing nuclear.

  17. Molecular structure and biological function of proliferating cell nuclear antigen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is the core component of replication complex in eukaryote.As a processive factor of DNA polymerase delta, PCNA coordinates the replication process by interacting with various replication proteins. PCNA appears to play an essential role in many cell events, such as DNA damage repair, cell cycle regulation, and apoptosis, through the coordination or organization of different partners. PCNA is an essential factor in cell proliferation, and has clinical significance in tumor research. In this article we review the functional structure of PCNA, which acts as a function switch in different cell events.

  18. Nuclear effects in F_3 structure function of nucleon

    CERN Document Server

    Athar, M Sajjad; Vacas, M J Vicente

    2007-01-01

    We study nuclear effects in the $F^A_3(x)$ structure function in the deep inelastic neutrino reactions on iron by using a relativistic framework to describe the nucleon spectral functions in the nucleus. The results for the ratio $R(x,Q^2)=\\frac{F^A_3(x,Q^2)}{AF^N_3(x, Q^2)}$ and the Gross-Llewellyn Smith(GLS) integral $G(x,Q^2)=\\int_x^1 dx F^A_3(x,Q^2)$ in nuclei are discussed and compared with the recent results available in literature from theoretical and phenomenological analyses of experimental data.

  19. Seismic design and analysis of nuclear power plant structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pentti Varpasuo

    2013-01-01

    The seismic design and analysis of nuclear power plant (NPP) begin with the seismic hazard assessment and design ground motion development for the site.The following steps are needed for the seismic hazard assessment and design ground motion development:a.the development of regional seismo-tectonic model with seismic source areas within 500 km radius centered to the site; b.the development of strong motion prediction equations;c.logic three development for taking into account uncertainties and seismic hazard quantification; d.the development of uniform hazard response spectra for ground motion at the site; e.simulation of acceleration time histories compatible with uniform hazard response spectra.The following phase two in seismic design of NPP structures is the analysis of structural response for the design ground motion.This second phase of the process consists of the following steps:a.development of structural models of the plant buildings; b.development of the soil model underneath the plant buildings for soil-structure interaction response analysis; c.determination of in-structure response spectra for the plant buildings for the equipment response analysis.In the third phase of the seismic design and analysis the equipment is analyzed on the basis of in-structure response spectra.For this purpose the structural models of the mechanical components and piping in the plant are set up.In large 3D-structural models used today the heaviest equipment of the primary coolant circuit is included in the structural model of the reactor building.In the fourth phase the electrical equipment and automation and control equipment are seismically qualified with the aid of the in-structure spectra developed in the phase two using large three-axial shaking tables.For this purpose the smoothed envelope spectra for calculated in-structure spectra are constructed and acceleration time is fitted to these smoothed envelope spectra.

  20. Nuclear structure studies at Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics using gamma detector arrays

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Banerjee

    2001-07-01

    In-beam gamma-ray spectroscopy, carried out at the Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics in the recent past, using heavy-ion projectiles from the pelletron accelerator centres in the country and multi-detector arrays have yielded significant data on the structure of a large number of nuclei spanning different mass regions. The experiments included the study of two-fold -coincidence events for establishing decay schemes, directional correlation of oriented nuclei (DCO) for help in spin assignments and Doppler shift attenuation for lifetime information. The studies have led to the observation of rotational sequences of states in nuclei near closed shell in the mass = 110 region, vibrational spectra in nuclei with ∼ 60, interplay between single-particle and collective modes of excitation in the doubly-odd bromine isotopes, decoupled bands with large quadrupole deformation in 77Br, shape transition with rotational frequency within a band in 138Pm and octupole collectivity in 153Eu. Particle-rotor-model and cranked-shell-model calculations have been carried out to provide an understanding of the underlying nuclear structure

  1. Research activities in nuclear astrophysics and related areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    NASA/GRO grant NAG 5-2081, at the University of Chicago, has provided support for a broad program of theoretical research in nuclear astrophysics and related areas, with regard to gamma-ray and hard X-ray emission from classical nova explosions. This research emphasized the possible detection of 22Na gamma-ray line emission from nearby novae involving ONeMg white dwarfs, the detailed examination of 26Al production in novae, and the possible detection of the predicted early gamma ray emission from novae that arises from the decay of the short lived, positron emitting isotopes of CNO elements. Studies of nova related problems have consumed an increasing fraction of the Principal Investigator's research efforts over the past decade. Current research addresses problems associated with the standard model for the outbursts of the classical novae: the occurrence of thermonuclear runaways (TNR) in the accreted hydrogen rich envelopes on white dwarfs in close binary systems (see, e.g., the reviews by Truran 1982; and Shara 1989). Research in progress and planned for the next three years has three main objectives: (1) to gain an improved understanding of the early evolution of the light curves of, particularly, the fastest novae; (2) to gain an improved understanding of the relative importance of the various possible mechanisms of envelope hydrogen depletion (e.g. winds, common envelope driven mass loss, and nuclear burning) to the long term evolution of novae in outburst; and (3) to seek to provide a somewhat more definitive statement of the role of classical novae in nucleosynthesis. Our proposed 2-D studies of convection during the early phases of the TNR and our systematic attempt to incorporate an improved treatment of radiation hydrodynamics into the hydrodynamic code utilized in our calculations, are particularly relevant to the first of these objectives. Further 2-D studies of the effects of common envelope evolution are intended to provide more realistic constraints

  2. The nuclear higher-order structure defined by the set of topological relationships between DNA and the nuclear matrix is species-specific in hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Santiago, Evangelina; Pardo, Juan Pablo; Hernández-Muñoz, Rolando; Aranda-Anzaldo, Armando

    2017-01-15

    During the interphase the nuclear DNA of metazoan cells is organized in supercoiled loops anchored to constituents of a nuclear substructure or compartment known as the nuclear matrix. The stable interactions between DNA and the nuclear matrix (NM) correspond to a set of topological relationships that define a nuclear higher-order structure (NHOS). Current evidence suggests that the NHOS is cell-type-specific. Biophysical evidence and theoretical models suggest that thermodynamic and structural constraints drive the actualization of DNA-NM interactions. However, if the topological relationships between DNA and the NM were the subject of any biological constraint with functional significance then they must be adaptive and thus be positively selected by natural selection and they should be reasonably conserved, at least within closely related species. We carried out a coarse-grained, comparative evaluation of the DNA-NM topological relationships in primary hepatocytes from two closely related mammals: rat and mouse, by determining the relative position to the NM of a limited set of target sequences corresponding to highly-conserved genomic regions that also represent a sample of distinct chromosome territories within the interphase nucleus. Our results indicate that the pattern of topological relationships between DNA and the NM is not conserved between the hepatocytes of the two closely related species, suggesting that the NHOS, like the karyotype, is species-specific.

  3. Structures and construction of nuclear power plants on lunar surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Katsunori; Kobatake, Masuhiko; Ogawa, Sachio; Kanamori, Hiroshi; Okada, Yasuhiko; Mano, Hideyuki; Takagi, Kenji

    1991-07-01

    The best structure and construction techniques of nuclear power plants in the severe environments on the lunar surface are studied. Facility construction types (functional conditions such as stable structure, shield thickness, maintainability, safety distances, and service life), construction conditions (such as construction methods, construction equipment, number of personnel, time required for construction, external power supply, and required transportation) and construction feasibility (construction method, reactor transportation between the moon and the earth, ground excavation for installation, loading and unloading, transportation, and installation, filling up the ground, electric power supply of plant S (300 kW class) and plant L (3000 kW class)) are outlined. Items to pay attention to in construction are (1) automation and robotization of construction; (2) cost reduction by multi functional robots; and (3) methods of supplying power to robots. A precast concrete block manufacturing plant is also outlined.

  4. Chlorine Nuclear Quadrupole Hyperfine Structure in the Vinyl - Chloride Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Helen O.; Marshall, Mark D.; Messinger, Joseph P.

    2015-06-01

    The microwave spectrum of the vinyl chloride--hydrogen chloride complex, presented at last year's symposium, is greatly complicated by the presence of two chlorine nuclei as well as an observed, but not fully explained tunneling motion. Indeed, although it was possible at that time to demonstrate conclusively that the complex is nonplanar, the chlorine nuclear quadrupole hyperfine splitting in the rotational spectrum resisted analysis. With higher resolution, Balle-Flygare Fourier transform microwave spectra, the hyperfine structure has been more fully resolved, but appears to be perturbed for some rotational transitions. It appears that knowledge of the quadrupole coupling constants will provide essential information regarding the structure of the complex, specifically the location of the hydrogen atom in HCl. Our progress towards obtaining values for these constants will be presented.

  5. Spectral structure of electron antineutrinos from nuclear reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, D A; Langford, T J

    2015-01-01

    Recent measurements of the positron energy spectrum obtained from inverse beta decay interactions of reactor electron antineutrinos show an excess in the 4 to 6 MeV region relative to current predictions. First-principles calculations of fission and beta decay processes within a typical pressurized water reactor core identify prominent fission daughter isotopes as a possible origin for this excess. These calculations also predict percent-level substructures in the antineutrino spectrum due to Coulomb effects in beta decay. Precise measurement of these substructures can elucidate the nuclear processes occurring within reactors. These substructures can be a systematic issue for measurements utilizing the detailed spectral shape.

  6. Spectral Structure of Electron Antineutrinos from Nuclear Reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Dwyer, D A

    2014-01-01

    Recent measurements of the positron energy spectrum obtained from inverse beta decay interactions of reactor electron antineutrinos show an excess in the 4 to 6 MeV region relative to current predictions. First-principle calculations of fission and beta decay processes within a typical pressurized water reactor core identify prominent fission daughter isotopes as a possible origin for this excess. These calculations also predict percent-level substructure in the antineutrino spectrum due to Coulomb effects in beta decay. Precise measurement of this substructure can constrain nuclear reactor physics. The substructure can be a systematic uncertainty for measurements utilizing the detailed spectral shape.

  7. Membrane proteins structure and dynamics by nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltsev, Sergey; Lorigan, Gary A

    2011-10-01

    Membrane proteins represent a challenging class of biological systems to study. They are extremely difficult to crystallize and in most cases they retain their structure and functions only in membrane environments. Therefore, commonly used diffraction methods fail to give detailed molecular structure and other approaches have to be utilized to obtain biologically relevant information. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, however, can provide powerful structural and dynamical constraints on these complicated systems. Solution- and solid-state NMR are powerful methods for investigating membrane proteins studies. In this work, we briefly review both solution and solid-state NMR techniques for membrane protein studies and illustrate the applications of these methods to elucidate proteins structure, conformation, topology, dynamics, and function. Recent advances in electronics, biological sample preparation, and spectral processing provided opportunities for complex biological systems, such as membrane proteins inside lipid vesicles, to be studied faster and with outstanding quality. New analysis methods therefore have emerged, that benefit from the combination of sample preparation and corresponding specific high-end NMR techniques, which give access to more structural and dynamic information.

  8. Physics with gamma-beams and charged particle detectors: I) Nuclear structure II) Nuclear astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gai, Moshe [LNS at Avery Point, University of Connecticut, Groton, CT 06340-6097, USA and Wright Lab, Dept. of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520-8124 and the Charged Particle Working Group (CPWG) of the Technical Design Report (TDR) (United States)

    2015-02-24

    The Charged Particle Working Group (CPWG) is proposing to construct large area Silicon Strip Detector (SSD), a gas Time Projection Chamber detector read by an electronic readout system (eTPC) and a Bubble Chamber (BC) containing superheated high purity water to be used in measurements utilizing intense gamma-ray beams from the newly constructed ELI-NP facility at Magurele, Bucharest in Romania. We intend to use the SSD and eTPC detectors to address essential problems in nuclear structure physics, such as clustering and the many alpha-decay of light nuclei such as {sup 12}C and {sup 16}O. All three detectors (SSD, eTPC and BC) will be used to address central problems in nuclear astrophysics such as the astrophysical cross section factor of the {sup 12}C(α,γ) reaction and other processes central to stellar evolution. The CPWG intends to submit to the ELI-NP facility a Technical Design Report (TDR) for the proposed detectors.

  9. Cooperative measures to support the Indo-Pak Agreement Reducing Risk from Accidents Relating to Nuclear Weapons.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, Sitakanta [Centre for Air Power Studies, New Delhi (India); Ahmed, Mansoor [Quaid-i-Azam Univ., Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2014-04-01

    In 2012, India and Pakistan reaffirmed the Agreement on Reducing the Risk from Accidents Relating to Nuclear Weapons. Despite a history of mutual animosity and persistent conflict between the two countries, this agreement derives strength from a few successful nuclear confidence building measures that have stood the test of time. It also rests on the hope that the region would be spared a nuclear holocaust from an accidental nuclear weapon detonation that might be misconstrued as a deliberate use of a weapon by the other side. This study brings together two emerging strategic analysts from South Asia to explore measures to support the Agreement and further develop cooperation around this critical issue. This study briefly dwells upon the strategic landscape of nuclear South Asia with the respective nuclear force management structures, doctrines, and postures of India and Pakistan. It outlines the measures in place for the physical protection and safety of nuclear warheads, nuclear materials, and command and control mechanisms in the two countries, and it goes on to identify the prominent, emerging challenges posed by the introduction of new weapon technologies and modernization of the respective strategic forces. This is followed by an analysis of the agreement itself leading up to a proposed framework for cooperative measures that might enhance the spirit and implementation of the agreement.

  10. Online Monitoring of Concrete Structures in Nuclear Power Plants: Interim Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahadevan, Sankaran [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cai, Guowei [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Agarwal, Vivek [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-01

    The existing fleet of nuclear power plants in the United States have initial operating licenses of 40 years, and many of these plants have applied for and received license extensions. As plant structures, systems, and components age, their useful life—considering both structural integrity and performance—is reduced as a result of deterioration of the materials. Assessment and management of aging concrete structures in nuclear plants require a more systematic approach than simple reliance on existing code-based design margins of safety. Structural health monitoring is required to produce actionable information regarding structural integrity that supports operational and maintenance decisions. The online monitoring of concrete structures project conducted under the Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Technologies Pathway of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability program at Idaho National Laboratory is seeking to develop and demonstrate capabilities for concrete structures health monitoring. Through this research project, several national laboratories and Vanderbilt University propose to develop a framework of research activities for the health monitoring of nuclear power plant concrete structures that includes the integration of four elements—damage modeling, monitoring, data analytics, and uncertainty quantification. This report briefly discusses activities in this project during October-December, 2014. The most significant activity during this period was the organizing of a two-day workshop on research needs in online monitoring of concrete structures, hosted by Vanderbilt University in November 2014. Thirty invitees from academia, industry and government participated in the workshop. The presentations and discussions at the workshop surveyed current activities related to concrete structures deterioration modeling and monitoring, and identified the challenges, knowledge gaps, and opportunities for advancing the state of the art; these

  11. Telomere dysfunction and chromosome structure modulate the contribution of individual chromosomes in abnormal nuclear morphologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pampalona, J.; Soler, D.; Genesca, A. [Department of Cell Biology, Physiology and Immunology, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra E-08193 (Spain); Tusell, L., E-mail: laura.tusell@uab.es [Department of Cell Biology, Physiology and Immunology, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra E-08193 (Spain)

    2010-01-05

    The cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay has emerged as a biomarker of chromosome damage relevant to cancer. Although it was initially developed to measure micronuclei, it is also useful for measuring nucleoplasmic bridges and nuclear buds. Abnormal nuclear morphologies are frequently observed in malignant tissues and short-term tumour cell cultures. Changes in chromosome structure and number resulting from chromosome instability are important factors in oncogenesis. Telomeres have become key players in the initiation of chromosome instability related to carcinogenesis by means of breakage-fusion-bridge cycles. To better understand the connection between telomere dysfunction and the appearance of abnormal nuclear morphologies, we have characterised the presence of micronuclei, nucleoplasmic bridges and nuclear buds in human mammary primary epithelial cells. These cells can proliferate beyond the Hayflick limit by spontaneously losing expression of the p16{sup INK4a} protein. Progressive telomere shortening leads to the loss of the capping function, and the appearance of end-to-end chromosome fusions that can enter into breakage-fusion-bridge cycles generating massive chromosomal instability. In human mammary epithelial cells, different types of abnormal nuclear morphologies were observed, however only nucleoplasmatic bridges and buds increased significantly with population doublings. Fluorescent in situ hybridisation using centromeric and painting specific probes for chromosomes with eroded telomeres has revealed that these chromosomes are preferentially included in the different types of abnormal nuclear morphologies observed, thus reflecting their common origin. Accordingly, real-time imaging of cell divisions enabled us to determine that anaphase bridge resolution was mainly through chromatin breakage and the formation of symmetric buds in daughter nuclei. Few micronuclei emerged in this cell system thus validating the scoring of nucleoplasmic bridges and

  12. Carbon Nanotubes and Related Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kingsuk Mukhopadhyay

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes have attracted the fancy of many scientists world wide. The small dimensions,strength, and the remarkable physical properties of these structures make them a unique material with a whole range of promising applications. In this review, the structural aspects, the advantages and disadvantages of different for their procedures synthesis, the qualitative and quantitative estimation of carbon nanotubes by different analytical techniques, the present status on their applications as well as the current challenges faced in the application field, national, in particular DRDO, DMSRDE status, and interest in this field, have been discussed.Defence Science Journal, 2008, 58(4, pp.437-450, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.58.1666

  13. Pseudospin symmetry in nuclear structure and its supersymmetric representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, H. Z.

    2016-08-01

    The quasi-degeneracy between the single-particle states (n,l,j=l+1/2) and (n-1,l+2,j=l+3/2) indicates a special and hidden symmetry in atomic nuclei—the so-called pseudospin symmetry (PSS)—which is an important concept in both spherical and deformed nuclei. A number of phenomena in nuclear structure have been successfully interpreted directly or implicitly by this symmetry, including nuclear superdeformed configurations, identical bands, quantized alignment, pseudospin partner bands, and so on. Since the PSS was recognized as a relativistic symmetry in 1990s, there have been comprehensive efforts to understand its properties in various systems and potentials. In this review, we mainly focus on the latest progress on the supersymmetric (SUSY) representation of PSS, and one of the key targets is to understand its symmetry-breaking mechanism in realistic nuclei in a quantitative and perturbative way. The SUSY quantum mechanics and its applications to the SU(2) and U(3) symmetries of the Dirac Hamiltonian are discussed in detail. It is shown that the origin of PSS and its symmetry-breaking mechanism, which are deeply hidden in the origin Hamiltonian, can be traced by its SUSY partner Hamiltonian. Essential open questions, such as the SUSY representation of PSS in the deformed system, are pointed out.

  14. Pseudospin symmetry in nuclear structure and its supersymmetric representation

    CERN Document Server

    Liang, Haozhao

    2016-01-01

    The quasi-degeneracy between the single-particle states $(n,\\,l,\\,j=l+1/2)$ and $(n-1,\\,l+2,\\,j=l+3/2)$ indicates a special and hidden symmetry in atomic nuclei---the so-called pseudospin symmetry (PSS)---which is an important concept in both spherical and deformed nuclei. A number of phenomena in nuclear structure have been successfully interpreted directly or implicitly by this symmetry, including nuclear superdeformed configurations, identical bands, quantized alignment, pseudospin partner bands, and so on. Since the PSS was recognized as a relativistic symmetry in 1990s, there have been comprehensive efforts to understand its properties in various systems and potentials. In this Review, we mainly focus on the latest progress on the supersymmetric (SUSY) representation of PSS, and one of the key targets is to understand its symmetry-breaking mechanism in realistic nuclei in a quantitative and perturbative way. The SUSY quantum mechanics and its applications to the SU(2) and U(3) symmetries of the Dirac Ham...

  15. Nuclear structure of light Ca and heavy Cr isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buerger, A.

    2007-07-01

    In the present thesis, the shell structure in exotic nuclei has been investigated. The focus of the work was on finding new experimental data in neutron-rich Cr and proton-rich Ca isotopes. The investigation of light Ca isotopes concentrated on the nucleus {sup 36}Ca which was produced in a knockout reaction from a radioactive {sup 37}Ca beam. For {sup 36}Ca, the excitation energy of the first 2{sup +} state has been measured for the first time. Furthermore, momentum distributions were analyzed using a Monte-Carlo simulation of the knockout reaction. This analysis yielded the contributions of neutrons from individual orbitals to the total knockout cross section. In principle, these may be used to calculate spectroscopic factors, but such a calculation is hampered by difficulties of present knockout-reaction models in predicting precise single-particle cross sections. The measured branching ratio to the ground and excited states, on the other hand, is close to the predicted value. A remaining difference might be due to emission of protons which cannot be detected with the present experimental setup. Both the branching ratio and the large excitation energy are compatible with a large N=16 gap in {sup 36}Ca that leads to relatively pure configurations both in the ground state and the excited 2{sup +} state. As a by-product of the experiment, two excitation energies in the T=2 nuclei {sup 32}Ar and {sup 28}S have been confirmed, and two {gamma}-ray transitions have been observed for the first time in {sup 37}Ca. While the mirror energy differences in the T=2 pairs {sup 36}Ca-{sup 36}S, {sup 32}Ar-{sup 32}Si, and {sup 28}S-{sup 28}Mg can be reproduced in shell model calculations using a modified USD interaction, these modifications are not sufficient to explain the mirror energy differences for the pair {sup 37}Ca-{sup 37}Cl. In the heavy Cr isotopes, new experimental evidence for a sub-shell closure at N=32 was found in a measurement of B(E2) values using high

  16. In silico analyses of dystrophin Dp40 cellular distribution, nuclear export signals and structure modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Martínez-Herrera

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Dystrophin Dp40 is the shortest protein encoded by the DMD (Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene. This protein is unique since it lacks the C-terminal end of dystrophins. In this data article, we describe the subcellular localization, nuclear export signals and the three-dimensional structure modeling of putative Dp40 proteins using bioinformatics tools. The Dp40 wild type protein was predicted as a cytoplasmic protein while the Dp40n4 was predicted to be nuclear. Changes L93P and L170P are involved in the nuclear localization of Dp40n4 protein. A close analysis of Dp40 protein scored that amino acids 93LEQEHNNLV101 and 168LLLHDSIQI176 could function as NES sequences and the scores are lost in Dp40n4. In addition, the changes L93/170P modify the tertiary structure of putative Dp40 mutants. The analysis showed that changes of residues 93 and 170 from leucine to proline allow the nuclear localization of Dp40 proteins. The data described here are related to the research article entitled “EF-hand domains are involved in the differential cellular distribution of dystrophin Dp40” (J. Aragón et al. Neurosci. Lett. 600 (2015 115–120 [1].

  17. Nuclear structure research with the Penning-trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP at CERN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neidherr, Dennis [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, Mainz (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    At the double-Penning-trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP at ISOLDE/CERN the cyclotron frequency of short-lived radionuclides is measured in order to determine their mass with a relative uncertainty in the order of 10{sup -8} and below. This ground state property plays an important role in many fields of modern physics from nuclear-structure research to nuclear astrophysics and tests of the weak interaction of the Standard Model. An example for the first one is the evolution of the nuclear shape as a function of the number of neutrons and protons. In 2008 the masses of {sup 223-229}Rn and {sup 143-146}Xe were measured for the first time directly, whereas {sup 229}Rn was even discovered by our Penning trap based experiment. With this mass values one can study the proton-neutron interaction and therefore get information about the nuclear structure like collectivity, the onset of deformation or the geometrical shapes in atomic nuclei. The experimental results as well as the impact on the theoretical models will be presented.

  18. Hybrid Tourism-Related Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pasgaard, Jens Christian

    2014-01-01

    This article is rooted in theories presented in the PhD dissertation Tourism and Strategic Planning (Pasgaard 2012) and features a number of much discussed concepts related to the complicated phenomenon of tourism and to the discipline of strategic urban planning. It is beyond the scope of this a...

  19. Nuclear Structure Studies from Hg and Au Alpha Decay Chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goon, J. Tm.; Bingham, C. R.; Hartley, D. J.; Zhang, Jing-Ye; Riedinger, L. L.; Danchev, M.; Kondev, F. G.; Carpenter, M. P.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Abu Saleem, K. H.; Ahmad, I.; Davids, C. N.; Heinz, A.; Khoo, T. L.; Lauritsen, T.; Lister, C. J.; Poli, G. L.; Seweryniak, D.; Wiedenhover, I.; Ma, W. C.; Amro, H.; Reviol, W.; Cizewski, J. A.; Smith, M.

    2003-04-01

    Neutron deficient nuclei near the Z = 82 shell gap have been a source of great interest. This region is known to exhibit the phenomena of shape-coexistence and triaxiality. Alpha decay study of these nuclei coupled with gamma-rayspectroscopy data can give a better understanding of their nuclear structure properties. The decay chains of ^173-177Au and ^175-179Hg were studied following the bombardment of ^92,94,96Mo targets with ^84Sr beam from the ATLAS accelerator at the Argonne National Laboratory. The experiment utilized the Gammasphere array in conjunction with the Fragment Mass Analyzer (FMA) for mass identification and a Double-sided Silicon Strip Detector (DSSD) that was used to detect the recoiling implants and the alpha particles associated with each nuclide. An array of four Ge detectors and a low-energy photon spectrometer (LEPS) was used at the focal plane of the FMA to detect γ rays in coincidence with the α particles. This information was used to elucidate the α-decay fine structures. Inverse radioactive decay tagging was also useful in assigning certain fine structure α peaks to a particular nuclide. New α decay lines were observed and their energies, and half-lives were measured. These include fine structure lines in the α decays of ^174,176Au and ^173Pt. The decay schemes resulting from the fine structure observations will be presented. The α decay reduced widths are used to suggest spin and parity assignments. The structure of these states will be discussed in the framework of the Nilsson model and alpha decay selection rules. * This work is supported by the Department of Energy through contract numbers DE-FG02-96ER40983 (UT), W-31-109-ENG-38 (ANL), DE-FG02-95ER40939 (MSU), DE-FG05-88ER40406 (WU), and by the National Science Foundation (RU

  20. Nuclear Structure of N $\\simeq$ 56 Krypton Isotopes

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    In view of the strong overlap in subject matter, the proposals IP-39 and 40 were considered together by the ISOLDE-Committee, and a combined investigation was suggested to be presented to the PSCC.\\\\ \\\\ First results on $\\beta$-decay properties of very neutron-rich Br isotopes (Z=35) indicate a rather smooth onset of deformation already below N=60 and the existence of a deformed N=56 subshell gap. This behaviour is in contrast to earlier observations of a sudden onset of strong deformations at N=60 for $ \\% Z ge $ 37 nuclei. \\\\ \\\\ We propose to study at CERN-ISOLDE nuclear structure properties of N=55 - 57 Kr isotopes from $\\beta$-decay of $^9

  1. Structure of nuclear transition matrix elements for neutrinoless double- decay

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P K Rath

    2010-08-01

    The structure of nuclear transition matrix elements (NTMEs) required for the study of neutrinoless double- decay within light Majorana neutrino mass mechanism is disassembled in the PHFB model. The NTMEs are calculated using a set of HFB intrinsic wave functions, the reliability of which has been previously established by obtaining an overall agreement between the theoretically calculated spectroscopic properties and the available experimental data. Presently, we study the role of short-range correlations, radial evolution of NTMEs and deformation effects due to quadrupolar correlations. In addition, limits on effective light neutrino mass $\\langle m_{} \\rangle$ are extracted from the observed limits on half-lives $T_{1/2}^{0}$ of neutrinoless double- decay.

  2. Nuclear structure of 216Ra at high spin

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Muralithar; G Rodrigues; R P Singh; R K Bhowmik; P Mukherjee; B Sethi; I Mukherjee

    2012-09-01

    High-spin states of 216Ra ( = 88, = 128) have been investigated through 209Bi(10B, 3n) reaction at an incident beam energy of 55 MeV and 209Bi(11B, 4n) reaction at incident beam energies ranging from 65 to 78 MeV. Based on coincidence data, the level scheme for 216Ra has been considerably extended up to $∼ 33\\hbar$ spin and 7.2 MeV excitation energy in the present experiment with placement of 28 new -transitions over what has been reported earlier. Tentative spin-parity assignments are done for the newly proposed levels on the basis of the DCO ratios corresponding to strong gates. Empirical shell model calculations were carried out to provide an understanding of the underlying nuclear structure.

  3. Low-energy nuclear reactions in crystal structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagulya, A. V.; Dalkarov, O. D.; Negodaev, M. A.; Rusetskii, A. S.

    2017-09-01

    Results of studying low-energy nuclear reactions at the HELIS facility (LPI) are presented. Investigations of yields from DD reactions in deuterated crystal structures at deuteron energies of 10 to 25 keV show a considerable enhancement effect. It is shown that exposure of the deuterated targets to the H+ (proton) and Ne+ beams with energies from 10 to 25 keV and an X-ray beam with the energy of 20 to 30 keV stimulates DD reaction yields. For the CVD diamond target, it is shown that its orientation with respect to the deuteron beam affects the neutron yield. The D+ beam is shown to cause much higher heat release in the TiDx target than the H+ and Ne+ beams, and this heat release depends on the deuterium concentration in the target and the current density of the deuteron beam.

  4. Nuclear structure studies. Progress report, [1988--1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walters, W.B.

    1993-07-31

    In this report, newly initiated work at the FMA is described where the use of double-sided strip detectors for charged particle spectroscopy on nuclides near the proton drip line has been investigated. Half lives for proton emitting nuclides have been determined with improved uncertainties. Several sections report on the results of studies of model parameters in the Z = 50 region for even-even nuclides, for odd-mass nuclides and for odd-odd nuclides. Other studies are reported for nuclear orientation in Br and for structure of Pr-147 which lies in a transition zone between reflection-asymmetric, spherical, and prolate nuclides. And there is a section in which the positions of the single Particle levels in the A = 100 region are discussed.

  5. Relating structure and dynamics in organisation models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonkers, C.M.; Treur, J.

    To understand how an organisational structure relates to dynamics is an interesting fundamental challenge in the area of social modelling. Specifications of organisational structure usually have a diagrammatic form that abstracts from more detailed dynamics. Dynamic properties of agent systems,

  6. Development of a Method for Quantifying the Reliability of Nuclear Safety-Related Software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi Zhang; Michael W. Golay

    2003-10-01

    The work of our project is intended to help introducing digital technologies into nuclear power into nuclear power plant safety related software applications. In our project we utilize a combination of modern software engineering methods: design process discipline and feedback, formal methods, automated computer aided software engineering tools, automatic code generation, and extensive feasible structure flow path testing to improve software quality. The tactics include ensuring that the software structure is kept simple, permitting routine testing during design development, permitting extensive finished product testing in the input data space of most likely service and using test-based Bayesian updating to estimate the probability that a random software input will encounter an error upon execution. From the results obtained the software reliability can be both improved and its value estimated. Hopefully our success in the project's work can aid the transition of the nuclear enterprise into the modern information world. In our work, we have been using the proprietary sample software, the digital Signal Validation Algorithm (SVA), provided by Westinghouse. Also our work is being done with their collaboration. The SVA software is used for selecting the plant instrumentation signal set which is to be used as the input the digital Plant Protection System (PPS). This is the system that automatically decides whether to trip the reactor. In our work, we are using -001 computer assisted software engineering (CASE) tool of Hamilton Technologies Inc. This tool is capable of stating the syntactic structure of a program reflecting its state requirements, logical functions and data structure.

  7. Nuclear Structure at the Legnaro National Laboratories:. from High Intensity Stable to Radioactive Nuclear Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Angelis, G.

    2007-04-01

    To understand the properties of a nucleus, apart from establishing the interaction between its components, it is necessary to determine the arrangement of the nucleons, i.e. the structure of a nucleus. So far our knowledge about the structure of nuclei is mostly limited to nuclei close to the valley of stability, or nuclei with a deficiency of neutrons, which can be produced in fusion-evaporation reactions with stable beams and stable targets. Future perspectives in nuclear structure rely on radioactive ion beams (RIB) as well as on high intensity beams of stable ions (HISB). A world wide effort is presently going on in order to built the next generation radioactive ion beam facilities like the FAIR and the EURISOL projects. The LNL are contributing to such development through the design study of the EURISOL project as well as through the design and construction of the intermediate facility SPES. Concerning the instrumentation, particularly powerful is the combination of large acceptance spectrometers with highly segmented γ-detector arrays. An example is the CLARA γ-ray detector array coupled with the PRISMA spectrometer at the Legnaro National Laboratories (LNL). The physics aims achievable with such device complement studies performed with current radioactive beam (RIB) facilities. With this set-up we have recently investigated the stability of the N=50 shell closure. Here the comparison of the experimental data with shell model calculations seems to indicate a persistence of the N=50 shell gap down to Z=31. Also the study of proton rich nuclei can strongly benefit from the use of high intensity stable beams using fusion evaporation reactions at energies close to the Coulomb barrier. Future perspectives at LNL are based on an increase in intensity as well as on the availability of heavy ion species. Moreover a new ISOL facility (SPES) dedicated to the production and acceleration of radioactive neutron rich species is now under development at LNL. Among the new

  8. Future Perspectives in Nuclear Structure: From high intensity stable to radioactive nuclear beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Angelis, Giacomo

    2005-04-01

    Future perspectives in nuclear structure rely on radioactive nuclear beams as well as on high intensity beams of stable ions. Especially for neutron rich nuclei, deep-inelastic and multi-nucleon transfer reactions can be used to populate yrast and non yrast states. Particularly powerful is here the combination of large acceptance spectrometers with highly segmented γ-detector arrays. Such devices, eventually complemented by large cov- erage particle detectors, can provide the necessary channel selectivity to identify very rare signals. An example is the CLARA γ-ray detector array coupled with the PRISMA spectrometer at the Legnaro National Laboratories (LNL). The physics aims achievable with this setup will complement studies performed with current radioactive beam (RIB) facilities. With such set-up we have recently investigated the stability of the N=50 shell closure when moving towards more exotic systems. Here the comparison of the experi- mental data with shell model calculations seems to indicate a persistence of the N=50 shell gap down to Z=32. Future perspectives at LNL are based on an increase in in- tensity as well as on the availability of heavy ion species. Beams like 136Xe or 208Pb, which will be provided by the new PIAVE injector, can be used to drive the multinucleon flux toward the more exotic regions. Moreover a new ISOL facility (SPES) dedicated to the production and acceleration of radioactive neutron rich species is now under develop- ment at LNL. It will be based on an high intensity proton and deuteron LINAC. Induced fission fragments will be ionized and then accelerated using the presently existing super- conductive LINAC (ALPI). Among the new instrumentation the concept of γ-ray tracking has been recently introduced in nuclear spectroscopy. Detectors based on γ-ray tracking have position resolution capabilities with excellent performances both in efficiency and in achievable Doppler correction. A new γ-ray detector array (AGATA) based on

  9. Understanding the proton radius puzzle: Nuclear structure effects in light muonic atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Ji, Chen; Dinur, Nir Nevo; Bacca, Sonia; Barnea, Nir

    2015-01-01

    We present calculations of nuclear structure effects to the Lamb shift in light muonic atoms. We adopt a modern ab-initio approach by combining state-of-the-art nuclear potentials with the hyperspherical harmonics method. Our calculations are instrumental to the determination of nuclear charge radii in the Lamb shift measurements, which will shed light on the proton radius puzzle.

  10. Nuclear energy related capabilities at Sandia National Laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pickering, Susan Y. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Sandia National Laboratories' technology solutions are depended on to solve national and global threats to peace and freedom. Through science and technology, people, infrastructure, and partnerships, part of Sandia's mission is to meet the national needs in the areas of energy, climate and infrastructure security. Within this mission to ensure clean, abundant, and affordable energy and water is the Nuclear Energy and Fuel Cycle Programs. The Nuclear Energy and Fuel Cycle Programs have a broad range of capabilities, with both physical facilities and intellectual expertise. These resources are brought to bear upon the key scientific and engineering challenges facing the nation and can be made available to address the research needs of others. Sandia can support the safe, secure, reliable, and sustainable use of nuclear power worldwide by incorporating state-of-the-art technologies in safety, security, nonproliferation, transportation, modeling, repository science, and system demonstrations.

  11. A symmetry-related sequence-structure relation of proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Ruizhen; LI Mingfen; CHEN Hanlin; HUANG Yanzhao; XIAO Yi

    2005-01-01

    Proteins have regular tertiary structures but irregular amino acid sequences. This made it very difficult to decode the structural information in the protein sequences. Here we demonstrate that many small αprotein domains have hidden sequence symmetries characteristic of their pseudo-symmetric tertiary structures. We also present a modified method of recurrent plot to reveal this kind of the hidden sequence symmetry. The results may enable us to understand part of the relations between protein sequences and their tertiary structures.

  12. Are There Nuclear Structure Effects on the Isoscalar Giant Monopole Resonance and Nuclear Incompressibility near A~90?

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Y K; Howard, K B; Matta, J T; Senyigit, M; Itoh, M; Ando, S; Aoki, T; Uchiyama, A; Adachi, S; Fujiwara, M; Iwamoto, C; Tamii, A; Akimune, H; Kadono, C; Matsuda, Y; Nakahara, T; Furuno, T; Kawabata, T; Tsumura, M; Harakeh, M N; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N

    2016-01-01

    "Background-free" spectra of inelastic $\\alpha$-particle scattering have been measured at a beam energy of 385 MeV in $^{90, 92}$Zr and $^{92}$Mo at extremely forward angles, including 0$^{\\circ}$. The ISGMR strength distributions for the three nuclei coincide with each other, establishing clearly that nuclear incompressibility is not influenced by nuclear shell structure near $A\\sim$90 as was claimed in recent measurements.

  13. Medical lessons learned from chernobyl relative to nuclear detonations and failed nuclear reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallas, Cham E

    2012-12-01

    The Chernobyl disaster in 1986 involved the largest airborne release of radioactivity in history, more than 100 times as much radioactivity as the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombs together. The resulting emergency response, administrative blunders, and subsequent patient outcomes from this large-scale radiological disaster provide a wealth of information and valuable lessons for those who may find themselves having to deal with the staggering consequences of nuclear war. Research findings, administrative strategies (successful and otherwise), and resulting clinical procedures from the Chernobyl experience are reviewed to determine a current utility in addressing the appropriate protocols for a medical response to nuclear war. As various myths are still widely associated with radiation exposure, attention is given to the realities of a mass casualty medical response as it would occur with a nuclear detonation.

  14. Hybrid Tourism-Related Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pasgaard, Jens Christian

    2014-01-01

    This article is rooted in theories presented in the PhD dissertation Tourism and Strategic Planning (Pasgaard 2012) and features a number of much discussed concepts related to the complicated phenomenon of tourism and to the discipline of strategic urban planning. It is beyond the scope...... of this article to enter a detailed discussion of all mentioned concepts; however, it is important to set the stage by providing a few compressed notes on the overall approach to the phenomenon of tourism. Corresponding to the fluid transition between chores of everyday life and tourism behavior, the tourist...... space is not an unequivocal spatial specification. Rather, tourist space is a temporary condition, which depends on tourism activity and the mode of the observer. It is essential to understand and accept the liquidity of the tourism phenomenon and remember that tourism behavior and tourist space...

  15. Impact of structural aging on seismic risk assessment of reinforced concrete structures in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellingwood, B.; Song, J. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1996-03-01

    The Structural Aging Program is addressing the potential for degradation of concrete structural components and systems in nuclear power plants over time due to aging and aggressive environmental stressors. Structures are passive under normal operating conditions but play a key role in mitigating design-basis events, particularly those arising from external challenges such as earthquakes, extreme winds, fires and floods. Structures are plant-specific and unique, often are difficult to inspect, and are virtually impossible to replace. The importance of structural failures in accident mitigation is amplified because such failures may lead to common-cause failures of other components. Structural condition assessment and service life prediction must focus on a few critical components and systems within the plant. Components and systems that are dominant contributors to risk and that require particular attention can be identified through the mathematical formalism of a probabilistic risk assessment, or PRA. To illustrate, the role of structural degradation due to aging on plant risk is examined through the framework of a Level 1 seismic PRA of a nuclear power plant. Plausible mechanisms of structural degradation are found to increase the core damage probability by approximately a factor of two.

  16. Probing nuclear structure with nucleons; Sonder la structure nucleaire avec des nucleons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauge, E. [CEA Bruyeres-le-Chatel, Service de Physique Nucl aire, 91 (France)

    2007-07-01

    The goal of this lecture is to show how nucleon scattering can be used to probe the structure of target nuclei, and how nucleon scattering observables can be interpreted in terms of nuclear structure using microscopic optical potentials. After a brief overview of the specificities of nucleon-nucleus scattering, and a quick reminder on scattering theory, the main part of this lecture is devoted to the construction of optical potentials in which the target nuclei structure information is folded with an effective interaction. Several examples of such microscopic optical model potentials are given. (author)

  17. Nuclear containment structure subjected to commercial and fighter aircraft crash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadique, M.R., E-mail: rehan.sadique@gmail.com; Iqbal, M.A., E-mail: iqbalfce@iitr.ernet.in; Bhargava, P., E-mail: bhpdpfce@iitr.ernet.in

    2013-07-15

    Highlights: • Nuclear containment response has been studied against aircraft crash. • Concrete damaged plasticity and Johnson–Cook elasto-viscoplastic models were employed. • Boeing 747-400 and Boeing 767-400 aircrafts caused global failure of containment. • Airbus A320 and Boeing 707-320 aircrafts caused local damage. • Tension damage of concrete was found more prominent compared to compression damage. -- Abstract: The response of a boiling water reactor (BWR) nuclear containment vessel has been studied against commercial and fighter aircraft crash using a nonlinear finite element code ABAQUS. The aircrafts employed were Boeing 747-400, Boeing 767-400, Airbus A-320, Boeing 707-320 and Phantom F4. The containment was modeled as a three-dimensional deformable reinforced concrete structure while the loading of aircraft was assigned using the respective reaction–time curve. The location of strike was considered near the junction of dome and cylinder, and the angle of incidence, normal to the containment surface. The material behavior of the concrete was incorporated using the damaged plasticity model while that of the reinforcement, the Johnson–Cook elasto-viscoplastic model. The containment could not sustain the impact of Boeing 747-400 and Boeing 767-400 aircrafts and suffered rupture of concrete around the impact region leading to global failure. On the other hand, the maximum local deformation at the point of impact was found to be 0.998 m, 0.099 m, 0.092 m, 0.089 m, and 0.074 m against Boeing 747-400, Phantom F4, Boeing 767, Boeing 707-320 and Airbus A-320 aircrafts respectively. The results of the present study were compared with those of the previous analytical and numerical investigations with respect to the maximum deformation and overall behavior of the containment.

  18. Research on a laser ultrasound method for testing the quality of a nuclear radiation protection structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kuanshuang; Zhou, Zhenggan; Ma, Liyin

    2017-02-01

    Laser ultrasonics has been investigated for inspecting the quality of a nuclear radiation protection structure. A possibility is proposed to improve the signal to noise ratio (SNR) of a laser ultrasonic inspection system. Then, a nuclear radiation protection structure composed of an AISI 1045 steel sheet connected with a lead alloy sheet by using an epoxy resin adhesive was manufactured with simulated defects. A non-contact laser ultrasonic inspection system, where the measured signals were filtered using a wavelet threshold de-noising method, was established to conduct a series of experiments. The proposed signal processing method can significantly improve the SNR of measured laser ultrasound signals on a rough solid surface. Compared with the SNR of original ultrasonic signals measured in transmission and reflection, the SNR of processed transmitted and reflected signals is improved by 13.8 and 16.6 dB, respectively. Moreover, laser ultrasonic C-scans based on the transmission and pulse-echo method can detect the simulated de-bonding defects, and the relative deviation between the measured sizes and design values is below 9%. Therefore, the laser ultrasonic method combined with effective signal processing can achieve the quantitative characterization of de-bonding defects in nuclear radiation protection structures.

  19. The Surface Structure of Relative Clauses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Michael A.

    1974-01-01

    This article attempts to show that a more rigorous approach to surface structure analysis can reveal distinctions just as subtle as those discovered through analyzing deep structures or transformations. Relative clauses are examined in relation to nominal constructions, and alternatives to restrictive and non-restrictive classifications are…

  20. Morality and Nuclear Energy : Perceptions of Risks and Benefits, Personal Norms, and Willingness to Take Action Related to Nuclear Energy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, Judith I. M.; Steg, Linda

    2010-01-01

    We examined factors underlying people's willingness to take action in favor of or against nuclear energy from a moral perspective. We conducted a questionnaire study among a sample of the Dutch population (N = 123). As expected, perceptions of risks and benefits were related to personal norms (PN),

  1. Morality and Nuclear Energy : Perceptions of Risks and Benefits, Personal Norms, and Willingness to Take Action Related to Nuclear Energy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, Judith I. M.; Steg, Linda

    We examined factors underlying people's willingness to take action in favor of or against nuclear energy from a moral perspective. We conducted a questionnaire study among a sample of the Dutch population (N = 123). As expected, perceptions of risks and benefits were related to personal norms (PN),

  2. Defect assessment in nuclear components: R and D related to industrial problems - synthesis of the research, training and teaching activities; Analyse de nocivite de defauts dans les structures nucleaires: R et D associee aux problemes industriels - synthese des activites de recherche, d'encadrement et d'enseignement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marie, St

    2007-06-15

    Nuclear industry pays a particular attention to structures integrity problems: well-aware of the possible catastrophic consequence of a major accident, everything is carried out to minimise the risk of such a situation. From the design, and during all the operating life of the plant, a high level of safety is required and checks by the safety authorities, on the basis of reports made by the operator. These two entities ask for R and D activities to support the improvement of the knowledge of the phenomena already identified (as in the case of the vessel of the PWR) or to bring some element of understanding to situation not considered yet, up to the first incident (as in 1998 with the fatigue problems in the thermal mixing zone, at the origin of the Civaux arrest). Among the CEA teams concerned with these problems, the Laboratory of the Structures Integrity and of Normalisation aims to study the integrity problems in metallic nuclear structures leaning on exceptional experimental means: the RESEDA platform allows the realisation of large-scaled tests on analytical tests (representative of analysed phenomena) to reproduce the industrial situation, linked to various and accurate equipment for the measures and the analyses. Three industrial thematics represent to main part of my research activities at CEA in the fracture mechanics field: - the industrial case of the PWR vessel is related to brittle fracture of the ferritic steels, - the piping components, related to ductile tearing and fracture in the brittle-to-ductile domain, - the high temperature fracture mechanics for the components submitted to very complex loadings. (author)

  3. Integrating Structured Metadata with Relational Affinity Propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Plangprasopchok, Anon; Getoor, Lise

    2010-01-01

    Structured and semi-structured data describing entities, taxonomies and ontologies appears in many domains. There is a huge interest in integrating structured information from multiple sources; however integrating structured data to infer complex common structures is a difficult task because the integration must aggregate similar structures while avoiding structural inconsistencies that may appear when the data is combined. In this work, we study the integration of structured social metadata: shallow personal hierarchies specified by many individual users on the SocialWeb, and focus on inferring a collection of integrated, consistent taxonomies. We frame this task as an optimization problem with structural constraints. We propose a new inference algorithm, which we refer to as Relational Affinity Propagation (RAP) that extends affinity propagation (Frey and Dueck 2007) by introducing structural constraints. We validate the approach on a real-world social media dataset, collected from the photosharing website ...

  4. Morality and nuclear energy: perceptions of risks and benefits, personal norms, and willingness to take action related to nuclear energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Groot, Judith I M; Steg, Linda

    2010-09-01

    We examined factors underlying people's willingness to take action in favor of or against nuclear energy from a moral perspective. We conducted a questionnaire study among a sample of the Dutch population (N = 123). As expected, perceptions of risks and benefits were related to personal norms (PN), that is, feelings of moral obligation toward taking action in favor of or against nuclear energy. In turn, PN predicted willingness to take action. Furthermore, PN mediated the relationships between perceptions of risk and benefits and willingness to take action. In line with our hypothesis, beliefs about the risks and benefits of nuclear energy were less powerful in explaining PN for supporters compared to PN of opponents. Also, beliefs on risks and benefits and PN explained significantly more variance in willingness to take action of opponents than of supporters. Our results suggest that a moral framework is useful to explain willingness to take action in favor of and against nuclear energy, and that people are more likely to protest in favor of or against nuclear energy when PN are strong. © 2010 Society for Risk Analysis.

  5. Nucleus-Dependent Valence-Space Approach to Nuclear Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroberg, S. R.; Calci, A.; Hergert, H.; Holt, J. D.; Bogner, S. K.; Roth, R.; Schwenk, A.

    2017-01-01

    We present a nucleus-dependent valence-space approach for calculating ground and excited states of nuclei, which generalizes the shell-model in-medium similarity renormalization group to an ensemble reference with fractionally filled orbitals. Because the ensemble is used only as a reference, and not to represent physical states, no symmetry restoration is required. This allows us to capture three-nucleon (3 N ) forces among valence nucleons with a valence-space Hamiltonian specifically targeted to each nucleus of interest. Predicted ground-state energies from carbon through nickel agree with results of other large-space ab initio methods, generally to the 1% level. In addition, we show that this new approach is required in order to obtain convergence for nuclei in the upper p and s d shells. Finally, we address the 1+/3+ inversion problem in 22Na and 46V. This approach extends the reach of ab initio nuclear structure calculations to essentially all light- and medium-mass nuclei.

  6. Monitoring the Geneseo Nuclear Structure Lab with VISION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicklaw, R.; Padalino, S.; McLean, J.

    2002-10-01

    VISION (Virtual Instrument System Information) is a LabVIEW based program designed to monitor a 2 MV Van de Graaff accelerator in the Geneseo Nuclear Structure Laboratory (GNSL). The purpose of the system is to monitor and notify the user of potentially critical situations in the lab. Main parameters of interest are the water coolant temperatures in the diffusion pumps, pressures within the vacuum chambers, and Van de Graaff operational parameters. LabVIEW reads these values and then displays them on monitors located throughout the laboratory. The user can set alarm limits on the relevant parameters, and when exceeded notifies the user verbally and visually. Recent additions to the VISION program include the water level sensor, calibration of the pressure readings, a web server application, and data logging. The VISION system is Internet accessible ^1, data from the main screen is displayed over the web for remote monitoring of the accelerator. Another useful monitoring tool is the data logger, which writes acquired data to a formatted text document at specified intervals. A future goal for VISION is to not only monitor, but to control aspects of the GNSL with LabVIEW. ^1 Webpage accessible at: http://s69n144.sci.geneseo.edu/vision.htm * Research funded in part by the United States Department of Energy

  7. The shell model. Towards a unified description of nuclear structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poves, Alfredo [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Universidad Autonoma Cantoblanco, 28049 - Madrid (Spain); Collaboration: La Direction des Sciences de la Matiere du CEA (FR); Le Fonds National de la Recherche Scientifique de Belgique (BE)

    1998-12-31

    In this series of lectures we present the foundations of the spherical shell model that we treat as an approximation to the exact solution of the full secular problem. We introduce the notions of valence space, effective interaction and effective operator. We analyse the structure of the realistic effective interactions, identifying their monopole part with the spherical mean field. The multipole Hamiltonian is shown to have a universal (simple) form that includes pairing (isovector and isoscalar), quadrupole, octupole, deca-pole, and ({sigma}{center_dot}{tau})({sigma}{center_dot}{tau}). We describe the methods of resolution of the secular problem, in particular the Lanczos method. The model is applied to the description of nuclear deformation and its relationship with the deformed mean field theories is studied. We propose a new symmetry, `quasi`-SU3, to understand deformation in the spherical basis. Finally, we discuss the domain of nuclei very far from the valley of {beta} stability, addressing the vanishing of some magic closures that can be explained in terms of intruder states. (author) 53 refs., 20 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Nuclear structure and reaction studies at medium energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, G.W.; Ray, R.L.

    1990-10-01

    This document constitutes the (1988--1991) technical progress report for the ongoing medium energy physics research program supported by the US Department of Energy through special Research Grant FG05-88ER40444. The experiments discussed are conducted at the Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL) Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF), the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) facility of the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), and at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL). The overall motivation for the work discussed in this document is driven by three main objectives: (1) provide hadron-nucleon and hadron-nucleus scattering data which serve to facilitate the study of effective two-body interactions, test (and possibly determine) nuclear structure, and help study reaction mechanisms and dynamics;(2) provide unique, first-of-a-kind exploratory'' hadron-nucleus scattering data in the hope that such data will lead to discovery of new phenomena and new physics; and (3) perform precision tests of fundamental interactions, such as rare decay searches, whose observation would imply fundamental new physics.

  9. Alterations in nuclear structure promote lupus autoimmunity in a mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namrata Singh

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is an autoimmune disorder characterized by the development of autoantibodies that recognize components of the cell nucleus. The vast majority of lupus research has focused on either the contributions of immune cell dysfunction or the genetics of the disease. Because granulocytes isolated from human SLE patients had alterations in neutrophil nuclear morphology that resembled the Pelger–Huet anomaly, and had prominent mis-splicing of mRNA encoding the nuclear membrane protein lamin B receptor (LBR, consistent with their Pelger–Huet-like nuclear morphology, we used a novel mouse model system to test the hypothesis that a disruption in the structure of the nucleus itself also contributes to the development of lupus autoimmunity. The lupus-prone mouse strain New Zealand White (NZW was crossed with c57Bl/6 mice harboring a heterozygous autosomal dominant mutation in Lbr (B6.Lbric/+, and the (NZW×B6.LbricF1 offspring were evaluated for induction of lupus autoimmunity. Only female (NZW×B6.LbricF1 mice developed lupus autoimmunity, which included splenomegaly, kidney damage and autoantibodies. Kidney damage was accompanied by immune complex deposition, and perivascular and tubule infiltration of mononuclear cells. The titers of anti-chromatin antibodies exceeded those of aged female MRL-Faslpr mice, and were predominantly of the IgG2 subclasses. The anti-nuclear antibody staining profile of female (NZW×B6.LbricF1 sera was complex, and consisted of an anti-nuclear membrane reactivity that colocalized with the A-type lamina, in combination with a homogeneous pattern that was related to the recognition of histones with covalent modifications that are associated with gene activation. An anti-neutrophil IgM recognizing calreticulin, but not myeloperoxidase (MPO or proteinase 3 (PR3, was also identified. Thus, alterations in nuclear structure contribute to lupus autoimmunity when expressed in the context of a lupus

  10. Alterations in nuclear structure promote lupus autoimmunity in a mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Namrata; Johnstone, Duncan B.; Martin, Kayla A.; Tempera, Italo; Kaplan, Mariana J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disorder characterized by the development of autoantibodies that recognize components of the cell nucleus. The vast majority of lupus research has focused on either the contributions of immune cell dysfunction or the genetics of the disease. Because granulocytes isolated from human SLE patients had alterations in neutrophil nuclear morphology that resembled the Pelger–Huet anomaly, and had prominent mis-splicing of mRNA encoding the nuclear membrane protein lamin B receptor (LBR), consistent with their Pelger–Huet-like nuclear morphology, we used a novel mouse model system to test the hypothesis that a disruption in the structure of the nucleus itself also contributes to the development of lupus autoimmunity. The lupus-prone mouse strain New Zealand White (NZW) was crossed with c57Bl/6 mice harboring a heterozygous autosomal dominant mutation in Lbr (B6.Lbric/+), and the (NZW×B6.Lbric)F1 offspring were evaluated for induction of lupus autoimmunity. Only female (NZW×B6.Lbric)F1 mice developed lupus autoimmunity, which included splenomegaly, kidney damage and autoantibodies. Kidney damage was accompanied by immune complex deposition, and perivascular and tubule infiltration of mononuclear cells. The titers of anti-chromatin antibodies exceeded those of aged female MRL-Faslpr mice, and were predominantly of the IgG2 subclasses. The anti-nuclear antibody staining profile of female (NZW×B6.Lbric)F1 sera was complex, and consisted of an anti-nuclear membrane reactivity that colocalized with the A-type lamina, in combination with a homogeneous pattern that was related to the recognition of histones with covalent modifications that are associated with gene activation. An anti-neutrophil IgM recognizing calreticulin, but not myeloperoxidase (MPO) or proteinase 3 (PR3), was also identified. Thus, alterations in nuclear structure contribute to lupus autoimmunity when expressed in the context of a lupus

  11. Investigations of nuclear structure and nuclear reactions induced by complex projectiles. Progress report, September 1, 1991--August 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarantites, D.G.

    1992-12-01

    The research program described touches five areas of nuclear physics: nuclear structure studies at high spin (hyperdeformation in the mass A {approx_equal} 182 region, structure of {sup 182}Hg and {sup 182}Au at high spin, a highly deformed band in {sup 136}Pm and the anomalous h{sub 11/2} proton crossing in the A{approximately}135 superdeformed region), studies at the interface between structure and reactions (population of entry states in heavy-ion fusion reactions, nuclear structure effects in proton evaporation spectra, nuclear structure- dependent entry state population by total spectroscopy, entrance channel effects in fusion near the barrier, lifetimes of subbarrier {alpha} particles by the atomic clock method), production and study of hot nuclei (the statistical model evaporation code EVAP, statistical emission of deuterons and tritons from highly excited compound nuclei, heavy-fragment emission as a probe of the thermal properties of highly excited compound nuclei, use of incoming-wave boundary condition transmission coefficients in the statistical model: implications in the particle evaporation spectra, study of transparency in the optical model), reaction mechanism studies (binary character of highly dissipative {sup 209}Bi + {sup 136}Xe collisions at E/A=28.2 MeV), and development and use of novel techniques and instrumentation in these areas of research (including a 4{pi} channel selection device, a novel x-ray detector, and a simple channel-selecting detector).

  12. Investigations of nuclear structure and nuclear reactions induced by complex projectiles. [Dept. of Chemistry, Washington Univ. , St. Louis, Mo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarantites, D.G.

    1992-01-01

    The research program described touches five areas of nuclear physics: nuclear structure studies at high spin (hyperdeformation in the mass A [approx equal] 182 region, structure of [sup 182]Hg and [sup 182]Au at high spin, a highly deformed band in [sup 136]Pm and the anomalous h[sub 11/2] proton crossing in the A[approximately]135 superdeformed region), studies at the interface between structure and reactions (population of entry states in heavy-ion fusion reactions, nuclear structure effects in proton evaporation spectra, nuclear structure- dependent entry state population by total spectroscopy, entrance channel effects in fusion near the barrier, lifetimes of subbarrier [alpha] particles by the atomic clock method), production and study of hot nuclei (the statistical model evaporation code EVAP, statistical emission of deuterons and tritons from highly excited compound nuclei, heavy-fragment emission as a probe of the thermal properties of highly excited compound nuclei, use of incoming-wave boundary condition transmission coefficients in the statistical model: implications in the particle evaporation spectra, study of transparency in the optical model), reaction mechanism studies (binary character of highly dissipative [sup 209]Bi + [sup 136]Xe collisions at E/A=28.2 MeV), and development and use of novel techniques and instrumentation in these areas of research (including a 4[pi] channel selection device, a novel x-ray detector, and a simple channel-selecting detector).

  13. Development of a seismic damage assessment program for nuclear power plant structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Hyun Moo; Cho, Yang Heui; Shin, Hyun Mok [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2001-12-15

    The most part of the nuclear power plants operating currently in Korea are more than 20 years old and obviously we cannot pretend that their original performance is actually maintained. In addition, earthquake occurrences show an increasing trend all over the world, and Korea can no more be considered as a zone safe from earthquake. Therefore, need is to guarantee the safety of these power plant structures against seismic accident, to decide to maintain them operational and to obtain data relative to maintenance/repair. Such objectives can be reached by damage assessment using inelastic seismic analysis considering aging degradation. It appears to be more important particularly for the structure enclosing the nuclear reactor that must absolutely protect against any radioactive leakage. Actually, the tendency of the technical world, led by the OECD/NEA, BNL in the United States, CEA in France and IAEA, is to develop researches or programs to assess the seismic safety considering aging degradation of operating nuclear power plants. Regard to the above-mentioned international technical trend, a technology to establish inelastic seismic analysis considering aging degradation so as to assess damage level and seismic safety margin appears to be necessary. Damage assessment and prediction system to grasp in real-time the actual seismic resistance capacity and damage level by 3-dimensional graphic representations are also required.

  14. Development of a seismic damage assessment program for nuclear power plant structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Hyun Moo; Cho, Ho Hyun; Cho, Yang Hui [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2000-12-15

    Some of nuclear power plants operating currently in Korea have been passed about 20 years after construction. Moreover, in the case of KORI I the service year is over 20 years, so their abilities are different from initial abilities. Also, earthquake outbreak increase, our country is not safe area for earthquake. Therefore, need is to guarantee the safety of these power plant structures against seismic accident, to decide to maintain them operational and to obtain data relative to maintenance/repair. Such objectives can be reached by damage assessment using inelastic seismic analysis considering aging degradation. It appears to be more important particularly for the structure enclosing the nuclear reactor that must absolutely protect against any radioactive leakage. Actually, the tendency of the technical world, led by the OECD/NEA, BNL in the United States, CEA in France and IAEA, is to develop researches or programs to assess the seismic safety considering aging degradation of operating nuclear power plants. Regard to the above-mentioned international technical trend, a technology to establish inelastic seismic analysis considering aging degradation so as to assess damage level and seismic safety margin appears to be necessary. Damage assessment and prediction system to grasp in real-time the actual seismic resistance capacity and damage level by 3-dimensional graphic representations are also required.

  15. U.S.-Pakistani Nuclear Relations: A Strategic Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    makeup  can  influence  the  quality  of  the...as  a  form  of  nuclear  “discrimination.”    Western  commentators  reason   that  the   shadow  of  the  A.Q...the  legacy  of  A.Q.  Khan  continues  to  cast  a   shadow  on  Pakistan’s  proliferation   reputation.   Before

  16. PREFACE: 11th International Spring Seminar on Nuclear Physics: Shell Model and Nuclear Structure - achievements of the past two decades

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    The 11th International Seminar on Nuclear Physics was held in Ischia from May 12 to May 16, 2014. This Seminar was dedicated to Aldo Covello, who has been the promoter of this series of meetings, which started in Sorrento in 1986 and continued with meetings held every two or three years in the Naples area. Aldo's idea was to offer to a group of researchers, actively working in selected fields of Nuclear Physics, the opportunity to confront their points of view in a lively and informal way. The choice for the period of the year, Spring, as well as the sites chosen reflected this intent. The first meeting was of a purely theoretical nature, but it was immediately clear that the scope of these conferences needed to be enlarged calling into play the experimental community. Then, starting from the second meeting, all the following ones have been characterized by fruitful discussion between theoretical and experimental researchers on current achievements and future developments of nuclear structure. This may be read, in fact, as one of the motivating factors for Aldo's election as Fellow of the American Physical Society in 2008 "... for his outstanding contributions to the international nuclear physics community by providing, for over two decades, a venue for theorists and experimentalists to share their latest ideas." The present meeting, organized by Aldo's former students and with the benefit of his suggestions, has maintained this tradition. The title "Shell model and nuclear structure: achievements of the past two decades" recalls that of the 2nd International Spring Seminar "Shell Model and Nuclear Structure: where do we stand?". The main aim of this 11th Seminar was, in fact, to discuss the changes of the past two decades on our view of nuclei in terms of shell structure as well as the perspectives of the shell model, which has been one of the key points in Aldo's research. This point is well accounted by the Opening Speech of Igal Talmi, one of the fathers of the

  17. Nuclear Structure Functions at Low-$x$ in a Holographic Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Agozzino, L; Colangelo, P

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear effects in deep inelastic scattering at low$-x$ are phenomenologically described changing the typical dynamical and/or kinematical scales characterizing the free nucleon case. In a holographic approach, this rescaling is an analytical property of the computed structure function $F_2(x,Q^2)$. This function is given by the sum of a conformal term and of a contribution due to quark confinement, depending on IR hard-wall parameter $z_0$ and on the mean square distances, related to a parameter $Q^\\prime$, among quarks and gluons in the target. The holographic structure function per nucleon in a nucleus $A$ is evaluated showing that a rescaling of the typical nucleon size, $z_0$ and $Q^\\prime$, due to nuclear binding, can be reabsorbed in a $Q^2$-rescaling scheme. The difference between neutron and proton structure functions and the effects of the longitudinal structure functions can also be taken into account. The obtained theoretical results favourably compare with the experimental data.

  18. Improved estimates of the nuclear structure corrections in $\\mu$D

    CERN Document Server

    Hernandez, Oscar Javier; Bacca, Sonia; Dinur, Nir Nevo; Barnea, Nir

    2014-01-01

    We calculate the nuclear structure corrections to the Lamb shift in muonic deuterium by using state-of-the-art nucleon-nucleon potentials derived from chiral effective field theory. Our calculations complement previous theoretical work obtained from phenomenological potentials and the zero range approximation. The study of the chiral convergence order-by-order and the dependence on cutoff variations allows us to improve the estimates on the nuclear structure corrections and the theoretical uncertainty coming from nuclear potentials. This will enter the determination of the nuclear radius from ongoing muonic deuterium experiments at PSI.

  19. Zirconium-based alloys, nuclear fuel rods and nuclear reactors including such alloys, and related methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Robert Dominick

    2014-09-09

    Zirconium-based metal alloy compositions comprise zirconium, a first additive in which the permeability of hydrogen decreases with increasing temperatures at least over a temperature range extending from 350.degree. C. to 750.degree. C., and a second additive having a solubility in zirconium over the temperature range extending from 350.degree. C. to 750.degree. C. At least one of a solubility of the first additive in the second additive over the temperature range extending from 350.degree. C. to 750.degree. C. and a solubility of the second additive in the first additive over the temperature range extending from 350.degree. C. to 750.degree. C. is higher than the solubility of the second additive in zirconium over the temperature range extending from 350.degree. C. to 750.degree. C. Nuclear fuel rods include a cladding material comprising such metal alloy compositions, and nuclear reactors include such fuel rods. Methods are used to fabricate such zirconium-based metal alloy compositions.

  20. Relating structure and dynamics in organisation models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonkers, C.M.; Treur, J.

    2008-01-01

    To understand how an organisational structure relates to dynamics is an interesting fundamental challenge in the area of social modelling. Specifications of organisational structure usually have a diagrammatic form that abstracts from more detailed dynamics. Dynamic properties of agent systems, on t

  1. Public participation processes related to nuclear research installations: what are the driving factors behind participation intention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcanu, Catrinel; Perko, Tanja; Laes, Erik

    2014-04-01

    This article addresses organised public participation processes related to installations for nuclear research. The aim was to determine predictors that could provide an empirical insight into the motivations underlying people's intended level of involvement. The results highlight attitude towards participation and moral norm as the strongest predictors for participation intention. Other significant predictors were time constraints, attitude towards nuclear energy, subjective and descriptive norms, and knowledge. An opposing relationship is noted between participation intention and attitude towards nuclear energy. At the same time, people who are more knowledgeable about the nuclear domain seem more willing to get involved. The analysis also revealed that financial benefits do not influence people's intended involvement in participation processes related to nuclear research installations. The results reported here are based on empirical data from a large-scale public opinion survey (N = 1020) carried out in Belgium during May-June 2011.

  2. Nuclear methods in technology of Si:Er structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naidenov, V.O. [Ioffe Physico-Technical Inst., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Sobolev, N.A. [Ioffe Physico-Technical Inst., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Alexandrov, O.B. [Ioffe Physico-Technical Inst., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Bresler, M.S. [Ioffe Physico-Technical Inst., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Gusev, O.V. [Ioffe Physico-Technical Inst., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Gusinskii, G.M. [Ioffe Physico-Technical Inst., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Shek, E.I. [Ioffe Physico-Technical Inst., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Makaviichuk, M.I. [Institute of Microelectronics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Yaroslavl (Russian Federation); Parshin, E.O. [Institute of Microelectronics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Yaroslavl (Russian Federation)

    1995-05-01

    Formation of optically and electrically active Er-related centers and redistribution of Er atoms in Si:Er structures were investigated at annealings in different atmospheres. It is shown that annealing in chlorine-containing atmosphere leads to an increase of photoluminescence intensity at wavelength of 1.54 {mu}m as compared with annealing in argon or oxygen ambient. Annealing atmosphere also affects the behaviour of Er atoms and electrically active Er-related defects introduced by means of diffusion from film source. Silicon nitride films covering a surface of wafers were used to investigate the effect of annealing atmosphere on Er redistribution. Changes of concentration and penetration depth of Er atoms and electrically active Er-related centers dependent on annealing medium arose due to generation of excess vacancies and/or self-interstitials near surface. (orig.).

  3. Response of base-isolated nuclear structures to extreme earthquake shaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Manish, E-mail: mkumar2@buffalo.edu; Whittaker, Andrew S.; Constantinou, Michael C.

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Response-history analysis of nuclear structures base-isolated using lead–rubber bearings is performed. • Advanced numerical model of lead–rubber bearing is used to capture behavior under extreme earthquake shaking. • Results of response-history analysis obtained using simplified and advanced model of lead–rubber bearings are compared. • Heating of the lead core and variation in buckling load and axial stiffness affect the response. - Abstract: Seismic isolation using low damping rubber and lead–rubber bearings is a viable strategy for mitigating the effects of extreme earthquake shaking on safety-related nuclear structures. The mechanical properties of these bearings are not expected to change substantially in design basis shaking. However, under shaking more intense than design basis, the properties of the lead cores in lead–rubber bearings may degrade due to heating associated with energy dissipation, some bearings in an isolation system may experience net tension, and the compression and tension stiffness may be affected by the lateral displacement of the isolation system. The effects of intra-earthquake changes in mechanical properties on the response of base-isolated nuclear power plants (NPPs) are investigated using an advanced numerical model of a lead–rubber bearing that has been verified and validated, and implemented in OpenSees. A macro-model is used for response-history analysis of base-isolated NPPs. Ground motions are selected and scaled to be consistent with response spectra for design basis and beyond design basis earthquake shaking at the site of the Diablo Canyon Nuclear Generating Station. Ten isolation systems of two periods and five characteristic strengths are analyzed. The responses obtained using simplified and advanced isolator models are compared. Strength degradation due to heating of lead cores and changes in buckling load most significantly affect the response of the base-isolated NPP.

  4. Developing a structural health monitoring system for nuclear dry cask storage canister

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoyi; Lin, Bin; Bao, Jingjing; Giurgiutiu, Victor; Knight, Travis; Lam, Poh-Sang; Yu, Lingyu

    2015-03-01

    Interim storage of spent nuclear fuel from reactor sites has gained additional importance and urgency for resolving waste-management-related technical issues. In total, there are over 1482 dry cask storage system (DCSS) in use at US plants, storing 57,807 fuel assemblies. Nondestructive material condition monitoring is in urgent need and must be integrated into the fuel cycle to quantify the "state of health", and more importantly, to guarantee the safe operation of radioactive waste storage systems (RWSS) during their extended usage period. A state-of-the-art nuclear structural health monitoring (N-SHM) system based on in-situ sensing technologies that monitor material degradation and aging for nuclear spent fuel DCSS and similar structures is being developed. The N-SHM technology uses permanently installed low-profile piezoelectric wafer sensors to perform long-term health monitoring by strategically using a combined impedance (EMIS), acoustic emission (AE), and guided ultrasonic wave (GUW) approach, called "multimode sensing", which is conducted by the same network of installed sensors activated in a variety of ways. The system will detect AE events resulting from crack (case for study in this project) and evaluate the damage evolution; when significant AE is detected, the sensor network will switch to the GUW mode to perform damage localization, and quantification as well as probe "hot spots" that are prone to damage for material degradation evaluation using EMIS approach. The N-SHM is expected to eventually provide a systematic methodology for assessing and monitoring nuclear waste storage systems without incurring human radiation exposure.

  5. Structural Aging Program approach to providing an improved basis for aging management of safety-related concrete structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Ellingwood, B. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)

    1993-11-01

    The Structural Aging (SAG) Program is being conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC). The SAG Program is addressing the aging management of safety-related concrete structures in nuclear power plants for the purpose of providing improved technical bases for their continued service. The program is organized into four tasks: Program Management, Materials Property Data Base, Structural Component Assessment/Repair Technologies, and Quantitative Methodology for Continued Service Determinations. Objectives and a summary of recent accomplishments under each of these tasks are presented.

  6. Damage - Permeability relation for concrete. Applications to structural computations; Relation endommagement permeabilite pour les betons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jason, L

    2004-10-01

    The relation between damage and permeability is of great importance to evaluate the consequences of a mechanical loading on the hydraulic integrity of sensitive concrete structures like containment buildings of nuclear power plants. An elastic plastic damage constitutive law for the mechanical behaviour is first developed. The model is validated on elementary and structural applications with a special focus on the efficiency of the numerical tools (tangent matrices). A relation between water saturation (drying), damage and permeability is then proposed, based on theoretical and experimental observations. Finally, a Representative Structural Volume of a containment vessel is studied to highlight the influence of hygro - mechanical loading on the hydraulic behaviour (distribution of gas pressure). (author)

  7. Structure and Activities of Nuclear Medicine in Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgazzar, Abdelhamid H; Owunwanne, Azuwuike; Alenezi, Saud

    2016-07-01

    The practice of nuclear medicine in Kuwait began in 1965 as a clinic for treating thyroid diseases. The practice developed gradually and until 1981 when the Faculty of Medicine established the Division of Nuclear Medicine in the Department of Radiology, which later became a separate department responsible for establishing and managing the practice in all hospitals of Kuwait. In 1987, a nuclear medicine residency program was begun and it is administered by Kuwait Institute for Medical Specializations originally as a 4-year but currently as a 5-year program. Currently there are 11 departments in the ministry of health hospitals staffed by 49 qualified attending physicians, mostly the diplomats of the Kuwait Institute for Medical Specializations nuclear medicine residency program, 4 academic physicians, 2 radiopharmacists, 2 physicists, and 130 technologists. These departments are equipped with 33 dual-head gamma cameras, 10 SPET/CT, 5 PET/CT, 2 cyclotrons, 1 breast-specific gamma imaging, 1 positron-emitting mammography, 10 thyroid uptake units, 8 technegas machines, 7 PET infusion systems, and 8 treadmills. Activities of nuclear medicine in Kuwait include education and training, clinical service, and research. Education includes nuclear medicine technology program in the Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, the 5-year residency program, medical school teaching distributed among different modules of the integrated curriculum with 14 didactic lecture, and other teaching sessions in nuclear medicine MSc program, which run concurrently with the first part of the residency program. The team of Nuclear Medicine in Kuwait has been active in research and has published more than 300 paper, 11 review articles, 12 book chapters, and 17 books in addition to 36 grants and 2 patents. A PhD program approved by Kuwait University Council would begin in 2016.

  8. A study on establishing export system of nuclear related equipments to the IAEA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Ki Dong; Lee, Man Ki; Moon, Ki Hwan; Kim, Seung Soo; Lim, Chae Young; Kim, Hwa Sup; Min, Tae Sik [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2002-04-01

    In spite of the advanced status in the international nuclear society, exports of domestic nuclear industries to procurement market of the international organizations has been negligible. This study briefly explained the role and the structure of the IAEA. Then, this study surveyed the size of procurement market, major procurement items, and procurement process. This study also gave an export example to the IAEA from Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute for the ease of understanding the procurement process. Based on these surveys and analysis, this study established the goal and strategy for exports of nuclear equipments to the IAEA. Besides, this study surveyed domestic nuclear industries that have potential to export their products to the IAEA. Then, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, by a cooperation with Korea Atomic Industrial Forum Inc., held workshop on 'export of nuclear equipments to IAEA' in May 2001 for them. 4 refs., 1 fig., 10 tabs. (Author)

  9. Structural basis for the regulation of nuclear import of Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) by phosphorylation of the nuclear localization signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakada, Ryohei; Hirano, Hidemi; Matsuura, Yoshiyuki

    2017-02-26

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) is expressed in every EBV-positive tumor and is essential for the maintenance, replication, and transcription of the EBV genome in the nucleus of host cells. EBNA1 is a serine phosphoprotein, and it has been shown that phosphorylation of S385 in the nuclear localization signal (NLS) of EBNA1 increases the binding affinity to the nuclear import adaptor importin-α1 as well as importin-α5, and stimulates nuclear import of EBNA1. To gain insights into how phosphorylation of the EBNA1 NLS regulates nuclear import, we have determined the crystal structures of two peptide complexes of importin-α1: one with S385-phosphorylated EBNA1 NLS peptide, determined at 2.0 Å resolution, and one with non-phosphorylated EBNA1 NLS peptide, determined at 2.2 Å resolution. The structures show that EBNA1 NLS binds to the major and minor NLS-binding sites of importin-α1, and indicate that the binding affinity of the EBNA1 NLS to the minor NLS-binding site could be enhanced by phosphorylation of S385 through electrostatic interaction between the phosphate group of phospho-S385 and K392 of importin-α1 (corresponding to R395 of importin-α5) on armadillo repeat 8.

  10. Resistance ability evaluation of safety-related structures for the simulated aircraft accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Jin; Kim, Sung Woon; Choi, Jang Kyu [Daewoo E and C Co., Ltd., Suwon (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2003-03-15

    Aircraft accidents on nuclear safety-related structures can cause severe damage to the safety of NPP(Nuclear Power Plant)s. To assess the safety of nuclear safety-related structures, the local damage and the dynamic response of global structures should be investigated together. This study have compared several local damage assessment formulas suggested for aircraft as an impactor, and have set the assessment system of local damage for impact-proof design of NPP containment buildings. And the local damage of nuclear safety-related structures in operation in Korea for commercial aircraft as impactor have been estimated. Impact load-time functions of the aircraft crash have been decided to assessment the safety of nuclear safety-related structures against the intentional colliding of commercial aircraft. Boeing 747 and Boeing 767 is selected as target aircraft based on the operation frequencies and weights. Comparison of the fire analysis methods showed that the method considering heat convection and radiation is adequate for the temperature analysis of the aircraft fuel fire. Finally, the study covered the analysis of the major structural drawings and design drawings with which three-dimensional finite element model analysis is expected to be performed.

  11. Structure of Leptin Receptor Related with Obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toleikis, Zigmantas

    The hormone leptin is central to obesity, but the molecular processes underlying the activation of the leptin receptor are unknown. To further the understanding of the system, an atomic resolution structure of this cytokine type I receptor in the unbound inactive form and in the activated bound...... of the receptor, while the D5 domain is the central leptin-binding domain, implicated in the first steps of activation. Both domains are characterized by a fibronectin type III fold and both contain a conserved WSXWS motif (X represents an unconserved amino acid residue), a distinct feature of the cytokine...... receptors. This motif is thought to play a major role in correct folding and activation of the receptor. The complex between leptin and the D5CA domain was analyzed using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and the amino acid residues implicated in the binding were determined. To investigate which parts...

  12. Structure of Leptin Receptor Related with Obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toleikis, Zigmantas

    The hormone leptin is central to obesity, but the molecular processes underlying the activation of the leptin receptor are unknown. To further the understanding of the system, an atomic resolution structure of this cytokine type I receptor in the unbound inactive form and in the activated bound...... of the receptor, while the D5 domain is the central leptin-binding domain, implicated in the first steps of activation. Both domains are characterized by a fibronectin type III fold and both contain a conserved WSXWS motif (X represents an unconserved amino acid residue), a distinct feature of the cytokine...... receptors. This motif is thought to play a major role in correct folding and activation of the receptor. The complex between leptin and the D5CA domain was analyzed using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and the amino acid residues implicated in the binding were determined. To investigate which parts...

  13. WASTE PROCESSING ANNUAL NUCLEAR SAFETY RELATED R AND D REPORT FOR CY2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fellinger, A.

    2009-10-15

    The Engineering and Technology Office of Waste Processing identifies and reduces engineering and technical risks associated with key waste processing project decisions. The risks, and actions taken to mitigate those risks, are determined through technology readiness assessments, program reviews, technology information exchanges, external technical reviews, technical assistance, and targeted technology development and deployment (TDD). The Office of Waste Processing TDD program prioritizes and approves research and development scopes of work that address nuclear safety related to processing of highly radioactive nuclear wastes. Thirteen of the thirty-five R&D approved work scopes in FY2009 relate directly to nuclear safety, and are presented in this report.

  14. 25 CFR 170.900 - What is the purpose of the provisions relating to transportation of hazardous and nuclear waste?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... transportation of hazardous and nuclear waste? 170.900 Section 170.900 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS... and Nuclear Waste Transportation § 170.900 What is the purpose of the provisions relating to transportation of hazardous and nuclear waste? Sections 170.900 through 170.907 on transportation of nuclear...

  15. A survey of nuclear-related agreements and possibilities for nuclear cooperation in South Asia: Cooperative Monitoring Center Occasional Paper/15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RAJEN,GAURAV

    2000-04-01

    Several existing nuclear-related agreements already require India and Pakistan, as members, to share information. The agreements are bilateral, regional, and international. Greater nuclear transparency between India and Pakistan could be promoted by first understanding the information flows required by existing agreements. This understanding is an essential step for developing projects that can incrementally advance the sensitivity of the information being shared. This paper provides a survey of existing nuclear-related agreements involving India and Pakistan, and suggests future confidence-building projects using the frameworks provided by these agreements. The Bilateral Agreement on the Prohibition of Attack against Nuclear Reactors and Nuclear Facilities is discussed as a basis for creating further agreements on restricting the use and deployment of nuclear weapons. The author suggests options for enhancing the value of the list of nuclear facilities exchanged annually as a part of this agreement. The International Atomic Energy Agency's regional cooperation agreement among countries in the Asia-Pacific region is an opportunity for greater subregional nuclear cooperation in South Asia. Linking the regional agreement with South Asian environmental cooperation and marine pollution protection efforts could provide a framework for projects involving Indian and Pakistani coastal nuclear facilities. Programs of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations that use nuclear techniques to increase food and crop production and optimize water management in arid areas also provide similar opportunities for nuclear cooperation. Other frameworks for nuclear cooperation originate from international conventions related to nuclear safety, transportation of nuclear wastes, worker protection against ionizing radiation, and the nondeployment of nuclear weapons in certain areas. The information shared by existing frameworks includes: laws and regulations

  16. Understanding the proton radius puzzle: Nuclear structure effects in light muonic atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present calculations of nuclear structure effects to the Lamb shift in light muonic atoms. We adopt a modern ab-initio approach by combining state-of-the-art nuclear potentials with the hyperspherical harmonics method. Our calculations are instrumental to the determination of nuclear charge radii in the Lamb shift measurements, which will shed light on the proton radius puzzle.

  17. VIPERdb: a relational database for structural virology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Craig M; Borelli, Ian A; Lander, Gabriel; Natarajan, Padmaja; Siddavanahalli, Vinay; Bajaj, Chandrajit; Johnson, John E; Brooks, Charles L; Reddy, Vijay S

    2006-01-01

    VIPERdb (http://viperdb.scripps.edu) is a database for icosahedral virus capsid structures. Our aim is to provide a comprehensive resource specific to the needs of the structural virology community, with an emphasis on the description and comparison of derived data from structural and energetic analyses of capsids. A relational database implementation based on a schema for macromolecular structure makes the data highly accessible to the user, allowing detailed queries at the atomic level. Together with curation practices that maintain data uniformity, this will facilitate structural bioinformatics studies of virus capsids. User friendly search, visualization and educational tools on the website allow both structural and derived data to be examined easily and extensively. Links to relevant literature, sequence and taxonomy databases are provided for each entry.

  18. Have NEC Coat, Will Travel: Structural Basis of Membrane Budding During Nuclear Egress in Herpesviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigalke, J M; Heldwein, E E

    2017-01-01

    Herpesviruses are unusual among enveloped viruses because they bud twice yet acquire a single envelope. Furthermore, unlike other DNA viruses that replicate in the nucleus, herpesviruses do not exit it by passing through the nuclear pores or by rupturing the nuclear envelope. Instead, herpesviruses have a complex mechanism of nuclear escape whereby nascent capsids bud at the inner nuclear membrane to form perinuclear virions that subsequently fuse with the outer nuclear membrane, releasing capsids into the cytosol. This makes them some of the very few known viruses that bud into the nuclear envelope. The envelope acquired during nuclear budding does not end up in the mature viral particle but instead allows the capsid to translocate from the nucleus into the cytosol. The viral nuclear egress complex (NEC) is a critical player in the nuclear egress, yet its function and mechanism have remained enigmatic. Recent studies have demonstrated that the NEC buds membranes without the help of other proteins by forming a honeycomb coat, which established the NEC as the first virally encoded budding machine that operates at the nuclear, as opposed to cytoplasmic, membrane. This review discusses our current understanding of the NEC budding mechanism, with the emphasis on studies that illuminated the structure of the NEC coat and its role in capsid budding during herpesvirus nuclear escape.

  19. A Multifaceted FISH Approach to Study Endogenous RNAs and DNAs within Native Nuclear and Cell Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byron, Meg; Hall, Lisa L.; Lawrence, Jeanne B.

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is not a singular technique, but a battery of powerful and versatile tools to examine the distribution of endogenous genes and RNAs in precise context with each other and in relation to specific proteins or cell structures. This unit offers the details of highly sensitive and successful protocols that were initially developed largely in our lab and honed over a number of years. Our emphasis is on analysis of nuclear RNAs and DNA to address specific biological questions about nuclear structure, pre-mRNA metabolism or the role of non-coding RNAs, although cytoplasmic RNA detection is also provided and generally discussed. Multi-faceted molecular cytological approaches bring precise resolution and sensitive multi-color detection to illuminate the organization and functional roles of endogenous genes and their RNAs within the native structure of fixed cells. Solutions to several common technical pitfalls are discussed, as are cautions regarding the judicious use of digital imaging and the rigors of analyzing and interpreting complex molecular cytological results. PMID:23315927

  20. Magnetic field effect on nuclear shell structure and implications to physics of neutron stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondratyev, V.N.; Maruyama, Toshiki; Chiba, Satoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1999-12-01

    The effect of the magnetic field on the shell structure of nuclei is considered by employing the shell-correction method. The shift of a phase in shell-oscillations is shown to represent the main feature of the field effect. Such a phase-change is originating from the Pauli-magnetic response associated with the relative shift of spin-up and spin-down energy levels. The neutron shell-correction energy behaves almost periodically as a function of the field strength with a slightly enhanced amplitude of the shell-oscillations at a large field. The period of the sign change is determined by the energy difference between neighbour levels. The proton shell-correction energy displays an anomalous dependence on the field. The proton orbital magnetism enhances the nuclear shell effect especially when the field influence is comparable to the spin-orbit coupling. The nuclear magic numbers are demonstrated to depend considerably on the magnetic field on the strength scale B {approx} 10{sup 16} - 10{sup 17} G relevant for neutron stars and supernovas. Such a field is found to shift significantly nuclear magics of the iron region towards smaller mass numbers. (author)

  1. The nuclear to host galaxy relation of high redshift quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Kotilainen, J K; Labita, M; Treves, A; Uslenghi, M

    2007-01-01

    We present near-infrared imaging with ESO VLT+ISAAC of the host galaxies of low luminosity quasars in the redshift range 1 < z < 2, aimed at investigating the relationship between the nuclear and host galaxy luminosities at high redshift. This work complements our previous study to trace the cosmological evolution of the host galaxies of high luminosity quasars (Falomo et al. 2004). The new sample includes 15 low luminosity quasars, nine radio-loud (RLQ) and six radio-quiet (RQQ). They have similar distribution of redshift and optical luminosity, and together with the high luminosity quasars they cover a large range (~4 mag) of the quasar luminosity function. The host galaxies of both types of quasars are in the range of massive inactive ellipticals between L* and 10 L*. RLQ hosts are systematically more luminous than RQQ hosts by a factor of ~2. This difference is similar to that found for the high luminosity quasars. This luminosity gap appears to be independent of the rest-frame U-band luminosity but...

  2. Nuclear to host galaxy relation of high redshift quasars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. K. Kotilainen

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Se presentan imágenes en el cercano infrarrojo de cuásares a 1 < z < 2 con una cobertura amplia (~ 4 mag de la función de luminosidad de cuásares. Las galaxias anfitrionas de cuásares radio-fuertes (RLQ y radio-callados (RQQ tienen luminosidades en el intervalo de las elípticas masivas inactivas entre L* y 10 L*. Las galaxias huésped de los RLQ son más luminosas que las de los RQQ. La brecha en luminosidad es independiente de la luminosidad en la banda-U en reposo pero está correlacionada con la luminosidad en la banda-R en reposo. Esta diferencia en el color de RLQ y RQQ es probablemente debida a una combinación de la diferencia intrínseca en sus SEDs y a un efecto de selección debido a la extinción interna por polvo. Hay una correlación razonable entre las luminosidades nuclear y huésped para RLQ pero no para RQQ. Si la banda-R traza la luminosidad bolométrica y si la luminosidad huésped es proporcional a la masa del agujero negro, los cuásares de alto corrimiento al rojo emiten en un estrecho intervalo de potencias con respecto a su luminosidad de Eddington.

  3. Nuclear shapes: from earliest ideas to multiple shape coexisting structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyde, K.; Wood, J. L.

    2016-08-01

    The concept of the atomic nucleus being characterized by an intrinsic property such as shape came as a result of high precision hyperfine studies in the field of atomic physics, which indicated a non-spherical nuclear charge distribution. Herein, we describe the various steps taken through ingenious experimentation and bold theoretical suggestions that mapped the way for later work in the early 50s by Aage Bohr, Ben Mottelson and James Rainwater. We lay out a long and winding road that marked, in the period of 50s to 70s, the way shell-model and collective-model concepts were reconciled. A rapid increase in both accelerator and detection methods (70s towards the early 2000s) opened new vistas into nuclear shapes, and their coexistence, in various regions of the nuclear mass table. Next, we outline a possible unified view of nuclear shapes: emphasizing decisive steps taken as well as questions remaining, next to the theoretical efforts that could result in an emerging understanding of nuclear shapes, building on the nucleus considered as a strongly interacting system of nucleons as the microscopic starting point.

  4. A study on the establishment of nuclear cooperative relations and future direction between Korea and Egypt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, M. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. J.; Yun, S. W.; Ko, H. S

    2000-10-01

    This study was carried out in order to review the cooperation with Egypt and establish and activate the cooperative relations with Egypt. Recent policy trends in the use and development of nuclear energy in Egypt, were investigated including introduction of nuclear power plant, and cooperative relations between two nations were also established under the implementation of the project. It was agreed through exchanges of visits of nuclear cooperation delegation; 1) exchange of visits of cooperation delegation, 2) invitation of egypt experts to policy seminar 3) cooperation between relevant nuclear related organizations of two countries, 4) future cooperation fields and directions between two countries. It is recommended that cooperation with Egypt be implemented systematically through the long term based on national basic cooperation directions and integrated strategies.

  5. The effects of nuclear structure on generalized parton distributions of 3He

    CERN Document Server

    Scopetta, S

    2005-01-01

    The effect of the nuclear medium on generalized parton distributions (GPDs) is studied for the 3He nucleus, through a realistic microscopic analysis. In Impulse Approximation, Fermi motion and binding effects, evaluated by modern potentials, are found to be larger than in the forward case and very sensitive to the details of nuclear structure at short distances.

  6. Cardiac nuclear receptors: architects of mitochondrial structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Rick B; Kelly, Daniel P

    2017-04-03

    The adult heart is uniquely designed and equipped to provide a continuous supply of energy in the form of ATP to support persistent contractile function. This high-capacity energy transduction system is the result of a remarkable surge in mitochondrial biogenesis and maturation during the fetal-to-adult transition in cardiac development. Substantial evidence indicates that nuclear receptor signaling is integral to dynamic changes in the cardiac mitochondrial phenotype in response to developmental cues, in response to diverse postnatal physiologic conditions, and in disease states such as heart failure. A subset of cardiac-enriched nuclear receptors serve to match mitochondrial fuel preferences and capacity for ATP production with changing energy demands of the heart. In this Review, we describe the role of specific nuclear receptors and their coregulators in the dynamic control of mitochondrial biogenesis and energy metabolism in the normal and diseased heart.

  7. Study of the derivative expansions for the nuclear structure functions

    CERN Document Server

    Simo, I Ruiz

    2008-01-01

    We study the convergence of the series expansions sometimes used in the analysis of the nuclear effects in Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS) proccesses induced by leptons. The recent advances in statistics and quality of the data, in particular for neutrinos calls for a good control of the theoretical uncertainties of the models used in the analysis. Using realistic nuclear spectral functions which include nucleon correlations, we find that the convergence of the derivative expansions to the full results is poor except at very low values of $x$.

  8. International Relations and HRD Activities of the International Nuclear Nonproliferation and Security Academy of the ROK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwan Kyoo Choe

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this article is to explain the HRD activities on nuclear nonproliferation and security area of the International Nuclear Nonproliferation and Security Academy (INSA of the Korea Institute of Nuclear Nonproliferation and Control (KINAC. The HRD activities on nuclear security in international society have moved gradually from military dimension to the aspect of social management of conflict and threat. The paper would be developed in the following ways; First, the main concept of nuclear security in the Republic of Korea(ROK will be touched, which could show us why and how the ROK has put its step forward into the HRD efforts. Second, the background in conjunction with international relations and its developing process how the Korea Center of Excellence (COE, named as INSA, had been set would be described. Third, the detailed efforts of the ROK to build a COE in Korea in connection with the 2nd Nuclear Security Summit (NSS will be touched with a detailed explanation on its main activities, direction and the perspective. Finally, the aspect of nuclear culture issues and lessons learned in the first year of the nuclear nonproliferation and security HRD activities of the INSA would be developed.

  9. Safety-Related Contractor Activities at Nuclear Power Plants. New Challenges for Regulatory Oversight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chockie, Alan [Chockie Group International, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States)

    2005-09-15

    The use of contractors has been an integral and important part of the design, construction, operation, and maintenance of nuclear power plants. To ensure the safe and efficient completion of contracted tasks, each nuclear plant licensee has developed and refined formal contract management processes to meet their specific needs and plant requirements. Although these contract management processes have proven to be effective tools for the procurement of support and components tailored to the needs of nuclear power plants, contractor-related incidents and accidents have revealed some serious weaknesses with the implementation of these processes. Identifying and addressing implementation problems are becoming more complicated due to organizational and personnel changes affecting the nuclear power industry. The ability of regulators and licensees to effectively monitor and manage the safety-related performance of contractors will likely be affected by forthcoming organization and personnel changes due to: the aging of the workforce; the decline of the nuclear industry; and the deregulation of nuclear power. The objective of this report is to provide a review of current and potential future challenges facing safety-related contractor activities at nuclear power plants. The purpose is to assist SKI in establishing a strategy for the proactive oversight of contractor safety-related activities at Swedish nuclear power plants and facilities. The nature and role of contractors at nuclear plants is briefly reviewed in the first section of the report. The second section describes the essential elements of the contract management process. Although organizations have had decades of experience with the a contract management process, there remain a number of common implantation weaknesses that have lead to serious contractor-related incidents and accidents. These implementation weaknesses are summarized in the third section. The fourth section of the report highlights the

  10. Hydroxyapatites: Key Structural Questions and Answers from DNP (Dynamic Nuclear Polarization).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, Cesar; Aussenac, Fabien; Bonhomme-Coury, Laure; Osaka, Akiyoshi; Hayakawa, Satoshi; Babonneau, Florence; Coelho Diogo, Cristina; Bonhomme, Christian

    2017-09-05

    We demonstrate that NMR/DNP (Dynamic Nuclear Polarization) allows an unprecedented description of carbonate substituted hydroxyapatite (CHAp). Key structural questions related to order/disorder and clustering of carbonates are tackled by using distance sensitive DNP experiments using (13)C-(13)C recoupling. Such experiments are easily implemented due to huge DNP gain (orders of magnitude). DNP is efficiently mediated by quasi one-dimensional spin diffusion through the hydroxyl columns present in the CHAp structure (thought as "highways" for spin diffusion). For spherical nanoparticles (< 100 nm), it is numerically shown that spin diffusion allows their study as a whole. Most importantly, we demonstrate also that the DNP study at 100 K leads to data which are comparable to the one obtained at room temperature (in terms of spin dynamics and lineshape resolution). Finally, all 2D DNP experiments can be interpreted in terms of domains exhibiting well identified types of substitution: local order and carbonate clustering are clearly favored.

  11. "Parking-garage" structures in nuclear astrophysics and cellular biophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, D. K.; Caplan, M. E.; Horowitz, C. J.; Huber, Greg; Schneider, A. S.

    2016-11-01

    A striking shape was recently observed for the endoplasmic reticulum, a cellular organelle consisting of stacked sheets connected by helical ramps [Terasaki et al., Cell 154, 285 (2013), 10.1016/j.cell.2013.06.031]. This shape is interesting both for its biological function, to synthesize proteins using an increased surface area for ribosome factories, and its geometric properties that may be insensitive to details of the microscopic interactions. In the present work, we find very similar shapes in our molecular dynamics simulations of the nuclear pasta phases of dense nuclear matter that are expected deep in the crust of neutron stars. There are dramatic differences between nuclear pasta and terrestrial cell biology. Nuclear pasta is 14 orders of magnitude denser than the aqueous environs of the cell nucleus and involves strong interactions between protons and neutrons, while cellular-scale biology is dominated by the entropy of water and complex assemblies of biomolecules. Nonetheless, the very similar geometry suggests both systems may have similar coarse-grained dynamics and that the shapes are indeed determined by geometrical considerations, independent of microscopic details. Many of our simulations self-assemble into flat sheets connected by helical ramps. These ramps may impact the thermal and electrical conductivities, viscosity, shear modulus, and breaking strain of neutron star crust. The interaction we use, with Coulomb frustration, may provide a simple model system that reproduces many biologically important shapes.

  12. Mechanistic Insights from Structural Analyses of Ran-GTPase-Driven Nuclear Export of Proteins and RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Yoshiyuki

    2016-05-22

    Understanding how macromolecules are rapidly exchanged between the nucleus and the cytoplasm through nuclear pore complexes is a fundamental problem in biology. Exportins are Ran-GTPase-dependent nuclear transport factors that belong to the karyopherin-β family and mediate nuclear export of a plethora of proteins and RNAs, except for bulk mRNA nuclear export. Exportins bind cargo macromolecules in a Ran-GTP-dependent manner in the nucleus, forming exportin-cargo-Ran-GTP complexes (nuclear export complexes). Transient weak interactions between exportins and nucleoporins containing characteristic FG (phenylalanine-glycine) repeat motifs facilitate nuclear pore complex passage of nuclear export complexes. In the cytoplasm, nuclear export complexes are disassembled, thereby releasing the cargo. GTP hydrolysis by Ran promoted in the cytoplasm makes the disassembly reaction virtually irreversible and provides thermodynamic driving force for the overall export reaction. In the past decade, X-ray crystallography of some of the exportins in various functional states coupled with functional analyses, single-particle electron microscopy, molecular dynamics simulations, and small-angle solution X-ray scattering has provided rich insights into the mechanism of cargo binding and release and also begins to elucidate how exportins interact with the FG repeat motifs. The knowledge gained from structural analyses of nuclear export is being translated into development of clinically useful inhibitors of nuclear export to treat human diseases such as cancer and influenza.

  13. Cleave to Leave : Structural Insights into the Dynamic Organization of the Nuclear Pore Complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dokudovskaya, Svetlana; Veenhoff, Liesbeth M.; Rout, Michael P.

    2002-01-01

    A detailed understanding of the fine structure of the nuclear pore complex has remained elusive. Now, studies on a small protein domain have shed light on the dynamic organization of this massive assembly.

  14. Ataxin-1 with an expanded glutamine tract alters nuclear matrix-associated structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skinner, P J; Koshy, B T; Cummings, C J

    1997-01-01

    the subcellular localization of wild-type human ataxin-1 (the protein encoded by the SCA1 gene) and mutant ataxin-1 in the Purkinje cells of transgenic mice. We found that ataxin-1 localizes to the nuclei of cerebellar Purkinje cells. Normal ataxin-1 localizes to several nuclear structures approximately 0.......5 microm across, whereas the expanded ataxin-1 localizes to a single approximately 2-microm structure, before the onset of ataxia. Mutant ataxin-1 localizes to a single nuclear structure in affected neurons of SCA1 patients. Similarly, COS-1 cells transfected with wild-type or mutant ataxin-1 show...... a similar pattern of nuclear localization; with expanded ataxin-1 occurring in larger structures that are fewer in number than those of normal ataxin-1. Colocalization studies show that mutant ataxin-1 causes a specific redistribution of the nuclear matrix-associated domain containing promyelocytic...

  15. An introduction to using the FORTRAN programs provided with Computational Nuclear Physics 1 Nuclear Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boytos, Matthew A.; Norbury, John W.

    1992-01-01

    The authors of this paper have provided a set of ready-to-run FORTRAN programs that should be useful in the field of theoretical nuclear physics. The purpose of this document is to provide a simple synopsis of the programs and their use. A separate section is devoted to each program set and includes: abstract; files; compiling, linking, and running; obtaining results; and a tutorial.

  16. Primer on Durability of Nuclear Power Plant Reinforced Concrete Structures - A Review of Pertinent Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naus, Dan J [ORNL

    2007-02-01

    The objective of this study was to provide a primer on the environmental effects that can affect the durability of nuclear power plant concrete structures. As concrete ages, changes in its properties will occur as a result of continuing microstructural changes (i.e., slow hydration, crystallization of amorphous constituents, and reactions between cement paste and aggregates), as well as environmental influences. These changes do not have to be detrimental to the point that concrete will not be able to meet its performance requirements. Concrete, however, can suffer undesirable changes with time because of improper specifications, a violation of specifications, or adverse performance of its cement paste matrix or aggregate constituents under either physical or chemical attack. Contained in this report is a discussion on concrete durability and the relationship between durability and performance, a review of the historical perspective related to concrete and longevity, a description of the basic materials that comprise reinforced concrete, and information on the environmental factors that can affect the performance of nuclear power plant concrete structures. Commentary is provided on the importance of an aging management program.

  17. Development of the NPL gamma-ray spectrometer NANA for traceable nuclear decay and structure studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorusso, G; Shearman, R; Regan, P H; Judge, S M; Bell, S; Collins, S M; Larijani, C; Ivanov, P; Jerome, S M; Keightley, J D; Lalkovski, S; Pearce, A K; Podolyak, Zs

    2016-03-01

    We present a brief report on the progress towards the construction of the National Nuclear Array (NANA), a gamma-ray coincidence spectrometer for discrete-line nuclear structure and decay measurements. The proposed spectrometer will combine a gamma-ray energy resolution of approximately 3% at 1MeV with sub-nanosecond timing discrimination between successive gamma rays in mutually coincident decay cascades. We also review a number of recent measurements using coincidence fast-timing gamma-ray spectroscopy for nuclear structure studies, which have helped to inform the design criteria for the NANA spectrometer.

  18. Co-ordination of the International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricard-McCutchan, E. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Dimitriou, P. [Intl Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Vienna (Austria); Nichols, A. L. [Univ. of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-01

    The 21st meeting of the International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluators was convened at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, from 20 to 24 April 2015 under the auspices of the IAEA Nuclear Data Section. This meeting was attended by 36 scientists from 15 Member States, plus IAEA staff, concerned with the compilation, evaluation and dissemination of nuclear structure and decay data. A summary of the meeting, data centre reports, various proposals considered, and actions agreed by the participants, as well as recommendations/conclusions are presented within this document.

  19. A NEW METHOD FOR EXTRACTING SPIN-DEPENDENT NEUTRON STRUCTURE FUNCTIONS FROM NUCLEAR DATA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahn, Y.F.; Melnitchouk, W.

    2009-01-01

    High-energy electrons are currently the best probes of the internal structure of nucleons (protons and neutrons). By collecting data on electrons scattering off light nuclei, such as deuterium and helium, one can extract structure functions (SFs), which encode information about the quarks that make up the nucleon. Spin-dependent SFs, which depend on the relative polarization of the electron beam and the target nucleus, encode quark spins. Proton SFs can be measured directly from electron-proton scattering, but those of the neutron must be extracted from proton data and deuterium or helium-3 data because free neutron targets do not exist. At present, there is no reliable method for accurately determining spin-dependent neutron SFs in the low-momentum-transfer regime, where nucleon resonances are prominent and the functions are not smooth. The focus of this study was to develop a new method for extracting spin-dependent neutron SFs from nuclear data. An approximate convolution formula for nuclear SFs reduces the problem to an integral equation, for which a recursive solution method was designed. The method was then applied to recent data from proton and deuterium scattering experiments to perform a preliminary extraction of spin-dependent neutron SFs in the resonance region. The extraction method was found to reliably converge for arbitrary test functions, and the validity of the extraction from data was verifi ed using a Bjorken integral, which relates integrals of SFs to a known quantity. This new information on neutron structure could be used to assess quark-hadron duality for the neutron, which requires detailed knowledge of SFs in all kinematic regimes.

  20. THE AIMS AND ACTIVITIES OF THE INTERNATIONAL NETWORK OF NUCLEAR STRUCTURE AND DECAY DATA EVALUATORS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NICHOLS,A.L.; TULI, J.K.

    2007-04-22

    International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data (NSDD) Evaluators consists of a number of evaluation groups and data service centers in several countries that appreciate the merits of working together to maintain and ensure the quality and comprehensive content of the ENSDF database (Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File). Biennial meetings of the network are held under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to assign evaluation responsibilities, monitor progress, discuss improvements and emerging difficulties, and agree on actions to be undertaken by individual members. The evaluated data and bibliographic details are made available to users via various media, such as the journals ''Nuclear Physics A'' and ''Nuclear Data Sheets'', the World Wide Web, on CD-ROM, wall charts of the nuclides and ''Nuclear Wallet Cards''. While the ENSDF master database is maintained by the US National Nuclear Data Center at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, these data are also available from other nuclear data centers including the IAEA Nuclear Data Section. The Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP), Trieste, Italy, in cooperation with the IAEA, organizes workshops on NSDD at regular intervals. The primary aims of these particular workshops are to provide hands-on training in the data evaluation processes, and to encourage new evaluators to participate in NSDD activities. The technical contents of these NSDD workshops are described, along with the rationale for the inclusion of various topics.

  1. Spin-dependent structure functions in nuclear matter and the polarized EMC effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloët, I C; Bentz, W; Thomas, A W

    2005-07-29

    An excellent description of both spin-independent and spin-dependent quark distributions and structure functions has been obtained with a modified Nambu--Jona-Lasinio model, which is free of unphysical thresholds for nucleon decay into quarks--hence incorporating an important aspect of confinement. We utilize this model to investigate nuclear medium modifications to structure functions and find that we are readily able to reproduce both nuclear matter saturation and the experimental F2N(A)/F2N ratio, that is, the European Muon Collaboration (EMC) effect. Applying this framework to determine g1p(A), we find that the ratio g1p(A)/g1p differs significantly from unity, with the quenching caused by the nuclear medium being about twice that of the spin-independent case. This represents an exciting result, which, if confirmed experimentally, will reveal much about the quark structure of nuclear matter.

  2. Engineering and maintenance applied to safety-related valves in nuclear power plants; Ingenieria y mantenimiento aplicado a valvulas relacionadas con la seguridad en centrales nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verdu, M. F.; Perez-Aranda, J.

    2014-04-01

    Nuclear Division in Iberdrola engineering and Construction has a team with extensive experience on engineering and services works related to valves. Also, this team is linked to UNESA as Technical support and Reference Center. Iberdrola engineering and construction experience in nuclear power plants valves, gives effective response to engineering and maintenance works that can be demanded in a nuclear power plant and it requires a high degree of qualification and knowledge both in Operation and Outages. (Author)

  3. Investigation of nuclear structure function and angular distribution of scattered leptons from 40Ca and 56Fe nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Zolfagharpour

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available  In this paper, we calculate nuclear structure function and EMC effect of 40Ca and 56Fe nuclei. To achive the goals, we consider Fermi motion and binding energy contrbiution in the harmonic oscillator model. In this model, harmonic oscillator parameter ħω related to shells root mean square radius and for free nucleon structure functions, is obtained from GRV’s free nucleon structure functions. Then, we calculate differential cross section of lepton scattering from those nuclei at the E=4.8 GeV and E=4.032 GeV. The obtained results show good agreement with available experimental data.

  4. Structuring medication related activities for information management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luukkonen, Irmeli; Mykkänen, Juha; Kivekäs, Eija; Saranto, Kaija

    2014-01-01

    Medication treatment and the related information management are central parts of a patient's health care. As a cross-organizational and cooperative process, medication information management is a complex domain for development activities. We studied medication activities and related information management in a regional project in order to produce a shared broad picture of its processes and to understand the main issues and the needs for improvement. In this paper we provide a summary of the findings in a structured form, based on a six-dimensioned framework for design and analysis of activities and processes.

  5. Structure-Property Relations in Nonferrous Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Alan; Loong Lee, Kok

    2005-05-01

    A long-awaited text that fills the void in non-ferrous metallurgy literature While most undergraduate metallurgy textbooks focus on iron, the most commercially important metallic element, Structure-Property Relations in Nonferrous Metals is a comprehensive textbook covering the remaining eighty-two nonferrous metals. Designed to be readily accessible to materials engineering students at all academic levels, the text describes the relationships between the atomic-, crystal-, and micro-structures of nonferrous metals, and such physical behaviors as strength, ductility, electrical conductivity, and corrosion. In order to capture and retain students' interest, the authors maintain a strong focus on practical application. Each chapter supplements fundamental concepts with engaging examples from actual engineering case studies and industrial projects, directly relating content to real-world application. Part One describes the general concepts of crystal- and micro-structures and the implications of these structures for the mechanical, thermal, and electronic properties of nonferrous metals, intermetallic compounds, and metal matrix composites. Chapters focus on such relevant topics as: Point, line, and planar defects and their effects on a material's properties Dislocations and strengthening mechanisms Fracture and fatigue Strain rate effects and creep Deviations from classic crystallinity Processing methods Composites and intermetallic compounds Part Two builds on Part One by exploring how the concepts presented define the properties of a particular metallic element and its alloys, and how these properties contribute to the engineering uses of each nonferrous metal. An accompanying ftp site contains homework problems, appendices, bibliographies, and tables of data indicating the nations producing metallic elements and the quantities produced. Structure-Property Relations in Nonferrous Metals is a valuable reference for both students in undergraduate metallurgy courses

  6. Structural relations between nested harmonic sums

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bluemlein, J.

    2008-07-15

    We describe the structural relations between nested harmonic sums emerging in the description of physical single scale quantities up to the 3-loop level in renormalizable gauge field theories. These are weight w=6 harmonic sums. We identify universal basic functions which allow to describe a large class of physical quantities and derive their complex analysis. For the 3-loop QCD Wilson coefficients 35 basic functions are required, whereas a subset of 15 describes the 3-loop anomalous dimensions. (orig.)

  7. Structured information analysis for human reliability analysis of emergency tasks in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Won Dea; Kim, Jae Whan; Park, Jin Kyun; Ha, Jae Joo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2000-02-01

    More than twenty HRA (Human Reliability Analysis) methodologies have been developed and used for the safety analysis in nuclear field during the past two decades. However, no methodology appears to have universally been accepted, as various limitations have been raised for more widely used ones. One of the most important limitations of conventional HRA is insufficient analysis of the task structure and problem space. To resolve this problem, we suggest SIA (Structured Information Analysis) for HRA. The proposed SIA consists of three parts. The first part is the scenario analysis that investigates the contextual information related to the given task on the basis of selected scenarios. The second is the goals-means analysis to define the relations between the cognitive goal and task steps. The third is the cognitive function analysis module that identifies the cognitive patterns and information flows involved in the task. Through the three-part analysis, systematic investigation is made possible from the macroscopic information on the tasks to the microscopic information on the specific cognitive processes. It is expected that analysts can attain a structured set of information that helps to predict the types and possibility of human error in the given task. 48 refs., 12 figs., 11 tabs. (Author)

  8. Structured information analysis for human reliability analysis of emergency tasks in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Won Dea; Kim, Jae Whan; Park, Jin Kyun; Ha, Jae Joo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2000-02-01

    More than twenty HRA (Human Reliability Analysis) methodologies have been developed and used for the safety analysis in nuclear field during the past two decades. However, no methodology appears to have universally been accepted, as various limitations have been raised for more widely used ones. One of the most important limitations of conventional HRA is insufficient analysis of the task structure and problem space. To resolve this problem, we suggest SIA (Structured Information Analysis) for HRA. The proposed SIA consists of three parts. The first part is the scenario analysis that investigates the contextual information related to the given task on the basis of selected scenarios. The second is the goals-means analysis to define the relations between the cognitive goal and task steps. The third is the cognitive function analysis module that identifies the cognitive patterns and information flows involved in the task. Through the three-part analysis, systematic investigation is made possible from the macroscopic information on the tasks to the microscopic information on the specific cognitive processes. It is expected that analysts can attain a structured set of information that helps to predict the types and possibility of human error in the given task. 48 refs., 12 figs., 11 tabs. (Author)

  9. Alternative similarity renormalization group generators in nuclear structure calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Dicaire, Nuiok M; Navratil, Petr

    2014-01-01

    The similarity renormalization group (SRG) has been successfully applied to soften interactions for ab initio nuclear calculations. In almost all practical applications in nuclear physics, an SRG generator with the kinetic energy operator is used. With this choice, a fast convergence of many-body calculations can be achieved, but at the same time substantial three-body interactions are induced even if one starts from a purely two-nucleon (NN) Hamiltonian. Three-nucleon (3N) interactions can be handled by modern many-body methods. However, it has been observed that when including initial chiral 3N forces in the Hamiltonian, the SRG transformations induce a non-negligible four-nucleon interaction that cannot be currently included in the calculations for technical reasons. Consequently, it is essential to investigate alternative SRG generators that might suppress the induction of many-body forces while at the same time might preserve the good convergence. In this work we test two alternative generators with oper...

  10. Nuclear Structure aspects of gamma decay from giant resonances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bracco A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The gamma decay of the giant dipole resonance (including its tail region is an important tool to probe the properties of these states, and thus to test the predictions of mean field theories. This paper focuses on two main aspects concerning the electric dipole excitation in nuclei. These are the study of the isospin character of the low energy tail of the Giant Dipole Resonance (GDR, the so-called Pygmy resonance, and the isospin mixing of nuclear systems at finite temperature. In the first case, the Pygmy resonance has been populated in the inelastic scattering reaction 17O+124Sn at 20 MeV/u. Its gamma decay has been measured using the AGATA Demonstrator and an array of 8 large volume LaBr3:Ce scintillators. In the second case, the gamma decay of the GDR in thermalized nuclear systems, formed in fusion evaporation reactions, has been used to investigate the isospin mixing in 80Zr. For this work the reactions 40Ca+40Ca at 3.4 MeV/u and 37Cl +44Ca at 2.6 MeV/u were used.

  11. Automatic classification of hepatocellular carcinoma images based on nuclear and structural features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyuna, Tomoharu; Saito, Akira; Marugame, Atsushi; Yamashita, Yoshiko; Ogura, Maki; Cosatto, Eric; Abe, Tokiya; Hashiguchi, Akinori; Sakamoto, Michiie

    2013-03-01

    Diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) on the basis of digital images is a challenging problem because, unlike gastrointestinal carcinoma, strong structural and morphological features are limited and sometimes absent from HCC images. In this study, we describe the classification of HCC images using statistical distributions of features obtained from image analysis of cell nuclei and hepatic trabeculae. Images of 130 hematoxylin-eosin (HE) stained histologic slides were captured at 20X by a slide scanner (Nanozoomer, Hamamatsu Photonics, Japan) and 1112 regions of interest (ROI) images were extracted for classification (551 negatives and 561 positives, including 113 well-differentiated positives). For a single nucleus, the following features were computed: area, perimeter, circularity, ellipticity, long and short axes of elliptic fit, contour complexity and gray level cooccurrence matrix (GLCM) texture features (angular second moment, contrast, homogeneity and entropy). In addition, distributions of nuclear density and hepatic trabecula thickness within an ROI were also extracted. To represent an ROI, statistical distributions (mean, standard deviation and percentiles) of these features were used. In total, 78 features were extracted for each ROI and a support vector machine (SVM) was trained to classify negative and positive ROIs. Experimental results using 5-fold cross validation show 90% sensitivity for an 87.8% specificity. The use of statistical distributions over a relatively large area makes the HCC classifier robust to occasional failures in the extraction of nuclear or hepatic trabecula features, thus providing stability to the system.

  12. Verification of split spectrum technique for ultrasonic inspection of welded structures in nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ericsson, L.; Stepinski, T. (Uppsala Univ., Dept. of Technology, Uppsala (Sweden))

    1992-10-01

    Ultrasonic nondestructive inspection of materials is often limited by the presence of backscattered echoes from the material structure. A digital signal processing technique for removal of this material noise, referred to as split spectrum processing (SSP), has been developed and verified using simple laboratory experiments during the last decade. However, application of the split spectrum processing algorithm to industrial conditions has been rarely reported. In the paper the results of the practical evaluation of the SSP technique are presented. A number of different ultrasonic transducers were used for acquiring echoes from artificial flaws as well as natural cracks. The flaws were located in test blocks employed by the Swedish Nuclear Power Companies as reference during ultrasonic inspection of nuclear reactor vessels. The acquired ultrasonic A-scan signals were processed off-line using specially developed algorithms on a personal computer (PC). The experiments show evidence that properly tuned SSP algorithms result in a considerable improvement of the signal to material noise ratio. The enhancements were similar irrespective of the features of the transducer used or the nature of the inspected flaw. The problems related to the development of self-tuning SSP algorithms for on-line processing of B-scans are discussed. (author).

  13. Off-shell Corrections and Moments of the Deep Inelastic Nuclear Structure Functions

    CERN Document Server

    Cothran, C D; Liuti, S

    1998-01-01

    We present an improved method for handling off-shell effects in deep inelastic nuclear scattering. With a firm understanding of the effects of the nuclear wave function, including these off-shell corrections as well as binding and nucleon-nucleon correlations, we can begin to examine the role of QCD in nuclei through an analysis of the moments of the nuclear structure function. Our analysis is aimed at extracting the Q^2 dependence of the moments of the nucleon structure function by using the recent high x world Iron data and by properly removing nuclear effects from the perturbative contribution. In addition, we compare quantitatively the behavior of the extracted moments with a simple O(1/Q^2) phenomenological form and we determine the mass term for this parametrization.

  14. DETERMINING THE EFFECTS OF RADIATION ON AGING CONCRETE STRUCTURES OF NUCLEAR REACTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrato, M.

    2010-01-29

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) is responsible for the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) of nuclear facilities throughout the DOE Complex. Some of these facilities will be completely dismantled, while others will be partially dismantled and the remaining structure will be stabilized with cementitious fill materials. The latter is a process known as In-Situ Decommissioning (ISD). The ISD decision process requires a detailed understanding of the existing facility conditions, and operational history. System information and material properties are need for aged nuclear facilities. This literature review investigated the properties of aged concrete structures affected by radiation. In particular, this review addresses the Savannah River Site (SRS) isotope production nuclear reactors. The concrete in the reactors at SRS was not seriously damaged by the levels of radiation exposure. Loss of composite compressive strength was the most common effect of radiation induced damage documented at nuclear power plants.

  15. Relative rates of synonymous substitutions in the mitochondrial, chloroplast and nuclear genomes of seed plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drouin, Guy; Daoud, Hanane; Xia, Junnan

    2008-12-01

    Previous studies have estimated that, in angiosperms, the synonymous substitution rate of chloroplast genes is three times higher than that of mitochondrial genes and that of nuclear genes is twelve times higher than that of mitochondrial genes. Here we used 12 genes in 27 seed plant species to investigate whether these relative rates of substitutions are common to diverse seed plant groups. We find that the overall relative rate of synonymous substitutions of mitochondrial, chloroplast and nuclear genes of all seed plants is 1:3:10, that these ratios are 1:2:4 in gymnosperms but 1:3:16 in angiosperms and that they go up to 1:3:20 in basal angiosperms. Our results show that the mitochondrial, chloroplast and nuclear genomes of seed plant groups have different synonymous substitutions rates, that these rates are different in different seed plant groups and that gymnosperms have smaller ratios than angiosperms.

  16. Dispersion Relation of σ Meson and Pion at Finite Nuclear Density in Chiral σ Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Dong-Qiao; CHEN Wei; WEN De-Hua; LIU Liang-Gang; Masahiro Nakano

    2004-01-01

    The propagators of pion and sigma meson at a finite nuclear density and zero temperature are studied in chiral σ model. Their dispersion relations are calculated numerically in one-loop approximation. In order to avoid the so-called tachyon pole appearing in the one-loop propagators of pion and sigma meson, we regard the mass of sigma meson mσ as a free parameter and adjust it to fit the nuclear saturation properties. For mσ equal to 3075 MeV, the tachyonpole does not appear at the normal nuclear density. Thus the dispersion relation can be calculated in chiral σ model in one-loop level for the first time.

  17. A study of nuclear effect in $F_3$ structure function in the deep inelastic $\

    CERN Document Server

    Athar, M Sajjad; Singh, S K; Vacas, M J Vicente

    2009-01-01

    We study nuclear effect in the $F^A_3(x)$ structure function in the deep inelastic neutrino reactions on iron by taking into account Fermi motion, binding, target mass correction, shadowing and anti-shadowing corrections. Calculations have been done in a local density approximation using relativistic nuclear spectral functions which include nucleon correlations for nuclear matter. Results for $F^A_3(x)$ have been compared with the results reported at NuTeV and also with some of the older experiments reported in the literature.

  18. Laminopathies: involvement of structural nuclear proteins in the pathogenesis of an increasing number of human diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maraldi, Nadir M; Squarzoni, Stefano; Sabatelli, Patrizia; Capanni, Cristina; Mattioli, Elisabetta; Ognibene, Andrea; Lattanzi, Giovanna

    2005-05-01

    Just at the beginning of the millennium the neologism laminopathies has been introduced in the scientific vocabulary. An exponential increase of interest on the subject started concomitantly, so that a formerly quite neglected group of rare human diseases is now widely investigated. This review will cover the history of the identification of the molecular basis for fourteen (since now) hereditary diseases arising from defects in genes that encode nuclear envelope and nuclear lamina-associated proteins and will also consider the hypotheses that can account for the role of structural nuclear proteins in the pathogenesis of diseases affecting a wide spectrum of tissues.

  19. Changing nuclear landscape and unique PML structures during early epigenetic transitions of human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, John T; Hall, Lisa L; Smith, Kelly P; Lawrence, Jeanne B

    2009-07-01

    The complex nuclear structure of somatic cells is important to epigenomic regulation, yet little is known about nuclear organization of human embryonic stem cells (hESC). Here we surveyed several nuclear structures in pluripotent and transitioning hESC. Observations of centromeres, telomeres, SC35 speckles, Cajal Bodies, lamin A/C and emerin, nuclear shape and size demonstrate a very different "nuclear landscape" in hESC. This landscape is remodeled during a brief transitional window, concomitant with or just prior to differentiation onset. Notably, hESC initially contain abundant signal for spliceosome assembly factor, SC35, but lack discrete SC35 domains; these form as cells begin to specialize, likely reflecting cell-type specific genomic organization. Concomitantly, nuclear size increases and shape changes as lamin A/C and emerin incorporate into the lamina. During this brief window, hESC exhibit dramatically different PML-defined structures, which in somatic cells are linked to gene regulation and cancer. Unlike the numerous, spherical somatic PML bodies, hES cells often display approximately 1-3 large PML structures of two morphological types: long linear "rods" or elaborate "rosettes", which lack substantial SUMO-1, Daxx, and Sp100. These occur primarily between Day 0-2 of differentiation and become rare thereafter. PML rods may be "taut" between other structures, such as centromeres, but clearly show some relationship with the lamina, where PML often abuts or fills a "gap" in early lamin A/C staining. Findings demonstrate that pluripotent hES cells have a markedly different overall nuclear architecture, remodeling of which is linked to early epigenomic programming and involves formation of unique PML-defined structures.

  20. Precision mass measurements of short-lived nuclides for nuclear structure studies at TITAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaudhuri A.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available TITAN (TRIUMF’s Ion Trap for Atomic and Nuclear science at TRIUMF’s rare isotope beam facility ISAC is an advanced Penning trap based mass spectrometer dedicated to precise and accurate mass determinations. An overview of TITAN, the measurement technique and a highlight of recent mass measurements of the short-lived nuclides important to the nuclear structure program at TITAN are presented.

  1. Nuclear structure at high spin using multidetector gamma array and ancillary detectors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Muralithar

    2014-04-01

    A multidetector gamma array (GDA), for studying nuclear structure was built with ancillary devices namely gamma multiplicity filter and charged particle detector array. This facility was designed for in-beam gamma spectroscopy measurements in fusion evaporation reactions at Inter-University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi. Description of the facility and in-beam performance with two experimental studies done are presented. This array was used in a number of nuclear spectroscopic and reaction investigations.

  2. Electric monopole transitions: What they can tell us about nuclear structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zganjar, E.F. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Wood, J.L. [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Physics

    1997-07-02

    A brief survey of E0 strength in a number of nuclei in different regions of the nuclear chart is presented. The connection between E0 strength and shape coexistence is reviewed. Nuclear structure information obtained from measurements of electric monopole transitions in {sup 184}Pt and {sup 187}Au is discussed. Plans for future experiments utilizing radioactive ion beams and E0 internal pair formation is presented.

  3. Electric monopole transitions: What they can tell us about nuclear structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zganjar, E.F. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Wood, J.L. [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Physics

    1995-12-31

    A brief survey of E0 strength in a number of nuclei in different regions of the nuclear chart is presented. The connection between E0 strength and shape coexistence is reviewed. Nuclear structure information obtained from measurements of electric monopole transitions in {sup 184}Pt and {sup 187}Au is discussed. Plans for future experiments utilizing radioactive ion beams and E0 internal-pair-formation is presented.

  4. Epigenetic stochasticity, nuclear structure and cancer: the implications for medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinberg, A P

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize an evolution of thinking about the epigenetic basis of human cancer, from the earliest studies of altered DNA methylation in cancer to the modern comprehensive epigenomic era. Converging data from epigenetic studies of primary cancers and from experimental studies of chromatin in development and epithelial-mesenchymal transition suggest a role for epigenetic stochasticity as a driving force of cancer, with Darwinian selection of tumour cells at the expense of the host. This increased epigenetic stochasticity appears to be mediated by large-scale changes in DNA methylation and chromatin in domains associated with the nuclear lamina. The implications for diagnosis include the potential to identify stochastically disrupted progenitor cells years before cancer develops, and to target drugs to epigenetic drivers of gene expression instability rather than to mean effects per se. © 2014 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  5. Application of Radiation Chemistry to Some Selected Technological Issues Related to the Development of Nuclear Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobrowski, Krzysztof; Skotnicki, Konrad; Szreder, Tomasz

    2016-10-01

    The most important contributions of radiation chemistry to some selected technological issues related to water-cooled reactors, reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive wastes, and fuel evolution during final radioactive waste disposal are highlighted. Chemical reactions occurring at the operating temperatures and pressures of reactors and involving primary transients and stable products from water radiolysis are presented and discussed in terms of the kinetic parameters and radiation chemical yields. The knowledge of these parameters is essential since they serve as input data to the models of water radiolysis in the primary loop of light water reactors and super critical water reactors. Selected features of water radiolysis in heterogeneous systems, such as aqueous nanoparticle suspensions and slurries, ceramic oxides surfaces, nanoporous, and cement-based materials, are discussed. They are of particular concern in the primary cooling loops in nuclear reactors and long-term storage of nuclear waste in geological repositories. This also includes radiation-induced processes related to corrosion of cladding materials and copper-coated iron canisters, dissolution of spent nuclear fuel, and changes of bentonite clays properties. Radiation-induced processes affecting stability of solvents and solvent extraction ligands as well oxidation states of actinide metal ions during recycling of the spent nuclear fuel are also briefly summarized.

  6. Shamir secret sharing scheme with dynamic access structure (SSSDAS). Case study on nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiyagarajan, P.; Thandra, Prasanth Kumar; Rajan, J.; Satyamurthy, S.A.V. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Kalpakkam (India). Computer Div.; Aghila, G. [National Institute of Technology, Karaikal (India). Dept. of Computer Science and Engineering

    2015-05-15

    In recent years, due to the sophistication offered by the Internet, strategic organizations like nuclear power plants are linked to the outside world communication through the Internet. The entry of outside world communication into strategic organization (nuclear power plant) increases the hacker's attempts to crack its security and to trace any information which is being sent among the top level officials. Information security system in nuclear power plant is very crucial as even small loophole in the security system will lead to a major disaster. Recent cyber attacks in nuclear power plant provoked information security professionals to look deeply into the information security aspects of strategic organizations (nuclear power plant). In these lines, Shamir secret sharing scheme with dynamic access structure (SSSDAS) is proposed in the paper which provides enhanced security by providing dynamic access structure for each node in different hierarchies. The SSSDAS algorithm can be applied to any strategic organizations with hierarchical structures. In this paper the possible scenarios where SSSDAS algorithm can be applied to nuclear power plant is explained as a case study. The proposed SSSDAS scheme identifies the wrong shares, if any, used for reconstruction of the secret. The SSSDAS scheme also address the three major security parameters namely confidentiality, authentication and integrity.

  7. Improved technical specifications and related improvements to safety in commercial Nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, D.R.; Demitrack, T.; Schiele, R.; Jones, J.C. [EXCEL Services Corporation, 11921 Rockville Pike, Suite 100, Rockville, MD 20852 (United States)]. e-mail: donaldh@excelservices.com

    2004-07-01

    Many of the commercial nuclear power plants in the United States (US) have been converting a portion of the plant operating license known as the Technical Specifications (TS) in accordance with a document published by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The TS prescribe commercial nuclear power plant operating requirements. There are several types of nuclear power plants in the US, based on the technology of different vendors, and there is an NRC document that supports each of the five different vendor designs. The NRC documents are known as the Improved Standard Technical Specifications (ISTS) and are contained in a separate document (NUREG series) for each one of the designs. EXCEL Services Corporation (hereinafter EXCEL) has played a major role in the development of the ISTS and in the development, licensing, and implementation of the plant specific Improved Technical Specifications (ITS) (which is based on the ISTS) for the commercial nuclear power plants in the US that have elected to make this conversion. There are currently 103 operating commercial nuclear power plants in the US and 68 of them have successfully completed the conversion to the ITS and are now operating in accordance with their plant specific ITS. The ISTS is focused mainly on safety by ensuring the commercial nuclear reactors can safely shut down and mitigate the consequences of any postulated transient and accident. It accomplishes this function by including requirements directly associated with safety in a document structured systematically and taking into account some key human factors and technical initiatives. This paper discusses the ISTS including its format, content, and detail, the history of the ISTS, the ITS development, licensing, and implementation process, the safety improvements resulting from a plant conversion to ITS, and the importance of the ITS Project to the industry. (Author)

  8. Protein Structure Is Related to RNA Structural Reactivity In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yin; Assmann, Sarah M; Bevilacqua, Philip C

    2016-02-27

    We assessed whether in vivo mRNA structural reactivity and the structure of the encoded protein are related. This is the first investigation of such a relationship that utilizes information on RNA structure obtained in living cells. Based on our recent genome-wide Structure-seq analysis in Arabidopsis thaliana, we report that, as a meta property, regions of individual mRNAs that code for protein domains generally have higher reactivity to DMS (dimethyl sulfate), a chemical that covalently modifies accessible As and Cs, than regions that encode protein domain junctions. This relationship is prominent for proteins annotated for catalytic activity and reversed in proteins annotated for binding and transcription regulatory activity. Upon analyzing intrinsically disordered proteins, we found a similar pattern for disordered regions as compared to ordered regions: regions of individual mRNAs that code for ordered regions have significantly higher DMS reactivity than regions that code for intrinsically disordered regions. Based on these effects, we hypothesize that the decreased DMS reactivity of RNA regions that encode protein domain junctions or intrinsically disordered regions may reflect increased RNA structure that may slow translation, allowing time for the nascent protein domain or ordered region of the protein to fold, thereby reducing protein misfolding. In addition, a drop in DMS reactivity was observed on portions of mRNA sequences that correspond to the C-termini of protein domains, suggesting ribosome protection at these mRNA regions. Structural relationships between mRNAs and their encoded proteins may have evolved to allow efficient and accurate protein folding.

  9. Fire and the related effects of nuclear explosions. 1982 Asilomar Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, S.B.; Alger, R.S. (eds.)

    1982-11-01

    This report summarizes the proceedings of a Federal Emergency Management Agency-sponsored Conference on fire and the related effects of nuclear explosions (with passing attention to earthquakes and other nonnuclear mishaps). This conference, the fifth of an annual series (formally called Blast/Fire Interaction Conferences), was held during the week of April 25, 1982, again at Asilomar, California.

  10. Historical evolution of nuclear energy systems development and related activities in JAERI. Fission, fusion, accelerator utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tone, Tatsuzo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-03-01

    Overview of the historical evolution of nuclear energy systems development and related activities in JAERI is given in the report. This report reviews the research and development for light water reactor, fast breeder reactor, high temperature gas reactor, fusion reactor and utilization of accelerator-based neutron source. (author)

  11. 37 CFR 5.20 - Export of technical data relating to sensitive nuclear technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Export of technical data... LICENSES TO EXPORT AND FILE APPLICATIONS IN FOREIGN COUNTRIES Licenses for Foreign Exporting and Filing § 5.20 Export of technical data relating to sensitive nuclear technology. Under regulations (10 CFR...

  12. Nuclear matrix element of neutrinoless double-β decay: Relativity and short-range correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, L. S.; Yao, J. M.; Ring, P.; Meng, J.

    2017-02-01

    Background:The discovery of neutrinoless double-β (0 ν β β ) decay would demonstrate the nature of neutrinos, have profound implications for our understanding of matter-antimatter mystery, and solve the mass hierarchy problem of neutrinos. The calculations for the nuclear matrix elements M0 ν of 0 ν β β decay are crucial for the interpretation of this process. Purpose: We study the effects of relativity and nucleon-nucleon short-range correlations on the nuclear matrix elements M0 ν by assuming the mechanism of exchanging light or heavy neutrinos for the 0 ν β β decay. Methods:The nuclear matrix elements M0 ν are calculated within the framework of covariant density functional theory, where the beyond-mean-field correlations are included in the nuclear wave functions by configuration mixing of both angular-momentum and particle-number projected quadrupole deformed mean-field states. Results: The nuclear matrix elements M0 ν are obtained for ten 0 ν β β -decay candidate nuclei. The impact of relativity is illustrated by adopting relativistic or nonrelativistic decay operators. The effects of short-range correlations are evaluated. Conclusions: The effects of relativity and short-range correlations play an important role in the mechanism of exchanging heavy neutrinos though the influences are marginal for light neutrinos. Combining the nuclear matrix elements M0 ν with the observed lower limits on the 0 ν β β -decay half-lives, the predicted strongest limits on the effective masses are || |-1>3.065 ×108GeV for heavy neutrinos.

  13. Hydrogen Gas Production from Nuclear Power Plant in Relation to Hydrogen Fuel Cell Technologies Nowadays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusibani, Elin; Kamil, Insan; Suud, Zaki

    2010-06-01

    Recently, world has been confused by issues of energy resourcing, including fossil fuel use, global warming, and sustainable energy generation. Hydrogen may become the choice for future fuel of combustion engine. Hydrogen is an environmentally clean source of energy to end-users, particularly in transportation applications because without release of pollutants at the point of end use. Hydrogen may be produced from water using the process of electrolysis. One of the GEN-IV reactors nuclear projects (HTGRs, HTR, VHTR) is also can produce hydrogen from the process. In the present study, hydrogen gas production from nuclear power plant is reviewed in relation to commercialization of hydrogen fuel cell technologies nowadays.

  14. Challenging nuclear structure models through a microscopic description of proton inelastic scattering off 208Pb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuis, M.; Karataglidis, S.; Bauge, E.; Delaroche, J.-P.; Gogny, D.

    2008-07-01

    Differential cross sections from fully microscopic calculations of inelastic proton scattering off 208Pb are compared to experimental scattering data for incident proton energies between 65 and 201 MeV. The required nucleon-nucleus interactions were formed by folding nuclear structure information with a reliable nucleon-nucleon effective interaction that has no adjustable parameter. The absence of phenomenological normalisation in our approach offers the possibility to interpret with confidence the calculated results in terms of the quality of the underlying nuclear structure description: a feature that had been reserved, until recently, to the electron probe. We have used this method to investigate the effect of long range correlations embedded in excited states on calculated inelastic observables and demonstrate the sensitivity of nucleon scattering predictions to details of the nuclear structure.

  15. Toward the atomic structure of the nuclear pore complex: when top down meets bottom up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoelz, André; Glavy, Joseph S; Beck, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Elucidating the structure of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) is a prerequisite for understanding the molecular mechanism of nucleocytoplasmic transport. However, owing to its sheer size and flexibility, the NPC is unapproachable by classical structure determination techniques and requires a joint effort of complementary methods. Whereas bottom-up approaches rely on biochemical interaction studies and crystal-structure determination of NPC components, top-down approaches attempt to determine the structure of the intact NPC in situ. Recently, both approaches have converged, thereby bridging the resolution gap from the higher-order scaffold structure to near-atomic resolution and opening the door for structure-guided experimental interrogations of NPC function.

  16. Structural basis of nucleic acid recognition by FK506-binding protein 25 (FKBP25), a nuclear immunophilin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Ajit; Shin, Joon; Rajan, Sreekanth; Yoon, Ho Sup

    2016-04-07

    The nuclear immunophilin FKBP25 interacts with chromatin-related proteins and transcription factors and is suggested to interact with nucleic acids. Currently the structural basis of nucleic acid binding by FKBP25 is unknown. Here we determined the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) solution structure of full-length human FKBP25 and studied its interaction with DNA. The FKBP25 structure revealed that the N-terminal helix-loop-helix (HLH) domain and C-terminal FK506-binding domain (FKBD) interact with each other and that both of the domains are involved in DNA binding. The HLH domain forms major-groove interactions and the basic FKBD loop cooperates to form interactions with an adjacent minor-groove of DNA. The FKBP25-DNA complex model, supported by NMR and mutational studies, provides structural and mechanistic insights into the nuclear immunophilin-mediated nucleic acid recognition. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  17. Going nuclear? Family structure and young women's health in India, 1992-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allendorf, Keera

    2013-06-01

    Scholars traditionally argued that industrialization, urbanization, and educational expansion lead to a decline in extended families and complementary rise in nuclear families. Some have suggested that such transitions are good for young married women because living in nuclear families benefits their health. However, extended families may also present advantages for young women's health that outweigh any disadvantages. Using the Indian National Family Health Survey, this article examines whether young married women living in nuclear families have better health than those in patrilocal extended families. It also examines whether young married women's living arrangements are changing over time and, if so, how such changes will affect their health. Results show that young married women living in nuclear families do not have better health than those in patrilocal extended families. Of eight health outcomes examined, only five differ significantly by family structure. Further, of the five outcomes that differ, four are patrilocal extended-family advantages and only one is a nuclear-family advantage. From 1992 to 2006, the percentage of young married women residing in nuclear families increased, although the majority remained in patrilocal extended families. This trend toward nuclear families will not benefit young women's health.

  18. The HST/ACS Coma Cluster Survey : X. Nuclear star clusters in low-mass early-type galaxies: scaling relations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brok, Mark den; Peletier, Reynier F.; Seth, Anil; Balcells, Marc; Dominguez, Lilian; Graham, Alister W.; Carter, David; Erwin, Peter; Ferguson, Henry C.; Goudfrooij, Paul; Guzman, Rafael; Hoyos, Carlos; Jogee, Shardha; Lucey, John; Phillipps, Steven; Puzia, Thomas; Valentijn, Edwin; Verdoes Kleijn, Gijsbert; Weinzirl, Tim

    2014-01-01

    We present scaling relations between structural properties of nuclear star clusters and their host galaxies for a sample of early-type dwarf galaxies observed as part of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) Coma Cluster Survey. We have analysed the light profiles of 200

  19. The HST/ACS Coma Cluster Survey - X. Nuclear star clusters in low-mass early-type galaxies : scaling relations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Brok, Mark; Peletier, Reynier F.; Seth, Anil; Balcells, Marc; Dominguez, Lilian; Graham, Alister W.; Carter, David; Erwin, Peter; Ferguson, Henry C.; Goudfrooij, Paul; Guzman, Rafael; Hoyos, Carlos; Jogee, Shardha; Lucey, John; Phillipps, Steven; Puzia, Thomas; Valentijn, Edwin; Kleijn, Gijs Verdoes; Weinzirl, Tim

    2014-01-01

    We present scaling relations between structural properties of nuclear star clusters and their host galaxies for a sample of early-type dwarf galaxies observed as part of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) Coma Cluster Survey. We have analysed the light profiles of 200

  20. Numerical simulation of aircraft crash on nuclear containment structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iqbal, M.A., E-mail: iqbalfce@iitr.ernet.in [Department of Civil Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247667 (India); Rai, S.; Sadique, M.R.; Bhargava, P. [Department of Civil Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247667 (India)

    2012-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The deformation was more localised at the center of cylindrical portion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The peak deflection at the junction of dome and cylinder was found to be 67 mm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The peak deflection at midpoint of the cylindrical portion was found to be 88.9 mm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The strain rate was found to be an important parameter to effect the deformation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The model without strain rate and 290 s{sup -1} strain rate predicted very high deformations. - Abstract: Numerical simulations were carried with ABAQUS/Explicit finite element code in order to predict the response of BWR Mark III type nuclear containment against Boeing 707-320 aircraft crash. The load of the aircraft was applied using and force history curve. The damaged plasticity model was used to predict the behavior of concrete while the Johnson-Cook elasto-viscoplastic material model was used to incorporate the behavior of steel reinforcement. The crash was considered to occur at two different locations i.e., the midpoint of the cylindrical portion and the junction of dome and cylinder. The midpoint of the cylindrical portion experienced more deformation. The strain rate in the material model was varied and found to have a significant effect on the response of containment. The results of the present investigation were compared with those of the studies available in literature and a close agreement with the previous results was found in terms of maximum target deformation.

  1. Airy structure in $^{16}$O+$^{14}$C nuclear rainbow scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Ohkubo, S

    2015-01-01

    The Airy structure in $^{16}$O+$^{14}$C rainbow scattering is studied with an extended double folding (EDF) model that describes all the diagonal and off-diagonal coupling potentials derived from the microscopic realistic wave functions for $^{16}$O using a density-dependent nucleon-nucleon force. The experimental angular distributions at $E_L$=132, 281 and 382.2 MeV are well reproduced by the calculations. By studying the energy evolution of the Airy structure, the Airy minimum at around $\\theta$=76$^\\circ$ in the angular distribution at $E_L$=132 MeV is assigned as the second order Airy minimum $A2$ in contrast to the recent literature which assigns it as the third order $A3$. The Airy minima in the 90$^\\circ$ excitation function is investigated in comparison with well-known $^{16}$O+$^{16}$O and $^{12}$C+$^{12}$C systems. Evolution of the Airy structure into the molecular resonances with the $^{16}$O+$^{14}$C cluster structure in the low energy region around $E_{c.m.}$=30 MeV is discussed. It is predicted ...

  2. Delineation of nuclear structures in 3D multicellular systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2013-09-13

    A pipeline, implemented within the Insight Segmentation and Registration Toolkit (ITK) and The Visualization Toolkit (VTK) framework, to delineate each nucleus and to profile morphometric and colony organization. At an abstract level, our approach is an extension of a previously developed method for monolayer call structure models.

  3. Nuclear structure contribution to the Lamb shift in muonic deuterium

    CERN Document Server

    Carlson, Carl E; Vanderhaeghen, Marc

    2014-01-01

    We consider the two-photon exchange contribution to the $2P-2S$ Lamb shift in muonic deuterium in the framework of forward dispersion relations. The dispersion integrals are evaluated using experimental data on elastic deuteron form factors and inelastic electron-deuteron scattering, both in the quasielastic and hadronic range. The subtraction constant that is required to ensure convergence of the dispersion relation for the forward Compton amplitude $T_1(\

  4. Structures of the autoproteolytic domain from the Saccharomyces cerevisiae nuclear pore complex component, Nup145

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sampathkumar, Parthasarathy; Ozyurt, Sinem A.; Do, Johnny; Bain, Kevin T.; Dickey, Mark; Rodgers, Logan A.; Gheyi, Tarun; Sali, Andrej; Kim, Seung Joong; Phillips, Jeremy; Pieper, Ursula; Fernandez-Martinez, Javier; Franke, Josef D.; Martel, Anne; Tsuruta, Hiro; Atwell, Shane; Thompson, Devon A.; Emtage, J. Spencer; Wasserman, Stephen R.; Rout, Michael P.; Sauder, J. Michael; Burley, Stephen K. (SLAC); (Rockefeller); (UCSF); (Lilly)

    2012-04-30

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are large, octagonally symmetric dynamic macromolecular assemblies responsible for exchange of proteins and RNAs between the nucleus and cytoplasm. NPCs are made up of at least 456 polypeptides from {approx}30 distinct nucleoporins. Several of these components, sharing similar structural motifs, form stable subcomplexes that form a coaxial structure containing two outer rings (the nuclear and cytoplasmic rings), two inner rings, and a membrane ring. The yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) Nup145 and its human counterpart are unique among the nucleoporins, in that they undergo autoproteolysis to generate functionally distinct proteins. The human counterpart of Nup145 is expressed as two alternatively spliced mRNA transcripts. The larger 190 kDa precursor undergoes post-translational autoproteolysis at the Phe863-Ser864 peptide bond yielding the 92 kDa Nup98 and the 96 kDa Nup96. The smaller 98 kDa precursor is also autoproteolysed at an analogous site giving 92 kDa Nup98-N and a 6 kDa C-terminal fragment, which may form a noncovalent complex. The yeast Nup145 precursor [Fig. 1(A)] contains twelve repeats of a 'GLFG' peptide motif (FG repeats) at its N-terminus, an internal autoproteolytic domain (a region of high conservation with the homologous yeast nucleoporins Nup110 and Nup116, neither of which undergo autoproteolysis), followed by the C-terminal domain. Various forms of the FG repeats are present in nearly half of all nucleoporins; they form intrinsically disordered regions implicated in gating mechanisms that control passage of macromolecules through NPCs. Nup145 undergoes autoproteolysis at the Phe605-Ser606 peptide bond to generate two functionally distinct proteins, Nup145N and Nup145C. Subsequently, Nup145C associates with six other proteins to form the heptameric Y-complex, a component of the outer rings of the NPC. Nup145N, on the other hand, can shuttle between the NPC and the nuclear interior. It has been suggested

  5. Electromagnetic and Weak Nuclear Structure Functions $F_{1,2}(x,Q^2)$ in the Intermediate Region of $Q^2$

    CERN Document Server

    Haider, H; Athar, M Sajjad; Singh, S K; Simo, I Ruiz

    2016-01-01

    We have studied nuclear structure functions $F_{1A}(x,Q^2)$ and $F_{2A}(x,Q^2)$ for electromagnetic and weak processes in the region of $1 GeV^2 < Q^2 <8 GeV^2$. The nuclear medium effects arising due to Fermi motion, binding energy, nucleon correlations, mesonic contributions and shadowing effects are taken into account using a many body field theoretical approach. The calculations are performed in a local density approximation using a relativistic nucleon spectral function. The results are compared with the available experimental data. Implications of nuclear medium effects on the validity of Callan-Gross relation are also discussed.

  6. Nuclear structure functions in carbon near x=1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benvenuti, A.C.; Bollini, D.; Camporesi, T.; Monari, L.; Navarria, F.L. (Dipt. di Fisica, Univ. Bologna (Italy) INFN, Sezione di Bologna (Italy)); Argento, A.; Cvach, J.; Lohmann, W.; Piemontese, L. (CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)); Genchev, V.I.; Hladky, J.; Golutvin, I.A.; Kiryushin, Yu.T.; Kiselev, V.S.; Krivokhizhin, V.G.; Kukhtin, V.V.; Nemecek, S.; Peshekhonov, D.V.; Reimer, P.; Savin, I.A.; Smirnov, G.I.; Sultanov, S.; Volodko, A.G.; Zacek, J. (Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation)); Jamnik, D.; Kopp, R.; Meyer-Berkhout, U.; Staude, A.; Teichert, K.M.; Tirler, R.; Voss, R.; Zupancic, C. (Sektion Physik, Univ. Muenchen (Germany)); Feltesse, J.; Misztajn, A.; Ouraou, A.; Rich-Hennion, P.; Sacquin, Y.; Smadja, G.; Verrecchia, P.; Virchaux, M. (DAPNIA-SPP, Centre d' Etudes de Saclay, CEA, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)); BCDMS Collaboration

    1994-07-01

    Data from deep inelastic scattering of 200 GeV muons on a carbon target with squared four-momentum transfer 52 GeV[sup 2][<=]Q[sup 2][<=]200 GeV[sup 2] were analysed in the region of the Bjorken variable close to x=1, which is the kinematic limit for scattering on a free nucleon. At this value of x, the carbon structure function is found to be F[sub 2][sup C][approx]1.2.10[sup -4]. The x dependence of the structure function for x>0.8 is well described by an exponential F[sub 2][sup C][proportional to]exp(-sx) with s=16.5[+-]0.6. (orig.)

  7. Structure Determination of Natural Products by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Du.

    High-field NMR experiments were used to determine the full structures of six new natural products extracted from plants. These are: four saponins (PT-2, P1, P2 and P3) from the plant Alphitonia zizyphoides found in Samoa; one sesquiterpene (DF-4) from Douglas fir and one diterpene derivative (E-2) from a Chinese medicinal herb. By concerted use of various 1D and 2D NMR techniques, the structures of the above compounds were established and complete resonance assignments were achieved. The 2D INADEQUATE technique coupled with a computerized spectral analysis was extensively used. When carried out on concentrations as low as 60 mg of sample, this technique provided absolute confirmation of the assignments for 35 of the possible 53 C-C bonds for PT-2. On 30 mg of sample of E-21, it revealed 22 of 28 possible C-C bonds.

  8. Nuclear Structure Studies of Exotic Nuclei with Radioactive Ion Beams A Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winger, Jeff Allen [Mississippi State Univ., Mississippi State, MS (United States)

    2016-04-21

    Beta-decay spectroscopy provides important information on nuclear structure and properties needed to understand topics as widely varied as fundamental nuclear astrophysics to applied nuclear reactor design. However, there are significant limitations of our knowledge due to an inability to experimentally measure everything. Therefore, it is often necessary to rely on theoretical calculations which need to be vetted with experimental results. The focus of this report will be results from experimental research performed by the Principal Investigator (PI) and his research group at Mississippi State University in which the group played the lead role in proposing, implementing, performing and analyzing the experiment. This research was carried out at both the National Superconduction Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) at Michigan State University and the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The primary emphasis of the research was the use of \\bdec spectroscopy as a tool to understand the evolution of nuclear structure in neutron-rich nuclei which could then be applied to improve theory and to increase the overall knowledge of nuclear structure.

  9. Nuclear structure corrections to the Lamb shift in μHe3+ and μ3H

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevo Dinur, N.; Ji, C.; Bacca, S.; Barnea, N.

    2016-04-01

    Measuring the 2S-2P Lamb shift in a hydrogen-like muonic atom allows one to extract its nuclear charge radius with a high precision that is limited by the uncertainty in the nuclear structure corrections. The charge radius of the proton thus extracted was found to be 7σ away from the CODATA value, in what has become the yet unsolved "proton radius puzzle". Further experiments currently aim at the isotopes of hydrogen and helium: the precise extraction of their radii may provide a hint at the solution of the puzzle. We present the first ab initio calculation of nuclear structure corrections, including the nuclear polarization correction, to the 2S-2P transition in μHe3+ and μ3H, and assess solid theoretical error bars. Our predictions reduce the uncertainty in the nuclear structure corrections to the level of a few percent and will be instrumental to the on-going μHe3+ experiment. We also support the mirror μ3H system as a candidate for further probing of the nucleon polarizabilities and shedding more light on the puzzle.

  10. Nuclear structure corrections to the Lamb shift in $\\mu^3$He$^+$ and $\\mu^3$H

    CERN Document Server

    Dinur, N Nevo; Bacca, S; Barnea, N

    2015-01-01

    Measuring the 2S-2P Lamb shift in a hydrogen-like muonic atom allows one to extract its nuclear charge radius with a high precision that is limited by the uncertainty in the nuclear structure corrections. The charge radius of the proton thus extracted was found to be 7-sigma away from the CODATA value, in what has become the yet unsolved "proton radius puzzle". Further experiments currently aim at the isotopes of hydrogen and helium: the precise extraction of their radii may provide a hint at the solution of the puzzle. We present the first ab initio calculation of nuclear structure corrections, including the nuclear polarization correction, to the 2S-2P transition in $\\mu^3$He$^+$ and $\\mu^3$H, and assess solid theoretical error bars. Our predictions reduce the uncertainty in the nuclear structure corrections to the level of a few percents and will be instrumental to the on-going $\\mu^3$He$^+$ experiment. We also support the mirror $\\mu\\,^3$H system as a candidate for further probing of the nucleon polarizab...

  11. The Legnaro National Laboratories and the SPES facility: nuclear structure and reactions today and tomorrow

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Angelis, Giacomo; Fiorentini, Gianni

    2016-11-01

    There is a very long tradition of studying nuclear structure and reactions at the Legnaro National Laboratories (LNL) of the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (Italian Institute of Nuclear Physics). The wide expertise acquired in building and running large germanium arrays has made the laboratories one of the most advanced research centers in γ-ray spectroscopy. The ’gamma group’ has been deeply involved in all the national and international developments of the last 20 years and is currently one of the major contributors to the AGATA project, the first (together with its American counterpart GRETINA) γ-detector array based on γ-ray tracking. This line of research is expected to be strongly boosted by the coming into operation of the SPES radioactive ion beam project, currently under construction at LNL. In this report, written on the occasion of the 40th anniversary of the Nobel prize awarded to Aage Bohr, Ben R Mottelson and Leo Rainwater and particularly focused on the physics of nuclear structure, we intend to summarize the different lines of research that have guided nuclear structure and reaction research at LNL in the last decades. The results achieved have paved the way for the present SPES facility, a new laboratories infrastructure producing and accelerating radioactive ion beams of fission fragments and other isotopes.

  12. Nuclear structure far off stability - New results from RISING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorska, M [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, 64294 Darmstadt (Germany); Grawe, H [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, 64294 Darmstadt (Germany); Banu, A [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, 64294 Darmstadt (Germany); Buerger, A [Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik, Universitaet Bonn (Germany); Doornenbal, P [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, 64294 Darmstadt (Germany); Gerl, J [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, 64294 Darmstadt (Germany); Hjorth-Jensen, M [Department of Physics and Center of Mathematics for Applications, University of Oslo, N-0316 Oslo (Norway); Huebel, H [Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik, Universitaet Bonn (Germany); Nowacki, F [IReS, F-67037 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France); Otsuka, T [Department of Physics and Center for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo, Hongo, Bunkyo-Ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Reiter, P [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet zu Cologne (Germany)

    2006-10-10

    A broad range of physics phenomena can be addressed by high-resolution in-beam {gamma}-ray spectroscopy experiments with radioactive beams offered within the Rare ISotopes INvestigation at GSI (RISING) project. It combines the EUROBALL Ge-Cluster detectors, the MINIBALL Ge detectors, the HECTOR-BaF detectors, and the fragment separator FRS. The secondary beams produced at relativistic energies are used for Coulomb excitation or secondary fragmentation experiments to study projectile like nuclei far off the stability line by measuring de-excitation photons. The physics studied comprises the evolution of shell structure towards the drip lines and its signatures as inferred from excitation energies, mirror symmetry and electromagnetic transition strengths. The first results of the 'fast beam campaign' are discussed in comparison to various shell model calculations including the structure of light Sn isotopes based on Coulomb excitation of {sup 108}Sn, the discussion of the N = 32,34 sub-shell closure based on neutron-rich {sup 56,58}Cr isotopes, and the shell structure in light proton-rich Ca isotopes from the fragmentation of a {sup 37}Ca radioactive beam.

  13. Structure, dynamics, evolution, and function of a major scaffold component in the nuclear pore complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampathkumar, Parthasarathy; Kim, Seung Joong; Upla, Paula; Rice, William J; Phillips, Jeremy; Timney, Benjamin L; Pieper, Ursula; Bonanno, Jeffrey B; Fernandez-Martinez, Javier; Hakhverdyan, Zhanna; Ketaren, Natalia E; Matsui, Tsutomu; Weiss, Thomas M; Stokes, David L; Sauder, J Michael; Burley, Stephen K; Sali, Andrej; Rout, Michael P; Almo, Steven C

    2013-04-02

    The nuclear pore complex, composed of proteins termed nucleoporins (Nups), is responsible for nucleocytoplasmic transport in eukaryotes. Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) form an annular structure composed of the nuclear ring, cytoplasmic ring, a membrane ring, and two inner rings. Nup192 is a major component of the NPC's inner ring. We report the crystal structure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Nup192 residues 2-960 [ScNup192(2-960)], which adopts an α-helical fold with three domains (i.e., D1, D2, and D3). Small angle X-ray scattering and electron microscopy (EM) studies reveal that ScNup192(2-960) could undergo long-range transition between "open" and "closed" conformations. We obtained a structural model of full-length ScNup192 based on EM, the structure of ScNup192(2-960), and homology modeling. Evolutionary analyses using the ScNup192(2-960) structure suggest that NPCs and vesicle-coating complexes are descended from a common membrane-coating ancestral complex. We show that suppression of Nup192 expression leads to compromised nuclear transport and hypothesize a role for Nup192 in modulating the permeability of the NPC central channel.

  14. Variations of sphenoid and related structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirikci, A.; Bayram, M. [Dept. of Radiology, Gaziantep University, Koljtepe (Turkey); Bayazit, Y.A.; Mumbuc, S.; Kanlikama, M. [Dept. of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Gaziantep University, Koljtepe (Turkey); Guengoer, K. [Dept. of Ophthalmology, Gaziantep University, Koljtepe (Turkey)

    2000-05-01

    The aim of this study was to delineate the precise relationship between the sphenoid sinus and internal carotid artery and the optic nerve, as well as to assess incidence of the anatomic variations of these structures. A review of 92 paranasal sinus tomographic scans was made for anatomic variations of the sphenoid sinus and related bony and neurovascular structures. Coronal and axial tomographic sections were obtained with 2.5-mm section thickness. We assessed the protrusion of the internal carotid artery (ICA) and the optic nerve (ON) into the sphenoid sinus, bone dehiscence of these structures, and pneumatization of the anterior clinoid process (ACP) and pterygoid recess (PR), as well as the variations of the sphenoid sinus septum. The protrusion of the ICA into the sphenoid sinus was found in 24 (26.1 %) patients. An ON protrusion was present in 29 (31.5 %) patients. Pneumatization of the PR was encountered in 27 (29.3 %) patients. There was not a statistically significant relationship between the pneumatization of the PR and ICA protrusion into the sphenoid sinus ({chi}{sup 2} = 0.258, p = 0.168). A significant relationship between the ACP pneumatization and protrusion of the ON into the sphenoid sinus was found ({chi}{sup 2} = 0.481, p = 0.007). Preoperative recognition of the anatomic variations by the radiologist is beneficial for identification of the limits of dissection. This is particularly important in the sphenoid sinus area where extensive pneumatization of the skull base bones may distort the anatomic configuration. Therefore, axial and coronal CT sections should always be obtained prior to any surgery in the sphenoid sinus area. (orig.)

  15. Relations Between Permeability and Structure of Wood

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bao Fucheng; Zhao Youke; Lü Jianxiong

    2003-01-01

    The permeability and the structure of heartwood and sapwood of the solvent-exchange dried and the air-dried green-wood of Chinese-fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata (Lamb.) Hook.) and masson pine (Pinus massoniana Lamb.) were measured inorder to study the relations between the permeability and the structure. The results showed that the permeability of sapwood of boththe air-dried and the solvent-exchange dried wood was higher than that of heartwood, and the permeability of the solvent-exchangeddried heartwood and sapwood was higher than that of the air-dried. A higher permeability of wood was attributed to, on the one hand,a bigger number of flow path per unit area of the wood perpendicular to the flow direction resulted from a bigger number ofunaspirated pits per unit area and a bigger number of effective pit openings per membrane, and on the other hand, a smaller numberof tracheid in series connection per unit length parallel to flow direction resulted from a longer tracheid length and an effectivetracheid length for permeability.

  16. Prion protein: structural features and related toxicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping Ping Hu; Cheng Zhi Huang

    2013-01-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies,or prion diseases,is a group of infectious neurodegenerative disorders.The conformational conversion from cellular form (PrPC) to disease-causing isoform (PrPSc) is considered to be the most important and remarkable event in these diseases,while accumulation of PrPSc is thought to be the main reason for cell death,inflammation and spongiform degeneration observed in infected individuals.Although these rare but unique neurodegenerative disorders have attracted much attention,there are still many questions that remain to be answered.Knowledge of the scrapie agent structures and the toxic species may have significance for understanding the causes of the diseases,and could be helpful for rational design of novel therapeutic and diagnostic methods.In this review,we summarized the available experimental evidence concerning the relationship among the structural features,aggregation status of misfolded PrP and related neurotoxicity in the course of prion diseases development.In particular,most data supports the idea that the smaller oligomeric PrPSc aggregates,rather than the mature amyloid fibers,exhibit the highest toxicity to the host.

  17. The polariser beamline at TRIUMF for nuclear structure physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, A.; Pearson, M. R.; Levy, C. D. P.; Billowes, J.; Buchinger, F.; Chow, K. H.; Crawford, J. E.; Hossein, M. D.; Kiefl, R. F.; Macfarlane, W. A.; Mané, E.; Morris, G. D.; Parolin, T. J.; Saadaoui, H.; Salman, Z.; Shelbaya, O. T. J.; Smadella, M.; Song, Q.; Wang, D.

    2011-10-01

    Originally built to provide polarised ion beams for condensed matter experiments, the polariser beamline at TRIUMF is coupled to both beta-NMR and beta-NQR spectrometers. In addition, the beam can be passed through a radio-frequency quadrupole cooler and buncher (RFQ) providing bunched beams. Recently, a laser spectroscopy and beta-NQR program was started to investigate the ground state structure of exotic nuclei. Results from recent experiments including zero-field beta-NQR studies to determine the quadrupole moment of the halo nucleus Li-11 and laser spectroscopy to determine the charge radius of Rb-74.

  18. Non-observable nature of the nuclear shell structure. Meaning, illustrations and consequences

    CERN Document Server

    Duguet, T; Holt, J D; Somà, V

    2014-01-01

    The concept of single-nucleon shells constitutes a basic pillar of our understanding of nuclear structure. Effective single-particle energies (ESPEs) introduced by French and Baranger represent the most appropriate tool to relate many-body observables to a single-nucleon shell structure. As briefly discussed in [T. Duguet, G. Hagen, Phys. Rev. C {\\bf 85}, 034330 (2012)], the dependence of ESPEs on one-nucleon transfer probability matrices makes them purely theoretical quantities that "run" with the non-observable resolution scale $\\lambda$ employed in the calculation. Given that ESPEs provide a way to interpret the many-body problem in terms of simpler theoretical ingredients, the goal is to specify the terms, i.e. the exact sense and conditions, in which this interpretation can be conducted meaningfully. State-of-the-art multi-reference in-medium similarity renormalization group and self-consistent Gorkov Green's function many-body calculations are employed to corroborate the formal analysis. This is done by...

  19. Nuclear Structure and the Search for Collective Enhancement of P,T-Violation

    CERN Document Server

    Auerbach, Naftali

    2008-01-01

    The discovery of the atomic electric dipole moment (EDM) would reveal the simultaneous violation of parity (P) and time-reversal (T) invariance. The EDM can be induced by T-odd forces between the nucleus and atomic electrons. As the nuclear dipole moment is screened according to the Schiff theorem, the appropriate nuclear operator is the Schiff moment that may exist in nuclei under PT-violation. We briefly review the current experimental situation and discuss more in detail the ideas concerning possible collective mechanisms for the enhancement of the nuclear Schiff moment. The most promising directions are related to the coexistence of octupole and quadrupole collective modes, either in the form of static deformation or as soft vibrational excitations. The search for enhancement is important for widening the pool of nuclei as candidates for the atomic EDM as well as for development of nuclear many-body theory beyond standard mean-field and random phase approximations.

  20. Genetic structure of the polymorphic metrosideros (Myrtaceae complex in the Hwaiian islands using nuclear microsatellite data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danica T Harbaugh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Five species of Metrosideros (Myrtaceae are recognized in the Hawaiian Islands, including the widespread M. polymorpha, and are characterized by a multitude of distinctive, yet overlapping, habit, ecological, and morphological forms. It remains unclear, despite several previous studies, whether the morphological variation within Hawaiian Metrosideros is due to hybridization, genetic polymorphism, phenotypic plasticity, or some combination of these processes. The Hawaiian Metrosideros complex has become a model system to study ecology and evolution; however this is the first study to use microsatellite data for addressing inter-island patterns of variation from across the Hawaiian Islands. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Ten nuclear microsatellite loci were genotyped from 143 individuals of Metrosideros. We took advantage of the bi-parental inheritance and rapid mutation rate of these data to examine the validity of the current taxonomy and to investigate whether Metrosideros plants from the same island are more genetically similar than plants that are morphologically similar. The Bayesian algorithm of the program structure was used to define genetic groups within Hawaiian Metrosideros and the closely related taxon M. collina from the Marquesas and Austral Islands. Several standard and nested AMOVAs were conducted to test whether the genetic diversity is structured geographically or taxonomically. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results suggest that Hawaiian Metrosideros have dynamic gene flow, with genetic and morphological diversity structured not simply by geography or taxonomy, but as a result of parallel evolution on islands following rampant island-island dispersal, in addition to ancient chloroplast capture. Results also suggest that the current taxonomy requires major revisions in order to reflect the genetic structure revealed in the microsatellite data.

  1. Advanced density matrix renormalization group method for nuclear structure calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Legeza, Ö; Poves, A; Dukelsky, J

    2015-01-01

    We present an efficient implementation of the Density Matrix Renormalization Group (DMRG) algorithm that includes an optimal ordering of the proton and neutron orbitals and an efficient expansion of the active space utilizing various concepts of quantum information theory. We first show how this new DMRG methodology could solve a previous $400$ KeV discrepancy in the ground state energy of $^{56}$Ni. We then report the first DMRG results in the $pf+g9/2$ shell model space for the ground $0^+$ and first $2^+$ states of $^{64}$Ge which are benchmarked with reference data obtained from Monte Carlo shell model. The corresponding correlation structure among the proton and neutron orbitals is determined in terms of the two-orbital mutual information. Based on such correlation graphs we propose several further algorithmic improvement possibilities that can be utilized in a new generation of tensor network based algorithms.

  2. Advanced density matrix renormalization group method for nuclear structure calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legeza, Ã.-.; Veis, L.; Poves, A.; Dukelsky, J.

    2015-11-01

    We present an efficient implementation of the Density Matrix Renormalization Group (DMRG) algorithm that includes an optimal ordering of the proton and neutron orbitals and an efficient expansion of the active space utilizing various concepts of quantum information theory. We first show how this new DMRG methodology could solve a previous 400 keV discrepancy in the ground state energy of 56Ni. We then report the first DMRG results in the p f +g 9 /2 shell model space for the ground 0+ and first 2+ states of 64Ge which are benchmarked with reference data obtained from a Monte Carlo shell model. The corresponding correlation structure among the proton and neutron orbitals is determined in terms of two-orbital mutual information. Based on such correlation graphs we propose several further algorithmic improvement possibilities that can be utilized in a new generation of tensor network based algorithms.

  3. An enhancement of NASTRAN for the seismic analysis of structures. [nuclear power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burroughs, J. W.

    1980-01-01

    New modules, bulk data cards and DMAP sequence were added to NASTRAN to aid in the seismic analysis of nuclear power plant structures. These allow input consisting of acceleration time histories and result in the generation of acceleration floor response spectra. The resulting system contains numerous user convenience features, as well as being reasonably efficient.

  4. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Structures, Systems, and Components Safety Classification White Paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pete Jordan

    2010-09-01

    This white paper outlines the relevant regulatory policy and guidance for a risk-informed approach for establishing the safety classification of Structures, Systems, and Components (SSCs) for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant and sets forth certain facts for review and discussion in order facilitate an effective submittal leading to an NGNP Combined Operating License application under 10 CFR 52.

  5. The determination of the in situ structure by nuclear spin contrast variation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuhrmann, H.B. [GKSS Forschungszentrum, Geesthacht (Germany); Nierhaus, K.H. [Max-Planch-Institut fuer Molekulare Genetik, Berlin (Germany)

    1994-12-31

    Polarized neutron scattering from polarized nuclear spins in hydrogenous substances opens a new way of contrast variation. The enhanced contrast due to proton spin polarization was used for the in situ structure determination of tRNA of the functional complex of the E.coli ribosome.

  6. Developing a Computerized Aging Management System for Concrete Structures in Finnish Nuclear Power Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hradil P.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Finland has four nuclear reactors units in two power plants. The first unit started operation in 1977 and in the early 1980's all four units were in use. During the last few years the aging management of the Nuclear Power Plant's (NPP concrete structures has grown an important issue because the existing structures are reaching the end of their licensed operating lifetime (about 40 years. Therefore the nuclear power companies are developing aging management systems to avoid premature degradation of NPP facilities and to be able to extend their operating lifetime. This paper is about the development of a computerized ageing management system for the nuclear power plants concrete structures. The computerized ageing management system is built upon central database and implementation applications. It will assist the personnel of power companies to implement the aging management activities at different phases of the lifetime of a power plant. It will provide systematic methods for planning, surveillance, inspection, monitoring, condition assessment, maintenance and repair of structures.

  7. Developing a Computerized Aging Management System for Concrete Structures in Finnish Nuclear Power Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Neshawy, F.; Piironen, J.; Sistonen, E.; Vesikari, E.; Tuomisto, M.; Hradil, P.; Ferreira, M.

    2013-07-01

    Finland has four nuclear reactors units in two power plants. The first unit started operation in 1977 and in the early 1980's all four units were in use. During the last few years the aging management of the Nuclear Power Plant's (NPP) concrete structures has grown an important issue because the existing structures are reaching the end of their licensed operating lifetime (about 40 years). Therefore the nuclear power companies are developing aging management systems to avoid premature degradation of NPP facilities and to be able to extend their operating lifetime. This paper is about the development of a computerized ageing management system for the nuclear power plants concrete structures. The computerized ageing management system is built upon central database and implementation applications. It will assist the personnel of power companies to implement the aging management activities at different phases of the lifetime of a power plant. It will provide systematic methods for planning, surveillance, inspection, monitoring, condition assessment, maintenance and repair of structures.

  8. Neutron Halo and Nuclear Shell Structure in New Nuclide 31Ne

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN ZhongZhou; CHEN BaoQiu; MA ZhongYu; XU GongOu

    2001-01-01

    The ground state properties of new nuclide 31Ne are investigated within the framework of the densitydependent relativistic mean-field theory. One-neutron halo in 31Ne is predicted. Calculations also show that the ground state of31Ne is (3/2)- and it can be used for the testing of the nuclear shell structure near the neutron-drip line.``

  9. A study on the establishment of nuclear cooperative relations and future direction between Korea and Vietnam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, M. H.; Kim, H. S.; Chung, W. S.; Yun, S. W.; Ko, H. S.; Lee, J. K

    2000-10-01

    This study was carried out in order to review the cooperation with vietnam and establish and activate the cooperative relations with Vietnam. During the study, current status of use and development of nuclear energy in vietnam, were investigated including nuclear power plant and cooperative relations between two nations were also established. It was agreed through exchanges of visits of cooperation delegation; 1) exchange of visits of cooperation delegation, 2) holding of policy seminar for high level decision makers of Vietnam 3) cooperaton between KAERI/VAEC, 4) joint feasibility study for the construction of KSNP into Vietnam and technical presentation of KSNP. It is recommended that cooperaion with vietnam be implemented systematically through the long term based basic directions and integrated national strategies.

  10. Study of the nuclear structure of {sup 155}Eu; Estudo da estrutura nuclear do {sup 155}Eu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genezini, Frederico Antonio

    2004-07-01

    The {sup 155}Eu nuclide was investigated by the directional angular correlation technique following the {beta} decay of {sup 155}Sm. The angular correlation measurements were carried out using a setup with 4 Ge detectors and a multi parametric data acquisition system. To perform the data analysis a new methodology was developed . The multipole mixing ratios of twenty sixty {gamma}- transitions were determined. Seven of them agreed with the results of earlier angular correlation studies and nineteen obtained for the first time confirmed the multipolarity suggested in earlier electron capture studies. Besides, the spin of the level at 1106.83 keV as well as the parity of the level at 1301.41 keV have also been suggested. The nuclear structure of {sup 155}Eu was discussed successfully in terms of the single particle model using a deformed Woods-Saxon potential plus residual pairing interaction permitting the description of the rotational quasi-proton band heads. (author)

  11. Cladding Effects on Structural Integrity of Nuclear Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sattari-Far, Iradi; Andersson, Magnus [lnspecta Technology AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2006-06-15

    measurement of different clad components. Measurement of cladding residual stresses in a decommissioned reactor pressure vessel head, which was exposed to service conditions (pressure test, temperature, neutron irradiation, etc.), and the results from the cladding in a cut-out-piece, which did not experience any service or test pressure, basically showed similar profiles. Considering the low scatter and the reproducible data, the hole-drilling technique is recommended in measurement of the peak of the cladding residual stresses. The profile and magnitude of the cladding residual stresses depend mainly upon cladding composition, cladding thickness, clad component geometry and clad component temperature. The peak of the cladding residual stresses is actually about 2-3 mm under the surface of the clad layer, and values in the range of 150 and 500 MPa are reported. Fracture assessments on different clad components at different loading conditions reveal that fracture assessments based on LEFM and ASME Kk curve lead to unrealistic conservative results, and the cladding residual stresses are of importance for surface crack behaviour, especially under cold loads. The NESC projects have shown that the Master Curve methodology can give good predictions of the conducted experiments. It is reasonable to assume a peak value of cladding residual stresses in the whole clad layer to be equal to the yield strength of the cladding material (around 300 MPa) at room temperature. Providing that the clad component has received PWHT, it can be assumed no residual stresses in the underlying base material. For the nuclear pressure vessel, it is also reasonable to assume that the cladding stress free temperature is at the operation temperature of the vessel (around 300 deg C). It has been shown that the cladding residual stresses have negligible influence on subclad crack behaviour in clad components (receiving PWHT). It has also been shown that the crack growth for subclad cracks would be towards the

  12. Structural determinants of nuclear export signal orientation in binding to exportin CRM1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Ho Yee Joyce; Fu, Szu-Chin; Brautigam, Chad A; Chook, Yuh Min

    2015-09-08

    The Chromosome Region of Maintenance 1 (CRM1) protein mediates nuclear export of hundreds of proteins through recognition of their nuclear export signals (NESs), which are highly variable in sequence and structure. The plasticity of the CRM1-NES interaction is not well understood, as there are many NES sequences that seem incompatible with structures of the NES-bound CRM1 groove. Crystal structures of CRM1 bound to two different NESs with unusual sequences showed the NES peptides binding the CRM1 groove in the opposite orientation (minus) to that of previously studied NESs (plus). Comparison of minus and plus NESs identified structural and sequence determinants for NES orientation. The binding of NESs to CRM1 in both orientations results in a large expansion in NES consensus patterns and therefore a corresponding expansion of potential NESs in the proteome.

  13. On the unification of nuclear-structure theory: A response to Bortignon and Broglia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Norman D.

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear-structure theory is unusual among the diverse fields of quantum physics. Although it provides a coherent description of all known isotopes on the basis of a quantum-mechanical understanding of nucleon states, nevertheless, in the absence of a fundamental theory of the nuclear force acting between nucleons, the prediction of all ground-state and excited-state nuclear binding energies is inherently semi-empirical. I suggest that progress can be made by returning to the foundational work of Eugene Wigner from 1937, where the mathematical symmetries of nucleon states were first defined. Those symmetries were later successfully exploited in the development of the independent-particle model ( IPM ˜ shell model , but the geometrical implications noted by Wigner were neglected. Here I review how the quantum-mechanical, but remarkably easy-to-understand geometrical interpretation of the IPM provides constraints on the parametrization of the nuclear force. The proposed "geometrical IPM" indicates a way forward toward the unification of nuclear-structure theory that Bortignon and Broglia have called for.

  14. Dynamic nuclear spin polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuhrmann, H.B. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany)

    1996-11-01

    Polarized neutron scattering from dynamic polarized targets has been applied to various hydrogenous materials at different laboratories. In situ structures of macromolecular components have been determined by nuclear spin contrast variation with an unprecedented precision. The experiments of selective nuclear spin depolarisation not only opened a new dimension to structural studies but also revealed phenomena related to propagation of nuclear spin polarization and the interplay of nuclear polarisation with the electronic spin system. The observation of electron spin label dependent nuclear spin polarisation domains by NMR and polarized neutron scattering opens a way to generalize the method of nuclear spin contrast variation and most importantly it avoids precontrasting by specific deuteration. It also likely might tell us more about the mechanism of dynamic nuclear spin polarisation. (author) 4 figs., refs.

  15. RELATIVE ECONOMIC INCENTIVES FOR HYDROGEN FROM NUCLEAR, RENEWABLE, AND FOSSIL ENERGY SOURCES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorensek, M; Charles W. Forsberg, C

    2008-08-04

    The specific hydrogen market determines the value of hydrogen from different sources. Each hydrogen production technology has its own distinct characteristics. For example, steam reforming of natural gas produces only hydrogen. In contrast, nuclear and solar hydrogen production facilities produce hydrogen together with oxygen as a by-product or co-product. For a user who needs both oxygen and hydrogen, the value of hydrogen from nuclear and solar plants is higher than that from a fossil plant because 'free' oxygen is produced as a by-product. Six factors that impact the relative economics of fossil, nuclear, and solar hydrogen production to the customer are identified: oxygen by-product, avoidance of carbon dioxide emissions, hydrogen transport costs, storage costs, availability of low-cost heat, and institutional factors. These factors imply that different hydrogen production technologies will be competitive in different markets and that the first markets for nuclear and solar hydrogen will be those markets in which they have a unique competitive advantage. These secondary economic factors are described and quantified in terms of dollars per kilogram of hydrogen.

  16. Large-Scale Computations Leading to a First-Principles Approach to Nuclear Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ormand, W E; Navratil, P

    2003-08-18

    We report on large-scale applications of the ab initio, no-core shell model with the primary goal of achieving an accurate description of nuclear structure from the fundamental inter-nucleon interactions. In particular, we show that realistic two-nucleon interactions are inadequate to describe the low-lying structure of {sup 10}B, and that realistic three-nucleon interactions are essential.

  17. Chaotic features of nuclear structure and dynamics: selected topics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelevinsky, Vladimir; Volya, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    Quantum chaos has become an important element of our knowledge about physics of complex systems. In typical mesoscopic systems of interacting particles the dynamics invariably become chaotic when the level density, growing by combinatorial reasons, leads to the increasing probability of mixing simple mean-field (particle-hole) configurations. The resulting stationary states have exceedingly complicated structures that are comparable to those in random matrix theory. We discuss the main properties of mesoscopic quantum chaos and show that it can serve as a justification for application of statistical mechanics to mesoscopic systems. We show that quantum chaos becomes a powerful instrument for experimental, theoretical and computational work. The generalization to open systems and effects in the continuum are discussed with the help of the effective non-Hermitian Hamiltonian; it is shown how to formulate this approach for numerous problems of quantum signal transmission. The artificially introduced randomness can also be helpful for a deeper understanding of physics. We indicate the problems that require more investigation so as to be understood further.

  18. Attutude-action consistency and social policy related to nuclear technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindell, M.K.; Perry, R.W.; Greene, M.

    1980-06-01

    This study reports the results of a further analysis of questionnaire data--parts of which have been previously reported by Lindell, Earle, Hebert and Perry (1978)--that are related to the issue of consistency of attitudes and behavior toward nuclear power and nuclear waste management. Three factors are considered that might be expected to have a significant bearing on attitude-action consistency: social support, attitude object importance and past activism. Analysis of the data indicated that pronuclear respondents were more likely to show consistency of attitudes and actions (66%) than were antinuclear respondents (51%) although the difference in proportions is not statistically significant. Further analyses showed a strong positive relation between attitude-action consistency and perceived social support, measured by the degree to which the respondent believed that close friends and work associated agreed with his attitude. This relationship held up even when controls for attitude object importance and past activism were introduced. Attitude object importance--the salience of the issue of energy shortage--had a statistically significant effect only when perceived social support was low. Past activism had no significant relation to attitude-action consistency. These data suggest that the level of active support for or opposition to nuclear technology will be affected by the distribution of favorable and unfavorable attitudes among residents of an area. Situations in which pro- and antinuclear attitudes are concentrated among members of interacting groups, rather than distributed randomly, are more likely to produce high levels of polarization.

  19. The HST/ACS Coma Cluster Survey. X. Nuclear star clusters in low-mass early-type galaxies: scaling relations

    CERN Document Server

    Brok, Mark den; Seth, Anil; Balcells, Marc; Dominguez, Lilian; Graham, Alister W; Carter, David; Erwin, Peter; Ferguson, Henry C; Goudfrooij, Paul; Guzman, Rafael; Hoyos, Carlos; Jogee, Shardha; Lucey, John; Phillipps, Steven; Puzia, Thomas; Valentijn, Edwin; Kleijn, Gijs Verdoes; Weinzirl, Tim

    2014-01-01

    We present scaling relations between structural properties of nuclear star clusters and their host galaxies for a sample of early-type dwarf galaxies observed as part of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) Coma Cluster Survey. We have analysed the light profiles of 200 early-type dwarf galaxies in the magnitude range $16.0 < m_{F814W} < 22.6 $ mag, corresponding to $-19.0 < M_{F814W} < -12.4 $ mag. Nuclear star clusters are detected in 80% of the galaxies, thus doubling the sample of HST-observed early-type dwarf galaxies with nuclear star clusters. \\changed{We confirm that the} nuclear star cluster detection fraction decreases strongly toward faint magnitudes. The luminosities of nuclear star clusters do not scale linearly with host galaxy luminosity. A linear fit yields L$_{nuc} \\sim $L$_{gal}^{0.57\\pm0.05}$. The nuclear star cluster-host galaxy luminosity scaling relation for low-mass early-type dwarf galaxies is consistent with formation by globular cluster accre...

  20. Accessing nuclear structure for field emission, in lens, scanning electron microscopy (FEISEM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, T D; Bennion, G R; Rutherford, S A; Reipert, S; Ramalho, A; Kiseleva, E; Goldberg, M W

    1996-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) has had a shorter time course in biology than conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) but has nevertheless produced a wealth of images that have significantly complemented our perception of biological structure and function from TEM information. By its nature, SEM is a surface imaging technology, and its impact at the subcellular level has been restricted by the considerably reduced resolution in conventional SEM in comparison to TEM. This restriction has been removed by the recent advent of high-brightness sources used in lensfield emission instruments (FEISEM) which have produced resolution of around 1 nanometre, which is not usually a limiting figure for biological material. This communication reviews our findings in the use of FEISEM in the imaging of nuclear surfaces, then associated structures, such as nuclear pore complexes, and the relationships of these structures with cytoplasmic and nucleoplasmic elements. High resolution SEM allows the structurally orientated cell biologist to visualise, directly and in three dimensions, subcellular structure and its modulation with a view to understanding, its functional significance. Clearly, intracellular surfaces require separation from surrounding structural elements in vivo to allow surface imaging, and we review a combination of biochemical and mechanical isolation methods for nuclear surfaces.

  1. Sequence-structure relations of biopolymers

    CERN Document Server

    Barrett, Christopher; Reidys, Christian M

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: DNA data is transcribed into single-stranded RNA, which folds into specific molecular structures. In this paper we pose the question to what extent sequence- and structure-information correlate. We view this correlation as structural semantics of sequence data that allows for a different interpretation than conventional sequence alignment. Structural semantics could enable us to identify more general embedded "patterns" in DNA and RNA sequences. Results: We compute the partition function of sequences with respect to a fixed structure and connect this computation to the mutual information of a sequence-structure pair for RNA secondary structures. We present a Boltzmann sampler and obtain the a priori probability of specific sequence patterns. We present a detailed analysis for the three PDB-structures, 2JXV (hairpin), 2N3R (3-branch multi-loop) and 1EHZ (tRNA). We localize specific sequence patterns, contrast the energy spectrum of the Boltzmann sampled sequences versus those sequences that refold ...

  2. Identification of candidates for interacting partners of the tail domain of DcNMCP1, a major component of the Daucus carota nuclear lamina-like structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, Ryota; Tsugama, Daisuke; Yamazaki, Michihiro; Fujino, Kaien; Masuda, Kiyoshi

    2017-02-01

    NMCP/CRWN (NUCLEAR MATRIX CONSTITUENT PROTEIN/CROWDED NUCLEI) is a major component of a protein fibrous meshwork (lamina-like structure) on the plant inner nuclear membrane. NMCP/CRWN contributes to regulating nuclear shape and nuclear functions. An NMCP/CRWN protein in Daucus carota (DcNMCP1) is localized to the nuclear periphery in interphase cells, and surrounds chromosomes in cells in metaphase and anaphase. The N-terminal region and the C-terminal region of DcNMCP1 are both necessary for localizing DcNMCP1 to the nuclear periphery. Here candidate interacting partners of the amino acid position 975-1053 of DcNMCP1 (T975-1053), which is present in the C-terminal region and contains a conserved sequence that plays a role in localizing DcNMCP1 to the nuclear periphery, are screened for. Arabidopsis thaliana nuclear proteins were subjected to far-Western blotting with GST-fused T975-1053 as a probe, and signals were detected at the positions corresponding to ∼70, ∼40, and ∼18 kDa. These ∼70, ∼40, and ∼18 kDa nuclear proteins were identified by mass spectrometry, and subjected to a yeast 2-hybrid (Y2H) analysis with T975-1053 as bait. In this analysis, the ∼40 kDa protein ARP7, which is a nuclear actin-related protein possibly involved in regulating chromatin structures, was confirmed to interact with T975-1053. Independently of the far-Western blotting, a Y2H screen was performed using T975-1053 as bait. Targeted Y2H assays confirmed that 3 proteins identified in the screen, MYB3, SINAT1, and BIM1, interact with T975-1053. These proteins might have roles in NMCP/CRWN protein-mediated biologic processes.

  3. Nuclear structure in strong magnetic fields: nuclei in the crust of a magnetar

    CERN Document Server

    Arteaga, Daniel Pena; Khan, Elias; Ring, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Covariant density functional theory is used to study the effect of strong magnetic fields, up to the limit predicted for neutron stars (for magnetars $B \\approx10^{18}$G), on nuclear structure. All new terms in the equation of motion resulting from time reversal symmetry breaking by the magnetic field and the induced currents, as well as axial deformation, are taken into account in a self-consistent fashion. For nuclei in the iron region of the nuclear chart it is found that fields in the order of magnitude of $10^{17}$G significantly affect bulk properties like masses and radii.

  4. Quality assessment of layer-structured semiconductor single crystals by nuclear quadruple resonance method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samila, Andriy; Khandozhko, Alexander; Lastivka, Galina; Politansky, Leonid; Khandozhko, Victor

    2015-11-01

    A method for quality assessment of layer-structured semiconductor single crystals (InSe, GaSe, GaS) grown in evacuated ampoules by the Bridgman technique is proposed. For this purpose, nuclear quadruple resonance method with a consecutive scanning of the entire sample volume and evaluation of crystal perfection by the resulting spectra is used. Effective interaction between high-frequency field and crystal and, accordingly, restriction of scanning area of sample under study is provided with the use of a two-way saddle-shaped coil for a nuclear quadruple resonance spectrometer.

  5. A Neutron Diffraction Study of the Nuclear and Magnetic Structure of MnNb2O6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Oliver Vindex; Lebech, Bente; Krebs Larsen, F.;

    1976-01-01

    A neutron diffraction study was made of the nuclear and the magnetic structure of MnNb2O6 single crystals. The thirteen nuclear parameters (space group Pbcn) were determined from 304 reflections at room temperature. The antiferromagnetic structure (Neel temperature=4.4K), determined at 1.2K, is a...

  6. Excitations in superfluid systems: contributions of the nuclear structure; Excitations dans les systemes superfluides: contributions de la structure nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, E

    2005-12-15

    The author presents successively the theoretical aspect, the experimental aspect and the applied aspect of excitations in nuclear structures. The quasi-particle random phase approximation (QRPA) tool is first described. Recent approaches on QRPA are based on the theory of the density function where the ground state and excited states are described from the same nucleon-nucleon interaction. 2 methods for measuring the collective excitations are then presented: the proton scattering that has the potentiality to investigate the evolution of magicity, the second method is in fact a new method for measuring the giant mono-polar resonance (GMP) in exotic nuclei. Nuclear reactions are considered as a compulsory step on the way from observables like cross-sections to nuclear structure. The author highlights the assets of the convolution model that can generate the optical potential from the effective nucleon-nucleon interaction and from proton and neutron densities of the nuclei involved. R-processes in nucleosynthesis and neutron stars are reviewed as applications of collective excitations in the field of nuclear astrophysics. (A.C.)

  7. NVR-BIP: Nuclear Vector Replacement using Binary Integer Programming for NMR Structure-Based Assignments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apaydin, Mehmet Serkan; Çatay, Bülent; Patrick, Nicholas; Donald, Bruce R

    2011-05-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is an important experimental technique that allows one to study protein structure and dynamics in solution. An important bottleneck in NMR protein structure determination is the assignment of NMR peaks to the corresponding nuclei. Structure-based assignment (SBA) aims to solve this problem with the help of a template protein which is homologous to the target and has applications in the study of structure-activity relationship, protein-protein and protein-ligand interactions. We formulate SBA as a linear assignment problem with additional nuclear overhauser effect constraints, which can be solved within nuclear vector replacement's (NVR) framework (Langmead, C., Yan, A., Lilien, R., Wang, L. and Donald, B. (2003) A Polynomial-Time Nuclear Vector Replacement Algorithm for Automated NMR Resonance Assignments. Proc. the 7th Annual Int. Conf. Research in Computational Molecular Biology (RECOMB), Berlin, Germany, April 10-13, pp. 176-187. ACM Press, New York, NY. J. Comp. Bio., (2004), 11, pp. 277-298; Langmead, C. and Donald, B. (2004) An expectation/maximization nuclear vector replacement algorithm for automated NMR resonance assignments. J. Biomol. NMR, 29, 111-138). Our approach uses NVR's scoring function and data types and also gives the option of using CH and NH residual dipolar coupling (RDCs), instead of NH RDCs which NVR requires. We test our technique on NVR's data set as well as on four new proteins. Our results are comparable to NVR's assignment accuracy on NVR's test set, but higher on novel proteins. Our approach allows partial assignments. It is also complete and can return the optimum as well as near-optimum assignments. Furthermore, it allows us to analyze the information content of each data type and is easily extendable to accept new forms of input data, such as additional RDCs.

  8. Track structure based modelling of light ion radiation effects on nuclear and mitochondrial DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Elke; Ottolenghi, Andrea; Dingfelder, Michael; Friedland, Werner; Kundrat, Pavel; Baiocco, Giorgio

    2016-07-01

    Space radiation risk assessment is of great importance for manned spaceflights in order to estimate risks and to develop counter-measures to reduce them. Biophysical simulations with PARTRAC can help greatly to improve the understanding of initial biological response to ionizing radiation. Results from modelling radiation quality dependent DNA damage and repair mechanisms up to chromosomal aberrations (e.g. dicentrics) can be used to predict radiation effects depending on the kind of mixed radiation field exposure. Especially dicentric yields can serve as a biomarker for an increased risk due to radiation and hence as an indicator for the effectiveness of the used shielding. PARTRAC [1] is a multi-scale biophysical research MC code for track structure based initial DNA damage and damage response modelling. It integrates physics, radiochemistry, detailed nuclear DNA structure and molecular biology of DNA repair by NHEJ-pathway to assess radiation effects on cellular level [2]. Ongoing experiments with quasi-homogeneously distributed compared to sub-micrometre focused bunches of protons, lithium and carbon ions allow a separation of effects due to DNA damage complexity on nanometre scale from damage clustering on (sub-) micrometre scale [3, 4]. These data provide an unprecedented benchmark for the DNA damage response model in PARTRAC and help understand the mechanisms leading to cell killing and chromosomal aberrations (e.g. dicentrics) induction. A large part of space radiation is due to a mixed ion field of high energy protons and few heavier ions that can be only partly absorbed by the shielding. Radiation damage induced by low-energy ions significantly contributes to the high relative biological efficiency (RBE) of ion beams around Bragg peak regions. For slow light ions the physical cross section data basis in PARTRAC has been extended to investigate radiation quality effects in the Bragg peak region [5]. The resulting range and LET values agree with ICRU data

  9. Structural mechanism of nuclear transport mediated by importin β and flexible amphiphilic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Shige H; Kumeta, Masahiro; Takeyasu, Kunio

    2014-12-02

    Karyopherin β family proteins mediate the nuclear/cytoplasmic transport of various proteins through the nuclear pore complex (NPC), although they are substantially larger than the size limit of the NPC.To elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying this paradoxical function, we focused on the unique structures called HEAT repeats, which consist of repetitive amphiphilic α helices. An in vitro transport assay and FRAP analyses demonstrated that not only karyopherin β family proteins but also other proteins with HEAT repeats could pass through the NPC by themselves, and serve as transport mediators for their binding partners. Biochemical and spectroscopic analyses and molecular dynamics simulations of purified HEAT-rich proteins revealed that they interact with hydrophobic groups, including phenyl and alkyl groups, and undergo reversible conformational changes in tertiary structures, but not in secondary structures. These results show that conformational changes in the flexible amphiphilic motifs play a critical role in translocation through the NPC.

  10. Resource Letter MP-3: The Manhattan Project and Related Nuclear Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, B. Cameron

    2016-10-01

    This Resource Letter is a supplement to the earlier Resource Letters MP-1 and MP-2, and provides further sources on the Manhattan Project and related research. Books, review papers, journal articles, videos, and websites are cited for the following topics: general works, technical works, biographical and autobiographical works, foreign wartime nuclear programs and related allied intelligence, the use of the bombs against Hiroshima and Nagasaki, technical papers of historical interest, postwar policy and technical developments, and educational materials. Together, these three Resource Letters describe nearly 400 sources of information on the Manhattan Project.

  11. Seismic resistance design of nuclear power plant building structures in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitano, Takehito [Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc., Osaka (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    Japan is one of the countries where earthquakes occur most frequently in the world and has incurred a lot of disasters in the past. Therefore, the seismic resistance design of a nuclear power plant plays a very important role in Japan. This report describes the general method of seismic resistance design of a nuclear power plant giving examples of PWR and BWR type reactor buildings in Japan. Nuclear facilities are classified into three seismic classes and is designed according to the corresponding seismic class in Japan. Concerning reactor buildings, the short-term allowable stress design is applied for the S1 seismic load and it is confirmed that the structures have a safety margin against the S2 seismic load. (J.P.N.)

  12. The long and winding road from chiral effective Lagrangians to nuclear structure

    CERN Document Server

    Meißner, Ulf-G

    2015-01-01

    I review the chiral dynamics of nuclear physics. In the first part, I discuss the new developments in the construction of the forces between two, three and four nucleons which have been partly carried out to fifth order in the chiral expansion. It is also shown that based on these forces in conjunction with the estimation of the corresponding theoretical uncertainties, the need for three-nucleon forces in few nucleon systems can be unambiguously established. I also introduce the lattice formulation of these forces, which allow for truly ab initio calculations of nuclear structure and reactions. I present some pertinent results of the nuclear lattice approach. Finally, I discuss how few-nucleon systems and nuclei can be used to explore symmetries and physics within and beyond the Standard Model.

  13. Nuclear envelope structural defects cause chromosomal numerical instability and aneuploidy in ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganjei-Azar Parvin

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite our substantial understanding of molecular mechanisms and gene mutations involved in cancer, the technical approaches for diagnosis and prognosis of cancer are limited. In routine clinical diagnosis of cancer, the procedure is very basic: nuclear morphology is used as a common assessment of the degree of malignancy, and hence acts as a prognostic and predictive indicator of the disease. Furthermore, though the atypical nuclear morphology of cancer cells is believed to be a consequence of oncogenic signaling, the molecular basis remains unclear. Another common characteristic of human cancer is aneuploidy, but the causes and its role in carcinogenesis are not well established. Methods We investigated the expression of the nuclear envelope proteins lamin A/C in ovarian cancer by immunohistochemistry and studied the consequence of lamin A/C suppression using siRNA in primary human ovarian surface epithelial cells in culture. We used immunofluorescence microscopy to analyze nuclear morphology, flow cytometry to analyze cellular DNA content, and fluorescence in situ hybridization to examine cell ploidy of the lamin A/C-suppressed cells. Results We found that nuclear lamina proteins lamin A/C are often absent (47% in ovarian cancer cells and tissues. Even in lamin A/C-positive ovarian cancer, the expression is heterogeneous within the population of tumor cells. In most cancer cell lines, a significant fraction of the lamin A/C-negative population was observed to intermix with the lamin A/C-positive cells. Down regulation of lamin A/C in non-cancerous primary ovarian surface epithelial cells led to morphological deformation and development of aneuploidy. The aneuploid cells became growth retarded due to a p53-dependent induction of the cell cycle inhibitor p21. Conclusions We conclude that the loss of nuclear envelope structural proteins, such as lamin A/C, may underlie two of the hallmarks of cancer - aberrations in nuclear

  14. Space Exploration Initiative Fuels, Materials and Related Nuclear Propulsion Technologies Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, S. K.; Olsen, C.; Cooper, R.; Matthews, R. B.; Walter, C.; Titran, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    This report was prepared by members of the Fuels, Materials and Related Technologies Panel, with assistance from a number of industry observers as well as laboratory colleagues of the panel members. It represents a consensus view of the panel members. This report was not subjected to a thorough review by DOE, NASA or DoD, and the opinions expressed should not be construed to represent the official position of these organizations, individually or jointly. Topics addressed include: requirement for fuels and materials development for nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) and nuclear electric propulsion (NEP); overview of proposed concepts; fuels technology development plan; materials technology development plan; other reactor technology development; and fuels and materials requirements for advanced propulsion concepts.

  15. Quantum Trajectory-Electronic Structure Approach for Exploring Nuclear Effects in the Dynamics of Nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garashchuk, Sophya; Jakowski, Jacek; Wang, Lei; Sumpter, Bobby G

    2013-12-10

    A massively parallel, direct quantum molecular dynamics method is described. The method combines a quantum trajectory (QT) representation of the nuclear wave function discretized into an ensemble of trajectories with an electronic structure (ES) description of electrons, namely using the density functional tight binding (DFTB) theory. Quantum nuclear effects are included into the dynamics of the nuclei via quantum corrections to the classical forces. To reduce computational cost and increase numerical accuracy, the quantum corrections to dynamics resulting from localization of the nuclear wave function are computed approximately and included into selected degrees of freedom representing light particles where the quantum effects are expected to be the most pronounced. A massively parallel implementation, based on the message passing interface allows for efficient simulations of ensembles of thousands of trajectories at once. The QTES-DFTB dynamics approach is employed to study the role of quantum nuclear effects on the interaction of hydrogen with a model graphene sheet, revealing that neglect of nuclear effects can lead to an overestimation of adsorption.

  16. Nuclear quantum effects in the structure and lineshapes of the N2 NEXAFS spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fatehi, Shervin; Schwartz, Craig P.; Saykally, Richard J.; Prendergast, David

    2009-12-04

    We study the relative ability of several models of the X-ray absorption spectrum to capture the Franck-Condon structure apparent from an experiment on gaseous nitrogen. In doing so, we adopt the Born-Oppenheimer approximation and a constrained density functional theory method for computing the energies of the X-ray-excited molecule. Starting from an otherwise classical model for the spectrum, we systematically introduce more realistic physics, first by substituting the quantum mechanical nuclear radial density in the bond separation R for the classical radial density, then by adding the effect of zero-point energy and other level shifts, and finally by including explicit rovibrational quantization of both the ground and excited states. The quantization is determined exactly, using a discrete variable representation. We show that the NEXAFS spectrum can be predicted semiquantiatively within this framework. We also address the possibility of non-trivial temperature dependence in the spectrum. Finally, we show that it is possible to improve the predicted spectrum by using constrained DFT in combination with more accurate potentials.

  17. Non-Nuclear Testing of Space Nuclear Systems at NASA MSFC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houts, Michael G.; Pearson, Boise J.; Aschenbrenner, Kenneth C.; Bradley, David E.; Dickens, Ricky; Emrich, William J.; Garber, Anne; Godfroy, Thomas J.; Harper, Roger T.; Martin, Jim J.; hide

    2010-01-01

    Highly realistic non-nuclear testing can be used to investigate and resolve potential issues with space nuclear power and propulsion systems. Non-nuclear testing is particularly useful for systems designed with fuels and materials operating within their demonstrated nuclear performance envelope. Non-nuclear testing allows thermal hydraulic, heat transfer, structural, integration, safety, operational, performance, and other potential issues to be investigated and resolved with a greater degree of flexibility and at reduced cost and schedule compared to nuclear testing. The primary limit of non-nuclear testing is that nuclear characteristics and potential nuclear issues cannot be directly investigated. However, non-nuclear testing can be used to augment the potential benefit from any nuclear testing that may be required for space nuclear system design and development. This paper describes previous and ongoing non-nuclear testing related to space nuclear systems at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  18. Legislative dispositions relative to the clearness and security in nuclear matter; Dispositions legislatives relatives a la transparence et a la securite en matiere nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-11-01

    This file treats the legislative dispositions devoted to the clearness and security in the nuclear field. It is divided in four great parts. The first part is devoted to the general dispositions, the second part concerns public information, the third part is relative to the local information commissions, a special point is noticed for the creation of a high comity of clearness in nuclear safety, a fourth part is devoted to the nuclear facilities and the transport of nuclear materials, control and monitoring are included, legal dispositions and sanctions are tackled. (N.C.)

  19. Definitional Hegemony as a Public Relations Strategy: The Rhetoric of the Nuclear Power Industry after Three Mile Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionisopoulos, George N.; Crable, Richard E.

    1988-01-01

    Examines (1) definitional hegemony as one of several rhetorical options available to issue managers; (2) the post-accident rhetorical context of the Three Mile Island nuclear crisis; and (3) the specific strategies utilized to deal with this crisis. Assesses the nuclear industry's public relations efforts. (MS)

  20. 76 FR 70169 - Draft Supplement 2 to Final Environmental Statement Related to the Operation of Watts Bar Nuclear...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-10

    ...The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is requesting comments on NUREG-0498, ``Final Environmental Statement, Supplement 2, Related to the Operation of Watts Bar Nuclear Plant [WBN], Unit 2-- Draft Report for Comment'' (draft SFES). The NRC will hold a public meeting on the draft SFES on December 8,...

  1. Nuclear structure and the fate of core collapse (Type II) supernova

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gai, Moshe [LNS at Avery Point, University of Connecticut, Groton, CT 06340-6097 (United States); Wright Lab, Dept. of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520-8124 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    For a long time Gerry Brown and his collaborator Hans Bethe considered the question of the final fate of a core collapse (Type II) supernova. Recalling ideas from nuclear structure on Kaon condensate and a soft equation of state of the dense nuclear matter they concluded that progenitor stars with mass as low as 17–18M{sub ⊙} (including supernova 1987A) could collapse to a small mass black hole with a mass just beyond 1.5M{sub ⊙}, the upper bound they derive for a neutron star. We discuss another nuclear structure effect that determines the carbon to oxygen ratio (C/O) at the end of helium burning. This ratio also determines the fate of a Type II supernova with a carbon rich progenitor star producing a neutron star and oxygen rich collapsing to a black hole. While the C/O ratio is one of the most important nuclear inputs to stellar evolution it is still not known with sufficient accuracy. We discuss future efforts to measure with gamma-beam and TPC detector of the {sup 12}C(α,γ){sup 16}O reaction that determines the C/O ratio in stellar helium burning.

  2. 3rd International Conference on High-energy Physics and Nuclear Structure

    CERN Document Server

    High energy physics and nuclear structure

    1970-01-01

    In preparing the program for this Conference, the third in the series, it soon became evident that it was not possible to in­ clude in a conference of reasonable duration all the topics that might be subsumed under the broad title, "High Energy Physics and Nuclear Structure. " From their initiation, in 1963, it has been as much the aim of these Conferences to provide some bridges between the steadily separating domains of particle and nuclear physics, as to explore thoroughly the borderline territory between the two -­ the sort of no-man's-land that lies unclaimed, or claimed by both sides. The past few years have witnessed the rapid development of many new routes connecting the two major areas of 'elementary par­ ticles' and 'nuclear structure', and these now spread over a great expanse of physics, logically perhaps including the whole of both subjects. (As recently as 1954, an International Conference on 'Nuclear and Meson Physics' did, in fact, embrace both fields!) Since it is not now possibl...

  3. Nuclear Structure and the Fate of Core Collapse (Type II) Supernova

    CERN Document Server

    Gai, Moshe

    2014-01-01

    For a long time Gerry Brown and his collaborator Hans Bethe considered the question of the final fate of a core collapse (Type II) supernova. Recalling ideas from nuclear structure on Kaon condensate and a soft equation of state of the dense nuclear matter they concluded that progenitor stars with mass as low a 17-18M$_\\odot$ (including supernova 1987A) could collapse to a small mass black hole with a mass just beyond 1.5M$_\\odot$, the upper bound they derive for a neutron star. We discuss another nuclear structure effect that determines the carbon to oxygen ratio (C/O) at the end of helium burning. This ratio also determines the fate of a Type II supernova with a carbon rich progenitor star producing a neutron star and oxygen rich collapsing to a black hole. While the C/O ratio is one of the most important nuclear input to stellar evolution it is still not known with sufficient accuracy. We discuss future efforts to measure with gamma-beam and TPC detector the 12C(a,g)16O reaction that determines the C/O rat...

  4. Relation of nuclear volume and radiosensitivity to ploidy level in higher plants and a yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conger, A.D. (Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA); Sparrow, A.H.; Schwemmer, S.S.; Klug, E.E.

    1982-01-01

    The relation between ploidy level and radiosensitivity for lethality among plants was examined to see if any major determinant could be found for the relation observed, and if any generalization could be derived. Data are presented on nuclear volume, interphase chromosome volume and acute lethal dose for x% killing for polyploid series of species within 11 genera, 117 species or varieties, of herbaceous higher plants and one species of the yeast Saccharomyces. Radiosensitivity data were obtained for 6 genera, 66 species' or varieties. In general, within any one genus, nuclear volume increases proportional to ploidy level. The relative increase of nuclear volume with ploidy is about the same for all 12 genera; it is less rapid than linear in the range 2x to 4x but almost linear from 4x to the higher ploidy levels. On the average, relative acute lethal dose of haploids is half that of diploids, is about constant from diploid to 10-diploid, and then decreases with increasing ploidy. When we compare the dose absorbed per average chromosome for x% killing, greater consistency is found both within and between genera. In general, the average haploid chromosome, and cell, is twice as sensitive as the diploid. In the range 2- to 10-ploid, chromosome sensitivity remains about constant and equal to the diploid. From 10- to 20-ploid, chromosome sensitivity increases rather smoothly up to about three to four times the diploid value for all six genera of herbaceous plants. Sensitivity of yeast chromosomes increases with ploidy at a faster rate, and to a much greater extent. In the range 2- to 10-ploid, it appears that the sensitizing effect of increased target size is about compensated for by the protective effect of the equivalent increase in genetic redundancy, leading to the net constancy in sensitivity. At the higher ploidy levels, genomic and chromosomal size do not account for the radiosensitivity increase.

  5. Application of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Hybrid Methods to Structure Determination of Complex Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prischi, Filippo; Pastore, Annalisa

    2016-01-01

    The current main challenge of Structural Biology is to undertake the structure determination of increasingly complex systems in the attempt to better understand their biological function. As systems become more challenging, however, there is an increasing demand for the parallel use of more than one independent technique to allow pushing the frontiers of structure determination and, at the same time, obtaining independent structural validation. The combination of different Structural Biology methods has been named hybrid approaches. The aim of this review is to critically discuss the most recent examples and new developments that have allowed structure determination or experimentally-based modelling of various molecular complexes selecting them among those that combine the use of nuclear magnetic resonance and small angle scattering techniques. We provide a selective but focused account of some of the most exciting recent approaches and discuss their possible further developments.

  6. Research and development of earthquake-resistant structure model for nuclear fuel facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uryu, Mitsuru; Terada, S.; Shioya, I. [and others

    1999-05-01

    It is important for a nuclear fuel facility to reduce an input intensity of earthquake on the upper part of the building. To study of a response of the building caused by earthquake, an earthquake-resistant structure model is constructed. The weight of the structure model is 90 ton, and is supported by multiple layers of natural ruber and steel. And a weight support device which is called 'softlanding' is also installed to prevent the structure model from loosing the function at excess deformation. The softlanding device consists of Teflon. Dynamic response characteristics of the structure model caused by sine wave and simulated seismic waves are measured and analyzed. Soil tests of the fourth geologic stratum on which the structure model is sited are made to confirm the safety of soil-structure interactions caused by earthquake. (M. Suetake)

  7. Resonance-inclined optical nuclear spin polarization of liquids in diamond structures

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Qiong; Jelezko, Fedor; Retzker, Alex; Plenio, Martin B

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of molecules in a solution at room temperature has potential to revolutionize nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging. The prevalent methods for achieving DNP in solutions are typically most effective in the regime of small interaction correlation times between the electron and nuclear spins, limiting the size of accessible molecules. To solve this limitation, we design a mechanism for DNP in the liquid phase that is applicable for large interaction correlation times. Importantly, while this mechanism makes use of a resonance condition similar to solid-state DNP, the polarization transfer is robust to a relatively large detuning from the resonance due to molecular motion. We combine this scheme with optically polarized nitrogen vacancy (NV) center spins in nanodiamonds to design a setup that employs optical pumping and is therefore not limited by room temperature electron thermal polarisation. We illustrate numerically the effectiveness of the model in a flow cel...

  8. Nuclear structure studies of rare francium isotopes using Collinear Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (CRIS)

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2084441

    It was known for many years that nuclei possessing certain numbers of protons (Z) and neutrons (N), called the magic numbers (8,20,28,50,82,126...), exhibit characteristic behavior and are in general more stable than their neighboring isotopes. As the capabilities of producing isotopes with more extreme values of Z and N increased, it was realized that those spherical nuclei only represent a small fraction of the total number of isotopes and that most isotopes are deformed. In order to study exotic isotopes and their deformation, it was necessary to develop new experimental techniques that would be powerful enough to be able to cope with very small production yields, but precise enough to measure the nuclear properties (such as radii and moments) with relatively small uncertainties. One technique that can measure nuclear properties of scarcely produced isotopes is in-source resonant ionization, but this technique does not allow for sufficient precision to deduce nuclear quadrupole moments. Furthermore, this t...

  9. Defining criteria related to wastes for use in multi-criteria decision tool for nuclear accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Diogo N.G.; Guimaraes, Jean R.D., E-mail: dneves@biof.ufrj.br, E-mail: jeanrdg@biof.ufrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Instituto de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho; Rochedo, Elaine R.R.; De Luca, Christiano, E-mail: elainerochedo@gmail.com, E-mail: christiano_luca@hotmail.com [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear; Rochedo, Pedro R.R., E-mail: rochedopedro@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Instituto Alberto Luiz Coimbra de Pos-Graduacao e Pesquisa de Engenharia

    2013-07-01

    The selection of protective measures and strategies for remediation of contaminated areas after a nuclear accident must be based on previously established criteria in order to prevent stress of the population and the unnecessary exposure of workers. After a nuclear accident resulting in environmental contamination, decisions on remediation of areas is complex due to the large numbers of factors involved in decontamination processes. This work is part of a project which aims to develop a multi-criteria tool to support a decision-making process in cases of a radiological or a nuclear accident in Brazil. First, a database of remediation strategies for contaminated areas was created. In this process, the most relevant aspects for the implementation of these strategies were considered, including technical criteria regarding aspects related to the generation of wastes in a reference urban area, which are discussed in this paper. The specific objective of this study is to define criteria for the aspects of radioactive wastes, resulted by the implementation of some urban measures, in order to be incorporated in a multi-criteria decision tool. Main aspects considered were the type, the amount and the type of treatment necessary for each procedure. The decontamination procedures are then classified according to the selected criteria in order to feed the multi-criteria decision tool. This paper describes the steps for the establishment of these criteria and evaluates the potential for future applications in order to improve predictions and to support the decisions to be made. (author)

  10. Differences in nuclear DNA organization between lymphocytes, Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells revealed by structured illumination microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righolt, Christiaan H; Guffei, Amanda; Knecht, Hans; Young, Ian T; Stallinga, Sjoerd; van Vliet, Lucas J; Mai, Sabine

    2014-08-01

    Advances in light microscopy have enabled the visualization of DNA in the interphase nucleus with more detail than is visible with conventional light microscopy. The nuclear architecture is assumed to be different in cancer cells compared to normal cells. In this paper we have studied, for the first time, the organization of nuclear DNA and that of DNA-free space in control lymphocytes, Hodgkin cells and Reed-Sternberg cells using 3D structured illumination microscopy (SIM). We have observed detail in these SIM images that was not observed in conventional widefield images. We have measured the size distribution of the DNA structure using granulometry and noted a significant, progressive increase in the amount of sub-micron structures from control lymphocytes to Hodgkin cells to Reed-Sternberg cells. The DNA-free space changes as well; "holes" in the DNA distribution start to appear in the malignant cells. We have studied whether these "holes" are nucleoli by staining for upstream binding factor (UBF), a protein associated with the nucleolus. We have found that the relative UBF content progressively and significantly decreases-or is absent-in the DNA-free space when measured as either the Pearson correlation coefficient with the DNA-free space or as the number of "holes" that contain UBF. Similar differences exist within the population of Reed-Sternberg cells between binucleated and multinucleated cells with four or more subnuclei. To our knowledge, this is the first study that investigates the changes of the nuclear DNA structure in any disease with superresolution light microscopy. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Biochemistry published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. IMPACT OF ENERGY GROUP STRUCTURE ON NUCLEAR DATA TARGET ACCURACY REQUIREMENTS FOR ADVANCED REACTOR SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Palmiotti; M. Salvatores; H. Hiruta

    2011-06-01

    A target accuracy assessment study using both a fine and a broad energy structure has shown that less stringent nuclear data accuracy requirements are needed for the latter energy structure. However, even though a reduction is observed, still the requirements will be very difficult to be met unless integral experiments are also used to reduce nuclear data uncertainties. Target accuracy assessment is the inverse problem of the uncertainty evaluation. To establish priorities and target accuracies on data uncertainty reduction, a formal approach can be adopted by defining target accuracy on design parameters and finding out required accuracy on data in order to meet them. In fact, the unknown uncertainty data requirements can be obtained by solving a minimization problem where the sensitivity coefficients in conjunction with the constraints on the integral parameters provide the needed quantities for finding the solutions.

  12. Nuclear medium effects in structure functions of nucleon at moderate $Q^2$

    CERN Document Server

    Haider, H; Athar, M Sajjad; Singh, S K; Simo, I Ruiz

    2015-01-01

    Recent experiments performed on inclusive electron scattering from nuclear targets have measured the nucleon electromagnetic structure functions $F_1(x,Q^2)$, $F_2(x,Q^2)$ and $F_L(x,Q^2)$ in $^{12}C$, $^{27}Al$, $^{56}Fe$ and $^{64}Cu$ nuclei. The measurements have been done in the energy region of $1 GeV^2 < W^2 < 4 GeV^2$ and $Q^2$ region of $0.5 GeV^2 < Q^2 < 4.5 GeV^2$. We have calculated nuclear medium effects in these structure functions arising due to the Fermi motion, binding energy, nucleon correlations, mesonic contributions from pion and rho mesons and shadowing effects. The calculations are performed in a local density approximation using relativistic nucleon spectral function which include nucleon correlations. The numerical results are compared with the recent experimental data from JLab and also with some earlier experiments.

  13. Nuclear structure of elements with 100 ≤ Z ≤ 109 from alpha spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asai, M.; Heßberger, F. P.; Lopez-Martens, A.

    2015-12-01

    Significant technical progress concerning the availability of intense heavy-ion beams and highly-efficient and sophisticated detection devices has made nuclear-structure investigations possible in the region of superheavy nuclei. Exciting new results have been obtained by applying α spectroscopy as well as α-γ and internal-conversion-electron coincidence spectroscopy. The present review article gives an overview of the experimental techniques and methods with specific attention to the recent developments of digital signal and data processing giving access to half-life ranges of less than a few microseconds. The presentation of the experimental results and the physics discussion will be focused on nuclear structure systematics in even-Z nuclei along the N = 151 , 153 ,and 155 isotonic lines, where most progress has been achieved in the last 10 years.

  14. Summary Report of a Specialized Workshop on Nuclear Structure and Decay Data (NSDD) Evaluations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, Alan L. [Univ. of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom); Dimitrious, P. [IAEA Nuclear Data Section, Vienna (Austria); Kondev, F. G. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Ricard-McCutchan, E. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-04-27

    A three-day specialised workshop on Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluations was organised and held at the headquarters of the International Atomic Energy Agency in Vienna, Austria, from 27 to 29 April 2015. This workshop covered a wide range of important topics and issues addressed when evaluating and maintaining the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF). The primary aim was to improve evaluators’ abilities to identify and understand the most appropriate evaluation processes to adopt in the formulation of individual ENSDF data sets. Participants assessed and reviewed existing policies, procedures and codes, and round-table discussions included the debate and resolution of specific difficulties experienced by ENSDF evaluators (i.e., all workshop participants). The contents of this report constitute a record of this workshop, based on the presentations and subsequent discussions.

  15. IMPACT OF ENERGY GROUP STRUCTURE ON NUCLEAR DATA TARGET ACCURACY REQUIREMENTS FOR ADVANCED REACTOR SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Palmiotti; M. Salvatores; H. Hiruta

    2011-06-01

    A target accuracy assessment study using both a fine and a broad energy structure has shown that less stringent nuclear data accuracy requirements are needed for the latter energy structure. However, even though a reduction is observed, still the requirements will be very difficult to be met unless integral experiments are also used to reduce nuclear data uncertainties. Target accuracy assessment is the inverse problem of the uncertainty evaluation. To establish priorities and target accuracies on data uncertainty reduction, a formal approach can be adopted by defining target accuracy on design parameters and finding out required accuracy on data in order to meet them. In fact, the unknown uncertainty data requirements can be obtained by solving a minimization problem where the sensitivity coefficients in conjunction with the constraints on the integral parameters provide the needed quantities for finding the solutions.

  16. A Structural Investigation into Oct4 Regulation by Orphan Nuclear Receptors, Germ Cell Nuclear Factor (GCNF) and Liver Receptor Homolog-1 (LRH-1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weikum, Emily R; Tuntland, Micheal L; Murphy, Michael N; Ortlund, Eric A

    2016-10-27

    Oct4 is a transcription factor required for maintaining pluripotency and self-renewal in stem cells. Prior to differentiation, Oct4 must be silenced to allow for the development of the three germ layers in the developing embryo. This fine-tuning is controlled by the nuclear receptors, liver receptor homolog-1 and germ cell nuclear factor. Liver receptor homolog-1 is responsible for driving the expression of Oct4 where germ cell nuclear factor represses its expression upon differentiation. Both receptors bind to a DR0 motif located within the Oct4 promoter. Here, we present the first structure of mouse germ cell nuclear factor DNA binding domain in complex with the Oct4 DR0. The overall structure revealed two molecules bound in a head-to-tail fashion on opposite sides of the DNA. Additionally, we solved the structure of the human liver receptor homolog-1 DNA binding domain bound to the same element. We explore the structural elements that govern Oct4 recognition by these two nuclear receptors.

  17. Structure Selection from Streaming Relational Data

    CERN Document Server

    Mihalkova, Lilyana

    2011-01-01

    Statistical relational learning techniques have been successfully applied in a wide range of relational domains. In most of these applications, the human designers capitalized on their background knowledge by following a trial-and-error trajectory, where relational features are manually defined by a human engineer, parameters are learned for those features on the training data, the resulting model is validated, and the cycle repeats as the engineer adjusts the set of features. This paper seeks to streamline application development in large relational domains by introducing a light-weight approach that efficiently evaluates relational features on pieces of the relational graph that are streamed to it one at a time. We evaluate our approach on two social media tasks and demonstrate that it leads to more accurate models that are learned faster.

  18. Nuclear magnetic resonance solution structure of the alpha-neurotoxin from the black mamba (Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, L R; Wüthrich, K

    1992-10-20

    The three-dimensional structure in solution of the alpha-neurotoxin from the black mamba (Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis) has been determined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. A high quality structure for this 60-residue protein was obtained from 656 NOE distance constraints and 143 dihedral angle constraints, using the distance geometry program DIANA for the structure calculation and AMBER for restrained energy minimization. For a group of 20 conformers used to represent the solution structure, the average root-mean-square deviation value calculated for the polypeptide backbone heavy atoms relative to the mean structure was 0.45 A. The protein consists of a core region from which three finger-like loops extend outwards. It includes a short, two-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet of residues 1-5 and 13-17, a three-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet involving residues 23-31, 34-42 and 51-55, and four disulfide bridges in the core region. There is also extensive non-regular hydrogen bonding between the carboxy-terminal tail of the polypeptide chain and the rest of the core region. Comparison with the crystal structure of erabutoxin-b indicates that the structure of alpha-neurotoxin is quite similar to other neurotoxin structures, but that local structural differences are seen in regions thought to be important for binding of neurotoxins to the acetylcholine receptor. For two regions of the alpha-neurotoxin structure there is evidence for an equilibrium between multiple conformations, which might be related to conformational rearrangements upon binding to the receptor. Overall, the alpha-neurotoxin presents itself as a protein with a stable core and flexible surface areas that interact with the acetylcholine receptor in such a way that high affinity binding is achieved by conformational rearrangements of the deformable regions of the neurotoxin structure.

  19. Invalidity of Geometrical Interpretation of F-Spin Structure of Nuclear Rotations by Otsuka's View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Guilu

    1995-06-01

    In Otsuka's view of nuclear rotations neutrons and protons are not rotating around a common axis, but rather around separate axis. In this letter, we pointed out that this invalidates the geometrical interpretation of F-spin structure of the neutron-proton interacting boson model, where the angle between the axis of symmetries of neutron ellipsoid and proton ellipsoid is used to determine whether a state is F-spin symmetric or mixed symmetric.

  20. STRUCTURAL CALCULATIONS FOR THE CODISPOSAL OF TRIGA SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL IN A WASTE PACKAGE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Mastilovic

    1999-07-28

    The purpose of this analysis is to determine the structural response of a TRIGA Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) codisposal canister placed in a 5-Defense High Level Waste (DHLW) waste package (WP) and subjected to a tipover design basis event (DBE) dynamic load; the results will be reported in terms of displacements and stress magnitudes. This activity is associated with the WP design.

  1. Agreement and the structure of relative clauses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boban Arsenijević

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposes an account of asymmetries in agreement patterns that obtain in restrictive and non-restrictive relative clauses headed by hybrid agreement nouns 'd(jeca '‘children’, 'braća '‘brothers’, and 'gospoda '‘gentry’ in Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian (BCS. We note that relative clauses headed by hybrid nouns display different possibilities of agreement morphology on the relative pronoun 'koji/a/e '‘which’, depending, on the one hand, on whether the relative clause is restrictive or non-restrictive and on the other, on the case of the relative pronoun. We argue that the observed differences are the result of a conspiracy of the following factors: (i hybrid number-agreement nouns introduce a null plural pronoun unspecified for gender (Postal 1966; den Dikken 2001; Torrego and Laga 2015, (ii all plural case forms of the relative pronoun except for nominative and accusative show full gender syncretism (Alsina and Arsenijević 2012b, and (iii non-restrictive relative clauses involve a null definite pronoun and attach to the head noun higher than the restrictive relative clauses (Postal 1994; de Vries 2002; 2006. We maintain that the facts discussed in the paper argue against analyses which derive the differences between restrictive and non-restrictive relative clauses from their LF representations, rather than from their overt syntax.

  2. A general numerical solution of dispersion relations for the nuclear optical model

    CERN Document Server

    Capote, R; Quesada, J M; Capote, Roberto; Molina, Alberto; Quesada, Jose Manuel

    2001-01-01

    A general numerical solution of the dispersion integral relation between the real and the imaginary parts of the nuclear optical potential is presented. Fast convergence is achieved by means of the Gauss-Legendre integration method, which offers accuracy, easiness of implementation and generality for dispersive optical model calculations. The use of this numerical integration method in the optical-model parameter search codes allows for a fast and accurate dispersive analysis. PACS number(s): 11.55.Fv, 24.10.Ht, 02.60.Jh

  3. Grain size evaluation of structural materials in nuclear power plant using a thickness independent ultrasonic method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiongbing, E-mail: lixb_ex@163.com [CAD/CAM Institute, Central South University, Changsha 410075 (China); State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Song, Yongfeng [CAD/CAM Institute, Central South University, Changsha 410075 (China); Ni, Peijun [The Ningbo Branch of Ordnance Science Institute of China, Ningbo 315103 (China); Wang, Zi; Liu, Feng [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Du, Hualong [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: •We derive a coefficient of ultrasonic attenuation rate related to the grain size. •The mean grain size of the pipe can be evaluated without measuring its thickness. •Experiments show this method is better suited to square pipe than other methods. -- Abstract: It is important to accurately and nondestructively evaluate the grain size of structural materials used in nuclear power plants. The current ultrasonic non-destructive methods are so dependent on the thickness measurement of a square pipe that it reduces their practicality and reliability. In this paper, a novel method using the coefficient of ultrasonic attenuation rate is developed by using the transmission and reflection coefficients. As a result, the mean grain size of the pipe can be nondestructively evaluated without measuring its thickness. Moreover, the signal preprocessing is studied to improve the stability and accuracy of evaluation results. The experimental results show that the dependence of the attenuation rate on grain sizes is much higher than that of the ultrasonic velocity. The relative error of the attenuation rate method is lower than that of the backscatter method if the thickness of the sample is less than 5 mm. When evaluating a TP304 stainless steel square pipe whose thickness is not convenient to measure, the mean grain sizes are measured 103.5 ± 2.6 μm, 96.9 ± 3.5 μm and 94.0 ± 1.7 μm by the attenuation method, the attenuation rate method and the electron backscattering diffraction method, respectively. The result verifies that the presented method works better than the attenuation method due to the fact that the error of the thickness measurement has no effect on the ultrasonic attenuation rate.

  4. Crystal Structures of the Nuclear Receptor, Liver Receptor Homolog 1, Bound to Synthetic Agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mays, Suzanne G; Okafor, C Denise; Whitby, Richard J; Goswami, Devrishi; Stec, Józef; Flynn, Autumn R; Dugan, Michael C; Jui, Nathan T; Griffin, Patrick R; Ortlund, Eric A

    2016-12-02

    Liver receptor homolog 1 (NR5A2, LRH-1) is an orphan nuclear hormone receptor that regulates diverse biological processes, including metabolism, proliferation, and the resolution of endoplasmic reticulum stress. Although preclinical and cellular studies demonstrate that LRH-1 has great potential as a therapeutic target for metabolic diseases and cancer, development of LRH-1 modulators has been difficult. Recently, systematic modifications to one of the few known chemical scaffolds capable of activating LRH-1 failed to improve efficacy substantially. Moreover, mechanisms through which LRH-1 is activated by synthetic ligands are entirely unknown. Here, we use x-ray crystallography and other structural methods to explore conformational changes and receptor-ligand interactions associated with LRH-1 activation by a set of related agonists. Unlike phospholipid LRH-1 ligands, these agonists bind deep in the pocket and do not interact with residues near the mouth nor do they expand the pocket like phospholipids. Unexpectedly, two closely related agonists with similar efficacies (GSK8470 and RJW100) exhibit completely different binding modes. The dramatic repositioning is influenced by a differential ability to establish stable face-to-face π-π-stacking with the LRH-1 residue His-390, as well as by a novel polar interaction mediated by the RJW100 hydroxyl group. The differing binding modes result in distinct mechanisms of action for the two agonists. Finally, we identify a network of conserved water molecules near the ligand-binding site that are important for activation by both agonists. This work reveals a previously unappreciated complexity associated with LRH-1 agonist development and offers insights into rational design strategies.

  5. Genetic Diversity and Structure of Lolium Species Surveyed on Nuclear Simple Sequence Repeat and Cytoplasmic Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongwei Cai

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available To assess the genetic diversity and population structure of Lolium species, we used 32 nuclear simple sequence repeat (SSR markers and 7 cytoplasmic gene markers to analyze a total of 357 individuals from 162 accessions of 9 Lolium species. This survey revealed a high level of polymorphism, with an average number of alleles per locus of 23.59 and 5.29 and an average PIC-value of 0.83 and 0.54 for nuclear SSR markers and cytoplasmic gene markers, respectively. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA revealed that 16.27 and 16.53% of the total variation was due to differences among species, with the remaining 56.35 and 83.47% due to differences within species and 27.39 and 0% due to differences within individuals in 32 nuclear SSR markers set and 6 chloroplast gene markers set, respectively. The 32 nuclear SSR markers detected three subpopulations among 357 individuals, whereas the 6 chloroplast gene markers revealed three subpopulations among 160 accessions in the STRUCTURE analysis. In the clustering analysis, the three inbred species clustered into a single group, whereas the outbreeding species were clearly divided, especially according to nuclear SSR markers. In addition, almost all Lolium multiflorum populations were clustered into group C4, which could be further divided into three subgroups, whereas Lolium perenne populations primarily clustered into two groups (C2 and C3, with a few lines that instead grouped with L. multiflorum (C4 or Lolium rigidum (C6. Together, these results will useful for the use of Lolium germplasm for improvement and increase the effectiveness of ryegrass breeding.

  6. Study for Nuclear Structures of 22-35Na Isotopes via Measurements of Reaction Cross Sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Shinji

    2014-09-01

    T. Ohtsubo, M. Nagashima, T. Ogura, Y. Shimbara (Grad. Sch. of Sc., Niigata Univ.), M.Takechi, H. Geissel, M. Winkler (GSI), D. Nishimura, T. Sumikama (Dept. of Phys., Tokyo Univ. of Sc.), M. Fukuda, M. Mihara, H. Uenishi (Dept. of Phys., Osaka Univ.), T. Kuboki, T. Suzuki, T. Yamaguchi, H. Furuki, C. S. Lee, K. Sato (Dept. of Phys., Saitama Univ.), A. Ozawa, H. Ohnishi, T. Moriguchi, S. Fukuda, Y. Ishibashi, D. Nagae, R. Nishikiori, T. Niwa (Inst. of Phys., Univ. of Tsukuba), N. Aoi (RCNP), Rui-Jiu Chen, N. Inabe, D. Kameda, T. Kubo, M. Lantz, T. Ohnishi, K. Okumura, H. Sakurai, H. Suzuki, H. Takeda, S. Takeuchi, K. Tanaka, Y. Yanagisawa (RIKEN), De-Qing Fang, Yu-Gang Ma (SINAP), T. Izumikawa (RI Ctr., Niigata Univ.), and S. Momota (Fac. of Engn., Kochi Univ. of Tech.) Reaction cross sections (σR) for 22-35Na isotopes have been measured at around 240 MeV/nucleon. The σR for 22-35Na were measured for the first time. Enhancement in cross sections is clearly observed from the systematics for stable nuclei, for isotopes with large mass numbers. These enhancement can be mainly ascribed to the nuclear deformation. We will discuss the nuclear structure (neutron skin, nuclear shell structure) for neutron-excess Na isotopes. T. Ohtsubo, M. Nagashima, T. Ogura, Y. Shimbara (Grad. Sch. of Sc., Niigata Univ.), M.Takechi, H. Geissel, M. Winkler (GSI), D. Nishimura, T. Sumikama (Dept. of Phys., Tokyo Univ. of Sc.), M. Fukuda, M. Mihara, H. Uenishi (Dept. of Phys., Osaka Univ.), T. Kuboki, T. Suzuki, T. Yamaguchi, H. Furuki, C. S. Lee, K. Sato (Dept. of Phys., Saitama Univ.), A. Ozawa, H. Ohnishi, T. Moriguchi, S. Fukuda, Y. Ishibashi, D. Nagae, R. Nishikiori, T. Niwa (Inst. of Phys., Univ. of Tsukuba), N. Aoi (RCNP), Rui-Jiu Chen, N. Inabe, D. Kameda, T. Kubo, M. Lantz, T. Ohnishi, K. Okumura, H. Sakurai, H. Suzuki, H. Takeda, S. Takeuchi, K. Tanaka, Y. Yanagisawa (RIKEN), De-Qing Fang, Yu-Gang Ma (SINAP), T. Izumikawa (RI Ctr., Niigata Univ.), and S. Momota (Fac. of Engn

  7. The Roles of Mutation, Selection, and Expression in Determining Relative Rates of Evolution in Mitochondrial versus Nuclear Genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havird, Justin C; Sloan, Daniel B

    2016-12-01

    Eukaryotes rely on proteins encoded by the nuclear and mitochondrial (mt) genomes, which interact within multisubunit complexes such as oxidative-phosphorylation enzymes. Although selection is thought to be less efficient on the asexual mt genome, in bilaterian animals the ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous substitutions (ω) is lower in mt- compared with nuclear-encoded OXPHOS subunits, suggesting stronger effects of purifying selection in the mt genome. Because high levels of gene expression constrain protein sequence evolution, one proposed resolution to this paradox is that mt genes are expressed more highly than nuclear genes. To test this hypothesis, we investigated expression and sequence evolution of mt and nuclear genes from 84 diverse eukaryotes that vary in mt gene content and mutation rate. We found that the relationship between mt and nuclear ω values varied dramatically across eukaryotes. In contrast, transcript abundance is consistently higher for mt genes than nuclear genes, regardless of which genes happen to be in the mt genome. Consequently, expression levels cannot be responsible for the differences in ω Rather, 84% of the variance in the ratio of ω values between mt and nuclear genes could be explained by differences in mutation rate between the two genomes. We relate these findings to the hypothesis that high rates of mt mutation select for compensatory changes in the nuclear genome. We also propose an explanation for why mt transcripts consistently outnumber their nuclear counterparts, with implications for mitonuclear protein imbalance and aging.

  8. Discovering hierarchical structure in normal relational data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Mikkel Nørgaard; Herlau, Tue; Mørup, Morten

    2014-01-01

    Hierarchical clustering is a widely used tool for structuring and visualizing complex data using similarity. Traditionally, hierarchical clustering is based on local heuristics that do not explicitly provide assessment of the statistical saliency of the extracted hierarchy. We propose a non-param...

  9. ZOOPLANKTON COMMUNITY STRUCTURE OF THE SEA SURFACE MICROLAYER NEAR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS AND MARINE FISH CULTURE ZONES IN DAYA BAY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨宇峰; 王肇鼎; 潘明祥; 焦念志

    2002-01-01

    The authors' surveys in May-June 1999 (two cruises) at six sampling stations near nuclear power plants (NPP) and marine fish culture zones in Daya Bay, Guangdong, revealed species composition, densities and body-size of thesea surface microlayer (SM) zooplankton (>35 μm). Results showed that protozoans and copepod nauplii were the predominant components, accounting for 65.40% to95.56% of total zooplankton in abundance. The size-frequency distributions showed that the frequency of micro-zooplankton (0.02-0.2 mm) reached 0.8235. The SM zooplankton community structure revealed in the present study was quite different from that revealed by investigations in the 1980s in Daya Bay. Difference of sampling method has important influence on the obtained zooplankton community structure. SM zooplankton consisted of micro- and mesozooplankton (0.2-2.0 mm), with micro-zooplankton being predominant. Some possible cause-effect relations between the zooplankton community structure and mariculture, nuclear power plants cooling systems and sampling method are discussed.``

  10. Arrangement of nuclear structures is not transmitted through mitosis but is identical in sister cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlova, Darya Yu; Stixová, Lenka; Kozubek, Stanislav; Gierman, Hinco J; Šustáčková, Gabriela; Chernyshev, Andrei V; Medvedev, Ruslan N; Legartová, Soňa; Versteeg, Rogier; Matula, Pavel; Stoklasa, Roman; Bártová, Eva

    2012-11-01

    Although it is well known that chromosomes are non-randomly organized during interphase, it is not completely clear whether higher-order chromatin structure is transmitted from mother to daughter cells. Therefore, we addressed the question of how chromatin is rearranged during interphase and whether heterochromatin pattern is transmitted after mitosis. We additionally tested the similarity of chromatin arrangement in sister interphase nuclei. We noticed a very active cell rotation during interphase, especially when histone hyperacetylation was induced or transcription was inhibited. This natural phenomenon can influence the analysis of nuclear arrangement. Using photoconversion of Dendra2-tagged core histone H4 we showed that the distribution of chromatin in daughter interphase nuclei differed from that in mother cells. Similarly, the nuclear distribution of heterochromatin protein 1β (HP1β) was not completely identical in mother and daughter cells. However, identity between mother and daughter cells was in many cases evidenced by nucleolar composition. Moreover, morphology of nucleoli, HP1β protein, Cajal bodies, chromosome territories, and gene transcripts were identical in sister cell nuclei. We conclude that the arrangement of interphase chromatin is not transmitted through mitosis, but the nuclear pattern is identical in naturally synchronized sister cells. It is also necessary to take into account the possibility that cell rotation and the degree of chromatin condensation during functionally specific cell cycle phases might influence our view of nuclear architecture.

  11. The nuclear symmetry energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldo, M.; Burgio, G. F.

    2016-11-01

    The nuclear symmetry energy characterizes the variation of the binding energy as the neutron to proton ratio of a nuclear system is varied. This is one of the most important features of nuclear physics in general, since it is just related to the two component nature of the nuclear systems. As such it is one of the most relevant physical parameters that affect the physics of many phenomena and nuclear processes. This review paper presents a survey of the role and relevance of the nuclear symmetry energy in different fields of research and of the accuracy of its determination from the phenomenology and from the microscopic many-body theory. In recent years, a great interest was devoted not only to the Nuclear Matter symmetry energy at saturation density but also to its whole density dependence, which is an essential ingredient for our understanding of many phenomena. We analyze the nuclear symmetry energy in different realms of nuclear physics and astrophysics. In particular we consider the nuclear symmetry energy in relation to nuclear structure, astrophysics of Neutron Stars and supernovae, and heavy ion collision experiments, trying to elucidate the connections of these different fields on the basis of the symmetry energy peculiarities. The interplay between experimental and observational data and theoretical developments is stressed. The expected future developments and improvements are schematically addressed, together with most demanded experimental and theoretical advances for the next few years.

  12. Opinions and social values related to the disposal of nuclear waste in Switzerland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidl, Roman; Stefanelli, Annalisa [ETH Zurich (Switzerland). Inst. for Environmental Decisions

    2015-07-01

    Discourse in media and politics about nuclear waste and its disposal in so-called ''Endlager'' (Germany) or ''Tiefenlager'' (geological deep ground repositories; Switzerland) often consider positions and arguments of diverse interest groups. Mostly polarized discussions are in the focus. However, we find a temporally consistent pattern of four opinion clusters in German speaking communities in Switzerland: one cluster in favor of a repository (perceiving mostly benefits) and one cluster with high-risk ratings opposing a repository; a third cluster of moderate opposition is ambivalent regarding risks and benefits, whereas a fourth cluster seems indifferent. Moreover, in qualitative interviews we found high importance of the development of the participatory process. Participants were sensitive to value related issues such as absence of political influence, transparency, comprehensive and independent information. Important to note is the problem that some of these values can be used as pro- or con-argument regarding a repository by different individuals. For instance, all agree that safety is essential - but both conclusions, to be for or against a repository, are possible. A recent study focused on the arguments, underlying people's opinions. The salient arguments that participants report are related to the sense of responsibility for the country to store safely the nuclear waste and to avoid its export. Moreover, people recognize the necessity of a safe solution for the storage in order to preserve future generations from the risks of nuclear waste. These arguments may be relevant for the fact that participants, on average, have a favorable position regarding a deep ground repository in Switzerland.

  13. Nuclear structure for the crust of neutron stars and exotic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goegelein, Peter

    2007-07-01

    In this work the Skyrme Hartree-Fock and Relativistic Hartree--Fock approaches have been considered to describe the structure of nuclear systems ranging from finite nuclei, structures in the crust of neutron stars to homogeneous matter. Effects of pairing correlations and finite temperature are also taken into account. The numerical procedure in the cubic box is described for the Skyrme Hartree-Fock as well as the relativistic Hartree-Fock approach. And finally, results for the crust of neutron stars and exotic nuclei are presented and discussed. (orig.)

  14. A structural analysis on the KN-12 spent nuclear fuel transport casks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dew Hey [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Young Shin; Ryu, Chung Hyun; Kim, Hyun Su; Lee, Jae Hyung; Na, Jae Yun [Chungnam National Univ., Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-08-15

    In this study, safety of the spent nuclear fuel cask KN-12 which is developed in 2000 is evaluated for hypothetical accidents conditions such as free drop, puncture, fire accident and water immersion. Finite element code ABAQUS/Explicit is used to compare with safety analysis report of the GNB in which analysis is performed with LS-DYNA3D for hypothetical accident conditions. Through this study, the safety of KN-12 is evaluated by comprehensive structural analysis. The capability and technological advancement of Korean community on the analysis and structural assessment of the cask will be improved. Also people's anxiety about radioactive dangers will be eliminated.

  15. A four-scale homogenization analysis of creep of a nuclear containment structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tran, A.B. [Université Paris-Est, Laboratoire Modélisation et Simulation Multi Échelle, MSME UMR 8208 CNRS, 5 bd Descartes, F-77454 Marne-la-Vallée (France); EDF R and D – Département MMC Site des Renardières – Avenue des Renardières - Ecuelles, 77818 Moret sur Loing Cedex (France); Department of Applied Informatics in Construction, National University of Civil Engineering, 55 Giai Phong Road, Hai Ba Trung District, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Yvonnet, J., E-mail: julien.yvonnet@univ-paris-est.fr [Université Paris-Est, Laboratoire Modélisation et Simulation Multi Échelle, MSME UMR 8208 CNRS, 5 bd Descartes, F-77454 Marne-la-Vallée (France); He, Q.-C. [Université Paris-Est, Laboratoire Modélisation et Simulation Multi Échelle, MSME UMR 8208 CNRS, 5 bd Descartes, F-77454 Marne-la-Vallée (France); Toulemonde, C.; Sanahuja, J. [EDF R and D – Département MMC Site des Renardières – Avenue des Renardières - Ecuelles, 77818 Moret sur Loing Cedex (France)

    2013-12-15

    A four-scale approach is proposed to predict the creep behavior of a concrete structure. The behavior of concrete is modeled through a numerical multiscale methodology, by successively homogenizing the viscoelastic behavior at different scales, starting from the cement paste. The homogenization is carried out by numerically constructing an effective relaxation tensor at each scale. In this framework, the impact of modifying the microstructural parameters can be directly observed on the structure response, like the interaction of the creep of concrete with the prestressing tendons network, and the effects of an internal pressure which might occur during a nuclear accident.

  16. Sensing actin dynamics: Structural basis for G-actin-sensitive nuclear import of MAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirano, Hidemi; Matsuura, Yoshiyuki, E-mail: matsuura.yoshiyuki@d.mbox.nagoya-u.ac.jp

    2011-10-22

    Highlights: {yields} MAL has a bipartite NLS that binds to Imp{alpha} in an extended conformation. {yields} Mutational analyses verified the functional significance of MAL-Imp{alpha} interactions. {yields} Induced folding and NLS-masking by G-actins inhibit nuclear import of MAL. -- Abstract: The coordination of cytoskeletal actin dynamics with gene expression reprogramming is emerging as a crucial mechanism to control diverse cellular processes, including cell migration, differentiation and neuronal circuit assembly. The actin-binding transcriptional coactivator MAL (also known as MRTF-A/MKL1/BSAC) senses G-actin concentration and transduces Rho GTPase signals to serum response factor (SRF). MAL rapidly shuttles between the cytoplasm and the nucleus in unstimulated cells but Rho-induced depletion of G-actin leads to MAL nuclear accumulation and activation of transcription of SRF:MAL-target genes. Although the molecular and structural basis of actin-regulated nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of MAL is not understood fully, it is proposed that nuclear import of MAL is mediated by importin {alpha}/{beta} heterodimer, and that G-actin competes with importin {alpha}/{beta} for the binding to MAL. Here we present structural, biochemical and cell biological evidence that MAL has a classical bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS) in the N-terminal 'RPEL' domain containing Arg-Pro-X-X-X-Glu-Leu (RPEL) motifs. The NLS residues of MAL adopt an extended conformation and bind along the surface groove of importin-{alpha}, interacting with the major- and minor-NLS binding sites. We also present a crystal structure of wild-type MAL RPEL domain in complex with five G-actins. Comparison of the importin-{alpha}- and actin-complexes revealed that the binding of G-actins to MAL is associated with folding of NLS residues into a helical conformation that is inappropriate for importin-{alpha} recognition.

  17. Discovering Multidimensional Structure in Relational Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mikael Rune; Holmgren, Thomas; Pedersen, Torben Bach

    2004-01-01

    On-Line Analytical Processing (OLAP) systems based on multidimensional databases are essential elements of decision support. However, most existing data is stored in “ordinary” relational OLTP databases, i.e., data has to be (re-) modeled as multidimensional cubes before the advantages of OLAP...... tools are available. In this paper we present an approach for the automatic construction of multidimensional OLAP database schemas from existing relational OLTP databases, enabling easy OLAP design and analysis for most existing data sources. This is achieved through a set of practical and effective...... algorithms for discovering multidimensional schemas from relational databases. The algorithms take a wide range of available metadata into account in the discovery process, including functional and inclusion dependencies, and key and cardinality information....

  18. Project for export system construction of nuclear equipment to IAEA; survey on current market status of the nuclear related international organizations and the domestic possible suppliers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, T. S.; Cho, H. K.; Kim, H. J. [Korea Atomic Industrial Forum, Seoul (Korea)

    2001-05-01

    Republic of Korea are keeping the dynamic activities in IAEA as the 8th advanced nuclear country over the world but has occupied very low late less than 0.01% in supplying the equipments to IAEA. About 6,000 nuclear equipment suppliers are registered in IAEA Supply Roster over the world but only 3 Suppliers of our country are registered in IAEA Supply Roster. The supply of nuclear industrial products equivalent to about 100 million dollars into IAEA market will endorse not only the international authorization for our technology and products but also give contribution to activate the domestic nuclear industries in order to increase its expert. The explanation for IAEA procurement market to the 53 nuclear companies will be made on May 16, 2001, and the participants for the export of their goods will be selected. And then we will do all possible supports by the government and related organizations for them to register in IAEA Supply Roster. 21 refs. (Author)

  19. Study on the applicability of structural and morphological parameters of selected uranium compounds for nuclear forensic purposes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho Mer Lin, Doris

    2015-03-13

    Nuclear forensic science or nuclear forensics, is a relatively young discipline which evolved due to the need of analysing interdicted nuclear or radioactive material, necessary for determining its origin. Fundamentally, nuclear forensic science makes use of measurable material properties, referred to as ''signatures'', which provide hints on the history of the material. As part of the advancement in this multi-faceted field, new signatures are constantly sought after and as well as analytical techniques to efficiently and accurately determine the signatures. The work carried out in this study is part of this fulfilment to investigate new structural and morphological parameters as possible new nuclear forensic signatures for selected uranium compounds. The scientific goals have been oriented into three parts for investigations in this study. Firstly, five different compositions of uranium ore concentrates (UOCs) were prepared in the laboratory under well-defined conditions. These materials were subsequently characterized by several techniques such as X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetry/differential thermal analysis, Infrared and Raman spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, scanning electron microscopy etc. Such materials were pivotal for comparison with the industrial samples. Secondly, several uranium compounds, mainly UOCs were measured using Raman spectroscopy. At least three different Raman spectrometers were used and a comparison made in their performance and suitability for nuclear forensics. Raman spectra of industrial uranium materials were interpreted with regard to compound identification and to determination of (anionic) impurities. Anionic impurities that were present were identified and they could provide clues to the processing history of the samples. Statistical techniques such as principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least square-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) were applied to several Raman spectra. The analysis showed that

  20. Nuclear Scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuclear scans use radioactive substances to see structures and functions inside your body. They use a special ... images. Most scans take 20 to 45 minutes. Nuclear scans can help doctors diagnose many conditions, including ...

  1. Diabetic polyneuropathy, sensory neurons, nuclear structure and spliceosome alterations: a role for CWC22.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Masaki; Chandrasekhar, Ambika; Cheng, Chu; Martinez, Jose A; Ng, Hilarie; de la Hoz, Cristiane; Zochodne, Douglas W

    2017-03-01

    Unique deficits in the function of adult sensory neurons as part of their early neurodegeneration might account for progressive polyneuropathy during chronic diabetes mellitus. Here, we provide structural and functional evidence for aberrant pre-mRNA splicing in a chronic type 1 model of experimental diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN). Cajal bodies (CBs), unique nuclear substructures involved in RNA splicing, increased in number in diabetic sensory neurons, but their expected colocalization with survival motor neuron (SMN) proteins was reduced - a mislocalization described in motor neurons of spinal muscular atrophy. Small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles (snRNPs), also participants in the spliceosome, had abnormal multiple nuclear foci unassociated with CBs, and their associated snRNAs were reduced. CWC22, a key spliceosome protein, was aberrantly upregulated in diabetic dorsal root ganglia (DRG), and impaired neuronal function. CWC22 attenuated sensory neuron plasticity, with knockdown in vitro enhancing their neurite outgrowth. Further, axonal delivery of CWC22 siRNA unilaterally to locally knock down the aberrant protein in diabetic nerves improved aspects of sensory function in diabetic mice. Collectively, our findings identify subtle but significant alterations in spliceosome structure and function, including dysregulated CBs and CWC22 overexpression, in diabetic sensory neurons that offer new ideas regarding diabetic sensory neurodegeneration in polyneuropathy.

  2. Diabetic polyneuropathy, sensory neurons, nuclear structure and spliceosome alterations: a role for CWC22

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Kobayashi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Unique deficits in the function of adult sensory neurons as part of their early neurodegeneration might account for progressive polyneuropathy during chronic diabetes mellitus. Here, we provide structural and functional evidence for aberrant pre-mRNA splicing in a chronic type 1 model of experimental diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN. Cajal bodies (CBs, unique nuclear substructures involved in RNA splicing, increased in number in diabetic sensory neurons, but their expected colocalization with survival motor neuron (SMN proteins was reduced – a mislocalization described in motor neurons of spinal muscular atrophy. Small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles (snRNPs, also participants in the spliceosome, had abnormal multiple nuclear foci unassociated with CBs, and their associated snRNAs were reduced. CWC22, a key spliceosome protein, was aberrantly upregulated in diabetic dorsal root ganglia (DRG, and impaired neuronal function. CWC22 attenuated sensory neuron plasticity, with knockdown in vitro enhancing their neurite outgrowth. Further, axonal delivery of CWC22 siRNA unilaterally to locally knock down the aberrant protein in diabetic nerves improved aspects of sensory function in diabetic mice. Collectively, our findings identify subtle but significant alterations in spliceosome structure and function, including dysregulated CBs and CWC22 overexpression, in diabetic sensory neurons that offer new ideas regarding diabetic sensory neurodegeneration in polyneuropathy.

  3. Diabetic polyneuropathy, sensory neurons, nuclear structure and spliceosome alterations: a role for CWC22

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Masaki; Chandrasekhar, Ambika; Cheng, Chu; Martinez, Jose A.; Ng, Hilarie; de la Hoz, Cristiane

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Unique deficits in the function of adult sensory neurons as part of their early neurodegeneration might account for progressive polyneuropathy during chronic diabetes mellitus. Here, we provide structural and functional evidence for aberrant pre-mRNA splicing in a chronic type 1 model of experimental diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN). Cajal bodies (CBs), unique nuclear substructures involved in RNA splicing, increased in number in diabetic sensory neurons, but their expected colocalization with survival motor neuron (SMN) proteins was reduced – a mislocalization described in motor neurons of spinal muscular atrophy. Small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles (snRNPs), also participants in the spliceosome, had abnormal multiple nuclear foci unassociated with CBs, and their associated snRNAs were reduced. CWC22, a key spliceosome protein, was aberrantly upregulated in diabetic dorsal root ganglia (DRG), and impaired neuronal function. CWC22 attenuated sensory neuron plasticity, with knockdown in vitro enhancing their neurite outgrowth. Further, axonal delivery of CWC22 siRNA unilaterally to locally knock down the aberrant protein in diabetic nerves improved aspects of sensory function in diabetic mice. Collectively, our findings identify subtle but significant alterations in spliceosome structure and function, including dysregulated CBs and CWC22 overexpression, in diabetic sensory neurons that offer new ideas regarding diabetic sensory neurodegeneration in polyneuropathy. PMID:28250049

  4. Consideration of hazardous and especially hazardous hydrometeorological impacts in design of buildings and structures of nuclear power plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryukhan Fedor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available External impacts of the hydrometeorological origin have a significant influence on the safety level of objects of use of atomic energy (OUAE, including nuclear power plants (NPP. Therefore, the existing NPP-related safety regulations demand to consider such impacts at all stages of the NPP life cycle. It is important to make decisions on considering or ignoring certain external impacts while designing NPP buildings and structures. The main criterion for such decisions is the probability of a non-project accident associated with the release of radionuclides into the environment when an extreme phenomena occurs. The aim of this study is to develop a concept for refinement regulatory requirements, considering hydrometeorological factors in organization of NPP engineering protection. Criteria for consideration of hazardous and especially hazardous hydrometeorological impacts for design of NPP buildings and structures were analyzed, and recommendations for refinement of regulatory requirements, considering hydrometeorological factors in organization of NPP engineering protection, were developed.

  5. A Procedure for Determination of Degradation Acceptance Criteria for Structures and Passive Components in Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nie, J.; Braverman, J.; Hofmayer, C.; Choun, Y-S.; Hahm, D.; Choi, I-K.

    2012-01-30

    The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has been collaborating with Brookhaven National Laboratory since 2007 to develop a realistic seismic risk evaluation system which includes the consideration of aging of structures and components in nuclear power plants (NPPs). This collaboration program aims at providing technical support to a five-year KAERI research project, which includes three specific areas that are essential to seismic probabilistic risk assessment: (1) probabilistic seismic hazard analysis, (2) seismic fragility analysis including the effects of aging, and (3) a plant seismic risk analysis. The understanding and assessment of age-related degradations of structures, systems, and components and their impact on plant safety is the major goal of this KAERI-BNL collaboration. Four annual reports have been published before this report as a result of the collaboration research.

  6. Polyethylene glycols (PEG) and related structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wenande, Emily; Kroigaard, Mogens; Mosbech, Holger

    2015-01-01

    We describe hypersensitivity to polyethylene glycols (PEGs), with cross-reactivity to a structural analog, polysorbate 80, in a 69-year-old patient with perioperative anaphylaxis and subsequent, severe anaphylactic reactions to unrelated medical products. PEGs and PEG analogs are prevalent...... in the perioperative setting, contained in a wide range of products seldom suspected of causing hypersensitivity reactions and thus rarely documented in surgical/anesthetic records. We suggest routine testing for PEGs after perioperative anaphylaxis because exposure to these polymers often is significant....... Comprehensive brand name documentation on the anesthetic chart of all product exposures is central to identifying the responsible allergen....

  7. Novel nuclear structure aspects of the O{nu}{beta}{beta}-decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menendez, J; Poves, A [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, and IFT, UAM-CSIC, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049-Madrid (Spain); Caurier, E; Nowacki, F, E-mail: alfredo.poves@uam.es [IPHC, IN2P3-CNRS/Universite Louis Pasteur, 67037-Strasbourg (France)

    2011-01-01

    We explore the influence of the deformation on the nuclear matrix elements of the neutrinoless double beta decay (NME), concluding that the difference in deformation -or more generally in the amount of quadrupole correlations- between parent and grand daughter nuclei quenches strongly the decay. We correlate these differences with the seniority structure of the nuclear wave functions. In this context, we examine the present discrepancies between the NME's obtained in the framework of the Interacting Shell Model and the Quasiparticle RPA. In our view, part of the discrepancy can be due to the limitations of the spherical QRPA in treating nuclei which have strong quadrupole correlations. We surmise that the NME's in a basis of generalized seniority are approximately model independent, i. e. they are 'universal'.

  8. Nuclear medium modification of the F{sub 2}(x,Q{sup 2}) structure function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sajjad Athar, M., E-mail: sajathar@gmail.co [Department of Physics, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh 202 002 (India); Ruiz Simo, I.; Vicente Vacas, M.J. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica and IFIC, Centro Mixto Universidad de Valencia - CSIC, 46100 Burjassot (Valencia) (Spain)

    2011-05-01

    We study the nuclear effects in the electromagnetic structure function F{sub 2}(x,Q{sup 2}) in the deep inelastic lepton-nucleus scattering process by taking into account Fermi motion, binding, pion and rho meson cloud contributions. Calculations have been done in a local density approximation using relativistic nuclear spectral functions which include nucleon correlations. The ratios R{sub F}{sub 2}{sup A}(x,Q{sup 2})=(2F{sub 2}{sup A}(x,Q{sup 2}))/(AF{sub 2}{sup D}(x,Q{sup 2})) are obtained and compared with recent JLab results for light nuclei with special attention to the slope of the x distributions. This magnitude shows a non-trivial A dependence and it is insensitive to possible normalization uncertainties. The results have also been compared with some of the older experiments using intermediate mass nuclei.

  9. Unified description of structure and reactions: implementing the Nuclear Field Theory program

    CERN Document Server

    Broglia, Ricardo A; Barranco, Francisco; Vigezzi, Enrico; Idini, Andrea; Potel, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    The modern theory of the atomic nucleus results from the merging of the liquid drop (Niels Bohr and Fritz Kalckar) and of the shell model (Marie Goeppert Meyer and Axel Jensen), which contributed the concepts of collective excitations and of independent-particle motion respectively. The unification of these apparently contradictory views in terms of the particle-vibration (rotation) coupling (Aage Bohr and Ben Mottelson) has allowed for an ever increasingly complete, accurate and detailed description of the nuclear structure, Nuclear Field Theory (NFT, developed by the Copenhagen-Buenos Aires collaboration) providing a powerful quantal embodiment. In keeping with the fact that reactions are not only at the basis of quantum mechanics (statistical interpretation, Max Born) , but also the specific tools to probe the atomic nucleus, NFT is being extended to deal with processes which involve the continuum in an intrinsic fashion, so as to be able to treat them on an equal footing with those associated with discret...

  10. Theoretical nuclear structure and astrophysics. Progress report for 1993--1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guidry, M.W.; Nazarewicz, W.; Strayer, M.R.

    1995-12-31

    This research effort is directed toward theoretical support and guidance for the developing fields of radioactive ion beam (RIB) physics, computational and nuclear astrophysics, and the interface between these disciplines. The authors are concerned both with the application of existing technologies and concepts to guide the initial RIB program, and the development of new ideas and new technologies to influence the longer-term future of nuclear structure physics and astrophysics. The authors report substantial progress in both areas. One measure of progress is publications and invited material. The research described here has led to more than 70 papers that are published, accepted, or submitted to refereed journals, and to 46 invited presentations at conferences and workshops.

  11. Relating transverse structure of various parton distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Maji, Tanmay; Chakrabarti, D; Teryaev, O V

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of T-even TMDs in a light front quark-diquark model of nucleons with the wave functions constructed from the soft-wall AdS/QCD prediction. The relations amongst TMDs are discussed. The $p_\\perp$ dependence of the TMDs are compared with the $t$-dependence of the GPDs. AdS/QCD wave function provides an explanation behind the approximate $x$ and $p_\\perp$ factorization observed in lattice TMD calculations.

  12. Review of Methods Related to Assessing Human Performance in Nuclear Power Plant Control Room Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katya L Le Blanc; Ronald L Boring; David I Gertman

    2001-11-01

    With the increased use of digital systems in Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) control rooms comes a need to thoroughly understand the human performance issues associated with digital systems. A common way to evaluate human performance is to test operators and crews in NPP control room simulators. However, it is often challenging to characterize human performance in meaningful ways when measuring performance in NPP control room simulations. A review of the literature in NPP simulator studies reveals a variety of ways to measure human performance in NPP control room simulations including direct observation, automated computer logging, recordings from physiological equipment, self-report techniques, protocol analysis and structured debriefs, and application of model-based evaluation. These methods and the particular measures used are summarized and evaluated.

  13. Potentially of using vertical and three dimensional isolation systems in nuclear structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Zhiuang [Research Institute of Structural Engineering and Disaster Reduction, Tongji University, Shanghai (China); Wong, Jenna [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories, Berkeley (United States); Mahin, Stephen [University of California, Berkeley (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Although the horizontal component of an earthquake response can be significantly reduced through the use of conventional seismic isolators, the vertical component of excitation is still transmitted directly into the structure. Records from instrumented structures, and some recent tests and analyses have actually seen increases in vertical responses in base isolated structures under the combined effects of horizontal and vertical ground motions. This issue becomes a great concern to facilities such as a Nuclear Power Plants (NPP), with specialized equipment and machinery that is not only expensive, but critical to safe operation. As such, there is considerable interest worldwide in vertical and three-dimensional (3D) isolation systems. This paper examines several vertical and 3D isolation systems that have been proposed and their potential application to modern nuclear facilities. In particular, a series of case study analyses of a modern NPP model are performed to examine the benefits and challenges associated with 3D isolation compared with horizontal isolation. It was found that compared with the general horizontal isolators, isolators that have vertical frequencies of no more than 3 Hz can effectively reduce the vertical in-structure responses for the studied NPP model. Among the studied cases, the case that has a vertical isolation frequency of 3 Hz is the one that can keep the horizontal period of the isolators as the first period while having the most flexible vertical isolator properties. When the vertical frequency of isolators reduces to 1 Hz, the rocking effect is obvious and rocking restraining devices are necessary.

  14. An Assessment of Uncertainty in Remaining Life Estimation for Nuclear Structural Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Fricke, Jacob M.; Bond, Leonard J.

    2012-12-01

    In recent years, several operating US light-water nuclear power reactors (LWRs) have moved to extended-life operations (from 40 years to 60 years), and there is interest in the feasibility of extending plant life to 80 years. Operating experience suggests that material degradation of structural components in LWRs (such as the reactor pressure vessel) is expected to be the limiting factor for safe operation during extended life. Therefore, a need exists for assessing the condition of LWR structural components and determining its remaining useful life (RUL). The ability to estimate RUL of degraded structural components provides a basis for determining safety margins (i.e., whether safe operation over some pre-determined time horizon is possible), and scheduling degradation management activities (such as potentially modifying operating conditions to limit further degradation growth). A key issue in RUL estimation is calculation of uncertainty bounds, which are dependent on current material state, as well as past and future stressor levels (such as time-at-temperature, pressure, and irradiation). This paper presents a preliminary empirical investigation into the uncertainty of RUL estimates for nuclear structural materials.

  15. Management of the aging of critical safety-related concrete structures in light-water reactor plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Arndt, E.G. (Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The Structural Aging Program has the overall objective of providing the USNRC with an improved basis for evaluating nuclear power plant safety-related structures for continued service. The program consists of a management task and three technical tasks: materials property data base, structural component assessment/repair technology, and quantitative methodology for continued-service determinations. Objectives, accomplishments, and planned activities under each of these tasks are presented. Major program accomplishments include development of a materials property data base for structural materials as well as an aging assessment methodology for concrete structures in nuclear power plants. Furthermore, a review and assessment of inservice inspection techniques for concrete materials and structures has been complete, and work on development of a methodology which can be used for performing current as well as reliability-based future condition assessment of concrete structures is well under way. 43 refs., 3 tabs.

  16. Evaluation of environmental data relating to selected nuclear power plant sites. Prairie Island Nuclear Generating Plant site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murarka, I.P.

    1976-11-01

    Environmental monitoring data for 1973 through 1975 pertaining to the Prairie Island Nuclear Generating Station (which began commercial operation in December 1973) were analyzed by the most practical qualitative and quantitative methods. Evaluations of aquatic and terrestrial biotic data are presented in this report. The data indicate no significant immediate deleterious effects on the biota from plant operation, thus confirming preoperational predictions. Although the station has not operated long enough to reveal long-term deleterious effects, present indications do not lead to a concerned prediction that any are developing. Recommendations are suggested for improving monitoring techniques.

  17. Nuclear relations with administrations of industry services; Relaciones de las centrales nucleares con las administraciones de los Servicios de Industria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernardez Garcia, A.

    2011-07-01

    The object of the article is to try to answer to the following question that can arise to the holder of a nuclear power station: What Administration of Industry must I myself direct to be able to support my complementary facilities of Industrial Security inside the in force legality?. The raised discussion arise between if the competent administration for the legal steps, is the Central Administration across his delegates and sub delegates of government, or is of the Territorial Services of Industry of Autonomous communities. (Author)

  18. Association between Long Interspersed Nuclear Element-1 Methylation and Relative Telomere Length in Wilms Tumor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui-Bo Chang; Ji-Zhen Zou; Cai He; Rui Zeng; Yuan-Yuan Li; Fei-Fei Ma; Zhuo Liu

    2015-01-01

    Background: DNA hypomethylation of long interspersed nuclear elements-1 (LINEs-1) occurs during carcinogenesis, whereas information addressing LINE-1 methylation in Wilms tumor (WT) is limited.The main purpose of our study was to quantify LINE-1 methylation levels and evaluate their relationship with relative telomere length (TL) in WT.Methods: We investigated LINE-1 methylation and relative TL using bisulfite-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) pyrosequencing and quantitative PCR, respectively, in 20 WT tissues, 10 normal kidney tissues and a WT cell line.Significant changes were analyzed by t-tests.Results: LINE-1 methylation levels were significantly lower (P < 0.05) and relative TLs were significantly shorter (P < 0.05) in WT compared with normal kidney.There was a significant positive relationship between LINE-1 methylation and relative TL in WT (r =0.671,P =0.001).LINE-1 Methylation levels were significantly associated with global DNA methylation (r =0.332, P < 0.01).In addition, relative TL was shortened and LINE-1 methylation was decreased in a WT cell line treated with the hypomethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine compared with untreated WT cell line.Conclusion: These results suggest that LINE-1 hypomethylation is common and may be linked to telomere shortening in WT.

  19. Nuclear Resonance Scattering of Synchrotron Radiation as a Unique Electronic, Structural, and Thermodynamic Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alp, E. Ercan; Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Toellner, Thomas S.; Zhao, Jiyong; Leu, Bogdan M.

    Discovery of Mössbauer effect [1] in a nuclear transition was a remarkable development. It revealed how long-lived nuclear states with relatively low energies in the kiloelectron volt (keV) region can be excited without recoil. This new effect had a unique feature involving a coupling between nuclear physics and solid-state physics, both in terms of physics and sociology. Physics coupling originates from the fact that recoilless emission and absorption or resonance is only possible if the requirement that nuclei have to be bound in a lattice with quantized vibrational states is fulfilled, and that the finite electron density on the nucleus couples to nuclear degrees of freedom leading to hyperfine interactions. Thus, Mössbauer spectroscopy allows peering into solid-state effects using unique nuclear transitions. Sociological aspects of this coupling had been equally startling and fruitful. The interaction between diverse scientific communities, who learned to use Mössbauer spectroscopy proved to be very valuable. For example, biologists, geologists, chemists, physicists, materials scientists, and archeologists, all sharing a common spectroscopic technique, also learned to appreciate the beauty and intricacies of each other's fields. As a laboratory-based technique, Mössbauer spectroscopy matured by the end of the 1970s. Further exciting developments took place when accelerator-based techniques were employed, like synchrotron radiation or "in-beam" Mössbauer experiments with implanted radioactive ions. More recently, two Mössbauer spectrometers on the surface of the Mars kept the technique vibrant and viable up until present time.

  20. Effects of nuclear medium and nonisoscalarity in extracting $sin^2\\theta_W$ using Paschos-Wolfenstein relation

    CERN Document Server

    Haider, H; Athar, M Sajjad

    2012-01-01

    We study the nuclear medium effects and nonisoscalarity correction in the extraction of weak mixing angle sin$^2\\theta_W$ using Paschos-Wolfenstein (PW) relation. The calculations are performed for the iron nucleus. The results are discussed along with the experimental result inferred by NuTeV collaboration. The nuclear medium effects like Fermi motion, binding, shadowing and antishadowing corrections and pion and rho meson cloud contributions have been taken into account. Calculations have been performed in the local density approximation using a relativistic nuclear spectral function which includes nucleon correlations. These studies may be useful for the ongoing MINER$\

  1. Application of X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy to the study of nuclear structural materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shanshan

    One of key technologies for the next generation nuclear systems are advanced materials, including high temperature structural materials, fast neutron resistance core materials and so on. Local structure determination in these systems, which often are crystallographically intractable, is critical to gaining an understanding of their properties. In this thesis, X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS), including Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) and X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES), is used to examine the geometric and electronic structure of nuclear structural materials under varying conditions. The thesis is divided into two main sections. The first examines the structural analysis of nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFA) which are dispersion strengthened by an ultra high density of Y-Ti-O enriched nano-features, resulting in remarkable high temperature creep strength and radiation damage resistance. Titanium and Yttrium K-edge XAS shows commercial alloys MA957 and J12YWT more closely resemble the as received Fe-14Cr-3W-0.4Ti (wt. %) powders, and mechanically alloyed (MA) powders with 0.25Y2O3 (wt. %). It shows that a significant fraction of substitutional Ti remains dissolved in the (BCC) ferrite matrix. In contrast, annealed powders and hot isostatic press (HIP) consolidated alloys show high temperature heat treatments shift the Y and Ti to more oxidized states that are consistent with combinations of Y2Ti2O7 and, especially, TiO. The second section describes corrosion studies of Pb with 316L stainless steel, molybdenum and spinet (MgAl2O4) at high temperature by XAS. The corrosion of fuel cladding and structural materials by liquid lead at elevated temperatures is an issue that must be considered when designing advanced nuclear systems and high-power spallation neutron targets. The results of ex-situ studies show that a Mo substrate retained a smooth and less corroded surface than 316L stainless steel sample at elevated temperature. In

  2. Spacetime Causal Structure and Dimension from Horismotic Relation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. C. Stoica

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A reflexive relation on a set can be a starting point in defining the causal structure of a spacetime in General Relativity and other relativistic theories of gravity. If we identify this relation as the relation between lightlike separated events (the horismos relation, we can construct in a natural way the entire causal structure: causal and chronological relations, causal curves, and a topology. By imposing a simple additional condition, the structure gains a definite number of dimensions. This construction works with both continuous and discrete spacetimes. The dimensionality is obtained also in the discrete case, so this approach can be suited to prove the fundamental conjecture of causal sets. Other simple conditions lead to a differentiable manifold with a conformal structure (the metric up to a scaling factor as in Lorentzian manifolds. This structure provides a simple and general reconstruction of the spacetime in relativistic theories of gravity, which normally requires topological structure, differential structure, and geometric structure (which decomposes in the conformal structure, giving the causal relations and the volume element. Motivations for such a reconstruction come from relativistic theories of gravity, where the conformal structure is important, from the problem of singularities, and from Quantum Gravity, where various discretization methods are pursued, particularly in the causal sets approach.

  3. Structure, Dynamics, and Assembly of Filamentous Bacteriophages by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opella, Stanley J.; Zeri, Ana Carolina; Park, Sang Ho

    2008-05-01

    Filamentous bacteriophages serve as model systems for the development and implementation of spectroscopic methods suitable for biological supramolecular assemblies. Not only are their coat proteins small and readily prepared in the laboratory, but they also have two primary roles as membrane proteins and as the principal structural element of the virus particles. As a bacterial system, they are readily labeled with stable isotopes, and this has opened possibilities for the many nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies described in this review. In particular, solid-state NMR of aligned samples has been used to determine the three-dimensional structures of both the membrane-bound forms of coat proteins in phospholipid bilayers and structural forms in virus particles, which has led to an analysis of the assembly mechanism for virus particles as they are extruded through the cell membrane.

  4. Continued stabilization of the nuclear higher-order structure of post-mitotic neurons in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janeth Alva-Medina

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cellular terminal differentiation (TD correlates with a permanent exit from the cell cycle and so TD cells become stably post-mitotic. However, TD cells express the molecular machinery necessary for cell proliferation that can be reactivated by experimental manipulation, yet it has not been reported the stable proliferation of any type of reactivated TD cells. Neurons become post-mitotic after leaving the ventricular zone. When neurons are forced to reenter the cell cycle they invariably undergo cell death. Wider evidence indicates that the post-mitotic state cannot solely depend on gene products acting in trans, otherwise mutations in the corresponding genes may lead to reentry and completion of the cell cycle in TD cells, but this has not been observed. In the interphase, nuclear DNA of metazoan cells is organized in supercoiled loops anchored to a nuclear nuclear matrix (NM. The DNA-NM interactions define a higher-order structure in the cell nucleus (NHOS. We have previously compared the NHOS of aged rat hepatocytes with that of early post-mitotic rat neurons and our results indicated that a very stable NHOS is a common feature of both senescent and post-mitotic cells in vivo. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present work we compared the NHOS in rat neurons from different post-natal ages. Our results show that the trend towards further stabilization of the NHOS in neurons continues throughout post-natal life. This phenomenon occurs in absence of overt changes in the post-mitotic state and transcriptional activity of neurons, suggesting that it is independent of functional constraints. CONCLUSIONS: Apparently the continued stabilization of the NHOS as a function of time is basically determined by thermodynamic and structural constraints. We discuss how the resulting highly stable NHOS of neurons may be the structural, non-genetic basis of their permanent and irreversible post-mitotic state.

  5. Continued Stabilization of the Nuclear Higher-Order Structure of Post-Mitotic Neurons In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alva-Medina, Janeth; Maya-Mendoza, Apolinar; Dent, Myrna A. R.; Aranda-Anzaldo, Armando

    2011-01-01

    Background Cellular terminal differentiation (TD) correlates with a permanent exit from the cell cycle and so TD cells become stably post-mitotic. However, TD cells express the molecular machinery necessary for cell proliferation that can be reactivated by experimental manipulation, yet it has not been reported the stable proliferation of any type of reactivated TD cells. Neurons become post-mitotic after leaving the ventricular zone. When neurons are forced to reenter the cell cycle they invariably undergo cell death. Wider evidence indicates that the post-mitotic state cannot solely depend on gene products acting in trans, otherwise mutations in the corresponding genes may lead to reentry and completion of the cell cycle in TD cells, but this has not been observed. In the interphase, nuclear DNA of metazoan cells is organized in supercoiled loops anchored to a nuclear nuclear matrix (NM). The DNA-NM interactions define a higher-order structure in the cell nucleus (NHOS). We have previously compared the NHOS of aged rat hepatocytes with that of early post-mitotic rat neurons and our results indicated that a very stable NHOS is a common feature of both senescent and post-mitotic cells in vivo. Principal Findings In the present work we compared the NHOS in rat neurons from different post-natal ages. Our results show that the trend towards further stabilization of the NHOS in neurons continues throughout post-natal life. This phenomenon occurs in absence of overt changes in the post-mitotic state and transcriptional activity of neurons, suggesting that it is independent of functional constraints. Conclusions Apparently the continued stabilization of the NHOS as a function of time is basically determined by thermodynamic and structural constraints. We discuss how the resulting highly stable NHOS of neurons may be the structural, non-genetic basis of their permanent and irreversible post-mitotic state. PMID:21731716

  6. Loss of function of the retinoid-related nuclear receptor (RORB) gene and epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudolf, Gabrielle; Lesca, Gaetan; Mehrjouy, Mana M

    2016-01-01

    nuclear receptor (RORβ), in four affected family members. In addition, two de novo variants (c.218T>C/p.(Leu73Pro); c.1249_1251delACG/p.(Thr417del)) were identified in sporadic patients by trio-based exome sequencing. We also found two de novo deletions in patients with behavioral and cognitive impairment...... in various types of epilepsies in the past few years. In the present study, we performed whole-exome sequencing in a family with GGE consistent with the diagnosis of eyelid myoclonia with absences. We found a nonsense variant (c.196C>T/p.(Arg66*)) in RORB, which encodes the beta retinoid-related orphan...

  7. Structural materials for Gen-IV nuclear reactors: Challenges and opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murty, K. L.; Charit, I.

    2008-12-01

    Generation-IV reactor design concepts envisioned thus far cater toward a common goal of providing safer, longer lasting, proliferation-resistant and economically viable nuclear power plants. The foremost consideration in the successful development and deployment of Gen-IV reactor systems is the performance and reliability issues involving structural materials for both in-core and out-of-core applications. The structural materials need to endure much higher temperatures, higher neutron doses and extremely corrosive environment, which are beyond the experience of the current nuclear power plants. Materials under active consideration for use in different reactor components include various ferritic/martensitic steels, austenitic stainless steels, nickel-base superalloys, ceramics, composites, etc. This paper presents a summary of various Gen-IV reactor concepts, with emphasis on the structural materials issues depending on the specific application areas. This paper also discusses the challenges involved in using the existing materials under both service and off-normal conditions. Tasks become increasingly complex due to the operation of various fundamental phenomena like radiation-induced segregation, radiation-enhanced diffusion, precipitation, interactions between impurity elements and radiation-produced defects, swelling, helium generation and so forth. Further, high temperature capability (e.g. creep properties) of these materials is a critical, performance-limiting factor. It is demonstrated that novel alloy and microstructural design approaches coupled with new materials processing and fabrication techniques may mitigate the challenges, and the optimum system performance may be achieved under much demanding conditions.

  8. Nuclear uncertainties in the spin-dependent structure functions for direct dark matter detection

    CERN Document Server

    Cerdeno, David G; Huh, Ji-Haeng; Peiro, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    We study the effect that uncertainties in the nuclear spin-dependent structure functions have in the determination of the dark matter (DM) parameters in a direct detection experiment. We show that different nuclear models that describe the spin-dependent structure function of specific target nuclei can lead to variations in the reconstructed values of the DM mass and scattering cross-section. We propose a parametrization of the spin structure functions that allows us to treat these uncertainties as variations of three parameters, with a central value and deviation that depend on the specific nucleus. The method is illustrated for germanium and xenon detectors with an exposure of 300 kg yr, assuming a hypothetical detection of DM and studying a series of benchmark points for the DM properties. We find that the effect of these uncertainties can be similar in amplitude to that of astrophysical uncertainties, especially in those cases where the spin-dependent contribution to the elastic scattering cross-section i...

  9. Structural integrity analysis of the degraded drywell containment at the Oyster Creek Nuclear generating station.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petti, Jason P.

    2007-01-01

    This study examines the effects of the degradation experienced in the steel drywell containment at the Oyster Creek Nuclear Generating Station. Specifically, the structural integrity of the containment shell is examined in terms of the stress limits using the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel (B&PV) Code, Section III, Division I, Subsection NE, and examined in terms of buckling (stability) using the ASME B&PV Code Case N-284. Degradation of the steel containment shell (drywell) at Oyster Creek was first observed during an outage in the mid-1980s. Subsequent inspections discovered reductions in the shell thickness due to corrosion throughout the containment. Specifically, significant corrosion occurred in the sandbed region of the lower sphere. Since the presence of the wet sand provided an environment which supported corrosion, a series of analyses were conducted by GE Nuclear Energy in the early 1990s. These analyses examined the effects of the degradation on the structural integrity. The current study adopts many of the same assumptions and data used in the previous GE study. However, the additional computational recourses available today enable the construction of a larger and more sophisticated structural model.

  10. Design criteria development for the structural stability of nuclear waste repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, C. H. [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Yu, T. S. [Daewoo Engineering Company, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of); Ko, H. M. [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    1990-11-15

    The objective of the present project is to develop design criteria for the structural stability of rock cavity for the underground repository are defined, according to which detailed descriptions for design methodologies, design stages and stability analysis of the cavity are made. The proposed criteria can be used as a guide for the preparation of design codes which are to be established as the site condition and technical emplacement procedure are fixed. The present report first reviews basic safety requirements and criteria of the underground disposal of nuclear wastes for the establishment of design concepts and stability analysis of the rock cavity. Important factors for the design are also described by considering characteristics of the wastes and underground facilities. The present project has investigated technical aspects on the design of underground structures based on the currently established underground construction technologies, and presented a proposal for design criteria for the structural stability of the nuclear waste repository. The proposed criteria consist of general provisions, geological exploration, rock classification, design process and methods, supporting system, analyses and instrumentation.

  11. Unified description of structure and reactions: implementing the nuclear field theory program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broglia, R. A.; Bortignon, P. F.; Barranco, F.; Vigezzi, E.; Idini, A.; Potel, G.

    2016-06-01

    The modern theory of the atomic nucleus results from the merging of the liquid drop model of Niels Bohr and Fritz Kalckar, and of the shell model of Marie Goeppert Meyer and Hans Jensen. The first model contributed the concepts of collective excitations. The second, those of independent-particle motion. The unification of these apparently contradictory views in terms of the particle-vibration and particle-rotation couplings carried out by Aage Bohr and Ben Mottelson has allowed for an ever more complete, accurate and detailed description of nuclear structure. Nuclear field theory (NFT), developed by the Copenhagen-Buenos Aires collaboration, provided a powerful quantal embodiment of this unification. Reactions are not only at the basis of quantum mechanics (statistical interpretation, Max Born), but also the specific tools to probe the atomic nucleus. It is then natural that NFT is being extended to deal with processes which involve the continuum in an intrinsic fashion, so as to be able to treat them on an equal footing with those associated with bound states (structure). As a result, spectroscopic studies of transfer to continuum states could eventually make use of the NFT rules, properly extended to take care of recoil effects. In the present contribution we review the implementation of the NFT program of structure and reactions, setting special emphasis on open problems and outstanding predictions.

  12. CHANGE IN DEFORMATION PROPERTIES MODELING OF CONCRETE IN PROTECTIVE STRUCTURES OF NUCLEAR REACTOR BY IONIZING RADIATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. K. Agakhanov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The necessity of studying the effect impact of elementary particles impact on the strength and deformation materials properties used in protective constructions nuclear reactors and reactor technology has been stipulated. A nuclear reactor pressure vessel from prestressed concrete, combining the functions of biological protection is to be considered. The neutron flux problem distribution in the pressure vessel of a nuclear reactor has been solved. The solution is made in axisymmetric with the finite element method using a flat triangular finite element. Computing has been conducted in Matlab package. The comparison with the results has been obtained using the finite difference method, as well as the graphs of changes under the influence of radiation exposure and the elastic modulus of concrete radiation deformations have been constructed. The proposed method allows to simulate changes in the deformation properties of concrete under the influence of neutron irradiation. Results of the study can be used in the calculation of stress-strain state of structures, taking into account indirect heterogeneity caused by the physical fields influence.

  13. Population structure of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA variation among humpback whales in the North Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, C S; Medrano-Gonzalez, L; Calambokidis, J; Perry, A; Pichler, F; Rosenbaum, H; Straley, J M; Urban-Ramirez, J; Yamaguchi, M; von Ziegesar, O

    1998-06-01

    The population structure of variation in a nuclear actin intron and the control region of mitochondrial DNA is described for humpback whales from eight regions in the North Pacific Ocean: central California, Baja Peninsula, nearshore Mexico (Bahia Banderas), offshore Mexico (Socorro Island), southeastern Alaska, central Alaska (Prince Williams Sound), Hawaii and Japan (Ogasawara Islands). Primary mtDNA haplotypes and intron alleles were identified using selected restriction fragment length polymorphisms of target sequences amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR-RFLP). There was little evidence of heterogeneity in the frequencies of mtDNA haplotypes or actin intron alleles due to the year or sex composition of the sample. However, frequencies of four mtDNA haplotypes showed marked regional differences in their distributions (phi ST = 0.277; P feeding grounds were selected for additional analyses of nuclear differentiation using allelic variation at four microsatellite loci. All four loci showed significant differences in allele frequencies (overall FST = 0.043; P feeding grounds were not panmictic for nuclear or mitochondrial loci, estimates of long-term migration rates suggested that male-mediated gene flow was several-fold greater than female gene flow. These results include and extend the range and sample size of previously published work, providing additional evidence for the significance of genetic management units within oceanic populations of humpback whales.

  14. Terracentric Nuclear Fission Reactor: Background, Basis, Feasibility, Structure, Evidence, and Geophysical Implications

    CERN Document Server

    Herndon, J Marvin

    2013-01-01

    The background, basis, feasibility, structure, evidence, and geophysical implications of a naturally occurring Terracentric nuclear fission georeactor are reviewed. For a nuclear fission reactor to exist at the center of the Earth, all of the following conditions must be met: (1) There must originally have been a substantial quantity of uranium within Earth's core; (2) There must be a natural mechanism for concentrating the uranium; (3) The isotopic composition of the uranium at the onset of fission must be appropriate to sustain a nuclear fission chain reaction; (4) The reactor must be able to breed a sufficient quantity of fissile nuclides to permit operation over the lifetime of Earth to the present; (5) There must be a natural mechanism for the removal of fission products; (6) There must be a natural mechanism for removing heat from the reactor; (7) There must be a natural mechanism to regulate reactor power level, and; (8) The location of the reactor or must be such as to provide containment and prevent ...

  15. Structural and isospin effects on balance energy and transition energy via different nuclear charge radii parameterizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangeeta; Kaur, Varinderjit

    2017-10-01

    The structural and isospin effects have been studied through isospin dependent and independent nuclear charge radii parameterizations on the collective flow within the framework of Isospin-dependent Quantum Molecular Dynamics (IQMD) model. The calculations have been carried out by using two approaches: (i) for the reaction series having fixed N / Z ratio and (ii) for the isobaric reaction series with different N / Z ratio. Our results indicate that there is a considerable effect of radii parameterizations on the excitation function of reduced flow (∂v1/∂Yred) and elliptical flow (v2). Both balance energy (Ebal) and transition energy (Etrans) are enhanced with increase in radii of reacting nuclei and found to follow a power law with nuclear charge radii. The exponent τ values show that the elliptical flow is more sensitive towards different nuclear charge radii as compared to reduced flow. Moreover, we observe that our theoretical calculation of Ebal and Etrans are in agreement with the experimental data provided by GSI, INDRA and FOPI collaborations.

  16. Damage to structures by pyroclastic flows and surges, inferred from nuclear weapons effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Greg A.

    1998-12-01

    In order to define the risk from explosive eruptions, one must constrain both the probability of explosive events and the effects, or consequences, of those events. This paper focuses on the effects of pyroclastic flows and surges (here termed `pyroclastic density currents', or PDCs) on buildings, infrastructure elements, and to some extent on vehicles. PDCs impart a lateral force to such structures in the form of dynamic pressure, which depends on the bulk density of the PDC (which in turn depends mainly on particle concentration) and its velocity. For reasonable ranges of particle concentration (10 -3 to 0.5) and velocities (10 to 300 m/s), dynamic pressure on the upstream face of a structure ranges from ˜0.1 kPa to 10 4 kPa. Lateral loads ranging up to about 100 kPa were produced during nuclear weapons tests in the 1940s and 1950s that were designed to study the effects of such loading on a variety of structures for civil defense and emergency response purposes in the event of nuclear war. Although considerable simplifications are involved, the data from these weapon tests provide useful analog information for understanding the effects of PDCs. I reviewed data from the nuclear tests, describing the expected damage from different loadings. Tables are provided that define the response of different structural elements (e.g., windows, framing, walls) and whole structures to loading in probabilistic terms, which in principle account for variations in construction quality, orientation, and other factors. Finally, damage documented from historical eruptions at Mt. Lamington (1951), Herculaneum (AD 79 Vesuvius eruption), and St. Pierre (1902 Mt. Pelee eruption) is reviewed. Damage patterns, combined with estimates of velocity, provide an independent estimate of particle concentration in the PDCs. Details of structural damage should be recorded and mapped around future eruptions in order to help refine this aspect of consequence analysis. Another fruitful approach would

  17. Structural Health Monitoring of Piping in Nuclear Power Plants - A Review of Efficiency of Existing Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stepinski, Tadeusz [Uppsala Univ., Uppsala (Sweden)

    2011-05-15

    In the first part of the report, we review various efforts that have been recently performed in the USA in the field of reactor health monitoring. They were carried out by different organizations and they addressed different issues related to the safety of nuclear reactors. Among other aspects, we present technical issues related to the design of a self-diagnostic monitoring system for the next generation of nuclear reactors. We also give a brief review of the international experience of such systems in today's reactors. In the second part of the report we focus on long range ultrasonic techniques that can be used for monitoring piping in nuclear reactors. Common strategy used in the Swedish nuclear plants is leak before break (LBB), which relies on monitoring leaks from the pipelines as indications of possible pipe break. Significant parts of piping systems are partly or entirely inaccessible for the NDE inspectors, which complicates the use of proactive strategies. One solution to the problem could be implementing monitoring systems capable of monitoring pipelines over a long range. The method, which has shown much promise in such applications is the UT based on guided waves (GW) referred to as long range ultrasound testing (LRUT). In the report we give a brief review of the GW theory followed by the presentation the commercial GW instruments and transducers designed for the LRUT of piping. We also present examples of the baseline based systems using permanently installed transducers. In the final part we report capacity tests of the LRUT instruments performed in collaboration with two different manufactures.

  18. Local fallout from nuclear test detonations. Volume 2. Compilation of fallout patterns and related test data. Supplement. Foreign nuclear tests. Sanitized

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgenthau, M.; Showers, R.L.

    1964-10-01

    The available fallout patterns and related test data for nuclear weapon tests conducted by the United Kingdom, the Republic of France, and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, are included in this supplement to NDL-TR-34. The related test data for the British and French tests include: date and time of detonation, location of test site, total yield, fission yield, type of burst and placement, height of burst, cloud-top and -bottom heights, crater data, and wind information up to nuclear cloud-top height. No fallout patterns are available for any of the Soviet detonations. The list of Soviet detonations, which is as comprehensive as possible, contains the chronological order of the detonations, date, yield, type of burst and location of test site.

  19. Brazilian nuclear politics in the context of contemporary international relations; A politica nuclear brasileira no contexto das relacoes internacionais contemporaneas. Dominio tecnologico como estrategia de insercao internacional

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpes, Mariana Montez

    2006-09-15

    The present dissertation analyses the retaking of the debate over Brazilian nuclear Program's recovery by Luis Inacio Lula da Silva government, based on the defense of the utilization of an already acquired technology of its own to enrich uranium. In spite of the intrinsic duality on this subject and having in mind the pacific ends concerning the utilization of such technology by Brazil, the hypothesis sustained in this work is that the Program's defense is considered a strategy of sovereign international insertion with relative autonomy and an instrument of national valorization against other powers. In order to verify the hypothesis outlined above, we will analyse the actual government, comparing it to, two other moments in Brazilian History in which the nuclear issue also acquired preponderance on the national agenda, namely, Geisel and Sarney governments. Although these three moments differ in relation to their internal political regime, our goal is to identify their similarities. (author)

  20. Nuclear structure constrains on resonant energies: A solution of the cosmological {sup 7}Li problem?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Civitarese, O., E-mail: osvaldo.civitarese@fisica.unlp.edu.ar [Department of Physics, University of La Plata c.c. 67, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Mosquera, M.E., E-mail: mmosquera@fcaglp.unlp.edu.ar [Department of Physics, University of La Plata c.c. 67, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Facultad de Ciencias Astronómicas y Geofísicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Paseo del Bosque, 1900 La Plata (Argentina)

    2013-01-17

    In this work, we study the cosmological {sup 7}Li problem from a nuclear structure point of view, by including resonances in the reactions which populate beryllium. The calculation of primordial abundances is performed by solving the balance equations semi-analytically. It is found that the primordial abundance of lithium is indeed reduced, as a consequence of the presence of resonant channels in the relevant cross sections. We set limits on the resonant energy for each reaction relevant for the chain leading to {sup 7}Li, by performing a statistical analysis of the available observational data.

  1. Molecular Structure Laboratory. Fourier Transform Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (FTNMR) Spectrometer and Ancillary Instrumentation at SUNY Geneseo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geiger, David K [State Univ. of New York (SUNY), Geneseo, NY (United States)

    2015-12-31

    An Agilent 400-MR nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer and ancillary equipment were purchased, which are being used for molecular structure elucidation.  The instrumentation is housed in a pre-existing facility designed specifically for its use. This instrument package is being used to expand the research and educational efforts of the faculty and students at SUNY-Geneseo and is made available to neighboring educational institutions and business concerns.  Funds were also used for training of College personnel, maintenance of the instrumentation, and installation of the equipment.

  2. Structure of Hamiltonian Matrix and the Shape of Eigenfunctions: Nuclear Octupole Deformation Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XING Yong-Zhong; LI Jun-Qing; LIU Fang; ZUO Wei

    2002-01-01

    The structure of a Hamiltonian matrix for a quantum chaotic system, the nuclear octupole deformationmodel, has been discussed in detail. The distribution of the eigenfunctions of this system expanded by the eigenstates ofa quantum integrable system is studied with the help ofgeneralized Brillouin-Wigner pcrturbation theory. The resultsshow that a significant randomness in this distribution can be observed when its classical counterpart is under the strongchaotic condition. The averaged shape of the eigenfunctions fits with the Gaussian distribution only when the effects ofthe symmetry have been removed.

  3. Next-generation Nuclear Data Web Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonzogni, A. A.

    2005-07-01

    The National Nuclear Data Center collects, evaluates, and disseminates nuclear physics data for basic nuclear research and applied nuclear technologies. We have recently produced a nuclear data portal featuring modern and powerful servers, relational database software, Linux operating system, and Java programming language. The portal includes nuclear structure, decay and reaction data, as well as literature information. Data can be searched for using optimized query forms; results are presented in tables and interactive plots. Additionally, a number of nuclear science tools, codes, applications, and links are provided. A brief tutorial of the different databases and products will be provided.

  4. Axial compression behavior and partial composite action of SC walls in safety-related nuclear facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai

    Steel-plate reinforced concrete (SC) composite walls typically consist of thick concrete walls with two exterior steel faceplates. The concrete core is sandwiched between the two steel faceplates, and the faceplates are attached to the concrete core using shear connectors, for example, ASTM A108 steel headed shear studs. The shear connectors and the concrete infill enhance the stability of the steel faceplates, and the faceplates serve as permanent formwork for concrete placement. SC composite walls were first introduced in the 1980's in Japan for nuclear power plant (NPP) structures. They are used in the new generation of nuclear power plants (GIII+) and being considered for small modular reactors (SMR) due to their structural efficiency, economy, safety, and construction speed. Steel faceplates can potentially undergo local buckling at certain locations of NPP structures where compressive forces are significant. The steel faceplates are usually thin (0.25 to 1.50 inches in Customary units, or 6.5 to 38 mm in SI units) to maintain economical and constructional efficiency, the geometric imperfections and locked-in stresses induced during construction make them more vulnerable to local buckling. Accidental thermal loading may also reduce the compressive strength and exacerbate the local buckling potential of SC composite walls. This dissertation presents the results from experimental and numerical investigations of the compressive behavior of SC composite walls at ambient and elevated temperatures. The results are used to establish a slenderness limit to prevent local buckling before yielding of the steel faceplates and to develop a design approach for calculating the compressive strength of SC composite walls with non-slender and slender steel faceplates at ambient and elevated temperatures. Composite action in SC walls is achieved by the embedment of shear connectors into the concrete core. The strength and stiffness of shear connectors govern the level of

  5. Energetic electron processes fluorescence effects for structured nanoparticles X-ray analysis and nuclear medicine applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taborda, A.; Desbrée, A. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), PRP-HOM/SDI/LEDI, BP-17, 31, Avenue de la Division Leclerc, 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Carvalho, A. [IEQUALTECS, Lda, Rua Dr. Francisco Sá Carneiro, 36, 2500-065 S. Gregório CLD (Portugal); Chaves, P.C. [C" 2TN, Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, EN10 km 139.7, 2685-066 Bobadela LRS (Portugal); Reis, M.A., E-mail: mareis@ctn.tecnico.ulisboa.pt [IEQUALTECS, Lda, Rua Dr. Francisco Sá Carneiro, 36, 2500-065 S. Gregório CLD (Portugal); C" 2TN, Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, EN10 km 139.7, 2685-066 Bobadela LRS (Portugal)

    2016-08-15

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles are widely used as contrast agents for nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and can be modified for improved imaging or to become tissue-specific or even protein-specific. The knowledge of their detailed elemental composition characterisation and potential use in nuclear medicine applications, is, therefore, an important issue. X-ray fluorescence techniques such as particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) or X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF), can be used for elemental characterisation even in problematic situations where very little sample volume is available. Still, the fluorescence coefficient of Fe is such that, during the decay of the inner-shell ionised atomic structure, keV Auger electrons are produced in excess to X-rays. Since cross-sections for ionisation induced by keV electrons, for low atomic number atoms, are of the order of 10{sup 3} barn, care should be taken to account for possible fluorescence effects caused by Auger electrons, which may lead to the wrong quantification of elements having atomic number lower than the atomic number of Fe. Furthermore, the same electron processes will occur in iron oxide nanoparticles containing {sup 57}Co, which may be used for nuclear medicine therapy purposes. In the present work, simple approximation algorithms are proposed for the quantitative description of radiative and non-radiative processes associated with Auger electrons cascades. The effects on analytical processes and nuclear medicine applications are quantified for the case of iron oxide nanoparticles, by calculating both electron fluorescence emissions and energy deposition on cell tissues where the nanoparticles may be embedded.

  6. NUSTART: A PC code for NUclear STructure And Radiative Transition analysis and supplementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, G.L.; Gardner, D.G.; Gardner, M.A.

    1990-10-01

    NUSTART is a computer program for the IBM PC/At. It is designed for use with the nuclear reaction cross-section code STAPLUS, which is a STAPRE-based CRAY computer code that is being developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The NUSTART code was developed to handle large sets of discrete nuclear levels and the multipole transitions among these levels; it operates in three modes. The Data File Error Analysis mode analyzes an existing STAPLUS input file containing the levels and their multipole transition branches for a number of physics and/or typographical errors. The Interactive Data File Generation mode allows the user to create input files of discrete levels and their branching fractions in the format required by STAPLUS, even though the user enters the information in the (different) format used by many people in the nuclear structure field. In the Branching Fractions Calculations mode, the discrete nuclear level set is read, and the multipole transitions among the levels are computed under one of two possible assumptions: (1) the levels have no collective character, or (2) the levels are all rotational band heads. Only E1, M1, and E2 transitions are considered, and the respective strength functions may be constants or, in the case of E1 transitions, the strength function may be energy dependent. The first option is used for nuclei closed shells; the bandhead option may be used to vary the E1, M1, and E2 strengths for interband transitions. K-quantum number selection rules may be invoked if desired. 19 refs.

  7. Energetic electron processes fluorescence effects for structured nanoparticles X-ray analysis and nuclear medicine applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taborda, A.; Desbrée, A.; Carvalho, A.; Chaves, P. C.; Reis, M. A.

    2016-08-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles are widely used as contrast agents for nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and can be modified for improved imaging or to become tissue-specific or even protein-specific. The knowledge of their detailed elemental composition characterisation and potential use in nuclear medicine applications, is, therefore, an important issue. X-ray fluorescence techniques such as particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) or X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF), can be used for elemental characterisation even in problematic situations where very little sample volume is available. Still, the fluorescence coefficient of Fe is such that, during the decay of the inner-shell ionised atomic structure, keV Auger electrons are produced in excess to X-rays. Since cross-sections for ionisation induced by keV electrons, for low atomic number atoms, are of the order of 103 barn, care should be taken to account for possible fluorescence effects caused by Auger electrons, which may lead to the wrong quantification of elements having atomic number lower than the atomic number of Fe. Furthermore, the same electron processes will occur in iron oxide nanoparticles containing 57Co, which may be used for nuclear medicine therapy purposes. In the present work, simple approximation algorithms are proposed for the quantitative description of radiative and non-radiative processes associated with Auger electrons cascades. The effects on analytical processes and nuclear medicine applications are quantified for the case of iron oxide nanoparticles, by calculating both electron fluorescence emissions and energy deposition on cell tissues where the nanoparticles may be embedded.

  8. The Nuclear Symmetry Energy and the Mass-Radius Relation of Neutron Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattimer, James

    2017-01-01

    The assumptions that i) neutron stars have hadronic crusts, ii) the equation of state is causal, iii) GR is the correct theory of gravity, and iv) their largest observed mass is 2 solar masses, when coupled with recent results from nuclear experiment and theoretical studies of neutron matter, generate powerful constraints on their structure. These include restriction of the radii of typical neutron stars to the range 11-13 km, as well as significant correlations among their masses, compactnesses, moments of inertia, binding energies, and tidal deformabilities. In addition, properties of quark matter, including the location and magnitude of the quark-hadron phase transition, can also be limited. The implications of recent and forthcoming experiments, such as those pertaining to the neutron skin thickness and astrophysical measurements of various structural properties is discussed. For the latter, emphasis is placed on pulsar timing, X-ray observations, supernova neutrino detections, and gravitational waves from mergers involving neutron stars. Supported in part by the US DOE grant DE-AC02-87ER40317.

  9. A highly organized structure mediating nuclear localization of a Myb2 transcription factor in the protozoan parasite Trichomonas vaginalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Chien-Hsin; Chang, Lung-Chun; Hsu, Hong-Ming; Wei, Shu-Yi; Liu, Hsing-Wei; Lee, Yu; Kuo, Chung-Chi; Indra, Dharmu; Chen, Chinpan; Ong, Shiou-Jeng; Tai, Jung-Hsiang

    2011-12-01

    Nuclear proteins usually contain specific peptide sequences, referred to as nuclear localization signals (NLSs), for nuclear import. These signals remain unexplored in the protozoan pathogen, Trichomonas vaginalis. The nuclear import of a Myb2 transcription factor was studied here using immunodetection of a hemagglutinin-tagged Myb2 overexpressed in the parasite. The tagged Myb2 was localized to the nucleus as punctate signals. With mutations of its polybasic sequences, 48KKQK51 and 61KR62, Myb2 was localized to the nucleus, but the signal was diffusive. When fused to a C-terminal non-nuclear protein, the Myb2 sequence spanning amino acid (aa) residues 48 to 143, which is embedded within the R2R3 DNA-binding domain (aa 40 to 156), was essential and sufficient for efficient nuclear import of a bacterial tetracycline repressor (TetR), and yet the transport efficiency was reduced with an additional fusion of a firefly luciferase to TetR, while classical NLSs from the simian virus 40 T-antigen had no function in this assay system. Myb2 nuclear import and DNA-binding activity were substantially perturbed with mutation of a conserved isoleucine (I74) in helix 2 to proline that altered secondary structure and ternary folding of the R2R3 domain. Disruption of DNA-binding activity alone by point mutation of a lysine residue, K51, preceding the structural domain had little effect on Myb2 nuclear localization, suggesting that nuclear translocation of Myb2, which requires an ordered structural domain, is independent of its DNA binding activity. These findings provide useful information for testing whether myriad Mybs in the parasite use a common module to regulate nuclear import.

  10. Global assemblages and structural models of International Relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corry, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    Rather than consigning assemblages to the micro-politics of international relations, the chapter argues that assemblages can also be seen to play a role in the ‘grand’ structures of international relations. Structural IR theory normally only considers how subjects are ordered – hierarchically......, anarchically, in core-periphery relations or in terms of networks. However, not only subjects but also assemblages – the bringing together of previously unconnected elements into novel constellations – play a critical role in structuring international relations. More specifically, one sub......-category of assemblages – those constructed as malleable and governable which I call ‘governance-objects’ – is central to structure in international relations. The chapter begins with standard definitions of what structures are – patterns of interaction between elements – and briefly covers the range of models currently...

  11. Resonance-inclined optical nuclear spin polarization of liquids in diamond structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Q.; Schwarz, I.; Jelezko, F.; Retzker, A.; Plenio, M. B.

    2016-02-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of molecules in a solution at room temperature has the potential to revolutionize nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging. The prevalent methods for achieving DNP in solutions are typically most effective in the regime of small interaction correlation times between the electron and nuclear spins, limiting the size of accessible molecules. To solve this limitation, we design a mechanism for DNP in the liquid phase that is applicable for large interaction correlation times. Importantly, while this mechanism makes use of a resonance condition similar to solid-state DNP, the polarization transfer is robust to a relatively large detuning from the resonance due to molecular motion. We combine this scheme with optically polarized nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center spins in nanodiamonds to design a setup that employs optical pumping and is therefore not limited by room temperature electron thermal polarization. We illustrate numerically the effectiveness of the model in a flow cell containing nanodiamonds immobilized in a hydrogel, polarizing flowing water molecules 4700-fold above thermal polarization in a magnetic field of 0.35 T, in volumes detectable by current NMR scanners.

  12. Accurate relative location estimates for the North Korean nuclear tests using empirical slowness corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, S. J.; Pabian, F.; Näsholm, S. P.; Kværna, T.; Mykkeltveit, S.

    2017-01-01

    Declared North Korean nuclear tests in 2006, 2009, 2013 and 2016 were observed seismically at regional and teleseismic distances. Waveform similarity allows the events to be located relatively with far greater accuracy than the absolute locations can be determined from seismic data alone. There is now significant redundancy in the data given the large number of regional and teleseismic stations that have recorded multiple events, and relative location estimates can be confirmed independently by performing calculations on many mutually exclusive sets of measurements. Using a 1-D global velocity model, the distances between the events estimated using teleseismic P phases are found to be approximately 25 per cent shorter than the distances between events estimated using regional Pn phases. The 2009, 2013 and 2016 events all take place within 1 km of each other and the discrepancy between the regional and teleseismic relative location estimates is no more than about 150 m. The discrepancy is much more significant when estimating the location of the more distant 2006 event relative to the later explosions with regional and teleseismic estimates varying by many hundreds of metres. The relative location of the 2006 event is challenging given the smaller number of observing stations, the lower signal-to-noise ratio and significant waveform dissimilarity at some regional stations. The 2006 event is however highly significant in constraining the absolute locations in the terrain at the Punggye-ri test-site in relation to observed surface infrastructure. For each seismic arrival used to estimate the relative locations, we define a slowness scaling factor which multiplies the gradient of seismic traveltime versus distance, evaluated at the source, relative to the applied 1-D velocity model. A procedure for estimating correction terms which reduce the double-difference time residual vector norms is presented together with a discussion of the associated uncertainty. The modified

  13. Reduced stability and increased dynamics in the human proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA relative to the yeast homolog.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo De Biasio

    Full Text Available Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA is an essential factor for DNA replication and repair. PCNA forms a toroidal, ring shaped structure of 90 kDa by the symmetric association of three identical monomers. The ring encircles the DNA and acts as a platform where polymerases and other proteins dock to carry out different DNA metabolic processes. The amino acid sequence of human PCNA is 35% identical to the yeast homolog, and the two proteins have the same 3D crystal structure. In this report, we give evidence that the budding yeast (sc and human (h PCNAs have highly similar structures in solution but differ substantially in their stability and dynamics. hPCNA is less resistant to chemical and thermal denaturation and displays lower cooperativity of unfolding as compared to scPCNA. Solvent exchange rates measurements show that the slowest exchanging backbone amides are at the β-sheet, in the structure core, and not at the helices, which line the central channel. However, all the backbone amides of hPCNA exchange fast, becoming undetectable within hours, while the signals from the core amides of scPCNA persist for longer times. The high dynamics of the α-helices, which face the DNA in the PCNA-loaded form, is likely to have functional implications for the sliding of the PCNA ring on the DNA since a large hole with a flexible wall facilitates the establishment of protein-DNA interactions that are transient and easily broken. The increased dynamics of hPCNA relative to scPCNA may allow it to acquire multiple induced conformations upon binding to its substrates enlarging its binding diversity.

  14. Investigation of the performance based structural safety factor of elbow pipes in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sung Ho; Park, Chi Yong [Korea Electric Power Reserch Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jai Hak [Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-07-01

    The piping systems in nuclear power plant are composed of various typed pipes such as straight pipe, elbow, branch and reducer etc. The elbow is connected from straight pipe to another pipes in order to establish the complicated piping system. Elbow is one of very important components considering management of wall thinning degradation. It is however applied by various loads such as system pressure, earthquake, postulated break loading and many transient loads, which provoke simply the internal pressure, bending and torsional stress. In this study, firstly pipes in the secondary system of the nuclear power plant are investigated in view of the ratio of radius to thickness. Next, a large number of finite element analysis considering the all typed dimensions of commercial pipe has been performed to find out the behavior of TES(Twice Elastic Slope) plastic load of elbows, which is based on evaluation of the structural safety factor. Finally performance based structural safety factor was investigated comparing with maximum allowable load by construction code.

  15. The Nuclear Structure in Nearby Luminous Infrared Galaxies: HST NICMOS Imaging of the GOALS Sample

    CERN Document Server

    Haan, S; Armus, L; Evans, A S; Howell, J H; Mazzarella, J M; Kim, D C; Vavilkin, T; Inami, H; Sanders, D B; Petric, A; Bridge, C R; Melbourne, J L; Charmandaris, V; Diaz-Santos, T; Murphy, E J; U, V; Stierwalt, S; Marshall, J A

    2010-01-01

    We present results of Hubble Space Telescope NICMOS H-band imaging of 73 of most luminous (i.e., log[L_IR/L_0]>11.4) Infrared Galaxies (LIRGs) in the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS). This dataset combines multi-wavelength imaging and spectroscopic data from space (Spitzer, HST, GALEX, and Chandra) and ground-based telescopes. In this paper we use the high-resolution near-infrared data to recover nuclear structure that is obscured by dust at optical wavelengths and measure the evolution in this structure along the merger sequence. A large fraction of all galaxies in our sample possess double nuclei (~63%) or show evidence for triple nuclei (~6%). Half of these double nuclei are not visible in the HST B-band images due to dust obscuration. The majority of interacting LIRGs have remaining merger timescales of 0.3 to 1.3 Gyrs, based on the projected nuclear separations and the mass ratio of nuclei. We find that the bulge luminosity surface density increases significantly along the merger sequence ...

  16. Synthesis of the Novel MAX Phases for the Future Nuclear Fuel Cladding and Structural Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Seung Hyeok [Kyunghee Univ., Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Taehee; Lee, Taegyu; Ryu, H. J. [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    With these properties, the MAX phases are expected to be used for the Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) cladding and oxidation/corrosion resistance materials. Especially, the MAX phase can be used for the Gen-IV, SFR and HTGR, component materials which have to possess the thermal and corrosion resistance. The zirconium has been used to the nuclear industry for fuel cladding because of the small thermal neutron cross-section. Zr-based MAX phase was discovered by group Lapauw et al. They observed the Zr{sub 2}AlC and Zr{sub 3}AlC{sub 2} with the X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns and backscattered electron detector. Fabrication of the Zr-containing MAX phase was investigated for nuclear fuel cladding and structural materials applications. A MAX phase with the Zr{sub 3}AlC{sub 2} structure was synthesized by spark plasma sintering of a powder mixture targeting (Zr{sub 0.5}Cr{sub 0.5}){sub 4}AlC{sub 3}. The formation of MAX phases was confirmed by XRD and EDS of sintered samples. In the future work, the electron probe micro analyzer (EPMA) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) are required to certain analyze the elements composition and formation of the MAX phase.

  17. Earthquake engineering for nuclear facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Kuno, Michiya

    2017-01-01

    This book is a comprehensive compilation of earthquake- and tsunami-related technologies and knowledge for the design and construction of nuclear facilities. As such, it covers a wide range of fields including civil engineering, architecture, geotechnical engineering, mechanical engineering, and nuclear engineering, for the development of new technologies providing greater resistance against earthquakes and tsunamis. It is crucial both for students of nuclear energy courses and for young engineers in nuclear power generation industries to understand the basics and principles of earthquake- and tsunami-resistant design of nuclear facilities. In Part I, "Seismic Design of Nuclear Power Plants", the design of nuclear power plants to withstand earthquakes and tsunamis is explained, focusing on buildings, equipment's, and civil engineering structures. In Part II, "Basics of Earthquake Engineering", fundamental knowledge of earthquakes and tsunamis as well as the dynamic response of structures and foundation ground...

  18. Virtual ultrasound sources for inspecting nuclear components of coarse-grained structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brizuela, J. [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Katchadjian, P.; Desimone, C.; Garcia, A. [INEND-UAENDE, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2014-02-18

    This work describes an ultrasonic inspection procedure designed for verifying coarse-grained structure materials, which are commonly used on nuclear reactors. In this case, conventional phased array techniques cannot be used due to attenuating characteristics and backscattered noise from microstructures inside the material. Thus, synthetic aperture ultrasonic imaging (SAFT) is used for this approach in contact conditions. In order to increase energy transferred to the medium, synthetic transmit aperture is formed by several elements which generate a diverging wavefront equivalent to a virtual ultrasound source behind the transducer. On the other hand, the phase coherence technique has been applied to reduce more structural noise and improve the image quality. The beamforming process has been implemented over a GPU platform to reduce computing time.

  19. Structure and biochemical characterization of proliferating cellular nuclear antigen from a parasitic protozoon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardona-Felix, Cesar S.; Lara-Gonzalez, Samuel; Brieba, Luis G. (LNLS)

    2012-02-08

    Proliferating cellular nuclear antigen (PCNA) is a toroidal-shaped protein that is involved in cell-cycle control, DNA replication and DNA repair. Parasitic protozoa are early-diverged eukaryotes that are responsible for neglected diseases. In this work, a PCNA from a parasitic protozoon was identified, cloned and biochemically characterized and its crystal structure was determined. Structural and biochemical studies demonstrate that PCNA from Entamoeba histolytica assembles as a homotrimer that is able to interact with and stimulate the activity of a PCNA-interacting peptide-motif protein from E. histolytica, EhDNAligI. The data indicate a conservation of the biochemical mechanisms of PCNA-mediated interactions between metazoa, yeast and parasitic protozoa.

  20. Nuclear Structure Functions and Heavy Flavour Leptoproduction Off the Nucleus at Small x in Perturbative QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Armesto-Pérez, Nestor

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear structure functions and cross-sections for heavy flavour production in lepton-nucleus collisions are investigated in the low x region accessible now or in the near future. The scattering on a heavy nucleus is described by the sum of fan diagrams of BFKL pomerons, which is exact in the high-colour limit. The initial condition for the evolution at x=0.01 is taken from a saturation model, which reproduces the experimental data on the proton. The A dependence of the structure functions is well described by a power factor $A^\\alpha$, with $\\alpha$ reaching values as low as 1/2 at extremely low x. The total cross-sections for heavy flavour production reach values of the order of mb, and the corresponding transverse momentum distributions are sizeable up to transverse momenta larger than the initial large scale $\\sqrt{Q^2+4m_f^2}$.

  1. Analyses of nuclear proteins and nucleic acid structures using atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Jamie L; Yoshida, Aiko; Takahashi, Hirohide; Deguchi, Katashi; Kobori, Toshiro; Louvet, Emilie; Kumeta, Masahiro; Yoshimura, Shige H; Takeyasu, Kunio

    2015-01-01

    Since the inception of atomic force microscopy (AFM) in 1986, the value of this technology for exploring the structure and biophysical properties of a variety of biological samples has been increasingly recognized. AFM provides the opportunity to both image samples at nanometer resolution and also measure the forces on the surface of the sample. Here, we describe a variety of methods for studying nuclear samples including single nucleic acid molecules, higher-order chromatin structures, the nucleolus, and the nucleus. Protocols to prepare nucleic acids, nucleic acid-protein complexes, reconstituted chromatin, the cell nucleus, and the nucleolus are included, as well as protocols describing how to prepare the AFM substrate and the AFM tip. Finally, we describe how to perform conventional imaging, high-speed imaging, recognition imaging, force spectroscopy, and nanoindentation experiments.

  2. ODS Steel As A Structural Material For High Temperature Nuclear Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pouchon, M.A.; Doebeli, M.; Schelldorfer, R.; Chen, J.; Hoffelner, W.; Degueldre, C

    2005-03-01

    Oxide-dispersed-strengthened (ODS) ferritic-martensitic steels are examined as possible candidates for the structural materials to be used in the future generation of High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Nuclear Reactors, and as a replacement for alternative high-temperature materials for tubing and other structural components. ODS steels are also being considered as possible material for use in future fusion applications. Since the oxide particles serve as an interfacial pinning mechanism for moving dislocations, the creep resistance of the material is improved. However, in order to use such materials in a reactor, their behaviour under irradiation must be thoroughly examined. In this work, the effects induced by He implantation are investigated the induced swelling is measured, and the mechanical behaviour of the irradiated surface is analysed. These first tests are performed at room temperature, for which clear evidence of swelling and hardening could be observed. (author)

  3. Sternheimer free determination of the 47Ti nuclear quadrupole moment from hyperfine structure measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, R.; Stachowska, E.; Johann, U.; Dembczyński, J.; Unkel, P.; Ertmer, W.

    1990-12-01

    The hyperfine structure (hfs) of 12 metastable states of47Ti has been measured by laser induced fluorescence. 11 of these states have been measured additionally very precisely by a laser-rf double resonance method. Taking into account results of earlier hfs measurements, the hfs of altogether 17 fine structure states has been analyzed by the simultaneous parametrization of the one- and two-body interactions in the atomic hfs for the model space (3 d+4 s) N+2 ( N=2). This gives 16 parameters for the magnetic dipole interaction and 12 parameters for the electric quadrupole interaction. From the model space parameters, obtained from the hfs fit, the nuclear quadrupole moment Q(47Ti)=0.303(24b), has been evaluated at the first time; it is free of Sternheimer corrections up to second order.

  4. Nuclear structure with unitarily transformed two-body plus phenomenological three-body interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenther, Anneke

    2011-02-02

    The importance of three-nucleon forces for a variety of nuclear structure phenomena is apparent in various investigations. This thesis provides a first step towards the inclusion of realistic three-nucleon forces by studying simple phenomenological threebody interactions. The Unitary Correlation Operator Method (UCOM) and the Similarity Renormalization Group (SRG) provide two different approaches to derive soft phase-shift equivalent nucleon-nucleon (NN) interactions via unitary transformations. Although their motivations are quite different the NN interactions obtained with the two methods exhibit some similarities. The application of the UCOM- or SRG-transformed Argonne V18 potential in the Hartree-Fock (HF) approximation and including the second-order energy corrections emerging from many-body perturbation theory (MBPT) reveals that the systematics of experimental ground-state energies can be reproduced by some of the interactions considering a series of closed-shell nuclei across the whole nuclear chart. However, charge radii are systematically underestimated, especially for intermediate and heavy nuclei. This discrepancy to experimental data is expected to result from neglected three-nucleon interactions. As first ansatz for a three-nucleon force, we consider a finite-range three-body interaction of Gaussian shape. Its influence on ground-state energies and charge radii is discussed in detail on the basis of HF plus MBPT calculations and shows a significant improvement in the description of experimental data. As the handling of the Gaussian three-body interaction is time-extensive, we show that it can be replaced by a regularized three-body contact interaction exhibiting a very similar behavior. An extensive study characterizes its properties in detail and confirms the improvements with respect to nuclear properties. To take into account information of an exact numerical solution of the nuclear eigenvalue problem, the No-Core Shell Model is applied to

  5. Structural insights into SUN-KASH complexes across the nuclear envelope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenjia Wang; Zhaocai Zhou; Zhubing Shi; Shi Jiao; Cuicui Chen; Huizhen Wang; Guoguang Liu; Qiang Wang; Yun Zhao; Mark I Greene

    2012-01-01

    Linker of the nucleoskeleton and the cytoskeleton (LINC) complexes are composed of SUN and KASH domaincontaining proteins and bridge the inner and outer membranes of the nuclear envelope.LINC complexes play critical roles in nuclear positioning,cell polarization and cellular stiffness.Previously,we reported the homotrimeric structure of human SUN2.We have now determined the crystal structure of the human SUN2-KASH complex.In the complex structure,the SUN domain homotrimer binds to three independent "hook"-like KASH peptides.The overall conformation of the SUN domain in the complex closely resembles the SUN domain in its apo state.A major conformational change involves the AA'-loop of KASH-bound SUN domain,which rearranges to form a mini β-sheet that interacts with the KASH peptide.The PPPT motif of the KASH domain fits tightly into a hydrophobic pocket on the homotrimeric interface of the SUN domain,which we termed the BI-pocket.Moreover,two adjacent protomers of the SUN domain homotrimer sandwich the KASH domain by hydrophobic interaction and hydrogen bonding.Mutations of these binding sites disrupt or reduce the association between the SUN and KASH domains in vitro.In addition,transfection of wild-type,but not mutant,SUN2 promotes cell migration in Ovcar-3 cells.These results provide a structural model of the LINC complex,which is essential for additional study of the physical and functional coupling between the cytoplasm and the nucleoplasm.

  6. Potentiality of Using Vertical and Three-Dimensional Isolation Systems in Nuclear Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiguang Zhou

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Although the horizontal component of an earthquake response can be significantly reduced through the use of conventional seismic isolators, the vertical component of excitation is still transmitted directly into the structure. Records from instrumented structures, and some recent tests and analyses have actually seen increases in vertical responses in base isolated structures under the combined effects of horizontal and vertical ground motions. This issue becomes a great concern to facilities such as a Nuclear Power Plants (NPP, with specialized equipment and machinery that is not only expensive, but critical to safe operation. As such, there is considerable interest worldwide in vertical and three-dimensional (3D isolation systems. This paper examines several vertical and 3D isolation systems that have been proposed and their potential application to modern nuclear facilities. In particular, a series of case study analyses of a modern NPP model are performed to examine the benefits and challenges associated with 3D isolation compared with horizontal isolation. It was found that compared with the general horizontal isolators, isolators that have vertical frequencies of no more than 3 Hz can effectively reduce the vertical in-structure responses for the studied NPP model. Among the studied cases, the case that has a vertical isolation frequency of 3 Hz is the one that can keep the horizontal period of the isolators as the first period while having the most flexible vertical isolator properties. When the vertical frequency of isolators reduces to 1 Hz, the rocking effect is obvious and rocking restraining devices are necessary.

  7. Crystal structure of the shrimp proliferating cell nuclear antigen: structural complementarity with WSSV DNA polymerase PIP-box.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus S Carrasco-Miranda

    Full Text Available DNA replication requires processivity factors that allow replicative DNA polymerases to extend long stretches of DNA. Some DNA viruses encode their own replicative DNA polymerase, such as the white spot syndrome virus (WSSV that infects decapod crustaceans but still require host replication accessory factors. We have determined by X-ray diffraction the three-dimensional structure of the Pacific white leg shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (LvPCNA. This protein is a member of the sliding clamp family of proteins, that binds DNA replication and DNA repair proteins through a motif called PIP-box (PCNA-Interacting Protein. The crystal structure of LvPCNA was refined to a resolution of 3 Å, and allowed us to determine the trimeric protein assembly and details of the interactions between PCNA and the DNA. To address the possible interaction between LvPCNA and the viral DNA polymerase, we docked a theoretical model of a PIP-box peptide from the WSSV DNA polymerase within LvPCNA crystal structure. The theoretical model depicts a feasible model of interaction between both proteins. The crystal structure of shrimp PCNA allows us to further understand the mechanisms of DNA replication processivity factors in non-model systems.

  8. Aging of turbine drives for safety-related pumps in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, D.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-06-01

    This study was performed to examine the relationship between time-dependent degradation and current industry practices in the areas of maintenance, surveillance, and operation of steam turbine drives for safety-related pumps. These pumps are located in the Auxiliary Feedwater (AFW) system for pressurized-water reactor plants and in the Reactor Core Isolation Cooling and High-Pressure Coolant Injection systems for boiling-water reactor plants. This research has been conducted by examination of failure data in the Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System, review of Licensee Event Reports, discussion of problems with operating plant personnel, and personal observation. The reported failure data were reviewed to determine the cause of the event and the method of discovery. Based on the research results, attempts have been made to determine the predictability of failures and possible preventive measures that may be implemented. Findings in a recent study of AFW systems indicate that the turbine drive is the single largest contributor to AFW system degradation. However, examination of the data shows that the turbine itself is a reliable piece of equipment with a good service record. Most of the problems documented are the result of problems with the turbine controls and the mechanical overspeed trip mechanism; these apparently stem from three major causes which are discussed in the text. Recent improvements in maintenance practices and procedures, combined with a stabilization of the design, have led to improved performance resulting in a reliable safety-related component. However, these improvements have not been universally implemented.

  9. Temperature-Independent Nuclear Quantum Effects on the Structure of Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung Hwan; Pathak, Harshad; Späh, Alexander; Perakis, Fivos; Mariedahl, Daniel; Sellberg, Jonas A.; Katayama, Tetsuo; Harada, Yoshihisa; Ogasawara, Hirohito; Pettersson, Lars G. M.; Nilsson, Anders

    2017-08-01

    Nuclear quantum effects (NQEs) have a significant influence on the hydrogen bonds in water and aqueous solutions and have thus been the topic of extensive studies. However, the microscopic origin and the corresponding temperature dependence of NQEs have been elusive and still remain the subject of ongoing discussion. Previous x-ray scattering investigations indicate that NQEs on the structure of water exhibit significant temperature dependence [Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 047801 (2005), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.94.047801]. Here, by performing wide-angle x-ray scattering of H2O and D2O droplets at temperatures from 275 K down to 240 K, we determine the temperature dependence of NQEs on the structure of water down to the deeply supercooled regime. The data reveal that the magnitude of NQEs on the structure of water is temperature independent, as the structure factor of D2O is similar to H2O if the temperature is shifted by a constant 5 K, valid from ambient conditions to the deeply supercooled regime. Analysis of the accelerated growth of tetrahedral structures in supercooled H2O and D2O also shows similar behavior with a clear 5 K shift. The results indicate a constant compensation between NQEs delocalizing the proton in the librational motion away from the bond and in the OH stretch vibrational modes along the bond. This is consistent with the fact that only the vibrational ground state is populated at ambient and supercooled conditions.

  10. Sequence and structural analyses of nuclear export signals in the NESdb database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Darui; Farmer, Alicia; Collett, Garen; Grishin, Nick V; Chook, Yuh Min

    2012-09-01

    We compiled >200 nuclear export signal (NES)-containing CRM1 cargoes in a database named NESdb. We analyzed the sequences and three-dimensional structures of natural, experimentally identified NESs and of false-positive NESs that were generated from the database in order to identify properties that might distinguish the two groups of sequences. Analyses of amino acid frequencies, sequence logos, and agreement with existing NES consensus sequences revealed strong preferences for the Φ1-X(3)-Φ2-X(2)-Φ3-X-Φ4 pattern and for negatively charged amino acids in the nonhydrophobic positions of experimentally identified NESs but not of false positives. Strong preferences against certain hydrophobic amino acids in the hydrophobic positions were also revealed. These findings led to a new and more precise NES consensus. More important, three-dimensional structures are now available for 68 NESs within 56 different cargo proteins. Analyses of these structures showed that experimentally identified NESs are more likely than the false positives to adopt α-helical conformations that transition to loops at their C-termini and more likely to be surface accessible within their protein domains or be present in disordered or unobserved parts of the structures. Such distinguishing features for real NESs might be useful in future NES prediction efforts. Finally, we also tested CRM1-binding of 40 NESs that were found in the 56 structures. We found that 16 of the NES peptides did not bind CRM1, hence illustrating how NESs are easily misidentified.

  11. Safety-related Innovative Nuclear Reactor Technology Elements R and D (SINTER) Network and Global HTGR R and D Network (GHTRN). Strategic benefits of international networking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Von Lensa, W. [Institut fuer Sicherheitsforschung und Reaktortechnik ISR, Forschungszentrum Juelich, Juelich (Germany)

    1998-09-01

    Action on `Safety-related Innovative Nuclear Reactor Technology Elements - R and D - (SINTER) Network` both aim at the identification of priority items for sustainable innovations of nuclear technologies and work-shared European collaboration structures. Such an approach can also be realised for future R and D on HTGR-related R and D under the umbrella of the IAEA as already proposed by the `International Working Group on Gas-Cooled Reactors (IWGGCR)` in 1996 and illustrated in this paper for the construction of a `Global HTGR R and D Network (GHTRN)`. 3 refs.

  12. Analogies (Adages) as Aids for Comprehending Structural Relations in Text.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Virginia; Di Vesta, Francis J.

    1994-01-01

    In 2 experiments involving a total of 43 college students, adages (relational metaphors) were found to facilitate processing of general ideas and higher-order principles. The higher the degree of structural relations embedded in the titles of passages, the greater the recall and accessibility of system-related ideas. (SLD)

  13. Genetic structure of Populus hybrid zone along the Irtysh River provides insight into plastid-nuclear incompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yan-Fei; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Duan, Ai-Guo; Abuduhamiti, Bawerjan

    2016-06-16

    In plants, the maintenance of species integrity despite hybridization has often been explained by the co-adaption of nuclear gene complexes. However, the interaction between plastid and nuclear sub-genomes has been underestimated. Here, we analyzed the genetic structure of a Populus alba and P. tremula hybrid zone along the Irtysh River system in the Altai region, northwest China, using both nuclear microsatellites and plastid DNA sequences. We found high interspecific differentiation, although the hybrid P. × canescens was prevalent. Bayesian inference classified most hybrids into F1, followed by a few back-crosses to P. alba, and fewer F2 hybrids and back-crosses to P. tremula, indicating a few introgressions but preference toward P. alba. When plastid haplotypes in parental species were distinct, P. × canescens carried the haplotypes of both parents, but showed significant linkage between intraspecific haplotype and nuclear genotypes at several microsatellite loci. Selection, rather than migration and assortative mating, might have contributed to such plastid-nuclear disequilibria. By removing later-generated hybrids carrying interspecific combinations of haplotype and nuclear genotypes, plastid-nuclear incompatibility has greatly limited the gene exchange between P. alba and P. tremula via backcrossing with hybrids, demonstrating a significant association between plastid haplotype and the proportion of nuclear admixture.

  14. Structural determination of importin alpha in complex with beak and feather disease virus capsid nuclear localization signal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patterson, Edward I. [Charles Sturt University, School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences, Boorooma St., Wagga Wagga, New South Wales 2678 (Australia); EH Graham Centre for Agricultural Innovation (NSW Department of Primary Industries and Charles Sturt University), Boorooma St., Wagga Wagga, New South Wales 2678 (Australia); Dombrovski, Andrew K. [Charles Sturt University, School of Biomedical Sciences, Boorooma St., Wagga Wagga, New South Wales 2678 (Australia); Swarbrick, Crystall M.D. [Charles Sturt University, School of Biomedical Sciences, Boorooma St., Wagga Wagga, New South Wales 2678 (Australia); EH Graham Centre for Agricultural Innovation (NSW Department of Primary Industries and Charles Sturt University), Boorooma St., Wagga Wagga, New South Wales 2678 (Australia); Raidal, Shane R. [Charles Sturt University, School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences, Boorooma St., Wagga Wagga, New South Wales 2678 (Australia); EH Graham Centre for Agricultural Innovation (NSW Department of Primary Industries and Charles Sturt University), Boorooma St., Wagga Wagga, New South Wales 2678 (Australia); Forwood, Jade K., E-mail: jforwood@csu.edu.au [Charles Sturt University, School of Biomedical Sciences, Boorooma St., Wagga Wagga, New South Wales 2678 (Australia); EH Graham Centre for Agricultural Innovation (NSW Department of Primary Industries and Charles Sturt University), Boorooma St., Wagga Wagga, New South Wales 2678 (Australia)

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •Circovirus capsid proteins contain large nuclear localization signals (NLS). •A method of nuclear import has not been elucidated. •Beak and feather disease virus (BFDV) capsid NLS was crystallized with importin α. •The structure showed BFDV NLS binding to the major site of importin α. •Result shows implications for mechanism of nuclear transport for all circoviruses. -- Abstract: Circoviruses represent a rapidly increasing genus of viruses that infect a variety of vertebrates. Replication requires shuttling viral molecules into the host cell nucleus, a process facilitated by capsid-associated protein (Cap). Whilst a nuclear localization signal (NLS) has been shown to mediate nuclear translocation, the mode of nuclear transport remains to be elucidated. To better understand this process, beak and feather disease virus (BFDV) Cap NLS was crystallized with nuclear import receptor importin-α (Impα). Diffraction yielded structural data to 2.9 Å resolution, and the binding site on both Impα and BFDV Cap NLS were well resolved. The binding mechanism for the major site is likely conserved across circoviruses as supported by the similarity of NLSs in circovirus Caps. This finding illuminates a crucial step for infection of host cells by this viral family, and provides a platform for rational drug design against the binding interface.

  15. Seismic response analysis of a nuclear reactor structure considering nonlinear soil-structure interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhaumik, Lopamudra, E-mail: lbhaumi2@illinois.edu [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (United States); Raychowdhury, Prishati, E-mail: prishati@iitk.ac.in [Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur (India)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • Seismic response analysis of an internal shearwall of a reactor is done. • Incremental dynamic analysis is performed with 30 recorded ground motions. • Equivalent viscous damping increases up to twice when nonlinear SSI is considered. • Roof drift demand increases up to 25% upon consideration of foundation nonlinearity. • Base shear, base moment and ductility reduce up to 62%, 40%, and 35%, respectively. - Abstract: This study focuses on the seismic response analysis of an internal shearwall of a typical Indian reactor resting on a medium dense sandy silty soil, incorporating the nonlinear behavior of the soil-foundation interface. The modeling is done in an open-source finite element framework, OpenSees, where the soil-structure interaction (SSI) is modeled using a Beam-on-Nonlinear-Winkler-Foundation (BNWF) approach. Static pushover analysis and cyclic analysis are performed followed by an incremental dynamic analysis (IDA) with 30 recorded ground motions. For performing IDA, the spectral acceleration of each motion corresponding to the fundamental period, S{sub a}(T{sub 1})is incremented from 0.1 g to 1.0 g with an increment step of 0.1 g. It is observed from the cyclic analysis that the equivalent viscous damping of the system increases upto twice upon incorporation of inelastic SSI. The IDA results demonstrate that the average peak base shear, base moment and displacement ductility demand reduces as much as 62%, 40%, and 35%, respectively, whereas the roof drift demand increases up to 25% upon consideration of foundation nonlinearity for the highest intensity motion. These observations indicate the need of critical consideration of nonlinear soil-structure interaction as any deficient modeling of the same may lead to an inaccurate estimation of the seismic demands of the structure.

  16. Nuclear Effects in Structure Functions xF3(x, Q2) from Charge Current Neutrino Deep Inelastic Scattering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Chun-Gui; SHEN Peng-Nian; LI Guang-Lie

    2006-01-01

    By taking advantage of the model-independent nuclear parton distributions, the structure functions xF3(x, Q2)are calculated, in comparison with the experimental data from CCFR neutrino-nuclei charge current deep inelastic scattering. It is shown that shadowing and anti-shadowing effects occur in valence quark distributions for small and medium x regions, respectively. It is suggested that the neutrino experimental data should be employed in the future for pinning down the nuclear parton distributions.

  17. A new method of evaluating tight gas sands pore structure from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) logs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Liang; Mao, Zhi-qiang; Xie, Xiu-hong

    2016-04-01

    Tight gas sands always display such characteristics of ultra-low porosity, permeability, high irreducible water, low resistivity contrast, complicated pore structure and strong heterogeneity, these make that the conventional methods are invalid. Many effective gas bearing formations are considered as dry zones or water saturated layers, and cannot be identified and exploited. To improve tight gas sands evaluation, the best method is quantitative characterizing rock pore structure. The mercury injection capillary pressure (MICP) curves are advantageous in predicting formation pore structure. However, the MICP experimental measurements are limited due to the environment and economy factors, this leads formation pore structure cannot be consecutively evaluated. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) logs are considered to be promising in evaluating rock pore structure. Generally, to consecutively quantitatively evaluate tight gas sands pore structure, the best method is constructing pseudo Pc curves from NMR logs. In this paper, based on the analysis of lab experimental results for 20 core samples, which were drilled from tight gas sandstone reservoirs of Sichuan basin, and simultaneously applied for lab MICP and NMR measurements, the relationships of piecewise power function between nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) transverse relaxation T2 time and pore-throat radius Rc are established. A novel method, which is used to transform NMR reverse cumulative curve as pseudo capillary pressure (Pc) curve is proposed, and the corresponding model is established based on formation classification. By using this model, formation pseudo Pc curves can be consecutively synthesized. The pore throat radius distribution, and pore structure evaluation parameters, such as the average pore throat radius (Rm), the threshold pressure (Pd), the maximum pore throat radius (Rmax) and so on, can also be precisely extracted. After this method is extended into field applications, several tight gas

  18. A cellular reporter to evaluate CRM1 nuclear export activity: functional analysis of the cancer-related mutant E571K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Santisteban, Iraia; Arregi, Igor; Alonso-Mariño, Marián; Urbaneja, María A; Garcia-Vallejo, Juan J; Bañuelos, Sonia; Rodríguez, Jose A

    2016-12-01

    The exportin CRM1 binds nuclear export signals (NESs), and mediates active transport of NES-bearing proteins from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Structural and biochemical analyses have uncovered the molecular mechanisms underlying CRM1/NES interaction. CRM1 binds NESs through a hydrophobic cleft, whose open or closed conformation facilitates NES binding and release. Several cofactors allosterically modulate the conformation of the NES-binding cleft through intramolecular interactions involving an acidic loop and a C-terminal helix in CRM1. This current model of CRM1-mediated nuclear export has not yet been evaluated in a cellular setting. Here, we describe SRV100, a cellular reporter to interrogate CRM1 nuclear export activity. Using this novel tool, we provide evidence further validating the model of NES binding and release by CRM1. Furthermore, using both SRV100-based cellular assays and in vitro biochemical analyses, we investigate the functional consequences of a recurrent cancer-related mutation, which targets a residue near CRM1 NES-binding cleft. Our data indicate that this mutation does not necessarily abrogate the nuclear export activity of CRM1, but may increase its affinity for NES sequences bearing a more negatively charged C-terminal end.

  19. Nuclear Data Resources for Capture gamma-Ray Spectroscopy and Related Topics

    CERN Document Server

    Pritychenko, B

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear reaction data play an important role in nuclear reactor, medical, and fundamental science and national security applications. The wealth of information is stored in internally adopted ENDF-6 and EXFOR formats. We present a complete calculation of resonance integrals, Westcott factors, thermal and Maxwellian-averaged cross sections for Z=1-100 using evaluated nuclear reaction data. The addition of newly-evaluated neutron reaction libraries, and improvements in data processing techniques allows us to calculate nuclear industry and astrophysics parameters, and provide additional insights on all currently available neutron-induced reaction data. Nuclear reaction calculations will be discussed and an overview of the latest reaction data developments will be given.

  20. Nuclear Data Resources for Capture gamma-Ray Spectroscopy and Related Topics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pritychenko, B.; Pritychenko,B.

    2011-08-18

    Nuclear reaction data play an important role in nuclear reactor, medical, and fundamental science and national security applications. The wealth of information is stored in internally adopted ENDF-6 and EXFOR formats. We present a complete calculation of resonance integrals, Westcott factors, thermal and Maxwellian-averaged cross sections for Z = 1-100 using evaluated nuclear reaction data. The addition of newly-evaluated neutron reaction libraries, and improvements in data processing techniques allows us to calculate nuclear industry and astrophysics parameters, and provide additional insights on all currently available neutron-induced reaction data. Nuclear reaction calculations will be discussed and an overview of the latest reaction data developments will be given.