WorldWideScience

Sample records for nuclear rocket technology

  1. Development of nuclear rocket engine technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunn, S.V.

    1989-01-01

    Research sponsored by the Atomic Energy Commission, the USAF, and NASA (later on) in the area of nuclear rocket propulsion is discussed. It was found that a graphite reactor, loaded with highly concentrated Uranium 235, can be used to heat high pressure liquid hydrogen to temperatures of about 4500 R, and to expand the hydrogen through a high expansion ratio rocket nozzle assembly. The results of 20 reactor tests conducted at the Nevada Test Site between July 1959 and June 1969 are analyzed. On the basis of these results, the feasibility of solid graphite reactor/nuclear rocket engines is revealed. It is maintained that this technology will support future space propulsion requirements, using liquid hydrogen as the propellant, for thrust requirements ranging from 25,000 lbs to 250,000 lbs, with vacuum specific impulses of at least 850 sec and with full engine throttle capability. 12 refs

  2. Nuclear rockets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarram, M.

    1972-01-01

    Nuclear energy has found many applications in space projects. This article deals with these applications. The first application is the use of nuclear energy for the production of electricity in space and the second main application is the use of nuclear energy for propulsion purposes in space flight. The main objective is to develop a 75000 pound thrust flight engine call NERVA by heating liquid hydrogen, in a nuclear reactor, from 420F to 4000 0 F. The paper describes in detail the salient features of the NERVA rocket as well as its comparison with the conventional chemical rockets. It is shown that a nuclear rocket using liquid hydrogen as medium is at least 85% more efficient as compared with the chemical rockets such as those used for the APOLLO moon flight

  3. Nuclear rockets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarram, M [Teheran Univ. (Iran). Inst. of Nuclear Science and Technology

    1972-02-01

    Nuclear energy has found many applications in space projects. This article deals with these applications. The first application is the use of nuclear energy for the production of electricity in space and the second main application is the use of nuclear energy for propulsion purposes in space flight. The main objective is to develop a 75000 pound thrust flight engine called NERVA by heating liquid hydrogen in a nuclear reactor. The paper describes in detail the salient features of the NERVA rocket as well as its comparison with the conventional chemical rockets. It is shown that a nuclear rocket using liquid hydrogen as medium is at least 85% more efficient as compared with the chemical rockets such as those used for the APOLLO moon flight.

  4. History of the Development of NERVA Nuclear Rocket Engine Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David L., Black

    2000-01-01

    During the 17 yr between 1955 and 1972, the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), the U.S. Air Force (USAF), and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) collaborated on an effort to develop a nuclear rocket engine. Based on studies conducted in 1946, the concept selected was a fully enriched uranium-filled, graphite-moderated, beryllium-reflected reactor, cooled by a monopropellant, hydrogen. The program, known as Rover, was centered at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL), funded jointly by the AEC and the USAF, with the intent of designing a rocket engine for long-range ballistic missiles. Other nuclear rocket concepts were studied during these years, such as cermet and gas cores, but are not reviewed herein. Even thought the program went through the termination phase in a very short time, the technology may still be fully recoverable/retrievable to the state of its prior technological readiness in a reasonably short time. Documents; drawings; and technical, purchasing, manufacturing, and materials specifications were all stored for ease of retrieval. If the U.S. space program were to discover a need/mission for this engine, its 1972 'pencils down' status could be updated for the technology developments of the past 28 yr for flight demonstration in 8 or fewer years. Depending on today's performance requirements, temperatures and pressures could be increased and weight decreased considerably

  5. Nuclear rocket propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, J.S.; Miller, T.J.

    1991-01-01

    NASA has initiated planning for a technology development project for nuclear rocket propulsion systems for Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) human and robotic missions to the Moon and to Mars. An Interagency project is underway that includes the Department of Energy National Laboratories for nuclear technology development. This paper summarizes the activities of the project planning team in FY 1990 and FY 1991, discusses the progress to date, and reviews the project plan. Critical technology issues have been identified and include: nuclear fuel temperature, life, and reliability; nuclear system ground test; safety; autonomous system operation and health monitoring; minimum mass and high specific impulse

  6. An historical perspective of the NERVA nuclear rocket engine technology program. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robbins, W.H.; Finger, H.B.

    1991-07-01

    Nuclear rocket research and development was initiated in the United States in 1955 and is still being pursued to a limited extent. The major technology emphasis occurred in the decade of the 1960s and was primarily associated with the Rover/NERVA Program where the technology for a nuclear rocket engine system for space application was developed and demonstrated. The NERVA (Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application) technology developed twenty years ago provides a comprehensive and viable propulsion technology base that can be applied and will prove to be valuable for application to the NASA Space Exploration Initiative (SEI). This paper, which is historical in scope, provides an overview of the conduct of the NERVA Engine Program, its organization and management, development philosophy, the engine configuration, and significant accomplishments

  7. Nuclear rocket engine reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanin, Anatoly

    2013-07-01

    Covers a new technology of nuclear reactors and the related materials aspects. Integrates physics, materials science and engineering Serves as a basic book for nuclear engineers and nuclear physicists. The development of a nuclear rocket engine reactor (NRER) is presented in this book. The working capacity of an active zone NRER under mechanical and thermal load, intensive neutron fluxes, high energy generation (up to 30 MBT/l) in a working medium (hydrogen) at temperatures up to 3100 K is displayed. Design principles and bearing capacity of reactors area discussed on the basis of simulation experiments and test data of a prototype reactor. Property data of dense constructional, porous thermal insulating and fuel materials like carbide and uranium carbide compounds in the temperatures interval 300 - 3000 K are presented. Technological aspects of strength and thermal strength resistance of materials are considered. The design procedure of possible emergency processes in the NRER is developed and risks for their origination are evaluated. Prospects of the NRER development for pilotless space devices and piloted interplanetary ships are viewed.

  8. Nuclear Rocket Engine Reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Lanin, Anatoly

    2013-01-01

    The development of a nuclear rocket engine reactor (NRER ) is presented in this book. The working capacity of an active zone NRER under mechanical and thermal load, intensive neutron fluxes, high energy generation (up to 30 MBT/l) in a working medium (hydrogen) at temperatures up to 3100 K is displayed. Design principles and bearing capacity of reactors area discussed on the basis of simulation experiments and test data of a prototype reactor. Property data of dense constructional, porous thermal insulating and fuel materials like carbide and uranium carbide compounds in the temperatures interval 300 - 3000 K are presented. Technological aspects of strength and thermal strength resistance of materials are considered. The design procedure of possible emergency processes in the NRER is developed and risks for their origination are evaluated. Prospects of the NRER development for pilotless space devices and piloted interplanetary ships are viewed.

  9. Rhenium Rocket Manufacturing Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center's On-Board Propulsion Branch has a research and technology program to develop high-temperature (2200 C), iridium-coated rhenium rocket chamber materials for radiation-cooled rockets in satellite propulsion systems. Although successful material demonstrations have gained much industry interest, acceptance of the technology has been hindered by a lack of demonstrated joining technologies and a sparse materials property data base. To alleviate these concerns, we fabricated rhenium to C-103 alloy joints by three methods: explosive bonding, diffusion bonding, and brazing. The joints were tested by simulating their incorporation into a structure by welding and by simulating high-temperature operation. Test results show that the shear strength of the joints degrades with welding and elevated temperature operation but that it is adequate for the application. Rhenium is known to form brittle intermetallics with a number of elements, and this phenomena is suspected to cause the strength degradation. Further bonding tests with a tantalum diffusion barrier between the rhenium and C-103 is planned to prevent the formation of brittle intermetallics.

  10. SAFE testing nuclear rockets economically

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, Steven D.; Travis, Bryan; Zerkle, David K.

    2003-01-01

    Several studies over the past few decades have recognized the need for advanced propulsion to explore the solar system. As early as the 1960s, Werner Von Braun and others recognized the need for a nuclear rocket for sending humans to Mars. The great distances, the intense radiation levels, and the physiological response to zero-gravity all supported the concept of using a nuclear rocket to decrease mission time. These same needs have been recognized in later studies, especially in the Space Exploration Initiative in 1989. One of the key questions that has arisen in later studies, however, is the ability to test a nuclear rocket engine in the current societal environment. Unlike the Rover/NERVA programs in the 1960s, the rocket exhaust can no longer be vented to the open atmosphere. As a consequence, previous studies have examined the feasibility of building a large-scale version of the Nuclear Furnace Scrubber that was demonstrated in 1971. We have investigated an alternative that would deposit the rocket exhaust along with any entrained fission products directly into the ground. The Subsurface Active Filtering of Exhaust, or SAFE, concept would allow variable sized engines to be tested for long times at a modest expense. A system overview, results of preliminary calculations, and cost estimates of proof of concept demonstrations are presented. The results indicate that a nuclear rocket could be tested at the Nevada Test Site for under $20 M

  11. Unique nuclear thermal rocket engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Culver, D.W.; Rochow, R.

    1993-06-01

    In January, 1992, a new, advanced nuclear thermal rocket engine (NTRE) concept intended for manned missions to the moon and to Mars was introduced (Culver, 1992). This NTRE promises to be both shorter and lighter in weight than conventionally designed engines, because its forward flowing reactor is located within an expansion-deflection rocket nozzle. The concept has matured during the year, and this paper discusses a nearer term version that resolves four open issues identified in the initial concept: (1) the reactor design and cooling scheme simplification while retaining a high pressure power balance option; (2) elimination need for a new, uncooled nozzle throat material suitable for long life application; (3) a practical provision for reactor power control; and (4) use of near-term, long-life turbopumps

  12. Estimates of the radiation environment for a nuclear rocket engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courtney, J.C.; Manohara, H.M.; Williams, M.L.

    1992-01-01

    Ambitious missions in deep space, such as manned expeditions to Mars, require nuclear propulsion if they are to be accomplished in a reasonable length of time. Current technology is adequate to support the use of nuclear fission as a source of energy for propulsion; however, problems associated with neutrons and gammas leaking from the rocket engine must be addressed. Before manned or unmanned space flights are attempted, an extensive ground test program on the rocket engine must be completed. This paper compares estimated radiation levels and nuclear heating rates in and around the rocket engine for both a ground test and space environments

  13. Hydrocarbon Rocket Technology Impact Forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuber, Eric; Prasadh, Nishant; Edwards, Stephen; Mavris, Dimitri N.

    2012-01-01

    Forecasting method is a normative forecasting technique that allows the designer to quantify the effects of adding new technologies on a given design. This method can be used to assess and identify the necessary technological improvements needed to close the gap that exists between the current design and one that satisfies all constraints imposed on the design. The TIF methodology allows for more design knowledge to be brought to the earlier phases of the design process, making use of tools such as Quality Function Deployments, Morphological Matrices, Response Surface Methodology, and Monte Carlo Simulations.2 This increased knowledge allows for more informed decisions to be made earlier in the design process, resulting in shortened design cycle time. This paper will investigate applying the TIF method, which has been widely used in aircraft applications, to the conceptual design of a hydrocarbon rocket engine. In order to reinstate a manned presence in space, the U.S. must develop an affordable and sustainable launch capability. Hydrocarbon-fueled rockets have drawn interest from numerous major government and commercial entities because they offer a low-cost heavy-lift option that would allow for frequent launches1. However, the development of effective new hydrocarbon rockets would likely require new technologies in order to overcome certain design constraints. The use of advanced design methods, such as the TIF method, enables the designer to identify key areas in need of improvement, allowing one to dial in a proposed technology and assess its impact on the system. Through analyses such as this one, a conceptual design for a hydrocarbon-fueled vehicle that meets all imposed requirements can be achieved.

  14. Lunar mission design using nuclear thermal rockets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stancati, M.L.; Collins, J.T.; Borowski, S.K.

    1991-01-01

    The NERVA-class Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR), with performance nearly double that of advanced chemical engines, has long been considered an enabling technology for human missions to Mars. NTR engines address the demanding trip time and payload delivery needs of both cargo-only and piloted flights. But NTR can also reduce the Earth launch requirements for manned lunar missions. First use of NTR for the Moon would be less demanding and would provide a test-bed for early operations experience with this powerful technology. Study of application and design options indicates that NTR propulsion can be integrated with the Space Exploration Initiative scenarios to deliver performance gains while managing controlled, long-term disposal of spent reactors to highly stable orbits

  15. Nuclear thermal rockets using indigenous Martian propellants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubrin, R.M.

    1989-01-01

    This paper considers a novel concept for a Martian descent and ascent vehicle, called NIMF (for nuclear rocket using indigenous Martian fuel), the propulsion for which will be provided by a nuclear thermal reactor which will heat an indigenous Martian propellant gas to form a high-thrust rocket exhaust. The performance of each of the candidate Martian propellants, which include CO2, H2O, CH4, N2, CO, and Ar, is assessed, and the methods of propellant acquisition are examined. Attention is also given to the issues of chemical compatibility between candidate propellants and reactor fuel and cladding materials, and the potential of winged Mars supersonic aircraft driven by this type of engine. It is shown that, by utilizing the nuclear landing craft in combination with a hydrogen-fueled nuclear thermal interplanetary vehicle and a heavy lift booster, it is possible to achieve a manned Mars mission in one launch. 6 refs

  16. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emrich, William J. Jr.

    2008-01-01

    To support a potential future development of a nuclear thermal rocket engine, a state-of-the-art non nuclear experimental test setup has been constructed to evaluate the performance characteristics of candidate fuel element materials and geometries in representative environments. The test device simulates the environmental conditions (minus the radiation) to which nuclear rocket fuel components could be subjected during reactor operation. Test articles mounted in the simulator are inductively heated in such a manner as to accurately reproduce the temperatures and heat fluxes normally expected to occur as a result of nuclear fission while at the same time being exposed to flowing hydrogen. This project is referred to as the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environment Simulator or NTREES. The NTREES device is located at the Marshall Space flight Center in a laboratory which has been modified to accommodate the high powers required to heat the test articles to the required temperatures and to handle the gaseous hydrogen flow required for the tests. Other modifications to the laboratory include the installation of a nitrogen gas supply system and a cooling water supply system. During the design and construction of the facility, every effort was made to comply with all pertinent regulations to provide assurance that the facility could be operated in a safe and efficient manner. The NTREES system can currently supply up to 50 kW of inductive heating to the fuel test articles, although the facility has been sized to eventually allow test article heating levels of up to several megawatts

  17. Turbopump options for nuclear thermal rockets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bissell, W.R.; Gunn, S.V.

    1992-07-01

    Several turbopump options for delivering liquid nitrogen to nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) engines were evaluated and compared. Axial and centrifugal flow pumps were optimized, with and without boost pumps, utilizing current design criteria within the latest turbopump technology limits. Two possible NTR design points were used, a modest pump pressure rise of 1,743 psia and a relatively higher pump pressure rise of 4,480 psia. Both engines utilized the expander cycle to maximize engine performance for the long duration mission. Pump suction performance was evaluated. Turbopumps with conventional cavitating inducers were compared with zero NPSH (saturated liquid in the tanks) pumps over a range of tank saturation pressures, with and without boost pumps. Results indicate that zero NSPH pumps at high tank vapor pressures, 60 psia, are very similar to those with the finite NPSHs. At low vapor pressures efficiencies fall and turbine pressure ratios increase leading to decreased engine chamber pressures and or increased pump pressure discharges and attendant high-pressure component weights. It may be concluded that zero tank NSPH capabilities can be obtained with little penalty to the engine systems but boost pumps are needed if tank vapor pressure drops below 30 psia. Axial pumps have slight advantages in weight and chamber pressure capability while centrifugal pumps have a greater operating range. 10 refs

  18. Technology for low cost solid rocket boosters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciepluch, C.

    1971-01-01

    A review of low cost large solid rocket motors developed at the Lewis Research Center is given. An estimate is made of the total cost reduction obtainable by incorporating this new technology package into the rocket motor design. The propellant, case material, insulation, nozzle ablatives, and thrust vector control are discussed. The effect of the new technology on motor cost is calculated for a typical expandable 260-in. booster application. Included in the cost analysis is the influence of motor performance variations due to specific impulse and weight changes. It is found for this application that motor costs may be reduced by up to 30% and that the economic attractiveness of future large solid rocket motors will be improved when the new technology is implemented.

  19. Cycle Trades for Nuclear Thermal Rocket Propulsion Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, C.; Guidos, M.; Greene, W.

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear fission has been used as a reliable source for utility power in the United States for decades. Even in the 1940's, long before the United States had a viable space program, the theoretical benefits of nuclear power as applied to space travel were being explored. These benefits include long-life operation and high performance, particularly in the form of vehicle power density, enabling longer-lasting space missions. The configurations for nuclear rocket systems and chemical rocket systems are similar except that a nuclear rocket utilizes a fission reactor as its heat source. This thermal energy can be utilized directly to heat propellants that are then accelerated through a nozzle to generate thrust or it can be used as part of an electricity generation system. The former approach is Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) and the latter is Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP), which is then used to power thruster technologies such as ion thrusters. This paper will explore a number of indirect-NTP engine cycle configurations using assumed performance constraints and requirements, discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each cycle configuration, and present preliminary performance and size results. This paper is intended to lay the groundwork for future efforts in the development of a practical NTP system or a combined NTP/NEP hybrid system.

  20. NERVA-Derived Concept for a Bimodal Nuclear Thermal Rocket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fusselman, Steven P.; Frye, Patrick E.; Gunn, Stanley V.; Morrison, Calvin Q.; Borowski, Stanley K.

    2005-01-01

    The Nuclear Thermal Rocket is an enabling technology for human exploration missions. The 'bimodal' NTR (BNTR) provides a novel approach to meeting both propulsion and power requirements of future manned and robotic missions. The purpose of this study was to evaluate tie-tube cooling configurations, NTR performance, Brayton cycle performance, and LOX-Augmented NTR (LANTR) feasibility to arrive at a point of departure BNTR configuration for subsequent system definition

  1. Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) Development Risk Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tony

    2014-01-01

    There are clear advantages of development of a Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) for a crewed mission to Mars. NTR for in-space propulsion enables more ambitious space missions by providing high thrust at high specific impulse (approximately 900 sec) that is 2 times the best theoretical performance possible for chemical rockets. Missions can be optimized for maximum payload capability to take more payload with reduced total mass to orbit; saving cost on reduction of the number of launch vehicles needed. Or missions can be optimized to minimize trip time significantly to reduce the deep space radiation exposure to the crew. NTR propulsion technology is a game changer for space exploration. However, "NUCLEAR" is a word that is feared and vilified by some groups and the hostility towards development of any nuclear systems can meet great opposition by the public as well as from national leaders and people in authority. Communication of nuclear safety will be critical to the success of the development of the NTR. Why is there a fear of nuclear? A bomb that can level a city is a scary weapon. The first and only times the Nuclear Bomb was used in a war was on Hiroshima and Nagasaki during World War 2. The "Little Boy" atomic bomb was dropped on Hiroshima on August 6, 1945 and the "Fat Man" on Nagasaki 3 days later on August 9th. Within the first 4 months of bombings, 90- 166 thousand people died in Hiroshima and 60-80 thousand died in Nagasaki. It is important to note for comparison that over 500 thousand people died and 5 million made homeless due to strategic bombing (approximately 150 thousand tons) of Japanese cities and war assets with conventional non-nuclear weapons between 1942- 1945. A major bombing campaign of "firebombing" of Tokyo called "Operation Meetinghouse" on March 9 and 10 consisting of 334 B-29's dropped approximately1,700 tons of bombs around 16 square mile area and over 100 thousand people have been estimated to have died. The declaration of death is very

  2. Nuclear rockets: High-performance propulsion for Mars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, C.W.

    1994-05-01

    A new impetus to manned Mars exploration was introduced by President Bush in his Space Exploration Initiative. This has led, in turn, to a renewed interest in high-thrust nuclear thermal rocket propulsion (NTP). The purpose of this report is to give a brief tutorial introduction to NTP and provide a basic understanding of some of the technical issues in the realization of an operational NTP engine. Fundamental physical principles are outlined from which a variety of qualitative advantages of NTP over chemical propulsion systems derive, and quantitative performance comparisons are presented for illustrative Mars missions. Key technologies are described for a representative solid-core heat-exchanger class of engine, based on the extensive development work in the Rover and NERVA nuclear rocket programs (1955 to 1973). The most driving technology, fuel development, is discussed in some detail for these systems. Essential highlights are presented for the 19 full-scale reactor and engine tests performed in these programs. On the basis of these tests, the practicality of graphite-based nuclear rocket engines was established. Finally, several higher-performance advanced concepts are discussed. These have received considerable attention, but have not, as yet, developed enough credibility to receive large-scale development

  3. A framework for the intelligent control of nuclear rockets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parlos, A.G.; Metzger, J.D.

    1993-01-01

    An intelligent control system architecture is proposed for nuclear rockets, and its various components are briefly described. The objective of the intelligent controller is the satisfaction of performance, robustness, fault-tolerance and reliability design specifications. The proposed hierarchical architecture consists of three levels: hardware, signal processing, and knowledge processing. The functionality of the intelligent controller is implemented utilizing advanced information processing technologies such as artificial neutral networks and fuzzy expert systems. The feasibility of a number of the controller architecture components have been independently validated using computer simulations. Preliminary results are presented demonstrating some of the signal processing capabilities of the intelligent nuclear rocket controller. Further work, currently in progress, is attempting to implement a number of the knowledge processing capabilities of the controller and their interface with the lower levels of the proposed architecture

  4. Major accomplishments of America's nuclear rocket program (ROVER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finseth, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    The United States embarked on a program to develop nuclear rocket engines in 1955. This program was known as project Rover. Initially nuclear rockets were considered as a potential backup for intercontinental ballistic missile propulsion but later proposed applications included both a lunar second stage as well as use in manned-Mars flights. Under the Rover program, 19 different reactors were built and tested during the period of 1959-1969. Additionally, several cold flow (non-fuelled) reactors were tested as well as a nuclear fuels test cell. The Rover program was terminated in 1973, due to budget constraints and an evolving political climate. The Rover program would have led to the development of a flight engine had the program continued through a logical continuation. The Rover program was responsible for a number of technological achievements. The successful operation of nuclear rocket engines on a system level represents the pinnacle of accomplishment. This paper will discuss the engine test program as well as several subsystems

  5. Nuclear thermal rocket engine operation and control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunn, S.V.; Savoie, M.T.; Hundal, R.

    1993-06-01

    The operation of a typical Rover/Nerva-derived nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) engine is characterized and the control requirements of the NTR are defined. A rationale for the selection of a candidate diverse redundant NTR engine control system is presented and the projected component operating requirements are related to the state of the art of candidate components and subsystems. The projected operational capabilities of the candidate system are delineated for the startup, full-thrust, shutdown, and decay heat removal phases of the engine operation. 9 refs

  6. Tools for advanced simulations to nuclear propulsion systems in rockets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres Sepulveda, A.; Perez Vara, R.

    2004-01-01

    While chemical propulsion rockets have dominated space exploration, other forms of rocket propulsion based on nuclear power, electrostatic and magnetic drive, and other principles besides chemical reactions, have been considered from the earliest days of the field. The goal of most of these advanced rocket propulsion schemes is improved efficiency through higher exhaust velocities, in order to reduce the amount of fuel the rocket vehicle needs to carry, though generally at the expense of high thrust. Nuclear propulsion seems to be the most promising short term technology to plan realistic interplanetary missions. The development of a nuclear electric propulsion spacecraft shall require the development of models to analyse the mission and to understand the interaction between the related subsystems (nuclear reactor, electrical converter, power management and distribution, and electric propulsion) during the different phases of the mission. This paper explores the modelling of a nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) spacecraft type using EcosimPro simulation software. This software is a multi-disciplinary simulation tool with a powerful object-oriented simulation language and state-of-the-art solvers. EcosimPro is the recommended ESA simulation tool for environmental Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) and has been used successfully within the framework of the European activities of the International Space Station programme. Furthermore, propulsion libraries for chemical and electrical propulsion are currently being developed under ESA contracts to set this tool as standard usage in the propulsion community. At present, there is not any workable NEP spacecraft, but a standardized-modular, multi-purpose interplanetary spacecraft for post-2000 missions, called ISC-2000, has been proposed in reference. The simulation model presented on this paper is based on the preliminary designs for this spacecraft. (Author)

  7. Gas core nuclear rocket feasibility project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, S.D.; DeVolder, B.; Thode, L.; Zerkle, D.

    1997-09-01

    The next giant leap for mankind will be the human exploration of Mars. Almost certainly within the next thirty years, a human crew will brave the isolation, the radiation, and the lack of gravity to walk on and explore the Red planet. However, because the mission distances and duration will be hundreds of times greater than the lunar missions, a human crew will face much greater obstacles and a higher risk than those experienced during the Apollo program. A single solution to many of these obstacles is to dramatically decrease the mission duration by developing a high performance propulsion system. The gas core nuclear rocket (GCNR) has the potential to be such a system. The gas core concept relies on the use of fluid dynamic forces to create and maintain a vortex. The vortex is composed of a fissile material which will achieve criticality and produce high power levels. By radiatively coupling to the surrounding fluids, extremely high temperatures in the propellant and, thus, high specific impulses can be generated. The ship velocities enabled by such performance may allow a 9 month round trip, manned Mars mission to be considered. Alternatively, one might consider slightly longer missions in ships that are heavily shielded against the intense Galactic Cosmic Ray flux to further reduce the radiation dose to the crew. The current status of the research program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory into the gas core nuclear rocket feasibility will be discussed

  8. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Simulation in NPSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belair, Michael L.; Sarmiento, Charles J.; Lavelle, Thomas M.

    2013-01-01

    Four nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) models have been created in the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) framework. The models are divided into two categories. One set is based upon the ZrC-graphite composite fuel element and tie tube-style reactor developed during the Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application (NERVA) project in the late 1960s and early 1970s. The other reactor set is based upon a W-UO2 ceramic-metallic (CERMET) fuel element. Within each category, a small and a large thrust engine are modeled. The small engine models utilize RL-10 turbomachinery performance maps and have a thrust of approximately 33.4 kN (7,500 lbf ). The large engine models utilize scaled RL-60 turbomachinery performance maps and have a thrust of approximately 111.2 kN (25,000 lbf ). Power deposition profiles for each reactor were obtained from a detailed Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP5) model of the reactor cores. Performance factors such as thermodynamic state points, thrust, specific impulse, reactor power level, and maximum fuel temperature are analyzed for each engine design.

  9. Rocket science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upson Sandra

    2011-01-01

    Expanding across the Solar System will require more than a simple blast off, a range of promising new propulsion technologies are being investigated by ex- NASA shuttle astronaut Chang Diaz. He is developing an alternative to chemical rockets, called VASIMR -Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasm Rocket. In 2012 Ad Astra plans to test a prototype, using solar power rather than nuclear, on the International Space Station. Development of this rocket for human space travel is discussed. The nuclear reactor's heat would be converted into electricity in an electric rocket such as VASIMR, and at the peak of nuclear rocket research thrust levels of almost one million newtons were reached.

  10. To MARS and Beyond with Nuclear Power - Design Concept of Korea Advanced Nuclear Thermal Engine Rocket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, Seung Hyun; Chang, Soon Heung

    2013-01-01

    The President Park of ROK has also expressed support for space program promotion, praising the success of NARO as evidence of a positive outlook. These events hint a strong signal that ROK's space program will be accelerated by the national eager desire. In this national eager desire for space program, the policymakers and the aerospace engineers need to pay attention to the advanced nuclear technology of ROK that is set to a major world nuclear energy country, even exporting the technology. The space nuclear application is a very much attractive option because its energy density is the most enormous among available energy sources in space. This paper presents the design concept of Korea Advanced Nuclear Thermal Engine Rocket (KANuTER) that is one of the advanced nuclear thermal rocket engine developing in Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) for space application. Solar system exploration relying on CRs suffers from long trip time and high cost. In this regard, nuclear propulsion is a very attractive option for that because of higher performance and already demonstrated technology. Although ROK was a late entrant into elite global space club, its prospect as a space racer is very bright because of the national eager desire and its advanced technology. Especially it is greatly meaningful that ROK has potential capability to launch its nuclear technology into space as a global nuclear energy leader and a soaring space adventurer. In this regard, KANuTER will be a kind of bridgehead for Korean space nuclear application

  11. To MARS and Beyond with Nuclear Power - Design Concept of Korea Advanced Nuclear Thermal Engine Rocket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Seung Hyun; Chang, Soon Heung [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    The President Park of ROK has also expressed support for space program promotion, praising the success of NARO as evidence of a positive outlook. These events hint a strong signal that ROK's space program will be accelerated by the national eager desire. In this national eager desire for space program, the policymakers and the aerospace engineers need to pay attention to the advanced nuclear technology of ROK that is set to a major world nuclear energy country, even exporting the technology. The space nuclear application is a very much attractive option because its energy density is the most enormous among available energy sources in space. This paper presents the design concept of Korea Advanced Nuclear Thermal Engine Rocket (KANuTER) that is one of the advanced nuclear thermal rocket engine developing in Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) for space application. Solar system exploration relying on CRs suffers from long trip time and high cost. In this regard, nuclear propulsion is a very attractive option for that because of higher performance and already demonstrated technology. Although ROK was a late entrant into elite global space club, its prospect as a space racer is very bright because of the national eager desire and its advanced technology. Especially it is greatly meaningful that ROK has potential capability to launch its nuclear technology into space as a global nuclear energy leader and a soaring space adventurer. In this regard, KANuTER will be a kind of bridgehead for Korean space nuclear application.

  12. Particle bed reactor nuclear rocket concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludewig, H.

    1991-01-01

    The particle bed reactor nuclear rocket concept consists of fuel particles (in this case (U,Zr)C with an outer coat of zirconium carbide). These particles are packed in an annular bed surrounded by two frits (porous tubes) forming a fuel element; the outer one being a cold frit, the inner one being a hot frit. The fuel element are cooled by hydrogen passing in through the moderator. These elements are assembled in a reactor assembly in a hexagonal pattern. The reactor can be either reflected or not, depending on the design, and either 19 or 37 elements, are used. Propellant enters in the top, passes through the moderator fuel element and out through the nozzle. Beryllium used for the moderator in this particular design to withstand the high radiation exposure implied by the long run times

  13. Nuclear-powered rocket of the future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yunqiao, B

    1979-06-01

    A possible manned mission to Mars with a crew of 7 in an 80-meter-long nuclear-powered rocket will take 180 days to reach its destination, will spend 10 to 14 days on the surface, and will take 200 days to return. A nuclear-powered engine (using U-235 or U-239) is the most likely means of propulsion. Four designs are described. The superheated exhaust engine will use a reactor to heat liquid hydrogen to over 4000/sup 0/C, after which it will be ejected from the exhaust. A plasma compression engine will use electric current produced by a reactor to heat hydrogen to plasma temperature (70,000/sup 0/C), after which it will be ejected through the exhaust by a magnetic field. In a gaseous-core reactor engine, gaseous fuel will heat liquid hydrogen to over 9,000/sup 0/C and use it as the propellant. The boldest solution is a proposal to use small nuclear explosions as the propulsive force. The first alternative will probably not produce enough thrust, while there will be a difficulty producing sufficient electricity in the second alternative. The other two alternatives seem promising.

  14. Nuclear thermal rockets using indigenous extraterrestrial propellants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubrin, R.M.

    1990-01-01

    A preliminary examination of a concept for a Mars and outer solar system exploratory vehicle is presented. Propulsion is provided by utilizing a nuclear thermal reactor to heat a propellant volatile indigenous to the destination world to form a high thrust rocket exhaust. Candidate propellants, whose performance, materials compatibility, and ease of acquisition are examined and include carbon dioxide, water, methane, nitrogen, carbon monoxide, and argon. Ballistics and winged supersonic configurations are discussed. It is shown that the use of this method of propulsion potentially offers high payoff to a manned Mars mission. This is accomplished by sharply reducing the initial mission mass required in low earth orbit, and by providing Mars explorers with greatly enhanced mobility in traveling about the planet through the use of a vehicle that can refuel itself each time it lands. Thus, the nuclear landing craft is utilized in combination with a hydrogen-fueled nuclear-thermal interplanetary launch. By utilizing such a system in the outer solar system, a low level aerial reconnaissance of Titan combined with a multiple sample return from nearly every satellite of Saturn can be accomplished in a single launch of a Titan 4 or the Space Transportation System (STS). Similarly a multiple sample return from Callisto, Ganymede, and Europa can also be accomplished in one launch of a Titan 4 or the STS

  15. Small Rocket/Spacecraft Technology (SMART) Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esper, Jaime; Flatley, Thomas P.; Bull, James B.; Buckley, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and the Department of Defense Operationally Responsive Space (ORS) Office are exercising a multi-year collaborative agreement focused on a redefinition of the way space missions are designed and implemented. A much faster, leaner and effective approach to space flight requires the concerted effort of a multi-agency team tasked with developing the building blocks, both programmatically and technologically, to ultimately achieve flights within 7-days from mission call-up. For NASA, rapid mission implementations represent an opportunity to find creative ways for reducing mission life-cycle times with the resulting savings in cost. This in tum enables a class of missions catering to a broader audience of science participants, from universities to private and national laboratory researchers. To that end, the SMART (Small Rocket/Spacecraft Technology) micro-spacecraft prototype demonstrates an advanced avionics system with integrated GPS capability, high-speed plug-and-playable interfaces, legacy interfaces, inertial navigation, a modular reconfigurable structure, tunable thermal technology, and a number of instruments for environmental and optical sensing. Although SMART was first launched inside a sounding rocket, it is designed as a free-flyer.

  16. Nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-03-01

    This report examines nuclear technology in Canada, with emphasis on Quebec, as a means of revitilizing industry. The historical, present day, and future states of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited are examined. Future research programs are discussed in greatest detail. These range from disposal of porcine wastes to new applications for electricity to nuclear medical techniques (to cite only a few examples). The executive summary is written in English. (23 fig., 16 tab.)

  17. Nuclear technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyama, Makoto; Hamasaki, Manabu; Kobayashi, Masahiko; Hoshide, Akihiko; Katayama, Kimio; Nozawa, H.; Karigome, Satoshi

    2010-01-01

    In recent days, energy security is becoming a major global concern and it has been recognized that a major reduction in greenhouse-gas emissions is required to combat climate change. Considerable expansion and new introduction of nuclear power generation are currently being planned and considered for the further in various parts of the world. Nuclear technologies of the latest 10 years in Japan were reviewed with their characteristics, advancement and future perspective. Steady efforts have been made to construct new nuclear power stations with computer-aided engineering system and modular and prefabricated structures, extend the interval of periodic inspections under the new inspection system that should improve both safety and reliability, implement advanced measures against aging and develop the next-generation light water reactors including a medium small reactor. Export of nuclear power plants has been promoted with international business alliance or cooperation. Activities to close nuclear fuel cycle to ensure sustainable nuclear energy utilization have been promoted. Decommissioning technologies for Tokai power station have been developed and accumulated know-how will be utilized in light water reactors. (T. Tanaka)

  18. Bimodal Nuclear Thermal Rocket Analysis Developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belair, Michael; Lavelle, Thomas; Saimento, Charles; Juhasz, Albert; Stewart, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear thermal propulsion has long been considered an enabling technology for human missions to Mars and beyond. One concept of operations for these missions utilizes the nuclear reactor to generate electrical power during coast phases, known as bimodal operation. This presentation focuses on the systems modeling and analysis efforts for a NERVA derived concept. The NERVA bimodal operation derives the thermal energy from the core tie tube elements. Recent analysis has shown potential temperature distributions in the tie tube elements that may limit the thermodynamic efficiency of the closed Brayton cycle used to generate electricity with the current design. The results of this analysis are discussed as well as the potential implications to a bimodal NERVA type reactor.

  19. The behavior of fission products during nuclear rocket reactor tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bokor, P.C.; Kirk, W.L.; Bohl, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    Fission product release from nuclear rocket propulsion reactor fuel is an important consideration for nuclear rocket development and application. Fission product data from the last six reactors of the Rover program are collected in this paper to provide as basis for addressing development and testing issues. Fission product loss from the fuel will depend on fuel composition and reactor design and operating parameters. During ground testing, fission products can be contained downstream of the reactor. The last Rover reactor tested, the Nuclear Furnance, was mated to an effluent clean-up system that was effective in preventing the discharge of fission products into the atmosphere

  20. Turbopump Design and Analysis Approach for Nuclear Thermal Rockets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Shucheng S.; Veres, Joseph P.; Fittje, James E.

    2006-01-01

    A rocket propulsion system, whether it is a chemical rocket or a nuclear thermal rocket, is fairly complex in detail but rather simple in principle. Among all the interacting parts, three components stand out: they are pumps and turbines (turbopumps), and the thrust chamber. To obtain an understanding of the overall rocket propulsion system characteristics, one starts from analyzing the interactions among these three components. It is therefore of utmost importance to be able to satisfactorily characterize the turbopump, level by level, at all phases of a vehicle design cycle. Here at the NASA Glenn Research Center, as the starting phase of a rocket engine design, specifically a Nuclear Thermal Rocket Engine design, we adopted the approach of using a high level system cycle analysis code (NESS) to obtain an initial analysis of the operational characteristics of a turbopump required in the propulsion system. A set of turbopump design codes (PumpDes and TurbDes) were then executed to obtain sizing and performance parameters of the turbopump that were consistent with the mission requirements. A set of turbopump analyses codes (PUMPA and TURBA) were applied to obtain the full performance map for each of the turbopump components; a two dimensional layout of the turbopump based on these mean line analyses was also generated. Adequacy of the turbopump conceptual design will later be determined by further analyses and evaluation. In this paper, descriptions and discussions of the aforementioned approach are provided and future outlooks are discussed

  1. Rocketing into the future the history and technology of rocket planes

    CERN Document Server

    van Pelt, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Rocketing into the Future journeys into the exciting world of rocket planes, examining the exotic concepts and actual flying vehicles that have been devised over the last one hundred years. Lavishly illustrated with over 150 photographs, it recounts the history of rocket planes from the early pioneers who attached simple rockets on to their wooden glider airplanes to the modern world of high-tech research vehicles. The book then looks at the possibilities for the future. The technological and economic challenges of the Space Shuttle proved insurmountable, and thus the program was unable to fulfill its promise of low-cost access to space. However, the burgeoning market of suborbital space tourism may yet give the necessary boost to the development of a truly reusable spaceplane.

  2. Grooved Fuel Rings for Nuclear Thermal Rocket Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emrich, William

    2009-01-01

    An alternative design concept for nuclear thermal rocket engines for interplanetary spacecraft calls for the use of grooved-ring fuel elements. Beyond spacecraft rocket engines, this concept also has potential for the design of terrestrial and spacecraft nuclear electric-power plants. The grooved ring fuel design attempts to retain the best features of the particle bed fuel element while eliminating most of its design deficiencies. In the grooved ring design, the hydrogen propellant enters the fuel element in a manner similar to that of the Particle Bed Reactor (PBR) fuel element.

  3. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) Upgrade Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emrich, William J. Jr.; Moran, Robert P.; Pearson, J. Boise

    2012-01-01

    To support the on-going nuclear thermal propulsion effort, a state-of-the-art non nuclear experimental test setup has been constructed to evaluate the performance characteristics of candidate fuel element materials and geometries in representative environments. The facility to perform this testing is referred to as the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environment Simulator (NTREES). This device can simulate the environmental conditions (minus the radiation) to which nuclear rocket fuel components will be subjected during reactor operation. Test articles mounted in the simulator are inductively heated in such a manner so as to accurately reproduce the temperatures and heat fluxes which would normally occur as a result of nuclear fission and would be exposed to flowing hydrogen. Initial testing of a somewhat prototypical fuel element has been successfully performed in NTREES and the facility has now been shutdown to allow for an extensive reconfiguration of the facility which will result in a significant upgrade in its capabilities

  4. U.S./CIS eye joint nuclear rocket venture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, John S.; Mcilwain, Melvin C.; Smetanikov, Vladimir; D'Yakov, Evgenij K.; Pavshuk, Vladimir A.

    1993-01-01

    An account is given of the significance for U.S. spacecraft development of a nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) reactor concept that has been developed in the (formerly Soviet) Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS). The CIS NTR reactor employs a hydrogen-cooled zirconium hydride moderator and ternary carbide fuels; the comparatively cool operating temperatures associated with this design promise overall robustness.

  5. RECENT ACTIVITIES AT THE CENTER FOR SPACE NUCLEAR RESEARCH FOR DEVELOPING NUCLEAR THERMAL ROCKETS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, Robert C.

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear power has been considered for space applications since the 1960s. Between 1955 and 1972 the US built and tested over twenty nuclear reactors/ rocket-engines in the Rover/NERVA programs. However, changes in environmental laws may make the redevelopment of the nuclear rocket more difficult. Recent advances in fuel fabrication and testing options indicate that a nuclear rocket with a fuel form significantly different from NERVA may be needed to ensure public support. The Center for Space Nuclear Research (CSNR) is pursuing development of tungsten based fuels for use in a NTR, for a surface power reactor, and to encapsulate radioisotope power sources. The CSNR Summer Fellows program has investigated the feasibility of several missions enabled by the NTR. The potential mission benefits of a nuclear rocket, historical achievements of the previous programs, and recent investigations into alternatives in design and materials for future systems will be discussed.

  6. United States Nuclear Rocket Company (USNRC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, L. A.

    2014-01-01

    Historically, the development of advanced space technology has been accomplished by the federal government providing funding to commercial companies through the standard contracting process. Although recently, commercial space ventures, such as Space X, have begun to develop enhanced commercial space launch capabilities, and many companies provide space related services - including satellite development and operations, advanced technology development still requires (and should require) participation by the federal agency assigned this role - the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). However, this standard funding model may not be the most efficient and stable means of developing the advanced technology systems. And while the federal government does not need to be involved in areas where private industry can reasonably operate, it should remain the leader in supporting the development of new and advanced space technologies to further increase our national capability. And as these technologies mature, then private industry can begin the commercialization process, freeing up resources and funds for NASA to develop the next generations of advanced space technology. In fact, simply examining the last decades of space technology development shows that there is room for improvement. Part of the problem is that there are realistically two space frontiers. There is the commercialization frontier (the realm of Space X and others) and the exploratory frontier (the realm of NASA.). Often technologies that can support the exploratory frontier can also immediately support the commercialization frontier. Yet, these technologies are still developed under the standard model of federal funding and contracting. Is that really the best way to proceed? In this paper, the argument is put forward that a new process is required, a new paradigm. A consortium of federal agencies as well as commercial companies is needed - in a collaborative rather than a contractual

  7. SPACE MAINTENANCE OF NUCLEAR ROCKET PROPULSION VEHICLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marjon, P. L.

    1963-08-15

    Maintenance and repair of spacecraft are discussed from the hardware viewpoint. Interior operations are rather straight forward, but study results show that space suits are not sufficient for exterior repair work. Evaluation of worker requirements leads to a maintenance capsule concept. Capsule application is depicted in contrasting situations: repair of meteoroid damage and nuclear engine replacement. Radiation shielding is also considered. (D.C.W.)

  8. Low Pressure Nuclear Thermal Rocket (LPNTR) concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsthaler, J.H.

    1991-01-01

    A background and a description of the low pressure nuclear thermal system are presented. Performance, mission analysis, development, critical issues, and some conclusions are discussed. The following subject areas are covered: LPNTR's inherent advantages in critical NTR requirement; reactor trade studies; reference LPNTR; internal configuration and flow of preliminary LPNTR; particle bed fuel assembly; preliminary LPNTR neutronic study results; multiple LPNTR engine concept; tank and engine configuration for mission analysis; LPNTR reliability potential; LPNTR development program; and LPNTR program costs

  9. Nuclear thermal rocket nozzle testing and evaluation program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidian, K.O.; Kacynski, K.J.

    1993-01-01

    Performance characteristics of the Nuclear Thermal Rocket can be enhanced through the use of unconventional nozzles as part of the propulsion system. In this report, the Nuclear Thermal Rocket nozzle testing and evaluation program being conducted at the NASA Lewis Research Center is outlined and the advantages of a plug nozzle are described. A facility description, experimental designs and schematics are given. Results of pretest performance analyses show that high nozzle performance can be attained despite substantial nozzle length reduction through the use of plug nozzles as compared to a convergent-divergent nozzle. Pretest measurement uncertainty analyses indicate that specific impulse values are expected to be within plus or minus 1.17%

  10. Thermohydraulic modeling of nuclear thermal rockets: The KLAXON code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, M.L.; Rider, W.J.; Cappiello, M.W.

    1992-01-01

    The hydrogen flow from the storage tanks, through the reactor core, and out the nozzle of a Nuclear Thermal Rocket is an integral design consideration. To provide an analysis and design tool for this phenomenon, the KLAXON code is being developed. A shock-capturing numerical methodology is used to model the gas flow (the Harten, Lax, and van Leer method, as implemented by Einfeldt). Preliminary results of modeling the flow through the reactor core and nozzle are given in this paper

  11. Research Technology (ASTP) Rocket Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Pictured is an artist's concept of the Rocket Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) launch. The RBCC's overall objective is to provide a technology test bed to investigate critical technologies associated with opperational usage of these engines. The program will focus on near term technologies that can be leveraged to ultimately serve as the near term basis for Two Stage to Orbit (TSTO) air breathing propulsions systems and ultimately a Single Stage To Orbit (SSTO) air breathing propulsion system.

  12. Nuclear thermal rocket workshop reference system Rover/NERVA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borowski, S.K.

    1991-01-01

    The Rover/NERVA engine system is to be used as a reference, against which each of the other concepts presented in the workshop will be compared. The following topics are reviewed: the operational characteristics of the nuclear thermal rocket (NTR); the accomplishments of the Rover/NERVA programs; and performance characteristics of the NERVA-type systems for both Mars and lunar mission applications. Also, the issues of ground testing, NTR safety, NASA's nuclear propulsion project plans, and NTR development cost estimates are briefly discussed

  13. Review of coaxial flow gas core nuclear rocket fluid mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinstein, H.

    1976-01-01

    In a prematurely aborted attempt to demonstrate the feasibility of using a gas core nuclear reactor as a rocket engine, NASA initiated a number of studies on the relevant fluid mechanics problems. These studies were carried out at NASA laboratories, universities and industrial research laboratories. Because of the relatively sudden termination of most of this work, a unified overview was never presented which demonstrated the accomplishments of the program and pointed out the areas where additional work was required for a full understanding of the cavity flow. This review attempts to fulfill a part of this need in two important areas

  14. The nuclear thermal electric rocket: a proposed innovative propulsion concept for manned interplanetary missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dujarric, C.; Santovincenzo, A.; Summerer, L.

    2013-03-01

    Conventional propulsion technology (chemical and electric) currently limits the possibilities for human space exploration to the neighborhood of the Earth. If farther destinations (such as Mars) are to be reached with humans on board, a more capable interplanetary transfer engine featuring high thrust, high specific impulse is required. The source of energy which could in principle best meet these engine requirements is nuclear thermal. However, the nuclear thermal rocket technology is not yet ready for flight application. The development of new materials which is necessary for the nuclear core will require further testing on ground of full-scale nuclear rocket engines. Such testing is a powerful inhibitor to the nuclear rocket development, as the risks of nuclear contamination of the environment cannot be entirely avoided with current concepts. Alongside already further matured activities in the field of space nuclear power sources for generating on-board power, a low level investigation on nuclear propulsion has been running since long within ESA, and innovative concepts have already been proposed at an IAF conference in 1999 [1, 2]. Following a slow maturation process, a new concept was defined which was submitted to a concurrent design exercise in ESTEC in 2007. Great care was taken in the selection of the design parameters to ensure that this quite innovative concept would in all respects likely be feasible with margins. However, a thorough feasibility demonstration will require a more detailed design including the selection of appropriate materials and the verification that these can withstand the expected mechanical, thermal, and chemical environment. So far, the predefinition work made clear that, based on conservative technology assumptions, a specific impulse of 920 s could be obtained with a thrust of 110 kN. Despite the heavy engine dry mass, a preliminary mission analysis using conservative assumptions showed that the concept was reducing the required

  15. The Rocket Balloon (Rocketball): Applications to Science, Technology, and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esper, Jaime

    2009-01-01

    Originally envisioned to study upper atmospheric phenomena, the Rocket Balloon system (or Rocketball for short) has utility in a range of applications, including sprite detection and in-situ measurements, near-space measurements and calibration correlation with orbital assets, hurricane observation and characterization, technology testing and validation, ground observation, and education. A salient feature includes the need to reach space and near-space within a critical time-frame and in adverse local meteorological conditions. It can also provide for the execution of technology validation and operational demonstrations at a fraction of the cost of a space flight. In particular, planetary entry probe proof-of-concepts can be examined. A typical Rocketball operational scenario consists of a sounding rocket launch and subsequent deployment of a balloon above a desired location. An obvious advantage of this combination is the additional mission 'hang-time' rendered by the balloon once the sounding rocket flight is completed. The system leverages current and emergent technologies at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and other organizations.

  16. Use of Soft Computing Technologies For Rocket Engine Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevino, Luis C.; Olcmen, Semih; Polites, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The problem to be addressed in this paper is to explore how the use of Soft Computing Technologies (SCT) could be employed to further improve overall engine system reliability and performance. Specifically, this will be presented by enhancing rocket engine control and engine health management (EHM) using SCT coupled with conventional control technologies, and sound software engineering practices used in Marshall s Flight Software Group. The principle goals are to improve software management, software development time and maintenance, processor execution, fault tolerance and mitigation, and nonlinear control in power level transitions. The intent is not to discuss any shortcomings of existing engine control and EHM methodologies, but to provide alternative design choices for control, EHM, implementation, performance, and sustaining engineering. The approaches outlined in this paper will require knowledge in the fields of rocket engine propulsion, software engineering for embedded systems, and soft computing technologies (i.e., neural networks, fuzzy logic, and Bayesian belief networks), much of which is presented in this paper. The first targeted demonstration rocket engine platform is the MC-1 (formerly FASTRAC Engine) which is simulated with hardware and software in the Marshall Avionics & Software Testbed laboratory that

  17. JPRS Report, Nuclear Developments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1991-01-01

    Partial Contents: Medium Range Missiles, Rocket Engine, Nuclear Submarine, Nuclear Reactor, Nuclear Inspection, Nuclear Weapons, Transfer Technology, Scud, Safety, Nuclear Power, Chernobyl Trial, ,CHemical Weapons...

  18. Low Cost Nuclear Thermal Rocket Cermet Fuel Element Environment Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, David E.; Mireles, Omar R.; Hickman, Robert R.

    2011-01-01

    Deep space missions with large payloads require high specific impulse (Isp) and relatively high thrust in order to achieve mission goals in reasonable time frames. Conventional, storable propellants produce average Isp. Nuclear thermal rockets (NTR) capable of high Isp thrust have been proposed. NTR employs heat produced by fission reaction to heat and therefore accelerate hydrogen which is then forced through a rocket nozzle providing thrust. Fuel element temperatures are very high (up to 3000K) and hydrogen is highly reactive with most materials at high temperatures. Data covering the effects of high temperature hydrogen exposure on fuel elements is limited. The primary concern is the mechanical failure of fuel elements which employ high-melting-point metals, ceramics or a combination (cermet) as a structural matrix into which the nuclear fuel is distributed. It is not necessary to include fissile material in test samples intended to explore high temperature hydrogen exposure of the structural support matrices. A small-scale test bed designed to heat fuel element samples via non-contact RF heating and expose samples to hydrogen is being developed to assist in optimal material and manufacturing process selection without employing fissile material. This paper details the test bed design and results of testing conducted to date.

  19. History of the development of rocket technology and astronautics in Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisler, W.

    1977-01-01

    The development of rocket technology in Poland is outlined. The history cites 13th century use of war rockets in combating Tartars as well as 20th century studies of the future and reality of space flights.

  20. Design and analysis of a single stage to orbit nuclear thermal rocket reactor engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labib, Satira; King, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Three NTR reactors are optimized for the single stage launch of 1–15 MT payloads. • The proposed rocket engines have specific impulses in excess of 700 s. • Reactivity and submersion criticality requirements are satisfied for each reactor. - Abstract: Recent advances in the development of high power density fuel materials have renewed interest in nuclear thermal rockets (NTRs) as a viable propulsion technology for future space exploration. This paper describes the design of three NTR reactor engines designed for the single stage to orbit launch of payloads from 1 to 15 metric tons. Thermal hydraulic and rocket engine analyses indicate that the proposed rocket engines are able to reach specific impulses in excess of 800 s. Neutronics analyses performed using MCNP5 demonstrate that the hot excess reactivity, shutdown margin, and submersion criticality requirements are satisfied for each NTR reactor. The reactors each consist of a 40 cm diameter core packed with hexagonal tungsten cermet fuel elements. The core is surrounded by radial and axial beryllium reflectors and eight boron carbide control drums. The 40 cm long reactor meets the submersion criticality requirements (a shutdown margin of at least $1 subcritical in all submersion scenarios) with no further modifications. The 80 and 120 cm long reactors include small amounts of gadolinium nitride as a spectral shift absorber to keep them subcritical upon submersion in seawater or wet sand following a launch abort

  1. Design and analysis of a single stage to orbit nuclear thermal rocket reactor engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labib, Satira, E-mail: Satira.Labib@duke-energy.com; King, Jeffrey, E-mail: kingjc@mines.edu

    2015-06-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Three NTR reactors are optimized for the single stage launch of 1–15 MT payloads. • The proposed rocket engines have specific impulses in excess of 700 s. • Reactivity and submersion criticality requirements are satisfied for each reactor. - Abstract: Recent advances in the development of high power density fuel materials have renewed interest in nuclear thermal rockets (NTRs) as a viable propulsion technology for future space exploration. This paper describes the design of three NTR reactor engines designed for the single stage to orbit launch of payloads from 1 to 15 metric tons. Thermal hydraulic and rocket engine analyses indicate that the proposed rocket engines are able to reach specific impulses in excess of 800 s. Neutronics analyses performed using MCNP5 demonstrate that the hot excess reactivity, shutdown margin, and submersion criticality requirements are satisfied for each NTR reactor. The reactors each consist of a 40 cm diameter core packed with hexagonal tungsten cermet fuel elements. The core is surrounded by radial and axial beryllium reflectors and eight boron carbide control drums. The 40 cm long reactor meets the submersion criticality requirements (a shutdown margin of at least $1 subcritical in all submersion scenarios) with no further modifications. The 80 and 120 cm long reactors include small amounts of gadolinium nitride as a spectral shift absorber to keep them subcritical upon submersion in seawater or wet sand following a launch abort.

  2. CFD Analysis of Square Flow Channel in Thermal Engine Rocket Adventurer for Space Nuclear Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, S. H.; Suh, K. Y.; Kang, S. G.

    2008-01-01

    Solar system exploration relying on chemical rockets suffers from long trip time and high cost. In this regard nuclear propulsion is an attractive option for space exploration. The performance of Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) is more than twice that of the best chemical rocket. Resorting to the pure hydrogen (H 2 ) propellant the NTRs can possibly achieve as high as 1,000 s of specific impulse (I sp ) representing the ratio of the thrust over the fuel consumption rate, as compared to only 425 s of H 2 /O 2 rockets. If we reflect on the mission to Mars, NTRs would reduce the round trip time to less than 300 days, instead of over 600 days with chemical rockets. This work presents CFD analysis of one Fuel Element (FE) of Thermal Engine Rocket Adventurer (TERA). In particular, one Square Flow Channel (SFC) is analyzed in Square Lattice Honeycomb (SLHC) fuel to examine the effects of mass flow rate on rocket performance

  3. A review of the Los Alamos effort in the development of nuclear rocket propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durham, F.P.; Kirk, W.L.; Bohl, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reviews the achievements of the Los Alamos nuclear rocket propulsion program and describes some specific reactor design and testing problems encountered during the development program along with the progress made in solving these problems. The relevance of these problems to a renewed nuclear thermal rocket development program for the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) is discussed. 11 figs

  4. An example of successful international cooperation in rocket motor technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Russell A.; Berdoyes, Michel

    2002-07-01

    The history of over 25 years of cooperation between Pratt & Whitney, San Jose, CA, USA and Snecma Moteurs, Le Haillan, France in solid rocket motor and, in one case, liquid rocket engine technology is presented. Cooperative efforts resulted in achievements that likely would not have been realized individually. The combination of resources and technologies resulted in synergistic benefits and advancement of the state of the art in rocket motors and components. Discussions begun between the two companies in the early 1970's led to the first cooperative project, demonstration of an advanced apogee motor nozzle, during the mid 1970's. Shortly thereafter advanced carboncarbon (CC) throat materials from Snecma were comparatively tested with other materials in a P&W program funded by the USAF. Use of Snecma throat materials in CSD Tomahawk boosters followed. Advanced space motors were jointly demonstrated in company-funded joint programs in the late 1970's and early 1980's: an advanced space motor with an extendible exit cone and an all-composite advanced space motor that included a composite chamber polar adapter. Eight integral-throat entrances (ITEs) of 4D and 6D construction were tested by P&W for Snecma in 1982. Other joint programs in the 1980's included test firing of a "membrane" CC exit cone, and integral throat and exit cone (ITEC) nozzle incorporating NOVOLTEX® SEPCARB® material. A variation of this same material was demonstrated as a chamber aft polar boss in motor firings that included demonstration of composite material hot gas valve thrust vector control (TVC). In the 1990's a supersonic splitline flexseal nozzle was successfully demonstrated by the two companies as part of a US Integrated High Payoff Rocket Propulsion Technology (IHPRPT) program effort. Also in the mid-1990s the NOVOLTEX® SEPCARB® material, so successful in solid rocket motor application, was successfully applied to a liquid engine nozzle extension. The first cooperative

  5. Innovative nuclear thermal rocket concept utilizing LEU fuel for space application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, Seung Hyun; Venneri, Paolo; Choi, Jae Young; Jeong, Yong Hoon; Chang, Soon Heung

    2015-01-01

    Space is one of the best places for humanity to turn to keep learning and exploiting. A Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) is a viable and more efficient option for human space exploration than the existing Chemical Rockets (CRs) which are highly inefficient for long-term manned missions such as to Mars and its satellites. NERVA derived NTR engines have been studied for the human missions as a mainstream in the United States of America (USA). Actually, the NERVA technology has already been developed and successfully tested since 1950s. The state-of-the-art technology is based on a Hydrogen gas (H_2) cooled high temperature reactor with solid core utilizing High-Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel to reduce heavy metal mass and to use fast or epithermal neutron spectrums enabling simple core designs. However, even though the NTR designs utilizing HEU is the best option in terms of rocket performance, they inevitably provoke nuclear proliferation obstacles on all Research and Development (R and D) activities by civilians and non-nuclear weapon states, and its eventual commercialization. To surmount the security issue to use HEU fuel for a NTR, a concept of the innovative NTR engine, Korea Advanced NUclear Thermal Engine Rocket utilizing Low-Enriched Uranium fuel (KANUTER-LEU) is presented in this paper. The design goal of KANUTER-LEU is to make use of a LEU fuel for its compact reactor, but does not sacrifice the rocket performance relative to the traditional NTRs utilizing HEU. KANUTER-LEU mainly consists of a fission reactor utilizing H_2 propellant, a propulsion system and an optional Electricity Generation System as a bimodal engine. To implement LEU fuel for the reactor, the innovative engine adopts W-UO_2 CERMET fuel to drastically increase uranium density and thermal neutron spectrum to improve neutron economy in the core. The moderator and structural material selections also consider neutronic and thermo-physical characteristics to reduce non-fission neutron loss and

  6. Reducing the risk to Mars: The gas core nuclear rocket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, S.D.; DeVolder, B.; Thode, L.; Zerkle, D.

    1998-01-01

    The next giant leap for mankind will be the human exploration of Mars. Almost certainly within the next thirty years, a human crew will brave the isolation, the radiation, and the lack of gravity to walk on and explore the Red planet. However, because the mission distances and duration will be hundreds of times greater than the lunar missions, a human crew will face much greater obstacles and a higher risk than those experienced during the Apollo program. A single solution to many of these obstacles is to dramatically decrease the mission duration by developing a high performance propulsion system. The gas-core nuclear rocket (GCNR) has the potential to be such a system. The authors have completed a comparative study of the potential impact that a GCNR could have on a manned Mars mission. The total IMLEO, transit times, and accumulated radiation dose to the crew will be compared with the NASA Design Reference Missions

  7. Engineering thermal engine rocket adventurer for space nuclear application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, Seung H.; Suh, Kune Y.; Kang, Seong G.

    2008-01-01

    The conceptual design for the first-of-a-kind engineering of Thermal Engine Rocket Adventure (TERA) is described. TERA comprising the Battery Omnibus Reactor Integral System (BORIS) as the heat resource and the Space Propulsion Reactor Integral System (SPRIS) as the propulsion system, is one of the advanced Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) engine utilizing hydrogen (H 2 ) propellant being developed at present time. BORIS in this application is an open cycle high temperature gas cooled reactor that has eighteen fuel elements for propulsion and one fuel element for electricity generation and propellant pumping. Each fuel element for propulsion has its own small nozzle. The nineteen fuel elements are arranged into hexagonal prism shape in the core and surrounded by outer Be reflector. The TERA maximum power is 1,000 MW th , specific impulse 1,000 s, thrust 250,000 N, and the total mass is 550 kg including the reactor, turbo pump and auxiliaries. Each fuel element comprises the fuel assembly, moderators, pressure tube and small nozzle. The TERA fuel assembly is fabricated of 93% enriched 1.5 mm (U, Zr, Nb)C wafers in 25.3% voided Square Lattice Honeycomb (SLHC). The H 2 propellant passes through these flow channels. This study is concerned with thermohydrodynamic analysis of the fuel element for propulsion with hypothetical axial power distribution because nuclear analysis of TERA has not been performed yet. As a result, when the power distribution of INSPI's M-SLHC is applied to the fuel assembly, the local heat concentration of fuel is more serious and the pressure of the initial inlet H 2 is higher than those of constant average power distribution applied. This means the fuel assembly geometry of 1.5 mm fuel wafers and 25.3% voided SLHC needs to be changed in order to reduce thermal and mechanical shocks. (author)

  8. The international nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remick, F.J.

    1992-01-01

    With today's technology, isolationism is virtually impossible. The world's economies are so strongly intertwined that what affects one country will, in some way, influence another. Nuclear technology is no exception. If anything, nuclear technology is a catalyst for international cooperation. In the United States of America, nuclear technology is undergoing significant changes. Many of these changes are being greatly influenced by programs of international cooperation

  9. The rationale/benefits of nuclear thermal rocket propulsion for NASA's lunar space transportation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowski, Stanley K.

    1994-09-01

    The solid core nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) represents the next major evolutionary step in propulsion technology. With its attractive operating characteristics, which include high specific impulse (approximately 850-1000 s) and engine thrust-to-weight (approximately 4-20), the NTR can form the basis for an efficient lunar space transportation system (LTS) capable of supporting both piloted and cargo missions. Studies conducted at the NASA Lewis Research Center indicate that an NTR-based LTS could transport a fully-fueled, cargo-laden, lunar excursion vehicle to the Moon, and return it to low Earth orbit (LEO) after mission completion, for less initial mass in LEO than an aerobraked chemical system of the type studied by NASA during its '90-Day Study.' The all-propulsive NTR-powered LTS would also be 'fully reusable' and would have a 'return payload' mass fraction of approximately 23 percent--twice that of the 'partially reusable' aerobraked chemical system. Two NTR technology options are examined--one derived from the graphite-moderated reactor concept developed by NASA and the AEC under the Rover/NERVA (Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application) programs, and a second concept, the Particle Bed Reactor (PBR). The paper also summarizes NASA's lunar outpost scenario, compares relative performance provided by different LTS concepts, and discusses important operational issues (e.g., reusability, engine 'end-of life' disposal, etc.) associated with using this important propulsion technology.

  10. Nuclear Technology applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cibils Machado, W. E- mail: wrcibils@adinet.com.uy

    2002-01-01

    The present work tries on the applications of the nuclear technology in the life daily, such as agriculture and feeding, human health, industry, non destructive essays, isotopic hydrology, and the nuclear power stations for electricity production and radioisotopes production

  11. Thermohydraulic Design Analysis Modeling for Korea Advanced NUclear Thermal Engine Rocket for Space Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Seung Hyun; Choi, Jae Young; Venneria, Paolo F.; Jeong, Yong Hoon; Chang, Soon Heung [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    NTR engines have continued as a main stream based on the mature technology. The typical core design of the NERVA derived engines uses hexagonal shaped fuel elements with circular cooling channels and structural tie-tube elements for supporting the fuel elements, housing moderator and regeneratively cooling the moderator. The state-of-the-art NTR designs mostly use a fast or epithermal neutron spectrum core utilizing a HEU fuel to make a high power reactor with small and simple core geometry. Nuclear propulsion is the most promising and viable option to achieve challenging deep space missions. Particularly, the attractions of a NTR include excellent thrust and propellant efficiency, bimodal capability, proven technology, and safe and reliable performance. The KANUTER-HEU and -LEU are the innovative and futuristic NTR engines to reduce the reactor size and to implement a LEU fuel in the reactor by using thermal neutron spectrum. The KANUTERs have some features in the reactor design such as the integrated fuel element and the regeneratively cooling channels to increase room for moderator and heat transfer in the core, and ensuing rocket performance. To study feasible design points in terms of thermo-hydraulics and to estimate rocket performance of the KANUTERs, the NSES is under development. The model of the NSES currently focuses on thermo-hydraulic analysis of the peculiar and complex EHTGR design during the propulsion mode in steady-state. The results indicate comparable performance for future applications, even though it uses the heavier LEU fuel. In future, the NSES will be modified to obtain temperature distribution of the entire reactor components and then more extensive design analysis of neutronics, thermohydraulics and their coupling will be conducted to validate design feasibility and to optimize the reactor design enhancing the rocket performance.

  12. Nuclear thermal rocket propulsion application to Mars missions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emrich, W.J. Jr.; Young, A.C.; Mulqueen, J.A.

    1991-01-01

    Options for vehicle configurations are reviewed in which nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) propulsion is used for a reference mission to Mars. The scenario assumes an opposition-class Mars transfer trajectory, a 435-day mission, and the use of a single nuclear engine with 75,000 lbs of thrust. Engine parameters are examined by calculating mission variables for a range of specific impulses and thrust/weight ratios. The reference mission is found to have optimal values of 925 s for the specific impulse and thrust/weight ratios of 4.0 and 0.06 for the engine and total stage ratios respectively. When the engine thrust/weight ratio is at least 4/1 the most critical engine parameter is engine specific impulse for reducing overall stage weight. In the context of this trans-Mars three-burn maneuver the NTR engine with an expander engine cycle is considered a more effective alternative than chemical/aerobrake and other propulsion options

  13. A Programmatic and Engineering Approach to the Development of a Nuclear Thermal Rocket for Space Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordelon, Wayne J., Jr.; Ballard, Rick O.; Gerrish, Harold P., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    With the announcement of the Vision for Space Exploration on January 14, 2004, there has been a renewed interest in nuclear thermal propulsion. Nuclear thermal propulsion is a leading candidate for in-space propulsion for human Mars missions; however, the cost to develop a nuclear thermal rocket engine system is uncertain. Key to determining the engine development cost will be the engine requirements, the technology used in the development and the development approach. The engine requirements and technology selection have not been defined and are awaiting definition of the Mars architecture and vehicle definitions. The paper discusses an engine development approach in light of top-level strategic questions and considerations for nuclear thermal propulsion and provides a suggested approach based on work conducted at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center to support planning and requirements for the Prometheus Power and Propulsion Office. This work is intended to help support the development of a comprehensive strategy for nuclear thermal propulsion, to help reduce the uncertainty in the development cost estimate, and to help assess the potential value of and need for nuclear thermal propulsion for a human Mars mission.

  14. Initial Operation of the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emrich, William J., Jr.; Pearson, J. Boise; Schoenfeld, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    The Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) facility is designed to perform realistic non-nuclear testing of nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) fuel elements and fuel materials. Although the NTREES facility cannot mimic the neutron and gamma environment of an operating NTR, it can simulate the thermal hydraulic environment within an NTR fuel element to provide critical information on material performance and compatibility. The NTREES facility has recently been upgraded such that the power capabilities of the facility have been increased significantly. At its present 1.2 MW power level, more prototypical fuel element temperatures nay now be reached. The new 1.2 MW induction heater consists of three physical units consisting of a transformer, rectifier, and inverter. This multiunit arrangement facilitated increasing the flexibility of the induction heater by more easily allowing variable frequency operation. Frequency ranges between 20 and 60 kHz can accommodated in the new induction heater allowing more representative power distributions to be generated within the test elements. The water cooling system was also upgraded to so as to be capable of removing 100% of the heat generated during testing In this new higher power configuration, NTREES will be capable of testing fuel elements and fuel materials at near-prototypic power densities. As checkout testing progressed and as higher power levels were achieved, several design deficiencies were discovered and fixed. Most of these design deficiencies were related to stray RF energy causing various components to encounter unexpected heating. Copper shielding around these components largely eliminated these problems. Other problems encountered involved unexpected movement in the coil due to electromagnetic forces and electrical arcing between the coil and a dummy test article. The coil movement and arcing which were encountered during the checkout testing effectively destroyed the induction coil in use at

  15. Technology Roadmaps: Nuclear Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    This nuclear energy roadmap has been prepared jointly by the IEA and the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA). Unlike most other low-carbon energy sources, nuclear energy is a mature technology that has been in use for more than 50 years. The latest designs for nuclear power plants build on this experience to offer enhanced safety and performance, and are ready for wider deployment over the next few years. Several countries are reactivating dormant nuclear programmes, while others are considering nuclear for the first time. China in particular is already embarking on a rapid nuclear expansion. In the longer term, there is great potential for new developments in nuclear energy technology to enhance nuclear's role in a sustainable energy future.

  16. Using Innovative Technologies for Manufacturing and Evaluating Rocket Engine Hardware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betts, Erin M.; Hardin, Andy

    2011-01-01

    Many of the manufacturing and evaluation techniques that are currently used for rocket engine component production are traditional methods that have been proven through years of experience and historical precedence. As we enter into a new space age where new launch vehicles are being designed and propulsion systems are being improved upon, it is sometimes necessary to adopt new and innovative techniques for manufacturing and evaluating hardware. With a heavy emphasis on cost reduction and improvements in manufacturing time, manufacturing techniques such as Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) and white light scanning are being adopted and evaluated for their use on J-2X, with hopes of employing both technologies on a wide variety of future projects. DMLS has the potential to significantly reduce the processing time and cost of engine hardware, while achieving desirable material properties by using a layered powdered metal manufacturing process in order to produce complex part geometries. The white light technique is a non-invasive method that can be used to inspect for geometric feature alignment. Both the DMLS manufacturing method and the white light scanning technique have proven to be viable options for manufacturing and evaluating rocket engine hardware, and further development and use of these techniques is recommended.

  17. Nuclear energy technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buden, David

    1992-01-01

    An overview of space nuclear energy technologies is presented. The development and characteristics of radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG's) and space nuclear power reactors are discussed. In addition, the policy and issues related to public safety and the use of nuclear power sources in space are addressed.

  18. Nuclear thermal rocket plume interactions with spacecraft. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauk, B.H.; Gatsonis, N.A.; Buzby, J.; Yin, X.

    1997-01-01

    This is the first study that has treated the Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) effluent problem in its entirety, beginning with the reactor core, through the nozzle flow, to the plume backflow. The summary of major accomplishments is given below: (1) Determined the NTR effluents that include neutral, ionized and radioactive species, under typical NTR chamber conditions. Applied an NTR chamber chemistry model that includes conditions and used nozzle geometries and chamber conditions typical of NTR configurations. (2) Performed NTR nozzle flow simulations using a Navier-Stokes solver. We assumed frozen chemistry at the chamber conditions and used nozzle geometries and chamber conditions typical of NTR configurations. (3) Performed plume simulations using a Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code with chemistry. In order to account for radioactive trace species that may be important for contamination purposes we developed a multi-weighted DSMC methodology. The domain in our simulations included large regions downstream and upstream of the exit. Inputs were taken from the Navier-Stokes solutions

  19. Assessment of the advantages and feasibility of a nuclear rocket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, S.D.

    1985-01-01

    The feasibility of rebuilding and testing a nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) for the Mars mission has been investigated. Calculations indicate that an NTR would substantially reduce the earth-orbit assembled mass compared to LOX/LH 2 systems. The mass savings were 36% and 65% for the cases of total aerobraking and of total propulsive braking respectively. Consequently, the cost savings for a single mission of using an NTR, if aerobraking is feasible, are probably insufficient to warrant the NTR development. If multiple missions are planned or if propulsive braking is desired at Mars and/or at Earth, then the savings of about $7B will easily pay for the NTR development. Estimates of the cost of rebuilding a NTR were based on the previous NERVA program's budget plus additional costs to develop a flight ready engine. The total cost to build the engine would be between $4 to 5B. The concept of developing a full-power test stand at Johnston Atoll in the Pacific appears very feasible. The added expense of building facilities on the island should be less than $1.4B

  20. Preliminary design study for a carbide LEU-nuclear thermal rocket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venneri, P.F.; Kim, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear space propulsion is a requirement for the successful exploration of the solar system. It offers the possibility of having both a high specific impulse and a relatively high thrust, allowing rapid transit times with a minimum usage of fuel. This paper proposes a nuclear thermal rocket design based on heritage NERVA rockets that makes use of Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel. The Carbide LEU Nuclear Thermal Rocket (C-LEU-NTR) is designed to fulfill the rocket requirements as set forth in the NASA 2009 Mars Mission Design Reference Architecture 5.0, that is provide 25,000 lbf of thrust, operate at full power condition for at least two hours, and have a specific impulse close to 900 s. The neutronics analysis was done using MCNP5 with the ENDF/B-VII.1 neutron library. The thermal hydraulic calculations and size optimization were completed with a finite difference code being developed at the Center for Space Nuclear Research. (authors)

  1. On the use of a pulsed nuclear thermal rocket for interplanetary travel

    OpenAIRE

    Arias Montenegro, Francisco Javier

    2016-01-01

    The object of this work is a first assessment of the use of a pulsed nuclear thermal rocket for thrust and specific impulse (Isp) augmentation with particular reference to interplanetary travel. The basis of the novel space propulsion idea is the possibility of working in a bimodal fashion where the classical stationary nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) could be switch on or switch off as a pulsed reactor as desired by the mission planners. It was found that the key factor for Isp augmentation ...

  2. Nuclear technology in Peru

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montoya, M.

    1993-01-01

    This book deals with the Nuclear Energy in Peru. It consists of ten chapters. In the first chapter is presented a rapid overview on nuclear science history. The second chapter describes the nuclear proliferation and the nuclear competition in South America. The nuclear organization in Peru, the Peruvian Institute of Nuclear Energy, and the main centers are described in the third chapter. The following chapters deals with peruvian advances in nuclear medicine, agriculture and food, nuclear application to industry, hydrology, earth sciences and environmental considerations. In the last chapter, the perspectives for nuclear science and technology in Peru are described from the inter institutional cooperation point of view. This book also includes appendix and bibliography. (author)

  3. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) Upgrade Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emrich, William J., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past year the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) has been undergoing a significant upgrade beyond its initial configuration. The NTREES facility is designed to perform realistic non-nuclear testing of nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) fuel elements and fuel materials. Although the NTREES facility cannot mimic the neutron and gamma environment of an operating NTR, it can simulate the thermal hydraulic environment within an NTR fuel element to provide critical information on material performance and compatibility. The first phase of the upgrade activities which was completed in 2012 in part consisted of an extensive modification to the hydrogen system to permit computer controlled operations outside the building through the use of pneumatically operated variable position valves. This setup also allows the hydrogen flow rate to be increased to over 200 g/sec and reduced the operation complexity of the system. The second stage of modifications to NTREES which has just been completed expands the capabilities of the facility significantly. In particular, the previous 50 kW induction power supply has been replaced with a 1.2 MW unit which should allow more prototypical fuel element temperatures to be reached. The water cooling system was also upgraded to so as to be capable of removing 100% of the heat generated during. This new setup required that the NTREES vessel be raised onto a platform along with most of its associated gas and vent lines. In this arrangement, the induction heater and water systems are now located underneath the platform. In this new configuration, the 1.2 MW NTREES induction heater will be capable of testing fuel elements and fuel materials in flowing hydrogen at pressures up to 1000 psi at temperatures up to and beyond 3000 K and at near-prototypic reactor channel power densities. NTREES is also capable of testing potential fuel elements with a variety of propellants, including hydrogen with additives to inhibit

  4. Using Innovative Technologies for Manufacturing Rocket Engine Hardware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betts, E. M.; Eddleman, D. E.; Reynolds, D. C.; Hardin, N. A.

    2011-01-01

    Many of the manufacturing techniques that are currently used for rocket engine component production are traditional methods that have been proven through years of experience and historical precedence. As the United States enters into the next space age where new launch vehicles are being designed and propulsion systems are being improved upon, it is sometimes necessary to adopt innovative techniques for manufacturing hardware. With a heavy emphasis on cost reduction and improvements in manufacturing time, rapid manufacturing techniques such as Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) are being adopted and evaluated for their use on NASA s Space Launch System (SLS) upper stage engine, J-2X, with hopes of employing this technology on a wide variety of future projects. DMLS has the potential to significantly reduce the processing time and cost of engine hardware, while achieving desirable material properties by using a layered powder metal manufacturing process in order to produce complex part geometries. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has recently hot-fire tested a J-2X gas generator (GG) discharge duct that was manufactured using DMLS. The duct was inspected and proof tested prior to the hot-fire test. Using a workhorse gas generator (WHGG) test fixture at MSFC's East Test Area, the duct was subjected to extreme J-2X hot gas environments during 7 tests for a total of 537 seconds of hot-fire time. The duct underwent extensive post-test evaluation and showed no signs of degradation. DMLS manufacturing has proven to be a viable option for manufacturing rocket engine hardware, and further development and use of this manufacturing method is recommended.

  5. Nuclear technology and beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiyama, Mamoru

    1997-01-01

    After the confrontation of East and West, and the problem of North and South, we are now facing the era of Globalization in the presence of twenty-first century. Tracing the history of civilization, human being has progressed along with the accumulation of experience, and the development of science and technology. Science and technology bloomed in modern ages, especially, energy technology showed the giant leap in this century. Nuclear science and technology has been developed for peaceful purposes, and for the benefit of humanity. As a result, today, its progress led nuclear science and technology to have the great applicability to the development of the society. Toward the twenty-first century and Globalization, the science and technology developed in nuclear field is hoped to play a great contribution in various area of the society. (author)

  6. Introduction to nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldsmith, M.W.

    1985-01-01

    In the late 1940s and early 1950s when nuclear technology emerged, there was no oil embargo or any obvious signs of an energy crisis. The driving forces for the rapid development of the atom were its fuel efficiency and its potential cost-effectiveness compared to its alternatives. Uranium was a cheap and abundant domestic fuel and the development of the technology provided new vistas and challenges for the engineering community. It was the goal of providing environmentally clean, abundant, and reasonably priced energy that motivated engineers then as now. Nuclear technology developed under a mixture of government regulation and promotion and utility industry commercialization. This paper discusses the development and implementation of a technology largely resulting from the efforts of government to make the production of nuclear-powered electricity a commercial enterprise. This effort has largely succeeded, as greater than 10% of the electricity generated nationally is now provided by nuclear power

  7. Chemistry and nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Wet, W.J.

    1977-01-01

    The underlying principles of nuclear sciece and technology as based on the two basic phenomena, namely, radioactivity and nuclear reactions, with their relatively large associated energy changes, are outlined. The most important contributions by chemists in the overall historical development are mentioned and the strong position chemistry has attained in these fields is indicated. It is concluded that chemistry as well as many other scientific discplines (apart from general benefits) have largely benefitted from these nuclear developments [af

  8. Nuclear technology international 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geary, Neville

    1987-01-01

    A total of 59 articles cover a wide range of subjects within the scope of nuclear power generation. The first 13 are concerned with the design and construction of nuclear reactors - PWRs, AGRs, Magnox reactors, fast reactors. The final article in this section is on reactor decommissioning. The next 33 papers all concern services to the nuclear power industry. These include the supply of uranium, uranium enrichment, fuel fabrication, reprocessing, spent fuel storage, robotics and remote handling and radioactive waste disposal. The 13 articles in the safety and public acceptability section concern fears over the Chernobyl accident, safety aspects of nuclear power including risk assessment, fire protection, quality assurance, earthquake tolerance, non-proliferation of nuclear weapons and finally, general problems of balancing advances in nuclear technology and economic desirability against a lack of public confidence in the industry. All reactor and fuel types are represented. Most of the articles concern nuclear power in Europe or North America. All are indexed separately. (UK)

  9. CANDU nuclear reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakaria, B. K.

    1994-01-01

    AECL has over 40 years of experience in the nuclear field. Over the past 20 years, this unique Canadian nuclear technology has made a worldwide presence, In addition to 22 CANDU reactors in Canada, there are also two in India, one in Pakistan, one in Argentina, four in Korea and five in Romania. CANDU advancements are based on evolutionary plant improvements. They consist of system performance improvements, design technology improvements and research and development in support of advanced nuclear power. Given the good performance of CANOU plants, it is important that this CANDU operating experience be incorporated into new and repeat designs

  10. Ground Testing a Nuclear Thermal Rocket: Design of a sub-scale demonstration experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Bedsun; Debra Lee; Margaret Townsend; Clay A. Cooper; Jennifer Chapman; Ronald Samborsky; Mel Bulman; Daniel Brasuell; Stanley K. Borowski

    2012-07-01

    In 2008, the NASA Mars Architecture Team found that the Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) was the preferred propulsion system out of all the combinations of chemical propulsion, solar electric, nuclear electric, aerobrake, and NTR studied. Recently, the National Research Council committee reviewing the NASA Technology Roadmaps recommended the NTR as one of the top 16 technologies that should be pursued by NASA. One of the main issues with developing a NTR for future missions is the ability to economically test the full system on the ground. In the late 1990s, the Sub-surface Active Filtering of Exhaust (SAFE) concept was first proposed by Howe as a method to test NTRs at full power and full duration. The concept relied on firing the NTR into one of the test holes at the Nevada Test Site which had been constructed to test nuclear weapons. In 2011, the cost of testing a NTR and the cost of performing a proof of concept experiment were evaluated.

  11. CFD Analysis of Square Flow Channel in Thermal Engine Rocket Adventurer for Space Nuclear Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, S. H.; Suh, K. Y. [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, S. G. [PHILOSOPHIA, Inc., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-10-15

    Solar system exploration relying on chemical rockets suffers from long trip time and high cost. In this regard nuclear propulsion is an attractive option for space exploration. The performance of Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) is more than twice that of the best chemical rocket. Resorting to the pure hydrogen (H{sub 2}) propellant the NTRs can possibly achieve as high as 1,000 s of specific impulse (I{sub sp}) representing the ratio of the thrust over the fuel consumption rate, as compared to only 425 s of H{sub 2}/O{sub 2} rockets. If we reflect on the mission to Mars, NTRs would reduce the round trip time to less than 300 days, instead of over 600 days with chemical rockets. This work presents CFD analysis of one Fuel Element (FE) of Thermal Engine Rocket Adventurer (TERA). In particular, one Square Flow Channel (SFC) is analyzed in Square Lattice Honeycomb (SLHC) fuel to examine the effects of mass flow rate on rocket performance.

  12. Preliminary Thermo-hydraulic Core Design Analysis of Korea Advanced Nuclear Thermal Engine Rocket for Space Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Seung Hyun; Lee, Jeong Ik; Chang, Soon Heung [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Nclear rockets improve the propellant efficiency more than twice compared to CRs and thus significantly reduce the propellant requirement. The superior efficiency of nuclear rockets is due to the combination of the huge energy density and a single low molecular weight propellant utilization. Nuclear Thermal Rockets (NTRs) are particularly suitable for manned missions to Mars because it satisfies a relatively high thrust as well as a high propellant efficiency. NTRs use thermal energy released from a nuclear fission reactor to heat a single low molecular weight propellant, i. e., Hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and then exhausted the extremely heated propellant through a thermodynamic nozzle to produce thrust. A propellant efficiency parameter of rocket engines is specific impulse (I{sub sp}) which represents the ratio of the thrust over the rate of propellant consumption. The difference of I{sub sp} makes over three times propellant savings of NTRs for a manned Mars mission compared to CRs. NTRs can also be configured to operate bimodally by converting the surplus nuclear energy to auxiliary electric power required for the operation of a spacecraft. Moreover, the concept and technology of NTRs are very simple, already proven, and safe. Thus, NTRs can be applied to various space missions such as solar system exploration, International Space Station (ISS) transport support, Near Earth Objects (NEOs) interception, etc. Nuclear propulsion is the most promising and viable option to achieve challenging deep space missions. Particularly, the attractions of a NTR include excellent thrust and propellant efficiency, bimodal capability, proven technology, and safe and reliable performance. The ROK has also begun the research for space nuclear systems as a volunteer of the international space race and a major world nuclear energy country. KANUTER is one of the advanced NTR engines currently under development at KAIST. This bimodal engine is operated in two modes of propulsion with 100 MW

  13. Review of fuel element development for nuclear rocket engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taub, J.M.

    1975-06-01

    The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) entered the nuclear propulsion field in 1955 and began work on all aspects of a nuclear propulsion program involving uranium-loaded graphite fuels, hydrogen propellant, and a target exhaust temperature of approximately 2500 0 C. A very extensive uranium-loaded graphite fuel element technology evolved from the program. Selection and composition of raw materials for the extrusion mix had to be coupled with heat treatment studies to give optimum element properties. The highly enriched uranium in the element was incorporated as UO 2 , pyrocarbon-coated UC 2 , or solid solution UC . ZrC particles. An extensive development program resulted in successful NbC or ZrC coatings on elements to withstand hydrogen corrosion at elevated temperatures. Hot gas, thermal shock, thermal stress, and NDT evaluation procedures were developed to monitor progress in preparation of elements with optimum properties. Final evaluation was made in reactor tests at NRDS. Aerojet-General, Westinghouse Astronuclear Laboratory, and the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant of Union Carbide Nuclear Company entered the program in the early 1960's, and their activities paralleled those of LASL in fuel element development. (U.S.)

  14. Nuclear Thermal Rocket/Vehicle Design Options for Future NASA Missions to the Moon and Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowski, Stanley K.; Corban, Robert R.; Mcguire, Melissa L.; Beke, Erik G.

    1995-01-01

    The nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) provides a unique propulsion capability to planners/designers of future human exploration missions to the Moon and Mars. In addition to its high specific impulse (approximately 850-1000 s) and engine thrust-to-weight ratio (approximately 3-10), the NTR can also be configured as a 'dual mode' system capable of generating electrical power for spacecraft environmental systems, communications, and enhanced stage operations (e.g., refrigeration for long-term liquid hydrogen storage). At present the Nuclear Propulsion Office (NPO) is examining a variety of mission applications for the NTR ranging from an expendable, single-burn, trans-lunar injection (TLI) stage for NASA's First Lunar Outpost (FLO) mission to all propulsive, multiburn, NTR-powered spacecraft supporting a 'split cargo-piloted sprint' Mars mission architecture. Each application results in a particular set of requirements in areas such as the number of engines and their respective thrust levels, restart capability, fuel operating temperature and lifetime, cryofluid storage, and stage size. Two solid core NTR concepts are examined -- one based on NERVA (Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application) derivative reactor (NDR) technology, and a second concept which utilizes a ternary carbide 'twisted ribbon' fuel form developed by the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS). The NDR and CIS concepts have an established technology database involving significant nuclear testing at or near representative operating conditions. Integrated systems and mission studies indicate that clusters of two to four 15 to 25 klbf NDR or CIS engines are sufficient for most of the lunar and Mars mission scenarios currently under consideration. This paper provides descriptions and performance characteristics for the NDR and CIS concepts, summarizes NASA's First Lunar Outpost and Mars mission scenarios, and describes characteristics for representative cargo and piloted vehicles compatible with a

  15. Nuclear industry technology boomerang

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholler, R.W.

    1987-01-01

    The benefits to the medical, pharmaceutical, semiconductor, computer, video, bioscience, laser, defense, and numerous high-tech industries from nuclear technology development fallout are indeed numerous and increase every day. Now those industries have made further progress and improvements that, in return, benefit the nuclear industry. The clean-air and particle-free devices and enclosures needed for protection and decontamination are excellent examples

  16. Nuclear technology and society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Tatsujiro; Tanaka, Yutaka; Taniguchi, Taketoshi; Oyama, Kosuke

    1999-01-01

    This special issue of Journal of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan deals with the relation between nuclear technology and society, and is composed of four papers: (1) Nuclear energy and international politics - sociotechnics around plutonium utilization; (2) Risk recognition and benefit recognition of nuclear facilities and social acceptance; (3) Environmental risk management and radioactive waste problem; and, (4) Public administration around the relation between nuclear energy and society. (1) describes the historical development of nuclear energy since its birth, focusing on how the leading countries tried to control nuclear proliferation. Peaceful utilization of nuclear energy is closely connected with the Non-proliferation problem. (1) also discusses the relation of plutonium utilization of Japan with international society. (2) discusses how nuclear facilities can be accepted by society, analyzing the background of risk recognition, in particular, of psychological character of mass society. (3) introduces an new approach (risk-based or risk-informed regulation) of environmental risk management for radioactive waste disposal problem, focusing on HLW (high-level waste). (4) explains the approach from public administration to nuclear energy and general energy policy and introduces PPA (participatory policy analysis) as a means for policy making. (M.M.)

  17. Design, qualification and operation of nuclear rockets for safe Mars missions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buden, D.; Madsen, W.W.; Olson, T.S.; Redd, L.R.

    1993-01-01

    Nuclear thermal propulsion modules planned for use on crew missions to Mars improve mission reliability and overall safety of the mission. This, as well as all other systems, are greatly enhanced if the system specifications take into account safety from design initiation, and operational considerations are well thought through and applied. For instance, the use of multiple engines in the propulsion module can lead to very high system safety and reliability. Operational safety enhancements may include: the use of multiple perigee burns, thus allowing time to ensure that all systems are functioning properly prior to departure from Earth orbit; the ability to perform all other parts of the mission in a degraded mode with little or no degradation of the mission; and the safe disposal of the nuclear propulsion module in a heliocentric orbit out of the ecliptic plane. The standards used to qualify nuclear rockets are one of the main cost drivers of the program. Concepts and systems that minimize cost and risk will rely on use of the element and component levels to demonstrate technology readiness and validation. Subsystem or systems testing then is only needed for verification of performance. Also, these will be the safest concepts because they will be more thoroughly understood and the safety margins will be well established and confirmed by tests

  18. Nuclear technology and societal needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-11-01

    This volume aims to review the present status of development of nuclear technologies and their applications in the country and also to make projections for future requirements. This will also cover state-of-the-art technologies in these areas. The following topics are covered in detail: nuclear technologies for water desalination, water resources development and management using nuclear technology, industrial applications of isotopes and radiation technology, radiation technology in health care, nuclear technology for food preservation, agricultural applications of nuclear technology. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  19. Nuclear technology in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    This pamphlet provides a summary of the research being carried out by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. The design and development of the CANDU type reactor are highlighted and the contribution of nuclear technology to medicine, agriculture and the Canadian economy is briefly discussed

  20. Radiological effluents released from nuclear rocket and ramjet engine tests at the Nevada Test Site 1959 through 1969: Fact Book

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friesen, H.N.

    1995-06-01

    Nuclear rocket and ramjet engine tests were conducted on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Area 25 and Area 26, about 80 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, from July 1959 through September 1969. This document presents a brief history of the nuclear rocket engine tests, information on the off-site radiological monitoring, and descriptions of the tests.

  1. Prospective application of laser plasma propulsion in rocket technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Xin; Zhang Jie; Li Yingjun

    2002-01-01

    Interest in laser plasma propulsion is growing intensively. The interaction of high intensity short laser pulses with materials can produce plasma expansion with a velocity of hundreds of km/s. The specific impulse of ablative laser propulsion can be many tens of times greater than that of chemical rockets. The development and potential application of laser plasma propulsion are discussed

  2. Why nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, Wilson J.; Ishiguro, Yuji; Urbina, Ligia M. Soto

    1996-01-01

    The importance of nuclear energy in the global society implies the nacional need to give priority and maintain an effective technology policy for nuclear science. In this work, it is considered three points that, although do not represent all the problems in the nuclear sector, were chosen because of their importance and need of change that require: evaluation of the Brazilian scientific policy, which is directed towards the publication in international periodicals, yielding more benefits to the developed countries; evaluation of the few and small investment in laboratories and research institutes, which are the natural producers of technology for the industry and service sectors; evaluation of the lack of concrete of concrete objectives in the universities and research institutes, whose policies are elaborated with-out the due consideration of the collective benefits. It is necessary a national plan for the nuclear are that makes investments in technology development, investments in the laboratories and research institutes, and that makes these universities and research institutes accountable for the success or failure to accomplish the proposed objectives. (author)

  3. International nuclear technology transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cartwright, P.; Rocchio, J.P.

    1978-01-01

    Light water reactors (LWRs), originally developed in the United States, became the nuclear workhorses for utilities in Europe and Japan largely because the U.S. industry was willing and able to transfer its nuclear know-how abroad. In this international effort, the industry had the encouragement and support of the U.S. governement. In the case of the boiling water reactor (BWR) the program for technology transfer was developed in response to overseas customer demands for support in building local designs and manufacturing capabilities. The principal vehicles have been technology exchange agreements through which complete engineering and manufacturing information is furnished covering BWR systems and fuel. Agreements are held with companies in Germany, Japan, Italy, and Sweden. In recent years, a comprehensive program of joint technology development with overseas manufacturers has begun. The rapidly escalating cost of nuclear research and development make it desirable to minimize duplication of effort. These joint programs provide a mechanism for two or more parties jointly to plan a development program, assign work tasks among themselves, and exchange test results. Despite a slower-than-hoped-for start, nuclear power today is playing a significant role in the economic growth of some developing countries, and can continue to do so. Roughly half of the 23 free world nations that have adopted LWRs are developing countries

  4. Thirteenth Workshop for Computational Fluid Dynamic Applications in Rocket Propulsion and Launch Vehicle Technology. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R. W. (Compiler)

    1996-01-01

    This conference publication includes various abstracts and presentations given at the 13th Workshop for Computational Fluid Dynamic Applications in Rocket Propulsion and Launch Vehicle Technology held at the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center April 25-27 1995. The purpose of the workshop was to discuss experimental and computational fluid dynamic activities in rocket propulsion and launch vehicles. The workshop was an open meeting for government, industry, and academia. A broad number of topics were discussed including computational fluid dynamic methodology, liquid and solid rocket propulsion, turbomachinery, combustion, heat transfer, and grid generation.

  5. Nuclear Technology Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmon, J.E.

    1990-10-01

    This document reports on the work done by the Nuclear Technology Programs of the Chemical Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, in the period April--September 1988. These programs involve R ampersand D in three areas: applied physical chemistry, separation science and technology, and nuclear waste management. The work in applied physical chemistry includes investigations into the processes that control the release and transport of fission products under accident-like conditions, the thermophysical properties of selected materials in environments simulating those of fusion energy systems. In the area of separation science and technology, the bulk of the effort is concerned with developing and implementing processes for the removal and concentration of actinides from waste streams contaminated by transuranic elements. Another effort is concerned with examining the feasibility of substituting low-enriched for high-enriched uranium in the production of fission-product 99 Mo. In the area of waste management, investigations are underway on the performance of materials in projected nuclear repository conditions to provide input to the licensing of the nation's high-level waste repositories

  6. Nuclear Technology Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmon, J.E. (ed.)

    1990-10-01

    This document reports on the work done by the Nuclear Technology Programs of the Chemical Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, in the period April--September 1988. These programs involve R D in three areas: applied physical chemistry, separation science and technology, and nuclear waste management. The work in applied physical chemistry includes investigations into the processes that control the release and transport of fission products under accident-like conditions, the thermophysical properties of selected materials in environments simulating those of fusion energy systems. In the area of separation science and technology, the bulk of the effort is concerned with developing and implementing processes for the removal and concentration of actinides from waste streams contaminated by transuranic elements. Another effort is concerned with examining the feasibility of substituting low-enriched for high-enriched uranium in the production of fission-product {sup 99}Mo. In the area of waste management, investigations are underway on the performance of materials in projected nuclear repository conditions to provide input to the licensing of the nation's high-level waste repositories.

  7. Nuclear technology programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmon, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    This document reports on the work done by the Nuclear Technology Programs of the Chemical Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, in the period October 1989--March 1990. These programs involve R ampersand D in three areas: applied physical chemistry, separation science and technology, and nuclear waste management. The work in applied physical chemistry includes investigations into the processes that control the release and transport of fission products under accident-like conditions, the thermophysical properties of metal fuel and blanket materials of the Integral Fast Reactor, and the properties of selected materials in environments simulating those of fusion energy systems. In the area of separation science and technology, the bulk of the effort is concerned with developing and implementing processes for the removal and concentration of actinides from waste streams contaminated by transuranic elements. Another effort is concerned water waste stream generated in production of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene. In the area of waste management, investigations are underway on the performance of materials in projected nuclear repository conditions to provide input to the licensing of the nation's high-level waste repositories

  8. The broad view of nuclear technology for aerospace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buden, D.; Angelo, J.A. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear technologies can directly support advanced space initiatives. For near-Earth missions, nuclear technology can be used to power air traffic control, communications and manufacturing platforms, provide emergency power for manned platforms, provide power for maneuvering units, move asteroids for mining, measure the natural radiation environment, provide radiation protection instruments, and design radiation hardened robotic systems. For the Lunar and Mars surfaces, nuclear technology can be used for base stationary, mobile, and emergency power, energy storage, process heat, nuclear thermal and electric rocket propulsion, excavation and underground engineering, water and sewage treatment and sterilization, food processing and preservation, mineral exploration, self-luminous systems, radiation protection instrumentation, radiation environmental warning systems, and habitat shielding design. Outer planet missions can make use of nuclear technology for power and propulsion. Programs need to be initiated to ensure the full beneficial use of nuclear technologies in advanced space missions

  9. Nuclear technology review 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-08-15

    The viability and credibility of a wide range of nuclear-based technologies require ready access to high-quality atomic, molecular and nuclear data. The demands of new nuclear technologies continue to determine the direction(s) of future data development, including the requirements for data that address innovative fuel cycles, accelerator-driven systems, nuclear incineration, fusion devices, diagnostic and therapeutic medical treatment by radiation, optimization of medical isotope production, non-destructive materials testing, radiation analytical techniques, minerals exploration and land-mine detection. Some recent data development projects with diverse applications are a search engine for Atomic and Molecular data to permit simultaneous data retrieval from a number of different sources for both numerical and bibliographic databases to aid designers. For over 50 years, research reactors have made valuable contributions to the development of nuclear power, basic science, materials development, radioisotope production for medicine and industry, and education and training. They remain core experimental instruments. As of June 2004, 672 research reactors are recorded in the IAEA's Research Reactor Data Base (RRDB), of which 274 are operational in 56 countries (85 in 39 developing countries), 214 are shut down, 168 have been decommissioned and 16 are planned or under construction. Nuclear power supplied 16% of global electricity generation in 2002, and as of 31 December 2003 there were 439 NPPs operating worldwide. Their global energy availability factor has risen steadily from 74.2% in 1991 to approximately 84% in 2003. In 2003 two new NPPs were connected to the grid, a 665 MW(e) pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR) in China and a 960 MW(e) pressurized water reactor (PWR) in the Republic of Korea. In addition Canada restarted two units that had been shutdown. Construction started on one new NPP in India. Four 50 MW(e) units in the UK were retired, as were one 640 MW

  10. Nuclear technology review 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-08-01

    The viability and credibility of a wide range of nuclear-based technologies require ready access to high-quality atomic, molecular and nuclear data. The demands of new nuclear technologies continue to determine the direction(s) of future data development, including the requirements for data that address innovative fuel cycles, accelerator-driven systems, nuclear incineration, fusion devices, diagnostic and therapeutic medical treatment by radiation, optimization of medical isotope production, non-destructive materials testing, radiation analytical techniques, minerals exploration and land-mine detection. Some recent data development projects with diverse applications are a search engine for Atomic and Molecular data to permit simultaneous data retrieval from a number of different sources for both numerical and bibliographic databases to aid designers. For over 50 years, research reactors have made valuable contributions to the development of nuclear power, basic science, materials development, radioisotope production for medicine and industry, and education and training. They remain core experimental instruments. As of June 2004, 672 research reactors are recorded in the IAEA's Research Reactor Data Base (RRDB), of which 274 are operational in 56 countries (85 in 39 developing countries), 214 are shut down, 168 have been decommissioned and 16 are planned or under construction. Nuclear power supplied 16% of global electricity generation in 2002, and as of 31 December 2003 there were 439 NPPs operating worldwide. Their global energy availability factor has risen steadily from 74.2% in 1991 to approximately 84% in 2003. In 2003 two new NPPs were connected to the grid, a 665 MW(e) pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR) in China and a 960 MW(e) pressurized water reactor (PWR) in the Republic of Korea. In addition Canada restarted two units that had been shutdown. Construction started on one new NPP in India. Four 50 MW(e) units in the UK were retired, as were one 640 MW

  11. Reusable Rocket Engine Advanced Health Management System. Architecture and Technology Evaluation: Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettit, C. D.; Barkhoudarian, S.; Daumann, A. G., Jr.; Provan, G. M.; ElFattah, Y. M.; Glover, D. E.

    1999-01-01

    In this study, we proposed an Advanced Health Management System (AHMS) functional architecture and conducted a technology assessment for liquid propellant rocket engine lifecycle health management. The purpose of the AHMS is to improve reusable rocket engine safety and to reduce between-flight maintenance. During the study, past and current reusable rocket engine health management-related projects were reviewed, data structures and health management processes of current rocket engine programs were assessed, and in-depth interviews with rocket engine lifecycle and system experts were conducted. A generic AHMS functional architecture, with primary focus on real-time health monitoring, was developed. Fourteen categories of technology tasks and development needs for implementation of the AHMS were identified, based on the functional architecture and our assessment of current rocket engine programs. Five key technology areas were recommended for immediate development, which (1) would provide immediate benefits to current engine programs, and (2) could be implemented with minimal impact on the current Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) and Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) engine controllers.

  12. Nuclear technology review 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-08-01

    The unifying theme of the Nuclear Technology Review 2002 (NTR-2002) is the importance of innovation. Innovation makes it possible to step beyond incremental evolutionary improvements constrained by diminishing returns. For crop production and public health, for example, the sterile insect technique created a whole new path for future improvements, distinctly different from applying ever larger amounts of pesticides. Nuclear techniques offer a new and safer approach to removing the world's estimated 60,000,000 abandoned land mines. New precision techniques create the potential for ever less intrusive and more effective radiation treatments for cancer. For nuclear power continuing innovation will be a key factor in closing the projection gap between long term global energy scenarios in which nuclear power expands substantially and near term scenarios with only modest expansion or even decline. While the NTR-2002 presents a worldwide review of the state-of-the-art of nuclear science and technology, and not an annual report on IAEA activities, it notes areas where the Agency has a particularly important role to play. Part I of the NTR-2002 'Fundamentals of Nuclear Development', reviews developments in the field of nuclear, atomic and molecular data. Research reactors remain essential to progress in nuclear science and technology. Part I reviews advances in radioisotope production, the use of accelerators and neutron activation analysis relevant to applications ranging from medicine particularly the light against cancer to industry. Part I also reviews developments in nuclear instrumentation and nuclear fusion, particularly in connection with the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. Part II begins with a summary of nuclear power production in 2001. At the end of 2001 there were 438 nuclear power plants (NPPs) in operation, corresponding to a total capacity of 353 GW(e), more than 10000 reactor-years of cumulative operating experience and about 16% of global

  13. Nuclear technology options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvatores, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Different strategies and motivations in different countries have led to diverse options. In Europe the SNETP (Sustainable Nuclear Energy Technology Platform) has the objective of developing R&D supporting GEN-II (present) and GEN-III nuclear systems under development; allowing sustainability and minimisation of waste burden, promoting advanced Gen-IV Fast Reactors; and accounting for a Nuclear Cogeneration Industrial Initiative. A remarkable initiative in the USA has been the promotion of small modular reactors (SMRs) – at less than 300 MWe in capacity, much smaller than typical reactors – which can be an ideal choice for (remote) areas which cannot support a larger reactor. Compact scalable design offers a host of potential safety, construction and economic benefits. More “upbeat” strategies are expected in other areas of the world where significant increase in nuclear energy demand is predicted in the next decades. If this growth materialises, future fuel cycles characteristics, feasibility and acceptability will be crucial. This paper will discuss different scenarios for future fuel cycles, resources optimisation and/or waste minimization, the range from full fast reactor deployment to phase-out, management of spent nuclear fuel and the significant potential benefits of advanced cycles. The next 45 years will be dominated by deployment of standard large or medium size plants operating for 60 years. Available resources do allow it. However, fuel cycle will be a growing and most challenging issue and early assessments will be needed for public acceptance and policy decisions.

  14. Rocket propulsion by nuclear microexplosions and the interstellar paradox

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winterberg, F

    1979-11-01

    Magnetic insulation is discussed with regard to generating ultra-intense ion beams (IIBs) for thermonuclear microexplosion ignition. With energies up to 10 to the 9th Joule reached by IIB pulses or target staging, the ignition of the hydrogen/boron-11 (HB-11) thermonuclear reaction by the addition of DT and fissionable material is considered. In addition, the possibility of HB-11 as a rocket propulsion system utilizing a magnetic mirror whose magnetic field is generated with high field superconductors is discussed in terms of interstellar travel at up to 1/10 the velocity of light. Attention is also given to the possibility of a relatively unique advanced civilization on earth caused by a rare, near-Roche limit capture of the moon and the subsequent tidal effects resulting in a land/water combination favorable for rapid evolution of life forms.

  15. Calculated concentrations of any radionuclide deposited on the ground by release from underground nuclear detonations, tests of nuclear rockets, and tests of nuclear ramjet engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hicks, H.G.

    1981-11-01

    This report presents calculated gamma radiation exposure rates and ground deposition of related radionuclides resulting from three types of event that deposited detectable radioactivity outside the Nevada Test Site complex, namely, underground nuclear detonations, tests of nuclear rocket engines and tests of nuclear ramjet engines

  16. Nuclear technology review 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-08-15

    Cadarache, France.The IAEA's International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO) grew to 24 members, with the addition in 2005 of Ukraine and the United States of America. Current INPRO activities include completion of a user manual on the INPRO methodology, application of the methodology to assessing innovative nuclear energy systems (INSs) in national and multinational studies, analyses of the role and structure of INSs in meeting energy demands in a sustainable manner, and selection of the most suitable areas for collaborative development. Developments in accelerator based techniques, production of radioisotopes and some novel uses of nanotechnology are also reported. Nuclear technologies continue to play key and often unique roles in food production and safety, in human and animal health, in water resource management and in the environment. Mutation breeding of crops, for example, has led to the use of previously unusable land in many countries for rice production. In human health, the use of stable isotopes is becoming an accepted tool for the development of nutrition programmes. Nuclear medicine is benefiting from technological advances in computing. Sustainable water management and desalination remain high on the international agenda. New developments in isotopic analysis of hydrological samples hold promise for increasing the use of isotopes in water resources management. Advances in sampling and analytical techniques have assisted in better understanding of the environment. Developments in all these areas are also reported.

  17. Nuclear technology review 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-08-01

    Cadarache, France.The IAEA's International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO) grew to 24 members, with the addition in 2005 of Ukraine and the United States of America. Current INPRO activities include completion of a user manual on the INPRO methodology, application of the methodology to assessing innovative nuclear energy systems (INSs) in national and multinational studies, analyses of the role and structure of INSs in meeting energy demands in a sustainable manner, and selection of the most suitable areas for collaborative development. Developments in accelerator based techniques, production of radioisotopes and some novel uses of nanotechnology are also reported. Nuclear technologies continue to play key and often unique roles in food production and safety, in human and animal health, in water resource management and in the environment. Mutation breeding of crops, for example, has led to the use of previously unusable land in many countries for rice production. In human health, the use of stable isotopes is becoming an accepted tool for the development of nutrition programmes. Nuclear medicine is benefiting from technological advances in computing. Sustainable water management and desalination remain high on the international agenda. New developments in isotopic analysis of hydrological samples hold promise for increasing the use of isotopes in water resources management. Advances in sampling and analytical techniques have assisted in better understanding of the environment. Developments in all these areas are also reported

  18. Nuclear power reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-09-01

    Risoe National Laboratory was established more than twenty years ago with research and development of nuclear reactor technology as its main objective. The Laboratory has by now accumulated many years of experience in a number of areas vital to nuclear reactor technology. The work and experience of, and services offered by the Laboratory within the following fields are described: Health physics site supervision; Treatment of low and medium level radioactive waste; Core performance evaluation; Transient analysis; Accident analysis; Fuel management; Fuel element design, fabrication and performance evaluation; Non-destructive testing of nuclear fuel; Theoretical and experimental structural analysis; Reliability analysis; Site evaluation. Environmental risk and hazard calculation; Review and analysis of safety documentation. Risoe has already given much assistance to the authorities, utilities and industries in such fields, carrying out work on both light and heavy water reactors. The Laboratory now offers its services to others as a consultant, in education and training of staff, in planning, in qualitative and quantitative analysis, and for the development and specification of fabrication techniques. (author)

  19. Nuclear vapor thermal reactor propulsion technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maya, I.; Diaz, N.J.; Dugan, E.T.; Watanabe, Y.; McClanahan, J.A.; Wen-Hsiung Tu; Carman, R.L.

    1993-01-01

    The conceptual design of a nuclear rocket based on the vapor core reactor is presented. The Nuclear Vapor Thermal Rocket (NVTR) offers the potential for a specific impulse of 1000 to 1200 s at thrust-to-weight ratios of 1 to 2. The design is based on NERVA geometry and systems with the solid fuel replaced by uranium tetrafluoride (UF 4 ) vapor. The closed-loop core does not rely on hydrodynamic confinement of the fuel. The hydrogen propellant is separated from the UF 4 fuel gas by graphite structure. The hydrogen is maintained at high pressure (∼100 atm), and exits the core at 3,100 K to 3,500 K. Zirconium carbide and hafnium carbide coatings are used to protect the hot graphite from the hydrogen. The core is surrounded by beryllium oxide reflector. The nuclear reactor core has been integrated into a 75 klb engine design using an expander cycle and dual turbopumps. The NVTR offers the potential for an incremental technology development pathway to high performance gas core reactors. Since the fuel is readily available, it also offers advantages in the initial cost of development, as it will not require major expenditures for fuel development

  20. Laser Ignition Technology for Bi-Propellant Rocket Engine Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Matthew E.; Bossard, John A.; Early, Jim; Trinh, Huu; Dennis, Jay; Turner, James (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The fiber optically coupled laser ignition approach summarized is under consideration for use in igniting bi-propellant rocket thrust chambers. This laser ignition approach is based on a novel dual pulse format capable of effectively increasing laser generated plasma life times up to 1000 % over conventional laser ignition methods. In the dual-pulse format tinder consideration here an initial laser pulse is used to generate a small plasma kernel. A second laser pulse that effectively irradiates the plasma kernel follows this pulse. Energy transfer into the kernel is much more efficient because of its absorption characteristics thereby allowing the kernel to develop into a much more effective ignition source for subsequent combustion processes. In this research effort both single and dual-pulse formats were evaluated in a small testbed rocket thrust chamber. The rocket chamber was designed to evaluate several bipropellant combinations. Optical access to the chamber was provided through small sapphire windows. Test results from gaseous oxygen (GOx) and RP-1 propellants are presented here. Several variables were evaluated during the test program, including spark location, pulse timing, and relative pulse energy. These variables were evaluated in an effort to identify the conditions in which laser ignition of bi-propellants is feasible. Preliminary results and analysis indicate that this laser ignition approach may provide superior ignition performance relative to squib and torch igniters, while simultaneously eliminating some of the logistical issues associated with these systems. Further research focused on enhancing the system robustness, multiplexing, and window durability/cleaning and fiber optic enhancements is in progress.

  1. Nuclear Technology Review 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-08-15

    The year 2006 saw increasing activities in the field of nuclear power. Significant plans for expansion were announced in some countries and plans for introducing nuclear power in some others. The year began with announcements by both the Russian Federation and the United States of America of international fuel cycle proposals in anticipation of a substantial expansion of nuclear power worldwide. In January, Russian President Vladimir Putin outlined a proposal to create 'a system of international centres providing nuclear fuel cycle services, including enrichment, on a non-discriminatory basis and under the control of the IAEA'. In February, the USA proposed a Global Nuclear Energy Partnership to develop advanced recycling technologies that would not separate pure plutonium; international collaboration in supplying fuel for States which agree not to pursue enrichment and reprocessing; advanced reactors to consume recycled spent fuel while providing energy; and safe and secure small reactors suited to the needs of developing countries. New medium-term projections by the IAEA and the International Energy Agency present a picture with opportunities for substantial nuclear expansion, but still with notable uncertainty. A number of countries have announced plans for significant expansion: China, India, Japan, Pakistan, the Russian Federation and the Republic of Korea. Announcements of planned license applications by US companies and consortia mentioned approximately 25 new reactors. Two site preparation applications were submitted in Canada. A major energy review by the United Kingdom concluded that new nuclear power stations would make a significant contribution to meeting the UK's energy policy goals. Utilities from Estonia, Lithuania and Latvia launched a joint feasibility study of a new nuclear power plant to serve all three countries, and Belarus, Egypt, Indonesia, Nigeria and Turkey made announcements of steps they are taking toward their first nuclear power plants

  2. Nuclear Technology Review 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-08-01

    The year 2006 saw increasing activities in the field of nuclear power. Significant plans for expansion were announced in some countries and plans for introducing nuclear power in some others. The year began with announcements by both the Russian Federation and the United States of America of international fuel cycle proposals in anticipation of a substantial expansion of nuclear power worldwide. In January, Russian President Vladimir Putin outlined a proposal to create 'a system of international centres providing nuclear fuel cycle services, including enrichment, on a non-discriminatory basis and under the control of the IAEA'. In February, the USA proposed a Global Nuclear Energy Partnership to develop advanced recycling technologies that would not separate pure plutonium; international collaboration in supplying fuel for States which agree not to pursue enrichment and reprocessing; advanced reactors to consume recycled spent fuel while providing energy; and safe and secure small reactors suited to the needs of developing countries. New medium-term projections by the IAEA and the International Energy Agency present a picture with opportunities for substantial nuclear expansion, but still with notable uncertainty. A number of countries have announced plans for significant expansion: China, India, Japan, Pakistan, the Russian Federation and the Republic of Korea. Announcements of planned license applications by US companies and consortia mentioned approximately 25 new reactors. Two site preparation applications were submitted in Canada. A major energy review by the United Kingdom concluded that new nuclear power stations would make a significant contribution to meeting the UK's energy policy goals. Utilities from Estonia, Lithuania and Latvia launched a joint feasibility study of a new nuclear power plant to serve all three countries, and Belarus, Egypt, Indonesia, Nigeria and Turkey made announcements of steps they are taking toward their first nuclear power plants

  3. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Design Using LEU Tungsten Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venneri, Paolo; Kim, Yonghee; Husemeyer, Peter and others

    2013-01-01

    This would then open the possibility for the commercial development and implementation of an NTR. The result was a design for a 114.66 kN thrust rocket engine, with an optimized specific impulse of 801 second, and a thrust-to-weight ratio 5.08. The development and analysis of the reactor was done using an integrated neutronics and thermal hydraulics code that combines MCNP5 using ENDF-B/VI cross sections with a purpose-built thermal hydraulics code. A proof of concept has been proposed for W LEU-NTR design. The current design is built upon traditional NTR design work and implements many of the proven design characteristics and materials from previous designs. Despite the current reactor design being preliminary, it already shows promise in being able to have similar, if not better performance characteristics than current and previous NTR designs. Future work will involve the flattening of radial power profile, optimization of the axial power profile, researching methods to address the full water immersion accident scenario, and further studies regarding the breeding potential in the reactor

  4. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Design Using LEU Tungsten Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venneri, Paolo; Kim, Yonghee; Husemeyer, Peter and others

    2013-10-15

    This would then open the possibility for the commercial development and implementation of an NTR. The result was a design for a 114.66 kN thrust rocket engine, with an optimized specific impulse of 801 second, and a thrust-to-weight ratio 5.08. The development and analysis of the reactor was done using an integrated neutronics and thermal hydraulics code that combines MCNP5 using ENDF-B/VI cross sections with a purpose-built thermal hydraulics code. A proof of concept has been proposed for W LEU-NTR design. The current design is built upon traditional NTR design work and implements many of the proven design characteristics and materials from previous designs. Despite the current reactor design being preliminary, it already shows promise in being able to have similar, if not better performance characteristics than current and previous NTR designs. Future work will involve the flattening of radial power profile, optimization of the axial power profile, researching methods to address the full water immersion accident scenario, and further studies regarding the breeding potential in the reactor.

  5. Nuclear energy and nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luescher, E.

    1982-01-01

    This book originated in the training courses for teachers of grammar- and secondary schools in Dillingen (Bavaria). The aim of these courses is to become informed about the latest state in one field of physics. The lectures are well-known experts in the respective fields. In the latest study (1980) of the National Academy of Sciences the experts came to the conclusion that without further development nuclear power plants the utilization of too much coal would become necessary and involve irreversible environmental damage (see chapter 6). There are two important obstacles impeding the further extension of nuclear energy. The first problem to be solved is the processing and storage of radioactive waste. This is a more technical task and can be treated in a satisfactory way. The second obstacle is less easy to take as the population has to be convinced that a nuclear power plant can be operated with almost unbelievable safety (see chapter 5) and be shut down safely in the case of incidents. The most promising possibility of controlled nuclear fusion as energy source is still many decades- if feasible at all- away from being performed (see chapter. 7). In the Soviet Union 25% of the electric energy production shall be proceed from nuclear power plants by the year 1990. (orig./GL) [de

  6. Nuclear science and technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-07-01

    The Program on Nuclear Science and Technology comprehends Nuclear and Condensed Matter Physics, Neutron Activation Analysis, Radiation Metrology, Radioprotection and Radioactive Waste Management. These activities are developed at the Research Reactor Center, the Radiation Metrology Center and the Radioactive Waste Management Laboratory. The Radioprotection activities are developed at all radioactive and nuclear facilities of IPEN-CNEN/SP. The Research Reactor Center at IPEN-CNEN/SP is responsible for the operation and maintenance of the Research Reactor IEA-R1 and has a three-fold mission: promoting basic and applied research in nuclear and neutron related sciences, providing educational opportunities for students in these fields and providing services and applications resulting from the reactor utilization. Specific research programs include nuclear structure study from beta and gamma decay of radioactive nuclei and nuclear reactions, nuclear and neutron metrology, neutron diffraction and neutron multiple-diffraction study for crystalline and magnetic structure determination, perturbed -angular correlation (PAC) using radioactive nuclear probes to study the nuclear hyperfine interactions in solids and instrumental neutron activation analysis, with comparative or ko standardization applied to the fields of health, agriculture, environment, archaeology, reference material production, geology and industry. The research in the areas of applied physics includes neutron radiography, scientific computation and nuclear instrumentation. During the last several years a special effort was made to refurbish the old components and systems of the reactor, particularly those related with the reactor safety improvement, in order to upgrade the reactor power. The primary objective was to modernize the IEA-R1 reactor for safe and sustainable operation to produce primary radioisotopes, such as {sup 99}Mo and {sup 131}I, among several others, used in nuclear medicine, by operating

  7. Nuclear science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The Program on Nuclear Science and Technology comprehends Nuclear and Condensed Matter Physics, Neutron Activation Analysis, Radiation Metrology, Radioprotection and Radioactive Waste Management. These activities are developed at the Research Reactor Center, the Radiation Metrology Center and the Radioactive Waste Management Laboratory. The Radioprotection activities are developed at all radioactive and nuclear facilities of IPEN-CNEN/SP. The Research Reactor Center at IPEN-CNEN/SP is responsible for the operation and maintenance of the Research Reactor IEA-R1 and has a three-fold mission: promoting basic and applied research in nuclear and neutron related sciences, providing educational opportunities for students in these fields and providing services and applications resulting from the reactor utilization. Specific research programs include nuclear structure study from beta and gamma decay of radioactive nuclei and nuclear reactions, nuclear and neutron metrology, neutron diffraction and neutron multiple-diffraction study for crystalline and magnetic structure determination, perturbed -angular correlation (PAC) using radioactive nuclear probes to study the nuclear hyperfine interactions in solids and instrumental neutron activation analysis, with comparative or ko standardization applied to the fields of health, agriculture, environment, archaeology, reference material production, geology and industry. The research in the areas of applied physics includes neutron radiography, scientific computation and nuclear instrumentation. During the last several years a special effort was made to refurbish the old components and systems of the reactor, particularly those related with the reactor safety improvement, in order to upgrade the reactor power. The primary objective was to modernize the IEA-R1 reactor for safe and sustainable operation to produce primary radioisotopes, such as 99 Mo and 131 I, among several others, used in nuclear medicine, by operating the reactor

  8. Nuclear Technology Review 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-08-01

    , on a non-discriminatory basis and under the control of the IAEA. Nineteen countries signed a statement of principles of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership, which aims at accelerating development and deployment of advanced fuel cycle technologies to foster development, improve the environment, and reduce the risk of nuclear proliferation. The NRC approved the release of most of the Big Rock Point nuclear power plant site and most of the Yankee Rowe nuclear power plant site for unrestricted public use. Thus, ten power plants around the world have been completely decommissioned with their sites released for unconditional use. Seventeen plants have been partially dismantled and safely enclosed. Thirty-two are being dismantled prior to eventual site release, and thirty-four reactors are undergoing minimum dismantling prior to long term enclosure. In September, the IAEA launched a new Network of Centres of Excellence for Decommissioning to improve the flow of knowledge and experience among those engaged in decommissioning and to encourage organizations in developed Member States to contribute to the activities of Member States requiring decommissioning assistance. Nuclear and isotopic techniques continue to make substantive contributions in agriculture, human health, the marine and terrestrial environments as well as in water resource management. In food and agriculture, plant mutation breeding is supporting the development of new varieties of crops that bring enhanced yields while also providing significant environmental benefits through reduced requirements for fertilizers and increased resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses. The genetic enhancement of biomass crops is useful in responding to increasing demands for biofuels. In addition to the continuing use of irradiation for sanitary purposes, the use of irradiation for phytosanitary applications, especially those applications related to quarantine measures, is increasing.

  9. Nuclear Technology Review 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-08-15

    , on a non-discriminatory basis and under the control of the IAEA. Nineteen countries signed a statement of principles of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership, which aims at accelerating development and deployment of advanced fuel cycle technologies to foster development, improve the environment, and reduce the risk of nuclear proliferation. The NRC approved the release of most of the Big Rock Point nuclear power plant site and most of the Yankee Rowe nuclear power plant site for unrestricted public use. Thus, ten power plants around the world have been completely decommissioned with their sites released for unconditional use. Seventeen plants have been partially dismantled and safely enclosed. Thirty-two are being dismantled prior to eventual site release, and thirty-four reactors are undergoing minimum dismantling prior to long term enclosure. In September, the IAEA launched a new Network of Centres of Excellence for Decommissioning to improve the flow of knowledge and experience among those engaged in decommissioning and to encourage organizations in developed Member States to contribute to the activities of Member States requiring decommissioning assistance. Nuclear and isotopic techniques continue to make substantive contributions in agriculture, human health, the marine and terrestrial environments as well as in water resource management. In food and agriculture, plant mutation breeding is supporting the development of new varieties of crops that bring enhanced yields while also providing significant environmental benefits through reduced requirements for fertilizers and increased resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses. The genetic enhancement of biomass crops is useful in responding to increasing demands for biofuels. In addition to the continuing use of irradiation for sanitary purposes, the use of irradiation for phytosanitary applications, especially those applications related to quarantine measures, is increasing.

  10. Nuclear Propulsion through Direct Conversion of Fusion Energy: The Fusion Driven Rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slough, John; Pancotti, Anthony; Kirtley, David; Pihl, Christopher; Pfaff, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The future of manned space exploration and development of space depends critically on the creation of a dramatically more proficient propulsion architecture for in-space transportation. A very persuasive reason for investigating the applicability of nuclear power in rockets is the vast energy density gain of nuclear fuel when compared to chemical combustion energy. Current nuclear fusion efforts have focused on the generation of electric grid power and are wholly inappropriate for space transportation as the application of a reactor based fusion-electric system creates a colossal mass and heat rejection problem for space application.

  11. Nuclear Rocket Test Facility Decommissioning Including Controlled Explosive Demolition of a Neutron-Activated Shield Wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michael Kruzic

    2007-01-01

    Located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site, the Test Cell A Facility was used in the 1960s for the testing of nuclear rocket engines, as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Program. The facility was decontaminated and decommissioned (D and D) in 2005 using the Streamlined Approach For Environmental Restoration (SAFER) process, under the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Utilities and process piping were verified void of contents, hazardous materials were removed, concrete with removable contamination decontaminated, large sections mechanically demolished, and the remaining five-foot, five-inch thick radiologically-activated reinforced concrete shield wall demolished using open-air controlled explosive demolition (CED). CED of the shield wall was closely monitored and resulted in no radiological exposure or atmospheric release

  12. Nuclear medicine technology study guide

    CERN Document Server

    Patel, Dee

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear Medicine Technology Study Guide presents a comprehensive review of nuclear medicine principles and concepts necessary for technologists to pass board examinations. The practice questions and content follow the guidelines of the Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board (NMTCB) and American Registry of Radiological Technologists (ARRT), allowing test takers to maximize their success in passing the examinations. The book is organized by sections of increasing difficulty, with over 600 multiple-choice questions covering all areas of nuclear medicine, including radiation safety; radi

  13. Nuclear power technology requirements for NASA exploration missions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloomfield, H.S.

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses how future exploration of the Moon and Mars will mandate developments in many areas of technology. In particular, major advances will be required in planet surface power systems and space transportation systems. Critical nuclear technology challenges that can enable strategic self-sufficiency, acceptable operational costs and cost-effective space transportation goals for NASA exploration missions have been identified. Critical technologies for surface power systems include stationary and mobile nuclear reactor and radio-isotope heat sources coupled to static and dynamic power conversion devices. These technologies can provide dramatic reductions in mass leading to operational and transportation cost savings. Critical technologies for space transportation systems include nuclear thermal rocket and nuclear electric propulsion options which present compelling concepts for significantly reducing mass, cost or travel time required for Earth-Mars transport

  14. Nuclear thermal rocket clustering: 1, A summary of previous work and relevant issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buksa, J.J.; Houts, M.G.

    1991-01-01

    A general review of the technical merits of nuclear thermal rocket clustering is presented. A summary of previous analyses performed during the Rover program is presented and used to assess clustering in the context of projected Space Exploration Initiative missions. A number of technical issues are discussed including cluster reliability, engine-out operation, neutronic coupling, shutdown core power generation, shutdown reactivity requirements, reactor kinetics, and radiation shielding. 7 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  15. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) Phase II Upgrade Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emrich, William J.; Moran, Robert P.; Pearson, J. Bose

    2013-01-01

    To support the on-going nuclear thermal propulsion effort, a state-of-the-art non nuclear experimental test setup has been constructed to evaluate the performance characteristics of candidate fuel element materials and geometries in representative environments. The facility to perform this testing is referred to as the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environment Simulator (NTREES). This device can simulate the environmental conditions (minus the radiation) to which nuclear rocket fuel components will be subjected during reactor operation. Test articles mounted in the simulator are inductively heated in such a manner so as to accurately reproduce the temperatures and heat fluxes which would normally occur as a result of nuclear fission and would be exposed to flowing hydrogen. Initial testing of a somewhat prototypical fuel element has been successfully performed in NTREES and the facility has now been shutdown to allow for an extensive reconfiguration of the facility which will result in a significant upgrade in its capabilities. Keywords: Nuclear Thermal Propulsion, Simulator

  16. Rockets: An Educator's Guide with Activities in Science, Mathematics, and Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    This educational guide discusses rockets and includes activities in science, mathematics, and technology. It begins with background information on the history of rocketry, scientific principles, and practical rocketry. The sections on scientific principles and practical rocketry focus on Sir Isaac Newton's Three Laws of Motion. These laws explain…

  17. National Nuclear Technology Map Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, J. I.; Lee, T. J.; Yoon, S. W.

    2005-03-01

    The objective of NuTRM is to prepare a plan of nuclear R and D and technological innovations which is very likely to make nuclear technology a promising power source for future national developments. The NuTRM finds out systematically the nuclear R and D vision and the high-value-added strategic technologies to be developed by the efficient cooperation of actors including government, industry, academy and research institute by 2020. In other words, NuTRM aims at a long-term strategic planning of nuclear R and D and technological innovation in order to promote the socio-economic contributions of nuclear science and technology for the nation's future competitiveness and sustainable development and to raise the global status of the Korean nuclear R and D and Industry

  18. Conventional and Bimodal Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) Artificial Gravity Mars Transfer Vehicle Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowski, Stanley K.; McCurdy, David R.; Packard, Thomas W.

    2016-01-01

    A variety of countermeasures have been developed to address the debilitating physiological effects of zero-gravity (0-g) experienced by cosmonauts and astronauts during their approximately 0.5 to 1.2 year long stays in low Earth orbit (LEO). Longer interplanetary flights, combined with possible prolonged stays in Mars orbit, could subject crewmembers to up to approximately 2.5 years of weightlessness. In view of known and recently diagnosed problems associated with 0-g, an artificial gravity (AG) spacecraft offers many advantages and may indeed be an enabling technology for human flights to Mars. A number of important human factors must be taken into account in selecting the rotation radius, rotation rate, and orientation of the habitation module or modules. These factors include the gravity gradient effect, radial and tangential Coriolis forces, along with cross-coupled acceleration effects. Artificial gravity Mars transfer vehicle (MTV) concepts are presented that utilize both conventional NTR, as well as, enhanced bimodal nuclear thermal rocket (BNTR) propulsion. The NTR is a proven technology that generates high thrust and has a specific impulse (Isp) capability of approximately 900 s-twice that of today's best chemical rockets. The AG/MTV concepts using conventional Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) carry twin cylindrical International Space Station (ISS)- type habitation modules with their long axes oriented either perpendicular or parallel to the longitudinal spin axis of the MTV and utilize photovoltaic arrays (PVAs) for spacecraft power. The twin habitat modules are connected to a central operations hub located at the front of the MTV via two pressurized tunnels that provide the rotation radius for the habitat modules. For the BNTR AG/MTV option, each engine has its own closed secondary helium(He)-xenon (Xe) gas loop and Brayton Rotating Unit (BRU) that can generate 10s of kilowatts (kWe) of spacecraft electrical power during the mission coast phase

  19. From A-4 to Explorer 1. [U.S. rocket and missile technology historical review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debus, K. H.

    1973-01-01

    Historical review of the development of rocket and missile technology in the United States over the period from 1945 to 1958. Attention is given to the organization of activities, the launch facilities, and the scope of test rocket firings at the White Sands Proving Ground area during the initial phase of research with captured German V2 rockets. The development of the Redstone missiles is outlined by discussing aspects of military involvement, cooperation with industrial suppliers, details of ground support equipment, and results of initial test firings. Subsequent development of the Jupiter missiles is examined in a similar manner, and attention is given to activities involved in the launching of the Explorer 1 satellite.

  20. Introduction to nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Pasques, R.H.

    1978-01-01

    In the 14 chapters of this text book intended for Spanish speaking university students, basic information is given on the different topics of Nucleonics, subdivided into: nuclear structure, stable and radioactive nucleids, nuclear and secondary radiations, radioactivity measurements, bombarding particles (accelerated ions, neutrons, photons), accelerators, elements of radiological physics, nuclear reactions, fissionable materials, nuclear reactors, production of radioactive materials, nucleonic applications, and a description of nuclear activities in Latin America. (M.E.L.) [es

  1. Nuclear medical technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daga, Avinash; Sharma, Smita; Sharma, K.S.

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear medical technology helps to use radiopharmaceuticals (drugs that give off radiation) to diagnose and treat illness. A more recent development is Positron Emission Tomography (PET) which is a more precise and sophisticated technique that uses isotopes produced in a cyclotron. F-18 in FDG (fluorodeoxyglucose) is one such positron-emitting radionuclide. Chemically, it is 2-deoxy-2-( 18 F) fluoro-D-glucose, a glucose analog with the positron-emitting radioactive isotope fluorine-18 substituted for the normal hydroxyl group at the 2' position in the glucose molecule. It is introduced, usually by injection, and then it gets accumulated in the target tissue. As it decays it emits a positron, which promptly combines with a nearby electron resulting in the simultaneous emission of two identifiable gamma rays in opposite directions. These are detected by a PET camera when the patient is placed in the PET scanner for a series of one or more scans which may take from 20 minutes to as long as an hour. It gives very precise indication of their origin. 18 F in FDG (fluorodeoxyglucose) has become very important in detection of cancers and the monitoring of progress in their treatment, using PET. (author)

  2. INVESTIGATION OF MARKETING TECHNOLOGIES IN THE INNOVATION PROCESS OF ROCKET AND SPACE INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. B. Dobrova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article we have studied the use of marketing technologies in the innovation process of enterprises of rocket and space industry. The present study specifies the relevance of chosen research topic, as well as the essence of marketing innovations at the enterprises of rocket and space industry, the structuring of marketing and management processes in the innovation process. There are provided the most common analytical instruments in the marketing and there is marked the importance of use of a global strategy for the enterprises of rocket and space industry. The article also specifies a clear example of application of marketing technologies in the innovation process of the Federal State Unitary Enterprise "State Space Research and Production Center named after Khrunichev M.V'.'. At the beginning the role and place of innovation management and innovation process in the strategic management of the FSUE "SSRPC named after Khrunichev M.V." are shown. Then there are described the basic marketing methods of program-oriented management of the innovation process in the FSUE "SSRPC named after Khrunichev M.V"" and there is highlighted the innovation marketing strategy of the FSUE "SSRPC named after Khrunichev M.V.". There are presented the distinctive features of the competitive strategy of the company of the rocket and space industry and the features of formation (development of the innovative enterprise development strategy based on marketing innovation in the FSUE "SSRPC named after Khrunichev M.V.". The conclusion includes the main findings of the study conducted.

  3. Modeling Transients and Designing a Passive Safety System for a Nuclear Thermal Rocket Using Relap5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatry, Jivan

    Long-term high payload missions necessitate the need for nuclear space propulsion. Several nuclear reactor types were investigated by the Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application (NERVA) program of National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Study of planned/unplanned transients on nuclear thermal rockets is important due to the need for long-term missions. A NERVA design known as the Pewee I was selected for this purpose. The following transients were run: (i) modeling of corrosion-induced blockages on the peripheral fuel element coolant channels and their impact on radiation heat transfer in the core, and (ii) modeling of loss-of-flow-accidents (LOFAs) and their impact on radiation heat transfer in the core. For part (i), the radiation heat transfer rate of blocked channels increases while their neighbors' decreases. For part (ii), the core radiation heat transfer rate increases while the flow rate through the rocket system is decreased. However, the radiation heat transfer decreased while there was a complete LOFA. In this situation, the peripheral fuel element coolant channels handle the majority of the radiation heat transfer. Recognizing the LOFA as the most severe design basis accident, a passive safety system was designed in order to respond to such a transient. This design utilizes the already existing tie rod tubes and connects them to a radiator in a closed loop. Hence, this is basically a secondary loop. The size of the core is unchanged. During normal steady-state operation, this secondary loop keeps the moderator cool. Results show that the safety system is able to remove the decay heat and prevent the fuel elements from melting, in response to a LOFA and subsequent SCRAM.

  4. Cryogenics in nuclear reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dharmadurai, G.

    1982-01-01

    The cryogenic technology has significantly contributed to the development of several proven techniques for use in the nuclear power industry. A noteworthy feature is the unique role of cryogenics in minimising the release of radioactive and some chemical pollutants to the environment during the operation of various plants associated with this industry. The salient technological features of several cryogenic processes relevant to the nuclear reactor technology are discussed. (author)

  5. Future nuclear systems technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, H.

    1979-01-01

    Five directions can be identified for evolution of nuclear systems, possibly a sixth. These are, first, and perhaps most important, toward a means of extending fissile resources through improvement of the efficiency of their use; second, improvements in nuclear safety; third, reduction in the environmental impacts of nuclear electric power generation, particularly water requirements; fourth, improvements in proliferation resistance of the nuclear fuel cycle; and fifth, improvements in economics. And added in a sixth, and somewhat more speculative direction, the use of nuclear power for purposes other than the direct generation of electricity

  6. Nuclear Technology Review 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-08-01

    With 434 nuclear power reactors in operation worldwide at the end of 2013, nuclear energy had a global generating capacity of 371.7 GW(e). There were four new grid connections and ten construction starts on new reactors. Belarus became the second nuclear ‘newcomer’ State in three decades to start building its first nuclear power plant. Near and long term growth prospects remained centred in Asia, particularly in China. The 72 reactors under construction in 2013 represented the highest number since 1989. Of these, 48 were in Asia, as were 42 of the last 52 new reactors to have been connected to the grid since 2000. Thirty States currently use nuclear power and about the same number are considering including it as part of their energy mix. Of the 30 States already operating nuclear power plants, 13 are either constructing new plants or actively completing previously suspended constructions, and 12 are planning to either construct new plants or to complete suspended constructions. The IAEA Ministerial Conference on Nuclear Power in the 21st Century, held in June 2013, reaffirmed that nuclear power remains an important option for many States to improve energy security, reduce the impact of volatile fossil fuels prices and mitigate the effects of climate change. The Concluding Statement said that “nuclear power, as a stable base-load source of electricity in an era of ever increasing global energy demands, complements other energy sources including renewables.” In the IAEA’s 2013 projections, nuclear power is expected to grow by between 17% as the low projection and 94% as the high projection by 2030. These figures are slightly lower than projected in 2012, reflecting the continued impact of the Fukushima Daiichi accident, the low prices of natural gas and the increasing use of renewable energy. Additional information focuses on the linkages between nuclear power and climate change, as nuclear power, hydropower and wind energy have the lowest life cycle

  7. Nuclear technology is dead - long live nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, G.

    1976-01-01

    While a group of German scientists asked for a moratorium for nuclear power plants in the Heidelberg memorandum, lecturers at the Reaktortagung in Duesseldorf offered convincing arguments in favour of nuclear technology and for the necessity of safety. Almost 2,000 participants, about 200 of those from 26 different countries, listened to 235 individual lectures on the state of science and technology. Main topics were activities in reactor safety research carried out in industry and in various institutes. (orig./RW) [de

  8. Nuclear Rocket Facility Decommissioning Project: Controlled Explosive Demolition of Neutron-Activated Shield Wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michael R. Kruzic

    2007-01-01

    Located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), the Test Cell A (TCA) Facility was used in the early to mid-1960s for the testing of nuclear rocket engines, as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Program, to further space travel. Nuclear rocket testing resulted in the activation of materials around the reactors and the release of fission products and fuel particles in the immediate area. Identified as Corrective Action Unit 115, the TCA facility was decontaminated and decommissioned (D and D) from December 2004 to July 2005 using the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) process, under the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order''. The SAFER process allows environmental remediation and facility closure activities (i.e., decommissioning) to occur simultaneously provided technical decisions are made by an experienced decision maker within the site conceptual site model, identified in the Data Quality Objective process. Facility closure involved a seven-step decommissioning strategy. Key lessons learned from the project included: (1) Targeted preliminary investigation activities provided a more solid technical approach, reduced surprises and scope creep, and made the working environment safer for the D and D worker. (2) Early identification of risks and uncertainties provided opportunities for risk management and mitigation planning to address challenges and unanticipated conditions. (3) Team reviews provided an excellent mechanism to consider all aspects of the task, integrated safety into activity performance, increase team unity and ''buy-in'' and promoted innovative and time saving ideas. (4) Development of CED protocols ensured safety and control. (5) The same proven D and D strategy is now being employed on the larger ''sister'' facility, Test Cell C

  9. Nuclear Forensics Technologies in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinohara, N.; Kimura, Y.; Okubo, A.; Tomikawa, H.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear forensics is the analysis of intercepted illicit nuclear or radioactive material and any associated material to provide evidence for nuclear attribution by determining origin, history, transit routes and purpose involving such material. Nuclear forensics activities include sampling of the illicit material, analysis of the samples and evaluation of the attribution by comparing the analysed data with database or numerical simulation. Because the nuclear forensics methodologies provide hints of the origin of the nuclear materials used in illegal dealings or nuclear terrorism, it contributes to identify and indict offenders, hence to enhance deterrent effect against such terrorism. Worldwide network on nuclear forensics can lead to strengthening global nuclear security regime. In the ESARDA Symposium 2015, the results of research and development of fundamental nuclear forensics technologies performed in Japan Atomic Energy Agency during the term of 2011-2013 were reported, namely (1) technique to analyse isotopic composition of nuclear material, (2) technique to identify the impurities contained in the material, (3) technique to determine the age of the purified material by measuring the isotopic ratio of daughter thorium to parent uranium, (4) technique to make image data by observing particle shapes with electron microscope, and (5) prototype nuclear forensics library for comparison of the analysed data with database in order to evaluate its evidence such as origin and history. Japan’s capability on nuclear forensics and effective international cooperation are also mentioned for contribution to the international nuclear forensics community.

  10. Radiation chemistry in nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsumura, Yosuke

    2006-01-01

    The importance of radiation chemistry in the field of nuclear technology including reactor chemistry, spent fuel reprocessing and radioactive high level waste repository, is summarized and, in parallel, our research activity will be briefly presented. (author)

  11. Nuclear Proliferation Technology Trends Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zentner, Michael D.; Coles, Garill A.; Talbert, Robert J.

    2005-10-04

    A process is underway to develop mature, integrated methodologies to address nonproliferation issues. A variety of methodologies (both qualitative and quantitative) are being considered. All have one thing in common, a need for a consistent set of proliferation related data that can be used as a basis for application. One approach to providing a basis for predicting and evaluating future proliferation events is to understand past proliferation events, that is, the different paths that have actually been taken to acquire or attempt to acquire special nuclear material. In order to provide this information, this report describing previous material acquisition activities (obtained from open source material) has been prepared. This report describes how, based on an evaluation of historical trends in nuclear technology development, conclusions can be reached concerning: (1) The length of time it takes to acquire a technology; (2) The length of time it takes for production of special nuclear material to begin; and (3) The type of approaches taken for acquiring the technology. In addition to examining time constants, the report is intended to provide information that could be used to support the use of the different non-proliferation analysis methodologies. Accordingly, each section includes: (1) Technology description; (2) Technology origin; (3) Basic theory; (4) Important components/materials; (5) Technology development; (6) Technological difficulties involved in use; (7) Changes/improvements in technology; (8) Countries that have used/attempted to use the technology; (9) Technology Information; (10) Acquisition approaches; (11) Time constants for technology development; and (12) Required Concurrent Technologies.

  12. Nuclear Technology Review 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-09-01

    In 2011, nuclear energy continued to play an important role in global electricity production despite the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (NPP). Total generating nuclear power capacity was slightly lower than in previous years due to the permanent shutdown of 13 reactors in 2011, including 8 in Germany and 4 in Japan in the wake of the accident. However, there were 7 new grid connections compared to 5 in 2010, 2 in 2009 and none in 2008. Significant growth in the use of nuclear energy worldwide is still anticipated - between 35% and 100% by 2030 - although the Agency projections for 2030 are 7-8% lower than projections made in 2010. The factors that have contributed to an increased interest in nuclear power did not change: an increasing global demand for energy, concerns about climate change, energy security and uncertainty about fossil fuel supplies. Most of the growth is still expected in countries that already have operating NPPs, especially in Asia, with China and India remaining the main centres of expansion while the Russian Federation will also remain a centre of strong growth. The 7-8% drop in projected growth for 2030 reflects an accelerated phase-out of nuclear power in Germany, some immediate shutdowns and a government review of the planned expansion in Japan, as well as temporary delays in expansion in several other countries. Measures taken by countries as a result of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident have been varied. A number of countries announced reviews of their programmes. Belgium, Germany and Switzerland took additional steps to phase out nuclear power entirely while others re-emphasized their expansion plans. Many Member States carried out national safety assessment reviews in 2011 (often called 'stress tests'), and commitments were made to complete any remaining assessments promptly and to implement the necessary corrective action. In countries considering the introduction of nuclear power, interest remained strong

  13. Technology of nuclear war

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broda, E.

    1973-01-01

    This Article is the Note of a lecture, which was hold by Engelbert Borda at the Catholic-Theological Faculty of the University of Vienna in 27. 03. 1973. The author describes the development of modern nuclear weapon systems and the resulting war strategies. He is concerned about a possible end of the ‚balance of terror’ and the development in automation of nuclear strike back strategies. (rössner) [de

  14. Nuclear Technology Review 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-08-01

    With 438 reactors operating at the end of 2014, nuclear energy had a global generating capacity of 376.2 GW(e). There was only one permanent shutdown. There were five new grid connections and three construction starts on new reactors. Near and long term growth prospects remained centred in Asia, particularly in China. Of the 70 reactors under construction, 46 were in Asia, as were 32 of the last 40 reactors that have been connected to the grid since 2004. Thirty countries currently use nuclear power and about the same number are considering, planning or actively working to include it as part of their energy mix. Of the 30 operating countries, 13 are either constructing new plants or actively completing previously suspended construction projects, and 12 are planning either to construct new plants or to complete suspended construction projects. Several countries that have decided to introduce nuclear power are at advanced stages of infrastructure preparation. The IAEA’s 2014 projections show a growth between 8% and 88% in nuclear power capacity by the year 2030. Growth of population and demand for electricity in the developing world, recognition of the role nuclear power plays in reducing greenhouse gas emissions, the importance of security of energy supply and the volatility of fossil fuel prices point to nuclear energy playing an important role in the energy mix in the long run. Safety improvements have continued to be made at nuclear power plants (NPPs) throughout the world. These have included identifying and applying lessons learned from the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, improving the effectiveness of defence in depth, strengthening emergency preparedness and response capabilities, enhancing capacity building, and protecting people and the environment from ionizing radiation

  15. New nuclear technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchard, J.; Thomas, J.B.

    2001-01-01

    The potential of nuclear energy for sustainable development is based on its competitiveness, environmental friendliness and sustainability of natural resources. The improvements to be achieved relate to cleanliness (by reducing the production of long lived radioactive waste), safety demonstration and sobriety which contributes to minimise the consumption of natural resources. The current level of competitiveness, which is fairly good, has to be maintained. The required improvements benefit from a high efficiency and a simpler architecture of industrial systems; they imply the recycling of nuclear materials and a high efficiency of nuclear combustion. The latter requires a hardened spectrum using fast neutrons, which makes the nuclear core 'omnivorous' as for transuranics. The studies must take into account reactor design, nuclear fuel and fuel cycle. Diverse coolants (water, gas, liquid metals) are considered, with solid fuel (pins, particles) and reprocessing by hydrometallurgical or pyrochemical processes, as well as liquid fuel reactors. Several ways of combining options look promising. The required time before industrial implementation is highly variable. A nuclear fleet can include diversified, specialized components and new applications (hydrogen production) can be envisaged. The R and D programme will rely on the development of simulation power and will imply a strong international cooperation. (authors)

  16. Nuclear technology and Latin America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raja Mohan, C.

    1980-01-01

    Developments in nuclear technology in Latin American countries, particularly in Argentina and Brazil, have been surveyed. In their efforts to acquire self-reliance in the nuclear field independently i.e. without seeking help from U.S.A., Argentina and Brazil came to accept stringent foreign controls on their nuclear programmes which envisage having a complete nuclear fuel cycle. Their struggle against the discriminatory nature of the NPT has become more or less theoretical. Moreover, the Latin American countries have signed the Tlatelolco treaty which prohibits testing, use, manufacture or acquisition of nuclear weapons. An encouraging feature is, however, growing bilateral and multilateral cooperation in the nuclear energy sector. It is illustrated by citing the example of the Argentina-Brazil nuclear cooperation agreement. The political significance of this development for the third world is discussed. (M.G.B.)

  17. Advanced technology for nuclear powerplants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohm, H.H.

    1987-01-01

    Advanced technology offers significant potential benefit to the nuclear industry. Improvements can be anticipated in plant performance, reliability, and overall plant safety as well as reduced life cycle costs. Utilizing artificial intelligence and expert systems, robotics, advanced instruments and controls, and modularization technologies can enhance plant operations and provide new insights and perspectives to plant risk and thus focus resources to areas of importance. Plant reliability, operability, availability, accident interdiction and limitation, and plant recovery are expected to improve. However, utilizing these technologies is not an automatic process. In addition to the actual costs associated with developing and implementing the technologies, operator training and acceptance represents a potential significant problem. Traditional plant operators have little or no experience with computer technology. There has already been some difficulty getting nuclear plant operators to accept and use the new technologies that have been implemented to accept and use the new technologies that have been implemented thus far

  18. Nuclear Technology Review 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-09-15

    In 2009, construction started on 12 new nuclear power reactors, the largest number since 1985, and projections of future nuclear power growth were once again revised upwards. However, only two new reactors were connected to the grid, and, with three reactors retired during the year, the total nuclear power capacity around the world dropped slightly for the second year in a row. Current expansion, as well as near term and long term growth prospects, remain centred in Asia. Ten of the 12 construction starts were in Asia, as were both of the new grid connections. Although the global financial crisis that started in the second half of 2008 did not dampen overall projections for nuclear power, it was cited as a contributing factor in near-term delays or postponements affecting nuclear projects in some regions of the world. In some European countries where previously there were restrictions on the future use of nuclear power, there was a trend towards reconsidering these policies. Interest in starting new nuclear power programmes remained high. Over 60 Member States have expressed to the IAEA interest in considering the introduction of nuclear power, and, in 2009, the IAEA conducted its first Integrated Nuclear Infrastructure Review missions in Jordan, Indonesia and Vietnam. Estimates of identified conventional uranium resources (at less than $130/kg U) increased slightly, due mainly to increases reported by Australia, Canada and Namibia. Uranium spot prices declined, and final data for 2009 are expected to show a consequent decrease in uranium exploration and development. The Board of Governors has authorized the IAEA Director General to sign an agreement with the Russian Federation to establish an international reserve of low enriched uranium (LEU). It would contain 120 tonnes of LEU that could be made available to a country affected by a non-commercial interruption of its LEU supply. The agreement between the IAEA and the Russian Federation was signed in March 2010

  19. Nuclear Technology Review 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-09-01

    In 2009, construction started on 12 new nuclear power reactors, the largest number since 1985, and projections of future nuclear power growth were once again revised upwards. However, only two new reactors were connected to the grid, and, with three reactors retired during the year, the total nuclear power capacity around the world dropped slightly for the second year in a row. Current expansion, as well as near term and long term growth prospects, remain centred in Asia. Ten of the 12 construction starts were in Asia, as were both of the new grid connections. Although the global financial crisis that started in the second half of 2008 did not dampen overall projections for nuclear power, it was cited as a contributing factor in near-term delays or postponements affecting nuclear projects in some regions of the world. In some European countries where previously there were restrictions on the future use of nuclear power, there was a trend towards reconsidering these policies. Interest in starting new nuclear power programmes remained high. Over 60 Member States have expressed to the IAEA interest in considering the introduction of nuclear power, and, in 2009, the IAEA conducted its first Integrated Nuclear Infrastructure Review missions in Jordan, Indonesia and Vietnam. Estimates of identified conventional uranium resources (at less than $130/kg U) increased slightly, due mainly to increases reported by Australia, Canada and Namibia. Uranium spot prices declined, and final data for 2009 are expected to show a consequent decrease in uranium exploration and development. The Board of Governors has authorized the IAEA Director General to sign an agreement with the Russian Federation to establish an international reserve of low enriched uranium (LEU). It would contain 120 tonnes of LEU that could be made available to a country affected by a non-commercial interruption of its LEU supply. The agreement between the IAEA and the Russian Federation was signed in March 2010

  20. An improved heat transfer configuration for a solid-core nuclear thermal rocket engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, J.S.; Walton, J.T.; Mcguire, M.L.

    1992-07-01

    Interrupted flow, impingement cooling, and axial power distribution are employed to enhance the heat-transfer configuration of a solid-core nuclear thermal rocket engine. Impingement cooling is introduced to increase the local heat-transfer coefficients between the reactor material and the coolants. Increased fuel loading is used at the inlet end of the reactor to enhance heat-transfer capability where the temperature differences are the greatest. A thermal-hydraulics computer program for an unfueled NERVA reactor core is employed to analyze the proposed configuration with attention given to uniform fuel loading, number of channels through the impingement wafers, fuel-element length, mass-flow rate, and wafer gap. The impingement wafer concept (IWC) is shown to have heat-transfer characteristics that are better than those of the NERVA-derived reactor at 2500 K. The IWC concept is argued to be an effective heat-transfer configuration for solid-core nuclear thermal rocket engines. 11 refs

  1. Analysis of plume backflow around a nozzle lip in a nuclear rocket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, C.H.; Kim, S.C.; Stubbs, R.M.; De Witt, K.J.

    1993-06-01

    The structure of the flow around a nuclear thermal rocket nozzle lip has been investigated using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method. Special attention has been paid to the behavior of a small amount of harmful particles that may be present in the rocket exhaust gas. The harmful fission product particles are modeled by four inert gases whose molecular weights are in a range of 4 131. Atomic hydrogen, which exists in the flow due to the extremely high nuclear fuel temperature in the reactor, is also included. It is shown that the plume backflow is primarily determined by the thin subsonic fluid layer adjacent to the surface of the nozzle lip, and that the inflow boundary in the plume region has negligible effect on the backflow. It is also shown that a relatively large amount of the lighter species is scattered into the backflow region while the amount of the heavier species becomes negligible in this region due to extreme separation between the species. Results indicate that the backscattered molecules are very energetic and are fast-moving along the surface in the backflow region near the nozzle lip. 22 refs

  2. A computational model for thermal fluid design analysis of nuclear thermal rockets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Given, J.A.; Anghaie, S.

    1997-01-01

    A computational model for simulation and design analysis of nuclear thermal propulsion systems has been developed. The model simulates a full-topping expander cycle engine system and the thermofluid dynamics of the core coolant flow, accounting for the real gas properties of the hydrogen propellant/coolant throughout the system. Core thermofluid studies reveal that near-wall heat transfer models currently available may not be applicable to conditions encountered within some nuclear rocket cores. Additionally, the possibility of a core thermal fluid instability at low mass fluxes and the effects of the core power distribution are investigated. Results indicate that for tubular core coolant channels, thermal fluid instability is not an issue within the possible range of operating conditions in these systems. Findings also show the advantages of having a nonflat centrally peaking axial core power profile from a fluid dynamic standpoint. The effects of rocket operating conditions on system performance are also investigated. Results show that high temperature and low pressure operation is limited by core structural considerations, while low temperature and high pressure operation is limited by system performance constraints. The utility of these programs for finding these operational limits, optimum operating conditions, and thermal fluid effects is demonstrated

  3. Canada's commitment to nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, Murray J.

    1998-01-01

    This paper gives a broad update on all facets of the Canadian nuclear industry and demonstrates Canada's continuing commitment to nuclear technology. Canada has developed a global leadership position in nuclear technology for power generation, uranium production and isotope supply. This commitment is being further enhanced by successes in international markets with Candu technology, new uranium mine developments in our province of Saskatchewan, and expanding isotope capabilities including the construction of two new production reactors. Korea's economy is benefiting through collaboration with Canada's leading nuclear companies, both in Korea and Canada. These collaborations have the potential to expand considerably with the implementation of the Kyoto Framework Convention on Climate Change and the anticipated increased demand for new nuclear power generation installations in all major global markets. Much has been publicized about the situation surrounding Ontario Hydro Nuclear and its nuclear recovery program. This paper gives the background and highlights the actions within Ontario and Ontario Hydro designed to ensure the long term recovery of all twenty nuclear units in Ontario. The presentation at the conference will bring the audience completely up-to-date on recent events. (author)

  4. Doubts on nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    The conversation is concerned with the pros and cons of nuclear power with regard to growth of the economy, use of energy, energy policy and the social point of view. First of all one should cover the present energy demand with a very wide spectrum, in order to save natural oil as primary energy source. The rate of growth is predicted at too high a rate (German model). A certain undercapacity in the base load region (water power or brown coal fired and nuclear power stations) with a high excess capacity in the medium load range (hard coal or oil fired power stations with full use of refining capacity) limits the construction of nuclear power stations, but contradicts the policy using coal. The scientists cannot evade the requirement of helping the politicians to decide. (GL) [de

  5. Technology of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravelet, F.

    2016-01-01

    This academic report for graduation in engineering first presents operation principles of a nuclear reactor core. It presents core components, atomic nuclei, the notions of transmutation and radioactivity, quantities used to characterize ionizing radiations, the nuclear fission, statistical aspects of fission and differences between fast and slow neutrons, a comparison between various heat transfer fluids, the uranium enrichment process, and different types of reactor (boiling water, natural uranium and heavy water, pressurized water, and fourth generation). Then, after having recalled the French installed power, the author proposes an analysis of a typical 900 MWe nuclear power plant: primary circuit, reactor, fuel, spent fuel, pressurizer and primary pump, secondary circuit, aspects related to control-command, regulation, safety and exploitation. The last part proposes a modelling of the thermodynamic cycle of a pressurized water plant by using an equivalent Carnot cycle, a Rankine cycle, and a two-phase expansion cycle with drying-overheating

  6. Industrial applications of nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas, Celso

    2010-01-01

    Industrial applications of nuclear technology have been very diverse worldwide. This type of technology has begun to introduce in Costa Rica to evaluate and improve different industrial processes. These applications have been classified into two or three categories, according to the criteria used. Nucleonic control systems, the gamma logging and radiotracers are determined. (author) [es

  7. Technology for Transient Simulation of Vibration during Combustion Process in Rocket Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubanov, V. M.; Stepanov, D. V.; Shabliy, L. S.

    2018-01-01

    The article describes the technology for simulation of transient combustion processes in the rocket thruster for determination of vibration frequency occurs during combustion. The engine operates on gaseous propellant: oxygen and hydrogen. Combustion simulation was performed using the ANSYS CFX software. Three reaction mechanisms for the stationary mode were considered and described in detail. The way for obtaining quick CFD-results with intermediate combustion components using an EDM model was found. The way to generate the Flamelet library with CFX-RIF was described. A technique for modeling transient combustion processes in the rocket thruster was proposed based on the Flamelet library. A cyclic irregularity of the temperature field like vortex core precession was detected in the chamber. Frequency of flame precession was obtained with the proposed simulation technique.

  8. Church - Technology - Nuclear Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    May, H.

    1982-01-01

    In order to cope with the problems causing a great deal of trouble today, i.e. with fear and with the ethical substantiation of technology, the author considers an integration model necessary which is to link science and technology and religion and philosophy. (RW) [de

  9. Church - Technology - Nuclear Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, H

    1982-03-01

    In order to cope with the problems causing a great deal of trouble today, i.e. with fear and with the ethical substantiation of technology, the author considers an integration model necessary which is to link science and technology and religion and philosophy.

  10. Nuclear safeguards technology handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-12-01

    The purpose of this handbook is to present to United States industrial organizations the Department of Energy's (DOE) Safeguards Technology Program. The roles and missions for safeguards in the U.S. government and application of the DOE technology program to industry safeguards planning are discussed. A guide to sources and products is included. (LK)

  11. Nuclear safeguards technology handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-12-01

    The purpose of this handbook is to present to United States industrial organizations the Department of Energy's (DOE) Safeguards Technology Program. The roles and missions for safeguards in the U.S. government and application of the DOE technology program to industry safeguards planning are discussed. A guide to sources and products is included

  12. Nuclear Technology Review 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-08-01

    The year 2008 was paradoxical for nuclear power. Projections of future growth were revised upwards, but no new reactors were connected to the grid. It was the first year since 1955 without at least one new reactor coming on-line. There were, however, ten construction starts, the most since 1985. At least until the global financial crisis, cost estimates reported for new nuclear reactors were often higher than those in previous years, particularly in regions with less recent experience in new construction. However, growth targets for nuclear power were raised in the Russian Federation, and similar considerations were under review in China. India negotiated a safeguards agreement with the Agency in August, and the Nuclear Suppliers Group subsequently exempted India from previous restrictions on nuclear trade, which should allow India to accelerate its planned expansion of nuclear power. In the USA, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) received combined licence (COL) applications for 26 new reactors. The US Department of Energy (USDOE) received 19 'Part I applications' for Federal loan guarantees to build 21 new reactors. Nonetheless, current expansion, as well as near term and long term growth prospects, remain centred in Asia. Of the ten construction starts in 2008, eight were in Asia. Twenty-eight of the 44 reactors under construction at the end of the year were in Asia, as were 28 of the last 39 new reactors to have been connected to the grid. Armenia joined the Russian Federation and Kazakhstan as members of the International Uranium Enrichment Centre in Angarsk, Siberia. The Ukrainian Government announced that Ukraine would also join. AREVA and USEC applied to the USDOE for loan guarantees for the construction of AREVA's proposed Eagle Rock Enrichment Facility and USEC's American Centrifuge Plant. Construction of an underground repository for low and medium level radioactive waste began at the former Konrad iron mine in Germany. The USDOE submitted a formal

  13. Nuclear Technology Review 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-08-15

    The year 2008 was paradoxical for nuclear power. Projections of future growth were revised upwards, but no new reactors were connected to the grid. It was the first year since 1955 without at least one new reactor coming on-line. There were, however, ten construction starts, the most since 1985. At least until the global financial crisis, cost estimates reported for new nuclear reactors were often higher than those in previous years, particularly in regions with less recent experience in new construction. However, growth targets for nuclear power were raised in the Russian Federation, and similar considerations were under review in China. India negotiated a safeguards agreement with the Agency in August, and the Nuclear Suppliers Group subsequently exempted India from previous restrictions on nuclear trade, which should allow India to accelerate its planned expansion of nuclear power. In the USA, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) received combined licence (COL) applications for 26 new reactors. The US Department of Energy (USDOE) received 19 'Part I applications' for Federal loan guarantees to build 21 new reactors. Nonetheless, current expansion, as well as near term and long term growth prospects, remain centred in Asia. Of the ten construction starts in 2008, eight were in Asia. Twenty-eight of the 44 reactors under construction at the end of the year were in Asia, as were 28 of the last 39 new reactors to have been connected to the grid. Armenia joined the Russian Federation and Kazakhstan as members of the International Uranium Enrichment Centre in Angarsk, Siberia. The Ukrainian Government announced that Ukraine would also join. AREVA and USEC applied to the USDOE for loan guarantees for the construction of AREVA's proposed Eagle Rock Enrichment Facility and USEC's American Centrifuge Plant. Construction of an underground repository for low and medium level radioactive waste began at the former Konrad iron mine in Germany. The USDOE submitted a formal

  14. Nuclear Technology Review 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-09-01

    The accident at the Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, caused by the extraordinary natural disasters of the earthquake and tsunamis that struck Japan on 11 March 2011, continues to be assessed. As this report focuses on developments in 2010, the accident and its implications are not addressed here, but will be addressed in future reports of the Agency. In 2010, construction started on sixteen new nuclear power reactors, the largest number since 1985. With five new reactors connected to the grid and only one reactor retired during the year, total nuclear power capacity around the world increased to 375 GW(e). Revised projections in 2010 of future nuclear power growth still indicated high expectations for nuclear power expansion. Expansion and near and long term growth prospects remained centred in Asia. Two thirds of the reactors currently under construction are in Asia, as were thirteen of the sixteen construction starts. Of these, ten construction starts were in China alone. Trends of uprates and renewed or extended licences for operating reactors continued in 2010, particularly in some European countries where the trend towards reconsidering policies that restricted the future use of nuclear power continued. Interest in starting new nuclear power programmes remained high, with over 60 Member States having indicated to the Agency their interest in considering the introduction of nuclear power. In the 2010 edition of the OECD/NEA-IAEA 'Red Book', estimates of identified conventional uranium resources at less than $130/kg U decreased slightly compared to the previous edition, but uranium production worldwide significantly increased due largely to increased production in Kazakhstan. Uranium spot prices, which declined in 2009, reached at the end of 2010 their highest levels in over two years topping $160/kg U, despite early and mid-year prices fluctuating between $105/kg U and $115/kg U. The Board of Governors, in December 2010, approved the establishment of an

  15. Nuclear Technology Review 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-09-15

    The accident at the Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, caused by the extraordinary natural disasters of the earthquake and tsunamis that struck Japan on 11 March 2011, continues to be assessed. As this report focuses on developments in 2010, the accident and its implications are not addressed here, but will be addressed in future reports of the Agency. In 2010, construction started on sixteen new nuclear power reactors, the largest number since 1985. With five new reactors connected to the grid and only one reactor retired during the year, total nuclear power capacity around the world increased to 375 GW(e). Revised projections in 2010 of future nuclear power growth still indicated high expectations for nuclear power expansion. Expansion and near and long term growth prospects remained centred in Asia. Two thirds of the reactors currently under construction are in Asia, as were thirteen of the sixteen construction starts. Of these, ten construction starts were in China alone. Trends of uprates and renewed or extended licences for operating reactors continued in 2010, particularly in some European countries where the trend towards reconsidering policies that restricted the future use of nuclear power continued. Interest in starting new nuclear power programmes remained high, with over 60 Member States having indicated to the Agency their interest in considering the introduction of nuclear power. In the 2010 edition of the OECD/NEA-IAEA 'Red Book', estimates of identified conventional uranium resources at less than $130/kg U decreased slightly compared to the previous edition, but uranium production worldwide significantly increased due largely to increased production in Kazakhstan. Uranium spot prices, which declined in 2009, reached at the end of 2010 their highest levels in over two years topping $160/kg U, despite early and mid-year prices fluctuating between $105/kg U and $115/kg U. The Board of Governors, in December 2010, approved the establishment of an

  16. Initial risk assessment for a single stage to orbit nuclear thermal rocket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labib, Satira, E-mail: Satira.Labib@duke-energy.com; King, Jeffrey, E-mail: kingjc@mines.edu

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • The risks posed by the surface launch of a nuclear thermal rocket are considered. • Radiation exposure at the public viewing distance is insignificant. • Production of fission products and actinides during launch is limited. • The production of activated argon around the rocket may be a significant concern. - Abstract: In order to consider the possibility of a nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) ground launch, it is necessary to evaluate the risks from such a launch. This includes analysis of the radiation dose rate around the rocket, determining the rate of activation of the materials near the launch, and considering the radionuclides present in the core after the launch. This paper evaluates the potential risk of the NTR ground launch for a range of payloads from 1 to 15 metric tons (MT) using three NTR reactor cores (40, 80, and 120 cm in length) designed in a previous study, based on data produced by MCNP5 and MCNPX models. At the same power level, the 40 cm core length reactor results in the lowest radiation dose rate of the three reactors. Radiation dose rates decrease to background levels 3.5 km from the launch site. After a 1-year decay time, all of the activated materials produced by an NTR launch would be classified as Class A low-level waste. The activation of air produces significant amounts of argon-41 and nitrogen-16 within 100 m of the launch. The derived air concentration (DAC) ratio of the activation products decays to less than unity within 2 days, with only argon-41 remaining. After 10 min of full power operation, the 120 cm core for a 15 MT payload contains 2.5 × 10{sup 13}, 1.4 × 10{sup 12} and 1.5 × 10{sup 12} Bq of {sup 131}I, {sup 137}Cs, and {sup 90}Sr, respectively. The decay heat after shutdown increases with increasing reactor power with a maximum decay heat of 108 kW immediately after shutdown for the 15 MT payload.

  17. Affordable Development and Demonstration of a Small Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) Engine and Stage: How Small Is Big Enough?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowski, Stanley K.; Sefcik, Robert J.; Fittje, James E.; McCurdy, David R.; Qualls, Arthur L.; Schnitzler, Bruce G.; Werner, James E.; Weitzberg, Abraham; Joyner, Claude R.

    2016-01-01

    The Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) derives its energy from fission of uranium-235 atoms contained within fuel elements that comprise the engine's reactor core. It generates high thrust and has a specific impulse potential of approximately 900 specific impulse - a 100 percent increase over today's best chemical rockets. The Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) project, funded by NASA's Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) program, includes five key task activities: (1) Recapture, demonstration, and validation of heritage graphite composite (GC) fuel (selected as the Lead Fuel option); (2) Engine Conceptual Design; (3) Operating Requirements Definition; (4) Identification of Affordable Options for Ground Testing; and (5) Formulation of an Affordable Development Strategy. During fiscal year (FY) 2014, a preliminary Design Development Test and Evaluation (DDT&E) plan and schedule for NTP development was outlined by the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), Department of Energy (DOE) and industry that involved significant system-level demonstration projects that included Ground Technology Demonstration (GTD) tests at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), followed by a Flight Technology Demonstration (FTD) mission. To reduce cost for the GTD tests and FTD mission, small NTR engines, in either the 7.5 or 16.5 kilopound-force thrust class, were considered. Both engine options used GC fuel and a common fuel element (FE) design. The small approximately 7.5 kilopound-force criticality-limited engine produces approximately157 thermal megawatts and its core is configured with parallel rows of hexagonal-shaped FEs and tie tubes (TTs) with a FE to TT ratio of approximately 1:1. The larger approximately 16.5 kilopound-force Small Nuclear Rocket Engine (SNRE), developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) at the end of the Rover program, produces approximately 367 thermal megawatts and has a FE to TT ratio of approximately 2:1. Although both engines use a common 35-inch (approximately

  18. Innovation in nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertel, E.

    2007-01-01

    Innovation has been a driving force for the success of nuclear energy and remains essential for its future. For the continued safe and economically effective operation and maintenance of existing nuclear systems, and to meet the goals set out by projects aiming at designing and implementing advanced systems for the future, efficient innovation systems are needed. Consequently, analysing innovation systems is essential to understand their characteristics and enhance their performance in the nuclear sector. Lessons learnt from innovation programmes that have already been completed can help enhance the effectiveness of future programmes. The analysis of past experience provides a means for identifying causes of failure as well as best practices. Although national and local conditions are important factors, the main drivers for the success of innovative endeavors are common to all countries. Cooperation and coordination among the various actors are major elements promoting success. All interested stakeholders, including research organisations, industrial actors, regulators and civil society, have a role to play in supporting the success of innovation, but governments are an essential trigger, especially for projects with long durations and very ambitious objectives. Governments have a major role to play in promoting innovation because they are responsible for the overall national energy policy which sets the stage for the eventual deployment of innovative products and processes. Moreover, only governments can create the stable legal and regulatory framework favourable to the undertaking and successful completion of innovation programmes. International organisations such as the NEA may help enhance the effectiveness of national policies and innovation programmes by providing a forum for exchanging information, facilitating multilateral collaboration and joint endeavors, and offering technical support for the management of innovative programmes

  19. Nuclear Rocket Facility Decommissioning Project: Controlled Explosive Demolition of Neutron-Activated Shield Wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michael R, Kruzic

    2008-01-01

    Located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), the Test Cell A (TCA) Facility (Figure 1) was used in the early to mid-1960s for testing of nuclear rocket engines, as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Program, to further space travel. Nuclear rocket testing resulted in the activation of materials around the reactors and the release of fission products and fuel particles. The TCA facility, known as Corrective Action Unit 115, was decontaminated and decommissioned (D and D) from December 2004 to July 2005 using the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) process, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. The SAFER process allows environmental remediation and facility closure activities (i.e., decommissioning) to occur simultaneously, provided technical decisions are made by an experienced decision maker within the site conceptual site model. Facility closure involved a seven-step decommissioning strategy. First, preliminary investigation activities were performed, including review of process knowledge documentation, targeted facility radiological and hazardous material surveys, concrete core drilling and analysis, shield wall radiological characterization, and discrete sampling, which proved to be very useful and cost-effective in subsequent decommissioning planning and execution and worker safety. Second, site setup and mobilization of equipment and personnel were completed. Third, early removal of hazardous materials, including asbestos, lead, cadmium, and oil, was performed ensuring worker safety during more invasive demolition activities. Process piping was to be verified void of contents. Electrical systems were de-energized and other systems were rendered free of residual energy. Fourth, areas of high radiological contamination were decontaminated using multiple methods. Contamination levels varied across the facility. Fixed beta/gamma contamination levels ranged up to 2 million disintegrations per minute (dpm)/100

  20. Nuclear Rocket Facility Decommissioning Project: Controlled Explosive Demolition of Neutron-Activated Shield Wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael R. Kruzic

    2008-06-01

    Located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), the Test Cell A (TCA) Facility (Figure 1) was used in the early to mid-1960s for testing of nuclear rocket engines, as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Program, to further space travel. Nuclear rocket testing resulted in the activation of materials around the reactors and the release of fission products and fuel particles. The TCA facility, known as Corrective Action Unit 115, was decontaminated and decommissioned (D&D) from December 2004 to July 2005 using the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) process, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. The SAFER process allows environmental remediation and facility closure activities (i.e., decommissioning) to occur simultaneously, provided technical decisions are made by an experienced decision maker within the site conceptual site model. Facility closure involved a seven-step decommissioning strategy. First, preliminary investigation activities were performed, including review of process knowledge documentation, targeted facility radiological and hazardous material surveys, concrete core drilling and analysis, shield wall radiological characterization, and discrete sampling, which proved to be very useful and cost-effective in subsequent decommissioning planning and execution and worker safety. Second, site setup and mobilization of equipment and personnel were completed. Third, early removal of hazardous materials, including asbestos, lead, cadmium, and oil, was performed ensuring worker safety during more invasive demolition activities. Process piping was to be verified void of contents. Electrical systems were de-energized and other systems were rendered free of residual energy. Fourth, areas of high radiological contamination were decontaminated using multiple methods. Contamination levels varied across the facility. Fixed beta/gamma contamination levels ranged up to 2 million disintegrations per minute (dpm)/100

  1. Nuclear technology and materials science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olander, D.R.

    1992-01-01

    Current and expected problems in the materials of nuclear technology are reviewed. In the fuel elements of LWRs, cladding waterside corrosion, secondary hydriding and pellet-cladding interaction may be significant impediments to extended burnup. In the fuel, fission gas release remains a key issue. Materials issues in the structural alloys of the primary system include stress-corrosion cracking of steel, corrosion of steam generator tubing and pressurized thermal shock of the reactor vessel. Prediction of core behavior in severe accidents requires basic data and models for fuel liquefaction, aerosol formation, fission product transport and core-concrete interaction. Materials questions in nuclear waste management and fusion technology are briefly reviewed. (author)

  2. Graduate diplomas in nuclear technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bereznai, G. [Univ. of Ontario Inst. of Tech., Oshawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    The University of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT) offers a graduate diploma program in nuclear technology that consists of a suite of six sub-specialties: Fuel, Materials and Chemistry; Reactor Systems; Operation and Maintenance; Safety, Licensing and Regulatory Affairs; Health Physics; and Radiological Applications. Four courses selected from a list that covers the knowledge and skill set of each sub-specialty have to be completed in order to gain a graduate diploma in the specific area. The program is designed to accommodate the needs of people working in the nuclear industry to upgrade their knowledge and skills, to promote career advancement and to provide a framework for lifelong learning. (author)

  3. Fuel/propellant mixing in an open-cycle gas core nuclear rocket engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, X.; Wehrmeyer, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    A numerical investigation of the mixing of gaseous uranium and hydrogen inside an open-cycle gas core nuclear rocket engine (spherical geometry) is presented. The gaseous uranium fuel is injected near the centerline of the spherical engine cavity at a constant mass flow rate, and the hydrogen propellant is injected around the periphery of the engine at a five degree angle to the wall, at a constant mass flow rate. The main objective is to seek ways to minimize the mixing of uranium and hydrogen by choosing a suitable injector geometry for the mixing of light and heavy gas streams. Three different uranium inlet areas are presented, and also three different turbulent models (k-var-epsilon model, RNG k-var-epsilon model, and RSM model) are investigated. The commercial CFD code, FLUENT, is used to model the flow field. Uranium mole fraction, axial mass flux, and radial mass flux contours are obtained. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  4. Kinetic---a system code for analyzing nuclear thermal propulsion rocket engine transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, E.; Lazareth, O.; Ludewig, H.

    1993-01-01

    A system code suitable for analyzing Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) rocket engines is described in this paper. The code consists of a point reactor model and nodes to describe the fluid dynamics and heat transfer mechanism. Feedback from the fuel, coolant, moderator and reflector are allowed for, and the control of the reactor is by motion of controls element (drums or rods). The worth of the control element and feedback coefficients are predetermined. Separate models for the turbo-pump assembly (TPA) and nozzle are also included. The model to be described in this paper is specific for the Particle Bed Reactor (PBR). An illustrative problem is solved. This problem consists of a PBR operating in a blowdown mode

  5. Kinetic—a system code for analyzing nuclear thermal propulsion rocket engine transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Eldon; Lazareth, Otto; Ludewig, Hans

    1993-01-01

    A system code suitable for analyzing Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) rocket engines is described in this paper. The code consists of a point reactor model and nodes to describe the fluid dynamics and heat transfer mechanism. Feedback from the fuel, coolant, moderator and reflector are allowed for, and the control of the reactor is by motion of controls element (drums or rods). The worth of the control element and feedback coefficients are predetermined. Separate models for the turbo-pump assembly (TPA) and nozzle are also included. The model to be described in this paper is specific for the Particle Bed Reactor (PBR). An illustrative problem is solved. This problem consists of a PBR operating in a blowdown mode.

  6. A unique nuclear thermal rocket engine using a particle bed reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culver, Donald W.; Dahl, Wayne B.; McIlwain, Melvin C.

    1992-01-01

    Aerojet Propulsion Division (APD) studied 75-klb thrust Nuclear Thermal Rocket Engines (NTRE) with particle bed reactors (PBR) for application to NASA's manned Mars mission and prepared a conceptual design description of a unique engine that best satisfied mission-defined propulsion requirements and customer criteria. This paper describes the selection of a sprint-type Mars transfer mission and its impact on propulsion system design and operation. It shows how our NTRE concept was developed from this information. The resulting, unusual engine design is short, lightweight, and capable of high specific impulse operation, all factors that decrease Earth to orbit launch costs. Many unusual features of the NTRE are discussed, including nozzle area ratio variation and nozzle closure for closed loop after cooling. Mission performance calculations reveal that other well known engine options do not support this mission.

  7. Analysis of startup strategies for a particle bed reactor nuclear rocket engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, D. E.

    1993-06-01

    This paper develops and analyzes engine system startup strategies for a particle bed reactor (PBR) nuclear rocket engine. The strategies are designed to maintain stable flow through the PBR fuel element while reaching the design conditions as quickly as possible. The analyses are conducted using a computer model of a representative particle bed reactor and engine system. Elements of the startup strategy considered include: the coordinated control of reactor power and coolant flow; turbine inlet temperature and flow control; and use of an external starter system. The simulation results indicate that the use of an external starter system enables the engine to reach design conditions very quickly while maintaining the flow well away from the unstable regime. If a bootstrap start is used instead, the transient does not progress as fast and approaches closer to the unstable flow regime, but allows for greater engine reusability. These results can provide important information for engine designers and mission planners.

  8. KINETIC: A system code for analyzing Nuclear thermal propulsion rocket engine transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, E.; Lazareth, O.; Ludewig, H.

    1993-07-01

    A system code suitable for analyzing Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) rocket engines is described in this paper. The code consists of a point reactor model and nodes to describe the fluid dynamics and heat transfer mechanism. Feedback from the fuel coolant, moderator and reflector are allowed for, and the control of the reactor is by motion of control elements (drums or rods). The worth of the control clement and feedback coefficients are predetermined. Separate models for the turbo-pump assembly (TPA) and nozzle are also included. The model to be described in this paper is specific for the Particle Bed Reactor (PBR). An illustrative problem is solved. This problem consists of a PBR operating in a blowdown mode.

  9. Nuclear safeguards technology 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This publication presents the results of the sixth in a series of international symposia on nuclear material safeguards. Development efforts related to safeguards for reprocessing plants constituted over twenty per cent of the programme. Other papers present results of over four years of field testing of near real time material accountancy at a plant in Japan, and results for a lesser period of time at a plant in Scotland. Papers reporting work on destructive and non-destructive measurement procedures or equipment constituted another thirty per cent of the programme, more if measurements in reprocessing and poster presentations are included. In honour of the tenth anniversary of the founding of the Safeguards Analytical Laboratory, two sessions were devoted to a review of destructive analytical measurement procedures. Some subjects received only minor attention during the Symposium. The statistical theory of random sampling, safeguards for uranium enrichment plants, material accountancy systems and several other topics appear only incidentally in the programme, but primarily because there are few remaining problems, not because there is little remaining interest

  10. Development of the nuclear technology in Latvia in the second half of 20 century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavars, V.; Tomsons, E.

    2004-01-01

    In the second part of 20th century Latvia that was at that time a part of the Soviet Union, one of the nuclear power world powers, participated in the development of nuclear technology. Already in the 60ies the local specialists created an original nuclear equipment highly recognized by specialists from different countries. The most important of them was critical assembly (zero power nuclear reactor) - RKS, large-scale gamma rays source - RK-LM, special control devices for space-rocket nuclear reactors and a renovated research nuclear reactor IRT-M with thermo power of 5MW, etc.(authors)

  11. Nuclear technology terms and definitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-02-01

    The terms and definitions in this standard are part of the catalogue of definitions 'Nuclear technology, terms and definitions', in eight parts; they are the latest version of the standards and draft standards of DIN 25 401, part 10 to 19, published at irregular intervals until now. (orig.) [de

  12. Nuclear Reactors and Technology; (USA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cason, D.L.; Hicks, S.C. (eds.)

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear Reactors and Technology (NRT) announces on a monthly basis the current worldwide information available from the open literature on nuclear reactors and technology, including all aspects of power reactors, components and accessories, fuel elements, control systems, and materials. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Science and Technology Database (EDB) during the past month. Also included are US information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through the International Energy Agency's Energy Technology Data Exchange or government-to-government agreements. The digests in NRT and other citations to information on nuclear reactors back to 1948 are available for online searching and retrieval on EDB and Nuclear Science Abstracts (NSA) database. Current information, added daily to EDB, is available to DOE and its contractors through the DOE integrated Technical Information System. Customized profiles can be developed to provide current information to meet each user's needs.

  13. Development and analysis of startup strategies for particle bed nuclear rocket engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, David E.

    1993-06-01

    The particle bed reactor (PBR) nuclear thermal propulsion rocket engine concept is the focus of the Air Force's Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion program. While much progress has been made in developing the concept, several technical issues remain. Perhaps foremost among these concerns is the issue of flow stability through the porous, heated bed of fuel particles. There are two complementary technical issues associated with this concern: the identification of the flow stability boundary and the design of the engine controller to maintain stable operation. This thesis examines a portion of the latter issue which has yet to be addressed in detail. Specifically, it develops and analyzes general engine system startup strategies which maintain stable flow through the PBR fuel elements while reaching the design conditions as quickly as possible. The PBR engine studies are conducted using a computer model of a representative particle bed reactor and engine system. The computer program utilized is an augmented version of SAFSIM, an existing nuclear thermal propulsion modeling code; the augmentation, dubbed SAFSIM+, was developed by the author and provides a more complete engine system modeling tool.

  14. The development of nuclear technology transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nack-chung Sung

    1987-01-01

    Korea, as a recipient of nuclear technology transfer, has good experience of progressively building up its indigeneous capability of nuclear technology through three stages of technology transfer, namely: technology transfer under the turnkey approach, component approach, and integrated technology transfer with a local prime contractor. Here, each stage of experience of technology transfer, with Korea as a recipient, is presented. (author)

  15. Nuclear technology and anthroposophic theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leben, S.

    1982-01-01

    The construction of nuclear power plants as a solution to the current energy, crisis is controversial. That was not so in the beginning of the 'peaceful' utilization of nuclear power; with thousands of millions to promote it given as subsidies by the governments it was developing fast, until citizens' initiatives asked ecologic and moral questions delaying the further extension of this energy production. Both positions can be substantiated. But can a first judgement, too, be given with any degree of safety. And what cognitive aids are provided by the anthroposophic theory. This is demonstrated in some aspects. From the contents: The energy crisis and its apparent way out; of the causes: modern scientific methods; New forces: some facts and phenomena; Destructive powers as viewed by ancient mysteries; Of desirable states of conscience and technical forms; spelling their distortion; Nuclear powers and morality; Untimeliness in historicity; 'What's the stance of anthroposophic theory with regard to nuclear technology'. (orig./HP) [de

  16. Nuclear energy: A female technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tennenbaum, J.

    1994-01-01

    Amongst the important scientific and technological revolutions of history there is none in which women have played such a substantial and many-sided role as in the development of nuclear energy. The birth of nuclear energy is not only due to Marie Curie and Lise Meitner but also to a large number of courageous 'nuclear women' who decided against all sorts of prejudices and resistances in favour of a life in research. Therefore the revolution of the atom has also become the greatest breakthrough of women in natural sciences. This double revolution is the subject of this book. Here the history of nuclear energy itself is dealt with documented with the original work and personal memories of different persons - mainly women - who have been substantially involved in this development. (orig./HP) [de

  17. Geology behind nuclear fission technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhana Raju, R.

    2005-01-01

    Geology appears to have played an important role of a precursor to Nuclear Fission Technology (NFT), in the latter's both birth from the nucleus of an atom of and most important application as nuclear power extracted from Uranium (U), present in its minerals. NFT critically depends upon the availability of its basic raw material, viz., nuclear fuel as U and/ or Th, extracted from U-Th minerals of specific rock types in the earth's crust. Research and Development of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle (NFC) depends heavily on 'Geology'. In this paper, a brief review of the major branches of geology and their contributions during different stages of NFC, in the Indian scenario, is presented so as to demonstrate the important role played by 'Geology' behind the development of NFT, in general, and NFC, in particular. (author)

  18. Export markets for nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huettl, A.J.

    1985-01-01

    By late 1984, nuclear power plants were in operation or under construction in 32 countries of the globe. An additional six countries had concrete plans for building nuclear power plants. Of these 38 countries, ten have shown that they posses the necessary know-how and the technical facilities to plan and build nuclear power plants practically on their own. Seven of these ten countries have already acted as exporters of nuclear power plants, albeit with very different degrees of market penetration. In addition, there have been a number of countries for quite some time whose industries have managed to manufacture many important nuclear power plant components. Their high level of technical development and the problems frequently encountered in export financing have made them very attractive partners of the true exporters of nuclear power plants. For the future, it must be expected that some of the countries which have so far limited their efforts to the construction of nuclear power plants at home will also develop into exporters of nuclear technology. The report contains a survey of the range of nuclear products available, a list of reactor vendors, reactor lines, and data on the economics of electricity generation in nuclear plants. It then goes on to offer detailed descriptions of the market and the demand situation. Interesting chapters are devoted to the selection criteria applied by importing countries, to financing problems, and to the influences exerted by the political environment. A realistic forecast is attempted in order to make a quantitative analysis of possible export contracts up until the year 2000. (orig.) [de

  19. ISO standardization in nuclear technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brabec, D [Ustav pro Vyzkum, Vyrobu a Vyuziti Radioisotopu, Prague (Czechoslovakia); Cermak, O [Urad pro Normalizaci a Mereni, Prague (Czechoslovakia)

    1984-10-01

    The activity is described of the technical commission ISO/TC 85 which is currently divided into 4 subcommissions (SC) and 24 working groups. SC 1 ''Terminology, definitions, units, abbreviations'' has one working group. The most important document of this SC is ISO 921-1972 (Dictionary of nuclear technology). SC 2 ''Radiation protection'' has 9 working groups and has processed standards in dosimetry. SC 3 ''Technology of power reactors'' has 6 working groups and its work is related to IAEA activities within the NUSS program. SC 4 ''Technology of nuclear fuels'' has 8 working groups. SC 4 has compiled the basic standards for sealed sources and methods of testing their tightness. The results of the work of this group have been reflected into the standardization work of CMEA. A list is given of published international standards within TC 85.

  20. Advanced nuclear energy analysis technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauntt, Randall O.; Murata, Kenneth K.; Romero, Vicente Josce; Young, Michael Francis; Rochau, Gary Eugene

    2004-01-01

    A two-year effort focused on applying ASCI technology developed for the analysis of weapons systems to the state-of-the-art accident analysis of a nuclear reactor system was proposed. The Sandia SIERRA parallel computing platform for ASCI codes includes high-fidelity thermal, fluids, and structural codes whose coupling through SIERRA can be specifically tailored to the particular problem at hand to analyze complex multiphysics problems. Presently, however, the suite lacks several physics modules unique to the analysis of nuclear reactors. The NRC MELCOR code, not presently part of SIERRA, was developed to analyze severe accidents in present-technology reactor systems. We attempted to: (1) evaluate the SIERRA code suite for its current applicability to the analysis of next generation nuclear reactors, and the feasibility of implementing MELCOR models into the SIERRA suite, (2) examine the possibility of augmenting ASCI codes or alternatives by coupling to the MELCOR code, or portions thereof, to address physics particular to nuclear reactor issues, especially those facing next generation reactor designs, and (3) apply the coupled code set to a demonstration problem involving a nuclear reactor system. We were successful in completing the first two in sufficient detail to determine that an extensive demonstration problem was not feasible at this time. In the future, completion of this research would demonstrate the feasibility of performing high fidelity and rapid analyses of safety and design issues needed to support the development of next generation power reactor systems

  1. 2005 annual nuclear technology conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2005-01-01

    This year's Annual Nuclear Technology Conference of the Deutsches Atomforum and Kerntechnische Gesellschaft was held in Nuremberg on May 10-12, 2005. More than 1 100 participants from eighteen countries make this specialized event one of the largest international conventions in the field of the peaceful uses of nuclear power, whose attendance has steadily increased over the past few years. The first day of the conference was devoted to plenary lectures traditionally dealing mainly with political and economic problems of the use of nuclear power. The partner country of JK 2005 was Switzerland. Traditionally, the program of the three-day conference was organized in the proven format of plenary sessions on the first day, followed by technical sessions, specialized sessions, poster sessions, and special events on the following days. For the third time, the ''Nuclear Campus'' was organized which successfully made the world of nuclear technology transparent to high school and university students in lectures and an exhibition. The meeting was accompanied by a technical exhibition with meeting points of manufacturers, suppliers, and service industries. (orig.)

  2. Innovative concept for an ultra-small nuclear thermal rocket utilizing a new moderated reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Hyun Nam

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Although the harsh space environment imposes many severe challenges to space pioneers, space exploration is a realistic and profitable goal for long-term humanity survival. One of the viable and promising options to overcome the harsh environment of space is nuclear propulsion. Particularly, the Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR is a leading candidate for near-term human missions to Mars and beyond due to its relatively high thrust and efficiency. Traditional NTR designs use typically high power reactors with fast or epithermal neutron spectrums to simplify core design and to maximize thrust. In parallel there are a series of new NTR designs with lower thrust and higher efficiency, designed to enhance mission versatility and safety through the use of redundant engines (when used in a clustered engine arrangement for future commercialization. This paper proposes a new NTR design of the second design philosophy, Korea Advanced NUclear Thermal Engine Rocket (KANUTER, for future space applications. The KANUTER consists of an Extremely High Temperature Gas cooled Reactor (EHTGR utilizing hydrogen propellant, a propulsion system, and an optional electricity generation system to provide propulsion as well as electricity generation. The innovatively small engine has the characteristics of high efficiency, being compact and lightweight, and bimodal capability. The notable characteristics result from the moderated EHTGR design, uniquely utilizing the integrated fuel element with an ultra heat-resistant carbide fuel, an efficient metal hydride moderator, protectively cooling channels and an individual pressure tube in an all-in-one package. The EHTGR can be bimodally operated in a propulsion mode of 100 MWth and an electricity generation mode of 100 kWth, equipped with a dynamic energy conversion system. To investigate the design features of the new reactor and to estimate referential engine performance, a preliminary design study in terms of neutronics and

  3. Innovative concept for an ultra-small nuclear thermal rocket utilizing a new moderated reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Seung Hyun; Venneri, Paolo; Kim, Yong Hee; Lee, Jeong Ik; Chang, Soon Heung; Jeong, Yong Hoon [Dept. of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Although the harsh space environment imposes many severe challenges to space pioneers, space exploration is a realistic and profitable goal for long-term humanity survival. One of the viable and promising options to overcome the harsh environment of space is nuclear propulsion. Particularly, the Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) is a leading candidate for near-term human missions to Mars and beyond due to its relatively high thrust and efficiency. Traditional NTR designs use typically high power reactors with fast or epithermal neutron spectrums to simplify core design and to maximize thrust. In parallel there are a series of new NTR designs with lower thrust and higher efficiency, designed to enhance mission versatility and safety through the use of redundant engines (when used in a clustered engine arrangement) for future commercialization. This paper proposes a new NTR design of the second design philosophy, Korea Advanced NUclear Thermal Engine Rocket (KANUTER), for future space applications. The KANUTER consists of an Extremely High Temperature Gas cooled Reactor (EHTGR) utilizing hydrogen propellant, a propulsion system, and an optional electricity generation system to provide propulsion as well as electricity generation. The innovatively small engine has the characteristics of high efficiency, being compact and lightweight, and bimodal capability. The notable characteristics result from the moderated EHTGR design, uniquely utilizing the integrated fuel element with an ultra heat-resistant carbide fuel, an efficient metal hydride moderator, protectively cooling channels and an individual pressure tube in an all-in-one package. The EHTGR can be bimodally operated in a propulsion mode of 100 MW{sub th} and an electricity generation mode of 100 kW{sub th}, equipped with a dynamic energy conversion system. To investigate the design features of the new reactor and to estimate referential engine performance, a preliminary design study in terms of neutronics and

  4. Innovative concept for an ultra-small nuclear thermal rocket utilizing a new moderated reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, Seung Hyun; Venneri, Paolo; Kim, Yong Hee; Lee, Jeong Ik; Chang, Soon Heung; Jeong, Yong Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Although the harsh space environment imposes many severe challenges to space pioneers, space exploration is a realistic and profitable goal for long-term humanity survival. One of the viable and promising options to overcome the harsh environment of space is nuclear propulsion. Particularly, the Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) is a leading candidate for near-term human missions to Mars and beyond due to its relatively high thrust and efficiency. Traditional NTR designs use typically high power reactors with fast or epithermal neutron spectrums to simplify core design and to maximize thrust. In parallel there are a series of new NTR designs with lower thrust and higher efficiency, designed to enhance mission versatility and safety through the use of redundant engines (when used in a clustered engine arrangement) for future commercialization. This paper proposes a new NTR design of the second design philosophy, Korea Advanced NUclear Thermal Engine Rocket (KANUTER), for future space applications. The KANUTER consists of an Extremely High Temperature Gas cooled Reactor (EHTGR) utilizing hydrogen propellant, a propulsion system, and an optional electricity generation system to provide propulsion as well as electricity generation. The innovatively small engine has the characteristics of high efficiency, being compact and lightweight, and bimodal capability. The notable characteristics result from the moderated EHTGR design, uniquely utilizing the integrated fuel element with an ultra heat-resistant carbide fuel, an efficient metal hydride moderator, protectively cooling channels and an individual pressure tube in an all-in-one package. The EHTGR can be bimodally operated in a propulsion mode of 100 MW th and an electricity generation mode of 100 kW th , equipped with a dynamic energy conversion system. To investigate the design features of the new reactor and to estimate referential engine performance, a preliminary design study in terms of neutronics and thermohydraulics

  5. A Study on the Nuclear Technology Policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Chung, W. S.; Lee, T. J.; Yun, S. W.; Jeong, I.; Lee, J. H.

    2007-02-01

    The objective of the study was to make policy-proposals for enhancing the effectiveness and efficiency of national nuclear technology R and D programs. To do this, environmental changes of international nuclear energy policy and trends of nuclear technology development were surveyed and analyzed. This Study analyzed trends of nuclear technology policies and developed the nuclear energy R and D innovation strategy in a viewpoint of analyzing the changes in the global policy environment associated with nuclear technology development and development of national nuclear R and D strategy

  6. Nuclear technology for the year 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    Eighteen papers and abstracts are presented under the following session headings: space nuclear power, health physics and dosimetry, nuclear design and thermal hydraulics, nuclear diagnostics, and fusion technology and plasma physics. The papers were processed separately for the data base

  7. Impact of rocket propulsion technology on the radiation risk in missions to Mars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durante, M. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fur Schwerionenforschung, Biophysics Department, Darmstadt (Germany); Technical University of Darmstadt, Department of Condensed Matter Physics, Darmstadt (Germany); Bruno, C. [Dipartimento di Meccanica e Aeronautica, Universita -La Sapienza-, Roma (Italy)

    2010-10-15

    Exposure to cosmic radiation is today acknowledged as a major obstacle to human missions to Mars. In fact, in addition to the poor knowledge on the late effects of heavy ions in the cosmic rays, simple countermeasures are apparently not available. Shielding is indeed very problematic in space, because of mass problems and the high-energy of the cosmic rays, and radio-protective drugs or dietary supplements are not effective. However, the simplest countermeasure for reducing radiation risk is to shorten the duration time, particularly the transit time to Mars, where the dose rate is higher than on the planet surface. Here we show that using nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) rockets, the transit time could be substantially reduced to a point where radiation risk could be considered acceptable even with the current uncertainty on late effects. (authors)

  8. Gas core nuclear thermal rocket engine research and development in the former USSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koehlinger, M.W.; Bennett, R.G.; Motloch, C.G.; Gurfink, M.M.

    1992-09-01

    Beginning in 1957 and continuing into the mid 1970s, the USSR conducted an extensive investigation into the use of both solid and gas core nuclear thermal rocket engines for space missions. During this time the scientific and engineering. problems associated with the development of a solid core engine were resolved. At the same time research was undertaken on a gas core engine, and some of the basic engineering problems associated with the concept were investigated. At the conclusion of the program, the basic principles of the solid core concept were established. However, a prototype solid core engine was not built because no established mission required such an engine. For the gas core concept, some of the basic physical processes involved were studied both theoretically and experimentally. However, no simple method of conducting proof-of-principle tests in a neutron flux was devised. This report focuses primarily on the development of the. gas core concept in the former USSR. A variety of gas core engine system parameters and designs are presented, along with a summary discussion of the basic physical principles and limitations involved in their design. The parallel development of the solid core concept is briefly described to provide an overall perspective of the magnitude of the nuclear thermal propulsion program and a technical comparison with the gas core concept

  9. ANSTO: Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization conducts or is engaged in collaborative research and development in the application of nuclear science and associated technology. Through its Australian radio-isotopes unit, it markets radioisotopes, their products and other services for nuclear medicine industry and research. It also operates national nuclear facilities ( HIFAR and Moata research reactors), promote training, provide advice and disseminates information on nuclear science and technology. The booklet briefly outlines these activities. ills

  10. Nuclear Systems (NS): Technology Demonstration Unit (TDU)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Nuclear Systems Project demonstrates nuclear power technology readiness to support the goals of NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate. To this end, the...

  11. Fusion of Nuclear and Emerging Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nahrul Khaer Alang Rashid

    2005-04-01

    The presentation discussed the following subjects: emerging technology; nuclear technology; fusion emerging and nuclear technology; progressive nature of knowledge; optically stimulated luminescence - application of luminescence technology to sediments; Biosystemics technology -convergence nanotechnology, ecological science, biotechnology, cognitive science and IT - prospective impact on materials science, the management of public system for bio-health, eco and food system integrity and disease mitigation

  12. Nuclear technology databases and information network systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwata, Shuichi; Kikuchi, Yasuyuki; Minakuchi, Satoshi

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the databases related to nuclear (science) technology, and information network. Following contents are collected in this paper: the database developed by JAERI, ENERGY NET, ATOM NET, NUCLEN nuclear information database, INIS, NUclear Code Information Service (NUCLIS), Social Application of Nuclear Technology Accumulation project (SANTA), Nuclear Information Database/Communication System (NICS), reactor materials database, radiation effects database, NucNet European nuclear information database, reactor dismantling database. (J.P.N.)

  13. Interviews concerning topical questions in nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segatz, U.; Schatz, A.; Stephany, M.; Michaelis, H.

    1978-01-01

    On the occasion of the Nuclex meeting, October 3-7, 1978, Basle/Switzerland, the editorial department of 'Atom und Strom' questioned some leading scientists in nuclear technology on particularly relevant topics. The following subjects were discussed: - How long can we do without nuclear energy, - Modern technology for nuclear power plants, - Nuclear fuel cycle and environment, - Nuclear energy and European Communities, - Nuclear energy and its risks (reflections on incidents). (orig./UA) [de

  14. Reexamining the Ethics of Nuclear Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrianov, Andrei; Kanke, Victor; Kuptsov, Ilya; Murogov, Viktor

    2015-08-01

    This article analyzes the present status, development trends, and problems in the ethics of nuclear technology in light of a possible revision of its conceptual foundations. First, to better recognize the current state of nuclear technology ethics and related problems, this article focuses on presenting a picture of the evolution of the concepts and recent achievements related to technoethics, based on the ethics of responsibility. The term 'ethics of nuclear technology' describes a multidisciplinary endeavor to examine the problems associated with nuclear technology through ethical frameworks and paradigms. Second, to identify the reasons for the intensification of efforts to develop ethics in relation to nuclear technology, this article presents an analysis of the recent situation and future prospects of nuclear technology deployment. This includes contradictions that have aggravated nuclear dilemmas and debates stimulated by the shortcomings of nuclear technology, as well as the need for the further development of a nuclear culture paradigm that is able to provide a conceptual framework to overcome nuclear challenges. Third, efforts in the field of nuclear technology ethics are presented as a short overview of particular examples, and the major findings regarding obstacles to the development of nuclear technology ethics are also summarized. Finally, a potential methodological course is proposed to overcome inaction in this field; the proposed course provides for the further development of nuclear technology ethics, assuming the axiological multidisciplinary problematization of the main concepts in nuclear engineering through the basic ethical paradigms: analytical, hermeneutical, and poststructuralist.

  15. Innovation in nuclear energy technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dujardin, Th.; Bertel, E.; Kwang Seok, Lee; Foskolos, K.

    2007-01-01

    Innovation has been a driving force for the success of nuclear energy and remains essential for its sustainable future. Many research and development programmes focus on enhancing the performance of power plants in operation, current fuel design and characteristics, and fuel cycle processes used in existing facilities. Generally performed under the leadership of the industry. Some innovation programmes focus on evolutionary reactors and fuel cycles, derived from systems of the current generation. Such programmes aim at achieving significant improvements, in the field of economics or resource management for example, in the medium term. Often, they are undertaken by the industry with some governmental support as they require basic research together with technological development and adaptation. Finally, large programmes, often undertaken in an international, intergovernmental framework are devoted to design and development of a new generation of systems meeting the goals of sustainable development in the long term. Driving forces for nuclear innovation vary depending on the target technology, the national framework and the international context surrounding the research programme. However, all driving factors can be grouped in three categories: market drivers, political drivers and technology drivers. Globally, innovation in the nuclear energy sector is a success story but is a lengthy process that requires careful planning and adequate funding to produce successful outcomes

  16. Launch Vehicles Based on Advanced Hybrid Rocket Motors: An Enabling Technology for the Commercial Small and Micro Satellite Planetary Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabeyoglu, Arif; Tuncer, Onur; Inalhan, Gokhan

    2016-07-01

    Mankind is relient on chemical propulsion systems for space access. Nevertheless, this has been a stagnant area in terms of technological development and the technology base has not changed much almost for the past forty years. This poses a vicious circle for launch applications such that high launch costs constrain the demand and low launch freqencies drive costs higher. This also has been a key limiting factor for small and micro satellites that are geared towards planetary science. Rather this be because of the launch frequencies or the costs, the access of small and micro satellites to orbit has been limited. With today's technology it is not possible to escape this circle. However the emergence of cost effective and high performance propulsion systems such as advanced hybrid rockets can decrease launch costs by almost an order or magnitude. This paper briefly introduces the timeline and research challenges that were overcome during the development of advanced hybrid LOX/paraffin based rockets. Experimental studies demonstrated effectiveness of these advanced hybrid rockets which incorporate fast burning parafin based fuels, advanced yet simple internal balistic design and carbon composite winding/fuel casting technology that enables the rocket motor to be built from inside out. A feasibility scenario is studied using these rocket motors as building blocks for a modular launch vehicle capable of delivering micro satellites into low earth orbit. In addition, the building block rocket motor can be used further solar system missions providing the ability to do standalone small and micro satellite missions to planets within the solar system. This enabling technology therefore offers a viable alternative in order to escape the viscous that has plagued the space launch industry and that has limited the small and micro satellite delivery for planetary science.

  17. China nuclear science and technology reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    114 abstracts of nuclear science and technology reports, which were published in 1986-1987 in China, are collected. The subjects inclucled are: nuclear physics, nuclear medicine, radiochemistry, isotopes and their applications, reactors and nuclear power plants, radioactive protection, nuclear instruments etc... They are arranged in accordance with the INIS subject categories, and a report number index is annexed

  18. Conceptual Engine System Design for NERVA derived 66.7KN and 111.2KN Thrust Nuclear Thermal Rockets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fittje, James E.; Buehrle, Robert J.

    2006-01-01

    The Nuclear Thermal Rocket concept is being evaluated as an advanced propulsion concept for missions to the moon and Mars. A tremendous effort was undertaken during the 1960's and 1970's to develop and test NERVA derived Nuclear Thermal Rockets in the 111.2 KN to 1112 KN pound thrust class. NASA GRC is leveraging this past NTR investment in their vehicle concepts and mission analysis studies, and has been evaluating NERVA derived engines in the 66.7 KN to the 111.2 KN thrust range. The liquid hydrogen propellant feed system, including the turbopumps, is an essential component of the overall operation of this system. The NASA GRC team is evaluating numerous propellant feed system designs with both single and twin turbopumps. The Nuclear Engine System Simulation code is being exercised to analyze thermodynamic cycle points for these selected concepts. This paper will present propellant feed system concepts and the corresponding thermodynamic cycle points for 66.7 KN and 111.2 KN thrust NTR engine systems. A pump out condition for a twin turbopump concept will also be evaluated, and the NESS code will be assessed against the Small Nuclear Rocket Engine preliminary thermodynamic data

  19. Let nuclear technology create new brilliancy for china's sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Xiangwan

    2008-01-01

    This paper summarizes the development and application directions of nuclear technology, including five aspects: nuclear technology and energy nuclear technology and medicine, nuclear anclear analysis technology, nuclear radiation technology, astronautics and voyage's nuclear power, etc. The paper discusses the importance of them to sustainable development and generalizes the development trilogy of nuclear science and technology and its prospect. (authors)

  20. Status on Technology Development of Optic Fiber-Coupled Laser Ignition System for Rocket Engine Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, Huu P.; Early, Jim; Osborne, Robin; Thomas, Matthew; Bossard, John

    2003-01-01

    To pursue technology developments for future launch vehicles, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is examining vortex chamber concepts for liquid rocket engine applications. Past studies indicated that the vortex chamber schemes potentially have a number of advantages over conventional chamber methods. Due to the nature of the vortex flow, relatively cooler propellant streams tend to flow along the chamber wall. Hence, the thruster chamber can be operated without the need of any cooling techniques. This vortex flow also creates strong turbulence, which promotes the propellant mixing process. Consequently, the subject chamber concept: not only offer system simplicity, but also enhance the combustion performance. Test results have shown that chamber performance is markedly high even at a low chamber length-to-diameter ratio. This incentive can be translated to a convenience in the thrust chamber packaging.

  1. COBALT: Development of a Platform to Flight Test Lander GN&C Technologies on Suborbital Rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, John M., III; Seubert, Carl R.; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Bergh, Chuck; Kourchians, Ara; Restrepo, Carolina I.; Villapando, Carlos Y.; O'Neal, Travis V.; Robertson, Edward A.; Pierrottet, Diego; hide

    2017-01-01

    The NASA COBALT Project (CoOperative Blending of Autonomous Landing Technologies) is developing and integrating new precision-landing Guidance, Navigation and Control (GN&C) technologies, along with developing a terrestrial fight-test platform for Technology Readiness Level (TRL) maturation. The current technologies include a third- generation Navigation Doppler Lidar (NDL) sensor for ultra-precise velocity and line- of-site (LOS) range measurements, and the Lander Vision System (LVS) that provides passive-optical Terrain Relative Navigation (TRN) estimates of map-relative position. The COBALT platform is self contained and includes the NDL and LVS sensors, blending filter, a custom compute element, power unit, and communication system. The platform incorporates a structural frame that has been designed to integrate with the payload frame onboard the new Masten Xodiac vertical take-o, vertical landing (VTVL) terrestrial rocket vehicle. Ground integration and testing is underway, and terrestrial fight testing onboard Xodiac is planned for 2017 with two flight campaigns: one open-loop and one closed-loop.

  2. Pakistan's experience in transfer of nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad Khan, Nunir

    1977-01-01

    Of all technologies, nuclear technology is perhaps the most interdisciplinary in character as it encompasses such varied fields as nuclear physics, reactor physics, mechanical, electrical electronics controls, metallurgical and even civil and geological engineering. When we speak of transfer of acquisition of nuclear technology we imply cumulative know-how in many fields, most of which are not nuclear per se but are essential for building the necessry infrastructure and back-up facilities for developing and implementing any nuclear energy program. In Pakistan, efforts on utilization of nuclear energy for peaceful applications were initiated about twenty years ago. During these years stepwise development of nuclear technology has taken place. The experience gained by Pakistan so far in transfer of nuclear technology is discussed. Suggestions have been made for continuing the transfer of this most essential technology from the advanced to the developing countries while making sure that necessary safeguard requirements are fullfilled

  3. Program ELM: A tool for rapid thermal-hydraulic analysis of solid-core nuclear rocket fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walton, J.T.

    1992-11-01

    This report reviews the state of the art of thermal-hydraulic analysis codes and presents a new code, Program ELM, for analysis of fuel elements. ELM is a concise computational tool for modeling the steady-state thermal-hydraulics of propellant flow through fuel element coolant channels in a nuclear thermal rocket reactor with axial coolant passages. The program was developed as a tool to swiftly evaluate various heat transfer coefficient and friction factor correlations generated for turbulent pipe flow with heat addition which have been used in previous programs. Thus, a consistent comparison of these correlations was performed, as well as a comparison with data from the NRX reactor experiments from the Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Applications (NERVA) project. This report describes the ELM Program algorithm, input/output, and validation efforts and provides a listing of the code

  4. Assessment of the advantages and feasibility of a nuclear rocket for a manned Mars mission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, S.D.

    1986-01-01

    The feasibility of rebuilding and testing a nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) for the Mars mission was investigted. Calculations indicate that an NTR would substantially reduce the Earth-orbit assemble mass compared to LOX/LH 2 systems. The mass savings were 36 and 65% for the cases of total aerobraking and of total propulsive braking respectively. Consequently, the cost savings for a single mission of using an NTR, if aerobraking is feasible, are probably insufficient to warrant the NTR development. If multiple missions are planned or if propulsive braking is desired at Mars and/or at Earth, then the savings of about $7 billion will easily pay for the NTR. Estimates of the cost of rebuilding a NTR were based on the previous NERVA program's budget plus additional costs to develop a flight ready engine. The total cost to build the engine would be between $4 to 5 billion. The concept of developing a full-power test stand at Johnston Atoll in the Pacific appears very feasible. The added expense of building facilities on the island should be less than $1.4 billion

  5. Mars mission opportunity and transit time sensitivity for a nuclear thermal rocket propulsion application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, A.C.; Mulqueen, J.A.; Nishimuta, E.L.; Emrich, W.J.

    1993-01-01

    President George Bush's 1989 challenge to America to support the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) of ''Back to the Moon and Human Mission to Mars'' gives the space industry an opportunity to develop effective and efficient space transportation systems. This paper presents stage performance and requirements for a nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) Mars transportation system to support the human Mars mission of the SEI. Two classes of Mars mission profiles are considered in developing the NTR propulsion vehicle performance and requirements. The two Mars mission classes include the opposition class and conjunction class. The opposition class mission is associated with relatively short Mars stay times ranging from 30 to 90 days and total mission duration of 350 to 600 days. The conjunction class mission is associated with much longer Mars stay times ranging from 500 to 600 days and total mission durations of 875 to 1,000 days. Vehicle mass scaling equations are used to determine the NTR stage mass, size, and performance range required for different Mars mission opportunities and for different Mars mission durations. Mission opportunities considered include launch years 2010 to 2018. The 2010 opportunity is the most demanding launch opportunity and the 2018 opportunity is the least demanding opportunity. NTR vehicle mass and size sensitivity to NTR engine thrust level, engine specific impulse, NTR engine thrust-to-weight ratio, and Mars surface payload are presented. NTR propulsion parameter ranges include those associated with NERVA, particle bed reactor (PBR), low-pressure, and ceramic-metal-type engine design

  6. Mars mission opportunity and transit time sensitivity for a nuclear thermal rocket propulsion application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Archie C.; Mulqueen, John A.; Nishimuta, Ena L.; Emrich, William J.

    1993-01-01

    President George Bush's 1989 challenge to America to support the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) of ``Back to the Moon and Human Mission to Mars'' gives the space industry an opportunity to develop effective and efficient space transportation systems. This paper presents stage performance and requirements for a nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) Mars transportation system to support the human Mars mission of the SEI. Two classes of Mars mission profiles are considered in developing the NTR propulsion vehicle performance and requirements. The two Mars mission classes include the opposition class and conjunction class. The opposition class mission is associated with relatively short Mars stay times ranging from 30 to 90 days and total mission duration of 350 to 600 days. The conjunction class mission is associated with much longer Mars stay times ranging from 500 to 600 days and total mission durations of 875 to 1,000 days. Vehicle mass scaling equations are used to determine the NTR stage mass, size, and performance range required for different Mars mission opportunities and for different Mars mission durations. Mission opportunities considered include launch years 2010 to 2018. The 2010 opportunity is the most demanding launch opportunity and the 2018 opportunity is the least demanding opportunity. NTR vehicle mass and size sensitivity to NTR engine thrust level, engine specific impulse, NTR engine thrust-to-weight ratio, and Mars surface payload are presented. NTR propulsion parameter ranges include those associated with NERVA, particle bed reactor (PBR), low-pressure, and ceramic-metal-type engine design.

  7. The Technology of Nuclear Warfare

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broda, E.

    1979-01-01

    The present technical status of the nuclear weapon system and of the systems for their delivery is explained. All these systems have made tremendous progress since the 1960s. Available destructive power now is literally millions of times larger than at the time of Hiroshima. Moreover, technical progress has had, especially through the MIRV principle and the cruise missile, a destabilizing influence and threatens the equilibrium of terror. New strategy doctrines for winning rather than preventing nuclear war are developed. According to the counterforce strategy the retaliation capacity of the opponent is to be destroyed by a surprise attack. Moreover, plans for the tactical first-use of nuclear weapons have been accepted. In a nuclear conflict, the commanders-in-chief are overburdened by the need for ultra-urgent decisions. As a consequence tendencies in the direction of increasing automatization become ever more conspicuous. In the extreme case, decisions may be entirely left to machines, and man would not any more be included in decision-making. The increasing automatization leads to further escalation of insecurity for the whole world. A solution cannot be found on the level of technology, but only on that of practical peace policy. (author)

  8. History of nuclear technology development in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Kiyonobu

    2015-04-01

    Nuclear technology development in Japan has been carried out based on the Atomic Energy Basic Act brought into effect in 1955. The nuclear technology development is limited to peaceful purposes and made in a principle to assure their safety. Now, the technologies for research reactors radiation application and nuclear power plants are delivered to developing countries. First of all, safety measures of nuclear power plants (NPPs) will be enhanced based on lesson learned from TEPCO Fukushima Daiichi NPS accident.

  9. History of nuclear technology development in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamashita, Kiyonobu, E-mail: yamashita.kiyonobu@jaea.go.jp [Visiting Professor, at the Faculty of Petroleum and Renewable Energy Engineering, University Teknologi Malaysia Johor Bahru 81310 (Malaysia); General Advisor Nuclear HRD Centre, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, TOKAI-mura, NAKA-gun, IBARAKI-ken, 319-1195 (Japan)

    2015-04-29

    Nuclear technology development in Japan has been carried out based on the Atomic Energy Basic Act brought into effect in 1955. The nuclear technology development is limited to peaceful purposes and made in a principle to assure their safety. Now, the technologies for research reactors radiation application and nuclear power plants are delivered to developing countries. First of all, safety measures of nuclear power plants (NPPs) will be enhanced based on lesson learned from TEPCO Fukushima Daiichi NPS accident.

  10. History of nuclear technology development in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Kiyonobu

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear technology development in Japan has been carried out based on the Atomic Energy Basic Act brought into effect in 1955. The nuclear technology development is limited to peaceful purposes and made in a principle to assure their safety. Now, the technologies for research reactors radiation application and nuclear power plants are delivered to developing countries. First of all, safety measures of nuclear power plants (NPPs) will be enhanced based on lesson learned from TEPCO Fukushima Daiichi NPS accident

  11. ISO standardization in nuclear technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brabec, D. (Ustav pro Vyzkum, Vyrobu a Vyuziti Radioisotopu, Prague (Czechoslovakia)); Cermak, O. (Urad pro Normalizaci a Mereni, Prague (Czechoslovakia))

    1984-10-01

    The activity is described of the technical commission ISO/TC 85 which is currently divided into 4 subcommissions (SC) and 24 working groups. SC 1 ''Terminology, definitions, units, abbreviations'' has one working group. The most important document of this SC is ISO 921-1972 (Dictionary of nuclear technology). SC 2 ''Radiation protection'' has 9 working groups and has processed standards in dosimetry. SC 3 ''Technology of power reactors'' has 6 working groups and its work is related to IAEA activities within the NUSS program. SC 4 ''Technology of nuclear fuels'' has 8 working groups. SC 4 has compiled the basic standards for sealed sources and methods of testing their tightness. The results of the work of this group have been reflected into the standardization work of CMEA. A list is given of published international standards within TC 85.

  12. Nuclear technology and mineral recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, Richard M.; Niermeyer, Karl E.

    1970-01-01

    The particular aspect of nuclear technology most applicable to the mineral field, as has been pointed out by various authors, is nuclear blasting. The prime target for this nuclear blasting has usually been a large disseminated deposit of copper mineralization which, because of large dimensions, employs the nuclear devices most effectively. From the work of the AEC we know that the larger nuclear devices fragment rock for a lower energy cost per unit of ground broken than do smaller nuclear devices or chemical explosives. A mineralized deposit near the surface is usually not amenable to nuclear fragmentation, nor are the more deeply buried thin deposits. Also, one would not anticipate fragmenting a zone of excessively erratic mineralization with nuclear devices. Many of our mineralized areas would be eliminated using the above criteria, so at this point you are well aware that my self-imposed limitation is to nuclear blasting and large disseminated copper deposits. As with most other industries, copper mining faces rising costs and greater demands for its products. One of the rising cost features peculiar to extractive industries is the reliance placed on production from lower grade deposits as the higher grade deposits are depleted. As the grade or metal content of an orebody decreases more material must be handled to produce a given amount of metal. The increased volume of ore which must be handled as the grade declines requires expansion of facilities and higher capital expenditures. Expansion of facilities for mining, milling, and concentrating of the ore increases the per unit capital cost of the end product--copper. Increased copper consumption will aggravate this situation with demand for more metal, much of which will have to be obtained from lower grade deposits. As the higher grade deposits are depleted, future production will come from those deposits which cannot be exploited economically today. Most familiar of the proposed new methods for copper mining

  13. Nuclear technology and mineral recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, Richard M; Niermeyer, Karl E [Anaconda Company, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1970-05-15

    The particular aspect of nuclear technology most applicable to the mineral field, as has been pointed out by various authors, is nuclear blasting. The prime target for this nuclear blasting has usually been a large disseminated deposit of copper mineralization which, because of large dimensions, employs the nuclear devices most effectively. From the work of the AEC we know that the larger nuclear devices fragment rock for a lower energy cost per unit of ground broken than do smaller nuclear devices or chemical explosives. A mineralized deposit near the surface is usually not amenable to nuclear fragmentation, nor are the more deeply buried thin deposits. Also, one would not anticipate fragmenting a zone of excessively erratic mineralization with nuclear devices. Many of our mineralized areas would be eliminated using the above criteria, so at this point you are well aware that my self-imposed limitation is to nuclear blasting and large disseminated copper deposits. As with most other industries, copper mining faces rising costs and greater demands for its products. One of the rising cost features peculiar to extractive industries is the reliance placed on production from lower grade deposits as the higher grade deposits are depleted. As the grade or metal content of an orebody decreases more material must be handled to produce a given amount of metal. The increased volume of ore which must be handled as the grade declines requires expansion of facilities and higher capital expenditures. Expansion of facilities for mining, milling, and concentrating of the ore increases the per unit capital cost of the end product--copper. Increased copper consumption will aggravate this situation with demand for more metal, much of which will have to be obtained from lower grade deposits. As the higher grade deposits are depleted, future production will come from those deposits which cannot be exploited economically today. Most familiar of the proposed new methods for copper mining

  14. Public fear of nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nealey, S.M.; Radford, L.R.

    1987-01-01

    Excessive fear of nuclear technology (EFONT) is estimated to affect from 35-50 percent of the U.S. public, EFONT is defined as an unpleasant state of fear with components of stress and anxiety, threat to security, and anger. The cognitive aspect of EFONT involves perception of risks, benefits, and values which reinforce and perpetuate the fear. EFONT can be reduced through communications and outreach programs by providing basic information, encouraging participation, and targeting misinformation. Risks need to be put in perspective and benefits made explicit. Safety messages should be combined with other information. Understanding and patience are indispensable in dealing with those who are afraid

  15. Nuclear Science and Technology for Thai Society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thailand Institute of Nuclear Technology, Bangkok

    2009-07-01

    Full text: Full text: The 11th conference on the nuclear science and technology was held on 2-3 July 2009 in Bangkok. This conference contain paper on non-power applications of nuclear technology in medicine, agriculture and industry. These application include irradiation of food for the infestation tram technologies used in diagnosis and therapy and radiation chemistry important to industrial processes. Some technologies which evolved from the development of nuclear power industry are also discussed

  16. Nuclear design analysis of square-lattice honeycomb space nuclear rocket engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widargo, Reza; Anghaie, Samim

    1999-01-01

    The square-lattice honeycomb reactor is designed based on a cylindrical core that is determined to have critical diameter and length of 0.50 m and 0.50 c, respectively. A 0.10-cm thick radial graphite reflector, in addition to a 0.20-m thick axial graphite reflector are used to reduce neutron leakage from the reactor. The core is fueled with solid solution of 93% enriched (U, Zr, Nb)C, which is one of several ternary uranium carbides that are considered for this concept. The fuel is to be fabricated as 2 mm grooved (U, Zr, Nb)C wafers. The fuel wafers are used to form square-lattice honeycomb fuel assemblies, 0.10 m in length with 30% cross-sectional flow area. Five fuel assemblies are stacked up axially to form the reactor core. Based on the 30% void fraction, the width of the square flow channel is about 1.3 mm. The hydrogen propellant is passed through these flow channels and removes the heat from the reactor core. To perform nuclear design analysis, a series of neutron transport and diffusion codes are used. The preliminary results are obtained using a simple four-group cross-section model. To optimize the nuclear design, the fuel densities are varied for each assembly. Tantalum, hafnium and tungsten are considered and used as a replacement for niobium in fuel material to provide water submersion sub-criticality for the reactor. Axial and radial neutron flux and power density distributions are calculated for the core. Results of the neutronic analysis indicate that the core has a relatively fast spectrum. From the results of the thermal hydraulic analyses, eight axial temperature zones are chosen for the calculation of group average cross-sections. An iterative process is conducted to couple the neutronic calculations with the thermal hydraulics calculations. Results of the nuclear design analysis indicate that a compact core can be designed based on ternary uranium carbide square-lattice honeycomb fuel. This design provides a relatively high thrust to weight

  17. Where is high technology taking nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veall, N.

    1985-01-01

    The question is posed as to whether high technology in nuclear medicine might lead to the nuclear medicine practitioner possibly finishing up working for the machine rather than the improvement of health care in its widest sense. A brief examination of some pros and cons of high technology nuclear medicine is given. (U.K.)

  18. Nuclear energy and nuclear technology in Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graf, P.

    1975-01-01

    The energy crisis, high fuel costs and slow progress in the development of alternative energy sources, e.g. solar energy have given further impetus to nuclear power generation. The Swiss nuclear energy programme is discussed and details are given of nuclear station in operation, under construction, in the project stage and of Swiss participation in foreign nuclear stations. Reference is made to the difficulties, delays and resulting cost increases caused by local and regional opposition to nuclear power stations. The significant contributions made by Swiss industry and Swiss consulting engineers are discussed. (P.G.R.)

  19. Nuclear disarmament and peaceful nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, T.B.

    1989-01-01

    According to the author, it remains to be seen whether nuclear disarmament can reduce the risks of nuclear war sufficiently for the residual risks to be acceptable to a majority of the world's population, while at the same time vigorous growth in the world's dependence on nuclear energy for peaceful purposes continues. This paper discusses how use of nuclear materials from dismantled weapons as fuel for peaceful purposes may help progress to be made towards that goal, by stimulating considerable improvements in the effectiveness of arrangements for preventing diversion of the materials from peaceful to military purposes, while at the same time eliminating large numbers of nuclear weapons

  20. A study on the nuclear technology policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H. J.; Oh, K. B.; Chung, W. S.; Lee, T. J.; Yun, S. W.; Jeong, Ik

    2005-01-01

    This study was conducted as a part of institutional activities of KAERI, and the objective of the study is to survey and analyze the change of international environment in nuclear use and research and development environment, and to propose systematic alternatives on technology policy for efficiency and effectiveness of research and development through national R and D program while timely responding to the environmental change in local and global sense. Acknowledging the importance of the relationship between the external environment and the national nuclear R and D strategic planning for changing of environment of surrounding nuclear technology and development in the world, this study focused on the three major subjects: (1) investigation and analysis of international nuclear environmental and technological change; (2) developing nuclear R and D strategy based on the analysis of national and global environment surrounding nuclear technology development and diffusion; (3) the evaluation of role of nuclear technology and environment from the point of views of environmental effects. In order to enhance the role of national nuclear R and D program and to cope with the environmental and technological change surrounding nuclear energy, it is recommended that active participation should be done in ongoing international collaboration on future innovative nuclear technology for absorption of advanced technologies and strategic R and D planning should be centered on core technology field based on long-term vision and suggested NuTRM considering future energy-environmental surroundings for maximized use of domestic technology capabilities and resources

  1. Development of nuclear analytical technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jee, Kwang Yong; Kim, W. H.; Park, Yeong J.; Park, Yong J.; Sohn, S. C.; Song, B. C.; Jeon, Y. S.; Pyo, H. Y.; Ha, Y. K.

    2004-04-01

    The objectives of this study are to develop the technology for the determination of isotopic ratios of nuclear particles detected from swipe samples and to develop the NIPS system. The R and D contents and results of this study are firstly the production of nuclear micro particle(1 ∼ 20 μm) and standardization, the examination of variation in fission track characteristic according to nuclear particle size and enrichment( 235 U: 1-50%), the construction of database and the application of this technique to swipe samples. If this technique is verified its superiority by various field tests and inter-laboratory comparison program with other institutes in developed countries, it can be possible to join NWAL supervised under IAEA and to export our technology abroad. Secondly, characteristics of alpha track by boron (n, α) nuclear reaction were studied to measure both total boron concentration and 10B enrichment. The correlation of number of alpha tracks and various 10B concentration was studied to evaluate the reliability of this method. Especially, cadmium shielding technique was introduced to reduce the background of alpha tracks by covering the solid track detector and the multi-dot detector plate was developed to increase the reproducibility of measurement by making boron solution dried evenly in the plate. The results of the alpha track method were found to be well agreed with those of mass spectroscopy within less than 10 % deviation. Finally, the NIPS system using 252 Cf neutron source was developed and prompt gamma spectrum and its background were obtained. Monte Carlo method using MCNP-4B code was utilized for the interpretation of neutron and gamma-ray shielding condition as well as the moderation of a fast neutron. Gamma-gamma coincidence was introduced to reduce the prompt gamma background. The counting efficiency of the HPGe detector was calibrated in the energy range from 50 keV to 10 MeV using radio isotope standards and prompt gamma rays of Cl for the

  2. Nuclear technology review 2005 update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-08-15

    The year 2004 marked the 50th anniversary of civilian nuclear power generation. While the current outlook for nuclear energy remains mixed, there is clearly a sense of rising expectations. Both the OECD International Energy Agency and the IAEA adjusted their medium-term projections for nuclear power upwards. The IAEA now projects 423 - 592 GW(e) of nuclear power installed worldwide in 2030, compared to 366 GW(e) at the end of 2004. This is driven by nuclear power's performance record, by growing energy needs around the world coupled with rising oil and natural gas prices, by new environmental constraints including entry-into-force of the Kyoto Protocol, by concerns about energy supply security in a number of countries, and by ambitious expansion plans in several key countries. National research on advanced reactor designs continues on all reactor categories - water cooled, gas cooled, liquid metal cooled, and hybrid systems. Five members of the US-initiated Generation IV International Forum (GIF) signed a framework agreement on international collaboration in research and development on Generation IV nuclear energy systems in February 2005. The IAEA's International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO) grew to 23 members. It completed a series of case studies testing its assessment methodology and the final report on the updated INPRO methodology was published in December. The realization of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, ITER, came closer with the announcement on 28 June 2005 by the ITER parties. The aim of ITER is to demonstrate the scientific and technological feasibility of fusion energy by constructing a functional fusion power plant. Nuclear technology developments are rapid and cover many fields of application. Not all can be covered in this update review, but certain key areas and trends are covered where these are seen to be of significant interest to IAEA Member States, and which are of relevance to and have

  3. Nuclear technology review 2005 update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-08-01

    The year 2004 marked the 50th anniversary of civilian nuclear power generation. While the current outlook for nuclear energy remains mixed, there is clearly a sense of rising expectations. Both the OECD International Energy Agency and the IAEA adjusted their medium-term projections for nuclear power upwards. The IAEA now projects 423 - 592 GW(e) of nuclear power installed worldwide in 2030, compared to 366 GW(e) at the end of 2004. This is driven by nuclear power's performance record, by growing energy needs around the world coupled with rising oil and natural gas prices, by new environmental constraints including entry-into-force of the Kyoto Protocol, by concerns about energy supply security in a number of countries, and by ambitious expansion plans in several key countries. National research on advanced reactor designs continues on all reactor categories - water cooled, gas cooled, liquid metal cooled, and hybrid systems. Five members of the US-initiated Generation IV International Forum (GIF) signed a framework agreement on international collaboration in research and development on Generation IV nuclear energy systems in February 2005. The IAEA's International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO) grew to 23 members. It completed a series of case studies testing its assessment methodology and the final report on the updated INPRO methodology was published in December. The realization of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, ITER, came closer with the announcement on 28 June 2005 by the ITER parties. The aim of ITER is to demonstrate the scientific and technological feasibility of fusion energy by constructing a functional fusion power plant. Nuclear technology developments are rapid and cover many fields of application. Not all can be covered in this update review, but certain key areas and trends are covered where these are seen to be of significant interest to IAEA Member States, and which are of relevance to and have

  4. A Study on the Nuclear Technology Policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, C. Y.; Lee, K. S.; Jeong, I.; Lee, J. H.

    2009-04-01

    The objective of the study was to make policy-proposes for enhancing the effectiveness and efficiency of national nuclear technology development programs. To do this, recent changes of international nuclear energy policy and trends of nuclear technology R and D was surveyed and analyzed. In the viewpoint of analysis of the changes in the global policy surrounding nuclear technology development and development of national nuclear R and D strategy, this study (1) analyzed the trends of nuclear technology policies and (2) discussed the mid and long term strategy of nuclear energy R and D. To put it in more detail, each subject was further explored as follows; (1) analyzed the trends of nuclear technology policies - Trend and prospects of the international and domestic nuclear policies - Investigation of development of small and medium sized policies - International collaboration for advanced nuclear technologies (2) discussed the mid and long term strategy of nuclear energy R and D - The long term development plan for future nuclear energy system - The facilitation of technology commercialization

  5. New nuclear technology; International developments. Review 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devell, L.; Aggeryd, I.; Hultgren, Aa.; Lundell, B.; Pedersen, T.

    1995-09-01

    A summary review of the development of new nuclear rector technology is presented in this report. Fuel cycle strategies and waste handling developments are also commented. Different plans for dismantling nuclear weapons are presented. 18 refs

  6. Commercialization of nuclear power plant decommissioning technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, D.H.

    1983-01-01

    The commercialization of nuclear power plant decommissioning is presented as a step in the commercialization of nuclear energy. Opportunities for technology application advances are identified. Utility planning needs are presented

  7. Nuclear energy technology transfer: the security barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinne, R.L.

    1975-08-01

    The problems presented by security considerations to the transfer of nuclear energy technology are examined. In the case of fusion, the national security barrier associated with the laser and E-beam approaches is discussed; for fission, the international security requirements, due to the possibility of the theft or diversion of special nuclear materials or sabotage of nuclear facilities, are highlighted. The paper outlines the nuclear fuel cycle and terrorist threat, examples of security barriers, and the current approaches to transferring technology. (auth)

  8. Development of high burnup nuclear fuel technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suk, Ho Chun; Kang, Young Hwan; Jung, Jin Gone; Hwang, Won; Park, Zoo Hwan; Ryu, Woo Seog; Kim, Bong Goo; Kim, Il Gone

    1987-04-01

    The objectives of the project are mainly to develope both design and manufacturing technologies for 600 MWe-CANDU-PHWR-type high burnup nuclear fuel, and secondly to build up the foundation of PWR high burnup nuclear fuel technology on the basis of KAERI technology localized upon the standard 600 MWe-CANDU- PHWR nuclear fuel. So, as in the first stage, the goal of the program in the last one year was set up mainly to establish the concept of the nuclear fuel pellet design and manufacturing. The economic incentives for high burnup nuclear fuel technology development are improvement of fuel utilization, backend costs plant operation, etc. Forming the most important incentives of fuel cycle costs reduction and improvement of power operation, etc., the development of high burnup nuclear fuel technology and also the research on the incore fuel management and safety and technologies are necessary in this country

  9. Thirteenth Workshop for Computational Fluid Dynamic Applications in Rocket Propulsion and Launch Vehicle Technology. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R. W. (Compiler)

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of the workshop was to discuss experimental and computational fluid dynamic activities in rocket propulsion and launch vehicles. The workshop was an open meeting for government, industry, and academia. A broad number of topics were discussed including computational fluid dynamic methodology, liquid and solid rocket propulsion, turbomachinery, combustion, heat transfer, and grid generation.

  10. Non-nuclear power application of nuclear technology in Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funtua, I.I.

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear Technology applications are found in Food and Agriculture, Human Health, Water Resources, Industry, Environment, Education and Research.There are more potentials for the deployment of nuclear technology in more aspects of our life with needed economic development in Nigeria.Nuclear Technology plays and would continue to play vital role in Agriculture, Human health, Water resources and industry in Nigeria.Nuclear technologies have been useful in developmental efforts worldwide and for these to take hold, capacity building programmes must be expanded and the general public must have informed opinions about the benefits and risk associated with the technologies.This presentation gives an overview of nuclear technology applications in Nigeria in the following areas: Food and Agriculture, Human Health, Water Resources, Industry, Education and Research

  11. A Study on the Nuclear Technology Policy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, H. J.; Lim, C. Y.; Yang, M. H. (and others)

    2008-03-15

    The objective of the study was to make policy-proposes for enhancing the effectiveness and efficiency of national nuclear technology development programs. To do this, changes of international nuclear energy policy environment and trends of nuclear technology development was surveyed and analyzed. In the viewpoint of analysis of the changes in the global policy environment surrounding nuclear technology development and development of national nuclear R and D strategy, this study (1) analyzed trends of nuclear technology policies and (2) developed the nuclear energy R and D innovation strategies. To put it in more detail, each subject was further explored as follows; (1) themes to analyze trends of nuclear policies: nuclear Renaissance and forecast for nuclear power plant, International collaboration for advanced nuclear technologies in GIF, INPRO and I-NERI, The present situation and outlook for world uranium market (2) themes to develop of nuclear energy R and D innovation strategies: The mid-term strategy plan of the KAERI, The technological innovation case of the KAERI.

  12. A Study on the Nuclear Technology Policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H. J.; Lim, C. Y.; Yang, M. H.

    2008-03-01

    The objective of the study was to make policy-proposes for enhancing the effectiveness and efficiency of national nuclear technology development programs. To do this, changes of international nuclear energy policy environment and trends of nuclear technology development was surveyed and analyzed. In the viewpoint of analysis of the changes in the global policy environment surrounding nuclear technology development and development of national nuclear R and D strategy, this study (1) analyzed trends of nuclear technology policies and (2) developed the nuclear energy R and D innovation strategies. To put it in more detail, each subject was further explored as follows; (1) themes to analyze trends of nuclear policies: nuclear Renaissance and forecast for nuclear power plant, International collaboration for advanced nuclear technologies in GIF, INPRO and I-NERI, The present situation and outlook for world uranium market (2) themes to develop of nuclear energy R and D innovation strategies: The mid-term strategy plan of the KAERI, The technological innovation case of the KAERI

  13. Physics and technology of nuclear materials

    CERN Document Server

    Ursu, Ioan

    2015-01-01

    Physics and Technology of Nuclear Materials presents basic information regarding the structure, properties, processing methods, and response to irradiation of the key materials that fission and fusion nuclear reactors have to rely upon. Organized into 12 chapters, this book begins with selectively several fundamentals of nuclear physics. Subsequent chapters focus on the nuclear materials science; nuclear fuel; structural materials; moderator materials employed to """"slow down"""" fission neutrons; and neutron highly absorbent materials that serve in reactor's power control. Other chapters exp

  14. Membrane processes in nuclear technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakrzewska-Trznadel, G.

    2006-01-01

    The treatment of radioactive wastes is necessary taking into account the potential hazard of radioactive substances to human health and surrounding environment. The choice of appropriate technology depends on capital and operational costs, wastes amount and their characteristics, appointed targets of the process, e.g. the values of decontamination factors and volume reduction coefficients. The conventional technologies applied for radioactive waste processing, such as precipitation coupled with sedimentation, ion exchange and evaporation have many drawbacks. These include high energy consumption and formation of secondary wastes, e.g. the sludge from sediment tanks, spent ion exchange adsorbents and regeneration solutions. There are also many limitations of such processes, i.e. foaming and drop entrainment in evaporators, loses of solvents and production of secondary wastes in solvent extraction or bed clogging in ion exchange columns. Membrane processes as the newest achievement of the process engineering can successfully supersede many non-effective, out-of-date methods. But in some instances they can also complement these methods whilst improving the parameters of effluents and purification economy. This monograph presents own research data on the application of recent achievements in the area of membrane processes for solving selected problems in nuclear technology. Relatively big space was devoted to the use of membrane processing of low and intermediate radioactive liquid wastes because of numerous applications of these processes in nuclear centres over the world and also because of the interests of the author that was reflected by her recent research projects and activity. This work presents a review on the membrane methods recently introduced into the nuclear technology against the background of the other, commonly applied separation techniques, with indications of the possibilities and prospects for their further developments. Particular attention was paid

  15. Overview of space nuclear technologies and the American Nuclear Society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singleterry, R.C. Jr.

    2000-01-01

    The American Nuclear Society (ANS) has seen an aspect of the universe where nuclear technology is the best energy source available for power, transportation, etc. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has been exploiting this aspect of the universe by sending machines and humans into it and exploring, colonizing, industrializing, developing, inhabiting, etc. Space is the final frontier, and nuclear technology is the best suited for today's or the next century's space exploration and development. Many aspects of nuclear technology and its uses in space will be needed. ANS encompasses these and many more aspects of nuclear technology, and all have some role to play in the exploration and development of space. It should be ANS's intent to be an advisory body to NASA on the nuclear aspects of space exploration

  16. Korean experiences on nuclear power technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H.; Yang, H.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the outstanding performance of the indigenous development program of nuclear power technology such as the design and fabrication of both CANDU and PWR fuel and in the design and construction of nuclear steam supply system in Korea. The success has been accomplished through the successful technology transfer from foreign suppliers and efficient utilization of R and D manpower in the design and engineering of nuclear power projects. In order to implement the technology transfer successfully, the joint design concept has been introduced along with effective on-the-job training and the transfer of design documents and computer codes. Korea's successful development of nuclear power program has resulted in rapid expansion of nuclear power generation capacity in a short time, and the nuclear power has contributed to the national economy through lowering electricity price by about 50 % as well as stabilizing electricity supply in 1980s. The nuclear power is expected to play a key role in the future electricity supply in Korea. Now Korea is under way of taking a step toward advanced nuclear technology. The national electricity system expansion plan includes 18 more units of NPPs to be constructed by the year 2006. In this circumstance, the country has fixed the national long-term nuclear R and D program (lgg2-2001) to enhance the national capability of nuclear technology. This paper also briefly describes future prospects of nuclear technology development program in Korea

  17. IEA Energy Technology Essentials: Nuclear Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-03-15

    The IEA Energy Technology Essentials series offers concise four-page updates on the different technologies for producing, transporting and using energy. Nuclear power is the topic covered in this edition.

  18. Transfer of nuclear technology from Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madrid, G.

    1985-01-01

    Technology transfer from Spain is possible in several fields of nuclear technology ranging from the head end of the fuel cycle (ENUSA) to the back end (ENRESA). The advantages of such a transfer are emphasized

  19. Experience in transfer of nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckurts, K.H.

    1977-01-01

    Nuclear energy development in the Federal Republic of Germany was initiated in 1955. In spite of this late start, the country now has a broad potential in all branches of peaceful nuclear technology. Turkey nuclear power plants are erected by German industry, and the country has the basic technology at its disposal for all stages of the nuclear fuel cycle. In the areas of uranium enrichment and reprocessing, multilateral joint ventures with European countries have been formed. The country also has an active development program for advanced reactors. In general areas of technology transfer and development aid, in the nuclear field, there are interrelated activities of both government and industry. The government has concluded bilateral agreements with a number of countires e.g. Argentina, Brazil, India, Iran and Pakistan, covering the general field of nuclear science; in the framework of these agreements, which are being carried out mainly by the nuclear research centers at Juelich and Karlsruhe, active cooperation in research, development, education, and training are being pursued. The nonproliferation of nuclear weapons is a major objective of the Federal government which strongly affects its policies for international nuclear trade. The paper describes the nuclear technology potential available in the Federal Republic of Germany and reviews experience gathered in cooperation with developing countries. Future policies for nuclear technology transfer are discussed with special reference to the role of national R and D laboratories

  20. Nuclear technology for the year 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-01-01

    Eighteen papers and abstracts are presented under the following session headings: space nuclear power, health physics and dosimetry, nuclear design and thermal hydraulics, nuclear diagnostics, and fusion technology and plasma physics. The papers were processed separately for the data base. (DLC)

  1. Kazakhstan innovation projects in nuclear technologies field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shkol'nik, V.S.; Tukhvatulin, Sh.T.

    2005-01-01

    At present in the Republic of Kazakhstan in preparation and realization stage there are several innovation projects related with use of advanced nuclear technologies. Projects are as follows: 'Implementation of Kazakhstan thermonuclear reactor tokamak (KTM)'; 'Implementation at the L.N. Gumilev Eurasian National University the inter-disciplinary research complex on the heavy ions accelerator base'; 'Development of the Technological Park 'Nuclear Technologies Center in Kurchatov city'; 'Development the first in the Central-Asian region Center of Nuclear Medicine and Biophysics'. The initiator and principal operator of these projects is the National Nuclear Center of the Republic of Kazakhstan

  2. Assessment of the facilities on Jackass Flats and other Nevada Test Site facilities for the new nuclear rocket program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandler, G.; Collins, D.; Dye, K.; Eberhart, C.; Hynes, M.; Kovach, R.; Ortiz, R.; Perea, J.; Sherman, D.

    1992-01-01

    Recent NASA/DOE studies for the Space Exploration Initiative have demonstrated a critical need for the ground-based testing of nuclear rocket engines. Experience in the ROVER/NERVA Program, experience in the Nuclear Weapons Testing Program, and involvement in the new nuclear rocket program has motivated our detailed assessment of the facilities used for the ROVER/NERVA Program and other facilities located at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The ROVER/NERVA facilities are located in the Nevada Research L, Development Area (NRDA) on Jackass Flats at NTS, approximately 85 miles northwest of Las Vegas. To guide our assessment of facilities for an engine testing program we have defined a program goal, scope, and process. To execute this program scope and process will require ten facilities. We considered the use of all relevant facilities at NTS including existing and new tunnels as well as the facilities at NRDA. Aside from the facilities located at remote sites and the inter-site transportation system, all of the required facilities are available at NRDA. In particular we have studied the refurbishment of E-MAD, ETS-1, R-MAD, and the interconnecting railroad. The total cost for such a refurbishment we estimate to be about $253M which includes additional contractor fees related to indirect, construction management, profit, contingency, and management reserves. This figure also includes the cost of the required NEPA, safety, and security documentation

  3. EPRI nuclear power plant decommissioning technology program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Karen S.; Bushart, Sean P.; Naughton, Michael; McGrath, Richard

    2011-01-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is a non-profit research organization that supports the energy industry. The Nuclear Power Plant Decommissioning Technology Program conducts research and develops technology for the safe and efficient decommissioning of nuclear power plants. (author)

  4. A study on the nuclear technology policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, M. H.; Kim, H. J.; Chung, W. S.; Lee, T. J.; Yun, S. W.; Jeong, Ik

    2002-01-01

    This study was carried out as a part of institutional activities of KAERI. This study suggested the effective and systematic alternatives for the development of domestic industry through nuclear long-term R and D program while timely responding to the environmental change in local and global sense. First of all, this study investigated the current status and prospect of nuclear power supply, the global technological change of nuclear fuel cycle, the nuclear policy changes of major countries and the role of nuclear energy in East Asian countries. Second, some policy alternatives are suggested in association with the role of national R and D in enhancing industrial competitiveness, the effective management of nuclear long-term R and D program to facilitate technological innovation and the way to enlarge the utilization of nuclear R and D results and radiation technology

  5. Effect of buoyancy on fuel containment in an open-cycle gas-core nuclear rocket engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putre, H. A.

    1971-01-01

    Analysis aimed at determining the scaling laws for the buoyancy effect on fuel containment in an open-cycle gas-core nuclear rocket engine, so conducted that experimental conditions can be related to engine conditions. The fuel volume fraction in a short coaxial flow cavity is calculated with a programmed numerical solution of the steady Navier-Stokes equations for isothermal, variable density fluid mixing. A dimensionless parameter B, called the Buoyancy number, was found to correlate the fuel volume fraction for large accelerations and various density ratios. This parameter has the value B = 0 for zero acceleration, and B = 350 for typical engine conditions.

  6. Technology Development of a Fiber Optic-Coupled Laser Ignition System for Multi-Combustor Rocket Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, Huu P.; Early, Jim; Osborne, Robin; Thomas, Matthew E.; Bossard, John A.

    2002-01-01

    This paper addresses the progress of technology development of a laser ignition system at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The first two years of the project focus on comprehensive assessments and evaluations of a novel dual-pulse laser concept, flight- qualified laser system, and the technology required to integrate the laser ignition system to a rocket chamber. With collaborations of the Department of Energy/Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and CFD Research Corporation (CFDRC), MSFC has conducted 26 hot fire ignition tests with lab-scale laser systems. These tests demonstrate the concept feasibility of dual-pulse laser ignition to initiate gaseous oxygen (GOX)/liquid kerosene (RP-1) combustion in a rocket chamber. Presently, a fiber optic- coupled miniaturized laser ignition prototype is being implemented at the rocket chamber test rig for future testing. Future work is guided by a technology road map that outlines the work required for maturing a laser ignition system. This road map defines activities for the next six years, with the goal of developing a flight-ready laser ignition system.

  7. Canadian Experience in Nuclear Power Technology Transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulton, J.

    1987-01-01

    Technology transfer has and will continue to play a major role in the development of nuclear power programs. From the early beginnings of the development of the peaceful uses of nuclear power by just a few nations in the mid-1940s there has been a considerable transfer of technology and today 34 countries have nuclear programs in various stages of development. Indeed, some of the major nuclear vendors achieves their present position through a process of technology transfer and subsequent development. Canada, one of the early leaders in the development of nuclear power, has experience with a wide range of programs bout within its own borders and with other countries. This paper briefly describes this experience and the lessons learned from Canada's involvement in the transfer of nuclear power technology. Nuclear technology is complex and diverse and yet it can be assimilated by a nation given a fire commitment of both suppliers and recipients of technology to achieve success. Canada has reaped large benefits from its nuclear program and we believe this has been instrumentally linked to the sharing of goals and opportunity for participation over extended periods of time by many interests within the Canadian infrastructure. While Canada has accumulated considerable expertise in nuclear technology transfer, we believe there is still much for US to learn. Achieving proficiency in any of the many kinds of nuclear related technologies will place a heavy burden on the financial and human resources of a nation. Care must be taken to plan carefully the total criteria which will assure national benefits in industrial and economic development. Above all, effective transfer of nuclear technology requires a long term commitment by both parties

  8. Cryogenic rocket engine development at Delft aerospace rocket engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wink, J; Hermsen, R.; Huijsman, R; Akkermans, C.; Denies, L.; Barreiro, F.; Schutte, A.; Cervone, A.; Zandbergen, B.T.C.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the current developments regarding cryogenic rocket engine technology at Delft Aerospace Rocket Engineering (DARE). DARE is a student society based at Delft University of Technology with the goal of being the first student group in the world to launch a rocket into space. After

  9. Overview of Nuclear Reactor Technologies Portfolio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O’Connor, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    Office of Nuclear Energy Roadmap R&D Objectives: • Develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of current reactors; • Develop improvements in the affordability of new reactors to enable nuclear energy to help meet the Administration's energy security and climate change goals; • Develop sustainable nuclear fuel cycles; • Develop capabilities to reduce the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism

  10. Nuclear power strategy: requirements for technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlov, V.V.; Rachkov, V.I.

    2001-01-01

    The possible role of nuclear power in sustainable development demands answers to at least three questions: Is large-scale nuclear power essential to future development? - Is it feasible to have modern nuclear power transformed for large-scale deployment? - When will large-scale nuclear power be practically needed? The questions are analysed with the requirements to be fulfilled concerning present-day technologies

  11. A Study on Nuclear Technology Policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, K. B.; Chung, W. S.; Lee, T. J.; Yun, S. W.; Jeong, Ik; Lee, J. H.

    2006-02-01

    This study was conducted as a part of institutional activities of KAERI, and the objective of the study is to survey and analyze the change of international environment in nuclear use and research and development environment, and to propose systematic alternatives on technology policy for efficiency and effectiveness of research and development through national R and D program while timely responding to the environmental change in local and global sense. In the investigation and analysis of international environmental and technological change 1. Viability of Nuclear Renaissance 2. Recent of Nuclear Technology Policy in Japan 3. Collaboration for Advanced Nuclear Technologies in GIF, INPRO and INERI 4. Nuclear Energy Utilization and Development in Europe. In the evaluation of nuclear technology and sustainable development from the point of views of environmental change 5. External Cost of Environmental Impact in Electric Power Sector 6. Nuclear Technology Development Direction Considering Changes of the Science and Technology Policy Environment 7. Nuclear Energy Development Strategy for a Sustainable National Energy Supply

  12. A Study on Nuclear Technology Policy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, K B; Chung, W S; Lee, T J; Yun, S W; Jeong, Ik; Lee, J H

    2006-02-15

    This study was conducted as a part of institutional activities of KAERI, and the objective of the study is to survey and analyze the change of international environment in nuclear use and research and development environment, and to propose systematic alternatives on technology policy for efficiency and effectiveness of research and development through national R and D program while timely responding to the environmental change in local and global sense. In the investigation and analysis of international environmental and technological change 1. Viability of Nuclear Renaissance 2. Recent of Nuclear Technology Policy in Japan 3. Collaboration for Advanced Nuclear Technologies in GIF, INPRO and INERI 4. Nuclear Energy Utilization and Development in Europe. In the evaluation of nuclear technology and sustainable development from the point of views of environmental change 5. External Cost of Environmental Impact in Electric Power Sector 6. Nuclear Technology Development Direction Considering Changes of the Science and Technology Policy Environment 7. Nuclear Energy Development Strategy for a Sustainable National Energy Supply.

  13. History of Solid Rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Rebecca

    2017-01-01

    Solid rockets are of interest to the space program because they are commonly used as boosters that provide the additional thrust needed for the space launch vehicle to escape the gravitational pull of the Earth. Larger, more advanced solid rockets allow for space launch vehicles with larger payload capacities, enabling mankind to reach new depths of space. This presentation will discuss, in detail, the history of solid rockets. The history begins with the invention and origin of the solid rocket, and then goes into the early uses and design of the solid rocket. The evolution of solid rockets is depicted by a description of how solid rockets changed and improved and how they were used throughout the 16th, 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries. Modern uses of the solid rocket include the Solid Rocket Boosters (SRBs) on the Space Shuttle and the solid rockets used on current space launch vehicles. The functions and design of the SRB and the advancements in solid rocket technology since the use of the SRB are discussed as well. Common failure modes and design difficulties are discussed as well.

  14. Robust Exploration and Commercial Missions to the Moon Using Nuclear Thermal Rocket Propulsion and Lunar Liquid Oxygen Derived from FeO-Rich Pyroclasitc Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowski, Stanley K.; Ryan, Stephen W.; Burke, Laura M.; McCurdy, David R.; Fittje, James E.; Joyner, Claude R.

    2018-01-01

    The nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) has frequently been identified as a key space asset required for the human exploration of Mars. This proven technology can also provide the affordable access through cislunar space necessary for commercial development and sustained human presence on the Moon. It is a demonstrated technology capable of generating both high thrust and high specific impulse (I(sub sp) approx. 900 s) twice that of today's best chemical rockets. Nuclear lunar transfer vehicles-consisting of a propulsion stage using three approx. 16.5-klb(sub f) small nuclear rocket engines (SNREs), an in-line propellant tank, plus the payload-are reusable, enabling a variety of lunar missions. These include cargo delivery and crewed lunar landing missions. Even weeklong ''tourism'' missions carrying passengers into lunar orbit for a day of sightseeing and picture taking are possible. The NTR can play an important role in the next phase of lunar exploration and development by providing a robust in-space lunar transportation system (LTS) that can allow initial outposts to evolve into settlements supported by a variety of commercial activities such as in-situ propellant production used to supply strategically located propellant depots and transportation nodes. The use of lunar liquid oxygen (LLO2) derived from iron oxide (FeO)-rich volcanic glass beads, found in numerous pyroclastic deposits on the Moon, can significantly reduce the launch mass requirements from Earth by enabling reusable, surface-based lunar landing vehicles (LLVs)that use liquid oxygen and hydrogen (LO2/LH2) chemical rocket engines. Afterwards, a LO2/LH2 propellant depot can be established in lunar equatorial orbit to supply the LTS. At this point a modified version of the conventional NTR-called the LO2-augmented NTR, or LANTR-is introduced into the LTS allowing bipropellant operation and leveraging the mission benefits of refueling with lunar-derived propellants for Earth return. The bipropellant LANTR

  15. Business of Nuclear Safety Analysis Office, Nuclear Technology Test Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, Masahiko

    1981-01-01

    The Nuclear Technology Test Center established the Nuclear Safety Analysis Office to execute newly the works concerning nuclear safety analysis in addition to the works related to the proving tests of nuclear machinery and equipments. The regulations for the Nuclear Safety Analysis Office concerning its organization, business and others were specially decided, and it started the business formally in August, 1980. It is a most important subject to secure the safety of nuclear facilities in nuclear fuel cycle as the premise of developing atomic energy. In Japan, the strict regulation of safety is executed by the government at each stage of the installation, construction, operation and maintenance of nuclear facilities, based on the responsibility for the security of installers themselves. The Nuclear Safety Analysis Office was established as the special organ to help the safety examination related to the installation of nuclear power stations and others by the government. It improves and puts in order the safety analysis codes required for the cross checking in the safety examination, and carries out safety analysis calculation. It is operated by the cooperation of the Science and Technology Agency and the Agency of Natural Resources and Energy. The purpose of establishment, the operation and the business of the Nuclear Safety Analysis Office, the plan of improving and putting in order of analysis codes, and the state of the similar organs in foreign countries are described. (Kako, I.)

  16. Advances in nuclear science and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Henley, Ernest J

    1976-01-01

    Advances in Nuclear Science and Technology, Volume 9 provides information pertinent to the fundamental aspects of nuclear science and technology. This book discusses the safe and beneficial development of land-based nuclear power plants.Organized into five chapters, this volume begins with an overview of the possible consequences of a large-scale release of radioactivity from a nuclear reactor in the event of a serious accident. This text then discusses the extension of conventional perturbation techniques to multidimensional systems and to high-order approximations of the Boltzmann equation.

  17. JAERI Nuclear Engineering School and technology transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Kazuaki; Kawaguchi, Chiyoji

    1978-01-01

    A method is introduced to evaluate the degree of nuclear technology transfer; that is, the output powers of Japanese nuclear reactors constructed in these 20 years are chronologically plotted in a semi-log figure. All reactors plotted are classified into imported and domestic ones according to a value of domestication factor. A space between two historical trajectories of reactor construction may be interpreted as one of the measures indicating the degree of nuclear technology transfer. In connection with this method, historical change of educational and training courses in Nuclear Engineering School of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute is reviewed in this report. (author)

  18. Advances in nuclear science and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Henley, Ernest J

    1972-01-01

    Advances in Nuclear Science and Technology, Volume 6 provides information pertinent to the fundamental aspects of nuclear science and technology. This book covers a variety of topics, including nuclear steam generator, oscillations, fast reactor fuel, gas centrifuge, thermal transport system, and fuel cycle.Organized into six chapters, this volume begins with an overview of the high standards of technical safety for Europe's first nuclear-propelled merchant ship. This text then examines the state of knowledge concerning qualitative results on the behavior of the solutions of the nonlinear poin

  19. Nuclear technology in research and everyday life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-12-01

    The paper.. discusses the impact of nuclear technology in research and everyday life covering the following issues: miniaturization of memory devices, neutron radiography in material science, nuclear reactions in the universe, sterilization of food, medical applies, cosmetics and packaging materials using beta and gamma radiation, neutron imaging for radioactive waste analysis, microbial transformation of uranium (geobacter uraniireducens), nuclear technology knowledge preservation, spacecrafts voyager 1 and 2, future fusion power plants, prompt gamma activation analysis in archeology, radiation protection and radioecology and nuclear medicine (radiotherapy).

  20. Technology transfer from Canadian nuclear laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDonald, R.D.; Evans, W.; MacEwan, J.R.; Melvin, J.G.

    1985-09-01

    Canada has developed a unique nuclear power system, the CANDU reactor. AECL - Research Company (AECL-RC) has played a key role in the CANDU program by supplying its technology to the reactor's designers, constructors and operators. This technology was transferred from our laboratories to our sister AECL companies and to domestic industries and utilities. As CANDUs were built overseas, AECL-RC made its technology available to foreign utilities and agencies. Recently the company has embarked on a new transfer program, commercial R and D for nuclear and non-nuclear customers. During the years of CANDU development, AECL-RC has acquired the skills and technology that are especially valuable to other countries embarking on their own nuclear programs. This report describes AECL-RC's thirty years' experience with the transfer of technology

  1. Research on Ground Motion Metal Target Based on Rocket Projectile by Using Millimeter Wave Radiometer Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Dongyang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available How to detect the ground motion metal target effectively is an important guarantee for precision strike in the process of Rocket Projectile flight. Accordingly and in view of the millimeter- wave radiation characteristic of the ground motion metal target, a mathematical model was established based on Rocket Projectile about millimeter-wave detection to the ground motion metal target. Through changing various parameters in the process of Rocket Projectile flight, the detection model was studied by simulation. The parameters variation and effective range of millimeter wave radiometer were obtained in the process of rotation and horizontal flight. So a certain theoretical basis was formed for the precision strike to the ground motion metal target.

  2. Nuclear technology in Germany in 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-07-01

    On 28-29 January 1993, the Nuclear Safety Department of the Federal Office for Radiation Protection in co-operation with the Office of the Nuclear Safety Standards Commission organized a winter seminar on 'Nuclear technology in the Federal Republic in 1993 - tasks, problems, perspectives from the point of view of those concerned'. Main topics were the practical aspects of nuclear safety regulations and the application of the nuclear safety rules. This volume includes the welcome and opening addresses and the 12 papers presented; the views expressed remain, however the responsibility of the named authors and are not necessarily those of the editor. (orig.) [de

  3. Advances in nuclear science and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Henley, Ernest J

    1962-01-01

    Advances in Nuclear Science and Technology, Volume 1 provides an authoritative, complete, coherent, and critical review of the nuclear industry. This book covers a variety of topics, including nuclear power stations, graft polymerization, diffusion in uranium alloys, and conventional power plants.Organized into seven chapters, this volume begins with an overview of the three stages of the operation of a power plant, either nuclear or conventionally fueled. This text then examines the major problems that face the successful development of commercial nuclear power plants. Other chapters consider

  4. Educating personnel for nuclear technology in Czechoslovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otcenasek, P.

    1980-01-01

    The basic preconditions are discussed of educating personnel for nuclear power and nuclear technology in Czechoslovakia. In educating specialists, the high societal significance of nuclear power and the need to obtain qualified personnel for safeguarding safety and reliability of nuclear facilities operation should primarily be borne in mind. The system of training applies not only to operating and maintenance personnel of nuclear power plants but also to fuel and power generation, transport, engineering, building industry, health care, education and other personnel. (J.B.)

  5. Implementation digital technologies in nuclear utilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiegand, C.; Maselli, A.J.

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of digital technologies into the nuclear industry has assisted in many ways and made many of the Life Extensions and Uprates a possibility. But with this introduction of digital technologies comes some potentially challenging issues which need to be addressed for ultimate project success. This presentation discusses what a nuclear utility should consider and establish when implementing digital technologies in their plant. Digital technologies have been employed in many safety critical industries such as Aerospace, Pharmaceutical, Oil and Gas, and Chemical. However, nuclear industry implementation of digital technologies has been slow and in many ways tenuous. There are even documented operating experience events in which plant trips/SCRAMs occurred during a digital system implementation. This presentation aims to prevent those issues drawing upon the lessons learned over the past 5 years. Considerations include general challenges to overcome when implementing Digital Technologies, how to justify and execute projects, evaluation of resource knowledge, and the new challenges of Cyber Security. (author)

  6. Implementation digital technologies in nuclear utilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiegand, C.; Maselli, A.J., E-mail: Tony.Maselli@Invensys.com [Invensys Operations Management, London (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-01

    The introduction of digital technologies into the nuclear industry has assisted in many ways and made many of the Life Extensions and Uprates a possibility. But with this introduction of digital technologies comes some potentially challenging issues which need to be addressed for ultimate project success. This presentation discusses what a nuclear utility should consider and establish when implementing digital technologies in their plant. Digital technologies have been employed in many safety critical industries such as Aerospace, Pharmaceutical, Oil and Gas, and Chemical. However, nuclear industry implementation of digital technologies has been slow and in many ways tenuous. There are even documented operating experience events in which plant trips/SCRAMs occurred during a digital system implementation. This presentation aims to prevent those issues drawing upon the lessons learned over the past 5 years. Considerations include general challenges to overcome when implementing Digital Technologies, how to justify and execute projects, evaluation of resource knowledge, and the new challenges of Cyber Security. (author)

  7. An Effective Method For Nuclear Technology Transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Jan Pung

    1987-01-01

    Three basic entities involved in the implementation of nuclear projects are the Owner, Regulatory Authority and Nuclear Industry. Their ultimate objective is to secure the safe, reliable and economical nuclear energy. For s successful nuclear power program, the owner should maintain a good relationship with the other entities and pursue an optimization of the objectives. On the other hand, he should manage projects along the well - planned paths in order to effectively learn the nuclear technology. One of the problems in the nuclear projects of developing countries was the absence of long - term technology development program, a limited local participation and the technical incapability. For the effective technology transfer, a motivation of the technology supplier and a readiness of the recipient to accommodate such technologies are required. Advanced technology is usually developed at considerable expense with the expectation that the developer will use it in furthering his own business. Therefore, he tends to be reluctant to transfer it to the others, particularly, to the potential competitors. There is a disinclination against further technology transfer beyond the minimum contractual obligation or the requirements by Government Regulatory. So, an additional commercial incentive must be provided to the developer

  8. China's nuclear technology for economy growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Yanxiao

    1998-01-01

    The transfer of nuclear technology to practical applications in energy, agriculture, food, industries and others has made important contributions to the prosperity of the national economy and the improvement of living standard of Chinese people in the past 40 years. Facing the great challenges in upcoming years, sustained efforts are needed to promote industrialization, commercialization and internationalization of nuclear technology. Rapid economic growth is providing the golden opportunities for the development of nuclear technology in China. With the trends to globalization of economic development, civilian applications of nuclear technology will have to be involved in international co-operation and competitive world markets to narrow the gap between China and other developed countries in the world in the next century. (author)

  9. Nuclear technology and the export control laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munroe, J.L.; Pankratz, M.C.; Hogsett, V.H.; Lundy, A.S.

    1988-01-01

    Three basic US laws regulate the export of commodities, services, and technical data. People working in nuclear fields need to know of these laws and their impact on professional endeavors. Export of technical data means the communication of any information by oral, written, or any other means to foreign nationals within or outside the US. The medium for the communication may be a model, blueprint, sketch, or any other device that can convey information. If the data relates to items on one of the control lists, a license must be sought from the appropriated federal agency. The Militarily Critical Technologies List (MCTL), though not itself a control list, plays a major role in determining what technical data will require a validated license. The US Department of Energy (DOE), through Technical Working Gorup (TWG) 11, is responsible for the Nuclear Technology chapter of the MCTL. TWG 11 also prepares the Nuclear Technology Reference Book (NTRB), a classified guide to sensitive nuclear technology

  10. Application of radionuclides in nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeck, H.

    1983-07-01

    Four main applications of radionuclides in nuclear technology are presented which are level-, density- and thickness gauging and moisture determination. Each method is surveyed for its general principle, various designs, accuracy, errors and practical designs. (Author)

  11. Nuclear Science and Technology in Myanmar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tin-Hlaing

    2001-01-01

    This article is about the Establishment of the Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) and its historical background. The department is organized under the Ministry of Science and Technology. It is the only national nuclear institution in Myanmar

  12. Nuclear technology and human civilization in interplay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broda, E.

    1979-01-01

    This lecture was held by E. Broda during a series of lectures “Wiener Internationale Hochschulkurse”, organized by the University of Vienna in 1979. The lecture is about nuclear technology and human civilization in interplay. (nowak)

  13. They invent tomorrow's nuclear technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurel, T.; Le Ngoc, B.

    2017-01-01

    3 leaders working in the nuclear industry for 3 different French entities: AREVA, EDF and CEA detail the role of innovation for tomorrow's nuclear energy. For AREVA, innovation is the response to the 4 challenges facing nuclear industry: improving the current business models, getting more modern and reliable plants, anticipating customers' wishes, and luring new young talents to ensure the future of the nuclear industry. As for EDF, innovation is the tool that will make nuclear energy absolutely necessary to counter-balance the intermittency of most renewable energies. EDF sees 3 main challenges to overcome: reactor safety, load following and developing a broader offer of reactors including small and modular reactors. For CEA, it is necessary to get a broad view of new nuclear systems and the nature of innovations can be very varied and for instance it can focus on a particular spot like fuel cladding or metal corrosion or on a complete new type of reactor. Innovation should also lead towards more predictive simulations. In all cases nuclear industry requires a better public financing for accelerating the implementation of innovations. (A.C.)

  14. Rockets: Educator's Guide with Activities in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, Deborah A.; Vogt, Gregory L.

    2008-01-01

    This guide provides teachers and students many opportunities. Chapters within the guide present the history of rocketry, National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) 21st Century Space Exploration Policy, rocketry principles, and practical rocketry. These topics lay the foundation for what follows--a wealth of dynamic rocket science…

  15. Nuclear Malaysia Strategic Approach Towards Public Acceptance on Nuclear Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasfazilah Hassan; Redzuan Mohamad; Abdul Halim Jumat; Sabariah Kader Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Full text: This paper describes the strategic approach taken by Malaysian Nuclear Agency in carrying out public information and public acceptance on nuclear technology activities. The main objective of this study is to ensure that public and stake holders are continuously getting correct information from credible sources. Through the feedback received, comprehensive and holistic approach provides the desired impact. Obtaining the correct information from credible sources culture should always be inculcate to ensure that the benefits of nuclear technologies can be practiced and accepted by civil society without prejudice. Through strategic approach and activities implemented, monitoring and review, and measurement of the effectiveness of ongoing programs are expected to increase public awareness of the importance and contribution of nuclear technology in Malaysia. (author)

  16. Russian youth for nuclear technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsiboulia, A.

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear industry has a half-century of history, but its development today depends on the young scientists and specialists, who have decided to devote themselves to work in this area. Unfavorable public opinion and insufficient support from state authorities in the last years have led to the fact that the professions of nuclear specialty have become less popular. Nuclear professionals leave their field in search of more lucrative jobs. Therefore, the real problem today is how to attract the youth to the industry and transfer the industry's years of accrued experience to the youth. (orig.)

  17. International Nuclear Science and Technology Conference 2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    Conference Nuclear technology has played an important role in many aspects of our lives, including agriculture, medicine and healthcare, materials, environment, forensics, energy, and frontier advancement. The International Nuclear Science and Technology Conference (INST) aims to bring together scientists, engineers, academics and students to share knowledge and experiences about all aspects of nuclear sciences. INST2016 was the second of the INST conference series organized by Thailand Institute of Nuclear Technology. INST has evolved from a national conference series on nuclear science and technology that was held every two years in Bangkok for over a twenty-year period. INST2016 was held from 4 - 6 August 2016 in Bangkok, Thailand, under the central theme “Nuclear for Better Life”. The conference working language was English. The oral and poster research presentations covered seven major topics: • Nuclear physics and engineering (PHY) • Nuclear and radiation safety (SAF) • Medical and nutritional applications (MED) • Environmental applications (ENV) • Radiation processing and industrial applications (IND) • Agriculture and food applications (AGR) • Instrumentation and other related topics (INS) The welcome addresses, committees, program of the conference and the list of presentations can be found in the PDF. (paper)

  18. National symposium on electrochemistry in nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    A National Symposium on Electrochemistry in Nuclear Technology (NASENT-94) was held at Kalpakkam, India during January 5-7, 1994. The subjects covered a wide range of topics in electrochemistry, such as electrochemical production, refining, analysis and corrosion of metals, electrochemical monitors and sensors, solid state electrochemistry, applications of electrochemical processes and measurement techniques in nuclear technology etc. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  19. Yes--This is Rocket Science: MMCs for Liquid Rocket Engines

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shelley, J

    2001-01-01

    The Air Force's Integrated High-Payoff Rocket Propulsion Technologies (IHPRPT) Program has established aggressive goals for both improved performance and reduced cost of rocket engines and components...

  20. Rocket propulsion elements - An introduction to the engineering of rockets (6th revised and enlarged edition)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, George P.

    The subject of rocket propulsion is treated with emphasis on the basic technology, performance, and design rationale. Attention is given to definitions and fundamentals, nozzle theory and thermodynamic relations, heat transfer, flight performance, chemical rocket propellant performance analysis, and liquid propellant rocket engine fundamentals. The discussion also covers solid propellant rocket fundamentals, hybrid propellant rockets, thrust vector control, selection of rocket propulsion systems, electric propulsion, and rocket testing.

  1. 'Bimodal' Nuclear Thermal Rocket (BNTR) propulsion for an artificial gravity HOPE mission to Callisto

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borowski, Stanley K.; McGuire, Melissa L.; Mason, Lee M.; Gilland, James H.; Packard, Thomas W.

    2003-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of a year long, multi-center NASA study which examined the viability of nuclear fission propulsion systems for Human Outer Planet Exploration (HOPE). The HOPE mission assumes a crew of six is sent to Callisto. Jupiter's outermost large moon, to establish a surface base and propellant production facility. The Asgard asteroid formation, a region potentially rich in water-ice, is selected as the landing site. High thrust BNTR propulsion is used to transport the crew from the Earth-Moon L1 staging node to Callisto then back to Earth in less than 5 years. Cargo and LH2 'return' propellant for the piloted Callisto transfer vehicle (PCTV) is pre-deployed at the moon (before the crew's departure) using low thrust, high power, nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) cargo and tanker vehicles powered by hydrogen magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters. The PCTV is powered by three 25 klbf BNTR engines which also produce 50 kWe of power for crew life support and spacecraft operational needs. To counter the debilitating effects of long duration space flight (∼855 days out and ∼836 days back) under '0-gE' conditions, the PCTV generates an artificial gravity environment of '1-gE' via rotation of the vehicle about its center-of-mass at a rate of ∼4 rpm. After ∼123 days at Callisto, the 'refueled' PCTV leaves orbit for the trip home. Direct capsule re-entry of the crew at mission end is assumed. Dynamic Brayton power conversion and high temperature uranium dioxide (UO2) in tungsten metal ''cermet'' fuel is used in both the BNTR and NEP vehicles to maximize hardware commonality. Technology performance levels and vehicle characteristics are presented, and requirements for PCTV reusability are also discussed

  2. Wireless Technology Application to Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Kweon; Jeong, See Chae; Jeong, Ki Hoon; Oh, Do Young; Kim, Jae Hack

    2009-01-01

    Wireless technologies are getting widely used in various industrial processes for equipment condition monitoring, process measurement and other applications. In case of Nuclear Power Plant (NPP), it is required to review applicability of the wireless technologies for maintaining plant reliability, preventing equipment failure, and reducing operation and maintenance costs. Remote sensors, mobile technology and two-way radio communication may satisfy these needs. The application of the state of the art wireless technologies in NPPs has been restricted because of the vulnerability for the Electromagnetic Interference and Radio Frequency Interference (EMI/RFI) and cyber security. It is expected that the wireless technologies can be applied to the nuclear industry after resolving these issues which most of the developers and vendors are aware of. This paper presents an overview and information on general wireless deployment in nuclear facilities for future application. It also introduces typical wireless plant monitoring system application in the existing NPPs

  3. Nuclear energy technology: theory and practice of commercial nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knief, R.A.

    1982-01-01

    Reviews Nuclear Energy Technology: Theory and Practice of Commercial Nuclear Power by Ronald Allen Knief, whose contents include an overview of the basic concepts of reactors and the nuclear fuel cycle; the basics of nuclear physics; reactor theory; heat removal; economics; current concerns at the front and back ends of the fuel cycle; design descriptions of domestic and foreign reactor systems; reactor safety and safeguards; Three Mile Island; and a brief overview of the basic concepts of nuclear fusion. Both magnetic and inertial confinement techniques are clearly outlined. Also reviews Nuclear Fuel Management by Harry W. Graves, Jr., consisting of introductory subjects (e.g. front end of fuel cycle); core physics methodology required for fuel depletion calculations; power capability evaluation (analyzes physical parameters that limit potential core power density); and fuel management topics (economics, loading arrangements and core operation strategies)

  4. Effective Methods of Nuclear Power Technology Transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shave, D. F.; Kent, G. F.; Giambusso, A.

    1987-01-01

    An effective technology transfer program is a necessary and significant step towards independence in nuclear power technology. Attaining success in the conduct of such a program is a result of a) the donor and recipient jointly understanding the fundamental concepts of the learning process, b) sharing a mutual philosophy involving a partnership relationship, c) joint and careful planning, d) rigorous adherence to proven project management techniques, and e) presence of adequate feedback to assure continuing success as the program proceeds. Several years ago, KEPCO President Park, Jung-KI presented a paper on technology in which he stated, 'Nuclear technology is an integration of many unit disciplines, and thus requires extensive investment and training in order to establish the base for efficient absorption of transferred technology.' This paper addresses President Park's observations by discussing the philosophy, approach, and mechanisms that are necessary to support an efficient and effective process of nuclear power technology transfer. All technical content and presentation methods discussed are based on a technology transfer program developed by Stone and Webster, as an Engineer/Constructor for nuclear power plants, and are designed and implemented to promote the primary program goal - the ability of the trainees and the organization to perform specific nuclear power related multi-discipline function independently and competitively

  5. Nuclear power economics and technology: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Intended for the non-specialist reader interested in energy and environmental policy matters, this report presents an overview of the current expert consensus on the status of nuclear power technology and its economic position. It covers the potential demand for nuclear energy, its economic competitivity, and the relevant aspects of reactor performance and future technological developments. The report provides an objective contribution to the ongoing scientific and political debate about what nuclear power can offer, now and in the future, in meeting the world's growing demand for energy and in achieving sustainable economic development. 24 refs., 18 figs;, 12 tabs., 5 photos

  6. Advances in nuclear science and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Henley, Ernest J

    1973-01-01

    Advances in Nuclear Science and Technology, Volume 7 provides information pertinent to the fundamental aspects of nuclear science and technology. This book discusses the safe and beneficial development of land-based nuclear power plants.Organized into five chapters, this volume begins with an overview of irradiation-induced void swelling in austenitic stainless steels. This text then examines the importance of various transport processes for fission product redistribution, which depends on the diffusion data, the vaporization properties, and the solubility in the fuel matrix. Other chapters co

  7. Technology transfer from nuclear research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    A number of processes, components and instruments developed at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, (BARC), Bombay, find application in industry and are available for transfer to private or public sector undertakings for commercial exploitation. The Technology Transfer Group (TTG) constituted in January 1980 identifies such processes and prototypes which can be made available for transfer. This catalogue contains brief descriptions of such technologies and they are arranged under three groups, namely, Group A containing descriptions of technologies already transferred, Group B containing descriptions of technologies ready for transfer and Group C containing descriptions of technology transfer proposals being processed. The position in the above-mentioned groups is as on 1 March 1989. The BARC has also set up a Technology Corner where laboratory models and prototypes of instruments, equipment and components are displayed. These are described in the second part of the catalogue. (M.G.B.)

  8. ISO: international standards development for nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, K.

    1981-01-01

    The importance of internationally recognized standards for nuclear technology and safety is rapidly increasing for technical as well as economical and political reasons such as public acceptance and nuclear technology transfer to developing countries. The need for such standards is also evident because of the large number of nuclear installations sited close to international borders, and the export of nuclear installations from relatively few supplier countries to a large number of user countries. It is the purpose of this report to describe briefly the history, organizational structures and procedures, goals, accomplishments, problems, and future needs of the relevant activities of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). ISO is composed of the partly governmental, partly non-governmental national standards bodies of 86 countries including China. The work of its Technical Committee (TC) 85 'Nuclear Energy' is mostly concerned with industrial applications, contractual aspects and international communication, for the benefit of both developed and developing countries. It works in close liaison with IAEA, which develops Codes and Guides addressed mainly to the regulatory aspects of nuclear power plants in developing countries. ISO/TC 85 has four sub-committees dealing with: (a) Terminology, Definitions, Units and Symbols (Secretariat USA, four working groups (WGs)); (b) Radiation Protection (Secretariat France, ten WGs); (c) Power Reactor Technology (Secretariat Sweden, nine WGs); (d) Nuclear Fuel Technology (Secretariat F.R. Germany, seven WGs). (author)

  9. A study on nuclear technology policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H. J.; Oh, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Chung, W. S.; Lee, T. J.; Yun, S. W.; Jeong, I.

    2004-01-01

    This study was conducted as a part of institutional activities of KAERI, and the objective of the study is to survey and analyze the change of international environment in nuclear use and research and development environment, and to propose systematic alternatives on technology policy for efficiency and effectiveness of research and development through national R and D program while timely responding to the environmental change in local and global sense. Acknowledging the importance of the relationship between the external environment and the national nuclear R and D strategic planning, this study focused on the two major subjects: (1) the international environmental and technological change attached to the development of nuclear power; (2) the direction and strategy of nuclear R and D to improve effectiveness through national R and D programs as role of electricity in the future society, strategic environment of nuclear use and R and D in the future society, energy environment and nuclear technology development scenario in the future, strategic study on future vision of KAERI and technological road-mapping of national nuclear R and D for enhancing competitiveness

  10. Technology transfer in the Spanish nuclear programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Naredo, F.

    1983-01-01

    The paper describes the process of technology transfer under the Spanish nuclear programme and its three generations of nuclear power plants during the last 20 years, with special reference to the nine new plants equipped with Westinghouse pressurized water reactors and the rising level of national involvement in these stations. It deals with the development of Westinghouse Nuclear's organization in Spain, referring to its staff and to the manufacturers who supply equipment for the programme, going into particular detail where problems of quality assurance are concerned. In conclusion, it summarizes the present capacity of Spanish industry in various areas connected with the design, manufacture and construction of nuclear power plants. (author)

  11. Atomic nanoscale technology in the nuclear industry

    CERN Document Server

    Woo, Taeho

    2011-01-01

    Developments at the nanoscale are leading to new possibilities and challenges for nuclear applications in areas ranging from medicine to international commerce to atomic power production/waste treatment. Progress in nanotech is helping the nuclear industry slash the cost of energy production. It also continues to improve application reliability and safety measures, which remain a critical concern, especially since the reactor disasters in Japan. Exploring the new wide-ranging landscape of nuclear function, Atomic Nanoscale Technology in the Nuclear Industry details the breakthroughs in nanosca

  12. Nuclear power technologies. Abstracts of reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koltysheva, G.I.; Mukusheva, M.K.; Perepelkin, I.G.

    2000-01-01

    In May 14-17, 2000, and on the initiative of the Ministry of Science and High Education of the Republic of Kazakstan with cooperation of Department of Energy US, International Seminar on Nuclear Power Technologies was held in Astana, Kazakhstan. More than 70 reports of scientists from different countries (USA, Russia, Japan and Kazakhstan) were presented during the Seminar. Representatives from different international organizations (European Commission Delegation, IAEA), from organizations of Kazakstan, Russia, USA, Japan took part in the Seminar. In all at the Seminar there were more then 100 participants. The Seminar included Plenary Session, two sections: 1) Nuclear Safety and Nuclear Technologies; 2) Material Investigations for Nuclear and Thermonuclear Power; Workshop: Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning and Decontamination; and Posters

  13. The regulations of the Nuclear Technology Committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarzer, W.

    1984-01-01

    The work of the Nuclear Technology Committee (NTC) is characterised by the key words 'safety related regulations' and 'nuclear technology'. The rationalisation effect desired from regulations and the not unlimited number of experts qualified for working out regulations, make it necessary to establish priorities. The NTC has almost exclusively worked out regulations for nuclear powerstations and mainly for light water reactors. The program defined at present seems to cover the most important areas. Future developments can be foreseen in the execution of the part of the program not yet concluded, the maintenance of the regulations and, depending on the development of nuclear technology, the greater inclusion of the HTR and possibly the expansion of the regulations to fast breeder reactors and plant of the fuel circuit. (orig./HSCH) [de

  14. Nuclear technology and national participation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gueray, B. S.

    2001-01-01

    The evolution from the initial turnkey approach into a split-package and eventually into a multiple-package approach requires a firm long-term policy for the nuclear program together with careful planning and realistic assessment. Definition of the possible areas and the extent for the national participation is a critical determining factor for the implementation of the program. In this study; importance of a throughout survey with its elementary methods and objectives is presented. Extent of national participation together with its evolutionary aspects investigated through analysis of some countries' experiences and IAEA guides. The beneficial effect of national participation in a nuclear power program is underlined

  15. A study on nuclear technology policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, M. H.; Kim, H. J.; Chung, W. S.; Yun, S. W.; Kim, H. S.

    2001-01-01

    This study was carried out as a part of institutional activities of KAERI. Major research area are as follows; Future directions and effects for national nuclear R and D to be resulted from restructuring of electricity industry are studied. Comparative study was carried out between nuclear energy and other energy sources from the point of views of environmental effects by introducing life cycle assessment(LCA) method. Japanese trends of reestablishment of nuclear policy such as restructuring of nuclear administration system and long-term plan of development and use of nuclear energy are also investigated, and Russian nuclear development program and Germany trends for phase-out of nuclear electricity generation are also investigated. And trends of the demand and supply of energy in eastern asian countries in from the point of view of energy security and tension in the south china sea are analyzed and investigation of policy trends of Vietnam and Egypt for the development and use of nuclear energy for the promotion of nuclear cooperation with these countries are also carried out. Due to the lack of energy resources and high dependence of imported energy, higher priority should be placed on the use of localized energy supply technology such as nuclear power. In this connection, technological development should be strengthened positively in order to improve economy and safety of nuclear energy and proliferation resistance of nuclear fuel cycle and wide ranged use of radiation and radioisotopes and should be reflected in re-establishment of national comprehensive promotion plan of nuclear energy in progress

  16. A study on nuclear technology policy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, M H; Kim, H J; Chung, W S; Yun, S W; Kim, H S

    2001-01-01

    This study was carried out as a part of institutional activities of KAERI. Major research area are as follows; Future directions and effects for national nuclear R and D to be resulted from restructuring of electricity industry are studied. Comparative study was carried out between nuclear energy and other energy sources from the point of views of environmental effects by introducing life cycle assessment(LCA) method. Japanese trends of reestablishment of nuclear policy such as restructuring of nuclear administration system and long-term plan of development and use of nuclear energy are also investigated, and Russian nuclear development program and Germany trends for phase-out of nuclear electricity generation are also investigated. And trends of the demand and supply of energy in eastern asian countries in from the point of view of energy security and tension in the south china sea are analyzed and investigation of policy trends of Vietnam and Egypt for the development and use of nuclear energy for the promotion of nuclear cooperation with these countries are also carried out. Due to the lack of energy resources and high dependence of imported energy, higher priority should be placed on the use of localized energy supply technology such as nuclear power. In this connection, technological development should be strengthened positively in order to improve economy and safety of nuclear energy and proliferation resistance of nuclear fuel cycle and wide ranged use of radiation and radioisotopes and should be reflected in re-establishment of national comprehensive promotion plan of nuclear energy in progress.

  17. Computer Design Technology of the Small Thrust Rocket Engines Using CAE / CAD Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryzhkov, V.; Lapshin, E.

    2018-01-01

    The paper presents an algorithm for designing liquid small thrust rocket engine, the process of which consists of five aggregated stages with feedback. Three stages of the algorithm provide engineering support for design, and two stages - the actual engine design. A distinctive feature of the proposed approach is a deep study of the main technical solutions at the stage of engineering analysis and interaction with the created knowledge (data) base, which accelerates the process and provides enhanced design quality. The using multifunctional graphic package Siemens NX allows to obtain the final product -rocket engine and a set of design documentation in a fairly short time; the engine design does not require a long experimental development.

  18. REIMR - A Process for Utilizing Liquid Rocket Propulsion-Oriented 'Lessons Learned' to Mitigate Development Risk in Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballard, Richard O.

    2006-01-01

    This paper is a summary overview of a study conducted at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (NASA-MSFC) during the initial phases of the Space Launch Initiative (SLI) program to evaluate a large number of technical problems associated with the design, development, test, evaluation and operation of several major liquid propellant rocket engine systems (i.e., SSME, Fastrac, J-2, F-1). One of the primary results of this study was the identification of the 'Fundamental Root Causes' that enabled the technical problems to manifest, and practices that can be implemented to prevent them from recurring in future propulsion system development efforts, such as that which is currently envisioned in the field of nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP). This paper will discus the Fundamental Root Causes, cite some examples of how the technical problems arose from them, and provide a discussion of how they can be mitigated or avoided in the development of an NTP system

  19. REIMR - A Process for Utilizing Liquid Rocket Propulsion-Oriented 'Lessons Learned' to Mitigate Development Risk in Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, RIchard O.

    2006-01-01

    This paper is a summary overview of a study conducted at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (NASA MSFC) during the initial phases of the Space Launch Initiative (SLI) program to evaluate a large number of technical problems associated with the design, development, test, evaluation and operation of several major liquid propellant rocket engine systems (i.e., SSME, Fastrac, J-2, F-1). One of the primary results of this study was the identification of the Fundamental Root Causes that enabled the technical problems to manifest, and practices that can be implemented to prevent them from recurring in future propulsion system development efforts, such as that which is currently envisioned in the field of nuclear thermal propulsion (NTF). This paper will discuss the Fundamental Root Causes, cite some examples of how the technical problems arose from them, and provide a discussion of how they can be mitigated or avoided in the development of an NTP system

  20. Spent Nuclear Fuel Alternative Technology Decision Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shedrow, C.B.

    1999-01-01

    The Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) made a FY98 commitment to the Department of Energy (DOE) to recommend a technology for the disposal of aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The two technologies being considered, direct co-disposal and melt and dilute, had been previously selected from a group of eleven potential SNF management technologies by the Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Task Team chartered by the DOE''s Office of Spent Fuel Management. To meet this commitment, WSRC organized the SNF Alternative Technology Program to further develop the direct co-disposal and melt and dilute technologies and ultimately provide a WSRC recommendation to DOE on a preferred SNF alternative management technology

  1. Spent Nuclear Fuel Alternative Technology Decision Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shedrow, C.B.

    1999-11-29

    The Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) made a FY98 commitment to the Department of Energy (DOE) to recommend a technology for the disposal of aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The two technologies being considered, direct co-disposal and melt and dilute, had been previously selected from a group of eleven potential SNF management technologies by the Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Task Team chartered by the DOE''s Office of Spent Fuel Management. To meet this commitment, WSRC organized the SNF Alternative Technology Program to further develop the direct co-disposal and melt and dilute technologies and ultimately provide a WSRC recommendation to DOE on a preferred SNF alternative management technology.

  2. Developing countries' motivation to use nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ratsch, U.

    1990-01-01

    Governments of various developing countries see nuclear energy as an important tool for at least three political goals: Firstly, the expected rise in future energy demand, so they argue, can only be met if nuclear electricity production in the Third World is expanded. Fossil sources are supposed to become increasingly scarce and expensive, and they are also seen to be ecologically damaging. Technologies to harness renewable energy sources are not yet mature and still too costly. Secondly, nuclear technology is seen as one of the most advanced technologies. Mastering of it might help to diminish the technological gap between the First and the Third World. Thirdly, scientific progress in developing countries is hoped to be accelerated by operating research reactors in these countries. All of these arguments ought to be taken as serious motivations. (orig./HSCH) [de

  3. Nuclear technology today and tomorrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombardi, C.

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear power has returned today to contain the energy problem. It is useful to make a summary of its characteristics and its evolution over the past 50 years and its prospects. The Italy can rely on their way by revitalizing its potential not fully disappeared [it

  4. Nuclear technology for sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Introduces three of the IAEA's current programmes: Promoting food security - use of the sterile insect technique to eradicate the tsetse fly in Sub-Saharan Africa; Managing water resources - use of isotope hydrology to check water for traces of arsenic in Bangladesh; Improving human health - use of nuclear techniques for diagnosis, imaging and cancer treatment in developing countries

  5. Graphite in Science and Nuclear Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Zhmurikov, Evgenij

    2015-01-01

    This review is devoted to the application of graphite and graphite composites in the science and technology. Structure and electrical properties, technological aspects of producing of high-strength artificial graphite and dynamics of its destruction are considered. These type of graphite are traditionally used in the nuclear industry, so author concentrates on actual problems of application and testing of graphite materials in modern science and technology. Translated from chapters 1 of monog...

  6. Development of Nuclear Analytical Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Yong Joon; Kim, J. Y.; Sohn, S. C.

    2007-06-01

    The pre-treatment and handling techniques for the micro-particles in swipe samples were developed for the safeguards purpose. The development of screening technique for the swipe samples has been established using the nuclear fission track method as well as the alpha track method. The laser ablation system to take a nuclear particle present in swipe was designed and constructed for the determination of the enrichment factors for uranium or plutonium, and its performance was tested in atmosphere as well as in vacuum. The optimum conditions for the synthesis of silica based micro-particles were obtained for mass production. The optimum ion exchange resin was selected and the optimum conditions for the uranium adsorption in resin bead technique were established for the development of the enrichment factor for nuclear particles in swipe. The established technique was applied to the swipe taken directly from the nuclear facility and also to the archive samples of IAEA's environmental swipes. The evaluation of dose rate of neutron and secondary gamma-ray for the radiation shields were carried out to design the NIPS system, as well as the evaluation of the thermal neutron concentration effect by the various reflectors. D-D neutron generator was introduced as a neutron source for the NIPS system to have more advantages such as easier control and moderation capability than the 252 Cf source. Simulated samples for explosive and chemical warfare were prepared to construct a prompt gamma-ray database. Based on the constructed database, a computer program for the detection of illicit chemical and nuclear materials was developed using the MATLAB software

  7. Nuclear technology review 2003 update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-09-01

    Worldwide there were 441 nuclear power plants (NPPs) operating at the end of 2002.These supplied 16% of global electricity generation in 2002, down slightly from 16.2% in 2001.1 Table 1 summarizes world nuclear experience as of the end of 2002. The global energy availability factor for NPPs rose to 83.4% in 2001, from 82.1% in 2000 and 74.2% in 1991. In 2002, upratings calculated from data on the IAEA's Power Reactor Information System (PRIS) totalled approximately 672 MW(e), of which the United States of America accounted for 574 MW(e) and the United Kingdom accounted for 98 MW(e).The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) expects applications for 2270 MW(e) worth of upratings over the next five years. Six new NPPs were connected to the grid in 2000, three in 2001, and six in 2002. There were three retirements in 2000: Chernobyl-3 in Ukraine and two units at Hinkley Point A in the United Kingdom.There were no retirements in 2001 and four in 2002:Kozloduy-1 and -2 in Bulgaria and Bradwell units A and B in the UK. In 2002, construction started on seven new NPPs: six in India and one in the Democratic People's Republic of Korea. This issue covers the following topics: Medium-Term Projections; Sustainable Development; Resources And Fuel; Decommissioning; Advanced Designs; Research Reactors; Waste From Non-Power Applications; Nuclear Knowledge; Matters Of Interest To The IAEA Arising From The World Summit On Sustainable Development; International Project On Innovative Nuclear Reactors And Fuel Cycles (INPRO); Knowledge Management; Key Commitments, Targets And Timetables From The Johannesburg Plan Of Implementation; Management Of The Natural Resource Base.

  8. Nuclear technology review 2003 update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-09-01

    Worldwide there were 441 nuclear power plants (NPPs) operating at the end of 2002.These supplied 16% of global electricity generation in 2002, down slightly from 16.2% in 2001.1 Table 1 summarizes world nuclear experience as of the end of 2002. The global energy availability factor for NPPs rose to 83.4% in 2001, from 82.1% in 2000 and 74.2% in 1991. In 2002, upratings calculated from data on the IAEA's Power Reactor Information System (PRIS) totalled approximately 672 MW(e), of which the United States of America accounted for 574 MW(e) and the United Kingdom accounted for 98 MW(e).The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) expects applications for 2270 MW(e) worth of upratings over the next five years. Six new NPPs were connected to the grid in 2000, three in 2001, and six in 2002. There were three retirements in 2000: Chernobyl-3 in Ukraine and two units at Hinkley Point A in the United Kingdom.There were no retirements in 2001 and four in 2002:Kozloduy-1 and -2 in Bulgaria and Bradwell units A and B in the UK. In 2002, construction started on seven new NPPs: six in India and one in the Democratic People's Republic of Korea. This issue covers the following topics: Medium-Term Projections; Sustainable Development; Resources And Fuel; Decommissioning; Advanced Designs; Research Reactors; Waste From Non-Power Applications; Nuclear Knowledge; Matters Of Interest To The IAEA Arising From The World Summit On Sustainable Development; International Project On Innovative Nuclear Reactors And Fuel Cycles (INPRO); Knowledge Management; Key Commitments, Targets And Timetables From The Johannesburg Plan Of Implementation; Management Of The Natural Resource Base

  9. Development of Nuclear Analytical Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Yong Joon; Kim, J. Y.; Sohn, S. C. (and others)

    2007-06-15

    The pre-treatment and handling techniques for the micro-particles in swipe samples were developed for the safeguards purpose. The development of screening technique for the swipe samples has been established using the nuclear fission track method as well as the alpha track method. The laser ablation system to take a nuclear particle present in swipe was designed and constructed for the determination of the enrichment factors for uranium or plutonium, and its performance was tested in atmosphere as well as in vacuum. The optimum conditions for the synthesis of silica based micro-particles were obtained for mass production. The optimum ion exchange resin was selected and the optimum conditions for the uranium adsorption in resin bead technique were established for the development of the enrichment factor for nuclear particles in swipe. The established technique was applied to the swipe taken directly from the nuclear facility and also to the archive samples of IAEA's environmental swipes. The evaluation of dose rate of neutron and secondary gamma-ray for the radiation shields were carried out to design the NIPS system, as well as the evaluation of the thermal neutron concentration effect by the various reflectors. D-D neutron generator was introduced as a neutron source for the NIPS system to have more advantages such as easier control and moderation capability than the {sup 252}Cf source. Simulated samples for explosive and chemical warfare were prepared to construct a prompt gamma-ray database. Based on the constructed database, a computer program for the detection of illicit chemical and nuclear materials was developed using the MATLAB software.

  10. Effective citizen advocacy of beneficial nuclear technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKibben, J. Malvyn; Wood, Susan

    2007-01-01

    In 1991, a small group of citizens from communities near the Savannah River Site (SRS) formed a pro-nuclear education and advocacy group, Citizens for Nuclear Technology Awareness (CNTA). Their purpose was to: (1) counter nuclear misinformation that dominated the nation's news outlets, (2) provide education on nuclear subjects to area citizens, students, elected officials, and (3) provide informed citizen support for potential new missions for SRS when needed. To effectively accomplish these objectives it is also essential to establish and maintain good relations with community leaders and reporters that cover energy and nuclear subjects. The organization has grown considerably since its inception and has expanded its sphere of influence. We believe that our experiences over these fifteen years are a good model for effectively communicating nuclear subjects with the public. This paper describes the structure, operation and some of the results of CNTA. (authors)

  11. Pursuit of nuclear science and technology education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rangacharyulu, C.

    2009-01-01

    While it is quite encouraging to note that there is a nuclear renaissance underway around the world, there is a growing concern that the knowledge-base of nuclear technologies will be lost. Several international organizations are making concerted efforts to avert this situation by establishing collaborative workshops etc. In Western Canada, our challenges and opportunities are many-fold. As a uranium mining region, we can engage our economy in the full life-cycle of the nuclear energy industry. It is also important that we maintain and augment nuclear technologies. We need to develop the infrastructure to jump-start the education and training of the youth. We are taking a multi-prong approach to this end. We are initiating specializations in undergraduate programs which emphasize nuclear radiation physics and technology. We are collaborating with Canadian organizations such as University Network of Excellence in Nuclear Engineering (UNENE) and University of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT). We are organizing collaborations with our colleagues at foreign institutions in Europe and Asia to provide an international component. We are also working with local industry and health organizations to provide a wide-range of learning opportunities to students by engaging them in research projects of immediate interest to professionals. My presentation will focus on these developments and we will also seek thoughts and suggestions for future collaborations.

  12. Proliferation Persuasion. Coercive Bargaining with Nuclear Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volpe, Tristan A. [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States)

    2015-08-31

    Why do states wait for prolonged periods of time with the technical capacity to produce nuclear weapons? Only a handful of countries have ever acquired the sensitive nuclear fuel cycle technology needed to produce fissile material for nuclear weapons. Yet the enduring trend over the last five decades is for these states to delay or forgo exercising the nuclear weapons option provided by uranium enrichment or plutonium reprocessing capabilities. I show that states pause at this threshold stage because they use nuclear technology to bargain for concessions from both allies and adversaries. But when does nuclear latency offer bargaining benefits? My central argument is that challengers must surmount a dilemma to make coercive diplomacy work: the more they threaten to proliferate, the harder it becomes to reassure others that compliance will be rewarded with nuclear restraint. I identify a range of mechanisms able to solve this credibility problem, from arms control over breakout capacity to third party mediation and confidence building measures. Since each step towards the bomb raises the costs of implementing these policies, a state hits a sweet spot when it first acquires enrichment and/or reprocessing (ENR) technology. Subsequent increases in proliferation capability generate diminishing returns at the bargaining table for two reasons: the state must go to greater lengths to make a credible nonproliferation promise, and nuclear programs exhibit considerable path dependency as they mature over time. Contrary to the conventional wisdom about power in world politics, less nuclear latency thereby yields more coercive threat advantages. I marshal new primary source evidence from archives and interviews to identify episodes in the historical record when states made clear decisions to use ENR technology as a bargaining chip, and employ this theory of proliferation persuasion to explain how Japan, North Korea, and Iran succeeded and failed to barter concessions from the

  13. Nuclear medicine. Medical technology research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerch, H.; Jigalin, A.

    2005-01-01

    Aim, method: the scientific publications in the 2003 and 2004 issues of the journal Nuklearmedizin were analyzed retrospectively with regard to the proportion of medical technology research. Results: out of a total of 73 articles examined, 9 (12%) were classified as medical technology research, that is, 8/15 of the original papers (16%) and one of the case reports (5%). Of these 9 articles, 44% (4/9) focused on the combination of molecular and morphological imaging with direct technical appliance or information technology solutions. Conclusion: medical technology research is limited in the journal's catchment area. The reason for this is related to the interdependency between divergent development dynamics in the medical technology industry's locations, the many years that the area of scintigraphic technology has been underrepresented, research policy particularly in discrepancies in the promotion of molecular imaging and a policy in which health is not perceived as a predominantly good and positive economic factor, but more as a curb to economic development. (orig.)

  14. Rocket Flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Evera, Bill; Sterling, Donna R.

    2002-01-01

    Describes an activity for designing, building, and launching rockets that provides students with an intrinsically motivating and real-life application of what could have been classroom-only concepts. Includes rocket design guidelines and a sample grading rubric. (KHR)

  15. The European fusion nuclear technology effort

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darvas, J.

    1989-01-01

    The role of fusion technology in the European fusion development strategy is outlined. The main thrust of the present fusion technology programme is responding to development needs of the Next European Torus. A smaller, but important and growing R and D effort is dealing with problems specific to the Demonstration, or Fusion Power, Reactor. The part of the programme falling under the somewhat arbitrarily defined category of 'fusion nuclear technology' is reviewed and an outlook to future activities is given. The review includes tritium technology, blanket technology and breeder materials development, technology and materials for the protection of the first wall and of other plasma facing components, remote handling technology, and safety and environmental impact studies. A few reflections are offered on the future long-term developments in fusion technology. (orig.)

  16. Some nuclear track technologies developed recently for practical purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Xiuhong

    2000-01-01

    For practical purposes three kinds of nuclear track technologies developed recently are described. They are coloring of nuclear track, nuclear track sheet replication and molding of micro metallic cones from nuclear tracks

  17. Current Abstracts Nuclear Reactors and Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bales, J.D.; Hicks, S.C. [eds.

    1993-01-01

    This publication Nuclear Reactors and Technology (NRT) announces on a monthly basis the current worldwide information available from the open literature on nuclear reactors and technology, including all aspects of power reactors, components and accessories, fuel elements, control systems, and materials. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Science and Technology Database during the past month. Also included are US information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through the International Energy Agency`s Energy Technology Data Exchange or government-to-government agreements. The digests in NRT and other citations to information on nuclear reactors back to 1948 are available for online searching and retrieval on the Energy Science and Technology Database and Nuclear Science Abstracts (NSA) database. Current information, added daily to the Energy Science and Technology Database, is available to DOE and its contractors through the DOE Integrated Technical Information System. Customized profiles can be developed to provide current information to meet each user`s needs.

  18. Nuclear data for fusion reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-06-01

    The meeting was organized in four sessions and four working groups devoted to the following topics: Requirements of nuclear data for fusion reactor technology (6 papers); Status of experimental and theoretical investigations of microscopic nuclear data (10 papers); Status of existing libraries for fusion neutronic calculations (5 papers); and Status of integral experiments and benchmark tests (6 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers

  19. Transfer of Canadian nuclear regulatory technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvie, J.D.

    1985-10-01

    This paper discusses the Canadian approach to the regulation of nuclear power reactors, and its possible application to CANDU reactors in other countries. It describes the programs which are in place to transfer information on licensing matters to egulatory agencies in other countries, and to offer training on nuclear safety regulation as it is practised in Canada. Experience to date in the transfer of regulatory technology is discussed. 5 refs

  20. Nuclear technologies for Moon and Mars exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buden, D.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear technologies are essential to successful Moon and Mars exploration and settlements. Applications can take the form of nuclear propulsion for transport of crews and cargo to Mars and the Moon; surface power for habitats and base power; power for human spacecraft to Mars; shielding and life science understanding for protection against natural solar and cosmic radiations; radioisotopes for sterilization, medicine, testing, and power; and resources for the benefits of Earth. 5 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs

  1. The status of nuclear power technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calori, F.

    1976-01-01

    A survey is presented of the present state of development concerning nuclear power technology, and the prospects of a modified future development of nuclear energy in the world are dealt with, modification being necessary on account of altered conditions in the development of the energy economy. Projections are made for the development of the fuel market taking into account the quantities and costs for the various steps of the fuel cycle. (UA) [de

  2. Promoting the acceptance of nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rueckl, E.

    1998-01-01

    Restoring the public acceptance of nuclear technology requires optimized public relations work and an enhanced interaction among the nuclear industry and schools and universities. Thinking in contexts needs to be promoted, also in order to improve knowledge of mass flows. Specific terms often mean different things to experts and to the public. This can be corrected by careful use of language and precision in public relations work. The young generation is more openminded towards technology now than it was in the seventies and eighties. This is a point of departure in winning young people also for nuclear technology. For this to happen, science education in schools needs to be improved and the appropriate courses need to be introduced. (orig.) [de

  3. 2007 annual meeting on nuclear technology. Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2007-01-01

    This year's Annual Nuclear Technology Conference (JK) organized by the Deutsches Atomforum e.V. (DAtF) and the Kerntechnische Gesellschaft e.V. (KTG) was held in Karlsruhe on May 22-24. The attendance of more than 1,200 persons from 21 nations, and the increase in participation over the past few years, underline the role of this specialized congress as one of the leading international events in the field of the peaceful uses of nuclear power. The first day of the conference, with its plenary presentations, traditionally focused mainly on political and economic problems of the use of nuclear power. The situation of nuclear power in the United Kingdom, the key country of this year's meeting, was covered in depth. As usual, the program of the three-day event was organized as follows: plenary sessions on the first day were followed by topical sessions, technical sessions, and special events on the other days. This year, the conference featured a record program of 251 papers presented at these sessions. The 'Nuclear Power Campus' was arranged very successfully for the 5th time as an event comprising lectures and a 'hands-on' exhibition explaining the world of nuclear power in a transparent way to students from schools and universities. The special commitment to young scientists and to the preservation of competence in the nuclear field were emphasized at the JK 2007, among other things, in a workshop on 'Preservation of Competence in Nuclear Technology'. Nearly 20 young scientists presented results of their scientific work. The Annual Meeting on Nuclear Technology was accompanied by a specialized exhibition with meeting points of industry organized by 33 manufacturers, vendors, and service companies. (orig.)

  4. Proceeding of the 7. Seminar on Technology and Safety of Nuclear Power Plants and Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hastowo, Hudi; Antariksawan, Anhar R.; Soetrisnanto, Arnold Y; Jujuratisbela, Uju; Aziz, Ferhat; Su'ud, Zaki; Suprawhardana, M. Salman

    2002-02-01

    The seventh proceedings of seminar safety and technology of nuclear power plant and nuclear facilities, held by National Nuclear Energy Agency. The Aims of seminar is to exchange and disseminate information about safety and nuclear Power Plant Technology and Nuclear Facilities consist of technology; high temperature reactor and application for national development sustain able and high technology. This seminar level all aspects technology, Power Reactor research reactor, high temperature reactor and nuclear facilities. The article is separated by index

  5. AREVA Germany. International competence in nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graeber, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    AREVA NP was created in 2001 by the merger of the French nuclear technology specialist Framatome with the nuclear sector of Siemens. The company is headquartered in Paris and has regional subsidiaries in Germany and the United States. The joint venture's strength lies in its all-round competence in nuclear power plants, from reactor development to power plant services and modernization of operating plants, design and production of fuel assemblies and turn-key construction of nuclear power reactors. Major core competences are located in Germany including the test facilities which are unique in the entire group as well as electrical engineering and instrumentation and control systems. AREVA NP is part of the globally acting AREVA group which pursues a unique integrated business model. The concept covers the entire nuclear fuel cycle from uranium mining to reprocessing used fuel assemblies. At present, AREVA has 48,000 employees worldwide, of which 5,700 are Germany-based. (orig.)

  6. Qualtity assurance in nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roesler, U.

    1977-01-01

    The demand for safety in nuclear power plants is rooted in the Atomic Energy Act of the Federal Republic of Germany, under which 'preplanned safety' is a licensing condition. Moreover, the safety of nuclear power plants is outlined in more precise terms in the guidelines of the German Advisory Committee for Reactor Safeguards (Reaktorsicherheitskommission). The usual approach taken in this country, i.e., to establish quality assurance for each specific product, with supplementary quality assurance measures geared to systems requirements being implemented by industry, has proved to work satisfactorily. Product-based quality assurance mainly stems from the classical quality control concept, whereas systems-based quality assurance primarily is to ensure that both manufacturers and systems suppliers take all measures in advance which are needed for the satisfactory processing of an order and to achieve the quality level required. The special features and the advantages of the joint action of manufacturers, systems suppliers and experts, which are characteristic of the German approach, very clearly emerge from a comparison with practices in the United States. In the further refinement of the quality assurance concept as practised in Germany, qhich will have a particularly great impact on costs and schedules because of the manpower requirement involved, it should be carefully weighed where there are exaggerations and unnecessary complications which can no longer be justified by the demand for more safety. (orig.) [de

  7. Advances in nuclear science and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Henley, Ernest J

    1970-01-01

    Advances in Nuclear Science and Technology, Volume 5 presents the underlying principles and theory, as well as the practical applications of the advances in the nuclear field. This book reviews the specialized applications to such fields as space propulsion.Organized into six chapters, this volume begins with an overview of the design and objective of the Fast Flux Test Facility to provide fast flux irradiation testing facilities. This text then examines the problem in the design of nuclear reactors, which is the analysis of the spatial and temporal behavior of the neutron and temperature dist

  8. Advances in nuclear science and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Greebler, Paul

    1966-01-01

    Advances in Nuclear Science and Technology, Volume 3 provides an authoritative, complete, coherent, and critical review of the nuclear industry. This book presents the advances in the atomic energy field.Organized into six chapters, this volume begins with an overview of the use of pulsed neutron sources for the determination of the thermalization and diffusion properties of moderating as well as multiplying media. This text then examines the effect of nuclear radiation on electronic circuitry and its components. Other chapters consider radiation effects in various inorganic solids, with empha

  9. Uses of Nuclear Technology in the Society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Rodriguez, A.; Vera Ruiz, H.

    2000-01-01

    As part of the programme of activities aimed at secondary school teachers, the President of the Spanish Nuclear Forum and General Manager of Empresarios Agrupados inaugurated the 16th Conference on Energy and Education with a description of nuclear technology applications and expectations of future developments in the area of the structure of matter, including sources of life. Dr. Hernan Vera Ruiz, Head of Industrial and Chemical Applications, IAEA, gave the opening speech and answered questions from the participants in the colloquium at the end which was moderated by the President of the Spanish Nuclear forum. (Author)

  10. Powder metallurgy techniques in nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mardon, P.G.

    1983-01-01

    The nuclear application of conventional powder metallurgy routes is centred on the fabrication of ceramic fuels. The stringent demands in terms of product performance required by the nuclear industry militate against the use of conventional powder metallurgy to produce metallic components such as the fuel cladding. However, the techniques developed in powder metallurgy find widespread application throughout nuclear technology. Illustrations of the use of these techniques are given in the fields of absorber materials, ceramic cladding materials, oxide fuels, cermet fuels, and the disposal of highly active waste. (author)

  11. China nuclear science and technology report. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The bibliographies and abstracts of China Nuclear Science and Technology Reports published in 1993 (Report Numbers CNIC-00675∼CNIC-00800) are presented. The items are arranged according to INIS subject categories, which mainly are physical sciences, chemistry, materials, earth sciences, life sciences, isotopes, isotope and radiation applications, engineering and technology, and other aspects of nuclear energy. The numbers on the left corners of the entries are report numbers, and on the right corners the serial numbers. A report number index is annexed

  12. China nuclear science and technology report. Abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-01-01

    The bibliographies and abstracts of China Nuclear Science and Technology Reports published in 1993 (Report Numbers CNIC-00675{approx}CNIC-00800) are presented. The items are arranged according to INIS subject categories, which mainly are physical sciences, chemistry, materials, earth sciences, life sciences, isotopes, isotope and radiation applications, engineering and technology, and other aspects of nuclear energy. The numbers on the left corners of the entries are report numbers, and on the right corners the serial numbers. A report number index is annexed.

  13. Saving Harvests Through Nuclear Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixit, Aabha; Madsen, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Crop diseases are one of the most challenging threats we face, affecting everyone on the planet directly or indirectly. Like so many crops, wheat — a key component for bread making — has over periods of time faced horrific destruction from diseases. One such disease, a wheat stem rust caused by a new virulent race (Ug99) can destroy whole wheat crops in a matter of days. Getting into action, the international community has strived over the years to protect crops against plant diseases. Leading in the use of nuclear techniques, the Joint FAO/IAEA Laboratories at Seibersdorf, Austria, irradiate seeds to induce biological variation from which varieties with disease resistance may be developed, thereby helping farmers as well as consumers

  14. Reliability technology and nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrick, B.J.; Kaplan, S.

    1976-01-01

    This paper reviews some of the history and status of nuclear reliability and the evolution of this subject from art towards science. It shows that that probability theory is the appropriate and essential mathematical language of this subject. The authors emphasize that it is more useful to view probability not as a $prime$frequency$prime$, i.e., not as the result of a statistical experiment, but rather as a measure of state of confidence or a state of knowledge. They also show that the probabilistic, quantitative approach has a considerable history of application in the electric power industry in the area of power system planning. Finally, the authors show that the decision theory notion of utility provides a point of view from which risks, benefits, safety, and reliability can be viewed in a unified way thus facilitating understanding, comparison, and communication. 29 refs

  15. Spent Nuclear Fuel Alternative Technology Risk Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perella, V.F.

    1999-11-29

    A Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Task Team (RRTT) was chartered by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Spent Fuel Management with the responsibility to recommend a course of action leading to a final technology selection for the interim management and ultimate disposition of the foreign and domestic aluminum-based research reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) under DOE''s jurisdiction. The RRTT evaluated eleven potential SNF management technologies and recommended that two technologies, direct co-disposal and an isotopic dilution alternative, either press and dilute or melt and dilute, be developed in parallel. Based upon that recommendation, the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) organized the SNF Alternative Technology Program to further develop the direct co-disposal and melt and dilute technologies and provide a WSRC recommendation to DOE for a preferred SNF alternative management technology. A technology risk assessment was conducted as a first step in this recommendation process to determine if either, or both, of the technologies posed significant risks that would make them unsuitable for further development. This report provides the results of that technology risk assessment.

  16. Spent Nuclear Fuel Alternative Technology Risk Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perella, V.F.

    1999-01-01

    A Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Task Team (RRTT) was chartered by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Spent Fuel Management with the responsibility to recommend a course of action leading to a final technology selection for the interim management and ultimate disposition of the foreign and domestic aluminum-based research reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) under DOE''s jurisdiction. The RRTT evaluated eleven potential SNF management technologies and recommended that two technologies, direct co-disposal and an isotopic dilution alternative, either press and dilute or melt and dilute, be developed in parallel. Based upon that recommendation, the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) organized the SNF Alternative Technology Program to further develop the direct co-disposal and melt and dilute technologies and provide a WSRC recommendation to DOE for a preferred SNF alternative management technology. A technology risk assessment was conducted as a first step in this recommendation process to determine if either, or both, of the technologies posed significant risks that would make them unsuitable for further development. This report provides the results of that technology risk assessment

  17. Preventive maintenance technology for nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazawa, Tatsuo

    1992-01-01

    With the increase of the number of nuclear power plants in operation and the number of years of operation, the improvement of reliability and the continuation of safe operation have become more important, and the expectation for preventive maintenance technology has also heightened. The maintenance of Japanese nuclear power plants is based on the time schedule maintenance mainly by the regular inspection carried out every year, but the monitoring of the conditions of various machinery and equipment in operation has been performed widely. In this report, the present state of checkup and inspection technologies and the monitoring and diagnostic technologies for operational condition, which are the key technologies of preventive maintenance, are described. As the checkup and inspection technologies, ultrasonic flow detection technology, phased array technology, Amplituden und Laufzeit Orts Kurven method and X-ray CT, and as the monitoring and diagnostic technologies for operational condition, the diagnosis support system for BWR plants 'PLADIS', those for rotary machines, those for turbogenerators, those for solenoid valves, the mechanization of patrol works and the systematizing technology are reported. (K.I.)

  18. Development of nuclear equipment qualification technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Heon O; Kim, Wu Hyun; Kim, Jin Wuk; Kim, Jeong Hyun; Lee, Jeong Kyu; Kim, Yong Han; Jeong, Hang Keun [Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-03-01

    In order to enhance testing and evaluation technologies, which is one of the main works of the Chanwon branch of KIMM(Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials), in addition to the present work scope of the testing and evaluation in the industrial facilities such as petroleum and chemical, plants, the qualification technologies of the equipments important to safety used in the key industrial facilities such as nuclear power plants should be localized: Equipments for testing and evaluation is to be set up and the related technologies must be developed. In the first year of this study, of vibration aging qualification technologies of equipments important to safety used in nuclear power plants have been performed. (author). 27 refs., 81 figs., 17 tabs.

  19. Nuclear fission and nuclear safeguards: Common technologies and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keepin, G.R.

    1989-01-01

    Nuclear fission and nuclear safeguards have much in common, including the basic physical phenomena and technologies involved as well as the commitments and challenges posed by expanding nuclear programs in many countries around the world. The unique characteristics of the fission process -- such as prompt and delayed neutron and gamma ray emission -- not only provide the means of sustaining and controlling the fission chain reaction, but also provide unique ''signatures'' that are essential to quantitative measurement and effective safeguarding of key nuclear materials (notably 239 Pu and 235 U) against theft, loss, or diversion. In this paper, we trace briefly the historical emergence of safeguards as an essential component of the expansion of the nuclear enterprise worldwide. We then survey the major categories of passive and active nondestructive assay techniques that are currently in use or under development for rapid, accurate measurement and verification of safe-guarded nuclear materials in the many forms in which they occur throughout the nuclear fuel cycle. 23 refs., 14 figs

  20. Nuclear technology for a sustainable future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-06-01

    The IAEA helps its Member States to use nuclear technology for a broad range of applications, from generating electricity to increasing food production, from fighting cancer to managing fresh water resources and protecting the world's seas and oceans. Despite the Fukushima Daiichi accident in March 2011, nuclear power will remain an important option for many countries. Use of nuclear power will continue to grow in the next few decades, although growth will be slower than was anticipated before the accident. The factors contributing to the continuing interest in nuclear power include increasing global demand for energy, as well as concerns about climate change, volatile fossil fuel prices and security of energy supply. It will be difficult for the world to achieve the twin goals of ensuring sustainable energy supplies and curbing greenhouse gases without nuclear power. It is up to each country to choose its optimal energy mix. The IAEA helps countries which opt for nuclear power to use it safely and securely. Every day, millions of people throughout the world benefit from the use of nuclear technology. The IAEA helps to make these benefits available to developing countries through its extensive Technical Cooperation programme. For instance, we provide assistance in areas such as human health (through our Programme of Action for Cancer Therapy), animal health (we were active partners in the successful global campaign to eradicate the deadly cattle disease rinderpest), food, water and the environment. The IAEA contributes to the development of global policies to address the energy, food, water and environmental challenges the world faces. We look forward to helping to make Rio+20 a success. This brochure provides an overview of the many ways in which nuclear technology is contributing to building the future we want.

  1. Analysis on Japanese nuclear industrial technologies and their military implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, H S; Yang, M H; Kim, H J. and others

    2000-10-01

    This study covered the following scopes : analysis of Japan's policy trend on the development and utilization of nuclear energy, international and domestic viewpoint of Japan's nuclear weapon capability, Japan's foreign affairs and international cooperation, status of Japan's nuclear technology development and its level, status and level of nuclear core technologies such as nuclear reactor and related fuel cycle technologies. Japan secures the whole spectrum of nuclear technologies including core technologies through the active implementation of nuclear policy for the peaceful uses of nuclear energy during the past five decades. Futhermore, as the result of the active cultivation of nuclear industry, Japan has most nuclear-related facilities and highly advanced nuclear industrial technologies. Therefore, it is reasonable that Japan might be recognized as one of countries having capability to get nuclear capability in several months.

  2. Analysis on Japanese nuclear industrial technologies and their military implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H. S.; Yang, M. H.; Kim, H. J. and others

    2000-10-01

    This study covered the following scopes : analysis of Japan's policy trend on the development and utilization of nuclear energy, international and domestic viewpoint of Japan's nuclear weapon capability, Japan's foreign affairs and international cooperation, status of Japan's nuclear technology development and its level, status and level of nuclear core technologies such as nuclear reactor and related fuel cycle technologies. Japan secures the whole spectrum of nuclear technologies including core technologies through the active implementation of nuclear policy for the peaceful uses of nuclear energy during the past five decades. Futhermore, as the result of the active cultivation of nuclear industry, Japan has most nuclear-related facilities and highly advanced nuclear industrial technologies. Therefore, it is reasonable that Japan might be recognized as one of countries having capability to get nuclear capability in several months

  3. Analysis on Japanese nuclear industrial technologies and their military implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, H. S.; Yang, M. H.; Kim, H. J. and others

    2000-10-01

    This study covered the following scopes : analysis of Japan's policy trend on the development and utilization of nuclear energy, international and domestic viewpoint of Japan's nuclear weapon capability, Japan's foreign affairs and international cooperation, status of Japan's nuclear technology development and its level, status and level of nuclear core technologies such as nuclear reactor and related fuel cycle technologies. Japan secures the whole spectrum of nuclear technologies including core technologies through the active implementation of nuclear policy for the peaceful uses of nuclear energy during the past five decades. Futhermore, as the result of the active cultivation of nuclear industry, Japan has most nuclear-related facilities and highly advanced nuclear industrial technologies. Therefore, it is reasonable that Japan might be recognized as one of countries having capability to get nuclear capability in several months.

  4. Status of technology for nuclear waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lieberman, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    In the area of low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes the successful development and application of specific management technologies have been demonstrated over the years. The major area in which technology remains to be effectively implemented is in the management of high-level wastes from the nuclear fuel cycle. Research and development specifically directed at the management of high-level radioactive wastes in the USA and other countries is briefly reviewed in the article introduced

  5. New technologies for monitoring nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moran, B.W.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes new technologies for monitoring the continued presence of nuclear materials that are being evaluated in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, to reduce the effort, cost, and employee exposures associated with conducting nuclear material inventories. These technologies also show promise for the international safeguarding of process systems and nuclear materials in storage, including spent fuels. The identified systems are based on innovative technologies that were not developed for safeguards applications. These advanced technologies include passive and active sensor systems based on optical materials, inexpensive solid-state radiation detectors, dimensional surface characterization, and digital color imagery. The passive sensor systems use specialized scintillator materials coupled to optical-fiber technologies that not only are capable of measuring radioactive emissions but also are capable of measuring or monitoring pressure, weight, temperature, and source location. Small, durable solid-state gamma-ray detection devices, whose components are estimated to cost less than $25 per unit, can be implemented in a variety of configurations and can be adapted to enhance existing monitoring systems. Variations in detector design have produced significantly different system capabilities. Dimensional surface characterization and digital color imaging are applications of developed technologies that are capable of motion detection, item surveillance, and unique identification of items

  6. Development of nuclear fuel cycle technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawahara, Akira; Sugimoto, Yoshikazu; Shibata, Satoshi; Ikeda, Takashi; Suzuki, Kazumichi; Miki, Atsushi.

    1990-01-01

    In order to establish the stable supply of nuclear fuel as an important energy source, Hitachi ltd. has advanced the technical development aiming at the heightening of reliability, the increase of capacity, upgrading and the heightening of performance of the facilities related to nuclear fuel cycle. As for fuel reprocessing, Japan Nuclear Fuel Service Ltd. is promoting the construction of a commercial fuel reprocessing plant which is the first in Japan. The verification of the process performance, the ensuring of high reliability accompanying large capacity and the technical development for recovering effective resources from spent fuel are advanced. Moreover, as for uranium enrichment, Laser Enrichment Technology Research Association was founded mainly by electric power companies, and the development of the next generation enrichment technology using laser is promoted. The development of spent fuel reprocessing technology, the development of the basic technology of atomic process laser enrichment and so on are reported. In addition to the above technologies recently developed by Hitachi Ltd., the technology of reducing harm and solidification of radioactive wastes, the molecular process laser enrichment and others are developed. (K.I.)

  7. Nuclear technology. All in good hands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, Michaela

    2011-01-01

    Babcock Noell GmbH (BNG) has more than 40 years of practical experience and fundamental know-how in the field of nuclear technology and thus is well equipped to meet future challenges. This applies to building new nuclear power plants, upgrading and decommissioning existing facilities as well as to conditioning and storage of radioactive waste. BNG is a supplier of, among other things, components for machine technology, personnel and materials transfer locks, safety enclosures and pool liners. Outstanding, technically demanding reference projects have demonstrated BNG's capabilities. BNG is a reliable service and assembly partner to the operators of nuclear power plants and nuclear facilities. This sector of activities has as its backbone a separate team of experienced service and assembly personnel. The synergies of engineering and service competence intensively utilized by Babcock Noell GmbH are employed, inter alia, in the development and advanced development, respectively, of nuclear technology products fit for practical use, such as personnel and materials transfer locks. (orig.)

  8. Briefings on nuclear technology in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyengar, P.K.

    2009-01-01

    Few scientists one knows of, have gone out of their way to educate the public-especially those involved in making policies at the government level-on what nuclear energy is all about and how it is produced. One might begin at the beginning and ask what the basic principles of scientific research are, how they are developed and what the methodology of converting science into technology is. Equally relevantly, how can one sensitise the administration, not to speak of the average citizen, in supporting science and technology. This work is divided into nine chapters. The first one discusses what science really is. The second introduces the reader to nuclear science and technology. The third progressively deals with Indian effort in developing nuclear science and the astounding amount of organisational effort involved. The fourth refers to nuclear testing, a somewhat controversial subject. The fifth addresses itself to the problem of nuclear non-proliferation, yet another controversial subject, but which Dr Iyengar deals with commendable objectivity. The last three chapters concern administrative reforms

  9. Nuclear technology in pest management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seth, R.K.

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear energy has been greatly explored for its use in various disciplines of entomology related to agriculture, medicine and industry. Since the ravages of the insects especially in the tropical and subtropical zones of the world are particularly serious, insect control is essential in the production of crop, animal produce and protection from dreadful communicable diseases. Presently, biological and para-biological control programmes are receiving major prominence due to insecticidal ill effects on health and environment, and due to development of insecticidal resistance in pests. The exposure to ionizing radiation is now the principal method for inducing reproductive sterility in mass-reared insects. Irradiation of insects is a relatively straightforward process with reliable quality control procedures. Using radiation may offer other advantages, such as insignificant increase in temperature during the process, use of treated insects immediately after processing, no addition of any residues harmful to human health or environment, etc. Various pragmatic perspectives of utilization of radiation as a tool in entomological research studies, in relation to noxious insects as well as ecologically beneficial insects, are highlighted. (author)

  10. Improved Technology To Prevent Nuclear Proliferation And Counter Nuclear Terrorism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richardson, J; Yuldashev, B; Labov, S; Knapp, R

    2006-06-12

    As the world moves into the 21st century, the possibility of greater reliance on nuclear energy will impose additional technical requirements to prevent proliferation. In addition to proliferation resistant reactors, a careful examination of the various possible fuel cycles from cradle to grave will provide additional technical and nonproliferation challenges in the areas of conversion, enrichment, transportation, recycling and waste disposal. Radiation detection technology and information management have a prominent role in any future global regime for nonproliferation. As nuclear energy and hence nuclear materials become an increasingly global phenomenon, using local technologies and capabilities facilitate incorporation of enhanced monitoring and detection on the regional level. Radiation detection technologies are an important tool in the prevention of proliferation and countering radiological/nuclear terrorism. A variety of new developments have enabled enhanced performance in terms of energy resolution, spatial resolution, passive detection, predictive modeling and simulation, active interrogation, and ease of operation and deployment in the field. For example, various gamma ray imaging approaches are being explored to combine spatial resolution with background suppression in order to enhance sensitivity many-fold at reasonable standoff distances and acquisition times. New materials and approaches are being developed in order to provide adequate energy resolution in field use without the necessity for liquid nitrogen. Different detection algorithms enable fissile materials to be distinguished from other radioisotopes.

  11. 2006 annual nuclear technology conference Aachen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2006-01-01

    This year's ANNUAL NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY CONFERENCE (JK) was organized in Aachen by the Deutsches Atomforum e.V. (DAtF) and the Kerntechnische Gesellschaft e.V. (KTG). The attendance by more than 1,200 participants from 17 nations underlines the role of this specialized congress as one of the leading events in the field of nuclear power use. For several years in a row, the number of participants has been increasing steadily. The first conference day offered plenary presentations traditionally dealing mainly with political and economic issues of the use of nuclear power, including a presentation by the President of the DAtF. The lead countries of JK 2006 were Belgium and Finland with contributions to the plenary day and special meetings on selected topics. The traditional proven scheme of the three-day meeting offered plenary sessions on the first day, and technical sessions, topical sessions, poster sessions, and special events on the following days. The 'Nuclear Power Campus' was run most successfully for the fourth time, presenting to high school students and university freshmen the world of nuclear power in a transparent way. The special commitment to the young generation was stressed at JK 2006 also by the 'Competence Preservation in Nuclear Technology' workshop. Nearly 2 dozen young scientists used the forum to present results of their work. The meeting was accompanied by a technical exhibition with meeting points established by vendors, suppliers, and service providers. (orig.)

  12. Methodology and technology of decommissioning nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The decommissioning and decontamination of nuclear facilities is a topic of great interest to many Member States of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) because of the large number of older nuclear facilities which are or soon will be retired from service. In response to increased international interest in decommissioning and to the needs of Member States, the IAEA's activities in this area have increased during the past few years and will be enhanced considerably in the future. A long range programme using an integrated systems approach covering all the technical, regulatory and safety steps associated with the decommissioning of nuclear facilities is being developed. The database resulting from this work is required so that Member States can decommission their nuclear facilities in a safe time and cost effective manner and the IAEA can effectively respond to requests for assistance. The report is a review of the current state of the art of the methodology and technology of decommissioning nuclear facilities including remote systems technology. This is the first report in the IAEA's expanded programme and was of benefit in outlining future activities. Certain aspects of the work reviewed in this report, such as the recycling of radioactive materials from decommissioning, will be examined in depth in future reports. The information presented should be useful to those responsible for or interested in planning or implementing the decommissioning of nuclear facilities

  13. The Extended Duration Sounding Rocket (EDSR): Low Cost Science and Technology Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruddace, R. G.; Chakrabarti, S.; Cash, W.; Eberspeaker, P.; Figer, D.; Figueroa, O.; Harris, W.; Kowalski, M.; Maddox, R.; Martin, C.; McCammon, D.; Nordsieck, K.; Polidan, R.; Sanders, W.; Wilkinson, E.; Asrat

    2011-12-01

    The 50-year old NASA sounding rocket (SR) program has been successful in launching scientific payloads into space frequently and at low cost with a 85% success rate. In 2008 the NASA Astrophysics Sounding Rocket Assessment Team (ASRAT), set up to review the future course of the SR program, made four major recommendations, one of which now called Extended Duration Sounding Rocket (EDSR). ASRAT recommended a system capable of launching science payloads (up to 420 kg) into low Earth orbit frequently (1/yr) at low cost, with a mission duration of approximately 30 days. Payload selection would be based on meritorious high-value science that can be performed by migrating sub-orbital payloads to orbit. Establishment of this capability is a essential for NASA as it strives to advance technical readiness and lower costs for risk averse Explorers and flagship missions in its pursuit of a balanced and sustainable program and achieve big science goals within a limited fiscal environment. The development of a new generation of small, low-cost launch vehicles (SLV), primarily the SpaceX Falcon 1 and the Orbital Sciences Minotaur I has made this concept conceivable. The NASA Wallops Flight Facility (WFF)conducted a detailed engineering concept study, aimed at defining the technical characteristics of all phases of a mission, from design, procurement, assembly, test, integration and mission operations. The work was led by Dr. Raymond Cruddace, a veteran of the SR program and the prime mover of the EDSR concept. The team investigated details such as, the "FAA licensed contract" for launch service procurement, with WFF and NASA SMD being responsible for mission assurance which results in a factor of two cost savings over the current approach. These and other creative solutions resulted in a proof-of-concept Class D mission design that could have a sustained launch rate of at least 1/yr, a mission duration of up to about 3 months, and a total cost of $25-30 million for each mission

  14. Nuclear energy for technology and industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemeny, L.G.

    1987-01-01

    It is a sad commentary on the complete lack of informed realism of the Government and people of Australia that, after thirty years of vacillation and political chicanery, nuclear technology, one of this nation's potential ''sunrise industries'' is in its death throes. Whilst our third world neighbours, in particular Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, the People's Republic of China and even impoverished Bangladesh are making giant strides to develop an autonomous expertise Australia's potential has been dissipated and its opportunities for leadership and technology transfer lost. By chance this paper was written some weeks before the nuclear accident at Chernobyl (U.S.S.R.) and many years after accidents at the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant (U.S.A.) and the plutonium production reactor at Windscale (U.K.). None of these incidents alter the basic arguments or conclusions contained in this manuscript. (See Appendix). The year 1986 might represent the final opportunity for concerned professionals to seek to improve the quality of public education and information to end ''the war against the atom''. It will be necessary to re-motivate the public and private sector of a demoralised technology and to launch it on a road of responsible and successful expansion unshackled by beaurocratic interference. It is the purpose of this paper to examine why the first three decades of nuclear technology in Australia have been so singularly unsuccessful and to discuss a coherent and rational implementation of plans and policies for the future. (author)

  15. Prospective of the nuclear energy, technological tendency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz F, G. De la; Salaices A, M.

    2004-01-01

    The world's concern about the energy supply in the near future, has had as an answer diverse proposals in which two multinational initiatives are highlighted, that of the International Project on Nuclear Innovative Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO) and that of the Generation-l V International Forum (GIF). Both initiatives direct their efforts to the development of new technologies in nuclear energy that would satisfy the energy requirements of the future. In this article, an analysis based on a) the available information on these technologies, b) a joint study (IEA/OECD/IAEA) on the new technologies regarding its capacity to confront the current challenges of the nuclear energy, and c) the authors' experience and knowledge about the phenomenology, design and security of nuclear facilities, is presented. Moreover, the technologies that, in the authors' opinion, will have the better possibilities to compete successfully in the energy markets and could be one of the viable options to satisfy the energy demands of the future, are described. (Author)

  16. Review of Current Nuclear Vacuum System Technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, M.; McCracken, J.; Shope, T.

    2003-01-01

    Nearly all industrial operations generate unwanted dust, particulate matter, and/or liquid wastes. Waste dust and particulates can be readily tracked to other work locations, and airborne particulates can be spread through ventilation systems to all locations within a building, and even vented outside the building - a serious concern for processes involving hazardous, radioactive, or nuclear materials. Several varieties of vacuum systems have been proposed and/or are commercially available for clean up of both solid and liquid hazardous and nuclear materials. A review of current technologies highlights both the advantages and disadvantages of the various systems, and demonstrates the need for a system designed to address issues specific to hazardous and nuclear material cleanup. A review of previous and current hazardous/nuclear material cleanup technologies is presented. From simple conventional vacuums modified for use in industrial operations, to systems specifically engineered for such purposes, the advantages and disadvantages are examined in light of the following criteria: minimal worker exposure; minimal secondary waste generation;reduced equipment maintenance and consumable parts; simplicity of design, yet fully compatible with all waste types; and ease of use. The work effort reviews past, existing and proposed technologies in light of such considerations. Accomplishments of selected systems are presented, including identified areas where technological improvements could be suggested

  17. On fundamentally new sources of energy for rockets in the early works of the pioneers of astronautics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melkumov, T. M.

    1977-01-01

    The research for more efficient methods of propelling a spacecraft, than can be achieved with chemical energy, was studied. During a time when rockets for space flight had not actually been built pioneers in rocket technology were already concerned with this problem. Alternative sources proposed at that time, were nuclear and solar energy. Basic engineering problems of each source were investigated.

  18. Localization of nuclear power plant technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stiteler, F.Z.; Rudek, T.G.

    1998-01-01

    Asia, and particularly China, has an enormous need for power and must deal with the practicalities of building large base load units. In China, as in other countries, there are limitations on the use of large quantities of fossil fuel. This raises the possibility of turning to nuclear power to satisfy their energy needs. Other issues tend to point to the nuclear option for these growing economies, including economic considerations, environmental concerns, energy independence and raising the technological capabilities of the country. When a country embarks on a nuclear power program with the intention of localizing the technology, a long-term commitment is necessary to achieve this objective. Localization of nuclear technology is not a new phenomenon. The nature of the industry from the early beginnings has always involved transfer of technology when a new country initiated a nuclear power construction program. In fact, most previous experiences with this localization process involved heavy governmental, political and financial support to drive the success of the program. Because of this strong governmental support, only the receiving nation's companies were generally allowed to participate in the local business operations of the technology recipient. What is new and different today is the retreat from heavy financial support by the receiving country's government. This change has created a strong emphasis on cost-effectiveness in the technology transfer process and opportunities for foreign companies to participate in local business activities. ABB is a world-wide company with two parent companies that have been very active over many years in establishing cost-justified local operations throughout the world. Today, ABB has become the largest electrical engineering company in the world with respected local operations in nearly every country. Lessons learned by ABB in their world-wide localization initiatives are being applied to the challenge of cost

  19. Applying Digital Technologies to Strengthen Nuclear Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huffeteau, S.; Roy, C.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The paper describes how the development of some information technologies can further contribute to the safety of nuclear facilities and their competitiveness. After repositioning the nuclear industry engineering practices in their historical and economic context, the paper describes five engineering practices or use cases widely developed especially in the aerospace industry: requirement management, business process enforcement by digitization of data and processes, facilities configuration management, engineering information unification, and digital licensing. Information technology (IT) plays a mandatory role for driving this change since IT is now mature enough to handle the level of complexity the nuclear industry requires. While the detailed evaluation of the expecting gains in cost decrease or safety increase can be difficult to quantify, the paper presents illustrative benefits reachable by a development of these practices. (author

  20. Thorium nuclear fuel cycle technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eom, Tae Yoon; Do, Jae Bum; Choi, Yoon Dong; Park, Kyoung Kyum; Choi, In Kyu; Lee, Jae Won; Song, Woong Sup; Kim, Heong Woo

    1998-03-01

    Since thorium produces relatively small amount of TRU elements after irradiation in the reactor, it is considered one of possible media to mix with the elements to be transmuted. Both solid and molten-salt thorium fuel cycles were investigated. Transmutation concepts being studied involved fast breeder reactor, accelerator-driven subcritical reactor, and energy amplifier with thorium. Long-lived radionuclides, especially TRU elements, could be separated from spent fuel by a pyrochemical process which is evaluated to be proliferation resistance. Pyrochemical processes of IFR, MSRE and ATW were reviewed and evaluated in detail, regarding technological feasibility, compatibility of thorium with TRU, proliferation resistance, their economy and safety. (author). 26 refs., 22 figs

  1. Macrosystems management approach to nuclear technology transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelo, J.A. Jr.; Maultsby, T.E.

    1978-01-01

    The world of the 1980s will be a world of diminishing resources, shifting economic bases, rapidly changing cultural and societal structures, and an ever increasing demand for energy. A major driving function in this massive redistribution of global power is man's ability to transfer technology, including nuclear technology, to the developing nations. The major task facing policy makers in planning and managing technology transfer is to avoid the difficulties inherent in such technology exploitation, while maximizing the technical, economic, social, and cultural benefits brought about by the technology itself. But today's policy makers, using industrial-style planning, cannot adequately deal with all the complex, closely-coupled issues involved in technology transfer. Yet, policy makers within the developing nations must be capable of tackling the full spectrum of issues associated with technology transfer before committing to a particular course of action. The transfer and acceptance of complex technology would be significantly enhanced if policy makers followed a macrosystems management approach. Macrosystems management is a decision making methodology based on the techniques of macrosystems analysis. Macrosystems analysis combines the best quantitative methods in systems analysis with the best qualitative evaluations provided by multidisciplined task teams. These are focused in a project management structure to produce solution-oriented advice to the policy makers. The general relationships and management approach offered by macrosystems analysis are examined. Nowhere are the nuclear power option problems and issues more complex than in the transfer of this technology to developing nations. Although many critical variables of interest in the analysis are generic to a particular importer/exporter relationship, two specific issues that have universally impacted the nuclear power option, namely the fuel cycle, and manpower and training, are examined in the light of

  2. Development of nuclear technology transfer - Korea as a recipient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, N.C.

    1988-01-01

    Korea, as a recipient of nuclear technology transfer, has good experience of progressively building up its indigenous capability of nuclear technology through three stages of technology transfer, namely: technology transfer under the turn-key approach, component approach, and integrated technology transfer with a local prime contractor. Here, each stage of experience of technology transfer, with Korea as a recipient, is presented

  3. Future of nuclear energy technology in Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiberini, A.; Brogli, R.; Jermann, M.; Alder, H.P.; Stratton, R.W.; Troyon, F.

    1988-01-01

    Despite the present gloom surrounding the nuclear option for electricity and heat generation, there are still people in Switzerland in industry, research, banking and even politics willing and capable to think in terms of long-range projections. The basis for these projections is the belief that a well-functioning and prosperous society always needs large and reliable sources of acceptably priced energy, which must be generated with a high respect for the necessity of a clean environment. Being aware of the current low acceptance level of the nuclear option, efforts to keep this option open are directed to achieving the following goals: to maintain and improve the country's capabilities to safely operate the four existing nuclear power plants of Beznau (twin units), Muehleberg, Goesgen and Leibstadt; to keep the capability of extending the applications of nuclear energy technology. In practice, this could be in the fields of district heating, fusion, and advanced power reactors

  4. JENDL. Nuclear databases for science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Keiichi

    2013-01-01

    It is exactly 50 years since the Japanese Nuclear Data Committee was founded both in the Atomic Energy Society of Japan and in the former Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. The committee promoted the development of Japan's own evaluated nuclear data libraries. As a result, we managed to produce a series of Japanese Evaluated Nuclear Data Libraries (JENDLs) to be used in various fields for science and technology. The libraries are categorized into general-purpose and special-purpose ones. The general-purpose libraries have been updated periodically by considering the latest knowledge on experimental and theoretical nuclear physics that was available at the time of the updates. On the other hand, the special-purpose libraries have been issued in order to meet the needs for particular application fields. This paper reviews the research and development for those libraries. (author)

  5. Small Nuclear Technology and Market Entry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, J S; Schock, R N; Brown, N W; Smith, C F

    2002-01-01

    An overview of energy-system projections into the new century leads to the conclusion that nuclear power will play a significant role. How significant a role will be determined by the marketplace. Within the range of nuclear-power technologies available, small nuclear-power plants of innovative design appear to fit the needs of a number of developing nations and states. Under similar financing options used by the airline industry and others, the capital requirement barrier that puts the nuclear industry at a disadvantage in deregulated markets could be reduced. These plants have the potential advantage of modularity, are proliferation-resistant, incorporate passive safety features, minimize waste, and could be cost-competitive with fossil-fuel plants

  6. SEI nuclear technology findings by the Stafford Synthesis Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buden, D.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear propulsion is key to reducing travel time to Mars, greatly reducing the mass in low Earth orbit, and enhancing schedule flexibility by increasing the Earth orbit departure launch window. Nuclear thermal rockets have twice to three times the performance of the best chemical rockets. This directly translates into reduced trip times and lower mass in low Earth orbit. Trip times of < 400 days in space are possible, a limitation if restricted to chemical propulsion. Psychological, physiological and radiological problems are significant issues for long mission times. The psychology of being cooped up so long in a minimum-sized capsule is cause for concern - much longer than considered healthy for nuclear submarine crews. The effects of long-term weightlessness are being debated. Short trip times eliminate the need for artificial gravity. The largest uncertainty is the effect of galactic radiation that will expose the crew to high levels of radiation for as much as 60 rem/yr

  7. Strategies and technologies for nuclear materials stewardship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, P.T.; Arthur, E.D.; Wagner, R.L. Jr.; Hanson, E.M.

    1997-01-01

    A strategy for future nuclear materials management and utilization from proliferation and long-term waste perspectives is described. It is aimed at providing flexible and robust responses to foreseeable nuclear energy scenarios. The strategy also provides for a smooth transition, in terms of technology development and facility implementation, to possible future use of breeder reactor technology. The strategy incorporates features that include minimization of stocks of separated plutonium; creation of a network of secure interim, retrievable storage facilities; and development and implementation of a system of Integrated Actinide Conversion Systems (IACS) aimed at near and far-term management of plutonium and other actinides. Technologies applicable to such IACS concepts are discussed as well as a high-level approach for implementation. (author)

  8. Strategies and technologies for nuclear materials stewardship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, P.T.; Arthur, E.D.; Wagner, R.L. Jr.; Hanson, E.M.

    1997-01-01

    A strategy for future nuclear materials management and utilization from proliferation and long-term waste perspectives is described. It is aimed at providing flexible and robust responses to foreseeable nuclear energy scenarios. The strategy also provides for a smooth transition, in terms of technology development and facility implementation, to possible future use of breeder reactor technology. The strategy incorporates features that include minimization of stocks of separated plutonium; creation of a network of secure interim, retrievable storage facilities; and development and implementation of a system of Integrated Actinide Conversion Systems (IACS) aimed at near and far-term management of plutonium and other actinides. Technologies applicable to such IACS concepts are discussed as well as a high-level approach for implementation

  9. Science and nuclear technology communication in Cordoba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Hugo R.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the communication activities conducted nuclear science and technology in 2012 in the scientific, educational and tourist areas of Cordoba. The first is the Promotion of the realization of scientific research school works to present in science and technology fairs. The public exhibitions fairs consist of projects conducted by students from all levels of the education system. To do this, students have the guidance of Advisory Teachers, researchers and technologists of the local scientific community, which involves training them for a period of approximately six months. During this year the courses were conducted in 37 cities in the interior province, which are the sites of Regional Headquarters, which included the promotion of the realization of school scientific research on the peaceful applications of nuclear technology and / or national nuclear activities. During the meetings, made presentations basing pedagogical and didactic aspects to coordination between teaching of conceptual content and activities practical introduction to nuclear scientific methodology. As a result of this initiative, between the months of June and September was reached more than 3,000 teachers, using the infrastructure of the Ministry of Science and Technology and Internet. As a result, a dozen schools have begun to seek assistance to develop projects related to nuclear power. Other activities under the name of Scientific School Research Incursion through Experiences with Natural Radiation, consisted of the design and realization of simple laboratory experiences in laboratory's schools. The objective was to strengthen the curriculum and promote critical thinking about the risks and benefits of nuclear technologies in relation to exposure to ionizing radiation involving them. As a result it has been observed that these activities contribute to a progressive scientific and technological literacy of students, who build original knowledge for themselves and develop

  10. Status of nuclear technology education in Mongolia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davaa, S.; Khuukhenkhuu, G.

    2007-01-01

    The National University of Mongolia (NUM) is the country's oldest, the only comprehensive university, and a leading center of science, education and culture. The NUM has twelve schools and faculties in the capital city Ulaanbaatar and three branches in provinces. The University offers the widest range of undergraduate and graduate programs in natural and social sciences and humanities. After sixty years of dynamic growth, the University has become a place of sustained innovation, a blend of scholarship and practical realism. The last ten years have been a period of reforms in the structure, financing and governance of Mongolian educational institutions. The NUM has been continuously adjusting its operations and curriculum to deal with new economic conditions, changing labour market demands and altered social aspirations. Committed to human peace, development and welfare in the increasingly globalized world, the NUM promotes equal and mutually beneficial international cooperation. It is a member of the International Association of Universities (IAU), University Mobility in Asia and the Pacific (UMAP), and Euro-Asian University Network (EAUN) and has direct co-operation agreements with more than sixty international academic and research centers in Europe, the USA and the Asia-Pacific Rim. On the threshold of the 21st century, the NUM remains a major center for fundamental and applied research as well as a university that is distinguished by the quality of its teaching. Following its values and traditions, the University strives to be an innovative and dynamic learning community. Requirements for Program Majored in Nuclear Technology: Profession major purpose: The objective is to provide knowledge and skills to use nuclear physics' methodology and nuclear radiation for education, science, health protection, agriculture, geology, mining, nature protection, energy and etc industries. The graduates of this major will become engineer technology staff and researchers in

  11. Current status and improvement of the nuclear physics experiment course for speciality of nuclear physics and nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qu Guopu; Guo Lanying

    1999-01-01

    The author reviews the current status of the nuclear physics experiment course for speciality of nuclear physics and nuclear technology in higher education and expresses author's views on the future improvement of the nuclear physics experiment course

  12. Development of Nuclear Fuel Remote Fabrication Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jung Won; Yang, M. S.; Kim, S. S. and others

    2005-04-01

    The aim of this study is to develop the essential technology of dry refabrication using spent fuel materials in a laboratory scale on the basis of proliferation resistance policy. The emphasis is placed on the assessment and the development of the essential technology of dry refabrication using spent fuel materials. In this study, the remote fuel fabrication technology to make a dry refabricated fuel with an enhanced quality was established. And the instrumented fuel pellets and mini-elements were manufactured for the irradiation testing in HANARO. The design and development technology of the remote fabrication equipment and the remote operating and maintenance technology of the equipment in hot cell were also achieved. These achievements will be used in and applied to the future back-end fuel cycle and GEN-IV fuel cycle and be a milestone for Korea to be an advanced nuclear country in the world

  13. NASA's progress in nuclear electric propulsion technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, J.R.; Doherty, M.P.; Peecook, K.M.

    1993-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has established a requirement for Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) technology for robotic planetary science mission applications with potential future evolution to systems for piloted Mars vehicles. To advance the readiness of NEP for these challenging missions, a near-term flight demonstration on a meaningful robotic science mission is very desirable. The requirements for both near-term and outer planet science missions are briefly reviewed, and the near-term baseline system established under a recent study jointly conducted by the Lewis Research Center (LeRC) and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is described. Technology issues are identified where work is needed to establish the technology for the baseline system, and technology opportunities which could provide improvement beyond baseline capabilities are discussed. Finally, the plan to develop this promising technology is presented and discussed. 19 refs

  14. Performance and technological feasibility of rocket powered HTHL-SSTO with take-off assist (aerospace plane/ekranoplane)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Nobuyuki; Nebylov, Alexander V.; Sokolov, Victor V.; Ohkami, Yoshiaki

    It might be said that it is common understanding that rocket-powered single stage to orbit (SSTO) aerospace planes will become feasible with near-term technology as described in [1] (Koelle, D. E. Survey and comparison of winged launch vehicle options, ISTS 94-g-11 V 1994) and [2] (Bekey, I. Why SSTO rocket launch vehicles are now feasible and practical, IAF-94-V.1.524 1994). Among two methods of launching aerospace planes into orbit, vertical take-off (VT) and horizontal take-off (HT), it seems that VT takes the lead from HT [1, 2]. The decision for the X-33 program by NASA, also, seems to favor VT. In retrospect, almost all of the launch vehicles in the past have been VT, mainly because VT solved the problem of exit from atmosphere to space. However, broadening the range of requirements for space transportation systems from military to commercial and unmanned to manned seems to favor the need for HT. In this paper, the authors are going to prove that aerospace plane/ekranoplane system, which is a reusable launch vehicle system based on the HT concept, with ekranoplane as a take-off and possibly, landing assist, could be competitive with the VT concept from both technological and economical view points. Ekranoplane is a wing-in-ground-effect craft (WIG), which moves at a speed of approximately 0.5 M, carrying heavy loads above the sea surface. Combination of high initial velocity and high performance tri-propellant engine for aerospace plane makes it possible to configure an aerospace plane which is competitive with VT. Other specific features of HT in comparison with VT are discussed.

  15. 48{sup th} Annual meeting on nuclear technology (AMNT 2017). Workshop: Preserving competence in nuclear technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinwarz, Wolfgang

    2017-10-15

    On the 19{sup th} workshop ''Preserving Competence in Nuclear Technology'' 17 young scientists presented the results from their thesis work for a diploma, mastership or a PhD covering a broad spectrum of technical areas. This demonstrated again the strong engagement of the younger generation for the nuclear technology and the significant support by the involved German institutions. The jury awarded Thomas Schaefer (Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden- Rossendorf) with the Siempelkamp Competence Price 2017.

  16. Advances in nuclear science and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Henley, Ernest J

    1975-01-01

    Advances in Nuclear Science and Technology, Volume 8 discusses the development of nuclear power in several countries throughout the world. This book discusses the world's largest program of land-based electricity production in the United States.Organized into six chapters, this volume begins with an overview of the phenomenon of quasi-exponential behavior by examining two mathematical models of the neutron field. This text then discusses the finite element method, which is a method for obtaining approximate solutions to integral or differential equations. Other chapters consider the status of

  17. Planning a revolution in nuclear power technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egan, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    Approaching the marketing and deployment of small, inherently safe reactors from the standpoint of the legal and financial community, the author suggests various ideal planning criteria that should be adhered to by designers and suppliers in order for the new plants to achieve political and financial acceptability. Although new nuclear technology based on those criteria promise to rekindle the prospects for nuclear fission, neither governments nor suppliers are likely to undertake the requisite investments. Rather, the author proposes a private development initiative between the political community, private investors, and would-be suppliers. (author)

  18. The German competence network on nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuczera, B.; Fritz, P.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The present German energy policy is based on the phase-out of nuclear electricity generation, which means that the last of the currently operating eighteen German nuclear power plants will run until about 2022. While the plants will be shut down one after the other, decommissioning will start together with interim storage of the radioactive waste. The safe waste disposal in a final repository is planned to start around 2030 and may take another two decades, i.e., in Germany nuclear competence is further needed, at least until the mid of this century. Against this background, a high-ranking commission under the direction of the Federal Ministry of Economy and Technology evaluated the publicly funded nuclear safety related research and development (R and D) activities in Germany. One of the recommendations made by the commission was the foundation of a Competence Network on Nuclear Technology for an optimum coordination of the remaining nuclear activities including aspects of future human resources in this area. This Network was established in March 2000 with the following member institutions: Research Centre Juelich, Research Centre Karlsruhe, Research Centre Rossendorf and the Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) in Munich and their neighbouring Technical Universities. The strategic objectives of the Competence Network include: Trend investigations on job development and on university education capacities in the nuclear technology sector; Enhanced cooperation of the Research Centres with universities in the nuclear field and support of international education initiatives (e.g. ENEN, WNU); Coordination and bundling of the activities in publicly funded reactor safety and waste management R and D programmes; Support of qualified young scientists and engineers (pre-doctoral students) - also by third-party funds; Participation in and collaboration with international projects and activities for advancements of international nuclear safety

  19. Technical Integration of Nuclear Hydrogen Production Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ki Young; Chang, J. H.; Park, J. K.

    2007-06-01

    These works focus on the development of attainment indices for nuclear hydrogen key technologies, the analysis of the hydrogen production process and the performance estimation for hydrogen production system, and the assessment of the nuclear hydrogen production economy. To estimate the attainments of the key technologies in progress with the performance goals of GIF, itemized are the attainment indices based on SRP published in VHTR R and D steering committee of Gen-IV. For assessing the degree of attainments in comparison with the final goals of VHTR technologies in progress of researches, subdivided are the prerequisite items conformed to the NHDD concepts established in a preconceptual design in 2005. The codes for analyzing the hydrogen production economy are developed for calculating the unit production cost of nuclear hydrogen. We developed basic R and D quality management methodology to meet design technology of VHTR's needs. By putting it in practice, we derived some problems and solutions. We distributed R and D QAP and Q and D QAM to each teams and these are in operation. Computer simulations are performed for estimating the thermal efficiency for the electrodialysis component likely to adapting as one of the hydrogen production system in Korea and EED-SI process known as the key components of the hydrogen production systems. Using the commercial codes, the process diagrams and the spread-sheets were produced for the Bunsen reaction process, Sulphuric Acid dissolution process and HI dissolution process, respectively, which are the key components composing of the SI process

  20. ELM - A SIMPLE TOOL FOR THERMAL-HYDRAULIC ANALYSIS OF SOLID-CORE NUCLEAR ROCKET FUEL ELEMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, J. T.

    1994-01-01

    ELM is a simple computational tool for modeling the steady-state thermal-hydraulics of propellant flow through fuel element coolant channels in nuclear thermal rockets. Written for the nuclear propulsion project of the Space Exploration Initiative, ELM evaluates the various heat transfer coefficient and friction factor correlations available for turbulent pipe flow with heat addition. In the past, these correlations were found in different reactor analysis codes, but now comparisons are possible within one program. The logic of ELM is based on the one-dimensional conservation of energy in combination with Newton's Law of Cooling to determine the bulk flow temperature and the wall temperature across a control volume. Since the control volume is an incremental length of tube, the corresponding pressure drop is determined by application of the Law of Conservation of Momentum. The size, speed, and accuracy of ELM make it a simple tool for use in fuel element parametric studies. ELM is a machine independent program written in FORTRAN 77. It has been successfully compiled on an IBM PC compatible running MS-DOS using Lahey FORTRAN 77, a DEC VAX series computer running VMS, and a Sun4 series computer running SunOS UNIX. ELM requires 565K of RAM under SunOS 4.1, 360K of RAM under VMS 5.4, and 406K of RAM under MS-DOS. Because this program is machine independent, no executable is provided on the distribution media. The standard distribution medium for ELM is one 5.25 inch 360K MS-DOS format diskette. ELM was developed in 1991. DEC, VAX, and VMS are trademarks of Digital Equipment Corporation. Sun4 and SunOS are trademarks of Sun Microsystems, Inc. IBM PC is a registered trademark of International Business Machines. MS-DOS is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation.

  1. Consideration on the interaction between society and nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinoda, Yoshihiko

    2007-01-01

    A social conflict over nuclear technology arises from the different interactions between society and nuclear technology. The purpose of this review is to grasp the essential points of this social conflict from a social viewpoint. These essential points can be discerned by interpreting results of polls about nuclear technology and the future of society in general. As a result, attitudes towards nuclear technology can be explained in terms of differences of general views on society such as social order or social progress. The attitudes of people toward nuclear technology were divided into strong agreement, weak agreement, weak objection and strong objection in order to obtain useful information for clarification of social conflict on this issue. Results of polls of people who have weak agreement for nuclear technology reveal their ambivalence about nuclear technology. This raises concern that further implementation of nuclear technology might cause these people to shift their views to objection. (author)

  2. Radioactive waste management and advanced nuclear fuel cycle technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    In 2007 ENEA's Department of Nuclear Fusion and Fission, and Related Technologies acted according to national policy and the role assigned to ENEA FPN by Law 257/2003 regarding radioactive waste management and advanced nuclear fuel cycle technologies

  3. Rocket-Based Combined Cycle Engine Technology Development: Inlet CFD Validation and Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBonis, J. R.; Yungster, S.

    1996-01-01

    A CFD methodology has been developed for inlet analyses of Rocket-Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) Engines. A full Navier-Stokes analysis code, NPARC, was used in conjunction with pre- and post-processing tools to obtain a complete description of the flow field and integrated inlet performance. This methodology was developed and validated using results from a subscale test of the inlet to a RBCC 'Strut-Jet' engine performed in the NASA Lewis 1 x 1 ft. supersonic wind tunnel. Results obtained from this study include analyses at flight Mach numbers of 5 and 6 for super-critical operating conditions. These results showed excellent agreement with experimental data. The analysis tools were also used to obtain pre-test performance and operability predictions for the RBCC demonstrator engine planned for testing in the NASA Lewis Hypersonic Test Facility. This analysis calculated the baseline fuel-off internal force of the engine which is needed to determine the net thrust with fuel on.

  4. 11-th International conference Nuclear power safety and nuclear education - 2009. Abstracts. Part 1. Session: Safety of nuclear technology; Innovative nuclear systems and fuel cycle; Nuclear knowledge management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The book includes abstracts of the 11-th International conference Nuclear power safety and nuclear education - 2009 (29 Sep - 2 Oct, 2009, Obninsk). Problems of safety of nuclear technology are discussed, innovative nuclear systems and fuel cycles are treated. Abstracts on professional education for nuclear power and industry are presented. Nuclear knowledge management are discussed

  5. Inherently safe technologies-chemical and nuclear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinberg, A.M.

    1984-01-01

    Probabilistic risk assessments show an inverse relationship between the likelihood and the consequences of nuclear and chemical plant accidents, but the Bhopal accident has change public complacency about the safety of chemical plants to such an extent that public confidence is now at the same low level as with nuclear plants. The nuclear industry's response was to strengthen its institutions and improve its technologies, but the public may not be convinced. One solution is to develop reactors which do not depend upon the active intervention of humans of electromechanical devices to deal with emergencies, but which have physical properties that limit the possible temperature and power of a reactor. The Process Inherent Ultimately Safe and the modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled reactors are two possibilities. the chemical industry needs to develop its own inherently safe design precepts that incorporate smallness, safe processes, and hardening against sabotage. 5 references

  6. Image processing technology for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Min; Lee, Yong Beom; Kim, Woong Ki; Park, Soon Young

    1993-05-01

    Digital image processing technique is being actively studied since microprocessors and semiconductor memory devices have been developed in 1960's. Now image processing board for personal computer as well as image processing system for workstation is developed and widely applied to medical science, military, remote inspection, and nuclear industry. Image processing technology which provides computer system with vision ability not only recognizes nonobvious information but processes large information and therefore this technique is applied to various fields like remote measurement, object recognition and decision in adverse environment, and analysis of X-ray penetration image in nuclear facilities. In this report, various applications of image processing to nuclear facilities are examined, and image processing techniques are also analysed with the view of proposing the ideas for future applications. (Author)

  7. Y-Notes; Introductory Sessions on Nuclear Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This chapter is divided into next parts: What is 'Y-Notes ; Young generation opening session; Nuclear education and transfer of know-how; Nuclear technology; Other applications of nuclear technology; Nuclear programs and technical cooperation; Political aspects; Environment and safety; Communication and public perception; Economics; Fuel cycle challenges; Video

  8. 2. International conference on nuclear technologies of XXI centuries. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakushev, A.P.

    2010-01-01

    The collection contains abstracts of the II International conference 'Nuclear technologies of the XXI century' on energy problems in the world, the prospects for nuclear power plant in Belarus, the various technological, technical and economic aspects of nuclear safety of NPP and nuclear reactions and international cooperation. The materials published in electronic form.

  9. Advances in nuclear science and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Greebler, Paul

    1968-01-01

    Advances in Nuclear Science and Technology Volume 4 provides information pertinent to the fundamental aspects of advanced reactor concepts. This book discusses the advances in various areas of general applicability, including modern perturbation theory, optimal control theory, and industrial application of ionizing radiations.Organized into seven chapters, this volume begins with an overview of the technology of sodium-cooled fast breeder power reactors and gas-cooled power reactors. This text then examines the key role of reactor safety in the development of fast breeder reactors. Other chapt

  10. Canadian nuclear desalination/cogeneration technology development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphries, J.R.

    1996-01-01

    The goal of the CANDESAL program has been to develop innovative applications of existing technologies that would offer an energy efficient, cost effective mechanism for the production of potable water and electricity. Large scale seawater desalination will be an important element in the solution of the global water shortage problem. For nuclear desalination to capture a significant share of this growing market, it must be economically competitive, as well as offer other advantages over more traditional fossil-fueled alternatives. The focus of activities in Canada has been on development of the technology in directions that would result in improved water production efficiency, reduced energy consumption, reduced environmental burden and reduced costs

  11. Coating technologies in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaae, J.L.

    1993-01-01

    Metallic, ceramic, and organic coatings are so commonly used in modern industry that virtually everyone can name several applications in which coatings are employed. Thus, it is no surprise that coating technologies are widely employed in the nuclear industry. Some of these technologies utilize processes that are mature and well developed, and others utilize processes that are new and state of the art. In this paper, five generic coating processes that include almost all vapor deposition processes are described, and then applications of each of these processes for deposition of specific materials in nuclear applications are described. These latter selections, of course, are very subjective, and others will be able to name other applications. Because of their wide range of application, coating technologies are considered to be national critical technologies. The generic coating processes that cover almost all vapor deposition technologies are as follows: (1) stationary substrate chemical vapor deposition; (2) fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition; (3) plasma-assisted chemical deposition; (4) sputtering; (5) evaporation

  12. Research on process management of nuclear power technological innovation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Hua; Zhou Yu

    2005-01-01

    Different from the other technological innovation processes, the technological innovation process of nuclear power engineering project is influenced deeply by the extensive environmental factors, the technological innovation of nuclear power engineering project needs to make an effort to reduce environmental uncertainty. This paper had described the mechanism of connection technological innovation process of nuclear power engineering project with environmental factors, and issued a feasible method based on model of bargaining to incorporate technological innovation process management of nuclear power engineering project with environmental factors. This method has realistic meanings to guide the technological innovation of nuclear power engineering project. (authors)

  13. Annual meeting on nuclear technology 2005. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-03-01

    The proceedings of the annual meeting on nuclear technology 2005 covers the following issues: (1) reactor physics and methods of calculation: design and transients; method development and validation; (2): thermodynamics and fluid dynamics: analytical thermohydraulics for existing reactors; experiments and operational behavior; analytical methods for innovative reactors; (3) Safety of nuclear installations - methods, analysis, results: special problems; PSA and in-vessel phenomena; ex-vessel phenomena; (4) front end and back end of the fuel cycle, radioactive waste, storage: intermediate storage of fuel elements, waste treatment, (5) fuel elements and core components: fuel elements, new methods in the interpretation, manufacturing and service; (6) operation of nuclear installations: experience with the operation of NPPs; management systems, digital instrumentation and control of NPPs revision management; (7) decommissioning of nuclear installations: concepts and strategies for decommissioning and dismantling; experiences with decommissioning projects; (8) fusion technology: fusion facilities; materials and test facility; cryo technique and simulations; (9) research reactors: building new and backfitting of existing research reactors; current development; dismantling of research reactors; (10) advanced reactor concepts, energy systems, energy economics; (11) communication with the public; (12) component materials, fabrication and service behavior: degradation effects of component materials; component behavior; (13): radiation protection: PSA and in-vessel phenomena, ex-vessel phenomena.

  14. NASA's nuclear electric propulsion technology project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, J.R.; Sovey, J.S.

    1992-07-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has initiated a program to establish the readiness of nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) technology for relatively near-term applications to outer planet robotic science missions with potential future evolution to system for piloted Mars vehicles. This program was initiated in 1991 with a very modest effort identified with nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP); however, NEP is also an integral part of this program and builds upon NASA's Base Research and Technology Program in power and electric propulsion as well as the SP-100 space nuclear power program. The NEP Program will establish the feasibility and practicality of electric propulsion for robotic and piloted solar system exploration. The performance objectives are high specific impulse (200 greater than I(sub sp) greater than 10000 s), high efficiency (over 0.50), and low specific mass. The planning for this program was initially focussed on piloted Mars missions, but has since been redirected to first focus on 100-kW class systems for relatively near-term robotic missions, with possible future evolution to megawatt-and multi-megawatt-class systems applicable to cargo vehicles supporting human missions as well as to the piloted vehicles. This paper reviews current plans and recent progress for the overall nuclear electric propulsion project and closely related activities. 33 refs

  15. Abnormality diagnostic technology for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Satoshi

    1986-01-01

    In nuclear power plants, it is feared that the failure of the installations containing radioactive substances may inflict serious damage on public and workers. Therefore in nuclear power plants, the ensuring of safety is planned by supposing hypothetical accidents which are not likely to occur from engineering viewpoint, and multiple protection measures are taken in the plant constitution. In addition to the safety measures from such hardware aspect, recently in order to prevent the occurrence of accidents by using various safety-confirming means, and to detect early when any accident occurred, the development and putting in practical use of many monitoring equipments have been promoted. In such background, the development of nuclear power generation supporting system was carried out for five years since fiscal year 1980, subsidized by the Ministry of International Trade and Industry, and in this report, the technology of equipment abnormality diagnosis developed as a part of that project and the diagnostic techniques for actual plants are described. The technology of diagnosing nuclear reactor abnormality includes the diagnosis of loose metal pieces and the abnormal vibration of in-core structures. The detection and diagnosis of valve leak and the diagnosis of the deterioration of detectors are also explained. (Kako, I.)

  16. Technological development of Guangdong nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Shiqiang

    2000-01-01

    After over 5 years of operations, the Guangdong Nuclear Power Station (GNPS) has achieved good results both economically and in operational safety performance. The main attributes to the success of the plant operational performances include the equipment reliability, the technical capability and management efficiency. To that the key strategy has been to adopt know-how and technological transfer and encourage self-innovation, aiming to strive for the long-term self-reliance in design, manufacturing and operating the plant. (author)

  17. Proceeding of the Fifth Scientific Presentation on Nuclear Safety Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suhaemi, Tj.; Sudarno; Sunaryo, G. R.; Supriatna, P.; Antariksawan, A. R.; Sumijanto; Febrianto; Histori; Aliq

    2000-01-01

    The proceedings includes the result of research and development activities on nuclear safety technology that have been done by research Center for Nuclear Safety Technology in 2000 and was presented on June 28, 2000. The proceedings is expected to give illustration of the research result on Nuclear Safety Technology

  18. Extended analysis on impact of nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ainul Hayati Daud; Hazmimi Kasim

    2010-01-01

    This chapter discusses a number of economic, social and knowledge impacts of the applications of nuclear technology in Malaysia as well as benchmarking with Japan and the Republic of Korea. Under economic impacts, index of gross value of products and services, index of gross value of exports, index of gross value of training expenditures, and index of total number of human resource trained are developed. In addition, the contribution of the application of nuclear technology to both Gross Domestic Products (GDP) and GDP per capita are also highlighted. The impact of the application of nuclear technology to Total Factor Productivity (TFP) is also covered in this chapter. Much of the discussions on economic impacts are based on findings in private companies. That is because many of their operations can be expressed in monetary terms by virtue of them operating in commercial environment. Public agencies, however, play crucial role in enabling the private companies attain the level of development reported in this study. Towards that end, public agencies invested in Research and development activities, human capital development, as well as in the setting-up, operation and maintenance of both technical and administrative infrastructures. The impact of such activities is discussed in the later part of this chapter. (author)

  19. Nuclear Technologies Secure Food For Future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Full text: For nearly fifty years, applications of nuclear technology have been helping the world's farmers, contributing new varieties of crops, controlling pests, diagnosing livestock disease, improving soil and water management and increasing food safety. The significant role of nuclear technology in supporting agriculture will be the focus of this year's IAEA Scientific Forum in Vienna on 18-19 September. Food for the Future: Meeting the Challenges with Nuclear Applications is the theme of the Forum, which takes place during the annual IAEA General Conference. ''Demand for food is rising significantly as the world's population grows,'' IAEA Director General Yukiya Amano said. ''Fighting hunger is a key priority. It is essential not only that the world should produce more food. We must also protect crops and livestock and make sure that food is safe to eat. Nuclear applications can make a real difference in all of these areas.'' ''The goal of the Scientific Forum is to make Member States more aware of the very important work of the IAEA in nuclear applications related to food and to encourage more countries to make use of our services.'' Nuclear technology has many possible uses in food and agriculture. By irradiation, scientists can accelerate natural spontaneous mutation and improve crop varieties to suit particular conditions. Farmers are benefitting from rice that grows in salty conditions, barley that flourishes above 4 000 metres (13 000 feet) and hundreds of other crop varieties. The use of the sterile insect technique, in which males of a targeted species such as the tsetse fly or the Mediterranean fruit fly are sterilised by radiation and released into the wild, is expanding significantly. This effectively combats insect pests that damage crops and spread disease among humans and livestock, while limiting pesticide use. The world was last year declared free of the deadly cattle disease rinderpest after a campaign made possible by nuclear techniques. The

  20. Nuclear power generation and automation technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korei, Yoshiro

    1985-01-01

    The proportion of nuclear power in the total generated electric power has been increasing year after year, and the ensuring of its stable supply has been demanded. For the further development of nuclear power generation, the heightening of economical efficiency which is the largest merit of nuclear power and the public acceptance as a safe and stable electric power source are the important subjects. In order to solve these subjects, in nuclear power generation, various automation techniques have been applied for the purpose of the heightening of reliability, labor saving and the reduction of radiation exposure. Meeting the high needs of automation, the automation technology aided by computers have been applied to the design, manufacture and construction, operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants. Computer-aided design and the examples of design of a reactor building, pipings and a fuel assembly, an automatic welder for pipings of all position TIG welding type, a new central monitoring and control system, an automatic exchanger of control rod-driving mechanism, an automatic in-service inspection system for nozzles and pipings, and a robot for steam generator maintenance are shown. The trend of technical development and an intelligent moving robot, a system maintenance robot and a four legs walking robot are explained. (Kako, I.)

  1. Nuclear technologies for local energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonnell, F.N.; Lynch, G.F.

    1990-03-01

    If nuclear energy is to realize its full potential as a safe and cost-effective alternative to fossil fuels, applications beyond those that are currently being serviced by large, central nuclear power stations must be identified and appropriate reactors developed. The Canadian program on reactor systems for local energy supply is at the forefront of these developments. This program emphasizes design simplicity, low power density and fuel rating, reliance on natural processes, passive systems, and reduced reliance on operator action. The first product, the SLOWPOKE Energy System, is a 10 MW heat source specifically designed to provide hot water to satisfy the needs of local heating systems for building complexes, institutions and municipal district heating systems. A demonstration heating reactor has been constructed at the Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment in Manitoba and has been undergoing an extensive test program since first operation in 1987 July. Based on the knowledge learned from the design, construction, licensing and operational testing of this facility, the design of the 10 MW commercial-size unit is well advanced, and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited is prepared to commit the construction of the first commercial unit. Although the technical demonstration of the concept is important, it is recognized that another crucial element is the public and regulatory acceptance of small nuclear systems in urban areas. The decision by a community to commit the construction of a SLOWPOKE Energy System brings to a sharp focus the current public apprehension about nuclear technologies

  2. Nuclear Technology Review 2013. Report by the Director General

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    In response to requests by Member States, the Secretariat produces a comprehensive Nuclear Technology Review each year. Attached is this year's report, which highlights notable developments principally in 2012. The Nuclear Technology Review 2013 covers the following areas: power applications, atomic and nuclear data, accelerators and research reactors, and nuclear sciences and applications. Additional documentation associated with the Nuclear Technology Review 2013 is available on the Agency's website1 in English on nuclear hydrogen production technology and preliminary lessons learned from the Fukushima Daiichi accident for advanced nuclear power plant technology development. Information on the IAEA's activities related to nuclear science and technology can also be found in the IAEA's Annual Report 2012 (GC(57)/3), in particular the Technology section, and the Technical Cooperation Report for 2012 (GC(57)/INF/4). The document has been modified to take account, to the extent possible, of specific comments by the Board of Governors and other comments received from Member States. (author)

  3. Research program on nuclear technology and nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreier, J.

    2010-04-01

    This paper elaborated for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) presents the synthesis report for 2009 made by the SFOE's program leader on the research program concerning nuclear technology and nuclear safety. Work carried out, knowledge gained and results obtained in the various areas are reported on. These include projects carried out in the Laboratory for Reactor Physics and System Behaviour LRS, the LTH Thermohydraulics Laboratory, the Laboratory for Nuclear Materials LNM, the Laboratory for Final Storage Safety LES and the Laboratory for Energy Systems Analysis LEA of the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI. Work done in 2009 and results obtained are reported on, including research on transients in Swiss reactors, risk and human reliability. Work on the 'Proteus' research reactor is reported on, as is work done on component safety. International co-operation in the area of serious accidents and the disposal of nuclear wastes is reported on. Future concepts for reactors and plant life management are discussed. The energy business in general is also discussed. Finally, national and international co-operation is noted and work to be done in 2010 is reviewed

  4. Decontamination Technology Development for Nuclear Research Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Won Zin; Jung, Chong Hun; Choi, Wang Kyu; Won, Hui Jun; Kim, Gye Nam

    2004-02-01

    Technology development of surface decontamination in the uranium conversion facility before decommissioning, technology development of component decontamination in the uranium conversion facility after decommissioning, uranium sludge treatment technology development, radioactive waste soil decontamination technology development at the aim of the temporary storage soil of KAERI, Optimum fixation methodology derivation on the soil and uranium waste, and safety assessment methodology development of self disposal of the soil and uranium waste after decontamination have been performed in this study. The unique decontamination technology applicable to the component of the nuclear facility at room temperature was developed. Low concentration chemical decontamination technology which is very powerful so as to decrease the radioactivity of specimen surface under the self disposal level was developed. The component decontamination technology applicable to the nuclear facility after decommissioning by neutral salt electro-polishing was also developed. The volume of the sludge waste could be decreased over 80% by the sludge waste separation method by water. The electrosorption method on selective removal of U(VI) to 1 ppm of unrestricted release level using the uranium-containing lagoon sludge waste was tested and identified. Soil decontamination process and equipment which can reduce the soil volume over 90% were developed. A pilot size of soil decontamination equipment which will be used to development of real scale soil decontamination equipment was designed, fabricated and demonstrated. Optimized fixation methodology on soil and uranium sludge was derived from tests and evaluation of the results. Safety scenario and safety evaluation model were development on soil and uranium sludge aiming at self disposal after decontamination

  5. The 4th Nuclear Science and Technology Conference. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This conference includes papers on a broad range of applications for nuclear technologies. Some of the topics covered are the electron beam and its applications, nuclear applications in industry, nuclear power in Japan, radiobiology for the environment, significant developments in nuclear medicine and nuclear applications in agriculture

  6. Safety management in nuclear technology. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    At the symposium of TueV Sued AG (Munich, Federal Republic of Germany) held in Munich on 28 and 29 October 2008, the following lectures were held: (1) Fundamental requirements of the management system in nuclear technology - Experiences from the international developments at IAEA and WENRA (M. Herttrich); (2) Information from a comparison of requirements of safety management systems (B. Kallenbach-Herbert); (3) Requirements of a modern management system in German nuclear power plants from the view of nuclear safety (D. Majer); (4) Requirements on safety management in module 8 of the regulations project (M. Maqua); (5) Requirements on the management system in nuclear power plants according to GRS-229 and developments at the KTA 1402 ''Integrated management system for safe operation of nuclear power plants (in progress)'' (C. Verstegen); (6) Experiences from the development and implementation of safety management systems in connection with the works management of a nuclear power plant (K. Ramler); (7) Design of a safety management system of a nuclear power plant in consideration of existing management systems (U. Naumann); (8) Experiences in the utilization and evaluation of a safety management system (J. Ritter); (9) Aspects of leadership of safety management systems (S. Seitz); (10) Management of safety or safety management system? Prevailing or administration? (A. Frischknecht); (11) Change management - strategies for successful transfer of new projects: How can I motivate co-workers for a further development of the safety management system? (U. Schnabel); (12) Requirements concerning indicators in integrated management systems and safety management systems (J. Stiller); (13) Integration of proactive and reactive indicators in the safety management system (B. Fahlbruch); (14) What do indicators show? About the use of indicators by regulatory authorities (A. Kern); (15) Safety management and radiation protection in nuclear technology (K. Grantner); (16) Any more

  7. Development of System Engineering Technology for Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hodong; Choi, Iljae

    2013-04-01

    The development of efficient process for spent fuel and establishment of system engineering technology to demonstrate the process are required to develop nuclear energy continuously. The demonstration of pyroprocess technology which is proliferation resistance nuclear fuel cycle technology can reduce spent fuel and recycle effectively. Through this, people's trust and support on nuclear power would be obtained. Deriving the optimum nuclear fuel cycle alternative would contribute to establish a policy on back-end nuclear fuel cycle in the future, and developing the nuclear transparency-related technology would contribute to establish amendments of the ROK-U. S. Atomic Energy Agreement scheduled in 2014

  8. Liquid Rocket Engine Testing Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Shamim

    2005-01-01

    Contents include the following: Objectives and motivation for testing. Technology, Research and Development Test and Evaluation (RDT&E), evolutionary. Representative Liquid Rocket Engine (LRE) test compaigns. Apollo, shuttle, Expandable Launch Vehicles (ELV) propulsion. Overview of test facilities for liquid rocket engines. Boost, upper stage (sea-level and altitude). Statistics (historical) of Liquid Rocket Engine Testing. LOX/LH, LOX/RP, other development. Test project enablers: engineering tools, operations, processes, infrastructure.

  9. NASA's nuclear thermal propulsion technology project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peecook, K.M.; Stone, J.R.

    1992-07-01

    The nonnuclear subsystem technologies required for incorporating nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) into space-exploration missions are discussed. Of particular interest to planned missions are such technologies as materials, instrumentation and controls, turbomachinery, CFD modeling, nozzle extension designs and models, and analyses of exhaust plumes. NASA studies are described and/or proposed for refractory metals and alloys, robotic NTP controls, and turbopump materials candidates. Alternative nozzle concepts such as aerospikes and truncated plugs are proposed, and numerical simulations are set forth for studying heavy molecules and the backstreaming of highly reactive free-radical hydrogen in the exhaust plume. The critical technologies described in the paper are central to the development of NTP, and NTP has the potential to facilitate a range of space exploration activities. 3 refs

  10. Nuclear Propulsion and Power Non-Nuclear Test Facility (NP2NTF): Preliminary Analysis and Feasibility Assessment

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) has been identified as a high NASA technology priority area by the National Research Council because nuclear thermal rockets (NTRs)...

  11. Scenario-based roadmapping assessing nuclear technology development paths for future nuclear energy system scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Den Durpel, Luc; Roelofs, Ferry; Yacout, Abdellatif

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear energy may play a significant role in a future sustainable energy mix. The transition from today's nuclear energy system towards a future more sustainable nuclear energy system will be dictated by technology availability, energy market competitiveness and capability to achieve sustainability through the nuclear fuel cycle. Various scenarios have been investigated worldwide each with a diverse set of assumptions on the timing and characteristics of new nuclear energy systems. Scenario-based roadmapping combines the dynamic scenario-analysis of nuclear energy systems' futures with the technology roadmap information published and analysed in various technology assessment reports though integrated within the nuclear technology roadmap Nuclear-Roadmap.net. The advantages of this combination is to allow mutual improvement of scenario analysis and nuclear technology roadmapping providing a higher degree of confidence in the assessment of nuclear energy system futures. This paper provides a description of scenario-based roadmapping based on DANESS and Nuclear-Roadmap.net. (author)

  12. Preliminary Sizing Completed for Single- Stage-To-Orbit Launch Vehicles Powered By Rocket-Based Combined Cycle Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Joseph M.

    2002-01-01

    Single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) propulsion remains an elusive goal for launch vehicles. The physics of the problem is leading developers to a search for higher propulsion performance than is available with all-rocket power. Rocket-based combined cycle (RBCC) technology provides additional propulsion performance that may enable SSTO flight. Structural efficiency is also a major driving force in enabling SSTO flight. Increases in performance with RBCC propulsion are offset with the added size of the propulsion system. Geometrical considerations must be exploited to minimize the weight. Integration of the propulsion system with the vehicle must be carefully planned such that aeroperformance is not degraded and the air-breathing performance is enhanced. Consequently, the vehicle's structural architecture becomes one with the propulsion system architecture. Geometrical considerations applied to the integrated vehicle lead to low drag and high structural and volumetric efficiency. Sizing of the SSTO launch vehicle (GTX) is itself an elusive task. The weight of the vehicle depends strongly on the propellant required to meet the mission requirements. Changes in propellant requirements result in changes in the size of the vehicle, which in turn, affect the weight of the vehicle and change the propellant requirements. An iterative approach is necessary to size the vehicle to meet the flight requirements. GTX Sizer was developed to do exactly this. The governing geometry was built into a spreadsheet model along with scaling relationships. The scaling laws attempt to maintain structural integrity as the vehicle size is changed. Key aerodynamic relationships are maintained as the vehicle size is changed. The closed weight and center of gravity are displayed graphically on a plot of the synthesized vehicle. In addition, comprehensive tabular data of the subsystem weights and centers of gravity are generated. The model has been verified for accuracy with finite element analysis. The

  13. Orbit transfer rocket engine technology program: Automated preflight methods concept definition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, C. M.; Hertzberg, D. W.

    1991-01-01

    The possibility of automating preflight engine checkouts on orbit transfer engines is discussed. The minimum requirements in terms of information and processing necessary to assess the engine'e integrity and readiness to perform its mission were first defined. A variety of ways for remotely obtaining that information were generated. The sophistication of these approaches varied from a simple preliminary power up, where the engine is fired up for the first time, to the most advanced approach where the sensor and operational history data system alone indicates engine integrity. The critical issues and benefits of these methods were identified, outlined, and prioritized. The technology readiness of each of these automated preflight methods were then rated on a NASA Office of Exploration scale used for comparing technology options for future mission choices. Finally, estimates were made of the remaining cost to advance the technology for each method to a level where the system validation models have been demonstrated in a simulated environment.

  14. Mass spectrometry in nuclear science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komori, Takuji

    1985-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has been widely used and playing a very important role in the field of nuclear science and technology. A major reason for this is that not only the types of element but also its isotopes have to be identified and measured in this field. Thus, some applications of this analytical method are reviewed and discussed in this article. Its application to analytical chemistry is described in the second section following an introductory section, which includes subsections for isotropic dilution mass spectrometry, resonance ionization mass spectrometry and isotopic correlation technique. The isotopic ratio measurement for hydrogen, uranium and plutonium as well as nuclear material control and safeguards are also reviewed in this section. In the third section, mass spectrometry is discussed in relation to nuclear reactors, with subsections on natural uranium reactor and neutron flux observation. Some techniques for measuring the burnup fraction, including the heavy isotopic ratio method and fission product monitoring, are also described. In the fourth section, application of mass spectrometry to measurement of nuclear constants, such as ratio of effective cross-sectional area for 235 U, half-life and fission yield is reviewed. (Nogami, K.)

  15. Technology, Effects and Doctrines of Nuclear Warfare

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broda, E.

    1981-01-01

    The development and the status of the nuclear weapons systems and of the systems for their delivery are explained. All these systems have made tremendous progress since the 1960s. Available destructive power now is literally millions of times larger than at the time of Hiroshima. Moreover, technical progress has had, especially through the MIRV principle and the cruise missile, a destabilizing influence and threatens the equilibrium of terror. New strategic doctrines for winning rather than preventing nuclear war have come to the foreground. Plans for the tactical first-use of nuclear weapons have been accepted. Alternatively, the retaliation capacity of the opponent could be destroyed by surprise attack - The First Strike. In a nuclear conflict, the commanders-in-chief are overburdened by the need for ultra-urgent decisions. This applies especially to a First Strike situation. As a consequence tendencies in the direction of increasing automatization become ever more conspicuous. In the extreme ease, decisions may be left entirely to machines, and men would not any more be included in decision-making. The increasing automatization leads to further escalation of insecurity for the whole world. Solutions for the principal problem of the world, war or peace, cannot be found On the level of technology, but only on that of practical policy of detente, disarmament, collaboration and reconciliation. (author)

  16. Nuclear imaging technology and global requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lele, R.D.

    1991-01-01

    After a brief review of the present state of availability of nuclear medicine services in the countries of world, a mention has been made of WHO programme on nuclear medicine. Nuclear medicine services in the developing countries are dependent on the availability of appropriate instrumentation and radiopharmaceuticals at affordable costs and existence of basic infrastructure required for giving such services. Basic infrastructure requirements are stable power supplies, air-conditioning systems, preventive maintenance and repair facilities. These are discussed. It is pointed out that the use of rectilinear scanners with 113m In instead of costly gamma cameras is still relevant in the third world countries. Need to develop a too low-cost gamma camera is emphasized. Electronics Corporation of India Ltd has plans to manufacture such cameras. Design of this camera is described. Foreign collaboration or technology transfer through concerned governement department needs to be explored so that the benefits of nuclear medicine can be brought to the third world countries by 2000 AD. (M.G.B.). 2 tabs

  17. Overview of fusion nuclear technology in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreani, R. E-mail: roberto.andreani@tech.efda.org; Gasparotto, M. E-mail: maurizio.gasparotto@tech.efda.org

    2002-11-01

    The fusion nuclear technology programme in the EU is focussed on materials and breeding blankets development, tritium and high heat flux component technologies. A strong effort is also devoted to the validation of the design of an intense 14 MeV neutron source (IFMIF). The material programme includes the development of reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel (EUROFER) to be used as structural material in a DEMO reactor, and potentially more attractive higher performance materials: ODS and SiC/SiC composites. The breeding blanket activities are focussed in the preparation of the two European Test Blanket Moduli to be installed in ITER. The Fuel Cycle activities for ITER include development of the torus exhaust cryopump, fuel storage system, performance characterisation of the torus exhaust processing and design of water detritiation system. High heat flux components have been developed in the framework of ITER R and D programme and based on copper alloy heat sink protected by an armour of beryllium, CFC or tungsten. Studies give an important contribution in defining the nuclear technology programme strategy.

  18. Overview of fusion nuclear technology in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreani, R.; Gasparotto, M.

    2002-01-01

    The fusion nuclear technology programme in the EU is focussed on materials and breeding blankets development, tritium and high heat flux component technologies. A strong effort is also devoted to the validation of the design of an intense 14 MeV neutron source (IFMIF). The material programme includes the development of reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel (EUROFER) to be used as structural material in a DEMO reactor, and potentially more attractive higher performance materials: ODS and SiC/SiC composites. The breeding blanket activities are focussed in the preparation of the two European Test Blanket Moduli to be installed in ITER. The Fuel Cycle activities for ITER include development of the torus exhaust cryopump, fuel storage system, performance characterisation of the torus exhaust processing and design of water detritiation system. High heat flux components have been developed in the framework of ITER R and D programme and based on copper alloy heat sink protected by an armour of beryllium, CFC or tungsten. Studies give an important contribution in defining the nuclear technology programme strategy

  19. Nuclear facilities: repair and replacement technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The oldest operating reactors are more than 35 years old and are now facing major maintenance operations. The first replacement of a pressurizer took place in autumn 2005 at the St-Lucie plant (Usa) while steam generators have been currently replaced since 1983. Nuclear industry has to adapt to this new market by proposing innovative technological solutions in the reactor maintenance field. This document gathers the 9 papers presented at the conference. The main improvements concern repair works on internal components of PWR-type reactors, the replacement of major components of the primary coolant circuit and surface treatments to limit the propagation of damages. The first paper shows that adequate design and feedback experience are good assets to manage the ageing of a nuclear unit. Another paper shows that a new repair method of a relief valve can avoid its replacement. (A.C.)

  20. Core Technology Development of Nuclear spin polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Byung Duk; Gwon, Sung Ok; Kwon, Duck Hee; Lee, Sung Man

    2009-12-01

    In order to study nuclear spin polarization, we need several core technologies such as laser beam source to polarize the nuclear spin, low pressured helium cell development whose surface is essential to maintain polarization otherwise most of the polarized helium relaxed in short time, development of uniform magnetic field system which is essential for reducing relaxation, efficient vacuum system, development of polarization measuring system, and development of pressure raising system about 1000 times. The purpose of this study is to develop resonable power of laser system, that is at least 5 watt, 1083 nm, 4GHz tuneable. But the limitation of this research fund enforce to develop amplifying system into 5 watt with 1 watt system utilizing laser-diod which is already we have in stock. We succeeded in getting excellent specification of fiber laser system with power of 5 watts, 2 GHz linewidth, more than 80 GHz tuneable

  1. SNETP – Sustainable Nuclear Energy Technology Platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aït Abderrahim, Hamid

    2016-07-01

    SNETP is one of the EU’s official European Technology & Innovation Platforms established to implement the SET-Plan. SNETP and its pillars gather more than 120 European stakeholders involved in the research and innovation, deployment and operation of nuclear fission reactors and fuel cycle facilities: industry, research centres, universities, technical safety organisations, small and medium enterprises, service providers, non-governmental organisations. Despite industrial competition, SNETP has achieved efficient collaboration between its stakeholders. It has developed a common vision on the future contribution of nuclear fission energy in Europe, with the publication of a Vision Report, a Strategic Research & Innovation Agenda (two editions) and a Deployment Strategy report. It issued also a dedicated report on the R&D topics related to safety issues triggered by the Fukushima accident.

  2. New developments in nuclear medicine technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziegler, S.I.; Pichler, B.J.

    2000-01-01

    During the past few years, there have been new impulses in the development of a number of technologies employed in Nuclear Medicine imaging. These include new scintillation materials, the way of detecting the scintillation light, and completely novel methods to detect gamma rays by means of semiconductor detectors. In addition to combined instrumentation that can be used for SPECT and PET, already in clinical use, combined scintigraphic and anatomic imaging devices are now becoming available, for example SPECT/CT or PET/CT. This review article describes the most important of the new components, part of which have already entered product development and part of which are still in the research phase. The review focus on the employment of modern semiconductor detectors in Nuclear Medicine. (orig.) [de

  3. A roadmap for nuclear energy technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofu, Tanju

    2018-01-01

    The prospects for the future use of nuclear energy worldwide can best be understood within the context of global population growth, urbanization, rising energy need and associated pollution concerns. As the world continues to urbanize, sustainable development challenges are expected to be concentrated in cities of the lower-middle-income countries where the pace of urbanization is fastest. As these countries continue their trajectory of economic development, their energy need will also outpace their population growth adding to the increased demand for electricity. OECD IEA's energy system deployment pathway foresees doubling of the current global nuclear capacity by 2050 to reduce the impact of rapid urbanization. The pending "retirement cliff" of the existing U.S. nuclear fleet, representing over 60 percent of the nation's emission-free electricity, also poses a large economic and environmental challenge. To meet the challenge, the U.S. DOE has developed the vision and strategy for development and deployment of advanced reactors. As part of that vision, the U.S. government pursues programs that aim to expand the use of nuclear power by supporting sustainability of the existing nuclear fleet, deploying new water-cooled large and small modular reactors to enable nuclear energy to help meet the energy security and climate change goals, conducting R&D for advanced reactor technologies with alternative coolants, and developing sustainable nuclear fuel cycle strategies. Since the current path relying heavily on water-cooled reactors and "once-through" fuel cycle is not sustainable, next generation nuclear energy systems under consideration aim for significant advances over existing and evolutionary water-cooled reactors. Among the spectrum of advanced reactor options, closed-fuel-cycle systems using reactors with fast-neutron spectrum to meet the sustainability goals offer the most attractive alternatives. However, unless the new public-private partnership models emerge

  4. Technical Integration of Nuclear Hydrogen Production Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ki Young; Park, J. K.; Chang, J. H.

    2009-04-01

    These works focus on the development of attainment indices for nuclear hydrogen key technologies, the analysis of the hydrogen production process and the performance estimation for hydrogen production systems, and the assessment of the nuclear hydrogen production cost. For assessing the degree of attainments in comparison with the final goals of VHTR technologies in progress of researches, subdivided are the prerequisite items confirmed to the NHDD concepts. We developed and applied R and D quality management methodology to meet 'Development of Key Technologies for Nuclear Hydrogen' project. And we also distributed R and D QAM and R and D QAP to each teams and are in operation. The preconceptual flow diagrams of SI, HTSE, and HyS processes are introduced and their material and energy balances have been proposed. The hydrogen production thermal efficiencies of not only the SI process as a reference process but also the HTSE and HyS processes were also estimated. Technical feasibility assessments of SI, HTSE, and HyS processes have been carried out by using the pair-wise comparison and analytic hierarchy process, and it is revealed that the experts are considering the SI process as the most feasible process. The secondary helium pathway across the SI process is introduced. Dynamic simulation codes for the H2S04vaporizer, sulfuric acid and sulfur trioxide decomposers, and HI decomposer on the secondary helium pathway and for the primary and secondary sulfuric acid distillation columns, HIx solution distillation column, and preheater for HI vapor have been developed and integrated

  5. Proceedings of 8. national conference on nuclear electronic and nuclear detection technology: Pt.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The 8th National Conference on Nuclear Electronics and Nuclear Detection Technology was held during 2-7, 12, 1996 in Zhuhai, Guangdong, China. 184 pieces of papers were collected in the conference proceedings. The contents of the conference proceedings are: nuclear electronics, nuclear detectors, nuclear instruments and its application, nuclear medical electronics, computer applications in nuclear sciences and technology, measurement of nuclear monitoring and nuclear explosion, radiation hardened electronics, liquid scintillation counting techniques and miscellaneous. Reported hereafter is the first part of the proceedings

  6. 2006 annual nuclear technology conference - opening address

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hohlefelder, W.

    2006-01-01

    The Energy Summit organized by Federal Chancellor Merkel set the right course in energy research. The funds to be made available by the federal government for energy research and innovation are to be raised by more than 30% by 2009. However, the Red-Green ban on research into reactor development still needs to be lifted. For Germany, 2005 was a year of change. As far as energy policy is concerned, it was a year more of disenchantment, as the diametrally opposed positions held by CDU/CSU and SPD in matters nuclear mean that, for the time being, the current regulations about residual plant lifetimes will continue to be valid. The Energy Summit as the first round in a process at the end of which, in 2007, there is to be a complete energy policy concept for the next few decades, does raise hopes. Clear emphasis must be given to worldwide developments, however. The assumption that others would follow Germany's 'good' example in opting out of the use of nuclear power has turned out to be naive. Ultimate clarity about which technology will turn out to be a bridge or an interim technology will be obtained in retrospect only. We should buy time now by extending nuclear power plant life so as to be able later to decide more freely about our options. The repository question, which is still considered a point of dispute, is less a technical than a political problem. The sequence of steps to be taken for solution is outlined in great detail and with high precision in the nuclear agreement. Following the ruling by the Lueneburg higher administrative court, Konrad can be installed and commissioned by 2013. After handling the so-called points of doubt, exploration of Gorleben can be completed. Nuclear power is an important building block in the energy mix in peaceful coexistence of various energy resources in accordance with their respective possible uses. For this reason, the renewables and nuclear power should no longer by played off one against the other. Both of them have a

  7. Role of high technology in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cain, D.G.

    1986-01-01

    A discussion of high technology identifies the characteristics which distinguish it from conventional technologies, and the impact high technology will have in the nuclear power industry in the near future. The basic theme is that high technology is an ensemble of competing technological developments that shifts with time and technological innovation. The attributes which current distinguish high technology are compactness, plasticity, convergence, and intelligence. These high technology attributes are presented as a prelude to some examples of high technology developments which are just beginning to penetrate the nuclear industry. Concluding remarks address some of the challenges which must be faced in order to assure that high technology is successfully adapted and used

  8. Nuclear waste transmutation and related innovative technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The main topics of the summer school meeting were 1. Motivation and programs for waste transmutation: The scientific perspective roadmaps; 2. The physics and scenarios of transmutation: The physics of transmutation and adapted reactor types. Impact on the fuel cycle and possible scenarios; 3. Accelerator driven systems and components: High intensity accelerators. Spallation targets and experiments. The sub critical core safety and simulation physics experiments; 4. Technologies and materials: Specific issues related to transmutation: Dedicated fuels for transmutation. Fuel processing - the role of pyrochemistry. Materials of irradiation. Lead/lead alloys. 5. Nuclear data: The N-TOF facility. Intermediate energy data and experiments. (orig./GL)

  9. Nuclear medicine technology for diagnosisof neuroendocrine tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Ryzhkova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is the review of issues of the literature for the past 10 years and is dedicated to the analysis of the radiopharmaceuticals and efficacy of the novel nuclear medicine technologies for the diagnosis, staging and prognosis of neuroendocrine tumors. Diagnostic efficacy of a scintigraphy and a positron emission tomography for detection of gastroenteropancreatic and lung carcinoid, medullary thyroid cancer, pheochromocytoma and haraganglioma and choice of radiopharmaceuticals were demonstrated by the results of the clinical studies. The causes of false positive and falce negative results were specified.

  10. Proceedings of the 5th nuclear science and technology conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-11-01

    The 5th conference on nuclear science and technology was held on 21-23 November, 1992 in Bangkok. This conference contain papers on non-power applications of nuclear technology in medicine, agriculture and industry. These application including irradiation of food for desinfestation; tram technologies used in diagnosis and therapy and radiation chemistry important to industrial processes. Some technologies which evolved from the development of the nuclear power industry are also discussed.

  11. Proceedings of the 6th nuclear science and technology conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-01

    The 6th conference on nuclear science and technology was held on 2 - 4 December, 1996 in Bangkok. This conference contain papers on non-power applications of nuclear technology in medicine, agriculture and industry. These application include irradiation of food for des infestation; tram technologies used in diagnosis and therapy and radiation chemistry important to industrial processes. Some technologies which evolved from the development of nuclear power industry are also discussed

  12. Proceedings of the 5th nuclear science and technology conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-11-01

    The 5th conference on nuclear science and technology was held on 21-23 November, 1992 in Bangkok. This conference contain papers on non-power applications of nuclear technology in medicine, agriculture and industry. These application including irradiation of food for desinfestation; tram technologies used in diagnosis and therapy and radiation chemistry important to industrial processes. Some technologies which evolved from the development of the nuclear power industry are also discussed

  13. Half Century and Upcoming Decade of Nuclear Technology in Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thailand Institute of Nuclear Technology, Bangkok

    2011-06-01

    Full text: The 12 t h conference on the nuclear science and technology was held on 6-7 June 2011 in Bangkok. This conference contain paper on non-power applications of nuclear technology in medicine, agriculture and industry. These application include irradiation of food for the infestation tram technologies used in diagnosis and therapy and radiation chemistry important to industrial processes. Some technologies which evolved from the development of nuclear power industry are also discussed

  14. Proceedings of the 7. Nuclear Science and Technology Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-01

    The 7. conference on nuclear science and technology was held on 1-2 December 1998 in Bangkok. This conference contain papers on non-power applications of nuclear technology in medicine, agriculture and industry. These application include irradiation of food for disinfestation; tram technologies used in diagnosis and therapy and radiation chemistry important to industrial processes. Some technologies which evolved from the development of nuclear power industry are also discussed

  15. Advanced pyrochemical technologies for minimizing nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bronson, M.C.; Dodson, K.E.; Riley, D.C.

    1994-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is seeking to reduce the size of the current nuclear weapons complex and consequently minimize operating costs. To meet this DOE objective, the national laboratories have been asked to develop advanced technologies that take uranium and plutonium, from retired weapons and prepare it for new weapons, long-term storage, and/or final disposition. Current pyrochemical processes generate residue salts and ceramic wastes that require aqueous processing to remove and recover the actinides. However, the aqueous treatment of these residues generates an estimated 100 liters of acidic transuranic (TRU) waste per kilogram of plutonium in the residue. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is developing pyrochemical techniques to eliminate, minimize, or more efficiently treat these residue streams. This paper will present technologies being developed at LLNL on advanced materials for actinide containment, reactors that minimize residues, and pyrochemical processes that remove actinides from waste salts

  16. Who works with nuclear fusion technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boettiger, H.

    1977-01-01

    Humanity today, and especially the youth in industrial nations, undergoes a trend towards a 'post-industrial society'. This may be due to the resignation of those who think themselves unable to meet the increasing demands made on social production. The paper draws up a concept to give humanity a new interest in life. First, the paradox educational situation in the FRG today is outlined. Nuclear fusion technology and the industrial development necessary for its implementation are offered as a way out of the paradox situation of the present educational system. The demands to be made on an educational system for fusion technology are discussed. This strategy for world-wide economic growth integrates the intelligence potential of the industrial nations and the potential labour force of the Third World. (GG) [de

  17. Training at the Australian School of Nuclear Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Culley, D.; Fredsall, J.R.; Toner, B.

    1987-01-01

    The Australian School of Nuclear Technology was founded in 1964 as a joint enterprise of the Australian Atomic Energy Commission and the University of New South Wales to support nuclear developments primarily in Australia. However, ASNT has developed into an important centre for nuclear science and technology training within the South East Asian Region with participants also attending from countries outside this Region. (author)

  18. Proceeding of the Eighth Scientific Presentation on Nuclear Safety Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geni Rina Sunaryo; Sony Tjahjani, D.T.; Anhar Riza Antariksawan; Sudarno; Djoko Hari Nugroho; Roziq Himawan; Ari Satmoko; Histori; Sumijanto

    2003-02-01

    The Proceeding of Scientific Meeting and Presentation is routine activity that held in National Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN) by Centre for Development of Nuclear Safety Technology for monitoring the research activity which was achieved in BATAN. The aims of the proceeding to able to information and reference for nuclear safety technology. There are 30 papers which separated index. (PPIN)

  19. Training at the Australian School of Nuclear Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Culley, D.; Fredsall, J.R.; Toner, B.

    1987-04-01

    The Australian School of Nuclear Technology (ASNT) was founded in 1964 as a joint enterprise of the Australian Atomic Energy Commission and the University of New South Wales to support nuclear developments primarily in Australia. However, ASNT has developed into an important centre for nuclear science and technology training within the South East Asian Region with participants also attending from countries outside this Region

  20. Application of analysis technology in nuclear plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takaoka, Keiko; Miura, Hiromi; Umeda, Kenji

    1996-01-01

    Recently, thanks to the rapid improvement of EWS performance, the authors have been able to carry out design evaluation comparatively, easily, utilizing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technology. The Nuclear Plant Engineering Department has carried out some analyses in the past several years with the main purpose of evaluating the design of nuclear reactor internals. These studies included ''Thermal Hydraulic Analysis for Top Plenum'' and ''Flow Analysis for Lower Plenum''. It is considered to be a special matter in thermal hydraulic analysis of the top plenum that temperature distribution has been estimated with a relatively small number of meshes by means of an imaginary spray nozzle, and in the flow analysis for the lower plenum that flow distribution has been found to change largely, depending on the reactor internals. One of the ways to confirm the safety of nuclear plants, detailed structural analysis, is required for all possible combinations of transient and load conditions during operation. In particular, it is very important to clarify the thermal stress behavior under operating conditions and to evaluate fatigue analysis in accordance with the Code Requirements. However, it is very complicated and it takes a lot of time. A new system was developed which can operate continuously all of the definitions of the analytical model, the analyzation of pressurized thermal and external stress, and editing reports. In this paper, the authors introduce this system and apply it to a pressurized water reactor

  1. Environmental assessment report: Nuclear Test Technology Complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonnessen, K.; Tewes, H.A.

    1982-08-01

    The US Department of Energy (USDOE) is planning to construct and operate a structure, designated the Nuclear Test Technology Complex (NTTC), on a site located west of and adjacent to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The NTTC is designed to house 350 nuclear test program personnel, and will accommodate the needs of the entire staff of the continuing Nuclear Test Program (NTP). The project has three phases: land acquisition, facility construction and facility operation. The purpose of this environmental assessment report is to describe the activities associated with the three phases of the NTTC project and to evaluate potential environmental disruptions. The project site is located in a rural area of southeastern Alameda County, California, where the primary land use is agriculture; however, the County has zoned the area for industrial development. The environmental impacts of the project include surface disturbance, high noise levels, possible increases in site erosion, and decreased air quality. These impacts will occur primarily during the construction phase of the NTTC project and can be mitigated in part by measures proposed in this report

  2. Development of nuclear fuel cycle technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuoki, Akira; Matsumoto, Takashi; Suzuki, Kazumichi; Kawamura, Fumio

    1995-01-01

    In the long term plan for atomic energy that the Atomic Energy Commission decided the other day, the necessity of the technical development for establishing full scale fuel cycle for future was emphasized. Hitachi Ltd. has engaged in technical development and facility construction in the fields of uranium enrichment, MOX fuel fabrication, spent fuel reprocessing and so on. In uranium enrichment, it took part in the development of centrifuge process centering around Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC), and took its share in the construction of the Rokkasho uranium enrichment plant of Japan Nuclear Fuel Service Co., Ltd. Also it cooperates with Laser Enrichment Technology Research Association. In Mox fuel fabrication, it took part in the construction of the facilities for Monju plutonium fuel production of PNC, for pellet production, fabrication and assembling processes. In spent fuel reprocessing, it cooperated with the technical development of maintenance and repair of Tokai reprocessing plant of PNC, and the construction of spent fuel stores in Rokkasho reprocessing plant is advanced. The centrifuge process and the atomic laser process of uranium enrichment are explained. The high reliability of spent fuel reprocessing plants and the advancement of spent fuel reprocessing process are reported. Hitachi Ltd. Intends to exert efforts for the technical development to establish nuclear fuel cycle which increases the importance hereafter. (K.I.)

  3. Science and technology as strategic way for nuclear activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paiano, Silvestre

    2000-01-01

    The article brings few instructive examples on the interaction between nuclear energy and other areas of science and technology, Microelectronics, computer technology, and new materials are among the many technologies which are crucial for developing nuclear energy technology. On the other way round, nuclear energy presents also a wide range of new demands and opportunities for several areas of science and technology. The problem is that such a relationship is not well understood by the society, and to a large extent it brings about the very process of legitimating the use of nuclear energy (author)

  4. The transfer of nuclear technology: necessities and limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haunschild, H.-H.

    1978-01-01

    Political and economical importance of the transfer of nuclear technologies to less developed countries is examined. Energy needs of the world create the necessity of technology transfer. Three levels are distinguished: 1) Basic elements of cooperation are agreed between the two Governments, 2) scientific cooperation and 3) industrial cooperation. Technology transfer is more than mere technology export. Limitations of nuclear technology transfer are: the lack of infrastructure, the high price of a nuclear power station but above all the problem of proliferation. In conclusion the solution of international problems of nuclear energy is the concept of cooperation on the basis of equal rights

  5. Data bank for nuclear science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajicek, J.

    1978-01-01

    The current state of the project for building a Data Bank for Nuclear Science and Technology is described. The tasks of the bank will be to provide data for nuclear sciences and technology in Czechoslovakia. The data bank is being projected as an open system consisting of a number of subject sections and it is expected to be formed in cooperation with the other CMEA countries. Current work is focused on securing the system in a comprehensive manner, on the necessary hardware and software, on organization and personnel. An experimental data sample from 22 selected PWR type power plants has been forwarded for processing to the Zentralinstitut fuer Isotopen- und Strahlenforschung in Leipzig using the EC 104O computer and the SOPS AIDOS program. The analysis of primary sources of the processed data showed that the data are, in fact, concentrated in a small number of specialist journals. It appears that the most favourable hardware and software solution of the project will be the use of the SIEMENS 7755 computer at the Central Institute for Scientific and Technical Information in Prague, using the SESAM and GOLEM retrieval systems. The data bank project is to be implemented after the year 1980. (Ha)

  6. Prospect of nuclear application in food technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maha, M [National Atomic Energy Agency, Jakarta (Indonesia). Pasar Djumat Research Centre

    1982-04-01

    Irradiation changes the normal living process of cells and the structure of molecules. It is good for food preservation because it kills off many of the microorganisms in the product and makes the remainder more sensitive to antimicrobial factors prevailing after the radiation treatment. It offers more benefits than conventional preservation in that it increases storage stability and quality of foodstuffs with the minimum use of energy. Good storage quality gives way to wider distribution of food, alleviates the world's food shortage, and improves food supplies. Research proved that irradiation increased the quality of subtropical fruits, spices, fish, and meat. No refrigeration is needed to store meat, poultry and fish preserved by the combination of irradiation and mild heat treatment. Nuclear technology can also be applied to destroy harmful insects, to sterilize food, to inhibit the sprouting of root crops, and to control ripening in stored fruits and vegetables. Based on the above potentials of irradiation, the prospect of nuclear application in food technology is promising.

  7. Welding technologies for nuclear machinery and equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Masahiro; Yokono, Tomomi.

    1991-01-01

    The main welding methods applied to nuclear machinery and equipment are shielded metal arc welding, submerged arc welding, MAG welding and TIG welding. But in the last 10 years, in order to improve the reliability required for the welding of nuclear machinery and equipment, the welding technologies aiming at the reduction of heat input, the decrease of the number of welding pass and the automatic control of welding factors have been applied for the main purpose of bettering the quality and excluding human errors. The merits and the technology of narrow gap, pulsed MAG welding and melt-through welding are explained. As the automation of TIG welding, image processing type narrow gap, hot wire TIG welding and remote control type automatic TIG welding are described. For the longitudinal welding of active metal sheet products, plasma key-hole welding is applied. Since the concentration of its arc is good, high speed welding with low heat input can be done. For the stainless steel cladding by welding, electroslag welding has become to be employed in place of conventional submerged arc welding. Arc is not generated in the electroslag welding, and the penetration into base metal is small. (K.I.)

  8. Proceedings of the 3. nuclear science and technology conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    Non-power applications of nuclear technology in medicine, agriculture and industry are discussed. These applications include irradiation of food for desinfestation; tram technologies used in diagnosis and therapy and radiation chemistry important to industrial processes. Some technologies which evolved from the development of the nuclear power industry are also discussed

  9. Nuclear technology and biotechnology for enhancing agricultural production in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamad Osman

    2005-04-01

    The presentation discussed the following subjects: sustainable development, agriculture in Malaysia, role of biotechnology, role of nuclear technology, improving crops through induced mutations with Malaysian experience in rice and roselle, fusion of nuclear and biotechnology challenges and opportunities

  10. The Application of Nuclear Technology for a Better World

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ita, E.B.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear Technology is widely used in different areas and sector of our economy to better man kind and his environment. Peaceful applications of nuclear technology have several benefits to the world today. It is widely believed that nuclear technology is mainly used mainly for the production of electricity (Nuclear Power Plants – NPPs). Many are not aware of the other numerous benefits of nuclear technology. Nuclear technology can be applied in different fields for numerous benefits. Different sectors Nuclear Technology application can improve the living standard of man and his environment: – Food and Agriculture; – Medicine; – Industrial; – Energy; – Education; — Research and Development; – Environment. The benefits of the application of nuclear technology cannot be over emphasised. These benefits range from the improved quality of purified water we drink, the textiles we wear, improved quality of stored grains for preservation of foods, water analyses, improved transportation system work, drugs production, medical tests and analysis, clean environment through radioisotope techniques etc. The application of nuclear technology also gives a safer, greener, healthier and pollution free environment and atmosphere for human habitation. In my poster, the numerous benefits of the various applications of Nuclear Technology will be clearly enumerated and heighted. (author)

  11. Pellet bed reactor for nuclear propelled vehicles: Part 1: Reactor technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    1991-01-01

    The pellet bed reactor (PBR) for nuclear propelled vehicles is briefly discussed. Much of the information is given in viewgraph form. Viewgraphs include information on the layout for a Mars mission using a PBR nuclear thermal rocket, the rocket reactor layout, the fuel pellet design, materials compatibility, fuel microspheres, microsphere coating, melting points in quasibinary systems, stress analysis of microspheres, safety features, and advantages of the PBR concept.

  12. Pellet bed reactor for nuclear propelled vehicles: Part 1: Reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-genk, M.S.

    1991-01-01

    The pellet bed reactor (PBR) for nuclear propelled vehicles is briefly discussed. Much of the information is given in viewgraph form. Viewgraphs include information on the layout for a Mars mission using a PBR nuclear thermal rocket, the rocket reactor layout, the fuel pellet design, materials compatibility, fuel microspheres, microsphere coating, melting points in quasibinary systems, stress analysis of microspheres, safety features, and advantages of the PBR concept

  13. Rocket observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-05-01

    The Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS) sounding rocket experiments were carried out during the periods of August to September, 1982, January to February and August to September, 1983 and January to February, 1984 with sounding rockets. Among 9 rockets, 3 were K-9M, 1 was S-210, 3 were S-310 and 2 were S-520. Two scientific satellites were launched on February 20, 1983 for solar physics and on February 14, 1984 for X-ray astronomy. These satellites were named as TENMA and OHZORA and designated as 1983-011A and 1984-015A, respectively. Their initial orbital elements are also described. A payload recovery was successfully carried out by S-520-6 rocket as a part of MINIX (Microwave Ionosphere Non-linear Interaction Experiment) which is a scientific study of nonlinear plasma phenomena in conjunction with the environmental assessment study for the future SPS project. Near IR observation of the background sky shows a more intense flux than expected possibly coming from some extragalactic origin and this may be related to the evolution of the universe. US-Japan cooperative program of Tether Experiment was done on board US rocket.

  14. Construction Technologies for Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    One of the IAEA's statutory objectives is to 'seek to accelerate and enlarge the contribution of atomic energy to peace, health and prosperity throughout the world'. One way this objective is achieved is through the publication of a range of technical series. Two of these are the IAEA Nuclear Energy Series and the IAEA Safety Standards Series. According to Statute Article III, A.6, the IAEA safety standards establish 'standards of safety for protection of health and minimization of danger to life and property.' The safety standards include the Safety Fundamentals, Safety Requirements and Safety Guides. These standards are written primarily in a regulatory style, and are binding on the IAEA for its own programmes. The principal users are the regulatory bodies in Member States and other national authorities. The IAEA Nuclear Energy Series comprises reports designed to encourage and assist R and D on and practical application of, nuclear energy for peaceful uses. This includes practical examples to be used by owners and operators of utilities in Member States, implementing organizations, academia, and government officials, among others. This information is presented in guides, reports on technology status and advances, and best practices for peaceful uses of nuclear energy based on inputs from international experts. The IAEA Nuclear Energy Series complements the IAEA Safety Standards Series. There are three distinct significant phases in a nuclear power plant (NPP) project after the signing of a contract; engineering, procurement, and construction and commissioning. Experience gained over the last forty years has shown that the construction phase is one of the most critical phases for the success of a project. Success is defined as completing the project with the specified quality, and within budget and schedule. The key to a successful construction project is to have an established programme that integrates the critical attributes into the overall project. Some of

  15. 2012 annual meeting on nuclear technology. Workshop on 'Preservation of competence in nuclear technology'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinwarz, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Within the 2-day workshop on 'Preservation of Competence in Nuclear Technology,' 31 young scientists competed for the 'Competence Prize' awarded by Siempelkamp Nukleartechnik for the 14th time. They reported about their papers focusing on nuclear technology, reactor technology, innovative reactor systems, radioactive waste management, radiological protection and energy supply systems. The jury composed of Prof. J. Starflinger (Universitaet Stuttgart, IKE), Prof. M.K. Koch (Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, LEE), and Dr. W. Steinwarz (Siempelkamp Nukleartechnik) assessed the advance compacts as well as the oral presentations. The winner of the 2012 Competence Prize is Dipl.-Ing.(M.S.) Thomas M. Fesich (University Stuttgart). Dr.-Ing. Oliver Czaikowski (Techn. University Clausthal) and Dipl.-Ing. Mario Kuschewski (Universitaet Stuttgart) won the second and third prizes. (orig.)

  16. A project in support of Nuclear Technology Cooperation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Ki Jung; Choi, Pyong Hoon; Yi, Ji Ho [and others

    2005-12-15

    Establish the integrated management system of information resources and to automate business flow and to improve business productivity through efficient information sharing. - Promotion of domestic nuclear energy technology by utilizing nuclear energy informations and computer software developed in the advanced countries. - Establish strategies of international cooperation in an effort to promote our nation's Leading role in international society, to form the foundation for the effective transfer of nuclear technology to developing countries, and to cope with the rapidly changing international nuclear climate.

  17. A project in support of Nuclear Technology Cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Ki Jung; Choi, Pyong Hoon; Yi, Ji Ho

    2005-12-01

    Establish the integrated management system of information resources and to automate business flow and to improve business productivity through efficient information sharing. - Promotion of domestic nuclear energy technology by utilizing nuclear energy informations and computer software developed in the advanced countries. - Establish strategies of international cooperation in an effort to promote our nation's Leading role in international society, to form the foundation for the effective transfer of nuclear technology to developing countries, and to cope with the rapidly changing international nuclear climate

  18. Economy and technology roles played by nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Eiji

    1985-01-01

    On the basis of the survey analysis made by Atomic Energy Commission on the roles in economy and technology played in the nuclear energy development and utilization, the following are described: economic roles in nuclear energy development and utilization (the present state of nuclear power industry in Japan and the economy effects); technological roles in the same (the present state of nuclear power technology in Japan and the technology effects). The economy effects in other areas are on higher level than in other industries etc. Then, in the technology effects, system technology and quality control in the nuclear power possess significant effects in other areas. While the nuclear energy development and utilization is important in Japan's energy security, it is contributing largely to the economy and society in Japan. (Mori, K.)

  19. Strengthened International Nuclear Safeguards; burdens and Effects on Nuclear Technology Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badawy, I.

    2000-01-01

    The present paper deals with the recent direction of strengthening the international nuclear safeguards and the effects on the development of nuclear technology for peaceful applications. The new basic principles for strengthening the international nuclear control in the direction of undeclared nuclear activities are elaborated, and the national obligations are indicated. The burdens on the development of nuclear technology are discussed. Approaches are proposed in this work for coping with the present and future situations

  20. Advanced nuclear reactor types and technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ignatiev, V [ed.; Feinberg, O; Morozov, A [Russian Research Centre ` Kurchatov Institute` , Moscow (Russian Federation); Devell, L [Studsvik Eco and Safety AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    1995-07-01

    The document is a comprehensive world-wide catalogue of concepts and designs of advanced fission reactor types and fuel cycle technologies. Two parts have been prepared: Part 1 Reactors for Power Production and Part 2 Heating and Other Reactor Applications. Part 3, which will cover advanced waste management technology, reprocessing and disposal for different nuclear fission options is planned for compilation during 1995. The catalogue was prepared according to a special format which briefly presents the project title, technical approach, development status, application of the technology, reactor type, power output, and organization which developed these designs. Part 1 and 2 cover water cooled reactors, liquid metal fast reactors, gas-cooled reactors and molten salt reactors. Subcritical accelerator-driven systems are also considered. Various reactor applications as power production, heat generation, ship propulsion, space power sources and transmutation of such waste are included. Each project is described within a few pages with the main features of an actual design using a table with main technical data and figure as well as references for additional information. Each chapter starts with an introduction which briefly describes main trends and approaches in this field. Explanations of terms and abbreviations are provided in a glossary.

  1. Advanced nuclear reactor types and technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ignatiev, V.; Devell, L.

    1995-01-01

    The document is a comprehensive world-wide catalogue of concepts and designs of advanced fission reactor types and fuel cycle technologies. Two parts have been prepared: Part 1 Reactors for Power Production and Part 2 Heating and Other Reactor Applications. Part 3, which will cover advanced waste management technology, reprocessing and disposal for different nuclear fission options is planned for compilation during 1995. The catalogue was prepared according to a special format which briefly presents the project title, technical approach, development status, application of the technology, reactor type, power output, and organization which developed these designs. Part 1 and 2 cover water cooled reactors, liquid metal fast reactors, gas-cooled reactors and molten salt reactors. Subcritical accelerator-driven systems are also considered. Various reactor applications as power production, heat generation, ship propulsion, space power sources and transmutation of such waste are included. Each project is described within a few pages with the main features of an actual design using a table with main technical data and figure as well as references for additional information. Each chapter starts with an introduction which briefly describes main trends and approaches in this field. Explanations of terms and abbreviations are provided in a glossary

  2. Decommissioning Technology Development for Nuclear Research Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K. W.; Kang, Y. A.; Kim, G. H.

    2007-06-01

    It is predicted that the decommissioning of a nuclear power plant would happen in Korea since 2020 but the need of partial decommissioning and decontamination for periodic inspection and life extension still has been on an increasing trend and its domestic market has gradually been extended. Therefore, in this project we developed following several essential technologies as a decommissioning R and D. The measurement technology for in-pipe radioactive contamination was developed for measuring alpha/beta/gamma emitting nuclides simultaneously inside a in-pipe and it was tested into the liquid waste transfer pipe in KRR-2. And the digital mock-up system for KRR-1 and 2 was developed for choosing the best scenarios among several scenarios on the basis of various decommissioning information(schedule, waste volume, cost, etc.) that are from the DMU and the methodology of decommissioning cost estimation was also developed for estimating a research reactor's decommissioning cost and the DMU and the decommissioning cost estimation system were incorporated into the decommissioning information integrated management system. Finally the treatment and management technology of the irradiated graphites that happened after decommissioning KRR-2 was developed in order to treat and manage the irradiated graphites safely

  3. Decommissioning Technology Development for Nuclear Research Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, K. W.; Kang, Y. A.; Kim, G. H. (and others)

    2007-06-15

    It is predicted that the decommissioning of a nuclear power plant would happen in Korea since 2020 but the need of partial decommissioning and decontamination for periodic inspection and life extension still has been on an increasing trend and its domestic market has gradually been extended. Therefore, in this project we developed following several essential technologies as a decommissioning R and D. The measurement technology for in-pipe radioactive contamination was developed for measuring alpha/beta/gamma emitting nuclides simultaneously inside a in-pipe and it was tested into the liquid waste transfer pipe in KRR-2. And the digital mock-up system for KRR-1 and 2 was developed for choosing the best scenarios among several scenarios on the basis of various decommissioning information(schedule, waste volume, cost, etc.) that are from the DMU and the methodology of decommissioning cost estimation was also developed for estimating a research reactor's decommissioning cost and the DMU and the decommissioning cost estimation system were incorporated into the decommissioning information integrated management system. Finally the treatment and management technology of the irradiated graphites that happened after decommissioning KRR-2 was developed in order to treat and manage the irradiated graphites safely.

  4. Nuclear Human Resource Development in Tokyo Institute of Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satio, Masaki; Igashira, Masayuki; Obara, Toru; Kikura, Hironari; Kawahara, Akira; Ujita, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear engineering education has been initiated in 1957 at the graduate school of Tokyo Institute of Technology. Higher Educational activities have been conducted for more than half century. More than 1000 Master students and 200 Doctoral students graduated from the Department of Nuclear Engineering in Tokyo Institute if Technology. Many of them are working in nuclear industries and institutes. International course of nuclear engineering was initiated in 1994, and 130 students from 20 overseas countries have graduated from Master and Doctoral Programs. In the present paper, the current nuclear educational activities in Tokyo Institute of Technology are summarized

  5. AFRA Network for Education in Nuclear Science and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashim, O.N.; Wanjala, F.

    2017-01-01

    The Africa Regional Cooperative Agreement for Research Development and Training related to Science and Technology (AFRA) established the AFRA Network for Education in Nuclear Science and Technology (AFRA-NEST) in order to implement AFRA strategy on Human Resource Development (HRD) and Nuclear Knowledge Management (NKM). The strategies for implementing the objectives are: to use ICT for web-based education and training; recognition of Regional Designated Centres (RDCs) for professional nuclear education in nuclear science and technology, and organization of harmonized and accredited programs at tertiary levels and awarding of fellowships/scholarships to young and brilliant students for teaching and research in the various nuclear disciplines

  6. Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Da Ruan

    1998-01-01

    FLINS is the acronym for Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science. The main task for FLINS is to solve intricate problems pertaining to the nuclear environment by using modern technologies as additional tools and to bridge the gap between novel technologies and the industrial nuclear world. In 1997, major efforts went to the specific prototyping of Fuzzy Logic Control of SCK-CEN's BR1 research Reactor. Progress and achievements are reported

  7. Nuclear technology transfer adapted to the needs of developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, A.; Nentwich, D.

    1983-01-01

    The paper explains the build-up of nuclear know-how in the Federal Republic of Germany after 1955, when activities in the nuclear field became permitted. Furthermore, it shows the development of nuclear technology transfer via the increasing number of nuclear power plants exported. The inevitable interrelationship between the efficient transfer of know-how and long-term nuclear co-operation is demonstrated. Emphasis is put on the adaptation of nuclear technology transfer to the needs of the recipient countries. Guidelines to achieve the desired goal are given. (author)

  8. Legal aspects of the transfer of nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sartorelli, C.

    1980-03-01

    The paper stresses the importance of nuclear technology transfer and describes the legal instruments for transfer of technical and scientific technology, particularly from the contractual viewpoint. A description follows of the setting-up of national joint ventures for nuclear power plant projects with emphasis on technological know-how to enable operation of plants in compliance with safety standards. The possibility is discussed of the export of nuclear technology, and finally mention is made of a proposal for a 'code of conduct' on such transfers in the framework of the United Nations, having regard to the 'London agreements' on nuclear exports. (NEA) [fr

  9. Technological and social change and the future of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douglas, H.

    1988-01-01

    Over the past decade and a half, the nuclear power industry has experienced growing public opposition. Underlying the nuclear industry's problems is a very fundamental anti-technology outlook by the public - visibly apparent in the environmental movement - that not only affects nuclear power but business in general. Is this anti-technology attitude of the public and media writers a passing phase, or will it wane and yield to a positive attitude toward technology? This paper discusses historical, sociological and technological change in the Western industrial world, and how changing attitudes might affect nuclear power in the future. (author)

  10. American Chemical Society. Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    The meeting of the 201st American Chemical Society Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology was comprised from a variety of topics in this field including: nuclear chemistry, nuclear physics, and nuclear techniques for environmental studies. Particular emphasis was given to fundamental research concerning nuclear structure (seven of the nineteen symposia) and studies of airborne particle monitoring and transport (five symposia). 105 papers were presented

  11. Nuclear data for fusion technology – the European approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fischer Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The European approach for the development of nuclear data for fusion technology applications is presented. Related R&D activities are conducted by the Consortium on Nuclear Data Development and Analysis for Fusion to satisfy the nuclear data needs of the major projects including ITER, the Early Neutron Source (ENS and DEMO. Recent achievements are presented in the area of nuclear data evaluations, benchmarking and validation, nuclear model improvements, and uncertainty assessments.

  12. Strategy for Nuclear Technology Education at Uppsala University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osterlund, M.; Hakansson, A.; Tengborn, E.

    2010-01-01

    After the TMI accident 1979, and later the Tjernobyl accident, the future of nuclear power was vividly debated in Sweden. The negative public opinion governed a number of political decisions that marked an ambition to out-phase nuclear power prior to 2010. Due to this, the student's interest in nuclear technology ceased and together with the fact that public funding to nuclear technology was withdrawn, academic research and education within the field were effectively dismounted. In the beginning of 1990 it became clear to the society that nuclear power could not easily be closed down and the issue of the future competence supply to the nuclear industry was initiated. In the mid-nineties the situation became acute due to the fact that personnel in the nuclear industry started to retire in an increasing pace necessitating measures to be taken in order to secure the future operation of the nuclear power plants. In the year 2000, the Swedish nuclear power plants, Westinghouse Electric Sweden and the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority embarked a project together with the three major universities in the field, Uppsala University, The Royal Institute of Technology and Chalmers University of Technology. The aim of this project was to define a financial platform for reconstructing the Swedish research and education in nuclear technology. The project, named the Swedish Centre for Nuclear Technology (SKC), has during a decade been the major financier to nuclear technology research and education. Using funding from SKC, Uppsala University formulated a strategy along two tracks: 1) Instead of creating ambitious master programs in nuclear technology, the already existing engineering programs in a wide range of fields were utilized to expose as many students as possible to nuclear technology. 2) A program was initiated together with the nuclear industry aiming at educating newly employed personnel. The result is encouraging; starting from essentially zero, typically 100

  13. Applying RFID technology in nuclear materials management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, H.; Chen, K.; Liu, Y.; Norair, J.P.; Bellamy, S.; Shuler, J.

    2008-01-01

    The Packaging Certification Program (PCP) of US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM), Office of Safety Management and Operations (EM-60), has developed a radio frequency identification (RFID) system for the management of nuclear materials. Argonne National Laboratory, a PCP supporting laboratory, and Savi Technology, a Lockheed Martin Company, are collaborating in the development of the RFID system, a process that involves hardware modification (form factor, seal sensor and batteries), software development and irradiation experiments. Savannah River National Laboratory and Argonne will soon field test the active RFID system on Model 9975 drums, which are used for storage and transportation of fissile and radioactive materials. Potential benefits of the RFID system are enhanced safety and security, reduced need for manned surveillance, real time access of status and history data, and overall cost effectiveness

  14. Technology development for special nuclear components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanatkumar, A.

    1994-01-01

    One of the attractive features of Candu Pressurised Heavy Water Reactor design which influenced the decision to make it the foundation of our nuclear power programme, is that its main components (calandria, end shields, coolant channel components) are relatively simple - in comparison with reactor pressure vessel and associated components of Boiling Water Reactors or Pressurised Water Reactors - and considered to be within the scope of manufacture of developing countries. Over the last two decades, India has been very successful in technology development in many important and critical areas. We are now about to launch the construction of the first 500 MWe PHWR project at Tarapur. In this context, this paper focuses attention on some of the aspects relating to self-reliance in design, engineering and manufacture of these special components as currently perceived. (author). 3 refs

  15. Siting technology of underground nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motojima, M.; Hibino, S.

    1989-01-01

    For the site of a nuclear power station, it may be possible to select a seaside mountain area, if the condition is suitable to excavate large rock caverns in which a reactor and other equipments are installed. As the case study on the siting technology for an underground nuclear power station, the following example was investigated. The site is a seaside steep mountain area, and almost all the equipments are installed in plural tunnel type caverns. The depth from the ground surface to the top of the reactor cavern is about 150 m, and the thickness of the rock pillar between the reactor cavern of 33 m W x 82 mH x 79 mD and the neighboring turbine cavern is 60 m. In this paper, the stability of rock caverns in this example, evaluated by numerical analysis, is described. The numerical analysis was carried out on the central cross section of the reactor cavern, taking the turbine cavern, geostress, the mechanical properties of rock mass and the process of excavation works in consideration. By the analysis, the underground caverns in this example were evaluated as stable, if the rock quality is equivalent to C H class or better according to the CRIEPI rock classification. (K.I.)

  16. Radioactive waste treatment technology at Czech nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulovany, J.

    2001-01-01

    This presentation describes the main technologies for the treatment and conditioning of radioactive wastes at Czech nuclear power plants. The main technologies are bituminisation for liquid radioactive wastes and supercompaction for solid radioactive wastes. (author)

  17. Transfer of nuclear technology: A designer-contractor's perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    See Hoye, D.; Hedges, K.R.; Hink, A.D.

    2000-01-01

    The paper presents the successful Canadian experience in developing a nuclear power technology - CANDU - and exporting it. Consideration is paid to technology that has to be transferred, receiver country objectives and mechanisms and organizational framework. (author)

  18. Air-Powered Rockets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Charley; Raynovic, Jim

    This document describes methods for designing and building two types of rockets--rockets from paper and rockets from bottles. Devices used for measuring the heights that the rockets obtain are also discussed. (KHR)

  19. Nuclear science and technology education and training in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karsono

    2007-01-01

    Deployment of nuclear technology requires adequate nuclear infrastructure which includes governmental infrastructure, science and technology infrastructure, education and training infrastructure, and industrial infrastructure. Governmental infrastructure in nuclear, i.e. BATAN (the National Nuclear Energy Agency) and BAPETEN (the Nuclear Energy Control Agency), need adequate number of qualified manpower with general and specific knowledge of nuclear. Science and technology infrastructure is mainly contained in the R and D institutes, education and training centers, scientific academies and professional associations, and national industry. The effectiveness of this infrastructure mainly depends on the quality of the manpower, in addition to the funding and available facilities. Development of human resource needed for research, development, and utilization of nuclear technology in the country needs special attention. Since the national industry is still in its infant stage, the strategy for HRD (human resource development) in the nuclear field addresses the needs of the following: BATAN for its research and development, promotion, and training; BAPETEN for its regulatory functions and training; users of nuclear technology in industry, medicine, agriculture, research, and other areas; radiation safety officers in organizations or institutions licensed to use radioactive materials; the education sector, especially lecturers and teachers, in tertiary and secondary education. Nuclear science and technology is a multidisciplinary and a highly specialized subject. It includes areas such as nuclear and reactor physics, thermal hydraulics, chemistry, material science, radiation protection, nuclear safety, health science, and radioactive waste management. Therefore, a broad nuclear education is absolutely essential to master the wide areas of science and technology used in the nuclear domain. The universities and other institutions of higher education are the only

  20. Physical Protection of Nuclear Safeguards Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoskins, Richard

    2004-01-01

    IAEA's Nuclear Security Plan is established to assist Member States in implementing effective measures against nuclear terrorism. Four potential threats were identified: theft of nuclear weapon, nuclear explosive device, radiological dispersal device and an attack on radiation facility. In order to achieve effective protection of nuclear materials and facilities, the IAEA sponsored the Convention of the Physical Protection of Nuclear Materials which focuses on the protection of nuclear materials 'in international transport. The IAEA also promoted INFCIRC/255 entitled the Physical Protection of Nuclear Materials and Nuclear Facilities and published TECDOC/967 for the protection of nuclear materials and facilities against theft and sabotage and during transport. Assistance is available for the Member States through the International Physical Protection Advisory Service (IPPAS) and the International Nuclear Security Advisory Service (INSServ). (author)