WorldWideScience

Sample records for nuclear resonance spectroscopy

  1. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 9; Issue 1. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. Susanta Das. General Article Volume 9 Issue 1 January 2004 pp 34-49. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/009/01/0034-0049. Keywords.

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rueterjans, H.

    1987-01-01

    Contributions by various authors who are working in the field of NMR imaging present the current status and the perspectives of in-vivo nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, explaining not only the scientific and medical aspects, but also technical and physical principles as well as questions concerning practical organisation and training, and points of main interest for further research activities. (orig./TRV) [de

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabenstein, D.L.; Guo, W.

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the most widely used instrumental methods, with applications ranging from the characterization of pure compounds by high-resolution NMR to the diagnosis of disease by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). To give some idea of the wide-spread use of NMR, a computer search for the period 1985-1987 turned up over 500 books and review articles and over 7000 literature citations, not including papers in which NMR was used together with other spectroscopic methods for the routine identification of organic compounds. Consequently, they have by necessity been somewhat selective in the topics they have chosen to cover and in the articles they have cited. In this review, which covers the published literature for the approximate period Sept 1985-Aug 1987, they have focused on new developments and applications of interest to the chemist. First they review recent developments in instrumentation and techniques. Although there have not been any major break-throughs in NMR instrumentation during the past two years, significant refinements have been reported which optimize instrumentation for the demanding multiple pulse experiments in routine use today. Next they review new developments in methods for processing NMR data, followed by reviews of one-dimensional and two-dimensional NMR experiments

  4. The nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goyer, Ph.

    1997-01-01

    The spectroscopy of nuclear magnetic resonance constitutes a major analytical technique in biological and organic analysis. This technique appears now in the programme of preparatory classes and its teaching is developed in the second year of DEUG. The following article reviews on the nuclear magnetic resonance and on the possibilities it offers to bring to the fore the physico-chemical properties of molecules. (N.C.)

  5. Nuclear level mixing resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coussement, R.; Put, P.; Scheveneels, G.; Hardeman, F.

    1985-01-01

    The existent methods for measuring quadrupole interactions are not suited to nuclei with lifetimes in the micro-seconds to minutes region. AD/NQR, a possible candidate in this lifetime gap, has not yet succeeded in overcoming its predicted difficulties. A new resonant method, recently developed and based on the principles of level mixing (cfr atomic spectroscopy) covers this less accessible lifetime range. Many other kinds of resonances can be described according to the level mixing formalism. The particular example of NMR as a level mixing resonance (LMR) is discussed. The underlying theory of LMR and its important consequences, leading to some interesting features of the method, is briefly formulated. Two successfully performed measurements demonstrate the feasibility and the predicted characteristics of this new promising method. (orig.)

  6. Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bax, A.; Lerner, L.

    1986-01-01

    Great spectral simplification can be obtained by spreading the conventional one-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrum in two independent frequency dimensions. This so-called two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy removes spectral overlap, facilitates spectral assignment, and provides a wealth of additional information. For example, conformational information related to interproton distances is available from resonance intensities in certain types of two-dimensional experiments. Another method generates 1 H NMR spectra of a preselected fragment of the molecule, suppressing resonances from other regions and greatly simplifying spectral appearance. Two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy can also be applied to the study of 13 C and 15 N, not only providing valuable connectivity information but also improving sensitivity of 13 C and 15 N detection by up to two orders of magnitude. 45 references, 10 figures

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in organic chemistry. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zschunke, A.

    1977-01-01

    The fundamentals of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy are discussed only briefly. The emphasis is laid on developing reader's ability to evaluate resonance spectra. The following topics are covered: principles of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy; chemical shift and indirect nuclear spin coupling constants and their relation to the molecular structure; analysis of spectra; and uses for structural analysis and solution of kinetic problems, mainly with regard to organic compounds. Of interest to chemists and graduate students who want to make themselves acquainted with nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

  8. Quantitative analysis by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wainai, T; Mashimo, K [Nihon Univ., Tokyo. Coll. of Science and Engineering

    1976-04-01

    Recent papers on the practical quantitative analysis by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) are reviewed. Specifically, the determination of moisture in liquid N/sub 2/O/sub 4/ as an oxidizing agent for rocket propulsion, the analysis of hydroperoxides, the quantitative analysis using a shift reagent, the analysis of aromatic sulfonates, and the determination of acids and bases are reviewed. Attention is paid to the accuracy. The sweeping velocity and RF level in addition to the other factors must be on the optimal condition to eliminate the errors, particularly when computation is made with a machine. Higher sweeping velocity is preferable in view of S/N ratio, but it may be limited to 30 Hz/s. The relative error in the measurement of area is generally 1%, but when those of dilute concentration and integrated, the error will become smaller by one digit. If impurities are treated carefully, the water content on N/sub 2/O/sub 4/ can be determined with accuracy of about 0.002%. The comparison method between peak heights is as accurate as that between areas, when the uniformity of magnetic field and T/sub 2/ are not questionable. In the case of chemical shift movable due to content, the substance can be determined by the position of the chemical shift. Oil and water contents in rape-seed, peanuts, and sunflower-seed are determined by measuring T/sub 1/ with 90 deg pulses.

  9. Spatial localization in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keevil, Stephen F

    2006-01-01

    The ability to select a discrete region within the body for signal acquisition is a fundamental requirement of in vivo NMR spectroscopy. Ideally, it should be possible to tailor the selected volume to coincide exactly with the lesion or tissue of interest, without loss of signal from within this volume or contamination with extraneous signals. Many techniques have been developed over the past 25 years employing a combination of RF coil properties, static magnetic field gradients and pulse sequence design in an attempt to meet these goals. This review presents a comprehensive survey of these techniques, their various advantages and disadvantages, and implications for clinical applications. Particular emphasis is placed on the reliability of the techniques in terms of signal loss, contamination and the effect of nuclear relaxation and J-coupling. The survey includes techniques based on RF coil and pulse design alone, those using static magnetic field gradients, and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging. Although there is an emphasis on techniques currently in widespread use (PRESS, STEAM, ISIS and MRSI), the review also includes earlier techniques, in order to provide historical context, and techniques that are promising for future use in clinical and biomedical applications. (topical review)

  10. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Weiping; Wang Qi; Zhou Xin

    2013-01-01

    This paper briefly introduces the basic principle of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Protein's structures and functions and dynamics studied by liquid NMR are elaborated; methods for enhancing the resolution of solid state NMR and its applications are discussed; the principle of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is interpreted, and applications in different aspects are reviewed. Finally, the progress of NMR is commented. (authors)

  11. Chiral discrimination in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzeretti, Paolo

    2017-11-01

    Chirality is a fundamental property of molecules whose spatial symmetry is characterized by the absence of improper rotations, making them not superimposable to their mirror image. Chiral molecules constitute the elementary building blocks of living species and one enantiomer is favoured in general (e.g. L-aminoacids and D-sugars pervade terrestrial homochiral biochemistry) because most chemical reactions producing natural substances are enantioselective. Since the effect of chiral chemicals and drugs on living beings can be markedly different between enantiomers, the quest for practical spectroscopical methods to scrutinize chirality is an issue of great importance and interest. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a topmost analytical technique, but spectrometers currently used are ‘blind’ to chirality, i.e. unable to discriminate the two mirror-image forms of a chiral molecule, because, in the absence of a chiral solvent, the spectral parameters, chemical shifts and spin-spin coupling constants are identical for enantiomers. Therefore, the development of new procedures for routine chiral recognition would offer basic support to scientists. However, in the presence of magnetic fields, a distinction between true and false chirality is mandatory. The former epitomizes natural optical activity, which is rationalized by a time-even pseudoscalar, i.e. the trace of a second-rank tensor, the mixed electric dipole/magnetic dipole polarizability. The Faraday effect, magnetic circular dichroism and magnetic optical activity are instead related to a time-odd axial vector. The present review summarizes recent theoretical and experimental efforts to discriminate enantiomers via NMR spectroscopy, with the focus on the deep connection between chirality and symmetry properties under the combined set of fundamental discrete operations, namely charge conjugation, parity (space inversion) and time (motion) reversal.

  12. Evaluation of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barreto, Felipe Rodrigues; Salmon, Carlos Ernesto Garrido, E-mail: garrido@ffclrp.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FFCLRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Filisofia, Ciencias e Letras; Otaduy, Maria Concepcion Garcia [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FAMUS/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina. Departamento de Radiologia

    2014-11-01

    Introduction: the intrinsically high sensitivity of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) causes considerable variability in metabolite quantification. In this study, we evaluated the variability of MRS in two research centers using the same model of magnetic resonance image scanner. Methods: two metabolic phantoms were created to simulate magnetic resonance spectra from in vivo hippocampus. The phantoms were filled with the same basic solution containing the following metabolites: N-acetyl-aspartate, creatine, choline, glutamate, glutamine and inositol. Spectra were acquired over 15 months on 26 acquisition dates, resulting in a total of 130 spectra per center. Results: the phantoms did not undergo any physical changes during the 15-month period. Temporal analysis from both centers showed mean metabolic variations of 3.7% in acquisitions on the same day and of 8.7% over the 15-month period. Conclusion: The low deviations demonstrated here, combined with the high specificity of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, confirm that it is feasible to use this technique in multicenter studies in neuroscience research. (author)

  13. Computer Assisted Instruction (Cain) For Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaturonrusmee, Wasna; Arthonvorakul, Areerat; Assateranuwat, Adisorn

    2005-10-01

    A computer assisted instruction program for nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was developed by using Author ware 5.0, Adobe Image Styler 1.0, Adobe Photo shop 7.0 and Flash MX. The contents included the basic theory of 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, the instrumentation of NMR spectroscopy, the two dimensional (2D) NMR spectroscopy and the interpretation of NMR spectra. The program was also provided examples, and exercises, with emphasis on NMR spectra interpretation to determine the structure of unknown compounds and solutions for self study. The questionnaire from students showed that they were very satisfied with the software

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in food applications: a critical appraisal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Divakar, S.

    1998-01-01

    Usefulness of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in food applications is presented in this review. Some of the basic concepts of NMR pertaining to one-dimensional and two-dimensional techniques, solid-state NMR and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) are discussed. Food applications dealt with encompass such diverse areas like nature and state of water in foods, detection and quantitation of important constituents of foods, intact food systems and NMR related to food biology. (author)

  15. Clinical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    The advantages and present limitations of the clinical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy are reviewed in outline, with passing references to skeletal muscular studies, in particular a group of children with advanced Duchenne dystrophy, and the applications to the study of cerebral metabolism of neonates, excised kidneys, biopsy studies of breast and axillary lymph node samples, and NMR spectroscopy performed during chemotherapy of a secondary rhabdomyosarcoma in the skin. (U.K.)

  16. Clinical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, R.J. (Glasgow Western Infirmary (UK))

    1984-09-01

    The advantages and present limitations of the clinical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy are reviewed in outline, with passing references to skeletal muscular studies, in particular a group of children with advanced Duchenne dystrophy, and the applications to the study of cerebral metabolism of neonates, excised kidneys, biopsy studies of breast and axillary lymph node samples, and NMR spectroscopy performed during chemotherapy of a secondary rhabdomyosarcoma in the skin.

  17. High resolution spectroscopy in solids by nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonagamba, T.J.

    1991-07-01

    The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques for High Resolution Spectroscopy in Solids are described. Also the construction project of a partially home made spectrometer and its applications in the characterization of solid samples are shown in detail. The high resolution spectrometer used is implemented with the double resonance multiple pulses sequences and magic angle spinning (MAS) and can be used with solid and liquid samples. The maximum spinning frequency for the MAS experiment is in excess of 5 Khz, the double resonance sequences can be performed with any type of nucleus, in the variable temperature operating range with nitrogen gas: -120 0 C to +160 0 C, and is fully controlled by a Macintosh IIci microcomputer. (author)

  18. Study of biological fluids by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kriat, M.; Vion-Dury, J.; Confort-Gouny, S.; Sciaky, M.; Cozzone, P.J.

    1991-01-01

    The use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in the study of biofluids is rapidly developing and might soon constitute a new major medical application of this technique which benefits from technological and methodological progress such as higher magnetic fields, new probe design, solvent suppression sequences and advanced data processing routines. In this overview, the clinical and pharmacological impact of this new approach is examined, with emphasis on the NMR spectroscopy of plasma, cerebrospinal fluid and urine. Applications to pharmacokinetics and toxicology are illustrated. Interestingly, a number of biochemical components of fluids which are not usually assayed by conventional biochemical methods are readily detected by NMR spectroscopy which is clearly a new competitive entrant among the techniques used in clinical biology. Its ease-of-use, cost effectiveness and high informational content might turn it into a major diagnostic tool in the years to come [fr

  19. Applications of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to certifiable food colors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marmion, D.M.

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was found suitable for the identification of individual colours, for distinguishing individual colours from colour mixtures, for the identification and semi-quantitative determination of the individual colours in mixtures and for proofs of the adulteration of certified colours adding noncertified colours. The method is well suited for observing the purity of colours and may also be used as the control method in the manufacture of colours and in assessing their stability and their resistance to increased temperature and light. (M.K.)

  20. Discrete decoding based ultrafast multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Zhiliang; Lin, Liangjie; Ye, Qimiao; Li, Jing; Cai, Shuhui; Chen, Zhong

    2015-01-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy constitutes an important and powerful tool in analyzing chemical and biological systems. However, the abundant 3D information arrives at the expense of long acquisition times lasting hours or even days. Therefore, there has been a continuous interest in developing techniques to accelerate recordings of 3D NMR spectra, among which the ultrafast spatiotemporal encoding technique supplies impressive acquisition speed by compressing a multidimensional spectrum in a single scan. However, it tends to suffer from tradeoffs among spectral widths in different dimensions, which deteriorates in cases of NMR spectroscopy with more dimensions. In this study, the discrete decoding is proposed to liberate the ultrafast technique from tradeoffs among spectral widths in different dimensions by focusing decoding on signal-bearing sites. For verifying its feasibility and effectiveness, we utilized the method to generate two different types of 3D spectra. The proposed method is also applicable to cases with more than three dimensions, which, based on the experimental results, may widen applications of the ultrafast technique

  1. Discrete decoding based ultrafast multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zhiliang; Lin, Liangjie; Ye, Qimiao; Li, Jing; Cai, Shuhui; Chen, Zhong

    2015-07-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy constitutes an important and powerful tool in analyzing chemical and biological systems. However, the abundant 3D information arrives at the expense of long acquisition times lasting hours or even days. Therefore, there has been a continuous interest in developing techniques to accelerate recordings of 3D NMR spectra, among which the ultrafast spatiotemporal encoding technique supplies impressive acquisition speed by compressing a multidimensional spectrum in a single scan. However, it tends to suffer from tradeoffs among spectral widths in different dimensions, which deteriorates in cases of NMR spectroscopy with more dimensions. In this study, the discrete decoding is proposed to liberate the ultrafast technique from tradeoffs among spectral widths in different dimensions by focusing decoding on signal-bearing sites. For verifying its feasibility and effectiveness, we utilized the method to generate two different types of 3D spectra. The proposed method is also applicable to cases with more than three dimensions, which, based on the experimental results, may widen applications of the ultrafast technique.

  2. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy-Based Identification of Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himmelreich, Uwe; Sorrell, Tania C; Daniel, Heide-Marie

    2017-01-01

    Rapid and robust high-throughput identification of environmental, industrial, or clinical yeast isolates is important whenever relatively large numbers of samples need to be processed in a cost-efficient way. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy generates complex data based on metabolite profiles, chemical composition and possibly on medium consumption, which can not only be used for the assessment of metabolic pathways but also for accurate identification of yeast down to the subspecies level. Initial results on NMR based yeast identification where comparable with conventional and DNA-based identification. Potential advantages of NMR spectroscopy in mycological laboratories include not only accurate identification but also the potential of automated sample delivery, automated analysis using computer-based methods, rapid turnaround time, high throughput, and low running costs.We describe here the sample preparation, data acquisition and analysis for NMR-based yeast identification. In addition, a roadmap for the development of classification strategies is given that will result in the acquisition of a database and analysis algorithms for yeast identification in different environments.

  3. Resolution Improvement in Multidimensional Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duma, L.

    2004-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis is concerned with both liquid-state and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Most of this work is devoted to the investigation by solid-state NMR of C 13 -enriched compounds with the principal aim of presenting techniques devised for further improving the spectral resolution in multidimensional NMR of microcrystalline proteins. In fully C 13 -labelled compounds, the J-coupling induces a broadening of the carbon lineshapes. We show that spin-state-selective technique called IPAP can be successfully combined with standard polarisation transfer schemes in order to remove the J-broadening in multidimensional solid-state NMR correlation experiments of fully C 13 -enriched proteins. We present subsequently two techniques tailored for liquid-state NMR spectroscopy. The carbon directly detected techniques provide chemical shift information for all backbone hetero-nuclei. They are very attracting for the study of large bio-molecular systems or for the investigation of paramagnetic proteins. In the last part of this thesis, we study the spin-echo J-modulation for homonuclear two-spin 1/2 systems. Under magic-angle spinning, the theory of J-induced spin-echo modulation allows to derive a set of modulation regimes which give a spin-echo modulation exactly equal to the J-coupling. We show that the chemical-shift anisotropy and the dipolar interaction tend to stabilize the spin-echo J-modulation. The theoretical conclusions are supported by numerical simulations and experimental results obtained for three representative samples containing C 13 spin pairs. (author)

  4. Characterization of Canadian coals by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furimsky, E.; Ripmeester, J.

    1983-06-01

    Apparent aromaticities of a series of Canadian coals of different rank were estimated by solid state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The aromaticities varied from 0.57 for a lignite up to 0.86 for a semi-anthracite coal. The aromaticities correlated well with fixed carbon and oxygen content of the coals as well as with the mean reflectance of the coals. Correlations were also established between aromaticities and the H/C and H/SUB/a/SUB/r/SUB/u/C/SUB/a/SUB/r ratios of the coals. Uncertainties in calculation of the hypothetical H/SUB/a/SUB/r/SUB/u/C/SUB/a/SUB/r ratios, from experimental data were pointed out. Structural parameters of the chars derived from the coals by pyrolysis at 535 C were, also, estimated. The H/C and H/SUB/a/SUB/r/SUB/u/C/SUB/a/SUB/r ratios of the chars were markedly lower than those of coals. This was complemented by higher apparent aromaticities of the chars compared with the coals. (21 refs.)

  5. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy studies of proteins-glycoconjugates interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Marchetti, Roberta

    2013-01-01

    This PhD thesis work has been focused on the analysis of the structural requisites for recognition and binding between proteins and glycoconjugates, essential for the comprehension of mechanisms of paramount importance in chemistry, biology and biomedicine. A large variety of techniques, such as crystallographic analysis, titration microcalorimetry (ITC), surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and fluorescence spectroscopy, allows the elucidation of molecular recognition events. In the last years...

  6. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of plasma lipoproteins in malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nabholtz, J.M.; Rossignol, A.; Farnier, M.; Gambert, P.; Tremeaux, J.C.; Friedman, S.; Guerrin, J.

    1988-01-01

    A recent study described a method of detecting malignant tumors by water-supressed proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1 H NMR) study of plasma. We performed a similar study of the W 1/2, a mean of the full width at half height of the resonances of the methyl and methylene groups of the lipids of plasma lipoproteins which is inversely related to the spin-spin apparent relaxation time (T 2 * ). W 1/2 values were measured at a fixed baseline width of 310 Hz. The study was prospective and blinded and comprised 182 subjects consisting of 40 controls, 68 patients with untreated malignancies, 45 with malignant tumors undergoing therapy and 29 benign tumor patients. No differences were seen between any groups that could serve as a basis for a useful clinical test. The major difficulty in the determination of W 1/2 was due to interference of metabolite protons (particularly lactate) within the lipoprotein resonance signal. Triglyceride level was seen to correlate inversely with W 1/2 within malignant patient groups. These discrepant results may be related to differing triglyceride-rich very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) levels in the ;atient populations of each study. We conclude that the water-suppressed 1H NMR of plasma lipoproteins is not a valid measurement for assessing malignancy. (orig.)

  7. Method of using a nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spicer, Leonard D.; Bennett, Dennis W.; Davis, Jon F.

    1985-01-01

    (CH.sub.3).sub.3 SiNSO is produced by the reaction of ((CH.sub.3).sub.3 Si).sub.2 NH with SO.sub.2. Also produced in the reaction are ((CH.sub.3).sub.3 Si).sub.2 O and a new solid compound [NH.sub.4 ][(CH.sub.3).sub.3 SiOSO.sub.2 ]. Both (CH.sub.3).sub.3 SiNSO and [NH.sub.4 ][(CH.sub.3).sub.3 SiOSO.sub.2 ] have fluorescent properties. The reaction of the subject invention is used in a method of measuring the concentration of SO.sub.2 pollutants in gases. By the method, a sample of gas is bubbled through a solution of ((CH.sub.3).sub.3 Si).sub.2 NH, whereby any SO.sub.2 present in the gas will react to produce the two fluorescent products. The measured fluorescence of these products can then be used to calculate the concentration of SO.sub.2 in the original gas sample. The solid product [NH.sub.4 ][(CH.sub.3).sub.3 SiOSO.sub.2 ] may be used as a standard in solid state NMR spectroscopy, wherein the resonance peaks of either .sup.1 H, .sup.13 C, .sup.15 N, or .sup.29 Si may be used as a reference.

  8. New Approaches to Quantum Computing using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colvin, M; Krishnan, V V

    2003-01-01

    The power of a quantum computer (QC) relies on the fundamental concept of the superposition in quantum mechanics and thus allowing an inherent large-scale parallelization of computation. In a QC, binary information embodied in a quantum system, such as spin degrees of freedom of a spin-1/2 particle forms the qubits (quantum mechanical bits), over which appropriate logical gates perform the computation. In classical computers, the basic unit of information is the bit, which can take a value of either 0 or 1. Bits are connected together by logic gates to form logic circuits to implement complex logical operations. The expansion of modern computers has been driven by the developments of faster, smaller and cheaper logic gates. As the size of the logic gates become smaller toward the level of atomic dimensions, the performance of such a system is no longer considered classical but is rather governed by quantum mechanics. Quantum computers offer the potentially superior prospect of solving computational problems that are intractable to classical computers such as efficient database searches and cryptography. A variety of algorithms have been developed recently, most notably Shor's algorithm for factorizing long numbers into prime factors in polynomial time and Grover's quantum search algorithm. The algorithms that were of only theoretical interest as recently, until several methods were proposed to build an experimental QC. These methods include, trapped ions, cavity-QED, coupled quantum dots, Josephson junctions, spin resonance transistors, linear optics and nuclear magnetic resonance. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is uniquely capable of constructing small QCs and several algorithms have been implemented successfully. NMR-QC differs from other implementations in one important way that it is not a single QC, but a statistical ensemble of them. Thus, quantum computing based on NMR is considered as ensemble quantum computing. In NMR quantum computing, the spins with

  9. Quantification of lipoprotein profiles by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and multivariate data analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aru, Violetta; Lam, Chloie; Khakimov, Bekzod

    2017-01-01

    Lipoproteins and their subfraction profiles have been associated to diverse diseases including Cardio Vascular Disease (CVD). There is thus a great demand for measuring and quantifying the lipoprotein profile in an efficient and accurate manner. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is un...

  10. 19F-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy as a tool to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    19F-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy as a tool to investigate host-guest complexation of some antidepressant drugs with natural and modified cyclodextrins. Leila Shafiee Dastjerdi1* and Mojtaba Shamsipur2. 1Faculty of Science, Roudehen Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, 2Department of Chemistry, ...

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of living systems : Applications in comparative physiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VanDenThillart, G; VanWaarde, A

    The most attractive feature of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is the noninvasive and nondestructive measurement of chemical compounds in intact tissues. MRS already has many applications in comparative physiology, usually based on observation of P-31, since the levels of phosphorus

  12. Nuclear magnetic resonance detection and spectroscopy of single proteins using quantum logic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovchinsky, I; Sushkov, A O; Urbach, E; de Leon, N P; Choi, S; De Greve, K; Evans, R; Gertner, R; Bersin, E; Müller, C; McGuinness, L; Jelezko, F; Walsworth, R L; Park, H; Lukin, M D

    2016-02-19

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the structural analysis of organic compounds and biomolecules but typically requires macroscopic sample quantities. We use a sensor, which consists of two quantum bits corresponding to an electronic spin and an ancillary nuclear spin, to demonstrate room temperature magnetic resonance detection and spectroscopy of multiple nuclear species within individual ubiquitin proteins attached to the diamond surface. Using quantum logic to improve readout fidelity and a surface-treatment technique to extend the spin coherence time of shallow nitrogen-vacancy centers, we demonstrate magnetic field sensitivity sufficient to detect individual proton spins within 1 second of integration. This gain in sensitivity enables high-confidence detection of individual proteins and allows us to observe spectral features that reveal information about their chemical composition. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, analytical chemistry by open learning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, D.A.R.

    1986-01-01

    This elementary text on NMR spectroscopy is designed for self-study, primarily by those studying to be chemical technicians. The style is informal and direct. The basic elements of chemical shifts, spin-spin coupling, integrated intensities, and relaxation times are discussed briefly, with examples, but the emphasis is much more on this is the way it is than on providing a satisfying rationale. Quick introduction to sample preparation, NMR instrumentation, and signal enhancement techniques are included, but these are very sketchy. Only four pages are devoted to the Fourier Transform technique, hardly enough to give anyone a reasonable basis for understanding the technique and its power. About a third of the main part of the text is devoted to practical applications of 1 H and 13 C NMR spectroscopy, including structural assignments of peaks in the spectra of simple molecules and quantitative measurements of simple mixtures. The author provides a variety of questions and problems throughout the book, some of the simple memory-retention type but some more thought-provoking. The last 90 pages of the book are devoted to answering the questions and problems posed in the five chapters

  14. Billion-Fold Enhancement in Sensitivity of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy for Magnesium Ions in Solution

    CERN Document Server

    Gottberg, Alexander; Kowalska, Magdalena; Bissell, Mark L; Arcisauskaite, Vaida; Blaum, Klaus; Helmke, Alexander; Johnston, Karl; Kreim, Kim; Larsen, Flemming H; Neugart, Rainer; Neyens, Gerda; Garcia Ruiz, Ronald F; Szunyogh, Daniel; Thulstrup, Peter W; Yordanov, Deyan T; Hemmingsen, Lars

    2014-01-01

    β-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is highly sensitive compared to conventional NMR spectroscopy, and may be applied for several elements across the periodic table. β-NMR has previously been successfully applied in the fields of nuclear and solid-state physics. In this work, β-NMR is applied, for the first time, to record an NMR spectrum for a species in solution. 31Mg β-NMR spectra are measured for as few as 107 magnesium ions in ionic liquid (EMIM-Ac) within minutes, as a prototypical test case. Resonances are observed at 3882.9 and 3887.2 kHz in an external field of 0.3 T. The key achievement of the current work is to demonstrate that β-NMR is applicable for the analysis of species in solution, and thus represents a novel spectroscopic technique for use in general chemistry and potentially in biochemistry.

  15. Evaluation of poly(vinylpyrrolidone) and collagen by Low Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Paula de M.; Tavares, Maria I.B.

    2005-01-01

    Blends of natural and synthetic polymers represent a new class of materials with better mechanical properties and biocompatibility than those of the single components. Collagen and poly(vinylpyrrolidone) are well known for their important biological properties. The blending of collagen with poly(vinylpyrrolidone) makes it possible to obtain new materials in which strong interactions between the synthetic and biological components occur. Do to the excellent biocompatibility of these polymers, this blend has been much studied intending biomedical applications. And a one technique that can provide important information on molecular mobility, compatibility and even evaluate the interactions that can occur with these polymers is the Low Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. Thus, the purpose of this work is to evaluate collagen and poly(vinylpyrrolidone) by Low Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. From the values of relaxation times obtained, we can conclude that these materials have different interactions, and different mobility domains, confirming the heterogeneity and complexity of these materials. (author)

  16. 1H and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of erythrocyte extracts in myotonic muscular dystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gadoth, N.; Grinblat, J.; Tel Aviv Univ.; Shvo, H.; Navon, G.

    1984-01-01

    Extracts freshly prepared from erythrocytes of patients with myotonic muscular dystrophy, their unaffected siblings, and normal control subjects were examined with both 1 H and 31 P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. A moderate variability was found in the relative amounts of various nonphosphorylated compounds among patients and control subjects; however, no significant differences were found between the groups. As for the phosphorylated compounds, the sum of ADP+ATP was found significantly elevated in the myotonic muscular dystrophy patients

  17. Neutron resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunsing, F.

    2005-06-01

    The present document has been written in order to obtain the diploma 'Habilitation a Diriger des Recherches'. Since this diploma is indispensable to supervise thesis students, I had the intention to write a document that can be useful for someone starting in the field of neutron resonance spectroscopy. Although the here described topics are already described elsewhere, and often in more detail, it seemed useful to have most of the relevant information in a single document. A general introduction places the topic of neutron-nucleus interaction in a nuclear physics context. The large variations of several orders of magnitude in neutron-induced reaction cross sections are explained in terms of nuclear level excitations. The random character of the resonances make nuclear model calculation predictions impossible. Then several fields in physics where neutron-induced reactions are important and to which I have contributed in some way or another, are mentioned in a first synthetic chapter. They concern topics like parity nonconservation in certain neutron resonances, stellar nucleosynthesis by neutron capture, and data for nuclear energy applications. The latter item is especially important for the transmutation of nuclear waste and for alternative fuel cycles. Nuclear data libraries are also briefly mentioned. A second chapter details the R-matrix theory. This formalism is the foundation of the description of the neutron-nucleus interaction and is present in all fields of neutron resonance spectroscopy. (author)

  18. Neutron resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunsing, F

    2005-06-15

    The present document has been written in order to obtain the diploma 'Habilitation a Diriger des Recherches'. Since this diploma is indispensable to supervise thesis students, I had the intention to write a document that can be useful for someone starting in the field of neutron resonance spectroscopy. Although the here described topics are already described elsewhere, and often in more detail, it seemed useful to have most of the relevant information in a single document. A general introduction places the topic of neutron-nucleus interaction in a nuclear physics context. The large variations of several orders of magnitude in neutron-induced reaction cross sections are explained in terms of nuclear level excitations. The random character of the resonances make nuclear model calculation predictions impossible. Then several fields in physics where neutron-induced reactions are important and to which I have contributed in some way or another, are mentioned in a first synthetic chapter. They concern topics like parity nonconservation in certain neutron resonances, stellar nucleosynthesis by neutron capture, and data for nuclear energy applications. The latter item is especially important for the transmutation of nuclear waste and for alternative fuel cycles. Nuclear data libraries are also briefly mentioned. A second chapter details the R-matrix theory. This formalism is the foundation of the description of the neutron-nucleus interaction and is present in all fields of neutron resonance spectroscopy. (author)

  19. Characterization of different cassava samples by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iulianelli, Gisele C.V.; Tavares, Maria I.B.

    2011-01-01

    Cassava root (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is grown in all Brazilian states, being an important product in the diet of Brazilians. For many families of the North and Northeast states, it may represent the main energy source. The cassava root flour has high levels of starch, in addition to containing fiber, lipids and some minerals. There is, however, great genetic variability, which results in differentiation in its chemical composition and structural aspect. Motivated by the economic, nutritional and pharmacological importance of this product, this work is aimed at characterizing six cassava flour samples by NMR spectroscopy. The spectra revealed the main chemical groups. Furthermore, the results confirmed differences on chemical and structural aspect of the samples. For instance, the F1 sample is richer in carbohydrates, while the F4 sample has higher proportion of glycolipids, the F2 sample has higher amylose content and the F6 sample exhibits a greater diversity of glycolipid types. Regarding the molecular structure, the NMR spectra indicated that the F1 sample is more organized at the molecular level, while the F3 and F5 samples are similar in amorphicity and in the molecular packing. (author)

  20. Scientific opportunities in nuclear resonance spectroscopy from source-driven revolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shenoy, G. K., E-mail: gks@aps.anl.gov [Argonne National Laboratory (United States); Roehlsberger, R. [Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron, DESY (Germany)

    2008-02-15

    From the beginning of its discovery the Moessbauer effect has continued to be one of the most powerful tools with broad applications in diverse areas of science and technology. With the advent of synchrotron radiation sources such as the Advanced Photon Source (APS), the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) and the Super Photon Ring-8 (SPring-8), the tool has enlarged its scope and delivered new capabilities. The popular techniques most generally used in the field of materials physics, chemical physics, geoscience, and biology are hyperfine spectroscopy via elastic nuclear forward scattering (NFS), vibrational spectroscopy via nuclear inelastic scattering (NRIXS), and, to a lesser extent, diffusional dynamics from quasielastic nuclear forward scattering (QNFS). As we look ahead, new storage rings with enhanced brilliance such as PETRA-III under construction at DESY, Hamburg, and PEP-III in its early design stage at SLAC, Stanford, will provide new and unique science opportunities. In the next two decades, x-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs), based both on self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE-XFELs) and a seed (SXFELs), with unique time structure, coherence and a five to six orders higher average brilliance will truly revolutionize nuclear resonance applications in a major way. This overview is intended to briefly address the unique radiation characteristics of new sources on the horizon and to provide a glimpse of scientific prospects and dreams in the nuclear resonance field from the new radiation sources. We anticipate an expanded nuclear resonance research activity with applications such as spin and phonon mapping of a single nanostructure and their assemblies, interfaces, and surfaces; spin dynamics; nonequilibrium dynamics; photochemical reactions; excited-state spectroscopy; and nonlinear phenomena.

  1. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for determining the functional content of organic aerosols: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalbot, Marie-Cecile G.; Kavouras, Ilias G.

    2014-01-01

    The knowledge deficit of organic aerosol (OA) composition has been identified as the most important factor limiting our understanding of the atmospheric fate and implications of aerosol. The efforts to chemically characterize OA include the increasing utilization of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). Since 1998, the functional composition of different types, sizes and fractions of OA has been studied with one-dimensional, two-dimensional and solid state proton and carbon-13 NMR. This led to the use of functional group ratios to reconcile the most important sources of OA, including secondary organic aerosol and initial source apportionment using positive matrix factorization. Future research efforts may be directed towards the optimization of experimental parameters, detailed NMR experiments and analysis by pattern recognition methods to identify the chemical components, determination of the NMR fingerprints of OA sources and solid state NMR to study the content of OA as a whole. - Highlights: • Organic aerosol composition by 1 H- and 13 C-NMR spectroscopy. • NMR fingerprints of specific sources, types and sizes of organic aerosol. • Source reconciliation and apportionment using NMR spectroscopy. • Research priorities towards understanding organic aerosol composition and origin. - This review presents the recent advances on the characterization of organic aerosol composition using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

  2. Methylmalonic aciduria and propionic acidaemia studied by proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iles, R A; Hind, A J; Chalmers, R A

    1986-12-15

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been used to monitor changes in urinary metabolites in a patient with propionic acidaemia over a period of 10 months and in a patient with methylmalonic aciduria over a period of 11 days. Results could be obtained within 5-10 min of sample receipt. In the spectra on the patient with propionic acidaemia not only could fluctuations in 3-hydroxypropionate and propionylglycine excretion be followed, but also variations in creatine, glycine and betaine, which were often present at millimolar concentrations. The patient with methylmalonic aciduria had an acute episode of severe ketoacidosis during which the glycine excretion fell but creatine excretion rose and then fell on recovery from the episode. The changes in the creatine excretion may reflect disorders in intracellular energy supply. Nuclear magnetic resonance is a powerful technique for monitoring metabolic perturbations in the organic acidurias in 'real-time', allowing the planning and evaluation of therapy. (Auth.). 18 refs.; 4 figs.; 3 tabs.

  3. Methylmalonic aciduria and propionic acidaemia studied by proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iles, R.A.; Hind, A.J.; Chalmers, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been used to monitor changes in urinary metabolites in a patient with propionic acidaemia over a period of 10 months and in a patient with methylmalonic aciduria over a period of 11 days. Results could be obtained within 5-10 min of sample receipt. In the spectra on the patient with propionic acidaemia not only could fluctuations in 3-hydroxypropionate and propionylglycine excretion be followed, but also variations in creatine, glycine and betaine, which were often present at millimolar concentrations. The patient with methylmalonic aciduria had an acute episode of severe ketoacidosis during which the glycine excretion fell but creatine excretion rose and then fell on recovery from the episode. The changes in the creatine excretion may reflect disorders in intracellular energy supply. Nuclear magnetic resonance is a powerful technique for monitoring metabolic perturbations in the organic acidurias in 'real-time', allowing the planning and evaluation of therapy. (Auth.)

  4. Accelerating two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance correlation spectroscopy via selective coherence transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Qimiao; Chen, Lin; Qiu, Wenqi; Lin, Liangjie; Sun, Huijun; Cai, Shuhui; Wei, Zhiliang; Chen, Zhong

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy serves as an important tool for both qualitative and quantitative analyses of various systems in chemistry, biology, and medicine. However, applications of one-dimensional 1H NMR are often restrained by the presence of severe overlap among different resonances. The advent of two-dimensional (2D) 1H NMR constitutes a promising alternative by extending the crowded resonances into a plane and thereby alleviating the spectral congestions. However, the enhanced ability in discriminating resonances is achieved at the cost of extended experimental duration due to necessity of various scans with progressive delays to construct the indirect dimension. Therefore, in this study, we propose a selective coherence transfer (SECOT) method to accelerate acquisitions of 2D correlation spectroscopy by converting chemical shifts into spatial positions within the effective sample length and then performing an echo planar spectroscopic imaging module to record the spatial and spectral information, which generates 2D correlation spectrum after 2D Fourier transformation. The feasibility and effectiveness of SECOT have been verified by a set of experiments under both homogeneous and inhomogeneous magnetic fields. Moreover, evaluations of SECOT for quantitative analyses are carried out on samples with a series of different concentrations. Based on these experimental results, the SECOT may open important perspectives for fast, accurate, and stable investigations of various chemical systems both qualitatively and quantitatively.

  5. Assessment of tumor energy and oxygenation status by bioluminescence, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and cryospectrophotometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller-Klieser, W; Schaefer, C; Walenta, S; Rofstad, E K; Fenton, B M; Sutherland, R M

    1990-03-15

    The energy and oxygenation status of tumors from two murine sarcoma lines (KHT, RIF-1) and two human ovarian carcinoma xenograft lines (MLS, OWI) were assessed using three independent techniques. Tumor energy metabolism was investigated in vivo by 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. After nuclear magnetic resonance measurements, tumors were frozen in liquid nitrogen to determine the tissue ATP concentration by imaging bioluminescence and to register the intracapillary oxyhemoglobin (HbO2) saturation using the cryospectrophotometric method. There was a positive correlation between the nucleoside triphosphate beta/total resonance ratio or a negative correlation between the Pi/total resonance ratio and the model ATP concentration obtained by bioluminescence, respectively. This was true for small tumors with no extended necrosis irrespective of tumor type. Moreover, a positive correlation was obtained between the HbO2 saturations and the ATP concentration measured with bioluminescence. The results demonstrate the potential of combined studies using noninvasive, integrating methods and high-resolution imaging techniques for characterizing the metabolic milieu in tumors.

  6. Time differentiated nuclear resonance spectroscopy coupled with pulsed laser heating in diamond anvil cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kupenko, I., E-mail: kupenko@esrf.fr; Strohm, C. [Bayerisches Geoinstitut, Universität Bayreuth, D-95440 Bayreuth (Germany); ESRF-The European Synchrotron, CS 40220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); McCammon, C.; Cerantola, V.; Petitgirard, S.; Dubrovinsky, L. [Bayerisches Geoinstitut, Universität Bayreuth, D-95440 Bayreuth (Germany); Glazyrin, K. [Photon Science, DESY, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Vasiukov, D.; Aprilis, G. [Laboratory of Crystallography, Material Physics and Technology at Extreme Conditions, Universität Bayreuth, D-95440 Bayreuth (Germany); Chumakov, A. I.; Rüffer, R. [ESRF-The European Synchrotron, CS 40220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2015-11-15

    Developments in pulsed laser heating applied to nuclear resonance techniques are presented together with their applications to studies of geophysically relevant materials. Continuous laser heating in diamond anvil cells is a widely used method to generate extreme temperatures at static high pressure conditions in order to study the structure and properties of materials found in deep planetary interiors. The pulsed laser heating technique has advantages over continuous heating, including prevention of the spreading of heated sample and/or the pressure medium and, thus, a better stability of the heating process. Time differentiated data acquisition coupled with pulsed laser heating in diamond anvil cells was successfully tested at the Nuclear Resonance beamline (ID18) of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. We show examples applying the method to investigation of an assemblage containing ε-Fe, FeO, and Fe{sub 3}C using synchrotron Mössbauer source spectroscopy, FeCO{sub 3} using nuclear inelastic scattering, and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} using nuclear forward scattering. These examples demonstrate the applicability of pulsed laser heating in diamond anvil cells to spectroscopic techniques with long data acquisition times, because it enables stable pulsed heating with data collection at specific time intervals that are synchronized with laser pulses.

  7. Determination of bound and unbound water in dental alginate irreversible hydrocolloid by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellows, C M; Thomas, G A

    2009-04-01

    Alginate materials are considered unsuitable for precise fixed prosthetic rehabilitation due to their tendency to undergo spontaneous syneresis. Commercial alginate impression materials were investigated using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy to probe the relation between changes in the microscopic water environment and dimensional change to obtain a better understanding of spontaneous syneresis. NMR was used to measure the spin-lattice relaxation times (T(1)) of (1)H nuclei in water in alginate matrices to characterize changes in gel structure over time. These results were related to the dimensional stabilities of the alginate impression materials, their chemical compositions, and the Moisture Sorption Isotherms (MSI) obtained by incubation at fixed relative humidities. The rate of change of T(1) with time was found to be a better predictor of dimensional stability than MSI. The greatest dimensional stability for the alginate powders investigated was associated with a high filler:alginate ratio and a high Ca:Na ratio. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy may used to measure changes in alginate impression materials under conditions where no dimensional change can be observed directly. Changes occurred rapidly even at 100% humidity, suggesting the dimensional stability of alginate impression materials is partially independent of the rate of dehydration. The results may open a way to formulate alginate impression materials more suitable for precise fabrication of dental prostheses.

  8. High resolution spectroscopy in solids by nuclear magnetic resonance; Espectroscopia de alta resolucao em solidos por ressonancia magnetica nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonagamba, T J

    1991-07-01

    The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques for High Resolution Spectroscopy in Solids are described. Also the construction project of a partially home made spectrometer and its applications in the characterization of solid samples are shown in detail. The high resolution spectrometer used is implemented with the double resonance multiple pulses sequences and magic angle spinning (MAS) and can be used with solid and liquid samples. The maximum spinning frequency for the MAS experiment is in excess of 5 Khz, the double resonance sequences can be performed with any type of nucleus, in the variable temperature operating range with nitrogen gas: -120{sup 0} C to +160{sup 0} C, and is fully controlled by a Macintosh IIci microcomputer. (author).

  9. Recommendations concerning magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    In medicine the technique of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is applied in the form of in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). In vivo MRS can be carried out non-invasively. The committee of the Dutch Health Council briefly discusses the qualities and potentialities of the nuclei that will probably be used in future clinical spectroscopy: 31 P, 13 C, 1 H (and possibly 19 F and 23 Na). The committee discusses several possibilities of combining imaging and spectroscopy. The imaging of nuclei other than protons is also possible with MRS. Potential applications are considered in oncology, cardiology, neurology and hepatology. (Auth.)

  10. Assessment of higher order structure comparability in therapeutic proteins using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amezcua, Carlos A; Szabo, Christina M

    2013-06-01

    In this work, we applied nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to rapidly assess higher order structure (HOS) comparability in protein samples. Using a variation of the NMR fingerprinting approach described by Panjwani et al. [2010. J Pharm Sci 99(8):3334-3342], three nonglycosylated proteins spanning a molecular weight range of 6.5-67 kDa were analyzed. A simple statistical method termed easy comparability of HOS by NMR (ECHOS-NMR) was developed. In this method, HOS similarity between two samples is measured via the correlation coefficient derived from linear regression analysis of binned NMR spectra. Applications of this method include HOS comparability assessment during new product development, manufacturing process changes, supplier changes, next-generation products, and the development of biosimilars to name just a few. We foresee ECHOS-NMR becoming a routine technique applied to comparability exercises used to complement data from other analytical techniques. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Monitoring of the insecticide trichlorfon by phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance (31P NMR) spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talebpour, Zahra; Ghassempour, Alireza; Zendehzaban, Mehdi; Bijanzadeh, Hamid Reza; Mirjalili, Mohammad Hossein

    2006-01-01

    Trichlorfon is an organophosphorus insecticide, which is extensively being used for protection of fruit crops. Trichlorfon is a thermal labile compound, which cannot be easily determined by gas chromatography (GC) and has no suitable group for sensitive detection by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). In this study, a 31 P nuclear magnetic resonance ( 31 P NMR) has been described for monitoring of trichlorfon without any separation step. The quantitative works of 31 P NMR spectroscopy has been performed in the presence of an internal standard (hexamethylphosphoramide). Limit of detection (LOD) for this method has been found to be 55 mg L -1 , without any sample preparation, and the linear working range was 150-5500 mg L -1 . Relative standard deviation (R.S.D.%) of the method for three replicates within and between days was obtained ≤9%. The average recovery efficiency was approximately 99-112%. This method was applied for monitoring trichlorfon in a commercial insecticide sample and tomato sample

  12. Nature versus nurture: functional assessment of restoration effects on wetland services using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundareshwar, P.V.; Richardson, C.J.; Gleason, R.A.; Pellechia, P.J.; Honomichl, S.

    2009-01-01

    Land-use change has altered the ability of wetlands to provide vital services such as nutrient retention. While compensatory practices attempt to restore degraded wetlands and their functions, it is difficult to evaluate the recovery of soil biogeochemical functions that are critical for restoration of ecosystem services. Using solution 31P Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, we examined the chemical forms of phosphorus (P) in soils from wetlands located across a land-use gradient. We report that soil P diversity, a functional attribute, was lowest in farmland, and greatest in native wetlands. Soil P diversity increased with age of restoration, indicating restoration of biogeochemical function. The trend in soil P diversity was similar to documented trends in soil bacterial taxonomic composition but opposite that of soil bacterial diversity at our study sites. These findings provide insights into links between ecosystem structure and function and provide a tool for evaluating the success of ecosystem restoration efforts. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  13. Application of diffusion ordered-1H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to quantify sucrose in beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Ruge; Nonaka, Airi; Komura, Fusae; Matsui, Toshiro

    2015-03-15

    This work focuses on a quantitative analysis of sucrose using diffusion ordered-quantitative (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (DOSY-qNMR), where an analyte can be isolated from interference based on its characteristic diffusion coefficient (D) in gradient magnetic fields. The D value of sucrose in deuterium oxide at 30°C was 4.9 × 10(-10)m(2)/s at field gradient pulse from 5.0 × 10(-2) to 3.0 × 10(-1)T/m, separated from other carbohydrates (glucose and fructose). Good linearity (r(2)=0.9999) was obtained between sucrose (0.5-20.0 g/L) and the resonance area of target glucopyranosyl-α-C1 proton normalised to that of cellobiose C1 proton (100.0 g/L, as an internal standard) in 1D sliced DOSY spectrum. The DOSY-qNMR method was successfully applied to quantify sucrose in orange juice (36.1 ± 0.5 g/L), pineapple juice (53.5 ± 1.1g/L) and a sports drink (24.7 ± 0.6g/L), in good agreement with the results obtained by an F-kit method. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Application of two-dimensional J-resolved nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to differentiation of beer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khatib, Alfi; Wilson, Erica G.; Kim, Hye Kyong; Lefeber, Alfons W.M.; Erkelens, Cornelis; Choi, Young Hae; Verpoorte, Robert

    2006-01-01

    A number of ingredients in beer that directly or indirectly affect its quality require an unbiased wide-spectrum analytical method that allows for the determination of a wide array of compounds for its efficient control. 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a method that clearly meets this description as the broad range of compounds in beer is detectable. However, the resulting congestion of signals added to the low resolution of 1 H NMR spectra makes the identification of individual components very difficult. Among two-dimensional (2D) NMR techniques that increase the resolution, J-resolved NMR spectra were successfully applied to the analysis of 2-butanol extracts of beer as overlapping signals in 1 H NMR spectra were fully resolved by the additional axis of the coupling constant. Principal component analysis based on the projected J-resolved NMR spectra showed a clear separation between all of the six brands of pilsner beer evaluated in this study. The compounds responsible for the differentiation were identified by 2D NMR spectra including correlated spectroscopy and heteronuclear multiple bond correlation spectra together with J-resolved spectra. They were identified as nucleic acid derivatives (adenine, uridine and xanthine), amino acids (tyrosine and proline), organic acid (succinic and lactic acid), alcohol (tyrosol and isopropanol), cholines and carbohydrates

  15. Profiling of some amoxicillin drugs in Ghana using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aboagye, Mary Esi

    2016-07-01

    The prevalence of counterfeit drugs is seen as a problem faced in both developed and developing countries where Ghana is not an exception. Antibiotics are amongst the most counterfeit drugs in developing countries. What is less understood is that there are inadequate and ineffective quality control procedures in monitoring of drugs manufactured and imported into the country. This research work is aimed at contributing towards the development of routine analytical procedures that will facilitate distinguishing between fake and genuine amoxicillin drugs. This was accomplished by elaborating operating procedures for the analysis of specific antibiotic drug using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and establishing the NMR profile of active principal ingredient (API) of amoxicillin drug and assessing the API in samples of amoxicillin drug purchased in Accra. Three brands of amoxicillin samples consisting of imported amoxicillin, National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS) amoxicillin were purchased from a licensed pharmacy shop in Accra and amoxicillin purchased from Okaishie market were used for analysis. Standard amoxicillin known as amoxicillin trihydrate obtained from Ernest Chemist in Accra was also used analysed. The authenticity of the drugs was analysed using 1H and C-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Upon analysis H-NMR and C-13 NMR profiles were obtained for the API (Amoxicillin Trihydrate) in amoxicillin. H NMR showed relatively higher sensitivities for the drug than C-13 NMR therefore analysis for the antibiotics was focused on H-NMR. After analysis amoxicillin trihydrate was identified as the API. A procedure suitable for NMR sample preparation of amoxicillin for NMR analysis was elaborated. Dimethyl sulfoxide was identified as a suitable solvent for the experiments. The samples were prepared by dissolving suitable quantities (10mg) of the drug in (1ml) of the chosen solvent. H-NMR technique was used to provide an NMR profile for the Active

  16. Nuclear magnetic resonance of organofluorine compounds: a challenge in the teaching of spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Branco, Frederico Silva Castelo; Boechat, Núbia; Silva, Bárbara V.; Rio, Gabriel Freitas do; Pinto, Angelo C.; Santana, Mábio João; Queiroz Júnior, Luiz Henrique Keng; Lião, Luciano Morais

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance is a technique that is widely used for elucidating and characterizing organic substances. Organofluorine substances have applications in many areas from drugs to liquid crystals, but their NMR spectra are often challenging due to fluoride coupling with other nuclei. For this reason, NMR spectra of this class of substances are not commonly covered in undergraduate and graduate chemistry courses and related fields. Thus, the aim of this work was the presentation and discussion of 1 H, 13 C, and 19 F NMR spectra of eleven organofluorine substances which, in the case of 1 H and 13 C nuclei, showed classic patterns of first-order coupling and the effects of the fluorine nucleus in different chemical and magnetic environments. In addition, the observation of long distance coupling constants was possible through the use of apodization functions in the processing of the spectra. It is expected that the examples presented herein can be utilized and discussed in undergraduate and graduate NMR spectroscopy disciplines and thus improve the teaching and future research of organofluorine compounds. (author)

  17. Characterization of urban aerosol using aerosol mass spectrometry and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleveland, M. J.; Ziemba, L. D.; Griffin, R. J.; Dibb, J. E.; Anderson, C. H.; Lefer, B.; Rappenglück, B.

    2012-07-01

    Particulate matter was measured during August and September of 2006 in Houston as part of the Texas Air Quality Study II Radical and Aerosol Measurement Project. Aerosol size and composition were determined using an Aerodyne quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer. Aerosol was dominated by sulfate (4.1 ± 2.6 μg m-3) and organic material (5.5 ± 4.0 μg m-3), with contributions of organic material from both primary (˜32%) and secondary (˜68%) sources. Secondary organic aerosol appears to be formed locally. In addition, 29 aerosol filter samples were analyzed using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) spectroscopy to determine relative concentrations of organic functional groups. Houston aerosols are less oxidized than those observed elsewhere, with smaller relative contributions of carbon-oxygen double bonds. These particles do not fit 1H NMR source apportionment fingerprints for identification of secondary, marine, and biomass burning organic aerosol, suggesting that a new fingerprint for highly urbanized and industrially influenced locations be established.

  18. Energy calibration issues in nuclear resonant vibrational spectroscopy: observing small spectral shifts and making fast calibrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongxin; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Dong, Weibing; Huang, Songping D

    2013-09-01

    The conventional energy calibration for nuclear resonant vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) is usually long. Meanwhile, taking NRVS samples out of the cryostat increases the chance of sample damage, which makes it impossible to carry out an energy calibration during one NRVS measurement. In this study, by manipulating the 14.4 keV beam through the main measurement chamber without moving out the NRVS sample, two alternative calibration procedures have been proposed and established: (i) an in situ calibration procedure, which measures the main NRVS sample at stage A and the calibration sample at stage B simultaneously, and calibrates the energies for observing extremely small spectral shifts; for example, the 0.3 meV energy shift between the 100%-(57)Fe-enriched [Fe4S4Cl4](=) and 10%-(57)Fe and 90%-(54)Fe labeled [Fe4S4Cl4](=) has been well resolved; (ii) a quick-switching energy calibration procedure, which reduces each calibration time from 3-4 h to about 30 min. Although the quick-switching calibration is not in situ, it is suitable for normal NRVS measurements.

  19. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and its application to biomedical research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakazawa, Mikio; Imai, Shoichi

    1988-07-01

    The principles of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy were explained and its application to biomedical research discussed. With /sup 31/P-NMR, it is feasible to conduct a continuous, non-invasive measurement of the contents of myocardial high-energy phosphate compounds and the intracellular pH (determined by monitoring the pH dependent shift of the inorganic phosphate peak relative to that of creatine phosphate), and to correlate them with the mechanical function. The determination of the free magnesium concentration is also possible on a similar principle to that for pH determination (the shift of MgATP peaks relative to ATP is utilized in this case). It is estimated to be 0.3 mM and was found not to be changed during ischemia. Several examples of studies including our own conducted to delineate the ischemic derangements of the myocardial energy metabolism and the effects of various interventions thereupon were illustrated. Finally a brief mention was made of the saturation transfer technique. This is the only method with which one can study the kinetics of the enzyme reactions under in vivo conditions. The application of the method for analysis of the creatine kinase reaction and the ATP synthesis was demonstrated. (author) 49 refs.

  20. Soil humic-like organic compounds in prescribed fire emissions using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalbot, M.-C.; Nikolich, G.; Etyemezian, V.; Dubois, D.W.; King, J.; Shafer, D.; Gamboa da Costa, G.; Hinton, J.F.; Kavouras, I.G.

    2013-01-01

    Here we present the chemical characterization of the water-soluble organic carbon fraction of atmospheric aerosol collected during a prescribed fire burn in relation to soil organic matter and biomass combustion. Using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, we observed that humic-like substances in fire emissions have been associated with soil organic matter rather than biomass. Using a chemical mass balance model, we estimated that soil organic matter may contribute up to 41% of organic hydrogen and up to 27% of water-soluble organic carbon in fire emissions. Dust particles, when mixed with fresh combustion emissions, substantially enhances the atmospheric oxidative capacity, particle formation and microphysical properties of clouds influencing the climatic responses of atmospheric aeroso. Owing to the large emissions of combustion aerosol during fires, the release of dust particles from soil surfaces that are subjected to intense heating and shear stress has, so far, been lacking. -- Highlights: •We characterized the water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) of fire emissions by NMR. •Distinct patterns were observed for soil dust and vegetation combustion emissions. •Soil organic matter accounted for most of WSOC in early prescribed burn emissions. -- Humic-like soil organic matter may be an important component of particulate emissions in the early stages of wildfires

  1. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the structure elucidation and biosynthesis of natural products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meksuriyen, D.

    1988-01-01

    Examination of a chloroform extract of Dracaena loureiri Gagnep (Agavaceae), a Thia medicinal plant possessing antibacterial activity, has led to the isolation of fifteen flavenoids. The biogenic relationships among these flavenoids isolated were briefly discussed. Definition of the skeleton and the unambiguous assignment of all of the protons of the isolates was achieved through extensive 2D-homonuclear chemical shift correlation, nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) difference spectroscopy and 2D-NOE experiments. The 1 H and 13 C NMR spectra of staurosporine, a potent biologically active agent from Streptomyces staurosporeus, were unambiguously assigned by using 2D homonuclear chemical shift correlation, NOE, 1 H-detected heteronuclear multiple-quantum coherence via direct coupling and via multiple-bond coupling for resonance assignments of protonated and nonprotonated carbons, respectively. S. Staurosporeus was found to utilize endogenous and exogenous D- and L-isomers of trytophan in the production of staurosporine. The biosynthesis of staurosporine was examined by employing carbon-14, tritium, and carbon-13 labeled precursors

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and its application to biomedical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakazawa, Mikio; Imai, Shoichi

    1988-01-01

    The principles of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy were explained and its application to biomedical research discussed. With 31 P-NMR, it is feasible to conduct a continuous, non-invasive measurement of the contents of myocardial high-energy phosphate compounds and the intracellular pH (determined by monitoring the pH dependent shift of the inorganic phosphate peak relative to that of creatine phosphate), and to correlate them with the mechanical function. The determination of the free magnesium concentration is also possible on a similar principle to that for pH determination (the shift of MgATP peaks relative to ATP is utilized in this case). It is estimated to be 0.3 mM and was found not to be changed during ischemia. Several examples of studies including our own conducted to delineate the ischemic derangements of the myocardial energy metabolism and the effects of various interventions thereupon were illustrated. Finally a brief mention was made of the saturation transfer technique. This is the only method with which one can study the kinetics of the enzyme reactions under in vivo conditions. The application of the method for analysis of the creatine kinase reaction and the ATP synthesis was demonstrated. (author) 49 refs

  3. Structure determination of human Lck unique and SH3 domains by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willbold Dieter

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein tyrosine kinases are involved in signal transduction pathways that regulate cell growth, differentiation, activation and transformation. Human lymphocyte specific kinase (Lck is a 56 kDa protein involved in T-cell- and IL2-receptor signaling. Three-dimensional structures are known for SH3, SH2 and kinase domains of Lck as well as for other tyrosine kinases. No structure is known for the unique domain of any Src-type tyrosine kinase. Results Lck(1–120 comprising unique and SH3 domains was structurally investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. We found the unique domain, in contrast to the SH3 part, to have basically no defined structural elements. The solution structure of the SH3 part could be determined with very high precision. It does not show significant differences to Lck SH3 in the absence of the unique domain. Minor differences were observed to the X-ray structure of Lck SH3. Conclusion The unique domain of Lck does not contain any defined structure elements in the absence of ligands and membranes. Presence of the unique domain is not relevant to the three-dimensional structure of the Lck SH3 domain.

  4. Investigation of stroke in sickle cell disease by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Z.; Bogdan, A.R.; Zimmermann, R.A.; Gusnard, D.A.; Leigh, J.S.; Ohene-Frempong, K.

    1992-01-01

    Localized proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), obtained with stimulated echo and spin echo sequences, MR imaging (MRI) and MR angiography (MRA) were used to study the brain in 13 children and adolescents with sickle cell disease. Regions of interest (ROI) studied by MRS included regions appearing normal on MRI as well as regions showing complications of sickle cell disease, including focal deep white matter areas of high signal intensity (deep white matter ischemia, DWMI) seen on long TR images, focal atropic brain areas, and infarcts. The findings in these studies are summarized as follows: Normal-appearing regions on MRI have normal MRS. In ROI including small areas of DWMI, lactate elevation was not detected, but the levels of N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA) appeared slightly elevated. In areas of DWMI 1-2 cm in size, reduced blood flow could be seen on MRA and lactate elevation could be detected with MRS. When blood flow to a DWMI region was normal, NAA was reduced and there was little lactate elevation, as cell death had already occurred. ROI consisting of atrophic tissue had reduced NAA levels but total creatine levels were not changed. Sometimes lipids, presumably from broken cell membrane, could be detected. In regions of past massive stroke, all metabolites were absent except for small amounts of lactate or lipids. (orig.)

  5. New insights into pre-lithiation kinetics of graphite anodes via nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtstiege, Florian; Schmuch, Richard; Winter, Martin; Brunklaus, Gunther; Placke, Tobias

    2018-02-01

    Pre-lithiation of anode materials can be an effective method to compensate active lithium loss which mainly occurs in the first few cycles of a lithium ion battery (LIB), due to electrolyte decomposition and solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) formation at the surface of the anode. There are many different pre-lithiation methods, whereas pre-lithiation using metallic lithium constitutes the most convenient and widely utilized lab procedure in literature. In this work, for the first time, solid state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) is applied to monitor the reaction kinetics of the pre-lithiation process of graphite with lithium. Based on static 7Li NMR, we can directly observe both the dissolution of lithium metal and parallel formation of LiCx species in the obtained NMR spectra with time. It is also shown that the degree of pre-lithiation as well as distribution of lithium metal on the electrode surface have a strong impact on the reaction kinetics of the pre-lithiation process and on the remaining amount of lithium metal. Overall, our findings are highly important for further optimization of pre-lithiation methods for LIB anode materials, both in terms of optimized pre-lithiation time and appropriate amounts of lithium metal.

  6. Atomic Scale Structural Studies of Macromolecular Assemblies by Solid-state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loquet, Antoine; Tolchard, James; Berbon, Melanie; Martinez, Denis; Habenstein, Birgit

    2017-09-17

    Supramolecular protein assemblies play fundamental roles in biological processes ranging from host-pathogen interaction, viral infection to the propagation of neurodegenerative disorders. Such assemblies consist in multiple protein subunits organized in a non-covalent way to form large macromolecular objects that can execute a variety of cellular functions or cause detrimental consequences. Atomic insights into the assembly mechanisms and the functioning of those macromolecular assemblies remain often scarce since their inherent insolubility and non-crystallinity often drastically reduces the quality of the data obtained from most techniques used in structural biology, such as X-ray crystallography and solution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). We here present magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy (SSNMR) as a powerful method to investigate structures of macromolecular assemblies at atomic resolution. SSNMR can reveal atomic details on the assembled complex without size and solubility limitations. The protocol presented here describes the essential steps from the production of 13 C/ 15 N isotope-labeled macromolecular protein assemblies to the acquisition of standard SSNMR spectra and their analysis and interpretation. As an example, we show the pipeline of a SSNMR structural analysis of a filamentous protein assembly.

  7. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 11. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: Biological Applications. B G Hegde. General Article Volume 20 Issue 11 November 2015 pp 1017-1032. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  8. Laser magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrari, C.A.

    1985-01-01

    The technique of laser resonance magnetic resonance allows one to study the high-resolution spectroscopy of transient paramagnetic species, viz, atoms, radicals, and molecular ions. This article is a brief exposition of the method, describing the principles, instrumentation and applicability of the IR and FIR-LMR and shows results of HF + . (Author) [pt

  9. Interleaved localized 1H/31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of skeletal muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyerspeer, M.

    2005-09-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has been used as a spectroscopic method in physics and chemistry before it was developed to become a diagnostic imaging tool in medicine. When NMR spectroscopy is applied to human tissue, metabolism can be studied in normal physiological and pathological states in vivo. Metabolite concentrations and rates can be monitored dynamically and with localization of a defined region of interest. The 'window' which is opened for observation, i.e. which quantities are measured, depends on the nucleus used for RF excitation. Mechanisms of adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP) resynthesis, as a direct source of energy for muscle contraction, are phosphocreatine (PCr) splitting, glycolysis, beta-oxidation and, finally, oxidative phosphorylation. Whilst the dependency of these processes' fractional contribution to muscular energy supply on exercise type and duration is well known, quantitative models of the regulating mechanisms involved are still subject of current research. A large fraction of the established knowledge about metabolism is based on biochemical analysis of tissue acquired invasively (e.g. microdialysis and open-flow microperfusion) or representing averaged metabolic concentrations for the whole body (via serum metabolites or gas exchange analysis). Localized NMR spectroscopy, however, is capable of non-invasively acquiring time-resolved data from a defined volume of interest, in vivo. In contrast to the vast majority of MRS studies investigating metabolism, where spectra of a single nucleus (commonly 1 H, 31 P or 13 C) were acquired or several MR spectra with different nuclei were measured in separate experiments, this work opens an additional 'window' on muscle metabolism by interleaved localized acquisition of 1 H and 31 P NMR spectra from human calf muscle in vivo, during rest, exercise and recovery, in a single experiment. Using this technique, the time courses of the concentrations of phosphocreatine, inorganic phosphate (Pi), ATP

  10. Predicting octane number using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and artificial neural networks

    KAUST Repository

    Abdul Jameel, Abdul Gani

    2018-04-17

    Machine learning algorithms are attracting significant interest for predicting complex chemical phenomenon. In this work, a model to predict research octane number (RON) and motor octane number (MON) of pure hydrocarbons, hydrocarbon-ethanol blends and gasoline-ethanol blends has been developed using artificial neural networks (ANN) and molecular parameters from 1H nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. RON and MON of 128 pure hydrocarbons, 123 hydrocarbon-ethanol blends of known composition and 30 FACE (fuels for advanced combustion engines) gasoline-ethanol blends were utilized as a dataset to develop the ANN model. The effect of weight % of seven functional groups including paraffinic CH3 groups, paraffinic CH2 groups, paraffinic CH groups, olefinic -CH=CH2 groups, naphthenic CH-CH2 groups, aromatic C-CH groups and ethanolic OH groups on RON and MON was studied. The effect of branching (i.e., methyl substitution), denoted by a parameter termed as branching index (BI), and molecular weight (MW) were included as inputs along with the seven functional groups to predict RON and MON. The topology of the developed ANN models for RON (9-540-314-1) and MON (9-340-603-1) have two hidden layers and a large number of nodes, and was validated against experimentally measured RON and MON of pure hydrocarbons, hydrocarbon-ethanol and gasoline-ethanol blends; a good correlation (R2=0.99) between the predicted and the experimental data was obtained. The average error of prediction for both RON and MON was found to be 1.2 which is close to the range of experimental uncertainty. This shows that the functional groups in a molecule or fuel can be used to predict its ON, and the complex relationship between them can be captured by tools like ANN.

  11. Predicting octane number using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and artificial neural networks

    KAUST Repository

    Abdul Jameel, Abdul Gani; Oudenhoven, Vincent Van; Emwas, Abdul-Hamid M.; Sarathy, Mani

    2018-01-01

    Machine learning algorithms are attracting significant interest for predicting complex chemical phenomenon. In this work, a model to predict research octane number (RON) and motor octane number (MON) of pure hydrocarbons, hydrocarbon-ethanol blends and gasoline-ethanol blends has been developed using artificial neural networks (ANN) and molecular parameters from 1H nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. RON and MON of 128 pure hydrocarbons, 123 hydrocarbon-ethanol blends of known composition and 30 FACE (fuels for advanced combustion engines) gasoline-ethanol blends were utilized as a dataset to develop the ANN model. The effect of weight % of seven functional groups including paraffinic CH3 groups, paraffinic CH2 groups, paraffinic CH groups, olefinic -CH=CH2 groups, naphthenic CH-CH2 groups, aromatic C-CH groups and ethanolic OH groups on RON and MON was studied. The effect of branching (i.e., methyl substitution), denoted by a parameter termed as branching index (BI), and molecular weight (MW) were included as inputs along with the seven functional groups to predict RON and MON. The topology of the developed ANN models for RON (9-540-314-1) and MON (9-340-603-1) have two hidden layers and a large number of nodes, and was validated against experimentally measured RON and MON of pure hydrocarbons, hydrocarbon-ethanol and gasoline-ethanol blends; a good correlation (R2=0.99) between the predicted and the experimental data was obtained. The average error of prediction for both RON and MON was found to be 1.2 which is close to the range of experimental uncertainty. This shows that the functional groups in a molecule or fuel can be used to predict its ON, and the complex relationship between them can be captured by tools like ANN.

  12. Chiral discrimination of sibutramine enantiomers by capillary electrophoresis and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong-Jae; Choi, Seungho; Lee, Jinhoo; Nguyen, NgocVan Thi; Lee, Kyungran; Kang, Jong Seong; Mar, Woongchon; Kim, Kyeong Ho

    2012-03-01

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-NMR) have been used to discriminate the enantiomers of sibutramine using cyclodextrin derivatives. Possible correlation between CE and (1)H-NMR was examined. Good correlation between the (1)H-NMR shift non-equivalence data for sibutramine and the degree of enantioseparation in CE was observed. In CE study, a method of enantiomeric separation and quantitation of sibutramine was developed using enantiomeric standards. The method was based on the use of 50 mM of phosphate buffer of pH 3.0 with 10 mM of methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (M-β-CD). 0.05% of LOD, 0.2% of LOQ for S-sibutramine enantiomer was achieved, and the method was validated and applied to the quantitative determination of sibutramine enantiomers in commercial drugs. On a 600 MHz (1)H-NMR analysis, enantiomer signal separation of sibutramine was obtained by fast diastereomeric interaction with a chiral selector M-β-CD. For chiral separation and quantification, N-methyl proton peaks (at 2.18 ppm) were selected because of its being singlet and simple for understanding of diastereomeric interaction. Effects of temperature and concentration of chiral selector on enantiomer signal separation were investigated. The optimum condition was 0.5 mg/mL of sibutramine and 10 mg/mL of M-β-CD at 10°C. Distinguishment of 0.5% of S-sibutramine in R-sibutramine was found to be possible by (1)H-NMR with M-β-CD as chiral selector. Host-guest interaction between sibutramine and M-β-CD was confirmed by (1)H-NMR studies and CE studies. A Structure of the inclusion complex was proposed considering (1)H-NMR and 2D ROESY studies.

  13. Absolute quantitative analysis for sorbic acid in processed foods using proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtsuki, Takashi; Sato, Kyoko; Sugimoto, Naoki; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Kawamura, Yoko

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A method using qHNMR was applied and validated to determine SA in processed foods. ► This method has good accuracy, precision, selectiveness, and linearity. ► The proposed method is more rapid and simple than the conventional method. ► We found that the proposed method is reliable for the accurate determination of SA. ► This method can be used for the monitoring of SA in processed foods. - Abstract: An analytical method using solvent extraction and quantitative proton nuclear magnetic resonance (qHNMR) spectroscopy was applied and validated for the absolute quantification of sorbic acid (SA) in processed foods. The proposed method showed good linearity. The recoveries for samples spiked at the maximum usage level specified for food in Japan and at 0.13 g kg −1 (beverage: 0.013 g kg −1 ) were larger than 80%, whereas those for samples spiked at 0.063 g kg −1 (beverage: 0.0063 g kg −1 ) were between 56.9 and 83.5%. The limit of quantification was 0.063 g kg −1 for foods (and 0.0063 g kg −1 for beverages containing Lactobacillus species). Analysis of the SA content of commercial processed foods revealed quantities equal to or greater than those measured using conventional steam-distillation extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography quantification. The proposed method was rapid, simple, accurate, and precise, and provided International System of Units traceability without the need for authentic analyte standards. It could therefore be used as an alternative to the quantification of SA in processed foods using conventional method.

  14. Absolute quantitative analysis for sorbic acid in processed foods using proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohtsuki, Takashi, E-mail: ohtsuki@nihs.go.jp [National Institute of Health Sciences, 1-18-1 Kamiyoga, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 158-8501 (Japan); Sato, Kyoko; Sugimoto, Naoki; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Kawamura, Yoko [National Institute of Health Sciences, 1-18-1 Kamiyoga, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 158-8501 (Japan)

    2012-07-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A method using qHNMR was applied and validated to determine SA in processed foods. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This method has good accuracy, precision, selectiveness, and linearity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The proposed method is more rapid and simple than the conventional method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found that the proposed method is reliable for the accurate determination of SA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This method can be used for the monitoring of SA in processed foods. - Abstract: An analytical method using solvent extraction and quantitative proton nuclear magnetic resonance (qHNMR) spectroscopy was applied and validated for the absolute quantification of sorbic acid (SA) in processed foods. The proposed method showed good linearity. The recoveries for samples spiked at the maximum usage level specified for food in Japan and at 0.13 g kg{sup -1} (beverage: 0.013 g kg{sup -1}) were larger than 80%, whereas those for samples spiked at 0.063 g kg{sup -1} (beverage: 0.0063 g kg{sup -1}) were between 56.9 and 83.5%. The limit of quantification was 0.063 g kg{sup -1} for foods (and 0.0063 g kg{sup -1} for beverages containing Lactobacillus species). Analysis of the SA content of commercial processed foods revealed quantities equal to or greater than those measured using conventional steam-distillation extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography quantification. The proposed method was rapid, simple, accurate, and precise, and provided International System of Units traceability without the need for authentic analyte standards. It could therefore be used as an alternative to the quantification of SA in processed foods using conventional method.

  15. Sealed magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance probe and process for spectroscopy of hazardous samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Herman M.; Washton, Nancy M.; Mueller, Karl T.; Sears, Jr., Jesse A.; Townsend, Mark R.; Ewing, James R.

    2016-06-14

    A magic-angle-spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe is described that includes double containment enclosures configured to seal and contain hazardous samples for analysis. The probe is of a modular design that ensures containment of hazardous samples during sample analysis while preserving spin speeds for superior NMR performance and convenience of operation.

  16. Phosphorus-doped thin silica films characterized by magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, H.J.; Skibsted, J.; Kristensen, Martin

    2001-01-01

    Magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of 31P and 29Si have been achieved for a thin silica film doped with only 1.8% 31P and deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition on a pure silicon wafer. The observation of a symmetric 31P chemical shift tensor is consistent...

  17. Advantages and disadvantages of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy as a hyphenated technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Elipe, Maria Victoria

    2003-01-01

    A general overview of the advancements and applications of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) hyphenated with other analytical techniques is given from a practical point of view. Details on the advantages and disadvantages of the hyphenation of NMR with liquid chromatography as LC-NMR and also with mass spectrometry as LC-MS-NMR are demonstrated with two examples. Current developments of NMR with other analytical separation techniques, especially with capillary liquid chromatography (capLC) are discussed

  18. Chromatographic and spectroscopic analysis of heavy crude oil mixtures with emphasis in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Sandra L.; Silva, Artur M.S.; Ribeiro, Jorge C.; Martins, Fernando G.; Da Silva, Francisco A.; Silva, Carlos M.

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The chromatographic and spectroscopic techniques used to characterize heavy crude oils, although more focused in the nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy as the technique of choice, due to its capability to provide great information on the chemical nature of individual types of proton and carbon atoms in different and complex mixtures of crude oils are described. This review is based on 65 references and describes in a critical and interpretative ways the advantages of the NMR spectroscopy as a main technique to be used in crude oil refining industries that want to characterize crude oil fractions and the obtained refined products. Highlights: ► Chromatogrfaphic and spectroscopic techniques used to characterize heavy crude oils have been reviewed. ► This review describes in a critical and interpretative ways the advantages of the NMR spectroscopy as a main technique to be used in crude oil refining industries. ► The progress in the interpretation of the NMR spectra and of different multivariate data analyses and their potential in the identification and characterization of hydrocarbons and their physical and chemical properties have also been reviewed. - Abstract: The state of the art in the characterization of heavy crude oil mixtures is presented. This characterization can be done by different techniques, such as gas chromatography (GC), high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), thin layer chromatography (TLC), infrared spectroscopy (IR), Raman spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and mass spectrometry (MS). Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is the technique of choice due to its capability to provide information on the chemical nature of individual types of hydrogen and carbon atoms in different and complex mixtures of crude oils. The progress made in the interpretation of the NMR spectra with the development of new NMR techniques and different multivariate data analyses could give relevant

  19. Structural Characterization of Amadori Rearrangement Product of Glucosylated Nα-Acetyl-Lysine by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanjiang Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Maillard reaction is a nonenzymatic reaction between reducing sugars and free amino acid moieties, which is known as one of the most important modifications in food science. It is essential to characterize the structure of Amadori rearrangement products (ARPs formed in the early stage of Maillard reaction. In the present study, the Nα-acetyl-lysine-glucose model had been successfully set up to produce ARP, Nα-acetyl-lysine-glucose. After HPLC purification, ARP had been identified by ESI-MS with intense [M+H]+ ion at 351 m/z and the purity of ARP was confirmed to be over 90% by the relative intensity of [M+H]+ ion. Further structural characterization of the ARP was accomplished by using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy, including 1D 1H NMR and 13C NMR, the distortionless enhancement by polarization transfer (DEPT-135 and 2D 1H-1H and 13C-1H correlation spectroscopy (COSY and 2D nuclear overhauser enhancement spectroscopy (NOESY. The complexity of 1D 1H NMR and 13C NMR was observed due to the presence of isomers in glucose moiety of ARP. However, DEPT-135 and 2D NMR techniques provided more structural information to assign the 1H and 13C resonances of ARP. 2D NOESY had successfully confirmed the glycosylated site between 10-N in Nα-acetyl-lysine and 7′-C in glucose.

  20. Nuclear structure studies of rare francium isotopes using Collinear Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (CRIS)

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2084441

    It was known for many years that nuclei possessing certain numbers of protons (Z) and neutrons (N), called the magic numbers (8,20,28,50,82,126...), exhibit characteristic behavior and are in general more stable than their neighboring isotopes. As the capabilities of producing isotopes with more extreme values of Z and N increased, it was realized that those spherical nuclei only represent a small fraction of the total number of isotopes and that most isotopes are deformed. In order to study exotic isotopes and their deformation, it was necessary to develop new experimental techniques that would be powerful enough to be able to cope with very small production yields, but precise enough to measure the nuclear properties (such as radii and moments) with relatively small uncertainties. One technique that can measure nuclear properties of scarcely produced isotopes is in-source resonant ionization, but this technique does not allow for sufficient precision to deduce nuclear quadrupole moments. Furthermore, this t...

  1. Evaluation of poly(vinylpyrrolidone) and collagen by Low Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy; Avaliacao da polivinilpirrolidona e do colageno por ressonancia magnetica nuclear de baixo campo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Paula de M.; Tavares, Maria I.B. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Macromoleculas Professora Eloisa Mano]. E-mail: pmcosta@ima.ufrj.br

    2005-07-01

    Blends of natural and synthetic polymers represent a new class of materials with better mechanical properties and biocompatibility than those of the single components. Collagen and poly(vinylpyrrolidone) are well known for their important biological properties. The blending of collagen with poly(vinylpyrrolidone) makes it possible to obtain new materials in which strong interactions between the synthetic and biological components occur. Do to the excellent biocompatibility of these polymers, this blend has been much studied intending biomedical applications. And a one technique that can provide important information on molecular mobility, compatibility and even evaluate the interactions that can occur with these polymers is the Low Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. Thus, the purpose of this work is to evaluate collagen and poly(vinylpyrrolidone) by Low Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. From the values of relaxation times obtained, we can conclude that these materials have different interactions, and different mobility domains, confirming the heterogeneity and complexity of these materials. (author)

  2. Material degradation of liquid organic semiconductors analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukushima, Tatsuya; Yamamoto, Junichi; Fukuchi, Masashi; Kaji, Hironori, E-mail: kaji@scl.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Hirata, Shuzo; Jung, Heo Hyo; Adachi, Chihaya [Center for Organic Photonics and Electronics Research (OPERA), Kyusyu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Hirata, Osamu; Shibano, Yuki [Nissan Chemical Industries, LTD, 722-1 Tsuboi, Funabashi 274-8507 (Japan)

    2015-08-15

    Liquid organic light-emitting diodes (liquid OLEDs) are unique devices consisting only of liquid organic semiconductors in the active layer, and the device performances have been investigated recently. However, the device degradation, especially, the origin has been unknown. In this study, we show that material degradation occurs in liquid OLEDs, whose active layer is composed of carbazole with an ethylene glycol chain. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments clearly exhibit that the dimerization reaction of carbazole moiety occurs in the liquid OLEDs during driving the devices. In contrast, cleavages of the ethylene glycol chain are not detected within experimental error. The dimerization reaction is considered to be related to the device degradation.

  3. Development of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging/spectroscopy for improved petroleum recovery. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrufet, M.A.; Flumerfelt, F.W.; Walsh, M.P.; Watson, A.T.

    1994-04-01

    The overall objectives of this program are to develop and apply Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging (NMRI) and CT X-Ray Scanning methods for determining rock, fluid, and petrophysical properties and for fundamental studies of multiphase flow behavior in porous media. Specific objectives are divided into four subtasks: (1) development of NMRI and CT scanning for the determination of rock-fluid and petrophysical properties; (2) development of NMRI and CT scanning for characterizing conventional multiphase displacement processes; (3) development of NMR and CT scanning for characterizing dispersed phase processes; and (4) miscible displacement studies.

  4. Classification of brain tumors by means of proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sottile, V.S.; Zanchi, D.E.

    2017-01-01

    In the present work, at the request of health professionals, a computer application named “ViDa” was developed. The aim of this study is to differentiate brain lesions according to whether or not they are tumors, and their subsequent classification into different tumor types using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (SVS) with an echo time of 30 milliseconds. For this development, different areas of knowledge were integrated, among which are Artificial intelligence, physics, programming, physiopathology, images in medicine, among others. Biomedical imaging can be divided into two stages: the pre-processing, performed by the resonator, and post-processing software, performed by ViDa, for the interpretation of the data. This application is included within the Medical Informatics area, as it provides assistance for clinical decision making. The role of the biomedical engineer is fulfilled by developing a health technology in response to a manifested real-life problem. The tool developed shows promising results achieving a 100% Sensitivity, 73% Specificity, 77% Positive Predictive Value and 100% Negative Predictive Value reported in 21 cases tested. The correct classifications of the tumor’s origin reach 70%, the classification of non-astrocytic lesions achieves 67% of correct classifications in that the gradation of astrocytomas achieves a 57% of gradations that agree with biopsies and 43% of slight errors. It was possible to develop an application of assistance to the diagnosis, which together with others medical tests, will make it possible to sharpen the diagnoses of brain tumors. (authors) [es

  5. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyerhoff, D.J.; Weiner, M.W.

    1989-01-01

    A major function of the liver is regulation of carbohydrate, lipid, and nitrogen metabolism. Food is absorbed by the intestines and transported to the liver by the portal circulation. Substrates are metabolized and stored in the liver to maintain optimal blood concentrations of glucose and lipids. Ammonia generated in the gastrointestinal tract is converted to urea in the liver by the urea cycle. Various forms of liver disease are associated with disorders of carbohydrate, fat, and nitrogen metabolism. Therefore the ability to characterize liver metabolism noninvasively is of potential diagnostic value. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) provides information about tissue metabolism by measuring concentrations of metabolites. However, to determine the anatomic location from which spectroscopic signals are derived, MRS could be performed in conjunction with MRI. This paper summarizes the current experience with spectroscopy ion animal models of human disease and reviews the clinical experience with hepatic MRS to date

  6. Material degradation of liquid organic semiconductors analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuya Fukushima

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Liquid organic light-emitting diodes (liquid OLEDs are unique devices consisting only of liquid organic semiconductors in the active layer, and the device performances have been investigated recently. However, the device degradation, especially, the origin has been unknown. In this study, we show that material degradation occurs in liquid OLEDs, whose active layer is composed of carbazole with an ethylene glycol chain. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR experiments clearly exhibit that the dimerization reaction of carbazole moiety occurs in the liquid OLEDs during driving the devices. In contrast, cleavages of the ethylene glycol chain are not detected within experimental error. The dimerization reaction is considered to be related to the device degradation.

  7. Erythrocytes in muscular dystrophy. Investigation with 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarpel, G.; Lubansky, H.J.; Danon, M.J.; Omachi, A.

    1981-01-01

    Phosphorus 31 nuclear magnetic resonance ( 31 P NMR) signals were recorded from intact human erythrocytes for 16 hours. Total phosphate concentration, which was estimated as the sum of the individual 31 P signals, was 25% lower in erythrocytes from men with myotonic dystrophy than in control erythrocytes. The inorganic-phosphate fraction contained the highest average phosphate concentration over the 16-hour period, and made the major contribution to the difference in total phosphate between the two groups. This result was not observed in erythrocytes from either women with myotonic dystrophy or patients with Duchenne's dystrophy and may be due to a change in cell membrane permeability to inorganic phosphate, which leads to lower steady-state concentrations of the intracellular phosphates

  8. Erythrocytes in muscular dystrophy. Investigation with 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarpel, G.; Lubansky, H.J.; Danon, M.J.; Omachi, A.

    1981-01-01

    Phosphorus 31 nuclear magnetic resonance (31P NMR) signals were recorded from intact human erythrocytes for 16 hours. Total phosphate concentration, which was estimated as the sum of the individual 31P signals, was 25% lower in erythrocytes from men with myotonic dystrophy than in control erythrocytes. The inorganic-phosphate fraction contained the highest average phosphate concentration over the 16-hour period, and made the major contribution to the difference in total phosphate between the two groups. This result was not observed in erythrocytes from either women with myotonic dystrophy or patients with Duchenne's dystrophy and may be due to a change in cell membrane permeability to inorganic phosphate, which lead to lower steady-state concentrations of the intracellular phosphates

  9. Discriminating poststroke depression from stroke by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy-based metabonomic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao J

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Jianqi Xiao,1,* Jie Zhang,2,* Dan Sun,3,* Lin Wang,4,* Lijun Yu,5 Hongjing Wu,5 Dan Wang,5 Xuerong Qiu5 1Department of Neurosurgery, The First Hospital of Qiqihar City, Qiqihar, 2Department of Internal Medicine, Central Hospital of Jiamusi City, Jiamusi, 3Department of Geriatrics, General Hospital of Daqing Oil Field, Daqing, 4Department of Nursing, 5Department of Neurology, The First Hospital of Qiqihar City, Qiqihar, Heilongjiang, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Poststroke depression (PSD, the most common psychiatric disease that stroke survivors face, is estimated to affect ~30% of poststroke patients. However, there are still no objective methods to diagnose PSD. In this study, to explore the differential metabolites in the urine of PSD subjects and to identify a potential biomarker panel for PSD diagnosis, the nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabonomic method was applied. Ten differential metabolites responsible for discriminating PSD subjects from healthy control (HC and stroke subjects were found, and five of these metabolites were identified as potential biomarkers (lactate, α-hydroxybutyrate, phenylalanine, formate, and arabinitol. The panel consisting of these five metabolites provided excellent performance in discriminating PSD subjects from HC and stroke subjects, achieving an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.946 in the training set (43 HC, 45 stroke, and 62 PSD subjects. Moreover, this panel could classify the blinded samples from the test set (31 HC, 33 stroke, and 32 PSD subjects with an area under the curve of 0.946. These results laid a foundation for the future development of urine-based objective methods for PSD diagnosis and investigation of PSD pathogenesis. Keywords: poststroke depression, PSD, stroke, nuclear magnetic resonance, NMR, metabonomic

  10. Altered phospholipid metabolism in schizophrenia: a phosphorus 31 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber-Fahr, Wolfgang; Englisch, Susanne; Esser, Andrea; Tunc-Skarka, Nuran; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Ende, Gabriele; Zink, Mathias

    2013-12-30

    Phospholipid (PL) metabolism is investigated by in vivo 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Inconsistent alterations of phosphocholine (PC), phosphoethanolamine (PE), glycerophosphocholine (GPC) and glycerophosphoethanolamine (GPE) have been described in schizophrenia, which might be overcome by specific editing techniques. The selective refocused insensitive nuclei-enhanced polarization transfer (RINEPT) technique was applied in a cross-sectional study involving 11 schizophrenia spectrum disorder patients (SZP) on stable antipsychotic monotherapy and 15 matched control subjects. Metabolite signals were found to be modulated by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) content and gray matter/brain matter ratio. Corrected metabolite concentrations of PC, GPC and PE differed between patients and controls in both subcortical and cortical regions, whereas antipsychotic medication exerted only small effects. Significant correlations were found between the severity of clinical symptoms and the assessed signals. In particular, psychotic symptoms correlated with PC levels in the cerebral cortex, depression with PC levels in the cerebellum and executive functioning with GPC in the insular and temporal cortices. In conclusion, after controlling for age and tissue composition, this investigation revealed alterations of metabolite levels in SZP and correlations with clinical properties. RINEPT 31P MRS should also be applied to at-risk-mental-state patients as well as drug-naïve and chronically treated schizophrenic patients in order to enhance the understanding of longitudinal alterations of PL metabolism in schizophrenia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Structural Elucidation of Metabolites of Synthetic Cannabinoid UR-144 by Cunninghamella elegans Using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Shimpei; Kuzhiumparambil, Unnikrishnan; Fu, Shanlin

    2018-03-08

    The number of new psychoactive substances keeps on rising despite the controlling efforts by law enforcement. Although metabolism of the newly emerging drugs is continuously studied to keep up with the new additions, the exact structures of the metabolites are often not identified due to the insufficient sample quantities for techniques such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The aim of the study was to characterise several metabolites of the synthetic cannabinoid (1-pentyl-1H-indol-3-yl) (2,2,3,3-tetramethylcyclopropyl) methanone (UR-144) by NMR spectroscopy after the incubation with the fungus Cunninghamella elegans. UR-144 was incubated with C. elegans for 72 h, and the resulting metabolites were chromatographically separated. Six fractions were collected and analysed by NMR spectroscopy. UR-144 was also incubated with human liver microsomes (HLM), and the liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry analysis was performed on the HLM metabolites with the characterised fungal metabolites as reference standards. Ten metabolites were characterised by NMR analysis including dihydroxy metabolites, carboxy and hydroxy metabolites, a hydroxy and ketone metabolite, and a carboxy and ketone metabolite. Of these metabolites, dihydroxy metabolite, carboxy and hydroxy metabolites, and a hydroxy and ketone metabolite were identified in HLM incubation. The results indicate that the fungus is capable of producing human-relevant metabolites including the exact isomers. The capacity of the fungus C. elegans to allow for NMR structural characterisation by enabling production of large amounts of metabolites makes it an ideal model to complement metabolism studies.

  12. Determination of aromatic fragment content in phenol-containing fractions of solid fuel conversion products using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanitskaya, L.V.; Kushnarev, D.F.; Polonov, V.M.; Kalabin, G.A.

    1986-03-01

    Optimum conditions are determined for obtaining quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance /sup 13/C spectra of fragments in phenol-containing fraction of coal products. Causes are analyzed of residual signals in spectra of un-protonized carbon atoms. The tests were carried out on: low-temperature carbonization tar and phenol fraction obtained during medium-temperature coking of Cherenkhovskii coal (which contains 84.13% C; 9.68% H; 1.23% S; 4.96% O); products of tar hydrogenation with various phenol content; standard phenol mixture. It was found that quantitative determination of aromatic fraction content in coal conversion products and other phenol- and amine-containing complex mixtures, using NMR spectroscopy requires the addition of dimethylsulfide or acetone in order to suppress specific interactions of phenols (amines) with relaxants and obtain quantitative subspectra of Tertiary and Quaternary aromatic carbon atoms. 16 references.

  13. Determination of scutellarin in breviscapine preparations using quantitative proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenzuo Jiang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to develop the selection criteria of proton signals for the determination of scutellarin using quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (qNMR, which is the main bioactive compound in breviscapine preparations for the treatment of cerebrovascular disease. The methyl singlet signal of 3-(trimethylsilylpropionic-2,2,3,3-d4 acid sodium salt was selected as the internal standard for quantification. The molar concentration of scutellarin was determined by employing different proton signals. To obtain optimum proton signals for the quantification, different combinations of proton signals were investigated according to two selection criteria: the recovery rate of qNMR method and quantitative results compared with those obtained with ultra-performance liquid chromatography. As a result, the chemical shift of H-2′ and H-6′ at δ 7.88 was demonstrated as the most suitable signal with excellent linearity range, precision, and recovery for determining scutellarin in breviscapine preparations from different manufacturers, batch numbers, and dosage forms. Hierarchical cluster analysis was employed to evaluate the determination results. The results demonstrated that the selection criteria of proton signals established in this work were reliable for the qNMR study of scutellarin in breviscapine preparations.

  14. Structures of peptide families by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and distance geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pease, J.H.

    1989-12-01

    The three dimensional structures of several small peptides were determined using a combination of {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and distance geometry calculations. These techniques were found to be particularly helpful for analyzing structural differences between related peptides since all of the peptides' {sup 1}H NMR spectra are very similar. The structures of peptides from two separate classes are presented. Peptides in the first class are related to apamin, an 18 amino acid peptide toxin from honey bee venom. The {sup 1}H NMR assignments and secondary structure determination of apamin were done previously. Quantitative NMR measurements and distance geometry calculations were done to calculate apamin's three dimensional structure. Peptides in the second class are 48 amino acid toxins from the sea anemone Radianthus paumotensis. The {sup 1}H NMR assignments of toxin II were done previously. The {sup 1}H NMR assignments of toxin III and the distance geometry calculations for both peptides are presented.

  15. A reactor for high-throughput high-pressure nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beach, N. J.; Knapp, S. M. M.; Landis, C. R., E-mail: landis@chem.wisc.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53719 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    The design of a reactor for operando nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) monitoring of high-pressure gas-liquid reactions is described. The Wisconsin High Pressure NMR Reactor (WiHP-NMRR) design comprises four modules: a sapphire NMR tube with titanium tube holder rated for pressures as high as 1000 psig (68 atm) and temperatures ranging from −90 to 90 °C, a gas circulation system that maintains equilibrium concentrations of dissolved gases during gas-consuming or gas-releasing reactions, a liquid injection apparatus that is capable of adding measured amounts of solutions to the reactor under high pressure conditions, and a rapid wash system that enables the reactor to be cleaned without removal from the NMR instrument. The WiHP-NMRR is compatible with commercial 10 mm NMR probes. Reactions performed in the WiHP-NMRR yield high quality, information-rich, and multinuclear NMR data over the entire reaction time course with rapid experimental turnaround.

  16. Metabolomics with Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in a Drosophila melanogaster Model of Surviving Sepsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakalov, Veli; Amathieu, Roland; Triba, Mohamed N.; Clément, Marie-Jeanne; Reyes Uribe, Laura; Le Moyec, Laurence; Kaynar, Ata Murat

    2016-01-01

    Patients surviving sepsis demonstrate sustained inflammation, which has been associated with long-term complications. One of the main mechanisms behind sustained inflammation is a metabolic switch in parenchymal and immune cells, thus understanding metabolic alterations after sepsis may provide important insights to the pathophysiology of sepsis recovery. In this study, we explored metabolomics in a novel Drosophila melanogaster model of surviving sepsis using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), to determine metabolite profiles. We used a model of percutaneous infection in Drosophila melanogaster to mimic sepsis. We had three experimental groups: sepsis survivors (infected with Staphylococcus aureus and treated with oral linezolid), sham (pricked with an aseptic needle), and unmanipulated (positive control). We performed metabolic measurements seven days after sepsis. We then implemented metabolites detected in NMR spectra into the MetExplore web server in order to identify the metabolic pathway alterations in sepsis surviving Drosophila. Our NMR metabolomic approach in a Drosophila model of recovery from sepsis clearly distinguished between all three groups and showed two different metabolomic signatures of inflammation. Sham flies had decreased levels of maltose, alanine, and glutamine, while their level of choline was increased. Sepsis survivors had a metabolic signature characterized by decreased glucose, maltose, tyrosine, beta-alanine, acetate, glutamine, and succinate. PMID:28009836

  17. Two-dimensional exchange and nutation exchange nuclear quadrupole resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackowiak, M.; Sinyavsky, N.; Velikite, N.; Nikolaev, D.

    2002-01-01

    A theoretical treatment of the 2D exchange NQR pulse sequence is presented and applied to a quantitative study of exchange processes in molecular crystals. It takes into account the off-resonance irradiation, which critically influences the spin dynamics. The response to the three-pulse sequence of a system of spins I=3/2 in zero applied field, experiencing electric quadrupole couplings, is analysed. The mixing dynamics by exchange and the expected cross-peak intensities as a function of the frequency offset have been derived. The theory is illustrated by a study of the optimization procedure, which is of crucial importance for the detection of the cross- and diagonal-peaks in a 2D-exchange spectrum. The systems investigated are hexachloroethane and tetrachloroethylene. They show threefold and twofold reorientational jumps about the carbon-carbon axis, respectively. A new method of direct determination of rotational angles based on two-dimensional nutation exchange NQR spectroscopy is proposed. The method involves the detection of exchange processes through NQR nutation spectra recorded after the mixing interval. The response of a system of spins I=3/2 to the three-pulse sequence with increasing pulse widths is analyzed. It is shown that the 2D-nutation exchange NQR spectrum exhibits characteristic ridges, which manifest the motional mechanism in a model-independent fashion. The angles through which the molecule rotates can be read directly from elliptical ridges in the 2D spectrum, which are also sensitive to the asymmetry parameter of the electric field gradient tensor. (orig.)

  18. Resonance ionization spectroscopy 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parks, J.E.; Omenetto, N.

    1991-01-01

    The Fifth International Symposium on Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (RIS) and its Applications was held in Varese, Italy, 16-21 September 1990. Interest in RIS and its applications continues to grow, and RIS is expanding into a more diverse and mature field of study. This maturity was evident in this meeting both in the basic science and understanding of RIS processes and in the number of new and improved applications and techniques. The application of RIS techniques to molecular detection problems made remarkable progress since the last meeting two years ago. Subtle effects pertaining to isotopic discrimination received more theoretical attention, and there now seems to be good understanding of these effects, which can lead to correction procedures and/or methods to avoid isotopic effects. RIS applications were presented in which significant, real world problems were addressed, demonstrating its capability to solve problems that previously could not be accurately solved by other more traditional techniques. The contributions to the conference are grouped under the following major topic headings: physics applications of rare atoms; laser ionization mechanisms - spectroscopy; atomic, molecular and ion sources; molecular RIS; atomic RIS - Rydberg states; environmental trace analysis; biological and medical applications; state selected chemistry; new laser sources and techniques; ultra-high resolution and isotopic selectivity; surface and bulk analysis. (Author)

  19. A no-tune no-match wideband probe for nuclear quadrupole resonance spectroscopy in the VHF range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharfetter, Hermann; Petrovic, Andreas; Eggenhofer, Heidi; Stollberger, Rudolf

    2014-12-01

    Nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectroscopy is a method for the characterization of chemical compounds containing so-called quadrupolar nuclei. Similar to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), the sample under investigation is irradiated with strong radiofrequency (RF) pulses, which stimulate the emission of weak RF signals from the quadrupolar nuclei. The signals are then amplified and Fourier transformed so as to obtain a spectrum. In principle, narrowband NQR spectra can be measured with NMR spectrometers. However, pure NQR signals require the absence of a static magnetic field and several special applications require the characterization of a substance over a large bandwidth, e.g. 50-100% of the central frequency, which is hardly possible with standard NMR equipment. Dedicated zero-field NQR equipment is not widespread and current concepts employ resonating probes which are tuned and matched over a wide range by using mechanical capacitors driven by stepper motors. While providing the highest signal to noise ratio (SNR) such probes are slow in operation and can only be operated from dedicated NMR consoles. We developed a low-cost NQR wideband probe without tuning and matching for applications in the very high frequency (VHF) range below 300 MHz. The probe coil was realized as part of a reactive network which approximates an exponential transmission line. The input reflection coefficient of the two developed prototype probe coils is ≤ 20 dB between 90-145 MHz and 74.5-99.5 MHz, respectively. Two wideband NQR spectra of published test substances were acquired with an SNR of better than 20 dB after sufficient averaging. The measured signals and the SNR correspond very well to the theoretically expected values and demonstrate the feasibility of the method. Because there is no need for tuning and matching, our probes can be operated easily from any available NMR console.

  20. Characterisation of human embryonic stem cells conditioning media by 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A MacIntyre

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cell culture media conditioned by human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs provide a complex supplement of protein and metabolic factors that support in vitro proliferation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs. However, the conditioning process is variable with different media batches often exhibiting differing capacities to maintain hESCs in culture. While recent studies have examined the protein complement of conditioned culture media, detailed information regarding the metabolic component of this media is lacking. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a (1H-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance ((1H-NMR metabonomics approach, 32 metabolites and small compounds were identified and quantified in media conditioned by passage 11 HFFs (CMp11. A number of metabolites were secreted by HFFs with significantly higher concentration of lactate, alanine, and formate detected in CMp11 compared to non-conditioned media. In contrast, levels of tryptophan, folate and niacinamide were depleted in CMp11 indicating the utilisation of these metabolites by HFFs. Multivariate statistical analysis of the (1H-NMR data revealed marked age-related differences in the metabolic profile of CMp11 collected from HFFs every 24 h over 72 h. Additionally, the metabolic profile of CMp11 was altered following freezing at -20°C for 2 weeks. CM derived from passage 18 HFFs (CMp18 was found to be ineffective at supporting hESCs in an undifferentiated state beyond 5 days culture. Multivariate statistical comparison of CMp11 and CMp18 metabolic profiles enabled rapid and clear discrimination between the two media with CMp18 containing lower concentrations of lactate and alanine as well as higher concentrations of glucose and glutamine. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: (1H-NMR-based metabonomics offers a rapid and accurate method of characterising hESC conditioning media and is a valuable tool for monitoring, controlling and optimising hESC culture media preparation.

  1. Characterization of the AT180 epitope of phosphorylated Tau protein by a combined nuclear magnetic resonance and fluorescence spectroscopy approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amniai, Laziza; Lippens, Guy; Landrieu, Isabelle

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → pThr231 of the Tau protein is necessary for the binding of the AT180 antibody. → pSer235 of the Tau protein does not interfere with the AT180 recognition of pThr231. → Epitope mapping is efficiently achieved by combining NMR and FRET spectroscopy. -- Abstract: We present here the characterization of the epitope recognized by the AT180 monoclonal antibody currently used to define an Alzheimer's disease (AD)-related pathological form of the phosphorylated Tau protein. Some ambiguity remains as to the exact phospho-residue(s) recognized by this monoclonal: pThr231 or both pThr231 and pSer235. To answer this question, we have used a combination of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and fluorescence spectroscopy to characterize in a qualitative and quantitative manner the phospho-residue(s) essential for the epitope recognition. Data from the first step of NMR experiments are used to map the residues bound by the antibodies, which were found to be limited to a few residues. A fluorophore is then chemically attached to a cystein residue introduced close-by the mapped epitope, at arginine 221, by mutagenesis of the recombinant protein. The second step of Foerster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between the AT180 antibody tryptophanes and the phospho-Tau protein fluorophore allows to calculate a dissociation constant Kd of 30 nM. We show that the sole pThr231 is necessary for the AT180 recognition of phospho-Tau and that phosphorylation of Ser235 does not interfere with the binding.

  2. The clinical utility of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy: recent in vitro, in vivo animal and clinical observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackstock, A. William; Kwock, Lester; Mukherji, Suresh K.; Schiro, Sharon; Tepper, Joel E.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Combined radiation and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) has resulted in improved outcomes in patients treated with gastrointestinal malignancies and squamous cancers of the head and neck. In our first aim, we proposed that the enhanced cell kill and tumor regression observed with the combination of 5-FU and radiation is related to radiation potentiating the anti-tumor effects of 5-FU. Using fluorine-19 ( 19 F) nuclear magnetic resonance (nmr) we non-invasively determined the tumor clearance rates of 5-FU +/- radiation in an animal model and used this research tool to predict tumor response in patients receiving concurrent radiation and 5-FU therapy. Our second aim was to evaluate the use of proton ( 1 H) nmr spectroscopy to non-invasively determine the spectral characteristics of malignant tumors in the head and neck and liver and correlate these clinical observations with in vitro and in vivo data. Materials and Methods: 1 H and 19 F spectroscopic analysis were performed with a 2.0T Otsuka magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy system. 1 H nmr patient studies were done on a clinical 1.5T Philips MR system. In vitro magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies were performed on a 11 T Bruker nmr system. Animal experiments for the 19 F nmr studies were performed on 3-6 week old female (Nu/Nu) athymic nude mice. Animals were injected s.c. with 10 6 human colon adenocarcinoma (HT-29) cells. At a tumor size of 1.0 cm, animals in the first group received i.v. 5-FU (100 mg/kg) immediately prior to spectroscopic analysis. Animals in the second group were treated with a single radiation dose of either 2 Gy or 10 Gy just prior to the 5-FU injection and subsequent spectroscopy. Spectroscopic analyses were performed at 20-30 minute intervals for 4-6 hr's. Results: 19 F nmr: A decrease in tumor clearance was observed in tumors pre-treated with a single dose of irradiation (2.0 Gy and 10 Gy). The clearance rate of the 5-FU for non-irradiated animals was 0.0178 min

  3. Evanescent Waves Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halidi, El Mohamed; Nativel, Eric; Akel, Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy and imaging can be classified as inductive techniques working in the near- to far-field regimes. We investigate an alternative capacitive detection with the use of micrometer sized probes positioned at sub wavelength distances of the sample in order...

  4. Simultaneous electromyography and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy--with application to muscle fatigue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard-Poulsen, P; Thomsen, C; Sinkjaer, T

    1992-01-01

    changes in human muscle. The aim of this study was to develop a method by which EMG and NMR spectroscopy measurements could be performed simultaneously. All measurements were performed in a whole body 1.5 Tesla NMR scanner. A calf muscle ergometer, designed for use in a whole body NMR scanner, was used....... The subject had the left foot strapped to the ergometer. The anterior tibial EMG was recorded by bipolar surface electrodes. A surface coil was strapped to the anterior tibial muscle next to the EMG electrodes. Simultaneous measurements of surface EMG and surface coil 31P NMR spectroscopy were performed...

  5. The utility of N-15 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for the study of natural products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randall, E.W.

    1978-01-01

    The utility of 15 N NMR spectroscopy for the study of natural products and the difficulties which must be overcome arte discussed. The widespread use of pulse Fourier techniques, decouplings, larger magnetic fields and large tube sizes allows a large number of 15 N studies of natural products, the more recent and important of these being peptides, nucleosides and nucleotides. Sites of protonation, tautomerism, sites of nitrosation and proton exchange behaviour for some of these natrual products have been studied. (A.G.)

  6. A phytochemical comparison of saw palmetto products using gas chromatography and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy metabolomic profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booker, Anthony; Suter, Andy; Krnjic, Ana; Strassel, Brigitte; Zloh, Mire; Said, Mazlina; Heinrich, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Preparations containing saw palmetto berries are used in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). There are many products on the market, and relatively little is known about their chemical variability and specifically the composition and quality of different saw palmetto products notwithstanding that in 2000, an international consultation paper from the major urological associations from the five continents on treatments for BPH demanded further research on this topic. Here, we compare two analytical approaches and characterise 57 different saw palmetto products. Methods An established method – gas chromatography – was used for the quantification of nine fatty acids, while a novel approach of metabolomic profiling using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used as a fingerprinting tool to assess the overall composition of the extracts. Key findings The phytochemical analysis determining the fatty acids showed a high level of heterogeneity of the different products in the total amount and of nine single fatty acids. A robust and reproducible 1H NMR spectroscopy method was established, and the results showed that it was possible to statistically differentiate between saw palmetto products that had been extracted under different conditions but not between products that used a similar extraction method. Principal component analysis was able to determine those products that had significantly different metabolites. Conclusions The metabolomic approach developed offers novel opportunities for quality control along the value chain of saw palmetto and needs to be followed further, as with this method, the complexity of a herbal extract can be better assessed than with the analysis of a single group of constituents. PMID:24417505

  7. A phytochemical comparison of saw palmetto products using gas chromatography and (1) H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy metabolomic profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booker, Anthony; Suter, Andy; Krnjic, Ana; Strassel, Brigitte; Zloh, Mire; Said, Mazlina; Heinrich, Michael

    2014-06-01

    Preparations containing saw palmetto berries are used in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). There are many products on the market, and relatively little is known about their chemical variability and specifically the composition and quality of different saw palmetto products notwithstanding that in 2000, an international consultation paper from the major urological associations from the five continents on treatments for BPH demanded further research on this topic. Here, we compare two analytical approaches and characterise 57 different saw palmetto products. An established method - gas chromatography - was used for the quantification of nine fatty acids, while a novel approach of metabolomic profiling using (1) H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used as a fingerprinting tool to assess the overall composition of the extracts. The phytochemical analysis determining the fatty acids showed a high level of heterogeneity of the different products in the total amount and of nine single fatty acids. A robust and reproducible (1) H NMR spectroscopy method was established, and the results showed that it was possible to statistically differentiate between saw palmetto products that had been extracted under different conditions but not between products that used a similar extraction method. Principal component analysis was able to determine those products that had significantly different metabolites. The metabolomic approach developed offers novel opportunities for quality control along the value chain of saw palmetto and needs to be followed further, as with this method, the complexity of a herbal extract can be better assessed than with the analysis of a single group of constituents. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  8. Acoustic resonance spectroscopy intrinsic seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olinger, C.T.; Burr, T.; Vnuk, D.R.

    1994-01-01

    We have begun to quantify the ability of acoustic resonance spectroscopy (ARS) to detect the removal and replacement of the lid of a simulated special nuclear materials drum. Conceptually, the acoustic spectrum of a container establishcs a baseline fingerprint, which we refer to as an intrinsic seal, for the container. Simply removing and replacing the lid changes some of the resonant frequencies because it is impossible to exactly duplicate all of the stress patterns between the lid and container. Preliminary qualitative results suggested that the ARS intrinsic seal could discriminate between cases where a lid has or has not been removed. The present work is directed at quantifying the utility of the ARS intrinsic seal technique, including the technique's sensitivity to ''nuisance'' effects, such as temperature swings, movement of the container, and placement of the transducers. These early quantitative tests support the potential of the ARS intrinsic seal application, but also reveal a possible sensitivity to nuisance effects that could limit environments or conditions under which the technique is effective

  9. A Metabolic Study on Colon Cancer Using 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Zamani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Colorectal carcinoma is the third cause of cancer deaths in the world. For diagnosis, invasive methods like colonoscopy and sigmoidoscopy are used, and noninvasive screening tests are not very accurate. We decided to study the potential of 1HNMR spectroscopy with metabolomics and chemometrics as a preliminary noninvasive test. We obtained a distinguishing pattern of metabolites and metabolic pathways between colon cancer patient and normal. Methods. Sera were obtained from confirmed colon cancer patients and the same number of healthy controls. Samples were sent for 1HNMR spectroscopy and analysis was carried out Chenomex and MATLAB software. Metabolites were identified using Human Metabolic Data Base (HDMB and the main metabolic cycles were identified using Metaboanalyst software. Results. 15 metabolites were identified such as pyridoxine, orotidine, and taurocholic acid. Main metabolic cycles involved were the bile acid biosynthesis, vitamin B6 metabolism, methane metabolism, and glutathione metabolism. Discussion. The main detected metabolic cycles were also reported earlier in different cancers. Our observations corroborated earlier studies that suggest the importance of lowering serum LCA/DCA and increasing vitamin B6 intake to help prevent colon cancer. This work can be looked upon as a preliminary step in using 1HNMR analysis as a screening test before invasive procedures.

  10. Monitoring of pistachio (Pistacia Vera) ripening by high field nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciubba, Fabio; Avanzato, Damiano; Vaccaro, Angela; Capuani, Giorgio; Spagnoli, Mariangela; Di Cocco, Maria Enrica; Tzareva, Irina Nikolova; Delfini, Maurizio

    2017-04-01

    The metabolic profiling of pistachio (Pistacia vera) aqueous extracts from two different cultivars, namely 'Bianca' and 'Gloria', was monitored over the months from May to September employing high field NMR spectroscopy. A large number of water-soluble metabolites were assigned by means of 1D and 2D NMR experiments. The change in the metabolic profiles monitored over time allowed the pistachio development to be investigated. Specific temporal trends of amino acids, sugars, organic acids and other metabolites were observed and analysed by multivariate Partial Least Squares (PLS) analysis. Statistical analysis showed that while in the period from May to September there were few differences between the two cultivars, the ripening rate was different.

  11. Green coffee oil analysis by high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amelio, Nicola; De Angelis, Elisabetta; Navarini, Luciano; Schievano, Elisabetta; Mammi, Stefano

    2013-06-15

    In this work, we show how an extensive and fast quantification of the main components in green coffee oil can be achieved by NMR, with minimal sample manipulation and use of organic solvents. The approach is based on the integration of characteristic NMR signals, selected because of their similar relaxation properties and because they fall in similar spectral regions, which minimizes offset effects. Quantification of glycerides, together with their fatty acid components (oleic, linoleic, linolenic and saturated) and minor species (caffeine, cafestol, kahweol and 16-O-methylcafestol), is achieved in less than 1h making use of (1)H and (13)C spectroscopy. The compositional data obtained are in reasonable agreement with classical chromatographic analyses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. High pressure Moessbauer spectroscopy with nuclear resonant forward scattering of synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasu, Saburo [Osaka Univ., Toyonaka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering Science

    1996-04-01

    The first observation of the pressure-induced transition from the antiferromagnetic to the ferromagnetic SrFeO{sub 3} was succeeded by measuring Moessbauer spectroscopy under high pressure produced by the diamond anvil cell (DAC). Sample is a polycrystal powder of antiferromagnetic SrFe0{sub 3} with the Neel temperature T{sub N}=140 K, the cubic system and perovskite type crystal. The average pressures used were 44 GPa and 74 GPa (300 K). SrFeO{sub 3} is paramagnetic material at 300 K, but the Neel temperature increases more than 300 K under high pressure and the quantized axis turns to the external magnetic field, so that we take it as it means the system displaying the phase transition to the ferromagnet. By the method, we can practice the measurement at low and high temperature under the external magnetic field by using the polarized light source. (S.Y.)

  13. Molecular speciation of phosphorus in organic amendments and amended soils using nuclear magnetic resonance and X-ray absorption spectroscopies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajibove, B.

    2007-01-01

    Characterization of phosphorus (P) in organic amendments is essential for environmentally sustainable fertilization of agricultural soils. The sequential chemical extraction (SCE) technique commonly used for P characterization does not provide any direct molecular information about P species. Studies were conducted to characterize P species in organic amendments and amended soils at a molecular level. The SCE was used to fractionate P in organic amendments including biosolids, hog, dairy and beef cattle manures, and poultry litter. The extracts were analyzed for total P and P species using inductively coupled plasma - optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) and solution 31 P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, respectively. The relative proportions of P species in intact organic amendments and residues after each extraction, and calcareous soils amended with organic amendments and monoammonium phosphate (MAP) were estimated using the synchrotron-based P 1s X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. The solution 31 P NMR provided a detailed characterization of organic P in the non-labile NaOH and HCl fractions of organic amendments, but was limited in characterizing the labile fractions of most of these organic amendments due to their proneness to alkaline hydrolysis. The XANES analysis, however, identified the actual chemical species constituting the labile P that was only characterized as inorganic P or orthophosphates by sequential extraction and solution 31 P NMR. In the amended Vertisolic and Chernozemic soils, XANES analysis estimated 'soluble and adsorbed P' as the dominant P species. For the Vertisolic soil, both the unamended and soil amended with biosolids and MAP contained hydroxyapatite (HAP). In addition, soil amended with biosolids, hog and dairy manures contained β-tricalcium phosphate (TRICAL), a more soluble CaP than HAP. TRICAL was found in all amended soils except in that amended with hog manure, while HAP was present

  14. Direct metabolic fingerprinting of commercial herbal tinctures by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Politi, Matteo; Zloh, Mire; Pintado, Manuela E; Castro, Paula M L; Heinrich, Michael; Prieto, Jose M

    2009-01-01

    Tinctures are widely used liquid pharmaceutical preparations traditionally obtained by maceration of one or more medicinal plants in ethanol-water solutions. Such a process results in the extraction of virtually hundreds of structurally diverse compounds with different polarities. Owing to the large chemical diversity of the constituents present in the herbal tinctures, the analytical tools used for the quality control of tinctures are usually optimised only for the detection of single chemical entities or specific class of compounds. In order to overcome the major limitations of the current methods used for analysis of tinctures, a new methodological approach based on NMR spectroscopy and MS spectrometry has been tested with different commercial tinctures. Diffusion-edited 1H-NMR (1D DOSY) and 1H-NMR with suppression of the ethanol and water signals have been applied here for the first time to the direct analysis of commercial herbal tinctures derived from Echinacea purpurea, Hypericum perforatum, Ginkgo biloba and Valeriana officinalis. The direct injection of the tinctures in the MS detector in order to obtain the corresponding metabolic profiles was also performed. Using both NMR and MS methods it was possible, without evaporation or separation steps, to obtain a metabolic fingerprint able to distinguish between tinctures prepared with different plants. Batch-to-batch homogeneity, as well as degradation after the expiry date of a batch, was also investigated. The techniques proposed here represent fast and convenient direct analyses of medicinal herbal tinctures.

  15. Molecular Level Structure and Dynamics of Electrolytes Using 17O Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murugesan, Vijayakumar; Han, Kee Sung; Hu, Jianzhi; Mueller, Karl T.

    2017-03-19

    Electrolytes help harness the energy from electrochemical processes by serving as solvents and transport media for redox-active ions. Molecular-level interactions between ionic solutes and solvent molecules – commonly referred to as solvation phenomena – give rise to many functional properties of electrolytes such as ionic conductivity, viscosity, and stability. It is critical to understand the evolution of solvation phenomena as a function of competing counterions and solvent mixtures to predict and design the optimal electrolyte for a target application. Probing oxygen environments is of great interest as oxygens are located at strategic molecular sites in battery solvents and are directly involved in inter- and intramolecular solvation interactions. NMR signals from 17O nuclei in battery electrolytes offer nondestructive bulk measurements of isotropic shielding, electric field gradient tensors, and transverse and longitudinal relaxation rates, which are excellent means for probing structure, bonding, and dynamics of both solute and solvent molecules. This article describes the use of 17O NMR spectroscopy in probing the solvation structures of various electrolyte systems ranging from transition metal ions in aqueous solution to lithium cations in organic solvent mixtures.

  16. Resolution Improvement in Multidimensional Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Proteins; Amelioration de la resolution dans la resonance magnetique nucleaire multidimensionnelle des proteines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duma, L

    2004-07-01

    The work presented in this thesis is concerned with both liquid-state and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Most of this work is devoted to the investigation by solid-state NMR of C{sup 13}-enriched compounds with the principal aim of presenting techniques devised for further improving the spectral resolution in multidimensional NMR of microcrystalline proteins. In fully C{sup 13}-labelled compounds, the J-coupling induces a broadening of the carbon lineshapes. We show that spin-state-selective technique called IPAP can be successfully combined with standard polarisation transfer schemes in order to remove the J-broadening in multidimensional solid-state NMR correlation experiments of fully C{sup 13}-enriched proteins. We present subsequently two techniques tailored for liquid-state NMR spectroscopy. The carbon directly detected techniques provide chemical shift information for all backbone hetero-nuclei. They are very attracting for the study of large bio-molecular systems or for the investigation of paramagnetic proteins. In the last part of this thesis, we study the spin-echo J-modulation for homonuclear two-spin 1/2 systems. Under magic-angle spinning, the theory of J-induced spin-echo modulation allows to derive a set of modulation regimes which give a spin-echo modulation exactly equal to the J-coupling. We show that the chemical-shift anisotropy and the dipolar interaction tend to stabilize the spin-echo J-modulation. The theoretical conclusions are supported by numerical simulations and experimental results obtained for three representative samples containing C{sup 13} spin pairs. (author)

  17. Natural abundance deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy: Study of the biosynthesis of monoterpenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leopold, M.F.

    1990-01-01

    Deuterium NMR spectroscopy at natural abundance (D NMR-na) is a new technique for exploring the biosynthesis of small molecules such as monoterpenes. The analysis of relative site-specific deuterium integration values is an effective means of measuring isotope effects, and examining the regio- and stereochemistry of biosynthetic reactions. The deuterium integration values of linalyl acetate and limonene isolated from the same source were consistent and showed that proton abstraction from the postulated α-terpinyl cation intermediate to form limonene is regioselective from the methyl derived from the Cs methyl of the precursor, geranyl diphosphate. This regiochemistry was observed in limonene samples from different sources and the measured primary kinetic isotope effect ranged from 0.25 to in excess of 100 (no deuterium was removed within experimental error). Various α- and β-pinene samples were isolated and D NMR-na analysis showed evidence of isotopically sensitive partitioning of the pinylcation in the formation of these products. This spectral analysis supported published radiolabeling studies but did not require synthesis of substrates or enzyme purification. The formation of 3-carene occurs without isomerization of the double bond which was previously postulated. The olefinic deuterium of the bicyclic compound was traced to the depleted deuterium at C 2 of isopentyl diphosphate by D NMR-na data and this supported unpublished radiolabeling studies. Study of irregular monoterpenes, chrysanthemyl acetate and lyratyl acetate, showed partitioning of dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP) by chrysanthemyl cyclase. The α-secondary kinetic isotope effect of 1.06-1.12, obtained from relative deuterium integration values, suggested that S N 1 ionization of one molecule of DMAPP is the first step in the condensation reaction

  18. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of polymer thin films: chain conformation, dynamics, and morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasreddine, V.F.

    2003-01-01

    This dissertation presents solid-state NMR studies of the chain conformation, dynamics and morphology of three adsorbed polymer systems: two random semi-crystalline copolymers, poly(ethylene-co-acrylic acid) (PEA) and poly(propylene-co-acrylic acid) (PPA), and an amorphous homopolymer, poly(n-butyl methacrylate) (PnBMA). Zirconia (ZrO 2 ) was chosen as the substrate for all three polymers since the binding of carboxylic acids to this metal oxide is well understood. The choice of polymers was based on their particular bulk conformational and dynamic properties as well as their common use in polymer coatings. These studies are motivated by the general lack of a microscopic picture of adsorbed polymers, which can be provided by NMR, and the relevance of chain conformation and dynamics to important polymer film properties such as adhesion. First the chain conformation and surface binding of adsorbed PEA as a function of acrylic acid content are characterized by 13 C cross polarization - magic angle spinning (CP-MAS), 2D 1 H- 13 C wideline separation (WISE) and 1 H spin diffusion NMR experiments and FTIR-PAS (Fourier transform infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy) measurements. The most important finding is that the chain conformation of adsorbed PEA is determined primarily by the sticker group density rather than the surface coverage. The second study of PEA concerns the chain dynamics in the bulk and adsorbed states. Variable temperature NMR experiments provide evidence that ethylene segments of adsorbed PEA form partially folded loops rather than flat extended trains. Finally 129 Xe NMR studies, used to probe the morphology of adsorbed PEA, show a bulk-like signal only for the highest loadings. The second system investigated, PPA, is another semi-crystalline random copolymer which binds to zirconia via carboxylate linkages. The 13 C CP-MAS NMR spectra of adsorbed PPAC unexpectedly show splittings normally associated with chain-chain packing in the crystalline regions

  19. Proton resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shriner, J.F. Jr.

    1991-11-01

    This report discusses the following topics: Complete Level Scheme for 30 P; A Search for Resonances Suitable for Tests of Detailed-Balance Violation; The Fourier Transform as a Tool for Detecting Chaos; Entrance Channel Correlations in p + 27 Al; The Parity Dependence of Level Densities in 49 V; and A Computer Program for the Calculation of Angular Momentum Coupling

  20. Characterization of phosphorus forms in lake macrophytes and algae by solution (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Weiying; Zhu, Yuanrong; Wu, Fengchang; Meng, Wei; Giesy, John P; He, Zhongqi; Song, Lirong; Fan, Mingle

    2016-04-01

    Debris from aquatic macrophytes and algae are important recycling sources of phosphorus (P), which can result in continuing blooms of algae by recycling bioavailable P in the eutrophic lakes. However, knowledge of forms of P in aquatic macrophytes and algae and their contribution to internal loads of P in lakes is limited. Without such knowledge, it is difficult to develop appropriate strategies to remediate and or restore aquatic ecosystems that have become eutrophic. Therefore, in this work, P was extracted from six types of aquatic macrophytes and algae collected from Tai Lake of China and characterized by use of solution (31)P-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. When extracted by 0.5 M NaOH-25 mM EDTA, extraction recovery of total P(TP) and organic P(Po) exceeded 90 %. Concentrations of Po in algae and aquatic macrophytes were 5552 mg kg(-1) and 1005 mg kg(-1) and accounted for 56.0 and 47.2 % of TP, respectively. When Po, including condensed P, was characterized by solution (31)P-NMR Po in algae included orthophosphate monoesters (79.8 %), pyrophosphate (18.2 %), and orthophosphate diester (2.0 %), and Po in aquatic macrophytes included orthophosphate monoesters (90.3 %), pyrophosphate (4.2 %), and orthophosphate diester (5.5 %). Additionally, orthophosphate monoesters in algal debris mainly included β-glycerophosphate (44.1 %), α-glycerophosphate (13.5 %), and glucose 6-phosphate (13.5 %). Orthophosphate monoesters in aquatic macrophytes mainly included β-glycerophosphate (27.9 %), α-glycerophosphate (24.6 %), and adenosine 5' monophosphate (8.2 %). Results derived from this study will be useful in better understanding nutrient cycling, relevant eutrophication processes, and pollution control for freshwater lakes.

  1. Metabolomics by proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the response to chloroethylnitrosourea reveals drug efficacy and tumor adaptive metabolic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morvan, Daniel; Demidem, Aicha

    2007-03-01

    Metabolomics of tumors may allow discovery of tumor biomarkers and metabolic therapeutic targets. Metabolomics by two-dimensional proton high-resolution magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was applied to investigate metabolite disorders following treatment by chloroethylnitrosourea of murine B16 melanoma (n = 33) and 3LL pulmonary carcinoma (n = 31) in vivo. Treated tumors of both types resumed growth after a delay. Nitrosoureas provoke DNA damage but the metabolic consequences of genotoxic stress are little known yet. Although some differences were observed in the metabolite profile of untreated tumor types, the prominent metabolic features of the response to nitrosourea were common to both. During the growth inhibition phase, there was an accumulation of glucose (more than x10; P < 0.05), glutamine (x3 to 4; P < 0.01), and aspartate (x2 to 5; P < 0.01). This response testified to nucleoside de novo synthesis down-regulation and drug efficacy. However, this phase also involved the increase in alanine (P < 0.001 in B16 melanoma), the decrease in succinate (P < 0.001), and the accumulation of serine-derived metabolites (glycine, phosphoethanolamine, and formate; P < 0.01). This response witnessed the activation of pathways implicated in energy production and resumption of nucleotide de novo synthesis, thus metabolic pathways of DNA repair and adaptation to treatment. During the growth recovery phase, it remained polyunsaturated fatty acid accumulation (x1.5 to 2; P < 0.05) and reduced utilization of glucose compared with glutamine (P < 0.05), a metabolic fingerprint of adaptation. Thus, this study provides the proof of principle that metabolomics of tumor response to an anticancer agent may help discover metabolic pathways of drug efficacy and adaptation to treatment.

  2. Migraine and magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Younis, Samaira; Hougaard, Anders; Vestergaard, Mark B.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review: To present an updated and streamlined overview of the metabolic and biochemical aspect of the migraine pathophysiology based on findings from phosphorous (31P) and hydrogen (1H) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies. Recent findings: Despite of the variation in the meth......Purpose of review: To present an updated and streamlined overview of the metabolic and biochemical aspect of the migraine pathophysiology based on findings from phosphorous (31P) and hydrogen (1H) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies. Recent findings: Despite of the variation...

  3. Characterization of a novel weak interaction between MUC1 and Src-SH3 using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunasekara, Nirosha [Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, University of Alberta, 5B4.21 WCM Health Science Centre, 8440-112th Street, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2R7 (Canada); Sykes, Brian, E-mail: brian.sykes@ualberta.ca [Department of Biochemistry, 4-19B Medical Sciences Bldg., University of Alberta Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2H7 (Canada); Hugh, Judith, E-mail: judithh@ualberta.ca [Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, University of Alberta, 5B4.21 WCM Health Science Centre, 8440-112th Street, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2R7 (Canada)

    2012-05-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MUC1 binds the Src-SH3 domain potentially triggering Src dependent cell migration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NMR Spectroscopy was used to monitor MUC1-CD and Src SH3 domain titrations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MUC1-CD peptides bind with a low affinity (K{sub d} of 2-3 mM) to a non-canonical site. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Weak interactions may mediate dynamic processes like migration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The MUC1-CD and Src-SH3 interaction may be a prime target to inhibit cell migration. -- Abstract: Breast cancer causes death through cancer cell migration and subsequent metastasis to distant organs. In vitro, the MUC1 mucin can mediate breast cancer cell migration by binding to intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). This migration is dependent on MUC1 cytoplasmic domain (MUC1-CD) activation of the non-receptor tyrosine kinase, Src, possibly through competitive displacement of an inhibitory Src intramolecular SH3 binding. Therefore, we characterized the binding site and affinity of the MUC1-CD for Src-SH3 using multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to monitor the titration of the {sup 15}N labeled Src-SH3 domain with synthetic native and mutant peptides of MUC1-CD. The results revealed that the dissociation constant (K{sub d}) for the interaction of the native MUC1-CD peptides and Src-SH3 domain was weak with a K{sub d} of 2-3 mM. Notably, the SH3 residues most perturbed upon peptide binding were located outside the usual hydrophobic binding cleft in a previously described alternate binding site on the Src-SH3, suggesting that MUC1-CD binds to a non-canonical site. The binding characteristics outlined here suggest that the interaction between Src-SH3 and MUC1-CD represents a novel weak electrostatic interaction of the type which is increasingly recognized as important in transient and dynamic protein complexes required for cell migration and signal transduction. As such, this

  4. Organic phosphorus fractionation in wetland soil profiles by chemical extraction and phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Min; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Guangqian; Yang, Haijun; Whelan, Michael J.; White, Sue M.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Chemical sequential extraction and 31 P NMR spectroscopy were used for organic P analysis. ► Organic P includes orthophosphate, monoester and diester phosphate and pyrophosphate. ► Highly resistant organic P and monoester phosphate were the dominant organic P. ► HCl pretreatment can remove most inorganic P and increase organic P recovery rate. ► A comprehensive organic P chemical sequential fractionation approach was proposed. - Abstract: Organic P (OP) plays an important role in soil P cycling and is a potential P source for wetland plants. In this study, a modified chemical sequential fractionation method and 31 P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 31 P NMR) of NaOH–EDTA extracts were used to examine the distribution of organic P fractions and compounds in soil profiles of the Beijing Yeyahu Wetland, China. The influence of acid treatment prior to NaOH–EDTA extraction on 31 P NMR spectra was also investigated. Results show that highly resistant OP was the major class of organic P. The rank order of organic P fractions was highly resistant OP (on average accounting for 68.5% of total OP) > moderately resistant OP (15.8%m of total OP) > moderately labile OP (11.4% of total OP) > labile OP (4.3% of total OP). Most of the organic P fractions decreased with soil depth due to the accumulation of plant residues in surface soils and the deposition and diagenesis of soils. Moderately (r = 0.586, p < 0.01) and highly (r = 0.741, p < 0.01) resistant OP fractions were positively correlated with soil organic matter. Phosphorus compounds including orthophosphate (23–74.6% of total P in spectra), monoester phosphate (18.6–76%), diester phosphate (nil-7.8%) and pyrophosphate (nil-6.7%) were characterized using 31 P NMR. Monoester-P was the dominant soil organic P compound identified. The proportion of monoester-P increased significantly in NaOH–EDTA extracts with HCl pretreatment and it was confirmed by chemical analysis. Therefore, it

  5. Nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ethier, R.; Melanson, D.; Peters, T.M.

    1983-01-01

    Ten years following computerized tomography, a new technique called nuclear magnetic resonance revolutionizes the field of diagnostic imaging. A major advantage of nuclear magnetic resonance is that the danger of radiation is non-existent as compared to computerized tomography. When parts of the human body are subject to radio-frequencies while in a fixed magnetic field, its most detailed structures are revealed. The quality of images, the applications, as well as the indications are forever increasing. Images obtained at the level of the brain and spinal cord through nuclear magnetic resonance supercede those obtained through computerized tomography. Hence, it is most likely that myelography, along with pneumoencephalography will be eliminated as a diagnostic means. It is without a doubt that nuclear magnetic resonance is tomorrow's computerized tomography [fr

  6. Nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, B.C.

    1984-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance gyro using two nuclear magnetic resonance gases, preferably xenon 129 and xenon 131, together with two alkaline metal vapors, preferably rubidium, potassium or cesium, one of the two alkaline metal vapors being pumped by light which has the wavelength of that alkaline metal vapor, and the other alkaline vapor being illuminated by light which has the wavelength of that other alkaline vapor

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, I.R.

    1984-01-01

    In a method of imaging a body in which nuclear magnetic resonance is excited in a region including part of the body, and the free induction decay signal is measured, a known quantity of a material of known nuclear magnetic resonance properties, for example a bag of water, is included in the region so as to enhance the measured free induction decay signal. This then reduces the generation of noise during subsequent processing of the signal. (author)

  8. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    namely a detector, is added to the apparatus (Figure 4), one can observe the ... There are usually rules - called selection rules - about which transitions can take place; these rules normally relate to ..... With this definition the chemical shift of ...

  9. Materials characterization by resonant ultrasonic spectroscopy method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheong, Yong Moo; Jung, H.K.; Joo, Y.S.; Sim, C.M.

    2001-01-01

    A high temperature resonant ultrasound spectroscopy(RUS) was developed. The dynamic elastic constant of RPV weld, which has various different microstructure was determined by RUS. It was confirmed the RUS method is very sensitive to the microstructures of the material. RUS can be used to monitor the degradation of nuclear materials including neutron irradiation embrittlement through the measurement of dynamic elastic constants, elastic anisotropy, high temperature elastic constant and Q-factor

  10. Trends in resonance ionization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurst, G.S.

    1986-01-01

    The author reviews the history of resonance ionization spectroscopy and then comments on the delineations of RIS with reference to many related laser processes. The substance of the paper deals with the trends in RIS and especially how the needs for sensitive analytical methods have overshadowed the orginal plan to study excited species. 9 refs., 1 fig

  11. Photon resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shriner, J.F. Jr.

    1990-11-01

    This report summarizes the progress on Grant No. FG05-87ER40353 during the period February 1, 1990 to November 30, 1990. The primary focus of the research during this period has been on fluctuations of nuclear levels and possible connections with fundamental symmetries. In this paper the analysis of low-lying nuclear levels for a large collection of nuclides is discussed, and the analysis of just the levels in 116 Sn is presented. The current status experiments to study fluctuation properties in 30 P is summarized, while the development of hardware and software for the next phase of these measurements in outlined. We discuss the early stages of a project to search for a particular type of detailed-balance violation

  12. Dynamics of asymmetric non-polymeric binary glass formers—A nuclear magnetic resonance and dielectric spectroscopy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pötzschner, B.; Mohamed, F.; Lichtinger, A.; Bock, D.; Rössler, E. A., E-mail: ernst.roessler@uni-bayreuth.de [Experimentalphysik II, Universität Bayreuth, 95440 Bayreuth (Germany)

    2015-10-21

    We study a dynamically asymmetric binary glass former with the low-T{sub g} component m-tri-cresyl phosphate (m-TCP: T{sub g} = 206 K) and a spirobichroman derivative as a non-polymeric high-T{sub g} component (T{sub g} = 382 K) by means of {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), {sup 31}P NMR, and dielectric spectroscopy which allow component-selectively probing the dynamics. The entire concentration range is covered, and two main relaxation processes with two T{sub g} are identified, T{sub g1} and T{sub g2}. The slower one is attributed to the high-T{sub g} component (α{sub 1}-process), and the faster one is related to the m-TCP molecules (α{sub 2}-process). Yet, there are indications that a small fraction of m-TCP is associated also with the α{sub 1}-process. While the α{sub 1}-relaxation only weakly broadens upon adding m-TCP, the α{sub 2}-relaxation becomes extremely stretched leading to quasi-logarithmic correlation functions at low m-TCP concentrations—as probed by {sup 31}P NMR stimulated echo experiments. Frequency-temperature superposition does not apply for the α{sub 2}-process and it reflects an isotropic, liquid-like motion which is observed even below T{sub g1}, i.e., in the matrix of the arrested high-T{sub g} molecules. As proven by 2D {sup 31}P NMR, the corresponding dynamic heterogeneities are of transient nature, i.e., exchange occurs within the distribution G(lnτ{sub α2}). At T{sub g1} a crossover is found for the temperature dependence of (mean) τ{sub α2}(T) from non-Arrhenius above to Arrhenius below T{sub g1} which is attributed to intrinsic confinement effects. This “fragile-to-strong” transition also leads to a re-decrease of T{sub g2}(c{sub m−TCP}) at low concentration c{sub m−TCP}, i.e., a maximum is observed in T{sub g2}(c{sub m−TCP}) while T{sub g1}(c{sub m−TCP}) displays the well-known plasticizer effect. Although only non-polymeric components are involved, we re-discover essentially all features previously

  13. Neutron resonance spectroscopy at n-TOF at CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunsing, F.; Abbondanno, U.; Aerts, G.; Alvarez, H.; Alvarez-Velarde, F.; Andriamonje, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Assimakopoulos, P.; Audouin, L.; Badurek, G.; Baumann, P.; Becvar, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Calvino, F.; Calviani, M.; Cano-Ott, D.; Capote, R.; Carrapic, C.; Cennini, P.; Chepel, V.; Chiaveri, E.; Colonna, N.; Cortes, G.; Couture, A.; Cox, J.; Dahlfors, M.; David, S.; Dillmann, I.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Dridi, W.; Duran, I.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Embid-Segura, M.; Ferrant, L.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira-Marques, R.; Fujii, K.; Furman, W.; Goncalves, I.; Gonzalez-Romero, E.; Gramegna, F.; Guerrero, C.; Haas, B.; Haight, R.; Heil, M.; Herrera-Martinez, A.; Igashira, M.; Jericha, E.; Kappeler, F.; Kadi, Y.; Karadimos, D.; Karamanis, D.; Kerveno, M.; Koehler, P.; Kossionides, E.; Krticka, M.; Lampoudis, C.; Leeb, H.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, I.; Lozano, M.; Lukic, S.; Marganiec, J.; Marrone, S.; Martinez, T.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P.M.; Moreau, C.; Mosconi, M.; Neves, F.; Oberhummer, H.; O'Brien, S.; Pancin, J.; Papachristodoulou, C.; Papadopoulos, C.; Paradela, C.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Perrot, L.; Pigni, M.T.; Plag, R.; Plompen, A.; Plukis, A.; Poch, A.; Praena, J.; Pretel, C.; Quesada, J.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Rubbia, C.; Rudolf, G.; Rullhusen, P.; Salgado, J.; Santos, C.; Sarchiapone, L.; Savvidis, I.; Stephan, C.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J.L.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tavora, L.; Terlizzi, R.; Vannini, G.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Villamarin, D.; Vincente, M.C.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Voss, F.; Walter, S.; Wiescher, M.; Wisshak, K.

    2008-01-01

    Neutron resonance spectroscopy plays an important role in the investigation of neutron induced reaction cross sections and nuclear structure in the MeV excitation range. Neutron time-of-flight facilities are the most used installations to explore neutron resonances. In this paper we describe the basic features of neutron resonance spectroscopy together with recent results from the time-of-flight facility n-TOF at CERN. (authors)

  14. Application of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, UV-Visible spectroscopy and kinetic modeling for elucidation of adsorption chemistry in uptake of tetracycline by zeolite beta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jin; Liu, Huijuan; Zheng, Yu-Ming; Qu, Jiuhui; Chen, J Paul

    2011-02-01

    Extensive usage of tetracycline has resulted in its contamination in surface water and groundwater. The adsorption of tetracycline on zeolite beta was systematically investigated for the decontamination of the antibiotic polluted water in this study. Ninety percent of uptake by the zeolite beta occured in 0.25h, and the adsorption equilibrium was obtained within 3h, which was well described by an intraparticle diffusion model. The adsorption generally increased when pH was increased from 4.0 to 5.0, and then decreased significantly as the pH was further increased, which was caused by the pH-dependent speciation of tetracycline and surface charge of zeolite beta. Both Freundlich and Langmuir equations well described the adsorption isotherm. A thermodynamic analysis showed that the sorption process was spontaneous and endothermic. Aluminum atoms in the zeolite played a crucial role in the uptake; the adsorption increased with the increasing aluminum content in zeolite. The UV-Visible spectroscopy study showed that the spectra of tetracycline changed upon the interaction with zeolite beta, which could be ascribed to the formation of complexes of tetracycline and aluminum atoms in the zeolite surface. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy study further confirmed the participation of Al in the tetracycline adsorption. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy studies showed that the amino functional groups in tetracycline were involved in the complexation with the zeolite surface. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Proton Resonance Spectroscopy -- Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shriner, Jr., J. F. [Tennessee Technological Univ., Cookeville, TN (United States)

    2009-07-27

    This report summarizes work supported by the DOE Grant DE-FG02-96ER40990 during its duration from June 1996 to May 2009. Topics studied include (1) statistical descriptions of nuclear levels and measurements of proton resonances relevant to such descriptions, including measurements toward a complete level scheme for 30P, (2) the development of methods to estimate the missing fraction of levels in a given measurement, and (3) measurements at HRIBF relevant to nuclear astrophysics.

  16. Nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, R.

    1991-01-01

    In order to include the effect of a magnetic object in a subject under investigation, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) apparatus is operable at more than one radio frequency (RF) frequency. The apparatus allows normal practice as far as obtaining an NMR response or image from a given nuclear species is concerned, but, in addition, interrogates the nuclear spin system at a frequency which is different from the resonance frequency normally used for the given nuclear species, as determined from the applied magnetic field. The magnetic field close to a magnetised or magnetisable object is modified and the given nuclear species gives a response at the different frequency. Thus detection of a signal at the frequency indicates the presence of the chosen nuclei close to the magnetised or magnetisable object. Applications include validation of an object detection or automatic shape inspection system in the presence of magnetic impurities, and the detection of magnetic particles which affect measurement of liquid flow in a pipe. (author)

  17. Swelling and sedimentation of bentonite clays in bulk and in slits: nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dvinskikh, S.V.; Furo, I.; Neretnieks, I.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Compacted bentonite clay is currently attracting attention as a promising 'self-sealing' buffer material to build in-ground barriers for the encapsulation of radioactive waste. It is expected to fill up the space between waste canister and surrounding ground by swelling and thus delay flow and migration from the host rock to the canister. Evaluation and understanding of the swelling properties of pre-compacted bentonite are of uttermost importance for designing such buffers. The major goal of our studies was to provide, in a non-invasive manner, a quantitative measure of bentonite distribution in extended samples during different physical processes in an aqueous environment such as swelling, dissolution, and sedimentation on the time scale from minutes to years. The propagation of the swelling front during clay expansion depending on the geometry of the confining space was also studied. To characterize the state of colloids that form after/during clay swelling the water self-diffusion coefficient was measured on a spatially resolved manner. The distribution and displacement within the bentonite systems of foreign particles, either natural ones (sand or quartz) or artificially admixed model particles of controlled size were also monitored. Both natural montmorillonites and purified and ion-exchanged montmorillonite clays were investigated. The primary variables were clay composition and water ionic strength. Magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were adapted and used as main experimental techniques. With this approach, spatially resolved movement of the clay/water interface as well as clay particle distributions in gel phase can be monitored. Bulk samples with swelling in a vertical tube and in a horizontal channel were investigated and clay content distribution profiles in the concentration range over five orders of magnitude and with sub-millimetre spatial resolution were

  18. Direct monitoring by carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the metabolism and metabolic rate of 13C-labeled compounds in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, K; Hidoh, O; Fukami, J; Kajiwara, M

    1991-01-01

    Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been used to observe the transformations of [1-13C]-D-glucose to [1,1'-13C2]-D-trehalose, and [3-13C]-L-alanine to [2-13C]-L-glutamic acid in the living body of Gryllodes sigillatus. [3-13C]-D-Alanine was not metabolized. The metabolic rate of [1-13C]-D-glucose was found to be altered by prior injection of boric acid.

  19. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-06-01

    This report summarises the aspects of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI) considered by the National Health Technology Advisory Panel and makes recommendations on its introduction in Australia with particular regard to the need for thorough evaluation of its cost effectiveness. Topics covered are: principles of the technique, equipment required, installation, costs, reliability, performance parameters, clinical indications, training and staff requirements, and safety considerations

  20. Statistical nuclear spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parikh, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    The aim of nuclear spectroscopy is to study properties of nuclear energy levels and transitions (electromagnetic, particle transfer, etc.) between these levels. Traditionally, the properties that involve a single level or a few levels have theoretically been investigated using models e.g. shell model, self-consistent field approximation, collective model (RPA, Generator Coordinate) and so on. Basically from these models, one obtains eigenvalues and eigenfunctions (or expectation values and transfer strengths) which can be compared with data. The choice of the model depends upon the properties that one wants to examine and the usefulness of the model depends upon its ability to explain observations and make predictions

  1. Classification of spectra and search for bio-makers in prostate tumours form proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parfait, S.

    2010-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men over 50 years. Current detection methods either lack sensitivity or specificity or are unpleasant for the patient. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy allows the study of metabolism in vivo. The use of a high field machine (>3 T) has allowed us to dispense with the use of an endorectal coil, which is particularly uncomfortable for the patient. The objective of this work is to create an automatic method to detect cancer by processing data obtained through magnetic resonance spectroscopy. MRS is a complex phenomenon, very sensitive to acquisition conditions. First, we have studied how to improve and optimise signal acquisition. However, even with a very good quality signal, it must still undergo further post-processing to be analysed automatically by a classification method. Further work was therefore needed to investigate which post-processing steps were required in order to optimize the spectra for classification. We then investigated the optimal classification method for this problem. A particular set of steps (signal acquisition, processing and spectral classification data) allows us to highlight the presence of prostate tumors with an overall error rate of less than 12%. In a second step, we searched for new bio-markers within the spectra. These bio-markers could be a metabolite or a specific frequency range corresponding to several metabolites. We did not find any additional significant attributes other than choline and citrate, however, some frequency bands seem to participate in improving the error rate. Finally, we expanded our investigation by attempting to apply these techniques to the rat. Technical constraints related to acquisition did not allow us to obtain a sufficient number of spectra in the pre-clinical cases. Nonetheless, we have validated the feasibility of MRS in rodents and its relevance in the brain. The technique, however, must be improved in order to be validated in the case of prostate cancer in

  2. Giant nuclear resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snover, K.A.

    1989-01-01

    Giant nuclear resonances are elementary mods of oscillation of the whole nucleus, closely related to the normal modes of oscillation of coupled mechanical systems. They occur systematically in most if not all nuclei, with oscillation energies typically in the range 10-30 MeV. One of the best - known examples is the giant electric dipole (El) resonance, in which all the protons and all the neutrons oscillate with opposite phase, producing a large time - varying electric dipole moment which acts as an effective antenna for radiating gamma ray. This paper discusses this mode as well as quadrupole and monopole modes

  3. Espectroscopia de Ressonância Magnética Nuclear de 13C no estudo de rotas biossintéticas de produtos naturais 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy in the studies of biosythetic routes of natural products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando César de Macedo Júnior

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available During the last five decades, as a result of an interaction between natural product chemistry, synthetic organic chemistry, molecular biology and spectroscopy, scientists reached an extraordinary level of comprehension about the natural processes by which living organisms build up complex molecules. In this context, 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, allied with isotopic labeling, played a determinant role. Nowadays, the widespread use of modern NMR techniques allows an even more detailed picture of the biochemical steps by accurate manipulation of the atomic nuclei. This article focuses on the development of such techniques and their impact on biosynthetic studies.

  4. Advanced Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Alonso, Diego A.

    2014-01-01

    Transparencias en inglés de la asignatura "Resonancia Magnética Nuclear Avanzada" (Advanced Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) (36643) que se imparte en el Máster de Química Médica como asignatura optativa de 3 créditos ECTS. En esta asignatura se completa el estudio iniciado en la asignatura de quinto curso de la licenciatura en Química "Determinación estructural" (7448) y en la del Grado de Química de tercer curso "Determinación estructural de los compuestos orgánicos" (26030) en lo referente a té...

  5. A study of J-coupling spectroscopy using the Earth's field nuclear magnetic resonance inside a laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Shu-Hsien; Chen, Ming-Jye; Yang, Hong-Chang; Lee, Shin-Yi; Chen, Hsin-Hsien; Horng, Herng-Er; Yang, Shieh-Yueh

    2010-10-01

    In this paper, an instrumentation of the Earth's field nuclear magnetic resonance (EFNMR) inside a laboratory is presented. A lock-in analysis (LIA) technique was proposed to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). A SNR of 137.8 was achieved in a single measurement for 9 ml tap water, and the LIA technique significantly enhanced the SNR to 188 after a 10-average in a noisy laboratory environment. The proton-phosphorus coupling in trimethyl phosphate ((CH(3)O)(3)PO) with J-coupling J[H,F]=(10.99±0.013) Hz has been demonstrated. The LIA technique improves the SNR, and a 2.6-fold improvement in SNR over that of the frequency-adjusted averaging is achieved. To reduce the noise in EFNMR, it was suggested that the LIA technique and the first order gradient shim be used to achieve a subhertz linewidth.

  6. Waveguide volume probe for magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present disclosure relates to a probe for use within the field of nuclear magnetic resonance, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS)). One embodiment relates to an RF probe for magnetic resonance imaging and/or spectroscopy comprising a conductive...... non-magnetic hollow waveguide having an internal volume and at least one open end, one or more capacitors and at least a first conductive non-magnetic wire, wherein said first conductive wire connects at least one of said one or more capacitors to opposite walls of one open end of the waveguide...

  7. Migraine and magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Younis, Samaira; Hougaard, Anders; Vestergaard, Mark B.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review: To present an updated and streamlined overview of the metabolic and biochemical aspect of the migraine pathophysiology based on findings from phosphorous (31P) and hydrogen (1H) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies. Recent findings: Despite of the variation in the meth......Purpose of review: To present an updated and streamlined overview of the metabolic and biochemical aspect of the migraine pathophysiology based on findings from phosphorous (31P) and hydrogen (1H) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies. Recent findings: Despite of the variation...... in the methodology and quality of the MRS migraine studies over time, some results were consistent and reproducible. 31P-MRS studies suggested reduced availability of neuronal energy and implied a mitochondrial dysfunction in the migraine brain. 1H-MRS studies reported interictal abnormalities in the excitatory...... and inhibitory neurotransmitters, glutamate and g-aminobutyric acid (GABA), suggesting persistent altered excitability in migraine patients. N-Acetylaspartate levels were decreased in migraine, probably due to a mitochondrial dysfunction and abnormal energy metabolism. The reported abnormalities may increase...

  8. Sensitivity enhancement by chromatographic peak concentration with ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for minor impurity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokunaga, Takashi; Akagi, Ken-Ichi; Okamoto, Masahiko

    2017-07-28

    High performance liquid chromatography can be coupled with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to give a powerful analytical method known as liquid chromatography-nuclear magnetic resonance (LC-NMR) spectroscopy, which can be used to determine the chemical structures of the components of complex mixtures. However, intrinsic limitations in the sensitivity of NMR spectroscopy have restricted the scope of this procedure, and resolving these limitations remains a critical problem for analysis. In this study, we coupled ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) with NMR to give a simple and versatile analytical method with higher sensitivity than conventional LC-NMR. UHPLC separation enabled the concentration of individual peaks to give a volume similar to that of the NMR flow cell, thereby maximizing the sensitivity to the theoretical upper limit. The UHPLC concentration of compound peaks present at typical impurity levels (5.0-13.1 nmol) in a mixture led to at most three-fold increase in the signal-to-noise ratio compared with LC-NMR. Furthermore, we demonstrated the use of UHPLC-NMR for obtaining structural information of a minor impurity in a reaction mixture in actual laboratory-scale development of a synthetic process. Using UHPLC-NMR, the experimental run times for chromatography and NMR were greatly reduced compared with LC-NMR. UHPLC-NMR successfully overcomes the difficulties associated with analyses of minor components in a complex mixture by LC-NMR, which are problematic even when an ultra-high field magnet and cryogenic probe are used. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Radiation-induced changes in human brain metabolites as studied by {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usenius, Taina; Usenius, Jussi-Pekka; Tenhunen, Mikko; Vainio, Pauli; Johansson, Risto; Soimakallio, Seppo; Kauppinen, Risto

    1995-10-15

    Purpose: External radiation therapy for brain tumors exposes healthy areas of brain to considerable doses of radiation. This may cause cognitive and psychological impairment, which indicate neuronal dysfunction. {sup 1}H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was used to study brain metabolites in the adjacent regions 0.5-13 years after exposure to therapeutic irradiation. Methods and Materials: Eight patients with irradiated brain tumors were examined by means of in vivo{sup 1}H-MRS using a point-resolved spectroscopy (PRESS) sequence with echo times of 60 or 270 ms. The metabolites were quantified by using brain water concentration as internal reference. The volume of interest (VOI) was positioned in irradiated brain areas excluding, however, scar and recurrent tumor. The respective radiation doses were measured based on radiation therapy plans, simulator films, and localization MR images. Results: The concentration of the neuron-specific metabolite N-acetyl-l-aspartate (NAA) was 13.2 {+-} 1.4 mmol/l in controls, whereas it was reduced in the brains of treated patients to 8.6 {+-} 0.9 mmol/l (total radiation dose 59-62 Gy). Concentrations of creatine and choline-containing compounds were unchanged. The T2 of water was longer in irradiated than in unexposed brain areas. Conclusion: Therapeutic brain irradiation causes neuronal damage, which is reflected by reduction of N-acetyl-l-aspartate (NAA) concentrations. {sup 1}H-MRS could serve clinically as a means of evaluating adverse effects in the central nervous system, enabling intervention and rehabilitation.

  10. Radiation-induced changes in human brain metabolites as studied by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usenius, Taina; Usenius, Jussi-Pekka; Tenhunen, Mikko; Vainio, Pauli; Johansson, Risto; Soimakallio, Seppo; Kauppinen, Risto

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: External radiation therapy for brain tumors exposes healthy areas of brain to considerable doses of radiation. This may cause cognitive and psychological impairment, which indicate neuronal dysfunction. 1 H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was used to study brain metabolites in the adjacent regions 0.5-13 years after exposure to therapeutic irradiation. Methods and Materials: Eight patients with irradiated brain tumors were examined by means of in vivo 1 H-MRS using a point-resolved spectroscopy (PRESS) sequence with echo times of 60 or 270 ms. The metabolites were quantified by using brain water concentration as internal reference. The volume of interest (VOI) was positioned in irradiated brain areas excluding, however, scar and recurrent tumor. The respective radiation doses were measured based on radiation therapy plans, simulator films, and localization MR images. Results: The concentration of the neuron-specific metabolite N-acetyl-l-aspartate (NAA) was 13.2 ± 1.4 mmol/l in controls, whereas it was reduced in the brains of treated patients to 8.6 ± 0.9 mmol/l (total radiation dose 59-62 Gy). Concentrations of creatine and choline-containing compounds were unchanged. The T2 of water was longer in irradiated than in unexposed brain areas. Conclusion: Therapeutic brain irradiation causes neuronal damage, which is reflected by reduction of N-acetyl-l-aspartate (NAA) concentrations. 1 H-MRS could serve clinically as a means of evaluating adverse effects in the central nervous system, enabling intervention and rehabilitation

  11. Method of using a nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy standard. [SO/sub 2/ in gases by fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spicer, L.D.; Bennett, D.W.; Davis, J.F.

    1983-05-09

    (CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/SiNSO is produced by the reaction of ((CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/SI)/sub 2/NH with SO/sub 2/. Also produced in the reaction are ((CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/Si)/sub 2/O and a new solid compound (NH/sub 4/)((CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/SiOSO/sub 2/). Both (CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/SiNSO and (NH/sub 4/)((CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/SiOSO/sub 2/) have fluorescent properties. The reaction of the subject invention is used in a method of measuring the concentration of SO/sub 2/ pollutants in gases. By the method, a sample of gas is bubbled through a solution of ((CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/Si)/sub 2/NH, whereby any SO/sub 2/ present in the gas will react to produce the two fluorescent products. The measured fluorescence of these products can then be used to calculate the concentration of SO/sub 2/ in the original gas sample. The solid product (NH/sub 4/)((CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/SiOSO/sub 2/) may be used as a standard in solid state NMR spectroscopy, wherein the resonance peaks of either /sup 1/H, /sup 13/C, /sup 15/N, or /sup 29/Si may be used as a reference.

  12. Use of 15N reverse gradient two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to follow metabolic activity in Nicotiana plumbaginifolia cell-suspension cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesnard, F; Azaroual, N; Marty, D; Fliniaux, M A; Robins, R J; Vermeersch, G; Monti, J P

    2000-02-01

    Nitrogen metabolism was monitored in suspension cultured cells of Nicotiana plumbaginifolia Viv. using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy following the feeding of (15NH4)2SO4 and K15NO3. By using two-dimensional 15N-1H NMR with heteronuclear single-quantum-coherence spectroscopy and heteronuclear multiple-bond-coherence spectroscopy sequences, an enhanced resolution of the incorporation of 15N label into a range of compounds could be detected. Thus, in addition to the amino acids normally observed in one-dimensional 15N NMR (glutamine, aspartate, alanine), several other amino acids could be resolved, notably serine, glycine and proline. Furthermore, it was found that the peak normally assigned to the non-protein amino-acid gamma-aminobutyric acid in the one-dimensional 15N NMR spectrum was resolved into a several components. A peak of N-acetylated compounds was resolved, probably composed of the intermediates in arginine biosynthesis, N-acetylglutamate and N-acetylornithine and, possibly, the intermediate of putrescine degradation into gamma-aminobutyric acid, N-acetylputrescine. The occurrence of 15N-label in agmatine and the low detection of labelled putrescine indicate that crucial intermediates of the pathway from glutamate to polyamines and/or the tobacco alkaloids could be monitored. For the first time, labelling of the peptide glutathione and of the nucleotide uridine could be seen.

  13. Maintenance of high-energy brain phosphorous compounds during insulin-induced hypoglycemia in men. 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, Jannik; Jensen, K E; Thomsen, C

    1988-01-01

    31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy allows noninvasive studies of cerebral energy-rich phosphorous compounds in humans. In an attempt to characterize the relationship between peripheral blood glucose concentrations and whole-brain phosphate metabolism during insulin......-induced hypoglycemia, 31P NMR spectra were obtained before and after intravenous injection of insulin (0.15 IU/kg body wt) in six men. Compared with prehypoglycemic measurements, no significant changes were found in brain content of Pi, sugar phosphates, phosphocreatine, phosphodiesters, and ATP, and brain pH remained...... constant during the experiment. These results show that the integrated brain profile of energy-rich phosphorous compounds is unaffected by experimental insulin-induced hypoglycemia in humans....

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in biomedicine. Course organized by the Istituto Superiore di Sanita. Marciana Marina (Isola d'Elba), r 18-23 September 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luciani, A.M.; Rosi, A.

    1997-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance is a powerful technique that can be used in a wide range of applications, such as the structural characterization of high molecular weight molecules, conformational studies on enzymes in solution, enzyme-substrate or DNA-protein interactions, monitoring of cell metabolism in vivo, and for diagnostic purposes, employing spectroscopic and imaging techniques. This course was organized in order to introduce the participants to the fundamentals of NMR spectroscopy, and offer practical advice on performing NMR experiments on cell systems, cell and tissue extracts and animal models. The main implications regarding human experiments were also discussed. Finally the quantification of information and the interpretation of data were considered with regard to the main nuclei observed [it

  15. Reaction Coordinate Leading to H2 Production in [FeFe]-Hydrogenase Identified by Nuclear Resonance Vibrational Spectroscopy and Density Functional Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelmenschikov, Vladimir; Birrell, James A; Pham, Cindy C; Mishra, Nakul; Wang, Hongxin; Sommer, Constanze; Reijerse, Edward; Richers, Casseday P; Tamasaku, Kenji; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Rauchfuss, Thomas B; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Cramer, Stephen P

    2017-11-22

    [FeFe]-hydrogenases are metalloenzymes that reversibly reduce protons to molecular hydrogen at exceptionally high rates. We have characterized the catalytically competent hydride state (H hyd ) in the [FeFe]-hydrogenases from both Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans using 57 Fe nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) and density functional theory (DFT). H/D exchange identified two Fe-H bending modes originating from the binuclear iron cofactor. DFT calculations show that these spectral features result from an iron-bound terminal hydride, and the Fe-H vibrational frequencies being highly dependent on interactions between the amine base of the catalytic cofactor with both hydride and the conserved cysteine terminating the proton transfer chain to the active site. The results indicate that H hyd is the catalytic state one step prior to H 2 formation. The observed vibrational spectrum, therefore, provides mechanistic insight into the reaction coordinate for H 2 bond formation by [FeFe]-hydrogenases.

  16. Exploring symbiotic nitrogen fixation and assimilation in pea root nodules by in vivo 15N nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scharff, A.M.; Egsgaard, H.; Hansen, P.E.

    2003-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) fixation and assimilation in pea (Pisum sativum) root nodules were studied by in vivo N-15 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) by exposing detached nodules to N-15, via a perfusion medium, while recording a time course of spectra. In vivo P-31 NMR spectroscopy was used to monitor...... the physiological state of the metabolically active nodules. The nodules were extracted after the NMR studies and analyzed for total soluble amino acid pools and N-15 labeling of individual amino acids by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. A substantial pool of free ammonium was observed by N-15 NMR...... labeling of Asn was observed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, which is consistent with the generally accepted role of Asn as the end product of primary N assimilation in pea nodules. However, the Asn N-15 amino signal was absent in in vivo N-15 NMR spectra, which could be because...

  17. Resonance ionization spectroscopy in dysprosium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Studer, D., E-mail: dstuder@uni-mainz.de; Dyrauf, P.; Naubereit, P.; Heinke, R.; Wendt, K. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, Institut für Physik (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    We report on resonance ionization spectroscopy (RIS) of high-lying energy levels in dysprosium. We developed efficient excitation schemes and re-determined the first ionization potential (IP) via analysis of Rydberg convergences. For this purpose both two- and three-step excitation ladders were investigated. An overall ionization efficiency of 25(4) % could be demonstrated in the RISIKO mass separator of Mainz University, using a three-step resonance ionization scheme. Moreover, an extensive analysis of the even-parity 6sns- and 6snd-Rydberg-series convergences, measured via two-step excitation was performed. To account for strong perturbations in the observed s-series, the approach of multichannel quantum defect theory (MQDT) was applied. Considering all individual series limits we extracted an IP-value of 47901.76(5) cm{sup −1}, which agrees with the current literature value of 47901.7(6) cm{sup −1}, but is one order of magnitude more precise.

  18. Windowed direct exponential curve resolution quantification of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy with applications to amniotic fluid metabonomics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botros, L.L.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis presents a quantitative protocol of proton nuclear magnetic resonance ( 1 H NMR) that allows the determination of human amniotic fluid metabolite concentrations, which are then used in a metabonomic study to establish patient health during gestation. 1 H NMR free inductive decays (FIDs) of 258 human amniotic fluid samples from a 500MHz spectrometer are acquired. Quantitative analyses methods in both the frequency- and time-domain are carried out and compared. Frequency-domain analysis is accomplished by integration of the metabolite peaks before and after the inclusion of a known standard addition of alanine. Time-domain analysis is accomplished by the direct exponential curve resolution algorithm (DECRA). Both techniques are assessed by applications to calibration biological solutions and a simulated data set. The DECRA method proves to be a more accurate and precise route for quantitative analysis, and is included in the developed protocol. Well-defined peaks of various components are visible in the frequency-domain 1 H NMR spectra, including lactate, alanine, acetate, citrate, choline, glycine, and glucose. All are quantified with the proposed protocol. Statistical t-test and notched box and whisker plots are used to compare means of metabolite concentrations for diabetic and normal patients. Glucose, glycine, and choline are all found to correlate with gestational diabetes mellitus early in gestation. With further development, time-domain quantitative 1 H NMR has potential to become a robust diagnostic tool for gestational health. (author)

  19. Windowed direct exponential curve resolution quantification of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy with applications to amniotic fluid metabonomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botros, L.L

    2007-07-01

    This thesis presents a quantitative protocol of proton nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 1}H NMR) that allows the determination of human amniotic fluid metabolite concentrations, which are then used in a metabonomic study to establish patient health during gestation. {sup 1}H NMR free inductive decays (FIDs) of 258 human amniotic fluid samples from a 500MHz spectrometer are acquired. Quantitative analyses methods in both the frequency- and time-domain are carried out and compared. Frequency-domain analysis is accomplished by integration of the metabolite peaks before and after the inclusion of a known standard addition of alanine. Time-domain analysis is accomplished by the direct exponential curve resolution algorithm (DECRA). Both techniques are assessed by applications to calibration biological solutions and a simulated data set. The DECRA method proves to be a more accurate and precise route for quantitative analysis, and is included in the developed protocol. Well-defined peaks of various components are visible in the frequency-domain {sup 1}H NMR spectra, including lactate, alanine, acetate, citrate, choline, glycine, and glucose. All are quantified with the proposed protocol. Statistical t-test and notched box and whisker plots are used to compare means of metabolite concentrations for diabetic and normal patients. Glucose, glycine, and choline are all found to correlate with gestational diabetes mellitus early in gestation. With further development, time-domain quantitative {sup 1}H NMR has potential to become a robust diagnostic tool for gestational health. (author)

  20. Fingerprinting analysis of Saposhnikovia divaricata using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and high performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Yue-Yang; Deng, An-Jun; Du, Guan-Hua; Zhang, Jin-Lan; Qin, Hai-Lin

    2010-09-01

    The (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) fingerprints of fractionated non-polar and polar extracts (control substance for plant drug [CSPD] A and B) from the roots of 12 specimens of Saposhnikovia divaricata (Turcz.) Schischk were achieved with Fourier Transform (FT)-NMR spectrometer and assigned by comparison to each other and to the (1)H NMR spectra of the isolated individual compounds. These fingerprints were found to be uniform in terms of the specificity for the implication of all 12 specimens being systematically of the same origin. The uniformity was further affirmed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), which also revealed exactly identical specificity for the identified S. divaricata species with the (1)H NMR appearances of corresponding CSPD on the part of the composition of characteristic constituents when comparing to corresponding individual compounds. This investigation unambiguously shows that the specific signals from the chemotaxonomically significant compounds of chromones and coumarins in S. divaricata are exhibited distinctively in the composite features of both (1)H NMR fingerprints and HPLC profiles. The (1)H NMR and HPLC profiles established can successfully be used as reference for the authentication of the origin of S. divaricata species as well as for chemotaxonomic studies.

  1. Nuclear magnetic resonance scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, I.R.

    1985-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus is described including a magnet system which is capable of providing a steady magnetic field along an axis, and is constructed so as to define a plurality of regions along the axis in each of which the field is substantially homogeneous so that in each region an imaging operation may be separately carried out. Iron shields increase the field homogeneity. In use, each patient lies on a wheeled trolley which is provided with magnetic field gradient coils and an RF coil system, some of the coils being movable to facilitate positioning of the patient, and there are terminals for connection to a common computing and control facility. (author)

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cremin, B.J.

    1981-01-01

    Recent advances in diagnostic imaging, have been the medical application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). It's been used to study the structure of various compounds in chemistry and physics, and in the mid-1970 to produce images of rabbits and eventually of the human hand and head. The images are produced by making use of the nuclear magnetization of the hydrogen ion, or proton, that is present in biological material to record the density distribution of protons in cellular water and lipids. An exploration of the end-results of complicated free induction decay signals, that have been digitized and frequency-analysed by mathematical computerized techniques to produce an image of tissue density, is given. At present NMR produces images comparable to those of early computed tomography

  3. 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies of tumor energy metabolism and its relationship to intracapillary oxyhemoglobin saturation status and tumor hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rofstad, E K; DeMuth, P; Fenton, B M; Sutherland, R M

    1988-10-01

    Relationships between tumor bioenergetic status on the one hand and intracapillary oxyhemoglobin (HbO2) saturation status and fraction of radiobiologically hypoxic cells on the other were studied using two murine sarcoma lines (KHT, RIF-1) and two human ovarian carcinoma xenograft lines (MLS, OWI). Tumor energy metabolism was studied in vivo by 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and the resonance area ratio (PCr + NTP beta)/Pi was used as parameter for bioenergetic status. Intracapillary HbO2 saturation status reflects the oxygen supply conditions in tumors and was measured in vitro using a cryospectrophotometric method. The KHT, RIF-1, and MLS lines showed decreasing bioenergetic status, i.e., decreasing PCr and NTP beta resonances and an increasing Pi resonance, with increasing tumor volume, whereas the OWI line showed no changes in these resonances during tumor growth. The volume-dependence of the HbO2 saturation status differed similarly among the tumor lines; HbO2 saturation status decreased with increasing tumor volume for the KHT, RIF-1, and MLS lines and was independent of tumor volume for the OWI line. Moreover, linear correlations were found between bioenergetic status and HbO2 saturation status for individual tumors of the KHT, RIF-1, and MLS lines. These observations together indicated a direct relationship between 31P-NMR spectral parameters and tumor oxygen supply conditions. However, this relationship was not identical for the different tumor lines, suggesting that it was influenced by intrinsic properties of the tumor cells such as rate of respiration and ability to survive under hypoxia. Similarly, there was no correlation between bioenergetic status and fraction of radiobiologically hypoxic cells across the four tumor lines. This indicates that 31P-NMR spectroscopy data have to be supplemented with other data, e.g., rate of oxygen consumption, cell survival time under hypoxic stress, and/or fraction of metabolically active

  4. The Use and Evaluation of Scaffolding, Student Centered-Learning, Behaviorism, and Constructivism to Teach Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and IR Spectroscopy in a Two-Semester Organic Chemistry Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livengood, Kimberly; Lewallen, Denver W.; Leatherman, Jennifer; Maxwell, Janet L.

    2012-01-01

    Since 2002, infrared spectroscopy (IR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry have been introduced at the beginning of the first-semester organic chemistry lab course at this university. Starting in 2008, each individual student was given 20 unique homework problems that consisted of multiple-choice [superscript 1]H NMR and IR problems…

  5. Structural characterization of Kraft lignins from different spent cooking liquors by 1D and 2D Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernández-Costas, C.; Gouveia, S.; Sanromán, M.A.; Moldes, D.

    2014-01-01

    Three Kraft lignins isolated from black liquors of several paper pulp mills of the North of Spain and Portugal were structurally characterized by using monodimensional ( 1 H and 13 C) and bidimensional Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectrometry. From the latter, 13 C– 1 H heteronuclear single quantum correlation (HSQC) and heteronuclear multiple bond correlation (HMBC) were employed. Lignins from black liquors are usually burned for power generation. Nevertheless, they could become high value added products within a biorefinery context. In that case, a good understanding of their structure is a prior step to transform them. From all the NMR techniques studied, HSQC has risen as the most powerful tool in lignin characterization. Kraft cooking conditions and the type of wood seem to be the main factors that determine the differences observed in the lignins. All the samples have shown an important decrease in the number of β–O–4′ linkages, due to the Kraft process, and resinol has become the most resistant linkage to the process. Moreover, all samples seem to be mainly linked to a one polysaccharide: xylan. Several parameters like S/G ratio, portion of phenolic and aliphatic hydroxyls, amount of aromatic protons and other structural aspects were also estimated. - Highlights: • Lignins from three Kraft spent liquors were obtained by acid precipitation. • Structural characterization of the dissolved lignins was performed by NMR. • Wood source and pulping conditions determine the lignin characteristics. • Kraft process implies cleavage of β–O–4 linkages and survival of resinol linkages. • Comparison of the samples would aid decisions on its future revalorization

  6. Metabolomic analysis based on 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy metabolic profiles in tuberculous, malignant and transudative pleural effusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cheng; Peng, Jingjin; Kuang, Yanling; Zhang, Jiaqiang; Dai, Luming

    2017-01-01

    Pleural effusion is a common clinical manifestation with various causes. Current diagnostic and therapeutic methods have exhibited numerous limitations. By involving the analysis of dynamic changes in low molecular weight catabolites, metabolomics has been widely applied in various types of disease and have provided platforms to distinguish many novel biomarkers. However, to the best of our knowledge, there are few studies regarding the metabolic profiling for pleural effusion. In the current study, 58 pleural effusion samples were collected, among which 20 were malignant pleural effusions, 20 were tuberculous pleural effusions and 18 were transudative pleural effusions. The small molecule metabolite spectrums were obtained by adopting 1H nuclear magnetic resonance technology, and pattern-recognition multi-variable statistical analysis was used to screen out different metabolites. One-way analysis of variance, and Student-Newman-Keuls and the Kruskal-Wallis test were adopted for statistical analysis. Over 400 metabolites were identified in the untargeted metabolomic analysis and 26 metabolites were identified as significantly different among tuberculous, malignant and transudative pleural effusions. These metabolites were predominantly involved in the metabolic pathways of amino acids metabolism, glycometabolism and lipid metabolism. Statistical analysis revealed that eight metabolites contributed to the distinction between the three groups: Tuberculous, malignant and transudative pleural effusion. In the current study, the feasibility of identifying small molecule biochemical profiles in different types of pleural effusion were investigated reveal novel biological insights into the underlying mechanisms. The results provide specific insights into the biology of tubercular, malignant and transudative pleural effusion and may offer novel strategies for the diagnosis and therapy of associated diseases, including tuberculosis, advanced lung cancer and congestive heart

  7. Structural analysis of d(GCAATTGC)2 and its complex with berenil by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Mitsuru; Banville, D.L.; Shafer, R.H.

    1990-01-01

    The structures of d(GCAATTGC) 2 and its complex with berenil in solution were analyzed by two-dimensional 1 H NMR spectroscopy. Intra- and internucleotide nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) connectivities demonstrate that the octanucleotide duplex is primarily in the B conformation. Binding with berenil stabilizes the duplex with respect to thermal denaturation by about 10 degree C, based on the appearance of the imino proton signals. The berenil-d(GCAATTGC) 2 system is in fast exchange on the NMR time scale. The two-dimensional NMR data reveal that berenil binds in the minor groove of d(GCAATTGC) 2 . The aromatic drug protons are placed within 5 angstrom of the H2 proton of both adenines, the H1', H5', and H5 double-prime of both thymidines, and the H4', H5', and H5 double-prime of the internal guanosine. The amidine protons on berenil are also close to the H2 proton of both adenines. The duplex retains an overall B conformation in the complex with berenil. At 18 degree C, NOE contacts at longer mixing times indicate the presence of end-to-end association both in the duplex alone and also in its complex with berenil. These intermolecular contacts either vanished or diminished substantially at 45 degree C. Two molecular models are proposed for the berenil-(GCAATTGC) 2 complex; one has hydrogen bonds between the berenil amidine protons and the carbonyl oxygen, O2, of the external thymines, and the other has hydrogen bonds between the drug amidine protons and the purine nitrogen, N3, of the internal adenines. Quantitative analysis of the NOE data favors the second model

  8. Transition metal nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pregosin, P.S.

    1991-01-01

    Transition metal NMR spectroscopy has progressed enormously in recent years. New methods, and specifically solid-state methods and new pulse sequences, have allowed access to data from nuclei with relatively low receptivities with the result that chemists have begun to consider old and new problems, previously unapproachable. Moreover, theory, computational science in particular, now permits the calculation of not just 13 C, 15 N and other light nuclei chemical shifts, but heavy main-group element and transition metals as well. These two points, combined with increasing access to high field pulsed spectrometer has produced a wealth of new data on the NMR transition metals. A new series of articles concerned with measuring, understanding and using the nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of the metals of Group 3-12 is presented. (author)

  9. Two methods for nuclear spin determination in collinear laser spectroscopy: classical r.f. magnetic resonance and observation of the Larmor precession

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bendali, N.; Duong, H.T.; Saint-Jalm, J.M.; Vialle, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    Measurement of nuclear spin in the collinear laser spectroscopy method has been investigated using a fast sodium atomic beam excited collinearly by a C.W. single mode dye laser beam. The atomic magnetic moments are first aligned by optical pumping process, then they interact with a static magnetic field H 0 . The magnetic alignment of the atomic system just at the exit of the magnetic field is monitored by the laser induced fluorescence. Upon varying the amplitude of H 0 , the fluorescence signal presents a fringed structure. This structure is due to the Larmor precession of the aligned magnetic moments around H 0 , and therefore it is a signature of the spin involved. The modulation patterns corresponding to different relative orientations of H 0 and light polarization direction, are fitted by an analytical formula. In a second step, a classical magnetic resonance experiment with a static magnetic field and a radiofrequency field has been performed. The monocinetic character of our fast atomic beam allowed us to observe, even at high r.f. power, resonances line shapes in agreement with the Majorana formula

  10. Selection of Annonaceae Species for the Control of Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) and Metabolic Profiling of Duguetia lanceolata Using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, D S; Machado, A R T; Campos, V A C; Oliveira, D F; Carvalho, G A

    2016-04-01

    This study was performed to investigate the activity of 19 dichloromethane-soluble fractions obtained from the methanolic extracts of 10 Annonaceae species against the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith). The stem bark of Duguetia lanceolata A. St.-Hil. showed the highest insecticidal activity, with a median lethal time (LT50) of 61.4 h and a median lethal concentration (LC50) of 946.5 µg/ml of diet. The dichloromethane-soluble fractions from six D. lanceolata specimens were subjected to evaluation of their activities against S. frugiperda and metabolomic analysis using hydrogen (1H) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Although all of the samples affected S. frugiperda mortality, their insecticidal activities varied according to the sample used in the experiments. Using partial least squares regression of the results, the D. lanceolata specimens were grouped according to their metabolite profile and insecticidal activity. A detailed analysis via uni- and bidimensional NMR spectroscopy showed that the peaks in the 1H NMR spectra associated with increased insecticidal activity could be attributed to 2,4,5-trimethoxystyrene, which suggests that this substance is involved in the insecticidal activity of the stem bark fraction of D. lanceolata.

  11. Evaluation of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for determination of deuterium abundance in body fluids: application to measurement of total-body water in human infants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebouche, C.J.; Pearson, G.A.; Serfass, R.E.; Roth, C.W.; Finley, J.W.

    1987-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used to quantitate abundance of 2H in body water of human infants. This method provides precise measurement of total-body water without the extensive sample preparation requirements of previously described methods for determination of 2H content in body fluids. 2H2O (1 g/kg body weight) was administered to infants and saliva and urine were collected for up to 5 h. An internal standard was added directly to the fluid specimen and 2H enrichment in water was measured by NMR spectroscopy. Working range of deuterium abundance was 0.04-0.32 atom %. Coefficients of variation for saliva samples at 0.20 atom % 2H was 1.97%. 2H content in urine and saliva water reached a plateau by 4 h after administration, and amounts in the two fluids were virtually identical. Mean total-body water determination for six infants was 58.3 +/- 5.8% of body weight (range 53-66%)

  12. Differentiation of Organically and Conventionally Grown Tomatoes by Chemometric Analysis of Combined Data from Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Mid-infrared Spectroscopy and Stable Isotope Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohmann, Monika; Monakhova, Yulia; Erich, Sarah; Christoph, Norbert; Wachter, Helmut; Holzgrabe, Ulrike

    2015-11-04

    Because the basic suitability of proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H NMR) to differentiate organic versus conventional tomatoes was recently proven, the approach to optimize (1)H NMR classification models (comprising overall 205 authentic tomato samples) by including additional data of isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS, δ(13)C, δ(15)N, and δ(18)O) and mid-infrared (MIR) spectroscopy was assessed. Both individual and combined analytical methods ((1)H NMR + MIR, (1)H NMR + IRMS, MIR + IRMS, and (1)H NMR + MIR + IRMS) were examined using principal component analysis (PCA), partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA), linear discriminant analysis (LDA), and common components and specific weight analysis (ComDim). With regard to classification abilities, fused data of (1)H NMR + MIR + IRMS yielded better validation results (ranging between 95.0 and 100.0%) than individual methods ((1)H NMR, 91.3-100%; MIR, 75.6-91.7%), suggesting that the combined examination of analytical profiles enhances authentication of organically produced tomatoes.

  13. Comparative study of nuclear magnetic resonance and UV-visible spectroscopy dose-response of polymer gel based on N-(Isobutoxymethyl) acrylamide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfy, S.; Basfar, A. A.; Moftah, B.; Al-Moussa, A. A.

    2017-12-01

    A comparative study of nuclear magnetic resonance and UV-visible spectroscopy of dose-response for polymer gel dosimeters was performed. Dosimeters were prepared using N-(Isobutoxymethyl) acrylamide (NIBMA) as a new monomer via radiation induced polymerization for use in radiotherapy planning. The prepared dosimeters were irradiated with doses up to 30 Gy at a constant dose rate of 600 MU/min. Using a medical linear accelerator at irradiation energies of 6, 10 and 18 MV photon beam. The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), via spin-spin relaxation rate (R2) for water proton surrounding the polymer formulation and UV-Visible spectroscopy, via the optical absorbance measurements of irradiated dosimeters at selected wavelengths of 500 nm, was used to investigate the dose response of NIBMAGAT gel dosimeters. Scavenge of oxygen was done using tetrakis (hydroxymethyl) phosphonium chloride (THPC). The THPC optimum concentration in the dosimeters formulations were 5 and 10 mM for the NMR and optical absorbance measurements respectively. The quantitative investigation of the dosimeters components reveals the selective formulations based on 4% w/w gelatin, 1% w/w NIBMA, 3% w/w BisAAm, 5 or 10 mM THPC and 17% w/w glycerol which significantly increase the dosimeters dose response. The prepared dosimeters were found to be dose rate and photon beam irradiation energy independent. The stability study shows no change in the relaxation rate or in the optical absorbance of the gel dosimeters up to 8 days post-irradiation. The prepared polymer gel dosimeters at the energies of 6, 10 and 18 MV photon beam irradiation in the range of 1-30 Gy have the linearity of the dose response function in the case of R2 is better than in the case of absorbance measurements; correlation coefficient (r2) equals 0.995 and 0.991, respectively. Dose sensitivity, R2 of NIBMAGAT dosimeters (0.0775 s-1 Gy-1). The absorption band intensity increases linearly with a dose sensitivity of 0.016 cm-1 Gy-1. The

  14. Qualitative characterization of free polyamines in ethyleneamines epoxide hardeners by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy; Caracterizacion cualitativa de poliaminas libres en endurecedores de resinas epoxidicas del tipo etilenaminas por espectroscopia de resonancia magnetica nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez Garcia, Filiberto [Universidade Federal de Itajuba (UNIFEI), MG (Brazil); Miguez, Eduardo; Tavares, Maria Ines B. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ/IMA), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Macromoleculas Professora Eloisa Mano

    2008-01-15

    The qualitative characterization of two commercial ethyneamines epoxide hardeners marketed by ACROS (U.S.A.) was carried out by using carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The products were triethylenetetramine (TETA) and tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA). TETA had four components, the most important one being triethylenetetramine, an ethyleneamine of lineal structure, in a concentration of 60 mol%. Another component had ramified structure, while the other two exhibited recurrent structures of the piperazina type. TEPA had five components with similar structures. The major component was tetraethylenepentamine in an approximate concentration of 55 mol%. These results agree with the composition of similar products marketed by Dow Chemical Company, namely DEH 24 and DEH 26, respectively. (author)

  15. Resonant metallic nanostructures for enhanced terahertz spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Toma, A.

    2015-11-12

    We present our recent studies on terahertz resonant dipole nanoantennas. Exploiting the localization and enhancement capabilities of these devices, we introduce an effective method to perform terahertz spectroscopy on an extremely small number of nano-objects.

  16. Resonant metallic nanostructures for enhanced terahertz spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Toma, A.; Tuccio, S.; Prato, M.; De Donato, F.; Perucchi, A.; Di Pietro, P.; Marras, S.; Liberale, Carlo; Zaccaria, R. Proietti; De Angelis, F.; Manna, L.; Lupi, S.; Di Fabrizio, Enzo M.; Razzari, L.

    2015-01-01

    We present our recent studies on terahertz resonant dipole nanoantennas. Exploiting the localization and enhancement capabilities of these devices, we introduce an effective method to perform terahertz spectroscopy on an extremely small number

  17. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Study of Nanoscale Ionic Materials

    KAUST Repository

    Oommen, Joanna Mary; Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa; Emwas, Abdul-Hamid M.; Agarwal, Praveen; Archer, Lynden A.

    2010-01-01

    using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. NIMs are relatively stable over a temperature range from 300 to 383 K, rendering them usable in high temperature applications. We confirmed the presence of covalent bonds between the SiO2 core

  18. Single voxel magnetic resonance spectroscopy in distinguishing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Assess diagnostic utility of combined magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRI, MRS) in differentiating focal neoplastic lesions from focal non- neoplastic (infective or degenerative) brain lesions. Design: Descriptive, analytical - prospective study. Setting: The Aga Khan University ...

  19. A new approach for heparin standardization: combination of scanning UV spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance and principal component analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo A Lima

    Full Text Available The year 2007 was marked by widespread adverse clinical responses to heparin use, leading to a global recall of potentially affected heparin batches in 2008. Several analytical methods have since been developed to detect impurities in heparin preparations; however, many are costly and dependent on instrumentation with only limited accessibility. A method based on a simple UV-scanning assay, combined with principal component analysis (PCA, was developed to detect impurities, such as glycosaminoglycans, other complex polysaccharides and aromatic compounds, in heparin preparations. Results were confirmed by NMR spectroscopy. This approach provides an additional, sensitive tool to determine heparin purity and safety, even when NMR spectroscopy failed, requiring only standard laboratory equipment and computing facilities.

  20. Measurement of adenosine triphosphate and 2,3-diphosphoglycerate in stored blood with 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambruso, D R; Hawkins, B; Johnson, D L; Fritzberg, A R; Klingensmith, W C; McCabe, E R

    1986-06-01

    Conditions for blood storage are chosen to assure adequate levels of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG). Because of the invasive nature of the techniques, biochemical assays are not routinely used to measure levels of these compounds in stored blood. However, 31P NMR spectroscopy measures phosphorylated intermediates in intact cells and could be used without disruption of the storage pack. We compared levels of ATP and 2,3-DPG measured by 31P spectroscopy and standard enzyme-linked biochemical assays in whole blood (WB) and packed red blood cells (PRBCs) at weekly intervals during a 35-day storage period. NMR demonstrated a marked decrease in 2,3-DPG and an increase in inorganic phosphate after the first week of storage. No significant differences in ATP concentrations were seen in WB during the storage period, but a significant decrease in ATP in PRBCs was documented. There was good agreement in levels of ATP and 2,3-DPG measured by NMR and biochemical techniques. 31P NMR spectroscopy is a noninvasive technique for measuring ATP and 2,3-DPG which has a potential use in quality assurance of stored blood.

  1. Probing atomic scale transformation of fossil dental enamel using Fourier transform infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy: a case study from the Tugen Hills (Rift Gregory, Kenya).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Haohao; Balan, Etienne; Gervais, Christel; Ségalen, Loïc; Roche, Damien; Person, Alain; Fayon, Franck; Morin, Guillaume; Babonneau, Florence

    2014-09-01

    A series of fossil tooth enamel samples was investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, (13)C and (19)F magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Tooth remains were collected in Mio-Pliocene deposits of the Tugen Hills in Kenya. Significant transformations were observed in fossil enamel as a function of increasing fluorine content (up to 2.8wt.%). FTIR spectroscopy revealed a shift of the ν1 PO4 stretching band to higher frequency. The ν2 CO3 vibrational band showed a decrease in the intensity of the primary B-type carbonate signal, which was replaced by a specific band at 864cm(-1). This last band was ascribed to a specific carbonate environment in which the carbonate group is closely associated to a fluoride ion. The occurrence of this carbonate defect was consistently attested by the observation of two different fluoride signals in the (19)F NMR spectra. One main signal, at ∼-100ppm, is related to structural F ions in the apatite channel and the other, at -88ppm, corresponds to the composite defect. These spectroscopic observations can be understood as resulting from the mixture of two phases: biogenic hydroxylapatite (bioapatite) and secondary fluorapatite. SEM observations of the most altered sample confirmed the extensive replacement of the bioapatite by fluorapatite, resulting from the dissolution of the primary bioapatite followed by the precipitation of carbonate-fluorapatite. The ν2 CO3 IR bands can be efficiently used to monitor the extent of this type of bioapatite transformation during fossilization. Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Metabonomic profiling of renal cell carcinoma: High-resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of human serum with multivariate data analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Hongchang; Dong Baijun; Liu Xia; Xuan Hanqing; Huang Yiran; Lin Donghai

    2008-01-01

    Metabonomic profiling using proton nuclear magnetic resonance ( 1 H NMR) spectroscopy and multivariate data analysis of human serum samples was used to characterize metabolic profiles in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). We found distinct, easily detectable differences between (a) RCC patients and healthy humans, (b) RCC patients with metastases and without metastases, and (c) RCC patients before and after nephrectomy. Compared to healthy human serum, RCC serum had higher levels of lipid (mainly very low-density lipoproteins), isoleucine, leucine, lactate, alanine, N-acetylglycoproteins, pyruvate, glycerol, and unsaturated lipid, together with lower levels of acetoacetate, glutamine, phosphatidylcholine/choline, trimethylamine-N-oxide, and glucose. This pattern was somewhat reversed after nephrectomy. Altered metabolite concentrations are most likely the result of the cells switching to glycolysis to maintain energy homeostasis following the loss of ATP caused by impaired TCA cycle in RCC. Serum NMR spectra combined with principal component analysis techniques offer an efficient, convenient way of depicting tumour biochemistry and stratifying tumours under different pathophysiological conditions. It may be able to assist early diagnosis and postoperative surveillance of human malignant diseases using single blood samples

  3. Quantitative analysis of retinol and retinol palmitate in vitamin tablets using {sup 1}H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Young Hae; Kim, Hye Kyong; Wilson, Erica G.; Erkelens, Cornelis; Trijzelaar, Ben; Verpoorte, Robert

    2004-06-04

    {sup 1}H-NMR spectrometry was applied to the quantitative analysis of Vitamin A in four different types of vitamin tablets without any chromatographic purification or saponification. The experiment was performed analysing the H-15 resonance, which appears at {delta} 4.32 for retinol and {delta} 4.69 for retinol palmitate, well separated from other resonances in the {sup 1}H-NMR spectrum. Compounds were quantified using the relative ratio of the integral of the H-15 signal to that of a known amount of internal standard (200 {mu}g/ml), anthracene. In order to evaluate the feasibility of avoiding the saponification of retinol palmitate in the preparation of samples, several solvents such as dimethylsulfoxide, n-hexane, methanol, water, and 0.1 M of HCl were tested as possible extraction solvents. Among these, dimethylsulfoxide showed the best yield of retinol palmitate. This method, using dimethylsulfoxide extraction and {sup 1}H-NMR, allows rapid and simple quantitation of retinol palmitate in tablets avoiding tedious saponification.

  4. Quantitative analysis of retinol and retinol palmitate in vitamin tablets using 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Young Hae; Kim, Hye Kyong; Wilson, Erica G.; Erkelens, Cornelis; Trijzelaar, Ben; Verpoorte, Robert

    2004-01-01

    1 H-NMR spectrometry was applied to the quantitative analysis of Vitamin A in four different types of vitamin tablets without any chromatographic purification or saponification. The experiment was performed analysing the H-15 resonance, which appears at δ 4.32 for retinol and δ 4.69 for retinol palmitate, well separated from other resonances in the 1 H-NMR spectrum. Compounds were quantified using the relative ratio of the integral of the H-15 signal to that of a known amount of internal standard (200 μg/ml), anthracene. In order to evaluate the feasibility of avoiding the saponification of retinol palmitate in the preparation of samples, several solvents such as dimethylsulfoxide, n-hexane, methanol, water, and 0.1 M of HCl were tested as possible extraction solvents. Among these, dimethylsulfoxide showed the best yield of retinol palmitate. This method, using dimethylsulfoxide extraction and 1 H-NMR, allows rapid and simple quantitation of retinol palmitate in tablets avoiding tedious saponification

  5. Detection and quantification of phenolic compounds in olive oil by high resolution {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christophoridou, Stella [NMR Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of Crete, P.O. Box 2208, Voutes, 71003 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Dais, Photis [NMR Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of Crete, P.O. Box 2208, Voutes, 71003 Heraklion, Crete (Greece)], E-mail: dais@chemistry.uoc.gr

    2009-02-09

    High resolution {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy has been employed as a versatile and rapid method to analyze the polar fraction of extra virgin olive oils containing various classes of phenolic compounds. The strategy for identification of phenolic compounds is based on the NMR chemical shifts of a large number of model compounds assigned by using two-dimensional (2D) NMR spectroscopy. Furthermore, 2D NMR was applied to phenolic extracts in an attempt to discover additional phenolic compounds. The {sup 1}H NMR methodology was successful in detecting simple phenols, such as p-coumaric acid, vanillic acid, homovanillyl alcohol, vanillin, free tyrosol, and free hydroxytyrosol, the flavonols apigenin and luteolin, the lignans (+) pinoresinol, (+) 1-acetoxypinoresinol and syringaresinol, two isomers of the aldehydic form of oleuropein and ligstroside, the dialdehydic form of oleuropein and ligstroside lacking a carboxymethyl group, and finally total hydroxytyrosol and total tyrosol reflecting the total amounts of free and esterified hydroxytyrol and tyrosol, respectively. The absolute amount of each phenolic constituent was determined in the polar fraction by using anhydrous 1,3,5-triazine as an internal standard.

  6. Detection and quantification of phenolic compounds in olive oil by high resolution 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christophoridou, Stella; Dais, Photis

    2009-01-01

    High resolution 1 H NMR spectroscopy has been employed as a versatile and rapid method to analyze the polar fraction of extra virgin olive oils containing various classes of phenolic compounds. The strategy for identification of phenolic compounds is based on the NMR chemical shifts of a large number of model compounds assigned by using two-dimensional (2D) NMR spectroscopy. Furthermore, 2D NMR was applied to phenolic extracts in an attempt to discover additional phenolic compounds. The 1 H NMR methodology was successful in detecting simple phenols, such as p-coumaric acid, vanillic acid, homovanillyl alcohol, vanillin, free tyrosol, and free hydroxytyrosol, the flavonols apigenin and luteolin, the lignans (+) pinoresinol, (+) 1-acetoxypinoresinol and syringaresinol, two isomers of the aldehydic form of oleuropein and ligstroside, the dialdehydic form of oleuropein and ligstroside lacking a carboxymethyl group, and finally total hydroxytyrosol and total tyrosol reflecting the total amounts of free and esterified hydroxytyrol and tyrosol, respectively. The absolute amount of each phenolic constituent was determined in the polar fraction by using anhydrous 1,3,5-triazine as an internal standard

  7. Chemical degradation of proton conducting perflurosulfonic acid ionomer membranes studied by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghassemzadeh, L. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Heisenbergstrasse 1, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Institut fuer Physikalische Chemie, Universitaet Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 55, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Marrony, M. [European Institute for Energy Research, Emmy-Noether-Strasse 11, D-76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Barrera, R. [Edison, Via Giorgio La Pira, 2, I-10028 Trofarello (Italy); Kreuer, K.D.; Maier, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Heisenbergstrasse 1, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Mueller, K. [Institut fuer Physikalische Chemie, Universitaet Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 55, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2009-01-15

    The degradation of two different types of perfluorinated polymer membranes, Nafion and Hyflon Ion, has been examined by solid-state {sup 19}F and {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy. This spectroscopic technique is demonstrated to be a valuable tool for the study of the membrane structure and its alterations after in situ degradation in a fuel cell. The structural changes in different parts of the polymers are clearly distinguished, which provides unique insight into details of the degradation processes. The experimental NMR spectra prove that degradation mostly takes place within the polymer side chains, as reflected by the intensity losses of NMR signals associated with SO{sub 3}H, CF{sub 3}, OCF{sub 2} and CF groups. The integral degree of degradation is found to decrease with increasing membrane thickness while for a given thickness, Hyflon Ion appears to degrade less than Nafion. (author)

  8. Triplet State Resonance Raman Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilbrandt, Robert Walter; Jensen, N. H.; Pagsberg, Palle Bjørn

    1978-01-01

    Makes the first report on the resonance Raman spectrum of a molecule in its triplet state generated by pulse radiolysis. A solution of 0.01 mol dm-3 of p-terphenyl in benzene was studied......Makes the first report on the resonance Raman spectrum of a molecule in its triplet state generated by pulse radiolysis. A solution of 0.01 mol dm-3 of p-terphenyl in benzene was studied...

  9. NMR clinical imaging and spectroscopy: Its impact on nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This is a collection of four papers describing aspects of past and future use of nuclear magnetic resonance as a clinical diagnostic tool. The four papers are entitled (1) What Does NMR Offer that Nuclear Medicine Does Not? by Jerry W. Froelich, (2) Oncological Imaging: Now, Future and Impact Jerry W. Froelich, (3) Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy/Spectroscopic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine: Past, Present and Future by H. Cecil Charles, and (4) MR Cardiology: Now, Future and Impact by Robert J. Herfkens

  10. Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geick, R.

    1981-01-01

    This review starts with the basic principles of resonance phenomena in physical systems. Especially, the connection is shown between the properties of these systems and Fourier transforms. Next, we discuss the principles of nuclear magnetic resonance. Starting from the general properties of physical systems showing resonance phenomena and from the special properties of nuclear spin systems, the main part of this paper reviews pulse and Fourier methods in nuclear magnetic resonance. Among pulse methods, an introduction will be given to spin echoes, and, apart from the principle of Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance, an introduction to the technical problems of this method, e.g. resolution in the frequency domain, aliasing, phase and intensity errors, stationary state of the spin systems for repetitive measurements, proton decoupling, and application of Fourier methods to systems in a nonequilibrium state. The last section is devoted to special applications of Fourier methods and recent developments, e.g. measurement of relaxation times, solvent peak suppression, 'rapid scan'-method, methods for suppressing the effects of dipolar coupling in solids, two-dimensional Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance, and spin mapping or zeugmatography. (author)

  11. Kinetics of oxygen exchange between bisulfite ion and water as studied by oxygen-17 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horner, D.A.

    1984-08-01

    The nuclear magnetic relaxation times of oxygen-17 have been measured in aqueous sodium bisulfite solutions in the pH range from 2.5 to 5 as a function of temperature, pH, and S(IV) concentration, at an ionic strength of 1.0 m. The rate law for oxygen exchange between bisulfite ion and water was obtained from an analysis of the data, and is consistent with oxygen exchange occurring via the reaction SO 2 + H 2 O right reversible H + + SHO 3 - . The value of k/sub -1/ is in agreement with relaxation measurements. Direct spectroscopic evidence was found for the existence of two isomers of bisulfite ion: one with the proton bonded to the sulfur (HSO 3 - ) and the other with the proton bonded to an oxygen (SO 3 H - ). (The symbol SHO 3 - in the above chemical equation refers to both isomeric forms of bisulfite ion.) The relative amounts of the two isomers were determined as a function of temperature, and the rate and mechanism of oxygen exchange between the two was investigated. One of the two isomers, presumably SO 3 H - , exchanges oxygens with water much more rapidly than does the other. A two-pulse sequence was developed which greatly diminished the solvent peak in the NMR spectrum

  12. Nuclear magnetic resonance and medicine. Present applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    At the workshop on nuclear magnetic resonance and medicine held at Saclay, the following topics were presented: physical principles of NMR; NMR spectroscopy signal to noise ratio; principles of NMR imaging; methods of NMR imaging; image options in NMR; biological significance of contrast in proton NMR imaging; measurement and significance of relaxation times in cancers; NMR contrast agents; NMR for in-vivo biochemistry; potential effects and hazards of NMR applications in Medicine; difficulties of NMR implantation in Hospitals; NMR imaging of brain tumors and diseases of the spinal cord; NMR and Nuclear Medicine in brain diseases [fr

  13. Jet-associated resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Englert, Christoph [University of Glasgow, SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Ferretti, Gabriele [Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Physics, Goeteborg (Sweden); Spannowsky, Michael [Durham University, Department of Physics, Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology, Durham (United Kingdom)

    2017-12-15

    We present a model-independent study aimed at characterising the nature of possible resonances in the jet-photon or jet-Z final state at hadron colliders. Such resonances are expected in many models of compositeness and would be a clear indication of new physics. At leading order, in the narrow width approximation, the matrix elements are parameterised by just a few constants describing the coupling of the various helicities to the resonance. We present the full structure of such amplitudes up to spin 2 and use them to simulate relevant kinematic distributions that could serve to constrain the coupling structure. This also generalises the signal generation strategy that is currently pursued by ATLAS and CMS to the most general case in the considered channels. While the determination of the P/CP properties of the interaction seems to be out of reach within this framework, there is a wealth of information to be gained about the spin of the resonance and the relative couplings of the helicities. (orig.)

  14. Jet-associated resonance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englert, Christoph; Ferretti, Gabriele; Spannowsky, Michael

    2017-12-01

    We present a model-independent study aimed at characterising the nature of possible resonances in the jet-photon or jet- Z final state at hadron colliders. Such resonances are expected in many models of compositeness and would be a clear indication of new physics. At leading order, in the narrow width approximation, the matrix elements are parameterised by just a few constants describing the coupling of the various helicities to the resonance. We present the full structure of such amplitudes up to spin 2 and use them to simulate relevant kinematic distributions that could serve to constrain the coupling structure. This also generalises the signal generation strategy that is currently pursued by ATLAS and CMS to the most general case in the considered channels. While the determination of the P/CP properties of the interaction seems to be out of reach within this framework, there is a wealth of information to be gained about the spin of the resonance and the relative couplings of the helicities.

  15. Clinical magnetic resonance: imaging and spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrew, E.R.; Bydder, Graeme; Griffiths, John; Iles, Richard; Styles, Peter

    1990-01-01

    This book begins with a readable, comprehensive but non-mathematical introduction to the basic underlying principles of magnetic resonance. Further chapters include information on the theory and principles of MRI and MRS, the interpretation of MR images, the clinical applications and scope of MRI and MRS, practical aspects of spectroscopy and magnetic resonance, and also the practical problems associated with the siting, safety and operation of large MRI and MRS equipment. (author)

  16. [Effect of Electroacupuncture at "Neiguan"(PC 6) on Serum and Myocardial Metabolites in Rats with Myocardial Ischemia Reperfusion Injury Based on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ya-Ni; Tan, Cheng-Fu; Liu, Wei-Wei; Yan, Jie; Wang, Chao; Liu, Mi; Lin, Dong-Hai; Huang, Cai-Hua; Du, Lin; Chen, Mei-Lin; Li, Jiao-Lan; Zhu, Ding-Ming

    2018-03-25

    We have repeatedly demonstrated that electroacupuncture (EA) of "Neiguan"(PC 6) can improve myocardial ischemia in rats. The present study was designed to investigate the metabolomic profile of peripheral blood se-rum and myocardium involving EA-induced improvement of myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury (MIRI) in rats by using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Thirty male SD rats were equally randomized into blank control, model and EA groups. Rats of the control group were only banded for 20 min, once a day for 7 days. The MIRI model was established by occlusion of the anterior descending branch of the left coronary artery for 40 min, followed by reperfusion for 60 min, and rats of the model group were banded as those in the control group. EA (10 Hz/50 Hz, 1 mA) was applied to bilateral PC 6 for 20 min, once daily for 7 days. The blood samples and left ventricular myocardial tissues were collected for assaying the profiles of differential metabolites using 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance ( 1 H NMR) spectroscopy and multivariate statistical analysis such as the principal components analysis (PCA), partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) and orthogonal PLS-DA (O-PLS-DA) with SIMCA-P software 12.0. A total of 19 differential metabolites (17 down-regulated, 2 up-regulated) in the serum and 14 differential metabolites (13 down-regulated and 1 up-regulated) in the ischemic left myocardium were identified after MIRI. Of the 19 serum differential metabolites, amino acids (leucine, isoleucine, valine,alanine, lysine, glycine, glutamine), 3-hydroxy butyric acid (3-HB), lactic acid, acetate, N-acetyl glycoprotein (NAc), acetone, acetoacetate, succinate, polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), creatine, glycerophosphocholine (GPC) were down-regulated; while low density lipoprotein (LDL), LDL/very low density lipoprotein(LDL/VLDL)and glucose obviously up-regulated. Of the 14 myocardial differential metabolites, amino acids (alanine, lysine, glutamate

  17. A Preliminary Urinary Metabolomics Study of Sprague-Dawley Rats after Short-term Ketamine Administration by Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Lu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug abuse has become a global problem. The mass spectrometry-based metabolic consequences of ketamine administration in anesthesia and therapy have been well studied, but to the best of our knowledge, metabolomic studies of ketamine abuse based on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy are still lacking. In this study, twenty Sprague–Dawley rats were randomly assigned into two groups: a control group (n = 10 and a ketamine group (n = 10. The animals in the ketamine group received intraperitoneal injections of ketamine twice daily at 12-h intervals at progressively increasing doses over a period of 9 days, while the control group received an equal volume of saline. The urine samples were collected for 24 h at days 0, 1, 3, 5, 7, and 9 for the metabolomics study. The metabolic changes in urine after short-term ketamine administration were analyzed by proton NMR coupled with multivariate statistical analysis. The results indicated that short-term ketamine exposure led to significant alterations of the metabolites in the urine of the rats. Specifically, 1,3,7-trimethyluric acid, 1,3-dimethyluric acid, acetoacetic acid, acetylglycine, creatine, sarcosine, dimethylglycine, glycine, and theobromine were significantly increased in the urine. Significant changes were also found in metabolites related to antioxidant and energy metabolism, including acetoacetic acid, succinate, 1,3,7-trimethyluric acid, 1,3-dimethyluric acid, creatine, and taurine. Our findings indicated that short-term ketamine administration leads to disorder of energy metabolism and oxidative stress. In addition, the modified metabolites identified could serve as the new biological markers and potential biological indices reflecting the underlying mechanism of ketamine abuse.

  18. Chemical structures of coal lithotypes before and after CO2 adsorption as investigated by advanced solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, X.; Mastalerz, Maria; Chappell, M.A.; Miller, L.F.; Li, Y.; Mao, J.

    2011-01-01

    Four lithotypes (vitrain, bright clarain, clarain, and fusain) of a high volatile bituminous Springfield Coal from the Illinois Basin were characterized using advanced solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The NMR techniques included quantitative direct polarization/magic angle spinning (DP/MAS), cross polarization/total sideband suppression (CP/TOSS), dipolar dephasing, CHn selection, and recoupled C-H long-range dipolar dephasing techniques. The lithotypes that experienced high-pressure CO2 adsorption isotherm analysis were also analyzed to determine possible changes in coal structure as a result of CO2 saturation at high pressure and subsequent evacuation. The main carbon functionalities present in original vitrain, bright clarain, clarain and fusain were aromatic carbons (65.9%-86.1%), nonpolar alkyl groups (9.0%-28.9%), and aromatic C-O carbons (4.1%-9.5%). Among these lithotypes, aromaticity increased in the order of clarain, bright clarain, vitrain, and fusain, whereas the fraction of alkyl carbons decreased in the same order. Fusain was distinct from other three lithotypes in respect to its highest aromatic composition (86.1%) and remarkably small fraction of alkyl carbons (11.0%). The aromatic cluster size in fusain was larger than that in bright clarain. The lithotypes studied responded differently to high pressure CO2 saturation. After exposure to high pressure CO2, vitrain and fusain showed a decrease in aromaticity but an increase in the fraction of alkyl carbons, whereas bright clarain and clarain displayed an increase in aromaticity but a decrease in the fraction of alkyl carbons. Aromatic fused-rings were larger for bright clarain but smaller for fusain in the post-CO2 adsorption samples compared to the original lithotypes. These observations suggested chemical CO2-coal interactions at high pressure and the selectivity of lithotypes in response to CO2 adsorption. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  19. Metabolic fingerprinting of joint tissue of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) rat: In vitro, high resolution NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectroscopy based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Niraj Kumar; Sharma, Shikha; Sharma, Rajkumar; Sinha, Neeraj; Mandal, Sudhir Kumar; Sharma, Deepak

    2018-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease whose major characteristics persistent joint inflammation that results in joint destruction and failure of the function. Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) rat is an autoimmune disease model and in many ways shares features with RA. The CIA is associated with systemic manifestations, including alterations in the metabolism. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy-based metabolomics has been successfully applied to the perchloric acid extract of the joint tissue of CIA rat and control rat for the analysis of aqueous metabolites. GPC (Glycerophosphocholine), carnitine, acetate, and creatinine were important discriminators of CIA rats as compared to control rats. Level of lactate (significance; p = 0.004), alanine (p = 0.025), BCA (Branched-chain amino acids) (p = 0.006) and creatinine (p = 0.023) was significantly higher in CIA rats as compared to control rats. Choline (p = 0.038) and GPC (p = 0.009) were significantly reduced in CIA rats as compared to control rats. Choline to GPC correlation was good and negative (Pearson correlation = -0.63) for CIA rats as well as for control rats (Pearson correlation = -0.79). All these analyses collectively considered as metabolic fingerprinting of the joint tissue of CIA rat as compared to control rat. The metabolic fingerprinting of joint tissue of CIA rats was different as compared to control rats. The metabolic fingerprinting reflects inflammatory disease activity in CIA rats with synovitis, demonstrating that underlying inflammatory process drives significant changes in metabolism that can be measured in the joint tissue. Therefore, the outcome of this study may be helpful for understanding the mechanism of metabolic processes in RA. This may be also helpful for the development of advanced diagnostic methods and therapy for RA.

  20. Combination of 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and principal component analysis to evaluate the lipid fluidity of flutamide-encapsulated lipid nanoemulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takegami, Shigehiko; Ueyama, Keita; Konishi, Atsuko; Kitade, Tatsuya

    2018-06-06

    The lipid fluidity of various lipid nanoemulsions (LNEs) without and with flutamide (FT) and containing one of two neutral lipids, one of four phosphatidylcholines as a surfactant, and sodium palmitate as a cosurfactant was investigated by the combination of 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and principal component analysis (PCA). In the 1 H NMR spectra, the peaks from the methylene groups of the neutral lipids and surfactants for all LNE preparations showed downfield shifts with increasing temperature from 20 to 60 °C. PCA was applied to the 1 H NMR spectral data obtained for the LNEs. The PCA resulted in a model in which the first two principal components (PCs) extracted 88% of the total spectral variation; the first PC (PC-1) axis and second PC (PC-2) axis accounted for 73 and 15%, respectively, of the total spectral variation. The Score-1 values for PC-1 plotted against temperature revealed the existence of two clusters, which were defined by the neutral lipid of the LNE preparations. Meanwhile, the Score-2 values decreased with rising temperature and reflected the increase in lipid fluidity of each LNE preparation, consistent with fluorescence anisotropy measurements. In addition, the changes of Score-2 values with temperature for LNE preparations with FT were smaller than those for LNE preparations without FT. This indicates that FT encapsulated in LNE particles markedly suppressed the increase in lipid fluidity of LNE particles with rising temperature. Thus, PCA of 1 H NMR spectra will become a powerful tool to analyze the lipid fluidity of lipid nanoparticles. Graphical abstract ᅟ.

  1. Characterization of oil shale, isolated kerogen, and post-pyrolysis residues using advanced 13 solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiaoyan; Birdwell, Justin E.; Chappell, Mark A.; Li, Yuan; Pignatello, Joseph J.; Mao, Jingdong

    2013-01-01

    Characterization of oil shale kerogen and organic residues remaining in postpyrolysis spent shale is critical to the understanding of the oil generation process and approaches to dealing with issues related to spent shale. The chemical structure of organic matter in raw oil shale and spent shale samples was examined in this study using advanced solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Oil shale was collected from Mahogany zone outcrops in the Piceance Basin. Five samples were analyzed: (1) raw oil shale, (2) isolated kerogen, (3) oil shale extracted with chloroform, (4) oil shale retorted in an open system at 500°C to mimic surface retorting, and (5) oil shale retorted in a closed system at 360°C to simulate in-situ retorting. The NMR methods applied included quantitative direct polarization with magic-angle spinning at 13 kHz, cross polarization with total sideband suppression, dipolar dephasing, CHn selection, 13C chemical shift anisotropy filtering, and 1H-13C long-range recoupled dipolar dephasing. The NMR results showed that, relative to the raw oil shale, (1) bitumen extraction and kerogen isolation by demineralization removed some oxygen-containing and alkyl moieties; (2) unpyrolyzed samples had low aromatic condensation; (3) oil shale pyrolysis removed aliphatic moieties, leaving behind residues enriched in aromatic carbon; and (4) oil shale retorted in an open system at 500°C contained larger aromatic clusters and more protonated aromatic moieties than oil shale retorted in a closed system at 360°C, which contained more total aromatic carbon with a wide range of cluster sizes.

  2. Collinear resonance ionization spectroscopy of radium ions

    CERN Multimedia

    We propose to study the neutron-deficient radium isotopes with high-resolution collinear resonance ionization spectroscopy. Probing the hyperfine structure of the $7{s}\\,^2\\!{S}\\!_{1/2}\\,\\rightarrow\\,7{p}\\,^{2}\\!{P}\\!_{1/2}$ and $7{s}\\,^{2}\\!{S}\\!_{1/2}\\,\\rightarrow\\,7{p}\\,^{2}\\!{P}\\!_{3/2}$ transitions in Ra II will provide atomic-structure measurements that have not been achieved for $^{{A}<208}$Ra. Measurement of the $7{s}\\,^{2}\\!{S}\\!_{1/2}\\,\\rightarrow\\,7{p}\\,^{2}\\!{P}\\!_{3/2}$ transition in $^{{A}<214}$Ra will allow the spectroscopic quadrupole moments to be directly measured for the first time. In addition, the technique will allow tentative spin assignments to be confirmed and the magnetic dipole moments measured for $^{\\textit{A}<208}$Ra. Measurement of the hyperfine structure (in particular the isotope shifts) of the neutron-deficient radium will provide information to further constrain the nuclear models away from the N=126 shell closure.

  3. Intra- and inter-metabolite correlation spectroscopy of tomato metabolomics data obtained by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moco, S.I.A.; Forshed, J.; Vos, de C.H.; Bino, R.J.; Vervoort, J.J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LCMS) are frequently used as technological platforms for metabolomics applications. In this study, the metabolic profiles of ripe fruits from 50 different tomato cultivars, including beef, cherry and round types, were

  4. Nuclear magnetic resonance diagnostic apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, H.

    1985-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance diagnostic apparatus including a coil for generating a gradient field in a plane perpendicular to a static magnetic field, means for controlling the operation of the coil to rotationally shift in angular steps the gradient direction of the gradient field at an angle pitch of some multiple of the unit index angle through a plurality of rotations to assume all the shift positions of the gradient direction, a rough image reconstructor for reconstructing a rough tomographic image on the basis of nuclear magnetic resonance signals acquired during a rotation of the second gradient magnetic field, a rough image display for depicting the rough tomographic image, a final image reconstructor for reconstructing a final tomographic image on the basis of all nuclear magnetic resonance signals corresponding to all of the expected rotation shift positions acquired during a plurality of rotations and a final image display for depicting the final tomographic image

  5. Overlapping β decay and resonance neutron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raman, S.; Fogelberg, B.

    1984-01-01

    By carrying out a detailed study of 87 Kr levels, we have shown that delayed neutron spectroscopy can be a viable method for studying individual levels and that a broad resonance-like structure is present in the β-strength distribution. 12 refs., 1 fig

  6. High-spin nuclear spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond, R.M.

    1986-07-01

    High-spin spectroscopy is the study of the changes in nuclear structure, properties, and behavior with increasing angular momentum. It involves the complex interplay between collective and single-particle motion, between shape and deformation changes, particle alignments, and changes in the pairing correlations. A review of progress in theory, experimentation, and instrumentation in this field is given

  7. Nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy applied to [Fe(OEP)(NO)]: the vibrational assignments of five-coordinate ferrous heme-nitrosyls and implications for electronic structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnert, Nicolai; Galinato, Mary Grace I; Paulat, Florian; Richter-Addo, George B; Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Xu, Nan; Zhao, Jiyong

    2010-05-03

    This study presents Nuclear Resonance Vibrational Spectroscopy (NRVS) data on the five-coordinate (5C) ferrous heme-nitrosyl complex [Fe(OEP)(NO)] (1, OEP(2-) = octaethylporphyrinato dianion) and the corresponding (15)N(18)O labeled complex. The obtained spectra identify two isotope sensitive features at 522 and 388 cm(-1), which shift to 508 and 381 cm(-1), respectively, upon isotope labeling. These features are assigned to the Fe-NO stretch nu(Fe-NO) and the in-plane Fe-N-O bending mode delta(ip)(Fe-N-O), the latter has been unambiguously assigned for the first time for 1. The obtained NRVS data were simulated using our quantum chemistry centered normal coordinate analysis (QCC-NCA). Since complex 1 can potentially exist in 12 different conformations involving the FeNO and peripheral ethyl orientations, extended density functional theory (DFT) calculations and QCC-NCA simulations were performed to determine how these conformations affect the NRVS properties of [Fe(OEP)NO]. These results show that the properties and force constants of the FeNO unit are hardly affected by the conformational changes involving the ethyl substituents. On the other hand, the NRVS-active porphyrin-based vibrations around 340-360, 300-320, and 250-270 cm(-1) are sensitive to the conformational changes. The spectroscopic changes observed in these regions are due to selective mechanical couplings of one component of E(u)-type (in ideal D(4h) symmetry) porphyrin-based vibrations with the in-plane Fe-N-O bending mode. This leads to the observed variations in Fe(OEP) core mode energies and NRVS intensities without affecting the properties of the FeNO unit. The QCC-NCA simulated NRVS spectra of 1 show excellent agreement with experiment, and indicate that conformer F is likely present in the samples of this complex investigated here. The observed porphyrin-based vibrations in the NRVS spectra of 1 are also assigned based on the QCC-NCA results. The obtained force constants of the Fe-NO and N

  8. Metabolic alterations produced by 3-nitropropionic acid in rat striata and cultured astrocytes: quantitative in vitro 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and biochemical characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, C.; Wan, Y.L.; Goh, C.C.; Tsai, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    Quantitative high resolution in vitro 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was employed to study the metabolic effects of 3-nitropropionic acid associated with aging from perchloric acid extracts of rat striata. Systemic injection of 3-nitropropionic acid in rats at a dose of 10 mg/kg/day for seven consecutive days significantly impaired energy metabolism in rats one, four and eight months of age, as evidenced by a marked elevation of succinate and lactate levels. However, a significant decrease in N-acetyl-l-aspartate level, a neuronal marker, was observed in four- and eight-month-old rats but not in one-month-old rats. This would indicate that rats at four to eight months are more susceptible to 3-nitropropionic acid than those at one month. A significant decrease in GABA level was observed in four-month-old 3-nitropropionic acid-treated rats, which is consistent with the literature that GABAergic neurons are particularly vulnerable to 3-nitropropionic acid treatment. In addition, glutamine and glutamate levels were markedly decreased at four and eight months in 3-nitropropionic acid-treated rats. Since glutamine is synthesized predominantly in glia, the observation above suggests that 3-nitropropionic acid intoxication may involve perturbation of energy metabolism, glial injury and consequent neuronal damage. Astrocytes which are essential in the metabolism of glutamate and glutamine were used to further assess 3-nitropropionic acid-induced toxicity. Glial proliferation, mitochondrial metabolism and glutamine synthetase activity were all reduced by 3-nitropropionic acid treatment with a concomitant increase, in a dose-dependent manner, of lactate levels, suggesting that 3-nitropropionic acid is also detrimental to astrocytes in vivo and thus may affect metabolic interaction between neurons and glia.These results not only imply that 3-nitropropionic acid blocks energy metabolism prior to exerting neurotoxic damage but also demonstrate that the degree of

  9. GHz nuclear magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, T.A.; Drobny, G.; Trewhella, J.

    1994-12-01

    For the past dozen years, 500- and 600-MHz spectrometers have become available in many laboratories. The first 600-MHz NMR spectrometer (at Carnegie Mellon University) was commissioned more than 15 years ago and, until 1994, represented the highest field available for high-resolution NMR. This year, we have witnessed unprecedented progress in the development of very high field magnets for NMR spectroscopy, including the delivery of the first commercial 750-MHz NMR spectrometers. In addition, NMR signals have been obtained from 20-Tesla magnets (850 MHz for {sup 1}H`s) at both Los Alamos National Laboratory and Florida State University in the NHMFL (National High Magnetic Field Laboratory). These preliminary experiments have been performed in magnets with 100-ppm homogeneity, but a 20-Tesla magnet developed for the NHMFL will be brought to field this year with a projected homogeneity of 0.1 ppm over a 1-cm-diam spherical volume.

  10. Nuclear magnetic resonance applications in biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Ling; Liu Maili

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a state-of-the-art technology which has been widely applied in biological systems over the past decades. It is a powerful tool for macromolecular structure determination in solution, and has the unique advantage of being capable of elucidating the structure and dynamic behavior of proteins during vital biomedical processes. In this review, we introduce the recent progress in NMR techniques for studying the structure, interaction and dynamics of proteins. The methods for NMR based drug discovery and metabonomics are also briefly introduced. (authors)

  11. Nuclear spectroscopy with lithium ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiser, C.

    1977-02-01

    A survey of the state of nuclear spectroscopy with lithium ions is given. Proceeding from the physical and nuclear properties the specific topics arising by the acceleration of these ions are discussed. The results obtained from measurements of excitation functions of different lithium reactions, particularly of compound reactions, with several target nuclei are summarized. Besides compound reactions direct reactions are important, especially transfer reactions, elastic and inelastic scattering and exchange reactions. The results on high spin states obtained by in-beam gamma-spectroscopy are discussed in detail. Finally the possibilities are considered for accelerating lithium ions in the cyclotron U-120 and in the tandem generator EGP-10 of the ZfK. (author)

  12. In vitro quantitative ((1))H and ((19))F nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging studies of fluvastatin™ in Lescol® XL tablets in a USP-IV dissolution cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qilei; Gladden, Lynn; Avalle, Paolo; Mantle, Michael

    2011-12-20

    Swellable polymeric matrices are key systems in the controlled drug release area. Currently, the vast majority of research is still focused on polymer swelling dynamics. This study represents the first quantitative multi-nuclear (((1))H and ((19))F) fast magnetic resonance imaging study of the complete dissolution process of a commercial (Lescol® XL) tablet, whose formulation is based on the hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) polymer under in vitro conditions in a standard USP-IV (United States Pharmacopeia apparatus IV) flow-through cell that is incorporated into high field superconducting magnetic resonance spectrometer. Quantitative RARE ((1))H magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ((19))F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and imaging methods have been used to give information on: (i) dissolution media uptake and hydrodynamics; (ii) active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) mobilisation and dissolution; (iii) matrix swelling and dissolution and (iv) media activity within the swelling matrix. In order to better reflect the in vivo conditions, the bio-relevant media Simulated Gastric Fluid (SGF) and Fasted State Simulated Intestinal Fluid (FaSSIF) were used. A newly developed quantitative ultra-fast MRI technique was applied and the results clearly show the transport dynamics of media penetration and hydrodynamics along with the polymer swelling processes. The drug dissolution and mobility inside the gel matrix was characterised, in parallel to the ((1))H measurements, by ((19))F NMR spectroscopy and MRI, and the drug release profile in the bulk solution was recorded offline by UV spectrometer. We found that NMR spectroscopy and 1D-MRI can be uniquely used to monitor the drug dissolution/mobilisation process within the gel layer, and the results from ((19))F NMR spectra indicate that in the gel layer, the physical mobility of the drug changes from "dissolved immobilised drug" to "dissolved mobilised drug". Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  13. Methods of quantification by means of spectroscopy of nuclear magnetic resonance and gas chromatography of the active principles of Justice pectoralis Jacq. Acanthaceae and Lippia alba (Mill.) N.E.Brownw ex Brit and Wils Verbenaceae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina Lopez, Ligia de los Angeles

    2008-01-01

    The quality control of the vegetable material, presence and concentration of the active principles of Justice pectoralis and Lippia alba were studied for the use and marketing as herbal products. The method of analysis of the Justice pectoralis and Lippia alba was carried out by means of proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and the gas chromatography. Coumarin and essential oils were determinate in the plants extracts. Different samples were collected throughout one year to evaluate the variation of concentration of the active principles of the plant and there was evaluated a method of extraction of solvents [es

  14. Department of Nuclear Spectroscopy - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Styczen, J.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: The contributions given hereafter to this Annual Report cover a broad activity of the Department in 1999 both in the pure nuclear spectroscopy and in the applied spectroscopy investigations. That activity is then assembled in the two main groups: the nuclear structure studies with the application of the multidetector systems such as GASP, GAMMASPHERE, EUROBALL and the RFD - as its ancillary device, and investigations of condensed matter properties with the use of nuclear methods. In addition, non-nuclear methods such as the atomic force microscopy provided several new encouraging results. The nice data obtained are due to the great skill and hard work of all members of the staff, and a vast cooperation both with international and national institutes and institutions. When anticipated for calling the attractive results of the past year, I would rather admit that all data given here pretend to be those. To meet with, I refer directly to the short presentations given in the next pages. (author)

  15. Isomeric shift compensation when using resonance detectors in Moessbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irkaev, S.M.; Semenkin, V.A.; Sokolov, M.M.

    1981-01-01

    Method for compensation of isomeric shift of lines observed during operation of resonance detectors being part of spectrometers of nuclear gamma resonance is suggested. A flowsheet of device permitting to realize the method described is given. The method is based on using the Doppler effect. A source of resonance radiation is moved at a constant velocity, which is choosen so as to compensate energy shift of lines of the source and convertors of the resonance detector. The absorber under investigation is put in motion with a constant acceleration. The resonance detector signals are amplified selected according to amplitude by a discriminator and come to the input of multichannel analyzer operating in the regime of subsequent scaling. Analysis of experimental spectra obtained at velocities of source movement from 0 to +3 mm/s shows that value of resonance absorption effect drops as increasing energy shift in the source-converter system. It is concluded that application of the method described will permit to considerably extend the field of application of resonance detectors in the Moessbauer spectroscopy and investigate in practice all the isotopes having converted transitions [ru

  16. Nuclear quadrupole resonance of arsenolite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madarazo, R.

    1988-01-01

    A pulsed Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) spectrometer was constructed using imported Matec units. Peripherical components were specially assembled and tested for the implantation of the spin-echo technique in the Laboratorio de Centros de Cor of IFUSP. The R.F. operation range is from 50 to 1 ) and spin-spin (T 2 ) relaxation times were carried out at room temperature in arsenolite. The 75 As NQR frequency measured at room temperature is 116.223 MHz. (author) [pt

  17. Fingerprinting analysis of Rhizoma chuanxiong of commercial types using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and high performance liquid chromatography method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Hai-Lin; Deng, An-Jun; Du, Guan-Hua; Wang, Peng; Zhang, Jin-Lan; Li, Zhi-Hong

    2009-06-01

    The (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) fingerprints of fractionated non-polar extracts (control substance for a plant drug (CSPD) A) from Rhizoma chuanxiong, the rhizomes of Ligusticum chuanxiong Hort., of seven specimens from different sources were measured on Fourier Transform (FT)-NMR spectrometer and assigned by comparing them with the (1)H NMR spectra of the isolated pure compounds. The (1)H NMR fingerprints showed exclusively characteristic resonance signals of the major special constituents of the plant. Although the differences in the relative intensity of the (1)H NMR signals due to a discrepancy in the ratio of the major constituents among these samples could be confirmed by high performance liquid chromatography analysis, the general features of the (1)H NMR fingerprint established for an authentic sample of the rhizomes of L. chuanxiong exhibited exclusive data from those special compounds and can be used for authenticating L. Chuanxiong species.

  18. Fingerprinting Analysis of Rhizoma Chuanxiong of Commercial Types using 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and High Performance Liquid Chromatography Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Lin Qin; An-Jun Deng; Guan-Hua Du; Peng Wang; Jin-Lan Zhang; Zhi-Hong Li

    2009-01-01

    The 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) fingerprints of fractionated non-polar extracts (control substance for a plant drug (CSPD) A) from Rhizoma chuanxiong, the rhizomes of Ligusticum chuanxiong Hort., of seven specimens from different sources were measured on Fourier Transform (FT)-NMR spectrometer and assigned by comparing them with the 1H NMR spectra of the isolated pure compounds. The 1H NMR fingerprints showed exclusively characteristic resonance signals of the major special constituents of the plant. Although the differences in the relative intensity of the 1H NMR signals due to a discrepancy in the ratio of the major constituents among these samples could be confirmed by high performance liquid chromatography analysis, the general features of the 1H NMR fingerprint established for an authentic sample of the rhizomes of L. chuanxiong exhibited exclusive data from those special compounds and can be used for authenticating L. Chuanxiong species.

  19. The structure of teichoic acid from Bacillus subtilis var. niger WM as determined by 13C nuclear-magnetic-resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Boer, W.R.; Kruyssen, F.J.; Wouters, J.T.M.; Kruk, C.

    1976-01-01

    The walls of Bacillus subtilis var. niger WM, grown in a Mg 2+ -limited chemostat culture (carbon source glucose, dilution rate = 0.2 h -1 , 37 0 C, pH 7) contained 45% (w/w) teichoic acid, a polymer composed of glycerol, phosphate and glucose in the molar ratio 1.00 : 1.00 : 0.88. Alkaline hydrolysis of this teichoic acid yielded 1-O-β-glucosylglycerol phosphate (together with small amounts of glycerol phosphate), and 13 C nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of this hydrolysis product, and its derivative after alkaline phosphatase treatment, confirmed that the monomeric unit was 1-O-β-glucosylglycerol-3-phosphate. Assignment of the resonances in the spectrum of undegraded teichoic acid revealed that the polymer was a poly[(2,3)glycerol phosphate], glucosidically substituted on C-1 of glycerol with β-glucose. (orig.) [de

  20. Nuclear magnetic resonance of organofluorine compounds: a challenge in the teaching of spectroscopy; Ressonância magnética nuclear de substâncias organofluoradas: um desafio no ensino de espectroscopia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branco, Frederico Silva Castelo; Boechat, Núbia [Instituto de Tecnologia de Fármacos, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Farmanguinhos - Fiocruz, Rio de Janeiro – RJ (Brazil); Silva, Bárbara V.; Rio, Gabriel Freitas do; Pinto, Angelo C. [Instituto de Química, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Santana, Mábio João; Queiroz Júnior, Luiz Henrique Keng; Lião, Luciano Morais, E-mail: lucianoliao@ufg.br [Instituto de Química, Universidade Federal de Goiás, GO (Brazil)

    2015-11-15

    Nuclear magnetic resonance is a technique that is widely used for elucidating and characterizing organic substances. Organofluorine substances have applications in many areas from drugs to liquid crystals, but their NMR spectra are often challenging due to fluoride coupling with other nuclei. For this reason, NMR spectra of this class of substances are not commonly covered in undergraduate and graduate chemistry courses and related fields. Thus, the aim of this work was the presentation and discussion of {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, and {sup 19}F NMR spectra of eleven organofluorine substances which, in the case of {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C nuclei, showed classic patterns of first-order coupling and the effects of the fluorine nucleus in different chemical and magnetic environments. In addition, the observation of long distance coupling constants was possible through the use of apodization functions in the processing of the spectra. It is expected that the examples presented herein can be utilized and discussed in undergraduate and graduate NMR spectroscopy disciplines and thus improve the teaching and future research of organofluorine compounds. (author)

  1. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy: clinical application in neuroradiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penev, L.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) provides a non-invasive method of studying metabolism in vivo. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) defines neuro chemistry on a regional basis by acquiring a radiofrequency signal with chemical shift from one or many voxels or volumes previously selected on MRI. The tissue's chemical environment determines the frequency of a metabolite peak in an MRS spectrum. Candidates for MRS include: 1 H, 31 P, 13 C, 23 Na, 7 Li, 19 F, 14 N, 15 N, 17 O, 39 K The most commonly studied nuclei are 1 H and 31 P. This lecture is focused on Proton ( 1 H) Spectroscopy. Proton MRS can be added on to conventional MR imaging protocols. It can be used to serially monitor biochemical changes in tumors, stroke, epilepsy, metabolic disorders, infections, and neurodegenerative diseases.The MR spectra do not come labeled with diagnoses. They require interpretation and should always be correlated with the MR images before making a final diagnosis. As a general rule, the single voxel, short TE technique is used to make the initial diagnosis, because the signal-to-noise is high and all metabolites are represented. Multi-voxel, long TE techniques are used to further characterize different regions of a mass and to assess brain parenchyma around or adjacent to the mass. Multi-voxel, long TE techniques are also used to assess response to therapy and to search for tumor recurrence. Each metabolite appears at a specific ppm, and each one reflects specific cellular and biochemical processes

  2. Carbon storage in soil: how different land uses affect particulate organic matter composition. A molecular approach using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panettieri, Marco; Courtier-Murias, Denis; Rumpel, Cornelia; Dignac, Marie-France; Doumert, Bertrand; Chabbi, Abad

    2017-04-01

    The future soil carbon stocks in a climate change scenario is being closely monitored. However, the huge edaphoclimatic variability impedes to disclose the mechanisms which underlie the cycle of accumulation/mineralization of soil organic matter (SOM). Soil environment could be described as a complex three phases matrix in which gases, liquids, and solids are not uniformly mixed, and in which microbes, fungi, vegetal residues, and roots are continuously interacting with the soil matrix and with each other. Molecular analyses on soil samples are crucial to estimate how stable those pools are and to predict which practices may accumulate larger C stocks. However, the study of land use impact through molecular characterization of a complex mixture like SOM is a challenge that requires a multidisciplinary approach. The present study applied a combination of soil physical fractionation (separation by density of the particulate organic matter (POM) within water stable aggregate fractions) followed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy as a way to overcome spatial variability and to quantify the changes in the composition of SOM induced by land-use changes. The objective of the study was to assess, at a molecular level, the impact of different land managements, i.e. the introduction of temporary (ley) grassland into cropping cycles, on the chemical composition of SOM. Soil samples were collected at the long-term experimental observatory in Lusignan (http://www.soere-acbb.com/), in which control plots under permanent grassland, permanent cropland, and bare fallow are part of the experiment. To improve the signal-to-noise ratio (especially in the aromatic-C region), samples were analyzed using a ramped cross polarization-single pulse/magic angle spinning (CPSP/MAS) experiment. Peak integrals of different spectral regions (indicating different compound classes) were compared between treatments and two different molecular mixing models, calibrated against standard

  3. Laser spectroscopy used in nuclear physics; La spectroscopie laser appliquee a la physique nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Blanc, F

    2001-04-05

    The study of nuclear shapes is a basic topic since it constitutes an excellent ground for testing and validating nuclear models. Measurements of the electron quadrupolar moment, of the nuclear charge radius and of the magnetic dipolar moment shed light on the nuclear deformation. Laser spectroscopy is a specific tool for such measurements, it is based on the interaction of the nucleus with the surrounding electron cloud (hyperfine structure), it is then an external approach of the shape of the nucleus whereas the classical nuclear spectroscopy ({alpha}, {beta} or {gamma}) gives information on the deformation from the inside of the nucleus. The author describes 2 techniques of laser spectroscopy: the colinear spectroscopy directly applied to a beam issued from an isotope separator and the resonant ionization spectroscopy linked with atom desorption that allows the study of particular nuclei. In order to illustrate both methods some effective measurements are presented: - the colinear spectroscopy has allowed the achievement of the complete description of the isomeric state (T = 31 years) of hafnium-178; - The experiment Complis has revealed an unexpected even-odd zigzag effect on very neutron-deficient platinum isotopes; and - the comparison of 2 isotopes of gold and platinum with their isomers has shown that the inversion of 2 levels of neutron, that was found out by nuclear spectroscopy, is in fact a consequence of a change in the nuclear shape. (A.C.)

  4. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the fetus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Story, Lisa; Damodaram, Mellisa S; Allsop, Joanna M; McGuinness, Amy; Wylezinska, Marzena; Kumar, Sailesh; Rutherford, Mary A

    2011-09-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has become an established technique in fetal medicine, providing complementary information to ultrasound in studies of the brain. MRI can provide detailed structural information irrespective of the position of the fetal head or maternal habitus. Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy ((1)HMRS) is based on the same physical principles as MRI but data are collected as a spectrum, allowing the biochemical and metabolic status of in vivo tissue to be studied in a non-invasive manner. (1)HMRS has been used to assess metabolic function in the neonatal brain but fetal studies have been limited, primarily due to fetal motion. This review will assess the technique and findings from fetal studies to date. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The market for magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, L.

    1990-01-01

    The medical market is, at present, the most dominant market for low T c superconductors. Indeed, without magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), there would hardly be a low T c superconductor market at all. According to the author, any development that can expand the medical market for MRI machines would be a welcome one. This paper reports how the recent advances in magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) are such a development. While the principle of MRS has bee around as long as MRI, only recently have advances in technique, computer programming and magnet technology allowed MRS to advance to a point where it may become an important technology-one that could increase the medical market for superconductors. The author discussed how MRS can be used to analyze oil core samples for their oil content, oil/water ratios, how the oil is bound and how to extract it

  6. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in schizophrenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertolino, Alessandro; Weinberger, Daniel R.

    1999-01-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) has become an important tool to study in vivo certain biochemical aspects of brain disorders. In the last decade this technique has been applied to the in vivo investigation of pathophysiological aspects of psychiatric disorders, extending knowledge of the related brain alterations. This review will focus on providing some background to clarify technical and biochemical issues and it will describe the studies that have been performed in schizophrenia. The results will be framed in a more general context to highlight what we have learned and what remains to be understood from the application of this technique to schizophrenia

  7. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies in migraine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montagna, P.; Cortelli, P.; Barbiroli, B. (Inst. of Medical Pathology, Univ. of Bologna (Italy))

    1994-06-01

    The authors describe the method of [sup 31]phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy and review the results when it is applied to the study of brain and muscle energy metabolism in migraine subjects. Brain energy metabolism appears to be abnormal in all major subtypes of migraine when measured both during and between attacks. Impaired energy metabolism is also documented in skeletal muscle. It is suggested that migraine is associated with a generalized disorder of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and that this may constitute a threshold for the triggering of migraine attacks. 47 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Department of Nuclear Spectroscopy - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Styczen, J.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The Nuclear Spectroscopy Department is the largest department of the Institute. It merges a variety of research groups having been performing investigations with a rich diversity of methods: from pure studies of the structure of nucleus and of nuclear properties through applied nuclear spectroscopy in condensed matter research, to the complex biophysical investigations of biological tissues. The nuclear structure experiments were performed mainly in European Large Scale Facilities (ALPIINFN-Legnaro, VIVITRON-IReS-Strasbourg, JYFL-K100-Cyclotron) with the use of the GASP, EUROBALL IV, RITU systems and with application of ancillary detectors - HECTOR+HELENA, RFD. Some data were obtained with the GAMMASPHERE in USA. Other research has been based on our own instrumentation - VdG, AFM, Dual-Beam-Implanter, PAC, Moessbauer spectrometers etc., in a strong co-operation with Polish and European institutions, of course. The atomic studies were done on the ESR at GSI in Darmastadt. In several pages which follow, some important results of the investigations in the Department are presented. In 2001, Dr hab. Jerzy Dryzek and Dr hab. Adam Maj were granted the Associated Professor positions, and Miss Agnieszka Kulinska and Mrs Maria Kmiecik - the Ph.D. degrees. Dr Kmiecik was also awarded the Henryk Niewodniczanski prize for studies of 147 Eu compound nucleus shape evolution. Some of us became (continued to be) members of International Committees - the PHINUFY (R. Broda), the Steering Committee of RISING at GSI (J. Styczen), the PAC of the VIVITRON at Strasbourg (J. Styczen). We organized an International Conference on Condensed Matter Studies (100 participants), which belonged to the well known series of Zakopane School of Physics. It's Proceedings appeared as a volume of the Acta Physica Polonica A journal. (author)

  9. Stimulated resonance Raman spectroscopy: An alternative to laser-rf double resonance for ion spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, L.; Dinneen, T.; Mansour, N.B.

    1988-01-01

    Stimulated resonance Raman spectroscopy is presented as an alternative to laser-rf double resonance for obtaining high-precision measurements in ion beams. By use of a single-phase modulated laser beam to derive the two required fields, the laser--ion-beam alignment is significantly simplified. In addition, this method is especially useful in the low-frequency regime where the laser-rf double-resonance method encounters difficulties due to modifications of the ion-beam velocity distribution. These modifications, which result from interaction with the traveling rf wave used to induce magnetic dipole transitions, are observed and quantitatively modeled

  10. Analysis and characterization. Nuclear resonant scattering with the synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruffer, R.; Teillet, J.

    2003-01-01

    The nuclear resonant scattering using the synchrotron radiation combines the uncommon properties of the Moessbauer spectroscopy and those of the synchrotron radiation. Since its first observation in 1984, this technique and its applications have been developed rapidly. The nuclear resonant scattering is now a standard technique for all the synchrotron radiation sources of the third generation. As the Moessbauer spectroscopy, it is a method of analysis at the atomic scale and a non destructive method. It presents the advantage not to require the use of radioactive sources of incident photons which can be difficult to make, of a lifetime which can be short and of an obviously limited intensity. The current applications are the hyperfine spectroscopy and the structural dynamics. In hyperfine spectroscopy, the nuclear resonant scattering can measure the same size than the Moessbauer spectroscopy. Nevertheless, it is superior in the ranges which exploit the specific properties of the synchrotron radiation, such as the very small samples, the monocrystals, the measures under high pressures, the geometry of small angle incidence for surfaces and multilayers. The structural dynamics, in a time scale of the nanosecond to the microsecond can be measured in the temporal scale. Moreover, the nuclear inelastic scattering gives for the first time a tool which allows to have directly the density of states of phonons and then allow to deduce the dynamical and thermodynamical properties of the lattice. The nuclear resonant scattering technique presented here, which corresponds to the Moessbauer spectroscopy technique (SM), is called 'nuclear forward scattering' (NFS). Current applications in physics and chemistry are develop. The NFS is compared to the usual SM technique in order to reveal its advantages and disadvantages. (O.M.)

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of lens transparency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaulieu, C.F.

    1989-01-01

    Transparency of normal lens cytoplasm and loss of transparency in cataract were studied by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods. Phosphorus ( 31 P) NMR spectroscopy was used to measure the 31 P constituents and pH of calf lens cortical and nuclear homogenates and intact lenses as a function of time after lens enucleation and in opacification produced by calcium. Transparency was measured with laser spectroscopy. Despite complete loss of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) within 18 hrs of enucleation, the homogenates and lenses remained 100% transparent. Additions of calcium to ATP-depleted cortical homogenates produced opacification as well as concentration-dependent changes in inorganic phosphate, sugar phosphates, glycerol phosphorylcholine and pH. 1 H relaxation measurements of lens water at 200 MHz proton Larmor frequency studied temperature-dependent phase separation of lens nuclear homogenates. Preliminary measurements of T 1 and T 2 with non-equilibrium temperature changes showed a change in the slope of the temperature dependence of T 1 and T 2 at the phase separation temperature. Subsequent studies with equilibrium temperature changes showed no effect of phase separation on T 1 or T 2 , consistent with the phase separation being a low-energy process. 1 H nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) studies (measurements of the magnetic field dependence of the water proton 1/T 1 relaxation rates) were performed on (1) calf lens nuclear and cortical homogenates (2) chicken lens homogenates, (3) native and heat-denatured egg white and (4) pure proteins including bovine γ-II crystallin bovine serum albumin (BSA) and myoglobin. The NMRD profiles of all samples exhibited decreases in 1/T 1 with increasing magnetic field

  12. Real-Time Monitoring of Chemical Changes in Three Kinds of Fermented Milk Products during Fermentation Using Quantitative Difference Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yi; Ishikawa, Hiroto; Kwon, Yeondae; Hu, Fangyu; Miyakawa, Takuya; Tanokura, Masaru

    2018-02-14

    Fermented milk products are rising in popularity throughout the world as a result of their health benefits, including improving digestion, normalizing the function of the immune system, and aiding in weight management. This study applies an in situ quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance method to monitor chemical changes in three kinds of fermented milk products, Bulgarian yogurt, Caspian Sea yogurt, and kefir, during fermentation. As a result, the concentration changes in nine organic compounds, α/β-lactose, α/β-galactose, lactic acid, citrate, ethanol, lecithin, and creatine, were monitored in real time. This revealed three distinct metabolic processes in the three fermented milk products. Moreover, pH changes were also determined by variations in the chemical shift of citric acid during the fermentation processes. These results can be applied to estimate microbial metabolism in various flora and help guide the fermentation and storage of various fermented milk products to improve their quality, which may directly influence human health.

  13. Molecular exchange of n-hexane in zeolite sieves studied by diffusion-diffusion and T{sub 1}-diffusion nuclear magnetic resonance exchange spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neudert, Oliver; Stapf, Siegfried; Mattea, Carlos, E-mail: carlos.mattea@tu-ilmenau.de [Fachgebiet Technische Physik II/Polymerphysik, Institute of Physics, Technische Universitaet Ilmenau, PO Box 100 565, 98684 Ilmenau (Germany)

    2011-03-15

    Molecular exchange properties and diffusion of n-hexane embedded in a bimodal pore structure with characteristic length scales in the order of nano and micrometres, respectively, formed by packing of zeolite particles, are studied. Two-dimensional (2D) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) diffusion correlation experiments together with relaxation-diffusion correlation experiments are performed at low magnetic field using a single-sided NMR scanner. The exchange time covers a range from 10{sup -3} to 10{sup -1} s. The molecular exchange properties are modulated by transport inside the zeolite particles. Different exchange regimes are observed for molecules starting from different positions inside the porous sample. The influence of the spin-lattice relaxation properties of the fluid molecules inside the zeolite particles on the signal intensity is also studied. A Monte Carlo simulation of the exchange process is performed and is used to support the analysis of the experimental data.

  14. The digital holographic interferometry in resonant acoustic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GAPONOV, V.E.; AZAMATOV, Z.T.; REDKORECHEV, V.I.; ISAEV, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    The opportunities of application of digital holographic interferometry method for studies of shapes of resonant modes in resonant acoustic spectroscopy are shown. The results of experimental measurements and analytical calculations are submitted. (authors)

  15. Historical survey of resonance ionization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurst, G.S.

    1984-04-01

    We have recently celebrated the 10th birthday of Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (RIS), and this seems an appropriate time to review the history of its development. Basically, RIS is a photophysics process in which tunable light sources are used to remove a valence electron from an atom of selected atomic number, Z. If appropriate lasers are used as the light source, one electron can be removed from each atom of the selected Z in the laser pulse. This implies that RIS can be a very efficient, as well as selective, ionization process. In what we normally call RIS, laser schemes are employed which preserve both of these features. In contrast, multiphoton ionization (MPI) is more general, although not necessarily Z selective or very efficient because resonances are often not used. Early research completed in the USSR and described as selective two-step photoionization, employed resonances to ionize the rubidium atom and served to guide work on laser isotope separation. 29 references, 8 figures

  16. Transient nutation electron spin resonance spectroscopy on spin-correlated radical pairs: A theoretical analysis on hyperfine-induced nuclear modulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Stefan; Kothe, Gerd; Norris, James R.

    1997-04-01

    The influence of anisotropic hyperfine interaction on transient nutation electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) of light-induced spin-correlated radical pairs is studied theoretically using the density operator formalism. Analytical expressions for the time evolution of the transient EPR signal during selective microwave excitation of single transitions are derived for a model system comprised of a weakly coupled radical pair and one hyperfine-coupled nucleus with I=1/2. Zero-quantum electron coherence and single-quantum nuclear coherence are created as a result of the sudden light-induced generation of the radical pair state from a singlet-state precursor. Depending on the relative sizes of the nuclear Zeeman frequency and the secular and pseudo-secular parts of the hyperfine coupling, transitions between levels with different nuclear spin orientations are predicted to modulate the time-dependent EPR signal. These modulations are in addition to the well-known transient nutations and electron zero-quantum precessions. Our calculations provide insight into the mechanism of recent experimental observations of coherent nuclear modulations in the time-resolved EPR signals of doublets and radical pairs. Two distinct mechanisms of the modulations are presented for various microwave magnetic field strengths. The first modulation scheme arises from electron and nuclear coherences initiated by the laser excitation pulse and is "read out" by the weak microwave magnetic field. While the relative modulation depth of these oscillations with respect to the signal intensity is independent of the Rabi frequency, ω1, the frequencies of this coherence phenomenon are modulated by the effective microwave amplitude and determined by the nuclear Zeeman interaction and hyperfine coupling constants as well as the electron-electron spin exchange and dipolar interactions between the two radical pair halves. In a second mechanism the modulations are both created and detected by the microwave

  17. Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy of a single nuclear spin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, F; Fernández-Rossier, J

    2011-08-12

    Detection of a single nuclear spin constitutes an outstanding problem in different fields of physics such as quantum computing or magnetic imaging. Here we show that the energy levels of a single nuclear spin can be measured by means of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS). We consider two different systems, a magnetic adatom probed with scanning tunneling microscopy and a single Bi dopant in a silicon nanotransistor. We find that the hyperfine coupling opens new transport channels which can be resolved at experimentally accessible temperatures. Our simulations evince that IETS yields information about the occupations of the nuclear spin states, paving the way towards transport-detected single nuclear spin resonance.

  18. Proton resonance spectroscopy in 40Ca

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warthen, B.J.

    1987-01-01

    The differential cross sections for the 39 K(p,p o ) 39 K and 39 K-(p,α o ) 36 Ar reactions have been measured for E p = 1.90 to 4.02 MeV at laboratory angles θ = 90 degree, 108 degree, 150 degree and 165 degree. Data were taken with the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL) KN Van de Graaff accelerator and the associated high resolution system. The targets consisted of 1-2 μg/cm 2 of potassium carbonate (K 2 CO 3 ), enriched to 99.97% 39 K, evaporated onto gold coated carbon backings. Excitation functions were measured in proton energy steps varying from 100 to 400 3V. The energy region studied corresponds to an excitation energy range in the 40 Ca nucleus of E x = 10.2 to 12.3 MeV. A multi-level multi-channel R-matrix based computer code was used to fit the experimental excitation functions. Resonance parameters obtained include resonance energy, spin, parity, partial widths, and channel spin and orbital angular momentum mixing ratios. Of the 248 resonances observed in the proton channel, 148 were also observed in the alpha channel. A fit to the observed level density yielded a nuclear temperature of 1.5 MeV. The data were compared with predictions of statistical theories of energy levels for both level spacing and reduced width distributions. The alpha reduced widths agree with the Porter-Thomas distribution and suggest that only 5-10% of the states with alpha widths were not observed. The summed strength in each of the alpha channels represents a significant fraction of the Wigner limit for these channels. The proton channels, on the other hand, generally have much smaller fractions. The two proton s-wave strength functions are equal and thus show no evidence for spin-exchange forces in the nucleon-nucleus interaction

  19. Detection of kestoses and kestose-related oligosaccharides in extracts of Festuca arundinacea, Dactylis glomerate L., and Asparagus officinalis L. root cultures and invertase by 13C and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsythe, K.L.; Feather, M.S.; Gracz, H.; Wong, T.C.

    1990-01-01

    Previous studies show that 13 C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy can be used to detect and identify mixtures of 1-kestose and neokestose after conversion to the acetate derivatives. In this study, unequivocal assignments are made for the anomeric carbon and proton signals for the above two trisaccharide acetates as well as for 6-kestose hendecaacetate and for nystose tetradecaacetate (a 1-kestose-derived tetrasaccharide). A number of oligosaccharide fractions were isolated from several plant species, converted to the acetates, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra obtained. Using the above reference data, the following information was obtained. The trisaccharide fraction from Dactylis gomerata L. stem tissue and Asparagus officinalis L. roots contain both 1-kestose and neokestose, and the tetrasaccharide fractions contain three components, one of which is nystose. Penta- and hexasaccharide acetates were also isolated from A. officinalis L. roots and were found to contain, respectively, four and at least five components. All components of both of the above species appear to contain a kestose residue and to be produced by the sequential addition of fructofuranosyl units to these. The trisaccharide fraction from Festuca arundinacea is complex, and contains at least five different components, two of which appear to be 1-kestose and neokestose

  20. Conceptual basis of resonance ionization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payne, M.G.

    1984-04-01

    Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (RIS) can b defined as a state-selective detection process in which tunable lasers are used to promote transitions from the selected state of the atoms or molecules in question to higher states, one of which will be ionized by the absorption of another photon. At least one resonance step is used in the stepwise ionization process, and it has been shown that the ionization probability of the spectroscopically selected species can nearly always be made close to unity. Since measurements of the number of photoelectrons or ions can be made very precisely and even one electron (or under vacuum conditions, one ion) can be detected, the technique can be used to make quantitative measurements of very small populations of the state-selected species. Counting of individual atoms has special meaning for detection of rare events. The ability to make saturated RIS measurements opens up a wide variety of applications to both basic and applied research. We view RIS as a specific type of multi-photon ionization in which the goal is to make quantitative measurements of quantum-selected populations in atomic or molecular systems. 16 references

  1. Electronic resonances in broadband stimulated Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batignani, G.; Pontecorvo, E.; Giovannetti, G.; Ferrante, C.; Fumero, G.; Scopigno, T.

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous Raman spectroscopy is a formidable tool to probe molecular vibrations. Under electronic resonance conditions, the cross section can be selectively enhanced enabling structural sensitivity to specific chromophores and reaction centers. The addition of an ultrashort, broadband femtosecond pulse to the excitation field allows for coherent stimulation of diverse molecular vibrations. Within such a scheme, vibrational spectra are engraved onto a highly directional field, and can be heterodyne detected overwhelming fluorescence and other incoherent signals. At variance with spontaneous resonance Raman, however, interpreting the spectral information is not straightforward, due to the manifold of field interactions concurring to the third order nonlinear response. Taking as an example vibrational spectra of heme proteins excited in the Soret band, we introduce a general approach to extract the stimulated Raman excitation profiles from complex spectral lineshapes. Specifically, by a quantum treatment of the matter through density matrix description of the third order nonlinear polarization, we identify the contributions which generate the Raman bands, by taking into account for the cross section of each process.

  2. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy as an imaging method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bomsdorf, H.; Imme, M.; Jensen, D.; Kunz, D.; Menhardt, W.; Ottenberg, K.; Roeschmann, P.; Schmidt, K.H.; Tschendel, O.; Wieland, J.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental Magnetic Resonance (MR) system with 4 tesla flux density was set up. For that purpose a data acquisition system and RF coils for resonance frequencies up to 170 MHz were developed. Methods for image guided spectroscopy as well as spectroscopic imaging focussing on the nuclei 1 H and 13 C were developed and tested on volunteers and selected patients. The advantages of the high field strength with respect to spectroscopic studies were demonstrated. Developments of a new fast imaging technique for the acquisition of scout images as well as a method for mapping and displaying the magnetic field inhomogeneity in-vivo represent contributions to the optimisation of the experimental procedure in spectroscopic studies. Investigations on the interaction of RF radiation with the exposed tissue allowed conclusions regarding the applicability of MR methods at high field strengths. Methods for display and processing of multi-dimensional spectroscopic imaging data sets were developed and existing methods for real-time image synthesis were extended. Results achieved in the field of computer aided analysis of MR images comprised new techniques for image background detection, contour detection and automatic image interpretation as well as knowledge bases for textural representation of medical knowledge for diagnosis. (orig.) With 82 refs., 3 tabs., 75 figs [de

  3. The nuclear magnetic resonance well logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yumin; Shen Huitang

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, the characteristic of the nuclear magnetic resonance logging is described at first. Then its development and its principle is presented. Compared with the nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer, the magnet techniques is the first question that we must solve in the manufacture of the NMR well logging

  4. Possibilities and limitations of sup 1 H and sup 13 C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for the identification and the quantitative determination of some naturally occurring carcinogenic risk factors. [Senecio vulgaris; Senecio vernalis; Senecio jacobaea; Euphorbia ingens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pieters, L.

    1988-01-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a phytochemical screening method for some selected carcinogenic or tumor-promoting principles in higher plants. The pyrrolizidine alkaloids from some Senecio species (Compositae or Asteraceae), and the diterpene ester from Croton tiglium L. and Euphorbia ingens E. Mey (Euphorbiaceae) were chosen as representatives of both groups. The possibilities and limitations of {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR) for the analysis of mixtures of carcinogenic pyrrolizidine alkaloids were compared with high performance liquid chromatography, and gas chromatography with high performance liquid chromatography, and gas chromatography was well as gas chromatography - mass spectrometry. Senecio vulgaris L., Senecio vernalis Waldst. and Kit. and Senecio jacobaea L. were investigated.

  5. An overview of the metabolic differences between Bradyrhizobium japonicum 110 bacteria and differentiated bacteroids from soybean (Glycine max) root nodules: an in vitro 13C- and 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vauclare, Pierre; Bligny, Richard; Gout, Elisabeth; Widmer, Francois

    2013-01-01

    Bradyrhizobium japonicum is a symbiotic nitrogen-fixing soil bacteria that induce root nodules formation in legume soybean (Glycine max.). Using 13 C- and 31 P-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, we have analysed the metabolite profiles of cultivated B. japonicum cells and bacteroids isolated from soybean nodules. Our results revealed some quantitative and qualitative differences between the metabolite profiles of bacteroids and their vegetative state. This includes in bacteroids a huge accumulation of soluble carbohydrates such as trehalose, glutamate, myo-inositol and homo-spermidine as well as Pi, nucleotide pools and intermediates of the primary carbon metabolism. Using this novel approach, these data show that most of the compounds detected in bacteroids reflect the metabolic adaptation of rhizobia to the surrounding microenvironment with its host plant cells. (authors)

  6. Structural investigation of 18-crown-6 complexes of Tri organotin carboxylate by 1H, 13C, 19F and 119Sn nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foladi, S.; Yousefi, M.; Mohammadpour Ammini, M. M.

    2002-01-01

    Single crystal structure determination of several 18-crown 6 complexes of orga nation derivatives reveals formation of aqua complex through hydrogen bonding to 18-crown-6, which is an important feature in their structure. In the majority of those studies, mono- and dichloro organotin have been used for complexation of them with crown ethers. In the present work, several 18-crown 6 complexes of tri organotin acetate[(C 6 H 5 ) 3 SnOCOCX 3 ] 2 , 18 C6 ], X=F, Cl, and H, have been prepared. The Lewis acidity of tin moiety in tri organotin carboxylate have been tailored by replacing hydrogen atoms of acetate group with chlorine and fluorine and influence of them in the formation of aqua complex with 18 C6 have been studied by infrared. 1 H, 13 C, 19 F and 119 Sn nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopes. The effects of coordinating and non-coordinating solvent in status of structure in solution have been explored

  7. Comparison of Attenuated Total Reflectance Mid-Infrared, Near Infrared, and 1H-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopies for the Determination of Coffee’s Geographical Origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Medina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The sensorial properties of Colombian coffee are renowned worldwide, which is reflected in its market value. This raises the threat of fraud by adulteration using coffee grains from other countries, thus creating a demand for robust and cost-effective methods for the determination of geographical origin of coffee samples. Spectroscopic techniques such as Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR, near infrared (NIR, and mid-infrared (mIR have arisen as strong candidates for the task. Although a body of work exists that reports on their individual performances, a faithful comparison has not been established yet. We evaluated the performance of 1H-NMR, Attenuated Total Reflectance mIR (ATR-mIR, and NIR applied to fraud detection in Colombian coffee. For each technique, we built classification models for discrimination by species (C. arabica versus C. canephora (or robusta and by origin (Colombia versus other C. arabica using a common set of coffee samples. All techniques successfully discriminated samples by species, as expected. Regarding origin determination, ATR-mIR and 1H-NMR showed comparable capacity to discriminate Colombian coffee samples, while NIR fell short by comparison. In conclusion, ATR-mIR, a less common technique in the field of coffee adulteration and fraud detection, emerges as a strong candidate, faster and with lower cost compared to 1H-NMR and more discriminating compared to NIR.

  8. A Combined Probe-Molecule, Mössbauer, Nuclear Resonance Vibrational Spectroscopy, and Density Functional Theory Approach for Evaluation of Potential Iron Active Sites in an Oxygen Reduction Reaction Catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kneebone, Jared L. [Univ. of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Daifuku, Stephanie L. [Univ. of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Kehl, Jeffrey A. [Univ. of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Wu, Gang [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Chung, Hoon T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hu, Michael Y. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Alp, E. Ercan [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); More, Karren L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Zelenay, Piotr [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Holby, Edward F. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Neidig, Michael L. [Univ. of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States)

    2017-07-06

    While non-precious metal M-N-C (M = Fe or Co) catalysts have been developed that are effective for the oxygen reduction reaction in polymer electrolyte fuel cells, no consensus has yet been reached regarding the nature of the M sites in these heterogeneous catalysts that are responsible for reaction with dioxygen (O2). While multiple studies have developed correlations between Fe distributions in as-prepared catalysts and ORR activity, the direct identification of sites reactive towards O2 or O2-analog molecules remains a significant challenge. In the present study, we demonstrate a new approach to identifying and characterizing potential Fe active sites in complex ORR catalysts that combines an effective probe molecule (NO(g)) Mössbauer spectroscopy and nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Mössbauer spectroscopic studies demonstrate that NO(g) treatment of electrochemically reduced PANI-57Fe-C leads to selective reaction with only a sub-set of the Fe species present. Nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopic studies identified new Fe-ligand vibrations associated with the site reactive towards NO(g). DFT calculations of vibrational properties of a small selection of previously proposed active site structures suggest that graphene zig-zag edge hosted Fe-N structures may be responsible for the observed vibrational behavior with NO(g) probe molecules. Moreover, such sites are likely also reactive to O2, possibly serving as the ORR active sites in the synthesized materials.

  9. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy as a diagnostic modality for carcinoma thyroid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Nikhil; Kakar, Arun K.; Chowdhury, Veena; Gulati, Praveen; Shankar, L. Ravi; Vindal, Anubhav

    2007-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to observe the findings of magnetic resonance spectroscopy of solitary thyroid nodules and its correlation with histopathology. Materials and methods: In this study, magnetic resonance spectroscopy was carried out on 26 patients having solitary thyroid nodules. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was performed on a 1.5 T super conductive system with gradient strength of 33 mTs. Fine needle aspiration cytology was done after MRS. All 26 patients underwent surgery either because of cytopathologically proven malignancy or because of cosmetic reasons. Findings of magnetic resonance spectroscopy were compared with histopathology of thyroid specimens. Results and conclusion: It was seen that presence or absence of choline peak correlates very well with presence or absence of malignant foci with in the nodule (sensitivity = 100%; specificity = 88.88%). These results indicate that magnetic resonance spectroscopy may prove to be an useful diagnostic modality for carcinoma thyroid

  10. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, G.; MacDonald, J.; Hutchison, S.; Eastwood, L.M.; Redpath, T.W.T.; Mallard, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    A method of deriving three dimensional image information from an object using nuclear magnetic resonance signals comprises subjecting the object to a continuous, static magnetic field and carrying out the following set of sequential steps: 1) exciting nuclear spins in a selected volume (90deg pulse); 2) applying non-aligned first, second and third gradients of the magnetic field; 3) causing the spins to rephase periodically by reversal of the first gradient to produce spin echoes, and applying pulses of the second gradient prior to every read-out of an echo signal from the object, to differently encode the spin in the second gradient direction for each read-out signal. The above steps 1-3 are then successively repeated with different values of gradient of the third gradient, there being a recovery interval between the repetition of successive sets of steps. Alternate echoes only are read out, the other echoes being time-reversed and ignored for convenience. The resulting signals are appropriately sampled, set out in an array and subjected to three dimensional Fourier transformation. (author)

  11. Acid dissociation constants of uridine-5 Prime -diphosphate compounds determined by {sup 31}phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and internal pH referencing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jancan, Igor [Louisiana State University, Department of Chemistry, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Macnaughtan, Megan A., E-mail: macnau@lsu.edu [Louisiana State University, Department of Chemistry, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States)

    2012-10-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The first reported phosphate and imide pK{sub a} values of UDP-GlcNAc and UDP-S-GlcNAc. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New role for the monosaccharide in the imide pK{sub a} of uridine-5 Prime -phosphate compounds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UDP-S-GlcNAc and UDP-GlcNAc have the same phosphate pK{sub a}, unlike thioyl analogs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The {sup 31}P chemical shift of inorganic phosphate is a viable internal pH reference. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stability of the external {sup 31}P chemical shift reference is essential. - Abstract: The acid dissociation constant (pK{sub a}) of small, biological molecules is an important physical property used for investigating enzyme mechanisms and inhibitor design. For phosphorus-containing molecules, the {sup 31}P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shift is sensitive to the local chemical environment, particularly to changes in the electronic state of the molecule. Taking advantage of this property, we present a {sup 31}P NMR approach that uses inorganic phosphate buffer as an internal pH reference to determine the pK{sub a} values of the imide and second diphosphate of uridine-5 Prime -diphosphate compounds, including the first reported values for UDP-GlcNAc and UDP-S-GlcNAc. New methods for using inorganic phosphate buffer as an internal pH reference, involving mathematical correction factors and careful control of the chemical shift reference sample, are illustrated. A comparison of the newly determined imide and diphosphate pK{sub a} values of UDP, UDP-GlcNAc, and UDP-S-GlcNAc with other nucleotide phosphate and thio-analogs reveals the significance of the monosaccharide and sulfur position on the pK{sub a} values.

  12. Collinear resonant ionization laser spectroscopy of rare francium isotopes

    CERN Multimedia

    Neyens, G; Flanagan, K; Rajabali, M M; Le blanc, F M; Ware, T; Procter, T J

    2008-01-01

    We propose a programme of collinear resonant ionization spectroscopy (CRIS) of the francium isotopes up to and including $^{201}$Fr and $^{218,219}$Fr. This work aims at answering questions on the ordering of quantum states, and effect of the ($\\pi s_{1/2}^{-1}$)1/2$^{+}$ intruder state, which is currently believed to be the ground state of $^{199}$Fr. This work will also study the edge of the region of reflection asymmetry through measurement of the moments and radii of $^{218,219}$Fr. This proposal forms the first part of a series of experiments that will study nuclei in this region of the nuclear chart. Based on the success of this initial proposal it is the intention of the collaboration to perform high resolution measurements on the isotopes of radium and radon that surround $^{201}$Fr and $^{218}$Fr and thus providing a comprehensive description of the ground state properties of this region of the nuclear chart. Recent in-source spectroscopy measurements of lead, bismuth and polonium have demonstrated a...

  13. Report of the Nuclear Spectroscopy Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerry, T.B.; Wylie, W.; Hugo

    1978-01-01

    This is a report of the group working with Nuclear Spectroscopy. They made a general discussion involving personnel, research interests (present and future) and suggestions, on general. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  14. Neutron spectroscopy, nuclear structure, related topics. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukhovoj, A.M.

    1996-01-01

    Neutron spectroscopy, nuclear structure and related topics are considered. P, T-breaking, neutron beta decay, neutron radiative capture and neutron polarizability are discussed. Reaction with fast neutrons, methodical aspect low-energy fission are considered too

  15. Radio frequency scanning tunneling spectroscopy for single-molecule spin resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müllegger, Stefan; Tebi, Stefano; Das, Amal K; Schöfberger, Wolfgang; Faschinger, Felix; Koch, Reinhold

    2014-09-26

    We probe nuclear and electron spins in a single molecule even beyond the electromagnetic dipole selection rules, at readily accessible magnetic fields (few mT) and temperatures (5 K) by resonant radio-frequency current from a scanning tunneling microscope. We achieve subnanometer spatial resolution combined with single-spin sensitivity, representing a 10 orders of magnitude improvement compared to existing magnetic resonance techniques. We demonstrate the successful resonant spectroscopy of the complete manifold of nuclear and electronic magnetic transitions of up to ΔI(z)=±3 and ΔJ(z)=±12 of single quantum spins in a single molecule. Our method of resonant radio-frequency scanning tunneling spectroscopy offers, atom-by-atom, unprecedented analytical power and spin control with an impact on diverse fields of nanoscience and nanotechnology.

  16. Application of resonance ionisation spectroscopy in atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kluge, H.J.

    1997-01-01

    Resonance ionization spectroscopy (RIS) and resonance ionization mass spectroscopy (RIMS) techniques have proved to be a powerful tool in atomic spectroscopy and trace analysis. Detailed atomic spectroscopy can be performed on samples containing less than 10 12 atoms. This sensitivity is especially important for investigating atomic properties of transuranium elements. RIMS is especially suitable for ultra trace determination of long lived radioactive isotopes. The extremely low detection limits allow analysis of samples in the sub-femtogram regime. High elemental and isotopic selectivity can be obtained. To produce isobarically pure ion beams, a RIS based laser ion source can be used

  17. Pyrogenic organic matter accumulation after density and particle size fractionation of burnt Cambisol using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Martín, María; Knicker, Heike

    2017-04-01

    Fires lead to formation of the pyrogenic organic matter (PyOM) which is quickly incorporated into the soil. The charring process involves chemical alterations of the litter material, where biologically available structures are transferred into aromatic polymers, such as black carbon (BC) and black nitrogen (BN). In order to reveal the medium term fate of BC and BN in soils, the top 5 cm of A horizons from unburnt, single and double burnt Cambisols of the Sierra de Aznalcóllar (Southern Spain) were collected 7 year after an intense fire and separated according to their density and their size (Golchin et al., 1994; Sohi et al., 2001). The density fractionation yielded in the free (fPOM), occluded particulate organic matter (oPOM) and the mineral-association organic fraction (MAF) and was performed using a sodium polytungstate solution with a density of 1.8 g cm-3. The MAF was further separated into the sand (2 mm to 63 μm) and coarse silt (63 to 20 μm) and fine fraction (solid-state 13C and 15N NMR spectroscopy. The 13C and 15N NMR spectra of all fPOM and oPOM fractions are dominated by signals assignable to O-alkyl C followed by resonance lines of alkyl C. The spectra indicate that fPOM is mainly composed of undecomposed plant debris whereas oPOM is rich in unsubstituted-aliphatic material. The lack of intensity in the chemical shift region from 160 to140 ppm in the spectra of the small size fractions reveals the absence of lignin residues. This, their low C/N ratios and the clear 13C-signal attributed to carboxylic C allows the conclusion that this fraction mainly composed of microbial residues. Former studies evidenced that aromaticity of the burnt bulk soil decreased with elapsing time after the fire. The present investigation revealed that most of the remaining aromatic C accumulated in the POM fractions, which is in contrast to other studies showing a preferential recovery of BC in the fine particle size fractions. Possibly, the poor interaction between Py

  18. Fifty years of nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez Valderrama, Juan Crisostomo

    1997-01-01

    Short information about the main developments of nuclear magnetic resonance during their fifty existence years is presented. Beside two examples of application (HETCOR and INADEQUATE) to the structural determination of organic compounds are described

  19. Principles of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pykett, I.L.; Newhouse, J.H.; Buonanno, F.S.; Brady, T.J.; Goldman, M.R.; Kistler, J.P.; Pohost, G.M.

    1982-01-01

    The physical principles which underlie the phenomenon of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) are presented in this primer. The major scanning methods are reviewed, and the principles of technique are discussed. A glossary of NMR terms is included

  20. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Trackbed Moisture Sensor System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-01

    In this initial phase, conducted from March 2015 through December 2016, Vista Clara and its subcontractor Zetica Rail successfully developed and tested a man-portable, non-invasive spot-check nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) moisture sensor that dire...

  1. Nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopic studies of iron-containing biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, Takehiro; Seto, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we report recent nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopic (NRVS) studies of iron-containing biomolecules and their model complexes. The NRVS is synchrotron-based element-specific vibrational spectroscopic methods. Unlike Raman and infrared spectroscopy, the NRVS can investigate all iron motions without selection rules, which provide atomic level insights into the structure/reactivity correlation of biologically relevant iron complexes. (author)

  2. Metabolic regulation in Streptomyces parvulus during actinomycin D synthesis, studied with 13C- and 15N-labeled precursors by 13C and 15N nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inbar, L.; Lapidot, A.

    1988-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that the onset of synthesis of actinomycin D in Streptomyces is due to a release from L-glutamate catabolic repression. In the present investigation we showed that S. parvulus has the capacity to maintain high levels of intracellular glutamate during the synthesis of actinomycin D. The results seem contradictory, since actinomycin D synthesis cannot start before a release from L-glutamate catabolic repression, but a relatively high intracellular pool of glutamate is needed for the synthesis of actinomycin D. Utilizing different labeled precursors, D-[U- 13 C]fructose and 13 C- and 15 N-labeled L-glutamate, and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques, we showed that carbon atoms of an intracellular glutamate pool of S. parvulus were not derived biosynthetically from the culture medium glutamte source but rather from D-fructose catabolism. A new intracellular pyrimidine derivative whose nitrogen and carbon skeletons were derived from exogenous L-glutamate was obtained as the main glutamate metabolite. Another new pyrimidine derivative that had a significantly reduced intracellular mobility and that was derived from D-fructose catabolism was identified in the cell extracts of S. parvulus during actinomycin D synthesis. These pyrimidine derivatives may serve as a nitrogen store for actinomycin D synthesis. In the present study, the N-trimethyl group of a choline derivative was observed by 13 C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in growing S. parvulus cells. The choline group, as well as the N-methyl groups of sarcosine, N-methyl-valine, and the methyl groups of an actinomycin D chromophore, arose from D-fructose catabolism. The 13 C enrichments found in the peptide moieties of actinomycin D were in accordance with a mechanism of actinomycin D synthesis from L-glutamate and D-fructose

  3. Laser resonant ionization spectroscopy and laser-induced resonant fluorescence spectra of samarium atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Changtai

    1995-01-01

    We have measured new high-lying levels of Sm atom by two-colour resonant photoionisation spectroscopy; we have observed the isotope shifts of Sm atom by laser-induced resonant fluorescence spectroscopy; the lifetime of eight low-lying levels of Sm atom were measured by using pulsed laser-Boxcar technique in atomic beam.

  4. 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy of skeletal muscle in patients with fibromyalgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Søren; Jensen, K E; Thomsen, C

    1992-01-01

    31Phosphorous nuclear magnetic resonance (31P NMR) spectroscopy of painful calf muscle was performed in 12 patients with fibromyalgia (FS) and 7 healthy subjects during rest, aerobic and anaerobic exercising conditions, and postexercise recovery. Ratios of inorganic phosphate and creatinine...

  5. Principles of resonance-averaged gamma-ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chrien, R.E.

    1981-01-01

    The unambiguous determination of excitation energies, spins, parities, and other properties of nuclear levels is the paramount goal of the nuclear spectroscopist. All developments of nuclear models depend upon the availability of a reliable data base on which to build. In this regard, slow neutron capture gamma-ray spectroscopy has proved to be a valuable tool. The observation of primary radiative transitions connecting initial and final states can provide definite level positions. In particular the use of the resonance-averaged capture technique has received much recent attention because of the claims advanced for this technique (Chrien 1980a, Casten 1980); that it is able to identify all states in a given spin-parity range and to provide definite spin parity information for these states. In view of the importance of this method, it is perhaps surprising that until now no firm analytical basis has been provided which delineates its capabilities and limitations. Such an analysis is necessary to establish the spin-parity assignments derived from this method on a quantitative basis; in other words a quantitative statement of the limits of error must be provided. It is the principal aim of the present paper to present such an analysis. To do this, a historical description of the technique and its applications is presented and the principles of the method are stated. Finally a method of statistical analysis is described, and the results are applied to recent measurements carried out at the filtered beam facilities at the Brookhaven National Laboratory

  6. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging in cerebral ischemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rijen, P.C. van.

    1991-01-01

    In-vivo proton and phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to detect changes in cerebral metabolism during ischemia and other types of metabolic stress. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed in an animal model to observe morphological alterations during focal cerebral ischemia. Spectroscopy was performed in animal models with global ischemia, in volunteers during hyperventilation and pharmaco-logically altered cerebral perfusion, and in patients with acute and prolonged focal cerebral ischemia. (author). 396 refs.; 44 figs.; 14 tabs

  7. Quantification of liquid products from the electroreduction of CO2 and CO using static headspace-gas chromatography and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertheussen, Erlend; Abghoui, Younes; Jovanov, Zarko P.

    2017-01-01

    Static headspace-gas chromatography (HS-GC) useful for ex-situ liquid product analysis. Could complement high-performance liquid chromatography and NMR spectroscopy. Particularly high sensitivity towards compounds with high vapor pressure. Detection limits below 0.5μM were shown for acetaldehyde...

  8. Fast Resonance Raman Spectroscopy of Short-Lived Radicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagsberg, Palle Bjørn; Wilbrandt, Robert Walter; Hansen, Karina Benthin

    1976-01-01

    We report the first application of pulsed resonance Raman spectroscopy to the study of short-lived free radicals produced by pulse radiolysis. A single pulse from a flash-lamp pumped tunable dye laser is used to excite the resonance Raman spectrum of the p-terphenyl anion radical with an initial...

  9. Acoustic resonance spectroscopy for the advanced undergraduate laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franco-Villafañe, J A; Méndez-Sánchez, R A; Flores-Olmedo, E; Báez, G; Gandarilla-Carrillo, O

    2012-01-01

    We present a simple experiment that allows advanced undergraduates to learn the principles and applications of spectroscopy. The technique, known as acoustic resonance spectroscopy, is applied to study a vibrating rod. The setup includes electromagnetic-acoustic transducers, an audio amplifier and a vector network analyzer. Typical results of compressional, torsional and bending waves are analyzed and compared with analytical results. (paper)

  10. High energy resolution off-resonant X-ray spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wojciech, Blachucki [Univ. of Fribourg (Switzerland). Dept. of Physics

    2015-10-16

    This work treats of the high energy resolution off-resonant X-ray spectroscopy (HEROS) method of determining the density of unoccupied electronic states in the vicinity of the absorption edge. HEROS is an alternative to the existing X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) methods and opens the way for new studies not achievable before.

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of lipoproteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, J.A.; Morrisett, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    Several nuclei in lipoproteins are magnetically active and are thus potential NMR probes of lipoprotein structure. Table I lists the magnetic isotopes preset in the covalent structures of the molecular constituents of lipoproteins: lipids, proteins, and carbohydrates. Every type of nucleus that is part of the endogenous structure of these molecules has at least one magnetic isotope. Each magnetic nucleus represents an intrinsic and completely nonperturbing probe (when at the natural abundance level) of local molecular motion and magnetic environment. The NMR experiment itself is also nonperturbing and nondestructive. Table I also lists for each nucleus its nuclear spin, its natural isotopic abundance, its sensitivity, and its resonance frequency at two commonly employed magnetic in the low field range (21.14 kG or 2.11 Tesla) and the other in the high field range (47.0 kG or 4.70 Tesla). Of the nuclei listed in Table I, /sup 1/H, /sup 13/C, and /sup 31/P have been the primary ones studied in lipoproteins. The general advantages and disadvantages afforded by these and other nuclei as probes of lipoprotein structure are discussed. /sup 13/C NMR spectroscopy, the method which has had the most extensive application (and probably has the greatest future potential) to lipoproteins, is treated in greatest detail, but many of the principles described apply to other nuclei as well

  12. Characterization of functional LB films using electron spin resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroda, Shin-ichi

    1995-01-01

    The role of ESR spectroscopy in the characterization of functional LB films is discussed. Unpaired electrons in LB films are associated with isolated radical molecules produced by charge transfer, paramagnetic metallic ions such as Cu 2+ , strongly interacting spins in the mixed valence states in charge-transfer salts, and so on. These spins often manifest the functions of materials. They can also act as microscopic probes in the ESR analysis devoted for the elucidation of characteristic properties of LB films. In structural studies, ESR is of particular importance in the analysis of molecular orientation of LB films. ESR can unambiguously determine the orientation of molecules through g-value anisotropy: different g value, different resonance field. Two types of new control methods of molecular orientation in LB films originated from the ESR analysis: study of in-plane orientation in dye LB films which led to the discovery of flow-orientation effect, and observation of drastic change of orientation of Cu-porphyrin in LB films using the trigger molecule, n-hexatriacontane. In the studies of electronic properties, hyperfine interactions between electron and nuclear spins provide information about molecular orbitals and local structures. Stable isotopes have been successfully applied to the stable radicals in merocyanine LB films to identify hyperfine couplings. In conducting LB films composed of charge-transfer salts, quasi-one-dimensional antiferromagnetism in semiconducting films and spin resonance of conduction electrons in metallic films are observed. Results provide microscopic evidence for the development of columnar structures of constituent molecules. Development of new functional LB films may provide more cases where ESR spectroscopy will clarify the nature of such films. (author)

  13. Resonant double photoionisation spectroscopy of strontium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokell, E; Grimm, M; Sheridan, P, E-mail: emma.sokell@ucd.i, E-mail: paul.sheridan@ucd.i [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland)

    2009-11-01

    Resonant triple-differential cross-section (TDCS) measurements on atomic strontium on the 4p {yields} 4d resonance are presented. All of these TDCS measurements display unexpected lobes at a mutual emission angle for the two electrons of 180{sup o}. Possible explanations for these lobes are explored.

  14. Nanometrology using localized surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Claus; Lindstedt, Daniel N.; Laurberg, Asger V.

    2013-01-01

    in a transmission spectrum and it is very sensitive to the constituent materials as well as both lateral and vertical dimensions of the structures. This makes LSPR spectroscopy interesting for a number of applications including nanometrology. Like scatterometry, LSPR spectroscopy requires test structures...... and computer simulations to establish the correlation between spectra and physical dimensions. Instead of measuring on individual structures like CD-SEM and AFM, LSPR spectroscopy measures on an array of test structures with an arbitrary array size. This makes LSPR spectroscopy particularly interesting...... for dense device layers where the vacant space for test structures is limited.In this work, LSPR spectroscopy is used to evaluate a fabrication process including imprinting, etching and metallisation of gammadion test structures distributed on a 4” wafer....

  15. Synchrotron radiation resonance Raman spectroscopy (SR3S)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hester, R.E.

    1979-01-01

    The use of normal Raman spectroscopy and resonance Raman spectroscopy to study the structure of molecular species and the nature of their chemical bonds is discussed. The availability of a fully tunable radiation source (the Synchrotron Radiation Source) extending into the ultraviolet raises the possibility of using synchrotron radiation resonance Raman spectroscopy as a sensitive and specific analytical probe. The pulsed nature of the SRS beam may be exploited for time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy and its high degree of polarization could be very helpful in the interpretation of spectra. The possibilities are considered under the headings: intensity requirements and comparison with other sources; some applications (e.g. structure of proteins; study of iron-porphyrin unit; study of chlorophylls). (U.K.)

  16. Evolution of nuclear spectroscopy at Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1990 to date a variety of medium energy heavy ions were made available from the BARC-TIFR Pel- letron and the Nuclear Science Centre Pelletron. The state of the art gamma detector arrays in these centres enabled the Saha Institute groups to undertake more sophisticated experiments. Front line nuclear spectroscopy ...

  17. Nuclear Forensics using Gamma-ray Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman E. B.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Much of George Dracoulis’s research career was devoted to utilising gamma-ray spectroscopy in fundamental studies in nuclear physics. This same technology is useful in a wide range of applications in the area of nuclear forensics. Over the last several years, our research group has made use of both high- and low-resolution gamma-ray spectrometers to: identify the first sample of plutonium large enough to be weighed; determine the yield of the Trinity nuclear explosion; measure fission fragment yields as a function of target nucleus and neutron energy; and observe fallout in the U. S. from the Fukushima nuclear reactor accident.

  18. Selective One-Dimensional Total Correlation Spectroscopy Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Experiments for a Rapid Identification of Minor Components in the Lipid Fraction of Milk and Dairy Products: Toward Spin Chromatography?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaemmanouil, Christina; Tsiafoulis, Constantinos G; Alivertis, Dimitrios; Tzamaloukas, Ouranios; Miltiadou, Despoina; Tzakos, Andreas G; Gerothanassis, Ioannis P

    2015-06-10

    We report a rapid, direct, and unequivocal spin-chromatographic separation and identification of minor components in the lipid fraction of milk and common dairy products with the use of selective one-dimensional (1D) total correlation spectroscopy (TOCSY) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments. The method allows for the complete backbone spin-coupling network to be elucidated even in strongly overlapped regions and in the presence of major components from 4 × 10(2) to 3 × 10(3) stronger NMR signal intensities. The proposed spin-chromatography method does not require any derivatization steps for the lipid fraction, is selective with excellent resolution, is sensitive with quantitation capability, and compares favorably to two-dimensional (2D) TOCSY and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) methods of analysis. The results of the present study demonstrated that the 1D TOCSY NMR spin-chromatography method can become a procedure of primary interest in food analysis and generally in complex mixture analysis.

  19. Nuclear gamma resonance absorption (Moessbauer) spectroscopy as an archaeometric technique to assess chemical states of iron in a Tupiguarani ceramic artifact from Corinto, Minas Gerais, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floresta, D.L.; Ardisson, J.D.; Fagundes, M.; Fabris, J.D.

    2013-01-01

    Archaeological ceramics of Tupiguarani Tradition are found in many parts throughout the Brazilian territory and have many similarities. Fragments of Tupiguarani pottery found in the archaeological site known as Beltrao, in the municipality of Corinto, state of Minas Gerais, were identified and collected by researchers of the LAEP/UFVJM, in Diamantina, also in Minas Gerais. A selected fragment of about 15 mm-thick, with a color gradation across the ceramic wall ranging from red, on one side, grayish in the middle and orange on the opposite side, was transversely cut and a series of subsamples of powdered materials were collected from different depths across the wall, in layer segments of ∼3 mm, from the orange side. These powdered subsamples were analyzed with X-ray fluorescence and diffraction spectroscopy and 57 Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy at room temperature (298 K) and at 80 K. According to the XRF results, the elementary composition does not clearly vary with the depth in the sample. The powder XRD analysis revealed the occurrence mainly of quartz and muscovite. Results of 57 Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy reveal that hematite is the magnetically ordered phase. An Fe 2+ component appears for the grayish subsample. According to these results, the red subsample seems to be the external part of the pottery, representing the side that had direct contact with fire used to burn the precursor clay in air for this primitive ceramics preparation. The grayish middle layer is probably due to burning clay mixed with some ashes containing residual carbon, under milder temperature than on the external . (author)

  20. Comparison of nuclear electric resonance and nuclear magnetic resonance in integer and fractional quantum Hall states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomimatsu, Toru; Shirai, Shota; Hashimoto, Katsushi; Sato, Ken; Hirayama, Yoshiro

    2015-01-01

    Electric-field-induced nuclear resonance (NER: nuclear electric resonance) involving quantum Hall states (QHSs) was studied at various filling factors by exploiting changes in nuclear spins polarized at quantum Hall breakdown. Distinct from the magnetic dipole interaction in nuclear magnetic resonance, the interaction of the electric-field gradient with the electric quadrupole moment plays the dominant role in the NER mechanism. The magnitude of the NER signal strongly depends on whether electronic states are localized or extended. This indicates that NER is sensitive to the screening capability of the electric field associated with QHSs

  1. Overview. Department of Nuclear Spectroscopy. Section 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Styczen, J. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    The 1994 year activity in the Nuclear Spectroscopy Department was like in previous years spread over large variety of subjects concerned with the in-beam nuclear spectroscopy and many nucleon transfer reactions, properties of high excited nuclear states, and the applied nuclear spectroscopy. The studies in the first two groups were mostly carried out in a vast international collaboration which enabled us to carry out experiments on highly sophisticated experimental facilities abroad like EUROGAM, GASP, HECTOR or OSIRIS, and others. Some preparations for `home` experiments have been carried out on the very much looked forward and recently obtained heavy ion beam from the cyclotron at the Warsaw University. The applied nuclear spectroscopy works, on the other hand, were based on using our own installations: an elaborated set-up for perturbed angular correlations, the RBS and PIXE set-ups at the Van de Graaff accelerator, the implanter, an atomic force microscope and several others. Much of the effort manifests itself in several valuable results which are summarized in the following pages. It is to be underlined that those results, as well as some new instrumentation developments were possible due to additional support via special grants and the promotion of the international cooperation by the State Committee for Scientific Research (KBN). (author).

  2. Overview. Department of Nuclear Spectroscopy. Section 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Styczen, J [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland)

    1996-12-31

    The 1994 year activity in the Nuclear Spectroscopy Department was like in previous years spread over large variety of subjects concerned with the in-beam nuclear spectroscopy and many nucleon transfer reactions, properties of high excited nuclear states, and the applied nuclear spectroscopy. The studies in the first two groups were mostly carried out in a vast international collaboration which enabled us to carry out experiments on highly sophisticated experimental facilities abroad like EUROGAM, GASP, HECTOR or OSIRIS, and others. Some preparations for `home` experiments have been carried out on the very much looked forward and recently obtained heavy ion beam from the cyclotron at the Warsaw University. The applied nuclear spectroscopy works, on the other hand, were based on using our own installations: an elaborated set-up for perturbed angular correlations, the RBS and PIXE set-ups at the Van de Graaff accelerator, the implanter, an atomic force microscope and several others. Much of the effort manifests itself in several valuable results which are summarized in the following pages. It is to be underlined that those results, as well as some new instrumentation developments were possible due to additional support via special grants and the promotion of the international cooperation by the State Committee for Scientific Research (KBN). (author).

  3. Stability of hydrophilic vitamins mixtures in the presence of electrolytes and trace elements for parenteral nutrition: a nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uccello-Barretta, Gloria; Balzano, Federica; Aiello, Federica; Falugiani, Niccolò; Desideri, Ielizza

    2015-03-25

    In total parenteral nutrition (TPN), especially in the case of preterm infants, simultaneous administration of vitamins and trace elements is still a problematic issue: guidelines put in evidence the lack of specific documentation. In this work NMR spectroscopy was applied to the study of vitamins (pyridoxine hydrochloride, thiamine nitrate, riboflavin-5'-phosphate and nicotinamide) stability in presence of salts and trace elements. Vitamins in D2O were first analyzed by (1)H NMR spectroscopy in absence of salts and trace elements; changes in chemical shifts or in diffusion coefficients, measured by NMR DOSY technique, were analyzed. The effects of salts and trace elements on single vitamins and on their admixtures were then investigated by performing quantitative analyses during 48h. Selected vitamins are subject to intermolecular interactions. No degradative effects were observed in presence of salts and trace elements. Only riboflavin-5'-phosphate is subject to precipitation in presence of divalent cations; however, at low concentration and in presence of other vitamins this effect was not observed. Solutions analyzed, in the condition of this study, are stable for at least 48h and vitamins and trace elements can be administered together in TPN. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance: investigating the spins of nuclear related materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charpentier, Th.

    2007-10-01

    The author reviews his successive research works: his research thesis work on the Multiple Quantum Magic Angle Spinning (MQMAS) which is a quadric-polar nucleus multi-quanta correlation spectroscopy method, the modelling of NMR spectra of disordered materials, the application to materials of interest for the nuclear industry (notably the glasses used for nuclear waste containment). He presents the various research projects in which he is involved: storing glasses, nuclear magnetic resonance in paramagnetism, solid hydrogen storing matrices, methodological and instrument developments in high magnetic field and high resolution solid NMR, long range distance measurement by solid state Tritium NMR (observing the structure and dynamics of biological complex systems at work)

  5. Nuclear magnetic resonance method and apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burl, M.; Young, I.R.

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus for determining the rate of flow of a liquid in a selected region of a body by nuclear magnetic resonance techniques are described. The method includes a sequence of applying a first magnetic pulse effective to excite nuclear magnetic resonance of a chosen nucleus within the liquid preferentially in a slice of the body which includes the selected region. A period of time (tsub(D)) is waited and then a second magnetic pulse is applied which is effective to excite nuclear magnetic resonance of the nuclei preferentially in the slice, and the free induction decay signal is measured. The whole sequence is repeated for different values of the period of time (tsub(D)). The variation in the value of the measured signal with tsub(D) is then related to the rate of flow of the liquid through the slice. (author)

  6. Interaction between Wine Phenolic Acids and Salivary Proteins by Saturation-Transfer Difference Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (STD-NMR) and Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer-Gallego, Raúl; Hernández-Hierro, José Miguel; Brás, Natércia F; Vale, Nuno; Gomes, Paula; Mateus, Nuno; de Freitas, Victor; Heredia, Francisco J; Escribano-Bailón, María Teresa

    2017-08-09

    The interaction between phenolic compounds and salivary proteins is highly related to the astringency perception. Recently, it has been proven the existence of synergisms on the perceived astringency when phenolic acids were tested as mixtures in comparison to individual compounds, maintaining constant the total amount of the stimulus. The interactions between wine phenolic acids and the peptide fragment IB7 12 have been studied by saturation-transfer difference (STD) NMR spectroscopy. This technique provided the dissociation constants and the percentage of interaction between both individual and mixtures of hydroxybenzoic and hydroxycinnamic acids and the model peptide. It is noteworthy that hydroxybenzoic acids showed higher affinity for the peptide than hydroxycinnamic acids. To obtain further insights into the mechanisms of interaction, molecular dynamics simulations have been performed. Results obtained not only showed the ability of these compounds to interact with salivary proteins but also may justify the synergistic effect observed in previous sensory studies.

  7. Force detection of nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rugar, D.; Zueger, O.; Hoen, S.; Yannoni, C.S.; Vieth, H.M.; Kendrick, R.D.

    1994-01-01

    Micromechanical sensing of magnetic force was used to detect nuclear magnetic resonance with exceptional sensitivity and spatial resolution. With a 900 angstrom thick silicon nitride cantilever capable of detecting subfemtonewton forces, a single shot sensitivity of 1.6 x 10 13 protons was achieved for an ammonium nitrate sample mounted on the cantilever. A nearby millimeter-size iron particle produced a 600 tesla per meter magnetic field gradient, resulting in a spatial resolution of 2.6 micrometers in one dimension. These results suggest that magnetic force sensing is a viable approach for enhancing the sensitivity and spatial resolution of nuclear magnetic resonance microimaging

  8. Nuclear spectroscopy and quantum chaos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakata, Fumihiko; Marumori, Toshio; Hashimoto, Yukio; Yamamoto, Yoshifumi; Tsukuma, Hidehiko; Iwasawa, Kazuo.

    1990-05-01

    In this paper, a recent development of INS-TSUKUBA joint research project on large-amplitude collective motion is summerized. The classical theory of nuclear collective dynamics formulated within the time-dependent Hartree-Fock theory is recapitulated and decisive role of the level crossing in the single-particle dynamics on the order-to-chaos transition of collective motion is discussed in detail. Extending the basic idea of the classical theory, we discuss a quantum theory of nuclear collective dynamics which allows us to properly define a concept of quantum chaos for each eigenfunction. By using numerical calculation, we illustrate what the quantum chaos for each eigenfunction means and its relation to usual definition based on the random matrix theory. (author)

  9. Comparison of 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy for estimating humification and aromatization of soil organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, K.; Cooper, W. T.; Hodgkins, S. B.; Verbeke, B. A.; Chanton, J.

    2017-12-01

    Solid state direct polarization 13C NMR spectroscopy (DP-NMR) is generally considered the most quantitatively reliable method for soil organic matter (SOM) characterization, including determination of the relative abundances of carbon functional groups. These functional abundances can then be used to calculate important soil parameters such as degree of humification and extent of aromaticity that reveal differences in reactivity or compositional changes along gradients (e.g. thaw chronosequence in permafrost). Unfortunately, the 13C NMR DP-NMR experiment is time-consuming, with a single sample often requiring over 24 hours of instrument time. Alternatively, solid state cross polarization 13C NMR (CP-NMR) can circumvent this problem, reducing analyses times to 4-6 hours but with some loss of quantitative reliability. Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) is a quick and relatively inexpensive method for characterizing solid materials, and has been suggested as an alternative to NMR for analysis of soil organic matter and determination of humification (HI) and aromatization (AI) indices. However, the quantitative reliability of ATR-FTIR for SOM analyses has never been verified, nor have any ATR-FTIR data been compared to similar measurements by NMR. In this work we focused on FTIR vibrational bands that correspond to the three functional groups used to calculate HI and AI values: carbohydrates (1030 cm-1), aromatics (1510, 1630 cm-1), and aliphatics (2850, 2920 cm-1). Data from ATR-FTIR measurements were compared to analogous quantitation by DP- and CP-NMR using peat samples from Sweden, Minnesota, and North Carolina. DP- and CP-NMR correlate very strongly, although the correlations are not always 1:1. Direct comparison of relative abundances of the three functional groups determined by NMR and ATR-FTIR yielded satisfactory results for carbohydrates (r2= 0.78) and aliphatics (r2=0.58), but less so for aromatics (r2= 0

  10. Chemical variability along the value chains of turmeric (Curcuma longa): a comparison of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and high performance thin layer chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booker, Anthony; Frommenwiler, Debora; Johnston, Deborah; Umealajekwu, Chinenye; Reich, Eike; Heinrich, Michael

    2014-03-14

    Herbal medicine value chains have generally been overlooked compared with food commodities. Not surprisingly, revenue generation tends to be weighted towards the end of the chain and consequently the farmers and producers are the lowest paid beneficiaries. Value chains have an impact both on the livelihood of producers and on the composition and quality of products commonly sold locally and globally and consequently on the consumers. In order to understand the impact of value chains on the composition of products, we studied the production conditions for turmeric (Curcuma longa) and the metabolomic composition of products derived from it. We aimed at integrating these two components in order to gain a better understanding of the effect of different value chains on the livelihoods of some producers. This interdisciplinary project uses a mixed methods approach. Case studies were undertaken on two separate sites in India. Data was initially gathered on herbal medicine value chains by means of semi-structured interviews and non-participant observations. Samples were collected from locations in India, Europe and the USA and analysed using (1)H NMR spectroscopy coupled with multivariate analysis software and with high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC). We investigate medicinal plant value chains and interpret the impact different value chains have on some aspects of the livelihoods of producers in India and, for the first time, analytically assess the chemical variability and quality implications that different value chains may have on the products available to end users in Europe. There are benefits to farmers that belonged to an integrated chain and the resulting products were subject to a higher standard of processing and storage. By using analytical methods, including HPTLC and (1)H NMR spectroscopy, it has been possible to correlate some variations in product composition for selected producers and identify strengths and weaknesses of some types of value

  11. Analysis of the unresolved organic fraction in atmospheric aerosols with ultrahigh-resolution mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy: organosulfates as photochemical smog constituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Gelencsér, Andras; Dabek-Zlotorzynska, Ewa; Kiss, Gyula; Hertkorn, Norbert; Harir, Mourad; Hong, Yang; Gebefügi, Istvan

    2010-10-01

    Complementary molecular and atomic signatures obtained from Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectra and NMR spectra provided unequivocal attribution of CHO, CHNO, CHOS, and CHNOS molecular series in secondary organic aerosols (SOA) and high-resolution definition of carbon chemical environments. Sulfate esters were confirmed as major players in SOA formation and as major constituents of its water-soluble fraction (WSOC). Elevated concentrations of SO(2), sulfate, and photochemical activity were shown to increase the proportion of SOA sulfur-containing compounds. Sulfonation of CHO precursors by means of heterogeneous reactions between carbonyl derivatives and sulfuric acid in gas-phase photoreactions was proposed as a likely formation mechanism of CHOS molecules. In addition, photochemistry induced oligomerization processes of CHOS molecules. Methylesters found in methanolic extracts of a SOA subjected to strong photochemical exposure were considered secondary products derived from sulfate esters by methanolysis. The relative abundance of nitrogen-containing compounds (CHNO and CHNOS series) appeared rather dependent on local effects such as biomass burning. Extensive aliphatic branching and disruption of extended NMR spin-systems by carbonyl derivatives and other heteroatoms were the most significant structural motifs in SOA. The presence of heteroatoms in elevated oxidation states suggests a clearly different SOA formation trajectory in comparison with established terrestrial and aqueous natural organic matter.

  12. Rapid and novel discrimination and quantification of oleanolic and ursolic acids in complex plant extracts using two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy-Comparison with HPLC methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kontogianni, Vassiliki G.; Exarchou, Vassiliki; Troganis, Anastassios; Gerothanassis, Ioannis P.

    2009-01-01

    A novel strategy for NMR analysis of mixtures of oleanolic and ursolic acids that occur in natural products is described. These important phytochemicals have similar structure and their discrimination and quantification is rather difficult. We report herein the combined use of proton-carbon heteronuclear single-quantum coherence ( 1 H- 13 C HSQC) and proton-carbon heteronuclear multiple-bond correlation ( 1 H- 13 C HMBC) NMR spectroscopy, in the identification and quantitation of oleanolic acid (OA) and ursolic acid (UA)in plant extracts of the Lamiaceae and Oleaceae family. The combination of 1 H- 13 C HSQC and 1 H- 13 C HMBC techniques allows the connection of the proton and carbon-13 spins across the molecular backbone resulting in the identification and, thus, discrimination of oleanolic and ursolic acid without resorting to physicochemical separation of the components. The quantitative results provided by 2D 1 H- 13 C HSQC NMR data were obtained within a short period of time (∼14 min) and are in excellent agreement with those obtained by HPLC, which support the efficiency of the suggested methodology

  13. Measurement of the exchange rate of waters of hydration in elastin by 2D T{sub 2}-T{sub 2} correlation nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Cheng; Boutis, Gregory S, E-mail: gboutis@brooklyn.cuny.edu [Brooklyn College, Department of Physics, 2900 Bedford Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11210 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    We report on a direct measurement of the exchange rate of waters of hydration in elastin by T{sub 2}-T{sub 2} exchange spectroscopy. The exchange rates in bovine nuchal ligament elastin and aortic elastin at temperatures near, below and at the physiological temperature are reported here. Using an inverse Laplace transform (ILT) algorithm, we are able to identify four components in the relaxation times. While three of the components are in good agreement with previous measurements that used multi-exponential fitting, the ILT algorithm distinguishes a fourth component having relaxation times close to that of free water and is identified as water between fibers. With the aid of scanning electron microscopy, a model is proposed that allows for the application of a two-site exchange analysis between any two components for the determination of exchange rates between reservoirs. The results of the measurements support a model (described by Urry and Parker 2002 J. Muscle Res. Cell Motil. 23 543-59) wherein the net entropy of waters of hydration should increase with increasing temperature in the inverse temperature transition.

  14. Measurement of the exchange rate of waters of hydration in elastin by 2D T2-T2 correlation nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Cheng; Boutis, Gregory S

    2011-01-01

    We report on a direct measurement of the exchange rate of waters of hydration in elastin by T 2 -T 2 exchange spectroscopy. The exchange rates in bovine nuchal ligament elastin and aortic elastin at temperatures near, below and at the physiological temperature are reported here. Using an inverse Laplace transform (ILT) algorithm, we are able to identify four components in the relaxation times. While three of the components are in good agreement with previous measurements that used multi-exponential fitting, the ILT algorithm distinguishes a fourth component having relaxation times close to that of free water and is identified as water between fibers. With the aid of scanning electron microscopy, a model is proposed that allows for the application of a two-site exchange analysis between any two components for the determination of exchange rates between reservoirs. The results of the measurements support a model (described by Urry and Parker 2002 J. Muscle Res. Cell Motil. 23 543-59) wherein the net entropy of waters of hydration should increase with increasing temperature in the inverse temperature transition.

  15. Measurement of the Exchange Rate of Waters of Hydration in Elastin by 2D T(2)-T(2) Correlation Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Cheng; Boutis, Gregory S

    2011-02-28

    We report on the direct measurement of the exchange rate of waters of hydration in elastin by T(2)-T(2) exchange spectroscopy. The exchange rates in bovine nuchal ligament elastin and aortic elastin at temperatures near, below and at the physiological temperature are reported. Using an Inverse Laplace Transform (ILT) algorithm, we are able to identify four components in the relaxation times. While three of the components are in good agreement with previous measurements that used multi-exponential fitting, the ILT algorithm distinguishes a fourth component having relaxation times close to that of free water and is identified as water between fibers. With the aid of scanning electron microscopy, a model is proposed allowing for the application of a two-site exchange analysis between any two components for the determination of exchange rates between reservoirs. The results of the measurements support a model (described elsewhere [1]) wherein the net entropy of bulk waters of hydration should increase upon increasing temperature in the inverse temperature transition.

  16. A study by nitrogen-15 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the state of histidine in the catalytic triad of α-lytic protease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachovchin, W.W.; Roberts, J.D.

    1978-01-01

    The ionization behaviour of the histidine of the catalytic triad of α-lytic protease using N-15 NMR spectroscopy is studied. This technique is especially informative about the protonation, hydrogen-bond formation, and tautomeric equilibrium of imidazole rings. The efficient and specific incorporation of N-15 labelled histidine into α-lytic protease was achieved by inducing and isolating an auxotroph of myxobacter 495 for which histidine is an essential amino acid. The results show that histidine of the catalytic triad of α-lytic protease appears to have a base strength which is essentially normal for an imidazole derivative but, in the pH range where the enzymatic activity is high, the histidine tautomer is favoured with the hydrogen located on N3 (π), as the result of hydrogen bonding to the asparate anion and possible the serine hydroxyl. Thus, the N-15 NMR shifts support the general geometry postulated for the ''charge-relay'' mechanism but not the idea of an unusually weakly basic histidine or an unusually strongly basic asparate carboxylate anion. (A.G.)

  17. Resonance Raman Spectroscopy of Free Radicals Produced by Ionizing Radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilbrandt, Robert Walter

    1984-01-01

    Applications of time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy to the study of short-lived free radicals produced by ionizing radiation are briefly reviewed. Potential advantages and limitations of this technique are discussed in the light of given examples. The reduction of p-nitrobenzylchloride and......Applications of time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy to the study of short-lived free radicals produced by ionizing radiation are briefly reviewed. Potential advantages and limitations of this technique are discussed in the light of given examples. The reduction of p......-nitrobenzylchloride and subsequent formation of the p-nitrobenzyl radical and the reaction of p-nitrotoluene with O– are studied by resonance Raman and optical absorption spectroscopy....

  18. Basis of the nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahceli, S.

    1996-08-01

    The aim of this book which is translated from English language is to explain the physical and mathematical basis of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). There are nine chapters covering different aspects of NMR. In the firs chapter fundamental concepts of quantum mechanics are given at a level suitable for readers to understand NMR fully. The remaining chapters discuss the magnetic properties of nucleus, the interactions between atoms and molecules, continuous wave NMR, pulsed NMR, nuclear magnetic relaxation and NMR of liquids

  19. The electric monopole transition: Nuclear structure, and nuclear spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zganiar, E.F.

    1992-01-01

    The electric monopole (E0) transition process provides unique information on the structure of nuclei. For example, δI=0 transitions between nuclear configurations of different shape have enhanced EO components. The authors have observed I π→Iπ (I=0) transitions in 185 Pt and 184 Pt which are pure E0. This is unprecedented. Further, they have initiated searches for the location of the superdeformed band in 192 Hg utilizing internal conversion spectroscopy and, for the first time, internal pair spectroscopy. Additionally, the lifetime of the 0 + 2 level in 188 Hg was measured with a newly developed picosecond lifetime system which utilized the 0 + 2 →0 + 1 E0 internal conversion transition as an energy gate and its associated atomic X-ray as a fast trigger. The role of the E0 internal conversion process in the study of nuclear structure and as a tool in nuclear spectroscopy are discussed

  20. Nuclear disarmament verification via resonant phenomena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecla, Jake J; Danagoulian, Areg

    2018-03-28

    Nuclear disarmament treaties are not sufficient in and of themselves to neutralize the existential threat of the nuclear weapons. Technologies are necessary for verifying the authenticity of the nuclear warheads undergoing dismantlement before counting them toward a treaty partner's obligation. Here we present a concept that leverages isotope-specific nuclear resonance phenomena to authenticate a warhead's fissile components by comparing them to a previously authenticated template. All information is encrypted in the physical domain in a manner that amounts to a physical zero-knowledge proof system. Using Monte Carlo simulations, the system is shown to reveal no isotopic or geometric information about the weapon, while readily detecting hoaxing attempts. This nuclear technique can dramatically increase the reach and trustworthiness of future nuclear disarmament treaties.

  1. Ion-cyclotron-resonance- and Fourier-transform-ion-cyclotron-resonance spectroscopy: technology and application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luederwald, I.

    1977-01-01

    Instrumentation and technology of Ion-Cyclotron-Resonance and Fourier-Transform-Ion-Cyclotron-Resonance Spectroscopy are described. The method can be applied to studies of ion/molecule reactions in gas phase, to obtain thermodynamic data as gas phase acidity or basicity, proton and electron affinity, and to establish reaction mechanisms and ion structures. (orig.) [de

  2. Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry (RIMS): applications in spectroscopy and chemical dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naik, P.D.; Kumar, Awadhesh; Upadhyaya, Hari; Bajaj, P.N.

    2009-01-01

    Resonance ionization is a photophysical process wherein electromagnetic radiation is used to ionize atoms, molecules, transient species, etc., by exciting them through their quantum states. The number of photons required to ionize depends on the species being investigated and energy of the photon. Once a charged particle is produced, it is easy to detect it with high efficiency. With the advent of narrow band high power pulsed and cw tunable dye lasers, it has blossomed into a powerful spectroscopic and analytical technique, commonly known as resonance ionization spectroscopy (RIS)/resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI). The alliance of resonance ionization with mass spectrometry has grown into a still more powerful technique, known as resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS), which has made significant contributions in a variety of frontier areas of research and development, such as spectroscopy, chemical dynamics, analytical chemistry, cluster science, surface science, radiochemistry, nuclear physics, biology, environmental science, material science, etc. In this article, we shall describe the application of resonance ionization mass spectrometry to spectroscopy of uranium and chemical dynamics of polyatomic molecules

  3. Nuclear spectroscopy using the neutron capture reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egidy, T.

    1982-01-01

    Experimental methods using neutron spectroscopy as a means to study the nucleus structure are described. Since reactions of neutron capture (n, γ) are non-selective, they permit to study the nature of excitation (monoparticle and collective) of nuclear levels, the nature of vibrational excitations, to check the connection between shell model and liquid drop model etc. In many cases (n, γ) reactions are the only way to check the forecast of nuclear models. Advantages of (n, γ) spectroscopy, possessing a high precision of measurement and high sensitivity, are underlined. Using neutron spectroscopy on facilities with a high density of neutron flux the structures of energy levels of a large group of nuclei are studied. In different laboratories complete schemes of energy levels of nuclei are obtained, a great number of new levels are found, the evergy level densities are determined, multipolarities of γ-transitions, spins, level parities are considered. StrUctures of rotational bands of heavy deformed nuclei are studied. The study of the structure of high-spin states is possible only using the methods of (n, γ) spectroscopy Investigation results of the nuclei 24 Na, 114 Cd, 154 Eu, 155 Cd, 155 Sm, 233 Th are considered as examples. The most interesting aspects of the investigations using neutron spectroscopy are discUssed

  4. Synthesis of highly anti-HIV active sulfated poly- and oligo-saccharides and analysis of their action mechanisms by NMR [nuclear magnetic resonance] spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uryu, Toshiyuki

    1998-01-01

    We have been synthesizing sulfated polysaccharides and oligosaccharides with highly anti-HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) activities. It has been known that sulfated polysaccharides such as dextran sulfate and pentosan polysulfate have biological activities such as anticoagulant activity and recently anti-HIV activity. Curdlan sulfate having 1,3-β-linked glucan backbone had high anti-HIV activity but low anticoagulant activity. Phase I/II test for the curdlan sulfate as an AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome) drug was carried out in the United States. In this study, regioselectivity sulfatec curdlan sulfates were prepared in order to study effects of sulfate groups and conformation of curdlan sulfates. In addition, action mechanisms of curdlan sulfate as anti-AIDS drug and of heparin as an anticoagulant were examined by means of NMR spectroscopy. 1. Structure dependence of anti-HIV and anticoagulant activities of sulfated polysaccharides. Curdlan with M n 9000 was regioselectively sulfated on its hydroxyl groups at 6, 4, and 2 positions. Those were a curdlan sulfate 62S in which 100% of 6-OH, and about 50% of 2-OH was sulfated, a curdlan sulfate 42S in which 4- and 2-OH's were sulfated, and a curdlan sulfate in which 6, 4, and 2-OH's were partially sulfated. All curdlan sulfates had very high anti-HIV activities exhibited by the drug concentration of 50% inhibition of infection, i.e., EC 50 of 0.04 - 0.25 μg/mL. However, there was almost no difference in the activity among the samples. Therefore, it was revealed that the degree of sulfation and putative conformation of the curdlan sulfates but not the position of sulfate groups have large effects on the anti-HIV activity. On the other hand, the anticoagulant activity increased with increasing molecular weight of the curdlan sulfates. As a result, it is assumed that the size of reaction sites of the virus protein reacting with curdlan sulfate is different from that of the proteins related to anticoagulant

  5. Basic principles of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valk, J.; MacLean, C.; Algra, P.R.

    1985-01-01

    The intent of this book is to help clinicians understand the basic physical principles of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The book consists of the following: a discussion of elementary considerations; pulse sequencing; localization of MR signals in space; MR equipment; MR contrast agents; clinical applications; MR spectroscopy; and biological effects of MR imaging; a set of appendixes; and a bibliography. Illustrations and images are included

  6. Structure elucidation and quantification of impurities formed between 6-aminocaproic acid and the excipients citric acid and sorbitol in an oral solution using high-resolution mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schou-Pedersen, Anne Marie V; Cornett, Claus; Nyberg, Nils; Østergaard, Jesper; Hansen, Steen Honoré

    2015-03-25

    Concentrated solutions containing 6-aminocaproic acid and the excipients citric acid and sorbitol have been studied at temperatures of 50°C, 60°C, 70°C and 80°C as well as at 20°C. It has previously been reported that the commonly employed citric acid is a reactive excipient, and it is therefore important to thoroughly investigate a possible reaction between 6-aminocaproic acid and citric acid. The current study revealed the formation of 3-hydroxy-3,4-dicarboxy-butanamide-N-hexanoic acid between 6-aminocaproic acid and citric acid by high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). Less than 0.03% of 6-aminocaproic acid was converted to 3-hydroxy-3,4-dicarboxy-butanamide-N-hexanoic acid after 30 days of storage at 80°C. Degradation products of 6-aminocaproic acid were also observed after storage at the applied temperatures, e.g., dimer, trimer and cyclized 6-aminocaproic acid, i.e., caprolactam. No reaction products between D-sorbitol and 6-aminocaproic acid could be observed. 3-Hydroxy-3,4-dicarboxy-butanamide-N-hexanoic acid, dimer and caprolactam were also observed after storage at 20°C for 3 months. The findings imply that an oral solution of 6-aminocaproic acid is relatively stable at 20°C at the pH values 4.00 and 5.00 as suggested in the USP for oral formulations. Compliance with the ICH guideline Q3B is expected. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Periodontitis diagnostics using resonance Raman spectroscopy on saliva

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonchukov, S.; Sukhinina, A.; Bakhmutov, D.; Biryukova, T.; Tsvetkov, M.; Bagratashvily, V.

    2013-07-01

    In view of its wealth of molecular information, Raman spectroscopy has been the subject of active biomedical research. The aim of this work is Raman spectroscopy (RS) application for the determination of molecular biomarkers in saliva with the objective of early periodontitis detection. As was shown in our previous study, carotenoids contained in saliva can be molecular fingerprint information for the periodontitis level. It is shown here that the carotenoid RS lines at wavenumbers of 1156 and 1524 cm-1 can be easily detected and serve as reliable biomarkers of periodontitis using resonance Raman spectroscopy of dry saliva.

  8. Periodontitis diagnostics using resonance Raman spectroscopy on saliva

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonchukov, S; Sukhinina, A; Bakhmutov, D; Biryukova, T; Tsvetkov, M; Bagratashvily, V

    2013-01-01

    In view of its wealth of molecular information, Raman spectroscopy has been the subject of active biomedical research. The aim of this work is Raman spectroscopy (RS) application for the determination of molecular biomarkers in saliva with the objective of early periodontitis detection. As was shown in our previous study, carotenoids contained in saliva can be molecular fingerprint information for the periodontitis level. It is shown here that the carotenoid RS lines at wavenumbers of 1156 and 1524 cm −1 can be easily detected and serve as reliable biomarkers of periodontitis using resonance Raman spectroscopy of dry saliva. (letter)

  9. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and perfusion magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of musculoskeletal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Flavia Martins; Setti, Marcela; Vianna, Evandro Miguelote; Domingues, Romulo Cortes; Meohas, Walter; Rezende, Jose Francisco; Gasparetto, Emerson Leandro

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To assess the role of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in the differentiation between malignant and benign musculoskeletal tumors. Materials And Methods: Fifty-five patients with musculoskeletal tumors (27 malignant and 28 benign) were studied. The examinations were performed in a 1.5 T magnetic resonance scanner with standard protocol, and single voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy with 135 msec echo time. The dynamic contrast study was performed using T1-weighted gradient-echo sequence after intravenous gadolinium injection. Time signal intensity curves and slope values were calculated. The statistical analysis was performed with the Levene's test, followed by a Student's t-test, besides the Pearson's chi-squared and Fischer's exact tests. Results: Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were, respectively, 87.5%, 92.3% and 90.9% (p < 0.0001). Statistically significant difference was observed in the slope (%/min) between benign (mean, 27.5%/min) and malignant (mean, 110.9%/min) lesions (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: The time-intensity curve and slope values using dynamic-enhanced perfusion magnetic resonance imaging in association with the presence of choline peak demonstrated by single voxel magnetic resonance spectroscopy study are useful in the differentiation between malignant and benign musculoskeletal tumors. (author)

  10. Nuclear fission and fission-product spectroscopy: 3. International workshop on nuclear fission and fission-product spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goutte, Heloise; Fioni, Gabriele; Faust, Herbert; Goutte, Dominique

    2005-01-01

    The present book contains the proceedings of the third workshop in a series of workshops previously held in Seyssins in 1994 and 1998. The meeting was jointly organized by different divisions of CEA and two major international laboratories. In the opening address, Prof. B. Bigot, the French High Commissioner for Atomic Energy, outlined France's energy policy for the next few decades. He emphasized the continuing progress of nuclear fission in both technical and economic terms, allowing it to contribute to the energy needs of the planet even more in the future than it does today. Such progress implies a very strong link between fundamental and applied research based on experimental and theoretical approaches. The workshop gathered the different nuclear communities studying the fission process, including topics as the following: - nuclear fission experiments, - spectroscopy of neutron rich nuclei, - fission data evaluation, - theoretical aspects of nuclear fission, - and innovative nuclear systems and new facilities. The scientific program was suggested by an International Advisory Committee. About 100 scientists from 13 different countries attended the conference in the friendly working atmosphere of the Castle of Cadarache in the heart of the Provence. The proceedings of the workshop were divided into 11 sections addressing the following subject matters: 1. Cross sections and resonances (5 papers); 2. Fission at higher energies - I (5 papers); 3. Fission: mass and charge yields (4 papers); 4. Light particles and cluster emission (4 papers); 5. Spectroscopy of neutron rich nuclei (5 papers); 6. Resonances, barriers, and fission times (5 papers); 7. Fragment excitation and neutron emission (4 papers); 8. Mass and energy distributions (4 papers); 9. Needs for nuclear data and new facilities - I (4 papers); 10. Angular momenta and fission at higher Energies - II (3 papers); 11. New facilities - II (2 papers). A poster session of 8 presentations completed the workshop

  11. Spectroscopy of hadron resonances on the lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bali, Gunnar; Burch, Tommy; Ehmann, Christian; Goeckeler, Meinulf; Hagen, Christian; Schaefer, Andreas [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Regensburg, D-93040 Regensburg (Germany); Gattringer, Christof; Lang, Christian; Limmer, Markus; Mohler, Daniel [Institut fuer Physik, FB Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Graz, A-8010 Graz (Austria)

    2009-07-01

    The reproduction of the hadron mass spectrum from first principles is an important task for lattice QCD. While ground state spectroscopy, especially in the quenched approximation, is by now well understood, a clean extraction of excited hadron masses from a lattice QCD simulation still is a serious challenge. We discuss the relevant techniques for spectroscopy calculations on the lattice, in particular the variational technique which is needed for separating the different excited states from the ground state. Using this method we study three different sectors of the hadron spectrum. In the light quark sector we present hadron masses obtained from simulations with dynamical approximately chiral fermions, so-called Chirally Improved Fermions. For charmonium, we are able to extract masses for a number of excited states including ones with higher spin and exotic quantum numbers. The heavy-light hadron sector is investigated in the static-light approximation, i.e., the heavy quark is treated as infinitely heavy. Also here we are able to determine a large number of excitations.

  12. Introduction to Spin Label Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melanson, Michelle; Sood, Abha; Torok, Fanni; Torok, Marianna

    2013-01-01

    An undergraduate laboratory exercise is described to demonstrate the biochemical applications of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The beta93 cysteine residue of hemoglobin is labeled by the covalent binding of 3-maleimido-proxyl (5-MSL) and 2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-1-oxyl-3-methyl methanethiosulfonate (MTSL), respectively. The excess…

  13. Role of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in diagnosis of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mohammed Mahmoud Donia

    2012-01-23

    Jan 23, 2012 ... Subjects and methods: This study included seven pediatric patients ... ton magnetic resonance spectroscopy was done using either single or multi-voxel technique. ... with increased NAA/Cr ratio (2.32 ± 1.1). ... Table 1 Summary of the spectroscopic MRI findings in the seven patients included in the study.

  14. Resonant Dipole Nanoantenna Arrays for Enhanced Terahertz Spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Toma, A.

    2015-08-04

    Our recent studies on dipole nanoantenna arrays resonating in the terahertz frequency range (0.1 – 10 THz) will be presented. The main near- and far-field properties of these nanostructures will be shown and their application in enhanced terahertz spectroscopy of tiny quantities of nanomaterials will be discussed.

  15. Strong overtones and combination bands in ultraviolet resonance Raman spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Efremov, E.V.; Ariese, F.; Mank, A.J.G.; Gooijer, C.

    2006-01-01

    Ultraviolet resonance Raman spectroscopy is carried out using a continuous wave frequency-doubled argon ion laser operated at 229, 244, and 257 nm in order to characterize the overtones and combination bands for several classes of organic compounds in liquid solutions. Contrary to what is generally

  16. Russian Federal nuclear center facilities for nuclear spectroscopy investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilkaev, R.I.; Punin, V.T.; Abramovich, S.N.

    2001-01-01

    Russian Federal Nuclear Center facilities for Spectroscopy investigation in the field of nuclear spectroscopy are described. Here are discussed basic properties of used radiation sources, facilities and technologies for target material production and manufacture of targets from rare, high-toxic or radioactive materials. Here are also reported basic features of complex detector systems and technologies for manufacture of scintillation detectors with special properties VNIIEF was founded as a weapons laboratory. The development of nuclear and thermonuclear bombs was followed by a wide complex of nuclear-physics investigations. Naturally, data on nuclear-physics properties of active and structure materials being part of nuclear weapons were of greatest interest.At the initial stage of work on the development of nuclear weapons the information on nuclear constants of materials including the most important neutron ones was rather scant. Data published in scientific literature had low exactness and were insecure. Results of measurements sometimes differed greatly by various groups of investigators. At the same time it was clear that, for example, a 1,5-times mistake in the fission cross-section could cause a several times mistake in the choice of uranium or plutonium mass, which is necessary for the bomb development. These circumstances determined importance of the nuclear-physics investigations. Demands on knowledge of process details occurring inside the nuclei conditioned by a problem of developing and improving of nuclear weapons and atomic power are rather limited. However, the further development of nuclear industry has proved a well-known point that this knowledge being accumulated forms a critical mass that leads to an explosive situation in the elaboration both of ideological and technological aspects of these problems. It is the tendency of inside development of nuclear science that has conditioned preparedness of knowledge about intranuclear processes for

  17. Resonances: from nuclear physics to mesoscopic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Lidia S.; Maglione, Enrico

    2007-01-01

    Resonances are one of the most interesting phenomena in many fields of physics which lead to important findings. In the quantum world, systems with electrons, hadrons or atoms provide enormous amount of data on resonances, leading to the discovery of new states of matter. In nuclear physics, the recent findings on exotic nuclei, added to the list many new examples, which are important not only as direct data on resonances, but also for the production of new isotopes in regions of the nuclear chart which were 'terra incognita', until recently. With recent developments in microelectronics it is possible to create in the laboratory almost two dimensional wave guides where the motion of the electrons can exhibit typical quantum effects. The geometry of systems, such as bends, corners or crosses, has a strong influence on the conduction properties of the electrons, since it can create the appropriate conditions required for the formation of bound states or resonances in the conduction channels. Therefore it is quite important to have an accurate description of the relation between geometry and observables, which in a theoretical perspective emerges naturally from the solution of a multichannel eigenvalue problem. The study of resonances and their behaviour in these domains of physics, will be the purpose of the lecture. (Author)

  18. Nuclear spectroscopy with density dependent effective interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krewald, S.

    1976-07-01

    The paper investigates excited nuclear states with density-dependent effective interactions. In the first part of the paper, the structure and the width of the multipole giant resonances discovered in 1972 are derived microscopically. Because of their high excitation energy, these giant resonances are unstable to particle emission and thus often have a considerable decay width. Due to their collective structure, the giant resonances can be described by RPA in good approximation. In this paper, the continuum RPA is applied to the spherical nuclei 16 O, 40 Ca, 90 Zr and 208 Pb. The experimental centroid energy are in very good agreement with the calculations performed in the paper. (orig./WL) [de

  19. Photon cooperative effect in resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veklenko, B.A.

    1998-01-01

    A systematic method is proposed for calculating the density matrix of subsystems interacting with their environment under conditions of thermodynamic equilibrium. The density matrix of photons resonantly interacting with a surrounding gas is calculated. It is shown that use of the Gibbs distribution allows one to completely eliminate inelastic processes from the calculations. A correct account of photon-photon correlators indicates the presence of new cooperative effects. A new branch of the polariton spectrum is predicted, which is due to the presence of excited atoms in the medium. With the help of the density matrix the mean filling numbers of the photon modes are calculated. In terms of wavelengths, we have obtained a generalization of the Planck formula which accounts for photon cooperative phenomena. The manifestation of these effects in kinetic processes is discussed

  20. Progress in zirconium resonance ionization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Page, R.H.; Dropinski, S.C.; Worden, E.F.; Stockdale, J.A.D.

    1993-01-01

    The authors have examined the stepwise-resonant three-photon-ionization spectrum of neutral zirconium atoms using three separately-tunable pulsed visible dye lasers. The ground-level (first-step) transitions were chosen on the basis of demonstrated 91 Zr selectivity. Lifetimes of even-parity levels around 36,000 cm -1 , measured with the delayed-photoionization technique, range from 10 to 100 nsec. Direct ionization cross sections appear to be less than 10 -17 cm 2 ; newly-detected autoionizing levels give peak ionization cross sections (inferred from saturation fluences) up to 10 -15 cm 2 . Portions of Rydberg series converging to the 315 and 763 cm -1 levels of Zr + were identified. Clumps of autoionizing levels are thought to be due to Rydberg-valence mixing

  1. Nuclear spectroscopy with direct relations II. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Throw, F. E.

    1964-01-01

    The Symposium on Nuclear Spectroscopy with Direct Reactions, sponsored and organized by Argonne National Laboratory under the auspices of the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission, was held on 9-11 March 1964 at the Center for Continuing Education, University of Chicago. The present volume contains the invited papers along with abstracts or summaries of the few short papers selected for their special relevance to the topics of the invited lecturers . Edited versions of the discussions are also included

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy in current medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganssen, A.; Hartl, W.; Kaiser, W.; Margosian, P.; Weikl, A.

    1987-01-01

    The first MR scanning methods have been developed to a maturity allowing application for clinical MRI. Essentially reduced measuring periods are possible now in connection with three-dimensional and multi-layer methods, and this certainly will have a positive effect towards enhanced use of MRI. Still shorter measuring periods is the future goal with regard to so important examinations as chest studies. MR angiography without contrast agent is applicable now for clinical examination of larger vessels. For small vessels, size-adjusted surface coils are required. A number of specially tailored surface coils is available now for achieving high spatial resolution in the regions of interest. This trend will continue. In-vivo MR spectroscopy now offers methods of selection of the volume of interest that encourage clinical trial application. Due to the rapidly growing experience obtained by in-vivo animal experiments, correlations can now be revealed between MRS data and pathologic conditions. Despite the still unresolved sensitivity problems, clinical applicability can be expected in a not too far future. (orig./SHA) [de

  3. Two qubits in pure nuclear quadrupole resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furman, G.B.; Goren, S.D.; Meerovich, V.M.; Sokolovsky, V.L.

    2002-01-01

    It is shown theoretically that by the use of two radio-frequency fields of the same resonance frequency but with the different phases and directions the degeneracy of the energy spectrum of a spin system with I=3/2 is removed. This leads to four non-degenerate spin states which can be used as a platform for quantum computing. The feasibility of quantum computing based on a pure (without DC magnetic fields) nuclear quadrupole resonance technique is investigated in detail. Various quantum logic gates can be constructed by using different excitation techniques allowing different manipulations with the spin system states. Three realizations of quantum logic gates are considered: the application of an additional magnetic field with the resonance frequency, the amplitude modulation of one of the applied RF fields by the resonance frequency field, and the level-crossing method. It is shown that the probabilities of the resonance transitions depend on the method of excitation and on the direction of the excitation field. Feasibility of quantum computing is demonstrated with the examples of constructing a controlled-NOT logic gate using the resonance excitation technique and SWAP and NOT2 logic gates using the level-crossing method. (author)

  4. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in biochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, J.K.M.; Jardetzky, O.

    1985-01-01

    This chapter aims to provide an orienting overview of the main directions in which the field of biological application of NMR has developed, the kinds of biochemical or biological questions which can be studied by NMR, and the major specific NMR techniques useful for this purpose. This discussion is preceded by a brief exposition of the elementary concepts of NMR and supplemented by references to the literature that treats each topic in greater depth. Applications of NMR of interest in biochemistry are treated in three major categories: (1) determination of the structure of biologically active compounds - especially new natural products; (2) studies of biochemical reactions, or processes, especially in vivo; and (3) studies of macromolecular structure and dynamics. 122 refs.; 35 figs.; 3 tabs

  5. Resonance ionization spectroscopy using ultraviolet laser

    CERN Document Server

    Han, J M; Ko, D K; Park, H M; Rhee, Y J

    2002-01-01

    In this study, Ti:sapphire laser which is pumped by the enhanced Nd:YAG laser using laser diode, was designed and manufactured. The AO Q-switched CW Nd:YAG laser was converted into a high repetition plus-type laser using the AO Q-switch, and two heads were installed inside the cavity in order to improve the laser beam quality. The Nd:YAG laser enhancement was completed by optimization using a simulation for the cavity length, structure and thermal lens effect that greatly effected the laser beam output and quality. As the result of the enhancement, a 30W laser at 532nm and at 5k-Hz was successfully made. Also, the Ti:sapphire laser that will be used for atomic spectroscopy which is pumped by the Nd:YAG laser, was completely designed. As a basic experiment for laser oscillation. We measured the tunability of the laser, and it turned out that the wave tunability range was 730 850 nm. A self-seeding type tunable laser using grating for narrow line width, is planned to be designed due to the fact that the Ti:sapp...

  6. Improved single ion cyclotron resonance mass spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyce, K.R.

    1993-01-01

    The author has improved the state of the art for precision mass spectroscopy of a mass doublet to below one part in 10 10 . By alternately loading single ions into a Penning trap, the author has determined the mass ratio M(CO + )/M(N + 2 ) = 0.999 598 887 74(11), an accuracy of 1 x 10 -10 . This is a factor of 4 improvement over previous measurements, and a factor of 10 better than the 1985 atomic mass table adjustment [WAA85a]. Much of the author's apparatus has been rebuilt, increasing the signal-to-noise ratio and improving the reliability of the machine. The typical time needed to make and cool a single ion has been reduced from about half an hour to under 5 minutes. This was done by a combination of faster ion-making and a much faster procedure for driving out ions of the wrong species. The improved S/N, in combination with a much better signal processing algorithm to extract the ion phase and frequency from the author's data, has substantially reduced the time required for the actual measurements. This is important now that the measurement time is a substantial fraction of the cycle time (the time to make a new ion and measure it). The improvements allow over 30 comparisons in one night, compared to 2 per night previously. This not only improves the statistics, but eliminates the possibility of large non-Gaussian errors due to sudden magnetic field shifts

  7. Nonlinear nuclear magnetic resonance in ferromagnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nurgaliev, T.

    1988-01-01

    The properties of nonlinear nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) have been studied theoretically by taking into account the interaction between NMR and FMR in the ferromagnets. The Landau-Lifshitz-Bloch equations, describing the electron and nuclear magnetization behaviour in ferromagnets are presented in an integral form for a weakly excited electronic system. The stationary solution of these equations has been analysed in the case of equal NMR and FMR frequencies: the criteria for the appearance of two stable dynamic states is found and the high-frequency magnetic susceptibility for these systems is investigated. 2 figs., 8 refs

  8. Radiofrequency/infrared double resonance spectroscopy of the HD+ ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrington, Alan; McNab, I.R.; Montgomerie, C.A.

    1989-01-01

    We describe a double resonance technique for obtaining radiofrequency spectra of the HD + ion in vibration-rotation levels close to the dissociation limit. Infrared transitions are driven by Doppler tuning an HD + ion beam into resonance with a carbon dioxide infrared laser, and are detected by measuring H + fragment ions produced by electric field dissociation of the upper vibration-rotation level. Radiofrequency transitions between nuclear hyperfine components of the lower vibration-rotation level are then detected through resonant increases in the H + fragment ion current. The high spectroscopic resolution obtained, and the ability to measure magnetic dipole hyperfine transitions, will enable the hyperfine constants to be determined accurately. (author)

  9. NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE THE GELLED PRODUCT OF CANNIZZARO REACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilia Fernández-Sánchez

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR of proton 1H, carbon 13C and two dimensional spectrums, product of a green organic synthesis of redox on the Cannizzaro reaction. The product was reported as a tribochemical gel (heterogeneous mixture and confirmed by Infrared Spectroscopy IR, X-ray and scanning electron microscope (SEM. The results in this paper confirm its structure through various techniques of NMR and evaluate the content of sodium benzoate and benzyl alcohol in the spectroscopy sample, examining the values of the integrals on 1H NMR signals. The result of analysis indicates that benzyl alcohol (dispersed phase is in 33.44% mol in comparison with sodium benzoate content (continuous phase. These results confirm that the gel structure over time loses the dispersed phase of the benzyl alcohol producing a xerogel.

  10. Nuclear magnetic resonance - from molecules to man

    OpenAIRE

    Wüthrich, Kurt

    2017-01-01

    Initial observations of the physical phenomenon of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) date back to the late 1940s. In the following two decades high-resolution NMR in solution became an indispensible analytical tool in chemistry, and solid state NMR had an increasingly important role in physics. Some of the potentialities of the method for investigations of complex biological systems had also long been anticipated, and initial experiments with biological specimens were described already 30 year...

  11. Wax Point Determinations Using Acoustic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bostick, D.T.; Jubin, R.T.; Schmidt, T.W.

    2001-06-01

    The thermodynamic characterization of the wax point of a given crude is essential in order to maintain flow conditions that prevent plugging of undersea pipelines. This report summarizes the efforts made towards applying an Acoustic Cavity Resonance Spectrometer (ACRS) to the determination of pressures and temperatures at which wax precipitates from crude. Phillips Petroleum Company, Inc., the CRADA participant, supplied the ACRS. The instrumentation was shipped to Dr. Thomas Schmidt of ORNL, the CRADA contractor, in May 2000 after preliminary software development performed under the guidance of Dr. Samuel Colgate and Dr. Evan House of the University of Florida, Gainesville, Fl. Upon receipt it became apparent that a number of modifications still needed to be made before the ACRS could be precisely and safely used for wax point measurements. This report reviews the sequence of alterations made to the ACRS, as well as defines the possible applications of the instrumentation once the modifications have been completed. The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Phillips Petroleum Company, Inc. (Participant) and Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corporation (Contractor) was the measurement of the formation of solids in crude oils and petroleum products that are commonly transported through pipelines. This information is essential in the proper design, operation and maintenance of the petroleum pipeline system in the United States. Recently, new petroleum discoveries in the Gulf of Mexico have shown that there is a potential for plugging of undersea pipeline because of the precipitation of wax. It is important that the wax points of the expected crude oils be well characterized so that the production facilities for these new wells are capable of properly transporting the expected production. The goal of this work is to perform measurements of solids formation in crude oils and petroleum products supplied by the Participant. It is

  12. Authentication Sensing System Using Resonance Evaluation Spectroscopy (ASSURES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trolinger, James D.; Dioumaev, Andrei K.; Lal, Amit K.; Dimas, Dave

    2017-08-01

    This paper describes an ongoing instrument development project to distinguish genuine manufactured components from counterfeit components; we call the instrument ASSURES (Authentication Sensing System Using Resonance Evaluation Spectroscopy). The system combines Laser Doppler Vibrometry with acoustical resonance spectroscopy, augmented with finite element analysis. Vibrational properties of components, such as resonant modes, damping, and spectral frequency response to various forcing functions depend strongly upon the mechanical properties of the material, including its size, shape, internal hardness, tensile strength, alloy/composite compositions, flaws, defects, and other internal material properties. Although acoustic resonant spectroscopy has seen limited application, the information rich signals in the vibrational spectra of objects provide a pathway to many new applications. Components with the same shape but made of different materials, different fatigue histories, damage, tampering, or heat treatment, will respond differently to high frequency stimulation. Laser Doppler Vibrometry offers high sensitivity and frequency bandwidth to measure the component's frequency spectrum, and overcomes many issues that limit conventional acoustical resonance spectroscopy, since the sensor laser beam can be aimed anywhere along the part as well as to multiple locations on a part in a non-contact way. ASSURES is especially promising for use in additive manufacturing technology by providing signatures as digital codes that are unique to specific objects and even to specific locations on objects. We believe that such signatures can be employed to address many important issues in the manufacturing industry. These include insuring the part meets the often very rigid specifications of the customer and being able to detect non-visible internal manufacturing defects or non-visible damage that has occurred after manufacturing.

  13. Polarization of nuclear spins by a cold nanoscale resonator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, Mark C.; Weitekamp, Daniel P.

    2011-01-01

    eigenstates, spontaneous emission from eigenstate populations into the resonant mode can be interpreted as independent emission by individual spins, and the spins relax exponentially to thermal equilibrium if the development of resonator-induced correlations is suppressed. When the spin Hamiltonian includes a significant contribution from the homonuclear dipolar coupling, the energy eigenstates entail a correlation specific to the coupling network. Simulations of dipole-dipole coupled systems of up to five spins suggest that these systems contain weakly emitting eigenstates that can trap a fraction of the population for time periods >>100/R 0 , where R 0 is the rate constant for resonator-enhanced spontaneous emission by a single spin 1/2. Much of the polarization, however, relaxes with rates comparable to R 0 . A distribution of characteristic high-field chemical shifts tends to increase the relaxation rates of weakly emitting states, enabling transitions to states that can quickly relax to thermal equilibrium. The theoretical framework presented in this paper is illustrated with discussions of spin polarization in the contexts of force-detected nuclear-magnetic-resonance spectroscopy and magnetic-resonance force microscopy.

  14. Novel nuclear laser spectroscopy method using superfluid helium for measurement of spins and moments of exotic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, Takeshi; Wakui, Takashi; Yang, Xiaofei; Fujita, Tomomi; Imamura, Kei; Yamaguchi, Yasuhiro; Tetsuka, Hiroki; Tsutsui, Yoshiki; Mitsuya, Yosuke; Ichikawa, Yuichi; Ishibashi, Yoko; Yoshida, Naoki; Shirai, Hazuki; Ebara, Yuta; Hayasaka, Miki; Arai, Shino; Muramoto, Sosuke

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Development of a novel nuclear laser spectroscopy method using superfluid helium. • Observation of the Zeeman resonance with the 85 Rb beam introduced into helium. • Demonstration of deducing the nuclear spins from the observed resonance spectrum. -- Abstract: We have been developing a novel nuclear laser spectroscopy method “OROCHI” for determining spins and moments of exotic radioisotopes. In this method, we use superfluid helium as a stopping material of energetic radioisotope beams and then stopped radioisotope atoms are subjected to in situ laser spectroscopy in superfluid helium. To confirm the feasibility of this method for rare radioisotopes, we carried out a test experiment using a 85 Rb beam. In this experiment, we have successfully measured the Zeeman resonance signals from the 85 Rb atoms stopped in superfluid helium by laser-RF double resonance spectroscopy. This method is efficient for the measurement of spins and moments of more exotic nuclei

  15. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR): principles and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quibilan, E.I.

    The basis for the phenomenon of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is the ability of certain nuclei possessing both intrinsic angular momentum or ''spin'' I and magnetic moment to absorb electromagnetic energy in the radio frequency range. In principle, there are approximately 200 nuclei which may be investigated using the NMR technique. The NMR spectrum consists of intensity peaks along an axis calibrated in terms of the steady magnetic field or the frequency of the radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation. Analysis of the number, spacing, position and intensity of the lines in an NMR spectrum consists of intensity peaks along an axis calibrated in terms of the steady magnetic field or the frequency of the radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation. Analysis of the number, spacing, position and intensity of the lines in an NMR spectrum provides a variety of qualitative and quantitative analytical applications. The most obvious applications consist of the measurements of nuclear properties, such as spin number and nuclear magnetic moment. In liquids, the fine structure of resonance spectra provides a tool for chemical identification and molecular structure analysis. Other applications include the measurements of self-diffusion coefficients, magnetic fields and field homogeneity, inter-nuclear distances, and, in some cases, the water content of biological materials. (author)

  16. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy in patients with cerebral glial tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ugarte Moreno, Dayana; Ugarte Suarez, Jose Carlos; Pinnera Moliner, Jesus; Gonzalez, Jose Jordan

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of the intracranial primitive tumors is about 1 to 12 cases for 100 000 inhabitants per year. The most frequent tumors are gliomas that include tumors like astrocytomas benign and malignant. We studied twenty nine patients who were sent to Medical Surgical Research Center to make a magnetic resonance with spectroscopy, in a period of 18 months. The histological result was obtained by biopsy or autopsy

  17. Clinical applications of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laubenberger, J.; Bayer, S.; Thiel, T.; Hennig, J.; Langer, M.

    1998-01-01

    In spite of all the scientific advances of the past few years, proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the brain has not attained the status of a routine examination technique with clinically accepted indications. The method should be considered as an additional option to MR imaging for inherited and acquired encephalopathic changes as well as, in future, for localization diagnosis of epilepsies. A proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic investigation without a prior intensive clinical and imaging investigation is not useful. Above all, factors influencing metabolite distribution such as for example, serum osmolability must be known. Methodological prerequisites for the clinical application of proton resonance spectroscopy are, first of all, a high stability of the chosen technique as well as a sufficiently certain quantification of metabolites and the availability of a reference group. The use of short echo times is necessary for the quantification of glutamine and the osmolyte myo-inositol. Indications for individual cases in which clinical investigations and MR topography cannot provide sufficient certainty and spectroscopy can furnish additional information are, in addition to uses in neuropediatrics, the suspicion of Alzheimer's dementia, HIV encephalopathy in early manifestations, and unclarified depressions of consciousness accompanying liver cirrhosis. (orig.) [de

  18. Phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance in isolated perfused rat pancreas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Takehisa; Kanno, Tomio; Seo, Yoshiteru; Murakami, Masataka; Watari, Hiroshi

    1988-01-01

    Phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was applied to measure phosphorus energy metabolites in isolated perfused rat pancreas. The gland was perfused with a modified Krebs-Henseleit solution at room temperature (25 degree C). 31 P resonances of creatine phosphate (PCr), ATP, ADP, inorganic phosphate (P i ) and phosphomonoesters (PMEs) were observed in all the preparations of pancreas. In different individual preparations, the resonance of PCr varied, but those of ATP were almost the same. The initial levels of PCr and ATP in individual preparations, however, remained almost unchanged during perfusion with the standard solution for 2 h. When the perfusion was stopped, the levels of ATP and PCr decreased, while the levels of PME and P i increased. At that time, the P i resonance shfted to a higher magnetic field, indicating that the tissue pH decreased. On reperfusion, the tissue levels of phosphorus compounds and the tissue pH were restored to their initial resting levels. Continuous infusion of 0.1 μM acetylcholine caused marked and sustained increases in the flow of pancreatic juice and protein output. During the stimulation the tissue levels of phosphorus compounds remained unchanged, while the tissue pH was decreased slightly

  19. A CAMAC system for nuclear spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EL Araby, S.M.S.

    1983-01-01

    The thesis describes a computer based multichannel pulse height analyzer for acquiring, processing and displaying random signals coming from a nuclear detector for on - line γ- ray spectroscopy. The system is built around a Pdp - 11/ 04 Computer. Interfacing to the computer is carried out by CAMAC modules. The necessary hard- were required to interface the nuclear detector system to the computer- CAMAC system is developed together with the associated circuits needed to measure the dead time of the whole system. The software has been written Macro,FORTRAN and CATY languages. emphasis was placed on execution speed and it was found that accumulating a large number of data for later processing could improve the execution speed considerably thereby minimizing dead time fast FORTRAN - CAMAC callable subroutine have been developed and used in the software

  20. Mesoscopic Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy with a Remote Spin Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Tianyu; Shi, Fazhan; Chen, Sanyou; Guo, Maosen; Chen, Yisheng; Zhang, Yixing; Yang, Yu; Gao, Xingyu; Kong, Xi; Wang, Pengfei; Tateishi, Kenichiro; Uesaka, Tomohiro; Wang, Ya; Zhang, Bo; Du, Jiangfeng

    2018-06-01

    Quantum sensing based on nitrogen-vacancy (N -V ) centers in diamond has been developed as a powerful tool for microscopic magnetic resonance. However, the reported sensor-to-sample distance is limited within tens of nanometers resulting from the cubic decrease of the signal of spin fluctuation with the increasing distance. Here we extend the sensing distance to tens of micrometers by detecting spin polarization rather than spin fluctuation. We detect the mesoscopic magnetic resonance spectra of polarized electrons of a pentacene-doped crystal, measure its two typical decay times, and observe the optically enhanced spin polarization. This work paves the way for the N -V -based mesoscopic magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging at ambient conditions.

  1. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy in pediatric neuroradiology: clinical and research applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panigrahy, Ashok; Nelson, Marvin D.; Blueml, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) offers a unique, noninvasive approach to assess pediatric neurological abnormalities at microscopic levels by quantifying cellular metabolites. The most widely available MRS method, proton ( 1 H; hydrogen) spectroscopy, is FDA approved for general use and can be ordered by clinicians for pediatric neuroimaging studies if indicated. There are a multitude of both acquisition and post-processing methods that can be used in the implementation of MR spectroscopy. MRS in pediatric neuroimaging is challenging to interpret because of dramatic normal developmental changes that occur in metabolites, particularly in the first year of life. Still, MRS has been proven to provide additional clinically relevant information for several pediatric neurological disease processes such as brain tumors, infectious processes, white matter disorders, and neonatal injury. MRS can also be used as a powerful quantitative research tool. In this article, specific research applications using MRS will be demonstrated in relation to neonatal brain injury and pediatric brain tumor imaging. (orig.)

  2. Ultrasonic Resonance Spectroscopy of Composite Rings for Flywheel Rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, Laura M.; Baaklini, George Y.

    2001-01-01

    Flywheel energy storage devices comprising multilayered composite rotor systems are being studied extensively for utilization in the International Space Station. These composite material systems were investigated with a recently developed ultrasonic resonance spectroscopy technique. The system employs a swept frequency approach and performs a fast Fourier transform on the frequency spectrum of the response signal. In addition. the system allows for equalization of the frequency spectrum, providing all frequencies with equal amounts of energy to excite higher order resonant harmonics. Interpretation of the second fast Fourier transform, along with equalization of the frequency spectrum, offers greater assurance in acquiring and analyzing the fundamental frequency, or spectrum resonance spacing. The range of frequencies swept in a pitch-catch mode was varied up to 8 MHz, depending on the material and geometry of the component. Single and multilayered material samples, with and without known defects, were evaluated to determine how the constituents of a composite material system affect the resonant frequency. Amplitude and frequency changes in the spectrum and spectrum resonance spacing domains were examined from ultrasonic responses of a flat composite coupon, thin composite rings, and thick composite rings. Also, the ultrasonic spectroscopy responses from areas with an intentional delamination and a foreign material insert, similar to defects that may occur during manufacturing malfunctions, were compared with those from defect-free areas in thin composite rings. A thick composite ring with varying thickness was tested to investigate the full-thickness resonant frequency and any possible bulk interfacial bond issues. Finally, the effect on the frequency response of naturally occurring single and clustered voids in a composite ring was established.

  3. On spectral averages in nuclear spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verbaarschot, J.J.M.

    1982-01-01

    In nuclear spectroscopy one tries to obtain a description of systems of bound nucleons. By means of theoretical models one attemps to reproduce the eigenenergies and the corresponding wave functions which then enable the computation of, for example, the electromagnetic moments and the transition amplitudes. Statistical spectroscopy can be used for studying nuclear systems in large model spaces. In this thesis, methods are developed and applied which enable the determination of quantities in a finite part of the Hilbert space, which is defined by specific quantum values. In the case of averages in a space defined by a partition of the nucleons over the single-particle orbits, the propagation coefficients reduce to Legendre interpolation polynomials. In chapter 1 these polynomials are derived with the help of a generating function and a generalization of Wick's theorem. One can then deduce the centroid and the variance of the eigenvalue distribution in a straightforward way. The results are used to calculate the systematic energy difference between states of even and odd parity for nuclei in the mass region A=10-40. In chapter 2 an efficient method for transforming fixed angular momentum projection traces into fixed angular momentum for the configuration space traces is developed. In chapter 3 it is shown that the secular behaviour can be represented by a Gaussian function of the energies. (Auth.)

  4. Triple aldose reductase/α-glucosidase/radical scavenging high-resolution profiling combined with high-performance liquid chromatography – high-resolution mass spectrometry – solid-phase extraction – nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for identification of antidiabetic constituents in crude, extract of Radix Scutellariae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tahtah, Yousof; Kongstad, Kenneth Thermann; Wubshet, Sileshi Gizachew

    2015-01-01

    high-performance liquid chromatography – high-resolution mass spectrometry – solid-phase extraction – nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The only α-glucosidase inhibitor was baicalein, whereas main aldose reductase inhibitors in the crude extract were baicalein and skullcapflavone II, and main....../α-glucosidase/radical scavenging high-resolution inhibition profile - allowing proof of concept with Radix Scutellariae crude extract as a polypharmacological herbal drug. The triple bioactivity high-resolution profiles were used to pinpoint bioactive compounds, and subsequent structure elucidation was performed with hyphenated...

  5. 41 Polish Seminar on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Its Applications - Abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    The Report consist of abstracts of 63 communications presented during the 41 Polish Seminar on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Its Applications, held on December 1-2, 2008 in Cracow. Presentations cover a variety of research fields, including magnetic resonance imaging in vivo, applications of NMR spectroscopy to medical diagnosis, studies on molecular properties of different materials as well as quantum chemical calculations of NMR parameters.

  6. Materials of the 39 Polish Seminar on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Its Applications - Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The Report comprises abstracts of 78 communications presented during the 39 Polish Seminar on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Its Applications, held on November, 30 - December, 2006 in Cracow (PL). They cover a variety of research fields, including magnetic resonance imaging in vivo, applications of NMR spectroscopy to medical diagnosis, studies on molecular properties of different materials as well as quantum chemical calculations of NMR parameters

  7. 41 Polish Seminar on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Its Applications - Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The Report consist of abstracts of 63 communications presented during the 41 Polish Seminar on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Its Applications, held on December 1-2, 2008 in Cracow. Presentations cover a variety of research fields, including magnetic resonance imaging in vivo, applications of NMR spectroscopy to medical diagnosis, studies on molecular properties of different materials as well as quantum chemical calculations of NMR parameters

  8. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in pharmaceutical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarkar, S.K.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging has important applications in pharmaceutical research since it allows specific tissue and disease characterization in animal models noninvasively with excellent anatomical resolution and therefore provides improved ability to monitor the efficacy of novel drugs. The utility of NMR imaging in renal studies to monitor the mechanism of drug action and renal function in rats is described. The extension of the resolution of an NMR image to microscopic domain at higher magnetic field strengths and the utility of NMR microimaging in cerebrovascular and tumour metastasis studies in mice are discussed. (author). 40 refs., 14 figs

  9. Nuclear magnetic resonance common laboratory, quadrennial report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This quadrennial report of the nuclear magnetic resonance common laboratory gives an overview of the main activities. Among the different described activities, only one is interesting for the INIS database: it concerns the Solid NMR of cements used for radioactive wastes storage. In this case, the NMR is used to characterize the structure of the material and the composition, structure and kinetics of formation of the alteration layer which is formed at the surface of concrete during water leaching conditions. The NMR methodology is given. (O.M.)

  10. Generation of nuclear magnetic resonance images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckmann, N.X.

    1986-01-01

    Two generation techniques of nuclear magnetic resonance images, the retro-projection and the direct transformation method are studied these techniques are based on the acquisition of NMR signals which phases and frequency components are codified in space by application of magnetic field gradients. The construction of magnet coils is discussed, in particular a suitable magnet geometry with polar pieces and air gap. The obtention of image contrast by T1 and T2 relaxation times reconstructed from generated signals using sequences such as spin-echo, inversion-recovery and stimulated echo, is discussed. The mathematical formalism of matrix solution for Bloch equations is also presented. (M.C.K.)

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance method and apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, I.R.

    1983-01-01

    In a method of investigating the distribution of a quantity in a chosen region of a body (E) by nuclear magnetic resonance techniques movement of the body during the investigation is monitored by probes (A, B C) (C extends orthogonally to A and B) attached to the body and responsive to magnetic fields applied to the body during the investigation. An apparatus for carrying out the method is also described. If movement is detected, due compensation may be made during processing of the collected data, or the latter may be re-ascertained after appropriate adjustment e.g. a change in the RF excitation frequency. (author)

  12. Fast storage of nuclear quadrupole resonance signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anferov, V.P.; Molchanov, S.V.; Levchun, O.D.

    1988-01-01

    Fast multichannel storage of nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) signals is described. Analog-to-digital converter, arithmetic-logical unit, internal memory device (IMD) selection-storage unit and control unit are the storage main units. The storage is based on 43 microcircuits and provides for record and storage of NQR-signals at the contributed operation with Mera-60 microcomputer. Time of analog-to-digital conversion and signal recording into IMD is ∼ 1 mks. Capacity of analog-to-digital converter constitutes 8-10 bits. IMD capacity is 4 K bitsx16. Number of storage channels is 4

  13. Rheo-NMR: nuclear magnetic resonance and the rheology of complex fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callaghan, Paul T.

    1999-01-01

    The application of nuclear magnetic resonance methods to the study of complex fluids under shearing and extensional flows is reviewed. Both NMR velocimetry and spectroscopy approaches are discussed while specific systems studied include polymer melts, rigid rod and random coil polymers in solution, lyotropic and thermotropic liquid crystals and liquid crystalline polymers, and wormlike micelles. Reference is made to food systems. (author)

  14. Interaction between adrenaline and dibenzo-18-crown-6: Electrochemical, nuclear magnetic resonance, and theoretical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhang-Yu; Liu, Tao; Wang, Xue-Liang

    2014-12-01

    The interaction between adrenaline (Ad) and dibenzo-18-crown-6 (DB18C6) was studied by cyclic voltammetry, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and the theoretical calculations, respectively. The results show that DB18C6 will affect the electron transfer properties of Ad. DB18C6 can form stable supramolecular complexes with Ad through ion-dipole and hydrogen bond interactions.

  15. Nuclear magnetic resonance and earth magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1998-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance concerns nuclei whose spin is different from 0. These nuclei exposed to a magnetic field is comparable to a peg top spinning around its axis while being moved by a precession movement called Larmor precession. This article presents an experiment whose aim is to reveal nuclear magnetism of nuclei by observing Larmor precession phenomena due to the earth magnetic field. The earth magnetic field being too weak, it is necessary to increase the magnetization of the sample during a polarization phase. First the sample is submitted to a magnetic field B perpendicular to the earth magnetic field B 0 , then B is cut off and the nuclei move back to their equilibrium position by executing a precession movement due to B 0 field. (A.C.)

  16. Nuclear overhauser spectroscopy of chiral CHD methylene groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Augustyniak, Rafal [Ecole Normale Supérieure – PSL Research University, Département de chimie (France); Stanek, Jan [University of Warsaw, Faculty of Chemistry (Poland); Colaux, Henri; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey [Ecole Normale Supérieure – PSL Research University, Département de chimie (France); Koźmiński, Wiktor [University of Warsaw, Faculty of Chemistry (Poland); Herrmann, Torsten [Université de Lyon/UMR 5280 CNRS/ENS Lyon/UCB Lyon 1, Institut des Sciences Analytiques, Centre de RMN à Très Hauts Champs (France); Ferrage, Fabien, E-mail: Fabien.Ferrage@ens.fr [Ecole Normale Supérieure – PSL Research University, Département de chimie (France)

    2016-01-15

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) can provide a great deal of information about structure and dynamics of biomolecules. The quality of an NMR structure strongly depends on the number of experimental observables and on their accurate conversion into geometric restraints. When distance restraints are derived from nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY), stereo-specific assignments of prochiral atoms can contribute significantly to the accuracy of NMR structures of proteins and nucleic acids. Here we introduce a series of NOESY-based pulse sequences that can assist in the assignment of chiral CHD methylene protons in random fractionally deuterated proteins. Partial deuteration suppresses spin-diffusion between the two protons of CH{sub 2} groups that normally impedes the distinction of cross-relaxation networks for these two protons in NOESY spectra. Three and four-dimensional spectra allow one to distinguish cross-relaxation pathways involving either of the two methylene protons so that one can obtain stereospecific assignments. In addition, the analysis provides a large number of stereospecific distance restraints. Non-uniform sampling was used to ensure optimal signal resolution in 4D spectra and reduce ambiguities of the assignments. Automatic assignment procedures were modified for efficient and accurate stereospecific assignments during automated structure calculations based on 3D spectra. The protocol was applied to calcium-loaded calbindin D{sub 9k}. A large number of stereospecific assignments lead to a significant improvement of the accuracy of the structure.

  17. Department of Nuclear Spectroscopy and Technique: Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlowski, T.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: During the last year, the activity of our department was spread over basic research in nuclear physics (standard spectroscopy, more exotic regions close to the elementary particle physics, theoretical studies of heavy ion interactions), high energy atomic physics, applications of and nuclear physics (environmental studies, effects of irradiation, ion production). Some effort was focused on teaching - actually, four Ph. D. students are working for their degrees. Some of us were involved in organisation and further activity of the ''Radioactive Waste'' exhibition in Swierk. Our research is performed on our facilities (C30 cyclotron, low background detection facility), and in close co-operation with the Heavy Ion Laboratory of the Warsaw University, Jagellonian University in Cracow, Military Technical Academy in Warsaw, Institute of Electronic Technology and Materials in Warsaw and some foreign centers like GSI in Darmstadt, MPI in Heidelberg and KFA in Juelich (Germany), PSI in Villigen (Switzerland), University of Notre Dame, Argonne National Lab., Lawrence Berkeley Lab. and Los Alamos National Lab. (USA). The reader is invited to find some of our recent results on the next pages; together with a list of publications. Nevertheless some activities are worth mentioning: Nuclear spectroscopic studies were concentrated on Z or N 50 nuclei - determination of excited level schemes of 182,183 Ir, 180,181,182 Os and 110 Sn and 132 Ce was continued and some new effects found. The most precise lifetime of the A hyperon in very heavy hypernuclei was measured(COSY-13 project). The search of muon number forbidden nuclear μ - e nuclear conversion was continued (SINDRUM II coll.). Heavy ion interactions leading to fusion or fission processes were studied theoretically, and the experiments are in preparation. The experimental studies of atomic effects in bare, H- and He- like very heavy atoms and X ray spectroscopy of heavy ion atomic collisions were continued at GSI

  18. Nuclear magnetic resonance in ferromagnetic terbium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, C.L.T.

    1974-01-01

    The magnetic properties of terbium were studied by the method of zero field nuclear magnetic resonance at 1.5 to 4 and 85 to 160 0 K. Two unconventional experimental techniques have been employed: the swept frequency and the swept temperature technique. Near 4 0 K, triplet resonance line structures were found and interpreted in terms of the magnetic domain and wall structures of ferromagnetic terbium. In the higher temperature range, temperature dependence of the resonance frequency and the quadrupole splitting were measured. The former provides a measurement of the temperature dependence of the magnetization M, and it agrees with bulk M measurements as well as the latest spin wave theory of M(T) (Brooks 1968). The latter agrees well with a calculation using a very general single ion density matrix for collective excitations (Callen and Shtrikman 1965). In addition, the small temperature-independent contribution to the electric field gradient at the nucleus due to the lattice and conduction electrons was untangled from the P(T) data. Also an anomalous and unexplained relaxation phenomenon was also observed

  19. Evaluation of toxicological effects induced by tributyltin in clam Ruditapes decussatus using high-resolution magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy: Study of metabolic responses in heart tissue and detection of a novel metabolite

    OpenAIRE

    Hanana, H.; Simon, G.; Kervarec, N.; Cérantola, S.

    2014-01-01

    Tributyltin (TBT) is a highly toxic pollutant present in many aquatic ecosystems. Its toxicity in mollusks strongly affects their performance and survival. The main purpose of this study was to elucidate the mechanisms of TBT toxicity in clam Ruditapes decussatus by evaluating the metabolic responses of heart tissues, using high-resolution magic angle-spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (HRMAS NMR), after exposure to TBT (10−9, 10−6 and 10−4 M) during 24 h and 72 h. Results show that response...

  20. A microwave resonator for limiting depth sensitivity for electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidabras, Jason W; Varanasi, Shiv K; Mett, Richard R; Swarts, Steven G; Swartz, Harold M; Hyde, James S

    2014-10-01

    A microwave Surface Resonator Array (SRA) structure is described for use in Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The SRA has a series of anti-parallel transmission line modes that provides a region of sensitivity equal to the cross-sectional area times its depth sensitivity, which is approximately half the distance between the transmission line centers. It is shown that the quarter-wave twin-lead transmission line can be a useful element for design of microwave resonators at frequencies as high as 10 GHz. The SRA geometry is presented as a novel resonator for use in surface spectroscopy where the region of interest is either surrounded by lossy material, or the spectroscopist wishes to minimize signal from surrounding materials. One such application is in vivo spectroscopy of human finger-nails at X-band (9.5 GHz) to measure ionizing radiation dosages. In order to reduce losses associated with tissues beneath the nail that yield no EPR signal, the SRA structure is designed to limit depth sensitivity to the thickness of the fingernail. Another application, due to the resonator geometry and limited depth penetration, is surface spectroscopy in coating or material science. To test this application, a spectrum of 1.44 μM of Mg(2+) doped polystyrene 1.1 mm thick on an aluminum surface is obtained. Modeling, design, and simulations were performed using Wolfram Mathematica (Champaign, IL; v. 9.0) and Ansys High Frequency Structure Simulator (HFSS; Canonsburg, PA; v. 15.0). A micro-strip coupling circuit is designed to suppress unwanted modes and provide a balanced impedance transformation to a 50 Ω coaxial input. Agreement between simulated and experimental results is shown.

  1. A microwave resonator for limiting depth sensitivity for electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sidabras, Jason W.; Varanasi, Shiv K.; Hyde, James S. [Department of Biophysics, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53211 (United States); Mett, Richard R. [Department of Biophysics, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53211 (United States); Department of Physics and Chemistry, Milwaukee School of Engineering, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53202 (United States); Swarts, Steven G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 32610 (United States); Swartz, Harold M. [Department of Radiology, Geisel Medical School at Dartmouth, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    A microwave Surface Resonator Array (SRA) structure is described for use in Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The SRA has a series of anti-parallel transmission line modes that provides a region of sensitivity equal to the cross-sectional area times its depth sensitivity, which is approximately half the distance between the transmission line centers. It is shown that the quarter-wave twin-lead transmission line can be a useful element for design of microwave resonators at frequencies as high as 10 GHz. The SRA geometry is presented as a novel resonator for use in surface spectroscopy where the region of interest is either surrounded by lossy material, or the spectroscopist wishes to minimize signal from surrounding materials. One such application is in vivo spectroscopy of human finger-nails at X-band (9.5 GHz) to measure ionizing radiation dosages. In order to reduce losses associated with tissues beneath the nail that yield no EPR signal, the SRA structure is designed to limit depth sensitivity to the thickness of the fingernail. Another application, due to the resonator geometry and limited depth penetration, is surface spectroscopy in coating or material science. To test this application, a spectrum of 1.44 μM of Mg{sup 2+} doped polystyrene 1.1 mm thick on an aluminum surface is obtained. Modeling, design, and simulations were performed using Wolfram Mathematica (Champaign, IL; v. 9.0) and Ansys High Frequency Structure Simulator (HFSS; Canonsburg, PA; v. 15.0). A micro-strip coupling circuit is designed to suppress unwanted modes and provide a balanced impedance transformation to a 50 Ω coaxial input. Agreement between simulated and experimental results is shown.

  2. Elucidation of reactive wavepackets by two-dimensional resonance Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Zhenkun; Molesky, Brian P.; Cheshire, Thomas P.; Moran, Andrew M., E-mail: ammoran@email.unc.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States)

    2015-09-28

    Traditional second-order kinetic theories fail to describe sub-picosecond photochemical reactions when solvation and vibrational dephasing undermine the assumption of equilibrium initial conditions. Four-wave mixing spectroscopies may reveal insights into such non-equilibrium processes but are limited by the single “population time” available in these types of experiments. Here, we use two-dimensional resonance Raman (2DRR) spectroscopy to expose correlations between coherent nuclear motions of the reactant and product in the photodissociation reaction of triiodide. It is shown that the transition of a nuclear wavepacket from the reactant (triiodide) to product (diiodide) states gives rise to a unique pattern of 2DRR resonances. Peaks associated with this coherent reaction mechanism are readily assigned, because they are isolated in particular quadrants of the 2DRR spectrum. A theoretical model in which the chemical reaction is treated as a vibronic coherence transfer transition from triiodide to diiodide reproduces the patterns of 2DRR resonances detected in experiments. These signal components reveal correlation between the nonequilibrium geometry of triiodide and the vibrational coherence frequency of diiodide. The 2DRR signatures of coherent reaction mechanisms established in this work may generalize to studies of ultrafast energy and charge transfer processes.

  3. Resonance Enhanced Multi-photon Spectroscopy of DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligare, Marshall Robert

    For over 50 years DNA has been studied to better understand its connection to life and evolution. These past experiments have led to our understanding of its structure and function in the biological environment but the interaction of DNA with UV radiation at the molecular level is still not very well understood. Unique mechanisms in nucleobase chromaphores protect us from adverse chemical reactions after UV absorption. Studying these processes can help develop theories for prebiotic chemistry and the possibility of alternative forms of DNA. Using resonance enhanced multi-photon spectroscopic techniques in the gas phase allow for the structure and dynamics of individual nucleobases to be studied in detail. Experiments studying different levels of structure/complexity with relation to their biological function are presented. Resonant IR multiphoton dissociation spectroscopy in conjunction with molecular mechanics and DFT calculations are used to determine gas phase structures of anionic nucleotide clusters. A comparison of the identified structures with known biological function shows how the hydrogen bonding of the nucleotides and their clusters free of solvent create favorable structures for quick incorporation into enzymes such as DNA polymerase. Resonance enhanced multi-photon ionization (REMPI) spectroscopy techniques such as resonant two photon ionization (R2PI) and IR-UV double resonance are used to further elucidate the structure and excited state dynamics of the bare nucleobases thymine and uracil. Both exhibit long lived excited electronic states that have been implicated in DNA photolesions which can ultimately lead to melanoma and carcinoma. Our experimental data in comparison with many quantum chemical calculations suggest a new picture for the dynamics of thymine and uracil in the gas phase. A high probability of UV absorption from a vibrationally hot ground state to the excited electronic state shows that the stability of thymine and uracil comes from

  4. Resonance Raman spectroscopy in one-dimensional carbon materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dresselhaus Mildred S.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Brazil has played an important role in the development and use of resonance Raman spectroscopy as a powerful characterization tool for materials science. Here we present a short history of Raman scattering research in Brazil, highlighting the important contributions to the field coming from Brazilian researchers in the past. Next we discuss recent and important contributions where Brazil has become a worldwide leader, that is on the physics of quasi-one dimensional carbon nanotubes. We conclude this article by presenting results from a very recent resonance Raman study of exciting new materials, that are strictly one-dimensional carbon chains formed by the heat treatment of very pure double-wall carbon nanotube samples.

  5. Gravity resonance spectroscopy constrains dark energy and dark matter scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenke, T; Cronenberg, G; Burgdörfer, J; Chizhova, L A; Geltenbort, P; Ivanov, A N; Lauer, T; Lins, T; Rotter, S; Saul, H; Schmidt, U; Abele, H

    2014-04-18

    We report on precision resonance spectroscopy measurements of quantum states of ultracold neutrons confined above the surface of a horizontal mirror by the gravity potential of Earth. Resonant transitions between several of the lowest quantum states are observed for the first time. These measurements demonstrate that Newton's inverse square law of gravity is understood at micron distances on an energy scale of 10-14  eV. At this level of precision, we are able to provide constraints on any possible gravitylike interaction. In particular, a dark energy chameleon field is excluded for values of the coupling constant β>5.8×108 at 95% confidence level (C.L.), and an attractive (repulsive) dark matter axionlike spin-mass coupling is excluded for the coupling strength gsgp>3.7×10-16 (5.3×10-16) at a Yukawa length of λ=20  μm (95% C.L.).

  6. Inelastic tunneling spectroscopy for magnetic atoms and the Kondo resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldberg, E C; Flores, F

    2013-01-01

    The interaction between a single magnetic atom and the metal environment (including a magnetic field) is analyzed by introducing an ionic Hamiltonian combined with an effective crystal-field term, and by using a Green-function equation of motion method. This approach describes the inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy and the Kondo resonances as due to atomic spin fluctuations associated with electron co-tunneling processes between the leads and the atom. We analyze in the case of Fe on CuN the possible spin fluctuations between states with S = 2 and 3/2 or 5/2 and conclude that the experimentally found asymmetries in the conductance with respect to the applied bias, and its marked structures, are well explained by the 2↔3/2 spin fluctuations. The case of Co is also considered and shown to present, in contrast with Fe, a resonance at the Fermi energy corresponding to a Kondo temperature of 6 K. (paper)

  7. Highly sensitive high resolution Raman spectroscopy using resonant ionization methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owyoung, A.; Esherick, P.

    1984-05-01

    In recent years, the introduction of stimulated Raman methods has offered orders of magnitude improvement in spectral resolving power for gas phase Raman studies. Nevertheless, the inherent weakness of the Raman process suggests the need for significantly more sensitive techniques in Raman spectroscopy. In this we describe a new approach to this problem. Our new technique, which we call ionization-detected stimulated Raman spectroscopy (IDSRS), combines high-resolution SRS with highly-sensitive resonant laser ionization to achieve an increase in sensitivity of over three orders of magnitude. The excitation/detection process involves three sequential steps: (1) population of a vibrationally excited state via stimulated Raman pumping; (2) selective ionization of the vibrationally excited molecule with a tunable uv source; and (3) collection of the ionized species at biased electrodes where they are detected as current in an external circuit

  8. Gamma-ray and electron spectroscopy in nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ejiri, H.

    1989-01-01

    This book is devoted to the role of gamma-ray and conversion-electron (γ-e) spectroscopy in developing our understanding of nuclear structure and nuclear reaction-mechanisms. The book was written because of the spectacular development in the last decade of new γ-e spectroscopic methods, and their application to various kinds of nuclear reactions and the need to present γ-e spectroscopy from the point of view of nuclear structure as well as of reaction mechanism. The importance of γ-e spectroscopy is due to the simplicity and familiarity of the electromagnetic interaction, which gives accurate values for many nuclear quantities and reveals special nuclear properties. γ-e spectroscopy is applied to investigate static as well as dynamic nuclear properties over a wide range of excitation energies from the ground state to states of extreme temperatures and angular momentum, including some new degrees of freedom. (author)

  9. Digital signal processing application in nuclear spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Zeynalova

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Digital signal processing algorithms for nuclear particle spectroscopy are described along with a digital pile-up elimination method applicable to equidistantly sampled detector signals pre-processed by a charge-sensitive preamplifier. The signal processing algorithms provided as recursive one- or multi-step procedures which can be easily programmed using modern computer programming languages. The influence of the number of bits of the sampling analogue-to-digital converter to the final signal-to-noise ratio of the spectrometer considered. Algorithms for a digital shaping-filter amplifier, for a digital pile-up elimination scheme and for ballistic deficit correction were investigated using a high purity germanium detector. The pile-up elimination method was originally developed for fission fragment spectroscopy using a Frisch-grid back-to-back double ionisation chamber and was mainly intended for pile-up elimination in case of high alpha-radioactivity of the fissile target. The developed pile-up elimination method affects only the electronic noise generated by the preamplifier. Therefore, the influence of the pile-up elimination scheme on the final resolution of the spectrometer investigated in terms of the distance between piled-up pulses. The efficiency of developed algorithms compared with other signal processing schemes published in literature.

  10. Resonance Raman spectroscopy of volatile organics -- Carbon tetrachloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barletta, R.E.; Veligdan, J.T.

    1994-09-01

    Volatile organic chemicals are a class of pollutants which are regulated at very low levels by the EPA. Consequently a need exists as a part of site remediation efforts within DOE to develop technologies which will allow for the in situ monitoring of these chemicals. Resonance Raman spectroscopy is a potential technique to accomplish this if the resonance enhancement is sufficiently high. Carbon tetrachloride was selected as a test case. Measurements under resonance conditions at 248 nm showed an enhancement factor of 2 x 10 4 . Using this value an estimate of the sensitivity for both in situ and remote monitoring of CCl 4 was made. It was concluded that resonance Raman could be used to detect these chemicals at levels of regulatory interest. Future effort directed towards the development of a suitable probe as well as a field-portable system would be desirable. Such effort could be directed towards the solution of a particular monitoring problem within a DOE waste remediation project. Once developed, however, it should be easily generalized to the analysis of other VOC's in other environments

  11. Barium Tagging from nEXO Using Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twelker, K.; Kravitz, S.

    nEXO is a 5-ton liquid enriched-xenon time projection chamber (TPC) to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay, designed to have the sensitivity to completely probe the inverted mass hierarchy of Majorana neutrinos. The detector will accommodate-as a background reduction technique-a system to recover and identify the barium decay product. This upgrade will allow a background-free measurement of neutrinoless double-beta decay and increase the half-life sensitivity of the experiment by at least one order of magnitude. Ongoing research and development includes a system to test barium extraction from liquid xenon using surface adsorption and Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (RIS).

  12. Monitoring of blood oxygenation in brain by resonance Raman spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brazhe, Nadezda A; Thomsen, Kirsten; Lønstrup, Micael

    2018-01-01

    Blood oxygenation in cerebral vessels is an essential parameter to evaluate brain function and to investigate the coupling between local blood flow and neuronal activity. We apply resonance Raman spectroscopy in vivo to study hemoglobin oxygenation in cortex vessels of anesthetized ventilated mice....... We demonstrate that the pairs of Raman peaks at 1355 and1375 cm-1(symmetric vibrations of pyrrol half-rings in the heme molecule), 1552 and 1585 cm-1and 1602 and 1638 cm-1(vibrations of methine bridges in heme molecule) are reliable markers for quantitative estimation of the relative amount...

  13. Elastic properties of gamma-Pu by resonant ultrasound spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Migliori, Albert [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Betts, J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Trugman, A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mielke, C H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mitchell, J N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ramos, M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stroe, I [WORXESTER, MA

    2009-01-01

    Despite intense experimental and theoretical work on Pu, there is still little understanding of the strange properties of this metal. We used resonant ultrasound spectroscopy method to investigate the elastic properties of pure polycrystalline Pu at high temperatures. Shear and longitudinal elastic moduli of the {gamma}-phase of Pu were determined simultaneously and the bulk modulus was computed from them. A smooth linear and large decrease of all elastic moduli with increasing temperature was observed. We calculated the Poisson ratio and found that it increases from 0.242 at 519K to 0.252 at 571K.

  14. Collinear Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy of Neutron-Deficient Francium Isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Flanagan, K T; Ruiz, R F Garcia; Budincevic, I; Procter, T J; Fedosseev, V N; Lynch, K M; Cocolios, T E; Marsh, B A; Neyens, G; Strashnov, I; Stroke, H H; Rossel, R E; Heylen, H; Billowes, J; Rothe, S; Bissell, M L; Wendt, K D A; de Groote, R P; De Schepper, S

    2013-01-01

    The magnetic moments and isotope shifts of the neutron-deficient francium isotopes Fr202-205 were measured at ISOLDE-CERN with use of collinear resonance ionization spectroscopy. A production-to-detection efficiency of 1\\% was measured for Fr-202. The background from nonresonant and collisional ionization was maintained below one ion in 10(5) beam particles. Through a comparison of the measured charge radii with predictions from the spherical droplet model, it is concluded that the ground-state wave function remains spherical down to Fr-205, with a departure observed in Fr-203 (N = 116).

  15. Two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy: correlated, homonuclear-correlated, and nuclear Overhauser spectroscopy. January 1975-December 1988 (Citations from the INSPEC: Information Services for the Physics and Engineering Communities data base). Report for January 1975-December 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-12-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning the enhanced analytical techniques of two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2-D NMR). Applications to specific molecules, biomolecules, and compounds as well as comparisons of three 2-D NMR techniques: correlated spectroscopy (COSY), nuclear Overhauser (NOSEY), and homonuclear-correlated spectroscopy (HOMCOR). (Contains 190 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

  16. High resolution collinear resonance ionization spectroscopy of neutron-rich $^{76,77,78}$Cu isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2083035

    In this work, nuclear magnetic dipole moments, electric quadrupole moments, nuclear spins and changes in the mean-squared charge radii of radioactive copper isotopes are presented. Reaching up to $^{78}$Cu ($Z=29$, $N=49$), produced at rates of only 10 particles per second, these measurements represent the most exotic laser spectroscopic investigations near the doubly-magic and very exotic $^{78}$Ni ($Z=28$,$N=50$) to date. This thesis outlines the technical developments and investigations of laser-atom interactions that were performed during this thesis. These developments were crucial for establishing a high-resolution, high sensitivity collinear resonance ionization spectroscopy experiment at ISOLDE, CERN. This thesis furthermore provides a detailed description of the analysis tools that were implemented and applied to extract the nuclear observables from the experimental data. The results were compared to several large-scale shell model calculations, and provide deep insight into the structure of $^{78}$N...

  17. Multinuclear solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance of inorganic materials

    CERN Document Server

    MacKenzie, Kenneth J D

    2002-01-01

    Techniques of solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy are constantly being extended to a more diverse range of materials, pressing into service an ever-expanding range of nuclides including some previously considered too intractable to provide usable results. At the same time, new developments in both hardware and software are being introduced and refined. This book covers the most important of these new developments. With sections addressed to non-specialist researchers (providing accessible answers to the most common questions about the theory and practice of NMR asked by novices) as well as a more specialised and up-to-date treatment of the most important areas of inorganic materials research to which NMR has application, this book should be useful to NMR users whatever their level of expertise and whatever inorganic materials they wish to study.

  18. High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance studies of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, Jiri

    2002-03-25

    The combination of advanced high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques with high-pressure capability represents a powerful experimental tool in studies of protein folding. This review is organized as follows: after a general introduction of high-pressure, high-resolution NMR spectroscopy of proteins, the experimental part deals with instrumentation. The main section of the review is devoted to NMR studies of reversible pressure unfolding of proteins with special emphasis on pressure-assisted cold denaturation and the detection of folding intermediates. Recent studies investigating local perturbations in proteins and the experiments following the effects of point mutations on pressure stability of proteins are also discussed. Ribonuclease A, lysozyme, ubiquitin, apomyoglobin, alpha-lactalbumin and troponin C were the model proteins investigated.

  19. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Study of Nanoscale Ionic Materials

    KAUST Repository

    Oommen, Joanna Mary

    2010-08-13

    Nanoscale ionic materials (NIMs) are a new class of nanomaterials that exhibit interesting properties including negligible vapor pressures and tunable physical states, among others. In this study, we analyzed the temperature-wise performance of NIMs using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. NIMs are relatively stable over a temperature range from 300 to 383 K, rendering them usable in high temperature applications. We confirmed the presence of covalent bonds between the SiO2 core and the sulfonate group and determined relative concentrations of aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons. These findings serve as first hand proof-of-concept for the usefulness of NMR analyses in further studies on the diffusive properties of NIMs. © 2010 The Electrochemical Society.

  20. Determining phenols in coal conversion products by nuclear magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanitskaya, L.V.; Kushnarev, D.F.; Polonov, V.M.; Kalabin, G.A.

    1985-03-01

    Possibility of using nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of the hydrogen 1 (/sup 1/H) isotope for a qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the hydroxyl groups in the products of coal processing is investigated. The basis of the method is the fact that in NMR spectra of the /sup 1/H in organic compounds with acid protons, the latter are unprotected when strong bases are used as solvents because of intermolecular hydrogen bonds. The resin from the medium-temperature semicoking of Cheremkhovskii coals, its hydrogenate, and phenol fraction of the hydrogenate were used for the investigation. The results were compared with the results of other NMR spectroscopy methods. The high solubility of hexamethanol and the fact that the products can be analyzed in the natural state, are some advantages of the method. 18 references.

  1. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Magnetic Resonance Imaging / Spectroscopy

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NMR - MRI/S techniques and instruments are available at two different MagLab facilities in Florida: The NMR-MRI/S Facility at MagLab headquarters near Florida State...

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance of laser-polarized noble gases in molecules, materials and organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodson, Boyd M.

    1999-01-01

    Conventional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are fundamentally challenged by the insensitivity that stems from the ordinarily low spin polarization achievable in even the strongest NMR magnets. However, by transferring angular momentum from laser light to electronic and nuclear spins, optical pumping methods can increase the nuclear spin polarization of noble gases by several orders of magnitude, thereby greatly enhancing their NMR sensitivity. This dissertation is primarily concerned with the principles and practice of optically pumped nuclear magnetic resonance (OPNMR). The enormous sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping noble gases can be exploited to permit a variety of novel NMR experiments across many disciplines. Many such experiments are reviewed, including the void-space imaging of organisms and materials, NMR and MRI of living tissues, probing structure and dynamics of molecules in solution and on surfaces, and zero-field NMR and MRI

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance of laser-polarized noble gases in molecules, materials and organisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodson, Boyd McLean [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1999-12-01

    Conventional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are fundamentally challenged by the insensitivity that stems from the ordinarily low spin polarization achievable in even the strongest NMR magnets. However, by transferring angular momentum from laser light to electronic and nuclear spins, optical pumping methods can increase the nuclear spin polarization of noble gases by several orders of magnitude, thereby greatly enhancing their NMR sensitivity. This dissertation is primarily concerned with the principles and practice of optically pumped nuclear magnetic resonance (OPNMR). The enormous sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping noble gases can be exploited to permit a variety of novel NMR experiments across many disciplines. Many such experiments are reviewed, including the void-space imaging of organisms and materials, NMR and MRI of living tissues, probing structure and dynamics of molecules in solution and on surfaces, and zero-field NMR and MRI.

  4. 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy of skeletal muscle in patients with fibromyalgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Søren; Jensen, K E; Thomsen, C

    1992-01-01

    31Phosphorous nuclear magnetic resonance (31P NMR) spectroscopy of painful calf muscle was performed in 12 patients with fibromyalgia (FS) and 7 healthy subjects during rest, aerobic and anaerobic exercising conditions, and postexercise recovery. Ratios of inorganic phosphate and creatinine...... phosphate (Pi/PCr) and pH were calculated from the collected 31P NMR spectra. Resting values of Pi/PCr were normal in the patients. Patients delivered only 49% of the muscle power of the controls (p = 0.005). Patients and controls had similar rates of Pi/PCr and pH changes during work and recovery...

  5. Production of photofission fragments and study of their nuclear structure by laser spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gangrskij, Yu.P.; Zemlyanoj, S.G.; Karaivanov, D.V.; Marinova, K.P.; Markov, B.N.; Mel'nikova, L.M.; Myshinskij, G.V.; Penionzhkevich, Yu.Eh.; Zhemenik, V.I.

    2005-01-01

    The prospective nuclear structure investigations of the fission fragments by resonance laser spectroscopy methods are discussed. Research in this field is currently being carried out as part of the DRIBs project, which is under development at the Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, JINR. The fission fragments under study are mainly very neutron-rich nuclei near the proton (Z=50) and neutron (N=50 and 82) closed shells, nuclei in the region of strong deformation (N>60 and N>90) and nuclei with high-spin isomeric states. Resonance laser spectroscopy is used successfully in the study of the structure of such nuclei. It allows one to determine a number of nuclear parameters (mean-square charge radius, magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole moments) and to make conclusions about the collective and single particle properties of the nuclei

  6. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the thorax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamsu, G.; Webb, W.R.; Sheldon, P.; Kaufman, L.; Crooks, L.E.; Birnberg, F.A.; Goodman, P.; Hinchcliffe, W.A.; Hedgecock, M.

    1983-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) images of the thorax were obtained in ten normal volunteers, nine patients with advanced bronchogenic carcinoma, and three patients with benign thoracic abnormalities. In normal volunteers, mediastinal and hilar structures were seen with equal frequency on NMR images and computed tomographic scans. The hila were especially well displayed on spin-echo images. Spin-echo images showed mediastinal invasion by tumor, vascular and bronchial compression and invasion, and hilar and mediastinal adenopathy. Tumor and benign abnormalities could be separated from mediastinal and hilar fat because of their longer T1 times. Lung masses and nodules as small as 1.5 cm could be seen on the spin-echo images. NMR imaging shows promise for assessment of benign and malignant mediastinal, hilar, and lung abnormalities

  7. Geochemical Controls on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knight, Rosemary; Prasad, Manika; Keating, Kristina

    2003-01-01

    OAK-B135 Our research objectives are to determine, through an extensive set of laboratory experiments, the effect of the specific mineralogic form of iron and the effect of the distribution of iron on proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation mechanisms. In the first nine months of this project, we have refined the experimental procedures to be used in the acquisition of the laboratory NMR data; have ordered, and conducted preliminary measurements on, the sand samples to be used in the experimental work; and have revised and completed the theoretical model to use in this project. Over the next year, our focus will be on completing the first phase of the experimental work where the form and distribution of the iron in the sands in varied

  8. Proceedings of the 9. Meeting of the nuclear magnetic resonance users. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been one of the methods more powerful for characterizing and identifying substances, because it allows a detailed evaluation on internal molecular dynamics as well as clarifying its molecular and electronic structures. This meeting has presented a widespread variety of NMR techniques, as well as, advances in the use of this techniques in studies of the structure of liquids and solids. Theoretical and experimental papers are presented, covering the following subjects: nuclear magnetic resonance, structural chemical analysis, chemical shift and NMR spectrometers

  9. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy in schizophrenia. Possibilities and limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wobrock, T.; Scherk, H.; Falkai, P.

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy is a noninvasive investigative technique for in vivo detection of biochemical changes in neuropsychiatric disorders for which especially proton ( 1 H-MRS) and phosphorus ( 31 P-MRS) magnetic resonance spectroscopy have been used. In this review we explain the principles of MRS and summarize the studies in schizophrenia. A systematic literature review was carried out for 1 H-MRS studies investigating schizophrenic patients compared to controls. The inconsistent results in the cited studies may be due to different study population, specific neuroimaging technique, and selected brain regions. Frequent findings are decreased PME and increased PDE concentrations ( 31 P-MRS) linked to altered metabolism of membrane phospholipids and decreased N-acetylaspartate (NAA) or NAA/choline ratio ( 1 H-MRS) linked to neuronal damage in frontal (DLPFC) or temporal regions in patients with schizophrenia. These results contribute to the disturbed frontotemporal-thalamic network assumed in schizophrenia and are supported by additional functional neuroimaging, MRI morphometry, and neuropsychological evaluation. The combination of the described investigative techniques with MRS in follow-up studies may provide more specific clues for understanding the pathogenesis and disease course in schizophrenia. (orig.) [de

  10. [Dementias: diagnostic contribution of imaging and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arana, E; Martínez-Granados, B; Marti-Bonmati, L; Martínez-Bisbal, M C; Gil, A; Blasco, C; Celda, B

    2007-06-01

    The objective is analyze the complementarity between 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the global diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) or vascular dementia (VD). We studied 168 patients with cognitive impairment from AD, VD, mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and major depression. All patients were evaluated by brain MR imaging and MRS using two sample volumes localized at right medial temporal gyrus and posterior parietal gyrus. Metabolites analyzed were N-acetylaspartate (NAA), myo-Inositol (mI), Choline (Cho) and creatine (Cr), as standard references for obtaining the Co/Cr, mI/Cr and NAA/Cr ratios. Imaging and spectroscopy alterations were graded from 0 to 4 and the average of both was used to draw ROC and SROC curves. Area under ROC curve (Az) was used as a measure of discriminative ability. Combination of MR imaging and MRS significantly improved AD diagnosis (Global Az: 0.722 vs. MR imaging Az: 0.624; p: 0.003). However, the combination of MR imaging and MRS did not improve VD diagnosis. SROC curve obtained for the diagnosis of global dementia was Az: 0.6658 with 0.67 sensitivity and 0.65 specificity. Combination of both MR techniques significantly improved AD diagnosis versus MR imaging alone. More studies are needed to enhance VD classification. Metabolic data found by MRS can be useful to differentiate cognitive impairment

  11. Selectivity in multiple quantum nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, W.S.

    1980-11-01

    The observation of multiple-quantum nuclear magnetic resonance transitions in isotropic or anisotropic liquids is shown to give readily interpretable information on molecular configurations, rates of motional processes, and intramolecular interactions. However, the observed intensity of high multiple-quantum transitions falls off dramatically as the number of coupled spins increases. The theory of multiple-quantum NMR is developed through the density matrix formalism, and exact intensities are derived for several cases (isotropic first-order systems and anisotropic systems with high symmetry) to shown that this intensity decrease is expected if standard multiple-quantum pulse sequences are used. New pulse sequences are developed which excite coherences and produce population inversions only between selected states, even though other transitions are simultaneously resonant. One type of selective excitation presented only allows molecules to absorb and emit photons in groups of n. Coherent averaging theory is extended to describe these selective sequences, and to design sequences which are selective to arbitrarily high order in the Magnus expansion. This theory and computer calculations both show that extremely good selectivity and large signal enhancements are possible

  12. Selectivity in multiple quantum nuclear magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Warren Sloan [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Sciences Division

    1980-11-01

    The observation of multiple-quantum nuclear magnetic resonance transitions in isotropic or anisotropic liquids is shown to give readily interpretable information on molecular configurations, rates of motional processes, and intramolecular interactions. However, the observed intensity of high multiple-quantum transitions falls off dramatically as the number of coupled spins increases. The theory of multiple-quantum NMR is developed through the density matrix formalism, and exact intensities are derived for several cases (isotropic first-order systems and anisotropic systems with high symmetry) to shown that this intensity decrease is expected if standard multiple-quantum pulse sequences are used. New pulse sequences are developed which excite coherences and produce population inversions only between selected states, even though other transitions are simultaneously resonant. One type of selective excitation presented only allows molecules to absorb and emit photons in groups of n. Coherent averaging theory is extended to describe these selective sequences, and to design sequences which are selective to arbitrarily high order in the Magnus expansion. This theory and computer calculations both show that extremely good selectivity and large signal enhancements are possible.

  13. Evaluation and analysis of nuclear resonance data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frohner, F.H.

    2000-01-01

    A probabilistic foundations of data evaluation are reviewed, with special emphasis on parameter estimation based on Bayes' theorem and a quadratic loss function, and on modern methods for the assignment of prior probabilities. The data reduction process leading from raw experimental data to evaluated computer files of nuclear reaction cross sections is outlined, with a discussion of systematic and statistical errors and their propagation and of the generalized least squares formalism including prior information and nonlinear theoretical models. It is explained how common errors induce correlations between data, what consequences they have for uncertainty propagation and sensitivity studies, and how evaluators can construct covariance matrices from the usual error information provided by experimentalists. New techniques for evaluation of inconsistent data are also presented. The general principles are then applied specifically to the analysis and evaluation of neutron resonance data in terms of theoretical models - R-matrix theory (and especially its practically used multi-level Breit-Wigner and Reich-Moore variants) in the resolved region, and resonance-averaged R-matrix theory (Hauser-Feshbach theory with width-fluctuation corrections) in the unresolved region. Complications arise because the measured transmission data, capture and fission yields, self-indication ratios and other observables are not yet the wanted cross sections. These are obtained only by means of parametrisation. The intervening effects - Doppler and resolution broadening, self-shielding, multiple scattering, backgrounds, sample impurities, energy-dependent detector efficiencies, inaccurate reference data etc - are therefore also discussed. (author)

  14. Diagnostic apparatus employing nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshino, K.; Yamada, N.; Yoshitome, E.; Matsuura, H.

    1987-01-01

    An NMR diagnostic apparatus is described comprising means for applying a primary magnetic field to a subject; means for applying RF pulses to the subject to give nuclear magnetic resonance to the nuclei of atoms in the subject; means for applying gradient magnetic fields to project an NMR signal of the nuclei at least in one direction; means for observing the NMR signal projected by the gradient magnetic fields applying means; and arithmetic means for constructing a distribution of information on resonance energy as an image from an output signal from the observing means; wherein the gradient magnetic fields applying means comprises means for applying the gradient magnetic fields at a predetermined time and for not applying the gradient magnetic fields at another predetermined time, during the time period of one view; and wherein the gradient magnetic fields applying means further comprises means for measuring the NMR signal during the predetermined time when the gradient magnetic fields are applied, and means for measuring the intensity of the primary magnetic field during the other predetermined time when no gradient magnetic fields are applied

  15. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Safeguards Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludewigt, Bernhard A; Quiter, Brian J; Ambers, Scott D

    2011-02-04

    In nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) measurements, resonances are excited by an external photon beam leading to the emission of {gamma} rays with specific energies that are characteristic of the emitting isotope. The promise of NRF as a non-destructive analysis technique (NDA) in safeguards applications lies in its potential to directly quantify a specific isotope in an assay target without the need for unfolding the combined responses of several fissile isotopes as often required by other NDA methods. The use of NRF for detection of sensitive nuclear materials and other contraband has been researched in the past. In the safeguards applications considered here one has to go beyond mere detection and precisely quantify the isotopic content, a challenge that is discussed throughout this report. Basic NRF measurement methods, instrumentation, and the analytical calculation of NRF signal strengths are described in Section 2. Well understood modeling and simulation tools are needed for assessing the potential of NRF for safeguards and for designing measurement systems. All our simulations were performed with the radiation transport code MCNPX, a code that is widely used in the safeguards community. Our initial studies showed that MCNPX grossly underestimated the elastically scattered background at backwards angles due to an incorrect treatment of Rayleigh scattering. While new, corrected calculations based on ENDF form factors showed much better agreement with experimental data for the elastic scattering of photons on an uranium target, the elastic backscatter is still not rigorously treated. Photonuclear scattering processes (nuclear Thomson, Delbruck and Giant Dipole Resonance scattering), which are expected to play an important role at higher energies, are not yet included. These missing elastic scattering contributions were studied and their importance evaluated evaluated against data found in the literature as discussed in Section 3. A transmission experiment

  16. Sub-terahertz resonance spectroscopy of biological macromolecules and cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Globus, Tatiana; Moyer, Aaron; Gelmont, Boris; Khromova, Tatyana; Sizov, Igor; Ferrance, Jerome

    2013-05-01

    Recently we introduced a Sub-THz spectroscopic system for characterizing vibrational resonance features from biological materials. This new, continuous-wave, frequency-domain spectroscopic sensor operates at room temperature between 315 and 480 GHz with spectral resolution of at least 1 GHz and utilizes the source and detector components from Virginia Diode, Inc. In this work we present experimental results and interpretation of spectroscopic signatures from bacterial cells and their biological macromolecule structural components. Transmission and absorption spectra of the bacterial protein thioredoxin, DNA and lyophilized cells of Escherichia coli (E. coli), as well as spores of Bacillus subtillis and B. atrophaeus have been characterized. Experimental results for biomolecules are compared with absorption spectra calculated using molecular dynamics simulation, and confirm the underlying physics for resonance spectroscopy based on interactions between THz radiation and vibrational modes or groups of modes of atomic motions. Such interactions result in multiple intense and narrow specific resonances in transmission/absorption spectra from nano-gram samples with spectral line widths as small as 3 GHz. The results of this study indicate diverse relaxation dynamic mechanisms relevant to sub-THz vibrational spectroscopy, including long-lasting processes. We demonstrate that high sensitivity in resolved specific absorption fingerprints provides conditions for reliable detection, identification and discrimination capability, to the level of strains of the same bacteria, and for monitoring interactions between biomaterials and reagents in near real-time. Additionally, it creates the basis for the development of new types of advanced biological sensors through integrating the developed system with a microfluidic platform for biomaterial samples.

  17. Clocking Femtosecond Collisional Dynamics via Resonant X-Ray Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, Q. Y.; Fernandez-Tello, E. V.; Burian, T.; Chalupský, J.; Chung, H.-K.; Ciricosta, O.; Dakovski, G. L.; Hájková, V.; Hollebon, P.; Juha, L.; Krzywinski, J.; Lee, R. W.; Minitti, M. P.; Preston, T. R.; de la Varga, A. G.; Vozda, V.; Zastrau, U.; Wark, J. S.; Velarde, P.; Vinko, S. M.

    2018-02-01

    Electron-ion collisional dynamics is of fundamental importance in determining plasma transport properties, nonequilibrium plasma evolution, and electron damage in diffraction imaging applications using bright x-ray free-electron lasers (FELs). Here we describe the first experimental measurements of ultrafast electron impact collisional ionization dynamics using resonant core-hole spectroscopy in a solid-density magnesium plasma, created and diagnosed with the Linac Coherent Light Source x-ray FEL. By resonantly pumping the 1 s →2 p transition in highly charged ions within an optically thin plasma, we have measured how off-resonance charge states are populated via collisional processes on femtosecond time scales. We present a collisional cross section model that matches our results and demonstrates how the cross sections are enhanced by dense-plasma effects including continuum lowering. Nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium collisional radiative simulations show excellent agreement with the experimental results and provide new insight on collisional ionization and three-body-recombination processes in the dense-plasma regime.

  18. Science and history explored by nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baias, Maria Antoaneta

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance was chosen as the main tool for investigating different biological and chemical systems, as it is unique in providing the information details about the morphology and molecular structures and conformations by which the fundamental properties of these biological and chemical systems can be understood. Proton spin-diffusion experiments combined with 13 C CPMAS spectroscopy were successfully applied to characterize the changes that occur during the thermal denaturation of keratin fibers from wool and hair. A model describing both the effect of thermal denaturation and the effect of different chemical treatments on keratin fibers is presented. Proton NMR spectroscopy was used for studying the proton exchange in Sulfonated Polyether Ether Ketone proton exchange membranes revealing that the water exchange processes in hydrated SPEEK-silica membranes are more efficient when low concentrations of polyethoxysiloxane (PEOS) are used for the membrane preparation. Proton 1D exchange spectroscopy combined with transverse relaxation measurements offered good insight in the state of water in hydrated SPEEK/SiO 2 membranes revealing that concentrations of 5%-10% wt. PEOS could enhance the electrical conductivity of PEM. Hyperpolarized 129 Xe NMR spectroscopy was successfully applied for monitoring the free radical polymerization reactions of methyl methacrylate, methyl acrylate and the copolymerization of methyl methacrylate and methyl acrylate. The observation of Xe chemical shift and linewidths during the reactions reveal information about the polymer chain growths during the polymerizations. The successful application of the NMR-MOUSE to visualise the different anatomical layers with varying proton densities opens the possibility of its use in clinical studies such as osteoporosis for bone density measurements. The NMR-MOUSE was also successfully applied for the analysis of violins and bows and a classification of the violins and bows as a function of

  19. Caracterização de diferentes amostras de mandioca por espectroscopia de ressonância magnética nuclear Characterization of different cassava samples by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele C. V Iulianelli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A raiz de mandioca (Manihot esculenta crantz é cultivada nas mais diversas regiões do Brasil e desempenha importante papel na dieta alimentar dos brasileiros, representando para muitas famílias do Norte e Nordeste a principal fonte energética. A farinha de mandioca constitui-se num alimento com alto teor de amido, além de conter fibras, lipídeos e alguns minerais, entretanto apresenta grande variabilidade genética, o que resulta em diferenciação na sua constituição química e estrutural. Frente à importância econômica, nutricional e farmacológica deste produto, o presente trabalho objetivou caracterizar seis diferentes amostras de farinha de mandioca por meio da espectroscopia de RMN. Além de estabelecer o assinalamento dos principais grupamentos químicos, os resultados confirmaram diferenças no aspecto químico e estrutural das amostras de mandioca. Foi visto que a amostra F1 é mais rica em carboidratos, a amostra F4 é mais rica em glicolipídeos, a amostra F2 apresenta alto teor de amilose, e a amostra F6 apresenta maior diversidade de glicolipídeos. Em relação à estrutura molecular, os espectros de RMN indicaram que a amostra F1 apresenta maior organização molecular e que as amostras F3 e F5 apresentam similaridade na amorficidade e também no arranjo e empacotamento molecular.Cassava root (Manihot esculenta crantz is grown in all Brazilian states, being an important product in the diet of Brazilians. For many families of the North and Northeast states, it may represent the main energy source. The cassava root flour has high levels of starch, in addition to containing fiber, lipids and some minerals. There is, however, great genetic variability, which results in differentiation in its chemical composition and structural aspect. Motivated by the economic, nutritional and pharmacological importance of this product, this work is aimed at characterizing six cassava flour samples by NMR spectroscopy. The spectra revealed

  20. Caracterización cualitativa de poliaminas libres en endurecedores de resinas epoxídicas del tipo etilenaminas por espectroscopia de resonancia magnética nuclear Qualitative characterization of free polyamines in ethyleneamines epoxide hardeners by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filiberto González Garcia

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available La caracterización cualitativa de dos agentes de curado comerciales de resinas epoxídicas del tipo etilenaminas comercializados por la ACROS (U.S.A. fue realizada usando la espectroscopia de resonancia magnética nuclear de carbono-13. Los productos comerciales corresponden a la trietilentetramina (TETA y a la tetraetilenpentamina (TEPA. El producto TETA presentó cuatro compuestos diferentes. El compuesto mayoritario correspondió a la trietilentetramina en una concentración de 60% molar que corresponde a una etilenamina de estructura linear. Los otros tres compuestos, uno de ellos mostró estructura ramificada, y los otros dos compuestos presentaron estructuras cíclicas del tipo piperazina. El producto TEPA mostró cinco compuestos con estructuras semejantes a las encontradas en el producto TETA. El compuesto mayoritario correspondió a la tetraetilenpentamina en una concentración aproximada de 55% molar. Los resultados encontrados en este trabajo están de acuerdo con la composición cualitativa de los productos semejantes comercializados por la Compañía Química Dow, productos DEH 24 y DEH 26, respectivamente.The qualitative characterization of two commercial ethyneamines epoxide hardeners marketed by ACROS (U.S.A. was carried out by using carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The products were triethylenetetramine (TETA and tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA. TETA had four components, the most importante one being triethylenetetramine, an ethyleneamine of lineal structure, in a concentration of 60 mol%. Another component had ramified structure, while the other two exhibited recurrent structures of the piperazina type. TEPA had five components with similar structures. The major component was tetraethylenepentamine in an approximate concentration of 55 mol%. These results agree with the composition of similar products marketed by Dow Chemical Company, namely DEH 24 and DEH 26, respectively.

  1. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in biomedicine. Course organized by the Istituto Superiore di Sanita`. Marciana Marina (Isola d`Elba), September 18-23, 1995; Spettroscopia di risonanza magnetica nucleare in biomedicina. Corso organizzato dall`Istituto Superiore di Sanita`. Marciana Marina (Isola d`Elba), 18-23 settembre 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luciani, A M; Rosi, A [ed.; Istituto Superiore di Sanita` , Rome (Italy). Lab. di Fisica

    1997-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance is a powerful technique that can be used in a wide range of applications, such as the structural characterization of high molecular weight molecules, conformational studies on enzymes in solution, enzyme-substrate or DNA-protein interactions, monitoring of cell metabolism in vivo, and for diagnostic purposes, employing spectroscopic and imaging techniques. This course was organized in order to introduce the participants to the fundamentals of NMR spectroscopy, and offer practical advice on performing NMR experiments on cell systems, cell and tissue extracts and animal models. The main implications regarding human experiments were also discussed. Finally the quantification of information and the interpretation of data were considered with regard to the main nuclei observed. [Italiano] La risonanza magnetica nucleare e` una delle tecniche spettroscopiche che meglio risponde all`ampio spettro di condizioni imposto dalla ricerca in biofisica e biomedicina. Il campo applicativo di questa tecnica copre un intervallo molto ampio che va dalla caratterizzazione di strutture di macromolecole con elevato peso moleculare, a studi di tipo conformazionale su enzimi in soluzione e sull`interazione enzima-substrato o DNA-proteine, fino al monitoraggio in vivo del metabolosmi cellulare e alla diagnostica medica con spettroscopia ed imaging. Il corso e` stato articolato in modo da presentare ai partecipanti nozioni di base della spettroscopia RMN, aspetti pratici della realizzazione di esperimenti di spettroscopia in sistemi cellulari, in estratti cellulari e tissutali e in animali da esperimento, nonche` le principali considerazioni relative agli esperimenti nell`uomo. Sono state affrontate tematiche relative alla quantificazione dell`informazione e all`interpretazione dei dati in relazione ai principali nuclei osservati.

  2. A personal computer-based nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Job, Constantin; Pearson, Robert M.; Brown, Michael F.

    1994-11-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy using personal computer-based hardware has the potential of enabling the application of NMR methods to fields where conventional state of the art equipment is either impractical or too costly. With such a strategy for data acquisition and processing, disciplines including civil engineering, agriculture, geology, archaeology, and others have the possibility of utilizing magnetic resonance techniques within the laboratory or conducting applications directly in the field. Another aspect is the possibility of utilizing existing NMR magnets which may be in good condition but unused because of outdated or nonrepairable electronics. Moreover, NMR applications based on personal computer technology may open up teaching possibilities at the college or even secondary school level. The goal of developing such a personal computer (PC)-based NMR standard is facilitated by existing technologies including logic cell arrays, direct digital frequency synthesis, use of PC-based electrical engineering software tools to fabricate electronic circuits, and the use of permanent magnets based on neodymium-iron-boron alloy. Utilizing such an approach, we have been able to place essentially an entire NMR spectrometer console on two printed circuit boards, with the exception of the receiver and radio frequency power amplifier. Future upgrades to include the deuterium lock and the decoupler unit are readily envisioned. The continued development of such PC-based NMR spectrometers is expected to benefit from the fast growing, practical, and low cost personal computer market.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy at ultra high fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuberger, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The goal of the work presented in this thesis was to explore the possibilities and limitations of MRI / MRS using an ultra high field of 17.6 tesla. A broad range of specific applications and MR methods, from MRI to MRSI and MRS were investigated. The main foci were on sodium magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging of rodents, magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the mouse brain, and the detection of small amounts of iron labeled stem cells in the rat brain using MRI Sodium spectroscopic imaging was explored since it benefits tremendously from the high magnetic field. Due to the intrinsically low signal in vivo, originating from the low concentrations and short transverse relaxation times, only limited results have been achieved by other researchers until now. Results in the literature include studies conducted on large animals such as dogs to animals as small as rats. No studies performed on mice have been reported, despite the fact that the mouse is the most important laboratory animal due to the ready availability of transgenic strains. Hence, this study concentrated on sodium MRSI of small rodents, mostly mice (brain, heart, and kidney), and in the case of the brain on young rats. The second part of this work concentrated on proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the rodent brain. Due to the high magnetic field strength not only the increasing signal but also the extended spectral resolution was advantageous for such kind of studies. The difficulties/limitations of ultra high field MRS were also investigated. In the last part of the presented work detection limits of iron labeled stem cells in vivo using magnetic resonance imaging were explored. The studies provided very useful benchmarks for future researchers in terms of the number of labeled stem cells that are required for high-field MRI studies. Overall this work has shown many of the benefits and the areas that need special attention of ultra high fields in MR. Three topics in MRI, MRS and MRSI were

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy at ultra high fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuberger, Thomas

    2009-06-23

    The goal of the work presented in this thesis was to explore the possibilities and limitations of MRI / MRS using an ultra high field of 17.6 tesla. A broad range of specific applications and MR methods, from MRI to MRSI and MRS were investigated. The main foci were on sodium magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging of rodents, magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the mouse brain, and the detection of small amounts of iron labeled stem cells in the rat brain using MRI Sodium spectroscopic imaging was explored since it benefits tremendously from the high magnetic field. Due to the intrinsically low signal in vivo, originating from the low concentrations and short transverse relaxation times, only limited results have been achieved by other researchers until now. Results in the literature include studies conducted on large animals such as dogs to animals as small as rats. No studies performed on mice have been reported, despite the fact that the mouse is the most important laboratory animal due to the ready availability of transgenic strains. Hence, this study concentrated on sodium MRSI of small rodents, mostly mice (brain, heart, and kidney), and in the case of the brain on young rats. The second part of this work concentrated on proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the rodent brain. Due to the high magnetic field strength not only the increasing signal but also the extended spectral resolution was advantageous for such kind of studies. The difficulties/limitations of ultra high field MRS were also investigated. In the last part of the presented work detection limits of iron labeled stem cells in vivo using magnetic resonance imaging were explored. The studies provided very useful benchmarks for future researchers in terms of the number of labeled stem cells that are required for high-field MRI studies. Overall this work has shown many of the benefits and the areas that need special attention of ultra high fields in MR. Three topics in MRI, MRS and MRSI were

  5. Department of Nuclear Spectroscopy and Technique - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sernicki, J.

    2005-01-01

    Full text:Research activities in our Department in the last year were focused on traditional domains of nuclear physics: heavy-ion reactions and nuclear spectroscopy, but also on medium-energy elementary particle physics, neutrino physics, as well as atomic physics. Along with the group of nuclear and atomic physicists, our Department encompasses a team working on medical physics and another team engaged in ecology and environmental physics. We maintain our collaboration with FZ Juelich (Germany) continuing experiments on the COSY storage ring, aimed at studying heavy hyperons produced in pp collisions. Recently, evidence for a new hyperon has been obtained. At PSI Villigen (Switzerland) rare pion- and muon decays have been studied using the large PIBETA detector. The branching ratio for the pion beta decay was measured with six times better accuracy than previously. From the precise measurements of the radiative pion decay the pion axial form factor was evaluated (four times more precisely). Some anomaly, which can not be explained by the Standard Model, was observed in this process. In the field of neutrino physics, data collected with the T600 module of the cosmic ray detector ICARUS in Pavia (Italy) have been analysed. In collaboration with the Department of Nuclear Theory, conditions to observe the fascinating process of neutrino-less double electron capture were further examined from the point of view of the fundamental question of the neutrino nature and mass. Our involvement in the CHIMERA/ISOSPIN Collaboration resulted in interesting studies of semi-peripheral nucleus-nucleus collisions at the Fermi energy range. In particular, a new method of determination of the time scale of the emission of intermediate mass fragments was developed. We continued the collaboration with LBNL Berkeley (USA) and IEP Warsaw University on a theoretical model of the synthesis of super-heavy elements. A comprehensive description of the model with extensive predictions of the

  6. Nuclear elasticity applied to giant resonances of fast rotating nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, S.; Bouyssy, A.

    1987-06-01

    Isoscalar giant resonances in fast rotating nuclei are investigated within the framework of nuclear elasticity by solving the equation of motion of elastic nuclear medium in a rotating frame of reference. Both Coriolis and centrifugal forces are taken into account. The nuclear rotation removes completely the azimuthal degeneracy of the giant resonance energies. Realistic large values of the angular velocity, which are still small as compared to the giant resonance frequencies, are briefly reviewed in relation to allowed high angular momenta. It is shown that for the A=150 region, the Coriolis force is dominating for small values (< ∼ 0.05) of the ratio of angular velocity to resonance frequency, whereas the centrifugal force plays a prominent part in the shift of the split resonance energies for larger values of the ratio. Typical examples of the resonance energies and their fragmentation due to both rotation and deformation are given

  7. Collinear resonance ionization spectroscopy of exotic francium and radium isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2094150

    Two experimental campaigns were performed at the Collinear Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (CRIS) experiment, located at the ISOLDE radioactive-beam facility. The spectroscopic quadrupole moment of $^{203}$Fr was measured. Its magnitude with respect to the other even-$N$ francium isotopes below $N = 126$ suggests an onset of static deformation. However, calculations of the static and total deformation parameters reveal that it cannot be considered as purely statically deformed. The neutron-rich radium isotopes were investigated. The spectroscopic quadrupole moment of $^{231}$Ra was measured and the continuation of increasing quadrupole deformation with neutron number in neutron-rich radium isotopes was further established. Measurements of the changes in mean-square charge radii of $^{231,233}$Ra allowed the odd-even staggering parameter to be calculated for $^{230-232}$Ra. A normal odd-even staggering which increases in magnitude with neutron number was observed in these isotopes.

  8. Review: Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Studies of Pediatric Major Depressive Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas G. Kondo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. This paper focuses on the application of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS to the study of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD in children and adolescents. Method. A literature search using the National Institutes of Health's PubMed database was conducted to identify indexed peer-reviewed MRS studies in pediatric patients with MDD. Results. The literature search yielded 18 articles reporting original MRS data in pediatric MDD. Neurochemical alterations in Choline, Glutamate, and N-Acetyl Aspartate are associated with pediatric MDD, suggesting pathophysiologic continuity with adult MDD. Conclusions. The MRS literature in pediatric MDD is modest but growing. In studies that are methodologically comparable, the results have been consistent. Because it offers a noninvasive and repeatable measurement of relevant in vivo brain chemistry, MRS has the potential to provide insights into the pathophysiology of MDD as well as the mediators and moderators of treatment response.

  9. Identification of irradiated chicken meat using electron spin resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chawla, S.P.; Thomas, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Studies were carried out on detection of irradiation treatment in chicken using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. The effect of gamma- irradiation treatment on radiation induced signal in different types of chicken namely, broiler, deshi and layers was studied. Irradiation treatment induced a characteristic ESR signal that was not detected in non-irradiated samples. The shape of the signal was not affected by type of the bone. The intensity of radiation induced ESR signal was affected by factors such as absorbed radiation dose, bone type irradiation temperature, post-irradiation storage, post-irradiation cooking and age of the bird. Deep-frying resulted in the formation of a symmetric signal that had a different shape and was weaker than the radiation induced signal. This technique can be effectively used to detect irradiation treatment in bone-in chicken meat even if stored and/or subjected to various traditional cooking procedures. (author)

  10. Applications of resonance ionization spectroscopy in neutron dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitaker, T.J.; Hurst, G.S.

    1982-01-01

    Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (RIS) is a new analytical technique which is orders of magnitude more sensitive than previous methods of atomic analysis. In this method, lasers are used to selectively excite specific electronic transitions in the element being analyzed. A second laser photon can then ionize the excited atoms. Commercial lasers have sufficient intensity to assure that every atom located in the central portion of the laser beam will be ionized, and therefore can be detected. In this paper the concept of a xenon-containing matrix (XCM) which would release xenon atoms when exposed to neutrons is explored. Accumulated xenon would be measured using RIS to determine total dose. The total dosimeter would consist of an XCM, a radiator, and an encapsulation around both to contain released xenon atoms

  11. The resonant detector and its application to epithermal neutron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorini, G.; Perelli-Cippo, E.; Tardocchi, M.; Andreani, C.; D'Angelo, A.; Pietropaolo, A.; Senesi, R.; Imberti, S.; Bracco, A.; Previtali, E.; Pessina, G.; Rhodes, N.J.; Schooneveld, E.M.

    2004-01-01

    New perspectives for epithermal neutron spectroscopy are being opened by the development of the resonant detector (RD) and its use on inverse geometry time of flight spectrometers at spallation sources. The RD was first proposed in the 1980s and was recently brought to a performance level exceeding conventional neutron-sensitive Li-glass scintillator detectors. It features a photon counter coupled to a neutron analyzer foil. Resonant neutron absorption in the foil results in the emission of prompt gamma rays that are detected in the photon counter. The dimensions of the RD set the spatial resolution that can be achieved, ranging from a fraction of a cm to several cm. It can thus be tailored to the construction of detector arrays of different geometry. The main results of the research on this kind of detector are reported leading to the present optimized RD design based on a combination of YAP scintillation photon counter and uranium or gold analyzer foils. This detector has already been selected for application in the upgrade of the VESUVIO spectrometer on ISIS. A special application is the Very Low Angle Detector (VLAD) bank, which will extend the kinematical region for neutron scattering to low momentum transfer ( -1 ) whilst still keeping energy transfer >1 eV, thus allowing new experimental studies in condensed matter systems. The first results of tests made with prototype VLAD detectors are presented, confirming the usefulness of the RD for measurements at scattering angles as low as 2-5 deg

  12. Ultrasonic Resonance Spectroscopy of Composite Rims for Flywheel Rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, Laura M.; Baaklini, George Y.

    2002-01-01

    Flywheel energy storage devices comprising multilayered composite rotor systems are being studied extensively for utilization in the International Space Station. These composite material systems were investigated with a recently developed ultrasonic resonance spectroscopy technique. The ultrasonic system employs a continuous swept-sine waveform and performs a fast Fourier transform (FFT) on the frequency response spectrum. In addition, the system is capable of equalizing the amount of energy at each frequency. Equalization of the frequency spectrum, along with interpretation of the second FFT, aids in the evaluation of the fundamental frequency. The frequency responses from multilayered material samples, with and without known defects, were analyzed to assess the capabilities and limitations of this nondestructive evaluation technique for material characterization and defect detection. Amplitude and frequency changes were studied from ultrasonic responses of thick composite rings and a multiring composite rim. A composite ring varying in thickness was evaluated to investigate the full thickness resonance. The frequency response characteristics from naturally occurring voids in a composite ring were investigated. Ultrasonic responses were compared from regions with and without machined voids in a composite ring and a multiring composite rim. Finally, ultrasonic responses from the multiring composite rim were compared before and after proof spin testing to 63,000 rpm.

  13. Phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy in malformations of cortical development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celi Santos Andrade

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Malformations of cortical development (MCD result from disruptions in the dynamic process of cerebral corticogenesis and are important causes of epilepsy, motor deficits and cognitive impairment. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate phospholipids metabolism in vivo in a series of patients with epilepsy and MCD. Methods Thirty-seven patients with MCD and 31 control subjects were studied using three-dimensional phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS at a 3.0 T scanner. Quantification methods were applied to the following resonances: phosphoethanolamine (PE, phosphocholine (PC, glycerophosphoethanolamine (GPE, glycerophosphocholine (GPC, inorganic phosphate (Pi, phosphocreatine (PCr, and a-, b-, and g-adenosine triphosphate (ATP. The magnesium (Mg2+ levels and pH were calculated based on PCr, Pi and b-ATP chemical shifts. Results Compared to controls, the MCD lesions exhibited lower pH values and higher Mg2+ levels (p<0.05. The lesions also presented significant reduction of GPC and PDE, and an increased PME/PDE ratio. The otherwise normal appearing parenchyma also demonstrated lower pH values in the frontoparietal cortex and bilateral centrum semiovale. Conclusions Our data support the idea that metabolic impairments occur in the lesions of MCD, with propagation to remote normal appearing parenchyma. The results also suggest that there are membrane turnover disturbances in MCD lesions.

  14. THz Electron Paramagnetic Resonance / THz Spectroscopy at BESSY II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karsten Holldack

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The THz beamline at BESSY II employs high power broadband femto- to picosecond long THz pulses for magneto-optical THz and FIR studies. A newly designed set-up exploits the unique properties of ultrashort THz pulses generated by laser-energy modulation of electron bunches in the storage ring or alternatively from compressed electron bunches. Experiments from 0.15 to 5 THz (~ 5 – 150 cm-1 may be conducted at a user station equipped with a fully evacuated high resolution FTIR spectrometer (0.0063 cm-1, lHe cooled bolometer detectors, a THz TDS set-up and different sample environments, including a superconducting high field magnet (+11 T - 11T with variable temperature insert (1.5 K – 300 K, a sample cryostat and a THz attenuated total reflection chamber.  Main applications are Frequency Domain Fourier transform THz-Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (FD-FT THz-EPR, THz-FTIR spectroscopy and optical pump - THz probe time domain spectroscopy (TDS, with sub-ps time resolution.

  15. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the kidney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hricak, H.; Crooks, L.; Sheldon, P.; Kaufman, L.

    1983-01-01

    The role of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging of the kidney was analyzed in 18 persons (6 normal volunteers, 3 patients with pelvocaliectasis, 2 with peripelvic cysts, 1 with renal sinus lipomatosis, 3 with renal failure, 1 with glycogen storage disease, and 2 with polycystic kidney disease). Ultrasound and/or computed tomography (CT) studies were available for comparison in every case. In the normal kidney distinct anatomical structures were clearly differentiated by NMR. The best anatomical detail ws obtained with spin echo (SE) imaging, using a pulse sequence interval of 1,000 msec and an echo delay time of 28 msec. However, in the evaluation of normal and pathological conditions, all four intensity images (SE 500/28, SE 500/56, SE 1,000/28, and SE 1,000/56) have to be analyzed. No definite advantage was found in using SE imaging with a pulse sequence interval of 1,500 msec. Inversion recovery imaging enhanced the differences between the cortex and medulla, but it had a low signal-to-noise level and, therefore, a suboptimal overall resolution. The advantages of NMR compared with CT and ultrasound are discussed, and it is concluded that NMR imaging will prove to be a useful modality in the evaluation of renal disease

  16. Nuclear resonant scattering beamline at SPring-8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harami, Taikan [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Kamigori, Hyogo (Japan). Kansai Research Establishment

    1996-04-01

    Mainly by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research and Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, the construction of the Super Photon ring-8 GeV (SPring-8) which is the large scale synchrotron radiation facility for a high luminance light source placing emphasis on short wavelength region (shorter than about 1 nm) is in progress at the Harima Science Park City, Hyogo Prefecture. The features of the SPring-8 are the high luminance of light, the good parallelism and directionality of light, the quasi-monochromatic light with variable wavelength, and the possibility of design from straight polarization to circular polarization. The injection system that accelerates electrons up to 8 GeV and the storage ring storing the 8 GeV electrons for long hours, and 61 beamlines are explained. The manufacture of the nuclear resonant scattering beamline as the beamline for joint utilization was begun. Its transport channel and the experiment hutch are shown. By the features of undulator synchrotron radiation, the research on the matters with small recoilless fraction such as biological substances, liquid, gas and others and the research on time-dependent phenomena become feasible anew. The research on the dynamic structural analysis of heme protein is planned. (K.I.)

  17. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of metabolic regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sillerud, L.O.; Han, C.H.; Whaley, T.W.

    1983-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques for the detection of the metabolic transformations of biological compounds labeled with stable isotopes, particularly carbon-13 have been explored. We have studied adipose tissue in the intact rat, the exteriorized epididymal fat pad, and the isolated adipocyte. Triacylglycerol metabolism in adipose tissue is regulated by lipogenic factors (insulin, corticosterone, thyroxine, and growth hormone) and lipolytic factors (glucagon and catecholamines). The synthesis of triglyceride from 5.5 mM glucose was stimulated by about 4-fold by 10 nM insulin. Triglyceride synthesis from glucose in the presence of insulin occurred at a rate of 330 nmol/hr/10 6 cells. Since the NMR signals from free and esterified fatty acids and glycerol are distinct, we could directly measure the rate of hormone-stimulated lipolysis. Epinephrine (10 μM) gave a lipolytic rate of 0.30 μmol/hr/10 6 cells as monitored by free-glycerol appearance in the medium. 13 C NMR provides a superior method for the measurement of triglyceride metabolism since it directly measures the changes in the substrates and products in situ

  18. Quantum information processing and nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cummins, H.K.

    2001-01-01

    Quantum computers are information processing devices which operate by and exploit the laws of quantum mechanics, potentially allowing them to solve problems which are intractable using classical computers. This dissertation considers the practical issues involved in one of the more successful implementations to date, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Techniques for dealing with systematic errors are presented, and a quantum protocol is implemented. Chapter 1 is a brief introduction to quantum computation. The physical basis of its efficiency and issues involved in its implementation are discussed. NMR quantum information processing is reviewed in more detail in Chapter 2. Chapter 3 considers some of the errors that may be introduced in the process of implementing an algorithm, and high-level ways of reducing the impact of these errors by using composite rotations. Novel general expressions for stabilising composite rotations are presented in Chapter 4 and a new class of composite rotations, tailored composite rotations, presented in Chapter 5. Chapter 6 describes some of the advantages and pitfalls of combining composite rotations. Experimental evaluations of the composite rotations are given in each case. An actual implementation of a quantum information protocol, approximate quantum cloning, is presented in Chapter 7. The dissertation ends with appendices which contain expansions of some equations and detailed calculations of certain composite rotation results, as well as spectrometer pulse sequence programs. (author)

  19. Comparative analysis of nuclear magnetic resonance well logging and nuclear magnetic resonance mud logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Zugui

    2008-01-01

    The hydrogen atoms in oil and water are able to resonate and generate signals in the magnetic field, which is used by the NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) technology in petroleum engineering to research and evaluate rock characteristics. NMR well logging was used to measure the physical property parameters of the strata in well bore, whereas NMR mud logging was used to analyze (while drilling) the physical property parameters of cores, cuttings and sidewall coring samples on surface (drilling site). Based on the comparative analysis of the porosity and permeability parameters obtained by NMR well logging and those from analysis of the cores, cuttings and sidewall coring samples by NMR mud logging in the same depth of 13 wells, these two methods are of certain difference, but their integral tendency is relatively good. (authors)

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy of combretastatin A4 prodrug-induced disruption of tumour perfusion and energetic status

    OpenAIRE

    1998-01-01

    The effects of combretastatin A4 prodrug on perfusion and the levels of 31P metabolites in an implanted murine tumour were investigated for 3 h after drug treatment using nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS). The area of regions of low signal intensity in spin-echo images of tumours increased slightly after treatment with the drug. These regions of low signal intensity corresponded to necrosis seen in histological sections, whereas the expanding regions surrounding ...

  1. Laser assisted nuclear decay spectroscopy: A new method for studying neutron-deficient francium

    CERN Document Server

    Lynch, Kara Marie

    2015-01-01

    Radioactive decay studies of rare isotopes produced at radioactive ion beam facilities have often been hindered by the presence of isobaric and isomeric contamination. The Collinear Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (CRIS) experiment at ISOLDE, CERN uses laser radiation to stepwise excite and ionize an atomic beam in a particular isomeric state. Deflection of this selectively ionized beam of exotic nuclei, from the remaining neutral contaminants, allows ultra-sensitive detection of rare isotopes and nuclear structure measurements in background-free conditions.\

  2. Effect of Polysorbate 20 and Polysorbate 80 on the Higher-Order Structure of a Monoclonal Antibody and Its Fab and Fc Fragments Probed Using 2D Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Surinder M; Bandi, Swati; Jones, David N M; Mallela, Krishna M G

    2017-12-01

    We examined how polysorbate 20 (PS20; Tween 20) and polysorbate 80 (PS80; Tween 80) affect the higher-order structure of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) and its antigen-binding (Fab) and crystallizable (Fc) fragments, using near-UV circular dichroism and 2D nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Both polysorbates bind to the mAb with submillimolar affinity. Binding causes significant changes in the tertiary structure of mAb with no changes in its secondary structure. 2D 13 C- 1 H methyl NMR indicates that with increasing concentration of polysorbates, the Fab region showed a decrease in crosspeak volumes. In addition to volume changes, PS20 caused significant changes in the chemical shifts compared to no changes in the case of PS80. No such changes in crosspeak volumes or chemical shifts were observed in the case of Fc region, indicating that polysorbates predominantly affect the Fab region compared to the Fc region. This differential effect of polysorbates on the Fab and Fc regions was because of the lesser thermodynamic stability of the Fab compared to the Fc. These results further indicate that PS80 is the preferred polysorbate for this mAb formulation, because it offers higher protection against aggregation, causes lesser structural perturbation, and has weaker binding affinity with fewer binding sites compared to PS20. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Mechanism of the negative force-frequency relationship in physiologically intact rat ventricular myocardium. Studies by intracellular Ca2+ monitor with iodo-1 and by 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morii, Isao; Kihara, Yasuki; Sasayama, Shigetake; Konishi, Takashi; Inubushi, Toshiro.

    1996-01-01

    We studied the subcellular mechanisms of the negative force-frequency relationship in rat myocardium by measuring intracellular Ca 2+ transients by indo-1 fluorometry and intracellular pH (pH i ) and phosphate compounds with 31 P-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The data were compared with those from guinea pig hearts, which show a positive force-frequency relationship. By increasing the pacing rate from 3 Hz to 5 Hz, the peak positive first derivative of left ventricular pressure (LVdP/dt) in rat heart decreased by 10±1% (n=6). In contrast to this negative inotropic response, simultaneously measured peak Ca 2+ transients increased by 6±1%. Guinea pig heart (n=6) showed an increase in peak positive LVdP/dt (33±1%) which was associated with an increase in peak Ca 2+ transients (8±1%). Under equivalent experimental conditions in an NMR spectrometer, this increase in the pacing rate did not affect intracellular levels of phosphate compounds in either rat (n=6) or guinea pig heart (n=6). In contrast, pH i showed a decrease of 0.031±0.006 pH units in rat heart, while no changes were observed in guinea pig heart. These results suggest that in physiological rat myocardium, pH i is susceptible to changes in the stimulus frequency and may affect the Ca 2+ -responsiveness of contractile proteins, which results in the negative force-frequency relationship. (author)

  4. Characterization of sodium transport in Acholeplasma laidlawii B cells and in lipid vesicles containing purified A. laidlawii (Na+-Mg2+)-ATPase by using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and 22Na tracer techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahajan, S.; Lewis, R.N.; George, R.; Sykes, B.D.; McElhaney, R.N.

    1988-01-01

    The active transport of sodium ions in live Acholeplasma laidlawii B cells and in lipid vesicles containing the (Na+-Mg2+)-ATPase from the plasma membrane of this microorganism was studied by 23Na nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic and 22 Na tracer techniques, respectively. In live A. laidlawii B cells, the transport of sodium was an active process in which metabolic energy was harnessed for the extrusion of sodium ions against a concentration gradient. The process was inhibited by low temperatures and by the formation of gel state lipid in the plasma membrane of this organism. In reconstituted proteoliposomes containing the purified (Na+-Mg2+)-ATPase, the hydrolysis of ATP was accompanied by the transport of sodium ions into the lipid vesicles, and the transport process was impaired by reagents known to inhibit ATPase activity. At the normal growth temperature (37 degrees C), this transport process required a maximum of 1 mol of ATP per mol of sodium ion transported. Together, these results provide direct experimental evidence that the (Na+-Mg2+)-ATPase of the Acholeplasma laidlawii B membrane is the cation pump which maintains the low levels of intracellular sodium characteristic of this microorganism

  5. Single-level resonance parameters fit nuclear cross-sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drawbaugh, D. W.; Gibson, G.; Miller, M.; Page, S. L.

    1970-01-01

    Least squares analyses of experimental differential cross-section data for the U-235 nucleus have yielded single level Breit-Wigner resonance parameters that fit, simultaneously, three nuclear cross sections of capture, fission, and total.

  6. The Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and its utilization in image formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonagamba, T.J.; Tannus, A.; Panepucci, H.

    1987-01-01

    Some aspects about Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (as Larmor Theorem, radio frequency pulse, relaxation of spins system) and its utilization in two dimensional image processing with the necessity of a tomography plane are studied. (C.G.C.) [pt

  7. FY08 Annual Report for Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Glen A.; Caggiano, Joseph A.

    2009-01-06

    FY08 annual report for project the "Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence Imaging" project. Reviews accomplishments of last 3 years, including U-235 signature search, comparison of different photon sources, and examination of NRF measurements using monochromatic photon source.

  8. Proceedings of the nuclear magnetic resonance user meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    Studies on utilization of nuclear magnetic resonance, such as: chemical analysis in complexes and organic compounds; structures and magnetic properties of solids; construction of images and; spectrometer designs, are presented. (M.C.K.) [pt

  9. Development and applications of NMR [nuclear magnetic resonance] in low fields and zero field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bielecki, A.

    1987-05-01

    This dissertation is about nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in the absence of applied magnetic fields. NMR is usually done in large magnetic fields, often as large as can be practically attained. The motivation for going the opposite way, toward zero field, is that for certain types of materials, particularly powdered or polycrystalline solids, the NMR spectra in zero field are easier to interpret than those obtained in high field. 92 refs., 60 figs., 1 tab

  10. Zero Quantum Nuclear Magnetic Resonance experiments utilizing a toroid cell and coil

    OpenAIRE

    Bebout, William Roach

    1989-01-01

    Over the past ten to fifteen years the area of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy has seen tremendous growth. For example, in conjunction with multiple quantum NMR, molecular structural mapping of a compound can be easily performed in a two dimensional (2D) experiment. However, only two kinds of detector coils have been typically used in NMR studies. These are the solenoid coil and the Helmholtz coil. The solenoid coil was very popular with the permanent and e...

  11. Two-dimensional J-resolved nuclear magnetic resonance spectral study of two bromobenzene glutathione conjugates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferretti, J.A.; Highet, R.J.; Pohl, L.R.; Monks, T.J.; Hinson, J.A.

    1985-09-01

    The application of two-dimensional J-resolved nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to determine the structure of two bile metabolites isolated from rats injected interperitoneally with bromobenzene is described. The structures of the two molecules are obtained unambiguously from the proton-proton spin coupling constants. The paper discusses the fundamentals of the technique and demonstrates the resolution of small long-range coupling constants.

  12. Gravitational Resonance Spectroscopy with an Oscillating Magnetic Field Gradient in the GRANIT Flow through Arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebreyend, D.; Pignol, G.; Baeßler, S.; Nesvizhevsky, V. V.; Protasov, K.; Voronin, A.

    2014-01-01

    Gravitational resonance spectroscopy consists in measuring the energy spectrum of bouncing ultracold neutrons above a mirror by inducing resonant transitions between different discrete quantum levels. We discuss how to induce the resonances with a flow through arrangement in the GRANIT spectrometer, excited by an oscillating magnetic field gradient. The spectroscopy could be realized in two distinct modes (so called DC and AC) using the same device to produce the magnetic excitation. We present calculations demonstrating the feasibility of the newly proposed AC mode

  13. Magnetic resonance vs. computerized tomography, ultrasonic examinations and nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruna, J.

    1985-01-01

    A symposium on magnetic resonance in nuclear medicine was held from 23rd to 27th January, 1985 in Munich and Garmisch-Partenkirchen. Discussed were suitable methods, the use of contrast media, the evaluation of results, the application of nuclear magnetic resonance in examining various body organs, and the latest apparatus. NMR achievements in medicine were compared to those by other diagnostic methods. (M.D.)

  14. On nuclear reaction duration at the range of overlapping resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olkhovsky, V.S.

    1981-01-01

    Nuclear reaction duration above the threshold of overlapping resonances is investigated and its importance to obtain a new information on a collision mechanism is evidenced. It is shown also that the duration of resonant nuclear reactions is asymptotically decreasing according to the law[E 2 n(E)] -1 when the energy E and the number of open channels n(E) are increasing [ru

  15. GEOCHEMICAL CONTROLS ON NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE MEASUREMENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knight, Rosemary

    2008-01-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is used in the Earth Sciences as a means of obtaining information about the molecular-scale environment of fluids in porous geological materials. Laboratory experiments were conducted to advance our fundamental understanding of the link between the NMR response and the geochemical properties of geological materials. In the first part of this research project, we studied the impact of both the surface-area-to-volume ratio (S/V) of the pore space and the surface relaxivity on the NMR response of fluids in sand-clay mixtures. This study highlighted the way in which these two parameters control our ability to use NMR measurements to detect and quantify fluid saturation in multiphase saturated systems. The second part of the project was designed to explore the way in which the mineralogic form of iron, as opposed to simply the concentration of iron, affects the surface relaxation rate and, more generally, the NMR response of porous materials. We found that the magnitude of the surface relaxation rate was different for the various iron-oxide minerals because of changes in both the surface-area-to-volume ratio of the pore space, and the surface relaxivity. Of particular significance from this study was the finding of an anomalously large surface relaxivity of magnetite compared to that of the other iron minerals. Differences in the NMR response of iron minerals were seen in column experiments during the reaction of ferrihydrite-coated quartz sand with aqueous Fe(II) solutions to form goethite, lepidocrocite and magnetite; indicating the potential use of NMR as a means of monitoring geochemical reactions. The final part of the research project investigated the impact of heterogeneity, at the pore-scale, on the NMR response. This work highlighted the way in which the geochemistry, by controlling the surface relaxivity, has a significant impact on the link between NMR data and the microgeometry of the pore space.

  16. Pulse shaping amplifier (PSA) for nuclear spectroscopy system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombigit, L.; Maslina Mohd Ibrahim; Nolida Yusup; Nur Aira Abdul Rahman; Yong, C.F.

    2014-01-01

    Pulse Shaping Amplifier (PSA) is an essential components in nuclear spectroscopy system. This networks have two functions; to shape the output pulse and performs noise filtering. In this paper, we describes procedure for design and development of a pulse shaping amplifier which can be used for nuclear spectroscopy system. This prototype was developed using high performance electronics devices and assembled on a FR4 type printed circuit board. Performance of this prototype was tested by comparing it with an equivalent commercial spectroscopy amplifier (Model SILENA 7611). The test results show that the performance of this prototype is comparable to the commercial spectroscopic amplifier. (author)

  17. Novel Chiroptical Analysis of Hemoglobin by Surface Enhanced Resonance Raman Optical Activity Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brazhe, Nadezda; Brazhe, Alexey; Sosnovtseva, Olga

    2010-01-01

    The metalloprotein hemoglobin (Hb) was studied using surface enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy (SERRS) and surface enhanced resonance Raman optical activity (SERROA). The SERROA results are analyzed and compared with the SERRS, and the later to the resonance Raman (RRS) performed on Hb...

  18. Charm and Hidden Charm Scalar Resonances in Nuclear Matter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tolos, Laura; Molina, Raquel; Gamermann, Daniel; Oset, Eulogio

    2009-01-01

    We study the properties of the scalar charm resonances D(s0)(2317) and D(0)(2400), and the theoretical hidden charm state X(3700) in nuclear matter. We find that for the D(s0)(2317) and X(3700) resonances, with negligible and small width at zero density, respectively, the width becomes about 100 MeV

  19. Department of Nuclear Spectroscopy and Technique - Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozlowski, T. [Soltan Inst. for Nuclear Studies, Otwock-Swierk (Poland)

    1997-12-31

    Departamental at activity was concentrated on two different regions according to the Department`s name: ``spectroscopy`` (basic research) and ``technology`` (applications). Simultaneously, some effort was focused on teaching. Our research was activated by cooperation with several Polish, European and USA centres and by access to their experimental facilities like the C200 heavy ion cyclotron of the Warsaw University, the heavy ion accelerator complex at GSI in Darmstadt (Germany), PSI cyclotrons in Villigen (Switzerland), NORDBALL, ANL-UND BALL and GAMMASPHERE detectors. However, some results were also obtained using our C30 proton cyclotron, the crystal X-ray spectrometer installed on the SINS EAK electron accelerator and our low background gamma detection facility. On-line radioactive ion sources are under preparation in cooperation with our Department. Nevertheless, it is worthwhile to stress some highlights of 1996. i) Calculations of heavy ion collision dynamics were performed in cooperation with the SINS Theory Department and LBL at Berkeley (USA). It has been shown that the experimental data on the mean kinetic energies of fission fragments are not sufficient to distinguish between one-and two-body dissipation. The mass flow seems to be more sensitive to the dissipation mechanism. ii) A final analysis of the NORDBALL experiments on the excited states of nuclei in the vicinity of {sup 100}Sn. The level structures of {sup 90,101,} {sup 102,103}Cd, {sup 101,103,1O5}In and {sup 105}Sn are reasonably well described by the shell model. iii) The discovery of two high spin isomers in {sup {sup 1}83}Ir and two superdeformed bands in {sup 149}Tb in experiments at LBL on ANL-UND BALL and GAMMASPHERE detectors. iv) Determination of radionuclide concentration in the air, some plants and soil. In particular, the map of concentration of {sup 210}Pb in our soil is an unique achievement. v) Participation in the project of the flue gas treatment plant using the electron beam

  20. Department of Nuclear Spectroscopy and Technique - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlowski, T.

    1997-01-01

    Departamental at activity was concentrated on two different regions according to the Department's name: ''spectroscopy'' (basic research) and ''technology'' (applications). Simultaneously, some effort was focused on teaching. Our research was activated by cooperation with several Polish, European and USA centres and by access to their experimental facilities like the C200 heavy ion cyclotron of the Warsaw University, the heavy ion accelerator complex at GSI in Darmstadt (Germany), PSI cyclotrons in Villigen (Switzerland), NORDBALL, ANL-UND BALL and GAMMASPHERE detectors. However, some results were also obtained using our C30 proton cyclotron, the crystal X-ray spectrometer installed on the SINS EAK electron accelerator and our low background gamma detection facility. On-line radioactive ion sources are under preparation in cooperation with our Department. Nevertheless, it is worthwhile to stress some highlights of 1996. i) Calculations of heavy ion collision dynamics were performed in cooperation with the SINS Theory Department and LBL at Berkeley (USA). It has been shown that the experimental data on the mean kinetic energies of fission fragments are not sufficient to distinguish between one-and two-body dissipation. The mass flow seems to be more sensitive to the dissipation mechanism. ii) A final analysis of the NORDBALL experiments on the excited states of nuclei in the vicinity of 100 Sn. The level structures of 90,101, 102,103 Cd, 101,103,1O5 In and 105 Sn are reasonably well described by the shell model. iii) The discovery of two high spin isomers in 1 83 Ir and two superdeformed bands in 149 Tb in experiments at LBL on ANL-UND BALL and GAMMASPHERE detectors. iv) Determination of radionuclide concentration in the air, some plants and soil. In particular, the map of concentration of 210 Pb in our soil is an unique achievement. v) Participation in the project of the flue gas treatment plant using the electron beam method for the 'Pomorzany' coal power plant

  1. Characterization of human breast disease using phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy and proton magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merchant, T.E.

    1992-01-01

    This thesis provides the fundamental characterization and differentiation of breast tissues using in vivo and ex vivo MR techniques in the hope that these techniques and experimental findings will be used on a larger scale and in a predictive manner in order to improve the specificity of diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. In this dissertation, clinical studies were performed using proton magnetic resonance imaging and phosphorus magnetic resonance spectro-scopy ( 31 P MRS) to characterize and differentiate malignant breast tumors, benign breast tumors and normal breast tissues in vivo. These studies were carried out following the methodical characterization of chemical extracts of malignant breast tumor, benign breast tumor and normal breast parenchymal surgical tissue specimens using high resolution 31 P MRS. Alterations in breast tissue metabolism, as a result of pathological processes, were postulated to be responsible for measurable differences between malignant breast tumors, benign breast tumors and normal breast tissues using magnetic resonance techniques. (author). 365 refs.; 37 figs.; 25 tabs

  2. Atomic resonances in nuclear fusion plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clauser, C. F.; Barrachina, R. O.

    2013-01-01

    We present a study of zero energy resonances of photoionization and radiative recombination cross section for the different species in a fusion reactor. In this context, the interaction potential is screened and its typical length depends on the plasma density and temperature. Due to the nature of these resonances, we propose other atomic processes in which they can take place. Finally, we show the density and temperature conditions where these resonances occur and their probable consequence on the reactor performance. (author)

  3. Nuclear and x-ray spectroscopy with radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, R.W.

    1977-01-01

    Research in nuclear chemistry for 1977 is reviewed. The greatest part of the effort was directed to nuclear spectroscopy (systematics, models, experimental studies), but some work was also done involving fast neutrons and x rays from radioactive sources. Isotopes of Tl, Hg, Au, and Eu were studied in particular. Personnel and publications lists are also included. 5 figures, 1 table

  4. 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller-Lisse, U.G.; Scherr, M.

    2003-01-01

    To provide a brief summary of important technical and biochemical aspects and current clinical applications of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) of the prostate.Material and methods Pertinent radiological and biochemical literature was searched and retrieved via electronic media (medline trademark , pubmed trademark ). Basic concepts of MRS of the prostate and its clinical applications were extracted to provide an overview. The prostate lends itself to MRS due to its unique production, storage, and secretion of citrate. While healthy prostate tissue demonstrates high levels of citrate and low levels of choline that marks cell wall turnover, prostate cancer (PCA) utilizes citrate for energy metabolism and shows high levels of choline. The ratio of (choline + creatine)/citrate differentiates healthy prostate tissue and PCA. The combination of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and 3-dimensional MRS (3D-MRSI or 3D-CSI) of the prostate localizes PCA to a sextant of the peripheral zone of the prostate with sensitivity/specificity of up to 80/80%. Combined MRI and 3D-MRSI exceed the sensitivity and specificity of sextant biopsy of the prostate. When MRS and MRI agree on PCA presence, the positive predictive value is about 90%. In principle, combined MRI and 3D-MRSI recognize and localize remnant or recurrent cancer after hormone therapy, radiation therapy and cryo-surgery. Since it is non-invasive and radiation-free, combined MRI and 3D-MRSI lends itself to the planning of prostate biopsy and therapy as well as to post-therapeutic follow-up. For broad clinical application, it will be necessary to facilitate MRS examinations and their evaluation and make MRS available to a wider range of institutions. (orig.) [de

  5. Decay Spectroscopy for Nuclear Astrophysics: {beta}-delayed Proton Decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trache, L.; Simmons, E.; Spiridon, A.; McCleskey, M.; Roeder, B. T.; Tribble, R. E. [Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77845 (United States); Saastamoinen, A.; Jokinen, A.; Aysto, J. [University of Jyvaskyla, Jyvaskyla (Finland); Davinson, T.; Woods, P. J. [University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Pollacco, E.; Kebbiri, M. [CEA/IRFU Saclay (France); Pascovici, G. [IKP, Universitaet zu Koeln (Germany)

    2011-11-30

    Decay spectroscopy is one of the oldest indirect methods in nuclear astrophysics. We have developed at TAMU techniques to measure beta- and beta-delayed proton decay of sd-shell, proton-rich nuclei. The short-lived radioactive species are produced in-flight, separated, then slowed down (from about 40 MeV/u) and implanted in the middle of very thin Si detectors. These allowed us to measure protons with energies as low as 200 keV from nuclei with lifetimes of 100 ms or less. At the same time we measure gamma-rays up to 8 MeV with high resolution HPGe detectors. We have studied the decay of {sup 23}Al, {sup 27}P, {sup 31}Cl, all important for understanding explosive H-burning in novae. The technique has shown a remarkable selectivity to beta-delayed charged-particle emission and works even at radioactive beam rates of a few pps. The states populated are resonances for the radiative proton capture reactions {sup 22}Na(p,{gamma}){sup 23}Mg(crucial for the depletion of {sup 22}Na in novae), {sup 26m}Al(p,{gamma}){sup 27}Si and {sup 30}P(p,{gamma}){sup 31}S(bottleneck in novae and XRB burning), respectively. More recently we have radically improved the technique using a gas based detector we call AstroBox.

  6. Power quality considerations for nuclear spectroscopy applications: Grounding

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Hernández, J. M.; Ramírez-Jiménez, F. J.; Mondragón-Contreras, L.; López-Callejas, R.; Torres-Bribiesca, M. A.; Peña-Eguiluz, R.

    2013-11-01

    Traditionally the electrical installations are designed for supplying power and to assure the personnel safety. In nuclear analysis laboratories, additional issues about grounding also must be considered for proper operation of high resolution nuclear spectroscopy systems. This paper shows the traditional ways of grounding nuclear spectroscopy systems and through different scenarios, it shows the effects on the more sensitive parameter of these systems: the energy resolution, it also proposes the constant monitoring of a power quality parameter as a way to preserve or to improve the resolution of the systems, avoiding the influence of excessive extrinsic noise.

  7. Systematic study on nuclear resonant scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez, A.A.; Freitas, M.L.

    1974-01-01

    New resonant scattering effect of thermal neutron capture gamma rays from Ti and Fe on Sb, Cu, Se and Ce target were observed. These results together with those published by other authors are summarized and discussed in terms of a possible systematic search for new resonant scattering effects

  8. Evaluation of toxicological effects induced by tributyltin in clam Ruditapes decussatus using high-resolution magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy: Study of metabolic responses in heart tissue and detection of a novel metabolite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanana, H; Simon, G; Kervarec, N; Cérantola, S

    2014-01-01

    Tributyltin (TBT) is a highly toxic pollutant present in many aquatic ecosystems. Its toxicity in mollusks strongly affects their performance and survival. The main purpose of this study was to elucidate the mechanisms of TBT toxicity in clam Ruditapes decussatus by evaluating the metabolic responses of heart tissues, using high-resolution magic angle-spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (HRMAS NMR), after exposure to TBT (10 -9 , 10 -6 and 10 -4 M) during 24 h and 72 h. Results show that responses of clam heart tissue to TBT exposure are not dose dependent. Metabolic profile analyses indicated that TBT 10 -6 M, contrary to the two other doses tested, led to a significant depletion of taurine and betaine. Glycine levels decreased in all clam groups treated with the organotin. It is suggested that TBT abolished the cytoprotective effect of taurine, betaine and glycine thereby inducing cardiomyopathie. Moreover, results also showed that TBT induced increase in the level of alanine and succinate suggesting the occurrence of anaerobiosis particularly in clam group exposed to the highest dose of TBT. Taken together, these results demonstrate that TBT is a potential toxin with a variety of deleterious effects on clam and this organotin may affect different pathways depending to the used dose. The main finding of this study was the appearance of an original metabolite after TBT treatment likely N-glycine-N'-alanine. It is the first time that this molecule has been identified as a natural compound. Its exact role is unknown and remains to be elucidated. We suppose that its formation could play an important role in clam defense response by attenuating Ca 2+ dependent cell death induced by TBT. Therefore this compound could be a promising biomarker for TBT exposure.

  9. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in disturbances of cortical development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaminaga, T.; Kobayashi, M.; Abe, T.

    2001-01-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy( 1 H-MRS) can be used for looking at cerebral metabolites in vivo. However, measurement of concentrations of cerebral metabolites in patients with disturbances of cerebral development have not been successful. Our purpose was to measure the concentrations of cerebral metabolites in such patients. We carried out quantitative 1 H-MRS in eight patients with cortical dysplasia, four with lissencephaly and three with heterotopic grey matter and six age-matched normal controls. Regions of interest for 1 H-MRS were set over the affected cortex in the patients and the occipital cortex in controls. The calculated concentration of N-acetylaspartate (NAA) was significantly lower in the affected cortex in patients with cortical dysplasia (P < 0.05), lissencephaly (P < 0.01), and heterotopia (P < 0.05) than in controls, idnicating a decreased number and/or immaturity or dysfunction of neurones in the affected cortex. The concentration of choline (Cho) was significantly lower in patients with lissencephaly (P < 0.01) than in controls, indicating glial proliferation and/or membrane abnormality. (orig.)

  10. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy of traumatic brain in SD rats model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ke; Li Yangbin; Li Zhiming; Huang Yong; Li Bin; Lu Guangming

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To assess the value and prospect of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in early diagnosis of traumatic brain with traumatic brain model in SD rats. Methods: Traumatic brain modal was established in 40 male SD rats utilizing a weigh-drop device, and MRS was performed before trauma and 4,8,24 and 48 hours after trauma. The ratio of N-acetylaspartate/creatine (NAA/Ct) and choline/creatine (Cho/Cr) were calculated and compared with pathological findings respectively. Results: Axonal changes were confirmed in microscopic study 4 hours after injury. The ratio of NAA/Ct decreased distinctly at 4 hours after trauma, followed by a steadily recover at 8 hours, and no significant change from 24h to 48h. There was no significant change in the ratio of Cho/Cr before and after trauma. Conclusion: MRS can be used to monitor the metabolic changes of brain non-invasively. MRS could play a positive role in early diagnosis, prognosis and follow-up of traumatic brain. (authors)

  11. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in ecstasy (MDMA) users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daumann, Jörg; Fischermann, Thomas; Pilatus, Ulrich; Thron, Armin; Moeller-Hartmann, Walter; Gouzoulis-Mayfrank, Euphrosyne

    2004-05-20

    The popular recreational drug 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ecstasy) has well-recognized neurotoxic effects upon central serotonergic systems in animal studies. In humans, the use of MDMA has been linked to cognitive problems, particularly to deficits in long-term memory and learning. Recent studies with proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) have reported relatively low levels of the neuronal marker N-acetylaspartate (NAA) in MDMA users, however, these results have been ambiguous. Moreover, the only available 1H MRS study of the hippocampus reported normal findings in a small sample of five MDMA users. In the present study, we compared 13 polyvalent ecstasy users with 13 matched controls. We found no differences between the NAA/creatine/phosphocreatine (Cr) ratios of users and controls in neocortical regions, and only a tendency towards lower NAA/Cr ratios in the left hippocampus of MDMA users. Thus, compared with cognitive deficits, 1H MRS appears to be a less sensitive marker of potential neurotoxic damage in ecstasy users. Copyright 2004 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI and Spectroscopy (MRS in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uma Sharma

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is a major health problem in women and early detection is of prime importance. Breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI provides both physical and physiologic tissue features that are useful in discriminating malignant from benign lesions. Contrast enhanced MRI is valuable for diagnosis of small tumors in dense breast and the structural and kinetic parameters improved the specificity of diagnosing benign from malignant lesions. It is a complimentary modality for preoperative staging, to follow response to therapy, to detect recurrences and for screening high risk women. Diffusion, perfusion and MR elastography have been applied to breast lesion characterization and show promise.In-vivo MR spectroscopy (MRS is a valuable method to obtain the biochemical status of normal and diseased tissues. Malignant tissues contain high concentration of choline containing compounds that can be used as a biochemical marker. MRS helps to increase the specificity of MRI in lesions larger than 1cm and to monitor the tumor response. Various MR techniques show promise primarily as adjunct to the existing standard detection techniques, and its acceptability as a screening method will increase if specificity can be improved. This review presents the progress made in different MRI and MRS techniques in breast cancer management.

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI and Spectroscopy (MRS in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uma Sharma

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is a major health problem in women and early detection is of prime importance. Breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI provides both physical and physiologic tissue features that are useful in discriminating malignant from benign lesions. Contrast enhanced MRI is valuable for diagnosis of small tumors in dense breast and the structural and kinetic parameters improved the specificity of diagnosing benign from malignant lesions. It is a complimentary modality for preoperative staging, to follow response to therapy, to detect recurrences and for screening high risk women. Diffusion, perfusion and MR elastography have been applied to breast lesion characterization and show promise. In-vivo MR spectroscopy (MRS is a valuable method to obtain the biochemical status of normal and diseased tissues. Malignant tissues contain high concentration of choline containing compounds that can be used as a biochemical marker. MRS helps to increase the specificity of MRI in lesions larger than 1cm and to monitor the tumor response. Various MR techniques show promise primarily as adjunct to the existing standard detection techniques, and its acceptability as a screening method will increase if specificity can be improved. This review presents the progress made in different MRI and MRS techniques in beast cancer management.

  14. Threedimensional imaging of organ structures by nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waters, W.; Smolorz, J.; Wellner, U.

    1985-01-01

    A simple method for threedimensional imaging of organ structures is presented. The method is based on a special acquisition mode in a nuclear resonance tomograph, exciting layers of 20 cm thickness at different angulations. The display is done by cinematography (which is usually used in nuclear cardiology) projecting the structures in a rotating movement. (orig.) [de

  15. Multinuclear nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic study of cartilage proteoglycans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerner, L.

    1985-01-01

    Hyaline cartilage is a composite material whose major function is to withstand compression while retaining flexibility. Its mechanical properties are affected by tissue hydration and ionic composition. Models of the mechanical behavior of cartilage have incorporated certain assumptions about the interactions of the major components of cartilage: collagen, proteoglycans, water, and cations. To determine the validity of these assumption, the authors have used nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). Two approaches have been used: (a) natural abundance carbon-13 NMR; and (b) NMR of sodium-23, potassium-39, magnesium-25, and calcium-43. Evidence from studies in intact tissues are reinforced by extensive measurements on solutions of proteoglycans and other relevant macromolecules. Based on the measurements of NMR relaxation rates and lineshapes reported here, it is concluded that neither sodium nor potassium interact strongly with bovine nasal proteoglycan aggregates or their substituent glycosaminoglycan chains in solution. Proteoglycans do bind magnesium and calcium. Therefore there is a qualitative difference between monovalent and divalent cations, which is not taken into account by polyelectrolyte models or models for the ionic dependence of mechanical properties. Cation binding to heparin, which has a higher charge density than cartilage proteoglycans, was also studied. The results presented here establish that heparin binds sodium, magnesium, and calcium.

  16. Nuclear laser spectroscopy with on-line ion traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, M.; Nakamura, T.; Ohtani, S.

    1996-01-01

    The hyperfine structure of atoms informs us various static characteristics of nuclei, particularly for electro-magnetic moments and their distributions. We have been developing an experimental method to perform laser-microwave double-resonance spectroscopy for the hyperfine structure of Be and Ca isotopes, including unstable nuclei. The purpose and the status of the experiments are described. (orig.)

  17. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies at high pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonas, J.

    1980-01-01

    Recent advances in the field of NMR spectroscopy at high pressure are reviewed. After a brief discussion of two novel experimental techniques, the main focus of this review is on several specific studies which illustrate the versatility and power of this high pressure field. Experimental aspects of NMR measurements at high pressure and high temperature and the techniques for the high resolution NMR spectroscopy at high pressure are discussed. An overview of NMR studies of the dynamic structure of simple polyatomic liquids and hydrogen bonded liquids is followed by a discussion of high resolution spectroscopy at high pressure. Examples of NMR studies of disordered organic solids and polymers conclude the review. (author)

  18. High-resolution inverse Raman and resonant-wave-mixing spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahn, L.A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    These research activities consist of high-resolution inverse Raman spectroscopy (IRS) and resonant wave-mixing spectroscopy to support the development of nonlinear-optical techniques for temperature and concentration measurements in combustion research. Objectives of this work include development of spectral models of important molecular species needed to perform coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) measurements and the investigation of new nonlinear-optical processes as potential diagnostic techniques. Some of the techniques being investigated include frequency-degenerate and nearly frequency-degenerate resonant four-wave-mixing (DFWM and NDFWM), and resonant multi-wave mixing (RMWM).

  19. Contraband Detection with Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence: Feasibility and Impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruet, J; Lange, D

    2007-01-01

    In this report they show that cargo interrogation systems developed to thwart trafficking of illicit nuclear materials could also be powerful tools in the larger fight against contraband smuggling. In particular, in addition to detecting special nuclear materials, cargo scanning systems that exploit nuclear resonance fluorescence to detect specific isotopes can be used to help find: chemical weapons; some drugs as well as some chemicals regulated under the controlled substances act; precious metals; materials regulated under export control laws; and commonly trafficked fluorocarbons

  20. 40. Polish Seminar on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Its Applications. Cracow, 3-4 December 2007. Abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    The Report comprises abstracts of 59 communications presented during the 40. Polish Seminar on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Its Applications, held on December 3-4, 2007 in Cracow (PL). They cover a variety of research fields, including magnetic resonance imaging in vivo, applications of NMR spectroscopy to medical diagnosis, studies on molecular properties of different materials as well as quantum chemical calculations of NMR parameters.

  1. 40. Polish Seminar on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Its Applications. Cracow, 3-4 December 2007. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The Report comprises abstracts of 59 communications presented during the 40. Polish Seminar on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Its Applications, held on December 3-4, 2007 in Cracow (PL). They cover a variety of research fields, including magnetic resonance imaging in vivo, applications of NMR spectroscopy to medical diagnosis, studies on molecular properties of different materials as well as quantum chemical calculations of NMR parameters

  2. Relativistic, QED and nuclear effects in highly charged ions revealed by resonant electron-ion recombination in storage rings

    OpenAIRE

    Schippers, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    Dielectronic recombination (DR) of few-electron ions has evolved into a sensitive spectroscopic tool for highly charged ions. This is due to technological advances in electron-beam preparation and ion-beam cooling techniques at heavy-ion storage rings. Recent experiments prove unambiguously that DR collision spectroscopy has become sensitive to 2nd order QED and to nuclear effects. This review discusses the most recent developments in high-resolution spectroscopy of low-energy DR resonances, ...

  3. N-acetylated metabolites in urine: proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic study on patients with inborn errors of metabolism.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelke, U.F.H.; Liebrand-van Sambeek, M.L.F.; Jong, J.G.N. de; Leroy, J.G.; Morava, E.; Smeitink, J.A.M.; Wevers, R.A.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is no comprehensive analytical technique to analyze N-acetylated metabolites in urine. Many of these compounds are involved in inborn errors of metabolism. In the present study, we examined the potential of proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H-NMR) spectroscopy as a tool to

  4. Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Findings of Children with Kernicterus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarı, Sahabettin; Yavuz, Alpaslan; Batur, Aabdussamet; Bora, Aydın; Caksen, Huseyin

    2015-01-01

    The term kernicterus, or bilirubin encephalopathy, is used to describe pathological bilirubin staining of the basal ganglia, brain stem, and cerebellum, and is associated with hyperbilirubinemia. Kernicterus generally occurs in untreated hyperbilirubinemia or cases where treatment is delayed. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based studies have shown characteristic findings in kernicterus. The objective of our study was to describe the role of 1 H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in demonstrating these metabolic changes and to review conventional MRI findings of kernicterus. Forty-eight pediatric cases with kernicterus were included in this study. MRI and MRS examinations were performed on variable dates (10–29 days after birth). NAA, Cr, Cho, NAA/Cr, NAA/Cho, and Cho/Cr values were evaluated visually and by computer analysis. There was no statistically significant difference between the NAA and Cho levels in the acute kernicterus patients and the control group (healthy patients), whereas both were significantly elevated in the chronic kernicterus patients. Both the mean NAA/Cr and Cho/Cr ratio values were significantly higher in the acute and chronic cases compared to the control group. The NAA/Cho ratio value was statistically lower in the acute cases than in the control group while it was similar in the chronic cases. Conventional MR imaging and 1 H-MRS are important complementary tools in the diagnostics of neonatal bilirubin encephalopathy. This study provided important information for applying these MR modalities in the evaluation of neonates with bilirubin encephalopathy

  5. Multivoxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in heat stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, J.; Zhang, X.Y.; Wang, B.; Zou, Z.M.; Li, H.F.; Wang, P.Y.; Xia, J.K.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To assess the role of proton MR spectroscopy (MRS) in the detection of changes in metabolite levels of the cerebellum after heat stroke (HS). Materials and methods: The study group consisted of eight patients after HS, with a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of 3–9. The MR studies were performed with a 1.5 T system. MR spectra were recorded from a normal-appearing cerebellum region. Spectra from patients were compared with a control group including seven age-matched healthy volunteers recorded with the same techniques. Metabolites ratios including N-acetyl aspartate/creatine (NAA/Cr), N-acetyl aspartate/creatine2 (NAA/Cr2), choline/creatine (Cho/Cr), choline/creatine2 (Cho/Cr2), and N-acetyl aspartate/choline (NAA/Cho) were calculated and the differences between the two groups were evaluated using the Mann–Whitney U-test. Pearson correlation analysis was used to analyse the relationship between NAA/Cr ratios and GCS scores for eight patients after HS. Results: In the cerebellum of the patients after HS, NAA/Cr ratios were found to be significantly decreased compared to normal controls (p = 0.004) and Cho/Cr ratios were found to be decreased compared to normal controls (p = 0.032). Significant positive correlation was found between NAA/Cr ratios and GCS scores for eight patients after HS (r = 0.748, p = 0.033). Conclusions: Metabolite abnormalities were seen in normal-appearing cerebellum structures in patients after HS. Proton MRS is a useful tool for evaluating major changes in metabolite levels of the cerebellum after HS and the severity of the disease can be effectively evaluated by NAA/Cr ratios. - Highlights: • Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy offers important information in patients with heat stroke. • Significantly different NAA/Cr ratios were found between heat stroke and controls. • The severity of heat stroke can be effectively evaluated by NAA/Cr ratios

  6. Laser resonance ionization spectroscopy on lutetium for the MEDICIS project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gadelshin, V., E-mail: gadelshin@uni-mainz.de [University of Mainz, Institute of Physics (Germany); Cocolios, T. [KU Leuven, Institute for Nuclear and Radiation Physics (Belgium); Fedoseev, V. [CERN, EN Department (Switzerland); Heinke, R.; Kieck, T. [University of Mainz, Institute of Physics (Germany); Marsh, B. [CERN, EN Department (Switzerland); Naubereit, P. [University of Mainz, Institute of Physics (Germany); Rothe, S.; Stora, T. [CERN, EN Department (Switzerland); Studer, D. [University of Mainz, Institute of Physics (Germany); Duppen, P. Van [KU Leuven, Institute for Nuclear and Radiation Physics (Belgium); Wendt, K. [University of Mainz, Institute of Physics (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    The MEDICIS-PROMED Innovative Training Network under the Horizon 2020 EU program aims to establish a network of early stage researchers, involving scientific exchange and active cooperation between leading European research institutions, universities, hospitals, and industry. Primary scientific goal is the purpose of providing and testing novel radioisotopes for nuclear medical imaging and radionuclide therapy. Within a closely linked project at CERN, a dedicated electromagnetic mass separator system is presently under installation for production of innovative radiopharmaceutical isotopes at the new CERN-MEDICIS laboratory, directly adjacent to the existing CERN-ISOLDE radioactive ion beam facility. It is planned to implement a resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) to ensure high efficiency and unrivaled purity in the production of radioactive ions. To provide a highly efficient ionization process, identification and characterization of a specific multi-step laser ionization scheme for each individual element with isotopes of interest is required. The element lutetium is of primary relevance, and therefore was considered as first candidate. Three two-step excitation schemes for lutetium atoms are presented in this work, and spectroscopic results are compared with data of other authors.

  7. Laser resonance ionization spectroscopy on lutetium for the MEDICIS project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadelshin, V.; Cocolios, T.; Fedoseev, V.; Heinke, R.; Kieck, T.; Marsh, B.; Naubereit, P.; Rothe, S.; Stora, T.; Studer, D.; Van Duppen, P.; Wendt, K.

    2017-11-01

    The MEDICIS-PROMED Innovative Training Network under the Horizon 2020 EU program aims to establish a network of early stage researchers, involving scientific exchange and active cooperation between leading European research institutions, universities, hospitals, and industry. Primary scientific goal is the purpose of providing and testing novel radioisotopes for nuclear medical imaging and radionuclide therapy. Within a closely linked project at CERN, a dedicated electromagnetic mass separator system is presently under installation for production of innovative radiopharmaceutical isotopes at the new CERN-MEDICIS laboratory, directly adjacent to the existing CERN-ISOLDE radioactive ion beam facility. It is planned to implement a resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) to ensure high efficiency and unrivaled purity in the production of radioactive ions. To provide a highly efficient ionization process, identification and characterization of a specific multi-step laser ionization scheme for each individual element with isotopes of interest is required. The element lutetium is of primary relevance, and therefore was considered as first candidate. Three two-step excitation schemes for lutetium atoms are presented in this work, and spectroscopic results are compared with data of other authors.

  8. Unusual Synthetic Pathway for an {Fe(NO)2}9 Dinitrosyl Iron Complex (DNIC) and Insight into DNIC Electronic Structure via Nuclear Resonance Vibrational Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Speelman, Amy L.; Zhang, Bo; Silakov, Alexey; Skodje, Kelsey M.; Alp, E. Ercan; Zhao, Jiyong; Hu, Michael Y.; Kim, Eunsuk; Krebs, Karsten; Lehnert, Nicolai

    2016-06-06

    Dinitrosyl iron complexes (DNICs) are among the most abundant NO-derived cellular species. Monomeric DNICs can exist in the {Fe(NO)2}9 or {Fe(NO)2}10 oxidation state (in the Enemark -Feltham notation). However, experimental studies of analogous DNICs in both oxidation states are rare, which prevents a thorough understanding of the di ff erences in the electronic structures of these species. Here, the {Fe(NO)2}9 DNIC [Fe(dmp)(NO)2](OTf) ( 1 ; dmp = 2,9-dimethyl-1,10- phenanthroline) is synthesized from a ferrous precursor via an unusual pathway, involving disproportionation of an {FeNO}7 complex to yield the {Fe(NO)2}9 DNIC and a ferric species, which is subsequently reduced by NO gas to generate a ferrous complex that re-enters the reaction cycle. In contrast to most {Fe(NO)2}9 DNICs with neutral N-donor ligands, 1 exhibits high solution stability and can be characterized structurally and spectroscopically. Reduction of 1 yields the corresponding {Fe(NO)2}10 DNIC [Fe(dmp)(NO)2](2). The Mo ssbauer isomer shift of 2 is 0.08 mm/s smaller than that of 1 , which indicates that the iron center is slightly more oxidized in the reduced complex. The nuclear resonance vibrational spectra (NRVS) of 1 and 2 are distinct and provide direct experimental insight into di ff erences in bonding in these complexes. In particular, the symmetric out-of-plane Fe -N - O bending mode is shifted to higher energy by 188 cm-1 in 2 in comparison to 1 . Using quantum chemistry centered normal coordinate analysis (QCC-NCA), this is shown to arise from an increase in Fe - NO bond order and a sti ff ening of the Fe(NO)2 unit upon reduction of 1 to 2 . DFT calculations demonstrate that the changes in bonding arise from an iron- centered reduction which leads to a distinct increase in Fe - NO π -back-bonding in

  9. Resonance internal conversion as a way of accelerating nuclear processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpeshin, F.F.

    2006-01-01

    Theory of resonance conversion is presented. Being a natural extension of the traditional internal conversion into the subthreshold area, resonance conversion in a number of cases strongly affects the nuclear processes. Moreover, concentrating the transition strength on the narrow bands corresponding to the spectral atomic lines, it offers a unique tool capable of accelerating nuclear decay rates. Furthermore, along with the conventional nonradiative process of nuclear excitation through NEET and its reverse, TEEN, resonance conversion offers an appropriate mathematics for consideration of a number of cross-invariant processes involving both nuclei and electrons: excitation and deexcitation of the nuclei by hyperfine magnetic field, nuclear spin mixing, hyperfine interaction and magnetic anomalies in the atomic spectra, collisional nuclear excitation via ionization of the shells in the muon decay in the orbit, etc. The mechanisms of the optical pumping of the isomers are also considered, as well as triggering their energy in the resonance field of a laser. The effect is especially high in the hydrogen-like heavy ions due to practical absence of any damping of the resonance. The theory is also generalized to the case of the discrete Auger transitions [ru

  10. Photochemical cycle of bacteriorhodopsin studied by resonance Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockburger, M; Klusmann, W; Gattermann, H; Massig, G; Peters, R

    1979-10-30

    Individual species of the photochemical cycle of bacteriorhodopsin, a retinal-protein complex of Halobacteria, were studied in aqueous suspensions of the "purple membrane" at room temperature by resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopy with flow systems. Two pronounced deuterium shifts were found in the RR spectra of the all-trans complex BR-570 in H2O-D2O suspensions. The first is ascribed to C=NH+ (C=ND+) stretching vibrations of the protonated Schiff base which links retinal to opsin. The second is assigned tentatively to an "X-H" ("X-D") bending mode, where "X" is an atom which carries an exchangeable proton. A RR spectrum of the 13-cis-retinal complex "BR-548" could be deduced from spectra of the dark-adapted purple membrane. The RR spectrum of the M-412 intermediate was monitored in a double-beam pump-probe experiment. The main vibrational features of the intermediate M' in the reaction M-412 in equilibrium hv M' leads to delta BR-570 could be deduced from a photostationary mixture of M-412 and M'. Difference procedures were applied to obtain RR spectra of the L-550 intermediate and of two new long-lived species, R1'-590 and R2-550. From kinetic data it is suggested that T1'-590 links the proton-translocating cycle to the "13-cis" cycle of BR-548. The protonation and isomeric states of the different species are discussed in light of the new spectroscopic and kinetic data. It is found that conformational changes during the photochemical cycle play an important role.

  11. Acoustic Resonance Spectroscopy (ARS) Munition Classification System enhancements. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vela, O.A.; Huggard, J.C.

    1997-09-18

    Acoustic Resonance Spectroscopy (ARS) is a non-destructive evaluation technology developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This technology has resulted in three generations of instrumentation, funded by the Defense Special Weapons Agency (DSWA), specifically designed for field identification of chemical weapon (CW) munitions. Each generation of ARS instrumentation was developed with a specific user in mind. The ARS1OO was built for use by the U.N. Inspection Teams going into Iraq immediately after the Persian Gulf War. The ARS200 was built for use in the US-Russia Bilateral Chemical Weapons Treaty (the primary users for this system are the US Onsite Inspection Agency (OSIA) and their Russian counterparts). The ARS300 was built with the requirements of the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) in mind. Each successive system is an improved version of the previous system based on learning the weaknesses of each and, coincidentally, on the fact that more time was available to do a requirements analysis and the necessary engineering development. The ARS300 is at a level of development that warrants transferring the technology to a commercial vendor. Since LANL will supply the computer software to the selected vendor, it is possible for LANL to continue to improve the decision algorithms, add features where necessary, and adjust the user interface before the final transfer occurs. This paper describes the current system, ARS system enhancements, and software enhancements. Appendices contain the Operations Manual (software Version 3.01), and two earlier reports on enhancements.

  12. Molecular subgroups of medulloblastoma identification using noninvasive magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blüml, Stefan; Margol, Ashley S; Sposto, Richard; Kennedy, Rebekah J; Robison, Nathan J; Vali, Marzieh; Hung, Long T; Muthugounder, Sakunthala; Finlay, Jonathan L; Erdreich-Epstein, Anat; Gilles, Floyd H; Judkins, Alexander R; Krieger, Mark D; Dhall, Girish; Nelson, Marvin D; Asgharzadeh, Shahab

    2016-01-01

    Medulloblastomas in children can be categorized into 4 molecular subgroups with differing clinical characteristics, such that subgroup determination aids in prognostication and risk-adaptive treatment strategies. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is a widely available, noninvasive tool that is used to determine the metabolic characteristics of tumors and provide diagnostic information without the need for tumor tissue. In this study, we investigated the hypothesis that metabolite concentrations measured by MRS would differ between molecular subgroups of medulloblastoma and allow accurate subgroup determination. MRS was used to measure metabolites in medulloblastomas across molecular subgroups (SHH = 12, Groups 3/4 = 17, WNT = 1). Levels of 14 metabolites were analyzed to determine those that were the most discriminant for medulloblastoma subgroups in order to construct a multivariable classifier for distinguishing between combined Group 3/4 and SHH tumors. Medulloblastomas across molecular subgroups revealed distinct spectral features. Group 3 and Group 4 tumors demonstrated metabolic profiles with readily detectable taurine, lower levels of lipids, and high levels of creatine. SHH tumors showed prominent choline and lipid with low levels of creatine and little or no evidence of taurine. A 5-metabolite subgroup classifier inclusive of creatine, myo-inositol, taurine, aspartate, and lipid 13a was developed that could discriminate between Group 3/4 and SHH medulloblastomas with excellent accuracy (cross-validated area under the curve [AUC] = 0.88). The data show that medulloblastomas of Group 3/4 differ metabolically as measured using MRS when compared with SHH molecular subgroups. MRS is a useful and accurate tool to determine medulloblastoma molecular subgroups. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in Sjögren-Larsson Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fesih Aktar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Sjögren-Larsson syndrome (SLS is a rare neurocutane­ous disease showing an autosomal recessive transmis­sion due to a lack of fatty acid aldehyde dehydrogenase. Spastic diplegia or triplegia, mental retardation and con­genital lamellar ichthyosis are the major findings of the disease. The syndrome may be accompanied by various eye and teeth features, skeletal system anomaly, speak­ing defects, hypertelorism and epilepsy. A 9-month male patient has been hospitalized for convulsion and flaking on body. The patient history showed that flaking skin thickening and peeling was started at the birth, and he suffered a right-side focused seizure when he was three month-old and he was treated with phenobarbital and car­bamazepine upon the epilepsy diagnosis. Wide ichthyo­sis, hypertelorism and bilateral simian line were observed in the physical examination. Bilateral punctuate lesions in cornea, pigment epithelial atrophy in the right eye and esotropia in the left eye have been determined during the eye examination. An epiteliform anomaly has been ob­served in the left hemisphere by electroencephalography. In brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, an increase in cerebral-cerebellar brain parenchyma and T1-T2 relax­ation time and in the signal in corpus callosum (delayed myelination have been determined. With the observa­tion of the white matter in centrum semi oval using brain MRI spectroscopy, signs of a sphingolipid peak at 1.3 ppm have been observed. An SLS diagnosis has been proposed upon clinical and laboratory observations. We want to emphasize on the fact that in epilepsy cases with ichthyosis, SLS should be considered.

  14. Krypton isotope analysis using near-resonant stimulated Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitehead, C.A.; Cannon, B.D.; Wacker, J.F.

    1994-12-01

    A method for measuring low relative abundances of 85 Kr in one liter or less samples of air has been under development here at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The goal of the Krypton Isotope Laser Analysis (KILA) method is to measure ratios of 10 -10 or less of 85 Kr to more abundant stable krypton. Mass spectrometry and beta counting are the main competing technologies used in rare-gas trace analysis and are limited in application by such factors as sample size, counting times, and selectivity. The use of high-resolution lasers to probe hyperfine levels to determine isotopic abundance has received much attention recently. In this study, we report our progress on identifying and implementing techniques for trace 85 Kr analysis on small gas samples in a static cell as well as limitations on sensitivity and selectivity for the technique. High-resolution pulsed and cw lasers are employed in a laser-induced fluorescence technique that preserves the original sample. This technique, is based on resonant isotopic depletion spectroscopy (RIDS) in which one isotope is optically depleted while preserving the population of a less abundant isotope. The KILA method consists of three steps. In the first step, the 1s 5 metastable level of krypton is populated via radiative cascade following two-photon excitation of the 2p 6 energy level. Next, using RBDS, the stable krypton isotopes are optically depleted to the ground state through the 1s 4 level with the bulk of the 85 Kr population being preserved. Finally, the remaining metastable population is probed to determine 85 Kr concentration. The experimental requirements for each of these steps are outlined below

  15. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopic Characterization of Nanomaterials and Biopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Chengchen

    Nanomaterials have attracted considerable attention in recent research due to their wide applications in various fields such as material science, physical science, electrical engineering, and biomedical engineering. Researchers have developed many methods for synthesizing different types of nanostructures and have further applied them in various applications. However, in many cases, a molecular level understanding of nanoparticles and their associated surface chemistry is lacking investigation. Understanding the surface chemistry of nanomaterials is of great significance for obtaining a better understanding of the properties and functions of the nanomaterials. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy can provide a familiar means of looking at the molecular structure of molecules bound to surfaces of nanomaterials as well as a method to determine the size of nanoparticles in solution. Here, a combination of NMR spectroscopic techniques including one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopies was used to investigate the surface chemistry and physical properties of some common nanomaterials, including for example, thiol-protected gold nanostructures and biomolecule-capped silica nanoparticles. Silk is a natural protein fiber that features unique properties such as excellent mechanical properties, biocompatibility, and non-linear optical properties. These appealing physical properties originate from the silk structure, and therefore, the structural analysis of silk is of great importance for revealing the mystery of these impressive properties and developing novel silk-based biomaterials as well. Here, solid-state NMR spectroscopy was used to elucidate the secondary structure of silk proteins in N. clavipes spider dragline silk and B. mori silkworm silk. It is found that the Gly-Gly-X (X=Leu, Tyr, Gln) motif in spider dragline silk is not in a beta-sheet or alpha-helix structure and is very likely to be present in a disordered structure with evidence for 31-helix

  16. 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the brain in paediatrics: The diagnosis of creatine deficiencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijens, P.E.; Oudkerk, M.

    2005-01-01

    The diagnosis of creatine deficiencies, a paediatric application of magnetic resonance spectroscopy that has already become a diagnostic tool in clinical practice, is reviewed and illustrated with results from recent examinations

  17. Electron spin resonance (ESR), electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) and general triple resonance of irradiated biocarbonates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schramm, D.U.; Rossi, A.M.

    1996-01-01

    Several irradiated bicarbonates were studied by magnetic resonance techniques. Seven paramagnetic species, attributed to CO 2 - , SO 2 - and SO 3 - were identified. Comparison between radiation induced defects in bioaragonites and aragonite single-crystals show that isotropic and orthorhombic CO 2 - centers with broad line spectra are not produced in the latter samples. Vibrational and rotational properties of isotropic CO 2 - centers were studied from low temperature Q-band spectras. Vibrational frequency is determined from the 13 CO 2 - hyperfine spectrum and yielded ν 1.54 x 10 13 s -1 . The correlation time for isotropic CO 2 - , τc) = 1.2 x 10 -11 s (T = 300 K0, is typical of radicals rotating in liquids. ENDOR and General Triple spectroscopy show that orthorhombic CO 2 - centres are surrounded by water molecules located in the second nearest CO 2 2- sites at 5.14, 5.35 and 6.02 A. Water molecules replacing carbonates or as liquid inclusion of growth solution in local crystal imperfections may be responsible for the variety of orthorhombic and isotropic CO 2 - species, respectively. (author)

  18. Quantitative determination of Quarternary alicyclic carbon atoms in coal and oil using nuclear magnetic resonance /sup 13/C method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afonina, T.V.; Kushnarev, D.F.; Randin, O.I.; Shishkov, V.F.; Kalabin, G.A.

    1986-09-01

    Possibility is indicated for utilizing nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for quantitative determination of Quarternary aliphatic carbon atoms in heavy hydrocarbon fractions of oil and coal extracts. C/sub n/, CH, CH/sub 2/ and CH/sub 3/ content in coal and oil samples are determined and corresponding resonance lines are referred to individual structural fragments (on the basis of nuclear magnetic resonance /sup 13/C spectra) of known saturated hydrocarbons. Tests were carried out on chloroform extracts of Irsha-Borodinsk coal, Mungunsk coal and paraffin and cycloparaffin of Sivinsk oil (b.p. over 550 C) fractions. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectra were obtained using Burker WP 200 spectrometer (50.13 MHz frequency). Results of the tests are given. 11 references.

  19. Neutron resonance analysis for nuclear safeguards and security applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradela, Carlos; Heyse, Jan; Kopecky, Stefan; Schillebeeckx, Peter; Harada, Hideo; Kitatani, Fumito; Koizumi, Mitsuo; Tsuchiya, Harufumi

    2017-09-01

    Neutron-induced reactions can be used to study the properties of nuclear materials of interest in the fields of nuclear safeguards and security. The elemental and isotopic composition of these materials can be determined by using the presence of resonance structures. This idea is the basis of two non-destructive analysis techniques which have been developed at the GELINA neutron time-of-flight facility at JRC-Geel: Neutron Resonance Capture Analysis (NRCA) and Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis (NRTA). A combination of NRTA and NRCA has been proposed for the characterisation of particle-like debris of melted fuel formed in severe nuclear accidents. In this work, we present a quantitative validation of the NRTA technique which was used to determine the areal densities of Pu enriched reference samples used for safeguards applications. Less than 2% bias has been obtained for the fissile isotopes, with well-known total cross sections.

  20. Baryons and baryon resonances in nuclear matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenske, Horst; Dhar, Madhumita; Gaitanos, Theodoros; Cao, Xu

    2018-01-01

    Theoretical approaches to the production of hyperons and baryon resonances in elementary hadronic reactions and heavy ion collisions are reviewed. The focus is on the production and interactions of baryons in the lowest SU(3) flavor octet and states from the next higher SU(3) flavor decuplet. Approaches using the SU(3) formalism for interactions of mesons and baryons and effective field theory for hyperons are discussed. An overview of application to free space and in-medium baryon-baryon interactions is given and the relation to a density functional theory is indicated. The intimate connection between baryon resonances and strangeness production is shown first for reactions on the nucleon. Pion-induced hypernuclear reactions are shown to proceed essentially through the excitation of intermediate nucleon resonances. Transport theory in conjunction with a statistical fragmentation model is an appropriate description of hypernuclear production in antiproton and heavy ion induced fragmentation reactions. The excitation of subnuclear degrees of freedom in peripheral heavy ion collisions at relativistic energies is reviewed. The status of in-medium resonance physics is discussed.

  1. Quantitative dosing by nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomon, I.

    1958-01-01

    The measurement of the absolute concentration of a heavy water reference containing approximately 99.8 per cent of D 2 O has been performed, by an original magnetic resonance method ('Adiabatic fast passage method') with a precision of 5.10 -5 on the D 2 O concentration. (author) [fr

  2. Parent di-nuclear quasimolecular states as exotic resonant states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grama, N.

    2002-01-01

    It in shown that the parent di-nuclear quasimolecular state is an exotic resonant state that corresponds to a S-matrix pole in the neighbourhood of an attractor in the k-plane. The properties of the parent quasimolecular states i.e. energy, widths, deviation from the linear dependence of the energy on l(l + 1) doorway character and criteria for observability, result naturally from the general properties of the exotic resonant states. (author)

  3. NMR magnetic field controller for pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheler, G.; Anacker, M.

    1975-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance controller for magnetic fields, which can also be used for pulsed NMR investigations, is described. A longtime stability of 10 -7 is achieved. The control signal is generated by a modified time sharing circuit with resonance at the first side band of the 2 H signal. An exact calibration of the magnetic field is achieved by the variation of the H 1 - or of the time-sharing frequency. (author)

  4. Apparatus and method for nuclear magnetic resonance scanning and mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damadian, R.V.

    1983-01-01

    An improved apparatus and method is disclosed for analyzing the chemical and structural composition of a specimen including whole-body specimens which may include, for example, living mammals, utilizing nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. A magnetic field space necessary to obtain an NMR signal characteristic of the chemical structure of the specimen is focused to provide a resonance domain of selectable size, which may then be moved in a pattern with respect to the specimen to scan the specimen

  5. Substitution effect in nuclear magnetic resonance of C-13: α methoxicyclohexanones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Holland, M.A.G.

    1984-01-01

    Eletronic and steric interactions between the carbonyl and methoxyl groups in α-methoxicyclohexanones by H-1 and C-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (n.m.r) is studied. Interpretation of H-1 n.m.r measurements based on the carbonyl group anisotropy is made. The asigment of spectral lines to specific nuclear by Lanthanide Shift Reagent Experiments is confirmed. Interpretation of C-13 n.m.r. spectra with respect to molecular effects and emphirical relationships associated with the substituent was analysed. The C-13 chemical shift asignment by comparison with results of partially (SFORD) and fully decompled spectra and also by relating the measured chemical shift with values cited in the literature for similar compounds are made. A qualitative study using I.R. spectroscopy in attempt to evaluate the predominance of one the conformers of the studied compounds in solutions of n-hexan and chloroform is made. (M.J.C.) [pt

  6. Carbon-deuterium rotational-echo double-resonance NMR spectroscopy of lyophilized aspartame formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luthra, Suman A; Utz, Marcel; Gorman, Eric M; Pikal, Michael J; Munson, Eric J; Lubach, Joseph W

    2012-01-01

    In this study, changes in the local conformation of aspartame were observed in annealed lyophilized glasses by monitoring changes in the distance between two labeled sites using C-(2)H rotational-echo double-resonance (REDOR) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Confirmation that the REDOR experiments were producing accurate distance measurement was ensured by measuring the (13)C-(15)N distance in glycine. The experiment was further verified by measuring the REDOR dephasing curve on (13)C-(2)H methionine. (13)C-(2)H REDOR dephasing curves were then measured on lyophilized aspartame-disaccharide formulations. In aspartame-sucrose formulation, the internuclear distances increased upon annealing, which correlated with decreased chemical reactivity. By contrast, annealing had only a minimal effect on the dephasing curve in aspartame-trehalose formulation. The results show that stability is a function of both mobility and local structure (conformation), even in a small molecule system such as lyophilized aspartame-sucrose. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Study of the Neutron Deficient Pb and Bi Isotopes by Simultaneous Atomic- and Nuclear-Spectroscopy

    CERN Multimedia

    Kessler, T

    2002-01-01

    We propose to study systematically nuclear properties of the neutron deficient lead $^{183-189}$Pb, $^{191g}$Pb, $^{193g}$Pb and bismuth isotopes $^{188-200}$Bi by atomic spectroscopy with the ISOLDE resonance ionisation laser ion source (RILIS) combined with simultaneous nuclear spectroscopy at the detection set-up. The main focus is the determination of the mean square charge radii of $^{183-190}$Pb and $^{188-193}$Bi from which the influence of low-lying intruder states should become obvious. Also the nuclear spin and magnetic moments of ground-states and long-lived isomers will be determined unambiguously through evaluation of the hyperfine structure, and new isomers could be discovered. The decay properties of these nuclei can be measured by $\\alpha$-$\\gamma$ and $\\beta$-$\\gamma$ spectroscopy. With this data at hand, possible shape transitions around mid-shell at N$\\sim$104 will be studied. This data is crucial for the direct test of nuclear theory in the context of intruder state influence (e.g. energy ...

  8. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence and Isotopic Mapping of Containers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Micah S.; McNabb, Dennis P.

    2009-03-01

    National security programs have expressed interest in developing systems to isotopically map shipping containers, fuel assemblies, and waste barrels for various materials including special nuclear material (SNM). Current radiographic systems offer little more than an ambiguous density silhouette of a container's contents. In this paper we will present a system being developed at LLNL to isotopically map containers using the nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) method. Recent experimental measurements on NRF strengths in SNM are discussed.

  9. Nuclear resonance scattering of synchrotron radiation as a unique electronic, structural and thermodynamic probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alp, E. Ercan; Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Toellner, Thomas S.; Zhao, Jiyong; Leu, Bogdan M.

    2012-01-01

    Discovery of Moessbauer effect in a nuclear transition was a remarkable development. It revealed how long-lived nuclear states with relatively low energies in the kiloelectron volt (keV) region can be excited without recoil. This new effect had a unique feature involving a coupling between nuclear physics and solid-state physics, both in terms of physics and sociology. Physics coupling originates from the fact that recoilless emission and absorption or resonance is only possible if the requirement that nuclei have to be bound in a lattice with quantized vibrational states is fulfilled, and that the finite electron density on the nucleus couples to nuclear degrees of freedom leading to hyperfine interactions. thus, Moessbauer spectroscopy allows peering into solid-state effects using unique nuclear transitions. Sociological aspects of this coupling had been equally startling and fruitful. The interaction between diverse scientific communities, who learned to use Moessbauer spectroscopy proved to be very valuable. For example, biologists, geologists, chemists, physics, materials scientists, and archeologists, all sharing a common spectroscopic technique, also learned to appreciate the beauty and intricacies of each other's fields. As a laboratory-based technique, Moessbauer spectroscopy matured by the end of the 1970s. Further exciting developments took place when accelerator-based techniques were employed, like synchrotron radiation or 'in-beam'Moessbauer experiments with implanted radioactive ions. More recently, two Moessbauer spectrometers on the surface of the Mars kept the technique vibrant and viable up until present time. In this chapter, the authors look into some of the unique aspects of nuclear resonance excited with synchrotron radiation as a probe of condensed matter, including magnetism, valence, vibrations, and lattice dynamics, and review the development of nuclear resonance inelastic x-ray scattering (NRIXS) and synchrotron Moessbauer spectroscopy

  10. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) for the evaluation of treatment of brain tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houkin, K.; Kamada, K.; Sawamura, Y.; Iwasaki, Y.; Abe, H.; Kashiwaba, T.

    1995-01-01

    We investigated metabolic changes in brain tumours following treatment, using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. In meningiomas, effective therapeutic embolisation led to an acute increase in lactate. In radiosensitive tumours such as malignant lymphoma, a decrease in lactate and in increase in N-acetyl-aspartate occurred after radiotherapy, which preceded changes observed on magnetic resonance imaging. On the other hand, no significant changes in spectral patterns were observed in malignant gliomas resistant to therapy. Tissue characterisation of brain tumours by spectral patterns on proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy remains controversial. However, we have shown it to be sensitive to metabolic changes following treatment, which may reflect the efficacy of the therapy. (orig.)

  11. Breathers in Josephson junction ladders: Resonances and electromagnetic wave spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miroshnichenko, A. E.; Flach, S.; Fistul, M.

    2001-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of the resonant interaction between dynamical localized states (discrete breathers) and linear electromagnetic excitations (EE's) in Josephson junction ladders. By making use of direct numerical simulations we find that such an interaction manifests itself by resonant...

  12. Laser induced nuclear orientation: intersection of laser and nuclear spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, M.; Pappas, P.; Field, M.S.

    1978-01-01

    The application of lasers to the study of hyperfine structure is reviewed with emphasis placed on the ability of the laser beam to align the nuclei in a sample. This aligning effect is especially useful if the nuclei are unstable as then the angular distribution of the subsequent nuclear radiation may be effected and information will by given about the nuclear parameters. (B.R.H.)

  13. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in evaluation of central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krolicki, L.; Bak, M.; Grieb, P.

    1996-01-01

    The article presents the current results of MR spectroscopy in evaluation of central nervous system. This method is useful in examination of brain ischemia, brain tumors, epilepsy; white matter disorders and degeneration diseases. MR spectroscopy is unique technique for in vivo examination of the brain in physiological and pathophysiological states. (author)

  14. Effect of resonance line shape on precision measurements of nuclear magnetic resonance shifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kachurin, A.M.; Smelyanskij, A.Ya.

    1986-01-01

    Effect of resonance line shape on the systematic error of precision measurements of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shifts of high resolution (on the center of NMR dispersion line) is analysed. Effect of the device resonance line form-function asymmetry is evaluated; the form-function is determined by configuration of the spectrometer magnetic field and enters the convolution, which describes the resonance line form. It is shown that with the increase of the relaxation line width the form-function effect on the measurement error yields to zero. The form-function effect on measurements and correction of a phase angle of NMR detection is evaluated. The method of semiquantitative evaluation of resonance line and NMR spectrometer parameters, guaranteeing the systematic error of the given infinitesimal, is presented

  15. ANUSpect-workbench for nuclear spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padmini, S.; Diwakar, M.P.; Mukhopadhyay, P.K.; Pande, S.S.; Kataria, S.K.

    2001-01-01

    Multi-channel analyzers (MCA) are used extensively in nuclear instrumentation for research in physics, radiochemistry and many other branches of science. Though large variety of MCA hardware cards and analysis software packages are available, due to incompatibilities, user cannot mix and match these as per his requirement. Here, we present the components based approach used in the design of ANUSpect workbench, so as to give the user liberty in selecting the acquisition hardware and the analysis software for gamma, X ray and alpha spectrum analysis. AnuSpect will work under different MS Windows platforms. The paper also highlights the main functional features and the present implementation status. (author)

  16. Susceptibility effects in nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziener, Christian Herbert

    2008-01-01

    The properties of dephasing and the resulting relaxation of the magnetization are the basic principle on which all magnetic resonance imaging methods are based. The signal obtained from the gyrating spins is essentially determined by the properties of the considered tissue. Especially the susceptibility differences caused by magnetized materials (for example, deoxygenated blood, BOLD-effect) or magnetic nanoparticles are becoming more important for biomedical imaging. In the present work, the influence of such field inhomogeneities on the NMR-signal is analyzed. (orig.)

  17. Nuclear magnetic resonance. Advanced concepts and applications to quantum materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohlrautz, Jonas

    2017-01-01

    In this thesis, three separate topics were presented. These include the development of novel experimental NMR methods and data analysis, as well as their application to current topics of condensed matter research. The first part concerns NMR at the highest magnetic fields, i.e., in time-dependent pulsed high-field magnets. After a discussion of consequences for NMR, a method to acquire broad spectra was presented. Here, an intensity-correction for off-resonance effects was applied and the Fourier transform was modified to use time-dependent base functions. Subsequently, the method was tested with a Knight shift measurement of metallic aluminum using a second compound as a shift reference. It could be shown that signal averaging of a weak signal is possible, even across multiple field pulses. Thus, in principle, the signal-to-noise ratio can always be increased at the cost of measurement time, despite the inherently limited reproducibility of subsequent field high-field pulses. In another set of experiments, the feasibility of T 1 measurements was shown. Here, a weak radio frequency field was used to perform an adiabatic inversion of the spin system in the time-dependent field. Ensuing small-angle RF pulses monitored the relaxation process. Using a mathematical model, T 1 was then determined. Finally, this method was applied for the investigation of the spin-dimer antiferromagnet SrCu 2 (BO 3 ) 2 . Evidence for a field-induced change in the ground state of the material was found. This appears to be the first convincing observation of a field-induced phenomenon with pulsed field NMR. It proves that nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy at the highest fields is able to produce unique insights into quantum materials. The second part of the thesis concerns NMR investigations and analysis of cuprate high-temperature superconductors in conventional static field measurements. Results on HgBa 2 CuO 4+δ for underdoped, optimally doped, and overdoped materials revealed

  18. Nuclear magnetic resonance. Advanced concepts and applications to quantum materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohlrautz, Jonas

    2017-05-22

    In this thesis, three separate topics were presented. These include the development of novel experimental NMR methods and data analysis, as well as their application to current topics of condensed matter research. The first part concerns NMR at the highest magnetic fields, i.e., in time-dependent pulsed high-field magnets. After a discussion of consequences for NMR, a method to acquire broad spectra was presented. Here, an intensity-correction for off-resonance effects was applied and the Fourier transform was modified to use time-dependent base functions. Subsequently, the method was tested with a Knight shift measurement of metallic aluminum using a second compound as a shift reference. It could be shown that signal averaging of a weak signal is possible, even across multiple field pulses. Thus, in principle, the signal-to-noise ratio can always be increased at the cost of measurement time, despite the inherently limited reproducibility of subsequent field high-field pulses. In another set of experiments, the feasibility of T{sub 1} measurements was shown. Here, a weak radio frequency field was used to perform an adiabatic inversion of the spin system in the time-dependent field. Ensuing small-angle RF pulses monitored the relaxation process. Using a mathematical model, T{sub 1} was then determined. Finally, this method was applied for the investigation of the spin-dimer antiferromagnet SrCu{sub 2}(BO{sub 3}){sub 2}. Evidence for a field-induced change in the ground state of the material was found. This appears to be the first convincing observation of a field-induced phenomenon with pulsed field NMR. It proves that nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy at the highest fields is able to produce unique insights into quantum materials. The second part of the thesis concerns NMR investigations and analysis of cuprate high-temperature superconductors in conventional static field measurements. Results on HgBa{sub 2}CuO{sub 4+δ} for underdoped, optimally doped, and

  19. Hyperfine structure analysis in magnetic resonance spectroscopy: from astrophysical measurements towards endogenous biosensors in human tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, L.; California Univ., Berkeley, CA; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., Berkeley, CA

    2007-01-01

    The hyperfine interaction of two spins is a well studied effect in atomic systems. Magnetic resonance experiments demonstrate that the detectable dipole transitions are determined by the magnetic moments of the constituents and the external magnetic field. Transferring the corresponding quantum mechanics to molecular bound nuclear spins allows for precise prediction of NMR spectra obtained from metabolites in human tissue. This molecular hyperfine structure has been neglected so far in in vivo NMR spectroscopy but contains useful information, especially when studying molecular dynamics. This contribution represents a review of the concept of applying the Breit-Rabi formalism to coupled nuclear spins and discusses the immobilization of different metabolites in anisotropic tissue revealed by 1H NMR spectra of carnosine, phosphocreatine and taurine. Comparison of atomic and molecular spin systems allows for statements on the biological constraints for direct spin-spin interactions. Moreover, the relevance of hyperfine effects on the line shapes of multiplets of indirectly-coupled spin systems with more than two constituents can be predicted by analyzing quantum mechanical parameters. As an example, the superposition of eigenstates of the AMX system of adenosine 5'-triphosphate and its application for better quantification of 31P-NMR spectra will be discussed. (orig.)

  20. [Hyperfine structure analysis in magnetic resonance spectroscopy: from astrophysical measurements towards endogenous biosensors in human tissue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Leif

    2007-01-01

    The hyperfine interaction of two spins is a well studied effect in atomic systems. Magnetic resonance experiments demonstrate that the detectable dipole transitions are determined by the magnetic moments of the constituents and the external magnetic field. Transferring the corresponding quantum mechanics to molecular bound nuclear spins allows for precise prediction of NMR spectra obtained from metabolites in human tissue. This molecular hyperfine structure has been neglected so far in in vivo NMR spectroscopy but contains useful information, especially when studying molecular dynamics. This contribution represents a review of the concept of applying the Breit-Rabi formalism to coupled nuclear spins and discusses the immobilization of different metabolites in anisotropic tissue revealed by 1H NMR spectra of carnosine, phosphocreatine and taurine. Comparison of atomic and molecular spin systems allows for statements on the biological constraints for direct spin-spin interactions. Moreover, the relevance of hyperfine effects on the line shapes of multiplets of indirectly-coupled spin systems with more than two constituents can be predicted by analyzing quantum mechanical parameters. As an example, the superposition of eigenstates of the A MX system of adenosine 5'-triphosphate and its application for better quantification of 31P-NMR spectra will be discussed.